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Sample records for plasmid dna irradiated

  1. Repair of UV-irradiated plasmid DNA in excision repair deficient mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikai, K.; Tano, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Nozu, K.

    1985-01-01

    The repair of UV-irradiated DNA of plasmid YEp13 was studied in the incision defective strains by measurement of cell transformation frequency. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, rad1,2,3 and 4 mutants could repair UV-damaged plasmid DNA. In Escherichia coli, uvrA mutant was unable to repair UV-damaged plasmid DNA; however, pretreatment of the plasmid with Micrococcus luteus endonuclease increased repair. It was concluded that all the mutations of yeast were probably limited only to the nuclear DNA. (author)

  2. Strand breaks and lethal damage in plasmid DNA subjected to 60CO-γirradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimczak, U.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments with calf thymus DNA subjected to extracellular irradiation yield information on the role of direct and indirect effects in single-strand breakage, if this is evaluated with reference to the scavenger activity in respect of OH radicals. The role of the two processes in the occurrence of double-stand breaks and further damage leading to cell decay has so far remained largely obscure. It was the aim of the study described here to contribute to research in this field by performing in vitro experiments on biologically active DNA. For this purpose, DNA from pBR322 plasmids was irradiated in the presence of OH-radical scavengers. The number of single-strand and double-strand breaks was determined on the basis of the system's ability to eliminate OH radicals. In order to asses the influence of irradiation processes on the biological activity of DNA, investigations were carried out in E. coli for transformations caused by irradiated plasmid DNA. The results were interpreted in the light of theories about inhomogenous reaction kinetics put forward by Mark et al. (1989). It was finally discussed, which of the gamma-irradiation injuries occurring in DNA was to be held responsible for the inactivation of plasmid DNA and which enzymatic processes were additionally at work here. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Electrophoresis examination of strand breaks in plasmid DNA induced by low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yong; Tan Zheng; Du Yanhua; Qiu Guanying

    2003-01-01

    To study the effect on plasmid DNA of heavy ion in the energy range of keV where nuclear stopping interaction becomes more important or even predominant, thin film of plasmid pGEM-3Zf(-) DNA was prepared on aluminum surface and irradiated in vacuum ( -3 Pa) by low-energy nitrogen ions with energy of 30 keV (LET=285 keV/μm) at various fluence ranging from 2 x 10 10 to 8.2 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . DNA strand breaks were analyzed by neutral electrophoresis followed by quantification with image analysis software. Low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation induced single-, double- and multiple double-strand breaks (DSB) and multiple DSB as the dominating form of DNA damages. Moreover, the linear fluence-response relationship at a low fluence range suggests that DSBs are induced predominantly by single ion track. However, strand break production is limited to a short range in the irradiated samples

  4. Photolysis of phosphodiester bonds in plasmid DNA by high intensity UV laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croke, D.T.; Blau, Werner; OhUigin, Colm; Kelly, J.M.; McConnell, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The cleavage of phosphodiester bonds in DNA exposed to high intensity UV laser pulses in aerated aqueous solution has been investigated using a krypton fluoride excimer laser (248 nm) and bacterial plasmid DNA. The dependence of strand breakage on fluence and intensity has been studied in detail and shows that the process is non-linear with respect to intensity. The relationship between the quantum yield for strand breakage and intensity shows that the strand breakage reaction involves two-photon excitation of DNA bases. The quantum yield rises with intensity from a lower value of 7 x 10 -5 until a maximum value of 4.5 x 10 -4 is attained at intensities of 10 11 W m -2 and above. This value is approximately fifty-fold higher than the quantum yield for strand breakage induced by exposure to low density UV irradiation (254 nm, 12 W m -2 ). DNA sequencing experiments have shown that strand breakage occurs by the specific cleavage of the phosphodiester bond which lies immediately 3' to guanine residues in the DNA, leaving some alkali-labile remnant attached to the terminal phosphate. A mechanism for DNA strand breakage which involves the generation of guanine radical cations is proposed. (author)

  5. Transformation frequency of γ irradiated plasmid DNA and the enzymatic double strand break formation by incubation in a protein extract of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, D.; Mark, F.; Ventur, Y.

    1994-01-01

    It was found that incubation of γ-irradiated or DNaseI-treated plasmid DNA in a protein extract of Escherichia coli leads to enzyme-induced formation of double strand breaks (dsb) in competition with repair of precursors of these dsb. A survival curve of the plasmid DNA (as determined by transformation of E. coli) was calculated on the basis of enzyme-induced dsb as well as those produced by irradiation assuming that they are lethal. The calculated D O value was the same as that measured directly by transformation of irradiated plasmid DNA. Two models are presented that fit the experimental survival data as a function of dose. One is based on damage formation in the plasmid DNA including enzymatic conversion of single strand damage into dsb (U-model), the other is an enzymatic repair saturation model based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics. (Author)

  6. A novel technique using DNA denaturation to detect multiply induced single-strand breaks in a hydrated plasmid DNA molecule by X-ray and 4He2+ ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoya, A.; Shikazono, N.; Fujii, K.; Noguchi, M.; Urushibara, A.

    2011-01-01

    To detect multiple single-strand breaks (SSBs) produced in plasmid DNA molecules by direct energy deposition from radiation tracks, we have developed a novel technique using DNA denaturation by which irradiated DNA is analysed as single-strand DNA (SS-DNA). The multiple SSBs that arise in both strands of DNA, but do not induce a double-strand break, are quantified as loss of SS-DNA using agarose gel electrophoresis. We have applied this method to X-ray and 4 He 2+ ion-irradiated samples of fully hydrated pUC18 plasmid DNA. The fractions of both SS-DNA and closed circular DNA (CC-DNA) exponentially decrease with the increasing dose of X rays and 4 He 2+ ions. The efficiency of the loss of SS-DNA was half that of CC-DNA for both types of irradiation, indicating that one of two strands in DNA is not broken when one SSB is produced in CC-DNA by irradiation. Contrary to our initial expectation, these results indicate that SSBs are not multiply induced even by high linear energy transfer radiation distributed in both strands. (authors)

  7. Plasmid DNA Delivery: Nanotopography Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hao; Yu, Meihua; Lu, Yao; Gu, Zhengying; Yang, Yannan; Zhang, Min; Fu, Jianye; Yu, Chengzhong

    2017-12-20

    Plasmid DNA molecules with unique loop structures have widespread bioapplications, in many cases relying heavily on delivery vehicles to introduce them into cells and achieve their functions. Herein, we demonstrate that control over delicate nanotopography of silica nanoparticles as plasmid DNA vectors has significant impact on the transfection efficacy. For silica nanoparticles with rambutan-, raspberry-, and flower-like morphologies composed of spike-, hemisphere-, and bowl-type subunit nanotopographies, respectively, the rambutan-like nanoparticles with spiky surfaces demonstrate the highest plasmid DNA binding capability and transfection efficacy of 88%, higher than those reported for silica-based nanovectors. Moreover, it is shown that the surface spikes of rambutan nanoparticles provide a continuous open space to bind DNA chains via multivalent interactions and protect the gene molecules sheltered in the spiky layer against nuclease degradation, exhibiting no significant transfection decay. This unique protection feature is in great contrast to a commercial transfection agent with similar transfection performance but poor protection capability against enzymatic cleavage. Our study provides new understandings in the rational design of nonviral vectors for efficient gene delivery.

  8. Electron Resonance Decay into a Biological Function: Decrease in Viability of E. coli Transformed by Plasmid DNA Irradiated with 0.5-18 eV Electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouass Sahbani, S; Cloutier, P; Bass, A D; Hunting, D J; Sanche, L

    2015-10-01

    Transient negative ions (TNIs) are ubiquitous in electron-molecule scattering at low electron impact energies (0-20 eV) and are particularly effective in damaging large biomolecules. Because ionizing radiation generates mostly 0-20 eV electrons, TNIs are expected to play important roles in cell mutagenesis and death during radiotherapeutic cancer treatment, although this hypothesis has never been directly verified. Here, we measure the efficiency of transforming E. coli bacteria by inserting into the cells, pGEM-3ZfL(-) plasmid DNA that confers resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin. Before transformation, plasmids are irradiated with electrons of specific energies between 0.5 and 18 eV. The loss of transformation efficiency plotted as a function of irradiation energy reveals TNIs at 5.5 and 9.5 eV, corresponding to similar states observed in the yields of DNA double strand breaks. We show that TNIs are detectable in the electron-energy dependence of a biological process and can decrease cell viability.

  9. Large-scale preparation of plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, J S; Elbing, K L; Brent, R

    2001-05-01

    Although the need for large quantities of plasmid DNA has diminished as techniques for manipulating small quantities of DNA have improved, occasionally large amounts of high-quality plasmid DNA are desired. This unit describes the preparation of milligram quantities of highly purified plasmid DNA. The first part of the unit describes three methods for preparing crude lysates enriched in plasmid DNA from bacterial cells grown in liquid culture: alkaline lysis, boiling, and Triton lysis. The second part describes four methods for purifying plasmid DNA in such lysates away from contaminating RNA and protein: CsCl/ethidium bromide density gradient centrifugation, polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation, anion-exchange chromatography, and size-exclusion chromatography.

  10. Modeling the yield of double-strand breaks due to formation of multiply damaged sites in irradiated plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xapsos, M.A.; Pogozelski, W.K.

    1996-01-01

    Although double-strand breaks have long been recognized as an important type of DNa lesion, it is well established that this broad class of damage does not correlate well with indicators of the effectiveness of radiation as the cellular level. Assays of double-strand breaks do not distinguish the degree of complexity or clustering of singly damaged sites produced in a single energy deposition event, which is currently hypothesized to be key to understanding cellular end points. As a step toward this understanding, double-strand breaks that are formed proportionally to dose in plasmid DNA are analyzed from the mechanistic aspect to evaluate the yield that arises from multiply damaged sites as hypothesized by Ward (Prog. Nucleic Acid Res. Mol. Biol. 35, 95-125, 1988) and Goodhead (Int. J. Radiat. Biol. 65, 7-17, 1994) as opposed to the yield that arises form single hydroxyl radicals as hypothesized by Siddiqi and Bothe (Radiat. Res. 112, 449-463, 1987). For low-LET radiation such as γ rays, the importance of multiply damaged sites is shown to increase with the solution's hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity. For moderately high-LET radiation such as 100 keV/μm helium ions, a much different behavior is observed. In this case, a large fraction of double-strand breaks are formed as a result of multiply damaged sties over a broad range of scavenging conditions. Results also indicate that the RBE for common cellular end points correlates more closely with the RBE for common cellular end points correlates more closely with the RBE for multiply damaged sites than with the RBE for total double-strand breaks over a range of LET up to at least 100 keV/μm. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  12. Plasmid fermentation process for DNA immunization applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Aaron E; Williams, James A

    2014-01-01

    Plasmid DNA for immunization applications must be of the highest purity and quality. The ability of downstream purification to efficiently produce a pure final product is directly influenced by the performance of the upstream fermentation process. While several clinical manufacturing facilities already have validated fermentation processes in place to manufacture plasmid DNA for use in humans, a simple and inexpensive laboratory-scale fermentation process can be valuable for in-house production of plasmid DNA for use in animal efficacy studies. This chapter describes a simple fed-batch fermentation process for producing bacterial cell paste enriched with high-quality plasmid DNA. A constant feeding strategy results in a medium cell density culture with continuously increasing plasmid amplification towards the end of the process. Cell banking and seed culture preparation protocols, which can dramatically influence final product yield and quality, are also described. These protocols are suitable for production of research-grade plasmid DNA at the 100 mg-to-1.5 g scale from a typical 10 L laboratory benchtop fermentor.

  13. Damage of plasmid DNA by high energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaelidesova, A.; Pachnerova Brabcova, K.; Davidkova, M.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the degree of direct DNA damage by high-energy ions, which are one of the components of cosmic rays, and therefore the knowledge of the biological effects of these ions is key to long-term space missions with human crew. The pBR322 plasmid containing 4361 base pairs was used in this study. The aqueous solution of plasmid pBR322 was transferred on ice to Japan to the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, the Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy. Just before the experiment, the droplets of solution of known concentration were applied to the slides and the water was allowed to evaporate to produce dry DNA samples. Half of the slides were irradiated with 290 MeV/u of carbon ions and a dose rate of 20 Gy/min. The other half of the slides were irradiated with helium nuclei of 150 MeV/hr and a dose rate of 12.6 Gy/min. Both sets of slides were irradiated with doses of 0-1,400 Gy with a 200 Gy step. After irradiation, the samples were re-dissolved in distilled water, frozen and transported on ice to the Czech Republic for processing. Samples were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The plasmid was evaluated separately to determine the degree of radiation induced lesions and further to incubation with enzymes recognizing basal damage. (authors)

  14. [Replication of Streptomyces plasmids: the DNA nucleotide sequence of plasmid pSB 24.2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotin, A P; Sorokin, A V; Aleksandrov, N N; Danilenko, V N; Kozlov, Iu I

    1985-11-01

    The nucleotide sequence of DNA in plasmid pSB 24.2, a natural deletion derivative of plasmid pSB 24.1 isolated from S. cyanogenus was studied. The plasmid amounted by its size to 3706 nucleotide pairs. The G-C composition was equal to 73 per cent. The analysis of the DNA structure in plasmid pSB 24.2 revealed the protein-encoding sequence of DNA, the continuity of which was significant for replication of the plasmid containing more than 1300 nucleotide pairs. The analysis also revealed two A-T-rich areas of DNA, the G-C composition of which was less than 55 per cent and a DNA area with a branched pin structure. The results may be of value in investigation of plasmid replication in actinomycetes and experimental cloning of DNA with this plasmid as a vector.

  15. Plasmid DNA damage by heavy ions at spread-out Bragg peak energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dang, H. M.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlatholter, T.

    2010-01-01

    Interaction of ionizing radiation with plasmid DNA can lead to formation of single strand breaks, double strand breaks and clustered lesions. We have investigated the response of the synthetic plasmid pBR322 in aqueous solution upon irradiation with (12)C ions under spread-out Bragg peak conditions

  16. Resident enhanced repair: novel repair process action on plasmid DNA transformed into Escherichia coli K-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strike, P.; Roberts, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The survival of UV-irradiated DNA of plasmid NTP16 was monitored after its transformation into recipient cells containing an essentially homologous undamaged plasmid, pLV9. The presence of pLV9 resulted in a substantial increase in the fraction of damaged NTP16 molecules which survived in the recipient cells. This enhanced survival requires the host uvrA + and uvrB + gene products, but not the host recA + gene product. The requirement for both homologous DNA and the uvrA + gene products suggests that a novel repair process may act on plasmid DNA. Possible mechanisms for this process are considered

  17. Comparative assessment of plasmid DNA delivery by encapsulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research January 2018; 17 (1): 1-10 ... Purpose: To compare the gene delivery effectiveness of plasmid DNA (pDNA) ..... Intramuscular delivery of DNA ... copolymeric system for gene delivery in complete.

  18. Production and pharmaceutical formulation of plasmid DNA vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, I.

    2013-01-01

    Research leading to the thesis ‘Production and pharmaceutical formulation of plasmid DNA vaccines‘ can be divided into two parts. The first part describes the development of a Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) compliant plasmid DNA production process of pDNA vaccines for the treatment of Human

  19. Transformation of UV-hypersensitive Chinese hamster ovary cell mutants with UV-irradiated plasmids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nairn, R.S.; Humphrey, R.M.; Adair, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Transfection of UV-hypersensitive, DNA repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines and parental, repair-proficient CHO cells with UV-irradiated pHaprt-1 or pSV2gpt plasmids resulted in different responses by recipient cell lines to UV damage in transfected DNA. Unlike results reported for human cells, UV irradiation of transfecting DNA did not stimulate genetic transformation of CHO recipient cells. In repair-deficient CHO cells, proportionally fewer transformants were produced with increasing UV damage than in repair-proficient cells in transfections with UV-irradiated hamster adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) gene contained in plasmid pHaprt-1. Transfection of CHO cells with UV-irradiated pSV2gpt resulted in neither decline in transformation frequencies in repair-deficient cell lines relative to repair-proficient cells nor stimulation of genetic transformation by UV damage in the plasmid. Blot hybridization analysis of DNA samples isolated from transformed cells showed no dramatic changes in copy number or arrangement of transfected plasmid DNA with increasing UV dose. The authors conclude responses of recipient cells to UV-damaged transfecting plasmids depend on type of recipient cell and characteristics of the genetic sequence used for transfection. (author)

  20. Influence of anoxia on the induction of mutations by phenylalanine radicals during gamma-irradiation of plasmid DNA in aqueous solution.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, G.K.; Slotman, B.J.; Reitsma-Wijker, CA; Andel, R.J.; Poldervaart, H.A.; Lafleur, M.V.M.

    2004-01-01

    When DNA is irradiated in aqueous solution, most of the damage is inflicted by water-derived radicals. This is called the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. However in whole cells not only the primary formed water radicals play a role, because some cellular compounds form secondary radicals

  1. Influence of anoxia on the induction of mutations by phenylalanine radicals during gamma-irradiation of plasmid DNA in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Gitta K; Slotman, Ben J; Reitsma-Wijker, Carola A; van Andel, Rob J; Poldervaart, Hester A; Lafleur, M Vincent M

    2004-12-21

    When DNA is irradiated in aqueous solution, most of the damage is inflicted by water-derived radicals. This is called the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. However in whole cells not only the primary formed water radicals play a role, because some cellular compounds form secondary radicals which can also damage DNA. It is known that the amino acid phenylalanine is able to react with water radicals, resulting in the production of secondary phenylalanine radicals which can damage and inactivate DNA. In a previous study the influence of the presence of phenylalanine during gamma-irradiation of DNA in aqueous solution under oxic conditions was studied. Under anoxic irradiation conditions different amounts and types of reactive water-derived radicals are formed compared to oxic conditions and also different phenylalanine radicals are formed. Therefore, this study examines the influence of the presence of phenylalanine under anoxic conditions on the gamma-radiation-induced mutation spectrum. The results indicate that phenylalanine radicals are damaging to DNA, but less effective compared to primary water radicals. On the mutational level, in the presence of phenylalanine radicals under anoxic conditions, the amount of mutations on G:C base pairs was significantly decreased as compared to oxic conditions. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate that nucleotide excision repair is involved in repair of both inactivating and mutagenic damage induced by phenylalanine radicals under anoxic conditions.

  2. Absence of ultraviolet-inducible DNA polymerase I-like activity in Escherichia coli strains harbouring R plasmids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, C.; Pinney, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    No DNA polymerase I-like activity was found associated with the ultraviolet (u.v.)-protecting plasmids R205, R46 or pKM101 in either uninduced or u.v.-induced wild-type or DNA polymerase I-deficient strains of Escherichia coli. Nor was any plasmid-associated polymerase activity detectable in similar systems containing u.v.-irradiated DNA as template. However, plasmids R205, R46 and pKM 101 still increased survival and mutagenesis of the polymerase I-deficient E. coli strain after u.v. irradiation. (author)

  3. Plasmid P1 replication: negative control by repeated DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Chattoraj, D; Cordes, K; Abeles, A

    1984-01-01

    The incompatibility locus, incA, of the unit-copy plasmid P1 is contained within a fragment that is essentially a set of nine 19-base-pair repeats. One or more copies of the fragment destabilizes the plasmid when present in trans. Here we show that extra copies of incA interfere with plasmid DNA replication and that a deletion of most of incA increases plasmid copy number. Thus, incA is not essential for replication but is required for its control. When cloned in a high-copy-number vector, pi...

  4. Breaks in plasmid DNA strand induced by laser radiation at a wavelength of 193 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurzadyan, G.G.; Shul'te Frolinde, D.

    1996-01-01

    DNA of plasmid pB322 irradiated with laser at a wavelength of 193 nm was treated with an extract containing proteins from E.coli K12 AB1157 (wild-type). The enzymes were found to produce single- and double-strand DNA breaks, which was interpreted as a transformation of a portion of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts into nonrepairable single-strand DNA breaks. The products resulted from ionization of DNA, in particular, single-strand breaks, transform to double-strand breaks. A comparison of these data with the data on survival of plasmid upon transformation of E.coli K12 AB1157 enables one to assess the biological significance of single- and double-strand breaks. The inactivation of the plasmid is mainly determined by the number of directly formed laser-induced single-strand breaks. 26 refs.; 2 figs

  5. Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with UV-irradiated single-stranded plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgaga, Z

    1991-08-01

    UV-irradiated single-stranded replicative plasmids were used to transform different yeast strains. The low doses of UV used in this study (10-75 J/m2) caused a significant decrease in the transforming efficiency of plasmid DNA in the Rad+ strain, while they had no effect on transformation with double-stranded plasmids of comparable size. Neither the rev3 mutation, nor the rad18 or rad52 mutations influenced the efficiency of transformation with irradiated single-stranded plasmid. However, it was found to be decreased in the double rev3 rad52 mutant. Extracellular irradiation of plasmid that contains both URA3 and LEU2 genes (psLU) gave rise to up to 5% Leu- transformants among selected Ura+ ones in the repair-proficient strain. Induction of Leu- transformants was dose-dependent and only partially depressed in the rev3 mutant. These results suggest that both mutagenic and recombinational repair processes operate on UV-damaged single-stranded DNA in yeast.

  6. Comparative assessment of plasmid DNA delivery by encapsulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To compare the gene delivery effectiveness of plasmid DNA (pDNA) encapsulated within poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles with that adsorbed on PLGA nanoparticles. Methods: PLGA nanoparticles were prepared using solvent-evaporation method. To encapsulate pDNA within the particles, ...

  7. Protection of vanillin derivative VND3207 on plasmid DNA damage induced by different LET ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Huihui; Wang Li; Sui Li; Guan Hua; Wang Yu; Liu Xiaodan; Zhang Shimeng; Xu Qinzhi; Wang Xiao; Zhou Pingkun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the radioprotective effect of vanillin derivative VND3207 on DNA damage induced by different LET ionizing radiation. Methods: The plasmid DNA in liquid was irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays, proton or 7 Li heavy ion with or without VND3207. The conformation changes of plasmid DNA were assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis and the quantification was done using gel imaging system. Results: The DNA damage induced by proton and 7 Li heavy ion was much more serious as compared with that by 60 Co γ-rays, and the vanillin derivative VND3207 could efficiently decrease the DNA damage induced by all three types of irradiation sources, which was expressed as a significantly reduced ratio of open circular form (OC) of plasmid DNA. The radioprotective effect of VND3207 increased with the increasing of drug concentration. The protective efficiencies of 200 μmol/L VND3207 were 85.3% (t =3.70, P=0.033), 73.3% (t=10.58, P=0.017) and 80.4% (t=8.57, P=0.008) on DNA damage induction by 50 Gy of γ-rays, proton and 7 Li heavy ion, respectively. It seemed that the radioprotection of VND3207 was more effective on DNA damage induced by high LET heavy ion than that by proton. Conclusions: VND3207 has a protective effect against the genotoxicity of different LET ionizing radiation, especially for γ-rays and 7 Li heavy ion. (authors)

  8. Chemical repair activity of free radical scavenger edaravone. Reduction reactions with dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts and suppression of base lesions and AP sites on irradiated plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Kuniki; Katsumura, Yosuke; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Lin Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Fu Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) with deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) hydroxyl radical adducts were investigated by pulse radiolysis technique. Edaravone was found to reduce the dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts through electron transfer reactions. The rate constants of the reactions were greater than 4 × 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and similar to those of the reactions of ascorbic acid, which is a representative antioxidant. Yields of single-strand breaks, base lesions, and abasic sites produced in pUC18 plasmid DNA by gamma ray irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–1000 μmol dm -3 ) of edaravone were also quantified, and the chemical repair activity of edaravone was estimated by a method recently developed by the authors. By comparing suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, it was found that base lesions and abasic sites were suppressed by the chemical repair activity of edaravone, although the suppression of single-strand breaks was not very effective. This phenomenon was attributed to the chemical repair activity of edaravone toward base lesions and abasic sites. However, the chemical repair activity of edaravone for base lesions was lower than that of ascorbic acid. (author)

  9. Chemical repair activity of free radical scavenger edaravone: reduction reactions with dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts and suppression of base lesions and AP sites on irradiated plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Lin, Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Fu, Haiying; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) with deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) hydroxyl radical adducts were investigated by pulse radiolysis technique. Edaravone was found to reduce the dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts through electron transfer reactions. The rate constants of the reactions were greater than 4 × 10(8) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) and similar to those of the reactions of ascorbic acid, which is a representative antioxidant. Yields of single-strand breaks, base lesions, and abasic sites produced in pUC18 plasmid DNA by gamma ray irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10-1000 μmol dm(-3)) of edaravone were also quantified, and the chemical repair activity of edaravone was estimated by a method recently developed by the authors. By comparing suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, it was found that base lesions and abasic sites were suppressed by the chemical repair activity of edaravone, although the suppression of single-strand breaks was not very effective. This phenomenon was attributed to the chemical repair activity of edaravone toward base lesions and abasic sites. However, the chemical repair activity of edaravone for base lesions was lower than that of ascorbic acid. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  10. Photoinduced silver nanoparticles/nanorings on plasmid DNA scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianhua; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Yu, Mei; Li, Songmei; Zhang, Jindan

    2012-01-23

    Biological scaffolds are being actively explored for the synthesis of nanomaterials with novel structures and unexpected properties. Toroidal plasmid DNA separated from the Bacillus host is applied as a sacrificial mold for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles and nanorings. The photoirradiation method is applied to reduce Ag(I) on the plasmid. The nanoparticles are obtained by varying the concentration of the Ag(I) ion solution and the exposure time of the plasmid-Ag(I) complex under UV light at 254 nm and room temperature. It is found that the plasmid serves not only as a template but also as a reductant to drive the silver nucleation and deposition. The resulting nanoparticles have a face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure and 20-30 nm average diameter. The detailed mechanism is discussed, and other metals or alloys could also be synthesized with this method. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Pharmaceutical development of the plasmid DNA vaccine pDERMATT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quaak, S.G.L.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of tumor specific antigens and self tolerance mechanisms against these antigens led to the assumption that antigens circulating at sufficient concentration levels could break this self tolerance mechanism and evoke immunological antitumor effects. pDERMATT (plasmid DNA encoding

  12. Effect of Surfactants on Plasmid DNA Stability and Release from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of surfactants on plasmid DNA during preparation and release from polylactic glycolide (PLGA) microspheres. Methods: Various surfactants, both ionic and non-ionic (Span, Tween, Triton X100, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium dodecyl sulphate), were added during the ...

  13. Rapid and inexpensive method for isolating plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aljanabi, S. M.; Al-Awadi, S. J.; Al-Kazaz, A. A.; Baghdad Univ.

    1997-01-01

    A small-scale and economical method for isolating plasmid DNA from bacteria is described. The method provides DNA of suitable quality for most DNA manipulation techniques. This DNA can be used for restriction endonuclease digestion, southern blot hybridization, nick translation and end labeling of DNA probes, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) -based techniques, transformation, DNA cycle-sequencing, and Chain-termination method for DNA sequencing. The entire procedure is adapted to 1.5 ml microfuge tubes and takes approximately 30 mins. The DNA isolated by this method has the same purity produced by CTAB and cesium chloride precipitation and purification procedures respectively. The two previous methods require many hours to obtain the final product and require the use of very expensive equipment as ultracentrifuge. This method is well suited for the isolation of plasmid DNA from a large number of bacterial samples and in a very short time and low cost in laboratories where chemicals, expensive equipment and finance are limited factors in conducting molecular research. (authors). 11refs. 11refs

  14. A fresh method of DNA transformation to the seeds irradiated by Co ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-29

    Jun 29, 2011 ... To find out a simpler method that can directly transfer the aim gene into plant ... Key words: DNA transformation, irradiated seeds, purple medic, salt screening. ..... characterization of a maize mitochondrial plasmid-like DNA.

  15. Simple method for identification of plasmid-coded proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sancar, A.; Hack, A.M.; Rupp, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    Proteins encoded by plasmid DNA are specifically labeled in uv-irradiated cells of Escherichia coli carrying recA and uvrA mutations because extensive degradation of the chromosome DNA occurs concurrently with amplification of plasmid DNA

  16. Proton-induced direct and indirect damage of plasmid DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vyšín, Luděk; Pachnerová Brabcová, Kateřina; Štěpán, V.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bugler, B.; Legube, G.; Cafarelli, P.; Casta, R.; Champeaux, J. P.; Sence, M.; Vlk, M.; Wagner, Richard; Štursa, Jan; Zach, Václav; Incerti, S.; Juha, Libor; Davídková, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 3 (2015), s. 343-352 ISSN 0301-634X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28721S; GA MŠk LD12008; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : proton radiation * DNA plasmid * direct and indirect effects * clustered damage * repair enzymes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.923, year: 2015

  17. DNA repair in bacterial cultures and plasmid DNA exposed to infrared laser for treatment of pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, K S; Sergio, L P S; Marciano, R S; Guimarães, O R; Polignano, G A C; Geller, M; Fonseca, A S; Paoli, F

    2013-01-01

    Biostimulation of tissues by low intensity lasers has been described on a photobiological basis and clinical protocols are recommended for treatment of various diseases, but their effects on DNA are controversial. The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of low intensity infrared laser exposure on survival and bacterial filamentation in Escherichia coli cultures, and induction of DNA lesions in bacterial plasmids. In E. coli cultures and plasmids exposed to an infrared laser at fluences used to treat pain, bacterial survival and filamentation and DNA lesions in plasmids were evaluated by electrophoretic profile. Data indicate that the infrared laser (i) increases survival of E. coli wild type in 24 h of stationary growth phase, (ii) induces bacterial filamentation, (iii) does not alter topological forms of plasmids and (iv) does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. A low intensity infrared laser at the therapeutic fluences used to treat pain can alter survival of E. coli wild type, induce filamentation in bacterial cells, depending on physiologic conditions and DNA repair, and induce DNA lesions other than single or double DNA strand breaks or alkali-labile sites, which are not targeted by exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. (letter)

  18. Plasmid DNA damage caused by stibine and trimethylstibine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrewes, Paul; Kitchin, Kirk T.; Wallace, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Antimony is classified as 'possibly carcinogenic to humans' and there is also sufficient evidence for antimony carcinogenicity in experimental animals. Stibine is a volatile inorganic antimony compound to which humans can be exposed in occupational settings (e.g., lead-acid battery charging). Because it is highly toxic, stibine is considered a significant health risk; however, its genotoxicity has received little attention. For the work reported here, stibine was generated by sodium borohydride reduction of potassium antimony tartrate. Trimethylstibine is a volatile organometallic antimony compound found commonly in landfill and sewage fermentation gases at concentrations ranging between 0.1 and 100 μg/m 3 . Trimethylstibine is generally considered to pose little environmental or health risk. In the work reported here, trimethylstibine was generated by reduction of trimethylantimony dichloride using either sodium borohydride or the thiol compounds, dithioerythritol (DTE), L-cysteine, and glutathione. Here we report the evaluation of the in vitro genotoxicities of five antimony compounds--potassium antimony tartrate, stibine, potassium hexahydroxyantimonate, trimethylantimony dichloride, and trimethylstibine--using a plasmid DNA-nicking assay. Of these five antimony compounds, only stibine and trimethylstibine were genotoxic (significant nicking to pBR 322 plasmid DNA). We found stibine and trimethylstibine to be about equipotent with trimethylarsine using this plasmid DNA-nicking assay. Reaction of trimethylantimony dichloride with either glutathione or L-cysteine to produce DNA-damaging trimethylstibine was observed with a trimethylantimony dichloride concentration as low as 50 μM and L-cysteine or glutathione concentrations as low as 500 and 200 μM, respectively, for a 24 h incubation

  19. Genotoxic activity of 4,4',5'-trimethylazapsoralen on plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagatolla, C; Dolzani, L; Granzotto, M; Monti-Bragadin, C

    1998-01-01

    The genotoxic activities of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and 4,4',5'-trimethylazapsoralen (4,4',5'-TMAP) on plasmid DNA have been compared. In a previous work, 4,4',5'-TMAP, a methyl derivative of a psoralen isoster, had shown potential photochemotherapeutic activity. The mutagenic activity of mono- and bifunctional lesions caused by these compounds was evaluated both after UVA irradiation, which causes the formation of both kinds of lesions, and after a two-step irradiation procedure of the psoralen-plasmid DNA complex, which allowed monoadducts and interstrand crosslinks to be studied separately. Furthermore, we used a procedure that allowed us to evaluate both the mutagenic and recombinogenic activity of the two compounds. Results indicate that the most important difference between 8-MOP and 4,4',5'-TMAP consists in their mode of photoreaction with DNA rather than in their mutagenic potential. In fact, in all of the experimental procedures, 4,4',5'-TMAP shows a lower ability than 8-MOP to generate interstrand crosslinks. However, when comparable toxicity levels are reached, the two compounds show the same mutagenic potentiality.

