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Sample records for plasmid dna replication

  1. Plasmid P1 replication: negative control by repeated DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Chattoraj, D; Cordes, K.; Abeles, A

    1984-01-01

    The incompatibility locus, incA, of the unit-copy plasmid P1 is contained within a fragment that is essentially a set of nine 19-base-pair repeats. One or more copies of the fragment destabilizes the plasmid when present in trans. Here we show that extra copies of incA interfere with plasmid DNA replication and that a deletion of most of incA increases plasmid copy number. Thus, incA is not essential for replication but is required for its control. When cloned in a high-copy-number vector, pi...

  2. Functional amyloids as inhibitors of plasmid DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-García, Laura; Gasset-Rosa, Fátima; Moreno-del Álamo, María; Fernández-Tresguerres, M. Elena; Moreno-Díaz de la Espina, Susana; Lurz, Rudi; Giraldo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is tightly regulated to constrain the genetic material within strict spatiotemporal boundaries and copy numbers. Bacterial plasmids are autonomously replicating DNA molecules of much clinical, environmental and biotechnological interest. A mechanism used by plasmids to prevent over-replication is ‘handcuffing’, i.e. inactivating the replication origins in two DNA molecules by holding them together through a bridge built by a plasmid-encoded initiator protein (Rep). Besides being involved in handcuffing, the WH1 domain in the RepA protein assembles as amyloid fibres upon binding to DNA in vitro. The amyloid state in proteins is linked to specific human diseases, but determines selectable and epigenetically transmissible phenotypes in microorganisms. Here we have explored the connection between handcuffing and amyloidogenesis of full-length RepA. Using a monoclonal antibody specific for an amyloidogenic conformation of RepA-WH1, we have found that the handcuffed RepA assemblies, either reconstructed in vitro or in plasmids clustering at the bacterial nucleoid, are amyloidogenic. The replication-inhibitory RepA handcuff assembly is, to our knowledge, the first protein amyloid directly dealing with DNA. Built on an amyloid scaffold, bacterial plasmid handcuffs can bring a novel molecular solution to the universal problem of keeping control on DNA replication initiation. PMID:27147472

  3. DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I in the initiation of plasmid DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mammalian DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I of Escherichia coli in DNA replication and in base excision repair. We have now obtained genetic evidence suggesting that DNA polymerase beta can substitute for E. coli DNA polymerase I in the initiation of replication of a plasmid containing a pMB1 origin of DNA replication. Specifically, we demonstrate that a plasmid with a pMB1 origin of replication can be maintained in an E. coli polA mutant ...

  4. Identification of putative DnaN-binding motifs in plasmid replication initiation proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Brian P; Kongsuwan, Kritaya; Wijffels, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Recently the plasmid RK2 replication initiation protein, TrfA, has been shown to bind to the beta subunit of DNA Polymerase III (DnaN) via a short pentapeptide with the consensus QL[S/D]LF. A second consensus peptide, the hexapeptide QLxLxL, has also been demonstrated to mediate binding to DnaN. Here we describe the results of a comprehensive survey of replication initiation proteins encoded by bacterial plasmids to identify putative DnaN-binding sites. Both pentapeptide and hexapeptide motifs have been identified in a number of families of replication initiation proteins. The distribution of sites is sporadic and closely related families of proteins may differ in the presence, location, or type of putative DnaN-binding motif. Neither motif has been identified in replication initiation proteins encoded by plasmids that replicate via rolling circles or strand displacement. The results suggest that the recruitment of DnaN to the origin of replication of a replisome by plasmid replication initiation proteins is not generally required for plasmid replication, but that in some cases it may be beneficial for efficiency of replication initiation.

  5. RK2 plasmid dynamics in Caulobacter crescentus cells--two modes of DNA replication initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Witosinska, Monika; Schweiger, Pawel; Bury, Katarzyna; Jenal, Urs; Konieczny, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Undisturbed plasmid dynamics is required for the stable maintenance of plasmid DNA in bacterial cells. In this work, we analysed subcellular localization, DNA synthesis and nucleoprotein complex formation of plasmid RK2 during the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. Our microscopic observations showed asymmetrical distribution of plasmid RK2 foci between the two compartments of Caulobacter predivisional cells, resulting in asymmetrical allocation of plasmids to progeny cells. Moreover, using a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method, we estimated that multiple plasmid particles form a single fluorescent focus and that the number of plasmids per focus is approximately equal in both swarmer and predivisional Caulobacter cells. Analysis of the dynamics of TrfA-oriV complex formation during the Caulobacter cell cycle revealed that TrfA binds oriV primarily during the G1 phase, however, plasmid DNA synthesis occurs during the S and G2 phases of the Caulobacter cell cycle. Both in vitro and in vivo analysis of RK2 replication initiation in C. crescentus cells demonstrated that it is independent of the Caulobacter DnaA protein in the presence of the longer version of TrfA protein, TrfA-44. However, in vivo stability tests of plasmid RK2 derivatives suggested that a DnaA-dependent mode of plasmid replication initiation is also possible.

  6. The heat-shock DnaK protein is required for plasmid R1 replication and it is dispensable for plasmid ColE1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo-Suárez, R; Fernández-Tresguerres, E; Díaz-Orejas, R; Malki, A; Kohiyama, M

    1993-01-01

    Plasmid R1 replication in vitro is inactive in extracts prepared from a dnaK756 strain but is restored to normal levels upon addition of purified DnaK protein. Replication of R1 in extracts of a dnaKwt strain can be specifically inhibited with polyclonal antibodies against DnaK. RepA-dependent replication of R1 in dnaK756 extracts supplemented with DnaKwt protein at maximum concentration is partially inhibited by rifampicin and it is severely inhibited at sub-optimal concentrations of DnaK protein. The copy number of a run-away R1 vector is reduced in a dnaK756 background at 30 degrees C and at 42 degrees C the amplification of the run-away R1 vector is prevented. However a runaway R1 vector containing dnaK gene allows the amplification of the plasmid at high temperature. These data indicate that DnaK is required for both in vitro and in vivo replication of plasmid R1 and show a partial compensation for the low level of DnaK by RNA polymerase. In contrast ColE1 replication is not affected by DnaK as indicated by the fact that ColE1 replicates with the same efficiency in extracts from dnaKwt and dnaK756 strains. Images PMID:8265367

  7. Plasmid Rolling-Circle Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Masó, J A; MachóN, C; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, L; Espinosa, M; Coll, M; Del Solar, G

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are DNA entities that undergo controlled replication independent of the chromosomal DNA, a crucial step that guarantees the prevalence of the plasmid in its host. DNA replication has to cope with the incapacity of the DNA polymerases to start de novo DNA synthesis, and different replication mechanisms offer diverse solutions to this problem. Rolling-circle replication (RCR) is a mechanism adopted by certain plasmids, among other genetic elements, that represents one of the simplest initiation strategies, that is, the nicking by a replication initiator protein on one parental strand to generate the primer for leading-strand initiation and a single priming site for lagging-strand synthesis. All RCR plasmid genomes consist of a number of basic elements: leading strand initiation and control, lagging strand origin, phenotypic determinants, and mobilization, generally in that order of frequency. RCR has been mainly characterized in Gram-positive bacterial plasmids, although it has also been described in Gram-negative bacterial or archaeal plasmids. Here we aim to provide an overview of the RCR plasmids' lifestyle, with emphasis on their characteristic traits, promiscuity, stability, utility as vectors, etc. While RCR is one of the best-characterized plasmid replication mechanisms, there are still many questions left unanswered, which will be pointed out along the way in this review.

  8. Toxin Kid uncouples DNA replication and cell division to enforce retention of plasmid R1 in Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Belén; Nair, Radhika; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Preston, Mark A; Agu, Chukwuma A; Wang, Xindan; Bernal, Juan A; Sherratt, David J; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2014-02-18

    Worldwide dissemination of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is facilitated by plasmids that encode postsegregational killing (PSK) systems. These produce a stable toxin (T) and a labile antitoxin (A) conditioning cell survival to plasmid maintenance, because only this ensures neutralization of toxicity. Shortage of antibiotic alternatives and the link of TA pairs to PSK have stimulated the opinion that premature toxin activation could be used to kill these recalcitrant organisms in the clinic. However, validation of TA pairs as therapeutic targets requires unambiguous understanding of their mode of action, consequences for cell viability, and function in plasmids. Conflicting with widespread notions concerning these issues, we had proposed that the TA pair kis-kid (killing suppressor-killing determinant) might function as a plasmid rescue system and not as a PSK system, but this remained to be validated. Here, we aimed to clarify unsettled mechanistic aspects of Kid activation, and of the effects of this for kis-kid-bearing plasmids and their host cells. We confirm that activation of Kid occurs in cells that are about to lose the toxin-encoding plasmid, and we show that this provokes highly selective restriction of protein outputs that inhibits cell division temporarily, avoiding plasmid loss, and stimulates DNA replication, promoting plasmid rescue. Kis and Kid are conserved in plasmids encoding multiple antibiotic resistance genes, including extended spectrum β-lactamases, for which therapeutic options are scarce, and our findings advise against the activation of this TA pair to fight pathogens carrying these extrachromosomal DNAs.

  9. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States); Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Medicine, Center for Predictive Medicine and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Pushko, Peter, E-mail: ppushko@medigen-usa.com [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF. - Highlights: • The iDNA{sup ®} platform combines advantages of DNA and live attenuated vaccines. • Yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine was launched from iDNA plasmid in vitro and in vivo. • Safety of iDNA-generated 17D virus was confirmed in AG129 mice. • BALB/c mice seroconverted after a single-dose vaccination with iDNA. • YF virus-neutralizing response was elicited in iDNA-vaccinated mice.

  10. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S; Pushko, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF.

  11. Replication of plasmids in gram-negative bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Replication of plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is dependent on three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. The first stage, initiation, depends on plasmid-encoded properties such as the replication origin and, in most cases, the replication initiation protein (Rep protein). In recent years the understanding of initiation and regulation of plasmid replication in Escherichia coli has increased considerably, but it is only for the ColE1-type plasmids that significant biochemical d...

  12. Stress responses and replication of plasmids in bacterial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegrzyn Alicja

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plasmids, DNA (or rarely RNA molecules which replicate in cells autonomously (independently of chromosomes as non-essential genetic elements, play important roles for microbes grown under specific environmental conditions as well as in scientific laboratories and in biotechnology. For example, bacterial plasmids are excellent models in studies on regulation of DNA replication, and their derivatives are the most commonly used vectors in genetic engineering. Detailed mechanisms of replication initiation, which is the crucial process for efficient maintenance of plasmids in cells, have been elucidated for several plasmids. However, to understand plasmid biology, it is necessary to understand regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to different environmental conditions in which host cells exist. Knowledge of such regulatory processes is also very important for those who use plasmids as expression vectors to produce large amounts of recombinant proteins. Variable conditions in large-scale fermentations must influence replication of plasmid DNA in cells, thus affecting the efficiency of recombinant gene expression significantly. Contrary to extensively investigated biochemistry of plasmid replication, molecular mechanisms of regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to various environmental stress conditions are relatively poorly understood. There are, however, recently published studies that add significant data to our knowledge on relations between cellular stress responses and control of plasmid DNA replication. In this review we focus on plasmids derived from bacteriophage λ that are among the best investigated replicons. Nevertheless, recent results of studies on other plasmids are also discussed shortly.

  13. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  14. In vitro replication of cyanobacterial plasmids from Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Daniell, H; McFadden, B

    1994-09-01

    Little knowledge of DNA replication in cyanobacteria is available. In this study, we report the development and characterization of an in vitro system for studies of replication of the endogenous plasmids from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803. This system (fraction III) was isolated at high salt concentrations and partially purified on a heparin-agarose column. DNA polymerases in Synechocystis 6803 appeared to be associated with membranes and could be released by the addition of ammonium sulfate to 20% saturation. DNA synthesis in fraction III was dependent on the addition of cyanobacterial plasmids isolated from the same strain. The in vitro replication products consist mostly of the supercoiled form of the plasmids. Unlike replication of many Escherichia coli plasmids, replication of cyanobacterial plasmids did not require added ATP, was not inhibited by omission of the ribonucleotides, and was insensitive to the RNA polymerase inhibitor rifampicin and the gyrase inhibitor novobiocin, but was inhibited by ethidium bromide. These data suggest that RNA may not be involved in the initiation of replication of cyanobacterial plasmids from Synechocystis 6803. In addition, intermediates of replication have been detected by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Density labeling experiments also indicate that cyanobacterial plasmid synthesis in vitro occurs by a semiconservative replication.

  15. Plasmid DNA Initiates Replication of Yellow Fever Vaccine In Vitro and Elicits Virus-Specific Immune Response in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Pushko, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to s...

  16. Transcription-replication collision increases recombination efficiency between plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jialiang, Li; Feng, Chen; Zhen, Xu; Jibing, Chen; Xiang, Lv; Lingling, Zhang; Depei, Liu

    2013-11-01

    It has been proposed that the stalling of the replication forks can induce homologous recombination in several organisms, and that arrested replication forks may offer nuclease targets, thereby providing a substrate for proteins involved in double-strand repair. In this article, we constructed a plasmid with the potential for transcription-replication collision (TRC), in which DNA replication and RNA transcription occur on the same DNA template simultaneously. Theoretically, transcription will impede DNA replication and increase homologous recombination. To validate this hypothesis, another plasmid was constructed that contained a homologous sequence with the exception of some mutated sites. Co-transfection of these two plasmids into 293T cells resulted in increased recombination frequency. The ratio of these two plasmids also affected the recombination frequency. Moreover, we found high expression levels of RAD51, which indicated that the increase in the recombination rate was probably via the homologous recombination pathway. These results indicate that mutant genes in plasmids can be repaired by TRC-induced recombination.

  17. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  18. DNA is a co-factor for its own replication in Xenopus egg extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebofsky, Ronald; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, Johannes C.

    Soluble Xenopus egg extracts efficiently replicate added plasmids using a physiological mechanism, and thus represent a powerful system to understand vertebrate DNA replication. Surprisingly, DNA replication in this system is highly sensitive to plasmid concentration, being undetectable below

  19. DNA is a co-factor for its own replication in Xenopus egg extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebofsky, Ronald; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, Johannes C.

    2011-01-01

    Soluble Xenopus egg extracts efficiently replicate added plasmids using a physiological mechanism, and thus represent a powerful system to understand vertebrate DNA replication. Surprisingly, DNA replication in this system is highly sensitive to plasmid concentration, being undetectable below simila

  20. DNA is a co-factor for its own replication in Xenopus egg extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebofsky, Ronald; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, Johannes C.

    2011-01-01

    Soluble Xenopus egg extracts efficiently replicate added plasmids using a physiological mechanism, and thus represent a powerful system to understand vertebrate DNA replication. Surprisingly, DNA replication in this system is highly sensitive to plasmid concentration, being undetectable below simila

  1. Replication regions of two pairs of incompatible lactococcal theta-replicating plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, A; von Wright, A; Josephsen, J; Vogensen, F K

    1997-01-01

    Incompatibility tests were performed employing 12 replicons belonging to a family of homologous lactococcal theta-replicating plasmids. Two pairs of incompatible plasmids were found, namely, pFV1001 and pFV1201, and pJW565 and pFW094. The replicons of plasmids pFV1001, pFV1201, pJW565, pJW566, and pFW094 were sequenced. Alignments were made of the replicational origins (repA) and putative replication proteins (RepB) of these and 11 related plasmid sequences. Comparison of the alignments with the incompatibility data indicated that the incompatibility determinant could be contained within the 22-bp tandem repeats DRII and/or the inverted repeat IR1 in repA. In support, the incompatibility determinant of pJW563 was localized to a 743-bp fragment encompassing repA. A stretch of 13 amino acids of RepB was proposed to be responsible for the plasmid-specific initiation of replication. This stretch is part of a domain containing features that are highly conserved within the proposed DNA binding regions of the initiation proteins from several well-characterized plasmids from Gram-negative bacteria, including pSC101, R6K, and mini-F.

  2. The replication origin of a repABC plasmid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevallos Miguel A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background repABC operons are present on large, low copy-number plasmids and on some secondary chromosomes in at least 19 α-proteobacterial genera, and are responsible for the replication and segregation properties of these replicons. These operons consist, with some variations, of three genes: repA, repB, and repC. RepA and RepB are involved in plasmid partitioning and in the negative regulation of their own transcription, and RepC is the limiting factor for replication. An antisense RNA encoded between the repB-repC genes modulates repC expression. Results To identify the minimal region of the Rhizobium etli p42d plasmid that is capable of autonomous replication, we amplified different regions of the repABC operon using PCR and cloned the regions into a suicide vector. The resulting vectors were then introduced into R. etli strains that did or did not contain p42d. The minimal replicon consisted of a repC open reading frame under the control of a constitutive promoter with a Shine-Dalgarno sequence that we designed. A sequence analysis of repC revealed the presence of a large A+T-rich region but no iterons or DnaA boxes. Silent mutations that modified the A+T content of this region eliminated the replication capability of the plasmid. The minimal replicon could not be introduced into R. etli strain containing p42d, but similar constructs that carried repC from Sinorhizobium meliloti pSymA or the linear chromosome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens replicated in the presence or absence of p42d, indicating that RepC is an incompatibility factor. A hybrid gene construct expressing a RepC protein with the first 362 amino acid residues from p42d RepC and the last 39 amino acid residues of RepC from SymA was able to replicate in the presence of p42d. Conclusions RepC is the only element encoded in the repABC operon of the R. etli p42d plasmid that is necessary and sufficient for plasmid replication and is probably the initiator protein. The ori

  3. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  4. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  5. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  6. Streptomyces linear plasmids that contain a phage-like, centrally located, replication origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P C; Kim, E S; Cohen, S N

    1996-12-01

    Unlike previously studied linear replicons containing 5' DNA termini covalently bound to protein, pSLA2, a 17 kb linear plasmid of Streptomyces rochei, initiates replication internally rather than at the telomeres (Chang and Cohen, 1994). Here we identify and characterize the replication origin of pSLA2, showing that it contains a series of direct repeats (iterons) within a centrally located gene encoding an essential DNA-binding protein (Rep1); a second essential protein (Rep2), which resembles prokaryotic DNA helicases and has ATPase activity stimulated by single-stranded DNA, is expressed from the same transcript. A 430 bp locus separated by almost 2 kb from the iterons of the origin specifies an as yet undefined additional function required in cis for plasmid replication. pSCL, a 12 kb linear plasmid of Streptomyces clavuligerus, contains, near the centre of the plasmid, a region configured like the pSLA2 origin. The replication regions of pSLA2 and pSCL, which are capable of propagating plasmid DNA in either a circular or linear form (Shiffman and Cohen, 1992; Chang and Cohen, 1994) resemble those of temperate bacteriophages of the Enterobacteriacae and Bacillus. Our observations suggest that Streptomyces linear plasmids may occupy an evolutionarily intermediate position between circular plasmids and linear phage replicons.

  7. Eclipse period of R1 plasmids during downshift from elevated copy number: Nonrandom selection of copies for replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Jan A; Berg, Otto; Nordström, Kurt; Dasgupta, Santanu

    2012-03-01

    The classical Meselson-Stahl density-shift method was used to study replication of pOU71, a runaway-replication derivative of plasmid R1 in Escherichia coli. The miniplasmid maintained the normal low copy number of R1 during steady growth at 30°C, but as growth temperatures were raised above 34°C, the copy number of the plasmid increased to higher levels, and at 42°C, it replicated without control in a runaway replication mode with lethal consequences for the host. The eclipse periods (minimum time between successive replication of the same DNA) of the plasmid shortened with rising copy numbers at increasing growth temperatures (Olsson et al., 2003). In this work, eclipse periods were measured during downshifts in copy number of pOU71 after it had replicated at 39 and 42°C, resulting in 7- and 50-fold higher than normal plasmid copy number per cell, respectively. Eclipse periods for plasmid replication, measured during copy number downshift, suggested that plasmid R1, normally selected randomly for replication, showed a bias such that a newly replicated DNA had a higher probability of replication compared to the bulk of the R1 population. However, even the unexpected nonrandom replication followed the copy number kinetics such that every generation, the plasmids underwent the normal inherited number of replication, n, independent of the actual number of plasmid copies in a newborn cell.

  8. Characterization of the replication and stability regions of Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallie, D R; Zaitlin, D; Perry, K L; Kado, C I

    1984-03-01

    A 5.4-kilobase region containing the origin of replication and stability maintenance of the 44-kilobase Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTAR has been mapped and characterized. Within this region is a 1.3-kilobase segment that is capable of directing autonomous replication. The remaining segment contains the stability locus for maintenance of pTAR during nonselective growth. Approximately 35% of pTAR shares sequence homology with pAg119, a 44-kilobase cryptic plasmid in grapevine strain 1D1119. However, no homology was detected between pTAR DNA and several Ti plasmids or several other small cryptic plasmids in many A. tumefaciens strains. A recombinant plasmid containing the origin of replication and stability maintenance region of pTAR was compatible with pTiC58, pTi15955, and pTi119 and incompatible with pAg119. A new compatibility group, Inc Ag-1, is discussed.

  9. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new deve...

  10. Involvement of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Cyclin) in DNA replication in living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuber, M.; Tan, E.M.; Ryoji, M.

    1989-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (also called cyclin) is known to stimulate the activity of DNA polymerase /delta/ but not the other DNA polymerases in vitro. The authors injected a human autoimmune antibody against PCNA into unfertilized eggs of Xenopus laevis and examined the effects of this antibody on the replication of injected plasmid DNA as well as egg chromosomes. The anti-PCNA antibody inhibited plasmid replication by up to 67%, demonstrating that PCNA is involved in plasmid replication in living cells. This result further implies that DNA polymerase /delta/ is necessary for plasmid replication in vivo, Anti-PCNA antibody alone did not block plasmid replication completely, but the residual replication was abolished by coinjection of a monoclonal antibody against DNA polymerase /alpha/. Anti-DNA polymerase /alpha/ alone inhibited plasmid replication by 63%. Thus, DNA ploymerase /alpha/ is also required for plasmid replication in this system. In similar studies on the replication of egg chromosomes, the inhibition by anti-PCNA antibody was only 30%, while anti-DNA polymerase /alpha/ antibody blocked 73% of replication. They concluded that the replication machineries of chromosomes and plasmid differ in their relative content of DNA polymerase /delta/. In addition, they obtained evidence through the use of phenylbutyl deoxyguanosine, an inhibitor of DNA polymearse /alpha/, that the structure of DNA polymerase /alpha/ holoenzyme for chromosome replication is significantly different from that for plasmid replication.

  11. Chromosomal context and replication properties of ARS plasmids in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aditya S Pratihar; Vishnu P Tripathi; Mukesh P Yadav; Dharani D Dubey

    2015-12-01

    Short, specific DNA sequences called as Autonomously Replicating Sequence (ARS) elements function as plasmid as well as chromosomal replication origins in yeasts. As compared to ARSs, different chromosomal origins vary greatly in their efficiency and timing of replication probably due to their wider chromosomal context. The two Schizosaccharomyces pombe ARS elements, ars727 and ars2OO4, represent two extremities in their chromosomal origin activity - ars727 is inactive and late replicating, while ars2OO4 is a highly active, early-firing origin. To determine the effect of chromosomal context on the activity of these ARS elements, we have cloned them with their extended chromosomal context as well as in the context of each other in both orientations and analysed their replication efficiency by ARS and plasmid stability assays. We found that these ARS elements retain their origin activity in their extended/altered context. However, deletion of a 133-bp region of the previously reported ars727-associated late replication enforcing element (LRE) caused advancement in replication timing of the resulting plasmid. These results confirm the role of LRE in directing plasmid replication timing and suggest that the plasmid origin efficiency of ars2OO4 or ars727 remains unaltered by the extended chromosomal context.

  12. Initiation of adenovirus DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Reiter, T; Fütterer, J; Weingärtner, B; Winnacker, E L

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to study the mechanism of initiation of adenovirus DNA replication, an assay was developed to investigate the pattern of DNA synthesis in early replicative intermediates of adenovirus DNA. By using wild-type virus-infected cells, it was possible to place the origin of adenovirus type 2 DNA replication within the terminal 350 to 500 base pairs from either of the two molecular termini. In addition, a variety of parameters characteristic of adenovirus DNA replication were compared ...

  13. Host cell variations resulting from F plasmid-controlled replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, E F; Nieto, C; Casquero, I; Cánovas, J L

    1986-01-01

    Cell size and DNA concentration were measured in Escherichia coli K-12 ET64. This strain carries a dnaA (Ts) mutation that has been suppressed by the insertion of the F plasmid into the chromosome. ET64 can grow in a balanced steady state of exponential growth at the restrictive temperature for its dnaA allele (39 degrees C), in which chromosome replication is controlled by the F plasmid, and at the permissive temperature (30 degrees C), in which chromosome replication is controlled by dnaA-oriC. When cells grown at the indicated temperatures were compared, it was observed that at 39 degrees C, the cell mass increased and the amount of cellular DNA decreased slightly; therefore, the DNA concentration was strongly reduced. These changes can neither be explained by the reduction of the generation time (which is only 10-15%) nor from observed changes in the replication time and in the time between DNA synthesis termination and cell division. Variations were mainly due to the increase in cell mass per origin of replication, at initiation, in cells grown at 39 degrees C. Control of chromosome replication by the F plasmid appears to be the reason for the increase in the initiation mass. Other possible causes, such as the modification of growth temperature, the generation time, or both, were discarded. These observations suggest that at one growth rate, the F plasmid replicates at a particular cell mass to F particle number ratio, and that this ratio is higher than the cell mass to oriC ratio at the initiation of chromosome replication. This fact might be significant to coordinate the replication of two different replicons in the same cell. PMID:3511032

  14. Comparative Immunization in BALB/c Mice with Recombinant Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vector and DNA Plasmid Expressing a SARS-CoV Nucleocapsid Protein Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunling Ma; Kun Yao; Feng Zhou; Minsheng Zhu

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate immunogenicity in the induction of humoral and cellular immune responses, severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-N gene recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vector, rAd-N, was generated and immunized BALB/c mice in a pcDNA3.1-N prime-rAd-N boost regimen. After humoral and cellular immune response detection, different levels of SARS-CoV N protein specific antibodies and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion are shown compared to controls. The humoral immune response was induced more effectively by the DNA priming and recombinant adenovirus boosting regimen. There is a significant difference between heterogeneous and homologous vaccinations. The heterogeneous combinations were all higher than those of the homologous combinations in the induction of anti-N antibody response. Among the three heterogeneous combinations, pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/rAd-N induced the strongest antibody response. In the induction of IFN-γ production, the homologous combination of rAd-N/rAd-N/rAd-N/rAd- N was significantly stronger than that of pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3. 1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N, but was relatively weaker than the heterogeneous combination of pcDAN3.1-N/pcDAN3.1-N/pcDAN3.1-N/rAd-N. This combination was a most efficient immunization regimen in induction of SARS-CoV-N-specific (IFN-γ) secretion just as the antibody response. These results suggest that DNA immunization followed by recombinant adenovirus boosting could be used as a potential SARS-CoV vaccine.

  15. Chromosomal targeting of replicating plasmids in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Klaas Nico; Swaving, Gert Jan; Faber, Folkert; Ab, Geert; Harder, Willem; Veenhuis, Marten; Haima, Pieter

    1992-01-01

    Using an optimized transformation protocol we have studied the possible interactions between transforming plasmid DNA and the Hansenula polymorpha genome. Plasmids consisting only of a pBR322 replicon, an antibiotic resistance marker for Escherichia coli and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae LEU2 gene we

  16. Characterization of the replicon from the lactococcal theta-replicating plasmid pJW563.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, A; Josephsen, J; von Wright, A; Vogensen, F K

    1995-09-01

    The replication region of the lactococcal plasmid pJW563 was localized to a 2.3-kb EcoRI fragment. This DNA fragment was sequenced ans a 1155-bp open reading frame, repB563, encoding a putative protein RepB563 of 385 amino acids was found. An AT-rich noncoding region, repA563, was found upstream of repB563. This segment included several direct and inverted repeats. A downstream 591-bp open reading frame, ORF X, which was not necessary for replication, was putatively translationally coupled to repB563, RepB563 supplied in trans could support replication of a plasmid containing repA563 and a truncated repB563. This observation suggests that RepB563 is a trans-acting replication protein, and repA563 the cis-acting origin of replication, repA563, repB563, and the beginning of ORF X showed high homology to similar regions in a family of lactococcal theta-replicating plasmids. The repA DNA sequences and the RepB amino acid sequences of the plasmids were aligned and the consensus sequences generated. The comparison revealed highly conserved areas among this family of plasmids. In addition, variable domains emerged, presumably having a plasmid specific function, pVS40 and pC1305 were plasmids with replication proteins showing high homology to RepB563. Despite this homology, replication from repA563 could not be supported by the pVS40 or pC1305 replication protein supplied in trans. Likewise the pJW563 protein could not support replication from the pVS40 origin. pJW563 was found to be compatible with the pVS40 and pC1305 replicons. The results indicate that pJW563 belongs to the widespread family of lactococcal theta-replicating pladmids. Despite the high homology between their replicons, the interaction between the replication origin and the protein is highly specific in many cases rendering the plasmids compatible.

  17. Genetic and functional characterization of a yet-unclassified rhizobial Dtr (DNA-transfer-and-replication) region from a ubiquitous plasmid conjugal system present in Sinorhizobium meliloti, in Sinorhizobium medicae, and in other nonrhizobial Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, María de los Ángeles; Pistorio, Mariano; Lozano, Mauricio J; Tejerizo, Gonzalo A Torres; Salas, María Eugenia; Martini, María Carla; López, José Luis; Draghi, Walter O; Del Papa, María Florencia; Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Sanjuán, Juan; Lagares, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    Rhizobia are Gram-negative bacteria that live in soils and associate with leguminous plants to establish nitrogen-fixing symbioses. The ability of these bacteria to undergo horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is thought to be one of the main features to explain both the origin of their symbiotic life-style and the plasticity and dynamics of their genomes. In our laboratory we have previously characterized at the species level the non-pSym plasmid mobilome in Sinorhizobium meliloti, the symbiont of Medicago spp., and have found a high incidence of conjugal activity in many plasmids (Pistorio et al., 2008). In this work we characterized the Dtr (DNA-transfer-and-replication) region of one of those plasmids, pSmeLPU88b. This mobilization region was found to represent a previously unclassified Dtr type in rhizobia (hereafter type-IV), highly ubiquitous in S. meliloti and found in other genera of Gram-negative bacteria as well; including Agrobacterium, Ochrobactrum, and Chelativorans. The oriT of the type-IV Dtr described here could be located by function within a DNA fragment of 278 bp, between the divergent genes parA and mobC. The phylogenetic analysis of the cognate relaxase MobZ indicated that this protein groups close to the previously defined MOB(P3) and MOB(P4) type of enzymes, but is located in a separate and novel cluster that we have designated MOB(P0). Noteworthy, MOB(P0) and MOB(P4) relaxases were frequently associated with plasmids present in rhizospheric soil bacteria. A comparison of the nod-gene locations with the phylogenetic topology of the rhizobial relaxases revealed that the symbiotic genes are found on diverse plasmids bearing any of the four Dtr types, thus indicating that pSym plasmids are not specifically associated with any particular mobilization system. Finally, we demonstrated that the type-IV Dtr promoted the mobilization of plasmids from S. meliloti to Sinorhizobium medicae as well as from these rhizobia to other bacteria by means of their own

  18. A New Shuttle Plasmid That Stably Replicates in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kwon, Min-A; Choi, Sunwha; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Shin, Yong-An; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a new shuttle plasmid, designated as pLK1-MCS that can replicate in both Clostridium acetobutylicum and Escherichia coli, by combining the pUB110 and pUC19 plasmids. Plasmid pLK1-MCS replicated more stably than previously reported plasmids containing either the pIM13 or the pAMβ1 replicon in the absence of antibiotic selective pressure. The transfer frequency of pLK1-MCS into C. acetobutylicum was similar to the transfer frequency of other shuttle plasmids. We complemented C. acetobutylicum ML1 (that does not produce solvents such as acetone, butanol, and ethanol owing to loss of the megaplasmid pSOL1 harboring the adhE1-ctfAB-adc operon) by introducing pLK1-MCS carrying the adhE1-ctfAB-adc operon into C. acetobutylicum ML1. The transformed cells were able to resume anaerobic solvent production, indicating that the new shuttle plasmid has the potential for practical use in microbial biotechnology.

  19. DNA replication origins in archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenfang eWu; Jingfang eLiu; Haibo eYang; Hua eXiang

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication initiation, which starts at specific chromosomal site (known as replication origins), is the key regulatory stage of chromosome replication. Archaea, the third domain of life, use a single or multiple origin(s) to initiate replication of their circular chromosomes. The basic structure of replication origins is conserved among archaea, typically including an AT-rich unwinding region flanked by several conserved repeats (origin recognition box, ORB) that are located adjacent to ...

  20. Defects of mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William C

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is replicated by DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single-stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mitochondrial DNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion, which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mitochondrial DNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy. This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mitochondrial DNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2, and MGME1) that cause instability of mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial disease.

  1. Modeling inhomogeneous DNA replication kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel G Gauthier

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at a series of chromosomal locations called origins, where replication forks are assembled proceeding bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins, in conjunction with the velocity at which forks progress, dictate the program of the replication process. Previous attempts at modeling DNA replication in eukaryotes have focused on cases where the firing rate and the velocity of replication forks are homogeneous, or uniform, across the genome. However, it is now known that there are large variations in origin activity along the genome and variations in fork velocities can also take place. Here, we generalize previous approaches to modeling replication, to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities. We derive rate equations for left- and right-moving forks and for replication probability over time that can be solved numerically to obtain the mean-field replication program. This method accurately reproduces the results of DNA replication simulation. We also successfully adapted our approach to the inverse problem of fitting measurements of DNA replication performed on single DNA molecules. Since such measurements are performed on specified portion of the genome, the examined DNA molecules may be replicated by forks that originate either within the studied molecule or outside of it. This problem was solved by using an effective flux of incoming replication forks at the model boundaries to represent the origin activity outside the studied region. Using this approach, we show that reliable inferences can be made about the replication of specific portions of the genome even if the amount of data that can be obtained from single-molecule experiments is generally limited.

  2. Regulation of replication of lambda phage and lambda plasmid DNAs at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, M; Obuchowski, M; Srutkowska, S; Wegrzyn, G

    1998-06-01

    It was previously demonstrated that while lysogenic development of bacteriophage lambda in Escherichia coli proceeds normally at low temperature (20-25 degrees C), lytic development is blocked under these conditions owing to the increased stability of the phage CII protein. This effect was proposed to be responsible for the increased stimulation of the pE promoter, which interferes with expression of the replication genes, leading to inhibition of phage DNA synthesis. Here we demonstrate that the burst size of phage lambda cIb2, which is incapable of lysogenic development, increases gradually over the temperature range from 20 to 37 degrees C, while no phage progeny are observed at 20 degrees C. Contrary to previous reports, it is possible to demonstrate that pE promoter activation by CII may be more efficient at lower temperature. Using density-shift experiments, we found that phage DNA replication is completely blocked at 20 degrees C. Phage growth was also inhibited in cells overexpressing cII, which confirms that CII is responsible for inhibition of phage DNA replication. Unexpectedly, we found that replication of plasmids derived from bacteriophage lambda is neither inhibited at 20 degrees C nor in cells overexpressing cII. We propose a model to explanation the differences in replication observed between lambda phage and lambda plasmid DNA at low temperature.

  3. The rolling-circle melting-pot model for porcine circovirus DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stem-loop structure, formed by a pair of inverted repeats during DNA replication, is a conserved feature at the origin of DNA replication (Ori) among plant and animal viruses, bacteriophages and plasmids that replicate their genomes via the rolling-circle replication (RCR) mechanism. Porcine circo...

  4. Nucleotide Metabolism and DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Digby F; Evans, Joanna C; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2014-10-01

    The development and application of a highly versatile suite of tools for mycobacterial genetics, coupled with widespread use of "omics" approaches to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of mycobacterial proteins, has led to spectacular advances in our understanding of the metabolism and physiology of mycobacteria. In this article, we provide an update on nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication in mycobacteria, highlighting key findings from the past 10 to 15 years. In the first section, we focus on nucleotide metabolism, ranging from the biosynthesis, salvage, and interconversion of purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotides to the formation of deoxyribonucleotides. The second part of the article is devoted to DNA replication, with a focus on replication initiation and elongation, as well as DNA unwinding. We provide an overview of replication fidelity and mutation rates in mycobacteria and summarize evidence suggesting that DNA replication occurs during states of low metabolic activity, and conclude by suggesting directions for future research to address key outstanding questions. Although this article focuses primarily on observations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is interspersed, where appropriate, with insights from, and comparisons with, other mycobacterial species as well as better characterized bacterial models such as Escherichia coli. Finally, a common theme underlying almost all studies of mycobacterial metabolism is the potential to identify and validate functions or pathways that can be exploited for tuberculosis drug discovery. In this context, we have specifically highlighted those processes in mycobacterial DNA replication that might satisfy this critical requirement.

  5. DNA ligase I, the replicative DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Timothy R L; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2012-01-01

    Multiple DNA ligation events are required to join the Okazaki fragments generated during lagging strand DNA synthesis. In eukaryotes, this is primarily carried out by members of the DNA ligase I family. The C-terminal catalytic region of these enzymes is composed of three domains: a DNA binding domain, an adenylation domain and an OB-fold domain. In the absence of DNA, these domains adopt an extended structure but transition into a compact ring structure when they engage a DNA nick, with each of the domains contacting the DNA. The non-catalytic N-terminal region of eukaryotic DNA ligase I is responsible for the specific participation of these enzymes in DNA replication. This proline-rich unstructured region contains the nuclear localization signal and a PCNA interaction motif that is critical for localization to replication foci and efficient joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I initially engages the PCNA trimer via this interaction motif which is located at the extreme N-terminus of this flexible region. It is likely that this facilitates an additional interaction between the DNA binding domain and the PCNA ring. The similar size and shape of the rings formed by the PCNA trimer and the DNA ligase I catalytic region when it engages a DNA nick suggest that these proteins interact to form a double-ring structure during the joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I also interacts with replication factor C, the factor that loads the PCNA trimeric ring onto DNA. This interaction, which is regulated by phosphorylation of the non-catalytic N-terminus of DNA ligase I, also appears to be critical for DNA replication.

  6. Plasmid DNA entry into postmitotic nuclei of primary rat myotubes.

    OpenAIRE

    Dowty, M E; Williams, P.; G. Zhang; Hagstrom, J E; Wolff, J A

    1995-01-01

    These studies were initiated to elucidate the mechanism of DNA nuclear transport in mammalian cells. Biotin- or gold-labeled plasmid and plasmid DNA expression vectors for Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase or firefly luciferase were microinjected into the cytoplasm of primary rat myotubes in culture. Plasmid DNA was expressed in up to 70% of the injected myotubes, which indicates that it entered intact, postmitotic nuclei. The nuclear transport of plasmid DNA occurred through the nuclear po...

  7. The replication initiator of the cholera pathogen's second chromosome shows structural similarity to plasmid initiators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Natalia; Gerding, Matthew; Ivashkiv, Olha; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Chait, Brian T; Waldor, Matthew K; Jeruzalmi, David

    2016-12-27

    The conserved DnaA-oriC system is used to initiate replication of primary chromosomes throughout the bacterial kingdom; however, bacteria with multipartite genomes evolved distinct systems to initiate replication of secondary chromosomes. In the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae, and in related species, secondary chromosome replication requires the RctB initiator protein. Here, we show that RctB consists of four domains. The structure of its central two domains resembles that of several plasmid replication initiators. RctB contains at least three DNA binding winged-helix-turn-helix motifs, and mutations within any of these severely compromise biological activity. In the structure, RctB adopts a head-to-head dimeric configuration that likely reflects the arrangement in solution. Therefore, major structural reorganization likely accompanies complex formation on the head-to-tail array of binding sites in oriCII Our findings support the hypothesis that the second Vibrionaceae chromosome arose from an ancestral plasmid, and that RctB may have evolved additional regulatory features.

  8. Determination of plasmid copy number reveals the total plasmid DNA amount is greater than the chromosomal DNA amount in Bacillus thuringiensis YBT-1520.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunying Zhong

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis is the most widely used bacterial bio-insecticide, and most insecticidal crystal protein-coding genes are located on plasmids. Most strains of B. thuringiensis harbor numerous diverse plasmids, although the plasmid copy numbers (PCNs of all native plasmids in this host and the corresponding total plasmid DNA amount remains unknown. In this study, we determined the PCNs of 11 plasmids (ranging from 2 kb to 416 kb in a sequenced B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain YBT-1520 using real-time qPCR. PCNs were found to range from 1.38 to 172, and were negatively correlated to plasmid size. The amount of total plasmid DNA (∼8.7 Mbp was 1.62-fold greater than the amount of chromosomal DNA (∼5.4 Mbp at the mid-exponential growth stage (OD(600 = 2.0 of the organism. Furthermore, we selected three plasmids with different sizes and replication mechanisms to determine the PCNs over the entire life cycle. We found that the PCNs dynamically shifted at different stages, reaching their maximum during the mid-exponential growth or stationary phases and remaining stable and close to their minimum after the prespore formation stage. The PCN of pBMB2062, which is the smallest plasmid (2062 bp and has the highest PCN of those tested, varied in strain YBT-1520, HD-1, and HD-136 (172, 115, and 94, respectively. These findings provide insight into both the total plasmid DNA amount of B. thuringiensis and the strong ability of the species to harbor plasmids.

  9. A DNA polymerase mutation that suppresses the segregation bias of an ARS plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtteman, S W; Elder, R T

    1993-03-01

    Yeast autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) plasmids exhibit an unusual segregation pattern during mitosis. While the nucleus divides equally into mother and daughter cells, all copies of the ARS plasmid will often remain in the mother cell. A screen was designed to isolate mutations that suppress this segregation bias. A plasmid with a weak ARS (wARS) that displayed an extremely high segregation bias was constructed. When cells were grown under selection for the wARS plasmid, the resulting colonies grew slowly and had abnormal morphology. A spontaneous recessive mutation that restored normal colony morphology was identified. This mutation suppressed plasmid segregation bias, as indicated by the increased stability of the wARS plasmid in the mutant cells even though the plasmid was present at a lower copy number. An ARS1 plasmid was also more stable in mutant cells than in wild-type cells. The wild-type allele for this mutant gene was cloned and identified as POL delta (CDC2). This gene encodes DNA polymerase delta, which is essential for DNA replication. These results indicate that DNA polymerase delta plays some role in causing the segregation bias of ARS plasmids.

  10. Sample displacement chromatography of plasmid DNA isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černigoj, Urh; Martinuč, Urška; Cardoso, Sara; Sekirnik, Rok; Krajnc, Nika Lendero; Štrancar, Aleš

    2015-10-02

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) is a chromatographic technique that utilises different relative binding affinities of components in a sample mixture and has been widely studied in the context of peptide and protein purification. Here, we report a use of SDC to separate plasmid DNA (pDNA) isoforms under overloading conditions, where supercoiled (sc) isoform acts as a displacer of open circular (oc) or linear isoform. Since displacement is more efficient when mass transfer between stationary and mobile chromatographic phases is not limited by diffusion, we investigated convective interaction media (CIM) monoliths as stationary phases for pDNA isoform separation. CIM monoliths with different hydrophobicities and thus different binding affinities for pDNA (CIM C4 HLD, CIM-histamine and CIM-pyridine) were tested under hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) conditions. SD efficiency for pDNA isoform separation was shown to be dependent on column selectivity for individual isoform, column efficiency and on ammonium sulfate (AS) concentration in loading buffer (binding strength). SD and negative mode elution often operate in parallel, therefore negative mode elution additionally influences the efficiency of the overall purification process. Optimisation of chromatographic conditions achieved 98% sc pDNA homogeneity and a dynamic binding capacity of over 1mg/mL at a relatively low concentration of AS. SDC was successfully implemented for the enrichment of sc pDNA for plasmid vectors of different sizes, and for separation of linear and and sc isoforms, independently of oc:sc isoform ratio, and flow-rate used. This study therefore identifies SDC as a promising new approach to large-scale pDNA purification, which is compatible with continuous, multicolumn chromatography systems, and could therefore be used to increase productivity of pDNA production in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cnr interferes with dimerization of the replication protein alpha in phage-plasmid P4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchetti, A; Serina, S; Oliva, I; Dehò, G; Ghisotti, D

    2001-01-15

    DNA replication of phage-plasmid P4 in its host Escherichia coli depends on its replication protein alpha. In the plasmid state, P4 copy number is controlled by the regulator protein Cnr (copy number regulation). Mutations in alpha (alpha(cr)) that prevent regulation by Cnr cause P4 over-replication and cell death. Using the two-hybrid system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a system based on lambda immunity in E.coli for in vivo detection of protein-protein interactions, we found that (i) alpha protein interacts with Cnr, whereas alpha(cr) proteins do not; (ii) both alpha-alpha and alpha(cr)-alpha(cr) interactions occur and the interaction domain is located within the C-terminal of alpha; (iii) Cnr-Cnr interaction also occurs. Using an in vivo competition assay, we found that Cnr interferes with both alpha-alpha and alpha(cr)-alpha(cr) dimerization. Our data suggest that Cnr and alpha interact in at least two ways, which may have different functional roles in P4 replication control.

  12. Diversification of DnaA dependency for DNA replication in cyanobacterial evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbayashi, Ryudo; Watanabe, Satoru; Ehira, Shigeki; Kanesaki, Yu; Chibazakura, Taku; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-05-01

    Regulating DNA replication is essential for all living cells. The DNA replication initiation factor DnaA is highly conserved in prokaryotes and is required for accurate initiation of chromosomal replication at oriC. DnaA-independent free-living bacteria have not been identified. The dnaA gene is absent in plastids and some symbiotic bacteria, although it is not known when or how DnaA-independent mechanisms were acquired. Here, we show that the degree of dependency of DNA replication on DnaA varies among cyanobacterial species. Deletion of the dnaA gene in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 shifted DNA replication from oriC to a different site as a result of the integration of an episomal plasmid. Moreover, viability during the stationary phase was higher in dnaA disruptants than in wild-type cells. Deletion of dnaA did not affect DNA replication or cell growth in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 or Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, indicating that functional dependency on DnaA was already lost in some nonsymbiotic cyanobacterial lineages during diversification. Therefore, we proposed that cyanobacteria acquired DnaA-independent replication mechanisms before symbiosis and such an ancestral cyanobacterium was the sole primary endosymbiont to form a plastid precursor.

  13. 我国D2-43病毒株PrM-E基因的复制型载体质粒DNA的免疫原性%The Immunogenicity of Replicative Virus Plasmid DNA Containing PrM-E Gene of Chinese D2-43 Virus Strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈水平; 秦鄂德; 于曼; 胡志君; 赵卫; 范宝昌; 王鹏程; 杨佩英

    2002-01-01

    观察含我国登革2型病毒株(D2-43)的PrM-E基因的复制型SFV(semliki forest virus)重组质粒DNA的免疫原性,为登革新型疫苗的研制提供依据.将PrM-E基因自T载体上切下,插入复制型SFV病毒载体质粒DNA中.将此重组质粒DNA以电穿孔法导入BHK21细胞,用间接免疫荧光法在感染细胞内可检测到登革2型病毒特异蛋白的表达.采用去除内毒素的质粒提取试剂盒制备重组质粒DNA,然后以不同剂量通过肌肉多点注射途径免疫Balb/c鼠,获得的鼠血清可与登革D2-43感染的C6/36抗原片起特异的抗原抗体反应.结果表明,含登革2型病毒PrM-E基因的复制型SFV病毒载体质粒DNA在Balb/c鼠中可诱导登革2型病毒特异抗体的产生,但抗体水平较低.%To study the immunogenicity of replicative plasmid DNA containing PrM-E gene of Chinese D2-43virus strain and lay a foundation for new vaccine of dengue, the PrM-E gene was cut from pGEM-T-ME with Apa I and Cla I and inserted into replicative semliki forest virus (SFV) vector. The recombinant plasmid DNA was electroporated into BHK21 cells, then expression products specific to dengue virus type 2 could be detected by IFA (indirect immunofluorescence assay) in transfected cells. Endotoxin-free plasmid DNA was prepared with EndoFree plasmid Maxi kit. Mice were immunized with different doses of the recombinant SFV plasmid DNA intramuscularly at multiple sites. The titres of antibody to dengue virus type 2 was measured by IFA. And sera with recombinant plasmid, could react with antigen of dengue 2 virus on microscope slides. The results showed that recombinant SFV plasmid DNA containing the PrM-E gene of D2-43 virus strain, could produce specific antibody to dengue 2 virus in mice, but the titre was low.

  14. Influence of Plasmid Type on the Replication of Rhodococcus equi in Host Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham-Lane, Jennifer M; Berghaus, Londa J; Giguère, Steeve; Hondalus, Mary K

    2016-01-01

    The soil-dwelling, saprophytic actinomycete Rhodococcus equi is a multihost, facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages. When inhaled by susceptible foals, it causes severe bronchopneumonia. It is also a pathogen of pigs, which may develop submaxillary lymphadenitis upon exposure. R. equi isolates obtained from foals and pigs possess conjugative plasmids housing a pathogenicity island (PAI) containing a novel family of genes of unknown function called the virulence-associated protein or vap family. The PAI regions of the equine and swine plasmids differ in vap gene composition, with equine isolates possessing six vap genes, including the major virulence determinant vapA, while the PAIs of swine isolates house vapB and five other unique vap genes. Possession of the pVAPA-type virulence plasmid by equine isolates bestows the capacity for intramacrophage replication essential for disease development in vivo. Swine isolates of R. equi are largely unstudied. Here, we show that R. equi isolates from pigs, carrying pVAPB-type plasmids, are able to replicate in a plasmid-dependent manner in macrophages obtained from a variety of species (murine, swine, and equine) and anatomical locations. Similarly, equine isolates carrying pVAPA-type plasmids are capable of replication in swine macrophages. Plasmid swapping between equine and swine strains through conjugation did not alter the intracellular replication capacity of the parental strain, indicating that coevolution of the plasmid and chromosome is not crucial for this attribute. These results demonstrate that while distinct plasmid types exist among R. equi isolates obtained from equine and swine sources, this tropism is not determined by host species-specific intramacrophage replication capabilities. IMPORTANCE This work greatly advances our understanding of the opportunistic pathogen Rhodococcus equi, a disease agent of animals and immunocompromised people. Clinical isolates from diseased foals carry a

  15. Production and pharmaceutical formulation of plasmid DNA vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, I.

    2013-01-01

    Research leading to the thesis ‘Production and pharmaceutical formulation of plasmid DNA vaccines‘ can be divided into two parts. The first part describes the development of a Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) compliant plasmid DNA production process of pDNA vaccines for the treatment of Human papil

  16. Production and pharmaceutical formulation of plasmid DNA vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, I.

    2013-01-01

    Research leading to the thesis ‘Production and pharmaceutical formulation of plasmid DNA vaccines‘ can be divided into two parts. The first part describes the development of a Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) compliant plasmid DNA production process of pDNA vaccines for the treatment of Human papil

  17. Cloning of an origin of DNA replication of Xenopus laevis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, S.; Taylor, J.H.

    1980-09-01

    DNA fragments of Xenopus laevis, the African frog, were cloned in the EcoRI site of the Eschrichia coli plasmid pACYC189 and tested for ability to initiate and complete replication of the recombinant plasmid when injected into unfertilized eggs of X. laevis. After measurement of the (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation per egg for a number of recombinant plasmids, pSW14 and pSW9, which respectively contain a small segment (550 base pairs) and several kilobases of frog DNA, were selected for more extensive analysis. In spite of the small size of th segment in pSW14, it incorporates in 2 hr at least 3 times as much labeled thymidine as either pSW9 or the vector alone. To determine the number of replications of pSW14, a novel method was employed. The results showed that about 50% of the labeled, supercoiled DNA recovered from eggs after 4 hr was sensitive to EcoRI digestion, which indicates that most of the DNA that incorporated (/sup 3/H)thymidine had replicated twice during the 4 hr in the unfertilized eggs of X. laevis. We conclude the pSW14 has a functional origin in the Xenopus DNA segment.

  18. A quantitative and high-throughput assay of human papillomavirus DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, David; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Replication of the human papillomavirus (HPV) double-stranded DNA genome is accomplished by the two viral proteins E1 and E2 in concert with host DNA replication factors. HPV DNA replication is an established model of eukaryotic DNA replication and a potential target for antiviral therapy. Assays to measure the transient replication of HPV DNA in transfected cells have been developed, which rely on a plasmid carrying the viral origin of DNA replication (ori) together with expression vectors for E1 and E2. Replication of the ori-plasmid is typically measured by Southern blotting or PCR analysis of newly replicated DNA (i.e., DpnI digested DNA) several days post-transfection. Although extremely valuable, these assays have been difficult to perform in a high-throughput and quantitative manner. Here, we describe a modified version of the transient DNA replication assay that circumvents these limitations by incorporating a firefly luciferase expression cassette in cis of the ori. Replication of this ori-plasmid by E1 and E2 results in increased levels of firefly luciferase activity that can be accurately quantified and normalized to those of Renilla luciferase expressed from a control plasmid, thus obviating the need for DNA extraction, digestion, and analysis. We provide a detailed protocol for performing the HPV type 31 DNA replication assay in a 96-well plate format suitable for small-molecule screening and EC50 determinations. The quantitative and high-throughput nature of the assay should greatly facilitate the study of HPV DNA replication and the identification of inhibitors thereof.

  19. Sequence analysis and characterization of rolling-circle replicating plasmid pVCM01 from Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penido, A. F. B.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Characterization of cryptic plasmid pVCM01 (accession number JX133088 isolated from Salmonella enterica Enteritidis. Methodology and results: The complete sequence of pVCM01 was obtained. This plasmid possesses 1981 bp, with G+C content of 57% in agreement of the range of Salmonella genomic DNA. pVCM01 has a high degree of similarity to pB and pJ plasmids. It possesses six main open reading frames, only one have a very high degree of amino acid identity with protein involved in the rolling-circle-like replication (RCR. Based on the sequence similarities, pVCM01 plasmid belonged to the pC194/pUB110 rolling-circle replicating plasmid family. The Rep pVCM01 possesses the motifs: FLTLTVRN, HPHFHTL, SGDGYVKHERW, which were present in all Rep proteins. Conclusion, significance and impact of study: The small size of pVCM01 plasmid and its stability in E. coli cells, make it an attractive candidate to develop new vectors, such as cloning and/or expression vector.

  20. Identification of IncA/C Plasmid Replication and Maintenance Genes and Development of a Plasmid Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Steven J; Phan, Minh-Duy; Peters, Kate M; Forde, Brian M; Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Paterson, David L; Walsh, Timothy R; Beatson, Scott A; Schembri, Mark A

    2017-02-01

    Plasmids of incompatibility group A/C (IncA/C) are becoming increasingly prevalent within pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae They are associated with the dissemination of multiple clinically relevant resistance genes, including blaCMY and blaNDM Current typing methods for IncA/C plasmids offer limited resolution. In this study, we present the complete sequence of a blaNDM-1-positive IncA/C plasmid, pMS6198A, isolated from a multidrug-resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain. Hypersaturated transposon mutagenesis, coupled with transposon-directed insertion site sequencing (TraDIS), was employed to identify conserved genetic elements required for replication and maintenance of pMS6198A. Our analysis of TraDIS data identified roles for the replicon, including repA, a toxin-antitoxin system; two putative partitioning genes, parAB; and a putative gene, 053 Construction of mini-IncA/C plasmids and examination of their stability within E. coli confirmed that the region encompassing 053 contributes to the stable maintenance of IncA/C plasmids. Subsequently, the four major maintenance genes (repA, parAB, and 053) were used to construct a new plasmid multilocus sequence typing (PMLST) scheme for IncA/C plasmids. Application of this scheme to a database of 82 IncA/C plasmids identified 11 unique sequence types (STs), with two dominant STs. The majority of blaNDM-positive plasmids examined (15/17; 88%) fall into ST1, suggesting acquisition and subsequent expansion of this blaNDM-containing plasmid lineage. The IncA/C PMLST scheme represents a standardized tool to identify, track, and analyze the dissemination of important IncA/C plasmid lineages, particularly in the context of epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Influenza Plasmid DNA Vaccines: Progress and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicho, Diana; Queiroz, João António; Tomaz, Cândida Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines have long been used to fight flu infectious; however, recent advances highlight the importance of produce new alternatives. Even though traditional influenza vaccines are safe and usually effective, they need to be uploaded every year to anticipate circulating flu viruses. This limitation together with the use of embryonated chicken eggs as the substrate for vaccine production, is time-consuming and could involve potential biohazards in growth of new virus strains. Plasmid DNA produced by prokaryote microorganisms and encoding foreign proteins had emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. This technology allows the expression of a gene of interest by eukaryotic cells in order to induce protective immune responses against the pathogen of interest. In this review, we discuss the strategies to choose the best DNA vaccine to be applied in the treatment and prevention of influenza. Specifically, we give an update of influenza DNA vaccines developments, all involved techniques, their main characteristics, applicability and technical features to obtain the best option against influenza infections.

  2. High-frequency transformation of a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii, with autonomously replicating plasmids which are also functional in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Y.; Goh, T K; Tani, Y.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a transformation system which uses autonomous replicating plasmids for a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii. Two autonomous replication sequences, CARS1 and CARS2, were newly cloned from the genome of C. boidinii. Plasmids having both a CARS fragment and the C. boidinii URA3 gene transformed C. boidinii ura3 cells to Ura+ phenotype at frequencies of up to 10(4) CFU/micrograms of DNA. From Southern blot analysis, CARS plasmids seemed to exist in polymeric forms as well as...