  20. Quantification bias caused by plasmid DNA conformation in quantitative real-time PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Hui; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is the gold standard for the quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences. However, a serious concern has been revealed in a recent report: supercoiled plasmid standards cause significant over-estimation in qPCR quantification. In this study, we investigated the effect of plasmid DNA conformation on the quantification of DNA and the efficiency of qPCR. Our results suggest that plasmid DNA conformation has significant impact on the accuracy of absolute quantification by qPCR. DNA standard curves shifted significantly among plasmid standards with different DNA conformations. Moreover, the choice of DNA measurement method and plasmid DNA conformation may also contribute to the measurement error of DNA standard curves. Due to the multiple effects of plasmid DNA conformation on the accuracy of qPCR, efforts should be made to assure the highest consistency of plasmid standards for qPCR. Thus, we suggest that the conformation, preparation, quantification, purification, handling, and storage of standard plasmid DNA should be described and defined in the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) to assure the reproducibility and accuracy of qPCR absolute quantification.

  1. Effect of the atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas on the conformational changes of plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Xu; He Guangyuan; Shi Mengjun; Gao Xuan; Li Yin; Ma Fengyun; Yu Men; Wang Changdong; Wang Yuesheng; Yang Guangxiao; Zou Fei; Lu Xinpei; Xiong Qing; Xiong Zilan

    2009-01-01

    The cold atmospheric pressure plasma, which has been widely used for biomedical applications, may potentially affect the conformation of DNA. In this letter, an atmospheric pressure plasma plume is used to investigate its effects on the conformational changes of DNA of plasmid pAHC25. It is found that the plasma plume could cause plasmid DNA topology alteration, resulting in the percentage of the supercoiled plasmid DNA form decreased while that of the open circular and linearized form of plasmid DNA increased as detected by agrose gel electrophoresis. On the other hand, further investigation by using polymerase chain reaction method shows that the atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatments under proper conditions does not affect the genes of the plasmid DNA, which may have potential application in increasing the transformation frequency by genetic engineering.

  2. Use of damaged plasmid to study DNA repair in X-ray sensitive (xrs) strains of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith-Ravin, J.; Jeggo, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of γ-irradiation of pSV2gpt DNA on its transfection frequency has been analysed using radiosensitive CHO xrs mutants showing a defect in double-strand break (dsb) rejoining. At low doses a sharp decrease in relative transfection frequency, i.e. transfection frequency of irradiated plasmid relative to untreated plasmid, as observed in xrs mutants compared with the parent line K1. Electrophoresis of irradiated plasmid DNA showed the decrease in transfection frequency in the xrs mutants correlated with the change of supercoiled molecules into open-circular forms. In the parent line CHO-K1, open-circular and supercoiled molecules have the same transfection frequency. The effect of linearization of pSV2gpt DNA by restriction enzymes on transfection frequency in xrs and wild-type strains was also examined. No difference in the relative transfection frequency between xrs and wild-type strains was detected. (author)

  3. Plasmid-derived DNA Strand Displacement Gates for Implementing Chemical Reaction Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Jyue; Rao, Sundipta D; Seelig, Georg

    2015-11-25

    DNA nanotechnology requires large amounts of highly pure DNA as an engineering material. Plasmid DNA could meet this need since it is replicated with high fidelity, is readily amplified through bacterial culture and can be stored indefinitely in the form of bacterial glycerol stocks. However, the double-stranded nature of plasmid DNA has so far hindered its efficient use for construction of DNA nanostructures or devices that typically contain single-stranded or branched domains. In recent work, it was found that nicked double stranded DNA (ndsDNA) strand displacement gates could be sourced from plasmid DNA. The following is a protocol that details how these ndsDNA gates can be efficiently encoded in plasmids and can be derived from the plasmids through a small number of enzymatic processing steps. Also given is a protocol for testing ndsDNA gates using fluorescence kinetics measurements. NdsDNA gates can be used to implement arbitrary chemical reaction networks (CRNs) and thus provide a pathway towards the use of the CRN formalism as a prescriptive molecular programming language. To demonstrate this technology, a multi-step reaction cascade with catalytic kinetics is constructed. Further it is shown that plasmid-derived components perform better than identical components assembled from synthetic DNA.

  4. Blood extracellular DNA after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, V.G.; Tishchenko, L.I.; Surkova, E.A.; Vasil'eva, I.N.

    1993-01-01

    It has been shown that blood extracellular DNA of irradiated rats largely consists of the low-molecular DNA and its oligomers. Molecular masses of oligomers are multiple to molecular mass of monomer fragment with nucleosome size. The low-molecular DNA has linear form. The average content of GC-pairs in low-molecular DNA is higher than in total rat's DNA (48.5% against 41.5%). The low-molecular DNA is a part of complex containing RNA, acidic proteins and lipids. It is assumed that the formation of low-molecular DNA is a result of Ca/Mg - dependent nuclear endonuclease action

  5. Alterations of ultraviolet irradiated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davila, C.; Garces, F.

    1980-01-01

    Thymine dimers production has been studied in several DNA- 3 H irradiated at various wave lenght of U.V. Light. The influence of dimers on the hydrodynamic and optic properties, thermal structural stability and transformant capacity of DNA have been studied too. At last the recognition and excision of dimers by the DNA-UV-Endonuclease and DNA-Polimerase-I was also studied. (author)

  6. TOL plasmid carriage enhances biofilm formation and increases extracellular DNA content in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Alvise, Paul; Sjoholm, O.R.; Yankelevich, T.

    2010-01-01

    laser scanning microscopy. The TOL-carrying strains formed pellicles and thick biofilms, whereas the same strains without the plasmid displayed little adherent growth. Microscopy using fluorescent nucleic acid-specific stains revealed differences in the production of extracellular polymeric substances......: TOL carriage leads to more extracellular DNA (eDNA) in pellicles and biofilms. Pellicles were dissolved by DNase I treatment. Enhanced cell lysis due to plasmid carriage was ruled out as the mechanism for eDNA release. We report, for the first time, that carriage of a conjugative plasmid leads...

  7. 3G vector-primer plasmid for constructing full-length-enriched cDNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dong; Zhou, Yanna; Zhang, Zidong; Li, Zaiyu; Liu, Xuedong

    2008-09-01

    We designed a 3G vector-primer plasmid for the generation of full-length-enriched complementary DNA (cDNA) libraries. By employing the terminal transferase activity of reverse transcriptase and the modified strand replacement method, this plasmid (assembled with a polydT end and a deoxyguanosine [dG] end) combines priming full-length cDNA strand synthesis and directional cDNA cloning. As a result, the number of steps involved in cDNA library preparation is decreased while simplifying downstream gene manipulation, sequencing, and subcloning. The 3G vector-primer plasmid method yields fully represented plasmid primed libraries that are equivalent to those made by the SMART (switching mechanism at 5' end of RNA transcript) approach.

  8. A one-step miniprep for the isolation of plasmid DNA and lambda phage particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Lezin

    Full Text Available Plasmid DNA minipreps are fundamental techniques in molecular biology. Current plasmid DNA minipreps use alkali and the anionic detergent SDS in a three-solution format. In addition, alkali minipreps usually require additional column-based purification steps and cannot isolate other extra-chromosomal elements, such as bacteriophages. Non-ionic detergents (NIDs have been used occasionally as components of multiple-solution plasmid DNA minipreps, but a one-step approach has not been developed. Here, we have established a one-tube, one-solution NID plasmid DNA miniprep, and we show that this approach also isolates bacteriophage lambda particles. NID minipreps are more time-efficient than alkali minipreps, and NID plasmid DNA performs better than alkali DNA in many downstream applications. In fact, NID crude lysate DNA is sufficiently pure to be used in digestion and sequencing reactions. Microscopic analysis showed that the NID procedure fragments E. coli cells into small protoplast-like components, which may, at least in part, explain the effectiveness of this approach. This work demonstrates that one-step NID minipreps are a robust method to generate high quality plasmid DNA, and NID approaches can also isolate bacteriophage lambda particles, outperforming current standard alkali-based minipreps.

  9. Photoresponsive Bridged Silsesquioxane Nanoparticles with Tunable Morphology for Light-Triggered Plasmid DNA Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Fatieiev, Yevhen; Croissant, Jonas G.; Alsaiari, Shahad K.; Moosa, Basem; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2015-01-01

    Bridged silsesquioxane nanocomposites with tunable morphologies incorporating o-nitrophenylene-ammonium bridges are described. The systematic screening of the sol-gel parameters allowed the material to reach the nanoscale –unlike most reported bridged silsesquioxane materials– with controlled dense and hollow structures of 100 to 200 nm. The hybrid composition of silsesquioxanes with 50% of organic content homogenously distributed in the nanomaterials endowed them with photoresponsive properties. Light irradiation was performed to reverse the surface charge of nanoparticles from +46 to -39 mV via the photoreaction of the organic fragments within the particles, as confirmed by spectroscopic monitorings. Furthermore, such NPs were ap-plied for the first time for the on-demand delivery of plasmid DNA in HeLa cancer cells via light actuation.

  10. Photoresponsive Bridged Silsesquioxane Nanoparticles with Tunable Morphology for Light-Triggered Plasmid DNA Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Fatieiev, Yevhen

    2015-09-25

    Bridged silsesquioxane nanocomposites with tunable morphologies incorporating o-nitrophenylene-ammonium bridges are described. The systematic screening of the sol-gel parameters allowed the material to reach the nanoscale –unlike most reported bridged silsesquioxane materials– with controlled dense and hollow structures of 100 to 200 nm. The hybrid composition of silsesquioxanes with 50% of organic content homogenously distributed in the nanomaterials endowed them with photoresponsive properties. Light irradiation was performed to reverse the surface charge of nanoparticles from +46 to -39 mV via the photoreaction of the organic fragments within the particles, as confirmed by spectroscopic monitorings. Furthermore, such NPs were ap-plied for the first time for the on-demand delivery of plasmid DNA in HeLa cancer cells via light actuation.

  11. Characterization of Plasmid DNA Location within Chitosan/PLGA/pDNA Nanoparticle Complexes Designed for Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hali Bordelon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide- (PLGA-chitosan nanoparticles are becoming an increasingly common choice for the delivery of nucleic acids to cells for various genetic manipulation techniques. These particles are biocompatible, with tunable size and surface properties, possessing an overall positive charge that promotes complex formation with negatively charged nucleic acids. This study examines properties of the PLGA-chitosan nanoparticle/plasmid DNA complex after formation. Specifically, the study aims to determine the optimal ratio of plasmid DNA:nanoparticles for nucleic acid delivery purposes and to elucidate the location of the pDNA within these complexes. Such characterization will be necessary for the adoption of these formulations in a clinical setting. The ability of PLGA-chitosan nanoparticles to form complexes with pDNA was evaluated by using the fluorescent intercalating due OliGreen to label free plasmid DNA. By monitoring the fluorescence at different plasmid: nanoparticle ratios, the ideal plasmid:nanoparticle ration for complete complexation of plasmid was determined to be 1:50. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and gel digest studies suggested that even at these optimal complexation ratios, a portion of the plasmid DNA was located on the outer complex surface. This knowledge will facilitate future investigations into the functionality of the system in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Photo-transfection of mouse embryonic stem cells with plasmid DNA using femtosecond laser pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thobakgale, Lebogang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is about the photo-transfection of mouse embryonic stem cells with plasmid DNA using femtosecond laser pulses. It outlines the background on embryonic stem cells (ES) and phototransfection....

  13. Optimizing hyaluronidase dose and plasmid DNA delivery greatly improves gene electrotransfer efficiency in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Vedel, Kenneth; Needham Andersen, Josefine

    2015-01-01

    Transfection of rat skeletal muscle in vivo is a widely used research model. However, gene electrotransfer protocols have been developed for mice and yield variable results in rats. We investigated whether changes in hyaluronidase pre-treatment and plasmid DNA delivery can improve transfection...... with a homogenous distribution. We also show that transfection was stable over five weeks of regular exercise or inactivity. Our findings show that species-specific plasmid DNA delivery and hyaluronidase pre-treatment greatly improves transfection efficiency in rat skeletal muscle....... efficiency in rat skeletal muscle. We found that pre-treating the muscle with a hyaluronidase dose suitable for rats (0.56. U/g b.w.) prior to plasmid DNA injection increased transfection efficiency by >200% whereas timing of the pre-treatment did not affect efficiency. Uniformly distributing plasmid DNA...

  14. Formation of plasmid DNA strand breaks induced by low-energy ion beam: indication of nuclear stopping effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yu; Jiang Bingyao; Chen Youshan; Ding Xingzhao; Liu Xianghuai; Chen Ceshi; Guo Xinyou; Yin Guanglin

    1998-01-01

    Plasmid pGEM 3zf(+) was irradiated by nitrogen ion beam with energies between 20 and 100 keV and the fluence kept as 1 x 10 12 ions/cm 2 . The irradiated plasmid was assayed by neutral electrophoresis and quantified by densitometry. The yields of DNA with single-strand and double-strand breaks first increased then decreased with increasing ion energy. There was a maximal yield value in the range of 20-100 keV. The relationship between DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) cross-section and linear energy transfer (LET) also showed a peak-shaped distribution. To understand the physical process during DNA strand breaks, a Monte Carlo calculation code known as TRIM (Transport of Ions in Matter) was used to simulate energy losses due to nuclear stopping and to electronic stopping. It can be assumed that nuclear stopping plays a more important role in DNA strand breaks than electronic stopping in this energy range. The physical mechanisms of DNA strand breaks induced by a low-energy ion beam are also discussed. (orig.)

  15. Radiation-chemical discussion on inverse dose-rate effect observed in radiation-induced strand breaks of plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Takahiro

    1994-01-01

    Experimental results of inverse dose-rate effect, so-called Kada Effects, which was published by Takakura and her coworkers on radiation-induced strand breaks of plasmid DNA in aerated aqueous solution, have been kinetically analyzed and discussed on the basis of radiation chemistry. the kinetic analysis indicates that there are two possible mechanisms; 1) equilibrium mixture of O 2 - and HO 2 is responsible for strand breaks of DNA, and 2) peroxyl radical produced from citrate is effective for the strand breaks. However, the detailed kinetic analysis revealed that the latter is improbable because unimolecular decay of the peroxyl radical must be assumed to be negligible for its participation despite fast decay of analogous organic peroxyl radicals. The analysis has also given 9.93±0.10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 per nucleotide unit, which corresponds to 7.62 x 10 4 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 per DNA molecule, as the rate constant for the reaction of the equilibrium mixture with plasmid pBR 322 DNA. Furthermore the probability that the reaction of the mixture with a nucleotide unit of DNA leads to strand breaks was obtained to be 3.36 x 10 -3 for gamma-irradiated system and 1.98 x 10 -3 for beta-irradiated system, respectively. (author)

  16. A rapid method for screening arrayed plasmid cDNA library by PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yingchun; Zhang Kaitai; Wu Dechang; Li Gang; Xiang Xiaoqiong

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To develop a PCR-based method for rapid and effective screening of arrayed plasmid cDNA library. Methods: The plasmid cDNA library was arrayed and screened by PCR with a particular set of primers. Results: Four positive clones were obtained through about one week. Conclusion: This method can be applied to screening not only normal cDNA clones, but also cDNA clones-containing small size fragments. This method offers significant advantages over traditional screening method in terms of sensitivity, specificity and efficiency

  17. Plasmid DNA Analysis of Pasteurella multocida Serotype B isolated from Haemorrhagic Septicaemia outbreaks in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal, H.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 150 purified isolates of Pasteurella multocida serotype B were used (Salmah, 2004 for plasmid DNA curing experiment to determine hyaluronidase activity, antibiotic resistance pattern (ARP and mice lethality test (LD50 for their role of pathogenicity. A plasmid curing experiment was carried out by using the intercalating agent; ethidium bromide and rifampicin, where it was found all the plasmids had been cured (plasmidless from Pasteurella multocida. All of these plasmidless isolates maintained their phenotypic characteristics. They showed the same antibiotic resistancepattern as before curing, produced hyaluronidase and possessed lethality activity in mice when injected intraperitoneally(i.p. Based on this observation, the antibiotic resistance, hyaluronidase activity and mice virulence could probably be chromosomal-mediated. Plasmids were detected 100% in all P. multocida isolates with identical profile of 2 plasmids size 3.0 and 5.5 kb. No large plasmids could be detected in all isolates. Since all the isolates appeared to have identicalplasmid profiles, they were subjected to restriction enzyme(RE analysis. From RE analysis results obtained, it can be concluded that the plasmid DNA in serotype B isolates are identical. Only 4 of 32 REs were found to cleave these plasmids with identical restriction fingerprints; BglII, HaeIII, RsaI and SspI. From RE analysis results, it can be concluded that the plasmid DNA isolates are identical. This plasmid might not played any role in pathogenicity of Pasteurella multocida serotype B, however this information is important for the construction of shuttle vectors in genetic studies of the pathogenicity of haemorrhagic septicaemia(HS.

  18. Clustered DNA damage induced by proton and heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidkova, M.; Pachnerova Brabcova, K; Stepan, V.; Vysin, L.; Sihver, L.; Incerti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces in DNA strand breaks, damaged bases and modified sugars, which accumulate with increasing density of ionizations in charged particle tracks. Compared to isolated DNA damage sites, the biological toxicity of damage clusters can be for living cells more severe. We investigated the clustered DNA damage induced by protons (30 MeV) and high LET radiation (C 290 MeV/u and Fe 500 MeV/u) in pBR322 plasmid DNA. To distinguish between direct and indirect pathways of radiation damage, the plasmid was irradiated in pure water or in aqueous solution of one of the three scavengers (coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, dimethylsulfoxide, and glycylglycine). The goal of the contribution is the analysis of determined types of DNA damage in dependence on radiation quality and related contribution of direct and indirect radiation effects. The yield of double strand breaks (DSB) induced in the DNA plasmid-scavenger system by heavy ion radiation was found to decrease with increasing scavenging capacity due to reaction with hydroxyl radical, linearly with high correlation coefficients. The yield of non-DSB clusters was found to occur twice as much as the DSB. Their decrease with increasing scavenging capacity had lower linear correlation coefficients. This indicates that the yield of non-DSB clusters depends on more factors, which are likely connected to the chemical properties of individual scavengers. (authors)

  19. Purification of supercoiled DNA of plasmid Col E1 by RPC-5 chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, A.N.; Allison, D.P.; Novelli, G.D.

    1981-07-01

    Col E1 DNA can be purified to a high degree by RPC-5 chromatography of a partially purified cell lysate with a very shallow linear NaC1 gradient at pH 7.8. Electron micrographs demonstrated that the purest fractions were composed of 93% supercoiled (form I) DNA and 7% open circular (form II) DNA. The actual chromatography can be accomplished in 13 to 14 h and is designed for the production of several milligrams of plasmid DNA.

  20. Plasmid containing a DNA ligase gene from Haemophilus influenzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, D.; Griffin, K.; Setlow, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    A ligase gene from Haemophilus influenzae was cloned into the shuttle vector pDM2. Although the plasmid did not affect X-ray sensitivity, it caused an increase in UV sensitivity of the wild-type but not excision-defective H. influenzae and a decrease in UV sensitivity of the rec-1 mutant. 14 references, 2 figures

  1. Autonomous replication of plasmids bearing monkey DNA origin-enriched sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frappier, L.; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, M.

    1987-01-01

    Twelve clones of origin-enriched sequences (ORS) isolated from early replicating monkey (CV-1) DNA were examined for transient episomal replication in transfected CV-1, COS-7, and HeLa cells. Plasmid DNA was isolated at time intervals after transfection and screened by the Dpn I resistance assay or by the bromodeoxyuridine substitution assay to differentiate between input and replicated DNA. The authors have identified four monkey ORS (ORS3, -8, -9, and -12) that can support plasmid replication in mammalian cells. This replication is carried out in a controlled and semiconservative manner characteristic of mammalian replicons. ORS replication was most efficient in HeLa cells. Electron microscopy showed ORS8 and ORS12 plasmids of the correct size with replication bubbles. Using a unique restriction site in ORS12, we have mapped the replication bubble within the monkey DNA sequence

  2. TOL Plasmid Carriage Enhances Biofilm Formation and Increases Extracellular DNA Content in Pseudomonas Putida KT2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smets, Barth F.; D'Alvise, Paul; Yankelovich, T.

    laser scanning microscopy. The TOL-carrying strains formed pellicles and thick biofilms, whereas the same strains without the plasmid displayed little adherent growth. Microscopy using fluorescent nucleic acid- specific stains (cytox orange, propidium iodide) revealed differences in production...... combined with specific cytostains; release of cytoplasmic material was assayed by a β-glucosidase assay. Enhanced cell lysis due to plasmid carriage was ruled out as the mechanism for eDNA release. We report, for the first time, that carriage of a conjugative plasmid leads to increased biofilm formation...

  3. Heavy ion induced damage to plasmid DNA : plateau region vs. spread out Bragg-peak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dang, H.M.; van Goethem, M.J.; van der Graaf, E.R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.A.; Schlathölter, T.A.

    We have investigated the damage of synthetic plasmid pBR322 DNA in dilute aqueous solutions induced by fast carbon ions. The relative contribution of indirect damage and direct damage to the DNA itself is expected to vary with linear energy transfer along the ion track, with the direct damage

  4. Plasmid ColE1 as a Molecular Vehicle for Cloning and Amplification of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershfield, Vickers; Boyer, Herbert W.; Yanofsky, Charles; Lovett, Michael A.; Helinski, Donald R.

    1974-01-01

    DNA fragments obtained from EcoRI endonuclease digestion of bacteriophage ϕ80pt190 (trp+) and the plasmid ColE1 were covalently joined with polynucleotide ligase. Transformation of Escherichia coli trp- strains to tryptophan independence with the recombined DNA selected for reconstituted ColE1 plasmids containing the tryptophan operon and the ϕ80 immunity region. Similarly, an EcoRI endonuclease generated fragment of plasmid pSC105 DNA containing the genetic determinant of kanamycin resistance was inserted into the ColE1 plasmid and recovered in E. coli. The plasmids containing the trp operon (ColE1-trp) and the kanamycin resistance gene were maintained under logarithmic growth conditions at a level of 25-30 copies per cell and accumulate to the extent of several hundred copies per cell in the presence of chloramphenicol. Cells carrying the ColE1-trp plasmid determined the production of highly elevated levels of trp operon-specific mRNA and tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes. Images PMID:4610576

  5. The effects of a low-intensity red laser on bacterial growth, filamentation and plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, C; Santos, J N; Guimarães, O R; Geller, M; Fonseca, A S; Paoli, F

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of nonphotosynthesizing microorganisms to light could increase cell division in cultures, a phenomenon denominated as biostimulation. However, data concerning the importance of the genetic characteristics of cells on this effect are as yet scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of a low-intensity red laser on the growth, filamentation and plasmids in Escherichia coli cells proficient and deficient in DNA repair. E. coli cultures were exposed to a laser (658 nm, 10 mW, 1 and 8 J cm −2 ) to study bacterial growth and filamentation. Also, bacterial cultures hosting pBSK plasmids were exposed to the laser to study DNA topological forms from the electrophoretic profile in agarose gels. Data indicate the low-intensity red laser: (i) had no effect on the growth of E. coli wild type and exonuclease III deficient cells; (ii) induced bacterial filamentation, (iii) led to no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids from exonuclease III deficient cells, but plasmids from wild type cells were altered. A low-intensity red laser at the low fluences used in phototherapy has no effect on growth, but induces filamentation and alters the topological forms of plasmid DNA in E. coli cultures depending on the DNA repair mechanisms. (paper)

  6. Regulation of DNA replication in irradiated cells by trans-acting factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Huq, M.S.; Cheng, X.; Iliakis, G.

    1995-01-01

    We compared DNA replication activity in cytoplasmic extracts prepared from irradiated and nonirradiated HeLa cells using a simian virus 40 (SV40)-based in vitro replication assay. The assay measures semi-conservative DNA replication in a plasmid carrying the SV40 origin of replication and requires SV40 T antigen as the sole noncellular protein. The plasmid DNA used in the replication reaction is never exposed to radiation. We find that replication of plasmid DNA is significantly reduced when cytoplasmic extracts from irradiated cells are used. Since plasmid replication proceeds to completion in extracts from irradiated cells, the observed reduction in the overall replication activity is probably due to a reduction in the efficiency of initiation events. The degree of inhibition of DNA replication after exposure to 10, 30 and 50 Gy X rays as measured in vitro using this assay is similar to that measured in intact cells immediately before processing for extract preparation. These observations are compatible with the induction or activation by ionizing radiation of a factor(s) that inhibits in trans DNA replication. The results contribute to our understanding of the mechanism(s) developed by the cells to regulate DNA replication when exposed to clastogenic agents. Such processes may be of significance in the restoration of DNA integrity, and may define yet another checkpoint operating during S at the level of clusters of replicons. 26 refs., 4 figs

  7. Evaluation of plasmid and genomic DNA calibrants used for the quantification of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioara-Buda, M; Meyer, W; Jeynov, B; Corbisier, P; Trapmann, S; Emons, H

    2012-07-01

    The reliable quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) by real-time PCR requires, besides thoroughly validated quantitative detection methods, sustainable calibration systems. The latter establishes the anchor points for the measured value and the measurement unit, respectively. In this paper, the suitability of two types of DNA calibrants, i.e. plasmid DNA and genomic DNA extracted from plant leaves, for the certification of the GMO content in reference materials as copy number ratio between two targeted DNA sequences was investigated. The PCR efficiencies and coefficients of determination of the calibration curves as well as the measured copy number ratios for three powder certified reference materials (CRMs), namely ERM-BF415e (NK603 maize), ERM-BF425c (356043 soya), and ERM-BF427c (98140 maize), originally certified for their mass fraction of GMO, were compared for both types of calibrants. In all three systems investigated, the PCR efficiencies of plasmid DNA were slightly closer to the PCR efficiencies observed for the genomic DNA extracted from seed powders rather than those of the genomic DNA extracted from leaves. Although the mean DNA copy number ratios for each CRM overlapped within their uncertainties, the DNA copy number ratios were significantly different using the two types of calibrants. Based on these observations, both plasmid and leaf genomic DNA calibrants would be technically suitable as anchor points for the calibration of the real-time PCR methods applied in this study. However, the most suitable approach to establish a sustainable traceability chain is to fix a reference system based on plasmid DNA.

  8. Functionalized tetrapod-like ZnO nanostructures for plasmid DNA purification, polymerase chain reaction and delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie Leng; Gao Lizeng; Yan Xiyun; Wang Taihong

    2007-01-01

    Functionalized tetrapodal ZnO nanostructures are tested in plasmid DNA experiments (1) as a solid-phase adsorbent for plasmid DNA purification (2) as improving reagents in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and (3) as novel carriers for gene delivery. The amino-modification, the tetrapod-like shape of the nanostructure and its high biocompatibility all contribute to measurements showing promise for applications. A sol-gel method is used for silica coating and amino-modification. Plasmid DNA is purified through reversible conjugations of amino-modified ZnO tetrapods with DNA. Also, as additional reagents, functionalized tetrapods are shown to improve the amount of PCR product. For transfection, ZnO tetrapods provide some protection against deoxyribonuclease cleavage of plasmid DNA and deliver plasmid DNA into cells with little cytotoxicity

  9. Effect of the caffeine on treated and non-treated plasmid DNA with stannic chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Silvana Ramos F.; Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ; Mattos, Jose C.P. de; Dantas, Flavio; Araujo, Adriano Caldeira de; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2000-01-01

    Caffeine, a methilxantine drug is a component of coffee, tea, stimulants and other drinks. Caffeine inhibits phosphodiesterase leading to intracellular accumulation of cyclic AMP, blocks adenosine receptors, and increases the release of Ca 2+ . We have studied the possible effect of caffeine in DNA plasmid treated or not with stannous chloride (SnCl 2 ). Previous evaluations of the effect of caffeine on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with technetium-99m have showed a decrease of % ATI in the insoluble fraction of plasma proteins. Samples of DNA were treated with SnCl 2 (0 and 200μg/ml) in 0.8% agarose. SnCl 2 has induced break on DNA and caffeine has not showed effect on the DNA. This indicates that caffeine does not eliminate the oxidant action of SnCl 2 and does not promote break in isolated DNA plasmid. (author)

  10. Ca2+ promoted the low transformation efficiency of plasmid DNA exposed to PAH contaminants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuxing Kang

    Full Text Available The effects of interactions between genetic materials and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs on gene expression in the extracellular environment remain to be elucidated and little information is currently available on the effect of ionic strength on the transformation of plasmid DNA exposed to PAHs. Phenanthrene and pyrene were used as representative PAHs to evaluate the transformation of plasmid DNA after PAH exposure and to determine the role of Ca(2+ during the transformation. Plasmid DNA exposed to the test PAHs demonstrated low transformation efficiency. In the absence of PAHs, the transformation efficiency was 4.7 log units; however, the efficiency decreased to 3.72-3.14 log units with phenanthrene/pyrene exposures of 50 µg · L(-1. The addition of Ca(2+ enhanced the low transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to PAHs. Based on the co-sorption of Ca(2+ and phenanthrene/pyrene by DNA, we employed Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and mass spectrometry (MS to determine the mechanisms involved in PAH-induced DNA transformation. The observed low transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to either phenanthrene or pyrene can be attributed to a broken hydrogen bond in the double helix caused by planar PAHs. Added Ca(2+ formed strong electrovalent bonds with "-POO(--" groups in the DNA, weakening the interaction between PAHs and DNA based on weak molecular forces. This decreased the damage of PAHs to hydrogen bonds in double-stranded DNA by isolating DNA molecules from PAHs and consequently enhanced the transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to PAH contaminants. The findings provide insight into the effects of anthropogenic trace PAHs on DNA transfer in natural environments.

  11. Improvement of in vivo transfer of plasmid DNA in muscle : Comparison of electroporation versus ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusumanto, Yoka H.; Mulder, Nanno H.; Dam, Wendy A.; Losen, Mario H.; Meijer, Coby; Hospers, Geke A. P.

    Plasmid-based gene delivery to muscle is a treatment strategy for many diseases with potential advantages above viral-based gene delivery methods, however, with a relative low transfection efficiency. We compared two physical methods-electroporation and ultrasound-that facilitate DNA uptake into

  12. Cholesterol-conjugated supramolecular assemblies of low generations polyamidoamine dendrimers for enhanced EGFP plasmid DNA transfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golkar, Nasim; Samani, Soliman Mohammadi; Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad, E-mail: amtamadon@gmail.com [Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Aimed to prepare an enhanced gene delivery system with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, various cholesterol-conjugated derivates of low generation polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were prepared. The conjugates were characterized by TNBS assay, FTIR, and {sup 1}H-NMR spectroscopy. Self-assembly of the dendrimer conjugates (G1-Chol, G2-Chol, and G3-Chol) was investigated by pyrene assay. Following formation of the complexes between enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid and the dendrimer conjugates at various N (primary amine)/P (phosphate) mole ratios, plasmid condensation, biologic stability, cytotoxicity, and protein expression were investigated. The conjugates self-assembled into micellar dispersions with the critical micelle concentration values (<50 µg/ml) depending on the dendrimer generation and cholesterol/amine mole ratio. Cholesterol conjugation resulted in higher resistance of the condensed plasmid DNA in a competition assay with heparin sulfate. Also, the transfection efficiency was determined higher for the cholesterol conjugates than unmodified dendrimers in HepG2 cells, showing the highest for G2-Chol at 40 % degree of cholesterol modification (G2-Chol{sub 40 %}) among various dendrimer generations. Interestingly, such conjugate showed a complete protection of plasmid against serum nucleases. Our results confirmed that the cholesterol conjugation to PAMAM dendrimers of low generations bearing little cytotoxicity improves their several physicochemical and biological characteristics required for an enhanced delivery of plasmid DNA into cells.

  13. Size and Base Composition of RNA in Supercoiled Plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter H.; Boyer, Herbert W.; Helinski, Donald R.

    1973-01-01

    The average size and base composition of the covalently integrated RNA segment in supercoiled ColE1 DNA synthesized in Escherichia coli in the presence of chloramphenicol (CM-ColE1 DNA) have been determined by two independent methods. The two approaches yielded similar results, indicating that the RNA segment in CM-ColE1 DNA contains GMP at the 5′ end and comprises on the average 25 to 26 ribonucleotides with a base composition of 10-11 G, 3 A, 5-6 C, and 6-7 U. PMID:4359488

  14. Persistence of plasmid DNA in different soils | Kandhavelu | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural genetic transformation is believed to be the essential mechanism for the attainment of genetic plasticity in many species of bacteria. Dying cells are likely to release naked DNA that may survive for many hours. Although numerous studies have shown that horizontal gene transfer between distantly related genera, but ...

  15. Intrathecal injection of naked plasmid DNA provides long-term expression of secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Travis S; Langer, Stephen J; Johnson, Kirk W; Chavez, Raymond A; Watkins, Linda R; Milligan, Erin D; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic benefit has been reported to result from intrathecal (i.t.) injection of transgene vectors, including naked DNA. However, most studies using naked DNA have measured only the transgene expression of intracellular proteins. Here we demonstrate that i.t. injection of naked DNA can result in long-term expression of secreted proteins. Plasmids expressing either secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) or human interleukin-10 (hIL-10) were injected into the i.t. space in rats, and transgene products were repeatedly measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Both SEAP and hIL-10 were maximal at 1 and 2 days after the injection and still detectable at 4 months. The utilization of a plasmid having two features that are hypothesized to increase gene expression (matrix attachment regions (MARs) and lack of CpG dinucleotides) resulted in a significant increase in gene expression. Reinjection of SEAP or hIL-10 plasmids after 4 months significantly increased protein levels at 1 and 14 days after the reinjection. SEAP was uniformly distributed between the DNA delivery site (approximately vertebral level T13) and the lumbar puncture site (L5/L6 inter-vertebral space), was reduced at the cisterna magna, and was detectable, though at much lower levels, in serum. These data suggest that naked DNA has the potential to be used as a therapeutic tool for applications that require long-term release of transgenes into the CSF.

  16. Evaluation of the effect of non-B DNA structures on plasmid integrity via accelerated stability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, S C; Monteiro, G A; Prazeres, D M F

    2009-04-01

    Plasmid biopharmaceuticals are a new class of medicines with an enormous potential. Attempts to increase the physical stability of highly purified supercoiled (SC) plasmid DNA in pharmaceutical aqueous solutions have relied on: (i) changing the DNA sequence, (ii) improving manufacturing to reduce deleterious impurities and initial DNA damage, and (iii) controlling the storage medium characteristics. In this work we analyzed the role of secondary structures on the degradation of plasmid molecules. Accelerated stability experiments were performed with SC, open circular (OC) and linear (L) isoforms of three plasmids which differed only in the "single-strandlike" content of their polyadenylation (poly A) signals. We have proved that the presence of more altered or interrupted (non-B) DNA secondary structures did not directly translate into an easier strand scission of the SC isoforms. Rather, those unusual structures imposed a lower degree of SC in the plasmids, leading to an increase in their resistance to thermal degradation. However, this behavior was reversed when the relaxed or L isoforms were tested, in which case the absence of SC rendered the plasmids essentially double-stranded. Overall, this work suggests that plasmid DNA sequence and secondary structures should be taken into account in future investigations of plasmid stability during prolonged storage.

  17. Tissue-specific Calibration of Real-time PCR Facilitates Absolute Quantification of Plasmid DNA in Biodistribution Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan K Ho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the tissue distribution of plasmid DNA after administration of nonviral gene delivery systems is best accomplished using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, although published strategies do not allow determination of the absolute mass of plasmid delivered to different tissues. Generally, data is expressed as the mass of plasmid relative to the mass of genomic DNA (gDNA in the sample. This strategy is adequate for comparisons of efficiency of delivery to a single site but it does not allow direct comparison of delivery to multiple tissues, as the mass of gDNA extracted per unit mass of each tissue is different. We show here that by constructing qPCR standard curves for each tissue it is possible to determine the dose of intact plasmid remaining in each tissue, which is a more useful parameter when comparing the fates of different formulations of DNA. We exemplify the use of this tissue-specific qPCR method by comparing the delivery of naked DNA, cationic DNA complexes, and neutral PEGylated DNA complexes after intramuscular injection. Generally, larger masses of intact plasmid were present 24 hours after injection of DNA complexes, and neutral complexes resulted in delivery of a larger mass of intact plasmid to the spleen.

  18. Virus-sized self-assembling lamellar complexes between plasmid DNA and cationic micelles promote gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitard, Bruno; Aguerre, Olivier; Airiau, Marc; Lachagès, Anne-Marie; Boukhnikachvili, Tsiala; Byk, Gérardo; Dubertret, Catherine; Herviou, Christian; Scherman, Daniel; Mayaux, Jean-François; Crouzet, Joël

    1997-01-01

    Gene therapy is based on the vectorization of genes to target cells and their subsequent expression. Cationic amphiphile-mediated delivery of plasmid DNA is the nonviral gene transfer method most often used. We examined the supramolecular structure of lipopolyamine/plasmid DNA complexes under various condensing conditions. Plasmid DNA complexation with lipopolyamine micelles whose mean diameter was 5 nm revealed three domains, depending on the lipopolyamine/plasmid DNA ratio. These domains respectively corresponded to negatively, neutrally, and positively charged complexes. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray scattering experiments on complexes originating from these three domains showed that although their morphology depends on the lipopolyamine/plasmid DNA ratio, their particle structure consists of ordered domains characterized by even spacing of 80 Å, irrespective of the lipid/DNA ratio. The most active lipopolyamine/DNA complexes for gene transfer were positively charged. They were characterized by fully condensed DNA inside spherical particles (diameter: 50 nm) sandwiched between lipid bilayers. These results show that supercoiled plasmid DNA is able to transform lipopolyamine micelles into a supramolecular organization characterized by ordered lamellar domains. PMID:9405626

  19. Solid lipid nanoparticles mediate non-viral delivery of plasmid DNA to dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penumarthi, Alekhya; Parashar, Deepti; Abraham, Amanda N.; Dekiwadia, Chaitali; Macreadie, Ian; Shukla, Ravi; Smooker, Peter M.

    2017-06-01

    There is an increasing demand for novel DNA vaccine delivery systems, mainly for the non-viral type as they are considered relatively safe. Therefore, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were investigated for their suitability as a non-viral DNA vaccine delivery system. SLNs were synthesised by a modified solvent-emulsification method in order to study their potential to conjugate with plasmid DNA and deliver them in vitro to dendritic cells using eGFP as the reporter plasmid. The DNA-SLN complexes were characterised by electron microscopy, gel retardation assays and dynamic light scattering. The cytotoxicity assay data supported their biocompatibility and was used to estimate safe threshold concentration resulting in high transfection rate. The transfection efficiency of these complexes in a dendritic cell line was shown to increase significantly compared to plasmid alone, and was comparable to that mediated by lipofectamine. Transmission electron microscopy studies delineated the pathway of cellular uptake. Endosomal escape was observed supporting the mechanism of transfection.

  20. Fluoride enhances transfection activity of carbonate apatite by increasing cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, E.H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA is enhanced by fluoride incorporation into carbonate apatite carrier. → Fluoridated carbonate apatite promotes a robust increase in transgene expression. → Controlled dissolution of fluoridated carbonate apatite in endosomal acidic environment might buffer the endosomes and prevent degradation of the released DNA. -- Abstract: Intracellular delivery of a functional gene or a nucleic acid sequence to specifically knockdown a harmful gene is a potential approach to precisely treat a critical human disease. The intensive efforts in the last few decades led to the development of a number of viral and non-viral synthetic vectors. However, an ideal delivery tool in terms of the safety and efficacy has yet to be established. Recently, we have developed pH-sensing inorganic nanocrystals of carbonate apatite for efficient and cell-targeted delivery of gene and gene-silencing RNA. Here we show that addition of very low level of fluoride to the particle-forming medium facilitates a robust increase in transgene expression following post-incubation of the particles with HeLa cells. Confocal microscopic observation and Southern blotting prove the cytoplasmic existence of plasmid DNA delivered by likely formed fluoridated carbonate apatite particles while degradation of plasmid DNA presumably by cytoplasmic nucleases was noticed following delivery with apatite particles alone. The beneficial role of fluoride in enhancing carbonate apatite-mediated gene expression might be due to the buffering potential of generated fluoridated apatite in endosomal acidic environment, thereby increasing the half-life of delivered plasmid DNA.

  1. Fluoride enhances transfection activity of carbonate apatite by increasing cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, E.H., E-mail: md.ezharul.hoque@med.monash.edu.my [Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Sunway Campus, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA is enhanced by fluoride incorporation into carbonate apatite carrier. {yields} Fluoridated carbonate apatite promotes a robust increase in transgene expression. {yields} Controlled dissolution of fluoridated carbonate apatite in endosomal acidic environment might buffer the endosomes and prevent degradation of the released DNA. -- Abstract: Intracellular delivery of a functional gene or a nucleic acid sequence to specifically knockdown a harmful gene is a potential approach to precisely treat a critical human disease. The intensive efforts in the last few decades led to the development of a number of viral and non-viral synthetic vectors. However, an ideal delivery tool in terms of the safety and efficacy has yet to be established. Recently, we have developed pH-sensing inorganic nanocrystals of carbonate apatite for efficient and cell-targeted delivery of gene and gene-silencing RNA. Here we show that addition of very low level of fluoride to the particle-forming medium facilitates a robust increase in transgene expression following post-incubation of the particles with HeLa cells. Confocal microscopic observation and Southern blotting prove the cytoplasmic existence of plasmid DNA delivered by likely formed fluoridated carbonate apatite particles while degradation of plasmid DNA presumably by cytoplasmic nucleases was noticed following delivery with apatite particles alone. The beneficial role of fluoride in enhancing carbonate apatite-mediated gene expression might be due to the buffering potential of generated fluoridated apatite in endosomal acidic environment, thereby increasing the half-life of delivered plasmid DNA.

  2. Resistance to nitrofurantoin and UV-irradiation in recA; uvrA; and uvrA, lexA, Escherichia coli mutants conferred by an R-plasmid from an Escherichia coli clinical isolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obaseiki-Ebor, E.E. (Univ. of Benin, Benin City (Nigeria). Faculty of Pharmacy, Dept. of Pharmaceutical Microbiology)

    1984-01-01

    There have been some reports of R-plasmids conferring nitrofuran resistance by decreasing the reduction of nitrofurantoin. The mechanism by which these R-plasmids mediate nitrofurantoin resistance is still not properly understood. Since DNA repair mutants are very sensitive to nitrofurantoin, it was therefore of interest to see whether R-plasmids conferring nitrofurantoin resistance affected the nitrofurantoin sensitivity of recA; uvrA and uvrA, lexA strains of E. coli K-12. Protection against UV-irradiation was also estimated. The experiments showed that the nitrofurantoin resistance conferred by R-plasmid pBN105 was not due to defective nitrofurantoin reduction or altered permeability of the cell. Because it is known that repair-deficient bacteria have increased susceptibility to nitrofurantoin, it may be suggested that the mechanisms of UV and nitrofurantoin protection conferred by pBN105 to the DNA repair mutant strains are related.

  3. Resistance to nitrofurantoin and UV-irradiation in recA; uvrA; and uvrA, lexA, Escherichia coli mutants conferred by an R-plasmid from an Escherichia coli clinical isolate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obaseiki-Ebor, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    There have been some reports of R-plasmids conferring nitrofuran resistance by decreasing the reduction of nitrofurantoin. The mechanism by which these R-plasmids mediate nitrofurantoin resistance is still not properly understood. Since DNA repair mutants are very sensitive to nitrofurantoin, it was therefore of interest to see whether R-plasmids conferring nitrofurantoin resistance affected the nitrofurantoin sensitivity of recA; uvrA and uvrA, lexA strains of E. coli K-12. Protection against UV-irradiation was also estimated. The experiments showed that the nitrofurantoin resistance conferred by R-plasmid pBN105 was not due to defective nitrofurantoin reduction or altered permeability of the cell. Because it is known that repair-deficient bacteria have increased susceptibility to nitrofurantoin, it may be suggested that the mechanisms of UV and nitrofurantoin protection conferred by pBN105 to the DNA repair mutant strains are related. (Auth.)

  4. Dichromatic laser radiation effects on DNA of Escherichia coli and plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, W. A.; Polignano, G. A. C.; Guimarães, O. R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Dichromatic and consecutive laser radiations have attracted increased attention for clinical applications as offering new tools for the treatment of dysfunctional tissues in situations where monochromatic radiation is not effective. This work evaluated the survival, filamentation and morphology of Escherichia coli cells, and the induction of DNA lesions, in plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity consecutive dichromatic laser radiation. Exponential and stationary wild type and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein deficient E. coli cultures were exposed to consecutive low-intensity dichromatic laser radiation (infrared laser immediately after red laser) to study the survival, filamentation and morphology of bacterial cells. Plasmid DNA samples were exposed to dichromatic radiation to study DNA lesions by electrophoretic profile. Dichromatic laser radiation affects the survival, filamentation and morphology of E. coli cultures depending on the growth phase and the functional repair mechanism of oxidizing lesions in DNA, but does not induce single/double strands breaks or alkali-labile DNA lesions. Results show that low-intensity consecutive dichromatic laser radiation induces biological effects that differ from those induced by monochromatic laser radiation, suggesting that other therapeutic effects could be obtained using dichromatic radiation.

  5. Design of expanded bed supports for the recovery of plasmid DNA by anion exchange adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theodossiou, Irini; Søndergaard, M.; Thomas, Owen R. T.

    2001-01-01

    In this study we detail the rational design of new chromatographic adsorbents tailored for the capture of plasmid DNA. Features present on current chromatographic supports that can significantly enhance plasmid binding capacity have been identified in packed bed chromatography experiments...... and blueprints for improved expanded bed adsorbents have been put forward. The characterisation and testing of small (20-40 mum) high density (>3.7 g cm(-3)) pellicular expanded bed materials functionalised with various anion exchange structures is presented. In studies with calf thymus DNA, dynamic binding...... capacities of 1.2 and 3.4 mg ml(-1) were recorded for prototype diethylaminoethyl-and polyethylene imine-linked adsorbents which were respectively 25 and 70 fold higher than those of equivalently derivatised commercial expanded bed materials. The prototype polyethylene imine-coupled material exhibited severe...

  6. Strand breaks in plasmid DNA following positional changes of Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Kassis, A.I.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of our studies is to elucidate the kinetics of DNA strand breaks caused by low-energy Auger electron emitters in close proximity to DNA. Previously we have studied the DNA break yields in plasmids after the decay of indium-111 bound to DNA or free in solution. In this work, we compare the DNA break yields in supercoiled DNA of iodine-125 decaying close to DNA following DNA intercalation, minor-groove binding, or surface binding, and at a distance form DNA. Supercoiled DNA, stored at 4 C to accumulate radiation dose from the decay of 125 I, was then resolved by gel electrophoresis into supercoiled, nicked circular, and linear forms, representing undamaged DNA, single-strand breaks, and double-strand breaks respectively. DNA-intercalated or groove-bound 125 I is more effective than surface-bound radionuclide or 125 I free in solution. The hydroxyl radical scavenger DMSO protects against damage by 125 I free in solution but has minimal effect on damage by groove-bound 125 I. (orig.)

  7. Exponential Megapriming PCR (EMP) Cloning—Seamless DNA Insertion into Any Target Plasmid without Sequence Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Alexander; Andersen, Kasper R.; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP) cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF) cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts. PMID:23300917

  8. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning--seamless DNA insertion into any target plasmid without sequence constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ulrich

    Full Text Available We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts.

  9. Plasmid DNA loaded chitosan nanoparticles for nasal mucosal immunization against hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Kapil; Goyal, Amit K; Gupta, Prem N; Mishra, Neeraj; Vyas, Suresh P

    2008-04-16

    This work investigates the preparation and in vivo efficacy of plasmid DNA loaded chitosan nanoparticles for nasal mucosal immunization against hepatitis B. Chitosan pDNA nanoparticles were prepared using a complex coacervation process. Prepared nanoparticles were characterized for size, shape, surface charge, plasmid loading and ability of nanoparticles to protect DNA against nuclease digestion and for their transfection efficacy. Nasal administration of nanoparticles resulted in serum anti-HBsAg titre that was less compared to that elicited by naked DNA and alum adsorbed HBsAg, but the mice were seroprotective within 2 weeks and the immunoglobulin level was above the clinically protective level. However, intramuscular administration of naked DNA and alum adsorbed HBsAg did not elicit sIgA titre in mucosal secretions that was induced by nasal immunization with chitosan nanoparticles. Similarly, cellular responses (cytokine levels) were poor in case of alum adsorbed HBsAg. Chitosan nanoparticles thus produced humoral (both systemic and mucosal) and cellular immune responses upon nasal administration. The study signifies the potential of chitosan nanoparticles as DNA vaccine carrier and adjuvant for effective immunization through non-invasive nasal route.

  10. Isolation/separation of plasmid DNA using hemoglobin modified magnetic nanocomposites as solid-phase adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu-Wei; Mao, Quan-Xing; Liu, Jia-Wei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2012-10-15

    Hemoglobin (Hb) modified magnetic nanocomposites are prepared by immobilization of Hb onto the surface of amino-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) magnetic nanoparticles via covalent bonding with glutaraldehyde as cross-linker. The obtained nanocomposites are characterized with FT-IR, SEM, XRD and surface charge analysis. A direct solid-phase extraction procedure for the isolation/separation of plasmid DNA using this nanocomposite as a novel adsorbent is thus developed. Some important experimental parameters governing the sorption efficiency, i.e., the pH of sample solution and the ionic strength, are investigated. The Hb modified magnetic nanocomposites provide a sorption capacity of 27.86 mg g(-1) for DNA. By using 2.0mg of the nanocomposites as sorption medium and a suitable acidity of pH 6.1, a sorption efficiency of 93% is achieved for 25 μg mL(-1) of DNA in 1.0 mL of sample solution. Afterwards, the absorbed DNA could be readily recovered by using 1.0 mL of Tris-HCl buffer (pH 8.9, 0.01 mol L(-1)), giving rise to a recovery of ca. 68.3%. The present solid-phased extraction protocol is applied for the isolation of plasmid DNA from Escherichia coli culture, resulting in comparable yield and purity of plasmid DNA with respect to those obtained by using commercial kits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemical and biological consequences of the radioactive decay of iodine-125 in plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linz, U.

    1983-09-01

    The consequences of the decay of iodine-125 incorporated into DNA were studied on a molecular basis. Doubly ( 14 C and 125 I) labelled 5-iodo-2'-deoxycytidine 5'-triphosphate (IdCTP) was synthesized and incorporated enzymatically into the SalI-cutting site of the plasmid pBR 322. Part of the radioiodinated DNA was treated with T4-DNA ligase in order to restore the circular structure of the native plasmid molecule. After 4 months of storage under various conditions the stable end products were analyzed by radio GC, radio HPLC and electron microscopy. The experiments were not only carried out with doubly-labelled DNA but also with solutions of 14 C-labelled DNA containing Na 125 I as internal radiation source. The results clearly indicate that radiolysis alone causes only minor damage. Transmutation of the covalently bound iodine, on the other hand, leads to complete destruction of the labelled nucleotide, giving rise to 14 CO 2 and 14 CO as main products. The production of 14 CO 2 which originates from both the base as well as the sugar component shows a strong solvent effect. The electron microscopy analysis of the DNA reveals that the local effects are always connected with at least one double strand break directly at the site of decay. In addition, one finds DNA double strand breaks in areas which are hundreds of base pairs apart from that site. Under certain circumstances most of the DNA molecules exhibit up to 10 breaks. A comparison between ligase-treated and untreated DNA shows that the configuration of the DNA and the position of the labelled nucleotide play in important role in the extent of the overall damage. It could be demonstrated that there is a linear correlation between gaseous fragmentation products and the number of double strand breaks. (orig./MG) [de

  12. Replication of each copy of the yeast 2 micron DNA plasmid occurs during the S phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakian, V A; Brewer, B J; Fangman, W L

    1979-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains 50-100 copies per cell of a circular plasmid called 2 micron DNA. Replication of this DNA was studied in two ways. The distribution of replication events among 2 micron DNA molecules was examined by density transfer experiments with asynchronous cultures. The data show that 2 micron DNA replication is similar to chromosomal DNA replication: essentially all 2 micron duplexes were of hybrid density at one cell doubling after the density transfer, with the majority having one fully dense strand and one fully light strand. The results show that replication of 2 micron DNA occurs by a semiconservative mechanism where each of the plasmid molecules replicates once each cell cycle. 2 micron DNA is the only known example of a multiple-copy, extrachromosomal DNA in which every molecule replicates in each cell cycle. Quantitative analysis of the data indicates that 2 micron DNA replication is limited to a fraction of the cell cycle. The period in the cell cycle when 2 micron DNA replicates was examined directly with synchronous cell cultures. Synchronization was accomplished by sequentially arresting cells in G1 phase using the yeast pheromone alpha-factor and incubating at the restrictive temperature for a cell cycle (cdc 7) mutant. Replication was monitored by adding 3H-uracil to cells previously labeled with 14C-uracil, and determining the 3H/14C ratio for purified DNA species. 2 micron DNA replication did not occur during the G1 arrest periods. However, the population of 2 micron DNA doubled during the synchronous S phase at the permissive temperature, with most of the replication occurring in the first third of S phase. Our results indicate that a mechanism exists which insures that the origin of replication of each 2 micron DNA molecule is activated each S phase. As with chromosomal DNA, further activation is prevented until the next cell cycle. We propose that the mechanism which controls the replication initiation of each 2 micron DNA

  13. The effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on the induction of DNA strand breaks in plasmid DNA and colony formation of PC Cl3 mammalian cells by alpha-, beta-, and Auger electron emitters (223)Ra, (188)Re, and (99m)Tc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Roswitha; Oehme, Liane; Kotzerke, Jörg; Freudenberg, Robert

    2016-12-01

    DNA damage occurs as a consequence of both direct and indirect effects of ionizing radiation. The severity of DNA damage depends on the physical characteristics of the radiation quality, e.g., the linear energy transfer (LET). There are still contrary findings regarding direct or indirect interactions of high-LET emitters with DNA. Our aim is to determine DNA damage and the effect on cellular survival induced by (223)Ra compared to (188)Re and (99m)Tc modulated by the radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Radioactive solutions of (223)Ra, (188)Re, or (99m)Tc were added to either plasmid DNA or to PC Cl3 cells in the absence or presence of DMSO. Following irradiation, single strand breaks (SSB) and double strand breaks (DSB) in plasmid DNA were analyzed by gel electrophoresis. To determine the radiosensitivity of the rat thyroid cell line (PC Cl3), survival curves were performed using the colony formation assay. Exposure to 120 Gy of (223)Ra, (188)Re, or (99m)Tc leads to maximal yields of SSB (80 %) in plasmid DNA. Irradiation with 540 Gy (223)Ra and 500 Gy (188)Re or (99m)Tc induced 40, 28, and 64 % linear plasmid conformations, respectively. DMSO prevented the SSB and DSB in a similar way for all radionuclides. However, with the α-emitter (223)Ra, a low level of DSB could not be prevented by DMSO. Irradiation of PC Cl3 cells with (223)Ra, (188)Re, and (99m)Tc pre-incubated with DMSO revealed enhanced survival fractions (SF) in comparison to treatment without DMSO. Protection factors (PF) were calculated using the fitted survival curves. These factors are 1.23 ± 0.04, 1.20 ± 0.19, and 1.34 ± 0.05 for (223)Ra, (188)Re, and (99m)Tc, respectively. For (223)Ra, as well as for (188)Re and (99m)Tc, dose-dependent radiation effects were found applicable for plasmid DNA and PC Cl3 cells. The radioprotection by DMSO was in the same range for high- and low-LET emitter. Overall, the results indicate the contribution of mainly indirect radiation

  14. Very low-energy and low-fluence ion beam bombardment of naked plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norarat, R.; Semsang, N.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L.D.

    2009-01-01

    Ion beam bombardment of biological organisms has been recently applied to mutation breeding of both agricultural and horticultural plants. In order to explore relevant mechanisms, this study employed low-energy ion beams to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The study aimed at simulation of the final stage of the process of the ion beam bombardment of real cells to check whether and how very low-energy and low-fluence of ions can induce mutation. Argon and nitrogen ions at 5 keV and 2.5 keV respectively bombarded naked plasmid DNA pGFP to very low-fluences, an order of 10 13 ions/cm 2 . Subsequently, DNA states were analyzed using electrophoresis. Results provided evidences that the very low-energy and low-fluence ion bombardment indeed altered the DNA structure from supercoil to short linear fragments through multiple double strand breaks and thus induced mutation, which was confirmed by transfer of the bombarded DNA into bacteria Escherichia coli and subsequent expression of the marker gene.

  15. Antibacterial effect of cationic porphyrazines and anionic phthalocyanine and their interaction with plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Leila; Hakimian, Fatemeh; Safaei, Elham; Fazeli, Zahra

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is a public health issue and identification of new antibacterial agents is one of the most important goals of pharmacological research. Among the novel developed antibacterial agents, porphyrin complexes and their derivatives are ideal candidates for use in medical applications. Phthalocyanines differ from porphyrins by having nitrogen atoms link the individual pyrrol units. The aza analogues of the phthalocyanines (azaPcs) such as tetramethylmetalloporphyrazines are heterocyclic Pc analogues. In this investigation, interaction of an anionic phthalocyanine (Cu(PcTs)) and two cationic tetrapyridinoporphyrazines including [Cu(2,3-tmtppa)]4+ and [Cu(3,4-tmtppa)]4+ complexes with plasmid DNA was studied using spectroscopic and gel electrophoresis methods. In addition, antibacterial effect of the complexes against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria was investigated using dilution test method. The results indicated that both porphyrazines have significant antibacterial properties, but Cu(PcTs) has weak antibacterial effect. Compairing the binding of the phthalocyanine and the porphyrazines to DNA demonstrated that the interaction of cationic porphyrazines is stronger than the anionic phthalocyanine remarkably. The extent of hypochromicity and red shift of absorption spectra indicated preferential intercalation of the two porphyrazine into the base pairs of DNA helix. Gel electrophoresis result implied Cu(2,3-tmtppa) and Cu(3,4-tmtppa) are able to perform cleavage of the plasmid DNA. Consequently, DNA binding and cleavage might be one of the antibacterial mechanisms of the complexes.

  16. Lipofection of plasmid DNA into human mast cell lines using lipid nanoparticles generated by microfluidic mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguay, Brett A; Huang, Kate Wei-Chen; Kulka, Marianna

    2018-04-18

    Mast cells are important immune cells that have significant roles in mediating allergy and asthma. Therefore, studying the molecular mechanisms regulating these and other processes in mast cells is important to elucidate. Methods such as lipofection, transduction, and electroporation are often employed to dissect these mechanisms by disrupting gene expression in mast cell lines. However, as with other leukocytes, human mast cells (HMCs) are often refractory to the delivery of plasmids by lipofection. In this study, we investigated the utility of lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) containing the ionizable cationic lipids 1,2-dioleoyloxy-3-dimethylaminopropane, 1,2-dioleyloxy-3-dimethylaminopropane, or 2,2-dilinoleyl-4-(2-dimethylaminoethyl)-[1,3]-dioxolane for the delivery of plasmid DNA into HMC lines. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time the use of LNPs to achieve significant and reproducible levels of plasmid DNA transfection in HMC-1.2 and laboratory of allergic diseases 2 (LAD2) cells. These levels reached 53.2% and 16.0% in HMC-1.2 and LAD2 cells, respectively; and outperformed Lipofectamine 3000 in both cases. Moreover, cell viability in the transfected cells remained above 65% for all LNP conditions tested. Together, these observations illustrate the efficacy of this technique for mast cell researchers and further support the use of LNPs for nucleic acid delivery into leukocytes. ©2018 Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  17. Gene Transfer into the Lung by Nanoparticle Dextran-Spermine/Plasmid DNA Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahril Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel cationic polymer, dextran-spermine (D-SPM, has been found to mediate gene expression in a wide variety of cell lines and in vivo through systemic delivery. Here, we extended the observations by determining the optimal conditions for gene expression of D-SPM/plasmid DNA (D-SPM/pDNA in cell lines and in the lungs of BALB/c mice via instillation delivery. In vitro studies showed that D-SPM could partially protect pDNA from degradation by nuclease and exhibited optimal gene transfer efficiency at D-SPM to pDNA weight-mixing ratio of 12. In the lungs of mice, the levels of gene expression generated by D-SPM/pDNA are highly dependent on the weight-mixing ratio of D-SPM to pDNA, amount of pDNA in the complex, and the assay time postdelivery. Readministration of the complex at day 1 following the first dosing showed no significant effect on the retention and duration of gene expression. The study also showed that there was a clear trend of increasing size of the complexes as the amount of pDNA was increased, where the sizes of the D-SPM/pDNA complexes were within the nanometer range.