  3. Metal-Induced Stabilization and Activation of Plasmid Replication Initiator RepB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Masó, José A.; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, Lorena; Sanz, Marta; Menéndez, Margarita; del Solar, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Initiation of plasmid rolling circle replication (RCR) is catalyzed by a plasmid-encoded Rep protein that performs a Tyr- and metal-dependent site-specific cleavage of one DNA strand within the double-strand origin (dso) of replication. The crystal structure of RepB, the initiator protein of the streptococcal plasmid pMV158, constitutes the first example of a Rep protein structure from RCR plasmids. It forms a toroidal homohexameric ring where each RepB protomer consists of two domains: the C-terminal domain involved in oligomerization and the N-terminal domain containing the DNA-binding and endonuclease activities. Binding of Mn2+ to the active site is essential for the catalytic activity of RepB. In this work, we have studied the effects of metal binding on the structure and thermostability of full-length hexameric RepB and each of its separate domains by using different biophysical approaches. The analysis of the temperature-induced changes in RepB shows that the first thermal transition, which occurs at a range of temperatures physiologically relevant for the pMV158 pneumococcal host, represents an irreversible conformational change that affects the secondary and tertiary structure of the protein, which becomes prone to self-associate. This transition, which is also shown to result in loss of DNA binding capacity and catalytic activity of RepB, is confined to its N-terminal domain. Mn2+ protects the protein from undergoing this detrimental conformational change and the observed protection correlates well with the high-affinity binding of the cation to the active site, as substituting one of the metal-ligands at this site impairs both the protein affinity for Mn2+and the Mn2+-driven thermostabilization effect. The level of catalytic activity of the protein, especially in the case of full-length RepB, cannot be explained based only on the high-affinity binding of Mn2+ at the active site and suggests the existence of additional, lower-affinity metal binding site

  4. DNA replication stress: causes, resolution and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Velimezi, Georgia; Loizou, Joanna I

    2014-11-15

    DNA replication is a fundamental process of the cell that ensures accurate duplication of the genetic information and subsequent transfer to daughter cells. Various pertubations, originating from endogenous or exogenous sources, can interfere with proper progression and completion of the replication process, thus threatening genome integrity. Coordinated regulation of replication and the DNA damage response is therefore fundamental to counteract these challenges and ensure accurate synthesis of the genetic material under conditions of replication stress. In this review, we summarize the main sources of replication stress and the DNA damage signaling pathways that are activated in order to preserve genome integrity during DNA replication. We also discuss the association of replication stress and DNA damage in human disease and future perspectives in the field. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. In vitro replication of plasmids containing human ribosomal gene sequences: origin localization and dependence on an aprotinin-binding cytosolic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, F D; Georgoff, I; Fresa, K L; Sylvester, J; Gonzalez, I; Cohen, S

    1993-11-01

    We previously investigated the role of an aprotinin-binding protein (ADR) in the initiation of DNA replication in isolated quiescent nuclei. In the present study, we have used a cell-free DNA replication system to test the ability of plasmid vectors which contain sequences from the human ribosomal RNA gene to serve as replicative templates in vitro when exposed to ADR-containing preparations. Significant dTTP incorporation was seen using DNA from either a 7-kb sequence in the 5' spacer region (CHE) or a 7-kb sequence which begins near the end of the 28S coding region and extends into the 3' spacer region (ADBB), while sequences from other regions of the rRNA gene mediated little or no dTTP incorporation. The characteristics of plasmid-directed dTTP incorporation indicate that most incorporation is due to DNA replication and not repair or damage-initiated processes. To conclusively demonstrate origin-dependent replication in the plasmid system and to further map replication origins, an approach was developed using ddGTP to restrict the length of daughter strands followed by hybridization of these replication products to restriction fragments spanning the putative origin region. This approach allowed us to identify replication origin activity apart from parent strand repair or synthesis initiated at random damaged sites. One of the origins was localized to a 1375-bp fragment within the 5' spacer region, and this fragment contains sequences homologous to those found in other replication origins.

  6. DNA Replication via Entanglement Swapping

    CERN Document Server

    Pusuluk, Onur

    2010-01-01

    Quantum effects are mainly used for the determination of molecular shapes in molecular biology, but quantum information theory may be a more useful tool to understand the physics of life. Molecular biology assumes that function is explained by structure, the complementary geometries of molecules and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds. However, both this assumption and its converse are possible if organic molecules and quantum circuits/protocols are considered as hardware and software of living systems that are co-optimized during evolution. In this paper, we try to model DNA replication as a multiparticle entanglement swapping with a reliable qubit representation of nucleotides. In the model, molecular recognition of a nucleotide triggers an intrabase entanglement corresponding to a superposition state of different tautomer forms. Then, base pairing occurs by swapping intrabase entanglements with interbase entanglements.

  7. Synchronization of DNA array replication kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manturov, Alexey O.; Grigoryev, Anton V.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work we discuss the features of the DNA replication kinetics at the case of multiplicity of simultaneously elongated DNA fragments. The interaction between replicated DNA fragments is carried out by free protons that appears at the every nucleotide attachment at the free end of elongated DNA fragment. So there is feedback between free protons concentration and DNA-polymerase activity that appears as elongation rate dependence. We develop the numerical model based on a cellular automaton, which can simulate the elongation stage (growth of DNA strands) for DNA elongation process with conditions pointed above and we study the possibility of the DNA polymerases movement synchronization. The results obtained numerically can be useful for DNA polymerase movement detection and visualization of the elongation process in the case of massive DNA replication, eg, under PCR condition or for DNA "sequencing by synthesis" sequencing devices evaluation.

  8. Extrachromosomal recombination in vaccinia-infected cells requires a functional DNA polymerase participating at a level other than DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinas, R J; Condit, R C; Paoletti, E

    1990-12-01

    Homologous recombination was measured in vaccinia-infected cells cotransfected with two plasmid recombination substrates. One plasmid contains a vaccinia protein lacZ coding region bearing a 1.1 kb 3' terminal deletion while the other plasmid contains a non-promoted lacZ coding region bearing a 1.1 kb 5' terminal deletion. Homologous recombination occurring between the 825 bp of lacZ common to both plasmids regenerates a functional lacZ gene from which B-galactosidase expression was measured. The entire 3 kb lacZ gene was used as a positive control. A panel of thermosensitive mutants was screened in cells either transfected with the positive control plasmid or cotransfected with the recombination substrates. A DNA - mutant, ts42, known to map to the viral DNA polymerase gene was found to be defective in recombination. Significantly, other DNA - mutants, ts17 or ts25, or other DNA polymerase mutants did not exhibit a defect in recombination similar to ts42. Inhibitors of viral DNA synthesis did not uniformly affect recombination. Cytosine arabinoside and aphidicolin inhibited B-galactosidase expression from the recombination substrates but not from the positive control plasmid, whereas hydroxyurea enhanced expression from both. Marker rescue with the cloned wildtype DNA polymerase gene repaired the defect in ts42. Southern and western analyses demonstrated that B-galactosidase activity was consistent with a recombined lacZ gene and unit size 116 kDa protein. Measurement of plasmid and viral DNA replication in cells infected with the different DNA - mutants indicated that recombination was independent of plasmid and viral DNA replication. Together these results suggest that the vaccinia DNA polymerase participates in homologous recombination at a level other than that of DNA replication.

  9. Integration host factor is required for replication of pYGK-derived plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María D; Demuth, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we show that integration host factor protein (IHF) is required for replication of pYGK plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. YGK plasmids were not replicated in A. actinomycetemcomitans strains lacking either the α- or β- subunit of IHF. However, the deletion mutants were complemented, and plasmid replication was restored when the promoter region and gene for either ihfA or ihfB was cloned into pYGK. We also identified two motifs that resemble the consensus IHF-binding site in a 813-bp fragment containing the pYGK origin of replication. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, purified IHFα-IHFβ protein complex was shown to bind to probes containing either of these motifs. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that plasmid replication is IHF-dependent in the family Pasteurellaceae. In addition, using site-direct mutagenesis, the XbaI and KpnI restriction sites in the suicide vector pJT1 were modified to generate plasmid pJT10. The introduction of these new unique sites in pJT10 facilitates the transfer of transcriptional or translational lacZ fusion constructs for the generation of single-copy chromosomal insertion of the reporter construct. Plasmid pJT10 and its derivatives will be useful for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) and probably other genera of Pasteurellaceae, including Haemophilus, Pasteurella, and Mannheimia.

  10. Regulation of Unperturbed DNA Replication by Ubiquitylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Priego Moreno

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational modification of proteins by means of attachment of a small globular protein ubiquitin (i.e., ubiquitylation represents one of the most abundant and versatile mechanisms of protein regulation employed by eukaryotic cells. Ubiquitylation influences almost every cellular process and its key role in coordination of the DNA damage response is well established. In this review we focus, however, on the ways ubiquitylation controls the process of unperturbed DNA replication. We summarise the accumulated knowledge showing the leading role of ubiquitin driven protein degradation in setting up conditions favourable for replication origin licensing and S-phase entry. Importantly, we also present the emerging major role of ubiquitylation in coordination of the active DNA replication process: preventing re-replication, regulating the progression of DNA replication forks, chromatin re-establishment and disassembly of the replisome at the termination of replication forks.

  11. DNA adenine methylation is required to replicate both Vibrio cholerae chromosomes once per cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Demarre

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA adenine methylation is widely used to control many DNA transactions, including replication. In Escherichia coli, methylation serves to silence newly synthesized (hemimethylated sister origins. SeqA, a protein that binds to hemimethylated DNA, mediates the silencing, and this is necessary to restrict replication to once per cell cycle. The methylation, however, is not essential for replication initiation per se but appeared so when the origins (oriI and oriII of the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes were used to drive plasmid replication in E. coli. Here we show that, as in the case of E. coli, methylation is not essential for oriI when it drives chromosomal replication and is needed for once-per-cell-cycle replication in a SeqA-dependent fashion. We found that oriII also needs SeqA for once-per-cell-cycle replication and, additionally, full methylation for efficient initiator binding. The requirement for initiator binding might suffice to make methylation an essential function in V. cholerae. The structure of oriII suggests that it originated from a plasmid, but unlike plasmids, oriII makes use of methylation for once-per-cell-cycle replication, the norm for chromosomal but not plasmid replication.

  12. Replication-Uncoupled Histone Deposition during Adenovirus DNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Komatsu, Tetsuro; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2012-01-01

    In infected cells, the chromatin structure of the adenovirus genome DNA plays critical roles in its genome functions. Previously, we reported that in early phases of infection, incoming viral DNA is associated with both viral core protein VII and cellular histones. Here we show that in late phases of infection, newly synthesized viral DNA is also associated with histones. We also found that the knockdown of CAF-1, a histone chaperone that functions in the replication-coupled deposition of his...

  13. Host growth temperature and a conservative amino acid substitution in the replication protein of pPS10 influence plasmid host range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Tresguerres, M E; Martín, M; García de Viedma, D; Giraldo, R; Díaz-Orejas, R

    1995-01-01

    pPS10 is a replicon isolated from Pseudomonas syringe pv. savastanoi that can be established at 37 degrees C efficiently in Pseudomonas aeruginosa but very inefficiently in Escherichia coli. The establishment of the wild-type pPS10 replicon in E. coli is favored at low temperatures (30 degrees C or below). RepA protein of pPS10 promotes in vitro plasmid replication in extracts from E. coli, and this replication depends on host proteins DnaA, DnaB, DnaG, and SSB. Mutant plasmids able to efficiently replicate in E. coli at 37 degrees C were obtained. Three of four mutants whose mutations were mapped show a conservative Ala-->Val change in the amino-terminal region of the replication protein RepA. Plasmids carrying this mutation maintain the capacity to replicate in P. aeruginosa and have a fourfold increase in copy number in this host. The mutation does not substantially alter the autoregulation mediated by RepA. These results show that the physiological conditions of the host as well as subtle changes in the plasmid replication protein can modulate the host range of the pPS10 replicon. PMID:7635822

  14. Analysis of unassisted translesion replication by the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, G; Livneh, Z

    1999-05-01

    DNA damage-induced mutations are formed when damaged nucleotides present in single-stranded DNA are replicated. We have developed a new method for the preparation of gapped plasmids containing site-specific damaged nucleotides, as model DNA substrates for translesion replication. Using these substrates, we show that the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme from Escherichia coli can bypass a synthetic abasic site analogue with high efficiency (30% bypass in 16 min), unassisted by other proteins. The theta and tau subunits of the polymerase were not essential for bypass. No bypass was observed when the enzyme was assayed on a synthetic 60-mer oligonucleotide carrying the same lesion, and bypass on a linear gapped plasmid was 3-4-fold slower than on a circular gapped plasmid. There was no difference in the bypass when standing-start and running-start replication were compared. A comparison of translesion replication by DNA polymerase I, DNA polymerase II, the DNA polymerase III core, and the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme clearly showed that the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme was by far the most effective in performing translesion replication. This was not only due to the high processivity of the pol III holoenzyme, because increasing the processivity of pol II by adding the gamma complex and beta subunit, did not increase bypass. These results support the model that SOS regulation was imposed on a fundamentally constitutive translesion replication reaction to achieve tight control of mutagenesis.

  15. Separation of plasmid DNA topoisomers by multimodal chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santos, A Rita; Alves, Cláudia P A; Prazeres, Duarte Miguel F; Azevedo, Ana M

    2016-06-15

    The ability to analyze the distribution of topoisomers in a plasmid DNA sample is important when evaluating the quality of preparations intended for gene therapy and DNA vaccination or when performing biochemical studies on the action of topoisomerases and gyrases. Here, we describe the separation of supercoiled (sc) and open circular (oc) topoisomers by multimodal chromatography. A medium modified with the ligand N-benzyl-N-methyl ethanolamine and an elution scheme with increasing NaCl concentration are used to accomplish the baseline separation of sc and oc plasmid. The utility of the method is demonstrated by quantitating topoisomers in a purified plasmid sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The beta subunit sliding DNA clamp is responsible for unassisted mutagenic translesion replication by DNA polymerase III holoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, G; Reuven, N B; Livneh, Z

    1998-11-24

    The replication of damaged nucleotides that have escaped DNA repair leads to the formation of mutations caused by misincorporation opposite the lesion. In Escherichia coli, this process is under tight regulation of the SOS stress response and is carried out by DNA polymerase III in a process that involves also the RecA, UmuD' and UmuC proteins. We have shown that DNA polymerase III holoenzyme is able to replicate, unassisted, through a synthetic abasic site in a gapped duplex plasmid. Here, we show that DNA polymerase III*, a subassembly of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme lacking the beta subunit, is blocked very effectively by the synthetic abasic site in the same DNA substrate. Addition of the beta subunit caused a dramatic increase of at least 28-fold in the ability of the polymerase to perform translesion replication, reaching 52% bypass in 5 min. When the ssDNA region in the gapped plasmid was extended from 22 nucleotides to 350 nucleotides, translesion replication still depended on the beta subunit, but it was reduced by 80%. DNA sequence analysis of translesion replication products revealed mostly -1 frameshifts. This mutation type is changed to base substitution by the addition of UmuD', UmuC, and RecA, as demonstrated in a reconstituted SOS translesion replication reaction. These results indicate that the beta subunit sliding DNA clamp is the major determinant in the ability of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme to perform unassisted translesion replication and that this unassisted bypass produces primarily frameshifts.

  17. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Dai, Qun; Park, Dongkyoo; Deng, Xingming

    2016-01-01

    The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR) mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress. PMID:27548226

  18. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  19. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin; Pruitt, Steven C; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2017-09-15

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen the yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  20. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Timothy; Liachko, Ivan; Burt, Cassaundra; Meikle, Troy; Jiang, Katherine; Craciun, Gheorghe; Dunham, Maitreya J; Fox, Catherine A

    2016-04-07

    The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS), and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1) present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may function in plasmid

  1. Plasmid DNA Manufacturing for Indirect and Direct Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeer, Marco; Buchholz, Tatjana; Schleef, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Plasmid DNA is currently gaining increasing importance for clinical research applications in gene therapy and genetic vaccination. For direct gene transfer into humans, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-grade plasmid DNA is mandatory. The same holds true if the drug substance contains a genetically modified cell, for example chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, where these cells as well as the contained plasmids are used. According to the responsible regulatory agencies, they have to be produced under full GMP. On the other hand, for GMP production of, for example, mRNA or viral vectors (lentiviral vectors, adeno-associated virus vectors, etc.), in many cases, High Quality Grade plasmid DNA is accepted as a starting material. The manufacturing process passes through different production steps. To ensure the right conditions are used for the plasmid, a pilot run must be conducted at the beginning. In this step, a followed upscaling with respect to reproducibility and influences on product quality is performed. Subsequently, a cell bank of the transformed productions strain is established and characterized. This cell bank is used for the cultivation process. After cell harvesting and lysis, several chromatography steps are conducted to receive a pure plasmid product. Depending on the respective required quality grade, the plasmid product is subject to several quality controls. The last step consists of formulation and filling of the product.

  2. Development of new plasmid DNA vaccine vectors with R1-based replicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bower Diana M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been renewed interest in biopharmaceuticals based on plasmid DNA (pDNA in recent years due to the approval of several veterinary DNA vaccines, on-going clinical trials of human pDNA-based therapies, and significant advances in adjuvants and delivery vehicles that have helped overcome earlier efficacy deficits. With this interest comes the need for high-yield, cost-effective manufacturing processes. To this end, vector engineering is one promising strategy to improve plasmid production. Results In this work, we have constructed a new DNA vaccine vector, pDMB02-GFP, containing the runaway R1 origin of replication. The runaway replication phenotype should result in plasmid copy number amplification after a temperature shift from 30°C to 42°C. However, using Escherichia coli DH5α as a host, we observed that the highest yields of pDMB02-GFP were achieved during constant-temperature culture at 30°C, with a maximum yield of approximately 19 mg pDNA/g DCW being observed. By measuring mRNA and protein levels of the R1 replication initiator protein, RepA, we determined that RepA may be limiting pDMB02-GFP yield at 42°C. A mutant plasmid, pDMB-ATG, was constructed by changing the repA start codon from the sub-optimal GTG to ATG. In cultures of DH5α[pDMB-ATG], temperature-induced plasmid amplification was more dramatic than that observed with pDMB02-GFP, and RepA protein was detectable for several hours longer than in cultures of pDMB02-GFP at 42°C. Conclusions Overall, we have demonstrated that R1-based plasmids can produce high yields of high-quality pDNA without the need for a temperature shift, and have laid the groundwork for further investigation of this class of vectors in the context of plasmid DNA production.

  3. Characterization of the replication and stability regions of Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTAR.

    OpenAIRE

    Gallie, D R; Zaitlin, D; Perry, K L; Kado, C I

    1984-01-01

    A 5.4-kilobase region containing the origin of replication and stability maintenance of the 44-kilobase Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTAR has been mapped and characterized. Within this region is a 1.3-kilobase segment that is capable of directing autonomous replication. The remaining segment contains the stability locus for maintenance of pTAR during nonselective growth. Approximately 35% of pTAR shares sequence homology with pAg119, a 44-kilobase cryptic plasmid in grapevine strain 1D11...

  4. Absence of RNase H allows replication of pBR322 in Escherichia coli mutants lacking DNA polymerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogoma, T

    1984-12-01

    rnh (formerly termed sdrA) mutants of Escherichia coli K-12, capable of continuous DNA replication in the absence of protein synthesis (stable DNA replication), are devoid of ribonuclease H (RNase H, EC 3.1.26.4) activity. Plasmid pBR322 was found to replicate in rnh mutants in the absence of DNA polymerase I, the polA gene product, which is normally required for replication of this plasmid. The plasmid copy number in polA rnh double mutants was as high as in the wild-type strains. When a chimeric construct between pBR322 and pSC101 was introduced into a polA rnh double mutant, the replication of the plasmid via the pBR322 replicon was inhibited if the plasmid also carried an rnh+ gene or if the host harbored an F' plasmid carrying an rnh+ gene. Thus, DNA polymerase I-independent replication of pBR322 requires the absence of RNase H activity. This alternative mechanism requiring neither DNA polymerase I nor RNase H appears to involve a transcriptional event in the region of the normal origin of replication.

  5. Effects of the presence of ColE1 plasmid DNA in Escherichia coli on the host cell metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn Alicja

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although understanding of physiological interactions between plasmid DNA and its host is important for vector design and host optimization in many biotechnological applications, to our knowledge, global studies on plasmid-host interactions have not been performed to date even for well-characterized plasmids. Results Escherichia coli cells, either devoid of plasmid DNA or bearing plasmid pOri1 (with a single ColE1 replication origin or plasmid pOri2 (with double ColE1 replication origins, were cultured in a chemostat. We used a combination of metabolic flux analysis, DNA microarray and enzyme activity analysis methods to explore differences in the metabolism between these strains. We found that the presence of plasmids significantly influenced various metabolic pathways in the host cells, e.g. glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and the pentose phosphate (PP pathway. Expression of rpiA, a gene coding for ribose-5-phosphate isomerase A, was considerably decreased in E. coli carrying a high copy number plasmid relative to E. coli carrying a low copy number plasmid and plasmid-free E. coli. The rpiA gene was cloned into an expression vector to construct plasmid pETrpiA. Following induction of pETrpiA-bearing E. coli, which harbored either pOri1 or pOri2, with isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG, the copy number of pOri1 and pOri2 was sigificantly higher than that measured in a host devoid of pETrpiA. Conclusion The presence of plasmids can significantly influence some metabolic pathways in the host cell. We believe that the results of detailed metabolic analysis may be useful in optimizing host strains, vectors and cultivation conditions for various biotechnological purposes.

  6. How frog embryos replicate their DNA reliably

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechhoefer, John; Marshall, Brandon

    2007-03-01

    Frog embryos contain three billion base pairs of DNA. In early embryos (cycles 2-12), DNA replication is extremely rapid, about 20 min., and the entire cell cycle lasts only 25 min., meaning that mitosis (cell division) takes place in about 5 min. In this stripped-down cell cycle, there are no efficient checkpoints to prevent the cell from dividing before its DNA has finished replication - a disastrous scenario. Even worse, the many origins of replication are laid down stochastically and are also initiated stochastically throughout the replication process. Despite the very tight time constraints and despite the randomness introduced by origin stochasticity, replication is extremely reliable, with cell division failing no more than once in 10,000 tries. We discuss a recent model of DNA replication that is drawn from condensed-matter theories of 1d nucleation and growth. Using our model, we discuss different strategies of replication: should one initiate all origins as early as possible, or is it better to hold back and initiate some later on? Using concepts from extreme-value statistics, we derive the distribution of replication times given a particular scenario for the initiation of origins. We show that the experimentally observed initiation strategy for frog embryos meets the reliability constraint and is close to the one that requires the fewest resources of a cell.

  7. Efficient transformation of Bacillus thuringiensis requires nonmethylated plasmid DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Macaluso, A; Mettus, A M

    1991-01-01

    The transformation efficiency of Bacillus thuringiensis depends upon the source of plasmid DNA. DNA isolated from B. thuringiensis, Bacillus megaterium, or a Dam- Dcm- Escherichia coli strain efficiently transformed several B. thuringiensis strains, B. thuringiensis strains were grouped according to which B. thuringiensis backgrounds were suitable sources of DNA for transformation of other B. thuringiensis strains, suggesting that B. thuringiensis strains differ in DNA modification and restri...

  8. Analysis of benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide mutagenesis in a mammalian in vitro DNA replication system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasunia, K.; Cheng, L.; Carty, M. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Chemicals that interact with DNA and cause mutations, thereby activating protooncogenes or inactivating tumor suppressor genes, are thought to initiate the process of carcinogenesis. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in mutagenesis of bulky adducts, we used an in vitro DNA replication system. An SV40-based shuttle vector, PZ189, was treated with anti-benzo[a]pyrene-7,8- dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE) and then replicated in vitro using hypotonic extracts of human HeLa cells. The replication efficiency was monitored by the incorporation of a radiolabelled nucleotide into DNA. The products of the replication reaction were then digested with Dpn-1 to inactivate the unreplicated plasmid and the mutation frequency was evaluated by transfection into E. coli MBM7070. Our results show that BPDE-damaged plasmids undergo replication in the in vitro system. The efficiency of replication and the mutant frequency is dose-dependent, such that the replication efficiency decreases and mutation frequency increases with increasing BPDE dose to the plasmid. This study further validates the in vitro DNA replication system by demonstrating the mutagenicity of bulky adducts of BPDE.

  9. Self-replication of DNA rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghoon; Lee, Junwye; Hamada, Shogo; Murata, Satoshi; Ha Park, Sung

    2015-06-01

    Biology provides numerous examples of self-replicating machines, but artificially engineering such complex systems remains a formidable challenge. In particular, although simple artificial self-replicating systems including wooden blocks, magnetic systems, modular robots and synthetic molecular systems have been devised, such kinematic self-replicators are rare compared with examples of theoretical cellular self-replication. One of the principal reasons for this is the amount of complexity that arises when you try to incorporate self-replication into a physical medium. In this regard, DNA is a prime candidate material for constructing self-replicating systems due to its ability to self-assemble through molecular recognition. Here, we show that DNA T-motifs, which self-assemble into ring structures, can be designed to self-replicate through toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions. The inherent design of these rings allows the population dynamics of the systems to be controlled. We also analyse the replication scheme within a universal framework of self-replication and derive a quantitative metric of the self-replicability of the rings.

  10. Coupling between the Basic Replicon and the Kis-Kid Maintenance System of Plasmid R1: Modulation by Kis Antitoxin Levels and Involvement in Control of Plasmid Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan López-Villarejo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available kis-kid, the auxiliary maintenance system of plasmid R1 and copB, the auxiliary copy number control gene of this plasmid, contribute to increase plasmid replication efficiency in cells with lower than average copy number. It is thought that Kis antitoxin levels decrease in these cells and that this acts as the switch that activates the Kid toxin; activated Kid toxin reduces copB-mRNA levels and this increases RepA levels that increases plasmid copy number. In support of this model we now report that: (i the Kis antitoxin levels do decrease in cells containing a mini-R1 plasmid carrying a repA mutation that reduces plasmid copy number; (ii kid-dependent replication rescue is abolished in cells in which the Kis antitoxin levels or the CopB levels are increased. Unexpectedly we found that this coordination significantly increases both the copy number of the repA mutant and of the wt mini-R1 plasmid. This indicates that the coordination between plasmid replication functions and kis-kid system contributes significantly to control plasmid R1 replication.

  11. Multiple Pathways of Plasmid DNA Transfer in Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Stefanie; Holsten, Lea; Weiss, Evelyn; Benghezal, Mohammed; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Many Helicobacter pylori (Hp) strains carry cryptic plasmids of different size and gene content, the function of which is not well understood. A subgroup of these plasmids (e.g. pHel4, pHel12), contain a mobilisation region, but no cognate type IV secretion system (T4SS) for conjugative transfer. Instead, certain H. pylori strains (e.g. strain P12 carrying plasmid pHel12) can harbour up to four T4SSs in their genome (cag-T4SS, comB, tfs3, tfs4). Here, we show that such indigenous plasmids can be efficiently transferred between H. pylori strains, even in the presence of extracellular DNaseI eliminating natural transformation. Knockout of a plasmid-encoded mobA relaxase gene significantly reduced plasmid DNA transfer in the presence of DNaseI, suggesting a DNA conjugation or mobilisation process. To identify the T4SS involved in this conjugative DNA transfer, each individual T4SS was consecutively deleted from the bacterial chromosome. Using a marker-free counterselectable gene deletion procedure (rpsL counterselection method), a P12 mutant strain was finally obtained with no single T4SS (P12ΔT4SS). Mating experiments using these mutants identified the comB T4SS in the recipient strain as the major mediator of plasmid DNA transfer between H. pylori strains, both in a DNaseI-sensitive (natural transformation) as well as a DNaseI-resistant manner (conjugative transfer). However, transfer of a pHel12::cat plasmid from a P12ΔT4SS donor strain into a P12ΔT4SS recipient strain provided evidence for the existence of a third, T4SS-independent mechanism of DNA transfer. This novel type of plasmid DNA transfer, designated as alternate DNaseI-Resistant (ADR) mechanism, is observed at a rather low frequency under in vitro conditions. Taken together, our study describes for the first time the existence of three distinct pathways of plasmid DNA transfer between H. pylori underscoring the importance of horizontal gene transfer for this species. PMID:23029142

  12. Cationic lipids delay the transfer of plasmid DNA to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattiaux, R; Jadot, M; Laurent, N; Dubois, F; Wattiaux-De Coninck, S

    1996-10-14

    Plasmid 35S DNA, naked or associated with different cationic lipid preparations was injected to rats. Subcellular distribution of radioactivity in the liver one hour after injection, was established by centrifugation methods. Results show that at that time, 35S DNA has reached lysosomes. On the contrary, when 35S DNA was complexed with lipids, radioactivity remains located in organelles whose distribution after differential and isopycnic centrifugation, is clearly distinct from that of arylsulfatase, lysosome marker enzyme. Injection of Triton WR 1339, a specific density perturbant of lysosomes, four days before 35S DNA injection causes a density decrease of radioactivity bearing structures, apparent one hour after naked 35S DNA injection but visible only after more than five hours, when 35S DNA associated with a cationic lipid is injected. These observations show that cationic lipids delay the transfer to lysosomes, of plasmid DNA taken up by the liver.

  13. Liquid-Crystalline Mesophases of Plasmid DNA in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Ziv; Wachtel, Ellen J.; Minsky, Abraham

    1994-06-01

    Bacterial plasmids may often reach a copy number larger than 1000 per cell, corresponding to a total amount of DNA that may exceed the amount of DNA within the bacterial chromosome. This observation highlights the problem of cellular accommodation of large amounts of closed-circular nucleic acids, whose interwound conformation offers negligible DNA compaction. As determined by x-ray scattering experiments conducted on intact bacteria, supercoiled plasmids segregate within the cells into dense clusters characterized by a long-range order. In vitro studies performed at physiological DNA concentrations indicated that interwound DNA spontaneously forms liquid crystalline phases whose macroscopic structural properties are determined by the features of the molecular supercoiling. Because these features respond to cellular factors, DNA supercoiling may provide a sensitive regulatory link between cellular parameters and the packaging modes of interwound DNA in vivo.

  14. In vitro and in vivo analysis of transcription within the replication region of plasmid pIP501.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantl, S; Nuez, B; Behnke, D

    1992-07-01

    Derivatives of the conjugative streptococcal plasmid pIP501 replicate stably in Bacillus subtilis. The region essential for replication of pIP501 has been narrowed down to a 2.2 kb DNA segment, the sequence of which has been determined. This region comprises two genes, copR and repR, proposed to be involved in copy control and replication. By in vitro and in vivo transcriptional analysis we characterized three active promoters, pI, pII and pIII within this region. A putative fourth promoter (pIV) was neither active in vitro nor in vivo. We showed that copR is transcribed from promoter pI while the repR gene is transcribed from promoter pII located just downstream of copR. The pII transcript encompasses a 329 nucleotide (nt) long leader sequence. A counter transcript that was complementary to a major part of this leader was found to originate from a third promoter pIII. The secondary structure of the counter transcript revealed several stem-loop regions. A regulatory function for this antisense RNA in the control of repR expression is proposed. Comparative analysis of the replication regions of pAM beta 1 and pSM19035 suggested a similar organization of transcriptional units, suggesting that an antisense RNA is produced by these plasmids also.

  15. Partial Purification of a Megadalton DNA Replication Complex by Free Flow Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caroline M.; Miao, Yunan; Lingeman, Robert G.; Hickey, Robert J.; Malkas, Linda H.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a gentle and rapid method to purify the intact multiprotein DNA replication complex using free flow electrophoresis (FFE). In particular, we applied FFE to purify the human cell DNA synthesome, which is a multiprotein complex that is fully competent to carry-out all phases of the DNA replication process in vitro using a plasmid containing the simian virus 40 (SV40) origin of DNA replication and the viral large tumor antigen (T-antigen) protein. The isolated native DNA synthesome can be of use in studying the mechanism by which mammalian DNA replication is carried-out and how anti-cancer drugs disrupt the DNA replication or repair process. Partially purified extracts from HeLa cells were fractionated in a native, liquid based separation by FFE. Dot blot analysis showed co-elution of many proteins identified as part of the DNA synthesome, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), DNA topoisomerase I (topo I), DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ), DNA polymerase ɛ (Pol ɛ), replication protein A (RPA) and replication factor C (RFC). Previously identified DNA synthesome proteins co-eluted with T-antigen dependent and SV40 origin-specific DNA polymerase activity at the same FFE fractions. Native gels show a multiprotein PCNA containing complex migrating with an apparent relative mobility in the megadalton range. When PCNA containing bands were excised from the native gel, mass spectrometric sequencing analysis identified 23 known DNA synthesome associated proteins or protein subunits. PMID:28036377

  16. Oncogene v-jun modulates DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylyk, C; Schneikert, J; Wasylyk, B

    1990-07-01

    Cell transformation leads to alterations in both transcription and DNA replication. Activation of transcription by the expression of a number of transforming oncogenes is mediated by the transcription factor AP1 (Herrlich & Ponta, 1989; Imler & Wasylyk, 1989). AP1 is a composite transcription factor, consisting of members of the jun and fos gene-families. c-jun and c-fos are progenitors of oncogenes, suggestion that an important transcriptional event in cell transformation is altered activity of AP1, which may arise either indirectly by oncogene expression or directly by structural modification of AP1. We report here that the v-jun oncogene and its progenitor c-jun, as fusion proteins with the lex-A-repressor DNA binding domain, can activate DNA replication from the Polyoma virus (Py) origin of replication, linked to the lex-A operator. The transcription-activation region of v-jun is required for activation of replication. When excess v-jun is expressed in the cell, replication is inhibited or 'squelched'. These results suggest that one consequence of deregulated jun activity could be altered DNA replication and that there are similarities in the way v-jun activates replication and transcription.

  17. Replication efficiency of rolling-circle replicon-based plasmids derived from porcine circovirus 2 in eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faurez, Florence; Dory, Daniel; Henry, Aurélie; Bougeard, Stéphanie; Jestin, André

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a method was developed to measure replication rates of rolling-circle replicon-based plasmids in eukaryotic cells. This method is based on the discriminative quantitation of MboI-resistant, non-replicated input plasmids and DpnI-resistant, replicated plasmids. To do so, porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) replicon-based plasmids were constructed. These plasmids contained the PCV2 origin of replication, the PCV2 Rep promoter and the PCV2 Rep gene. The results show that the replication rate depends on the length of the PCV2 replicon-based plasmid and not on the respective position of the Rep promoter and the promoter of the gene of interest that encodes the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). In all cases, it was necessary to add the Rep gene encoded by a plasmid and cotransfected as a replication booster. This method can evaluate the replication potential of replicon-based plasmids quickly and is thereby a promising tool for the development of plasmids for vaccine purposes.

  18. Molecular analysis of the replication origin of the Lactococcus lactis plasmid pCI305

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foley, S; Bron, S; Venema, G; Daly, C; Fitzgerald, GF

    1996-01-01

    The replication origin region, ori, of the Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis plasmid pCI305 contains three-and-one-half directly repeated 22-bp sequences and two inverted repeat sequences, IR1 and IR2. These inverted repeat sequences overlap the promoter of the repB gene, which encodes a protein (Rep

  19. Chromatin challenges during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Rocha, Walter; Verreault, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Inheritance and maintenance of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are central for eukaryotic life. To orchestrate DNA-replication and -repair processes in the context of chromatin is a challenge, both in terms of accessibility and maintenance of chromatin organization. To meet...... the challenge of maintenance, cells have evolved efficient nucleosome-assembly pathways and chromatin-maturation mechanisms that reproduce chromatin organization in the wake of DNA replication and repair. The aim of this Review is to describe how these pathways operate and to highlight how the epigenetic...

  20. [Chromatographic separation of plasmid DNA by anion-exchange cryogel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yantao; Shen, Shaochuan; Yun, Junxian; Yao, Kejian

    2012-08-01

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA) is used as an important vector for gene therapy, and its wide application is restricted by the purity and yield. To obtain high-purity pDNA, a chromatographic method based on anion-exchange supermacroporous cryogel was explored. The anion-exchange cryogel was prepared by grafting diethylaminoethyl-dextran to the epoxide groups of polyacrylamide-based matrix and pUC19 plasmid was used as a target to test the method. The plasmid was transferred into Escherichia coli DH5alpha, cultivated, harvested and lysed. The obtained culture was centrifuged and the supernatant was used as the plasmid feedstock, which was loaded into the anion-exchange cryogel bed for chromatographic separation. By optimizing the pH of running buffer and the elution conditions, high-purity pDNA was obtained by elution with 0.5 mol/L sodium chloride solution at pH 6.6. Compared to the traditional methods for purification of pDNA, animal source enzymes and toxic reagents were not involved in the present separation process, ensuring the safety of both the purification operations and the obtained pDNA.

  1. Persistence of plasmid DNA in different soils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... ... transformation in bacteria (Davison, 1999), binding of DNA from Bacillus subtilis on clay mineral montmorillonite, and the ability of ... soil was taken and soil extract was prepared with sterile water the DNA was isolated and.

  2. Hundreds of circular novel plasmids and DNA elements identified in a rat cecum metamobilome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tue Sparholt Jørgensen

    Full Text Available Metagenomic approaches are widespread in microbiological research, but so far, the knowledge on extrachromosomal DNA diversity and composition has largely remained dependant on cultivating host organisms. Even with the emergence of metagenomics, complete circular sequences are rarely identified, and have required manual curation. We propose a robust in silico procedure for identifying complete small plasmids in metagenomic datasets from whole genome shotgun sequencing. From one very pure and exhaustively sequenced metamobilome from rat cecum, we identified a total of 616 circular sequences, 160 of which were carrying a gene with plasmid replication domain. Further homology analyses indicated that the majority of these plasmid sequences are novel. We confirmed the circularity of the complete plasmid candidates using an inverse-type PCR approach on a subset of sequences with 95% success, confirming the existence and length of discrete sequences. The implication of these findings is a broadened understanding of the traits of circular elements in nature and the possibility of massive data mining in existing metagenomic datasets to discover novel pools of complete plasmids thus vastly expanding the current plasmid database.

  3. Characterization of the replication, transfer, and plasmid/lytic phage cycle of the Streptomyces plasmid-phage pZL12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li; Cheng, Qiuxiang; Tian, Xinli; Zhao, Liqian; Qin, Zhongjun

    2010-07-01

    We report here the isolation and recombinational cloning of a large plasmid, pZL12, from endophytic Streptomyces sp. 9R-2. pZL12 comprises 90,435 bp, encoding 112 genes, 30 of which are organized in a large operon resembling bacteriophage genes. A replication locus (repA) and a conjugal transfer locus (traA-traC) were identified in pZL12. Surprisingly, the supernatant of a 9R-2 liquid culture containing partially purified phage particles infected 9R-2 cured of pZL12 (9R-2X) to form plaques, and a phage particle (phiZL12) was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Major structural proteins (capsid, portal, and tail) of phiZL12 virions were encoded by pZL12 genes. Like bacteriophage P1, linear phiZL12 DNA contained ends from a largely random pZL12 sequence. There was also a hot end sequence in linear phiZL12. phiZL12 virions efficiently infected only one host, 9R-2X, but failed to infect and form plaques in 18 other Streptomyces strains. Some 9R-2X spores rescued from lysis by infection of phiZL12 virions contained a circular pZL12 plasmid, completing a cycle comprising autonomous plasmid pZL12 and lytic phage phiZL12. These results confirm pZL12 as the first example of a plasmid-phage in Streptomyces.

  4. Focus on DNA Repair Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Gourdin (Audrey)

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The crucial factor for the survival of an organism resides in genetic stability. In fact the integrity of the DNA sequence, that carries out and regulates genetic information, can be impaired by inaccurate maintenance processes, endogenous metabolites or

  5. Spatial regulation and organization of DNA replication within the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U

    2010-01-01

    Duplication of chromosomal DNA is a temporally and spatially regulated process. The timing of DNA replication initiation at various origins is highly coordinated; some origins fire early and others late during S phase. Moreover, inside the nuclei, the bulk of DNA replication is physically organized in replication factories, consisting of DNA polymerases and other replication proteins. In this review article, we discuss how DNA replication is organized and regulated spatially within the nucleus and how this spatial organization is linked to temporal regulation. We focus on DNA replication in budding yeast and fission yeast and, where applicable, compare yeast DNA replication with that in bacteria and metazoans.

  6. Chemotherapy of Bacterial Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-29

    render them non-susceptible to K: z plasmid-encoded enzymes. (3) Development of drugs which are selective inhibitor! 1 4, of plasmid DNA replication. (4... Development of drugs which inhibit phenotypic as expression of plasmid genes, and (5) Development of drugs which are inhibitors o, drug-inactivating...Barnes [2] them non-susceptible to plasmid-encoded enzymes, tabulated data on the incidence of Gram-negative 3) development of drugs which are

  7. Spatial regulation and organization of DNA replication within the nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Duplication of chromosomal DNA is a temporally and spatially regulated process. The timing of DNA replication initiation at various origins is highly coordinated; some origins fire early and others late during S phase. Moreover, inside the nuclei, the bulk of DNA replication is physically organized in replication factories, consisting of DNA polymerases and other replication proteins. In this review article, we discuss how DNA replication is organized and regulated spatially within the nucleu...

  8. Assembling semiconductor nanocomposites using DNA replication technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heimer, Brandon W.; Crown, Kevin K.; Bachand, George David

    2005-11-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules represent Nature's genetic database, encoding the information necessary for all cellular processes. From a materials engineering perspective, DNA represents a nanoscale scaffold with highly refined structure, stability across a wide range of environmental conditions, and the ability to interact with a range of biomolecules. The ability to mass-manufacture functionalized DNA strands with Angstrom-level resolution through DNA replication technology, however, has not been explored. The long-term goal of the work presented in this report is focused on exploiting DNA and in vitro DNA replication processes to mass-manufacture nanocomposite materials. The specific objectives of this project were to: (1) develop methods for replicating DNA strands that incorporate nucleotides with ''chemical handles'', and (2) demonstrate attachment of nanocrystal quantum dots (nQDs) to functionalized DNA strands. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and primer extension methodologies were used to successfully synthesize amine-, thiol-, and biotin-functionalized DNA molecules. Significant variability in the efficiency of modified nucleotide incorporation was observed, and attributed to the intrinsic properties of the modified nucleotides. Noncovalent attachment of streptavidin-coated nQDs to biotin-modified DNA synthesized using the primer extension method was observed by epifluorescence microscopy. Data regarding covalent attachment of nQDs to amine- and thiol-functionalized DNA was generally inconclusive; alternative characterization tools are necessary to fully evaluate these attachment methods. Full realization of this technology may facilitate new approaches to manufacturing materials at the nanoscale. In addition, composite nQD-DNA materials may serve as novel recognition elements in sensor devices, or be used as diagnostic tools for forensic analyses. This report summarizes the results obtained over the course of this 1-year

  9. Pharmaceutical development of the plasmid DNA vaccine pDERMATT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quaak, S.G.L.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of tumor specific antigens and self tolerance mechanisms against these antigens led to the assumption that antigens circulating at sufficient concentration levels could break this self tolerance mechanism and evoke immunological antitumor effects. pDERMATT (plasmid DNA encoding recombi

  10. Pharmaceutical development of the plasmid DNA vaccine pDERMATT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quaak, S.G.L.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of tumor specific antigens and self tolerance mechanisms against these antigens led to the assumption that antigens circulating at sufficient concentration levels could break this self tolerance mechanism and evoke immunological antitumor effects. pDERMATT (plasmid DNA encoding

  11. Use of plasmid DNA for induction of protective immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels

    2004-01-01

    Vaccines based on plasmid DNA have been tested for a number of fish pathogens but so far it is only in case of the rhabdoviruses, where the technology has been a real break through in vaccine research. Aspects of dose, time-course and mechanisms of protection, as well as practical use are discussed....

  12. Replication of DNA during barley endosperm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, H.

    1992-01-01

    The incorporation of [6-H-3]-thymidine into DNA of developing barley end sperm was examined by autoradiography of cross sections of seeds and DNA analysis. The majority of nuclear divisions took place in the very young endosperm, but as late as 25 days after anthesis there was evidence for DNA...... replication. The DNA content of the endosperm increases during development and in response to nitrogen application in parallel to the storage protein synthesis profile. The hordein genes were hypersensitive to DNase I treatment throughout development....

  13. Current trends in separation of plasmid DNA vaccines: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Ashraf; Healey, Robert; Adly, Frady G

    2013-01-14

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccines offer more rapid avenues for development and production if compared to those of conventional virus-based vaccines. They do not rely on time- or labour-intensive cell culture processes and allow greater flexibility in shipping and storage. Stimulating antibodies and cell-mediated components of the immune system are considered as some of the major advantages associated with the use of pDNA vaccines. This review summarizes the current trends in the purification of pDNA vaccines for practical and analytical applications. Special attention is paid to chromatographic techniques aimed at reducing the steps of final purification, post primary isolation and intermediate recovery, in order to reduce the number of steps necessary to reach a purified end product from the crude plasmid.

  14. Completion of DNA replication in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Brian M; Courcelle, Charmain T; Courcelle, Justin

    2014-11-18

    The mechanism by which cells recognize and complete replicated regions at their precise doubling point must be remarkably efficient, occurring thousands of times per cell division along the chromosomes of humans. However, this process remains poorly understood. Here we show that, in Escherichia coli, the completion of replication involves an enzymatic system that effectively counts pairs and limits cellular replication to its doubling point by allowing converging replication forks to transiently continue through the doubling point before the excess, over-replicated regions are incised, resected, and joined. Completion requires RecBCD and involves several proteins associated with repairing double-strand breaks including, ExoI, SbcDC, and RecG. However, unlike double-strand break repair, completion occurs independently of homologous recombination and RecA. In some bacterial viruses, the completion mechanism is specifically targeted for inactivation to allow over-replication to occur during lytic replication. The results suggest that a primary cause of genomic instabilities in many double-strand-break-repair mutants arises from an impaired ability to complete replication, independent from DNA damage.

  15. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn C. Thomason

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion.

  16. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Lynn C.; Costantino, Nina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion. PMID:27624131

  17. Enhanced brain targeting efficiency of intranasally administered plasmid DNA: an alternative route for brain gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, In-Kwon; Kim, Mi Young; Byun, Hyang-Min; Hwang, Tae Sun; Kim, Jung Mogg; Hwang, Kwang Woo; Park, Tae Gwan; Jung, Woon-Won; Chun, Taehoon; Jeong, Gil-Jae; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2007-01-01

    Recently, nasal administration has been studied as a noninvasive route for delivery of plasmid DNA encoding therapeutic or antigenic genes. Here, we examined the brain targeting efficiency and transport pathways of intranasally administered plasmid DNA. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) measurements of plasmid DNA in blood and brain tissues revealed that intranasally administered pCMVbeta (7.2 kb) and pN2/CMVbeta (14.1 kb) showed systemic absorption and brain distribution. Following intranasal administration, the beta-galactosidase protein encoded by these plasmids was significantly expressed in brain tissues. Kinetic studies showed that intranasally administered plasmid DNA reached the brain with a 2,595-fold higher efficiency than intravenously administered plasmid DNA did, 10 min post-dose. Over 1 h post-dose, the brain targeting efficiencies were consistently higher for intranasally administered plasmid DNA than for intravenously administered DNA. To examine how plasmid DNA enters the brain and moves to the various regions, we examined tissues from nine brain regions, at 5 and 10 min after intranasal or intravenous administration of plasmid DNA. Intravenously administered plasmid DNA displayed similar levels of plasmid DNA in the nine different regions, whereas, intranasally administered plasmid DNA exhibited different levels of distribution among the regions, with the highest plasmid DNA levels in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, plasmid DNA was mainly detected in the endothelial cells, but not in glial cells. Our results suggest that intranasally applied plasmid DNA may reach the brain through a direct route, possibly via the olfactory bulb, and that the nasal route might be an alternative method for efficiently delivering plasmid DNA to the brain.

  18. Anion exchange purification of plasmid DNA using expanded bed adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, G N; Cabral, J M; Prazeres, D M

    2000-01-01

    Recent developments in gene therapy with non-viral vectors and DNA vaccination have increased the demand for large amounts of pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA. The high viscosity of process streams is of major concern in the purification of plasmids, since it can cause high back pressures in column operations, thus limiting the throughput. In order to avoid these high back pressures, expanded bed anion exchange chromatography was evaluated as an alternative to fixed bed chromatography. A Streamline 25 column filled with 100 ml of Streamline QXL media, was equilibrated with 0.5 M NaCl in TE (10 mM Tris, 1 mM EDTA, pH = 8.0) buffer at an upward flow of 300 cmh-1, E. coli lysates (obtained from up to 3 liters of fermentation broth) were injected in the column. After washing out the unbound material, the media was allowed to sediment and the plasmid was eluted with 1 M NaCl in TE buffer at a downward flow of 120 cmh-1. Purification factors of 36 +/- 1 fold, 26 +/- 0.4 plasmid purity, and close to 100% yields were obtained when less than one settled column volume of plasmid feed was injected. However, both recovery yield and purity abruptly decreased when larger amounts were processed-values of 35 +/- 2 and 5 +/- 0.7 were obtained for the recovery yield and purity, respectively, when 250 ml of feedstock were processed. In these cases, gel clogging and expansion collapse were observed. The processing of larger volumes, thus larger plasmid quantities, was only possible by performing an isopropanol precipitation step prior to the chromatographic step. This step led to an enhancement of the purification step.

  19. Entropy involved in fidelity of DNA replication

    CERN Document Server

    Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Information has an entropic character which can be analyzed within the Statistical Theory in molecular systems. R. Landauer and C.H. Bennett showed that a logical copy can be carried out in the limit of no dissipation if the computation is performed sufficiently slowly. Structural and recent single-molecule assays have provided dynamic details of polymerase machinery with insight into information processing. We introduce a rigorous characterization of Shannon Information in biomolecular systems and apply it to DNA replication in the limit of no dissipation. Specifically, we devise an equilibrium pathway in DNA replication to determine the entropy generated in copying the information from a DNA template in the absence of friction. Both the initial state, the free nucleotides randomly distributed in certain concentrations, and the final state, a polymerized strand, are mesoscopic equilibrium states for the nucleotide distribution. We use empirical stacking free energies to calculate the probabilities of incorpo...

  20. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Three DNA polymerases - Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ - are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson-Crick base pairing and 3'exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to 'polymerase proofreading associated polyposis' (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an 'ultramutator' phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions.

  1. Using Plasmids as DNA Vaccines for Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregoning, John S; Kinnear, Ekaterina

    2014-12-01

    DNA plasmids can be used to induce a protective (or therapeutic) immune response by delivering genes encoding vaccine antigens. That naked DNA (without the refinement of coat proteins or host evasion systems) can cross from outside the cell into the nucleus and be expressed is particularly remarkable given the sophistication of the immune system in preventing infection by pathogens. As a result of the ease, low cost, and speed of custom gene synthesis, DNA vaccines dangle a tantalizing prospect of the next wave of vaccine technology, promising individual designer vaccines for cancer or mass vaccines with a rapid response time to emerging pandemics. There is considerable enthusiasm for the use of DNA vaccination as an approach, but this enthusiasm should be tempered by the successive failures in clinical trials to induce a potent immune response. The technology is evolving with the development of improved delivery systems that increase expression levels, particularly electroporation and the incorporation of genetically encoded adjuvants. This review will introduce some key concepts in the use of DNA plasmids as vaccines, including how the DNA enters the cell and is expressed, how it induces an immune response, and a summary of clinical trials with DNA vaccines. The review also explores the advances being made in vector design, delivery, formulation, and adjuvants to try to realize the promise of this technology for new vaccines. If the immunogenicity and expression barriers can be cracked, then DNA vaccines may offer a step change in mass vaccination.

  2. The Role of the Transcriptional Response to DNA Replication Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlihy, Anna E; de Bruin, Robertus A M

    2017-03-02

    During DNA replication many factors can result in DNA replication stress. The DNA replication stress checkpoint prevents the accumulation of replication stress-induced DNA damage and the potential ensuing genome instability. A critical role for post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, in the replication stress checkpoint response has been well established. However, recent work has revealed an important role for transcription in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. In this review, we will provide an overview of current knowledge of the cellular response to DNA replication stress with a specific focus on the DNA replication stress checkpoint transcriptional response and its role in the prevention of replication stress-induced DNA damage.

  3. Single molecule analysis of replicated DNA reveals the usage of multiple KSHV genome regions for latent replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash C Verma

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV, an etiologic agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, Body Cavity Based Lymphoma and Multicentric Castleman's Disease, establishes lifelong latency in infected cells. The KSHV genome tethers to the host chromosome with the help of a latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA. Additionally, LANA supports replication of the latent origins within the terminal repeats by recruiting cellular factors. Our previous studies identified and characterized another latent origin, which supported the replication of plasmids ex-vivo without LANA expression in trans. Therefore identification of an additional origin site prompted us to analyze the entire KSHV genome for replication initiation sites using single molecule analysis of replicated DNA (SMARD. Our results showed that replication of DNA can initiate throughout the KSHV genome and the usage of these regions is not conserved in two different KSHV strains investigated. SMARD also showed that the utilization of multiple replication initiation sites occurs across large regions of the genome rather than a specified sequence. The replication origin of the terminal repeats showed only a slight preference for their usage indicating that LANA dependent origin at the terminal repeats (TR plays only a limited role in genome duplication. Furthermore, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation for ORC2 and MCM3, which are part of the pre-replication initiation complex to determine the genomic sites where these proteins accumulate, to provide further characterization of potential replication initiation sites on the KSHV genome. The ChIP data confirmed accumulation of these pre-RC proteins at multiple genomic sites in a cell cycle dependent manner. Our data also show that both the frequency and the sites of replication initiation vary within the two KSHV genomes studied here, suggesting that initiation of replication is likely to be affected by the genomic context rather than the DNA

  4. Isolation of a minireplicon of the plasmid pG6303 of Lactobacillus plantarum G63 and characterization of the plasmid-encoded Rep replication protein

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jing Fan; Xuedong Xi; Yan Huang; Zhongli Cui

    2015-06-01

    A cryptic 10.0-kb plasmid pG6303 from a multiplasmid-containing Lactobacillus plantarum G63 was studied. The analysis of replicon was facilitated by the construction of shuttle vectors and electrotransformation into L. plantarum. The pG6303 replicon included (i) an open reading frame encoding the putative Rep replication initiation protein; and (ii) the putative origin of replication. The Rep protein was expressed as a fusion with the hexa-histidine (His) at its C-terminal end and purified by Ni-affinity chromatography. The electrophoretic mobility shift assays in pG6303 showed that the purified Rep protein specifically bound from 5582 to 5945 bp, differing from the putative origin of replication of pG6303. We speculate that pG6303 replication is a new mode of plasmid replication.

  5. Characterization of the replication region of the Bacillus subtilis plasmid pLS20 : a novel type of replicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, WJJ; De Boer, AJ; van Tongeren, S; Venema, G; Bron, S

    1995-01-01

    A 3.1 kb fragment of the large (~55 kb) Bacillus subtilis plasmid pLS20 containing all the information for autonomous replication was cloned and sequenced. In contrast to the parental plasmid, derived minireplicons were unstably maintained. Using deletion analysis the fragment essential and sufficie

  6. Protein switches identified from diverse insertion libraries created using S1 nuclease digestion of supercoiled-form plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullman, Jennifer; Guntas, Gurkan; Dumont, Matthew; Ostermeier, Marc

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate that S1 nuclease converts supercoiled plasmid DNA to unit-length, linear dsDNA through the creation of a single, double-stranded break in a plasmid molecule. These double-stranded breaks occur not only in the origin of replication near inverted repeats but also at a wide variety of locations throughout the plasmid. S1 nuclease exhibits this activity under conditions typically employed for the nuclease's single-stranded nuclease activity. Thus, S1 nuclease digestion of plasmid DNA, unlike analogous digestion with DNaseI, effectively halts after the first double-stranded break. This property makes easier the construction of large domain insertion libraries in which the goal is to insert linear DNA at a variety of locations throughout a plasmid. We used this property to create a library in which a circularly permuted TEM1 β-lactamase gene was inserted throughout a plasmid containing the gene encoding Escherichia coli ribose binding protein. Gene fusions that encode allosteric switch proteins in which ribose modulates β-lactamase catalytic activity were isolated from this library using a combination of a genetic selection and a screen.

  7. Organization of Replication of Ribosomal DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linskens, Maarten H.K.; Huberman, Joel A.

    1988-01-01

    Using recently developed replicon mapping techniques, we have analyzed the replication of the ribosomal DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results show that (i) the functional origin of replication colocalizes with an autonomously replicating sequence element previously mapped to the

  8. Dataset of plasmid DNA extraction using different magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rahnama

    2016-12-01

    MNPs were characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Finally, the overall efficiency of different MNPs (Fe3O4, Fe3O4/SiO2, Fe3O4/SiO2/TiO2 in plasmid DNA isolation was compared using gel electrophoresis analysis. The data supplied in this article supports the accompanying publication “Comparative study of three magnetic nano-particles (FeSO4, FeSO4/SiO2, FeSO4/SiO2/TiO2 in plasmid DNA extraction” (H. Rahnama, A. Sattarzadeh, F. Kazemi, N. Ahmadi, F. Sanjarian, Z. Zand, 2016 [1].

  9. Regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication and nuclear structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUJIARUI

    1999-01-01

    In eukaryote,nuclear structure is a key component for the functions of eukaryotic cells.More and more evidences show that the nuclear structure plays important role in regulating DNA replication.The nuclear structure provides a physical barrier for the replication licensing,participates in the decision where DNA replication initiates,and organizes replication proteins as replication factory for DNA replication.Through these works,new concepts on the regulation of DNA replication have emerged,which will be discussed in this minireview.

  10. Bacterial Mitosis: ParM of Plasmid R1 Moves Plasmid DNA by an Actin-like Insertional Polymerization Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Borch, Jonas; Dam, Mette

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial DNA segregation takes place in an active and ordered fashion. In the case of Escherichia coli plasmid R1, the partitioning system (par) separates paired plasmid copies and moves them to opposite cell poles. Here we address the mechanism by which the three components of the R1 par system...

  11. A novel type of replicative enzyme harbouring ATPase, primase and DNA polymerase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipps, Georg; Röther, Susanne; Hart, Christina; Krauss, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    Although DNA replication is a process common in all domains of life, primase and replicative DNA polymerase appear to have evolved independently in the bacterial domain versus the archaeal/eukaryal branch of life. Here, we report on a new type of replication protein that constitutes the first member of the DNA polymerase family E. The protein ORF904, encoded by the plasmid pRN1 from the thermoacidophile archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus, is a highly compact multifunctional enzyme with ATPase, primase and DNA polymerase activity. Recombinant purified ORF904 hydrolyses ATP in a DNA-dependent manner. Deoxynucleotides are preferentially used for the synthesis of primers ∼8 nucleotides long. The DNA polymerase activity of ORF904 synthesizes replication products of up to several thousand nucleotides in length. The primase and DNA polymerase activity are located in the N-terminal half of the protein, which does not show homology to any known DNA polymerase or primase. ORF904 constitutes a new type of replication enzyme, which could have evolved indepen dently from the eubacterial and archaeal/eukaryal proteins of DNA replication. PMID:12743045

  12. DNA repair in bacterial cultures and plasmid DNA exposed to infrared laser for treatment of pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Marciano, R. S.; Guimarães, O. R.; Polignano, G. A. C.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2013-06-01

    Biostimulation of tissues by low intensity lasers has been described on a photobiological basis and clinical protocols are recommended for treatment of various diseases, but their effects on DNA are controversial. The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of low intensity infrared laser exposure on survival and bacterial filamentation in Escherichia coli cultures, and induction of DNA lesions in bacterial plasmids. In E. coli cultures and plasmids exposed to an infrared laser at fluences used to treat pain, bacterial survival and filamentation and DNA lesions in plasmids were evaluated by electrophoretic profile. Data indicate that the infrared laser (i) increases survival of E. coli wild type in 24 h of stationary growth phase, (ii) induces bacterial filamentation, (iii) does not alter topological forms of plasmids and (iv) does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. A low intensity infrared laser at the therapeutic fluences used to treat pain can alter survival of E. coli wild type, induce filamentation in bacterial cells, depending on physiologic conditions and DNA repair, and induce DNA lesions other than single or double DNA strand breaks or alkali-labile sites, which are not targeted by exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase.

  13. Curing of plasmid pBMB28 from Bacillus thuringiensis YBT-020 using an unstable replication region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengxia; Zhu, Qian; Shang, Hui; Zhu, Yiguang; Sun, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar finitimus strain YBT-020 is the well-studied spore-crystal association (SCA) phenotypic strain, whose parasporal crystals adhere to spore after lysis of the mother cell. Its endogenous plasmids pBMB26 and pBMB28 were proved essential for this SCA phenotype. In our previous study, using conventional methods, pBMB26 cured derivative and both pBMB26 and pBMB28 cured derivative of YBT-020 were obtained. However, YBT-020 solely cured of pBMB28 could not be obtained. In this study, an unstable replication region of pBMB28 was identified and was used to construct an incompatible plasmid pRep28B. This incompatible plasmid was successfully used to cure plasmid pBMB28 and was easily eliminated through segregational instability under the optimum growth temperature of YBT-020. Therefore, an endogenous plasmid was cured from the B. thuringiensis strain utilizing plasmid incompatibility. Moreover, using an unstable replication region instead of a temperature sensitive (Ts) replication region is better to cure the incompatible plasmid because it can avoid culturing at higher temperature. This method provides an efficient method for plasmid curing in B. thuringiensis and other bacteria.

  14. Complexation Between Cationic Diblock Copolymers and Plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seyoung; Reineke, Theresa; Lodge, Timothy

    Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA), as polyanions, can spontaneously bind with polycations to form polyelectrolyte complexes. When the polycation is a diblock copolymer with one cationic block and one uncharged hydrophilic block, the polyelectrolyte complexes formed with plasmid DNA (pDNA) are often colloidally stable, and show great promise in the field of polymeric gene therapy. While the resulting properties (size, stability, and toxicity to biological systems) of the complexes have been studied for numerous cationic diblocks, the fundamentals of the pDNA-diblock binding process have not been extensively investigated. Herein, we report how the cationic block content of a diblock influences the pDNA-diblock interactions. pDNA with 7164 base pairs and poly(2-deoxy-2-methacrylamido glucopyranose)-block-poly(N-(2-aminoethyl) methacrylamide) (PMAG-b-PAEMA) are used as the model pDNA and cationic diblock, respectively. To vary the cationic block content, two PMAG-b-PAEMA copolymers with similar PMAG block lengths but distinct PAEMA block lengths and a PAEMA homopolymer are utilized. We show that the enthalpy change from pDNA-diblock interactions is dependent on the cationic diblock composition, and is closely associated with both the binding strength and the pDNA tertiary structure.

  15. P1 plasmid replication: initiator sequestration is inadequate to explain control by initiator-binding sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, S. K.; Chattoraj, D K

    1988-01-01

    The unit-copy plasmid replicon mini-P1 consists of an origin, a gene for an initiator protein, RepA, and a control locus, incA. Both the origin and the incA locus contain repeat sequences that bind RepA. It has been proposed that the incA repeats control replication by sequestering the rate-limiting RepA initiator protein. Here we show that when the concentration of RepA was increased about fourfold beyond its normal physiological level from an inducible source in trans, the copy number of a ...

  16. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-08-13

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress.

  17. DnaA and ORC : more than DNA replication initiators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholefield, Graham; Veening, Jan-Willem; Murray, Heath

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in DNA replication initiator genes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes lead to a pleiotropic array of phenotypes, including defects in chromosome segregation, cytokinesis, cell cycle regulation and gene expression. For years, it was not clear whether these diverse effects were indirect cons

  18. DnaA and ORC : more than DNA replication initiators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholefield, Graham; Veening, Jan-Willem; Murray, Heath

    Mutations in DNA replication initiator genes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes lead to a pleiotropic array of phenotypes, including defects in chromosome segregation, cytokinesis, cell cycle regulation and gene expression. For years, it was not clear whether these diverse effects were indirect

  19. DnaA and ORC : more than DNA replication initiators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholefield, Graham; Veening, Jan-Willem; Murray, Heath

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in DNA replication initiator genes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes lead to a pleiotropic array of phenotypes, including defects in chromosome segregation, cytokinesis, cell cycle regulation and gene expression. For years, it was not clear whether these diverse effects were indirect cons

  20. Choreography of bacteriophage T7 DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Joo; Richardson, Charles C

    2011-10-01

    The replication system of phage T7 provides a model for DNA replication. Biochemical, structural, and single-molecule analyses together provide insight into replisome mechanics. A complex of polymerase, a processivity factor, and helicase mediates leading strand synthesis. Establishment of the complex requires an interaction of the C-terminal tail of the helicase with the polymerase. During synthesis the complex is stabilized by other interactions to provide for a processivity of 5 kilobase (kb). The C-terminal tail also interacts with a distinct region of the polymerase to captures dissociating polymerase to increase the processivity to >17kb. The lagging strand is synthesized discontinuously within a loop that forms and resolves during each cycle of Okazaki fragment synthesis. The synthesis of a primer as well as the termination of a fragment signal loop resolution.

  1. On the scattering of DNA replication completion times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilikhov, E. Z.; Farzetdinova, R. M.

    2015-07-01

    Stochasticity of Eukaryotes' DNA replication should not lead to large fluctuations of replication times, which could result in mitotic catastrophes. Fundamental problem that cells face is how to be ensured that entire genome is replicated on time. We develop analytic approach of calculating DNA replication times, that being simplified and approximate, leads, nevertheless, to results practically coincident with those that were obtained by some sophisticated methods. In the framework of that model we consider replication times' scattering and discuss the influence of repair stopping on kinetics of DNA replication. Our main explicit formulae for DNA replication time t r ∝ ( N is the total number of DNA base pairs) is of general character and explains basic features of DNA replication kinetics.

  2. High-frequency transformation of a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii, with autonomously replicating plasmids which are also functional in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Y; Goh, T K; Tani, Y

    1993-06-01

    We have developed a transformation system which uses autonomous replicating plasmids for a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii. Two autonomous replication sequences, CARS1 and CARS2, were newly cloned from the genome of C. boidinii. Plasmids having both a CARS fragment and the C. boidinii URA3 gene transformed C. boidinii ura3 cells to Ura+ phenotype at frequencies of up to 10(4) CFU/micrograms of DNA. From Southern blot analysis, CARS plasmids seemed to exist in polymeric forms as well as in monomeric forms in C. boidinii cells. The C. boidinii URA3 gene was overexpressed in C. boidinii on these CARS vectors. CARS1 and CARS2 were found to function as an autonomous replicating element in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well. Different portions of the CARS1 sequence were needed for autonomous replicating activity in C. boidinii and S. cerevisiae. C. boidinii could also be transformed with vectors harboring a CARS fragment and the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene.

  3. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Three DNA polymerases — Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ — are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson–Crick base pairing and 3′exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to ‘polymerase proofreading associated polyposis’ (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an ‘ultramutator’ phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. PMID:24583393

  4. Temporal order of evolution of DNA replication systems inferred by comparison of cellular and viral DNA polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The core enzymes of the DNA replication systems show striking diversity among cellular life forms and more so among viruses. In particular, and counter-intuitively, given the central role of DNA in all cells and the mechanistic uniformity of replication, the core enzymes of the replication systems of bacteria and archaea (as well as eukaryotes are unrelated or extremely distantly related. Viruses and plasmids, in addition, possess at least two unique DNA replication systems, namely, the protein-primed and rolling circle modalities of replication. This unexpected diversity makes the origin and evolution of DNA replication systems a particularly challenging and intriguing problem in evolutionary biology. Results I propose a specific succession for the emergence of different DNA replication systems, drawing argument from the differences in their representation among viruses and other selfish replicating elements. In a striking pattern, the DNA replication systems of viruses infecting bacteria and eukaryotes are dominated by the archaeal-type B-family DNA polymerase (PolB whereas the bacterial replicative DNA polymerase (PolC is present only in a handful of bacteriophage genomes. There is no apparent mechanistic impediment to the involvement of the bacterial-type replication machinery in viral DNA replication. Therefore, I hypothesize that the observed, markedly unequal distribution of the replicative DNA polymerases among the known cellular and viral replication systems has a historical explanation. I propose that, among the two types of DNA replication machineries that are found in extant life forms, the archaeal-type, PolB-based system evolved first and had already given rise to a variety of diverse viruses and other selfish elements before the advent of the bacterial, PolC-based machinery. Conceivably, at that stage of evolution, the niches for DNA-viral reproduction have been already filled with viruses replicating with the

  5. A Novel Mechanism for Activator-Controlled Initiation of DNA Replication that Resolves the Auto-regulation Sequestration Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, K.; Ehrenberg, M.

    For bacterial genes to be inherited to the next bacterial generation, the gene containing DNA sequences must be duplicated before cell division so that each daughter cell contains a complete set of genes. The duplication process is called DNA replication and it starts at one defined site on the DNA molecule called the origin of replication (oriC) [1]. In addition to chromosomal DNA, bacteria often also contain plasmid DNA. Plasmids are extra-chromosomal DNA molecules carrying genes that increase the fitness of their host in certain environments, with genes encoding antibiotic resistance as a notorious example [2]. The chromosome is found at a low per cell copy number and initiation of replication takes place synchronously once every cell generation [3,4], while many plasmids exist at a high copy number and replication initiates asynchronously, throughout the cell generation [5]. In this chapter we present a novel mechanism for the control of initiation of replication, where one type of molecule may activate a round of replication by binding to the origin of replication and also regulate its own synthesis accurately. This mechanism of regulating the initiation of replication also offers a novel solution to the so-called auto-regulation sequestration paradox, i.e. how a molecule sequestered by binding to DNA may at the same time accurately regulate its own synthesis [6]. The novel regulatory mechanism is inspired by the molecular set-up of the replication control of the chromosome in the bacterium Escherichia coli and is here transferred into a plasmid model. This allows us to illustrate principles of replication control in a simple way and to put the novel mechanism into the context of a previous analysis of plasmids regulated by inhibitor-dilution copy number control [7]. We analyze factors important for a sensitive response of the replication initiation rate to changes in plasmid concentration in an asynchronous model and discover a novel mechanism for creating a

  6. Mammalian RAD52 Functions in Break-Induced Replication Repair of Collapsed DNA Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Kamileri, Irene; Lugli, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers are characterized by the presence of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress (DRS), making them dependent on repair pathways such as break-induced replication (BIR) for damaged DNA replication forks. To better understand BIR, we performed a targeted siRNA screen for genes whose depl...

  7. Mechanism of chromosomal DNA replication initiation and replication fork stabilization in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, LiHong; Liu, Yang; Kong, DaoChun

    2014-05-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication is one of the central biological events occurring inside cells. Due to its large size, the replication of genomic DNA in eukaryotes initiates at hundreds to tens of thousands of sites called DNA origins so that the replication could be completed in a limited time. Further, eukaryotic DNA replication is sophisticatedly regulated, and this regulation guarantees that each origin fires once per S phase and each segment of DNA gets duplication also once per cell cycle. The first step of replication initiation is the assembly of pre-replication complex (pre-RC). Since 1973, four proteins, Cdc6/Cdc18, MCM, ORC and Cdt1, have been extensively studied and proved to be pre-RC components. Recently, a novel pre-RC component called Sap1/Girdin was identified. Sap1/Girdin is required for loading Cdc18/Cdc6 to origins for pre-RC assembly in the fission yeast and human cells, respectively. At the transition of G1 to S phase, pre-RC is activated by the two kinases, cyclindependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), and subsequently, RPA, primase-polα, PCNA, topoisomerase, Cdc45, polδ, and polɛ are recruited to DNA origins for creating two bi-directional replication forks and initiating DNA replication. As replication forks move along chromatin DNA, they frequently stall due to the presence of a great number of replication barriers on chromatin DNA, such as secondary DNA structures, protein/DNA complexes, DNA lesions, gene transcription. Stalled forks must require checkpoint regulation for their stabilization. Otherwise, stalled forks will collapse, which results in incomplete DNA replication and genomic instability. This short review gives a concise introduction regarding the current understanding of replication initiation and replication fork stabilization.

  8. DNA replication origin activation in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkos, Michalis; Ganier, Olivier; Coulombe, Philippe; Méchali, Marcel

    2015-06-01

    DNA replication begins with the assembly of pre-replication complexes (pre-RCs) at thousands of DNA replication origins during the G1 phase of the cell cycle. At the G1-S-phase transition, pre-RCs are converted into pre-initiation complexes, in which the replicative helicase is activated, leading to DNA unwinding and initiation of DNA synthesis. However, only a subset of origins are activated during any S phase. Recent insights into the mechanisms underlying this choice reveal how flexibility in origin usage and temporal activation are linked to chromosome structure and organization, cell growth and differentiation, and replication stress.

  9. Scaling-up recombinant plasmid DNA for clinical trial: current concern, solution and status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ruzila; Allaudin, Zeenathul Nazariah; Lila, Mohd-Azmi Mohd

    2012-09-07

    Gene therapy and vaccines are rapidly developing field in which recombinant nucleic acids are introduced in mammalian cells for enhancement, restoration, initiation or silencing biochemical function. Beside simplicity in manipulation and rapid manufacture process, plasmid DNA-based vaccines have inherent features that make them promising vaccine candidates in a variety of diseases. This present review focuses on the safety concern of the genetic elements of plasmid such as propagation and expression units as well as their host genome for the production of recombinant plasmid DNA. The highlighted issues will be beneficial in characterizing and manufacturing plasmid DNA for save clinical use. Manipulation of regulatory units of plasmid will have impact towards addressing the safety concerns raised in human vaccine applications. The gene revolution with plasmid DNA by alteration of their plasmid and production host genetics will be promising for safe delivery and obtaining efficient outcomes.

  10. Uncoupling of Sister Replisomes during Eukaryotic DNA Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yardimci, Hasan; Loveland, Anna B.; Habuchi, Satoshi; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, Johannes C.

    2010-01-01

    The duplication of eukaryotic genomes involves the replication of DNA from multiple origins of replication. In S phase, two sister replisomes assemble at each active origin, and they replicate DNA in opposite directions. Little is known about the functional relationship between sister replisomes.

  11. Visualizing Single-molecule DNA Replication with Fluorescence Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.; Loparo, Joseph J.; Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2009-01-01

    We describe a simple fluorescence microscopy-based real-time method for observing DNA replication at the single-molecule level. A circular, forked DNA template is attached to a functionalized glass coverslip and replicated extensively after introduction of replication proteins and nucleotides. The

  12. Uncoupling of Sister Replisomes during Eukaryotic DNA Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yardimci, Hasan; Loveland, Anna B.; Habuchi, Satoshi; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, Johannes C.

    2010-01-01

    The duplication of eukaryotic genomes involves the replication of DNA from multiple origins of replication. In S phase, two sister replisomes assemble at each active origin, and they replicate DNA in opposite directions. Little is known about the functional relationship between sister replisomes. So

  13. Geminin: a major DNA replication safeguard in higher eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melixetian, Marina; Helin, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved multiple mechanisms to restrict DNA replication to once per cell cycle. These mechanisms prevent relicensing of origins of replication after initiation of DNA replication in S phase until the end of mitosis. Most of our knowledge of mechanisms controlling prereplication...

  14. Visualizing Single-molecule DNA Replication with Fluorescence Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.; Loparo, Joseph J.; Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2009-01-01

    We describe a simple fluorescence microscopy-based real-time method for observing DNA replication at the single-molecule level. A circular, forked DNA template is attached to a functionalized glass coverslip and replicated extensively after introduction of replication proteins and nucleotides. The g

  15. Geminin: a major DNA replication safeguard in higher eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melixetian, Marina; Helin, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved multiple mechanisms to restrict DNA replication to once per cell cycle. These mechanisms prevent relicensing of origins of replication after initiation of DNA replication in S phase until the end of mitosis. Most of our knowledge of mechanisms controlling prereplication...

  16. Prevention of DNA re-replication in eukaryotic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan N. Truong; Xiaohua Wu

    2011-01-01

    DNA replication is a highly regulated process involving a number of licensing and replication factors that function in a carefully orchestrated manner to faithfully replicate DNA during every cell cycle. Loss of proper licensing control leads to deregulated DNA replication including DNA re-replication, which can cause genome instability and tumorigenesis. Eukaryotic organisms have established several conserved mechanisms to prevent DNA re-replication and to counteract its potentially harmful effects. These mechanisms include tightly controlled regulation of licensing factors and activation of cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints.Deregulated licensing control and its associated compromised checkpoints have both been observed in tumor cells, indicating that proper functioning of these pathways is essential for maintaining genome stability. In this review, we discuss the regulatory mechanisms of licensing control, the deleterious consequences when both licensing and checkpoints are compromised, and present possible mechanisms to prevent re-replication in order to maintain genome stability.

  17. DNA transformations of Candida tropicalis with replicating and integrative vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanglard, D; Fiechter, A

    1992-12-01

    The alkane-assimilating yeast Candida tropicalis was used as a host for DNA transformations. A stable ade2 mutant (Ha900) obtained by UV-mutagenesis was used as a recipient for different vectors carrying selectable markers. A first vector, pMK16, that was developed for the transformation of C. albicans and carries an ADE2 gene marker and a Candida autonomously replicating sequence (CARS) element promoting autonomous replication, was compatible for transforming Ha900. Two transformant types were observed: (i) pink transformants which easily lose pMK16 under non-selective growth conditions; (ii) white transformants, in which the same plasmid exhibited a higher mitotic stability. In both cases pMK16 could be rescued from these cells in Escherichia coli. A second vector, pADE2, containing the isolated C. tropicalis ADE2, gene, was used to transform Ha900. This vector integrated in the yeast genome at homologous sites of the ade2 locus. Different integration types were observed at one or both ade2 alleles in single or in tandem repeats.

  18. Microneedle-mediated transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA coated on cationic PLGA nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Wonganan, Piyanuch; Sandoval, Michael A.; Li, Xinran; Zhu, Saijie; Cui, Zhengrong

    2012-01-01

    Previously, it was shown that microneedle-mediated transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA can potentially induce a stronger immune response than intramuscular injection of the same plasmid DNA. In the present study, we showed that the immune responses induced by transcutaneous immunization by applying plasmid DNA onto a skin area pretreated with solid microneedles were significantly enhanced by coating the plasmid DNA on the surface of cationic nanoparticles. In addition, the net surface charge of the DNA-coated nanoparticles significantly affected their in vitro skin permeation and their ability to induce immune responses in vivo. Transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA-coated net positively charged anoparticles elicited a stronger immune response than with plasmid DNA-coated net negatively charged nanoparticles or by intramuscular immunization with plasmid DNA alone. Transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA-coated net positively charged nanoparticles induced comparable immune responses as intramuscular injection of them, but transcutaneous immunization was able to induce specific mucosal immunity and a more balanced T helper type 1 and type 2 response. The ability of the net positively charged DNA-coated nanoparticles to induce a strong immune response through microneedle-mediated transcutaneous immunization may be attributed to their ability to increase the expression of the antigen gene encoded by the plasmid and to more effectively stimulate the maturation of antigen-presenting cells. PMID:22921518

  19. Loss of maintenance DNA methylation results in abnormal DNA origin firing during DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haruta, Mayumi [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Shimada, Midori, E-mail: midorism@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Nishiyama, Atsuya; Johmura, Yoshikazu [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Le Tallec, Benoît; Debatisse, Michelle [Institut Curie, Centre de Recherche, 26 rue d’Ulm, CNRS UMR 3244, 75248 ParisCedex 05 (France); Nakanishi, Makoto, E-mail: mkt-naka@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan)

    2016-01-22

    The mammalian maintenance methyltransferase DNMT1 [DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 1] mediates the inheritance of the DNA methylation pattern during replication. Previous studies have shown that depletion of DNMT1 causes a severe growth defect and apoptosis in differentiated cells. However, the detailed mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here we show that conditional ablation of Dnmt1 in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) resulted in an aberrant DNA replication program showing an accumulation of late-S phase replication and causing severely defective growth. Furthermore, we found that the catalytic activity and replication focus targeting sequence of DNMT1 are required for a proper DNA replication program. Taken together, our findings suggest that the maintenance of DNA methylation by DNMT1 plays a critical role in proper regulation of DNA replication in mammalian cells. - Highlights: • DNMT1 depletion results in an abnormal DNA replication program. • Aberrant DNA replication is independent of the DNA damage checkpoint in DNMT1cKO. • DNMT1 catalytic activity and RFT domain are required for proper DNA replication. • DNMT1 catalytic activity and RFT domain are required for cell proliferation.

  20. Loss of maintenance DNA methylation results in abnormal DNA origin firing during DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Mayumi; Shimada, Midori; Nishiyama, Atsuya; Johmura, Yoshikazu; Le Tallec, Benoît; Debatisse, Michelle; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2016-01-22

    The mammalian maintenance methyltransferase DNMT1 [DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 1] mediates the inheritance of the DNA methylation pattern during replication. Previous studies have shown that depletion of DNMT1 causes a severe growth defect and apoptosis in differentiated cells. However, the detailed mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here we show that conditional ablation of Dnmt1 in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) resulted in an aberrant DNA replication program showing an accumulation of late-S phase replication and causing severely defective growth. Furthermore, we found that the catalytic activity and replication focus targeting sequence of DNMT1 are required for a proper DNA replication program. Taken together, our findings suggest that the maintenance of DNA methylation by DNMT1 plays a critical role in proper regulation of DNA replication in mammalian cells.

  1. Plasmid DNA gene therapy by electroporation: principles and recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tatsufumi; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2011-12-01

    Simple plasmid DNA injection is a safe and feasible gene transfer method, but it confers low transfection efficiency and transgene expression. This non-viral gene transfer method is enhanced by physical delivery methods, such as electroporation and the use of a gene gun. In vivo electroporation has been rapidly developed over the last two decades to deliver DNA to various tissues or organs. It is generally considered that membrane permeabilization and DNA electrophoresis play important roles in electro-gene transfer. Skeletal muscle is a well characterized target tissue for electroporation, because it is accessible and allows for long-lasting gene expression ( > one year). Skin is also a target tissue because of its accessibility and immunogenicity. Numerous studies have been performed using in vivo electroporation in animal models of disease. Clinical trials of DNA vaccines and immunotherapy for cancer treatment using in vivo electroporation have been initiated in patients with melanoma and prostate cancer. Furthermore, electroporation has been applied to DNA vaccines for infectious diseases to enhance immunogenicity, and the relevant clinical trials have been initiated. The gene gun approach is also being applied for the delivery of DNA vaccines against infectious diseases to the skin. Here, we review recent advances in the mechanism of in vivo electroporation, and summarize the findings of recent preclinical and clinical studies using this technology.

  2. A transcription and translation-coupled DNA replication system using rolling-circle replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakatani, Yoshihiro; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Kazuta, Yasuaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-05-27

    All living organisms have a genome replication system in which genomic DNA is replicated by a DNA polymerase translated from mRNA transcribed from the genome. The artificial reconstitution of this genome replication system is a great challenge in in vitro synthetic biology. In this study, we attempted to construct a transcription- and translation-coupled DNA replication (TTcDR) system using circular genomic DNA encoding phi29 DNA polymerase and a reconstituted transcription and translation system. In this system, phi29 DNA polymerase was translated from the genome and replicated the genome in a rolling-circle manner. When using a traditional translation system composition, almost no DNA replication was observed, because the tRNA and nucleoside triphosphates included in the translation system significantly inhibited DNA replication. To minimize these inhibitory effects, we optimized the composition of the TTcDR system and improved replication by approximately 100-fold. Using our system, genomic DNA was replicated up to 10 times in 12 hours at 30 °C. This system provides a step toward the in vitro construction of an artificial genome replication system, which is a prerequisite for the construction of an artificial cell.

  3. Cis-acting elements in the lytic origin of DNA replication of Marek's disease virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumata, A; Iwata, A; Ueda, S

    1998-12-01

    The replication origin of Marek's disease virus (MDV) type 1 was analysed by using a transient replication assay with plasmids containing various fragments of MDV strain Md5 genomic DNA. Plasmid pMBH, containing the BamHI-H fragment, showed replication activity in MDV-infected chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF). By deletion analysis of pMBH, two regions, the promoter-enhancer region of the MDV pp38 gene and the 132 bp tandem direct repeat, were shown to be required for replication activity. Replication of pMBH was not observed in uninfected CEF, suggesting that a trans-acting factor(s) encoded by the MDV genome was necessary for replication.

  4. Bacterial mitosis: ParM of plasmid R1 moves plasmid DNA by an actin-like insertional polymerization mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Borch, Jonas; Dam, Mette; Jensen, Rasmus B; Roepstorff, Peter; Gerdes, Kenn

    2003-12-01

    Bacterial DNA segregation takes place in an active and ordered fashion. In the case of Escherichia coli plasmid R1, the partitioning system (par) separates paired plasmid copies and moves them to opposite cell poles. Here we address the mechanism by which the three components of the R1 par system act together to generate the force required for plasmid movement during segregation. ParR protein binds cooperatively to the centromeric parC DNA region, thereby forming a complex that interacts with the filament-forming actin-like ParM protein in an ATP-dependent manner, suggesting that plasmid movement is powered by insertional polymerization of ParM. Consistently, we find that segregating plasmids are positioned at the ends of extending ParM filaments. Thus, the process of R1 plasmid segregation in E. coli appears to be mechanistically analogous to the actin-based motility operating in eukaryotic cells. In addition, we find evidence suggesting that plasmid pairing is required for ParM polymerization.

  5. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Jyoti K; Li, Mi; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chattoraj, Dhruba

    2017-04-18

    Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2) depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB) to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations in rctB that reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid-the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition) when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding.IMPORTANCE The capacity of proteins to undergo remodeling provides opportunities to control their function. However, remodeling remains a poorly understood aspect of the structure-function paradigm due to its dynamic nature. Here we have studied remodeling of the initiator of replication of Vibrio cholerae Chr2 by the molecular chaperone, DnaK. We show that DnaK binds to a site on the Chr2 initiator (RctB) that promotes initiation by reducing

  6. Adsorption behavior of plasmid DNA onto perfusion chromatographic matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miladys LIMONTA; Lourdes ZUMALACARREGUI; Dayana SOLER

    2012-01-01

    Anion exchange chromatography is the most popular chromatographic method for plasmid separa-tion.POROS RI 50 is a perfusion chromatographic support which is a reversed phase matrix and is an alterna-tive to conventional ones due to its mass transfer properties.The adsorption and elution of the pIDKE2 plasmidonto reversed phase POROS RI 50 was studied.Langmuir isotherm model was adjusted in order to get the max-imum adsorption capacity and the dissociation constant for POROS RI 50-plasmid DNA (pDNA) system.Break-through curves were obtained for volumetric flows between 0.69-3.33mL/min,given dynamic capacity up to2.3 times higher than those reported for ionic exchange matrix used during the purification process of plasmidswith similar size to that of pIDKE2.The efficiency was less than 45% for the flow conditions and initial concen-tration studied,which means that the support will not be operated under saturation circumstances.

  7. Mapping vaccinia virus DNA replication origins at nucleotide level by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkevich, Tatiana G; Bruno, Daniel; Martens, Craig; Porcella, Stephen F; Wolf, Yuri I; Moss, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Poxviruses reproduce in the host cytoplasm and encode most or all of the enzymes and factors needed for expression and synthesis of their double-stranded DNA genomes. Nevertheless, the mode of poxvirus DNA replication and the nature and location of the replication origins remain unknown. A current but unsubstantiated model posits only leading strand synthesis starting at a nick near one covalently closed end of the genome and continuing around the other end to generate a concatemer that is subsequently resolved into unit genomes. The existence of specific origins has been questioned because any plasmid can replicate in cells infected by vaccinia virus (VACV), the prototype poxvirus. We applied directional deep sequencing of short single-stranded DNA fragments enriched for RNA-primed nascent strands isolated from the cytoplasm of VACV-infected cells to pinpoint replication origins. The origins were identified as the switching points of the fragment directions, which correspond to the transition from continuous to discontinuous DNA synthesis. Origins containing a prominent initiation point mapped to a sequence within the hairpin loop at one end of the VACV genome and to the same sequence within the concatemeric junction of replication intermediates. These findings support a model for poxvirus genome replication that involves leading and lagging strand synthesis and is consistent with the requirements for primase and ligase activities as well as earlier electron microscopic and biochemical studies implicating a replication origin at the end of the VACV genome.

  8. Direct Visualization of DNA Replication Dynamics in Zebrafish Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriya, Kenji; Higashiyama, Eriko; Avşar-Ban, Eriko; Tamaru, Yutaka; Ogata, Shin; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2015-12-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of DNA replication in the S-phase nucleus has been extensively studied in mammalian cells because it is tightly coupled with the regulation of other nuclear processes such as transcription. However, little is known about the replication dynamics in nonmammalian cells. Here, we analyzed the DNA replication processes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) cells through the direct visualization of replicating DNA in the nucleus and on DNA fiber molecules isolated from the nucleus. We found that zebrafish chromosomal DNA at the nuclear interior was replicated first, followed by replication of DNA at the nuclear periphery, which is reminiscent of the spatiotemporal regulation of mammalian DNA replication. However, the relative duration of interior DNA replication in zebrafish cells was longer compared to mammalian cells, possibly reflecting zebrafish-specific genomic organization. The rate of replication fork progression and ori-to-ori distance measured by the DNA combing technique were ∼ 1.4 kb/min and 100 kb, respectively, which are comparable to those in mammalian cells. To our knowledge, this is a first report that measures replication dynamics in zebrafish cells.

  9. The role of the adenovirus DNA binding protein in DNA replication and recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukelen, B. van

    2003-01-01

    Replication of adenovirus DNA in infected cells is an efficient process that, compared to cellular replication, has the use of a protein primer as a hallmark. The mechanism of this DNA replication process and especially the role of one of the replication proteins, the DNA binding protein DBP, is the

  10. Variety of molecular conformation of plasmid pUC18 DNA and solenoidally supercoiled DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄熙泰; 王照清; 吴永文; 樊廷玉; 王树荣; 王勖焜

    1996-01-01

    The plasmid pUC18 DNA isolated from Escherichia coli HB101 were analyzed by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis and hybridization. The results show that the DNA sample can be separated into six groups of different structural components. The plectonemically and solenoidally supercoiled pUC18 DNA coexist in it. These two different conformations of supercoiled DNA are interchangeable with the circumstances (ionic strength and type, etc.). The amount of solenoidally supercoiled pUC18 DNA in the samples can be changed by treatment of DNA topoisome rases. Under an electron microscope, the solenoidal supercoiling DNA has a round shape with an average diameter of 45 nm. The facts suggest that solenoidaUy supercoiled DNA be a structural entity independent of histones. The polymorphism of DNA structure may be important to packing of DNA in vivo.

  11. Entanglement Swapping Model of DNA Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Pusuluk, Onur

    2011-01-01

    Molecular biology explains function of molecules by their geometric and electronic structures which are mainly determined by utilization of quantum effects in chemistry. However, further quantum effects are not thought to play any significant role in the essential processes of life. On the contrary, consideration of quantum circuits/protocols and organic molecules as software and hardware of living systems that are co-optimized during evolution, may be useful to pass over the difficulties raised by biochemical complexity and to understand the physics of life. In this sense, we model DNA replication with a reliable qubit representation of the nucleotides: 1) molecular recognition of a nucleotide is assumed to trigger an intrabase entanglement corresponding to a superposition of different tautomer forms and 2) pairing of complementary nucleotides is described by swapping intrabase entanglements with interbase entanglements. We examine possible realizations of quantum circuits/protocols to be used to obtain intr...

  12. DNA instability in replicating Huntington's disease lymphoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frati Luigi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expanded CAG repeat in the Huntington's disease (HD gene may display tissue-specific variability (e.g. triplet mosaicism in repeat length, the longest mutations involving mitotic (germ and glial cells and postmitotic (neurons cells. What contributes to the triplet mutability underlying the development of HD nevertheless remains unknown. We investigated whether, besides the increased DNA instability documented in postmitotic neurons, possible environmental and genetic mechanisms, related to cell replication, may concur to determine CAG repeat mutability. To test this hypothesis we used, as a model, cultured HD patients' lymphoblasts with various CAG repeat lengths. Results Although most lymphoblastoid cell lines (88% showed little or no repeat instability even after six or more months culture, in lymphoblasts with large expansion repeats beyond 60 CAG repeats the mutation size and triplet mosaicism always increased during replication, implying that the repeat mutability for highly expanded mutations may quantitatively depend on the triplet expansion size. None of the investigated genetic factors, potentially acting in cis to the mutation, significantly influence the repeat changes. Finally, in our experiments certain drugs controlled triplet expansion in two prone-to-expand HD cell lines carrying large CAG mutations. Conclusion Our data support quantitative evidence that the inherited CAG length of expanded alleles has a major influence on somatic repeat variation. The longest triplet expansions show wide somatic variations and may offer a mechanistic model to study triplet drug-controlled instability and genetic factors influencing it.

  13. Properties of DnaB helicase in [lambda] DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    A tailed nicked-circle DNA substrate was used to measure the rapid replication fork (RF) movement catalyzed by E. Coli DnaB helicase and DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (pol III HE) (DnaB-RFs) (30 DnaB hexamers/substrate). The DnaB RFs can efficiently utilize the DNA substrate (60% in 5 min at 30C), and the forks move at a rapid rate (550-780 bp/sec at 30C). The DnaB-RFs have an average maximal processivity of 40,000 nt, and addition of either SSB or primase increase the processivity (150,000 nt + SSB, 70,000-140,000 nt + primase). However, SSB and primase do not affect the rate of fork movement or the amount of substrate utilized in the assay. The [lambda] SS proteins are effective at transferring DnaB onto the DNA substrate (8 DnaB hexamers/substrate). The [lambda] SS proteins do not change the rate of RF movement or the amount of substrate utilized. However, the amount of synthesis measured in the assay is [approximately]2-fold higher in the presence of the [lambda] SS proteins. Therefore, the [lambda] SS proteins increase the processivity of DnaB at the RF (100,000 nt). The [lambda] SS proteins do not appear to play a role in elongation because the processivity of the RF in the presence of SSB and primase is equivalent to the processivity of the [lambda] SS-RFs. [lambda] P protein blocks DnaB helicase activity if added to the RF assay prior to initiation or during elongation. DnaB helicase is more resistant to P inhibition, if the helicase is allowed to bind to the substrate prior to addition of [lambda] P or if primase and rNTPs are included in the assay. These results suggest that the conformation of the RF complex (DNA or nucleoprotein structure) blocks the attack of P on DnaB helicase. The heat shock proteins may play an auxiliary role in mediating the effects of [lambda] P if the concentration of P protein in the cells are high.

  14. Rapid isolation of plasmid DNA by LiCl-ethidium bromide treatment and gel filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, T; Mukai, M; Kondo, Y

    1991-10-01

    We established a simple and rapid plasmid DNA purification method. Crude plasmid DNA preparations are treated with 4 M LiCl in the presence of 0.6 mg/ml ethidium bromide to precipitate RNA and proteins contained in the DNA preparations. After removal of RNA and protein precipitates, the supernatant is filtered through a Sepharose CL6B column to remove low-molecular-weight contaminants. This procedure takes only 30 min and provides pure plasmid DNA preparations that consist mainly of covalently closed circular plasmid DNA but have no detectable RNA and protein. The purified DNA preparations are susceptible to various six- and four-base-recognition restriction endonucleases, T4 DNA ligase, the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I, and T7 and Taq DNA polymerase. Since no special equipment is needed for this purification method, 20 or more samples of microgram to milligram levels can be treated in parallel.

  15. Control of DNA replication by anomalous reaction-diffusion kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechhoefer, John; Gauthier, Michel

    2010-03-01

    DNA replication requires two distinct processes: the initiation of pre-licensed replication origins and the propagation of replication forks away from the fired origins. Experiments indicate that these origins are triggered over the whole genome at a rate I(t) (the number of initiations per unreplicated length per time) that increases throughout most of the synthesis (S) phase, before rapidly decreasing to zero at the end of the replication process. We propose a simple model for the control of DNA replication in which the rate of initiation of replication origins is controlled by protein-DNA interactions. Analyzing recent data from Xenopus frog embryos, we find that the initiation rate is reaction limited until nearly the end of replication, when it becomes diffusion limited. Initiation of origins is suppressed when the diffusion-limited search time dominates. To fit the experimental data, we find that the interaction between DNA and the rate-limiting protein must be subdiffusive.

  16. Replication of adenovirus DNA-protein complex with purified proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, J E; Enomoto, T.; Hurwitz, J

    1981-01-01

    A protein fraction isolated from the cytosol of adenovirus-infected HeLa cells, which contained DNA polymerase alpha, catalyzed adenoviral DNA replication in the presence of adenovirus DNA binding protein, eukaryotic DNA polymerase beta, ATP, all four dNTPs, and MgCl2. DNA replication started at either end of exogenously added adenoviral DNA and was totally dependent on the presence of terminal 55,000-dalton proteins on the DNA template. The replicaton of adenovirus DNA in the system was sens...

  17. Identification of the minimal replicon and the origin of replication of the crenarchaeal plasmid pRN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkner, Silvia; Hinojosa, Mery Pina; Prangishvili, David; Lipps, Georg

    2014-10-01

    We have determined the minimal replicon of the crenarchaeal plasmid pRN1. It consists of 3097 base pairs amounting to 58% of the genome of pRN1. The minimal replicon comprises replication operon orf56/orf904 coding for a transcriptional repressor and the replication protein of pRN1. An upstream region of 64 bp that contains the promoter of the replication operon is essential as well as 166 bp of sequence downstream of the orf904 gene. This region contains a putative transcriptional terminator and a 100 nucleotides long stem-loop structure. Only the latter structure was shown to be required for replication. In addition replication was sustained when the stem-loop was displaced to another part of the pRN1 sequence. By mutational analysis we also find that the integrity of the stem-loop structure is required to maintain the replication of pRN1-derived constructs. As similar stem-loop structures are also present in other members of the pRN family, we suggest that this conserved structural element could be the origin of replication for the pRN plasmids. Further bioinformatic analysis revealed that the domain structure of the replication protein and the presence of a similar stem-loop structure as the putative replication origin are also found in several bacteriophages.

  18. Single molecule analysis of Trypanosoma brucei DNA replication dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderano, Simone Guedes; Drosopoulos, William C; Quaresma, Marina Mônaco; Marques, Catarina A; Kosiyatrakul, Settapong; McCulloch, Richard; Schildkraut, Carl L; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-03-11

    Eukaryotic genome duplication relies on origins of replication, distributed over multiple chromosomes, to initiate DNA replication. A recent genome-wide analysis of Trypanosoma brucei, the etiological agent of sleeping sickness, localized its replication origins to the boundaries of multigenic transcription units. To better understand genomic replication in this organism, we examined replication by single molecule analysis of replicated DNA. We determined the average speed of replication forks of procyclic and bloodstream form cells and we found that T. brucei DNA replication rate is similar to rates seen in other eukaryotes. We also analyzed the replication dynamics of a central region of chromosome 1 in procyclic forms. We present evidence for replication terminating within the central part of the chromosome and thus emanating from both sides, suggesting a previously unmapped origin toward the 5' extremity of chromosome 1. Also, termination is not at a fixed location in chromosome 1, but is rather variable. Importantly, we found a replication origin located near an ORC1/CDC6 binding site that is detected after replicative stress induced by hydroxyurea treatment, suggesting it may be a dormant origin activated in response to replicative stress. Collectively, our findings support the existence of more replication origins in T. brucei than previously appreciated.

  19. ClpP/ClpX-mediated degradation of the bacteriophage lambda O protein and regulation of lambda phage and lambda plasmid replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, A; Czyz, A; Gabig, M; Wegrzyn, G

    2000-01-01

    The O protein is a replication initiator that binds to the orilambda region and promotes assembly of the bacteriophage lambda replication complex. This protein, although protected from proteases by other elements of the replication complex, in a free form is rapidly degraded in the host, Escherichia coli, by the ClpP/ClpX protease. Nevertheless, the physiological role of this rapid degradation remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the copy number of plasmids derived from bacteriophage lambda is significantly higher in wild-type cells growing in rich media than in slowly growing bacteria. However, lambda plasmid copy number in bacteria devoid of the ClpP/ClpX protease was not dependent on the bacterial growth rate and in all minimal media tested was comparable to that observed in wildtype cells growing in a rich medium. Contrary to lambda plasmid replication, the efficiency of lytic growth of bacteriophage lambda was found to be dependent on the host growth rate in both wild-type bacteria and clpP and clpX mutants. The activities of two major lambda promoters operating during the lytic development, p(R) and p(L), were found to be slightly dependent on the host growth rate. However, when p(R) activity was significantly decreased in the dnaA mutant, production of phage progeny was completely abolished at low growth rates. These results indicate that the O protein (whose level in E. coli cells depends on the activity of ClpP/ClpX protease) is a major limiting factor in the regulation of lambda plasmid replication at low bacterial growth rates. However, this protein seems to be only one of the limiting factors in the bacteriophage lambda lytic development under poor growth conditions of host cells. Therefore, it seems that the role of the rapid ClpP/ClpX-mediated proteolysis of the O protein is to decrease the efficiency of early DNA replication of the phage in slowly growing host cells.

  20. A Simple and Inexpensive Method for Sending Binary Vector Plasmid DNA by Mail

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe a simple cost-effective technique for the transport of plasmid DNA by mail. Our results demonstrate that common multipurpose printing paper is a satisfactory substrate and superior to the more absorbent 3MM chromatography paper for the transport of plasmid DNA through the U.S. first clas...

  1. DNA vaccine initiates replication of live attenuated chikungunya virus in vitro and elicits protective immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakova, Irina; Hearn, Jason; Wang, Eryu; Weaver, Scott; Pushko, Peter

    2014-06-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes outbreaks of chikungunya fever worldwide and represents an emerging pandemic threat. Vaccine development against CHIKV has proved challenging. Currently there is no approved vaccine or specific therapy for the disease. To develop novel experimental CHIKV vaccine, we used novel immunization DNA (iDNA) infectious clone technology, which combines the advantages of DNA and live attenuated vaccines. Here we describe an iDNA vaccine composed of plasmid DNA that encode the full-length infectious genome of live attenuated CHIKV clone 181/25 downstream from a eukaryotic promoter. The iDNA approach was designed to initiate replication of live vaccine virus from the plasmid in vitro and in vivo. Experimental CHIKV iDNA vaccines were prepared and evaluated in cultured cells and in mice. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA was sufficient to initiate replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 10 μg of CHIKV iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion, elicitation of neutralizing antibodies, and protection from experimental challenge with a neurovirulent CHIKV. Live attenuated CHIKV 181/25 vaccine can be delivered in vitro and in vivo by using DNA vaccination. The iDNA approach appears to represent a promising vaccination strategy for CHIK and other alphaviral diseases. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Microcin B17 blocks DNA replication and induces the SOS system in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, M; Moreno, F

    1986-02-01

    Microcin B17 is a novel peptide antibiotic of low Mr (about 4000) produced by Escherichia coli strains carrying plasmid pMccB17. The action of this microcin in sensitive cells is essentially irreversible, follows single-hit kinetics, and leads to an abrupt arrest of DNA replication and, consequently, to the induction of the SOS response. RecA- and RecBC- strains are hypersensitive to microcin B17. Strains producing a non-cleavable SOS repressor (lexAl mutant) are also more sensitive than wild-type, whereas strains carrying a mutation which causes constitutive expression of the SOS response (spr-55) are less sensitive to microcin. Microcin B17 does not induce the SOS response in cells which do not have an active replication fork. The results suggest that the mode of action of this microcin is different from all other well-characterized microcins and colicins, and from other antibiotics which inhibit DNA replication.

  3. Molecular architecture of the preinitiation complex in adenovirus DNA replication

    OpenAIRE

    Mysiak, Monika Elzbieta

    2004-01-01

    After infection of a host cell, adenovirus (Ad) aims for generation of progeny viruses, and thus it rapidly replicates its genomic DNA. The replication process starts with the assembly of the preinitiation complex (PIC) on the origin DNA. The PIC consists of three viral proteins, DNA polymerase (pol), precursor terminal protein (pTP), DNA binding protein (DBP) and two transcription factors of the host cell, Nuclear Factor I (NFI) and Octamer binding protein (Oct-1). Both transcription factors...

  4. Long inverted repeat transiently stalls DNA replication by forming hairpin structures on both leading and lagging strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Pey Jiun; Lim, Chew Theng; Le, Hang Phuong; Katayama, Tsutomu; Leach, David R F; Furukohri, Asako; Maki, Hisaji

    2016-02-01

    Long inverted repeats (LIRs), often found in eukaryotic genomes, are unstable in Escherichia coli where they are recognized by the SbcCD (the bacterial Mre11/Rad50 homologue), an endonuclease/exonuclease capable of cleaving hairpin DNA. It has long been postulated that LIRs form hairpin structures exclusively on the lagging-strand template during DNA replication, and SbcCD cleaves these hairpin-containing lagging strands to generate DNA double-strand breaks. Using a reconstituted oriC plasmid DNA replication system, we have examined how a replication fork behaves when it meets a LIR on DNA. We have shown that leading-strand synthesis stalls transiently within the upstream half of the LIR. Pausing of lagging-strand synthesis at the LIR was not clearly observed, but the pattern of priming sites for Okazaki fragment synthesis was altered within the downstream half of the LIR. We have found that the LIR on a replicating plasmid was cleaved by SbcCD with almost equal frequency on both the leading- and lagging-strand templates. These data strongly suggest that the LIR is readily converted to a cruciform DNA, before the arrival of the fork, creating SbcCD-sensitive hairpin structures on both leading and lagging strands. We propose a model for the replication-dependent extrusion of LIRs to form cruciform structures that transiently impede replication fork movement.

  5. Anaphase onset before complete DNA replication with intact checkpoint responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres-Rosell, Jordi; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Cordon-Preciado, Violeta

    2007-01-01

    Cellular checkpoints prevent mitosis in the presence of stalled replication forks. Whether checkpoints also ensure the completion of DNA replication before mitosis is unknown. Here, we show that in yeast smc5-smc6 mutants, which are related to cohesin and condensin, replication is delayed, most...

  6. Eukaryotic Mismatch Repair in Relation to DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Thomas A; Erie, Dorothy A

    2015-01-01

    Three processes act in series to accurately replicate the eukaryotic nuclear genome. The major replicative DNA polymerases strongly prevent mismatch formation, occasional mismatches that do form are proofread during replication, and rare mismatches that escape proofreading are corrected by mismatch repair (MMR). This review focuses on MMR in light of increasing knowledge about nuclear DNA replication enzymology and the rate and specificity with which mismatches are generated during leading- and lagging-strand replication. We consider differences in MMR efficiency in relation to mismatch recognition, signaling to direct MMR to the nascent strand, mismatch removal, and the timing of MMR. These studies are refining our understanding of relationships between generating and repairing replication errors to achieve accurate replication of both DNA strands of the nuclear genome.

  7. Mitochondrial swinger replication: DNA replication systematically exchanging nucleotides and short 16S ribosomal DNA swinger inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2014-11-01

    Assuming systematic exchanges between nucleotides (swinger RNAs) resolves genomic 'parenthood' of some orphan mitochondrial transcripts. Twenty-three different systematic nucleotide exchanges (bijective transformations) exist. Similarities between transcription and replication suggest occurrence of swinger DNA. GenBank searches for swinger DNA matching the 23 swinger versions of human and mouse mitogenomes detect only vertebrate mitochondrial swinger DNA for swinger type AT+CG (from five different studies, 149 sequences) matching three human and mouse mitochondrial genes: 12S and 16S ribosomal RNAs, and cytochrome oxidase subunit I. Exchange AT+CG conserves self-hybridization properties, putatively explaining swinger biases for rDNA, against protein coding genes. Twenty percent of the regular human mitochondrial 16S rDNA consists of short swinger repeats (from 13 exchanges). Swinger repeats could originate from recombinations between regular and swinger DNA: duplicated mitochondrial genes of the parthenogenetic gecko Heteronotia binoei include fewer short AT+CG swinger repeats than non-duplicated mitochondrial genomes of that species. Presumably, rare recombinations between female and male mitochondrial genes (and in parthenogenetic situations between duplicated genes), favors reverse-mutations of swinger repeat insertions, probably because most inserts affect negatively ribosomal function. Results show that swinger DNA exists, and indicate that swinger polymerization contributes to the genesis of genetic material and polymorphism.

  8. Replication stress activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Ying, Songmin; Bjerregaard, Victoria A

    2015-01-01

    mitosis serves as the trigger for completion of DNA replication at CFS loci in human cells. Given that this POLD3-dependent mitotic DNA synthesis is enhanced in aneuploid cancer cells that exhibit intrinsically high levels of chromosomal instability (CIN(+)) and replicative stress, we suggest...

  9. Functional interactions of DNA topoisomerases with a human replication origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurashidova, Gulnara; Radulescu, Sorina; Sandoval, Oscar; Zahariev, Sotir; Danailov, Miltcho B; Demidovich, Alexander; Santamaria, Laura; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Riva, Silvano; Falaschi, Arturo

    2007-02-21

    The human DNA replication origin, located in the lamin B2 gene, interacts with the DNA topoisomerases I and II in a cell cycle-modulated manner. The topoisomerases interact in vivo and in vitro with precise bonds ahead of the start sites of bidirectional replication, within the pre-replicative complex region; topoisomerase I is bound in M, early G1 and G1/S border and topoisomerase II in M and the middle of G1. The Orc2 protein competes for the same sites of the origin bound by either topoisomerase in different moments of the cell cycle; furthermore, it interacts on the DNA with topoisomerase II during the assembly of the pre-replicative complex and with DNA-bound topoisomerase I at the G1/S border. Inhibition of topoisomerase I activity abolishes origin firing. Thus, the two topoisomerases are closely associated with the replicative complexes, and DNA topology plays an essential functional role in origin activation.

  10. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Lynn C; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2016-09-13

    Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion. Bacteriophage homologous recombination systems are widely used for in vivo genetic engineering in bacteria. Single- or double-stranded linear DNA substrates containing short flanking homologies to chromosome targets are used to generate precise and accurate genetic modifications when introduced into bacteria expressing phage recombinases. Understanding the molecular mechanism of these recombination systems will facilitate improvements in the technology. Here, two phage-specific systems are shown to require exposure of complementary single-strand homologous targets for efficient recombination; these single

  11. Separation of topological forms of plasmid DNA by anion-exchange HPLC: shifts in elution order of linear DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clara R; DePrince, Randolph B; Dackor, Jennifer; Weigl, Debra; Griffith, Jack; Persmark, Magnus

    2007-07-01

    We sought to establish a single anion-exchange HPLC method for the separation of linear, open circular and supercoiled plasmid topoisomers using purified topoisomeric forms of three plasmids (3.0, 5.5 and 7.6 kb). However, finding one condition proved elusive as the topoisomer elution order was determined to depend on salt gradient slope. The observed change in selectivity increased with plasmid size and was most pronounced for the linear form. Indeed, the elution order of the linear 7.6 kb plasmid was reversed relative to the supercoiled form. This observation may have implications for methods used in quality control of plasmid DNA.

  12. Enzymes involved in organellar DNA replication in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eMoriyama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Plastids and mitochondria possess their own genomes. Although the replication mechanisms of these organellar genomes remain unclear in photosynthetic eukaryotes, several organelle-localized enzymes related to genome replication, including DNA polymerase, DNA primase, DNA helicase, DNA topoisomerase, single-stranded DNA maintenance protein, DNA ligase, primer removal enzyme, and several DNA recombination-related enzymes, have been identified. In the reference Eudicot plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the replication-related enzymes of plastids and mitochondria are similar because many of them are dual targeted to both organelles, whereas in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, plastids and mitochondria contain different replication machinery components. The enzymes involved in organellar genome replication in green plants and red algae were derived from different origins, including proteobacterial, cyanobacterial, and eukaryotic lineages. In the present review, we summarize the available data for enzymes related to organellar genome replication in green plants and red algae. In addition, based on the type and distribution of replication enzymes in photosynthetic eukaryotes, we discuss the transitional history of replication enzymes in the organelles of plants.

  13. Optimizing hyaluronidase dose and plasmid DNA delivery greatly improves gene electrotransfer efficiency in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Vedel, Kenneth; Needham Andersen, Josefine

    2015-01-01

    Transfection of rat skeletal muscle in vivo is a widely used research model. However, gene electrotransfer protocols have been developed for mice and yield variable results in rats. We investigated whether changes in hyaluronidase pre-treatment and plasmid DNA delivery can improve transfection...... efficiency in rat skeletal muscle. We found that pre-treating the muscle with a hyaluronidase dose suitable for rats (0.56. U/g b.w.) prior to plasmid DNA injection increased transfection efficiency by >200% whereas timing of the pre-treatment did not affect efficiency. Uniformly distributing plasmid DNA...... delivery across the muscle by increasing the number of plasmid DNA injections further enhanced transfection efficiency whereas increasing plasmid dose from 0.2 to 1.6. μg/g b.w. or vehicle volume had no effect. The optimized protocol resulted in ~80% (CI95%: 79-84%) transfected muscle fibers...

  14. Platinum nanoparticles induce damage to DNA and inhibit DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejdl, Lukas; Kudr, Jiri; Moulick, Amitava; Hegerova, Dagmar; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Gumulec, Jaromir; Cihalova, Kristyna; Smerkova, Kristyna; Dostalova, Simona; Krizkova, Sona; Novotna, Marie; Kopel, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Sparsely tested group of platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) may have a comparable effect as complex platinum compounds. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of PtNPs in in vitro amplification of DNA fragment of phage λ, on the bacterial cultures (Staphylococcus aureus), human foreskin fibroblasts and erythrocytes. In vitro synthesized PtNPs were characterized by dynamic light scattering (PtNPs size range 4.8–11.7 nm), zeta potential measurements (-15 mV at pH 7.4), X-ray fluorescence, UV/vis spectrophotometry and atomic absorption spectrometry. The PtNPs inhibited the DNA replication and affected the secondary structure of DNA at higher concentrations, which was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing and DNA denaturation experiments. Further, cisplatin (CisPt), as traditional chemotherapy agent, was used in all parallel experiments. Moreover, the encapsulation of PtNPs in liposomes (LipoPtNPs) caused an approximately 2.4x higher of DNA damage in comparison with CisPt, LipoCisPt and PtNPs. The encapsulation of PtNPs in liposomes also increased their antibacterial, cytostatic and cytotoxic effect, which was determined by the method of growth curves on S. aureus and HFF cells. In addition, both the bare and encapsulated PtNPs caused lower oxidative stress (determined by GSH/GSSG ratio) in the human erythrocytes compared to the bare and encapsulated CisPt. CisPt was used in all parallel experiments as traditional chemotherapy agent. PMID:28704436

  15. Limiting DNA replication to once and only once

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    In Escherichia coli cells, the origin of chromosomal replication is temporarily inactivated after initiation has occurred. Origin sequestration is the first line of defence against over-initiation, providing a time window during which the initiation potential can be reduced by: (i) titration of DnaA proteins to newly replicated chromosomal elements; (ii) regulation of the activity of the DnaA initiator protein; and (iii) sequestration of the dnaA gene promoter. This review represents the firs...

  16. The hunt for origins of DNA replication in multicellular eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, J. M.; Foulk, M. S.; Casella, Cinzia;

    2015-01-01

    Origins of DNA replication (ORIs) occur at defined regions in the genome. Although DNA sequence defines the position of ORIs in budding yeast, the factors for ORI specification remain elusive in metazoa. Several methods have been used recently to map ORIs in metazoan genomes with the hope...... that features for ORI specification might emerge. These methods are reviewed here with analysis of their advantages and shortcomings. The various factors that may influence ORI selection for initiation of DNA replication are discussed....

  17. Low-dose plasmid DNA treatment increases plasma vasopressin and regulates blood pressure in experimental endotoxemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malardo Thiago

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although plasmid DNA encoding an antigen from pathogens or tumor cells has been widely studied as vaccine, the use of plasmid vector (without insert as therapeutic agent requires further investigation. Results Here, we showed that plasmid DNA (pcDNA3 at low doses inhibits the production of IL-6 and TNF-α by lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated macrophage cell line J774. These findings led us to evaluate whether plasmid DNA could act as an anti-inflammatory agent in a Wistar rat endotoxemia model. Rats injected simultaneously with 1.5 mg/kg of LPS and 10 or 20 μg of plasmid DNA had a remarkable attenuation of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP drop at 2 hours after treatment when compared with rats injected with LPS only. The beneficial effect of the plasmid DNA on MAP was associated with decreased expression of IL-6 in liver and increased concentration of plasma vasopressin (AVP, a known vasoconstrictor that has been investigated in hemorrhagic shock management. No difference was observed in relation to nitric oxide (NO production. Conclusion Our results demonstrate for the first time that plasmid DNA vector at low doses presents anti-inflammatory property and constitutes a novel approach with therapeutic potential in inflammatory diseases.