  18. Initiation and termination of the bacteriophage phi X174 rolling circle DNA replication in vivo: packaging of plasmid single-stranded DNA into bacteriophage phi X174 coats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ende, A.; Teertstra, R.; Weisbeek, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    The bacteriophage phi X174 viral (+) origin when inserted in a plasmid can interact in vivo with the A protein produced by infecting phi X174 phages. A consequence of this interaction is packaging of single-stranded plasmid DNA into preformed phage coats resulting in infective particles (1). This

  19. Construction of recombinant plasmid pIRESEgr-IFN γ and its expression in Lewis lung carcinoma induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wei; Li Xiuyi; Gong Shouliang; Sun Ting; Gong Pingsheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To construct the recombinant plasmid pIRESEgr-IFN γ and detect its expression in Lewis lung carcinoma induced by irradiation in vitro. Methods: The recombinant plasmid pIRESEgr-IFN γ containing Egr-1 promoter and IFN γ gene was constructed with gene recombinant technique. The plasmid was transferred into Lewis lung carcinoma by liposome in vitro. The correlations of dose- and time-effects in the expression of IFN γ gene induced by X-ray were detected by ELISA. Results: The identification with enzymes proved that Egr-1 promoter and IFN γ gene were inserted into vector pIRESlneo correctly. After X-ray irradiation with different doses, the expression of IFN γ in the supernatant of Lewis lung carcinoma transfected by pIRESEgr-IFN γ was significantly higher than that in 0 Gy group (P<0.001). After 5 Gy X-ray irradiation, the expression of IFN γ was the highest, being 4.39 times as much as that in 0 Gy group. The expression of IFN γ in the supernatant increased after 5 Gy X-ray irradiation, being 6.27 times as much as that in 0 h group 36 h after irradiation. Conclusion: The recombinant plasmid pIRESEgr-IFN γ is constructed successfully, and it has the property of enhancing the expression of IFN γ gene induced by irradiation. (authors)

  20. DNA damage induced by radionuclide internal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Fengmei; Zhao Jingyong; Hong Chengjiao; Lao Qinhua; Wang Liuyi; Yang Shuqin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the DNA damage of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) in rats exposed to radionuclide internal irradiation. Methods: The radionuclides were injected into the rats and single cell get electrophoresis (SCGE) was performed to detect the length of DNA migration in the rat PBMC. Results: DNA migration in the rat PBMC increased with accumulative dose or dose-rate. It showed good relationship of dose vs. response and of dose-rate vs. response, both relationship could be described as linear models. Conclusion: Radionuclide internal irradiation could cause DNA damage in rat PBMC. (authors)

  1. Effects of 32 P incorporated in plasmid DNA: strand breaks and mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Adenilson de S. da; Felzenszwalb, Israel

    1996-01-01

    In order to study the 32 P decay effects in DNA, bacterial plasmid were labeled with different activities of the radioisotope in vivo: 1,2 and 6 x 10 5 Bk/ml of bacterial culture, leading to 1,2 and 6 x 10 3 Bk/μg of nucleic acid or in vitro: 0.7, 1.5 and 3.5 x 10 3 Bk/μg of nucleic acid, stored at -20 deg C and its electroforetic profiles, transformation capacity of wild type and DNA repair. E. coli mutants cells and mutagenesis, were followed during three months. The results achieved in this work suggest that: the decay of the incorporated 32 P in vivo is able to change the pBR322 electroforetic profile, we detected a decrease on the form III (super coiled) and increase on the form II (circular), indicating single strands breaks; the decay incorporated 32 in vitro does not modify the electrophoretic profile of pBR322, suggesting that in some way the effects of the radioactive decay of incorporated 32 P is dependent of the DNA topology, the damages induced by 32 P decay increase mutation frequency in pAC189 plasmids. MRF is increased by a factor of three after 6 t 1/2 of storage, indicating direct or indirect action through mismatch DNA repair pathway. (author)

  2. Effect of low energy electron irradiation on DNA damage by Cu{sup 2+} ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyung Ah; Cho, Hyuck [Dept. of Physics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yeun Soo [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The combined effect of the low energy electron (LEE) irradiation and Cu{sup 2+} ion on DNA damage was investigated. Lyophilized pBR322 plasmid DNA films with various concentrations (1–15 mM) of Cu{sup 2+} ion were independently irradiated by monochromatic LEEs with 5 eV. The types of DNA damage, single strand break (SSB) and double strand break (DSB), were separated and quantified by gel electrophoresis. Without electron irradiation, DNA damage was slightly increased with increasing Cu ion concentration via Fenton reaction. LEE-induced DNA damage, with no Cu ion, was only 6.6% via dissociative electron attachment (DEA) process. However, DNA damage was significantly increased through the combined effect of LEE-irradiation and Cu ion, except around 9 mM Cu ion. The possible pathways of DNA damage for each of these different cases were suggested. The combined effect of LEE-irradiation and Cu ion is likely to cause increasing dissociation after elevated transient negative ion state, resulting in the enhanced DNA damage. For the decrease of DNA damage at around 9-mM Cu ion, it is assumed to be related to the structural stabilization due to DNA inter- and intra-crosslinks via Cu ion.

  3. Use of Ti plasmid DNA probes for determining tumorigenicity of agrobacterium strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, T.J.; Norelli, J.L.; Katz, B.H.; Bishop, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Probes consisting of T-DNA genes from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used for determining tumorigenicity of strains. Two 32 P-labeled probes hybridized with 28 of 28 tumorigenic strains of the pathogen but not with 20 of 22 nontumorigenic strains. One probe, pTHE17, consists of all but the far left portion of the T-DNA of strain C58. Probe SmaI7 consists of SmaI fragment 7 of pTiC58, including onc genes 1, 4, and 6a and most of 2. Another probe, pAL4044, consisting of the vir region of strain Ach-5, hybridized with several nontumorigenic as well as tumorigenic strains. Colony hybridizations were done with 28 tumorigenic and 22 nontumorigenic Agrobacterium strains. About 10 6 CFU of the different tumorigenic strains were detectable with this method. Southern analyses confirmed the presence or absence of Ti plasmids in strains for which tumorigenicity was questioned. Colony hybridization with the T-DNA probes provides a rapid and sensitive means for determining the tumorigenic nature of Agrobacterium strains

  4. Aqueous extract of Pinus caribaea inhibits the damage induced by ultraviolet radiations, in plasmid DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marioly Vernhes Tamayo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Context: The incidence of solar ultraviolet radiation (UV on Earth has increased due to diminish of the ozone layer. This enviromental agent is highly genotoxic causing numerous damage in DNA molecule. Nowadays there is a growing interest in the search of compounds capable to minimize these effects. In particular, phytocompounds have been tested as excelent candidates for their antigenotoxic properties. Aims: To evaluate the protective effect of the aqueous extract of Pinus caribaea (EPC against the damage induced by the UVB and UVC radiation. Methods: The cell-free plasmid DNA assay was employed. The forms of plasmid were separated electrophoretically in agarose gel. For genotoxic and photoprotective evaluation of P. caribaea, different concentrations of the extract (0.1 – 2.0 mg/mL and exposure times were evaluated. The CPD lesions were detected enzymatically. Additionally, the transmittance of the aqueous extract against 254 nm and 312 nm was measured. Results: None of the concentrations were genotoxic in 30 min of treatment, for superior times a clastogenic effect was observed. The EPC despite inhibiting the activity of the enzyme T4 endo V, impedes photolesions formation in DNA at concentrations ≥ 0.1 mg/mL. Conclusions: The EPC has photoprotective properties, this effect could be related with its antioxidants and absorptives capacities.

  5. Immunization with plasmid DNA encoding the hemagglutinin and the nucleoprotein confers robust protection against a lethal canine distemper virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Lotte; Jensen, Trine Hammer; Gottschalck, Elisabeth; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Jensen, Tove Dannemann; Nielsen, Line; Andersen, Mads Klindt; Buckland, Robin; Wild, T Fabian; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2004-09-09

    We have investigated the protective effect of immunization of a highly susceptible natural host of canine distemper virus (CDV) with DNA plasmids encoding the viral nucleoprotein (N) and hemagglutinin (H). The combined intradermal and intramuscular routes of immunization elicited high virus-neutralizing serum antibody titres in mink (Mustela vison). To mimic natural exposure, we also conducted challenge infection by horizontal transmission from infected contact animals. Other groups received a lethal challenge infection by administration to the mucosae of the respiratory tract and into the muscle. One of the mink vaccinated with N plasmid alone developed severe disease after challenge. In contrast, vaccination with the H plasmid together with the N plasmid conferred solid protection against disease and we were unable to detect CDV infection in PBMCs or in different tissues after challenge. Our findings show that DNA immunization by the combined intradermal and intramuscular routes can confer solid protective immunity against naturally transmitted morbillivirus infection and disease.

  6. Sensitivity of Vibrio cholerae cells to lethal and mutagenic effect of UV-irradiation mediated by plasmids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiganova, I.G.; Evdokimova, N.M.; Aleshkin, G.I.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of UV-irradiation on Vibrio cholerae cells and its changes mediated by the plasmid R245 have been studied. Vibrio cholerae strains 569B and RV31 have been shown to be considerably more sensitive to lethal effect of UV-irradiation as compared with Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium cells. Highly toxigenic strain 569B and practically atoxigenic strain RV31 have the same UV-sensitivity. Lethla effect of UV-irradiation on Vibrio cholerae cells is incresed when the irradiated cells are plated on enriched media. UV-induction of mutations was not registered in plasmidless strains of Vibrio cholerae. Plasmid R245 increase UV-resistance of vibrio cells and makes them UV-mutable

  7. Effect of thiol pendant conjugates on plasmid DNA binding, release, and stability of polymeric delivery vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacalocostantis, Irene; Mane, Viraj P; Kang, Michael S; Goodley, Addison S; Muro, Silvia; Kofinas, Peter

    2012-05-14

    Polymers have attracted much attention as potential gene delivery vectors due to their chemical and structural versatility. However, several challenges associated with polymeric carriers, including low transfection efficiencies, insufficient cargo release, and high cytotoxicity levels have prevented clinical implementation. Strong electrostatic interactions between polymeric carriers and DNA cargo can prohibit complete cargo release within the cell. As a result, cargo DNA never reaches the cell's nucleus where gene expression takes place. In addition, highly charged cationic polymers have been correlated with high cytotoxicity levels, making them unsuitable carriers in vivo. Using poly(allylamine) (PAA) as a model, we investigated how pH-sensitive disulfide cross-linked polymer networks can improve the delivery potential of cationic polymer carriers. To accomplish this, we conjugated thiol-terminated pendant chains onto the primary amines of PAA using 2-iminothiolane, developing three new polymer vectors with 5, 13, or 20% thiol modification. Unmodified PAA and thiol-conjugated polymers were tested for their ability to bind and release plasmid DNA, their capacity to protect genetic cargo from enzymatic degradation, and their potential for endolysosomal escape. Our results demonstrate that polymer-plasmid complexes (polyplexes) formed by the 13% thiolated polymer demonstrate the greatest delivery potential. At high N/P ratios, all thiolated polymers (but not unmodified counterparts) were able to resist decomplexation in the presence of heparin, a negatively charged polysaccharide used to mimic in vivo polyplex-protein interactions. Further, all thiolated polymers exhibited higher buffering capacities than unmodified PAA and, therefore, have a greater potential for endolysosomal escape. However, 5 and 20% thiolated polymers exhibited poor DNA binding-release kinetics, making them unsuitable carriers for gene delivery. The 13% thiolated polymers, on the other hand

  8. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) based magnetic nanoparticles for plasmid DNA purification from Escherichia coli lysate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Percin, Is Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I k [Department of Biology, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Karakoc, Veyis [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry Division, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Akgoel, Sinan [Department of Biochemistry, Ege University, Izmir (Turkey); Aksoez, Erol [Department of Biology, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Denizli, Adil, E-mail: denizli@hacettepe.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry Division, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-(L)-histidine) [PHEMAH] magnetic nanoparticles for plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification from Escherichia coli (E. coli) cell lysate. Magnetic nanoparticles were produced by surfactant free emulsion polymerization. mPHEMAH nanoparticles were characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), electron spin resonance (ESR), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Surface area, average particle size and size distribution were also performed. Specific surface area of the mPHEMAH nanoparticles was found to be 1180 m{sup 2}/g. Elemental analysis of MAH for nitrogen was estimated as 0.18 mmol/g polymer. The amount of pDNA adsorbed onto the mPHEMAH nanoparticles first increased and then reached a saturation value at around 1.0 mg/mL of pDNA concentration. Compared with the mPHEMA nanoparticles (50 {mu}g/g polymer), the pDNA adsorption capacity of the mPHEMAH nanoparticles (154 mg/g polymer) was improved significantly due to the MAH incorporation into the polymeric matrix. The maximum pDNA adsorption was achieved at 25 Degree-Sign C. The overall recovery of pDNA was calculated as 92%. The mPHEMAH nanoparticles could be used six times without decreasing the pDNA adsorption capacity significantly. The results indicate that the PHEMAH nanoparticles promise high selectivity for pDNA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic nanoparticles have several advantages over conventional adsorbents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAH acted as the pseudospecific ligand, ligand immobilization step was eliminated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer pDNA adsorption amount was 154 mg/g. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fifty-fold capacity increase was obtained when compared to conventional matrices.

  9. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) based magnetic nanoparticles for plasmid DNA purification from Escherichia coli lysate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perçin, Işık; Karakoç, Veyis; Akgöl, Sinan; Aksöz, Erol; Denizli, Adil

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-(L)-histidine) [PHEMAH] magnetic nanoparticles for plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification from Escherichia coli (E. coli) cell lysate. Magnetic nanoparticles were produced by surfactant free emulsion polymerization. mPHEMAH nanoparticles were characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), electron spin resonance (ESR), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Surface area, average particle size and size distribution were also performed. Specific surface area of the mPHEMAH nanoparticles was found to be 1180 m 2 /g. Elemental analysis of MAH for nitrogen was estimated as 0.18 mmol/g polymer. The amount of pDNA adsorbed onto the mPHEMAH nanoparticles first increased and then reached a saturation value at around 1.0 mg/mL of pDNA concentration. Compared with the mPHEMA nanoparticles (50 μg/g polymer), the pDNA adsorption capacity of the mPHEMAH nanoparticles (154 mg/g polymer) was improved significantly due to the MAH incorporation into the polymeric matrix. The maximum pDNA adsorption was achieved at 25 °C. The overall recovery of pDNA was calculated as 92%. The mPHEMAH nanoparticles could be used six times without decreasing the pDNA adsorption capacity significantly. The results indicate that the PHEMAH nanoparticles promise high selectivity for pDNA. - Highlights: ► Magnetic nanoparticles have several advantages over conventional adsorbents. ► MAH acted as the pseudospecific ligand, ligand immobilization step was eliminated. ► pDNA adsorption amount was 154 mg/g. ► Fifty-fold capacity increase was obtained when compared to conventional matrices.

  10. Effective plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA delivery to diseased human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slanina, H; Schmutzler, M; Christodoulides, M; Kim, K S; Schubert-Unkmeir, A

    2012-01-01

    Expression of exogenous DNA or small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro is significantly affected by the particular delivery system utilized. In this study, we evaluated the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA and siRNA into human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and meningioma cells, which constitute the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, a target of meningitis-causing pathogens. Chemical transfection methods and various lipofection reagents including Lipofectamin™, FuGene™, or jetPRIME®, as well as physical transfection methods and electroporation techniques were applied. To monitor the transfection efficiencies, HBMEC and meningioma cells were transfected with the reporter plasmid pTagGFP2-actin vector, and efficiency of transfection was estimated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. We established protocols based on electroporation using Cell Line Nucleofector® Kit V with the Amaxa® Nucleofector® II system from Lonza and the Neon® Transfection system from Invitrogen resulting in up to 41 and 82% green fluorescent protein-positive HBMEC, respectively. Optimal transfection solutions, pulse programs and length were evaluated. We furthermore demonstrated that lipofection is an efficient method to transfect meningioma cells with a transfection efficiency of about 81%. Finally, we applied the successful electroporation protocols to deliver synthetic siRNA to HBMEC and analyzed the role of the actin-binding protein cortactin in Neisseria meningitidis pathogenesis. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Pushko, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF. - Highlights: • The iDNA ® platform combines advantages of DNA and live attenuated vaccines. • Yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine was launched from iDNA plasmid in vitro and in vivo. • Safety of iDNA-generated 17D virus was confirmed in AG129 mice. • BALB/c mice seroconverted after a single-dose vaccination with iDNA. • YF virus-neutralizing response was elicited in iDNA-vaccinated mice

  12. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States); Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Medicine, Center for Predictive Medicine and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Pushko, Peter, E-mail: ppushko@medigen-usa.com [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF. - Highlights: • The iDNA{sup ®} platform combines advantages of DNA and live attenuated vaccines. • Yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine was launched from iDNA plasmid in vitro and in vivo. • Safety of iDNA-generated 17D virus was confirmed in AG129 mice. • BALB/c mice seroconverted after a single-dose vaccination with iDNA. • YF virus-neutralizing response was elicited in iDNA-vaccinated mice.

  13. Construction and confirmation of the plasmid of human mitochondrial DNA 4977 bp deletion induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaosui; Zhou Lijun; Wang Yuxiao; Qu Jia; Feng Jiangbing; Lu Xue; Chen Deqing; Liu Qingjie

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To construct a stable plasmid that spanning deleted human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 4977 bp induced by ionizing radiation and another one for control DNA fragment, in order to use in the human mitochondrial genome study in the future. Methods: The peripheral blood, which had no mtDNA 4977 bp deletion found in previous study, was exposed to 10 Gy 60 Co γ-rays in vitro. The total cell DNA was extracted and PCR was carried out: a nest-PCR of three-round PCR was used for the mtDNA 4977 bp deletion and one- round regular PCR was used for the control ND1 gene. The PCR products were used for transfection by electroporation and the positive clones were obtained after screening. The plasmid DNA was isolated and sequenced after enzymatic digestion and purification. The sequence result was BLASTed with the human mitochondrial genome. Results: The sizes of PCR products for the flanked 4977 bp deletion and the ND1 gene were similar with those predicted according to GeneBank. The sequences for the positive clones were above 99 per cent homologous with the human mitochondrial genome after BLASTed. Conclusion: The plasmids for deleted human mtDNA 4977 bp and control DNA fragment have been constructed successfully, and they could be used in the quality and quantity studies on human mtDNA 4977 bp deletion. (authors)

  14. Plasmid DNA transfection using magnetite cationic liposomes for construction of multilayered gene-engineered cell sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Kosuke; Kawasumi, Tamayo; Ito, Akira; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2008-05-01

    Modification of cellular functions by overexpression of genes is being increasingly practiced for tissue engineering. In the present study, we investigated whether transfection efficiency could be enhanced by magnetofection that involves the use of plasmid DNA (pDNA)/magnetite cationic liposomes (MCLs) complexes (pDNA/MCL) and magnetic force. The transfection efficiencies of the magnetofection technique by pDNA/MCL in fibroblasts and keratinocytes using reporter genes were 36- and 10-fold higher, respectively, than those of a lipofection technique by cationic liposomes. Moreover, in vitro construction of three-dimensional (3D) tissues is an important challenge. We recently proposed a novel technique termed "magnetic force-based tissue engineering" (Mag-TE) to produce 3D tissues. Since the fibroblasts after magnetofection incorporated both magnetite nanoparticles and pDNA, we investigated whether multilayered heterotypic cell sheets expressing transgene could be fabricated by Mag-TE. First, the fibroblasts were seeded onto an ultra-low attachment culture plate. When a magnet was placed under the plate, the cells accumulated at the bottom of the culture plate. After 24 h of culture, the transgene-expressing cells formed a multilayered cell sheet-like structure. These results indicated that MCLs are a potent biomanipulation tool for both gene transfer and 3D tissue construction, suggesting that these techniques are useful for tissue engineering. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Dual recombinant Lactococcus lactis for enhanced delivery of DNA vaccine reporter plasmid pPERDBY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagnik, Bhrugu; Sharma, Drashya; Padh, Harish; Desai, Priti

    2017-04-01

    Food grade Lactococcus lactis has been widely used as an antigen and DNA delivery vehicle. We have previously reported the use of non-invasive L. lactis to deliver the newly constructed immunostimulatory DNA vaccine reporter plasmid, pPERDBY. In the present report, construction of dual recombinant L. lactis expressing internalin A of Listeria monocytogenes and harboring pPERDBY (LL InlA + pPERDBY) to enhance the efficiency of delivery of DNA by L. lactis is outlined. After confirmation and validation of LL InlA + pPERDBY, its DNA delivery potential was compared with previously developed non-invasive r- L. lactis::pPERDBY. The use of invasive L. lactis resulted in around threefold increases in the number of enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing Caco-2 cells. These findings reinforce the prospective application of invasive strain of L. lactis for delivery of DNA/RNA and antigens. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Enhanced extraction and purification of plasmid DNA from escherichia coli by applying a hybrid magnetic nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.J. da; Chavez-Guajardo, A.E.; Medina-llamas, J.C.; Alcaraz-Espinoza, J.J.; Melo, C.P. de [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), PE (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Plasmid DNA (pDNA), a special kind of nucleic acid usually found in bacteria, is a small molecule physically distinct from chromosomal DNA that can replicate independently. This genetic material has been used in a wide set of biotechnological methodologies, such as genetic engineering, production of recombinant drugs and gene therapy, among others. In all these applications, the extraction and purification of pDNA appears as a crucial step. In this work, we describe the synthesis of a polyaniline and maghemite (PANI/?-Fe2O3) magnetic nanocomposite (MNC) and its use in a new Escherichia coli (E. coli) pDNA extraction and purification protocol. We have used transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-Vis spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and magnetic measurements to characterize the MNC, which was synthesized through an emulsion polymerization method. The yield, purity and quality of the pDNA extracted by using our proposed MNC protocol were evaluated through UV-Vis, agarose gel electrophoreses and PCR techniques, respectively. After comparing our results to those obtained by use of a commercial kit (Promega Wizard Plus SV Minipreps), we suggest that the novel protocol here proposed appears as a competitive alternative methodology. Not only the purification step can be completed within only 10 min, but the high adsorption capacity of the MNC results in pDNA yields that are almost twice the best values obtained by using the commercial kit. Hence, this new MNC methodology can be of general interest and find widespread use in different types of biomedical applications. (author)

  17. DNA sequence analysis of plasmids from multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Han

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg is among the most detected serovars in swine and poultry, ranks among the top five serotypes associated with human salmonellosis and is disproportionately associated with invasive infections and mortality in humans. Salmonella are known to carry plasmids associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence. To identify plasmid-associated genes in multidrug resistant S. enterica serovar Heidelberg, antimicrobial resistance plasmids from five isolates were sequenced using the 454 LifeSciences pyrosequencing technology. Four of the isolates contained incompatibility group (Inc A/C multidrug resistance plasmids harboring at least eight antimicrobial resistance genes. Each of these strains also carried a second resistance plasmid including two IncFIB, an IncHI2 and a plasmid lacking an identified Inc group. The fifth isolate contained an IncI1 plasmid, encoding resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and sulfonamides. Some of the IncA/C plasmids lacked the full concert of transfer genes and yet were able to be conjugally transferred, likely due to the transfer genes carried on the companion plasmids in the strains. Several non-IncA/C resistance plasmids also carried putative virulence genes. When the sequences were compared to previously sequenced plasmids, it was found that while all plasmids demonstrated some similarity to other plasmids, they were unique, often due to differences in mobile genetic elements in the plasmids. Our study suggests that Salmonella Heidelberg isolates harbor plasmids that co-select for antimicrobial resistance and virulence, along with genes that can mediate the transfer of plasmids within and among other bacterial isolates. Prevalence of such plasmids can complicate efforts to control the spread of S. enterica serovar Heidelberg in food animal and human populations.

  18. A combined approach of hollow microneedles and nanocarriers for skin immunization with plasmid DNA encoding ovalbumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamornpathomkul B

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Boonnada Pamornpathomkul,1 Adisak Wongkajornsilp,2 Wanida Laiwattanapaisal,3 Theerasak Rojanarata,1 Praneet Opanasopit,1 Tanasait Ngawhirunpat1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Development of Green Innovations Group, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, 2Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, 3Department of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the use of different types of microneedles (MNs and nanocarriers for in vitro skin permeation and in vivo immunization of plasmid DNA encoding ovalbumin (pOVA. In vitro skin permeation studies indicated that hollow MNs had a superior enhancing effect on skin permeation compared with solid MN patches, electroporation (EP patches, the combination of MN and EP patches, and untreated skin. Upon using hollow MNs combined with nanocarriers for pOVA delivery, the skin permeation was higher than for the delivery of naked pOVA, as evidenced by the increased amount of pOVA in Franz diffusion cells and immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody responses. When the hollow MNs were used for the delivery of nanocarrier:pOVA complexes into the skin of mice, they induced a stronger IgG immune response than conventional subcutaneous (SC injections. In addition, immunization of mice with the hollow MNs did not induce signs of skin infection or pinpoint bleeding. Accordingly, the hollow MNs combined with a nanocarrier delivery system is a promising approach for delivering pOVA complexes to the skin for promoting successful immunization. Keywords: hollow microneedle, solid microneedle, electroporation, plasmid DNA encoding ovalbumin, skin immunization, nanocarrier

  19. Plasmid DNA is released from nanosized acicular material surface by low molecular weight oligonucleotides: exogenous plasmid acquisition mechanism for penetration intermediates based on the Yoshida effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, N; Ide, K

    2008-10-01

    When a colloidal solution consisting of nanosized acicular material and bacterial cells is stimulated with sliding friction at the interface between the hydrogel and interface-forming material where the frictional coefficient increases rapidly, the nanosized acicular material accompanying the bacterial cells forms a penetration intermediate. This effect is known as the Yoshida effect in honor of its discoverer. Through the Yoshida effect, a novel property in which penetration intermediates incorporate exogenous plasmid DNA has been identified. This report proposes a possible mechanism for exogenous plasmid acquisition by penetration intermediates in the Yoshida effect. Escherichia coli cells, pUC18, and chrysotile were used as recipient cells, plasmid DNA, and nanosized acicular material, respectively. Even when repeatedly washing the mixture consisting of pUC18 and chrysotile, transformation efficiency by pUC18 was stable. Accordingly, pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile was introduced into recipient E. coli cells. At saturation, the amount of pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile was 0.8-1.2 microg/mg. To investigate whether pUC18 adsorbed on chrysotile is replicated by polymerase, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out with the chrysotile. Amplification of the beta-lactamase gene coded in pUC18, which was adsorbed onto chrysotile, was strongly inhibited. This suggests that DNA adsorbed onto chrysotile is not replicated in vivo. When we searched for substances to release pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile, we found that a 300-bp single- or double-stranded segment of DNA releases pUC18 from chrysotile. Competitive adsorption onto chrysotile between double-stranded DNA and pUC18 was then examined through the Yoshida effect. The 310- and 603-bp double-stranded nucleotides caused 50% competitive inhibition at the same molar ratio with pUC18. Hence, the adsorbed region of pUC18 is about 300 bp in length. As the culture period for recipient cells increases, transformation

  20. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S; Pushko, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Effect of endonuclease G depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and levels of homologous recombination in hela cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misic, V; El-Mogy, M; Geng, S; Haj-Ahmad, Y

    2016-01-01

    Endonuclease G (EndoG) is a mitochondrial apoptosis regulator that also has roles outside of programmed cell death. It has been implicated as a defence DNase involved in the degradation of exogenous DNA after transfection of mammalian cells and in homologous recombination of viral and endogenous DNA. In this study, we looked at the effect of EndoG depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and the levels of homologous recombination in HeLa cells. We show that the proposed defence role of EndoG against uptake of non-viral DNA vectors does not extend to the cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, as targeting of EndoG expression by RNA interference failed to increase intracellular plasmid DNA levels. However, reducing EndoG levels in HeLa cells resulted in a statistically significant reduction of homologous recombination between two plasmid DNA substrates. These findings suggest that non-viral DNA vectors are also substrates for EndoG in its role in homologous recombination.

  2. Process optimisation for anion exchange monolithic chromatography of 4.2kbp plasmid vaccine (pcDNA3F).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongkudon, Clarence M; Danquah, Michael K

    2010-10-15

    Anion exchange monolithic chromatography is increasingly becoming a prominent tool for plasmid DNA purification but no generic protocol is available to purify all types of plasmid DNA. In this work, we established a simple framework and used it to specifically purify a plasmid DNA model from a clarified alkaline-lysed plasmid-containing cell lysate. The framework involved optimising ligand functionalisation temperature (30-80°C), mobile phase flow rate (0.1-1.8mL/min), monolith pore size (done by changing the porogen content in the polymerisation reaction by 50-80%), buffer pH (6-10), ionic strength of binding buffer (0.3-0.7M) and buffer gradient elution slope (1-10% buffer B/min). We concluded that preferential pcDNA3F adsorption and optimum resolution could be achieved within the tested conditions by loading the clarified cell lysate into 400nm pore size of monolith in 0.7M NaCl (pH 6) of binding buffer followed by increasing the NaCl concentration to 1.0M at 3%B/min. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasmids which make their host bacteria mutable as well as resistant to ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Toshihiko; Ando, Takao

    1980-01-01

    Some of the naturally occurring Iα, I zeta, M, N, O and T group plasmids increase both the mutability and UV resistance of their host bacteria, while group H and S plasmids only increase mutability. This suggests that these two plasmid-mediated repair functions are separable. The two functions have no direct relation to their restriction-modification systems and nitrofuran resistant functions. In addition, the close linking between the restriction-modification genes and these repair function genes was suggested in group N plasmids. (author)

  4. Loss of cellular transformation efficiency induced by DNA irradiation with low-energy (10 eV) electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouass Sahbani, Saloua; Sanche, Leon; Cloutier, Pierre; Bass, Andrew D; Hunting, Darel J

    2014-11-20

    Low energy electrons (LEEs) of energies less than 20 eV are generated in large quantities by ionizing radiation in biological matter. While LEEs are known to induce single (SSBs) and double strand breaks (DSBs) in DNA, their ability to inactivate cells by inducing nonreparable lethal damage has not yet been demonstrated. Here we observe the effect of LEEs on the functionality of DNA, by measuring the efficiency of transforming Escherichia coli with a [pGEM-3Zf (-)] plasmid irradiated with 10 eV electrons. Highly ordered DNA films were prepared on pyrolitic graphite by molecular self-assembly using 1,3-diaminopropane ions (Dap(2+)). The uniformity of these films permits the inactivation of approximately 50% of the plasmids compared to transforming cluster damage into DSBs by digestion with repair enzymes, also occurred relatively infrequently. The exact nature of the lethal damage remains unknown, but it is probably a form of compact cluster damage in which the lesions are too close to be revealed by purified repair enzymes. In addition, this damage is either not repaired or is misrepaired by E. coli, since it results in plasmid inactivation, when they contain an average of three lesions. Comparison with previous results from a similar experiment performed with γ-irradiated plasmids indicates that the type of clustered DNA lesions, created directly on cellular DNA by LEEs, may be more difficult to repair than those produced by other species from radiolysis.