  18. NCOA4 transcriptional coactivator inhibits activation of DNA replication origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellelli, Roberto; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Guida, Teresa; Limongello, Roberto; Dathan, Nina Alayne; Merolla, Francesco; Cirafici, Anna Maria; Affuso, Andrea; Masai, Hisao; Costanzo, Vincenzo; Grieco, Domenico; Fusco, Alfredo; Santoro, Massimo; Carlomagno, Francesca

    2014-07-01

    NCOA4 is a transcriptional coactivator of nuclear hormone receptors that undergoes gene rearrangement in human cancer. By combining studies in Xenopus laevis egg extracts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), we show here that NCOA4 is a minichromosome maintenance 7 (MCM7)-interacting protein that is able to control DNA replication. Depletion-reconstitution experiments in Xenopus laevis egg extracts indicate that NCOA4 acts as an inhibitor of DNA replication origin activation by regulating CMG (CDC45/MCM2-7/GINS) helicase. NCOA4(-/-) MEFs display unscheduled origin activation and reduced interorigin distance; this results in replication stress, as shown by the presence of fork stalling, reduction of fork speed, and premature senescence. Together, our findings indicate that NCOA4 acts as a regulator of DNA replication origins that helps prevent inappropriate DNA synthesis and replication stress.

  19. USP7 is a SUMO deubiquitinase essential for DNA replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecona, Emilio; Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; Specks, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like modifiers regulates DNA replication. We have previously shown that chromatin around replisomes is rich in SUMO and poor in Ub, whereas mature chromatin exhibits an opposite pattern. How this SUMO-rich, Ub-poor environment...... is maintained at sites of DNA replication in mammalian cells remains unexplored. Here we identify USP7 as a replisome-enriched SUMO deubiquitinase that is essential for DNA replication. By acting on SUMO and SUMOylated proteins, USP7 counteracts their ubiquitination. Inhibition or genetic deletion of USP7 leads...... to the accumulation of Ub on SUMOylated proteins, which are displaced away from replisomes. Our findings provide a model explaining the differential accumulation of SUMO and Ub at replication forks and identify an essential role of USP7 in DNA replication that should be considered in the development of USP7...

  20. The sub-cellular localization of Sulfolobus DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gristwood, Tamzin; Duggin, Iain G; Wagner, Michaela; Albers, Sonja V; Bell, Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    Analyses of the DNA replication-associated proteins of hyperthermophilic archaea have yielded considerable insight into the structure and biochemical function of these evolutionarily conserved factors. However, little is known about the regulation and progression of DNA replication in the context of archaeal cells. In the current work, we describe the generation of strains of Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that allow the incorporation of nucleoside analogues during DNA replication. We employ this technology, in conjunction with immunolocalization analyses of replisomes, to investigate the sub-cellular localization of nascent DNA and replisomes. Our data reveal a peripheral localization of replisomes in the cell. Furthermore, while the two replication forks emerging from any one of the three replication origins in the Sulfolobus chromosome remain in close proximity, the three origin loci are separated.

  1. USP7 is a SUMO deubiquitinase essential for DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecona, Emilio; Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; Specks, Julia; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J; Ruppen, Isabel; Murga, Matilde; Muñoz, Javier; Mendez, Juan; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like modifiers regulates DNA replication. We have previously shown that chromatin around replisomes is rich in SUMO and poor in Ub, whereas mature chromatin exhibits an opposite pattern. How this SUMO-rich, Ub-poor environment is maintained at sites of DNA replication in mammalian cells remains unexplored. Here we identify USP7 as a replisome-enriched SUMO deubiquitinase that is essential for DNA replication. By acting on SUMO and SUMOylated proteins, USP7 counteracts their ubiquitination. Inhibition or genetic deletion of USP7 leads to the accumulation of Ub on SUMOylated proteins, which are displaced away from replisomes. Our findings provide a model explaining the differential accumulation of SUMO and Ub at replication forks and identify an essential role of USP7 in DNA replication that should be considered in the development of USP7 inhibitors as anticancer agents.

  2. Mcm10 regulates DNA replication elongation by stimulating the CMG replicative helicase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lõoke, Marko; Maloney, Michael F.; Bell, Stephen P.

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the Mcm2–7 replicative DNA helicase is the committed step in eukaryotic DNA replication initiation. Although Mcm2–7 activation requires binding of the helicase-activating proteins Cdc45 and GINS (forming the CMG complex), an additional protein, Mcm10, drives initial origin DNA unwinding by an unknown mechanism. We show that Mcm10 binds a conserved motif located between the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide fold (OB-fold) and A subdomain of Mcm2. Although buried in the interface between these domains in Mcm2–7 structures, mutations predicted to separate the domains and expose this motif restore growth to conditional-lethal MCM10 mutant cells. We found that, in addition to stimulating initial DNA unwinding, Mcm10 stabilizes Cdc45 and GINS association with Mcm2–7 and stimulates replication elongation in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, we identified a lethal allele of MCM10 that stimulates initial DNA unwinding but is defective in replication elongation and CMG binding. Our findings expand the roles of Mcm10 during DNA replication and suggest a new model for Mcm10 function as an activator of the CMG complex throughout DNA replication. PMID:28270517

  3. RAD52 Facilitates Mitotic DNA Synthesis Following Replication Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhowmick, Rahul; Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Hickson, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is necessary to counteract DNA replication stress. Common fragile site (CFS) loci are particularly sensitive to replication stress and undergo pathological rearrangements in tumors. At these loci, replication stress frequently activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis....... This mitotic DNA synthesis, termed MiDAS, requires the MUS81-EME1 endonuclease and a non-catalytic subunit of the Pol-delta complex, POLD3. Here, we examine the contribution of HR factors in promoting MiDAS in human cells. We report that RAD51 and BRCA2 are dispensable for MiDAS but are required to counteract...

  4. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research.

  5. Molecular cloning with bifunctional plasmid vectors in Bacillus subtilis: isolation of a spontaneous mutant of Bacillus subtilis with enhanced transformability for Escherichia coli-propagated chimeric plasmid DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Ostroff, G. R.; Pène, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Hybrid plasmid DNA cloned in Escherichia coli undergoes deletions when returned to competent Bacillus subtilis, even in defined restriction and modification mutants of strain 168. We have isolated a mutant of B. subtilis MI112 which is stably transformed at high frequency by chimeric plasmid DNA propagated in E. coli.

  6. Differential interactions of plasmid DNA, RNA and genomic DNA with amino acid-based affinity matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Angela; Sousa, Fani; Queiroz, João A

    2010-09-01

    The development of a strategy to plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification has become necessary for the development of gene therapy and DNA vaccine production processes in recent years, since this nucleic acid and most of contaminants, such as RNA, genomic DNA and endotoxins, are negatively charged. An ideal separation methodology may be achieved with the use of affinity interactions between immobilized amino acids and nucleic acids. In this study, the binding behaviour of nucleic acids under the influence of different environmental conditions, such as the composition and ionic strength of elution buffer, and the temperature, is compared with various amino acids immobilized on chromatography resins. Supercoiled (sc) plasmid isoform was isolated with all matrices used, but in some cases preferential interactions with other nucleic acids were found. Particularly, lysine chromatography showed to be an ideal technology mainly on RNA purification using low salt concentration. On the other hand, arginine ligands have shown a greater ability to retain the sc isoform comparatively to the other nucleic acids retention, becoming this support more adequate to sc pDNA purification. The temperature variation, competitive elution and oligonucleotides affinity studies also allowed to recognize the dominant interactions inherent to biorecognition of pDNA molecule and the affinity matrices.

  7. Homology and repair of UV-irradiated plasmid DNA in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrea-Juarez, E.; Setlow, J.K.

    1983-02-01

    UV-irradiated plasmid pNov1 containing a cloned fragment of chromosomal DNA could be repaired by excision, but plasmid p2265 without homology to the chromosome could not. Establishment of pNov1 was more UV resistant in Rec/sup -/ than in Rec/sup +/ cells. 19 references, 2 figures.

  8. A one-step miniprep for the isolation of plasmid DNA and lambda phage particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Lezin

    Full Text Available Plasmid DNA minipreps are fundamental techniques in molecular biology. Current plasmid DNA minipreps use alkali and the anionic detergent SDS in a three-solution format. In addition, alkali minipreps usually require additional column-based purification steps and cannot isolate other extra-chromosomal elements, such as bacteriophages. Non-ionic detergents (NIDs have been used occasionally as components of multiple-solution plasmid DNA minipreps, but a one-step approach has not been developed. Here, we have established a one-tube, one-solution NID plasmid DNA miniprep, and we show that this approach also isolates bacteriophage lambda particles. NID minipreps are more time-efficient than alkali minipreps, and NID plasmid DNA performs better than alkali DNA in many downstream applications. In fact, NID crude lysate DNA is sufficiently pure to be used in digestion and sequencing reactions. Microscopic analysis showed that the NID procedure fragments E. coli cells into small protoplast-like components, which may, at least in part, explain the effectiveness of this approach. This work demonstrates that one-step NID minipreps are a robust method to generate high quality plasmid DNA, and NID approaches can also isolate bacteriophage lambda particles, outperforming current standard alkali-based minipreps.

  9. A quantitative model of DNA replication in Xenopus embryos: reliable replication despite stochasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng-Hsin Yang, Scott; Bechhoefer, John

    2008-03-01

    DNA synthesis in Xenopus frog embryos initiates stochastically in time at many sites (origins) along the chromosome. Stochastic initiation implies fluctuations in the replication time and may lead to cell death if replication takes longer than the cell cycle time (˜ 25 min.). Surprisingly, although the typical replication time is about 20 min., in vivo experiments show that replication fails to complete only about 1 in 250 times. How is replication timing accurately controlled despite the stochasticity? Biologists have proposed two mechanisms: the first uses a regular spatial distribution of origins, while the second uses randomly located origins but increases their probability of initiation as the cell cycle proceeds. Here, we show that both mechanisms yield similar end-time distributions, implying that regular origin spacing is not needed for control of replication time. Moreover, we show that the experimentally inferred time-dependent initiation rate satisfies the observed low failure probability and nearly optimizes the use of replicative proteins.

  10. Characterization of Plasmid DNA Location within Chitosan/PLGA/pDNA Nanoparticle Complexes Designed for Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hali Bordelon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide- (PLGA-chitosan nanoparticles are becoming an increasingly common choice for the delivery of nucleic acids to cells for various genetic manipulation techniques. These particles are biocompatible, with tunable size and surface properties, possessing an overall positive charge that promotes complex formation with negatively charged nucleic acids. This study examines properties of the PLGA-chitosan nanoparticle/plasmid DNA complex after formation. Specifically, the study aims to determine the optimal ratio of plasmid DNA:nanoparticles for nucleic acid delivery purposes and to elucidate the location of the pDNA within these complexes. Such characterization will be necessary for the adoption of these formulations in a clinical setting. The ability of PLGA-chitosan nanoparticles to form complexes with pDNA was evaluated by using the fluorescent intercalating due OliGreen to label free plasmid DNA. By monitoring the fluorescence at different plasmid: nanoparticle ratios, the ideal plasmid:nanoparticle ration for complete complexation of plasmid was determined to be 1:50. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and gel digest studies suggested that even at these optimal complexation ratios, a portion of the plasmid DNA was located on the outer complex surface. This knowledge will facilitate future investigations into the functionality of the system in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Mechanistic basis of plasmid-specific DNA binding of the F plasmid regulatory protein, TraM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; Lu, Jun; Wong, Joyce J W; Edwards, Ross A; Frost, Laura S; Mark Glover, J N

    2014-11-11

    The conjugative transfer of bacterial F plasmids relies on TraM, a plasmid-encoded protein that recognizes multiple DNA sites to recruit the plasmid to the conjugative pore. In spite of the high degree of amino acid sequence conservation between TraM proteins, many of these proteins have markedly different DNA binding specificities that ensure the selective recruitment of a plasmid to its cognate pore. Here we present the structure of F TraM RHH (ribbon-helix-helix) domain bound to its sbmA site. The structure indicates that a pair of TraM tetramers cooperatively binds an underwound sbmA site containing 12 base pairs per turn. The sbmA is composed of 4 copies of a 5-base-pair motif, each of which is recognized by an RHH domain. The structure reveals that a single conservative amino acid difference in the RHH β-ribbon between F and pED208 TraM changes its specificity for its cognate 5-base-pair sequence motif. Specificity is also dictated by the positioning of 2-base-pair spacer elements within sbmA; in F sbmA, the spacers are positioned between motifs 1 and 2 and between motifs 3 and 4, whereas in pED208 sbmA, there is a single spacer between motifs 2 and 3. We also demonstrate that a pair of F TraM tetramers can cooperatively bind its sbmC site with an affinity similar to that of sbmA in spite of a lack of sequence similarity between these DNA elements. These results provide a basis for the prediction of the DNA binding properties of the family of TraM proteins.

  12. Epigenetic control of DNA replication dynamics in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Casas Delucchi, Corella Susana

    2011-01-01

    One of the most critically important processes in any living organism, essential for development and reproduction, is that of the accurate replication of its genome before each cell division. The process of DNA replication can take place millions of times in a single organism and any mistake, if left unrepaired, is potentially transmitted into the next generation. Errors during replication can result in genetic mutations or karyotype aberrations, both of which can lead to disease or death. ...

  13. Effects of medium composition on the production of plasmid DNA vector potentially for human gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhi-nan; SHEN Wen-he; CHEN Hao; CEN Pei-lin

    2005-01-01

    Plasmid vector is increasingly applied to gene therapy or gene vaccine. The production of plasmid pCMV-AP3 for cancer gene therapy was conducted in a modified MBL medium using a recombinant E. coli BL21 system. The effects of different MMBL components on plasmid yield, cell mass and specific plasmid DNA productivity were evaluated on shake-flask scale. The results showed that glucose was the optimal carbon source. High plasmid yield (58.3 mg/L) was obtained when 5.0 g/L glucose was added to MMBL. Glycerol could be chosen as a complementary carbon source because of the highest specific plasmid productivity (37.9 mg DNA/g DCW). After tests of different levels of nitrogen source and inorganic phosphate, a modified MMBL medium was formulated for optimal plasmid production. Further study showed that the initial acetate addition (less than 4.0 g/L) in MMBL improved plasmid production significantly, although it inhibited cell growth. The results will be useful for large-scale plasmid production using recombinant E. coli system.

  14. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITINABSTRACT Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  15. Mechanisms of plasmid segregation: have multicopy plasmids been overlooked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million-Weaver, Samuel; Camps, Manel

    2014-09-01

    Plasmids are self-replicating pieces of DNA typically bearing non-essential genes. Given that plasmids represent a metabolic burden to the host, mechanisms ensuring plasmid transmission to daughter cells are critical for their stable maintenance in the population. Here we review these mechanisms, focusing on two active partition strategies common to low-copy plasmids: par systems type I and type II. Both involve three components: an adaptor protein, a motor protein, and a centromere, which is a sequence area in the plasmid that is recognized by the adaptor protein. The centromere-bound adaptor nucleates polymerization of the motor, leading to filament formation, which can pull plasmids apart (par I) or push them towards opposite poles of the cell (par II). No such active partition mechanisms are known to occur in high copy number plasmids. In this case, vertical transmission is generally considered stochastic, due to the random distribution of plasmids in the cytoplasm. We discuss conceptual and experimental lines of evidence questioning the random distribution model and posit the existence of a mechanism for segregation in high copy number plasmids that moves plasmids to cell poles to facilitate transmission to daughter cells. This mechanism would involve chromosomally-encoded proteins and the plasmid origin of replication. Modulation of this proposed mechanism of segregation could provide new ways to enhance plasmid stability in the context of recombinant gene expression, which is limiting for large-scale protein production and for bioremediation.

  16. Nanoscale topographical replication of graphene architecture by manufactured DNA nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Youngkwon; Shin, Jihoon; Seo, Soonbeom; Park, Sung Ha; Ahn, Joung Real

    2015-03-01

    Despite many studies on how geometry can be used to control the electronic properties of graphene, certain limitations to fabrication of designed graphene nanostructures exist. Here, we demonstrate controlled topographical replication of graphene by artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nanostructures. Owing to the high degree of geometrical freedom of DNA nanostructures, we controlled the nanoscale topography of graphene. The topography of graphene replicated from DNA nanostructures showed enhanced thermal stability and revealed an interesting negative temperature coefficient of sheet resistivity when underlying DNA nanostructures were denatured at high temperatures.

  17. Effect of Plasmid Incompatibility on DNA Transfer to Streptococcus cremoris

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Lelie, Daniel; Vossen, Jos M.B.M. van der; Venema, Gerard

    1988-01-01

    Several Streptococcus cremoris strains were used in protoplast transformation and interspecific protoplast fusion experiments with Streptococcus lactis and Bacillus subtilis, with pGKV110, pGKV21, and ΔpAMβ1 as the marker plasmids. ΔpAMβ1 is a 15.9-kilobase nonconjugative, deletion derivative of pAMβ1, which is considerably larger than the pGKV plasmids (approximately 4.5 kilobases). In general, ΔpAMβ1 was transferred more efficiently than the pGKV plasmids. Using electroporation, we were abl...

  18. Plasmid loss and changes within the chromosomal DNA of Streptomyces reticuli.

    OpenAIRE

    Schrempf, H

    1982-01-01

    The sporulating wild-type strain of Streptomyces reticuli, which produces a melanin pigment and the macrolide leucomycin, contains plasmid DNA of 48 to 49 megadaltons. Plasmidless variants had an altered secondary metabolism and a changed antibiotic resistance pattern. By using a new colony hybridization technique developed for streptomycetes, it could be shown that plasmidless variants could be transformed with the wild-type plasmid DNA, which, however, is quickly lost from regenerated mycel...

  19. APOBEC3A damages the cellular genome during DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Abby M; Landry, Sébastien; Budagyan, Konstantin; Avgousti, Daphne C; Shalhout, Sophia; Bhagwat, Ashok S; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 family of DNA-cytosine deaminases comprises 7 members (A3A-A3H) that act on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The APOBEC3 proteins function within the innate immune system by mutating DNA of viral genomes and retroelements to restrict infection and retrotransposition. Recent evidence suggests that APOBEC3 enzymes can also cause damage to the cellular genome. Mutational patterns consistent with APOBEC3 activity have been identified by bioinformatic analysis of tumor genome sequences. These mutational signatures include clusters of base substitutions that are proposed to occur due to APOBEC3 deamination. It has been suggested that transiently exposed ssDNA segments provide substrate for APOBEC3 deamination leading to mutation signatures within the genome. However, the mechanisms that produce single-stranded substrates for APOBEC3 deamination in mammalian cells have not been demonstrated. We investigated ssDNA at replication forks as a substrate for APOBEC3 deamination. We found that APOBEC3A (A3A) expression leads to DNA damage in replicating cells but this is reduced in quiescent cells. Upon A3A expression, cycling cells activate the DNA replication checkpoint and undergo cell cycle arrest. Additionally, we find that replication stress leaves cells vulnerable to A3A-induced DNA damage. We propose a model to explain A3A-induced damage to the cellular genome in which cytosine deamination at replication forks and other ssDNA substrates results in mutations and DNA breaks. This model highlights the risk of mutagenesis by A3A expression in replicating progenitor cells, and supports the emerging hypothesis that APOBEC3 enzymes contribute to genome instability in human tumors.

  20. Efficient encapsulation of plasmid DNA in anionic liposomes by a freeze/thaw extrusion procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoen, P; Bijl, L; Wilschut, J

    1998-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether intact plasmid DNA can be efficiently encapsulated in anionic liposomes prepared by freeze/thaw and extrusion techniques. There is controversy about this method of DNA encapsulation, especially as to whether DNA remains intact and retains its biological activity

  1. Inheritance of Mitochondrial DNA and Plasmids in the Ascomycetous Fungus, Epichloe Typhina

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, K. R.; Leuchtmann, A.; Schardl, C. L.

    1996-01-01

    We analyzed the inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) species in matings of the grass symbiont Epichloe typhina. Eighty progeny were analyzed from a cross in which the maternal (stromal) parent possessed three linear plasmids, designated Callan-a (7.5 kb), Aubonne-a (2.1 kb) and Bergell (2.0 kb), and the paternal parent had one plasmid, Aubonne-b (2.1 kb). Maternal transmission of all plasmids was observed in 76 progeny; two progeny possessed Bergell and Callan-a, but had the maternal Aubo...

  2. Replication, checkpoint suppression and structure of centromeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Francesco; Falbo, Lucia; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2016-11-01

    Human centromeres contain large amounts of repetitive DNA sequences known as α satellite DNA, which can be difficult to replicate and whose functional role is unclear. Recently, we have characterized protein composition, structural organization and checkpoint response to stalled replication forks of centromeric chromatin reconstituted in Xenopus laevis egg extract. We showed that centromeric DNA has high affinity for SMC2-4 subunits of condensins and for CENP-A, it is enriched for DNA repair factors and suppresses the ATR checkpoint to ensure its efficient replication. We also showed that centromeric chromatin forms condensins enriched and topologically constrained DNA loops, which likely contribute to the overall structure of the centromere. These findings have important implications on how chromosomes are organized and genome stability is maintained in mammalian cells.

  3. Muscle damage after delivery of naked plasmid DNA into skeletal muscles is batch dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooddell, Christine I; Subbotin, Vladimir M; Sebestyén, Magdolna G; Griffin, Jacob B; Zhang, Guofeng; Schleef, Martin; Braun, Serge; Huss, Thierry; Wolff, Jon A

    2011-02-01

    Various plasmids were delivered into rodent limb muscles by hydrodynamic limb vein (HLV) injection of naked plasmid DNA (pDNA). Some of the pDNA preparations caused significant muscle necrosis and associated muscle regeneration 3 to 4 days after the injection whereas others caused no muscle damage. Occurrence of muscle damage was independent of plasmid sequence, size, and encoded genes. It was batch dependent and correlated with the quantity of bacterial genomic DNA (gDNA) that copurified with the pDNA. To determine whether such an effect was due to bacterial DNA or simply to fragmented DNA, mice were treated by HLV injection with sheared bacterial or murine gDNA. As little as 20 μg of the large fragments of bacterial gDNA caused muscle damage that morphologically resembled damage caused by the toxic pDNA preparations, whereas murine gDNA caused no damage even at a 10-fold higher dose. Toxicity from the bacterial gDNA was not due to endotoxin and was eliminated by DNase digestion. We conclude that pDNA itself does not cause muscle damage and that purification methods for the preparation of therapeutic pDNA should be optimized for removal of bacterial gDNA.

  4. Unveiling the mystery of mitochondrial DNA replication in yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin Jie; Clark-Walker, George Desmond

    2017-08-01

    Conventional DNA replication is initiated from specific origins and requires the synthesis of RNA primers for both the leading and lagging strands. In contrast, the replication of yeast mitochondrial DNA is origin-independent. The replication of the leading strand is likely primed by recombinational structures and proceeded by a rolling circle mechanism. The coexistent linear and circular DNA conformers facilitate the recombination-based initiation. The replication of the lagging strand is poorly understood. Re-evaluation of published data suggests that the rolling circle may also provide structures for the synthesis of the lagging-strand by mechanisms such as template switching. Thus, the coupling of recombination with rolling circle replication and possibly, template switching, may have been selected as an economic replication mode to accommodate the reductive evolution of mitochondria. Such a replication mode spares the need for conventional replicative components, including those required for origin recognition/remodelling, RNA primer synthesis and lagging-strand processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  5. The DNA Replication Stress Hypothesis of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri B. Yurov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A well-recognized theory of Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis suggests ectopic cell cycle events to mediate neurodegeneration. Vulnerable neurons of the AD brain exhibit biomarkers of cell cycle progression and DNA replication suggesting a reentry into the cell cycle. Chromosome reduplication without proper cell cycle completion and mitotic division probably causes neuronal cell dysfunction and death. However, this theory seems to require some inputs in accordance with the generally recognized amyloid cascade theory as well as to explain causes and consequences of genomic instability (aneuploidy in the AD brain. We propose that unscheduled and incomplete DNA replication (replication stress destabilizes (epigenomic landscape in the brain and leads to DNA replication “catastrophe” causing cell death during the S phase (replicative cell death. DNA replication stress can be a key element of the pathogenetic cascade explaining the interplay between ectopic cell cycle events and genetic instabilities in the AD brain. Abnormal cell cycle reentry and somatic genome variations can be used for updating the cell cycle theory introducing replication stress as a missing link between cell genetics and neurobiology of AD.

  6. Targeted Collection of Plasmid DNA in Large and Growing Animal Muscles 6 Weeks after DNA Vaccination with and without Electroporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Dory

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA vaccination has been developed in the last two decades in human and animal species as a promising alternative to conventional vaccination. It consists in the injection, in the muscle, for example, of plasmid DNA encoding the vaccinating polypeptide. Electroporation which forces the entrance of the plasmid DNA in cells at the injection point has been described as a powerful and promising strategy to enhance DNA vaccine efficacy. Due to the fact that the vaccine is composed of DNA, close attention on the fate of the plasmid DNA upon vaccination has to be taken into account, especially at the injection point. To perform such studies, the muscle injection point has to be precisely recovered and collected several weeks after injection. This is even more difficult for large and growing animals. A technique has been developed to localize precisely and collect efficiently the muscle injection points in growing piglets 6 weeks after DNA vaccination accompanied or not by electroporation. Electroporation did not significantly increase the level of remaining plasmids compared to nonelectroporated piglets, and, in all the cases, the levels were below the limit recommended by the FDA to research integration events of plasmid DNA into the host DNA.

  7. TOL plasmid carriage enhances biofilm formation and increases extracellular DNA content in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Alvise, Paul; Sjoholm, O.R.; Yankelevich, T.;

    2010-01-01

    : TOL carriage leads to more extracellular DNA (eDNA) in pellicles and biofilms. Pellicles were dissolved by DNase I treatment. Enhanced cell lysis due to plasmid carriage was ruled out as the mechanism for eDNA release. We report, for the first time, that carriage of a conjugative plasmid leads......Adherent growth of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 with and without the TOL plasmid (pWWO) at the solid-liquid and air-liquid interface was examined. We compared biofilm formation on glass in flow cells, and assayed pellicle (air-liquid interface biofilm) formation in stagnant liquid cultures by confocal...... laser scanning microscopy. The TOL-carrying strains formed pellicles and thick biofilms, whereas the same strains without the plasmid displayed little adherent growth. Microscopy using fluorescent nucleic acid-specific stains revealed differences in the production of extracellular polymeric substances...

  8. Optimizing hyaluronidase dose and plasmid DNA delivery greatly improves gene electrotransfer efficiency in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Vedel, Kenneth; Needham Andersen, Josefine;

    2015-01-01

    delivery across the muscle by increasing the number of plasmid DNA injections further enhanced transfection efficiency whereas increasing plasmid dose from 0.2 to 1.6. μg/g b.w. or vehicle volume had no effect. The optimized protocol resulted in ~80% (CI95%: 79-84%) transfected muscle fibers......Transfection of rat skeletal muscle in vivo is a widely used research model. However, gene electrotransfer protocols have been developed for mice and yield variable results in rats. We investigated whether changes in hyaluronidase pre-treatment and plasmid DNA delivery can improve transfection...... with a homogenous distribution. We also show that transfection was stable over five weeks of regular exercise or inactivity. Our findings show that species-specific plasmid DNA delivery and hyaluronidase pre-treatment greatly improves transfection efficiency in rat skeletal muscle....

  9. Plasmid cloning vectors for the conjugal transfer of DNA from Escherichia coli to Streptomyces spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, M; Logan, R; O'Brien, K; Seno, E T; Rao, R N; Schoner, B E

    1992-07-01

    We have constructed cloning vectors for the conjugal transfer of DNA from Escherichia coli to Streptomyces spp. All vectors contain the 760-bp oriT fragment from the IncP plasmid, RK2. Transfer functions need to be supplied in trans by the E. coli donor strain. We have incorporated into these vectors selectable antibiotic-resistance markers (AmR, ThR, SpR) that function in Streptomyces spp. and other features that should allow for: (i) integration via homologous recombination between cloned DNA and the Streptomyces spp. chromosome, (ii) autonomous replication, or (iii) site-specific integration at the bacteriophage phi C31 attachment site. Shuttle cosmids for constructing genomic libraries and bacteriophage P1 cloning vector capable of accepting approx. 100-kb fragments are also described. A simple mating procedure has been developed for the conjugal transfer of these vectors from E. coli to Streptomyces spp. that involves plating of the donor strain and either germinated spores or mycelial fragments of the recipient strain. We have shown that several of these vectors can be introduced into Streptomyces fradiae, a strain that is notoriously difficult to transform by PEG-mediated protoplast transformation.

  10. Insights into the Initiation of Eukaryotic DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Irina; Perez-Arnaiz, Patricia; Colbert, Max K; Kaplan, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of DNA replication is a highly regulated event in eukaryotic cells to ensure that the entire genome is copied once and only once during S phase. The primary target of cellular regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication initiation is the assembly and activation of the replication fork helicase, the 11-subunit assembly that unwinds DNA at a replication fork. The replication fork helicase, called CMG for Cdc45-Mcm2-7, and GINS, assembles in S phase from the constituent Cdc45, Mcm2-7, and GINS proteins. The assembly and activation of the CMG replication fork helicase during S phase is governed by 2 S-phase specific kinases, CDK and DDK. CDK stimulates the interaction between Sld2, Sld3, and Dpb11, 3 initiation factors that are each required for the initiation of DNA replication. DDK, on the other hand, phosphorylates the Mcm2, Mcm4, and Mcm6 subunits of the Mcm2-7 complex. Sld3 recruits Cdc45 to Mcm2-7 in a manner that depends on DDK, and recent work suggests that Sld3 binds directly to Mcm2-7 and also to single-stranded DNA. Furthermore, recent work demonstrates that Sld3 and its human homolog Treslin substantially stimulate DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. These data suggest that the initiation factor Sld3/Treslin coordinates the assembly and activation of the eukaryotic replication fork helicase by recruiting Cdc45 to Mcm2-7, stimulating DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2, and binding directly to single-stranded DNA as the origin is melted.

  11. Insights into the Initiation of Eukaryotic DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Irina; Perez-Arnaiz, Patricia; Colbert, Max K; Kaplan, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of DNA replication is a highly regulated event in eukaryotic cells to ensure that the entire genome is copied once and only once during S phase. The primary target of cellular regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication initiation is the assembly and activation of the replication fork helicase, the 11-subunit assembly that unwinds DNA at a replication fork. The replication fork helicase, called CMG for Cdc45-Mcm2–7, and GINS, assembles in S phase from the constituent Cdc45, Mcm2–7, and GINS proteins. The assembly and activation of the CMG replication fork helicase during S phase is governed by 2 S-phase specific kinases, CDK and DDK. CDK stimulates the interaction between Sld2, Sld3, and Dpb11, 3 initiation factors that are each required for the initiation of DNA replication. DDK, on the other hand, phosphorylates the Mcm2, Mcm4, and Mcm6 subunits of the Mcm2–7 complex. Sld3 recruits Cdc45 to Mcm2–7 in a manner that depends on DDK, and recent work suggests that Sld3 binds directly to Mcm2–7 and also to single-stranded DNA. Furthermore, recent work demonstrates that Sld3 and its human homolog Treslin substantially stimulate DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. These data suggest that the initiation factor Sld3/Treslin coordinates the assembly and activation of the eukaryotic replication fork helicase by recruiting Cdc45 to Mcm2–7, stimulating DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2, and binding directly to single-stranded DNA as the origin is melted. PMID:26710261

  12. Purification of transfection-grade plasmid DNA from bacterial cells with superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chen-Li; Sung, Ching-Shan

    2006-07-01

    The functionalized magnetic nanobeads were used to develop a rapid protocol for extracting and purifying transfection-grade plasmid DNA from bacterial culture. Nanosized superparamagnetic nanoparticles (Fe 3O 4) were prepared by chemical coprecipitation method using Fe 2+, Fe 3+ salt, and ammonium hydroxide under a nitrogen atmosphere. The surface of Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles was modified by coating with the multivalent cationic agent, polyethylenimine (PEI). The PEI-modified magnetic nanobeads were employed to simplify the purification of plasmid DNA from bacterial cells. We demonstrated a useful plasmid, pRSETB-EGFP, encoding the green fluorescent protein with T7 promoter, was amplified in DE3 strain of Escherichia coli. The loaded nanobeads are recovered by magnetically driven separation and regenerated by exposure to the elution buffer with optimal ionic strength (1.25 M) and pH (9.0). Up to approximately 819 μg of high-purity (A 260/A 280 ratio=1.86) plasmid DNA was isolated from 100 ml of overnight bacterial culture. The eluted plasmid DNA was used directly for restriction enzyme digestion, bacterial cell transformation and animal cell transfection applications with success. The PEI-modified magnetic nanobead delivers significant time-savings, overall higher yields and better transfection efficiencies compared to anion-exchange and other methods. The results presented in this report show that PEI-modified magnetic nanobeads are suitable for isolation and purification of transfection-grade plasmid DNA.

  13. Porcine circovirus: transcription and rolling-circle DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review summarizes the molecular studies pertaining to porcine circovirus (PCV) transcription and DNA replication. The genome of PCV is circular, single-stranded DNA and contains 1759-1768 nucleotides. Both the genome-strand (packaged in the virus particle) and the complementary-strand (synthesi...

  14. A Paper Model of DNA Structure and Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigismondi, Linda A.

    1989-01-01

    A paper model which is designed to give students a hands-on experience during lecture and blackboard instruction on DNA structure is provided. A list of materials, paper patterns, and procedures for using the models to teach DNA structure and replication are given. (CW)

  15. First report on vertical transmission of a plasmid DNA in freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Labrechai Mog; Gireesh-Babu, P; Pavan-Kumar, A; Suresh Babu, P P; Chaudhari, Aparna

    2014-09-01

    Outbreak of WSSV disease is one of the major stumbling blocks in shrimp aquaculture. DNA vaccines have shown potential for mass scale vaccination owing to their stability, cost effectiveness and easy maintenance. Development of economically feasible delivery strategies remains to be a major challenge. This study demonstrates vertical transmission of a plasmid DNA in a decapod Macrobrachium rosenbergii for the first time. Females at three different maturation stages (immature, matured and berried) and mature males were injected with a plasmid DNA and allowed to spawn with untreated counterparts. Using specific primers the plasmid DNA could be amplified from the offspring of all groups except that of berried females. For this confirmation genomic DNA was isolated from 3 pools of 10 post larvae in each group. This presents an ideal strategy to protect young ones at zero stress.

  16. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti K. Jha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2 depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations in rctB that reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid—the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding.

  17. Regulation of DNA Replication in Early Embryonic Cleavages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chames Kermi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Early embryonic cleavages are characterized by short and highly synchronous cell cycles made of alternating S- and M-phases with virtually absent gap phases. In this contracted cell cycle, the duration of DNA synthesis can be extraordinarily short. Depending on the organism, the whole genome of an embryo is replicated at a speed that is between 20 to 60 times faster than that of a somatic cell. Because transcription in the early embryo is repressed, DNA synthesis relies on a large stockpile of maternally supplied proteins stored in the egg representing most, if not all, cellular genes. In addition, in early embryonic cell cycles, both replication and DNA damage checkpoints are inefficient. In this article, we will review current knowledge on how DNA synthesis is regulated in early embryos and discuss possible consequences of replicating chromosomes with little or no quality control.

  18. A personal reflection on the replicon theory: from R1 plasmid to replication timing regulation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masai, Hisao

    2013-11-29

    Fifty years after the Replicon Theory was originally presented, detailed mechanistic insight into prokaryotic replicons has been obtained and rapid progress is being made to elucidate the more complex regulatory mechanisms of replicon regulation in eukaryotic cells. Here, I present my personal perspectives on how studies of model replicons have contributed to our understanding of the basic mechanisms of DNA replication as well as the evolution of replication regulation in human cells. I will also discuss how replication regulation contributes to the stable maintenance of the genome and how disruption of replication regulation leads to human diseases.

  19. Specific binding of the replication protein of plasmid pPS10 to direct and inverted repeats is mediated by an HTH motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de Viedma, D; Serrano-López, A; Díaz-Orejas, R

    1995-01-01

    The initiator protein of the plasmid pPS10, RepA, has a putative helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif at its C-terminal end. RepA dimers bind to an inverted repeat at the repA promoter (repAP) to autoregulate RepA synthesis. [D. García de Viedma, et al. (1996) EMBO J. in press]. RepA monomers bind to four direct repeats at the origin of replication (oriV) to initiate pPS10 replication This report shows that randomly generated mutations in RepA, associated with defficiencies in autoregulation, map either at the putative HTH motif or in its vicinity. These mutant proteins do not promote pPS10 replication and are severely affected in binding to both the repAP and oriV regions in vitro. Revertants of a mutant that map in the vicinity of the HTH motif have been obtained and correspond to a second amino acid substitution far upstream of the motif. However, reversion of mutants that map in the helices of the motif occurs less frequently, at least by an order of magnitude. All these data indicate that the helices of the HTH motif play an essential role in specific RepA-DNA interactions, although additional regions also seem to be involved in DNA binding activity. Some mutations have slightly different effects in replication and autoregulation, suggesting that the role of the HTH motif in the interaction of RepA dimers or monomers with their respective DNA targets (IR or DR) is not the same. Images PMID:8559664

  20. SMARCAL1 maintains telomere integrity during DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Lisa A; Zhao, Runxiang; Glick, Gloria G; Lovejoy, Courtney A; Eischen, Christine M; Cortez, David

    2015-12-01

    The SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent, regulator of chromatin, subfamily A-like 1) DNA translocase is one of several related enzymes, including ZRANB3 (zinc finger, RAN-binding domain containing 3) and HLTF (helicase-like transcription factor), that are recruited to stalled replication forks to promote repair and restart replication. These enzymes can perform similar biochemical reactions such as fork reversal; however, genetic studies indicate they must have unique cellular activities. Here, we present data showing that SMARCAL1 has an important function at telomeres, which present an endogenous source of replication stress. SMARCAL1-deficient cells accumulate telomere-associated DNA damage and have greatly elevated levels of extrachromosomal telomere DNA (C-circles). Although these telomere phenotypes are often found in tumor cells using the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway for telomere elongation, SMARCAL1 deficiency does not yield other ALT phenotypes such as elevated telomere recombination. The activity of SMARCAL1 at telomeres can be separated from its genome-maintenance activity in bulk chromosomal replication because it does not require interaction with replication protein A. Finally, this telomere-maintenance function is not shared by ZRANB3 or HLTF. Our results provide the first identification, to our knowledge, of an endogenous source of replication stress that requires SMARCAL1 for resolution and define differences between members of this class of replication fork-repair enzymes.

  1. Replication stress activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Ying, Songmin; Bjerregaard, Victoria A; Bursomanno, Sara; Aleliunaite, Aiste; Wu, Wei; Mankouri, Hocine W; Shen, Huahao; Liu, Ying; Hickson, Ian D

    2015-12-10

    Oncogene-induced DNA replication stress has been implicated as a driver of tumorigenesis. Many chromosomal rearrangements characteristic of human cancers originate from specific regions of the genome called common fragile sites (CFSs). CFSs are difficult-to-replicate loci that manifest as gaps or breaks on metaphase chromosomes (termed CFS 'expression'), particularly when cells have been exposed to replicative stress. The MUS81-EME1 structure-specific endonuclease promotes the appearance of chromosome gaps or breaks at CFSs following replicative stress. Here we show that entry of cells into mitotic prophase triggers the recruitment of MUS81 to CFSs. The nuclease activity of MUS81 then promotes POLD3-dependent DNA synthesis at CFSs, which serves to minimize chromosome mis-segregation and non-disjunction. We propose that the attempted condensation of incompletely duplicated loci in early mitosis serves as the trigger for completion of DNA replication at CFS loci in human cells. Given that this POLD3-dependent mitotic DNA synthesis is enhanced in aneuploid cancer cells that exhibit intrinsically high levels of chromosomal instability (CIN(+)) and replicative stress, we suggest that targeting this pathway could represent a new therapeutic approach.

  2. The LMO2 oncogene regulates DNA replication in hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Humbert, Magali; Grondin, Benoît; Lisi, Véronique; Veiga, Diogo F T; Haman, André; Cazaux, Christophe; Mashtalir, Nazar; Affar, El Bachir; Verreault, Alain; Hoang, Trang

    2016-02-02

    Oncogenic transcription factors are commonly activated in acute leukemias and subvert normal gene expression networks to reprogram hematopoietic progenitors into preleukemic stem cells, as exemplified by LIM-only 2 (LMO2) in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Whether or not these oncoproteins interfere with other DNA-dependent processes is largely unexplored. Here, we show that LMO2 is recruited to DNA replication origins by interaction with three essential replication enzymes: DNA polymerase delta (POLD1), DNA primase (PRIM1), and minichromosome 6 (MCM6). Furthermore, tethering LMO2 to synthetic DNA sequences is sufficient to transform these sequences into origins of replication. We next addressed the importance of LMO2 in erythroid and thymocyte development, two lineages in which cell cycle and differentiation are tightly coordinated. Lowering LMO2 levels in erythroid progenitors delays G1-S progression and arrests erythropoietin-dependent cell growth while favoring terminal differentiation. Conversely, ectopic expression in thymocytes induces DNA replication and drives these cells into cell cycle, causing differentiation blockade. Our results define a novel role for LMO2 in directly promoting DNA synthesis and G1-S progression.

  3. Plasmid containing a DNA ligase gene from Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, D.; Griffin, K.; Setlow, J.K.

    1984-05-01

    A ligase gene from Haemophilus influenzae was cloned into the shuttle vector pDM2. Although the plasmid did not affect X-ray sensitivity, it caused an increase in UV sensitivity of the wild-type but not excision-defective H. influenzae and a decrease in UV sensitivity of the rec-1 mutant. 14 references, 2 figures.

  4. TOL Plasmid Carriage Enhances Biofilm Formation and Increases Extracellular DNA Content in Pseudomonas Putida KT2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smets, Barth F.; D'Alvise, Paul; Yankelovich, T.;

    of extracellular polymeric substances: TOL carriage leads to more extracellular DNA (eDNA) in pellicles and biofilms. Pellicles were dissolved by DNAse I treatment. eDNA was observed as ominous fibrous structures. Quantitative analysis of live and dead cells in static cultures was performed by flow cytometry......Adherent growth of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 with and without the TOL plasmid (pWWO) at the solid-liquid and air-liquid interface was examined. We compared biofilm formation on glass in flow cells, and assayed pellicle (air-liquid interface biofilm) formation in stagnant liquid cultures by confocal...... combined with specific cytostains; release of cytoplasmic material was assayed by a β-glucosidase assay. Enhanced cell lysis due to plasmid carriage was ruled out as the mechanism for eDNA release. We report, for the first time, that carriage of a conjugative plasmid leads to increased biofilm formation...

  5. Inhibition of simian virus 40 DNA replication by ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edenberg, H.J.

    1983-07-30

    The effects of ultraviolet light (uv) upon SV40 DNA synthesis in monkey cells were examined to determine whether replication forks were halted upon encountering lesions in the DNA, or alternatively whether lesions were rapidly bypassed. Ultraviolet light inhibits elongation of nascent DNA strands; the extent of incorporation of (/sup 3/H)deoxythymidine ((/sup 3/H)dT) into DNA decreases with increasing uv fluence. Inhibition begins within minutes of irradiation, and becomes more pronounced with increasing time after irradiation. The synthesis of form I (covalently closed) molecules is inhibited even more severely than is total incorporation: post-uv incorporation is predominantly into replication intermediates. In contrast to previous reports, we find that replication intermediates labeled after uv resemble those in unirradiated cells, and contain covalently closed parental strands. DNA strands made after uv are approximately the size of parental DNA which has been cleaved at pyrimidine dimers by a uv endonuclease, indicating that they do not extend past dimers. The hypothesis that replication forks are halted upon encountering pyrimidine dimers in the template strand is consistent with these data.

  6. Species radiation by DNA replication that systematically exchanges nucleotides?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2014-12-21

    RNA and DNA syntheses share many properties. Therefore, the existence of 'swinger' RNAs, presumed 'orphan' transcripts matching genomic sequences only if transcription systematically exchanged nucleotides, suggests replication producing swinger DNA. Transcripts occur in many short-lived copies, the few cellular DNA molecules are long-lived. Hence pressures for functional swinger DNAs are greater than for swinger RNAs. Protein coding properties of swinger sequences differ from original sequences, suggesting rarity of corresponding swinger DNA. For genes producing structural RNAs, such as tRNAs and rRNAs, three exchanges (AT, CG and AT+CG) conserve self-hybridization properties. All nuclear eukaryote swinger DNA sequences detected in GenBank are for rRNA genes assuming AT+CG exchanges. In brachyuran crabs, 25 species had AT+CG swinger 18S rDNA, all matching the reverse-exchanged version of regular 18S rDNA of a related species. In this taxon, swinger replication of 18S rDNA apparently associated with, or even resulted in species radiation. AT+CG transformation doesn't invert sequence direction, differing from inverted repeats. Swinger repeats (detectable only assuming swinger transformations, AT+CG swinger repeats most frequent) within regular human rRNAs, independently confirm swinger polymerizations for most swinger types. Swinger replication might be an unsuspected molecular mechanism for ultrafast speciation.

  7. Mismatch repair balances leading and lagging strand DNA replication fidelity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Lujan

    Full Text Available The two DNA strands of the nuclear genome are replicated asymmetrically using three DNA polymerases, α, δ, and ε. Current evidence suggests that DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε is the primary leading strand replicase, whereas Pols α and δ primarily perform lagging strand replication. The fact that these polymerases differ in fidelity and error specificity is interesting in light of the fact that the stability of the nuclear genome depends in part on the ability of mismatch repair (MMR to correct different mismatches generated in different contexts during replication. Here we provide the first comparison, to our knowledge, of the efficiency of MMR of leading and lagging strand replication errors. We first use the strand-biased ribonucleotide incorporation propensity of a Pol ε mutator variant to confirm that Pol ε is the primary leading strand replicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We then use polymerase-specific error signatures to show that MMR efficiency in vivo strongly depends on the polymerase, the mismatch composition, and the location of the mismatch. An extreme case of variation by location is a T-T mismatch that is refractory to MMR. This mismatch is flanked by an AT-rich triplet repeat sequence that, when interrupted, restores MMR to > 95% efficiency. Thus this natural DNA sequence suppresses MMR, placing a nearby base pair at high risk of mutation due to leading strand replication infidelity. We find that, overall, MMR most efficiently corrects the most potentially deleterious errors (indels and then the most common substitution mismatches. In combination with earlier studies, the results suggest that significant differences exist in the generation and repair of Pol α, δ, and ε replication errors, but in a generally complementary manner that results in high-fidelity replication of both DNA strands of the yeast nuclear genome.

  8. Fabrication of Size-Tunable Metallic Nanoparticles Using Plasmid DNA as a Biomolecular Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Jacopo; Piscopo, Irene; Yampolski, Alex; Nahirney, Patrick; Parpas, Andrea; Aggarwal, Amit; Saleh, Raihan; Drain, Charles Michael

    2011-10-21

    Plasmid DNA can be used as a template to yield gold, palladium, silver, and chromium nanoparticles of different sizes based on variations in incubation time at 70 °C with gold phosphine complexes, with the acetates of silver or palladium, or chromium acetylacetonate. The employment of mild synthetic conditions, minimal procedural steps, and aqueous solvents makes this method environmentally greener and ensures general feasibility. The use of plasmids exploits the capabilities of the biotechnology industry as a source of nanoreactor materials.

  9. Priming DNA Replication from Triple Helix Oligonucleotides: Possible Threestranded DNA in DNA Polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P. Lestienne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Triplex associate with a duplex DNA presenting the same polypurine or polypyrimidine-rich sequence in an antiparallel orientation. So far, triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs are known to inhibit transcription, replication, and to induce mutations. A new property of TFO is reviewed here upon analysis of DNA breakpoint yielding DNA rearrangements; the synthesized sequence of the first direct repeat displays a skewed polypurine- rich sequence. This synthesized sequence can bind the second homologous duplex sequence through the formation of a triple helix, which is able to prime further DNA replication. In these case, the d(G-rich Triple Helix Primers (THP bind the homologous strand in a parallel manner, possibly via a RecA-like mechanism. This novel property is shared by all tested DNA polymerases: phage, retrovirus, bacteria, and human. These features may account for illegitimate initiation of replication upon single-strand breakage and annealing to a homologous sequence where priming may occur. Our experiments suggest that DNA polymerases can bind three instead of two polynucleotide strands in their catalytic centre.

  10. Direct observation of enzymes replicating DNA using a single-molecule DNA stretching assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulczyk, A.W.; Tanner, N.A.; Loparo, J.J.; Richardson, C.C.; Oijen, A.M. van

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method for observing real time replication of individual DNA molecules mediated by proteins of the bacteriophage replication system. Linearized lambda DNA is modified to have a biotin on the end of one strand, and a digoxigenin moiety on the other end of the same strand. The biotinylat

  11. POLD3 is haploinsufficient for DNA replication in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Murga, Matilde; Lecona, Emilio; Kamileri, Irene; Díaz,Marcos; Lugli, Natalia; Sotiriou, Sotirios K.; Anton, Marta E.; Méndez, Juan; Thanos D Halazonetis; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    The Pold3 gene encodes a subunit of the Polδ DNA polymerase complex. Pold3 orthologues are not essential in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or chicken DT40 cells, but the Schizzosaccharomyces pombe orthologue is essential. POLD3 also has a specialized role in the repair of broken replication forks, suggesting that POLD3 activity could be particularly relevant for cancer cells enduring high levels of DNA replication stress. We report here that POLD3 is essential for mouse development and is also requ...

  12. Identification and characterization of a novel type of replication terminator with bidirectional activity on the Bacillus subtilis theta plasmid pLS20

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, WJJ; Smith, M; Wake, RG; deBoer, AL; Venema, G; Bron, S

    1996-01-01

    We have sequenced and analysed a 3.1 kb fragment of the 55 kb endogenous Bacillus subtilis plasmid pLS20 containing its replication functions, Just outside the region required for autonomous replication, a segment of 18 bp was identified as being almost identical to part of the major B. subtilis chr

  13. Electromobility of plasmid DNA in tumor tissues during electric field-mediated gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharoff, D A; Barr, R C; Li, C-Y; Yuan, F

    2002-10-01

    Interstitial transport is a crucial step in plasmid DNA-based gene therapy. However, interstitial diffusion of large nucleic acids is prohibitively slow. Therefore, we proposed to facilitate interstitial transport of DNA via pulsed electric fields. To test the feasibility of this approach to gene delivery, we developed an ex vivo technique to quantify the magnitude of DNA movement due to pulsed electric fields in two tumor tissues: B16.F10 (a mouse melanoma) and 4T1 (a mouse mammary carcinoma). When the pulse duration and strength were 50 ms and 233 V/cm, respectively, we found that the average plasmid DNA movements per 10 pulses were 1.47 microm and 0.35 microm in B16.F10 and 4T1 tumors, respectively. The average plasmid DNA movements could be approximately tripled, ie to reach 3.69 microm and 1.01 microm, respectively, when the pulse strength was increased to 465 V/cm. The plasmid DNA mobility was correlated with the tumor collagen content, which was approximately eight times greater in 4T1 than in B16.F10 tumors. These data suggest that electric field can be a powerful driving force for improving interstitial transport of DNA during gene delivery.

  14. Compaction and transport properties of newly replicated Caulobacter crescentus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun-Hae; McAdams, Harley H

    2011-12-01

    Upon initiating replication of the Caulobacter chromosome, one copy of the parS centromere remains at the stalked pole; the other moves to the distal pole. We identified the segregation dynamics and compaction characteristics of newly replicated Caulobacter DNA during transport (highly variable from cell to cell) using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The parS centromere and a length (also highly variable) of parS proximal DNA on each arm of the chromosome are segregated with the same relatively slow transport pattern as the parS locus. Newly replicated DNA further than about 100 kb from parS segregates with a different and faster pattern, while loci at 48 kb from parS segregate with the slow pattern in some cells and the fast pattern in others. The observed parS-proximal DNA compaction characteristics have scaling properties that suggest the DNA is branched. HU2-deletion strains exhibited a reduced compaction phenotype except near the parS site where only the ΔHU1ΔHU2 double mutant had a compaction phenotype. The chromosome shows speed-dependent extension during translocation suggesting the DNA polymer is under tension. While DNA segregation is highly reliable and succeeds in virtually all wild-type cells, the high degree of cell to cell variation in the segregation process is noteworthy.

  15. Maintaining epigenetic inheritance during DNA replication in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eIglesias

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biotic and abiotic stresses alter the pattern of gene expression in plants. Depending on the frequency and duration of stress events, the effects on the transcriptional state of genes are remembered temporally or transmitted to daughter cells and, in some instances, even to offspring (transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. This memory effect, which can be found even in the absence of the original stress, has an epigenetic basis, through molecular mechanisms that take place at the chromatin and DNA level but do not imply changes in the DNA sequence. Many epigenetic mechanisms have been described and involve covalent modifications on the DNA and histones, such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation and methylation, and RNAi dependent silencing mechanisms. Some of these chromatin modifications need to be stable through cell division in order to be truly epigenetic. During DNA replication, histones are recycled during the formation of the new nucleosomes and this process is tightly regulated. Perturbations to the DNA replication process and/or the recycling of histones lead to epigenetic changes. In this mini-review, we discuss recent evidence aimed at linking DNA replication process to epigenetic inheritance in plants.

  16. Single molecular biology: coming of age in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Lou, Hui-Qiang

    2017-09-20

    DNA replication is an essential process of the living organisms. To achieve precise and reliable replication, DNA polymerases play a central role in DNA synthesis. Previous investigations have shown that the average rates of DNA synthesis on the leading and lagging strands in a replisome must be similar to avoid the formation of significant gaps in the nascent strands. The underlying mechanism has been assumed to be coordination between leading- and lagging-strand polymerases. However, Kowalczykowski's lab members recently performed single molecule techniques in E. coli and showed the real-time behavior of a replisome. The leading- and lagging-strand polymerases function stochastically and independently. Furthermore, when a DNA polymerase is paused, the helicase slows down in a self-regulating fail-safe mechanism, akin to a ''dead-man's switch''. Based on the real-time single-molecular observation, the authors propose that leading- and lagging-strand polymerases synthesize DNA stochastically within a Gaussian distribution. Along with the development and application of single-molecule techniques, we will witness a new age of DNA replication and other biological researches.

  17. DNA moves sequentially towards the nuclear matrix during DNA replication in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranda-Anzaldo Armando

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the interphase nucleus of metazoan cells DNA is organized in supercoiled loops anchored to a nuclear matrix (NM. There is varied evidence indicating that DNA replication occurs in replication factories organized upon the NM and that DNA loops may correspond to the actual replicons in vivo. In normal rat liver the hepatocytes are arrested in G0 but they synchronously re-enter the cell cycle after partial-hepatectomy leading to liver regeneration in vivo. We have previously determined in quiescent rat hepatocytes that a 162 kbp genomic region containing members of the albumin gene family is organized into five structural DNA loops. Results In the present work we tracked down the movement relative to the NM of DNA sequences located at different points within such five structural DNA loops during the S phase and after the return to cellular quiescence during liver regeneration. Our results indicate that looped DNA moves sequentially towards the NM during replication and then returns to its original position in newly quiescent cells, once the liver regeneration has been achieved. Conclusions Looped DNA moves in a sequential fashion, as if reeled in, towards the NM during DNA replication in vivo thus supporting the notion that the DNA template is pulled progressively towards the replication factories on the NM so as to be replicated. These results provide further evidence that the structural DNA loops correspond to the actual replicons in vivo.

  18. Links between DNA Replication, Stem Cells and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Vassilev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers can be categorized into two groups: those whose frequency increases with age, and those resulting from errors during mammalian development. The first group is linked to DNA replication through the accumulation of genetic mutations that occur during proliferation of developmentally acquired stem cells that give rise to and maintain tissues and organs. These mutations, which result from DNA replication errors as well as environmental insults, fall into two categories; cancer driver mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and genome destabilizing mutations that promote aneuploidy through excess genome duplication and chromatid missegregation. Increased genome instability results in accelerated clonal evolution leading to the appearance of more aggressive clones with increased drug resistance. The second group of cancers, termed germ cell neoplasia, results from the mislocation of pluripotent stem cells during early development. During normal development, pluripotent stem cells that originate in early embryos give rise to all of the cell lineages in the embryo and adult, but when they mislocate to ectopic sites, they produce tumors. Remarkably, pluripotent stem cells, like many cancer cells, depend on the Geminin protein to prevent excess DNA replication from triggering DNA damage-dependent apoptosis. This link between the control of DNA replication during early development and germ cell neoplasia reveals Geminin as a potential chemotherapeutic target in the eradication of cancer progenitor cells.

  19. Links between DNA Replication, Stem Cells and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilev, Alex; DePamphilis, Melvin L

    2017-01-25

    Cancers can be categorized into two groups: those whose frequency increases with age, and those resulting from errors during mammalian development. The first group is linked to DNA replication through the accumulation of genetic mutations that occur during proliferation of developmentally acquired stem cells that give rise to and maintain tissues and organs. These mutations, which result from DNA replication errors as well as environmental insults, fall into two categories; cancer driver mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and genome destabilizing mutations that promote aneuploidy through excess genome duplication and chromatid missegregation. Increased genome instability results in accelerated clonal evolution leading to the appearance of more aggressive clones with increased drug resistance. The second group of cancers, termed germ cell neoplasia, results from the mislocation of pluripotent stem cells during early development. During normal development, pluripotent stem cells that originate in early embryos give rise to all of the cell lineages in the embryo and adult, but when they mislocate to ectopic sites, they produce tumors. Remarkably, pluripotent stem cells, like many cancer cells, depend on the Geminin protein to prevent excess DNA replication from triggering DNA damage-dependent apoptosis. This link between the control of DNA replication during early development and germ cell neoplasia reveals Geminin as a potential chemotherapeutic target in the eradication of cancer progenitor cells.

  20. Trapping DNA replication origins from the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eki, Toshihiko; Murakami, Yasufumi; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2013-04-17

    Synthesis of chromosomal DNA is initiated from multiple origins of replication in higher eukaryotes; however, little is known about these origins' structures. We isolated the origin-derived nascent DNAs from a human repair-deficient cell line by blocking the replication forks near the origins using two different origin-trapping methods (i.e., UV- or chemical crosslinker-treatment and cell synchronization in early S phase using DNA replication inhibitors). Single-stranded DNAs (of 0.5-3 kb) that accumulated after such treatments were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). BrdU-labeled DNA was immunopurified after fractionation by alkaline sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cloned by complementary-strand synthesis and PCR amplification. Competitive PCR revealed an increased abundance of DNA derived from known replication origins (c-myc and lamin B2 genes) in the nascent DNA fractions from the UV-treated or crosslinked cells. Nucleotide sequences of 85 and 208 kb were obtained from the two libraries (I and II) prepared from the UV-treated log-phase cells and early S phase arrested cells, respectively. The libraries differed from each other in their G+C composition and replication-related motif contents, suggesting that differences existed between the origin fragments isolated by the two different origin-trapping methods. The replication activities for seven out of 12 putative origin loci from the early-S phase cells were shown by competitive PCR. We mapped 117 (library I) and 172 (library II) putative origin loci to the human genome; approximately 60% and 50% of these loci were assigned to the G-band and intragenic regions, respectively. Analyses of the flanking sequences of the mapped loci suggested that the putative origin loci tended to associate with genes (including conserved sites) and DNase I hypersensitive sites; however, poor correlations were found between such loci and the CpG islands, transcription start sites, and K27-acetylated histone H3 peaks.

  1. Rational design of a plasmid origin that replicates efficiently in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton V Bryksin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most plasmids replicate only within a particular genus or family. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe an engineered high copy number expression vector, pBAV1K-T5, that produces varying quantities of active reporter proteins in Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, (all gram-negative, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Leifsonia shinshuensis, Peanibacillus sp. S18-36 and Bacillus subtilis (gram-positive. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate the efficiency of pBAV1K-T5 replication in different bacterial species, thereby facilitating the study of proteins that don't fold well in E. coli and pathogens not amenable to existing genetic tools.

  2. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Jyoti K.; Li, Mi; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chattoraj, Dhruba; Dunny, Gary M.

    2017-04-18

    Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2) depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB) to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations inrctBthat reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid—the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition) when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding. IMPORTANCE The capacity of proteins to undergo remodeling provides opportunities to control their function. However, remodeling remains a poorly understood aspect of the structure-function paradigm due to its dynamic nature. Here we have studied remodeling of the initiator of replication ofVibrio choleraeChr2 by the molecular chaperone, DnaK. We show that DnaK binds to a site on the Chr2 initiator (RctB) that

  3. Bacterial spores as particulate carriers for gene gun delivery of plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aps, Luana R M M; Tavares, Milene B; Rozenfeld, Julio H K; Lamy, M Teresa; Ferreira, Luís C S; Diniz, Mariana O

    2016-06-20

    Bacillus subtilis spores represent a suitable platform for the adsorption of proteins, enzymes and viral particles at physiological conditions. In the present work, we demonstrate that purified spores can also adsorb DNA on their surface after treatment with cationic molecules. In addition, we demonstrate that DNA-coated B. subtilis spores can be used as particulate carriers and act as an alternative to gold microparticles for the biolistic (gene gun) administration of plasmid DNA in mice. Gene gun delivery of spores pre-treated with DODAB (dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide) allowed efficient plasmid DNA absorption and induced protein expression levels similar to those obtained with gold microparticles. More importantly, we demonstrated that a DNA vaccine adsorbed on spores can be loaded into biolistic cartridges and efficiently delivered into mice, which induced specific cellular and antibody responses. Altogether, these data indicate that B. subtilis spores represent a simple and low cost alternative for the in vivo delivery of DNA vaccines by the gene gun technology.

  4. Immune Responses in Mice Injected with gD Plasmid DNA of Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ji-chang; TONG Guang-zhi; QIU Hua-ji

    2004-01-01

    The gene encoding gD of isolate Luojing of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV)was amplified,sequenced, and cloned into plasmid pcDNA 3.1, resulting in a recombinant pcDNA-gD. Groups of BALB/c mice were injected with 100 μ g of plasmid only or together with liposome. After immunization, serum samples were collected from mice every 2 weeks for a 10-week period and tested for protein-specific antibody with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA). It was showed that the plasmid encoding IBRV glycopretein D developed gene-specific antibody. This report indicates the potential of DNA injection as a method of vaccination.

  5. Transduction of plasmid DNA in Streptomyces spp. and related genera by bacteriophage FP43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenney, M A; Baltz, R H

    1988-05-01

    A segment (hft) of bacteriophage FP43 DNA cloned into plasmid pIJ702 mediated high-frequency transduction of the resulting plasmid (pRHB101) by FP43 in Streptomyces griseofuscus. The transducing particles contained linear concatemers of plasmid DNA. Lysates of FP43 prepared on S. griseofuscus containing pRHB101 also transduced many other Streptomyces species, including several that restrict plaque formation by FP43 and at least two that produce restriction endonucleases that cut pRHB101 DNA. Transduction efficiencies in different species were influenced by the addition of anti-FP43 antiserum to the transduction plates, the temperature for cell growth before transduction, the multiplicity of infection, and the host on which the transducing lysate was prepared. FP43 lysates prepared on S. griseofuscus(pRHB101) also transduced species of Streptoverticillium, Chainia, and Saccharopolyspora.

  6. Mechanism of DNA Segregation in Prokaryotes: Replicon Pairing by parC of Plasmid R1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge; Lurz, Rudi; Gerdes, Kenn

    1998-07-01

    Prokaryotic chromosomes and plasmids encode partitioning systems that are required for DNA segregation at cell division. The systems are thought to be functionally analogous to eukaryotic centromeres and to play a general role in DNA segregation. The parA system of plasmid R1 encodes two proteins ParM and ParR, and a cis-acting centromere-like site denoted parC. The ParR protein binds to parC in vivo and in vitro. The ParM protein is an ATPase that interacts with ParR specifically bound to parC. Using electron microscopy, we show here that parC mediates efficient pairing of plasmid molecules. The pairing requires binding of ParR to parC and is stimulated by the ParM ATPase. The ParM mediated stimulation of plasmid pairing is dependent on ATP hydrolysis by ParM. Using a ligation kinetics assay, we find that ParR stimulates ligation of parC-containing DNA fragments. The rate-of-ligation was increased by wild type ParM protein but not by mutant ParM protein deficient in the ATPase activity. Thus, two independent assays show that parC mediates pairing of plasmid molecules in vitro. These results are consistent with the proposal that replicon pairing is part of the mechanism of DNA segregation in prokaryotes.

  7. The pPSU Plasmids for Generating DNA Molecular Weight Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrici, Ryan C; Pecen, Turner J; Johnston, James L; Tan, Song

    2017-05-26

    Visualizing nucleic acids by gel electrophoresis is one of the most common techniques in molecular biology, and reference molecular weight markers or ladders are commonly used for size estimation. We have created the pPSU1 & pPSU2 pair of molecular weight marker plasmids which produce both 100 bp and 1 kb DNA ladders when digested with two common restriction enzymes. The 100 bp ladder fragments have been optimized to migrate appropriately on both agarose and native polyacrylamide, unlike many currently available DNA ladders. Sufficient plasmid DNA can be isolated from 100 ml E. coli cultures for the two plasmids to produce 100 bp or 1 kb ladders for 1000 gels. As such, the pPSU1 and pPSU2 plasmids provide reference fragments from 50 to 10000 bp at a fraction of the cost of commercial DNA ladders. The pPSU1 and pPSU2 plasmids are available without licensing restrictions to nonprofit academic users, affording freely available high-quality, low-cost molecular weight standards for molecular biology applications.

  8. Molecular mechanism of immune response induced by foreign plasmid DNA after oral administration in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study immune response induced by foreign plasmid DNA after oral administration in mice.METHODS: Mice were orally administered with 200 μg of plasmid pcDNA3 once and spleen was isolated 4 h and 18 h after administration. Total RNA was extracted from spleen and gene expression profile of BALB/c mice spleen was analyzed by using Affymetrix oligonucleotide GeneChip. Functional cluster analysis was conducted by GenMAPP software.RESULTS: At 4 h and 18 h after oral plasmid pcDNA3 administration, a number of immune-related genes,including cytokine and cytokine receptors, chemokines and chemokine receptor, complement molecule,proteasome, histocompatibility molecule, lymphocyte antigen complex and apoptotic genes, were up-regulated. Moreover, MAPPFinder results also showed that numerous immune response processes were up-regulated. In contrast, the immunoglobulin genes were down-regulated.CONCLUSION: Foreign plasmid DNA can modulate the genes expression related to immune system via the gastrointestinal tract, and further analysis of the related immune process may help understand the molecular mechanisms of immune response induced by foreign plasmid via the gastrointestinal tract.

  9. The effects of a low-intensity red laser on bacterial growth, filamentation and plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, C.; Santos, J. N.; Guimarães, O. R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of nonphotosynthesizing microorganisms to light could increase cell division in cultures, a phenomenon denominated as biostimulation. However, data concerning the importance of the genetic characteristics of cells on this effect are as yet scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of a low-intensity red laser on the growth, filamentation and plasmids in Escherichia coli cells proficient and deficient in DNA repair. E. coli cultures were exposed to a laser (658 nm, 10 mW, 1 and 8 J cm-2) to study bacterial growth and filamentation. Also, bacterial cultures hosting pBSK plasmids were exposed to the laser to study DNA topological forms from the electrophoretic profile in agarose gels. Data indicate the low-intensity red laser: (i) had no effect on the growth of E. coli wild type and exonuclease III deficient cells; (ii) induced bacterial filamentation, (iii) led to no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids from exonuclease III deficient cells, but plasmids from wild type cells were altered. A low-intensity red laser at the low fluences used in phototherapy has no effect on growth, but induces filamentation and alters the topological forms of plasmid DNA in E. coli cultures depending on the DNA repair mechanisms.

  10. Specificity and function of Archaeal DNA replication initiator proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Rachel Y.; Xu, Yanqun; Gadelha, Catarina

    2013-01-01

    to investigate the role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in initiator function in vivo and in vitro. We find that the ATP-bound form of Orc1-1 is proficient for replication and implicates hydrolysis of ATP in downregulation of origin activity. Finally, we reveal that ATP and DNA binding by Orc1-1 remodels...... the protein's structure rather than that of the DNA template....

  11. Human papillomavirus DNA from warts for typing by endonuclease restriction patterns: purification by alkaline plasmid methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinami, M; Tanikawa, E; Hachisuka, H; Sasai, Y; Shingu, M

    1990-01-01

    The alkaline plasmid DNA extraction method of Birnboim and Doly was applied for the isolation of human papillomavirus (HPV) from warts. Tissue from common and plantar warts was digested with proteinase K, and the extrachromosomal circular covalently-closed form of HPV-DNA was rapidly extracted by alkaline sodium dodecyl sulphate and phenol-chloroform treatment. Recovery of HPV-DNA from the tissue was sufficient for determination of endonuclease restriction patterns by agarose gel electrophoresis.

  12. Physiological consequences of blocked Caulobacter crescentus dnaA expression, an essential DNA replication gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatyuk, B; Marczynski, G T

    2001-04-01

    Caulobacter crescentus chromosome replication is precisely coupled to a developmental cell cycle. Like most eubacteria, C. crescentus has a DnaA homologue that is presumed to initiate chromosome replication. However, the C. crescentus replication origin (Cori) lacks perfect consensus Escherichia coli DnaA boxes. Instead, the Cori strong transcription promoter (Ps) may regulate chromosome replication through the CtrA cell cycle response regulator. We therefore created a conditional dnaA C. crescentus strain. Blocking dnaA expression immediately decreased DNA synthesis, which stopped after approximately one doubling period. Fluorescent flow cytometry confirmed that DNA synthesis is blocked at the initiation stage. Cell division also stopped, but not swarmer to stalked cell differentiation. All cells became stalked cells that grew as long filaments. Therefore, general transcription and protein synthesis continued, whereas DNA synthesis stopped. However, transcription was selectively blocked from the flagellar fliQ and fliL and methyltransferase ccrM promoters, which require CtrA and are blocked by different DNA synthesis inhibitors. Interestingly, transcription from Cori Ps continued unaltered. Therefore, Ps transcription is not sufficient for chromosome replication. Approximately 6-8 h after blocked dnaA expression, cells lost viability exponentially. Coincidentally, beta-galactosidase was induced from one transcription reporter, suggesting an altered physiology. We conclude that C. crescentus DnaA is essential for chromosome replication initiation, and perhaps also has a wider role in cell homeostasis.

  13. Advances in host and vector development for the production of plasmid DNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairhofer, Juergen; Lara, Alvaro R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in DNA vaccine research provide a new momentum for this rather young and potentially disruptive technology. Gene-based vaccines are capable of eliciting protective immunity in humans to persistent intracellular pathogens, such as HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis, for which the conventional vaccine technologies have failed so far. The recent identification and characterization of genes coding for tumor antigens has stimulated the development of DNA-based antigen-specific cancer vaccines. Although most academic researchers consider the production of reasonable amounts of plasmid DNA (pDNA) for immunological studies relatively easy to solve, problems often arise during this first phase of production. In this chapter we review the current state of the art of pDNA production at small (shake flasks) and mid-scales (lab-scale bioreactor fermentations) and address new trends in vector design and strain engineering. We will guide the reader through the different stages of process design starting from choosing the most appropriate plasmid backbone, choosing the right Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain for production, and cultivation media and scale-up issues. In addition, we will address some points concerning the safety and potency of the produced plasmids, with special focus on producing antibiotic resistance-free plasmids. The main goal of this chapter is to make immunologists aware of the fact that production of the pDNA vaccine has to be performed with as much as attention and care as the rest of their research.

  14. Functional redundancy between DNA ligases I and III in DNA replication in vertebrate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Bednar, Theresa; Wang, Minli; Paul, Katja; Mladenov, Emil; Bencsik-Theilen, Alena A.; Iliakis, George

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the three families of ATP-dependent DNA ligases are associated with specific functions in DNA metabolism. DNA ligase I (LigI) catalyzes Okazaki-fragment ligation at the replication fork and nucleotide excision repair (NER). DNA ligase IV (LigIV) mediates repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) via the canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. The evolutionary younger DNA ligase III (LigIII) is restricted to higher eukaryotes and has been associated with base excision (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR). Here, using conditional knockout strategies for LIG3 and concomitant inactivation of the LIG1 and LIG4 genes, we show that in DT40 cells LigIII efficiently supports semi-conservative DNA replication. Our observations demonstrate a high functional versatility for the evolutionary new LigIII in DNA replication and mitochondrial metabolism, and suggest the presence of an alternative pathway for Okazaki fragment ligation. PMID:22127868

  15. Design of expanded bed supports for the recovery of plasmid DNA by anion exchange adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theodossiou, Irini; Søndergaard, M.; Thomas, Owen R. T.

    2001-01-01

    In this study we detail the rational design of new chromatographic adsorbents tailored for the capture of plasmid DNA. Features present on current chromatographic supports that can significantly enhance plasmid binding capacity have been identified in packed bed chromatography experiments...... and blueprints for improved expanded bed adsorbents have been put forward. The characterisation and testing of small (20-40 mum) high density (>3.7 g cm(-3)) pellicular expanded bed materials functionalised with various anion exchange structures is presented. In studies with calf thymus DNA, dynamic binding...

  16. Potential biomarkers of DNA replication stress in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Liqun; Chen, Long; Wu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Oncogene activation is an established driver of tumorigenesis. An apparently inevitable consequence of oncogene activation is the generation of DNA replication stress (RS), a feature common to most cancer cells. RS, in turn, is a causal factor in the development of chromosome instability (CIN), a...

  17. Timing, coordination, and rhythm: Acrobatics at the DNA replication fork

    KAUST Repository

    Hamdan, Samir

    2010-04-09

    In DNA replication, the antiparallel nature of the parental duplex imposes certain constraints on the activity of the DNA polymerases that synthesize new DNA. The leading-strand polymerase advances in a continuous fashion, but the lagging-strand polymerase is forced to restart at short intervals. In several prokaryotic systems studied so far, this problem is solved by the formation of a loop in the lagging strand of the replication fork to reorient the lagging-strand DNA polymerase so that it advances in parallel with the leading-strand polymerase. The replication loop grows and shrinks during each cycle of Okazaki fragment synthesis. The timing of Okazaki fragment synthesis and loop formation is determined by a subtle interplay of enzymatic activities at the fork. Recent developments in single-molecule techniques have enabled the direct observation of these processes and have greatly contributed to a better understanding of the dynamic nature of the replication fork. Here, we will review recent experimental advances, present the current models, and discuss some of the exciting developments in the field. 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. DNA replication: stalling a fork for imprinting and switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Mating-type switching in fission yeast has long been known to be directed by a DNA 'imprint'. This imprint has now been firmly characterized as a protected site-specific and strand-specific nick. New work also links the widely conserved Swi1-Swi3 complex to the protection of stalled replication...

  19. DNA replication at the single-molecule level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stratmann, S.A.; Oijen, A.M. van

    2014-01-01

    A cell can be thought of as a highly sophisticated micro factory: in a pool of billions of molecules – metabolites, structural proteins, enzymes, oligonucleotides – multi-subunit complexes assemble to perform a large number of basic cellular tasks, such as DNA replication, RNA/protein synthesis or i

  20. DNA replication at the single-molecule level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stratmann, S A; van Oijen, A M

    2014-01-01

    A cell can be thought of as a highly sophisticated micro factory: in a pool of billions of molecules - metabolites, structural proteins, enzymes, oligonucleotides - multi-subunit complexes assemble to perform a large number of basic cellular tasks, such as DNA replication, RNA/protein synthesis or i

  1. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  2. Chromatin Dynamics During DNA Replication and Uncharacterized Replication Factors determined by Nascent Chromatin Capture (NCC) Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Bau; Kustatscher, Georg; Nakamura, Kyosuke; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Menard, Patrice; Mejlvang, Jakob; Rappsilber, Juri; Groth, Anja

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To maintain genome function and stability, DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin must be duplicated during cell division. Understanding how entire chromosomes are copied remains a major challenge. Here, we use Nascent Chromatin Capture (NCC) to profile chromatin proteome dynamics during replication in human cells. NCC relies on biotin-dUTP labelling of replicating DNA, affinity-purification and quantitative proteomics. Comparing nascent chromatin with mature post-replicative chromatin, we provide association dynamics for 3995 proteins. The replication machinery and 485 chromatin factors like CAF-1, DNMT1, SUV39h1 are enriched in nascent chromatin, whereas 170 factors including histone H1, DNMT3, MBD1-3 and PRC1 show delayed association. This correlates with H4K5K12diAc removal and H3K9me1 accumulation, while H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 remain unchanged. Finally, we combine NCC enrichment with experimentally derived chromatin probabilities to predict a function in nascent chromatin for 93 uncharacterized proteins and identify FAM111A as a replication factor required for PCNA loading. Together, this provides an extensive resource to understand genome and epigenome maintenance. PMID:24561620

  3. Evaluation of plasmid and genomic DNA calibrants used for the quantification of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioara-Buda, M; Meyer, W; Jeynov, B; Corbisier, P; Trapmann, S; Emons, H

    2012-07-01

    The reliable quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) by real-time PCR requires, besides thoroughly validated quantitative detection methods, sustainable calibration systems. The latter establishes the anchor points for the measured value and the measurement unit, respectively. In this paper, the suitability of two types of DNA calibrants, i.e. plasmid DNA and genomic DNA extracted from plant leaves, for the certification of the GMO content in reference materials as copy number ratio between two targeted DNA sequences was investigated. The PCR efficiencies and coefficients of determination of the calibration curves as well as the measured copy number ratios for three powder certified reference materials (CRMs), namely ERM-BF415e (NK603 maize), ERM-BF425c (356043 soya), and ERM-BF427c (98140 maize), originally certified for their mass fraction of GMO, were compared for both types of calibrants. In all three systems investigated, the PCR efficiencies of plasmid DNA were slightly closer to the PCR efficiencies observed for the genomic DNA extracted from seed powders rather than those of the genomic DNA extracted from leaves. Although the mean DNA copy number ratios for each CRM overlapped within their uncertainties, the DNA copy number ratios were significantly different using the two types of calibrants. Based on these observations, both plasmid and leaf genomic DNA calibrants would be technically suitable as anchor points for the calibration of the real-time PCR methods applied in this study. However, the most suitable approach to establish a sustainable traceability chain is to fix a reference system based on plasmid DNA.

  4. DNA-binding proteins regulating pIP501 transfer and replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Grohmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available pIP501 is a Gram-positive broad-host-range model plasmid intensively used for studying plasmid replication and conjugative transfer. It is a multiple antibiotic resistance plasmid frequently found in clinical Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates. Replication of pIP501 proceeds unidirectionally by a theta mechanism. The minimal replicon of pIP501 is composed of the repR gene encoding the essential rate-limiting replication initiator protein RepR and the origin of replication, oriR, located downstream of repR. RepR is similar to RepE of related streptococcal plasmid pAMβ1, which has been shown to possess RNase activity cleaving free RNA molecules in close proximity of the initiation site of DNA synthesis. Replication of pIP501 is controlled by the concerted action of a small protein, CopR, and an antisense RNA, RNAIII. CopR has a dual role: It acts as transcriptional repressor at the repR promoter and prevents convergent transcription of RNAIII and repR mRNA (RNAII, thereby indirectly increasing RNAIII synthesis. CopR binds asymmetrically as a dimer at two consecutive binding sites upstream of and overlapping with the repR promoter. RNAIII induces transcriptional attenuation within the leader region of the repR mRNA (RNAII. Deletion of either control component causes a 10- to 20-fold increase of plasmid copy number, while simultaneous deletions have no additional effect. Conjugative transfer of pIP501 depends on a type IV secretion system (T4SS encoded in a single operon. Its transfer host-range is considerably broad, as it has been transferred to virtually all Gram-positive bacteria including filamentous streptomycetes and even the Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Expression of the 15 genes encoding the T4SS is tightly controlled by binding of the relaxase TraA, the transfer initiator protein, to the operon promoter, which overlaps with the origin of transfer (oriT. The T4SS operon encodes the DNA-binding proteins TraJ (VirD4

  5. DNA-Binding Proteins Regulating pIP501 Transfer and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohmann, Elisabeth; Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Brantl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    pIP501 is a Gram-positive broad-host-range model plasmid intensively used for studying plasmid replication and conjugative transfer. It is a multiple antibiotic resistance plasmid frequently detected in clinical Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium strains. Replication of pIP501 proceeds unidirectionally by a theta mechanism. The minimal replicon of pIP501 is composed of the repR gene encoding the essential rate-limiting replication initiator protein RepR and the origin of replication, oriR, located downstream of repR. RepR is similar to RepE of related streptococcal plasmid pAMβ1, which has been shown to possess RNase activity cleaving free RNA molecules in close proximity of the initiation site of DNA synthesis. Replication of pIP501 is controlled by the concerted action of a small protein, CopR, and an antisense RNA, RNAIII. CopR has a dual function: It acts as transcriptional repressor at the repR promoter and, in addition, prevents convergent transcription of RNAIII and repR mRNA (RNAII), which indirectly increases RNAIII synthesis. CopR binds asymmetrically as a dimer at two consecutive binding sites upstream of and overlapping with the repR promoter. RNAIII induces transcriptional attenuation within the leader region of the repR mRNA (RNAII). Deletion of either control component causes a 10- to 20-fold increase of plasmid copy number, while simultaneous deletions have no additional effect. Conjugative transfer of pIP501 depends on a type IV secretion system (T4SS) encoded in a single operon. Its transfer host-range is considerably broad, as it has been transferred to virtually all Gram-positive bacteria including Streptomyces and even the Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Expression of the 15 genes encoding the T4SS is tightly controlled by binding of the relaxase TraA, the transfer initiator protein, to the operon promoter overlapping with the origin of transfer (oriT). The T4SS operon encodes the DNA-binding proteins TraJ (VirD4-like coupling

  6. DNA ligase I selectively affects DNA synthesis by DNA polymerases delta and epsilon suggesting differential functions in DNA replication and repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Mossi, R; Ferrari, E; Hübscher, U

    1998-01-01

    The joining of single-stranded breaks in double-stranded DNA is an essential step in many important processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and genetic recombination. Several data implicate a role for DNA ligase I in DNA replication, probably coordinated by the action of other enzymes and proteins. Since both DNA polymerases delta and epsilon show multiple functions in different DNA transactions, we investigated the effect of DNA ligase I on various DNA synthesis events catalyzed by th...

  7. Preventing DNA over-replication: a Cdk perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Andrew CG

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cell cycle is tightly controlled to ensure that replication origins fire only once per cycle and that consecutive S-phases are separated by mitosis. When controls fail, DNA over-replication ensues: individual origins fire more than once per S-phase (re-replication or consecutive S-phases occur without intervening mitoses (endoreduplication. In yeast the cell cycle is controlled by a single cyclin dependent kinase (Cdk that prevents origin licensing at times when it promotes origin firing, and that is inactivated, via proteolysis of its partner cyclin, as cells undergo mitosis. A quantitative model describes three levels of Cdk activity: low activity allows licensing, intermediate activity allows firing but prevents licensing, and high activity promotes mitosis. In higher eukaryotes the situation is complicated by the existence of additional proteins (geminin, Cul4-Ddb1Cdt2, and Emi1 that control licensing. A current challenge is to understand how these various control mechanisms are co-ordinated and why the degree of redundancy between them is so variable. Here the experimental induction of DNA over-replication is reviewed in the context of the quantitative model of Cdk action. Endoreduplication is viewed as a consequence of procedures that cause Cdk activity to fall below the threshold required to prevent licensing, and re-replication as the result of procedures that increase that threshold value. This may help to explain why over-replication does not necessarily require reduced Cdk activity and how different mechanisms conspire to prevent over-replication. Further work is nevertheless required to determine exactly how losing just one licensing control mechanism often causes over-replication, and why this varies between cell systems.

  8. Verifying likelihoods for low template DNA profiles using multiple replicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Christopher D.; Greenhalgh, Matthew; Balding, David J.

    2014-01-01

    To date there is no generally accepted method to test the validity of algorithms used to compute likelihood ratios (LR) evaluating forensic DNA profiles from low-template and/or degraded samples. An upper bound on the LR is provided by the inverse of the match probability, which is the usual measure of weight of evidence for standard DNA profiles not subject to the stochastic effects that are the hallmark of low-template profiles. However, even for low-template profiles the LR in favour of a true prosecution hypothesis should approach this bound as the number of profiling replicates increases, provided that the queried contributor is the major contributor. Moreover, for sufficiently many replicates the standard LR for mixtures is often surpassed by the low-template LR. It follows that multiple LTDNA replicates can provide stronger evidence for a contributor to a mixture than a standard analysis of a good-quality profile. Here, we examine the performance of the likeLTD software for up to eight replicate profiling runs. We consider simulated and laboratory-generated replicates as well as resampling replicates from a real crime case. We show that LRs generated by likeLTD usually do exceed the mixture LR given sufficient replicates, are bounded above by the inverse match probability and do approach this bound closely when this is expected. We also show good performance of likeLTD even when a large majority of alleles are designated as uncertain, and suggest that there can be advantages to using different profiling sensitivities for different replicates. Overall, our results support both the validity of the underlying mathematical model and its correct implementation in the likeLTD software. PMID:25082140

  9. Essential and non-essential DNA replication genes in the model halophilic Archaeon, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DasSarma Shiladitya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information transfer systems in Archaea, including many components of the DNA replication machinery, are similar to those found in eukaryotes. Functional assignments of archaeal DNA replication genes have been primarily based upon sequence homology and biochemical studies of replisome components, but few genetic studies have been conducted thus far. We have developed a tractable genetic system for knockout analysis of genes in the model halophilic archaeon, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, and used it to determine which DNA replication genes are essential. Results Using a directed in-frame gene knockout method in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, we examined nineteen genes predicted to be involved in DNA replication. Preliminary bioinformatic analysis of the large haloarchaeal Orc/Cdc6 family, related to eukaryotic Orc1 and Cdc6, showed five distinct clades of Orc/Cdc6 proteins conserved in all sequenced haloarchaea. Of ten orc/cdc6 genes in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, only two were found to be essential, orc10, on the large chromosome, and orc2, on the minichromosome, pNRC200. Of the three replicative-type DNA polymerase genes, two were essential: the chromosomally encoded B family, polB1, and the chromosomally encoded euryarchaeal-specific D family, polD1/D2 (formerly called polA1/polA2 in the Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 genome sequence. The pNRC200-encoded B family polymerase, polB2, was non-essential. Accessory genes for DNA replication initiation and elongation factors, including the putative replicative helicase, mcm, the eukaryotic-type DNA primase, pri1/pri2, the DNA polymerase sliding clamp, pcn, and the flap endonuclease, rad2, were all essential. Targeted genes were classified as non-essential if knockouts were obtained and essential based on statistical analysis and/or by demonstrating the inability to isolate chromosomal knockouts except in the presence of a complementing plasmid copy of the gene. Conclusion The results showed that ten

  10. Large-scale purification of pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA using tangential flow filtration and multi-step chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Yu, XiangHui; Yin, Yuhe; Liu, Xintao; Wu, Yongge; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Xizhen; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei

    2013-09-01

    The demand for pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA in vaccine applications and gene therapy has been increasing in recent years. In the present study, a process consisting of alkaline lysis, tangential flow filtration, purification by anion exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and size exclusion chromatography was developed. The final product met the requirements for pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA. The chromosomal DNA content was <1 μg/mg plasmid DNA, and RNA was not detectable by agarose gel electrophoresis. Moreover, the protein content was <2 μg/mg plasmid DNA, and the endotoxin content was <10 EU/mg plasmid DNA. The process was scaled up to yield 800 mg of pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA from approximately 2 kg of bacterial cell paste. The overall yield of the final plasmid DNA reached 48%. Therefore, we have established a rapid and efficient production process for pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Persistence of Free Plasmid DNA in Soil Monitored by Various Methods, Including a Transformation Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, Gerd; Lorenz, Michael G.; Sayler, Gary; Wackernagel, Wilfried

    1992-01-01

    The persistence and stability of free plasmid pUC8-ISP DNA introduced into 10-g samples of various soils and kept at 23°C were monitored over a period of 60 days. The soils were sampled at a plant science farm and included a loamy sand soil (no. 1), a clay soil (no. 2), and a silty clay soil (no. 3). Four different methods allowed monitoring of (i) the production of acid-soluble radioactive material from [3H]thymidine-labeled plasmid DNA, (ii) the decrease of hybridizing nucleotide sequences in slot blot analysis, (iii) the loss of plasmid integrity measured by Southern hybridization, and (iv) the decay of the biological activity as determined by transformation of Ca2+-treated Escherichia coli cells with the DNA extracted from soil. Acid-soluble material was not produced within the first 24 h but then increased to 45% (soil no. 1), 27% (soil no. 2), and 77% (soil no. 3) until the end of incubation. A quite parallel loss of material giving a slot blot hybridization signal was observed. Southern hybridization indicated that after 1 h in the soils, plasmid DNA was mostly in the form of circular and full-length linear molecules but that, depending on the soil type, after 2 to 5 days full-length plasmid molecules were hardly detectable. The transforming activity of plasmid DNA reextracted from the soils followed inactivation curves over 2 to 4 orders of magnitude and dropped below the detection limit after 10 days. The inactivation was slower in soil no. 2 (28.2-h half-life time of the transforming activity of a plasmid molecule) than in soils no. 3 (15.1 h) and no. 1 (9.1 h). The studies provide data on the persistence of free DNA molecules in natural bacterial soil habitats. The data suggest that plasmid DNA may persist long enough to be available for uptake by competent recipient cells in situ. Images PMID:16348772

  12. 99mTc-Labeled HYNIC-DAPI Causes Plasmid DNA Damage with High Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Joerg Kotzerke; Robert Punzet; Roswitha Runge; Sandra Ferl; Liane Oehme; Gerd Wunderlich; Robert Freudenberg

    2014-01-01

    (99m)Tc is the standard radionuclide used for nuclear medicine imaging. In addition to gamma irradiation, (99m)Tc emits low-energy Auger and conversion electrons that deposit their energy within nanometers of the decay site. To study the potential for DNA damage, direct DNA binding is required. Plasmid DNA enables the investigation of the unprotected interactions between molecules and DNA that result in single-strand breaks (SSBs) or double-strand breaks (DSBs); the resulting DNA fragments ca...

  13. The immunogenicity of viral haemorragic septicaemia rhabdovirus (VHSV) DNA vaccines can depend on plasmid regulatory sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chico, V; Ortega-Villaizan, M; Falco, A; Tafalla, C; Perez, L; Coll, J M; Estepa, A

    2009-03-18

    A plasmid DNA encoding the viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV)-G glycoprotein under the control of 5' sequences (enhancer/promoter sequence plus both non-coding 1st exon and 1st intron sequences) from carp beta-actin gene (pAE6-G(VHSV)) was compared to the vaccine plasmid usually described the gene expression is regulated by the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate-early promoter (pMCV1.4-G(VHSV)). We observed that these two plasmids produced a markedly different profile in the level and time of expression of the encoded-antigen, and this may have a direct effect upon the intensity and suitability of the in vivo immune response. Thus, fish genetic immunisation assays were carried out to study the immune response of both plasmids. A significantly enhanced specific-antibody response against the viral glycoprotein was found in the fish immunised with pAE6-G(VHSV). However, the protective efficacy against VHSV challenge conferred by both plasmids was similar. Later analysis of the transcription profile of a set of representative immune-related genes in the DNA immunized fish suggested that depending on the plasmid-related regulatory sequences controlling its expression, the plasmid might activate distinct patterns of the immune system. All together, the results from this study mainly point out that the selection of a determinate encoded-antigen/vector combination for genetic immunisation is of extraordinary importance in designing optimised DNA vaccines that, when required for inducing protective immune response, could elicit responses biased to antigen-specific antibodies or cytotoxic T cells generation.

  14. Linking DNA replication to heterochromatin silencing and epigenetic inheritance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Li; Zhiguo Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin is organized into distinct functional domains.During mitotic cell division,both genetic information encoded in DNA sequence and epigenetic information embedded in chromatin structure must be faithfully duplicated.The inheritance of epigenetic states is critical in maintaining the genome integrity and gene expression state.In this review,we will discuss recent progress on how proteins known to be involved in DNA replication and DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly impact on the inheritance and maintenance of heterochromatin,a tightly compact chromatin structure that silences gene transcription.As heterochromatin is important in regulating gene expression and maintaining genome stability,understanding how heterochromatin states are inherited during S phase of the cell cycle is of fundamental importance.

  15. Studies on the mechanism of DNA replication in Physarum polycephalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, E.N.; Evans, T.E.; Evans, H.H.

    1974-01-01

    The synthesis of single-stranded DNA subunits (4 x 10/sup 7/ daltons) in Physarum polycephalum was studied by alkaline sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The results were compared with the synthesis of the double-stranded DNA molecules (2.3 x 10/sup 8/ daltons) which they comprise, as determined from neutral sucrose density gradient centrifugation patterns. Although the initiation of synthesis of most double-stranded DNA molecules takes place relatively early in the S period, synthesis of the subunits within them is initiated throughout at least the first two hours of this period. Similarly, replicating (presumably forked) DNA molecules appear to split into daughter DNA molecules prior to the completion of synthesis of the subunits therein. The average rate of DNA chain elongation within subunits is 0.3 x 10/sup 6/ daltons/minute. It is suggested that alkaline sucrose density gradient centrifugation may be a more sensitive method for determining the time required for the completion of replication than other methods based solely on the incorporation of radioactive DNA precursors into an acid-insoluble product.

  16. Evolution of DNA replication protein complexes in eukaryotes and Archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Chia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The replication of DNA in Archaea and eukaryotes requires several ancillary complexes, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, replication factor C (RFC, and the minichromosome maintenance (MCM complex. Bacterial DNA replication utilizes comparable proteins, but these are distantly related phylogenetically to their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts at best. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While the structures of each of the complexes do not differ significantly between the archaeal and eukaryotic versions thereof, the evolutionary dynamic in the two cases does. The number of subunits in each complex is constant across all taxa. However, they vary subtly with regard to composition. In some taxa the subunits are all identical in sequence, while in others some are homologous rather than identical. In the case of eukaryotes, there is no phylogenetic variation in the makeup of each complex-all appear to derive from a common eukaryotic ancestor. This is not the case in Archaea, where the relationship between the subunits within each complex varies taxon-to-taxon. We have performed a detailed phylogenetic analysis of these relationships in order to better understand the gene duplications and divergences that gave rise to the homologous subunits in Archaea. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This domain level difference in evolution suggests that different forces have driven the evolution of DNA replication proteins in each of these two domains. In addition, the phylogenies of all three gene families support the distinctiveness of the proposed archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota.

  17. Isolation of T—DNA flanking plant DNA from T—DNA insertional embryo—lethal mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana by plasmid rescue technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAOXIAOLI; JIANGESUN; 等

    1996-01-01

    Three T-DNA insertional embryonic lethal mutants from NASC(The Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Center) were first checked with their segregation ratio of abortive and normal seeds and the copy number of T-DNA insertion.The N4081 mutant has a segregation ratio of 1:3.04 in average and one T-DNA insertion site according to our assay.It was therefore chosen for further analysis.To isolate the joint fragment of T-DNA and plant DNA,the plasmid rescue technique was used.pEL-7,one of plasmids from left border of T-DNA,which contained pBR322 was selected from ampicillin plate.The T-DNA fragment of pEL-7 was checked by restriction enzyme analysis and Southern Blot.Restriction analysis confirmed the presence of known sites of EcoRI,PstI and PvuII on it.For confirming the presence of flanking plant DNA in this plasmid,pEL-7 DNA was labeled and hybridized with wild type and mutant plant DNA.The Southern Blot indicated the hybridization band in both of them.Furthermore,the junction of T-DNA/plant DNA was subcloned into bluescript SK+ and sequenced by Applied Biosystem 373A sequencer.The results showed the 822 bp fragment contained a 274 bp sequence,which is 99.6%homolog(273bp/274bp) to Ti plasmid pTi 15955,DNA.The bp of left 25 bp border repeat were also found in the juction of T-DNA and Plant DNA. Taken together,pEL-7 should coutain a joint fragment of T-DNA and flanking plant DNA.This plasmid DNA could be used for the isolation of plant gene,which will be helpful to elucidate the relationship between gene function and plant embryo development.

  18. Ca2+ promoted the low transformation efficiency of plasmid DNA exposed to PAH contaminants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuxing Kang

    Full Text Available The effects of interactions between genetic materials and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs on gene expression in the extracellular environment remain to be elucidated and little information is currently available on the effect of ionic strength on the transformation of plasmid DNA exposed to PAHs. Phenanthrene and pyrene were used as representative PAHs to evaluate the transformation of plasmid DNA after PAH exposure and to determine the role of Ca(2+ during the transformation. Plasmid DNA exposed to the test PAHs demonstrated low transformation efficiency. In the absence of PAHs, the transformation efficiency was 4.7 log units; however, the efficiency decreased to 3.72-3.14 log units with phenanthrene/pyrene exposures of 50 µg · L(-1. The addition of Ca(2+ enhanced the low transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to PAHs. Based on the co-sorption of Ca(2+ and phenanthrene/pyrene by DNA, we employed Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and mass spectrometry (MS to determine the mechanisms involved in PAH-induced DNA transformation. The observed low transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to either phenanthrene or pyrene can be attributed to a broken hydrogen bond in the double helix caused by planar PAHs. Added Ca(2+ formed strong electrovalent bonds with "-POO(--" groups in the DNA, weakening the interaction between PAHs and DNA based on weak molecular forces. This decreased the damage of PAHs to hydrogen bonds in double-stranded DNA by isolating DNA molecules from PAHs and consequently enhanced the transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to PAH contaminants. The findings provide insight into the effects of anthropogenic trace PAHs on DNA transfer in natural environments.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies on the parD-encoded protein Kid from Escherichia coli plasmid R1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hargreaves, D.; Giraldo, R.; Santos-Sierra, S.; Boelens, R.; Rice, D.W.; Díaz Orejas, R.; Rafferty, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    DNA replication in Escherichia coli and therefore bacterial proliferation relies upon the efficient functioning of the DnaB helicase. The toxin protein Kid from the plasmid-stability system parD encoded on plasmid R1 of E. coli is thought to target and block DnaB-dependent DNA replication. The

  20. Evaluation of different buffers on plasmid DNA encapsulation into PLGA microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Man Tsuey; Blatchford, Chris; Oya Alpar, H

    2009-03-31

    Double emulsion solvent evaporation is a widely used method to prepare poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles encapsulating plasmid DNA. There are inherent problems associated with preparing plasmid DNA in this form, in particular the DNA is liable to degrade during manufacture and the resulting powder has low encapsulation efficiencies. This study compares the use of two buffers, 0.1M NaHCO(3) and 0.07M Na(2)HPO(4) and the effect these have on the encapsulation efficiency and other critical parameters associated with these encapsulated DNA materials. Both buffers preserved the conformation of the original plasmid DNA during the homogenization process, but those made with 0.07M Na(2)HPO(4) had higher encapsulation efficiencies, as well as smaller diameters, compared with those made with 0.1M NaHCO(3) (encapsulation efficiencies of 40.72-45.65%, and mean volume diameters of 2.96-4.45microm). Buffers with a range of pH from 5 to 12 were investigated, and it was demonstrated that pH 9 was the point at which the highest amount of supercoiled DNA was balanced with the highest encapsulation efficiency. To simulate in vitro release, it was shown that microparticles made with 0.07M Na(2)HPO(4) had lower DNA release rates than those made with 0.1M NaHCO(3). These results demonstrate that the use of different buffers can aid in retaining the conformation of plasmid DNA, and can also modulate the amount of DNA encapsulated and the release profiles of microparticles.

  1. Encapsulation of plasmid DNA in calcium phosphate nanoparticles: stem cell uptake and gene transfer efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao X

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Xia Cao*, Wenwen Deng*, Yuan Wei*, Weiyan Su, Yan Yang, Yawei Wei, Jiangnan Yu, Ximing XuDepartment of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, and Center for Nano Drug/Gene Delivery and Tissue Engineering, Jiangsu University, Jingkou District, Zhenjiang, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The purpose of this study was to develop calcium phosphate nanocomposite particles encapsulating plasmid DNA (CP-pDNA nanoparticles as a nonviral vector for gene delivery.Methods: CP-pDNA nanoparticles employing plasmid transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 were prepared and characterized. The transfection efficiency and cell viability of the CP-pDNA nanoparticles were evaluated in mesenchymal stem cells, which were identified by immunofluorescence staining. Cytotoxicity of plasmid TGF-β1 and calcium phosphate to mesenchymal stem cells were evaluated by MTT assay.Results: The integrity of TGF-β1 encapsulated in the CP-pDNA nanoparticles was maintained. The well dispersed CP-pDNA nanoparticles exhibited an ultralow particle size (20–50 nm and significantly lower cytotoxicity than Lipofectamine™ 2000. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the cultured cells in this study were probably mesenchymal stem cells. The cellular uptake and transfection efficiency of the CP-pDNA nanoparticles into the mesenchymal stem cells were higher than that of needle-like calcium phosphate nanoparticles and a standard calcium phosphate transfection kit. Furthermore, live cell imaging and confocal laser microscopy vividly showed the transportation process of the CP-pDNA nanoparticles in mesenchymal stem cells. The results of a cytotoxicity assay found that both plasmid TGF-β1 and calcium phosphate were not toxic to mesenchymal stem cells.Conclusion: CP-pDNA nanoparticles can be developed into an effective alternative as a nonviral gene delivery system that is highly efficient and has low cytotoxicity.Keywords: calcium

  2. Regulation of DNA replication by the S-phase DNA damage checkpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhind Nicholas

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cells slow replication in response to DNA damage. This slowing was the first DNA damage checkpoint response discovered and its study led to the discovery of the central checkpoint kinase, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM. Nonetheless, the manner by which the S-phase DNA damage checkpoint slows replication is still unclear. The checkpoint could slow bulk replication by inhibiting replication origin firing or slowing replication fork progression, and both mechanisms appear to be used. However, assays in various systems using different DNA damaging agents have produced conflicting results as to the relative importance of the two mechanisms. Furthermore, although progress has been made in elucidating the mechanism of origin regulation in vertebrates, the mechanism by which forks are slowed remains unknown. We review both past and present efforts towards determining how cells slow replication in response to damage and try to resolve apparent conflicts and discrepancies within the field. We propose that inhibition of origin firing is a global checkpoint mechanism that reduces overall DNA synthesis whenever the checkpoint is activated, whereas slowing of fork progression reflects a local checkpoint mechanism that only affects replisomes as they encounter DNA damage and therefore only affects overall replication rates in cases of high lesion density.

  3. Production and purification of plasmid DNA vaccines: is there scope for further innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenopoulos, Alex; Pattnaik, Priyabrata

    2014-12-01

    The demand for plasmid DNA (pDNA) has vastly increased over the past decade in response to significant advances that have been made in its application for gene therapy and vaccine development. Plasmid DNA-based vaccines are experiencing a resurgence due to success with prime-boost immunization strategies. The challenge has always been poor productivity and delivery of pDNA. Plasmid DNA-based vaccines have traditionally required milligram scale of GMP-grade product for vaccination due to the relatively low efficacy and duration of gene expression. However, efforts to increase pDNA vaccine effectiveness are evolving in genetic manipulations of bacterial host, improvements in product recovery and innovative delivery methods. This review summarizes recent advances in large-scale pDNA vaccine manufacturing, ranging from upstream processing, downstream processing and formulation, as such information is usually not available to the scientific community. The article will highlight technology gaps and offer insight on further scope of innovation.

  4. DNA Replication Forks Pause at Silent Origins near the HML Locus in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yangzhou; Vujcic, Marija; Kowalski, David

    2001-01-01

    Chromosomal replicators in budding yeast contain an autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) that functions in a plasmid, but certain ARSs are silent as replication origins in their natural chromosomal context. In chromosome III, the HML ARS cluster (ARS302-ARS303-ARS320) and ARS301 flank the transcriptionally silent mating-type locus HML, and all of these ARSs are silent as replication origins. ARS301 and ARS302 function in transcriptional silencing mediated by the origin recognition complex ...

  5. Improvement of in vivo transfer of plasmid DNA in muscle : Comparison of electroporation versus ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusumanto, Yoka H.; Mulder, Nanno H.; Dam, Wendy A.; Losen, Mario H.; Meijer, Coby; Hospers, Geke A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Plasmid-based gene delivery to muscle is a treatment strategy for many diseases with potential advantages above viral-based gene delivery methods, however, with a relative low transfection efficiency. We compared two physical methods-electroporation and ultrasound-that facilitate DNA uptake into cel

  6. TOL plasmid carriage enhances biofilm formation and increases extracellular DNA content in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alvise, Paul W; Sjøholm, Ole R; Yankelevich, Tatiana; Jin, Yujie; Wuertz, Stefan; Smets, Barth F

    2010-11-01

    Adherent growth of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 with and without the TOL plasmid (pWWO) at the solid-liquid and air-liquid interface was examined. We compared biofilm formation on glass in flow cells, and assayed pellicle (air-liquid interface biofilm) formation in stagnant liquid cultures by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The TOL-carrying strains formed pellicles and thick biofilms, whereas the same strains without the plasmid displayed little adherent growth. Microscopy using fluorescent nucleic acid-specific stains revealed differences in the production of extracellular polymeric substances: TOL carriage leads to more extracellular DNA (eDNA) in pellicles and biofilms. Pellicles were dissolved by DNase I treatment. Enhanced cell lysis due to plasmid carriage was ruled out as the mechanism for eDNA release. We report, for the first time, that carriage of a conjugative plasmid leads to increased biofilm formation by production of eDNA. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermostable and site-specific DNA binding of the gene product ORF56 from the Sulfolobus islandicus plasmid pRN1, a putative archael plasmid copy control protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipps, Georg; Stegert, Mario; Krauss, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    There is still a lack of information on the specific characteristics of DNA-binding proteins from hyperthermophiles. Here we report on the product of the gene orf56 from plasmid pRN1 of the acidophilic and thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. orf56 has not been characterised yet but low sequence similarily to several eubacterial plasmid-encoded genes suggests that this 6.5 kDa protein is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein. The DNA-binding properties of ORF56, expressed in Escherichia coli, have been investigated by EMSA experiments and by fluorescence anisotropy measurements. Recombinant ORF56 binds to double-stranded DNA, specifically to an inverted repeat located within the promoter of orf56. Binding to this site could down-regulate transcription of the orf56 gene and also of the overlapping orf904 gene, encoding the putative initiator protein of plasmid replication. By gel filtration and chemical crosslinking we have shown that ORF56 is a dimeric protein. Stoichiometric fluorescence anisotropy titrations further indicate that ORF56 binds as a tetramer to the inverted repeat of its target binding site. CD spectroscopy points to a significant increase in ordered secondary structure of ORF56 upon binding DNA. ORF56 binds without apparent cooperativity to its target DNA with a dissociation constant in the nanomolar range. Quantitative analysis of binding isotherms performed at various salt concentrations and at different temperatures indicates that approximately seven ions are released upon complex formation and that complex formation is accompanied by a change in heat capacity of –6.2 kJ/mol. Furthermore, recombinant ORF56 proved to be highly thermostable and is able to bind DNA up to 85°C. PMID:11160922

  8. Differential behavior of plasmids containing chromosomal DNA insertions of various sizes during transformation and conjugation in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balganesh, M.; Setlow, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Plasmids with chromosomal insertions were constructed by removal of a 1.1-kilobase-pair piece from the 9.8-kilobase-pair vector plasmid pDM2 by EcoRI digestion and inserting in its place various lengths of chromosomal DNA (1.7, 3.4, and 9.0 kilobase pairs) coding for resistance to novobiocin. A fourth plasmid was constructed by insertion of the largest piece of chromosomal DNA into the SmaI site of pDM2. The plasmids without inserts were taken up poorly by competent cells and thus were considered not to contain specific DNA uptake sites. The presence of even the smallest insert of chromosomal DNA caused a large increase in transformation of Rec/sup +/ and Rec/sup -/ strains. The frequency of plasmid establishment in Rec/sup +/ cells by transformation increased exponentially with increasing insert size, but in Rec/sup -/ cells there was less transformation by the larger plasmids. Conjugal transfer of these plasmids was carried out with the 35-kilobase-pair mobilizing plasmid pHD147. The frequency of establishment of plasmids by this method not only was not markedly affected by the presence of the insertions, but also decreased somewhat with increase in insert size and was independent of rec-1 and rec-2 genes. Recombination between plasmid and chromosome was readily detected after transformation, but could not be detected after transconjugation even when the recipient cells were Rec/sup +/ and made competent. These data suggested that there is a special processing of plasmid DNA that enters the competent cells in transformation that makes possible recombination of homologous regions of the plasmid with the chromosome and pairing with the chromosome that aids plasmid establishment.

  9. DNA-Binding Proteins Essential for Protein-Primed Bacteriophage Φ29 DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Margarita; Holguera, Isabel; Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; de Vega, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis phage Φ29 has a linear, double-stranded DNA 19 kb long with an inverted terminal repeat of 6 nucleotides and a protein covalently linked to the 5' ends of the DNA. This protein, called terminal protein (TP), is the primer for the initiation of replication, a reaction catalyzed by the viral DNA polymerase at the two DNA ends. The DNA polymerase further elongates the nascent DNA chain in a processive manner, coupling strand displacement with elongation. The viral protein p5 is a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) that binds to the single strands generated by strand displacement during the elongation process. Viral protein p6 is a double-stranded DNA binding protein (DBP) that preferentially binds to the origins of replication at the Φ29 DNA ends and is required for the initiation of replication. Both SSB and DBP are essential for Φ29 DNA amplification. This review focuses on the role of these phage DNA-binding proteins in Φ29 DNA replication both in vitro and in vivo, as well as on the implication of several B. subtilis DNA-binding proteins in different processes of the viral cycle. We will revise the enzymatic activities of the Φ29 DNA polymerase: TP-deoxynucleotidylation, processive DNA polymerization coupled to strand displacement, 3'-5' exonucleolysis and pyrophosphorolysis. The resolution of the Φ29 DNA polymerase structure has shed light on the translocation mechanism and the determinants responsible for processivity and strand displacement. These two properties have made Φ29 DNA polymerase one of the main enzymes used in the current DNA amplification technologies. The determination of the structure of Φ29 TP revealed the existence of three domains: the priming domain, where the primer residue Ser232, as well as Phe230, involved in the determination of the initiating nucleotide, are located, the intermediate domain, involved in DNA polymerase binding, and the N-terminal domain, responsible for DNA binding and localization of the

  10. High-Throughput Plasmid cDNA Library Screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Kenneth H.; Yu, Charles; George, Reed A.; Carlson, JosephW.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Svirskas, Robert; Stapleton, Mark; Celniker, SusanE.

    2006-05-24

    Libraries of cDNA clones are valuable resources foranalysing the expression, structure, and regulation of genes, as well asfor studying protein functions and interactions. Full-length cDNA clonesprovide information about intron and exon structures, splice junctionsand 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs). Open reading frames (ORFs)derived from cDNA clones can be used to generate constructs allowingexpression of native proteins and N- or C-terminally tagged proteins.Thus, obtaining full-length cDNA clones and sequences for most or allgenes in an organism is critical for understanding genome functions.Expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing samples cDNA libraries at random,which is most useful at the beginning of large-scale screening projects.However, as projects progress towards completion, the probability ofidentifying unique cDNAs via EST sequencing diminishes, resulting in poorrecovery of rare transcripts. We describe an adapted, high-throughputprotocol intended for recovery of specific, full-length clones fromplasmid cDNA libraries in five days.

  11. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication with linear DNA sequences expressing antiviral micro-RNA shuttles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Saket; Ely, Abdullah; Bloom, Kristie; Weinberg, Marc S. [Antiviral Gene Therapy Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa); Arbuthnot, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.Arbuthnot@wits.ac.za [Antiviral Gene Therapy Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa)

    2009-11-20

    RNA interference (RNAi) may be harnessed to inhibit viral gene expression and this approach is being developed to counter chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Compared to synthetic RNAi activators, DNA expression cassettes that generate silencing sequences have advantages of sustained efficacy and ease of propagation in plasmid DNA (pDNA). However, the large size of pDNAs and inclusion of sequences conferring antibiotic resistance and immunostimulation limit delivery efficiency and safety. To develop use of alternative DNA templates that may be applied for therapeutic gene silencing, we assessed the usefulness of PCR-generated linear expression cassettes that produce anti-HBV micro-RNA (miR) shuttles. We found that silencing of HBV markers of replication was efficient (>75%) in cell culture and in vivo. miR shuttles were processed to form anti-HBV guide strands and there was no evidence of induction of the interferon response. Modification of terminal sequences to include flanking human adenoviral type-5 inverted terminal repeats was easily achieved and did not compromise silencing efficacy. These linear DNA sequences should have utility in the development of gene silencing applications where modifications of terminal elements with elimination of potentially harmful and non-essential sequences are required.

  12. Method for the preparation of plasmid DNA suitable for physicochemical measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtísková, M; Lukásová, E; Palecek, E

    1985-01-01

    A method has been developed for the isolation of plasmid DNA suitable for physical and physicochemical measurements. The procedure is based on the deproteinization of the cleared lysate of bacterial cells (after amplification of plasmids by chloramphenicol) by phenol at pH 8.0 and subsequent removal of chromosomal DNA by means of phenol at pH 4.0 and separation of RNA on a hydroxyapatite column at higher temperature. ColE1 DNA sample was compared with samples of the same DNA prepared by three thus far used methods. Samples obtained by means of the latter methods were contaminated with chromosomal DNA, RNA, or ethidium bromide. The presence of ethidium bromide in the DNA sample was a factor interfering in the electrochemical analysis, chromosomal DNA and RNA were disturbing in the use of other methods. DNA separated by the method devised by us was free of any detectable contaminants and fulfilled the high requirements for sample purity of differential pulse polarography. Measurements performed by means of differential pulse polarography showed that the content of single-stranded segments in superhelical ColE1 DNA is less than 0.15% (i.e. less than 20 bases per molecule). This is in keeping with the notion that a cruciform is formed in this DNA (as a result of tension due to supercoiling) in the region of inverted repeat sequence, containing only 5 bases in the single-stranded loop region.

  13. A Polycomb complex remains bound through DNA replication in the absence of other eukaryotic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Lengsfeld, Bettina M.

    2012-09-17

    Propagation of chromatin states through DNA replication is central to epigenetic regulation and can involve recruitment of chromatin proteins to replicating chromatin through interactions with replication fork components. Here we show using a fully reconstituted T7 bacteriophage system that eukaryotic proteins are not required to tether the Polycomb complex PRC1 to templates during DNA replication. Instead, DNA binding by PRC1 can withstand passage of a simple replication fork.

  14. Effects of DNA replication on mRNA noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Joseph R; Cole, John A; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida A

    2015-12-29

    There are several sources of fluctuations in gene expression. Here we study the effects of time-dependent DNA replication, itself a tightly controlled process, on noise in mRNA levels. Stochastic simulations of constitutive and regulated gene expression are used to analyze the time-averaged mean and variation in each case. The simulations demonstrate that to capture mRNA distributions correctly, chromosome replication must be realistically modeled. Slow relaxation of mRNA from the low copy number steady state before gene replication to the high steady state after replication is set by the transcript's half-life and contributes significantly to the shape of the mRNA distribution. Consequently both the intrinsic kinetics and the gene location play an important role in accounting for the mRNA average and variance. Exact analytic expressions for moments of the mRNA distributions that depend on the DNA copy number, gene location, cell doubling time, and the rates of transcription and degradation are derived for the case of constitutive expression and subsequently extended to provide approximate corrections for regulated expression and RNA polymerase variability. Comparisons of the simulated models and analytical expressions to experimentally measured mRNA distributions show that they better capture the physics of the system than previous theories.

  15. DNA replication of single-stranded Escherichia coli DNA phages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    Research on single-stranded DNA phages has contributed tremendously to our knowledge of several fundamental life-processes. The small size of their genomes and the fast rate at which they multiply in their host, Escherichia coil, made them attractive candidates for various studies. There are two cla

  16. Fabrication of Size-Tunable Metallic Nanoparticles Using Plasmid DNA as a Biomolecular Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Michael Drain

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid DNA can be used as a template to yield gold, palladium, silver, and chromium nanoparticles of different sizes based on variations in incubation time at 70 °C with gold phosphine complexes, with the acetates of silver or palladium, or chromium acetylacetonate. The employment of mild synthetic conditions, minimal procedural steps, and aqueous solvents makes this method environmentally greener and ensures general feasibility. The use of plasmids exploits the capabilities of the biotechnology industry as a source of nanoreactor materials.