  5. Induced effect of irradiated exogenous DNA on wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhongjie; Sun Guangzu; Wang Guangjin

    1996-01-01

    Irradiated exogenous DNA introduced into wheat can give rise to break of DNA-chain and damage of part of alkali radicals. Introducing exogenous DNA irradiated by γ rays could increase Do fructification rate and decrease seed size and plumpness. These tendencies became obvious with dose increase. In comparison with control DNA, introducing DNA irradiated could raise evidently mutagenic effect of pollen tube pathway technique

  6. Putative DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in Mitochondrial Plasmid of Paramecium caudatum Stock GT704

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trina Ekawati Tallei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria of Paramecium caudatum stock GT704 has a set of four kinds of linear plasmids with sizes of 8.2, 4.1, 2.8 and 1.4 kb. The plasmids of 8.2 and 2.8 kb exist as dimers consisting of 4.1- and 1.4-kb monomers, respectively. The plasmid 2.8 kb, designated as pGT704-2.8, contains an open reading frame encodes for putative DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP. This study reveals that this RNAP belongs to superfamily of DNA/RNA polymerase and family of T7/T3 single chain RNA polymerase and those of mitochondrial plasmid of fungi belonging to Basidiomycota and Ascomycota. It is suggested that RNAP of pGT704-2.8 can perform transcription without transcription factor as promoter recognition. Given that only two motifs were found, it could not be ascertained whether this RNAP has a full function independently or integrated with mtDNA in carrying out its function.

  7. Effect of the caffeine on treated and non-treated plasmid DNA with stannic chloride; Efeito da cafeina em DNA plasmidial tratado e nao tratado com cloreto estanoso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Silvana Ramos F. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria]|[Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Curso de Pos-graduacao em Patologia Experimental; Mattos, Jose C.P. de; Dantas, Flavio; Araujo, Adriano Caldeira de; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria]. E-mail: bernardo@uerj.br

    2000-07-01

    Caffeine, a methilxantine drug is a component of coffee, tea, stimulants and other drinks. Caffeine inhibits phosphodiesterase leading to intracellular accumulation of cyclic AMP, blocks adenosine receptors, and increases the release of Ca{sup 2+}. We have studied the possible effect of caffeine in DNA plasmid treated or not with stannous chloride (SnCl{sub 2}). Previous evaluations of the effect of caffeine on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with technetium-99m have showed a decrease of % ATI in the insoluble fraction of plasma proteins. Samples of DNA were treated with SnCl{sub 2} (0 and 200{mu}g/ml) in 0.8% agarose. SnCl{sub 2} has induced break on DNA and caffeine has not showed effect on the DNA. This indicates that caffeine does not eliminate the oxidant action of SnCl{sub 2} and does not promote break in isolated DNA plasmid. (author)

  8. Lipophilic Polycation Vehicles Display High Plasmid DNA Delivery to Multiple Cell Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yaoying; Smith, Adam E; Reineke, Theresa M

    2017-08-16

    A class of cationic poly(alkylamidoamine)s (PAAAs) containing lipophilic methylene linkers were designed and examined as in vitro plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery agents. The PAAAs were synthesized via step-growth polymerization between a diamine monomer and each of four different diacid chloride monomers with varying methylene linker lengths, including glutaryl chloride, adipoyl chloride, pimeloyl chloride, and suberoyl chloride, which served to systematically increase the lipophilicity of the polymers. The synthesized polymers successfully complexed with pDNA in reduced serum medium at N/P ratios of 5 and greater, resulting in polyplexes with hydrodynamic diameters of approximately 1 μm. These polyplexes were tested for in vitro transgene expression and cytotoxicity using HDFa (human dermal fibroblast), HeLa (human cervical carcinoma), HMEC (human mammary epithelial), and HUVEC (human umbilical vein endothelial) cells. Interestingly, select PAAA polyplex formulations were found to be more effective than Lipofectamine 2000 at promoting transgene expression (GFP) while maintaining comparable or higher cell viability. Transgene expression was highest in HeLa cells (∼90% for most formulations) and lowest in HDFa cells (up to ∼20%) as measured by GFP fluorescence. In addition, the cytotoxicity of PAAA polyplex formulations was significantly increased as the molecular weight, N/P ratio, and methylene linker length were increased. The PAAA vehicles developed herein provide a new delivery vehicle design strategy of displaying attributes of both polycations and lipids, which show promise as a tunable scaffold for refining the structure-activity-toxicity profiles for future genome editing studies.

  9. Correction of the lack of commutability between plasmid DNA and genomic DNA for quantification of genetically modified organisms using pBSTopas as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Yuhua; Wu, Gang; Cao, Yinglong; Lu, Changming

    2014-10-01

    Plasmid calibrators are increasingly applied for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). To evaluate the commutability between plasmid DNA (pDNA) and genomic DNA (gDNA) as calibrators, a plasmid molecule, pBSTopas, was constructed, harboring a Topas 19/2 event-specific sequence and a partial sequence of the rapeseed reference gene CruA. Assays of the pDNA showed similar limits of detection (five copies for Topas 19/2 and CruA) and quantification (40 copies for Topas 19/2 and 20 for CruA) as those for the gDNA. Comparisons of plasmid and genomic standard curves indicated that the slopes, intercepts, and PCR efficiency for pBSTopas were significantly different from CRM Topas 19/2 gDNA for quantitative analysis of GMOs. Three correction methods were used to calibrate the quantitative analysis of control samples using pDNA as calibrators: model a, or coefficient value a (Cva); model b, or coefficient value b (Cvb); and the novel model c or coefficient formula (Cf). Cva and Cvb gave similar estimated values for the control samples, and the quantitative bias of the low concentration sample exceeded the acceptable range within ±25% in two of the four repeats. Using Cfs to normalize the Ct values of test samples, the estimated values were very close to the reference values (bias -13.27 to 13.05%). In the validation of control samples, model c was more appropriate than Cva or Cvb. The application of Cf allowed pBSTopas to substitute for Topas 19/2 gDNA as a calibrator to accurately quantify the GMO.

  10. Persistence of plasmids, cholera toxin genes, and prophage DNA in classical Vibrio cholerae O1.

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, W L; Wachsmuth, K; Johnson, S R; Birkness, K A; Samadi, A R

    1984-01-01

    Plasmid profiles, the location of cholera toxin subunit A genes, and the presence of the defective VcA1 prophage genome in classical Vibrio cholerae isolated from patients in Bangladesh in 1982 were compared with those in older classical strains isolated during the sixth pandemic and with those in selected eltor and nontoxigenic O1 isolates. Classical strains typically had two plasmids (21 and 3 megadaltons), eltor strains typically had no plasmids, and nontoxigenic O1 strains had zero to thr...

  11. Size effect on transfection and cytotoxicity of nanoscale plasmid DNA/polyethyleneimine complexes for aerosol gene delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoon Byeon, Jeong, E-mail: jbyeon@purdue.edu [Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Kim, Jang-Woo, E-mail: jwkim@hoseo.edu [Department of Digital Display Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-03

    Nanoscale plasmid DNA (pDNA)/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes were fabricated in the aerosol state using a nebulization system consisting of a collison atomizer and a cool-walled diffusion dryer. The aerosol fabricated nanoscale complexes were collected and employed to determine fundamental properties of the complexes, such as size, structure, surface charge, and in vitro gene transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity. The results showed that mass ratio between pDNA and PEI should be optimized to enhance gene transfection efficiency without a significant loss of cell viability. These findings may support practical advancements in the field of nonviral gene delivery.

  12. Integral parametrization of the Kinetics of Crosslink production in plasmid DNA as a function of 8-methoxypsoralen concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidania, R. de; Paramio, J. M.; Bauluz, C.

    1986-07-01

    In this paper we present results of crosslink production in pBR322 DNA along a wide range of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) concentration. Experimental data were obtained as DNA renaturation percentages, from the shift in hyperchromicity after a temperature-dependent denaturation-renaturation process. the experimental results showed a three-stage profile when represented as a function of the natural logarithms of 8-MOP concentration. an integral parametrization which allows a simultaneous fit of the three observed stages is presented here. the theoretical values of crosslink production determined from the fit are useful to asses the genotoxicity of psoralen-induced crosslinks in plasmid DNA. (Author) 24 refs.

  13. Integral parametrization of the Kinetics of Crosslink production in plasmid DNA as a function of 8-methoxypsoralen concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidania, R. de; Paramio, J. M.; Bauluz, C.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper we present results of crosslink production in pBR322 DNA along a wide range of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) concentration. Experimental data were obtained as DNA renaturation percentages, from the shift in hyperchromicity after a temperature-dependent denaturation-renaturation process. the experimental results showed a three-stage profile when represented as a function of the natural logarithms of 8-MOP concentration. an integral parametrization which allows a simultaneous fit of the three observed stages is presented here. the theoretical values of crosslink production determined from the fit are useful to asses the genotoxicity of psoralen-induced crosslinks in plasmid DNA. (Author) 24 refs

  14. Cloning and DNA sequence of the mercuric- and organomercurial-resistance determinants of plasmid pDU1358

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, H.G.; Foster, T.J.; Silver, S.; Misra, T.K.

    1987-01-01

    The broad-spectrum mercurial-resistance plasmid pDU1358 was analyzed by cloning the resistance determinants and preparing a physical and genetic map of a 45-kilobase (kb) region of the plasmid that contains two separate mercurial-resistance operons that mapped about 20 kb apart. One encoded narrow-spectrum mercurial resistance to Hg 2+ and a few organomercurials; the other specified broad-spectrum resistance to phenylmercury and additional organomercurials. Each determinant governed mercurial transport functions. Southern DNA x DNA hybridization experiments using gene-specific probes from the plasmid R100 mer operon indicated close homology with the R100 deteminant. The 2153 base pairs of the promoter-distal part of the broad-spectrum Hg 2+ -resistance operon of pDU1358 were sequenced. This region included the 3'-terminal part of the merA gene, merD, unidentified reading frame URF1, and a part of URF2 homologous to previously sequenced determinants of plasmid R100. Between the merA and merD genes, an open reading frame encoding a 212 amino acid polypeptide was identified as the merB gene that determines the enzyme organomercurial lyase that cleaves the C-Hg bond of phenylmercury

  15. DNA damage produced by exposure of supercoiled plasmid DNA to high- and low-LET ionizing radiation: Effects of hydroxyl radical quenchers. DNA breakage, neutrons, OH radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak, J.G.; Ito, T.; Peak, M.J.; Robb, F.T.

    1994-01-01

    A supercoiled plasmid of 7300 base pairs was isolated and exposed in an aqueous environment to 60 Co γ rays and JANUS 0.85 MeV fission-spectrum neutrons. Dose responses for the production of single-strand breaks (SSBs), double-strand breaks (DSBs) and alkali-labile sites (ALSs) were compared with computations made from the conversion of the supercoil to its relaxed and linear forms. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for production of SSBs and DSBs was similar to that previously measured in the cellular environment. The RBE for destruction of genetic transforming activity of M13 viral DNA followed that for DNA damage. This is in contrast to the situation for biological effects such as lethality, mutagenesis, and cellular transformation measured in mammalian cells, where the RBE values are reversed. The role of hydroxyl (OH) radical in DNA damage induction by neutrons was investigated by exposure of plasmid in the presence of known quenchers of this species. Of four quenchers tested, all were able to reduce the yields of both SSBs and DSBs. These findings are consistent with a model for SSB and DSB induction by high linear energy transfer that involves OH radical mediation

  16. Explanatory chapter: how plasmid preparation kits work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Laura

    2013-01-01

    To isolate plasmid DNA from bacteria using a commercial plasmid miniprep kit (if interested, compare this protocol with Isolation of plasmid DNA from bacteria). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions between cell penetrating peptides and plasmid DNA are important for stable non-covalent complexation and intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhya, Archana; Sangave, Preeti C

    2016-10-01

    Cell penetrating peptides are useful tools for intracellular delivery of nucleic acids. Delivery of plasmid DNA, a large nucleic acid, poses a challenge for peptide mediated transport. The paper investigates and compares efficacy of five novel peptide designs for complexation of plasmid DNA and subsequent delivery into cells. The peptides were designed to contain reported DNA condensing agents and basic cell penetrating sequences, octa-arginine (R 8 ) and CHK 6 HC coupled to cell penetration accelerating peptides such as Bax inhibitory mutant peptide (KLPVM) and a peptide derived from the Kaposi fibroblast growth factor (kFGF) membrane translocating sequence. A tryptophan rich peptide, an analogue of Pep-3, flanked with CH 3 on either ends was also a part of the study. The peptides were analysed for plasmid DNA complexation, protection of peptide-plasmid DNA complexes against DNase I, serum components and competitive ligands by simple agarose gel electrophoresis techniques. Hemolysis of rat red blood corpuscles (RBCs) in the presence of the peptides was used as a measure of peptide cytotoxicity. Plasmid DNA delivery through the designed peptides was evaluated in two cell lines, human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and (NIH/3 T3) mouse embryonic fibroblasts via expression of the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene. The importance of hydrophobic sequences in addition to cationic sequences in peptides for non-covalent plasmid DNA complexation and delivery has been illustrated. An alternative to the employment of fatty acid moieties for enhanced gene transfer has been proposed. Comparison of peptides for plasmid DNA complexation and delivery of peptide-plasmid DNA complexes to cells estimated by expression of a reporter gene, SEAP. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Effect of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes on chromosomal and plasmid DNA of Escherichia coli. Role of acid DNase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenberg-Arska, M.; van Strijp, J.A.; Hoekstra, W.P.; Verhoef, J.

    1984-01-01

    Phagocytosis and killing by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes are important host resistance factors against invading microorganisms. Evidence showing that killing is rapidly followed by degradation of bacterial components is limited. Therefore, we studied the fate of Escherichia coli DNA following phagocytosis of E. coli by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes. [ 3 H]Thymidine-labeled, unencapsulated E. coli PC2166 and E. coli 048K1 were incubated in serum, washed, and added to leukocytes. Uptake and killing of the bacteria and degradation of DNA were measured. Although phagocytosis and killing by mononuclear leukocytes was less efficient than that by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, only mononuclear leukocytes were able to degrade E. coli PC2166 DNA. Within 2 h, 60% of the radioactivity added to mononuclear leukocytes was released into the supernate, of which 40% was acid soluble. DNA of E. coli 048K1 was not degraded. To further analyze the capacity of mononuclear leukocytes to degrade E. coli DNA, chromosomal and plasmid DNA was isolated from ingested bacteria and subjected to agarose gel-electrophoresis. Only chromosomal DNA was degraded after phagocytosis. Plasmid DNA of E. coli carrying a gene coding for ampicillin resistance remained intact for a 2-h period after ingestion, and was still able to transform recipient E. coli cells after this period. Although we observed no DNA degradation during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, lysates of both polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes contained acid-DNase activity with a pH optimum of 4.9. However, the DNase activity of mononuclear leukocytes was 20 times higher than that of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. No difference was observed between DNase activity from polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes from a chronic granulomatous disease patient with DNase activity from control polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes

  19. Auto-assembly of nanometer thick, water soluble layers of plasmid DNA complexed with diamines and basic amino acids on graphite: Greatest DNA protection is obtained with arginine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, T.T.; Boulanouar, O. [Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, UMR CNRS 6249 Chrono-Environnement, 16, Route de Gray, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France); Heintz, O. [Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, UMR CNRS 6303Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, DTAI/Centre de micro/nano caractérisation, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47870, F-21078 DIJON Cedex (France); Fromm, M., E-mail: michel.fromm@univ-fcomte.fr [Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, UMR CNRS 6249 Chrono-Environnement, 16, Route de Gray, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France)

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the ability of diamines as well as basic amino acids to condense DNA onto highly ordered pyrolytic graphite with minimum damage after re-dissolution in water. Based on a bibliographic survey we briefly summarize DNA binding properties with diamines as compared to basic amino acids. Thus, solutions of DNA complexed with these linkers were drop-cast in order to deposit ultra-thin layers on the surface of HOPG in the absence or presence of Tris buffer. Atomic Force Microscopy analyses showed that, at a fixed ligand-DNA mixing ratio of 16, the mean thickness of the layers can be statistically predicted to lie in the range 0–50 nm with a maximum standard deviation ± 6 nm, using a simple linear law depending on the DNA concentration. The morphology of the layers appears to be ligand-dependent. While the layers containing diamines present holes, those formed in the presence of basic amino acids, except for lysine, are much more compact and dense. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy measurements provide compositional information indicating that, compared to the maximum number of DNA sites to which the ligands may bind, the basic amino acids Arg and His are present in large excess. Conservation of the supercoiled topology of the DNA plasmids was studied after recovery of the complex layers in water. Remarkably, arginine has the best protection capabilities whether Tris was present or not in the initial solution. - Highlights: • Characterization of nanometer scaled layers composed of pUC21 plasmid DNA • Relation between nature of the ligand and structure of the layers • Capacities of the ligands to protect plasmids from strand break depending on their nature.

  20. Direct identification of antibiotic resistance genes on single plasmid molecules using CRISPR/Cas9 in combination with optical DNA mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Vilhelm; Rajer, Fredrika; Frykholm, Karolin; Nyberg, Lena K.; Quaderi, Saair; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Sandegren, Linus; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial plasmids are extensively involved in the rapid global spread of antibiotic resistance. We here present an assay, based on optical DNA mapping of single plasmids in nanofluidic channels, which provides detailed information about the plasmids present in a bacterial isolate. In a single experiment, we obtain the number of different plasmids in the sample, the size of each plasmid, an optical barcode that can be used to identify and trace the plasmid of interest and information about which plasmid that carries a specific resistance gene. Gene identification is done using CRISPR/Cas9 loaded with a guide-RNA (gRNA) complementary to the gene of interest that linearizes the circular plasmids at a specific location that is identified using the optical DNA maps. We demonstrate the principle on clinically relevant extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing isolates. We discuss how the gRNA sequence can be varied to obtain the desired information. The gRNA can either be very specific to identify a homogeneous group of genes or general to detect several groups of genes at the same time. Finally, we demonstrate an example where we use a combination of two gRNA sequences to identify carbapenemase-encoding genes in two previously not characterized clinical bacterial samples.

  1. DNA synthesis in irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painter, R.B.; California Univ., San Francisco; Young, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    One of the first responses observed in S phase mammalian cells that have suffered DNA damage is the inhibition of initiation of DNA replicons. In cells exposed to ionizing radiation, a single-strand break appears to be the stimulus for this effect, whereby the initiation of many adjacent replicons (a replicon cluster) is blocked by a single-strand break in any one of them. In cells exposed to ultraviolet light (u.v.), replicon initiation is blocked at fluences that induce about one pyrimidine dimer per replicon. The inhibition of replicon initiation by u.v. in Chinese hamster cells that are incapable of excising pyrimidine dimers from their DNA is virtually the same as in cells that are proficient in dimer excision. Therefore, a single-strand break formed during excision repair of pyrimidine dimers is not the stimulus for inhibition of replicon initiation in u.v.-irradiated cells. Considering this fact, as well as the comparative insensitivity of human ataxia telangiectasia cells to u.v.-induced inhibition of replicon initiation, we propose that a relatively rare lesion is the stimulus for u.v. -induced inhibition of replicon initiation. (author

  2. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction enhances naked plasmid DNA transfection in rabbit Achilles tendons in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L; Zhang, L; Wang, L; Jiang, Y; Luo, Y; Peng, Y; Lin, L

    2012-07-01

    The study was to investigate the probability of increasing the transfection of the gene in tendons by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), and to search for the most suitable transfection conditions. A mixture of microbubbles and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmids was injected into rabbit Achilles tendons by different administration routes and the tendons were ultrasound pulse by different ultrasonic conditions in order to determine the most appropriate conditions. Then, the rabbits were divided into four groups: (1) ultrasound + microbubbles + plasmid; (2) ultrasound+ plasmid; (3) microbubble + plasmid; (4) plasmid only. EGFP expression in the tendons and other tissues, and the damage to tendon and paratenon were all observed. The results showed that EGFP expression in the tendon was higher by ultrasound pulse with 2 W cm(-2) of output intensity and a 20% duty cycle for 10 min. Local injection was determined to be the better administration route. Among the four groups, EGFP expression in Group 1 was higher than that in other groups. EGFP expression was highest on seventh day, then it gradually decrease over time, and lasted more than 56 days. EGFP expression was not found in other tissues. There was no obvious injury caused by UTMD. Under suitable conditions, it is feasible to use UTMD as a safe and effective gene transfection therapy for tendon injuries.

  3. STUDY REGARDING EFFICIENCY OF INDUCED GENETIC TRANSFORMATION IN BACILLUS LICHENIFORMIS WITH PLASMID DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. VINTILĂ

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A strain of Bacillus licheniformis was subject to genetic transformation with plasmid vectors (pLC1 and pNC61, using electroporation technique, protoplast transformation and bivalent cations (CaCl2 mediated transformation. In the case of transformation by electroporation of Bacillus licheniformis B40, the highest number of transformed colonies (3 were obtained only after a 1,79 KV electric shock, for 2,2 milliseconds. Using this transformation technique we have obtained six kanamycin resistant transformants. The frequency of Bacillus licheniformis B40 protoplasts transformation using pLC1 and pNC61 plasmid vectors is approximately 10% (TF = 10%. As a result of pLC1 plasmid integration in Bacillus licheniformis protoplasts, six kanamycin resistant transformants were obtained. The pNC61 plasmid, which confers trimethoprim resistance, does not integrate in receiver cells by protoplast transformation. The direct genetic transformation in the presence of bivalent cations (CaCl2, mediated by pLC1 and pNC61 plasmid vectors, produce a low transformation frequency. Using this technique, we have obtained three trimethoprim resistant colonies and four kanamycin resistant colonies. The chemical way of transformation is the only technique, which realizes the integration of pNC61 in B. licheniformis B40 cells.

  4. Nanospines incorporation into the structure of the hydrophobic cryogels via novel cryogelation method: an alternative sorbent for plasmid DNA purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üzek, Recep; Uzun, Lokman; Şenel, Serap; Denizli, Adil

    2013-02-01

    In this study, it was aimed to prepare hydrophobic cryogels for plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification from Escherichia coli lysate. The hydrophobicity was achieved by incorporating a hydrophobic ligand, N-methacryloyl-(L)-phenylalanine (MAPA), into the cryogel backbone. In addition to the conventional cryogelation process, freeze-drying step was included to create nanospines. Three different cryogels {poly(2-hydoxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-phenylalanine)-freeze dried, [P(HEMA-MAPA)-FD]; poly(2-hydoxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-phenylalanine, [P(HEMA-MAPA)] and poly(2-hydoxyethyl methacrylate)-freeze dried, [P(HEMA)-FD]} were prepared, characterized, and used for DNA (salmon sperm DNA) adsorption studies from aqueous solution. The specific surface areas of cryogels were determined to be 21.4 m(2)/g for P(HEMA)-FD, 17.65 m(2)/g for P(HEMA-MAPA) and 36.0 m(2)/g for P(HEMA-MAPA)-FD. The parameters affecting adsorption such as temperature, initial DNA concentration, salt type and concentration were examined in continuous mode. The maximum adsorption capacities were observed as 45.31 mg DNA/g, 27.08 mg DNA/g and 1.81 mg DNA/g for P(HEMA-MAPA)-FD, P(HEMA-MAPA) and P(HEMA)-FD, respectively. Desorption process was performed using acetate buffer (pH 5.50) without salt. First, pDNA was isolated from E. coli lysate and the purity of pDNA was then determined by agarose gel electrophoresis. Finally, the chromatographic performance of P(HEMA-MAPA)-FD cryogel for pDNA purification was tested in FPLC. The resolution (R(s)) was 2.84, and the specific selectivity for pDNA was 237.5-folds greater than all impurities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Histone-Like Protein Induces Plasmid DNA to Form Liquid Crystals in Vitro and Gene Compaction in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyong Sun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The liquid crystalline state is a universal phenomenon involving the formation of an ordered structure via a self-assembly process that has attracted attention from numerous scientists. In this study, the dinoflagellate histone-like protein HCcp3 is shown to induce super-coiled pUC18 plasmid DNA to enter a liquid crystalline state in vitro, and the role of HCcp3 in gene condensation in vivo is also presented. The plasmid DNA (pDNA-HCcp3 complex formed birefringent spherical particles with a semi-crystalline selected area electronic diffraction (SAED pattern. Circular dichroism (CD titrations of pDNA and HCcp3 were performed. Without HCcp3, pUC18 showed the characteristic B conformation. As the HCcp3 concentration increased, the 273 nm band sharply shifted to 282 nm. When the HCcp3 concentration became high, the base pair (bp/dimer ratio fell below 42/1, and the CD spectra of the pDNA-HCcp3 complexes became similar to that of dehydrated A-form DNA. Microscopy results showed that HCcp3 compacted the super-coiled gene into a condensed state and that inclusion bodies were formed. Our results indicated that HCcp3 has significant roles in gene condensation both in vitro and in histone-less eukaryotes in vivo. The present study indicates that HCcp3 has great potential for applications in non-viral gene delivery systems, where HCcp3 may compact genetic material to form liquid crystals.

  6. The effect of irradiation on the DNA of cauliflower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmey, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The cellular DNA is one of the components most affected by ionizing radiation. Lesions caused range from single and double stranded breaks to chemical modification of bases depending on the radiation dosage and the metabolic status of the tissue. In attempting to assess the DNA damage induced by irradiation of vegetables in a speedy and convenient manner, we examined the effect on the DNA by subjecting cauliflower to a dose of 1 kGy. If DNA is nicked by irradiation, the extent of the damage can be assessed by using DNA polymerase to repair the nicks. Comparisons were made between irradiated and non irradiated cauliflower and incorporation of 32 p deoxy GTP in the presence of the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase measured

  7. Persistence of plasmids, cholera toxin genes, and prophage DNA in classical Vibrio cholerae O1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W L; Wachsmuth, K; Johnson, S R; Birkness, K A; Samadi, A R

    1984-07-01

    Plasmid profiles, the location of cholera toxin subunit A genes, and the presence of the defective VcA1 prophage genome in classical Vibrio cholerae isolated from patients in Bangladesh in 1982 were compared with those in older classical strains isolated during the sixth pandemic and with those in selected eltor and nontoxigenic O1 isolates. Classical strains typically had two plasmids (21 and 3 megadaltons), eltor strains typically had no plasmids, and nontoxigenic O1 strains had zero to three plasmids. The old and new isolates of classical V. cholerae had two HindIII chromosomal digest fragments containing cholera toxin subunit A genes, whereas the eltor strains from Eastern countries had one fragment. The eltor strains from areas surrounding the Gulf of Mexico also had two subunit A gene fragments, which were smaller and easily distinguished from the classical pattern. All classical strains had 8 to 10 HindIII fragments containing the defective VcA1 prophage genome; none of the Eastern eltor strains had these genes, and the Gulf Coast eltor strains contained a different array of weakly hybridizing genes. These data suggest that the recent isolates of classical cholera in Bangladesh are closely related to the bacterial strain(s) which caused classical cholera during the sixth pandemic. These data do not support hypotheses that either the eltor or the nontoxigenic O1 strains are precursors of the new classical strains.

  8. STUDY REGARDING EFFICIENCY OF INDUCED GENETIC TRANSFORMATION IN BACILLUS LICHENIFORMIS WITH PLASMID DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VINTILĂ T.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A strain of Bacillus licheniformis was subject to genetic transformation with plasmidvectors (pLC1 and pNC61, using electroporation technique, protoplasttransformation and bivalent cations (CaCl2 mediated transformation. In the case oftransformation by electroporation of Bacillus licheniformis B40, the highest numberof transformed colonies (3 were obtained only after a 1,79 KV electric shock, for 2,2milliseconds. Using this transformation technique we have obtained six kanamycinresistant transformants. The frequency of Bacillus licheniformis B40 protoplaststransformation using pLC1 and pNC61 plasmid vectors is approximately 10% (TF =10%. As a result of pLC1 plasmid integration in Bacillus licheniformis protoplasts,six kanamycin resistant transformants were obtained. The pNC61 plasmid, whichconfers trimethoprim resistance, does not integrate in receiver cells by protoplasttransformation. The direct genetic transformation in the presence of bivalent cations(CaCl2, mediated by pLC1 and pNC61 plasmid vectors, produce a lowtransformation frequency. Using this technique, we have obtained three trimethoprimresistant colonies and four kanamycin resistant colonies. The chemical way oftransformation is the only technique, which realizes the integration of pNC61 in B.licheniformis B40 cells.

  9. Detailed adsorption mechanism of plasmid DNA by newly isolated cellulose from waste flower spikes of Thypa latifolia using quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Muhammad; Kaya, Murat; Akyuz, Lalehan; Erdonmez, Demet; Akyuz, Bahar; Sargin, Idris

    2017-09-01

    Current study was designed to use the newly obtained cellulose from waste flower spikes of Thypa latifolia plant for plasmid DNA adsorption. Cellulose was isolated according to a previously described method including acid and base treatment, and cellulose content was recorded as 17%. T. latifolia cellulose was physicochemically characterized via FT-IR, TGA and SEM techniques. Detailed mechanism of plasmid DNA adsorption by newly isolated cellulose was described using chemical quantum calculations. To check the effect of Cu ++ immobilization on the affinity of cellulose for plasmid DNA, copper ions were immobilized onto T. latifolia cellulose. pUC18 plasmid DNA was used for adsorption studies. Membranes prepared with only T. latifolia cellulose and Cu ++ immobilized T. latifolia cellulose revealed different adsorption ratios as 43.9 and 86.9% respectively. This newly isolated cellulose from waste flower spikes of T. latifolia can be utilized as a suitable carrier for plasmid DNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Construction of adiponectin-encoding plasmid DNA and gene therapy of non-obese type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Mei Hua; Park, Jeong-Sook; Myung, Chang-Seon

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin (ADN), an insulin-sensitizing adipokine, stimulates glucose uptake, inhibits gluconeogenesis, and plays an important role in improving insulin sensitivity. Since blood levels of ADN are low in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), this study was designed to investigate the therapeutic effectiveness of increasing the ADN level through injection of plasmid DNA encoding ADN in type 2 DM. A non-obese type 2 DM mouse model was established via combined administration of streptozotocin with nicotinamide and exhibited significantly higher plasma glucose concentration and insulin resistance compared with normal controls according to oral glucose tolerance and insulin challenge tests. Plasmid DNA encoding mouse ADN from differentiated NIH3T3 adipocytes was constructed in pVAX1 (pVAX/ADN). Transfection of pVAX/ADN into various cell lines including HeLa, HT22, HEK293, HepG2, and SK-Hep1 cells, increased ADN mRNA expression levels in a dose-dependent manner. The administration of pVAX/ADN into non-obese type 2 DM mice via tail vein significantly increased the blood level of ADN and decreased the plasma glucose concentration. Moreover, the parameters related to insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and insulin sensitivity (QUICKI) were significantly improved. These results suggest that ADN gene therapy could be a clinically effective tool for the treatment of type 2 DM.