  17. Studies on the effects of persistent RNA priming on DNA replication and genomic stability

    OpenAIRE

    Stuckey, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    [EN]: DNA replication and transcription take place on the same DNA template, and the correct interplay between these processes ensures faithful genome duplication. DNA replication must be highly coordinated with other cell cycle events, such as segregation of fully replicated DNA in order to maintain genomic integrity. Transcription generates RNA:DNA hybrids, transient intermediate structures that are degraded by the ribonuclease H (RNaseH) class of enzymes. RNA:DNA hybrids can form R-loops, ...

  18. Studies on the effects of persistent RNA priming on DNA replication and genomic stability

    OpenAIRE

    Stuckey, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    [EN]: DNA replication and transcription take place on the same DNA template, and the correct interplay between these processes ensures faithful genome duplication. DNA replication must be highly coordinated with other cell cycle events, such as segregation of fully replicated DNA in order to maintain genomic integrity. Transcription generates RNA:DNA hybrids, transient intermediate structures that are degraded by the ribonuclease H (RNaseH) class of enzymes. RNA:DNA hybrids can form R-loops, ...

  19. Synthetic peptide inhibitors of DNA replication in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Kjelstrup, Susanne

    of clinically important pathogens and is essential for bacterial proliferation. The bacterial replication apparatus fulfill the requirements for a good drug target. The replisome of S. aureus consists of 5 different subunits (2, PolC2, 4, δ and δ`) who’s organization depends on multiple protein......-protein interactions. Centrally in the replisome is the -clamp where to multiple proteins binds through a conserved motif. We have identified the protein-protein interactions in the replisome of S. aureus by use of a bacterial two-hybrid system. A reverse bacterial two-hybrid system (R-BTH) based on Pyr......N (), DnaB and DnaX (). Three peptides identified as inhibitors of DnaN have been purified. Two of these peptides inhibited growth as well as DNA replication in S. aureus. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the peptides was approximately 50 g/ml. Overexpression of DnaN reduced the inhibitory...

  20. Putative DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in Mitochondrial Plasmid of Paramecium caudatum Stock GT704

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trina Ekawati Tallei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria of Paramecium caudatum stock GT704 has a set of four kinds of linear plasmids with sizes of 8.2, 4.1, 2.8 and 1.4 kb. The plasmids of 8.2 and 2.8 kb exist as dimers consisting of 4.1- and 1.4-kb monomers, respectively. The plasmid 2.8 kb, designated as pGT704-2.8, contains an open reading frame encodes for putative DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP. This study reveals that this RNAP belongs to superfamily of DNA/RNA polymerase and family of T7/T3 single chain RNA polymerase and those of mitochondrial plasmid of fungi belonging to Basidiomycota and Ascomycota. It is suggested that RNAP of pGT704-2.8 can perform transcription without transcription factor as promoter recognition. Given that only two motifs were found, it could not be ascertained whether this RNAP has a full function independently or integrated with mtDNA in carrying out its function.

  1. Transcriptional control of DNA replication licensing by Myc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovka, Taras; Schönfeld, Manuela; Raffeiner, Philipp; Breuker, Kathrin; Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Hartl, Markus; Bister, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    The c-myc protooncogene encodes the Myc transcription factor, a global regulator of fundamental cellular processes. Deregulation of c-myc leads to tumorigenesis, and c-myc is an important driver in human cancer. Myc and its dimerization partner Max are bHLH-Zip DNA binding proteins involved in transcriptional regulation of target genes. Non-transcriptional functions have also been attributed to the Myc protein, notably direct interaction with the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) controlling the initiation of DNA replication. A key component of the pre-RC is the Cdt1 protein, an essential factor in origin licensing. Here we present data suggesting that the CDT1 gene is a transcriptional target of the Myc-Max complex. Expression of the CDT1 gene in v-myc-transformed cells directly correlates with myc expression. Also, human tumor cells with elevated c-myc expression display increased CDT1 expression. Occupation of the CDT1 promoter by Myc-Max is demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and transactivation by Myc-Max is shown in reporter assays. Ectopic expression of CDT1 leads to cell transformation. Our results provide a possible direct mechanistic link of Myc's canonical function as a transcription factor to DNA replication. Furthermore, we suggest that aberrant transcriptional activation of CDT1 by deregulated myc alleles contributes to the genomic instabilities observed in tumor cells.

  2. PEGylation enhances tumor targeting of plasmid DNA by an artificial cationized protein with repeated RGD sequences, Pronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2004-05-31

    The objective of this study is to investigate feasibility of a non-viral gene carrier with repeated RGD sequences (Pronectin F+) in tumor targeting for gene expression. The Pronectin F+ was cationized by introducing spermine (Sm) to the hydroxyl groups to allow to polyionically complex with plasmid DNA. The cationized Pronectin F+ prepared was additionally modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules which have active ester and methoxy groups at the terminal, to form various PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+. The cationized Pronectin F+ with or without PEGylation at different extents was mixed with a plasmid DNA of LacZ to form respective cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes. The plasmid DNA was electrophoretically complexed with cationized Pronectin F+ and PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, irrespective of the PEGylation extent, although the higher N/P ratio of complexes was needed for complexation with the latter Pronectin F+. The molecular size and zeta potential measurements revealed that the plasmid DNA was reduced in size to about 250 nm and the charge was changed to be positive by the complexation with cationized Pronectin F+. For the complexation with PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, the charge of complex became neutral being almost 0 mV with the increasing PEGylation extents, while the molecular size was similar to that of cationized Pronectin F+. When cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes with or without PEGylation were intravenously injected to mice carrying a subcutaneous Meth-AR-1 fibrosarcoma mass, the PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complex specifically enhanced the level of gene expression in the tumor, to a significantly high extent compared with the cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes and free plasmid DNA. The enhanced level of gene expression depended on the percentage of PEG introduced, the N/P ratio, and the plasmid DNA dose. A fluorescent microscopic study revealed that the

  3. Insight into F plasmid DNA segregation revealed by structures of SopB and SopB–DNA complexes

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Accurate DNA segregation is essential for genome transmission. Segregation of the prototypical F plasmid requires the centromere-binding protein SopB, the NTPase SopA and the sopC centromere. SopB displays an intriguing range of DNA-binding properties essential for partition; it binds sopC to form a partition complex, which recruits SopA, and it also coats DNA to prevent non-specific SopA–DNA interactions, which inhibits SopA polymerization. To understand the myriad functions of SopB, we dete...

  4. Role for RNA: DNA hybrids in origin-independent replication priming in a eukaryotic system

    OpenAIRE

    Stuckey, Ruth; García Rodriguez, Néstor; Aguilera López, Andrés; Wellinger, Ralf Erik

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication initiates at defined replication origins along eukaryotic chromosomes, ensuring complete genome duplication within a single S-phase. A key feature of replication origins is their ability to control the onset of DNA synthesis mediated by DNA polymerase-α and its intrinsic RNA primase activity. Here, we describe a novel origin-independent replication process that is mediated by transcription. RNA polymerase I transcription constraints lead to persistent RNA:DNA hybrids (R-loops)...

  5. Binding and elution strategy for improved performance of arginine affinity chromatography in supercoiled plasmid DNA purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, F; Prazeres, D M F; Queiroz, J A

    2009-02-01

    New interesting strategies for plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification were designed, exploiting affinity interactions between amino acids and nucleic acids. The potential application of arginine-based chromatography to purify pDNA has been recently described in our work; however, to achieve higher efficiency and selectivity in arginine affinity chromatography, it is essential to characterize the behaviour of binding/elution of supercoiled (sc) isoforms. In this study, two different strategies based on increased sodium chloride (225-250 mm) or arginine (20-70 mm) stepwise gradients are described to purify sc isoforms. Thus, it was proved that well-defined binding/elution conditions are crucial to enhance the purification performance, resulting in an improvement of the final plasmids yields and transfection efficiency, as this could represent a significant impact on therapeutic applications of the purified sc isoform. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Isothermal titration calorimetric analysis of the interaction between cationic lipids and plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, B A; Davis, A; Koe, G; Smith, J G; Middaugh, C R

    2001-02-01

    The effects of buffer and ionic strength upon the enthalpy of binding between plasmid DNA and a variety of cationic lipids used to enhance cellular transfection were studied using isothermal titration calorimetry at 25.0 degrees C and pH 7.4. The cationic lipids DOTAP (1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethyl ammonium propane), DDAB (dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide), DOTAP:cholesterol (1:1), and DDAB:cholesterol (1:1) bound endothermally to plasmid DNA with a negligible proton exchange with buffer. In contrast, DOTAP: DOPE (L-alpha-dioleoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine) (1:1) and DDAB:DOPE (1:1) liposomes displayed a negative enthalpy and a significant uptake of protons upon binding to plasmid DNA at neutral pH. These findings are most easily explained by a change in the apparent pKa of the amino group of DOPE upon binding. Complexes formed by reverse addition methods (DNA into lipid) produced different thermograms, sizes, zeta potentials, and aggregation behavior, suggesting that structurally different complexes were formed in each titration direction. Titrations performed in both directions in the presence of increasing ionic strength revealed a progressive decrease in the heat of binding and an increase in the lipid to DNA charge ratio at which aggregation occurred. The unfavorable binding enthalpy for the cationic lipids alone and with cholesterol implies an entropy-driven interaction, while the negative enthalpies observed with DOPE-containing lipid mixtures suggest an additional contribution from changes in protonation of DOPE.

  7. MCM5: a new actor in the link between DNA replication and Meier-Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetro, Annalisa; Savasta, Salvatore; Russo Raucci, Annalisa; Cerqua, Cristina; Sartori, Geppo; Limongelli, Ivan; Forlino, Antonella; Maruelli, Silvia; Perucca, Paola; Vergani, Debora; Mazzini, Giuliano; Mattevi, Andrea; Stivala, Lucia Anna; Salviati, Leonardo; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2017-02-15

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGORS) is a rare disorder characterized by primordial dwarfism, microtia, and patellar aplasia/hypoplasia. Recessive mutations in ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, CDC6, and CDC45, encoding members of the pre-replication (pre-RC) and pre-initiation (pre-IC) complexes, and heterozygous mutations in GMNN, a regulator of cell-cycle progression and DNA replication, have already been associated with this condition. We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in a patient with a clinical diagnosis of MGORS and identified biallelic variants in MCM5. This gene encodes a subunit of the replicative helicase complex, which represents a component of the pre-RC. Both variants, a missense substitution within a conserved domain critical for the helicase activity, and a single base deletion causing a frameshift and a premature stop codon, were predicted to be detrimental for the MCM5 function. Although variants of MCM5 have never been reported in specific human diseases, defect of this gene in zebrafish causes a phenotype of growth restriction overlapping the one associated with orc1 depletion. Complementation experiments in yeast showed that the plasmid carrying the missense variant was unable to rescue the lethal phenotype caused by mcm5 deletion. Moreover cell-cycle progression was delayed in patient's cells, as already shown for mutations in the ORC1 gene. Altogether our findings support the role of MCM5 as a novel gene involved in MGORS, further emphasizing that this condition is caused by impaired DNA replication.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 15 February 2017; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2017.5.

  8. A novel class of mutations that affect DNA replication in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordman, Jared; Skovgaard, Ole; Wright, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Over-initiation of DNA replication in cells containing the cold-sensitive dnaA(cos) allele has been shown to lead to extensive DNA damage, potentially due to head-to-tail replication fork collisions that ultimately lead to replication fork collapse, growth stasis and/or cell death. Based on the a...

  9. Mouse zygotes respond to severe sperm DNA damage by delaying paternal DNA replication and embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna E Gawecka

    Full Text Available Mouse zygotes do not activate apoptosis in response to DNA damage. We previously reported a unique form of inducible sperm DNA damage termed sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF. SCF mirrors some aspects of somatic cell apoptosis in that the DNA degradation is mediated by reversible double strand breaks caused by topoisomerase 2B (TOP2B followed by irreversible DNA degradation by a nuclease(s. Here, we created zygotes using spermatozoa induced to undergo SCF (SCF zygotes and tested how they responded to moderate and severe paternal DNA damage during the first cell cycle. We found that the TUNEL assay was not sensitive enough to identify the breaks caused by SCF in zygotes in either case. However, paternal pronuclei in both groups stained positively for γH2AX, a marker for DNA damage, at 5 hrs after fertilization, just before DNA synthesis, while the maternal pronuclei were negative. We also found that both pronuclei in SCF zygotes with moderate DNA damage replicated normally, but paternal pronuclei in the SCF zygotes with severe DNA damage delayed the initiation of DNA replication by up to 12 hrs even though the maternal pronuclei had no discernable delay. Chromosomal analysis of both groups confirmed that the paternal DNA was degraded after S-phase while the maternal pronuclei formed normal chromosomes. The DNA replication delay caused a marked retardation in progression to the 2-cell stage, and a large portion of the embryos arrested at the G2/M border, suggesting that this is an important checkpoint in zygotic development. Those embryos that progressed through the G2/M border died at later stages and none developed to the blastocyst stage. Our data demonstrate that the zygote responds to sperm DNA damage through a non-apoptotic mechanism that acts by slowing paternal DNA replication and ultimately leads to arrest in embryonic development.

  10. The origin of replication, oriC, and the dnaA protein are dispensable in stable DNA replication (sdrA) mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogoma, T; von Meyenburg, K

    1983-01-01

    The sdrA224 mutants of Escherichia coli K-12, capable of continued DNA replication in the absence of protein synthesis (stable DNA replication), tolerate inactivation of the dnaA gene by insertion of transposon Tn10. Furthermore, oriC, the origin of E. coli chromosome replication, can be deleted from the chromosome of sdrA mutants without loss of viability. The results suggest the presence of a second, normally repressed, initiation system for chromosome replication alternative to the 'normal' dnaA+ oriC+-dependent initiation mechanism.

  11. 99mTc-labeled HYNIC-DAPI causes plasmid DNA damage with high efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzerke, Joerg; Punzet, Robert; Runge, Roswitha; Ferl, Sandra; Oehme, Liane; Wunderlich, Gerd; Freudenberg, Robert

    2014-01-01

    (99m)Tc is the standard radionuclide used for nuclear medicine imaging. In addition to gamma irradiation, (99m)Tc emits low-energy Auger and conversion electrons that deposit their energy within nanometers of the decay site. To study the potential for DNA damage, direct DNA binding is required. Plasmid DNA enables the investigation of the unprotected interactions between molecules and DNA that result in single-strand breaks (SSBs) or double-strand breaks (DSBs); the resulting DNA fragments can be separated by gel electrophoresis and quantified by fluorescent staining. This study aimed to compare the plasmid DNA damage potential of a (99m)Tc-labeled HYNIC-DAPI compound with that of (99m)Tc pertechnetate ((99m)TcO4(-)). pUC19 plasmid DNA was irradiated for 2 or 24 hours. Direct and radical-induced DNA damage were evaluated in the presence or absence of the radical scavenger DMSO. For both compounds, an increase in applied activity enhanced plasmid DNA damage, which was evidenced by an increase in the open circular and linear DNA fractions and a reduction in the supercoiled DNA fraction. The number of SSBs elicited by 99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI (1.03) was twice that caused by (99m)TcO4(-) (0.51), and the number of DSBs increased fivefold in the (99m)Tc-HYNIC-DAPI-treated sample compared with the (99m)TcO4(-) treated sample (0.02 to 0.10). In the presence of DMSO, the numbers of SSBs and DSBs decreased to 0.03 and 0.00, respectively, in the (99m)TcO4(-) treated samples, whereas the numbers of SSBs and DSBs were slightly reduced to 0.95 and 0.06, respectively, in the (99m)Tc-HYNIC-DAPI-treated samples. These results indicated that (99m)Tc-HYNIC-DAPI induced SSBs and DSBs via a direct interaction of the (99m)Tc-labeled compound with DNA. In contrast to these results, (99m)TcO4(-) induced SSBs via radical formation, and DSBs were formed by two nearby SSBs. The biological effectiveness of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-DAPI increased by approximately 4-fold in terms of inducing SSBs and by

  12. 99mTc-labeled HYNIC-DAPI causes plasmid DNA damage with high efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Kotzerke

    Full Text Available (99mTc is the standard radionuclide used for nuclear medicine imaging. In addition to gamma irradiation, (99mTc emits low-energy Auger and conversion electrons that deposit their energy within nanometers of the decay site. To study the potential for DNA damage, direct DNA binding is required. Plasmid DNA enables the investigation of the unprotected interactions between molecules and DNA that result in single-strand breaks (SSBs or double-strand breaks (DSBs; the resulting DNA fragments can be separated by gel electrophoresis and quantified by fluorescent staining. This study aimed to compare the plasmid DNA damage potential of a (99mTc-labeled HYNIC-DAPI compound with that of (99mTc pertechnetate ((99mTcO4(-. pUC19 plasmid DNA was irradiated for 2 or 24 hours. Direct and radical-induced DNA damage were evaluated in the presence or absence of the radical scavenger DMSO. For both compounds, an increase in applied activity enhanced plasmid DNA damage, which was evidenced by an increase in the open circular and linear DNA fractions and a reduction in the supercoiled DNA fraction. The number of SSBs elicited by 99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI (1.03 was twice that caused by (99mTcO4(- (0.51, and the number of DSBs increased fivefold in the (99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI-treated sample compared with the (99mTcO4(- treated sample (0.02 to 0.10. In the presence of DMSO, the numbers of SSBs and DSBs decreased to 0.03 and 0.00, respectively, in the (99mTcO4(- treated samples, whereas the numbers of SSBs and DSBs were slightly reduced to 0.95 and 0.06, respectively, in the (99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI-treated samples. These results indicated that (99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI induced SSBs and DSBs via a direct interaction of the (99mTc-labeled compound with DNA. In contrast to these results, (99mTcO4(- induced SSBs via radical formation, and DSBs were formed by two nearby SSBs. The biological effectiveness of (99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI increased by approximately 4-fold in terms of inducing SSBs and by approximately

  13. Reduced rate of DNA replication fork movement in megaloblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickremasinghe, R G; Hoffbrand, A V

    1980-01-01

    Chromatography on benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE-cellulose has been used to fractionate fully double-stranded from partially single-stranded DNA molecules. DNA was extracted from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes from patients with megaloblastic anemia resulting from vitamin B12 or folate deficiency after pulse-labeling the cells with [3H]thymidine for 5 min and chasing in unlabeled medium for 24 h. No gross accumulation of partially single-stranded material was observed in the DNA of these cells when compared with DNA from similarly labeled control cells obtained by the addition of 5-formyl tetrahydrofolic acid to the culture medium. When DNA from lymphocytes labeled with a 5-min pulse of [3H]thymidine and sheared to fragments of an average length of 18 micrometer was chromatographed on benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE-cellulose, approximately 80% of the label was recovered in the partially single-stranded fraction. After chasing in unlabeled medium the label was progressively transferred to the double-stranded fraction over a period of 2--3 h. The rate of transfer was slower in megaloblastic lymphocytes than in controls. The difference in rate suggested a slower rate of replication fork movement in megaloblastic lymphocytes and so the density shift technique of Painter and schaeffer (J. Mol. Biol. 45: 467--479, 1969) was used to measure the fork rate directly. [3H]Deoxycytidine was used as the labeled nucleoside to avoid possible complications arising from [3H]thymidine labeling of megaloblastic cells. Investigations on the lymphocytes from four patients showed that the replication fork rate in vitamin-treated control lyphocytes was about 1 micrometer/min. The fork rates in the corresponding untreated cells were invariably lower and rates ranging from 40 to 92% of those of controls were observed. Normal lymphocytes treated with the deoxynucleotide pool-depleting drugs methotrexate or hydroxyurea displayed defects in DNA synthesis similar to those of

  14. Fork rotation and DNA precatenation are restricted during DNA replication to prevent chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalbetter, Stephanie A; Mansoubi, Sahar; Chambers, Anna L; Downs, Jessica A; Baxter, Jonathan

    2015-08-18

    Faithful genome duplication and inheritance require the complete resolution of all intertwines within the parental DNA duplex. This is achieved by topoisomerase action ahead of the replication fork or by fork rotation and subsequent resolution of the DNA precatenation formed. Although fork rotation predominates at replication termination, in vitro studies have suggested that it also occurs frequently during elongation. However, the factors that influence fork rotation and how rotation and precatenation may influence other replication-associated processes are unknown. Here we analyze the causes and consequences of fork rotation in budding yeast. We find that fork rotation and precatenation preferentially occur in contexts that inhibit topoisomerase action ahead of the fork, including stable protein-DNA fragile sites and termination. However, generally, fork rotation and precatenation are actively inhibited by Timeless/Tof1 and Tipin/Csm3. In the absence of Tof1/Timeless, excessive fork rotation and precatenation cause extensive DNA damage following DNA replication. With Tof1, damage related to precatenation is focused on the fragile protein-DNA sites where fork rotation is induced. We conclude that although fork rotation and precatenation facilitate unwinding in hard-to-replicate contexts, they intrinsically disrupt normal chromosome duplication and are therefore restricted by Timeless/Tipin.

  15. A journey through the microscopic ages of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Marius; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2017-05-01

    Scientific discoveries and technological advancements are inseparable but not always take place in a coherent chronological manner. In the next, we will provide a seemingly unconnected and serendipitous series of scientific facts that, in the whole, converged to unveil DNA and its duplication. We will not cover here the many and fundamental contributions from microbial genetics and in vitro biochemistry. Rather, in this journey, we will emphasize the interplay between microscopy development culminating on super resolution fluorescence microscopy (i.e., nanoscopy) and digital image analysis and its impact on our understanding of DNA duplication. We will interlace the journey with landmark concepts and experiments that have brought the cellular DNA replication field to its present state.

  16. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-08-10

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z.

  17. Fluoride enhances transfection activity of carbonate apatite by increasing cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, E.H., E-mail: md.ezharul.hoque@med.monash.edu.my [Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Sunway Campus, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA is enhanced by fluoride incorporation into carbonate apatite carrier. {yields} Fluoridated carbonate apatite promotes a robust increase in transgene expression. {yields} Controlled dissolution of fluoridated carbonate apatite in endosomal acidic environment might buffer the endosomes and prevent degradation of the released DNA. -- Abstract: Intracellular delivery of a functional gene or a nucleic acid sequence to specifically knockdown a harmful gene is a potential approach to precisely treat a critical human disease. The intensive efforts in the last few decades led to the development of a number of viral and non-viral synthetic vectors. However, an ideal delivery tool in terms of the safety and efficacy has yet to be established. Recently, we have developed pH-sensing inorganic nanocrystals of carbonate apatite for efficient and cell-targeted delivery of gene and gene-silencing RNA. Here we show that addition of very low level of fluoride to the particle-forming medium facilitates a robust increase in transgene expression following post-incubation of the particles with HeLa cells. Confocal microscopic observation and Southern blotting prove the cytoplasmic existence of plasmid DNA delivered by likely formed fluoridated carbonate apatite particles while degradation of plasmid DNA presumably by cytoplasmic nucleases was noticed following delivery with apatite particles alone. The beneficial role of fluoride in enhancing carbonate apatite-mediated gene expression might be due to the buffering potential of generated fluoridated apatite in endosomal acidic environment, thereby increasing the half-life of delivered plasmid DNA.

  18. Hypermutable ligation of plasmid DNA ends in cells from patients with Werner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rünger, T M; Bauer, C; Dekant, B; Möller, K; Sobotta, P; Czerny, C; Poot, M; Martin, G M

    1994-01-01

    Werner Syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an increased cancer risk and by symptoms suggestive of premature aging. Cells from these patients demonstrate a typical pattern of chromosomal instability and a spontaneous hypermutability with a high rate of unusually large deletions. We have studied the in vivo DNA ligation in three lymphoblast cell lines from Werner syndrome patients and three from normal donors. In our host cell ligation assay we transfected linearized plasmid pZ189 and measured the amount of plasmid DNA ends rejoined by these host cells as the ability of the recovered plasmid to transform bacteria. A mutagenesis marker gene close to the ligation site allowed screening for mutations. Subsequent mutation analysis provided information about the accuracy of the ligation process. The cells from Werner syndrome patients were as effective as normal cells in ligating DNA ends. However, mutation analysis revealed that the three Werner syndrome cell lines introduced 2.4-4.6 times more mutations (p < 0.001) than the normal cell lines during ligation of the DNA ends: the mutation rates were 69.4, 97.2, and 58.7%, as compared to 23.6, 21.7, and 24.4% in the normal cell lines. These increased mutation frequencies in plasmids ligated during passage through Werner syndrome cells were mainly due to a significant (p < 0.001) increase in deletions. This error-prone DNA ligation might be responsible for the spontaneous hypermutability and the genomic instability in Werner syndrome cells and related to the apparently accelerated aging and high cancer risk in affected patients.

  19. AcMNPV As A Model for Baculovirus DNA Replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric B. Carstens

    2009-01-01

    Baculoviruses were first identified as insect-specific pathogens, and it was this specificity that lead to their use as safe, target specific biological pesticides. For the past 30 years, AcMNPV has served as the subject of intense basic molecular research into the baculovirus infectious cycle including the interaction of the virus with a continuous insect cell line derived from Spodoptera frugiperda. The studies on baculoviruese have led to an in-depth understanding of the physical organization of the viral genomes including many complete genomic sequences, the time course of gene expression, and the application of this basic research to the use of baculoviruses not only as insecticides, but also as a universal eukaryotic protein expression system, and a potential vector in gene therapy. A great deal has also been discovered about the viral genes required for the replication of the baculovirus genome, while much remains to be learned about the mechanism of viral DNA replication. This report outlines the current knowledge of the factors involved in baculovirus DNA replication, using data on AcMNPV as a model for most members of the Baculoviridae.

  20. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) origin of DNA replication oriS influences origin-dependent DNA replication and flanking gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Sommer, Marvin H; Hay, John; Ruyechan, William T; Arvin, Ann M

    2015-07-01

    The VZV genome has two origins of DNA replication (oriS), each of which consists of an AT-rich sequence and three origin binding protein (OBP) sites called Box A, C and B. In these experiments, the mutation in the core sequence CGC of the Box A and C not only inhibited DNA replication but also inhibited both ORF62 and ORF63 expression in reporter gene assays. In contrast the Box B mutation did not influence DNA replication or flanking gene transcription. These results suggest that efficient DNA replication enhances ORF62 and ORF63 transcription. Recombinant viruses carrying these mutations in both sites and one with a deletion of the whole oriS were constructed. Surprisingly, the recombinant virus lacking both copies of oriS retained the capacity to replicate in melanoma and HELF cells suggesting that VZV has another origin of DNA replication.

  1. ppGpp-dependent negative control of DNA replication of Shiga toxin-converting bacteriophages in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Dariusz; Kobiela, Wioletta; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka

    2013-11-01

    The pathogenicity of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains depends on the production of Shiga toxins that are encoded on lambdoid prophages. Effective production of these toxins requires prophage induction and subsequent phage replication. Previous reports indicated that lytic development of Shiga toxin-converting bacteriophages is inhibited in amino acid-starved bacteria. However, those studies demonstrated that inhibition of both phage-derived plasmid replication and production of progeny virions occurred during the stringent as well as the relaxed response to amino acid starvation, i.e., in the presence as well as the absence of high levels of ppGpp, an alarmone of the stringent response. Therefore, we asked whether ppGpp influences DNA replication and lytic development of Shiga toxin-converting bacteriophages. Lytic development of 5 such bacteriophages was tested in an E. coli wild-type strain and an isogenic mutant that does not produce ppGpp (ppGpp(0)). In the absence of ppGpp, production of progeny phages was significantly (in the range of an order of magnitude) more efficient than in wild-type cells. Such effects were observed in infected bacteria as well as after prophage induction. All tested bacteriophages formed considerably larger plaques on lawns formed by ppGpp(0) bacteria than on those formed by wild-type E. coli. The efficiency of synthesis of phage DNA and relative amount of lambdoid plasmid DNA were increased in cells devoid of ppGpp relative to bacteria containing a basal level of this nucleotide. We conclude that ppGpp negatively influences the lytic development of Shiga toxin-converting bacteriophages and that phage DNA replication efficiency is limited by the stringent control alarmone.

  2. The One-Kilobase DNA Fragment Upstream of the ardC Actin Gene of Physarum polycephalum Is Both a Replicator and a Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierron, Gérard; Pallotta, Dominick; Bénard, Marianne

    1999-01-01

    The 1-kb DNA fragment upstream of the ardC actin gene of Physarum polycephalum promotes the transcription of a reporter gene either in a transient-plasmid assay or as an integrated copy in an ectopic position, defining this region as the transcriptional promoter of the ardC gene (PardC). Since we mapped an origin of replication activated at the onset of S phase within this same fragment, we examined the pattern of replication of a cassette containing the PardC promoter and the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene, hph, integrated into two different chromosomal sites. In both cases, we show by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis that an efficient, early activated origin coincides with the ectopic PardC fragment. One of the integration sites was a normally late-replicating region. The presence of the ectopic origin converted this late-replicating domain into an early-replicating domain in which replication forks propagate with kinetics indistinguishable from those of the native PardC replicon. This is the first demonstration that initiation sites for DNA replication in Physarum correspond to cis-acting replicator sequences. This work also confirms the close proximity of a replication origin and a promoter, with both functions being located within the 1-kb proximal region of the ardC actin gene. A more precise location of the replication origin with respect to the transcriptional promoter must await the development of a functional autonomously replicating sequence assay in Physarum. PMID:10207074

  3. Dichromatic laser radiation effects on DNA of Escherichia coli and plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, W. A.; Polignano, G. A. C.; Guimarães, O. R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Dichromatic and consecutive laser radiations have attracted increased attention for clinical applications as offering new tools for the treatment of dysfunctional tissues in situations where monochromatic radiation is not effective. This work evaluated the survival, filamentation and morphology of Escherichia coli cells, and the induction of DNA lesions, in plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity consecutive dichromatic laser radiation. Exponential and stationary wild type and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein deficient E. coli cultures were exposed to consecutive low-intensity dichromatic laser radiation (infrared laser immediately after red laser) to study the survival, filamentation and morphology of bacterial cells. Plasmid DNA samples were exposed to dichromatic radiation to study DNA lesions by electrophoretic profile. Dichromatic laser radiation affects the survival, filamentation and morphology of E. coli cultures depending on the growth phase and the functional repair mechanism of oxidizing lesions in DNA, but does not induce single/double strands breaks or alkali-labile DNA lesions. Results show that low-intensity consecutive dichromatic laser radiation induces biological effects that differ from those induced by monochromatic laser radiation, suggesting that other therapeutic effects could be obtained using dichromatic radiation.

  4. Design of amphiphilic oligopeptides as models for fine tuning peptide assembly with plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goparaju, Geetha N; Gupta, Pardeep K

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the design of novel amphiphilic oligopeptides with hydrophobic and cationic amino acids to serve as models to understand peptide-DNA assembly. Biophysical and thermodynamic characterization of interaction of these amphiphilic peptides with plasmid DNA is presented. Peptides with at least +4 charges favor stable complex formation. Surface potential is dependent on the type of hydrophobic amino acid for a certain charge. Thermodynamically it is a spontaneous interaction between most of the peptides and plasmid DNA. Lys(7) and Tyr peptides with +4/+5 charges indicate cooperative binding with pDNA without saturation of interaction while Val(2)-Gly-Lys(4), Val-Gly-Lys(5), and Phe-Gly-Lys(5) lead to saturation of interaction indicating condensed pDNA within the range of N/Ps studied. We show that the biophysical properties of DNA-peptide complexes could be modulated by design and the peptides presented here could be used as building blocks for creating DNA-peptide complexes for various biomedical applications, mainly nucleic acid delivery.

  5. Stwl modifies chromatin compaction and is required to maintain DNA integrity in the presence of perturbed DNA replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, X.; Vries, de H.I.; Siudeja, K.; Rana, A.; Lemstra, W.; Brunsting, J.F.; Kok, R.J.M.; Smulders, Y.M.; Schaefer, M.; Dijk, F.; Shang, Y.F.; Eggen, B.J.L.; Kampinga, H.H.; Sibon, O.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyurea, a well-known DNA replication inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and intact checkpoint functions are required to survive DNA replication stress induced by this genotoxic agent. Perturbed DNA synthesis also results in elevated levels of DNA damage. It is unclear how organisms prevent ac

  6. Stwl Modifies Chromatin Compaction and Is Required to Maintain DNA Integrity in the Presence of Perturbed DNA Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, Xia; Vries, Hilda I. de; Siudeja, Katarzyna; Rana, Anil; Lemstra, Willy; Brunsting, Jeanette F.; Kok, Rob M.; Smulders, Yvo M.; Schaefer, Matthias; Dijk, Freark; Shang, Yongfeng; Eggen, Bart J.L.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Sibon, Ody C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyurea, a well-known DNA replication inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and intact checkpoint functions are required to survive DNA replication stress induced by this genotoxic agent. Perturbed DNA synthesis also results in elevated levels of DNA damage. It is unclear how organisms prevent ac

  7. Confidently estimating the number of DNA replication origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Anand; Keich, Uri

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for estimating and providing a confidence interval for the number of DNA replication origins in the genome of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The method requires an initial set of verified sites from which a position specific frequency matrix (PSFM) can be constructed. We further assume that we have access to a sparingly used experimental procedure which can verify the functionality of a few, but not all, computationally predicted sites. While our motivation comes from estimating the number of autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs), our method can also be applied to estimating the genome-wide number of "functional" transcription factor binding sites, where functionality is determined by experimental verification of the transcription factor binding event using, for example, ChIP data. The reliability of our method is demonstrated by correctly predicting the known number of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARSs as well as the number of S. cerevisiae probes that bind to the transcription factor ABF1.

  8. Enhanced transformation efficiency of recalcitrant Bacillus cereus and Bacillus weihenstephanensis isolates upon in vitro methylation of plasmid DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierop Groot, M.N.; Nieboer, F.; Abee, T.

    2008-01-01

    Digestion patterns of chromosomal DNAs of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus weihenstephanensis strains suggest that Sau3AI-type restriction modification systems are widely present among the isolates tested. In vitro methylation of plasmid DNA was used to enhance poor plasmid transfer upon electroporation

  9. Replication fork progression is paused in two large chromosomal zones flanking the DNA replication origin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Masahiro Tatsumi; Oshima, Taku; Chumsakul, Onuma; Ishikawa, Shu; Maki, Hisaji

    2016-08-01

    Although the speed of nascent DNA synthesis at individual replication forks is relatively uniform in bacterial cells, the dynamics of replication fork progression on the chromosome are hampered by a variety of natural impediments. Genome replication dynamics can be directly measured from an exponentially growing cell population by sequencing newly synthesized DNA strands that were specifically pulse-labeled with the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). However, a short pulse labeling with BrdU is impracticable for bacteria because of poor incorporation of BrdU into the cells, and thus, the genomewide dynamics of bacterial DNA replication remain undetermined. Using a new thymidine-requiring Escherichia coli strain, eCOMB, and high-throughput sequencing, we succeeded in determining the genomewide replication profile in bacterial cells. We also found that fork progression is paused in two ~200-kb chromosomal zones that flank the replication origin in the growing cells. This origin-proximal obstruction to fork progression was overcome by an increased thymidine concentration in the culture medium and enhanced by inhibition of transcription. These indicate that DNA replication near the origin is sensitive to the impediments to fork progression, namely a scarcity of the DNA precursor deoxythymidine triphosphate and probable conflicts between replication and transcription machineries.

  10. c-myc protein can be substituted for SV40 T antigen in SV40 DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Itani, Teru; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    1987-01-01

    Replicating activity of SV40 origin-containing plasmid was tested in human cells as well as in monkey CosI cells. All the plasmids possessing SV40 ori sequences could replicate, even in the absence of SV40 T antigen, in human HL-60 and Raji cells which are expressing c-myc gene at high level. The copy numbers of the replicated plasmids in these human cells were 1/100 as high as in monkey CosI cells which express SV40 T antigen constitutively. Exactly the same plasmids as the transfected origi...

  11. Investigation Into the Effects of Nucleotide Content on the Electrical Characteristics of DNA Plasmid Molecular Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshi, Noah; Narenji, Alaleh; Bui, Chris; Mokili, John L; Kassegne, Sam

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of nucleotide content on the conductivity of plasmid length DNA molecular wires covalently bound to high aspect-ratio gold electrodes. The DNA wires were all between [Formula: see text] in length (>6000bp), and contained either 39%, 53%, or 64% GC base-pairs. We compared the current-voltage (I-V) and frequency-impedance characteristics of the DNA wires with varying GC content, and observed statistically significantly higher conductivity in DNA wires containing higher GC content in both AC and DC measurement methods. Additionally, we noted that the conductivity decreased as a function of time for all DNA wires, with the impedance at 100 Hz nearly doubling over a period of seven days. All readings were taken in humidity and temperature controlled environments on DNA wires suspended above an insulative substrate, thus minimizing the effect of experimental and environmental factors as well as potential for nonlinear alternate DNA confirmations. While other groups have studied the effect of GC content on the conductivity of nanoscale DNA molecules (DNA wires at scales that may be required during the fabrication of DNA-based electronics. Furthermore, our results provide further evidence that many of the charge transfer theories developed from experiments using nanoscale DNA molecules may still be applicable for DNA wires at the micro scale.

  12. Investigation of Effects of Nucleotide Content on Electrical Characteristics of DNA Plasmid Molecular Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshi, Noah; Narenji, Alaleh; Bui, Chris; Mokili, John L; Kassegne, Sam

    2016-07-28

    In this study, we investigate the effect of nucleotide content on the conductivity of plasmid length DNA molecular wires covalently bound to high aspect-ratio gold electrodes. The DNA wires were all between 2.20-2.35μm in length (>6000bp), and contained either 39%, 53%, or 64% GC base-pairs. We compared the current-voltage (I-V) and frequency-impedance characteristics of the DNA wires with varying GC content, and observed statistically significantly higher conductivity in DNA wires containing higher GC content in both AC and DC measurement methods. Additionally, we noted that the conductivity decreased as a function of time for all DNA wires, with the impedance at 100Hz nearly doubling over a period of seven days. All readings were taken in humidity and temperature controlled environments on DNA wires suspended above an insulative substrate, thus minimizing the effect of experimental and environmental factors as well as potential for nonlinear alternate DNA confirmations. While other groups have studied the effect of GC content on the conductivity of nano-scale DNA molecules (DNA wires at scales that may be required during the fabrication of DNA-based electronics. Furthermore, our results provide further evidence that many of the charge transfer theories developed from experiments using nano-scale DNA molecules may still be applicable for DNA wires at the micro-scale.

  13. The Cloning of the Human Tumor Supressor Gene INGI: DNA Cloning into Plasmid Vector and DNA Analysis by Restriction Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA cloning is one of the most important techniques In the field of molecular biology, with a critical role in analyzing the structure and function of genes and their adjacent regulatory regions. DNA cloning is helpful in learning fundamental molecular biological techniques, since DNA cloning involves a series of them, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR, DNA ligation, bacterial transformation, bacterial culture, plasmid DNA extraction, DNA digestion with restriction enzymes and agarose gel electrophoresis. In this paper the cloning of the human tumor suppressor gene INGI has been used to illustrate the methodology. The gene was amplified by PCR, cloned into a TA-cloning vectore, and restriction enzyme mapping was used to distinguish the sense INGI construct from the antisense INGI construct.

  14. The crystal structure of a replicative hexameric helicase DnaC and its complex with single-stranded DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Yu-Hua; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Chen, Wei-Ti; Huang, Cheng-Yang; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng

    2008-01-01

    DNA helicases are motor proteins that play essential roles in DNA replication, repair and recombination. In the replicative hexameric helicase, the fundamental reaction is the unwinding of duplex DNA; however, our understanding of this function remains vague due to insufficient structural information. Here, we report two crystal structures of the DnaB-family replicative helicase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkDnaC) in the apo-form and bound to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The GkDnaC–...

  15. "Curing" of plasmid DNA in acetogen using microwave or applying an electric pulse improves cell growth and metabolite production as compared to the plasmid-harboring strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzin, Vel; Kiriukhin, Michael; Tyurin, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Plasmid-free acetogen Clostridium sp. MT962 electrotransformed with a small cryptic plasmid pMT351 was used to develop time- and cost-effective methods for plasmid elimination. Elimination of pMT351 restored production of acetate and ethanol to the levels of the plasmid-free strain with no dry cell weight changes. Destabilizing cell membrane via microwave at 2.45 GHz, or exposure to a single 12 ms square electric pulse at 35 kV cm⁻¹, eliminated pMT351 in 42-47 % of cells. Plasmid elimination with a single square electric pulse required 10 versus 0.1 J needed to introduce the same 3,202-bp plasmid into the cells as calculated per cell sample of Clostridium sp. MT962. Microwave caused visible changes in repPCR pattern and increased ethanol production at the expense of acetate. This is the first report on microwave of microwave ovens, wireless routers, and mobile devices causing chromosomal DNA aberrations in microbes along with carbon flux change.

  16. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP) cloning--seamless DNA insertion into any target plasmid without sequence constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Alexander; Andersen, Kasper R; Schwartz, Thomas U

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP) cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF) cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts.

  17. Analysis of heavy-ion-induced DNA strand breaks in plasmid pUC18

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Plasmid DNA was irradiated or implanted by mixed particle field(CR) or lithium-ion-beam to detect strand breaks.The primary results showed that mixed particle field could induce single and double strand breaks with positive linear-dose-effects;most of sequence changes induced by CR were point mutant.Lithium-ion-beam could induce strand breaks also,but it was only at dose of 20Gy.

  18. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning--seamless DNA insertion into any target plasmid without sequence constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ulrich

    Full Text Available We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts.

  19. Adenovirus DNA replication in vitro is stimulated by RNA from uninfected HeLa cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, P.C. van der; Dam, D. van; Kwant, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Adenovirus DNA replication was studied in a partially reconstituted system consisting of purified viral proteins (DNA-binding protein, precursor terminal protein and Ad DNA polymerase) and a nuclear extract from uninfected HeLa cells. Optimal DNA replication required the presence of a heat-stable, r

  20. Proteasome-dependent degradation of replisome components regulates faithful DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseaulin, Laura C; Noguchi, Chiaki; Noguchi, Eishi

    2013-08-15

    The replication machinery, or the replisome, collides with a variety of obstacles during the normal process of DNA replication. In addition to damaged template DNA, numerous chromosome regions are considered to be difficult to replicate owing to the presence of DNA secondary structures and DNA-binding proteins. Under these conditions, the replication fork stalls, generating replication stress. Stalled forks are prone to collapse, posing serious threats to genomic integrity. It is generally thought that the replication checkpoint functions to stabilize the replisome and replication fork structure upon replication stress. This is important in order to allow DNA replication to resume once the problem is solved. However, our recent studies demonstrated that some replisome components undergo proteasome-dependent degradation during DNA replication in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our investigation has revealed the involvement of the SCF(Pof3) (Skp1-Cullin/Cdc53-F-box) ubiquitin ligase in replisome regulation. We also demonstrated that forced accumulation of the replisome components leads to abnormal DNA replication upon replication stress. Here we review these findings and present additional data indicating the importance of replisome degradation for DNA replication. Our studies suggest that cells activate an alternative pathway to degrade replisome components in order to preserve genomic integrity.

  1. Optimum range of plasmid supercoiled DNA for preparation of ccompetent Top 10 E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tahir Majeed

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In-house preparation of chemically competent andelectrocompetent Top 10 E. coli is not only economical butmeets the needs for most of the molecular cloning work. Forsuch transformations an optimum range of plasmidsupercoiled DNA is needed. Therefore, the present studydescribes the modification of two protocols for the preparationof such cells, and optimization of the amount of plasmidsupercoiled DNA required for better efficiency.Materials and methods: As most of the available protocols torender bacterial cells competent need special media orchemicals and are time consuming, the methods from HelenDonis-Keller Laboratory Manual of Washington University inSt. Louis and Goldberg Laboratory Standard Protocols of theUnited States Department of Agriculture have been used aftermeticulous selection and with few modifications for preparingchemically competent and electrocompetent Top 10 E. coli,respectively. The transformation was carried out using pUC19supercoiled plasmid DNA.Results: The transformation efficiencies of chemicallycompetent and electrocompetent Top 10 E. coli were found tobe 1.1 x 106 and 7.88 x 107 tranformants/μg of DNA,respectively. Such efficiencies are slightly higher than therequired (105-106 transformants/μg DNA for most of thecloning experimentation.Conclusion: The results of the present study indicatethat for sufficient transformation competence rates theoptimum range of plasmid supercoiled DNA is 10 ng forchemically competent and 0.1 ng for electrocompetentTop 10 E. coli.

  2. DNA intercalator stimulates influenza transcription and virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poon Leo LM

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Influenza A virus uses its host transcription machinery to facilitate viral RNA synthesis, an event that is associated with cellular RNA polymerase II (RNAPII. In this study, various RNAPII transcription inhibitors were used to investigate the effect of RNAPII phosphorylation status on viral RNA transcription. A low concentration of DNA intercalators, such as actinomycin D (ActD, was found to stimulate viral polymerase activity and virus replication. This effect was not observed in cells treated with RNAPII kinase inhibitors. In addition, the loss of RNAPIIa in infected cells was due to the shift of nonphosphorylated RNAPII (RNAPIIa to hyperphosphorylated RNAPII (RNAPIIo.

  3. DNA intercalator stimulates influenza transcription and virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Olive T W; Poon, Leo L M

    2011-03-15

    Influenza A virus uses its host transcription machinery to facilitate viral RNA synthesis, an event that is associated with cellular RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). In this study, various RNAPII transcription inhibitors were used to investigate the effect of RNAPII phosphorylation status on viral RNA transcription. A low concentration of DNA intercalators, such as actinomycin D (ActD), was found to stimulate viral polymerase activity and virus replication. This effect was not observed in cells treated with RNAPII kinase inhibitors. In addition, the loss of RNAPII(a) in infected cells was due to the shift of nonphosphorylated RNAPII (RNAPII(a)) to hyperphosphorylated RNAPII (RNAPII(o)).

  4. Encapsulation and delivery of plasmid DNA by virus-like nanoparticles engineered from Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariyapong, Pitchanee; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Somrit, Monsicha; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Xing, Li; Cheng, Holland R; Weerachatyanukul, Wattana

    2014-01-22

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are potential candidates in developing biological containers for packaging therapeutic or biologically active agents. Here, we expressed Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNv) capsid protein (encoding amino acids M1-N371 with 6 histidine residuals) in an Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). These easily purified capsid protein self-assembled into VLPs, and disassembly/reassembly could be controlled in a calcium-dependent manner. Physically, MrNv VLPs resisted to digestive enzymes, a property that should be advantageous for protection of active compounds against harsh conditions. We also proved that MrNv VLPs were capable of encapsulating plasmid DNA in the range of 0.035-0.042 mol ratio (DNA/protein) or 2-3 plasmids/VLP (assuming that MrNV VLPs is T=1, i made up of 60 capsid monomers). These VLPs interacted with cultured insect cells and delivered loaded plasmid DNA into the cells as shown by green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. With many advantageous properties including self-encapsulation, MrNv VLPs are good candidates for delivery of therapeutic agents.

  5. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-09-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA.

  6. An increase in mitochondrial DNA promotes nuclear DNA replication in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi M Blank

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Coordination between cellular metabolism and DNA replication determines when cells initiate division. It has been assumed that metabolism only plays a permissive role in cell division. While blocking metabolism arrests cell division, it is not known whether an up-regulation of metabolic reactions accelerates cell cycle transitions. Here, we show that increasing the amount of mitochondrial DNA accelerates overall cell proliferation and promotes nuclear DNA replication, in a nutrient-dependent manner. The Sir2p NAD+-dependent de-acetylase antagonizes this mitochondrial role. We found that cells with increased mitochondrial DNA have reduced Sir2p levels bound at origins of DNA replication in the nucleus, accompanied with increased levels of K9, K14-acetylated histone H3 at those origins. Our results demonstrate an active role of mitochondrial processes in the control of cell division. They also suggest that cellular metabolism may impact on chromatin modifications to regulate the activity of origins of DNA replication.

  7. Process considerations related to the microencapsulation of plasmid DNA via ultrasonic atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jenny; Wang, Huanting; Forde, Gareth M

    2008-09-01

    An effective means of facilitating DNA vaccine delivery to antigen presenting cells is through biodegradable microspheres. Microspheres offer distinct advantages over other delivery technologies by providing release of DNA vaccine in its bioactive form in a controlled fashion. In this study, biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres containing polyethylenimine (PEI) condensed plasmid DNA (pDNA) were prepared using a 40 kHz ultrasonic atomization system. Process synthesis parameters, which are important to the scale-up of microspheres that are suitable for nasal delivery (i.e., less than 20 microm), were studied. These parameters include polymer concentration; feed flowrate; volumetric ratio of polymer and pDNA-PEI (plasmid DNA-polyethylenimine) complexes; and nitrogen to phosphorous (N/P) ratio. PDNA encapsulation efficiencies were predominantly in the range 82-96%, and the mean sizes of the particle were between 6 and 15 microm. The ultrasonic synthesis method was shown to have excellent reproducibility. PEI affected morphology of the microspheres, as it induced the formation of porous particles that accelerate the release rate of pDNA. The PLGA microspheres displayed an in vitro release of pDNA of 95-99% within 30 days and demonstrated zero order release kinetics without an initial spike of pDNA. Agarose electrophoresis confirmed conservation of the supercoiled form of pDNA throughout the synthesis and in vitro release stages. It was concluded that ultrasonic atomization is an efficient technique to overcome the key obstacles in scaling-up the manufacture of encapsulated vaccine for clinical trials and ultimately, commercial applications.

  8. The exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase γ is required for ligation during mitochondrial DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macao, Bertil; Uhler, Jay P.; Siibak, Triinu; Zhu, Xuefeng; Shi, Yonghong; Sheng, Wenwen; Olsson, Monica; Stewart, James B.; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Falkenberg, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase γ (POLγ) harbours a 3′–5′ exonuclease proofreading activity. Here we demonstrate that this activity is required for the creation of ligatable ends during mtDNA replication. Exonuclease-deficient POLγ fails to pause on reaching a downstream 5′-end. Instead, the enzyme continues to polymerize into double-stranded DNA, creating an unligatable 5′-flap. Disease-associated mutations can both increase and decrease exonuclease activity and consequently impair DNA ligation. In mice, inactivation of the exonuclease activity causes an increase in mtDNA mutations and premature ageing phenotypes. These mutator mice also contain high levels of truncated, linear fragments of mtDNA. We demonstrate that the formation of these fragments is due to impaired ligation, causing nicks near the origin of heavy-strand DNA replication. In the subsequent round of replication, the nicks lead to double-strand breaks and linear fragment formation. PMID:26095671

  9. 3D replicon distributions arise from stochastic initiation and domino-like DNA replication progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löb, D; Lengert, N; Chagin, V O; Reinhart, M; Casas-Delucchi, C S; Cardoso, M C; Drossel, B

    2016-04-07

    DNA replication dynamics in cells from higher eukaryotes follows very complex but highly efficient mechanisms. However, the principles behind initiation of potential replication origins and emergence of typical patterns of nuclear replication sites remain unclear. Here, we propose a comprehensive model of DNA replication in human cells that is based on stochastic, proximity-induced replication initiation. Critical model features are: spontaneous stochastic firing of individual origins in euchromatin and facultative heterochromatin, inhibition of firing at distances below the size of chromatin loops and a domino-like effect by which replication forks induce firing of nearby origins. The model reproduces the empirical temporal and chromatin-related properties of DNA replication in human cells. We advance the one-dimensional DNA replication model to a spatial model by taking into account chromatin folding in the nucleus, and we are able to reproduce the spatial and temporal characteristics of the replication foci distribution throughout S-phase.

  10. Identification of Fic-1 as an enzyme that inhibits bacterial DNA replication by AMPylating GyrB, promoting filament formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Canhua; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Zhang, Li-Qun; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-26

    The morphology of bacterial cells is important for virulence, evasion of the host immune system, and coping with environmental stresses. The widely distributed Fic proteins (filamentation induced by cAMP) are annotated as proteins involved in cell division because of the presence of the HPFx[D/E]GN[G/K]R motif. We showed that the presence of Fic-1 from Pseudomonas fluorescens significantly reduced the yield of plasmid DNA when expressed in Escherichia coli or P. fluorescens. Fic-1 interacted with GyrB, a subunit of DNA gyrase, which is essential for bacterial DNA replication. Fic-1 catalyzed the AMPylation of GyrB at Tyr(109), a residue critical for binding ATP, and exhibited auto-AMPylation activity. Mutation of the Fic-1 auto-AMPylated site greatly reduced AMPylation activity toward itself and toward GyrB. Fic-1-dependent AMPylation of GyrB triggered the SOS response, indicative of DNA replication stress or DNA damage. Fic-1 also promoted the formation of elongated cells when the SOS response was blocked. We identified an α-inhibitor protein that we named anti-Fic-1 (AntF), encoded by a gene immediately upstream of Fic-1. AntF interacted with Fic-1, inhibited the AMPylation activity of Fic-1 for GyrB in vitro, and blocked Fic-1-mediated inhibition of DNA replication in bacteria, suggesting that Fic-1 and AntF comprise a toxin-antitoxin module. Our work establishes Fic-1 as an AMPylating enzyme that targets GyrB to inhibit DNA replication and may target other proteins to regulate bacterial morphology.

  11. Vaccination with Trypomastigote Surface Antigen 1-Encoding Plasmid DNA Confers Protection against Lethal Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    DNA vaccination was evaluated with the experimental murine model of Trypanosoma cruzi infection as a means to induce antiparasite protective immunity, and the trypomastigote surface antigen 1 (TSA-1), a target of anti-T. cruzi antibody and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses, was used as the model antigen. Following the intramuscular immunization of H-2b and H-2d mice with a plasmid DNA encoding an N-terminally truncated TSA-1 ...

  12. Implementation of an Automated High-Throughput Plasmid DNA Production Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeci, Karen; Suh, Christopher; Di Ioia, Tina; Singh, Lovejit; Abraham, Ryan; Baldwin, Anne; Monteclaro, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    Biologics sample management facilities are often responsible for a diversity of large-molecule reagent types, such as DNA, RNAi, and protein libraries. Historically, the management of large molecules was dispersed into multiple laboratories. As methodologies to support pathway discovery, antibody discovery, and protein production have become high throughput, the implementation of automation and centralized inventory management tools has become important. To this end, to improve sample tracking, throughput, and accuracy, we have implemented a module-based automation system integrated into inventory management software using multiple platforms (Hamilton, Hudson, Dynamic Devices, and Brooks). Here we describe the implementation of these systems with a focus on high-throughput plasmid DNA production management.

  13. Rational design of human DNA ligase inhibitors that target cellular DNA replication and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zhong, Shijun; Zhu, Xiao; Dziegielewska, Barbara; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, Gerald M; MacKerell, Alexander D; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2008-05-01

    Based on the crystal structure of human DNA ligase I complexed with nicked DNA, computer-aided drug design was used to identify compounds in a database of 1.5 million commercially available low molecular weight chemicals that were predicted to bind to a DNA-binding pocket within the DNA-binding domain of DNA ligase I, thereby inhibiting DNA joining. Ten of 192 candidates specifically inhibited purified human DNA ligase I. Notably, a subset of these compounds was also active against the other human DNA ligases. Three compounds that differed in their specificity for the three human DNA ligases were analyzed further. L82 inhibited DNA ligase I, L67 inhibited DNA ligases I and III, and L189 inhibited DNA ligases I, III, and IV in DNA joining assays with purified proteins and in cell extract assays of DNA replication, base excision repair, and nonhomologous end-joining. L67 and L189 are simple competitive inhibitors with respect to nicked DNA, whereas L82 is an uncompetitive inhibitor that stabilized complex formation between DNA ligase I and nicked DNA. In cell culture assays, L82 was cytostatic whereas L67 and L189 were cytotoxic. Concordant with their ability to inhibit DNA repair in vitro, subtoxic concentrations of L67 and L189 significantly increased the cytotoxicity of DNA-damaging agents. Interestingly, the ligase inhibitors specifically sensitized cancer cells to DNA damage. Thus, these novel human DNA ligase inhibitors will not only provide insights into the cellular function of these enzymes but also serve as lead compounds for the development of anticancer agents.

  14. Multiple regulatory systems coordinate DNA replication with cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Author Summary DNA replication must be coordinated with cellular physiology to ensure proper genome inheritance. Model bacteria such as the soil-dwelling Bacillus subtilis can achieve a wide range of growth rates in response to nutritional and chemical signals. In order to match the rate of DNA synthesis to the rate of nutrient-mediated cell growth, bacteria regulate the initiation frequency of DNA replication. This control of bacterial DNA replication initiation was first observed over forty...

  15. Local gene delivery via endovascular stents coated with dodecylated chitosan–plasmid DNA nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunwan Zhu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Dunwan Zhu1*, Xu Jin2*, Xigang Leng1, Hai Wang1, Junbo Bao1, Wenguang Liu3, Kangde Yao3, Cunxian Song11Tianjin Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, China; 2Department of Anesthesia and Pain Therapy, Capital Medical University Affiliated Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing, China; 3Research Institute of Polymeric Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China; *Both investigators contributed equally to this work and are senior authors.Abstract: Development of efficacious therapeutic strategies to prevent and inhibit the occurrences of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty is critical for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, the feasibility and efficiency of stents coated with dodecylated chitosan–plasmid DNA nanoparticles (DCDNPs were evaluated as scaffolds for localized and prolonged delivery of reporter genes into the diseased blood vessel wall. Dodecylated chitosan–plasmid DNA complexes formed stable positive charged nanospheres with mean diameter of approximately 90–180 nm and zeta potential of +28 ± 3 mV. As prepared DCDNPs were spray-coated on stents, a thin layer of dense DCDNPs was successfully distributed onto the metal struts of the endovascular stents as demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy. The DCDNP stents were characterized for the release kinetics of plasmid DNA, and further evaluated for gene delivery and expression both in vitro and in vivo. In cell culture, DCDNP stents containing plasmid EGFP-C1 exhibited high level of GFP expression in cells grown on the stent surface and along the adjacent area. In animal studies, reporter gene activity was observed in the region of the artery in contact with the DCDNP stents, but not in adjacent arterial segments or distal organs. The DCDNP stent provides a very promising strategy for cardiovascular gene therapy

  16. Interleukin-12 plasmid DNA delivery using l-thyroxine-conjugated polyethylenimine nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehshahri, Ali; Sadeghpour, Hossein; Kazemi Oskuee, Reza; Fadaei, Mahin; Sabahi, Zahra; Alhashemi, Samira Hossaini; Mohazabieh, Erfaneh

    2014-05-01

    In this study, l-thyroxine was covalently grafted on 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI), and the ability of the nano-sized polyplexes for transferring plasmid encoding interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene was evaluated. As there are several problems in systemic administration of recombinant IL-12 protein, local expression of the plasmid encoding IL-12 gene inside the tumor tissue has been considered as an effective alternative approach. The l-thyroxine-conjugated PEI polyplexes were prepared using pUMVC3-hIL12 plasmid, and their transfection activity was determined in HepG2 human liver carcinoma and Neuro2A neuroblastoma cell lines. The polyplexes characterized in terms of DNA condensation ability, particle size, zeta potential, and buffering capacity as well as cytotoxicity and resistance to enzyme digestion. The results revealed that l-thyroxine conjugation of PEI increased gene transfer ability by up to two fold relative to unmodified 25 kDa PEI, the gold standard for non-viral gene delivery, with the highest increase occurring at degrees of conjugation around 10 %. pDNA condensation tests and dynamic light scattering measurements exhibited the ability of PEI conjugates to optimally condense the plasmid DNA into polyplexes in the size range around 200 nm. The modified polymers showed remarkable buffering capacity and protection against enzymatic degradation comparable to that of unmodified PEI. These results suggest that l-thyroxine conjugation of PEI is a simple modification strategy for future investigations aimed at developing a targeting gene vehicle.

  17. Photoinduced interactions of supramolecular ruthenium(II) complexes with plasmid DNA: synthesis and spectroscopic, electrochemical, and DNA photocleavage studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swavey, Shawn; DeBeer, Madeleine; Li, Kaiyu

    2015-04-06

    Two new bridging ligands have been synthesized by combining substituted benzaldehydes with phenanthrolinopyrrole (php), resulting in new polyazine bridging ligands. The ligands have been characterized by (1)H NMR, mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. These new ligands display π-π* transitions above 500 nm with modest molar absorptivities. Upon excitation at the ligand-centered charge-transfer transition, weak emission with a maximum wavelength of 612 nm is observed. When coordinated to two ruthenium(II) bis(bipyridyl) groups, the new bimetallic complexes generated give an overall 4+ charge. The electronic transitions of the bimetallic ruthenium(II) complexes display traditional π-π* transitions at 287 nm and metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions at 452 nm with molar absorptivities greater than 30000 M(-1) cm(-1). Oxidation of the ruthenium(II) metal centers to ruthenium(III) occurs at potentials above 1.4 V versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements indicate that the ruthenium(II) moieties behave independently. Both complexes are water-soluble and show the ability to photonick plasmid DNA when irradiated with low-energy light above 550 nm. In addition, one of the complexes, [Ru(bpy)2php]2Van(4+), shows the ability to linearize plasmid DNA and gives evidence, by gel electrophoresis, of photoinduced binding to plasmid DNA.

  18. Condensation of Plasmid DNA Enhances Mitochondrial Association in Skeletal Muscle Following Hydrodynamic Limb Vein Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Yasuzaki

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial gene therapy and diagnosis have the potential to provide substantial medical benefits. However, the utility of this approach has not yet been realized because the technology available for mitochondrial gene delivery continues to be a bottleneck. We previously reported on mitochondrial gene delivery in skeletal muscle using hydrodynamic limb vein (HLV injection. HLV injection, a useful method for nuclear transgene expression, involves the rapid injection of a large volume of naked plasmid DNA (pDNA. Moreover, the use of a condensed form of pDNA enhances the nuclear transgene expression by the HLV injection. The purpose of this study was to compare naked pDNA and condensed pDNA for mitochondrial association in skeletal muscle, when used in conjunction with HLV injection. PCR analysis showed that the use of condensed pDNA rather than naked pDNA resulted in a more effective mitochondrial association with pDNA, suggesting that the physicochemical state of pDNA plays a key role. Moreover, no mitochondrial toxicities in skeletal muscle following the HLV injection of condensed pDNA were confirmed, as evidenced by cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial membrane potential. These findings have the potential to contribute to the development for in vivo mitochondrial gene delivery system.

  19. Elg1 forms an alternative RFC complex important for DNA replication and genome integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellaoui, Mohammed; Chang, Michael; Ou, Jiongwen; Xu, Hong; Boone, Charles; Brown, Grant W

    2003-01-01

    Genome-wide synthetic genetic interaction screens with mutants in the mus81 and mms4 replication fork-processing genes identified a novel replication factor C (RFC) homolog, Elg1, which forms an alternative RFC complex with Rfc2-5. This complex is distinct from the DNA replication RFC, the DNA

  20. Elg1 forms an alternative RFC complex important for DNA replication and genome integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellaoui, Mohammed; Chang, Michael; Ou, Jiongwen; Xu, Hong; Boone, Charles; Brown, Grant W

    2003-01-01

    Genome-wide synthetic genetic interaction screens with mutants in the mus81 and mms4 replication fork-processing genes identified a novel replication factor C (RFC) homolog, Elg1, which forms an alternative RFC complex with Rfc2-5. This complex is distinct from the DNA replication RFC, the DNA damag

  1. The X gene of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is involved in viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Maohua; You, Hong; Hermonat, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) (type 2) is a popular human gene therapy vector with a long active transgene expression period and no reported vector-induced adverse reactions. Yet the basic molecular biology of this virus has not been fully addressed. One potential gene at the far 3' end of the AAV2 genome, previously referred to as X (nt 3929 to 4393), overlapping the 3' end of the cap gene, has never been characterized, although we did previously identify a promoter just up-stream (p81). Computer analysis suggested that X was involved in replication and transcription. The X protein was identified during active AAV2 replication using a polyclonal antibody against a peptide starting at amino acid 98. Reagents for the study of X included an AAV2 deletion mutant (dl78-91), a triple nucleotide substitution mutant that destroys all three 5' AUG-initiation products of X, with no effect on the cap coding sequence, and X-positive-293 cell lines. Here, we found that X up-regulated AAV2 DNA replication in differentiating keratinocytes (without helper virus, autonomous replication) and in various forms of 293 cell-based assays with help from wild type adenovirus type 5 (wt Ad5) or Ad5 helper plasmid (pHelper). The strongest contribution by X was seen in increasing wt AAV2 DNA replication in keratinocytes and dl78-91 in Ad5-infected X-positive-293 cell lines (both having multi-fold effects). Mutating the X gene in pAAV-RC (pAAV-RC-3Xneg) yielded approximately a ∼33% reduction in recombinant AAV vector DNA replication and virion production, but a larger effect was seen when using this same X-knockout AAV helper plasmid in X-positive-293 cell lines versus normal 293 cells (again, multi-fold). Taken together these data strongly suggest that AAV2 X encodes a protein involved in the AAV life cycle, particularly in increasing AAV2 DNA replication, and suggests that further studies are warranted.

  2. High-Voltage Electroporation of Bacteria: Genetic Transformation of Campylobacter jejuni with Plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeff F.; Dower, William J.; Tompkins, Lucy S.

    1988-02-01

    Electroporation permits the uptake of DNA by mammalian cells and plant protoplasts because it induces transient permeability of the cell membrane. We investigated the utility of high-voltage electroporation as a method for genetic transformation of intact bacterial cells by using the enteric pathogen Campylobacter jejuni as a model system. This report demonstrates that the application of high-voltage discharges to bacterial cells permits genetic transformation. Our method involves exposure of a Campylobacter cell suspension to a high-voltage exponential decay discharge (5-13 kV/cm) for a brief period of time (resistance-capacitance time constant = 2.4-26 msec) in the presence of plasmid DNA. Electrical transformation of C. jejuni results in frequencies as high as 1.2 × 106 transformants per μ g of DNA. We have investigated the effects of pulse amplitude and duration, cell growth conditions, divalent cations, and DNA concentration on the efficiency of transformation. Transformants of C. jejuni obtained by electroporation contained structurally intact plasmid molecules. In addition, evidence is presented that indicates that C. jejuni possesses DNA restriction and modification systems. The use of electroporation as a method for transforming other bacterial species and guidelines for its implementation are also discussed.

  3. Antibacterial effect of cationic porphyrazines and anionic phthalocyanine and their interaction with plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Leila; Hakimian, Fatemeh; Safaei, Elham; Fazeli, Zahra

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is a public health issue and identification of new antibacterial agents is one of the most important goals of pharmacological research. Among the novel developed antibacterial agents, porphyrin complexes and their derivatives are ideal candidates for use in medical applications. Phthalocyanines differ from porphyrins by having nitrogen atoms link the individual pyrrol units. The aza analogues of the phthalocyanines (azaPcs) such as tetramethylmetalloporphyrazines are heterocyclic Pc analogues. In this investigation, interaction of an anionic phthalocyanine (Cu(PcTs)) and two cationic tetrapyridinoporphyrazines including [Cu(2,3-tmtppa)]4+ and [Cu(3,4-tmtppa)]4+ complexes with plasmid DNA was studied using spectroscopic and gel electrophoresis methods. In addition, antibacterial effect of the complexes against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria was investigated using dilution test method. The results indicated that both porphyrazines have significant antibacterial properties, but Cu(PcTs) has weak antibacterial effect. Compairing the binding of the phthalocyanine and the porphyrazines to DNA demonstrated that the interaction of cationic porphyrazines is stronger than the anionic phthalocyanine remarkably. The extent of hypochromicity and red shift of absorption spectra indicated preferential intercalation of the two porphyrazine into the base pairs of DNA helix. Gel electrophoresis result implied Cu(2,3-tmtppa) and Cu(3,4-tmtppa) are able to perform cleavage of the plasmid DNA. Consequently, DNA binding and cleavage might be one of the antibacterial mechanisms of the complexes.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Chitosan-Saponin Nanoparticle for Application in Plasmid DNA Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruku Bande

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonviral delivery system receives attention over the last decade. Chitosan (CS is a cationic polymer whereas saponin (SP is classified as glycoside. In this study, a spherically-shaped CS-SP nanoparticle was synthesized and characterized. The ability of the nanoparticle to protect DNA from enzymatic degradation, its thermostability and cytotoxicity were evaluated. The particle size was found below 100 nm as determined by Zetasizer, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and field scanning electron microscopy (FSEM results. The surface charge ranges from 43.7 mV to 38.5 mV before and after encapsulation with DNA plasmid, respectively. In terms of thermostability, Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC revealed that CS-SP nanoparticle had a melting temperature of 110°C, with rapid decomposition occurring at 120°C. Encapsulation of DNA with the synthesized nanoparticle was evidenced by changes in the FTIR spectra including characteristic peaks at 3267.39 and 1635.58 cm−1, wavenumbers. Additional peak was also observed at 1169.7 cm−1 following encapsulation. Electrophoretic mobility showed that CS-SP nanoparticle protected plasmid DNA from enzymatic degradation, while cell viability assays confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticle exhibited low cytotoxicity at different concentrations in avian cells. Taken together these, CS-SP nanoparticle showed potentials for applications as a DNA delivery system.

  5. Multiple factors affect immunogenicity of DNA plasmid HIV vaccines in human clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xia; Morgan, Cecilia; Yu, Xuesong; DeRosa, Stephen; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Kublin, James; Corey, Larry; Keefer, Michael C

    2015-05-11

    Plasmid DNA vaccines have been licensed for use in domesticated animals because of their excellent immunogenicity, but none have yet been licensed for use in humans. Here we report a retrospective analysis of 1218 healthy human volunteers enrolled in 10 phase I clinical trials in which DNA plasmids encoding HIV antigens were administered. Elicited T-cell immune responses were quantified by validated intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) stimulated with HIV peptide pools. HIV-specific binding and neutralizing antibody activities were also analyzed using validated assays. Results showed that, in the absence of adjuvants and boosting with alternative vaccines, DNA vaccines elicited CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell responses in an average of 13.3% (95% CI: 9.8-17.8%) and 37.7% (95% CI: 31.9-43.8%) of vaccine recipients, respectively. Three vaccinations (vs. 2) improved the proportion of subjects with antigen-specific CD8+ responses (p=0.02), as did increased DNA dosage (p=0.007). Furthermore, female gender and participants having a lower body mass index were independently associated with higher CD4+ T-cell response rate (p=0.001 and p=0.008, respectively). These vaccines elicited minimal neutralizing and binding antibody responses. These findings of the immunogenicity of HIV DNA vaccines in humans can provide guidance for future clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 proteins associate in a complex and colocalize at replication factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Riccardo; Leva, Valentina; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Montecucco, Alessandra

    2009-08-15

    DNA ligase I is the main DNA ligase activity involved in eukaryotic DNA replication acting in the joining of Okazaki fragments. This enzyme is also implicated in nucleotide excision repair and in the long-patch base excision repair while its role in the recombinational repair pathways is poorly understood. DNA ligase I is phosphorylated during cell cycle at several serine and threonine residues that regulate its participation in different DNA transactions by modulating the interaction with different protein partners. Here we use an antibody-based array method to identify novel DNA ligase-interacting partners. We show that DNA ligase I participates in several multiprotein complexes with proteins involved in DNA replication and repair, cell cycle control, and protein modification. In particular we demonstrate that DNA ligase I complexes with Nbs1, a core component of the MRN complex critical for detection, processing and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. The analysis of epitope tagged DNA ligase I mutants demonstrates that the association is mediated by the catalytic fragment of the enzyme. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 colocalize at replication factories during unperturbed replication and after treatment with DNA damaging agents. Since MRN complex is involved in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks by homologous recombination at stalled replication forks our data support the notion that DNA ligase I participates in homology dependent pathways that deal with replication-associated lesions generated when replication fork encounters DNA damage.

  7. Studies on the replication of Escherichia coli phage lambda DNA. I. The kinetics of DNA replication and requirements for the generation of rolling circles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Better, M; Freifelder, D

    1983-04-15

    Escherichia coli phage lambda DNA has been isolated from infected bacteria using a new technique by which virtually all phage DNA is recovered. Isolated DNA is examined by electron microscopy. Addition of phi X174 RF1 molecules as a counting standard enables us to determine the average number of lambda DNA molecules present in an infected cell. In this study, we have followed the kinetics of lambda DNA replication and examined rolling circle replication. The most important findings are the following: (1) Rolling circle replication is initiated at roughly the same time as is theta replication, indicating that the rolling circle is not solely a late-replicating form. (2) theta replication stops at about 16 min after infection. (3) Early in infection the number of DNA molecules per cell doubles every 2-3 min until theta replication stops, at which point most DNA synthesis consists of growth of the tails of about three rolling circles per cell. (4) Neither the timing of rolling circle replication nor the number of molecules is affected by the activity of the lambda red genes. (5). The red genes are responsible for the production of oligomeric circles late in infection.

  8. Involvement of DNA ligase III and ribonuclease H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication in cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhanen, Heini; Ushakov, Kathy; Yasukawa, Takehiro

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis operates in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, but the factors involved in lagging strand synthesis are largely uncharacterised. We investigated the effect of knockdown of the candidate proteins in cultured human cells under conditions where mtDNA appears to replicate chiefly via coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis to restore the copy number of mtDNA to normal levels after transient mtDNA depletion. DNA ligase III knockdown attenuated the recovery of mtDNA copy number and appeared to cause single strand nicks in replicating mtDNA molecules, suggesting the involvement of DNA ligase III in Okazaki fragment ligation in human mitochondria. Knockdown of ribonuclease (RNase) H1 completely prevented the mtDNA copy number restoration, and replication intermediates with increased single strand nicks were readily observed. On the other hand, knockdown of neither flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) nor DNA2 affected mtDNA replication. These findings imply that RNase H1 is indispensable for the progression of mtDNA synthesis through removing RNA primers from Okazaki fragments. In the nucleus, Okazaki fragments are ligated by DNA ligase I, and the RNase H2 is involved in Okazaki fragment processing. This study thus proposes that the mitochondrial replication system utilises distinct proteins, DNA ligase III and RNase H1, for Okazaki fragment maturation.

  9. Binding Affinities among DNA Helicase-Primase, DNA Polymerase, and Replication Intermediates in the Replisome of Bacteriophage T7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huidong; Tang, Yong; Lee, Seung-Joo; Wei, Zeliang; Cao, Jia; Richardson, Charles C

    2016-01-15

    The formation of a replication loop on the lagging strand facilitates coordinated synthesis of the leading- and lagging-DNA strands and provides a mechanism for recycling of the lagging-strand DNA polymerase. As an Okazaki fragment is completed, the loop is released, and a new loop is formed as the synthesis of a new Okazaki fragment is initiated. Loop release requires the dissociation of the complex formed by the interactions among helicase, DNA polymerase, and DNA. The completion of the Okazaki fragment may result in either a nick or a single-stranded DNA region. In the replication system of bacteriophage T7, the dissociation of the polymerase from either DNA region is faster than that observed for the dissociation of the helicase from DNA polymerase, implying that the replication loop is released more likely through the dissociation of the lagging-strand DNA from polymerase, retaining the polymerase at replication fork. Both dissociation of DNA polymerase from DNA and that of helicase from a DNA polymerase · DNA complex are much faster at a nick DNA region than the release from a ssDNA region. These results suggest that the replication loop is released as a result of the nick formed when the lagging-strand DNA polymerase encounters the previously synthesized Okazaki fragment, releasing lagging-strand DNA and retaining DNA polymerase at the replication fork for the synthesis of next Okazaki fragment.

  10. Mechanism of replication machinery assembly as revealed by the DNA ligase-PCNA-DNA complex architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayanagi, Kouta; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Saito, Mihoko; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2009-03-24

    The 3D structure of the ternary complex, consisting of DNA ligase, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clamp, and DNA, was investigated by single-particle analysis. This report presents the structural view, where the crescent-shaped DNA ligase with 3 distinct domains surrounds the central DNA duplex, encircled by the closed PCNA ring, thus forming a double-layer structure with dual contacts between the 2 proteins. The relative orientations of the DNA ligase domains, which remarkably differ from those of the known crystal structures, suggest that a large domain rearrangement occurs upon ternary complex formation. A second contact was found between the PCNA ring and the middle adenylation domain of the DNA ligase. Notably, the map revealed a substantial DNA tilt from the PCNA ring axis. This structure allows us to propose a switching mechanism for the replication factors operating on the PCNA ring.

  11. Escherichia coli DnaE Polymerase Couples Pyrophosphatase Activity to DNA Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lapenta

    Full Text Available DNA Polymerases generate pyrophosphate every time they catalyze a step of DNA elongation. This elongation reaction is generally believed as thermodynamically favoured by the hydrolysis of pyrophosphate, catalyzed by inorganic pyrophosphatases. However, the specific action of inorganic pyrophosphatases coupled to DNA replication in vivo was never demonstrated. Here we show that the Polymerase-Histidinol-Phosphatase (PHP domain of Escherichia coli DNA Polymerase III α subunit features pyrophosphatase activity. We also show that this activity is inhibited by fluoride, as commonly observed for inorganic pyrophosphatases, and we identified 3 amino acids of the PHP active site. Remarkably, E. coli cells expressing variants of these catalytic residues of α subunit feature aberrant phenotypes, poor viability, and are subject to high mutation frequencies. Our findings indicate that DNA Polymerases can couple DNA elongation and pyrophosphate hydrolysis, providing a mechanism for the control of DNA extension rate, and suggest a promising target for novel antibiotics.

  12. Fed-batch microbioreactor platform for scale down and analysis of a plasmid DNA production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Diana M; Lee, Kevin S; Ram, Rajeev J; Prather, Kristala L J

    2012-08-01

    The rising costs of bioprocess research and development emphasize the need for high-throughput, low-cost alternatives to bench-scale bioreactors for process development. In particular, there is a need for platforms that can go beyond simple batch growth of the organism of interest to include more advanced monitoring, control, and operation schemes such as fed-batch or continuous. We have developed a 1-mL microbioreactor capable of monitoring and control of dissolved oxygen, pH, and temperature. Optical density can also be measured online for continuous monitoring of cell growth. To test our microbioreactor platform, we used production of a plasmid DNA vaccine vector (pVAX1-GFP) in Escherichia coli via a fed-batch temperature-inducible process as a model system. We demonstrated that our platform can accurately predict growth, glycerol and acetate concentrations, as well as plasmid copy number and quality obtained in a bench-scale bioreactor. The predictive abilities of the micro-scale system were robust over a range of feed rates as long as key process parameters, such as dissolved oxygen, were kept constant across scales. We have highlighted plasmid DNA production as a potential application for our microbioreactor, but the device has broad utility for microbial process development in other industries as well. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A role for the weak DnaA binding sites in bacterial replication origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    DnaA initiates the chromosomal DNA replication in nearly all bacteria, and replication origins are characterized by binding sites for the DnaA protein (DnaA-boxes) along with an ‘AT-rich’ region. However, great variation in number, spatial organization and specificity of DnaA-boxes is observed...... between species. In the study by Taylor et al. (2011), new and unexpectedly weak DnaA-boxes were identified within the Caulobacter crescentus origin of replication (Cori). The position of weak and stronger DnaA-boxes follows a pattern seen in Escherichia coli oriC. This raises the possibility...

  14. Gene Transfer into the Lung by Nanoparticle Dextran-Spermine/Plasmid DNA Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahril Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel cationic polymer, dextran-spermine (D-SPM, has been found to mediate gene expression in a wide variety of cell lines and in vivo through systemic delivery. Here, we extended the observations by determining the optimal conditions for gene expression of D-SPM/plasmid DNA (D-SPM/pDNA in cell lines and in the lungs of BALB/c mice via instillation delivery. In vitro studies showed that D-SPM could partially protect pDNA from degradation by nuclease and exhibited optimal gene transfer efficiency at D-SPM to pDNA weight-mixing ratio of 12. In the lungs of mice, the levels of gene expression generated by D-SPM/pDNA are highly dependent on the weight-mixing ratio of D-SPM to pDNA, amount of pDNA in the complex, and the assay time postdelivery. Readministration of the complex at day 1 following the first dosing showed no significant effect on the retention and duration of gene expression. The study also showed that there was a clear trend of increasing size of the complexes as the amount of pDNA was increased, where the sizes of the D-SPM/pDNA complexes were within the nanometer range.

  15. DNA sequence, products, and transcriptional pattern of the genes involved in production of the DNA replication inhibitor microcin B17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genilloud, O; Moreno, F; Kolter, R

    1989-02-01

    The 3.8-kilobase segment of plasmid DNA that contains the genes required for production of the DNA replication inhibitor microcin B17 was sequenced. The sequence contains four open reading frames which were shown to be translated in vivo by the construction of fusions to lacZ. The location of these open reading frames fits well with the location of the four microcin B17 production genes, mcbABCD, identified previously through genetic complementation. The products of the four genes have been identified, and the observed molecular weights of the proteins agree with those predicted from the nucleotide sequence. The transcription of these genes was studied by using fusions to lacZ and physical mapping of mRNA start sites. Three promoters were identified in this region. The major promoter for all the genes is a growth phase-regulated OmpR-dependent promoter located upstream of mcbA. A second promoter is located within mcbC and is responsible for a low-level basal expression of mcbD. A third promoter, located within mcbD, promotes transcription in the reverse direction starting within mcbD and extending through mcbC. The resulting mRNA appears to be an untranslated antisense transcript that could play a regulatory role in the expression of these genes.

  16. Termination of DNA replication forks: "Breaking up is hard to do".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Rachael; Priego Moreno, Sara; Gambus, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    To ensure duplication of the entire genome, eukaryotic DNA replication initiates from thousands of replication origins. The replication forks move through the chromatin until they encounter forks from neighboring origins. During replication fork termination forks converge, the replisomes disassemble and topoisomerase II resolves the daughter DNA molecules. If not resolved efficiently, terminating forks result in genomic instability through the formation of pathogenic structures. Our recent findings shed light onto the mechanism of replisome disassembly upon replication fork termination. We have shown that termination-specific polyubiquitylation of the replicative helicase component - Mcm7, leads to dissolution of the active helicase in a process dependent on the p97/VCP/Cdc48 segregase. The inhibition of terminating helicase disassembly resulted in a replication termination defect. In this extended view we present hypothetical models of replication fork termination and discuss remaining and emerging questions in the DNA replication termination field.

  17. Plasmid cloning vehicle for Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, D.; Clayton, N.L.; Setlow, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    A new plasmid cloning vehicle (pDM2) was used to introduce a library of Haemophilus influenzae chromosomal fragments into H. influenzae. Transformants of the higly recombination-defective rec-1 mutant were more likely to contain exclusively recombinant plasmids after exposure to ligated DNA mixtures than was the wild type. pDM2 could replicate in Escherichia coli K-12.

  18. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication.

  19. USP7/HAUSP: A SUMO deubiquitinase at the heart of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Veronique A J; Freire, Raimundo

    2016-09-01

    DNA replication is both highly conserved and controlled. Problematic DNA replication can lead to genomic instability and therefore carcinogenesis. Numerous mechanisms work together to achieve this tight control and increasing evidence suggests that post-translational modifications (phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation) of DNA replication proteins play a pivotal role in this process. Here we discuss such modifications in the light of a recent article that describes a novel role for the deubiquitinase (DUB) USP7/HAUSP in the control of DNA replication. USP7 achieves this function by an unusual and novel mechanism, namely deubiquitination of SUMOylated proteins at the replication fork, making USP7 also a SUMO DUB (SDUB). This work extends previous observations of increased levels of SUMO and low levels of ubiquitin at the on-going replication fork. Here, we discuss this novel study, its contribution to the DNA replication and genomic stability field and what questions arise from this work.

  20. Low energy electrons and ultra-soft X-rays irradiation of plasmid DNA. Technical innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Michel; Boulanouar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present in a first part the latest results of our group which are in relation with the study of DNA damages inflicted by low energy electrons (0-20 eV) in ultra-high vacuum as well as in air under atmospheric conditions. A short description of the drop-casting technique we developed to produce thin and nanometre-scaled DNA layers onto graphite sheets is given. We provide the absolute cross-section for loss of supercoiled topology of plasmid DNA complexed with 1,3-diaminopropane (Dap) in the vacuum under 10 eV electron impact and suggest a specific pathway for the dissociation of the transient negative ion formed by resonant capture of such a low energy electron (LEE) by the DNA's phosphate group when complexed to Dap. Well-gauged DNA-Dap layers with various nanometre-scaled thicknesses are used to evaluate the effective attenuation length of secondary photo-LEEs in the energy range (0-20 eV). The values of 11-16 nm for DNA kept under atmospheric conditions are in good agreement with the rare literature data available and which are stemming from computer simulations. In a second part, we describe the method we have developed in order to expose liquid samples of plasmid DNA to ultra-soft X-rays (Al Kα line at 1.5 keV) under hydroxyl radical scavenging conditions. We provide an experimentally determined percentage of indirect effects in aqueous medium kept under standard conditions of 94.7±2.1% indirect effects; in satisfactory agreement with the data published by others (i.e. 97.7%) relative to gamma irradiation of frozen solutions (Tomita et al., 1995).

  1. Vaccination with trypomastigote surface antigen 1-encoding plasmid DNA confers protection against lethal Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wizel, B; Garg, N; Tarleton, R L

    1998-11-01

    DNA vaccination was evaluated with the experimental murine model of Trypanosoma cruzi infection as a means to induce antiparasite protective immunity, and the trypomastigote surface antigen 1 (TSA-1), a target of anti-T. cruzi antibody and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses, was used as the model antigen. Following the intramuscular immunization of H-2(b) and H-2(d) mice with a plasmid DNA encoding an N-terminally truncated TSA-1 lacking or containing the C-terminal nonapeptide tandem repeats, the antibody level, CTL response, and protection against challenge with T. cruzi were assessed. In H-2(b) mice, antiparasite antibodies were induced only by immunization with the DNA construct encoding TSA-1 containing the C-terminal repeats. However, both DNA constructs were efficient in eliciting long-lasting CTL responses against the protective H-2Kb-restricted TSA-1515-522 epitope. In H-2(d) mice, inoculation with either of the two TSA-1-expressing vectors effectively generated antiparasite antibodies and primed CTLs that lysed T. cruzi-infected cells in an antigen-specific, MHC class I-restricted, and CD8(+)-T-cell-dependent manner. When TSA-1 DNA-vaccinated animals were challenged with T. cruzi, 14 of 22 (64%) H-2(b) and 16 of 18 (89%) H-2(d) mice survived the infection. The ability to induce significant murine anti-T. cruzi protective immunity by immunization with plasmid DNA expressing TSA-1 provides the basis for the application of this technology in the design of optimal DNA multicomponent anti-T. cruzi vaccines which may ultimately be used for the prevention or treatment of Chagas' disease.

  2. Expression and humoral immune response to Hepatitis C virus using a plasmid DNA construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to clone a c-DNA fragment of hepatitis C virus in a eukaryotic expression vector and to measure the efficacy of humoral immune responses in mice inoculated with this recombinant plasmid. This study was an attempt to lay a foundation for HCV nucleic acid vaccine development in the future. METHODS: A c-DNA fragment of BK146, a clone of HCV type 1b, was sub-cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector pMT3. HepG2 and COS cells were transfected with this construct, named pMT3-BK146. The expression of HCV mRNA and proteins was studied by reverse transcribed polymerase chain reaction, radio Immunoprecipitation (RIPA and immunofluorescence (IFA. The DNA of this construct was injected into the footpad of BALB/c mice and antibody response was tested by enzyme immunoassay and indirect immunofluorescence. RESULTS: COS and HepG2 cells transiently transfected with the recombinant plasmid pMT3-BK146 showed the expression of HCV proteins by RT-PCR, RIPA and immunofluorescence. This DNA clone when injected into Balb/c mice was able to generate specific antibody response to hepatitis C virus by ELISA and IFA. CONCLUSIONS: A c-DNA fragment of HCV cloned in an eukaryotic expression vector was able to express core protein. This DNA clone was also able to elicit antibody response in mice. This can be an initial step towards the development of a potential DNA vaccine for hepatitis C virus infection.

  3. Specific recognition of supercoiled plasmid DNA by affinity chromatography using the intercalator DAPP as ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramelo-Nunes, C; Almeida, P; Marcos, J C; Tomaz, C T

    2013-06-01

    Small molecules that bind DNA with high specificity present a promising opportunity for application as chromatographic ligands for plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification. This research used the intercalator 3,8-diamino-6-phenylphenanthridine (DAPP) as an immobilized ligand for the specific separation of supercoiled (sc) pDNA by affinity chromatography. The results showed that the protonated DAPP-Sepharose support has a great affinity for sc pDNA isoform, separating it from the less active open circular and linear isoforms. All pDNA isoforms were retained in the column using 10mM acetate buffer pH 5. Selective elution of oc and linear isoforms was achieved with 0.22M of sodium chloride in the same buffer. Finally, increasing the concentration to 0.55M led to the elution of the sc isoform. The binding of pDNA to DAPP-Sepharose varies in function of pH, and the stability of the protonated DAPP-DNA complex decreases with increasing salt concentration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Transformation of Azotobacter vinelandii OP with a broad host range plasmid containing a cloned chromosomal nif-DNA marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingle, W H

    1988-05-01

    The non-nitrogen-fixing (Nif-) strain UW10 of Azotobacter vinelandii OP (UW) was naturally induced to competence and transformed with broad host range plasmid pKT210 containing the cloned wild-type nif-10 locus from A. vinelandii UW (Nif+); this marker was unable to complement the nif-10 mutation in trans, but could through recombination with the chromosome. The most frequent type of transformation event observed was recombination between the homologous regions of the plasmid and chromosome (producing Nif+ transformants) with loss of the plasmid vector. At a substantially lower frequency, transformants expressing the plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance determinants were isolated which were phenotypically Nif-. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed that these transformants contained a plasmid migrating with the same mobility as the original donor plasmid. During culture these transformants acquired a Nif+ phenotype without the loss of the plasmid, as judged by the use of a hybridization probe specific for the cloned nif-DNA fragment. These data indicate that plasmids carrying sequences homologous to chromosomal sequences could be maintained in recombination-proficient A. vinelandii UW. The introduction of plasmids containing sequences homologous to chromosomal sequences was facilitated by prelinearization of the plasmid using a restriction endonuclease generating cohesive ends. Because the site of linearization could be chosen outside the region of shared homology, it was unlikely that the route of plasmid establishment occurred via a homology-facilitated transformation mechanism. The data also indicated that A. vinelandii UW could harbor broad host range cloning vectors based on plasmid RSF1010 without significant impairment of its nitrogen-fixation ability.

  5. Scientific advice on the suitability of data for the assessment of DNA integration into the fish genome of a genetically modified DNA plasmid-based veterinary vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreas disease caused by salmonid alphavirus in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar leads to high mortality rates post infection and histopathological lesions in several organs. As protection against pancreas disease, Novartis developed a prophylactic DNA plasmid-based vaccine to be administered to salmon as naked plasmid in a single intramuscular injection. In order to assess the legal status of the fish vaccinated with this new vaccine with regard to the legislation on genetically modified organisms, the European Commission suggested that the company carry out a scientific study on the integration/non-integration of the plasmid DNA into the fish genome. Subsequently, the European Commission requested EFSA to give scientific advice on the study design and the conclusions drawn by the company. PCR based analysis of genomic DNA from muscle samples, taken from at or around the injection site 436 days post vaccination, led the company to conclude that integration of plasmid DNA into the fish genome is extremely unlikely. After an assessment of the study, EFSA considers that the study presented by Novartis Animal Health on the integration/non-integration of DNA plasmid-based vaccine into the salmon genomic DNA provides insufficient information on the potential integration of plasmid DNA fragments into the fish genome due to a limited coverage of the plasmid DNA by the detection method provided, the limited number of samples analysed and an insufficient limit of detection and method validation. Therefore, EFSA is of the opinion that the results from the integration/non-integration study submitted by Novartis Animal Health are not sufficient to support the conclusion of non-integration of plasmid DNA into the fish genome drawn by the company.

  6. Nutritional Control of DNA Replication Initiation through the Proteolysis and Regulated Translation of DnaA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Leslie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria can arrest their own growth and proliferation upon nutrient depletion and under various stressful conditions to ensure their survival. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for suppressing growth and arresting the cell cycle under such conditions remain incompletely understood. Here, we identify post-transcriptional mechanisms that help enforce a cell-cycle arrest in Caulobacter crescentus following nutrient limitation and during entry into stationary phase by limiting the accumulation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator protein. DnaA is rapidly degraded by the Lon protease following nutrient limitation. However, the rate of DnaA degradation is not significantly altered by changes in nutrient availability. Instead, we demonstrate that decreased nutrient availability downregulates dnaA translation by a mechanism involving the 5' untranslated leader region of the dnaA transcript; Lon-dependent proteolysis of DnaA then outpaces synthesis, leading to the elimination of DnaA and the arrest of DNA replication. Our results demonstrate how regulated translation and constitutive degradation provide cells a means of precisely and rapidly modulating the concentration of key regulatory proteins in response to environmental inputs.

  7. DNA methyltransferases are required to induce heterochromatic re-replication in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hume Stroud

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between epigenetic marks on chromatin and the regulation of DNA replication is poorly understood. Mutations of the H3K27 methyltransferase genes, Arabidopsis trithorax-related protein5 (ATXR5 and ATXR6, result in re-replication (repeated origin firing within the same cell cycle. Here we show that mutations that reduce DNA methylation act to suppress the re-replication phenotype of atxr5 atxr6 mutants. This suggests that DNA methylation, a mark enriched at the same heterochromatic regions that re-replicate in atxr5/6 mutants, is required for aberrant re-replication. In contrast, RNA sequencing analyses suggest that ATXR5/6 and DNA methylation cooperatively transcriptionally silence transposable elements (TEs. Hence our results suggest a complex relationship between ATXR5/6 and DNA methylation in the regulation of DNA replication and transcription of TEs.

  8. The Escherichia coli Tus-Ter replication fork barrier causes site-specific DNA replication perturbation in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Sass, Ehud; Suski, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Replication fork (RF) pausing occurs at both 'programmed' sites and non-physiological barriers (for example, DNA adducts). Programmed RF pausing is required for site-specific DNA replication termination in Escherichia coli, and this process requires the binding of the polar terminator protein, Tus......, to specific DNA sequences called Ter. Here, we demonstrate that Tus-Ter modules also induce polar RF pausing when engineered into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. This heterologous RF barrier is distinct from a number of previously characterized, protein-mediated, RF pause sites in yeast, as it is neither...

  9. Mechanisms Governing DDK Regulation of the Initiation of DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larasati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK complex—comprised of cell division cycle (Cdc7 kinase and its regulatory subunit dumbbell former 4 (Dbf4—is required to trigger the initiation of DNA replication through the phosphorylation of multiple minichromosome maintenance complex subunits 2-7 (Mcm2-7. DDK is also a target of the radiation sensitive 53 (Rad53 checkpoint kinase in response to replication stress. Numerous investigations have determined mechanistic details, including the regions of Mcm2, Mcm4, and Mcm6 phosphorylated by DDK, and a number of DDK docking sites. Similarly, the way in which the Rad53 forkhead-associated 1 (FHA1 domain binds to DDK—involving both canonical and non-canonical interactions—has been elucidated. Recent work has revealed mutual promotion of DDK and synthetic lethal with dpb11-1 3 (Sld3 roles. While DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2-7 subunits facilitates their interaction with Sld3 at origins, Sld3 in turn stimulates DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. Details of a mutually antagonistic relationship between DDK and Rap1-interacting factor 1 (Rif1 have also recently come to light. While Rif1 is able to reverse DDK-mediated Mcm2-7 complex phosphorylation by targeting the protein phosphatase glycogen 7 (Glc7 to origins, there is evidence to suggest that DDK can counteract this activity by binding to and phosphorylating Rif1.

  10. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Gagnon, David [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Gjoerup, Ole [Molecular Oncology Research Institute, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Archambault, Jacques [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Bullock, Peter A., E-mail: Peter.Bullock@tufts.edu [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication.

  11. Characteristics of DNA replication in isolated nuclei initiated by an aprotinin-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, F D; Fresa, K L; Hameed, M; Cohen, S

    1993-02-01

    Isolated cell nuclei were used as the source of template DNA to investigate the role of a cytosolic aprotinin-binding protein (ADR) in the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication. Computerized image cytometry demonstrated that the DNA content of individual nuclei increased significantly following incubation with ADR-containing preparations, and the extent of DNA synthesis is consistent with that allowed by the limiting concentration of dTTP. Thus, dTTP incorporation into isolated nuclei represents DNA synthesis and not parent strand repair. We found that dTTP incorporation into the isolated nuclei is dependent on DNA polymerase alpha (a principal polymerase in DNA replication) but that DNA polymerase beta (a principal polymerase in DNA repair processes) does not play a significant role in this system. Finally, neither aprotinin nor a previously described cytosolic ADR inhibitor can block the replication of nuclease-treated calf thymus DNA, while both strongly inhibit replication of DNA in isolated nuclei. This result, coupled with the relative ineffectiveness of nuclease-treated DNA compared with nuclear DNA to serve as a replicative template in this assay, argues against a significant contribution from repair or synthesis which initiates at a site of DNA damage. These data indicate that ADR-mediated incorporation of 3H-dTTP into isolated nuclei results from DNA replicative processes that are directly relevant to in vivo S phase events.

  12. Aqueous extract of Pinus caribaea inhibits the damage induced by ultraviolet radiations, in plasmid DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marioly Vernhes Tamayo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Context: The incidence of solar ultraviolet radiation (UV on Earth has increased due to diminish of the ozone layer. This enviromental agent is highly genotoxic causing numerous damage in DNA molecule. Nowadays there is a growing interest in the search of compounds capable to minimize these effects. In particular, phytocompounds have been tested as excelent candidates for their antigenotoxic properties. Aims: To evaluate the protective effect of the aqueous extract of Pinus caribaea (EPC against the damage induced by the UVB and UVC radiation. Methods: The cell-free plasmid DNA assay was employed. The forms of plasmid were separated electrophoretically in agarose gel. For genotoxic and photoprotective evaluation of P. caribaea, different concentrations of the extract (0.1 – 2.0 mg/mL and exposure times were evaluated. The CPD lesions were detected enzymatically. Additionally, the transmittance of the aqueous extract against 254 nm and 312 nm was measured. Results: None of the concentrations were genotoxic in 30 min of treatment, for superior times a clastogenic effect was observed. The EPC despite inhibiting the activity of the enzyme T4 endo V, impedes photolesions formation in DNA at concentrations ≥ 0.1 mg/mL. Conclusions: The EPC has photoprotective properties, this effect could be related with its antioxidants and absorptives capacities.

  13. Optimization of a lipitoid-based plasmid DNA transfection protocol for bovine trophectoderm CT-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffmacher, Andrew T; Keefer, Carol L

    2012-08-01

    Embryo-derived cell lines are important in vitro models for investigating the molecular mechanisms directing embryonic tissue lineage segregation and maintenance. The bovine trophectoderm-derived CT-1 cell line has been widely used to identify regulatory mechanisms of interferon tau gene expression, and it possesses potential as a model for characterizing the gene regulatory network controlling trophoblast lineage differentiation and development. This functional potential, however, is severely limited as CT-1 cells are very recalcitrant to standard transfection methods. The focus of this study was to test the cationic lipitoid reagent as an effective transfection reagent for DNA plasmid delivery. Optimization of liptoid-based transfection of plasmid DNA resulted in 9% transfection efficiency averaged across entire CT-1 colonies, with many subregions of CT-1 colonies achieving transfection rates of 15%. These rates are a substantial improvement over near-zero efficiencies achieved using other standard transfection techniques. CT-1 cells were also successfully adapted to substrate-free culture for over 20 passages, eliminating the need to culture CT-1 colonies on feeder cells or matrix-coated cultureware. Together, these results increase the utility of the CT-1 cell line as an in vitro bovine trophoblast model and provide insight into overcoming DNA delivery difficulties in other cell lines not amenable to genetic manipulation.

  14. A bimetallic nanocomposite electrode for direct and rapid biosensing of p53 DNA plasmid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ezat Hamidi-Asl; Jahan-Bakhsh Raoof; Nahid Naghizadeh; Simin Sharifi; Mohammad Saeid Hejazi

    2015-09-01

    A new label-free electrochemical DNA biosensor is presented based on carbon paste electrode (CPE) modified with gold (Au) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles to prepare the bimetallic nanocomposite electrode. The proposed sensor was made by immobilization of 15-mer single stranded oligonucleotide probe related to p53 gene for detection of DNA plasmid samples. The hybridization detection relied on the alternation in the guanine oxidation signal following hybridization of the probe with complementary genomic DNA.The technique of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used for monitoring guanine oxidation. To optimize the performance of the modified CPE, different electrodes were prepared in various percentages of Au and Pt nanoparticles. The modified electrode containing 15% Au/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (15% Au/Pt-MCPE) was selected as the best working electrode. The selectivity of the sensor was investigated using plasmid samples containing non-complementary oligonucleotides. The detection limit of the biosensor was studied and calculated to be 53.10 pg L−1.

  15. Isolation and purification of recombinant proteins, antibodies and plasmid DNA with hydroxyapatite chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbrig, Frank; Freitag, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite and related stationary phases increasingly play a role in the downstream processing of high-value biological materials, such as recombinant proteins, therapeutic antibodies and pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA. Chromatographic hydroxyapatite is an inorganic, ceramic material identical in composition, if not in structure, to calcium phosphate found in human bones and teeth. The interaction of hydroxyapatite with biomacromolecules is complex and highly dynamic, which can make predicting performance difficult, but also allows the design of very selective isolation processes. This review discusses the currently commercially available chromatographic materials, different retention mechanisms supported by these materials and differential exploitation for the design of highly specific isolation procedures. The state of the art of antibody purification by hydroxy- and fluoroapatite is reviewed together with tested routines for method development and implementation. Finally, the isolation of plasmid DNA is discussed, since the purification of DNA therapeutics at a sufficiently large scale is an emerging need in bioprocess development and perhaps the area in bioseparation where apatite chromatography can make its most important contribution to date.

  16. Primer retention owing to the absence of RNase H1 is catastrophic for mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J Bradley; Akman, Gokhan; Wood, Stuart R; Sakhuja, Kiran; Cerritelli, Susana M; Moss, Chloe; Bowmaker, Mark R; Jacobs, Howard T; Crouch, Robert J; Holt, Ian J

    2015-07-28

    Encoding ribonuclease H1 (RNase H1) degrades RNA hybridized to DNA, and its function is essential for mitochondrial DNA maintenance in the developing mouse. Here we define the role of RNase H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication. Analysis of replicating mitochondrial DNA in embryonic fibroblasts lacking RNase H1 reveals retention of three primers in the major noncoding region (NCR) and one at the prominent lagging-strand initiation site termed Ori-L. Primer retention does not lead immediately to depletion, as the persistent RNA is fully incorporated in mitochondrial DNA. However, the retained primers present an obstacle to the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ in subsequent rounds of replication and lead to the catastrophic generation of a double-strand break at the origin when the resulting gapped molecules are copied. Hence, the essential role of RNase H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication is the removal of primers at the origin of replication.

  17. Replication stalling by catalytically impaired Twinkle induces mitochondrial DNA rearrangements in cultured cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohjoismaki, J.L.; Goffart, S.; Spelbrink, J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Pathological mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements have been proposed to result from repair of double-strand breaks caused by blockage of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. As mtDNA deletions are seen only in post-mitotic tissues, it has been suggested that they are selected out in actively d

  18. Metal chelate affinity precipitation of RNA and purification of plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Sindhu; Murphy, Jason; Galaev, Igor; Kumar, Ashok; Fox, George E.; Mattiasson, Bo; Willson, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    The affinity of metal chelates for amino acids, such as histidine, is widely used in purifying proteins, most notably through six-histidine 'tails'. We have found that metal affinity interactions can also be applied to separation of single-stranded nucleic acids through interactions involving exposed purines. Here we describe a metal affinity precipitation method to resolve RNA from linear and plasmid DNA. A copper-charged copolymer of N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAM) and vinyl imidazole (VI) is used to purify plasmid from an alkaline lysate of E. coli. The NIPAM units confer reversible solubility on the copolymer while the imidazole chelates metal ions in a manner accessible to interaction with soluble ligands. RNA was separated from the plasmid by precipitation along with the polymer in the presence of 800 mM NaCl. Bound RNA could be recovered by elution with imidazole and separated from copolymer by a second precipitation step. RNA binding showed a strong dependence on temperature and on the type of buffer used.

  19. Metal chelate affinity precipitation of RNA and purification of plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Sindhu; Murphy, Jason; Galaev, Igor; Kumar, Ashok; Fox, George E.; Mattiasson, Bo; Willson, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    The affinity of metal chelates for amino acids, such as histidine, is widely used in purifying proteins, most notably through six-histidine 'tails'. We have found that metal affinity interactions can also be applied to separation of single-stranded nucleic acids through interactions involving exposed purines. Here we describe a metal affinity precipitation method to resolve RNA from linear and plasmid DNA. A copper-charged copolymer of N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAM) and vinyl imidazole (VI) is used to purify plasmid from an alkaline lysate of E. coli. The NIPAM units confer reversible solubility on the copolymer while the imidazole chelates metal ions in a manner accessible to interaction with soluble ligands. RNA was separated from the plasmid by precipitation along with the polymer in the presence of 800 mM NaCl. Bound RNA could be recovered by elution with imidazole and separated from copolymer by a second precipitation step. RNA binding showed a strong dependence on temperature and on the type of buffer used.

  20. [Localization of denitrification genes in plasmid DNA of bacteria Azospirillum brasilense].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, L P; Varshalomidze, O É; Shelud'ko, A V; Katsy, E I

    2010-07-01

    In 85-Mda plasmid (p85) of plant-associated bacteria Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 model strain, the genes encoding copper-containing nitrite reductase (nirK); heterodimeric NO-reductase (norCB); NorQ and NorD proteins affecting synthesis and (or) activation of NirK and (or) NO-reductase (norQD); catalytic subunit I ofcytochrom c oxidase (CccoN); presumable NO sensor carrying two hemeerythrine domains (orf181); and an enzyme required for synthesis of presumable NO antagonist, homocystein (metC) were identified. In the same region of p85, orf293 encoding transcriptional regulator of LysR type, orf208 whose protein product carries a formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase subunit E domain, and an orf164-encoding conservative secretory protein with unknown function were also found. Localization of a set of denitrification genes in the plasmid DNA A. brasilense Sp245 adjacent to IS elements ISAzba1 and ISAzba2 indicates potential mobility of these genes and high probability of their horizontal transfer among populations of rhizospheric bacteria. A site homologous to p85 nirK-orf208-orf181 genes was detected in the 115 kb plasmid of A. brasilense Sp7 type strain.

  1. CONSECUTIVE IMMUNIZATION WITH RECOMBINANT FOWLPOX VIRUS AND PLASMID DNA FOR ENHANCING CELLULAR AND HUMORAL IMMUNITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗坤; 金宁一; 郭志儒; 秦云龙; 郭炎; 方厚华; 安汝国; 殷震

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the influence of consecutive immunization on cellular and humoral immunity in mice. Methods: We evaluated a consecutive immunization strategy of priming with recombinant fowlpox virus vUTALG and boosting with plasmid DNA pcDNAG encoding HIV-1 capsid protein Gag. Results: In immunized mice, the number of CD4+ T cells from splenic lymphocytes increased significantly and the proliferation response of splenocytes to ConA and LPS elevated markedly and HIV-1-specific antibody response could be induced. Conclusion: Consecutive immunization could increase cellular and humoral immunity responses in mice.

  2. Deciphering DNA replication dynamics in eukaryotic cell populations in relation with their averaged chromatin conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldar, A.; Arneodo, A.; Audit, B.; Argoul, F.; Rappailles, A.; Guilbaud, G.; Petryk, N.; Kahli, M.; Hyrien, O.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a non-local model of DNA replication that takes into account the observed uncertainty on the position and time of replication initiation in eukaryote cell populations. By picturing replication initiation as a two-state system and considering all possible transition configurations, and by taking into account the chromatin’s fractal dimension, we derive an analytical expression for the rate of replication initiation. This model predicts with no free parameter the temporal profiles of initiation rate, replication fork density and fraction of replicated DNA, in quantitative agreement with corresponding experimental data from both S. cerevisiae and human cells and provides a quantitative estimate of initiation site redundancy. This study shows that, to a large extent, the program that regulates the dynamics of eukaryotic DNA replication is a collective phenomenon that emerges from the stochastic nature of replication origins initiation.

  3. Using autonomous replication to physically and genetically define human origins of replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krysan, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The author previously developed a system for studying autonomous replication in human cells involving the use of sequences from the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome to provide extrachromosomal plasmids with a nuclear retention function. Using this system, it was demonstrated that large fragments of human genomic DNA could be isolated which replicate autonomously in human cells. In this study the DNA sequences which function as origins of replication in human cells are defined physically and genetically. These experiments demonstrated that replication initiates at multiple locations distributed throughout the plasmid. Another line of experiments addressed the DNA sequence requirements for autonomous replication in human cells. These experiments demonstrated that human DNA fragments have a higher replication activity than bacterial fragments do. It was also found, however, that the bacterial DNA sequence could support efficient replication if enough copies of it were present on the plasmid. These findings suggested that autonomous replication in human cells does not depend on extensive, specific DNA sequences. The autonomous replication system which the author has employed for these experiments utilizes a cis-acting sequence from the EBV origin and the trans-acting EBNA-1 protein to provide plasmids with a nuclear retention function. It was therefore relevant to verify that the autonomous replication of human DNA fragments did not depend on the replication activity associated with the EBV sequences utilized for nuclear retention. To accomplish this goal, the author demonstrated that plasmids carrying the EBV sequences and large fragments of human DNA could support long-term autonomous replication in hamster cells, which are not permissive for EBV replication.

  4. DNA sequence analysis of the composite plasmid pTC conferring virulence and antimicrobial resistance for porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Péter Z; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Blum-Oehler, Gabriele; Olasz, Ferenc; Szabó, Mónika; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Hacker, Jörg; Nagy, Béla

    2012-01-01

    In this study the plasmid pTC, a 90 kb self-conjugative virulence plasmid of the porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain EC2173 encoding the STa and STb heat-stable enterotoxins and tetracycline resistance, has been sequenced in two steps. As a result we identified five main distinct regions of pTC: (i) the maintenance region responsible for the extreme stability of the plasmid, (ii) the TSL (toxin-specific locus comprising the estA and estB genes) which is unique and characteristic for pTC, (iii) a Tn10 transposon, encoding tetracycline resistance, (iv) the tra (plasmid transfer) region, and (v) the colE1-like origin of replication. It is concluded that pTC is a self-transmissible composite plasmid harbouring antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. pTC belongs to a group of large conjugative E. coli plasmids represented by NR1 with a widespread tra backbone which might have evolved from a common ancestor. This is the first report of a completely sequenced animal ETEC virulence plasmid containing an antimicrobial resistance locus, thereby representing a selection advantage for spread of pathogenicity in the presence of antimicrobials leading to increased disease potential. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. The Caulobacter crescentus chromosome replication origin evolved two classes of weak DnaA binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James A; Ouimet, Marie-Claude; Wargachuk, Richard; Marczynski, Gregory T

    2011-10-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus replication initiator DnaA and essential response regulator CtrA compete to control chromosome replication. The C. crescentus replication origin (Cori) contains five strong CtrA binding sites but only two apparent DnaA boxes, termed G-boxes (with a conserved second position G, TGATCCACA). Since clusters of DnaA boxes typify bacterial replication origins, this discrepancy suggested that C. crescentus DnaA recognizes different DNA sequences or compensates with novel DNA-binding proteins. We searched for novel DNA sites by scanning mutagenesis of the most conserved Cori DNA. Autonomous replication assays showed that G-boxes and novel W-boxes (TCCCCA) are essential for replication. Further analyses showed that C. crescentus DnaA binds G-boxes with moderate and W-boxes with very weak affinities significantly below DnaA's capacity for high-affinity Escherichia coli-boxes (TTATCCACA). Cori has five conserved W-boxes. Increasing W-box affinities increases or decreases autonomous replication depending on their strategic positions between the G-boxes. In vitro, CtrA binding displaces DnaA from proximal G-boxes and from distal W-boxes implying CtrA-DnaA competition and DnaA-DnaA cooperation between G-boxes and W-boxes. Similarly, during cell cycle progression, CtrA proteolysis coincides with DnaA binding to Cori. We also observe highly conserved W-boxes in other replication origins lacking E. coli-boxes. Therefore, strategically weak DnaA binding can be a general means of replication control. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Managing Single-Stranded DNA during Replication Stress in Fission Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Sabatinos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Replication fork stalling generates a variety of responses, most of which cause an increase in single-stranded DNA. ssDNA is a primary signal of replication distress that activates cellular checkpoints. It is also a potential source of genome instability and a substrate for mutation and recombination. Therefore, managing ssDNA levels is crucial to chromosome integrity. Limited ssDNA accumulation occurs in wild-type cells under stress. In contrast, cells lacking the replication checkpoint cannot arrest forks properly and accumulate large amounts of ssDNA. This likely occurs when the replication fork polymerase and helicase units are uncoupled. Some cells with mutations in the replication helicase (mcm-ts mimic checkpoint-deficient cells, and accumulate extensive areas of ssDNA to trigger the G2-checkpoint. Another category of helicase mutant (mcm4-degron causes fork stalling in early S-phase due to immediate loss of helicase function. Intriguingly, cells realize that ssDNA is present, but fail to detect that they accumulate ssDNA, and continue to divide. Thus, the cellular response to replication stalling depends on checkpoint activity and the time that replication stress occurs in S-phase. In this review we describe the signs, signals, and symptoms of replication arrest from an ssDNA perspective. We explore the possible mechanisms for these effects. We also advise the need for caution when detecting and interpreting data related to the accumulation of ssDNA.

  7. Regulation of the switch from early to late bacteriophage lambda DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranska, S; Gabig, M; Wegrzyn, A; Konopa, G; Herman-Antosiewicz, A; Hernandez, P; Schvartzman, J B; Helinski, D R; Wegrzyn, G

    2001-03-01

    There are two modes of bacteriophage lambda DNA replication following infection of its host, Escherichia coli. Early after infection, replication occurs according to the theta (theta or circle-to-circle) mode, and is later switched to the sigma (sigma or rolling-circle) mode. It is not known how this switch, occurring at a specific time in the infection cycle, is regulated. Here it is demonstrated that in wild-type cells the replication starting from orilambda proceeds both bidirectionally and unidirectionally, whereas in bacteria devoid of a functional DnaA protein, replication from orilambda is predominantly unidirectional. The regulation of directionality of replication from orilambda is mediated by positive control of lambda p(R) promoter activity by DnaA, since the mode of replication of an artificial lambda replicon bearing the p(tet) promoter instead of p(R) was found to be independent of DnaA function. These findings and results of density-shift experiments suggest that in dnaA mutants infected with lambda, phage DNA replication proceeds predominantly according to the unidirectional theta mechanism and is switched early after infection to the sigma mode. It is proposed that in wild-type E. coli cells infected with lambda, phage DNA replication proceeds according to a bidirectional theta mechanism early after infection due to efficient transcriptional activation of orilambda, stimulated by the host DnaA protein. After a few rounds of this type of replication, the resulting increased copy number of lambda genomic DNA may cause a depletion of free DnaA protein because of its interaction with the multiple DnaA-binding sites in lambda DNA. It is proposed that this may lead to inefficient transcriptional activation of orilambda resulting in unidirectional theta replication followed by sigma type replication.