  11. Introduction to DNA methods for identification of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delincee, H.

    1996-01-01

    This brief introduction sets the scene with respect to the presentations in this ADMIT meeting dealing with DNA changes as a tool to detect the radiation processing of food. The choice to examine DNA seems obvious, since DNA is a sensitive cellular target to irradiation and the changes in DNA are responsible for many effects observed in irradiated foods, such as the inactivation of microorganisms, elimination of insects, inhibition of sprouting in bulbs and tubers and delay of ripening in several fruits. Therefore, these changes in DNA should be discernible in microbial or insect DNA or in the nucleic acids in the food itself. If DNA changes were specific to irradiation, a detection method could be designed which would have wide applicability, since most foods are derived from living organisms which all contain DNA. Such a method could almost be the universal method for detecting the radiation treatment of foods. Radiation-induced changes in DNA can be analysed by a variety of analytical techniques, which have mostly been employed on pure DNA or on DNA in living cells in radiation biology research. Whether or not some of these techniques can be utilised to detect irradiated food has recently been very briefly discussed. (author)

  12. Antigen-antibody reactions of UV-irradiated phage DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, A.

    1976-01-01

    The observation of others could be confirmed that UV-irradiated DNA is a better immunogen than unirradiated DNA. The author's immune sera contained a high amount of antibodies with a specific action against photoproducts in the DNA. The thymine dimer was identified as relevant photoproduct and thus as antigenic determinant. In comparison, the amount of unspecific antibodies reacting with denaturated DNA was low and varied between sera. Thymin-dimer antibodies showed a high specificity without cross-reaction with other pyrimidine dimers such as anti CC and anti CT; they belong to the class of IgG molecules. UV-irradiated dinucleotide dTpT is sufficient to induce the formation of antibodies reacting with the cis-syn thymine dimers in UV-irradiated DNA. Antibody binding is proportional to the UV doses applied to the DNA. When using completely denaturated DNA, there is a linear increase changing into a plateau at higher doses. The extent of antigen-antibody binding is strongly dependent on the degree of denaturation of the DNA. With increasing denaturation, the antibody binding of the DNA increases. The antigen-antibody reaction can thus be used to estimate the degree of denaturation of the DNA. There were no signs of an influence of the degree of denaturation of the DNA on the quantum yield of thymine dimers. The different amounts of antibodies is therefore due to the masking of thymine dimers in native DNA. When irradiating intact phage particles, there was no sign of an influence of the phages' protein covers on the antibody binding capacity of DNA compared with DNA irradiated in vitro. (orig.) [de

  13. Effect of uv irradiation on lambda DNA transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranade, S S [Cancer Research Inst., Bombay (India)

    1977-05-01

    The effect of uv irradiation of template DNA has been studied in vitro in the E.coli RNA polymerase system with native and uv treated lambda DNA. Lambda DNA was more susceptible to uv than was calf-thymus DNA, yet a residual activity was observed at a uv dose of 0.5 x 10/sup 4/ erg/mm/sup 2/. From the kinetic analysis of the reaction and the incorporation of lambda /sup 32/P-labelled nucleoside triphosphates, it seems reasonable to conclude that uv irradiation probably did not affect the DNA initiation sites, recognizable by RNA polymerase. The transcription products made with uv irradiated lambda DNA were asymmetrical, and hybridized to the right half (R) and the left half (L) of lambda DNA with the ratio of R/L=4/1, and they showed a lower hybridizability than the transcripts with native lambda DNA. The initiation sites recognizable by RNA polymerase seemed to be the same on both native and uv irradiated lambda DNA, though the transcription of uv treated lambda DNA appeared to terminate with rather short RNA chains.

  14. Photocleavage of DNA: irradiation of quinone-containing reagents converts supercoiled to linear DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kock, T.; Schuster, G.B.; Ropp, J.D.; Sligar, S.G.

    1993-01-01

    Irradiation (350 nm) of air-saturated solutions of reagents containing an anthraquinone group linked to quaternary alkyl ammonium groups converts supercoiled DNA to circular and to linear DNA. Generation of linear DNA does not occur by accumulation of numerous single-strand cuts but by coincident-site double-strand cleavage of DNA. Irradiation forms the triplet state of the anthraquinone, which reacts either by hydrogen atom abstraction from a sugar of DNA or by electron transfer from a base of the DNA. Subsequent reactions result in chain scission. The quinone is apparently reformed after this sequence and reirradiation leads to double-strand cleavage. (Author)

  15. Effect of tif expression, irradiation of recipient and presence of plasmid pKM101 on recovery of a marker from a donor exposed to ultraviolet light prior to conjugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A. von; Bridges, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    To detect the effect of the postulated inducible error-prone repair system ('SOS repair') on the bacterial chromosome an Hfr Escherichia coli strain JC5088 rec A was u.v.-irradiated immediately before mating it with recipients in which SOS repair was supposed to be functioning either through tif expression, u.v. irradiation or the presence of plasmid pKM101. The recombinant yields of these crosses were compared with those obtained in corresponding crosses with recipients in which SOS repair either was not induced or was totally eliminated by the lexA mutation. No difference in marker recovery efficiency could be detected between these two sets of recipients and thus no induced repair process acting on donor DNA could be demonstrated. The possible reasons for this finding are discussed. (author)

  16. Repair of UV-damaged incoming plasmid DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keszenman-Pereyra, David

    1990-01-01

    A whole-cell transformation assay was used for the repair of UV-damaged plasma DNA in highly-transformable haploid strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae having different repair capabilities. The experiments described demonstrate that three epistasis groups (Friedberg 1988) are involved in the repair of UV-incoming DNA and that the repair processes act less efficiently on incoming DNA than they do on chromosomal DNA. The implications of these findings for UV repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed. (author)

  17. DNA damage caused by UV- and near UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    1986-01-01

    Much work with mutants deficient in DNA repair has been performed concerning UV-induced DNA damage under the condition where there is no artificial stimulation. In an attempt to infer the effects of solar wavelengths, the outcome of the work is discussed in terms of cellular radiation sensitivity, unscheduled DNA synthesis, and mutation induction, leading to the conclusion that some DNA damage occurs even by irradiation of the shorter wavelength light (270 - 315 nm) and is repaired by excision repair. It has been thought to date that pyrimidine dimer (PD) plays the most important role in UV-induced DNA damage, followed by (6 - 4) photoproducts. As for DNA damage induced by near UV irradiation, the yield of DNA single-strand breaks and of DNA-protein crosslinking, other than PD, is considered. The DNA-protein crosslinking has proved to be induced by irradiation at any wavelength of UV ranging from 260 to 425 nm. Near UV irradiation causes the inhibition of cell proliferation to take place. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Plasmid segregation mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, G.; Gerdes, Kenn

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids encode partitioning (par) loci that ensure ordered plasmid segregation prior to cell division. par loci come in two types: those that encode actin-like ATPases and those that encode deviant Walker-type ATPases. ParM, the actin-like ATPase of plasmid R1, forms dynamic filaments...... that segregate plasmids paired at mid-cell to daughter cells. Like microtubules, ParM filaments exhibit dynamic instability (i.e., catastrophic decay) whose regulation is an important component of the DNA segregation process. The Walker box ParA ATPases are related to MinD and form highly dynamic, oscillating...... filaments that are required for the subcellular movement and positioning of plasmids. The role of the observed ATPase oscillation is not yet understood. However, we propose a simple model that couples plasmid segregation to ParA oscillation. The model is consistent with the observed movement...

  19. Analysis of point mutations in an ultraviolet-irradiated shuttle vector plasmid propagated in cells from Japanese xeroderma pigmentosum patients in complementation groups A and F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, T.; Tatsumi-Miyajima, J.; Sato, M.; Kraemer, K.H.; Takebe, H.

    1991-01-01

    To assess the contribution to mutagenesis by human DNA repair defects, a UV-treated shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, was passed through fibroblasts derived from Japanese xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients in two different DNA repair complementation groups (A and F). Patients with XP have clinical and cellular UV hypersensitivity, increased frequency of skin cancer, and defects in DNA repair. The XP DNA repair defects represented by complementation groups A (XP-A) and F (XP-F) are more common in Japan than in Europe or the United States. In comparison to results with DNA repair-proficient human cells (W138-VA13), UV-treated pZ189 passed through the XP-A [XP2OS(SV)] or XP-F [XP2YO(SV)] cells showed fewer surviving plasmids (XP-A less than XP-F) and a higher frequency of mutated plasmids (XP-A greater than XP-F). Base sequence analysis of more than 200 mutated plasmids showed the major type of base substitution mutation to be the G:C----A:T transition with all three cell lines. The XP-A and XP-F cells revealed a higher frequency of G:C----A:T transitions and a lower frequency of transversions among plasmids with single or tandem mutations and a lower frequency of plasmids with multiple point mutations compared to the normal line. The spectrum of mutations in pZ189 with the XP-A cells was similar to that with the XP-F cells. Seventy-six to 91% of the single base substitution mutations occurred at G:C base pairs in which the 5'-neighboring base of the cytosine was thymine or cytosine. These studies indicate that the DNA repair defects in Japanese XP patients in complementation groups A and F result in different frequencies of plasmid survival and mutagenesis but in similar types of mutagenic abnormalities despite marked differences in clinical features

  20. Sustained delivery of plasmid DNA from polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrie, Hannah; Mooney, David J

    2006-07-07

    The encapsulation of DNA into polymeric depot systems can be used to spatially and temporally control DNA release, leading to a sustained, local delivery of therapeutic factors for tissue regeneration. Prior to encapsulation, DNA may be condensed with cationic polymers to decrease particle size, protect DNA from degradation, promote interaction with cell membranes, and facilitate endosomal release via the proton sponge effect. DNA has been encapsulated with either natural or synthetic polymers to form micro- and nanospheres, porous scaffolds and hydrogels for sustained DNA release and the polymer physical and chemical properties have been shown to influence transfection efficiency. Polymeric depot systems have been applied for bone, skin, and nerve regeneration as well as therapeutic angiogenesis, indicating the broad applicability of these systems for tissue engineering.

  1. Vaxfectin enhances antigen specific antibody titers and maintains Th1 type immune responses to plasmid DNA immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, L; Hartikka, J; Bozoukova, V; Sukhu, L; Nishioka, W; Singh, G; Ferrari, M; Enas, J; Wheeler, C J; Manthorpe, M; Wloch, M K

    2001-06-14

    Antigen specific immune responses were characterized after intramuscular immunization of BALB/c mice with 5 antigen encoding plasmid DNAs (pDNAs) complexed with Vaxfectin, a cationic lipid formulation. Vaxfectin increased IgG titers for all of the antigens with no effect on the CTL responses to the 2 antigens for which CTL assays were performed. Both antigen specific IgG1 and IgG2a were increased, although IgG2a remained greater than IgG1. Furthermore, Vaxfectin had no effect on IFN-gamma or IL-4 production by splenocytes re-stimulated with antigen, suggesting that the Th1 type responses typical of intramuscular pDNA immunization were not altered. Studies with IL-6 -/- mice suggest that the antibody enhancement is IL-6 dependent and results in a correlative increase in antigen specific antibody secreting cells.

  2. Effect on Antibody and T-Cell Responses of Mixing Five GMP-Produced DNA Plasmids and Administration With Plasmid Expressing GM-CSF

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sedegah, M; Charoenvit, Y; Aguiar, J; Sacci, J; Hedstrom, R; Kumar, S; Belmonte, A; Lanar, DE; Jones, TR; Abot, E

    2004-01-01

    .... In preparation for a clinical trial, we assessed the immunogenicity of GMP-produced plasmids encoding five Plasmodium falciparum proteins, PfCSP, PfSSP2, PfEXP1, PfLSA1, and PfLSA3, given as a mixture, or alone...

  3. Effects of recombinant plasmid pEgr-p53 transfected stably in combination with X-irradiation on cell cycle progression and proliferation in human SKOV-3 tumor cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Lihua; Liu Feng; Li Yanbo; Fu Shibo; Gong Shouliang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of recombinant plasmid pEgr-hp53 transfected stably in combination with X-ray irradiation on the cell cycle progression and the proliferation in human SKOV-3 tumor cells. Methods: pEgr-hp53 and pcDNA3.1 packaged with liposome were stably transfected into SKOV-3 cells in vitro. SKOV-3-hp53 and SKOV-3-vect were irradiated with 0, 0.5, 2.0 and 5.0 Gy X-rays, respectively, i.e. 8 experimental groups. The SKOV-3 cell proliferation and the cell cycle progression were measured with flow cytometry and cell growth curve, respectively. Results: Compared with 0 Gy group, the cell counts in SKOV-3- hp53 plus different doses of irradiation groups 2 d after irradiation decreased significantly (P 0 /G 1 cells increased significantly (P 2 /M cells decreased in varying degrees. The cell counts in SKOV-3-hp53 plus irradiation group were significantly lower than those in corresponding SKOV-3-vect plus irradiation group, the cell counts 4-8 d after irradiation with 0.5 Gy, 2 d after 2.0 Gy irradiation and 6 d after 5.0 Gy irradiation decreased significantly (P 0 /G 1 cells increased significantly (P 2 /M cells decreased significantly (P 1 arrest in SKOV-3 cells and inhibits the cell proliferation. Ionizing radiation can activate early growth response-1 (Egr-1) gene promoter and increase the expression of p53 gene, and enhance the inhibition of tumor cell growth. (authors)

  4. Evaluation of irradiation in foods using DNA comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khawar, Affaf; Bhatti, Ijaz Ahmad; Khan, Q.M.; Ali, T.; Khan, A.I.; Asi, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Comet assay is a rapid, inexpensive and sensitive biological technique to detect DNA damage in food stuffs by irradiation. In this study the Comet assay is applied on foods of plant and animal origins. Samples were irradiated by using 60 Co gamma-radiation source. The applied doses were 2, 6 and 10 kGy for food of plant origin and 0.5, 1 and 2 kGy for meat items. The un-irradiated and irradiated samples were clearly differentiated on the basis of DNA fragmentation. During the electrophoresis study, it was found that in un-irradiated cells DNA remained intact and appeared as Comets without tail whereas in irradiated cells Comets with tails were visible due to stretching of fragmented DNA. Moreover, it was also revealed that the DNA tail length was dose dependent. Dry food stuffs (seeds) showed good results as compared to moist foods (meat, fruits and vegetables) due to the absence of background damage. (author)

  5. JANUS neutron irradiation of a mouse cell line containing a shuttle vector plasmid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, B.; Grdina, D.J.; Ashman, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    The study presented here represents the initial steps of our attempt to characterize JANUS neutron induced mutagenesis in mammalian cells. The approach which we are taking is to use a mammalian cell system which allows one to determine the actual changes in DNA base sequence which occur when a gene mutates. Recently, several systems have been described which make possible the rapid and unambiguous determination of DNA base sequence changes in genes of eukaryotic cells. In some of these systems, a target gene is introduced into the mammalian cells as part of a shuttle vector which is capable of replication in both mammalian cells and bacteria. In this study we have used such a system for the analysis of neutron-induced mutations in the presence and absence of the radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, WR1065. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. Antibodies to UV irradiated DNA: the monitoring of DNA damage by ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wani, A A; Gibson-D' Ambrosio, R E; D' Ambrosio, S M [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (USA). Dept. of Radiology

    1984-10-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) was modified to (1) characterize antibodies raised in rabbits against UV-irradiated single-stranded DNA (UVssDNA) complexed with methylated BSA and (2) directly detect pyrimidine dimers in irradiated DNA. The antisera specifically bound to UVssDNA, UVpoly(dT) and to a limited extent to UVdsDNA and UVpoly(dC). Fifty per cent of the maximum antibody binding was observed at a 1-5000 dilution against UVssDNA. Binding to ssDNA and poly(dT) was observed only at much higher concentrations of antibody, whereas no binding to double stranded DNA (dsDNA) was observed. The extent of binding of the antibody was dependent on the UV dose to DNA and the concentration of antigen immobilized on the plate. The ability of various irradiated molecules, DNA, homopolymers and linkers to act as inhibitors of antibody binding establishes that the antigenic determinants are mainly thymine homodimers with lower affinity for cytosine dimers. Potential usefulness of the antibodies to directly quantitate pyrimidine dimers in cells exposed to UV radiation was determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Flow cytometric analysis of immunostained human lymphocytes irradiated with 254 nm radiation indicated that greater than 50% of the population had significantly higher fluorescent intensity than unirradiated cells.

  7. Irradiation detection of food by DNA Comet Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.A.; Delincee, H.

    1999-01-01

    Microgel electrophoresis of single cells or nuclei (DNA Comet Assay) has been investigated to detect irradiation treatment of more than 50 food commodities e.g. meats, seafood, cereals, pulses, nuts, fruits and vegetables, and spices. The foodstuffs have been exposed to radiation doses covering the range of potential commercial irradiation for inactivation of pathogenic and spoilage micro-organisms, for insect disinfestation and for shelf-life extension. The Comet Assay is based on detection of DNA fragments presumptive to irradiation. For most of the food items investigated, the assay can be applied successfully for irradiation detection by working out different conditions of the assay. However, with some of the foods difficulties arose due to - lack of discrimination between the irradiated and unirradiated food samples due to the presence of the same kinds of comets in both cases and the total absence of the typical intact cells in unirradiated samples. - Sufficient DNA material was not available from some of the foods. - Insufficient lysis of the cell walls in case of some plant foods. In conclusion, the DNA Comet Assay can help to detect the irradiation treatment of several varieties of foods using low-cost equipment in a short time of analysis. (orig.)

  8. Identification of irradiated refrigerated pork with the DNA comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, M.M. E-mail: villavic@net.ipen.br; Marin-Huachaca, N.S.; Mancini-Filho, J. E-mail: jmancini@usp.br; Delincee, H.; Villavicencio, A.L.C.H. E-mail: henry.delincee@bfe.uni-karlsruhe.de

    2004-10-01

    Food irradiation can contribute to a safer and more plentiful food supply by inactivating pathogens, eradicating pests and by extending shelf-life. Particularly in the case of pork meat, this process could be a useful way to inactivate harmful parasites such as Trichinella and Taenia solium. Ionizing radiation causes damage to the DNA of the cells (e.g. strand breaks), which can be used to detect irradiated food. Microelectrophoresis of single cells ('Comet Assay') is a simple and rapid test for DNA damage and can be used over a wide dose range and for a variety of products. Refrigerated pork meat was irradiated with a {sup 60}Co source, Gammacell 220 (A.E.C.L.) installed in IPEN (Sao Paulo, Brazil). The doses given were 0, 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5 kGy for refrigerated samples. Immediately after irradiation the samples were returned to the refrigerator (6 deg. C). Samples were kept in the refrigerator after irradiation. Pork meat was analyzed 1, 8 and 10 days after irradiation using the DNA 'Comet Assay'. This method showed to be an inexpensive and rapid technique for qualitative detection of irradiation treatment.

  9. Identification of irradiated refrigerated pork with the DNA comet assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, M. M.; Marin-Huachaca, N. S.; Mancini-Filho, J.; Delincée, H.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2004-09-01

    Food irradiation can contribute to a safer and more plentiful food supply by inactivating pathogens, eradicating pests and by extending shelf-life. Particularly in the case of pork meat, this process could be a useful way to inactivate harmful parasites such as Trichinella and Taenia solium. Ionizing radiation causes damage to the DNA of the cells (e.g. strand breaks), which can be used to detect irradiated food. Microelectrophoresis of single cells (``Comet Assay'') is a simple and rapid test for DNA damage and can be used over a wide dose range and for a variety of products. Refrigerated pork meat was irradiated with a 60Co source, Gammacell 220 (A.E.C.L.) installed in IPEN (Sa~o Paulo, Brazil). The doses given were 0, 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5kGy for refrigerated samples. Immediately after irradiation the samples were returned to the refrigerator (6°C). Samples were kept in the refrigerator after irradiation. Pork meat was analyzed 1, 8 and 10 days after irradiation using the DNA ``Comet Assay''. This method showed to be an inexpensive and rapid technique for qualitative detection of irradiation treatment.

  10. Effect of γ-irradiated DNA on the activity of DNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leadon, S.A.; Ward, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    A cell-free assay was developed to measure the effect of γ-irradiated DNA template on the ability of DNA polymerase to copy unirradiated template. Doses as low as 1 krad were able to decrease (approx. 15%) the activity of both bacterial and mammalian DNA polymerases in the assay. The percentage of polymerase activity decreased as the dose received by the template increased. The reduction in DNA polymerase activity was shown to be due to an inhibition of the enzyme by the irradiated DNA. Irradiated poly(dA-dT) was more effective in reducing polymerase activity than calf thymus DNA. Thus the polymerase-inhibition site(s) appears to be associated with base damage, specifically adenine or thymine. Using a free-radical scavenger, OH radicals were found to be involved in producing the damage sites. The interaction between irradiated DNA and DNA polymerase was found to be specific for the enzyme and not for other proteins present in the assay. The inhibition of DNA polymerase occurred prior to or during the initiation of DNA synthesis rather than after initiation of synthesis, i.e., during elongation

  11. Quantification of plasmid DNA reference materials for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli based on UV, HR-ICP-MS and digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wen; Xu, Li; Sui, Zhiwei; Li, Yan; Li, Lanying; Wen, Yanli; Li, Chunhua; Ren, Shuzhen; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy and metrology traceability of DNA quantification is becoming a critical theme in many fields, including diagnosis, forensic analysis, microorganism detection etc. Thus the research of DNA reference materials (RMs) and consistency of DNA quantification methods has attracted considerable research interest. In this work, we developed 3 plasmid candidate RMs, containing 3 target genes of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7) and other Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC): stx1, stx2, and fliC (h7) respectively. Comprehensive investigation of the plasmid RMs was performed for their sequence, purity, homogeneity and stability, and then the concentration was quantified by three different methods: ultraviolet spectrophotometer (UV), high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) and digital PCR. As a routinely applied method for DNA analysis, UV was utilized for the quantification (OD260) and purity analysis for the plasmids. HR-ICP-MS quantified the plasmid DNA through analysing the phosphorus in DNA molecules. Digital PCR distributed the DNA samples onto a microarray chip containing thousands of reaction chambers, and quantified the DNA copy numbers by analysing the number of positive signals without any calibration curves needed. Based on the high purification of the DNA reference materials and the optimization of dPCR analysis, we successfully achieved good consistency between UV, HR-ICP-MS and dPCR, with relative deviations lower than 10 %. We then performed the co-quantification of 3 DNA RMs with three different methods together, and the uncertainties of their concentration were evaluated. Finally, the certified values and expanded uncertainties for 3 DNA RMs (pFliC, pStx1 and pStx2) were (1.60 ± 0.10) × 10(10) copies/μL, (1.53 ± 0.10) × 10(10) copies/μL and (1.70 ± 0.11) × 10(10) copies/μL respectively.Graphical abstractWe developed 3 plasmid candidate RMs, containing 3 target genes of

  12. Continuous induction of unscheduled DNA synthesis by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weniger, P.; Klein, W.; Ott, E.; Kocsis, F.; Altmann, H.

    1990-01-01

    The induction of DNA-synthesis in non-S-phase cells is a very sensitive measure of a preceding damage of DNA. Usually, in an in vivo - in vitro test (treatment of an animal, incorporation of H3-thymidine in a cell suspension) the damaging of DNA takes place hours to days before the evaluation. In this case, the time course of the UDS-induction after a single dose of 1 Gy gamma irradiation was observed over a long period of time (21 months). C57 black mice served as test animals. In an age of about 80 days they were irradiated and the induction of unscheduled DNA synthesis was measured at ten time intervals during the whole life-span of the animals. Although the repair in this gamma radiation damage in DNA is a very quick process - with centrifugation in alkaline sucrose a half-life of some minutes is found - an induction of unscheduled DNA synthesis could be seen at the irradiated animals until the end of their life (640 days). The reason for this could be permanent disorders in cellular regulation caused by the gamma irradiation. (author) 4 figs

  13. Continuous induction of unscheduled DNA synthesis by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weniger, P.; Klein, W.; Ott, E.; Kocsis, F.; Altmann, H.

    1988-08-01

    The induction of DNA-synthesis in non-S-phase cells is a very sensitive measure of a preceding damage of the DNA. Usually, in an in vivo -in vitro test (treatment of an animal, incorporation of H3-thymidine in a cell suspension) the damaging of DNA takes place hours to days before the evaluation. In this case, the time course of the UDS-induction after a single dose of 1 Gy gamma irradiation should be observed for a long time (21 months). C57 black mice served as test animals. In an age of about 80 days they were irradiated and the induction of unscheduled DNA synthesis was measured at ten points of time during the whole life-span of the animals. Although the repair in this gamma radiation damage in DNA is a very quick process - with centrifugation in alkaline sucrose you find a half time of some minutes - an induction of unscheduled DNA synthesis could be seen at the irradiated animals until the end of their life (640 days). The reason for this could be permanent disorders in cellular regulation caused by the gamma irradiation. 4 figs. (Author)

  14. Dendritic cell mediated delivery of plasmid DNA encoding LAMP/HIV-1 Gag fusion immunogen enhances T cell epitope responses in HLA DR4 transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory G Simon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the identification and bioinformatics analysis of HLA-DR4-restricted HIV-1 Gag epitope peptides, and the application of dendritic cell mediated immunization of DNA plasmid constructs. BALB/c (H-2d and HLA-DR4 (DRA1*0101, DRB1*0401 transgenic mice were immunized with immature dendritic cells transfected by a recombinant DNA plasmid encoding the lysosome-associated membrane protein-1/HIV-1 Gag (pLAMP/gag chimera antigen. Three immunization protocols were compared: 1 primary subcutaneous immunization with 1x10(5 immature dendritic cells transfected by electroporation with the pLAMP/gag DNA plasmid, and a second subcutaneous immunization with the naked pLAMP/gag DNA plasmid; 2 primary immunization as above, and a second subcutaneous immunization with a pool of overlapping peptides spanning the HIV-1 Gag sequence; and 3 immunization twice by subcutaneous injection of the pLAMP/gag DNA plasmid. Primary immunization with pLAMP/gag-transfected dendritic cells elicited the greatest number of peptide specific T-cell responses, as measured by ex vivo IFN-gamma ELISpot assay, both in BALB/c and HLA-DR4 transgenic mice. The pLAMP/gag-transfected dendritic cells prime and naked DNA boost immunization protocol also resulted in an increased apparent avidity of peptide in the ELISpot assay. Strikingly, 20 of 25 peptide-specific T-cell responses in the HLA-DR4 transgenic mice contained sequences that corresponded, entirely or partially to 18 of the 19 human HLA-DR4 epitopes listed in the HIV molecular immunology database. Selection of the most conserved epitope peptides as vaccine targets was facilitated by analysis of their representation and variability in all reported sequences. These data provide a model system that demonstrates a the superiority of immunization with dendritic cells transfected with LAMP/gag plasmid DNA, as compared to naked DNA, b the value of HLA transgenic mice as a model system for the identification and evaluation

  15. Effect of serotonin on the expression of antigens and DNA levels in Yersinia pestis cells with different plasmid content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueva, Svetlana N.; Korsukov, Vladimir N.; Schukovskaya, Tatyana N.; Kravtsov, Alexander L.

    2004-08-01

    Using flow cytometry (FCM) the influence of exogenous serotonin on culture growth, DNA content and fluorescence intensity of cells binding FITC-labelled plague polyclonal immunoglobulins was studied in Yersinia pestis EV (pFra+, pCad+, pPst+), Yersinia pestis KM218 (pFra-, pCad-, pPst-), Yersinia pestis KM 216 (pFra-, pCad-, pPst+). The results have been obtained by FCM showed serotonin accelerated Yersinia pestis EV (pFra+, pCad+, pPst+), Yersinia pestis KM218 (pFra-, pCad-, pPst-) culture growth during cultivation in Hottinger broth pH 7.2 at 28°C at concentration of 10-5 M. The presence of 10-5 M serotonin in nutrient broth could modulate DNA content in 37°C growing population of plague microbe independently of their plasmid content. Serotonin have been an impact on the distribution pattern of the cells according to their phenotypical characteristics, which was reflected in the levels of population heterogeneity in the intensity of specific immunofluorescence determined by FMC.

  16. Abnormal ultraviolet mutagenic spectrum in plasmid DNA replicated in cultured fibroblasts from a patient with the skin cancer-prone disease, xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seetharam, S.; Protic-Sabljic, M.; Seidman, M.M.; Kraemer, K.H.

    1987-01-01

    A shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, was utilized to assess the types of mutations that cells from a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group D, introduce into ultraviolet (UV) damaged, replicating DNA. Patients with xeroderma pigmentosum have clinical and cellular UV hypersensitivity, increased frequency of sun-induced skin cancer, and deficient DNA repair. In comparison to UV-treated pZ189 replicated in DNA repair-proficient cells, there were fewer surviving plasmids, a higher frequency of plasmids with mutations, fewer plasmids with two or more mutations in the marker gene, and a new mutagenic hotspot. The major type of base substitution mutation was the G:C to A:T transition with both cell lines. These results, together with similar findings published earlier with cells from a xeroderma pigmentosum patient in complementation group A, suggest that isolated G:C to A:T somatic mutations may be particularly important in generation of human skin cancer by UV radiation

  17. Phototransfection of mouse embryonic stem cells with plasmid DNA using femtosecond laser pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thobakgale, Setumo L

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available efficient in photonic interactions with biological material. As of late, laser pulses have been used for drug and DNA delivery into cells via transient optical perforation of the cellular membrane. Thus in this study, we design and construct an optical...

  18. PlasmaDNA: a free, cross-platform plasmid manipulation program for molecular biology laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainy Jeffrey

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most molecular biology experiments, and the techniques associated with this field of study, involve a great deal of engineering in the form of molecular cloning. Like all forms of engineering, perfect information about the starting material is crucial for successful completion of design and strategies. Results We have generated a program that allows complete in silico simulation of the cloning experiment. Starting with a primary DNA sequence, PlasmaDNA looks for restriction sites, open reading frames, primer annealing sequences, and various common domains. The databases are easily expandable by the user to fit his most common cloning needs. PlasmaDNA can manage and graphically represent multiple sequences at the same time, and keeps in memory the overhangs at the end of the sequences if any. This means that it is possible to virtually digest fragments, to add the digestion products to the project, and to ligate together fragments with compatible ends to generate the new sequences. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR fragments can also be virtually generated using the primer database, automatically adding to the fragments any 5' extra sequences present in the primers. Conclusion PlasmaDNA is a program available both on Windows and Apple operating systems, designed to facilitate molecular cloning experiments by building a visual map of the DNA. It then allows the complete planning and simulation of the cloning experiment. It also automatically updates the new sequences generated in the process, which is an important help in practice. The capacity to maintain multiple sequences in the same file can also be used to archive the various steps and strategies involved in the cloning of each construct. The program is freely available for download without charge or restriction.

  19. Studies on Post-Irradiation DNA Degradation in Micrococcus Radiodurans, Strain RII51

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auda, H.; Emborg, C.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of irradiation condition on post-irradiation DNA degradation was studied in a radiation resistant mutant of M. radiodurans, strain ${\\rm R}_{{\\rm II}}5$. After irradiation with 1 Mrad or higher more DNA is degraded in cells irradiated in wet condition than in cells irradiated with t...

  20. Detection of irradiation treatment of foods using DNA 'comet assay'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Hasan M.; Delincee, Henry

    1998-01-01

    Microgel electrophoresis of single cells (DNA comet assay) has been investigated to detect irradiation treatment of some food samples. These samples of fresh and frozen rainbow trout, red lentil, gram and sliced almonds were irradiated to 1 or 2 kGy using 10 MeV electron beam from a linear accelerator. Rainbow trout samples yielded good results with samples irradiated to 1 or 2 kGy showing fragmentation of DNA and, therefore, longer comets with no intact cells. Unirradiated samples showed shorter comets with a significant number of intact cells. For rainbow trout stored in a freezer for 11 days the irradiated samples can still be discerned by electrophoresis from unirradiated samples, however, the unirradiated trouts also showed some longer comets besides some intact cells. Radiation treatment of red lentils can also be detected by this method, i.e. no intact cells in 1 or 2 kGy irradiated samples and shorter comets and some intact cells in unirradiated samples. However, the results for gram and sliced almond samples were not satisfactory since some intact DNA cells were observed in irradiated samples as well. Probably, incomplete lysis has led to these deviating results

  1. Development of DNA elution method to detect irradiated foodstuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copin, M.P.; Bourgeois, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the work is to develop a reliable method to detect whether a fresh and frozen foodstuff has been irradiated. The molecule of DNA is one of the targets of ionizing radiation. The induction of three major classes of lesion have been shown. Double strand breaks, single strand breaks and base damage. Among the different techniques used to observe and quantify the strand breaks, techniques of elution are very interesting. The method proposed consisted of a filtration of the DNA at the atmospheric pressure and in non denaturing conditions. The amount of DNA retained on the filter is measured after being suitably labelled by microfluorometry. A difference in the amount of DNA retained on a filter of 2 μm from a lysed muscular tissue sample between a frozen Norway lobster which has been irradiated and one which has not, is observed. 7 refs

  2. Effect of the Plasmid-DNA Vaccination on Macroscopic and Microscopic Damage Caused by the Experimental Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in the Canine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Rodríguez-Morales

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dog is considered the main domestic reservoir for Trypanosoma cruzi infection and a suitable experimental animal model to study the pathological changes during the course of Chagas disease (CD. Vaccine development is one of CD prevention methods to protect people at risk. Two plasmids containing genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (TcSP and an amastigote-specific glycoprotein (TcSSP4 were used as DNA vaccines in a canine model. Splenomegaly was not found in either of the recombinant plasmid-immunized groups; however, cardiomegaly was absent in animals immunized only with the plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene. The inflammation of subendocardial and myocardial tissues was prevented only with the immunization with TcSSP4 gene. In conclusion, the vaccination with these genes has a partial protective effect on the enlargement of splenic and cardiac tissues during the chronic CD and on microscopic hearth damage, since both plasmids prevented splenomegaly but only one avoided cardiomegaly, and the lesions in heart tissue of dog immunized with plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene covered only subepicardial tissue.