  8. Transgenic Crops by Direct Treatment of Exogenous DNA Without Agrobacterium tumefaciens Plasmid and Tissue Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangGuodong

    1995-01-01

    Gene transfter methods are developing quickly recently,but each method has its limitations.We introduce a new gene transfer technique in this paper,which is simple,effective,and easy to operate,but does not get enough attention from scientists.This technique is used to transform plants by injecting exogenous DNA to stigma,style,ovary,young fruit or meristem of the recipient,or soaking the recipient's seeds in exogenous DNA solution.Los of heritable variations were found in many characters of many crops,It may be used to creaste new germplasms or realize gene exchange between different species,gerera,or families,even between animals and plants,A brief discussion was given to the mechanism of exogenous DNA introduction,integration into and expression in the recipient.We also discussed the merits and limitations of the technique.Currently there are two successful approaches that can be used to transform plants genetically,but each method has its limitations that are delaying the application of the techniques to certaincommercially important crops.The first tecnhique exploits a natural genetic engineer,Agrobacterium tumefaciens,which contains a tumor-inducing(Ti) plasmid that transfers a DNA segment(the T-DNA) from the plasmid to the nuclear genome of infected plants(or in vitro to plant tissue).The method is restricted to dicotyledenous plants;monocotyledenous plants are usually not susceptible to agrobacterial infection.The second technique involves direct transfter of DNA to plant protoplast ,prepared by enzymatic digestion of cell walls,for example by chemically stimulated uptake using polyethylene glycol or a high voltage pulse,generating transient'holes'in the protoplast membrane.This technique depends on a tissue culture system that allows regeneration of mature plants from protoplasts,But so far it is impossible to achieve plant regeneration from protoplasts in many crops.Both techniques use dominant selectable markers(for example,kanamycin resistance) to

  9. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) based magnetic nanoparticles for plasmid DNA purification from Escherichia coli lysate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Percin, Is Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I k [Department of Biology, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Karakoc, Veyis [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry Division, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Akgoel, Sinan [Department of Biochemistry, Ege University, Izmir (Turkey); Aksoez, Erol [Department of Biology, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Denizli, Adil, E-mail: denizli@hacettepe.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry Division, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-(L)-histidine) [PHEMAH] magnetic nanoparticles for plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification from Escherichia coli (E. coli) cell lysate. Magnetic nanoparticles were produced by surfactant free emulsion polymerization. mPHEMAH nanoparticles were characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), electron spin resonance (ESR), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Surface area, average particle size and size distribution were also performed. Specific surface area of the mPHEMAH nanoparticles was found to be 1180 m{sup 2}/g. Elemental analysis of MAH for nitrogen was estimated as 0.18 mmol/g polymer. The amount of pDNA adsorbed onto the mPHEMAH nanoparticles first increased and then reached a saturation value at around 1.0 mg/mL of pDNA concentration. Compared with the mPHEMA nanoparticles (50 {mu}g/g polymer), the pDNA adsorption capacity of the mPHEMAH nanoparticles (154 mg/g polymer) was improved significantly due to the MAH incorporation into the polymeric matrix. The maximum pDNA adsorption was achieved at 25 Degree-Sign C. The overall recovery of pDNA was calculated as 92%. The mPHEMAH nanoparticles could be used six times without decreasing the pDNA adsorption capacity significantly. The results indicate that the PHEMAH nanoparticles promise high selectivity for pDNA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic nanoparticles have several advantages over conventional adsorbents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAH acted as the pseudospecific ligand, ligand immobilization step was eliminated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer pDNA adsorption amount was 154 mg/g. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fifty-fold capacity increase was obtained when compared to conventional matrices.

  10. Efficient expression of human factor Ⅸ cDNA in livermediated by hydrodynamics-based plasmid administration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Hydrodynamics-based administration via tail vein was used to deliver naked plasmid with human factor Ⅸ (hFⅨ) cDNA in 2.2 mL Ringer's solution into mice within 7 s. The peak level of expression of hFⅨ was 2921 ng/mL in mouse plasma. The hFⅨ cDNA expression increased with increasing the amount of plasmid DNA injected. The peak level of gene expression declined after repeated injection of plasmid (1459 ng/mL). The hFⅨ cDNA was detected in various organs, but the highest level of gene expression appeared in liver. Transaminase levels and liver histological results showed that rapid intravenous plasmid injection into mice induced transient focal acute liver damage, which was rapidly repaired within 3-10 d. These results suggested that high-level expression of hFⅨ cDNA can be achieved by hydrodynamics-based plasmid transfer and this method is now further used for gene therapy and gene function study in our lab.

  11. Ancient mtDNA genetic variants modulate mtDNA transcription and replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Suissa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the functional consequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genetic backgrounds (haplotypes, haplogroups have been demonstrated by both disease association studies and cell culture experiments, it is not clear which of the mutations within the haplogroup carry functional implications and which are "evolutionary silent hitchhikers". We set forth to study the functionality of haplogroup-defining mutations within the mtDNA transcription/replication regulatory region by in vitro transcription, hypothesizing that haplogroup-defining mutations occurring within regulatory motifs of mtDNA could affect these processes. We thus screened >2500 complete human mtDNAs representing all major populations worldwide for natural variation in experimentally established protein binding sites and regulatory regions comprising a total of 241 bp in each mtDNA. Our screen revealed 77/241 sites showing point mutations that could be divided into non-fixed (57/77, 74% and haplogroup/sub-haplogroup-defining changes (i.e., population fixed changes, 20/77, 26%. The variant defining Caucasian haplogroup J (C295T increased the binding of TFAM (Electro Mobility Shift Assay and the capacity of in vitro L-strand transcription, especially of a shorter transcript that maps immediately upstream of conserved sequence block 1 (CSB1, a region associated with RNA priming of mtDNA replication. Consistent with this finding, cybrids (i.e., cells sharing the same nuclear genetic background but differing in their mtDNA backgrounds harboring haplogroup J mtDNA had a >2 fold increase in mtDNA copy number, as compared to cybrids containing haplogroup H, with no apparent differences in steady state levels of mtDNA-encoded transcripts. Hence, a haplogroup J regulatory region mutation affects mtDNA replication or stability, which may partially account for the phenotypic impact of this haplogroup. Our analysis thus demonstrates, for the first time, the functional impact of particular mtDNA

  12. Translation initiation of the replication initiator repB gene of promiscuous plasmid pMV158 is led by an extended non-SD sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Aguilar, Celeste; Ruiz-Masó, José A; Rubio-Lepe, Tania Samir; Sanz, Marta; del Solar, Gloria

    2013-07-01

    RepB is the pMV158-encoded protein that initiates rolling-circle replication of this promiscuous plasmid. Availability of RepB is rate-limiting for the plasmid replication process, and therefore the repB gene encoding the protein is subjected to strict control. Two trans-acting plasmid elements, CopG and the antisense RNAII, are involved in controlling the synthesis of the initiator at the transcriptional and translational level, respectively. In addition to this dual control of repB expression that senses and corrects fluctuations in plasmid copy number, proper availability of RepB also relies on the adequate functionality of the transcription and translation initiation regulatory signals. Translation of repB has been postulated to depend on an atypical ribosome binding site that precedes its start codon, although such a hypothesis has never been proved. To define sequences involved in translation of repB, several mutations in the translation initiation region of the repB mRNA have been characterized by using an Escherichia coli in vitro expression system wherein the synthesis of RepB was detected and quantified. We showed that translation of repB is not coupled to that of copG and depends only on its own initiation signals. The atypical ribosome binding site, as it was defined, is not involved in translation initiation. However, the sequence just upstream of the repB start codon, encompassing the proximal box of the atypical ribosome binding site and the four bases immediately downstream of it, is indeed important for efficient translation of repB. The high degree of conservation of this sequence among the rep genes of plasmids of the same pMV158 family supports its relevancy as a translation initiation signal in mRNAs without a recognizable Shine-Dalgarno sequence.

  13. A new light on DNA replication from the inactive X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladjem, Mirit I; Fu, Haiqing

    2014-06-01

    While large portions of the mammalian genome are known to replicate sequentially in a distinct, tissue-specific order, recent studies suggest that the inactive X chromosome is duplicated rapidly via random, synchronous DNA synthesis at numerous adjacent regions. The rapid duplication of the inactive X chromosome was observed in high-resolution studies visualizing DNA replication patterns in the nucleus, and by allele-specific DNA sequencing studies measuring the extent of DNA synthesis. These studies conclude that inactive X chromosomes complete replication earlier than previously thought and suggest that the strict order of DNA replication detected in the majority of genomic regions is not preserved in non-transcribed, "silent" chromatin. These observations alter current concepts about the regulation of DNA replication in non-transcribed portions of the genome in general and in the inactive X-chromosome in particular.

  14. Multiple regulatory systems coordinate DNA replication with cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath Murray

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes.

  15. Multiple regulatory systems coordinate DNA replication with cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Heath; Koh, Alan

    2014-10-01

    In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s) that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes.

  16. Regulation of DNA replication and chromosomal polyploidy by the MLL-WDR5-RBBP5 methyltransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fei; Wu, Xiaojun; Yin, Feng; Chia-Fang Lee, Christina; Yu, Min; Mihaylov, Ivailo S.; Yu, Jiekai; Sun, Hong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA replication licensing occurs on chromatin, but how the chromatin template is regulated for replication remains mostly unclear. Here, we have analyzed the requirement of histone methyltransferases for a specific type of replication: the DNA re-replication induced by the downregulation of either Geminin, an inhibitor of replication licensing protein CDT1, or the CRL4CDT2 ubiquitin E3 ligase. We found that siRNA-mediated reduction of essential components of the MLL-WDR5-RBBP5 methyltransferase complexes including WDR5 or RBBP5, which transfer methyl groups to histone H3 at K4 (H3K4), suppressed DNA re-replication and chromosomal polyploidy. Reduction of WDR5/RBBP5 also prevented the activation of H2AX checkpoint caused by re-replication, but not by ultraviolet or X-ray irradiation; and the components of MLL complexes co-localized with the origin recognition complex (ORC) and MCM2-7 replicative helicase complexes at replication origins to control the levels of methylated H3K4. Downregulation of WDR5 or RBBP5 reduced the methylated H3K4 and suppressed the recruitment of MCM2-7 complexes onto replication origins. Our studies indicate that the MLL complexes and H3K4 methylation are required for DNA replication but not for DNA damage repair. PMID:27744293

  17. DNA replication and transcription: An innovative teaching strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossey, Annabel; Hancock, Carolyn

    2005-11-01

    First-year students in genetics at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, attend two general biology modules, one in each semester. Teaching involves four formal lectures per week of 45 min each, one 3-h practical, and one lecture period tutorial. These students, graduating from secondary education, are well schooled in rote leaning but are limited in critical thinking and find assessment questions belonging to the higher levels of Bloom's taxonomy difficult. All students attend the formal lectures together, up to 300 students, whereas for the tutorials they are grouped into small groups, no more than 40 students in a tutorial class, allowing for innovative teaching strategies. Students find the processes of DNA replication and transcription difficult because of the sequential steps involved in the processes together with limitations imposed by the enzymes involved. Furthermore, they find the significance and relationships between the different components of the processes very difficult. A tutorial was developed in which students are requested to demonstrate replication with line drawings, which are then used in various iterations of transcription. The tutorial is administered in the presence of a tutor that guides the step by step execution of the tutorial while stimulating active participation. In the past 2 years, the presentation of this and other similar tutorials in genetics has improved overall class performance on average by 15%. Furthermore, students seem to display a greater retention from the first year to the second, which was previously rather limited. A survey among first-year students revealed that the implementation of this tutorial facilitated studying and recall by helping students to organize thoughts, picture the sequence of events, understand fundamental concepts, and create a feeling of confidence.

  18. Proficient Replication of the Yeast Genome by a Viral DNA Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodola, Joseph L; Stith, Carrie M; Burgers, Peter M

    2016-05-27

    DNA replication in eukaryotic cells requires minimally three B-family DNA polymerases: Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ϵ. Pol δ replicates and matures Okazaki fragments on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol δ is a three-subunit enzyme (Pol3-Pol31-Pol32). A small C-terminal domain of the catalytic subunit Pol3 carries both iron-sulfur cluster and zinc-binding motifs, which mediate interactions with Pol31, and processive replication with the replication clamp proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), respectively. We show that the entire N-terminal domain of Pol3, containing polymerase and proofreading activities, could be effectively replaced by those from bacteriophage RB69, and could carry out chromosomal DNA replication in yeast with remarkable high fidelity, provided that adaptive mutations in the replication clamp PCNA were introduced. This result is consistent with the model that all essential interactions for DNA replication in yeast are mediated through the small C-terminal domain of Pol3. The chimeric polymerase carries out processive replication with PCNA in vitro; however, in yeast, it requires an increased involvement of the mutagenic translesion DNA polymerase ζ during DNA replication.

  19. Ultrasound enhances the transfection of plasmid DNA by non-viral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Aoyama, Teruyoshi; Ogawa, Osamu; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2003-04-01

    Increasing attention has been paid to technology used for the delivery of genetic materials into cells for gene therapy and the generation of genetically engineered cells. So far, viral vectors have been mainly used because of their inherently high transfection efficiency of gene. However, there are some problems to be resolved for the clinical applications, such as the pathogenicity and immunogenicity of viral vectors themselves. Therefore, many research trials with non-viral vectors have been performed to enhance their efficiency to a level comparable to the viral vector. Two directions of these trials exist: material improvement of non-viral vectors and their combination with various external physical stimuli. This paper reviews the latter research trials, with special attention paid to the enhancement of gene expression by ultrasound (US). The expression level of plasmid DNA by various cationized polymers and liposomes is promoted by US irradiation in vitro as well as in vivo. This US-enhanced expression of plasmid DNA will be discussed to emphasize the technical feasibility of US in gene therapy and biotechnology.

  20. Mapping of bionic array electric field focusing in plasmid DNA-based gene electrotransfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, C J; Pinyon, J L; Housley, D M; Crawford, E N; Lovell, N H; Klugmann, M; Housley, G D

    2016-04-01

    Molecular medicine through gene therapy is challenged to achieve targeted action. This is now possible utilizing bionic electrode arrays for focal delivery of naked (plasmid) DNA via gene electrotransfer. Here, we establish the properties of array-based electroporation affecting targeted gene delivery. An array with eight 300 μm platinum ring electrodes configured as a cochlear implant bionic interface was used to transduce HEK293 cell monolayers with a plasmid-DNA green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene construct. Electroporation parameters were pulse intensity, number, duration, separation and electrode configuration. The latter determined the shape of the electric fields, which were mapped using a voltage probe. Electrode array-based electroporation was found to require ~100 × lower applied voltages for cell transduction than conventional electroporation. This was found to be due to compression of the field lines orthogonal to the array. A circular area of GFP-positive cells was created when the electrodes were ganged together as four adjacent anodes and four cathodes, whereas alternating electrode polarity created a linear area of GFP-positive cells. The refinement of gene delivery parameters was validated in vivo in the guinea pig cochlea. These findings have significant clinical ramifications, where spatiotemporal control of gene expression can be predicted by manipulation of the electric field via current steering at a cellular level.

  1. Unscheduled DNA replication origin activation at inserted HPV 18 sequences in a HPV-18/MYC amplicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Chiara; Herrick, John; Bensimon, Aaron

    2007-08-01

    Oncogene amplification is a critical step leading to tumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Despite data suggesting that DNA replication is a major source of genomic instability, little is known about replication origin usage and replication fork progression in rearranged regions. Using a single DNA molecule approach, we provide here the first study of replication kinetics on a previously characterized MYC/papillomavirus (HPV18) amplicon in a cervical cancer. Using this amplicon as a model, we investigated the role DNA replication control plays in generating amplifications in human cancers. The data reveal severely perturbed DNA replication kinetics in the amplified region when compared with other regions of the same genome. It was found that DNA replication is initiated from both genomic and viral sequences, resulting in a higher median frequency of origin firings. In addition, it was found that the higher initiation frequency was associated with an equivalent increase in the number of stalled replication forks. These observations raise the intriguing possibility that unscheduled replication origin activation at inserted HPV-18 viral DNA sequences triggers DNA amplification in this cancer cell line and the subsequent overexpression of the MYC oncogene.

  2. Top2 and Sgs1-Top3 Act Redundantly to Ensure rDNA Replication Termination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamilla Mundbjerg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Faithful DNA replication with correct termination is essential for genome stability and transmission of genetic information. Here we have investigated the potential roles of Topoisomerase II (Top2 and the RecQ helicase Sgs1 during late stages of replication. We find that cells lacking Top2 and Sgs1 (or Top3 display two different characteristics during late S/G2 phase, checkpoint activation and accumulation of asymmetric X-structures, which are both independent of homologous recombination. Our data demonstrate that checkpoint activation is caused by a DNA structure formed at the strongest rDNA replication fork barrier (RFB during replication termination, and consistently, checkpoint activation is dependent on the RFB binding protein, Fob1. In contrast, asymmetric X-structures are formed independent of Fob1 at less strong rDNA replication fork barriers. However, both checkpoint activation and formation of asymmetric X-structures are sensitive to conditions, which facilitate fork merging and progression of replication forks through replication fork barriers. Our data are consistent with a redundant role of Top2 and Sgs1 together with Top3 (Sgs1-Top3 in replication fork merging at rDNA barriers. At RFB either Top2 or Sgs1-Top3 is essential to prevent formation of a checkpoint activating DNA structure during termination, but at less strong rDNA barriers absence of the enzymes merely delays replication fork merging, causing an accumulation of asymmetric termination structures, which are solved over time.

  3. DNA Damage Reduces the Quality, but Not the Quantity of Human Papillomavirus 16 E1 and E2 DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly L. Bristol

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs are causative agents in almost all cervical carcinomas. HPVs are also causative agents in head and neck cancer, the cases of which are increasing rapidly. Viral replication activates the DNA damage response (DDR pathway; associated proteins are recruited to replication foci, and this pathway may serve to allow for viral genome amplification. Likewise, HPV genome double-strand breaks (DSBs could be produced during replication and could lead to linearization and viral integration. Many studies have shown that viral integration into the host genome results in unregulated expression of the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, promoting HPV-induced carcinogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that DNA-damaging agents, such as etoposide, or knocking down viral replication partner proteins, such as topoisomerase II β binding protein I (TopBP1, does not reduce the level of DNA replication. Here, we investigated whether these treatments alter the quality of DNA replication by HPV16 E1 and E2. We confirm that knockdown of TopBP1 or treatment with etoposide does not reduce total levels of E1/E2-mediated DNA replication; however, the quality of replication is significantly reduced. The results demonstrate that E1 and E2 continue to replicate under genomically-stressed conditions and that this replication is mutagenic. This mutagenesis would promote the formation of substrates for integration of the viral genome into that of the host, a hallmark of cervical cancer.

  4. Deciphering DNA replication dynamics in eukaryotic cell populations in relation with their averaged chromatin conformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldar, A.; Arneodo, A.; Audit, B.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a non-local model of DNA replication that takes into account the observed uncertainty on the position and time of replication initiation in eukaryote cell populations. By picturing replication initiation as a two-state system and considering all possible transition configurations......, and by taking into account the chromatin's fractal dimension, we derive an analytical expression for the rate of replication initiation. This model predicts with no free parameter the temporal profiles of initiation rate, replication fork density and fraction of replicated DNA, in quantitative agreement...... with corresponding experimental data from both S. cerevisiae and human cells and provides a quantitative estimate of initiation site redundancy. This study shows that, to a large extent, the program that regulates the dynamics of eukaryotic DNA replication is a collective phenomenon that emerges from the stochastic...

  5. Replication initiator DnaA binds at the Caulobacter centromere and enables chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, Paola E; Kalogeraki, Virginia S; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-11-11

    During cell division, multiple processes are highly coordinated to faithfully generate genetically equivalent daughter cells. In bacteria, the mechanisms that underlie the coordination of chromosome replication and segregation are poorly understood. Here, we report that the conserved replication initiator, DnaA, can mediate chromosome segregation independent of replication initiation. It does so by binding directly to the parS centromere region of the chromosome, and mutations that alter this interaction result in cells that display aberrant centromere translocation and cell division. We propose that DnaA serves to coordinate bacterial DNA replication with the onset of chromosome segregation.

  6. Architectures of archaeal GINS complexes, essential DNA replication initiation factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Mihoko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the early stage of eukaryotic DNA replication, the template DNA is unwound by the MCM helicase, which is activated by forming a complex with the Cdc45 and GINS proteins. The eukaryotic GINS forms a heterotetramer, comprising four types of subunits. On the other hand, the archaeal GINS appears to be either a tetramer formed by two types of subunits in a 2:2 ratio (α2β2 or a homotetramer of a single subunit (α4. Due to the low sequence similarity between the archaeal and eukaryotic GINS subunits, the atomic structures of the archaeal GINS complexes are attracting interest for comparisons of their subunit architectures and organization. Results We determined the crystal structure of the α2β2 GINS tetramer from Thermococcus kodakaraensis (TkoGINS, comprising Gins51 and Gins23, and compared it with the reported human GINS structures. The backbone structure of each subunit and the tetrameric assembly are similar to those of human GINS. However, the location of the C-terminal small domain of Gins51 is remarkably different between the archaeal and human GINS structures. In addition, TkoGINS exhibits different subunit contacts from those in human GINS, as a consequence of the different relative locations and orientations between the domains. Based on the GINS crystal structures, we built a homology model of the putative homotetrameric GINS from Thermoplasma acidophilum (TacGINS. Importantly, we propose that a long insertion loop allows the differential positioning of the C-terminal domains and, as a consequence, exclusively leads to the formation of an asymmetric homotetramer rather than a symmetrical one. Conclusions The DNA metabolizing proteins from archaea are similar to those from eukaryotes, and the archaeal multi-subunit complexes are occasionally simplified versions of the eukaryotic ones. The overall similarity in the architectures between the archaeal and eukaryotic GINS complexes suggests that the GINS function

  7. Both Chromosome Decondensation and Condensation Are Dependent on DNA Replication in C. elegans Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneville, Remi; Craig, Gillian; Labib, Karim; Gartner, Anton; Blow, J Julian

    2015-07-21

    During cell division, chromatin alternates between a condensed state to facilitate chromosome segregation and a decondensed form when DNA replicates. In most tissues, S phase and mitosis are separated by defined G1 and G2 gap phases, but early embryogenesis involves rapid oscillations between replication and mitosis. Using Caenorhabditis elegans embryos as a model system, we show that chromosome condensation and condensin II concentration on chromosomal axes require replicated DNA. In addition, we found that, during late telophase, replication initiates on condensed chromosomes and promotes the rapid decondensation of the chromatin. Upon replication initiation, the CDC-45-MCM-GINS (CMG) DNA helicase drives the release of condensin I complexes from chromatin and the activation or displacement of inactive MCM-2-7 complexes, which together with the nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS tethers condensed chromatin to the nuclear envelope, thereby promoting chromatin decondensation. Our results show how, in an early embryo, the chromosome-condensation cycle is functionally linked with DNA replication.

  8. DNA copy-number control through inhibition of replication fork progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. Nordman (Jared T.); E. Kozhevnikova (Elena); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter); A.V. Pindyurin (Alexey); E.N. Andreyeva (Evgeniya); V.V. Shloma (Victor); I.F. Zhimulev (Igor); T. Orr-Weaver (T.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractProper control of DNA replication is essential to ensure faithful transmission of genetic material and prevent chromosomal aberrations that can drive cancer progression and developmental disorders. DNA replication is regulated primarily at the level of initiation and is under strict

  9. DNA copy-number control through inhibition of replication fork progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. Nordman (Jared T.); E. Kozhevnikova (Elena); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter); A.V. Pindyurin (Alexey); E.N. Andreyeva (Evgeniya); V.V. Shloma (Victor); I.F. Zhimulev (Igor); T. Orr-Weaver (T.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractProper control of DNA replication is essential to ensure faithful transmission of genetic material and prevent chromosomal aberrations that can drive cancer progression and developmental disorders. DNA replication is regulated primarily at the level of initiation and is under strict cell

  10. The pathological consequences of impaired genome integrity in humans; disorders of the DNA replication machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Accurate and efficient replication of the human genome occurs in the context of an array of constitutional barriers, including regional topological constraints imposed by chromatin architecture and processes such as transcription, catenation of the helical polymer and spontaneously generated DNA lesions, including base modifications and strand breaks. DNA replication is fundamentally important for tissue development and homeostasis; differentiation programmes are intimately linked with stem cell division. Unsurprisingly, impairments of the DNA replication machinery can have catastrophic consequences for genome stability and cell division. Functional impacts on DNA replication and genome stability have long been known to play roles in malignant transformation through a variety of complex mechanisms, and significant further insights have been gained from studying model organisms in this context. Congenital hypomorphic defects in components of the DNA replication machinery have been and continue to be identified in humans. These disorders present with a wide range of clinical features. Indeed, in some instances, different mutations in the same gene underlie different clinical presentations. Understanding the origin and molecular basis of these features opens a window onto the range of developmental impacts of suboptimal DNA replication and genome instability in humans. Here, I will briefly overview the basic steps involved in DNA replication and the key concepts that have emerged from this area of research, before switching emphasis to the pathological consequences of defects within the DNA replication network; the human disorders. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. DNA copy-number control through inhibition of replication fork progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. Nordman (Jared T.); E. Kozhevnikova (Elena); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter); A.V. Pindyurin (Alexey); E.N. Andreyeva (Evgeniya); V.V. Shloma (Victor); I.F. Zhimulev (Igor); T. Orr-Weaver (T.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractProper control of DNA replication is essential to ensure faithful transmission of genetic material and prevent chromosomal aberrations that can drive cancer progression and developmental disorders. DNA replication is regulated primarily at the level of initiation and is under strict cell

  12. Plasmid DNA is internalized from the apical plasma membrane of the salivary gland epithelium in live animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramkova, Monika; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    Non-viral-mediated gene delivery represents an alternative way to express the gene of interest without inducing immune responses or other adverse effects. Understanding the mechanisms by which plasmid DNAs are delivered to the proper target in vivo is a fundamental issue that needs to be addressed in order to design more effective strategies for gene therapy. As a model system, we have used the submandibular salivary glands in live rats and we have recently shown that reporter transgenes can be expressed in different cell populations of the glandular epithelium, depending on the modality of administration of plasmid DNA. Here, by using a combination of immunofluorescence and intravital microscopy, we have explored the relationship between the pattern of transgenes expression and the internalization of plasmid DNA. We found that plasmid DNA is internalized: (1) by all the cells in the salivary gland epithelium, when administered alone, (2) by large ducts, when mixed with empty adenoviral particles, and (3) by acinar cells upon stimulation of compensatory endocytosis. Moreover, we showed that plasmid DNA utilizes different routes of internalization, and evades both the lysosomal degradative pathway and the retrograde pathway towards the Golgi apparatus. This study clearly shows that in vivo approaches have the potential to address fundamental questions on the cellular mechanisms regulating gene delivery.

  13. Fidelity of DNA Replication in Normal and Malignant Human Breast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-08-01

    A vatit"Y Of DNA synthesis and the typt of DNA replica~tion Products " celular prca including DNA rsplicatlon. DNA repsair. R~NA formed in experiments...Sicrturn thlarida wsMi SocletylMai yland Division . cnd the University of Maryland rDesigntld FIG.4. 1w ffet o a angeof cmu;, tloideResearch

  14. DnaN clamp zones provide a platform for spatiotemporal coupling of mismatch detection to DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Justin S; Sharma, Anushi; Hingorani, Manju M; Simmons, Lyle A

    2013-02-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) increases the fidelity of DNA replication by identifying and correcting replication errors. Processivity clamps are vital components of DNA replication and MMR, yet the mechanism and extent to which they participate in MMR remains unclear. We investigated the role of the Bacillus subtilis processivity clamp DnaN, and found that it serves as a platform for mismatch detection and coupling of repair to DNA replication. By visualizing functional MutS fluorescent fusions in vivo, we find that MutS forms foci independent of mismatch detection at sites of replication (i.e. the replisome). These MutS foci are directed to the replisome by DnaN clamp zones that aid mismatch detection by targeting the search to nascent DNA. Following mismatch detection, MutS disengages from the replisome, facilitating repair. We tested the functional importance of DnaN-mediated mismatch detection for MMR, and found that it accounts for 90% of repair. This high dependence on DnaN can be bypassed by increasing MutS concentration within the cell, indicating a secondary mode of detection in vivo whereby MutS directly finds mismatches without associating with the replisome. Overall, our results provide new insight into the mechanism by which DnaN couples mismatch recognition to DNA replication in living cells.

  15. Control of helicase loading in the coupled DNA replication and recombination systems of bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branagan, Amy M; Klein, Jenny A; Jordan, Christian S; Morrical, Scott W

    2014-01-31

    The Gp59 protein of bacteriophage T4 promotes DNA replication by loading the replicative helicase, Gp41, onto replication forks and recombination intermediates. Gp59 also blocks DNA synthesis by Gp43 polymerase until Gp41 is loaded, ensuring that synthesis is tightly coupled to unwinding. The distinct polymerase blocking and helicase loading activities of Gp59 likely involve different binding interactions with DNA and protein partners. Here, we investigate how interactions of Gp59 with DNA and Gp32, the T4 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein, are related to these activities. A previously characterized mutant, Gp59-I87A, exhibits markedly reduced affinity for ssDNA and pseudo-fork DNA substrates. We demonstrate that on Gp32-covered ssDNA, the DNA binding defect of Gp59-I87A is not detrimental to helicase loading and translocation. In contrast, on pseudo-fork DNA the I87A mutation is detrimental to helicase loading and unwinding in the presence or absence of Gp32. Other results indicate that Gp32 binding to lagging strand ssDNA relieves the blockage of Gp43 polymerase activity by Gp59, whereas the inhibition of Gp43 exonuclease activity is maintained. Our findings suggest that Gp59-Gp32 and Gp59-DNA interactions perform separate but complementary roles in T4 DNA metabolism; Gp59-Gp32 interactions are needed to load Gp41 onto D-loops, and other nucleoprotein structures containing clusters of Gp32. Gp59-DNA interactions are needed to load Gp41 onto nascent or collapsed replication forks lacking clusters of Gp32 and to coordinate bidirectional replication from T4 origins. The dual functionalities of Gp59 allow it to promote the initiation or re-start of DNA replication from a wide variety of recombination and replication intermediates.

  16. Genome-wide alterations of the DNA replication program during tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, A.; Goldar, A.; Argoul, F.; Hyrien, O.; Audit, B.

    2016-08-01

    Oncogenic stress is a major driving force in the early stages of cancer development. Recent experimental findings reveal that, in precancerous lesions and cancers, activated oncogenes may induce stalling and dissociation of DNA replication forks resulting in DNA damage. Replication timing is emerging as an important epigenetic feature that recapitulates several genomic, epigenetic and functional specificities of even closely related cell types. There is increasing evidence that chromosome rearrangements, the hallmark of many cancer genomes, are intimately associated with the DNA replication program and that epigenetic replication timing changes often precede chromosomic rearrangements. The recent development of a novel methodology to map replication fork polarity using deep sequencing of Okazaki fragments has provided new and complementary genome-wide replication profiling data. We review the results of a wavelet-based multi-scale analysis of genomic and epigenetic data including replication profiles along human chromosomes. These results provide new insight into the spatio-temporal replication program and its dynamics during differentiation. Here our goal is to bring to cancer research, the experimental protocols and computational methodologies for replication program profiling, and also the modeling of the spatio-temporal replication program. To illustrate our purpose, we report very preliminary results obtained for the chronic myelogeneous leukemia, the archetype model of cancer. Finally, we discuss promising perspectives on using genome-wide DNA replication profiling as a novel efficient tool for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized treatment.

  17. Absence of MutSβ leads to the formation of slipped-DNA for CTG/CAG contractions at primate replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slean, Meghan M; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Castel, Arturo López; Pearson, August B; Tomkinson, Alan E; Pearson, Christopher E

    2016-06-01

    Typically disease-causing CAG/CTG repeats expand, but rare affected families can display high levels of contraction of the expanded repeat amongst offspring. Understanding instability is important since arresting expansions or enhancing contractions could be clinically beneficial. The MutSβ mismatch repair complex is required for CAG/CTG expansions in mice and patients. Oddly, by unknown mechanisms MutSβ-deficient mice incur contractions instead of expansions. Replication using CTG or CAG as the lagging strand template is known to cause contractions or expansions respectively; however, the interplay between replication and repair leading to this instability remains unclear. Towards understanding how repeat contractions may arise, we performed in vitro SV40-mediated replication of repeat-containing plasmids in the presence or absence of mismatch repair. Specifically, we separated repair from replication: Replication mediated by MutSβ- and MutSα-deficient human cells or cell extracts produced slipped-DNA heteroduplexes in the contraction- but not expansion-biased replication direction. Replication in the presence of MutSβ disfavoured the retention of replication products harbouring slipped-DNA heteroduplexes. Post-replication repair of slipped-DNAs by MutSβ-proficient extracts eliminated slipped-DNAs. Thus, a MutSβ-deficiency likely enhances repeat contractions because MutSβ protects against contractions by repairing template strand slip-outs. Replication deficient in LigaseI or PCNA-interaction mutant LigaseI revealed slipped-DNA formation at lagging strands. Our results reveal that distinct mechanisms lead to expansions or contractions and support inhibition of MutSβ as a therapeutic strategy to enhance the contraction of expanded repeats.

  18. Adenovirus sequences required for replication in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, K.; Pearson, G D

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the in vivo replication properties of plasmids carrying deletion mutations within cloned adenovirus terminal sequences. Deletion mapping located the adenovirus DNA replication origin entirely within the first 67 bp of the adenovirus inverted terminal repeat. This region could be further subdivided into two functional domains: a minimal replication origin and an adjacent auxillary region which boosted the efficiency of replication by more than 100-fold. The minimal origin occup...

  19. Validation and scale-up of plasmid DNA purification by phenyl-boronic acid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, A Gabriela; Azevedo, Ana M; Aires-Barros, M Raquel; Prazeres, D Miguel F

    2012-11-01

    This study addresses the feasibility of scaling-up the removal of host cell impurities from plasmid DNA (pDNA)-containing Escherichia coli lysates by phenyl-boronic (PB) acid chromatography using columns packed with 7.6 and 15.2 cm(3) of controlled porous glass beads (CPG) derivatized with PB ligands. Equilibration was performed with water at 10 cm(3) /min and no conditioning of the lysate feed was required. At a ratio of lysate feed to adsorbent volume of 1.3, 93-96% of pDNA was recovered in the flow through while 66-71% of impurities remained bound (~2.5-fold purification). The entire sequence of loading, washing, elution, and re-equilibration was completed in 20 min. Run-to-run consistency was observed in terms of chromatogram features and performance (yield, purification factor, agarose electrophoresis) across the different amounts of adsorbent (0.75-15.2 cm(3) ) by performing successive injections of lysates prepared independently and containing 3.7 or 6.1 kbp plasmids. The column productivity at large scale was 4 dm(3) of alkaline lysate per hour per dm(3) of PB-CPG resin. The method is rapid, reproducible, simple, and straightforward to scale-up. Furthermore, it is capable of handling heavily contaminated samples, constituting a good alternative to purification techniques such as isopropanol precipitation, aqueous two-phase systems, and tangential flow filtration. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Charge density and particle size effects on oligonucleotide and plasmid DNA binding to nanosized hydrotalcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Brian A; Sowersby, Drew S; Crosby, Sergio; Goss, Marcus; Lewis, L Kevin; Beall, Gary W

    2013-12-01

    Hydrotalcite (HT) and other layered double metal hydroxides are of great interest as gene delivery and timed release drug delivery systems and as enteric vehicles for biologically active molecules that are sensitive to gastric fluids. HT is a naturally occurring double metal hydroxide that can be synthesized as a nanomaterial consisting of a brucite structure with isomorphous substitution of aluminum ions. These positively charged nanoparticles exhibit plate-like morphology with very high aspect ratios. Biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins form strong associations with HT because they can associate with the positively charged layers. The binding of nucleic acids with HT and other nanomaterials is currently being investigated for potential use in gene therapy; however, the binding of specific nucleic acid forms, such as single- and double-stranded DNA, has been little explored. In addition, the effects of charge density and particle size on DNA adsorption has not been studied. In this paper, the binding of different forms of DNA to a series of HTs prepared at different temperatures and with different anion exchange capacities has been investigated. Experiments demonstrated that HTs synthesized at higher temperatures associate with both single- and double-stranded oligomers and circular plasmid DNA more tightly than HTs synthesized at room temperature, likely due to the hydrothermal conditions promoting larger particle sizes. HT with an anion exchange capacity of 300 meq/100 g demonstrated the highest binding of DNA, likely due to the closer match of charge densities between the HT and DNA. The details of the interaction of various forms of DNA with HT as a function of charge density, particle size, and concentration are discussed.

  1. The DNA damage checkpoint response to replication stress: A Game of Forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel eJossen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Conditions challenging replication fork progression, collectively referred to as replication stress, represent a major source of genomic instability and are associated to cancer onset. The replication checkpoint, a specialized branch of the DNA damage checkpoint, monitors fork problems and triggers a cellular response aimed at preserving genome integrity. Here, we review the mechanisms by which the replication checkpoint monitors and responds to replication stress, focusing on the checkpoint-mediated pathways contributing to protect replication fork integrity. We discuss how cells achieve checkpoint signaling inactivation once replication stress is overcome and how a failure to timely revert checkpoint-mediated changes in cellular physiology might impact on replication dynamics and genome integrity. We also highlight the checkpoint function as an anti-cancer barrier preventing cells malignant transformation following oncogene-induced replication stress.

  2. Cdc6 ATPase activity disengages Cdc6 from the pre-replicative complex to promote DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, FuJung; Riera, Alberto; Evrin, Cecile; Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; Speck, Christian; Weinreich, Michael

    2015-08-25

    To initiate DNA replication, cells first load an MCM helicase double hexamer at origins in a reaction requiring ORC, Cdc6, and Cdt1, also called pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) assembly. The essential mechanistic role of Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis in this reaction is still incompletely understood. Here, we show that although Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis is essential to initiate DNA replication, it is not essential for MCM loading. Using purified proteins, an ATPase-defective Cdc6 mutant 'Cdc6-E224Q' promoted MCM loading on DNA. Cdc6-E224Q also promoted MCM binding at origins in vivo but cells remained blocked in G1-phase. If after loading MCM, Cdc6-E224Q was degraded, cells entered an apparently normal S-phase and replicated DNA, a phenotype seen with two additional Cdc6 ATPase-defective mutants. Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis is therefore required for Cdc6 disengagement from the pre-RC after helicase loading to advance subsequent steps in helicase activation in vivo.

  3. Development of a vector and host system and characterization of replication of plasmid pSQ10 in moderately halophilic Nocardiopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana Zeng; Tao Wang; Haiyang Xia; Shiyuan Peng; Weihua Chen; Chenglin Jiang; Lihua Xu

    2011-01-01

    The genus of Nocardiopsis is a new source of antibiotics,chemicals,and enzymes.Here we reported the development of a vector and host system in moderately halophilic Nocardiopsis via an oriT-mediated conjugation.By screening about 80 Nocardiopsis strains,6 of them harbored 8 plasmids (18-80 kb).The complete nucleotide sequence of pSQ10 consisted of 18,219 bp,with 71.9% G + Ccontent,encoding 17 open reading frames,5 of them resembled those of Streptomyces plasmids.A rep locus (iteron within the gene) was identified for replication in Nocardiopsis sp.YIM 90083,and rep protein bound to its iteron sequence.This system may be useful for gene cloning and expression in Nocardiopsis.

  4. Phototransfection of mouse embryonic stem cells with plasmid DNA using femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thobakgale, Lebogang; Manoto, Sello Lebohang; Ombinda Lemboumba, Saturnin; Maaza, Malik; Mthunzi-Kufa, Patience

    2017-02-01

    Cellular manipulation by delivery of molecules into cells has been applied extensively in tissue engineering research for medical applications . The different molecular delivery techniques used range from viral and chemical agents to physical and electrical methods. Although successful in most studies, these techniques have inherent difficulties such as toxicity, unwanted genetic mutations and low reproducibility respectively. Literature recognizes pulsed lasers at femtosecond level to be most efficient in photonic interactions with biological material. As of late, laser pulses have been used for drug and DNA delivery into cells via transient optical perforation of the cellular membrane. Thus in this study, we design and construct an optical system coupled to a femtosecond laser for the purpose of phototransfection or insertion of plasmid DNA (pDNA) into cells using lasers. We used fluorescent green protein (pGFP) to transfect mouse embryonic stem cells as our model. Secondly, we applied fluorescence imaging to view the extent of DNA delivery using this method. We also assessed the biocompatibility of our system by performing molecular assays of the cells post irradiation using adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH).

  5. Plasmid Biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Duarte Miguel F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2014-12-01

    Plasmids are currently an indispensable molecular tool in life science research and a central asset for the modern biotechnology industry, supporting its mission to produce pharmaceutical proteins, antibodies, vaccines, industrial enzymes, and molecular diagnostics, to name a few key products. Furthermore, plasmids have gradually stepped up in the past 20 years as useful biopharmaceuticals in the context of gene therapy and DNA vaccination interventions. This review provides a concise coverage of the scientific progress that has been made since the emergence of what are called today plasmid biopharmaceuticals. The most relevant topics are discussed to provide researchers with an updated overview of the field. A brief outline of the initial breakthroughs and innovations is followed by a discussion of the motivation behind the medical uses of plasmids in the context of therapeutic and prophylactic interventions. The molecular characteristics and rationale underlying the design of plasmid vectors as gene transfer agents are described and a description of the most important methods used to deliver plasmid biopharmaceuticals in vivo (gene gun, electroporation, cationic lipids and polymers, and micro- and nanoparticles) is provided. The major safety issues (integration and autoimmunity) surrounding the use of plasmid biopharmaceuticals is discussed next. Aspects related to the large-scale manufacturing are also covered, and reference is made to the plasmid products that have received marketing authorization as of today.

  6. Knockdown of DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 by RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type I DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muylaert, Isabella; Elias, Per

    2007-04-13

    Herpes simplex virus has a linear double-stranded DNA genome with directly repeated terminal sequences needed for cleavage and packaging of replicated DNA. In infected cells, linear genomes rapidly become endless. It is currently a matter of discussion whether the endless genomes are circles supporting rolling circle replication or arise by recombination of linear genomes forming concatemers. Here, we have examined the role of mammalian DNA ligases in the herpes simplex virus, type I (HSV-1) life cycle by employing RNA interference (RNAi) in human 1BR.3.N fibroblasts. We find that RNAi-mediated knockdown of DNA ligase IV and its co-factor XRCC4 causes a hundred-fold reduction of virus yield, a small plaque phenotype, and reduced DNA synthesis. The effect is specific because RNAi against DNA ligase I or DNA ligase III fail to reduce HSV-1 replication. Furthermore, RNAi against DNA ligase IV and XRCC4 does not affect replication of adenovirus. In addition, high multiplicity infections of HSV-1 in human DNA ligase IV-deficient cells reveal a pronounced delay of production of infectious virus. Finally, we demonstrate that formation of endless genomes is inhibited by RNAi-mediated depletion of DNA ligase IV and XRCC4. Our results suggests that DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 serves an important role in the replication cycle of herpes viruses and is likely to be required for the formation of the endless genomes early during productive infection.

  7. A leucine zipper motif determines different functions in a DNA replication protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de Viedma, D; Giraldo, R; Rivas, G; Fernández-Tresguerres, E; Diaz-Orejas, R

    1996-01-01

    RepA is the replication initiator protein of the Pseudomonas plasmid pPS10 and is also able to autoregulate its own synthesis. Here we report a genetic and functional analysis of a leucine zipper-like (LZ) motif located at the N-terminus of RepA. It is shown that the LZ motif modulates the equilibrium between monomeric and dimeric forms of the protein and that monomers of RepA interact with sequences at the origin of replication, oriV, while dimers are required for interactions of RepA at the repA promoter. Further, different residues of the LZ motif are seen to have different functional roles. Leucines at the d positions of the putative alpha-helix are relevant in the formation of RepA dimers required for transcriptional autoregulation. They also modulate other RepA-RepA interactions that result in cooperative binding of protein monomers to the origin of replication. The residues at the b/f positions of the putative helix play no relevant role in RepA-RepA interactions. These residues do not affect RepA autoregulation but do influence replication, as demonstrated by mutants that, without affecting binding to oriV, either increase the host range of the plasmid or are inactive in replication. It is proposed that residues in b/f positions play a relevant role in interactions between RepA and host replication factors. Images PMID:8631313

  8. Sulfolobus Replication Factor C stimulates the activity of DNA Polymerase B1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Xuanxuan; Zhang, Likui; Guo, Li;

    2014-01-01

    Replication factor C (RFC) is known to function in loading proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) onto primed DNA, allowing PCNA to tether DNA polymerase for highly processive DNA synthesis in eukaryotic and archaeal replication. In this report, we show that an RFC complex from...... with the ability of RFC to facilitate DNA binding by PolB1 through protein-protein interaction. These results suggest that Sulfolobus RFC may play a role in recruiting DNA polymerase for efficient primer extension, in addition to clamp loading, during DNA replication....... the hyperthermophilic archaea of the genus Sulfolobus physically interacts with DNA polymerase B1 (PolB1) and enhances both the polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities of PolB1 in an ATP-independent manner. Stimulation of the PolB1 activity by RFC is independent of the ability of RFC to bind DNA but is consistent...

  9. Linear forms of plasmid DNA are superior to supercoiled structures as active templates for gene expression in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballas, N; Zakai, N; Friedberg, D; Loyter, A

    1988-07-01

    Introduction of the plasmids pUC8CaMVCAT and pNOSCAT into plant protoplasts is known to result in transient expression of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene. Also, transfection with the plasmid pDO432 results in transient appearance of the luciferase enzyme. In the present work we have used these systems to study the effect of DNA topology on the expression of the above recombinant genes. Linear forms of the above plasmids exhibited much higher activity in supporting gene expression than their corresponding super-coiled structures. CAT activity in protoplasts transfected with the linear forms of pUC8CaMVCAT and pNOSCAT was up to ten-fold higher than that observed in protoplasts transfected by the supercoiled template of these plasmids. This effect was observed in protoplasts derived from two different lines of Petunia hybrida and from a Nicotiana tabacum cell line. Transfection with the relaxed form of pUC8CaMVCAT resulted in very low expression of the CAT gene.Northern blot analysis revealed that the amount of poly(A)(+) RNA extracted from protoplasts transformed with the linear forms of the DNA was about 10-fold higher than that found in protoplasts transformed with supercoiled DNA.Southern blot analysis revealed that about the same amounts of supercoiled and linear DNA molecules were present in nuclei of transfected protoplasts. No significant quantitative differences have been observed between the degradation rates of the various DNA templates used.

  10. INVESTIGATION OF POLYDL-LACTIDE-b-POLY(ETHYLENE GLYCOL)-b-POLYDL-LACTIDE MICROSPHERES CONTAINING PLASMID DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Liu; Long Huang; Xiao-rong Qiao; Xian-mo Deng; Wen-xiang Jia; Xiao-hong Li

    2004-01-01

    PolyDL-lactide (PDLLA) and the block copolymer, polyDL-lactide-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-polyDL-lactide (PELA) were used as the microsphere matrix to encapsulate plasmid DNA. The PDLLA, PELA, pBR322-1oaded PDLLA and pBR322-1oaded PELA microspheres were prepared by solvent extraction method based on the formation of multiple w1/o/w2 emulsion. The microspheres were characterized by surface morphology, mean particle size, particle size distribution and loading efficiency. The integrity of DNA molecules after being extracted from microspheres was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis. The result suggested that plasmid DNA molecules could retain their integrity after being encapsulated by PELA. The PELA microspheres could prevent plasmid DNA from being digested by DNase. The in vitro degradation and release profiles of plasmid DNA-loaded microspheres were measured in pH = 7.4 buffer solution at 37℃. The in vitro degradation profiles of the microspheres were evaluated by the deterioration in microspheres surface morphology, the molecular weight reduction of polymer, the mass loss of microspheres, the changes of pH values of degradation medium, and the changes of particle size. The in vitro release profiles of the microspheres were assessed by measurement of the amount of DNA presented in the release medium at determined intervals. The release profiles were correlation with the degradation profiles. The release of plasmid DNA from PELA microspheres showed a similar biphasic trend, that is, an initial burst release was followed by a slow, but sustained release.

  11. Human ribonuclease H1 resolves R-loops and thereby enables progression of the DNA replication fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Shankar; Teasley, Daniel C; Murali, Bhavna; Jackson, Jessica; Vindigni, Alessandro; Stewart, Sheila A

    2017-09-15

    Faithful DNA replication is essential for genome stability. To ensure accurate replication, numerous complex and redundant replication and repair mechanisms function in tandem with the core replication proteins to ensure DNA replication continues even when replication challenges are present that could impede progression of the replication fork. A unique topological challenge to the replication machinery is posed by RNA-DNA hybrids, commonly referred to as R-loops. Although R-loops play important roles in gene expression and recombination at immunoglobulin sites, their persistence is thought to interfere with DNA replication by slowing or impeding replication fork progression. Therefore, it is of interest to identify DNA-associated enzymes that help resolve replication-impeding R-loops. Here, using DNA fiber analysis, we demonstrate that human ribonuclease H1 (RNH1) plays an important role in replication fork movement in the mammalian nucleus by resolving R-loops. We found that RNH1 depletion results in accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids, slowing of replication forks, and increased DNA damage. Our data uncovered a role for RNH1 in global DNA replication in the mammalian nucleus. Because accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids is linked to various human cancers and neurodegenerative disorders, our study raises the possibility that replication fork progression might be impeded, adding to increased genomic instability and contributing to disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Analysis of spatial correlations between patterns of DNA damage response and DNA replication in nuclei of cells subjected to replication stress or oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernas, Tytus; Berniak, Krzysztof; Rybak, Paulina; Zarębski, Mirosław; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Dobrucki, Jerzy W

    2013-10-01

    Sites of DNA replication (EdU incorporation) and DNA damage signaling (γH2AX) induced by camptothecin (Cpt) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) form characteristic patterns of foci in cell nuclei. The overlap between these patterns is a function of the number of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) formed in replication sites. The goal of this study was to optimize a method of quantitative assessment of a degree of correlation between these two patterns. Such a correlation can be used to estimate a probability of inducing damage in sections of replicating DNA. The damage and replication foci are imaged in 3D with confocal microscopy and their respective positions within nuclei are determined with adaptive image segmentation. Using correlation functions spatial proximity of the resultant point patterns is quantified over the range of distances in cells in early-, mid- and late S-phase. As the numbers (and nuclear densities) of γH2AX and replication foci differ significantly in the subsequent substages of S phase, the detected association values were corrected for the expected random overlap between both classes of foci. Thus, the probability of their nonrandom association was estimated. Moreover, self association (clustering) of DNA replication sites in different stages of S-phase of the cell cycle was detected and accounted for. While the analysis revealed a strong correlation between the γH2AX foci and the sites of DNA replication in cells treated with Cpt, only a low correlation was apparent in cells exposed to H2O2. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  13. Damage-induced DNA replication stalling relies on MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köpper, Frederik; Bierwirth, Cathrin; Schön, Margarete

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage can obstruct replication forks, resulting in replicative stress. By siRNA screening, we identified kinases involved in the accumulation of phosphohistone 2AX (γH2AX) upon UV irradiation-induced replication stress. Surprisingly, the strongest reduction of phosphohistone 2AX followed...... replication impaired by gemcitabine or by Chk1 inhibition. This rescue strictly depended on translesion DNA polymerases. In conclusion, instead of being an unavoidable consequence of DNA damage, alterations of replication speed and origin firing depend on MK2-mediated signaling....... knockdown of the MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), a kinase currently implicated in p38 stress signaling and G2 arrest. Depletion or inhibition of MK2 also protected cells from DNA damage-induced cell death, and mice deficient for MK2 displayed decreased apoptosis in the skin upon UV irradiation...

  14. Tus-Ter as a tool to study site-specific DNA replication perturbation in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Hickson, Ian D; Mankouri, Hocine W

    2014-01-01

    The high-affinity binding of the Tus protein to specific 21-bp sequences, called Ter, causes site-specific, and polar, DNA replication fork arrest in E coli. The Tus-Ter complex serves to coordinate DNA replication with chromosome segregation in this organism. A number of recent and ongoing studies...... have demonstrated that Tus-Ter can be used as a heterologous tool to generate site-specific perturbation of DNA replication when reconstituted in eukaryotes. Here, we review these recent findings and explore the molecular mechanism by which Tus-Ter mediates replication fork (RF) arrest in the budding...... yeast, S. cerevisiae. We propose that Tus-Ter is a versatile, genetically tractable, and regulatable RF blocking system that can be utilized for disrupting DNA replication in a diverse range of host cells....

  15. Acute MUS81 depletion leads to replication fork slowing and a constitutive DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Meichun; Wang, Xiaohui; Palmai-Pallag, Timea;

    2015-01-01

    The MUS81 protein belongs to a conserved family of DNA structure-specific nucleases that play important roles in DNA replication and repair. Inactivation of the Mus81 gene in mice has no major deleterious consequences for embryonic development, although cancer susceptibility has been reported. We...... have investigated the role of MUS81 in human cells by acutely depleting the protein using shRNAs. We found that MUS81 depletion from human fibroblasts leads to accumulation of ssDNA and a constitutive DNA damage response that ultimately activates cellular senescence. Moreover, we show that MUS81...... is required for efficient replication fork progression during an unperturbed S-phase, and for recovery of productive replication following replication stalling. These results demonstrate essential roles for the MUS81 nuclease in maintenance of replication fork integrity....

  16. Ultrafine anaphase bridges, broken DNA and illegitimate recombination induced by a replication fork barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofueva, Sevil; Osman, Fekret; Lorenz, Alexander; Steinacher, Roland; Castagnetti, Stefania; Ledesma, Jennifer; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Most DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in S- and G2-phase cells are repaired accurately by Rad51-dependent sister chromatid recombination. However, a minority give rise to gross chromosome rearrangements (GCRs), which can result in disease/death. What determines whether a DSB is repaired accurately or inaccurately is currently unclear. We provide evidence that suggests that perturbing replication by a non-programmed protein–DNA replication fork barrier results in the persistence of replication intermediates (most likely regions of unreplicated DNA) into mitosis, which results in anaphase bridge formation and ultimately to DNA breakage. However, unlike previously characterised replication-associated DSBs, these breaks are repaired mainly by Rad51-independent processes such as single-strand annealing, and are therefore prone to generate GCRs. These data highlight how a replication-associated DSB can be predisposed to give rise to genome rearrangements in eukaryotes. PMID:21576223

  17. A bridging model for persistence of a polycomb group protein complex through DNA replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Stanley M; Follmer, Nicole E; Lengsfeld, Bettina M; Madamba, Egbert V; Seong, Samuel; Grau, Daniel J; Francis, Nicole J

    2012-06-29

    Epigenetic regulation may involve heritable chromatin states, but how chromatin features can be inherited through DNA replication is incompletely understood. We address this question using cell-free replication of chromatin. Previously, we showed that a Polycomb group complex, PRC1, remains continuously associated with chromatin through DNA replication. Here we investigate the mechanism of persistence. We find that a single PRC1 subunit, Posterior sex combs (PSC), can reconstitute persistence through DNA replication. PSC binds nucleosomes and self-interacts, bridging nucleosomes into a stable, oligomeric structure. Within these structures, individual PSC-chromatin contacts are dynamic. Stable association of PSC with chromatin, including through DNA replication, depends on PSC-PSC interactions. Our data suggest that labile individual PSC-chromatin contacts allow passage of the DNA replication machinery while PSC-PSC interactions prevent PSC from dissociating, allowing it to rebind to replicated chromatin. This mechanism may allow inheritance of chromatin proteins including PRC1 through DNA replication to maintain chromatin states.

  18. Curing of plasmid pXO1 from Bacillus anthracis using plasmid incompatibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiankai Liu

    Full Text Available The large plasmid pXO1 encoding the anthrax toxin is important for the virulence of Bacillus anthracis. It is essential to cure pXO1 from B. anthracis to evaluate its role in the pathogenesis of anthrax infection. Because conventional methods for curing plasmids (e.g., curing agents or growth at elevated temperatures can induce mutations in the host chromosomal DNA, we developed a specific and reliable method to eliminate pXO1 from B. anthracis using plasmid incompatibility. Three putative replication origins of pXO1 were inserted into a temperature-sensitive plasmid to generate three incompatible plasmids. One of the three plasmids successfully eliminated the large plasmid pXO1 from B. anthracis vaccine strain A16R and wild type strain A16. These findings provided additional information about the replication/partitioning of pXO1 and demonstrated that introducing a small incompatible plasmid can generate plasmid-cured strains of B. anthracis without inducing spontaneous mutations in the host chromosome.

  19. Comparison of nanoparticle-mediated transfection methods for DNA expression plasmids: efficiency and cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolte Ingo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reproducibly high transfection rates with low methodology-induced cytotoxic side effects are essential to attain the required effect on targeted cells when exogenous DNA is transfected. Different approaches and modifications such as the use of nanoparticles (NPs are being evaluated to increase transfection efficiencies. Several studies have focused on the attained transfection efficiency after NP-mediated approaches. However, data comparing toxicity of these novel approaches with conventional methods is still rare. Transfection efficiency and methodology-induced cytotoxicity were analysed after transfection with different NP-mediated and conventional approaches. Two eukaryotic DNA-expression-plasmids were used to transfect the mammalian cell line MTH53A applying six different transfection protocols: conventional transfection reagent (FuGENE HD, FHD, FHD in combination with two different sizes of stabilizer-free laser-generated AuNPs (PLAL-AuNPs_S1,_S2, FHD and commercially available AuNPs (Plano-AuNP, and two magnetic transfection protocols. 24 h post transfection efficiency of each protocol was analysed using fluorescence microscopy and GFP-based flow cytometry. Toxicity was assessed measuring cell proliferation and percentage of propidium iodide (PI% positive cells. Expression of the respective recombinant proteins was evaluated by immunofluorescence. Results The addition of AuNPs to the transfection protocols significantly increased transfection efficiency in the pIRES-hrGFPII-eIL-12 transfections (FHD: 16%; AuNPs mean: 28%, whereas the magnet-assisted protocols did not increase efficiency. Ligand-free PLAL-AuNPs had no significant cytotoxic effect, while the ligand-stabilized Plano-AuNPs induced a significant increase in the PI% and lower cell proliferation. For pIRES-hrGFPII-rHMGB1 transfections significantly higher transfection efficiency was observed with PLAL-AuNPs (FHD: 31%; PLAL-AuNPs_S1: 46%; PLAL-AuNPs_S2: 50

  20. Photoresponsive Bridged Silsesquioxane Nanoparticles with Tunable Morphology for Light-Triggered Plasmid DNA Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Fatieiev, Yevhen

    2015-09-25

    Bridged silsesquioxane nanocomposites with tunable morphologies incorporating o-nitrophenylene-ammonium bridges are described. The systematic screening of the sol-gel parameters allowed the material to reach the nanoscale –unlike most reported bridged silsesquioxane materials– with controlled dense and hollow structures of 100 to 200 nm. The hybrid composition of silsesquioxanes with 50% of organic content homogenously distributed in the nanomaterials endowed them with photoresponsive properties. Light irradiation was performed to reverse the surface charge of nanoparticles from +46 to -39 mV via the photoreaction of the organic fragments within the particles, as confirmed by spectroscopic monitorings. Furthermore, such NPs were ap-plied for the first time for the on-demand delivery of plasmid DNA in HeLa cancer cells via light actuation.