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Cationic PLA-PEG Nanoparticles for Delivery of Plasmid DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Weiwei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of the present work was to formulate and evaluate cationic poly(lactic acid-poly(ethylene glycol (PLA-PEG nanoparticles as novel non-viral gene delivery nano-device. Cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation method. The gene loaded nanoparticles were obtained by incubating the report gene pEGFP with cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles. The physicochemical properties (e.g., morphology, particle size, surface charge, DNA binding efficiency and biological properties (e.g., integrity of the released DNA, protection from nuclease degradation, plasma stability, in vitro cytotoxicity, and in vitro transfection ability in Hela cells of the gene loaded PLA-PEG nanoparticles were evaluated, respectively. The obtained cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles and gene loaded nanoparticles were both spherical in shape with average particle size of 89.7 and 128.9 nm, polydispersity index of 0.185 and 0.161, zeta potentials of +28.9 and +16.8 mV, respectively. The obtained cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles with high binding efficiency (>95% could protect the loaded DNA from the degradation by nuclease and plasma. The nanoparticles displayed sustained-release properties in vitro and the released DNA maintained its structural and functional integrity. It also showed lower cytotoxicity than Lipofectamine 2000 and could successfully transfect gene into Hela cells even in presence of serum. It could be concluded that the established gene loaded cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles with excellent properties were promising non-viral nano-device, which had potential to make cancer gene therapy achievable.

  4. Electric field-mediated transport of plasmid DNA in tumor interstitium in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, Joshua W; Zaharoff, David A; Mossop, Brian J; Yuan, Fan

    2007-11-01

    Local pulsed electric field application is a method for improving non-viral gene delivery. Mechanisms of the improvement include electroporation and electrophoresis. To understand how electrophoresis affects pDNA delivery in vivo, we quantified the magnitude of electric field-induced interstitial transport of pDNA in 4T1 and B16.F10 tumors implanted in mouse dorsal skin-fold chambers. Four different electric pulse sequences were used in this study, each consisted of 10 identical pulses that were 100 or 400 V/cm in strength and 20 or 50 ms in duration. The interval between consecutive pulses was 1 s. The largest distance of transport was obtained with the 400 V/cm and 50 ms pulse, and was 0.23 and 0.22 microm/pulse in 4T1 and B16.F10 tumors, respectively. There were no significant differences in transport distances between 4T1 and B16.F10 tumors. Results from in vivo mapping and numerical simulations revealed an approximately uniform intratumoral electric field that was predominantly in the direction of the applied field. The data in the study suggested that interstitial transport of pDNA induced by a sequence of ten electric pulses was ineffective for macroscopic delivery of genes in tumors. However, the induced transport was more efficient than passive diffusion.

  5. KEY COMPARISON: CCQM-K61: Quantitation of a linearised plasmid DNA, based on a matched standard in a matrix of non-target DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, Alison; Holden, Marcia; Salit, Marc; Burns, Malcolm; Ellison, Stephen L. R.

    2009-01-01

    Key comparison CCQM-K61 was performed to demonstrate and document the capability of interested national metrology institutes in the determination of the quantity of specific DNA target in an aqueous solution. The study provides support for the following measurement claim: "Quantitation of a linearised plasmid DNA, based on a matched standard in a matrix of non-target DNA". The comparison was an activity of the Bioanalysis Working Group (BAWG) of the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière and was coordinated by NIST (Gaithersburg, USA) and LGC (Teddington, UK). The following laboratories (in alphabetical order) participated in this key comparison. DMSC (Thailand); IRMM (European Union); KRISS (Republic of Korea); LGC (UK); NIM (China); NIST (USA); NMIA (Australia); NMIJ (Japan); VNIIM (Russian Federation) Good agreement was observed between the reported results of all nine of the participants. Uncertainty estimates did not account fully for the dispersion of results even after allowance for possible inhomogeneity in calibration materials. Preliminary studies suggest that the effects of fluorescence threshold setting might contribute to the excess dispersion, and further study of this topic is suggested Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  6. Metal ion protection of DNA to fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, B.; Bugoi, R.; Radulescu, I.; Radu, L.

    1998-01-01

    The most important effects of the ionising radiation are the single and double strand breaks (SSB and DBS), modifications of the DNA bases and deoxyribose, as well as the occurrence of alkali and heat labile sites (revealed as strand breaks after alkaline or thermic treatment of irradiated DNA). The ionising particles can have either direct effects on the DNA constituents or indirect effects, mediated by the OH - radicals, produced by water radiolysis. The occurrence of SSB and DSB in the chromatin DNA strands is supposed to hinder the DNA-dye complex formation. Usually, the dyes present different fluorescence parameters in the two possible states, so one can correlate the lifetime or the quantum yield with the extent of the damage. We took into account the protective effect offered both by histones, which behave as 'scavenger molecules' for OH - radicals and by the high compactness of DNA chromatin. Similar protective effects might be the results of the metallic ion addition which triggers some conformational transitions of the chromatin DNA towards a highly compacted structure. In this paper we present a study of the complexes of fast neutron irradiated chromatin with proflavine. Fluorimetric and time resolved spectroscopic determinations (single photon counting method) of chromatin-Pr complexes were realised. Information regarding the chromatin protein damage were obtained by monitoring the fluorescence of Trp. The chromatin was irradiated (20-100 Gy) with fast neutrons, obtained by the reaction of 13.5 MeV deuterons on a thick beryllium target at the IFIN-HH U-120 Cyclotron. The dose mean lineal energy in water at the point of interest was 50 keV/m and the mean dose rate was 1.5 Gy/min. By fluorescence determinations, changes of the Pr intercalation parameters in fast neutron irradiated chromatin DNA have been observed. Fluorescence techniques provide valuable information on the binding equilibrium by considering the radiation deexcitation of the complex. The

  7. Immunological detection of modified DNA bases in irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.H.H.; Tyreman, A.L.; Deeble, D.J.; Jones, M.; Smith, C.J.; Christiansen, J.F.; Beaumont, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    Ionising radiation is fatal to all known life forms given sufficient exposure in terms of dose and duration. This property has been used beneficially to sterilise a range of materials, particularly medical products where the removal of all contaminating organisms is deemed essential. Irradiation has long been used to sterilise food for consumption by certain categories of patients. The method is attractive because all potentially contaminating organisms can be removed by one simple treatment. Irradiation also slows down or stops certain processes such as sprouting. There are, however, disadvantages to irradiating food. It is not only DNA that is affected as alterations in lipid and protein components of the food may lead to a loss of quality. Although irradiation will kill bacteria it will probably not affect any toxin produced by those bacteria prior to treatment. Irradiation achieves its effects by damaging molecules, particularly nucleic acids. Consequently, if any of the damage to nucleic acids could be shown to by by a process unique to irradiation, and the products of this unique process could be measured, then there is the basis for a detection system. Furthermore, if the damage could be shown to be proportional to the dose of radiation received then the dose could also be quantified. Legislation, therefore, requires that assays be developed for use in different countries, those which totally ban irradiated food, those which require irradiated food to be labelled and those which have selective laws relating to specific foods and specific levels of irradiation. (author)

  8. Plasmid DNA studies in Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from olive fermentations: production of and immunity to plantaricin OL15 is associated to a 9.6 Kb plasmid (pOL15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad, Kacem

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Previously 12 Lactobacillus plantarum strains were isolated from fermented olives. Among these, only L. plantarum OL15 produced bacteriocin (plantaricin OL15. In this study, the 12 strains were examined for plasmid DNA content. Of these, 9 strains have shown one to three plasmid bands ranging in size from 5.4 to 12.2 kb. L. plantarum OL15 exhibited one plasmid (9.6 kb which was named pOL15. After curing with novobiocin and ethidium bromide, the plasmid profile analysis of non producing derivatives, showed that the 9.6 kb plasmid pOL15 harbored by the parental strain had been lost in all cases and none of them regained the ability to produce plantaricin OL15 suggesting that the production of plantaricin OL15 is plasmid linked. Plantaricin OL15 was not inactived by amylase and lipase suggesting that plantaricin OL15 activity was not dependent on the presence of either a carbohydrate or lipid moiety. Plantaricin OL15 showed activity against lactic acid bacteria of different species and also against olive spoilage and phytopathogenic bacteria, including Pseudomonas and Erwinia.En un estudio previo, se aislaron 12 cepas de Lactobacillus plantarum a partir de aceitunas fermentadas. Entre ellas, solo L. plantarum OL15 produjo bacteriocinas (plantaricin OL15. En este estudio, se examinó el contenido de AND plásmido en las 12 cepas citadas. Entre ellas, 9 cepas han mostrado de una a tres bandas de plásmido con tamaños en el rango de 5.4 a 12.2 kb. L. plantarum OL15 exhibió un plásmido (9.6 kb que se denominó pOL15. Después del curado con novobiocina y bromuro de etidio, la pérdida del plásmido pOL15 asociada a la pérdida de su facultad para producir plantaricin OL15, sugiere que la producción de plantaricina OL15 está ligada al plásmido. La plantaricin OL15 no se inactivó por amilasa ni por lipasa sugiriendo que su actividad no es dependiente de la presencia de carbohidratos o lípidos. La plantaricina OL15 mostró actividad frente a

  9. Radioprotection against DNA damage by an extract of Indian green mussel, Perna viridis (L.)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumaran, S.P.; Kutty, B.C.; Chatterji, A.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Mishra, K.P.

    -irradiation Prevention of DNA damage both in plasmid and lymphocytes and cell death in lymphocytes appears correlated with reduction of oxidatively generated free radicals It is concluded that protection against radiation-induced cell death and DNA damage by MH...

  10. Anchoring of self-assembled plasmid DNA/ anti-DNA antibody/cationic lipid micelles on bisphosphonate-modified stent for cardiovascular gene delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma G

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Guilei Ma,1,# Yong Wang,1,# Ilia Fishbein,2 Mei Yu,1 Linhua Zhang,1 Ivan S Alferiev,2 Jing Yang,1 Cunxian Song,1 Robert J Levy2 1Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Abramson Research Building, Philadelphia, PA, USA #These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To investigate the anchoring of plasmid DNA/anti-DNA antibody/cationic lipid tri-complex (DAC micelles onto bisphosphonate-modified 316 L coronary stents for cardiovascular site-specific gene delivery. Methods: Stents were first modified with polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PAA-BP, thereby enabling the retention of a PAA-BP molecular monolayer that permits the anchoring (via vector-binding molecules of DAC micelles. DAC micelles were then chemically linked onto the PAA-BP-modified stents by using N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithiol-propionate (SPDP as a crosslinker. Rhodamine-labeled DNA was used to assess the anchoring of DAC micelles, and radioactive-labeled antibody was used to evaluate binding capacity and stability. DAC micelles (encoding green fluorescent protein were tethered onto the PAA-BP-modified stents, which were assessed in cell culture. The presence of a PAA-BP molecular monolayer on the steel surface was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscope analysis. Results: The anchoring of DAC micelles was generally uniform and devoid of large-scale patches of defects. Isotopic quantification confirmed that the amount of antibody chemically linked on the stents was 17-fold higher than that of the physical adsorbed control stents and its retention time was also significantly longer. In cell culture, numerous green fluorescent protein-positive cells were found on the PAA-BP modified stents, which demonstrated high localization and efficiency of gene delivery. Conclusion: The DAC micelle

  11. DNA-membrane complex restoration in Micrococcus radiodurans after X-irradiation: relation to repair, DNA synthesis and DNA degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dardalhon-Samsonoff, M; Averbeck, D [Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. Curie

    1980-07-01

    The DNA-membrane complex in Micrococcus radiodurans was shown to be essentially constituted of proteins, lipids and DNA. The complex was dissociated immediately after X-irradiation of cells and restored during post-incubation in complete medium. In X-irradiated protoplasts some DNA remained associated with the complex. Restoration of the complex during post-incubation was only seen in a medium favouring DNA polymerase and ligase activities. Under this condition no DNA synthesis occurred, suggesting that complex restoration may involve ligase activity. The complex restoration in the wild type and the X-ray sensitive mutant UV17 of M. radiodurans was strictly dependent on the X-ray dose. It was correlated with survival and DNA degradation but always preceded the onset of DNA synthesis after X-irradiation. At the same dose the complex restoration was about 2 fold lower in mutant than in wild type cells indicating that the restoration of the complex is related to repair capacity. The results are consistent with the idea that the complex protects X-irradiated DNA of M. radiodurans from further breakdown and, subsequently, permits DNA synthesis and repair to occur.

  12. Longevity of rAAV vector and plasmid DNA in blood after intramuscular injection in nonhuman primates: implications for gene doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W; Le Guiner, C; Gernoux, G; Penaud-Budloo, M; Moullier, P; Snyder, R O

    2011-07-01

    Legitimate uses of gene transfer technology can benefit from sensitive detection methods to determine vector biodistribution in pre-clinical studies and in human clinical trials, and similar methods can detect illegitimate gene transfer to provide sports-governing bodies with the ability to maintain fairness. Real-time PCR assays were developed to detect a performance-enhancing transgene (erythropoietin, EPO) and backbone sequences in the presence of endogenous cellular sequences. In addition to developing real-time PCR assays, the steps involved in DNA extraction, storage and transport were investigated. By real-time PCR, the vector transgene is distinguishable from the genomic DNA sequence because of the absence of introns, and the vector backbone can be identified by heterologous gene expression control elements. After performance of the assays was optimized, cynomolgus macaques received a single dose by intramuscular (IM) injection of plasmid DNA, a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector serotype 1 (rAAV1) or a rAAV8 vector expressing cynomolgus macaque EPO. Macaques received a high plasmid dose intended to achieve a significant, but not life-threatening, increase in hematocrit. rAAV vectors were used at low doses to achieve a small increase in hematocrit and to determine the limit of sensitivity for detecting rAAV sequences by single-step PCR. DNA extracted from white blood cells (WBCs) was tested to determine whether WBCs can be collaterally transfected by plasmid or transduced by rAAV vectors in this context, and can be used as a surrogate marker for gene doping. We demonstrate that IM injection of a conventional plasmid and rAAV vectors results in the presence of DNA that can be detected at high levels in blood before rapid elimination, and that rAAV genomes can persist for several months in WBCs.

  13. In Vitro Repair of UV-Irradiated Micrococcus luteus Bacteriophage N1 Transfecting DNA 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Inga; George, Jeanne; Grossman, Lawrence

    1974-01-01

    Calcium-treated UV-sensitive, host cell reactivation− strains of Micrococcus luteus are infected with UV-irradiated N1 DNA. In strains lacking UV endonuclease, in vitro treatment of the irradiated DNA results in transfection enhancement. PMID:4823319

  14. Functional activity of plasmid DNA after entry into the atmosphere of earth investigated by a new biomarker stability assay for ballistic spaceflight experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cora S Thiel

    Full Text Available Sounding rockets represent an excellent platform for testing the influence of space conditions during the passage of Earth's atmosphere and re-entry on biological, physical and chemical experiments for astrobiological purposes. We designed a robust functionality biomarker assay to analyze the biological effects of suborbital spaceflights prevailing during ballistic rocket flights. During the TEXUS-49 rocket mission in March 2011, artificial plasmid DNA carrying a fluorescent marker (enhanced green fluorescent protein: EGFP and an antibiotic resistance cassette (kanamycin/neomycin was attached on different positions of rocket exterior; (i circular every 90 degree on the outer surface concentrical of the payload, (ii in the grooves of screw heads located in between the surface application sites, and (iii on the surface of the bottom side of the payload. Temperature measurements showed two major peaks at 118 and 130 °C during the 780 seconds lasting flight on the inside of the recovery module, while outer gas temperatures of more than 1000 °C were estimated on the sample application locations. Directly after retrieval and return transport of the payload, the plasmid DNA samples were recovered. Subsequent analyses showed that DNA could be recovered from all application sites with a maximum of 53% in the grooves of the screw heads. We could further show that up to 35% of DNA retained its full biological function, i.e., mediating antibiotic resistance in bacteria and fluorescent marker expression in eukaryotic cells. These experiments show that our plasmid DNA biomarker assay is suitable to characterize the environmental conditions affecting DNA during an atmospheric transit and the re-entry and constitute the first report of the stability of DNA during hypervelocity atmospheric transit indicating that sounding rocket flights can be used to model the high-speed atmospheric entry of organics-laden artificial meteorites.

  15. Plasmid origin of replication of herpesvirus papio: DNA sequence and enhancer function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, D D; Sung, N S; Pesano, R L; Sexton, C J; Hutchison, C; Pagano, J S

    1990-01-01

    Herpesvirus papio (HVP) is a lymphotropic virus of baboons which is related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and produces latent infection. The nucleotide sequence of the 5,775-base-pair (bp) EcoRI K fragment of HVP, which has previously been shown to confer the ability to replicate autonomously, has been determined. Within this DNA fragment is a region which bears structural and sequence similarity to the ori-P region of EBV. The HVP ori-P region has a 10- by 26-bp tandem array which is related to the 20- by 30-bp tandem array from the EBV ori-P region. In HVP there is an intervening region of 764 bp followed by five partial copies of the 26-bp monomer. Both the EBV and HVP 3' regions have the potential to form dyad structures which, however, differ in arrangement. We also demonstrate that a transcriptional enhancer which requires transactivation by a virus-encoded factor is present in the HVP ori-P. Images PMID:2159548

  16. Common Deletion (CD) in mitochondrial DNA of irradiated rat heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Raquel Gomes; Ferreira-Machado, Samara C.; Almeida, Carlos E.V. de, E-mail: raquelgsiqueira@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcanatara Gomes. Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Silva, Dayse A. da; Carvalho, Elizeu F. de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcanatara Gomes. Lab. de Diagnosticos por DNA; Melo, Luiz D.B. de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Parasitologia Molecular

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to map the common deletion (CD) area in mtDNA and investigate the levels of this deletion in irradiated heart. The assays were developed in male Wistar rats that were irradiated with three different single doses (5, 10 or 15 Gy) delivered directly to the heart and the analyses were performed at various times post-irradiation (3, 15 or 120 days). The CDs area were sequenced and the CD quantified by real-time PCR. Our study demonstrated that the CD levels progressively decreased from the 3rd until the 15th day after irradiation, and then increased thereafter. Additionally, it was observed that the levels of CD are modulated differently according to the different categories of doses (moderate and high). This study demonstrated an immediate response to ionizing radiation, measured by the presence of mutations in the CD area and a decrease in the CD levels. (author)

  17. DNA polymerase. beta. reaction with ultraviolet-irradiated DNA incised by correndonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, R; Zarebska, Z [Instytut Onkologii, Warsaw (Poland); Zmudzka, B [Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw. Inst. Biochemii i Biofizyki

    1980-09-19

    Covalently closed circular Col E1 DNA was ultraviolet-irradiated with a dose of 60 J/m/sup 2/, thus introducing about 3.2 pyrimidine dimers per DNA molecule. Treatment of irradiated Col E1 DNA with Micrococcus luteus correndonuclease resulted, in the vicinity of pyrimidine dimers, in an average of 3.3 incisions per DNA molecule, and converted DNA to the open circular form. Incised Col E1 DNA stimulated no reaction with calf thymus DNA polymerase ..cap alpha.. but was recognized as a template by DNA polymerase ..beta... The latter enzyme incorporated about 1.6 molecules of dTMP (corresponding to 6 molecules of dNMP) per one correndonuclease incision. The length of the DNA polymerase ..beta.. product was comparable to the anticipated length of the DNA region within which the hydrogen bonds were disrupted owing to dimer formation. The enzyme required Mg/sup 2 +/ and four dNTPs for reaction and was resistant to N-ethylmaleimide or p-mercuribenzoate.

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and plasmid-mediated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    negative Staphylococci (CoNS) were isolated from clinical samples and isolates subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing, plasmid curing and plasmid DNA isolation. Result: The highest percentages isolates were recovered from urine samples and ...

  19. Effect of CD34+ cord blood stem cell transfected by plasmid vector pIRES2-FL-IL-3 on the mice after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Zhang Linsheng; Zhang Hongbing; Guo Chaohua; Tong Shiwu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of CD34 cord blood stem cell transfected by plasmid vector plRES2-FL-IL-3 on the mouse after irradiation and to investigate its mechanisms. Methods: In the co-expressed group (12 mice), CD 34 + cord blood stem cells were transfected by plasmid vector pIRES2-FL-IL-3.5 x lO 5 cells were injected intravenously in the mouse. The hemogram changes in mice were detected 2, 4 and 6 weeks after radiation. At 6 weeks after irradiation, the expression of the CD 34 in spleen was detected by immumofluorescence method. The mRNA level and the activity of IL-3 and FL were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. Other 3 groups were CD 34 + cell group (CD 34 group), pIRES2-IL-3 group(IL 3 group) and pIRES2-FL group(FL group), and there were 12 mice in each group. Results: The survival rate of CD 34 group, IL3 group and FL group at the 6th week were 25.0% (3/12), 50.0% (6/12) and 50.0% (6/12), respectively. It was 91.7% (11/12) in the co-expressed group, which was higher than those in the other groups. The expression of the CD 34 of spleen in the co-expressed group was higher than those of the other groups. The mRNA level and the activity of IL-3 and FL of spleen in the co-expressed group were higher than those in the other groups too. Conclusions: The CD 34 '+ cord blood stem cells transfected by plasmid vector pIRES2-FL-IL-3 have hemogenesis promotion effect on the mice after irradiation, which was related with the aggregation, proliferation of stem cells and the high expression of the interest proteins.. (authors)

  20. Determination of melting curves of irradiated DNA preparations and of preparations isolated from irradiated calf lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowska, B.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of melting curves enabled to establish differences of melting temperature, hyperchromic effect and breadth of the helix - coil phase transition dependent on dose of the ionizing radiation applied and on kind of the irradiated object. Changes of the investigated parameters of DNA irradiated after isolation were detectably more pronounced that of DNA from irradiated lymph nodes. The obtained results suggest a protective role of tissue to the secondary structure of DNA. (author)

  1. DNA repair in ultraviolet-irradiated spores of Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, T.C.V.

    1976-01-01

    It has been shown previously by others that at least two independent repair mechanisms are present in Bacillus subtilis for removing ''spore photoproduct'' from DNA of ultraviolet (254 nm)-irradiated spores after germination. One of these, designated as ''spore repair,'' is shown in this study to restore ''spore photoproduct'' to two thymine residues, leaving the DNA backbone intact at the end of the process in vivo. The circumstances under which this repair can occur and some characteristics of its energy requirements have been clarified. The second repair process is identified as excision repair, which can excise both ''spore photoproduct'' from DNA of irradiated spores and cyclobutane-type pyrimidine dimers from DNA of irradiated vegetative cells. In this study it is shown that the gene hcr 1 affects an enzyme activity for the incision step initiating this repair, while the gene hcr 42 affects a step subsequent to incision in the mechanism. In addition a third, independent repair system, termed ''germinative excision repair,'' is discovered and shown to be specific for excising only cyclobutane-type pyrimidine dimers but not ''spore photoproduct.'' This repair system is responsible for the observed high ultraviolet-resistance and temporary capacity for host cell reactivation on recently germinated spores of Bacillus subtilis HCR - strains

  2. Highly Effective Non-Viral Antitumor Gene Therapy System Comprised of Biocompatible Small Plasmid Complex Particles Consisting of pDNA, Anionic Polysaccharide, and Fully Deprotected Linear Polyethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Koyama

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We have reported that ternary complexes of plasmid DNA with conventional linear polyethylenimine (l-PEI and certain polyanions were very stably dispersed, and, with no cryoprotectant, they could be freeze-dried and re-hydrated without the loss of transfection ability. These properties enabled the preparation of a concentrated suspension of very small pDNA complex, by preparing the complexes at highly diluted conditions, followed by condensation via lyophilization-and-rehydration procedure. Recently, a high potency linear polyethylenimine having no residual protective groups, i.e., Polyethylenimine “Max” (PEI “Max”, is available, which has been reported to induce much higher gene expression than conventional l-PEI. We tried to prepare the small DNA/PEI “Max”/polyanion complexes by a similar freeze-drying method. Small complex particles could be obtained without apparent aggregation, but transfection activity of the rehydrated complexes was severely reduced. Complex-preparation conditions were investigated in details to achieve the freeze-dried DNA/PEI “Max”/polyanion small ternary complexes with high transfection efficiency. DNA/PEI “Max”/polyanion complexes containing cytokine-coding plasmids were then prepared, and their anti-tumor therapeutic efficacy was examined in tumor-bearing mice.

  3. Effect of vanillin on methylene blue plus light-induced single-strand breaks in plasmid pBR322 DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S S; Ghosh, A; Devasagayam, T P; Chauhan, P S

    2000-09-20

    The ability of vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde), a naturally occurring food flavouring agent, in inhibiting photosensitization-induced single-strand breaks (ssbs) in plasmid pBR322 DNA has been examined in an in vitro system, independent of DNA repair/replication processes. Photosensitization of DNA with methylene blue, visible light and oxygen, induced ssbs resulting in the production of open circular form (OC form) in a concentration-dependent manner. The yield of OC form induced by photosensitization was increased several-fold by deuteration of the buffer and was found to be inhibited by sodium azide, a scavenger of singlet oxygen (1O(2)). Vanillin, per se, did not induce but inhibited photosensitization-induced ssbs in plasmid DNA, at millimolar concentrations. The inhibitory effect of vanillin was both concentration- and time-dependent. On a molar basis, vanillin was, however, less effective than trolox, a water-soluble analogue of alpha-tocopherol. Photosensitization by methylene blue system generates singlet oxygen, as one of the major components of ROS. Therefore, interaction of singlet oxygen with vanillin was investigated. The rate constant of vanillin with 1O(2) was estimated to be 5.93x10(7)M(-1)s(-1) and that of sodium azide as 2. 7x10(8)M(-1)s(-1). The present investigations show that vanillin can protect against photosensitization-induced ssbs in the plasmid pBR322 DNA, and this effect may partly be due to its ability to scavenge 1O(2).

  4. Cell lethality after selective irradiation of the DNA replication fork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, K.G.; Warters, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    It has been suggested that nascent DNA located at the DNA replication fork may exhibit enhanced sensitivity to radiation damage. To evaluate this hypothesis, Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) were labeled with 125 I-iododeoxyuridine ( 125 IUdR) either in the presence or absence of aphidicolin. Aphidicolin (5 μg/ml) reduced cellular 125 IUdR incorporation to 3-5% of the control value. The residual 125 I incorporation appeared to be restricted to low molecular weight (sub-replicon sized) fragments of DNA which were more sensitive to micrococcal nuclease attack and less sensitive to high salt DNase I digestion than randomly labeled DNA. These findings suggest that DNA replicated in the presence of aphidicolin remains localized at the replication fork adjacent to the nuclear matrix. Based on these observations an attempt was made to compare the lethal consequences of 125 I decays at the replication fork to that of 125 I decays randomly distributed over the entire genome. Regardless of the distribution of decay events, all treatment groups exhibited identical dose-response curves (D 0 : 101 125 I decays/cell). Since differential irradiation of the replication complex did not result in enhanced cell lethality, it can be concluded that neither the nascent DNA nor the protein components (replicative enzymes, nuclear protein matrix) associated with the DNA replication site constitute key radiosensitive targets within the cellular genome. (orig.)

  5. Cloning of Bacteroides fragilis plasmid genes affecting metronidazole resistance and ultraviolet survival in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehnert, G.U.; Abratt, V.R.; Goodman, H.J.; Woods, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    Since reduced metronidazole causes DNA damage, resistance to metronidazole was used as a selection method for the cloning of Bacteroides fragilis genes affecting DNA repair mechanisms in Escherichia coli. Genes from B. fragilis Bf-2 were cloned on a recombinant plasmid pMT100 which made E. coli AB1157 and uvrA, B, and C mutant strains more resistant to metronidazole, but more sensitive to far uv irradiation under aerobic conditions. The loci affecting metronidazole resistance and uv sensitivity were linked and located on a 5-kb DNA fragment which originated from the small 6-kb cryptic plasmid pBFC1 present in B. fragilis Bf-2 cells

  6. Persistence Mechanisms of Conjugative Plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Hansen, Lars H.; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Are plasmids selfish parasitic DNA molecules or an integrated part of the bacterial genome? This chapter reviews the current understanding of the persistence mechanisms of conjugative plasmids harbored by bacterial cells and populations. The diversity and intricacy of mechanisms affecting the suc...

  7. Un-repairable DNA damage in cell due to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Giichi

    1992-01-01

    Radiation-induced cell reproductive deactivation is caused by damage to DNA. In a cell, cellular DNA radical reacts with diffusion controlled rate and generates DNA peroxide radical. The chemical repair of DNA radical with hydrogen donation by thiol competes with the reaction of oxygen with same radicals in the DNA molecules. From the point reaction rates, the prolongation of radical life time is not as great as expected from the reduction in the glutathione content of the cell. This indicates that further reducting compounds (protein bound thiol) are present in the cell. The residual radicals are altered to strand breaks, base damages and so on. The effective lesions for a number of endpoints is un-repaired double strand break, which has been discovered in a cluster. This event gives risk to high LET radiation or to a track end of X-rays. For X- or electron irradiations the strand breaks are frequently induced by the interactions between sublesions on two strands in DNA. A single strand break followed by radical action may be unstable excited state, because of remaining sugar radical action and of having negative charged phosphates, in which strands breaks will be rejoined in a short time to stable state. On the same time, a break in the double helix will be immediately produced if two breaks are on either or approximately opposite locations. The formation of a double strand break in the helix depends on the ion strength of the cell. The potassium ions are largely released from polyanionic strand during irradiation, which results in the induction of denatured region. Double strand break with the denatured region seems to be un-repairable DNA damage. (author)

  8. S1-sensitive sites in DNA after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Bertram, H.

    1981-01-01

    DNA from γ-irradiated T 1 bacteriophages was analyzed for 'single-stranded' sites by cleavage with S1 nuclease from Aspergillus oryzae as lesion probe. The ratio of 'S1-sensitive sites' to the amount of radiation-induced single-strand breaks was about one. Presumably these 'denatured' sites were associated with single-strand breaks. The subsequent check for the persistence of 'single-stranded' sites within the DNA molecule by thermokinetics demonstrated a strong affinity of the nuclease to its substrate, the single-stranded lesion, and a perfect excision. It is assumed that the direct absorption of radiation energy in the DNA gives rise to the formation of such bulky lesions. (Auth.)

  9. Unscheduled DNA synthesis and elimination of DNA damage in liver cells of. gamma. -irradiated senescent mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaziev, A.I.; Malakhova, L.V. (AN SSSR, Pushchino-na-Oke. Inst. Biologicheskoj Fiziki)

    1982-10-01

    The level of 'spontaneous' and ..gamma..-radiation-induced DNA synthesis which is not inhibited with hydroxyurea (unscheduled synthesis) is considerably lower in hepatocytes of 18-22-month-old mice than that of 1.5-2-month-old mice. The dose-dependent increase (10-300 Gy) of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in hepatocytes of senescent mice is higher than in young animals. The elimination of damage in DNA of ..gamma..-irradiated hepatocytes (100 Gy) was examined by using an enzyme system (M. luteus extract and DNA-polymerase I of E. coli). It was found that the rate of elimination of the DNA damage in hepatocytes of 20-month-old mice is lower than that of 2-month-old mice although the activities of DNA-polymerase ..beta.. and apurinic endonuclease remain equal in the liver of both senescent and young mice. However, the nucleoids from ..gamma..-irradiated liver nuclei of 2-month-old mice are relaxed to a greater extent (as judged by the criterion of ethidium-binding capacity) than those of 20-month-old mice. The results suggest that there are limitations in the functioning of repair enzymes and in their access to damaged DNA sites in the chromatin of senescent mouse liver cells.

  10. Inhibition of gamma-radiation induced DNA damage in plasmid pBR322 by TMG, a water-soluble derivative of vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Rema; Wani, Khalida; Huilgol, Nagaraj G; Kagiya, Tsutomu V; Nair, Cherupally K Krishnan

    2002-06-01

    Alpha-tocopherol monoglucoside (TMG), a water-soluble derivative of alpha-tocopherol, has been examined for its ability to protect DNA against radiation-induced strand breaks. Gamma radiation, up to a dose of 6 Gy (dose rate, 0.7 Gy/minute), induced a dose-dependent increase in single strand breaks (SSBs) in plasmid pBR322 DNA. TMG inhibited the formation of gamma-radiation induced DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in a concentration-dependent manner; 500 microM of TMG protected the single strand breaks completely. It also protected thymine glycol formation induced by gamma-radiation in a dose-dependent manner, based on an estimation of thymine glycol by HPLC.

  11. Inhibition of {gamma}-radiation induced DNA damage in plasmid pBR322 by TMG, a water-soluble derivative of vitamin E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, R.; Nair, C.K.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Wani, K.; Huilgol, N.G. [Nanavati Hospital and MRC, Vile Parle (India); Kagiya, Tsutomu V. [Kinki Research Foundation, Kyoto (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Alpha-tocopherol monoglucoside (TMG), a water-soluble derivative of {alpha}-tocopherol, has been examined for its ability to protect DNA against radiation-induced strand breaks. Gamma radiation, up to a dose of 6 Gy (dose rate, 0.7 Gy/minute), induced a dose-dependent increase in single strand breaks (SSBs) in plasmid pBR322 DNA. TMG inhibited the formation of {gamma}-radiation induced DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in a concentration-dependent manner; 500 {mu}M of TMG protected the single strand breaks completely. It also protected thymine glycol formation induced by {gamma}-radiation in a dose-dependent manner, based on an estimation of thymine glycol by HPLC. (author)

  12. Inhibition of γ-radiation induced DNA damage in plasmid pBR322 by TMG, a water-soluble derivative of vitamin E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopalan, R.; Nair, C.K.K.; Wani, K.; Huilgol, N.G.; Kagiya, Tsutomu V.

    2002-01-01

    Alpha-tocopherol monoglucoside (TMG), a water-soluble derivative of α-tocopherol, has been examined for its ability to protect DNA against radiation-induced strand breaks. Gamma radiation, up to a dose of 6 Gy (dose rate, 0.7 Gy/minute), induced a dose-dependent increase in single strand breaks (SSBs) in plasmid pBR322 DNA. TMG inhibited the formation of γ-radiation induced DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in a concentration-dependent manner; 500 μM of TMG protected the single strand breaks completely. It also protected thymine glycol formation induced by γ-radiation in a dose-dependent manner, based on an estimation of thymine glycol by HPLC. (author)

  13. DNA degradation and reduced recombination following UV irradiation during meiosis in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salts, Y.; Pinon, R.; Simchen, G.

    1976-01-01

    Irradiation of meiotic yeast cells with moderate doses of ultraviolet irradiation (1,600 erg/mm 2 ) leads to the arrest of premeiotic DNA synthesis, massive (5-40%) DNA degradation, and a 40-50% loss of cell viability. In contrast, such doses of UV irradiation had a minor effect on viability (15-20% loss) of logarithmically growing cells, and no comparable DNA degradation was observed in irradiated synchronized vegetative cells. Meiotic recombination is also affected by UV irradiation. When administered at a stage comparable to meiotic prophase, low doses of irradiation result in a reduction in recombination frequency without significantly affecting cell viability. (orig.) [de

  14. Effect of West Nile virus DNA-plasmid vaccination on response to live virus challenge in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redig, Patrick T; Tully, Thomas N; Ritchie, Branson W; Roy, Alma F; Baudena, M Alexandra; Chang, Gwong-Jen J

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of an experimental adjuvanted DNA-plasmid vaccine against West Nile virus (WNV) in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). 19 permanently disabled but otherwise healthy red-tailed hawks of mixed ages and both sexes without detectable serum antibodies against WNV. Hawks were injected IM with an experimental WNV DNA-plasmid vaccine in an aluminum-phosphate adjuvant (n = 14) or with the adjuvant only (control group; 5). All birds received 2 injections at a 3-week interval. Blood samples for serologic evaluation were collected before the first injection and 4 weeks after the second injection (day 0). At day 0, hawks were injected SC with live WNV. Pre- and postchallenge blood samples were collected at intervals for 14 days for assessment of viremia and antibody determination; oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs were collected for assessment of viral shedding. Vaccination was not associated with morbidity or deaths. Three of the vaccinated birds seroconverted after the second vaccine injection; all other birds seroconverted following the live virus injection. Vaccinated birds had significantly less severe viremia and shorter and less-intense shedding periods, compared with the control birds. Use of the WNV DNA-plasmid vaccine in red-tailed hawks was safe, and vaccination attenuated but did not eliminate both the viremia and the intensity of postchallenge shedding following live virus exposure. Further research is warranted to conclusively determine the efficacy of this vaccine preparation for protection of red-tailed hawks and other avian species against WNV-induced disease.

  15. DNA repair in human fibroblasts, as reflected by host-cell reactivation of a transfected UV-irradiated luciferase gene, is not related to donor age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, Thomas J.; O'Brien, Katherine; Brooks, Philip J.; Tarone, Robert E.; Robbins, Jay H.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of donor age on the ability of mammalian cells to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage has been studied using several approaches, most recently via assays that measure the host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated reporter gene-containing plasmid vectors following their transfection into cells. Plasmid HCR assays indirectly quantify a cell line's ability to perform nucleotide excision repair (NER) by measuring the enzyme activity of the repaired reporter gene, e.g., chloramphenical acetyltransferase (cat) or luciferase (luc), and are useful in studies investigating whether increasing age may be a risk factor for the deficient repair of potentially cancer-causing, sunlight-induced, DNA lesions in skin cells. In our study, we quantified the DNA repair ability of cultured, nontransformed, human skin fibroblast lines through their HCR of a transfected UV-C-irradiated plasmid containing luc. HCR was measured at various times after transfection in five lines from normal donors of ages 21-96 years, and from one donor who had xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The normal lines displayed increasing HCR at successive post-transfection time points and showed no significant correlation between HCR and donor age. The XP-A line, known to be markedly deficient in NER of UV-induced DNA damage, showed minimal evidence of HCR compared to the normal lines. To further assess potential variation in HCR with donor age, fibroblast lines from five old donors, ages 84-94 years, were compared with lines from five young donors, ages 17-26 years. While significant differences in HCR were found between some lines, no significant difference was found between the young and old age groups (P=0.44). Our study provides no indication that the higher incidence of skin cancer observed with increasing age is due to an age-related decrease in the ability to repair UV-induced DNA damage

  16. DNA repair in human fibroblasts, as reflected by host-cell reactivation of a transfected UV-irradiated luciferase gene, is not related to donor age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, Thomas J.; O' Brien, Katherine; Brooks, Philip J.; Tarone, Robert E.; Robbins, Jay H

    2004-10-04

    The effect of donor age on the ability of mammalian cells to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage has been studied using several approaches, most recently via assays that measure the host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated reporter gene-containing plasmid vectors following their transfection into cells. Plasmid HCR assays indirectly quantify a cell line's ability to perform nucleotide excision repair (NER) by measuring the enzyme activity of the repaired reporter gene, e.g., chloramphenical acetyltransferase (cat) or luciferase (luc), and are useful in studies investigating whether increasing age may be a risk factor for the deficient repair of potentially cancer-causing, sunlight-induced, DNA lesions in skin cells. In our study, we quantified the DNA repair ability of cultured, nontransformed, human skin fibroblast lines through their HCR of a transfected UV-C-irradiated plasmid containing luc. HCR was measured at various times after transfection in five lines from normal donors of ages 21-96 years, and from one donor who had xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The normal lines displayed increasing HCR at successive post-transfection time points and showed no significant correlation between HCR and donor age. The XP-A line, known to be markedly deficient in NER of UV-induced DNA damage, showed minimal evidence of HCR compared to the normal lines. To further assess potential variation in HCR with donor age, fibroblast lines from five old donors, ages 84-94 years, were compared with lines from five young donors, ages 17-26 years. While significant differences in HCR were found between some lines, no significant difference was found between the young and old age groups (P=0.44). Our study provides no indication that the higher incidence of skin cancer observed with increasing age is due to an age-related decrease in the ability to repair UV-induced DNA damage.

  17. Spontaneous mutability and light-induced mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium: effects of an R-plasmid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivia, L.

    1979-01-01

    The UV-protecting plasmid R46 was transferred by conjugation to a genetically marked mouse-virulent Salmonella typhimurium strain, not derived from LT2; in this host the plasmid conferred UV protection and enhanced UV mutagenesis just as it does in LT2 lines. Tra - derivatives of R46 encountered during transduction retained UV-protecting and mutagenesis-enhancing ability. Stored strains carrying the R46-derived plasmids with strong mutator effect but not UV-protecting had lost most of their original streptomycin resistance but were slightly resistant to spectinomycin; attempts to transfer such plasmids failed. R46 enhanced the weak mutagenic effect of visible light on several his and trp mutants of strain LT2, including some whose frequency of spontaneous reversion was not increased by the plasmid. A mutagenic effect was produced by visible-light irradiation of hisG46(R46), either growing cells or nonmultiplying (histidine-deprived cells at 10 0 C). Presence of catalase or cyanide during irradiation did not prevent mutagenesis, which excludes some hypothetical mechanisms. Visible-light irradiation of hisG46 or hisG46(R46) under strict anaerobiosis had little or no mutagenic effect (controls showed that revertants if produced would have been detected). This is as expected if visible-light irradiation in air causes photodynamic damage to DNA and mutations are produced during error-prone, plasmid-enhanced repair

  18. Development of a novel rDNA based plasmid for enhanced cell surface display on Yarrowia lipolytica

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bulani, S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available (YlCWP1). mCherry was used as a model protein to assess the efficiency of the constructed plasmid. Y. lipolytica transformants harbouring the expression cassettes showed a purple colour phenotype on selective YNB-casamino plates as compared to control...

  19. Plasmids in Gram negatives: molecular typing of resistance plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carattoli, Alessandra

    2011-12-01

    A plasmid is defined as a double stranded, circular DNA molecule capable of autonomous replication. By definition, plasmids do not carry genes essential for the growth of host cells under non-stressed conditions but they have systems which guarantee their autonomous replication also controlling the copy number and ensuring stable inheritance during cell division. Most of the plasmids confer positively selectable phenotypes by the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes. Plasmids evolve as an integral part of the bacterial genome, providing resistance genes that can be easily exchanged among bacteria of different origin and source by conjugation. A multidisciplinary approach is currently applied to study the acquisition and spread of antimicrobial resistance in clinically relevant bacterial pathogens and the established surveillance can be implemented by replicon typing of plasmids. Particular plasmid families are more frequently detected among Enterobacteriaceae and play a major role in the diffusion of specific resistance genes. For instance, IncFII, IncA/C, IncL/M, IncN and IncI1 plasmids carrying extended-spectrum beta-lactamase genes and acquired AmpC genes are currently considered to be "epidemic resistance plasmids", being worldwide detected in Enterobacteriaceae of different origin and sources. The recognition of successful plasmids is an essential first step to design intervention strategies preventing their spread. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibitory effects of recombinant plasmid pshuttle-Egr1-shTRAIL transfection in combination with X-irradiation on growth of liver cancer cells SMMC7721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhiyong; Liu Min; Dong Lihua; Gong Shouliang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of recombinant plasmid pshuttle-Egr1-shTRAIL stable transfection in combination with X-ray irradiation on the TRAIL protein expression and the apoptosis in human SMMC7721 hepatoma cells. Methods: The pshuttle-Egr1-shTRAIL packaged with liposome was stably transfected into SMMC7721 cells in vitro. The shTRAIL protein expression were measured with ELISA assay, Annexin V-FITC kit was adopted to measure the apoptosis of pshuttle-Egr1-shTRAIL cells, and the changes in survival rate of SMMC7721 cells measured with cell cloning assay. Results: The TRAIL protein expressions in pshuttle-Egr1-shTRAIL plus different doses of irradiation groups were significantly increased compared with 0 Gy group (P<0.001). The percentage of apoptotic cells was significantly higher than that in 0 Gy group (P<0.05 or P<0.001), and the survival rate of SMMC7721 cells was decreased significantly (P<0.05 or P<0.001). Conclusion: The pshuttle-Egr1-shTRAIL stable transfection in combination with irradiation can significantly induce the apoptosis of SMMC7721 tumor cells and inhibit the cell proliferation. (authors)

  1. DNA metabolism in peripheral lymphocytes of UV-B wholebody irradiated men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Altmann, H.

    1983-02-01

    Healthy probands were UV-B irradiated and different times after the treatment blood was taken and lymphocytes were isolated. Semiconservative DNA-synthesis was enhanced after 4 in vivo expositions. DNA repair replication in lymphocytes after in vitro UV-C damage was initially increased in UV-B wholebody irradiated people. With nucleoidsedimentation DNA strand breaks after in vivo UV-B irradiation were detected. (Author) [de

  2. Repair promoted by plasmid pKM101 is different from SOS repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goze, A.; Devoret, R.

    1979-01-01

    In E. coli K12 bacteria carrying plasmid pKM101, prophage lambda was induced at UV doses higher than in plasmid-less parental bacteria. UV-induced reactivation per se was less effective. Bacteria with pKM101 showed no alteration in their division cycle. Plasmid PKM101 coded for a constitutive error-prone repair different from the inducible error-prone repair called SOS repair. Plasmid pKM101 protected E. coli bacteria from UV damage but slightly sensitized them to X-ray lesions. Protection against UV damage was effective in mutant bacteria deficient in DNA excision-repair provided that the recA, lexA and uvrE genes were functional. Survival of phages lambda and S13 after UV irradiation was enhanced in bacteria carrying plasmid pKM101; phage lambda mutagenesis was also increased. Plasmid pKM101 repaired potentially lethal DNA lesions, although Wild-type DNA sequences may not necessarily be restored; hence the mutations observed are the traces of the original DNA lesions. (Auth.)

  3. Quantification of DNA by Agarose Gel Electrophoresis and Analysis of the Topoisomers of Plasmid and M13 DNA Following Treatment with a Restriction Endonuclease or DNA Topoisomerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedie, John W.; Stowell, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    A two-session laboratory exercise for advanced undergraduate students in biochemistry and molecular biology is described. The first session introduces students to DNA quantification by ultraviolet absorbance and agarose gel electrophoresis followed by ethidium bromide staining. The second session involves treatment of various topological forms of…

  4. Plasmid mediated enhancement of uv resistance in Streptococcus faecalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miehl, R.; Miller, M.; Yasbin, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    A 38.5-Mdal plasmid of Streptococcus faecalis subdp. zymogenes has been shown to enhance survival following uv irradiation. In addition, the presence of this plasmid increases the mutation frequencies following uv irradiation and enhanced W-reactivation. The data presented indicate that S. faecalis has an inducible error-prone repair system and that the plasmid enhances these repair functions

  5. Repair replication in replicating and nonreplicating DNA after irradiation with uv light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slor, H.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1978-06-01

    Ultraviolet light induces more pyrimidine dimers and more repair replication in DNA that replicates within 2 to 3 h of irradiation than in DNA that does not replicate during this period. This difference may be due to special conformational changes in DNA and chromatin that might be associated with semiconservative DNA replication.

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of an HIV-1 gag DNA vaccine with or without IL-12 and/or IL-15 plasmid cytokine adjuvant in healthy, HIV-1 uninfected adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros A Kalams

    Full Text Available DNA vaccines are a promising approach to vaccination since they circumvent the problem of vector-induced immunity. DNA plasmid cytokine adjuvants have been shown to augment immune responses in small animals and in macaques.We performed two first in human HIV vaccine trials in the US, Brazil and Thailand of an RNA-optimized truncated HIV-1 gag gene (p37 DNA derived from strain HXB2 administered either alone or in combination with dose-escalation of IL-12 or IL-15 plasmid cytokine adjuvants. Vaccinations with both the HIV immunogen and cytokine adjuvant were generally well-tolerated and no significant vaccine-related adverse events were identified. A small number of subjects developed asymptomatic low titer antibodies to IL-12 or IL-15. Cellular immunogenicity following 3 and 4 vaccinations was poor, with response rates to gag of 4.9%/8.7% among vaccinees receiving gag DNA alone, 0%/11.5% among those receiving gag DNA+IL-15, and no responders among those receiving DNA+high dose (1500 ug IL-12 DNA. However, after three doses, 44.4% (4/9 of vaccinees receiving gag DNA and intermediate dose (500 ug of IL-12 DNA demonstrated a detectable cellular immune response.This combination of HIV gag DNA with plasmid cytokine adjuvants was well tolerated. There were minimal responses to HIV gag DNA alone, and no apparent augmentation with either IL-12 or IL-15 plasmid cytokine adjuvants. Despite the promise of DNA vaccines, newer formulations or methods of delivery will be required to increase their immunogenicity.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00115960 NCT00111605.

  7. Effect of gamma-irradiation on cereal DNA investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Yoko; Miura, Aya; Imura, Hiromi; Yamada, Takashi; Saito, Yukio

    1996-01-01

    The effects of gamma-irradiation on the DNA of corn, soybean and wheat were investigated using a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis technique. In order to avoid strand breaks during the DNA extracting steps, protoplasts prepared from seeds were embedded in agarose plugs and the DNA was purified by the digesting membranes and proteins. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis can separate large DNA strands of about a few Mb in length. The DNA from unirradiated corn, soybean and wheat had mainly 3 fragments, about 6Mb(Fr.1), 5Mb(Fr.2), a few hundred kb(Fr.3) and so on. After gamma-irradiation, Fr.1 and Fr.2 had decreased depend on irradiation dose. The Fr.4(about 200 kb) of corn and Fr.3 of soybean DNA increased while Fr.3 of wheat did not increase under 10 kGy irradiation, however, the Fr.3 of all samples and the Fr.4 of corn decreased by over 10 kGy irradiation. It can be assumed that the large DNA strands were broken into smaller strands which increased at low irradiation doses, whereas both large and small DNA strands were broken down at higher irradiation doses. The Fr.6(2.5Mb) and Fr.7(1.5Mb) appeared in irradiated wheat DNA. (author)

  8. Behavior of IncQ Plasmids in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, Jacques; Schilperoort, Rob

    1981-01-01

    Inc-Q plasmids were introduced into Agrobacterium tumefuciens, by mobilization from Escherichia coli with an Inc-P plasmid, or by transformation with purified plasmid DNA. It was found that they were stably maintained. The presence of an Inc-Q plasmid did not influence tumorigenicity. These results

  9. Low-Molecular Weight Polyethylenimine Modified with Pluronic 123 and RGD- or Chimeric RGD-NLS Peptide: Characteristics and Transfection Efficacy of Their Complexes with Plasmid DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem of transfection efficiency vs. cytotoxicity and tumor-targeting ability when polyethylenimine (PEI was used as a nonviral gene delivery vector, new degradable PEI polymers were synthesized via cross-linking low-molecular-weight PEI with Pluronic P123 and then further coupled with a targeting peptide R4 (RGD and a bifunctional R11 (RGD-NLS, which were termed as P123-PEI-R4 and P123-PEI-R11, respectively. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed that both P123-PEI-R4 and P123-PEI-R11 efficaciously condense plasmid DNA at a polymer-to-pDNA w/w ratio of 3.0 and 0.4, respectively. The polyplexes were stable in the presence of serum and could protect plasmid DNA against DNaseI. They had uniform spherical nanoparticles with appropriate sizes around 100–280 nm and zeta-potentials about +40 mV. Furthermore, in vitro experiments showed that these polyplexes had lower cytotoxicity at any concentration compared with PEI 25 kDa, thus giving promise to high transfection efficiency as compared with another P123-PEI derivate conjugated with trifunctional peptide RGD-TAT-NLS (P123-PEI-R18. More importantly, compared with the other polymers, P123-PEI-R11 showed the highest transfection efficiency with relatively lower cytotoxicity at any concentration, indicating that the new synthetic polymer P123-PEI-R11 could be used as a safe and efficient gene deliver vector.

  10. Hydrodynamic delivery of plasmid DNA encoding human FcγR-Ig dimers blocks immune-complex mediated inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashidharamurthy, R; Machiah, D; Bozeman, E N; Srivatsan, S; Patel, J; Cho, A; Jacob, J; Selvaraj, P

    2012-09-01

    Therapeutic use and function of recombinant molecules can be studied by the expression of foreign genes in mice. In this study, we have expressed human Fcγ receptor-Ig fusion molecules (FcγR-Igs) in mice by administering FcγR-Ig plasmid DNAs hydrodynamically and compared their effectiveness with purified molecules in blocking immune-complex (IC)-mediated inflammation in mice. The concentration of hydrodynamically expressed FcγR-Igs (CD16A(F)-Ig, CD32A(R)-Ig and CD32A(H)-Ig) reached a maximum of 130 μg ml(-1) of blood within 24 h after plasmid DNA administration. The in vivo half-life of FcγR-Igs was found to be 9-16 days and western blot analysis showed that the FcγR-Igs were expressed as a homodimer. The hydrodynamically expressed FcγR-Igs blocked 50-80% of IC-mediated inflammation up to 3 days in a reverse passive Arthus reaction model. Comparative analysis with purified molecules showed that hydrodynamically expressed FcγR-Igs are more efficient than purified molecules in blocking IC-mediated inflammation and had a higher half-life. In summary, these results suggest that the administration of a plasmid vector with the FcγR-Ig gene can be used to study the consequences of blocking IC binding to FcγRs during the development of inflammatory diseases. This approach may have potential therapeutic value in treating IC-mediated inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as lupus, arthritis and autoimmune vasculitis.

  11. Hydrodynamic delivery of plasmid DNA encoding human Fc?R-Ig dimers blocks immune-complex mediated inflammation in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Machiah, Deepa; Bozeman, Erica N.; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Patel, Jaina; Cho, Alice; Jacob, Joshy; Selvaraj, Periasamy

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic use and function of recombinant molecules can be studied by the expression of foreign genes in mice. In this study, we have expressed human Fcgamma receptor ?Ig fusion molecules (Fc?R-Igs) in mice by administering Fc?R-Ig plasmid DNAs hydrodynamically and compared their effectiveness to purified molecules in blocking immune-complex (IC) mediated inflammation in mice. The concentration of hydrodynamically expressed Fc?R-Igs (CD16AF-Ig, CD32AR-Ig and CD32AH-Ig) reached a maximum of ...

  12. Translesion DNA synthesis and mutation induced in a plasmid with a single adduct of the environmental contaminant 3-nitrobenzanthrone in SOS-induced Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawanishi, M.; Kanno, T.; Yagi, T.; Enya-Takamura, T.; Fuchs, R.P.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: 3-Nitrobenzanthrone (NBA) is a powerfully mutagenic nitrated aromatic hydrocarbon found in diesel exhaust and in airborne particulate matters. NBA forms an unusual DNA adduct in vitro that has a C-C bond between the C-8 position of deoxyguanosine and the C-2 position of NBA. We previously found that this adduct is also present in the human cells treated with NBA, and induces mutations in supF shuttle vector system. In this study, we analyzed translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) over a single adduct in lacZ' gene in a plasmid in uvrAmutS Escherichia coli. The result showed that the adduct blocked DNA replication and an observed TLS frequency was 5.4% in non-SOS-induced E. coli. All progenies after the TLS had no mutation. On the other hand, TLS increased to 11.3%, and 4.8% of them had mostly G to T mutations in SOS-induced E. coli. These results suggest that this unusual adduct would be one of causes of lung cancer that is increasing in the urban areas polluted with diesel exhaust. It must be interesting to reveal which DNA polymerase is involved in this TLS

  13. Effect of gamma-irradiation on rice seed DNA. Pt. 1. Yield and molecular size of DNA extracted from irradiated rice seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Yoko; Konishi, Akihiro; Yamada, Takashi; Saito, Yukio

    1995-01-01

    The effect of gamma-irradiation on the DNA of hulled rice seeds was investigated. The cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method was preferred for the extraction of DNA from rice seeds because of its high quality and good yield. The yield of DNA that was determined by gel electrophoresis, decreased as the irradiation dose increased from 1 kGy. DNA extracted from rice seeds irradiated with a 30 kGy dose showed a molecular size of less than 20 kb, while that from unirradiated rice showed more than 100 kb in electrophoretic profiles. It can be assumed that the decrease in yield was mainly induced by the crosslinking between protein and DNA, and the reduction in molecular size was induced by double-strand breaks. (J.P.N.)

  14. Lipofection and nucleofection of substrate plasmid can generate widely different readings of DNA end-joining efficiency in different cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Simon; Saha, Janapriya; Wang, Minli; Mladenova, Veronika; Coym, Nadine; Iliakis, George

    2013-02-01

    In vivo plasmid end-joining assays are valuable tools for dissecting important qualitative and quantitative aspects of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ)--a key mechanism for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in higher eukaryotes. They enable the use of defined DNA ends as substrates for end-joining and the analysis by sequencing of the resulting junctions to identify the repair pathways engaged. Yet, plasmid assays have generated divergent results of end-joining capacity in the same DSB repair mutants when used under different conditions, which implies contributions from undefined and therefore uncontrolled parameters. To help standardize these assays, we searched for parameters underpinning these variations and identified transfection method as an important determinant. Here, we compare a lipid-based transfection method, lipofection, with an electroporation method, nucleofection, and find large, unanticipated and cell line-dependent differences in percent end-joining without recognizable trends. For example, in rodent cells, transfection using lipofection gives nearly WT end-joining in DNA-PKcs mutants and only mildly inhibited end-joining in Lig4 and Ku mutants. In contrast, transfection using nucleofection shows marked end-joining inhibition in all NHEJ mutants tested as compared to the WT. In human HCT116 cells, end-joining after nucleofection is strongly suppressed even in the WT and the differences to the mutants are small. After lipofection, in contrast, end-joining is high in WT cells and markedly suppressed in the mutants. We conclude that better understanding and control of the physicochemical/biological and analytical parameters underpinning these differences will be required to generate with plasmid assays results with quantitative power comparable to that of well-established methods of DSB analysis such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis or γ-H2AX foci scoring. Until then, caution is needed in the interpretation of the results obtained

  15. Implication of the E. coli K12 uvrA and recA genes in the repair of 8-methoxypsoralen-induced mono adducts and crosslinks on plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramio, J.M.; Bauluz, C.; Vidania, R. de

    1986-01-01

    Genotoxicity of psoralen damages on plasmid DNA has been studied. pBR322 DNA was randomly modified with several concentrations of 8-methoxypsoralen plus 365 nm-UV light. After transformation into E. coli strains (wild-type, uvrA and recA) plasmid survival and mutagenesis were analyzed. To study the influence of the SOS response on plasmid recovery, preirradiation of the cells was performed. In absence of cell preirradiation, crosslinks were not repaired in any strain. Mono adducts were also lethal but in part removed by the excision-repair pathway. Preirradiation of the cells significantly. increased plasmid recovery in recA+ celia. In uvrA- only the mutagenic pathway seemed to be involved in the repair of the damaged DNA. Wild type strain showed the highest increase in plasmid survival, involving the repair of mono adducts and some fraction of crosslinks mainly through an error-free repair pathway. This suggests an enhancement of the excision repair promoted by the induction of SOS functions. (Author) 32 refs

  16. Repair of human DNA in molecules that replicate or remain unreplicated following ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, R.

    1980-01-01

    The extent of DNA replication, the incidence of uv induced pyrimidine dimers and the repair replication observed after their excision was monitored in human fibroblasts uv irradiated with single or split uv doses. The excision repair processes were measured in molecules that remained unreplicated or in those that replicated after the latter uv irradiation. Less DNA replication was observed after a split as opposed to single uv irradiation. Furthermore, a split dose did not modify the excision parameters measured after a single irradiation, regardless of whether the DNA had replicated or not

  17. X-irradiation affects all DNA replication intermediates when inhibiting replication initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loenn, U.; Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm

    1982-01-01

    When a human melanoma line was irradiated with 10 Gy, there was, after 30 to 60 min, a gradual reduction in the DNA replication rate. Ten to twelve hours after the irradiation, the DNA replication had returned to near normal rate. The results showed tht low dose-rate X-irradiation inhibits preferentially the formation of small DNA replication intermediates. There is no difference between the inhibition of these replication intermediates formed only in the irradiated cells and those formed also in untreated cells. (U.K.)

  18. Protective activity of a novel resveratrol analogue, HS-1793, against DNA damage in 137Cs-irradiated CHO-K1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Min Ho; Jo, Young Rae; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jeong, Dong Hyeok; Lee, Chang Geun; Oh, Su Jung; Jeong, Soo Kyung; Jo, Wol Soon; Lee, Ki Won

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol has received considerable attention as a polyphenol with anti-oxidant, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-inflammatory effects. Radiation is an important component of therapy for a wide range of malignant conditions. However, it causes damage to normal cells and, hence, can result in adverse side effects. This study was conducted to examine whether HS-1793, a novel resveratrol analogue free from the restriction of metabolic instability and the high dose requirement of resveratrol, induces a protective effect against radiation-induced DNA damage. HS-1793 effectively scavenged free radicals and inhibited radiation-induced plasmid DNA strand breaks in an in vitro assay. HS-1793 significantly decreased reactive oxygen species and cellular DNA damage in 2 Gy-irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells. In addition, HS-1793 dose-dependently reduced the levels of phosphorylated H2AX in irradiated CHO-K1 cells. These results indicate that HS-1793 has chemical radioprotective activity. Glutathione levels and superoxide dismutase activity in irradiated CHO-K1 cells increased significantly following HS-1793 treatment. The enhanced biological anti-oxidant activity and chemical radioprotective activity of HS-1793 maintained survival of irradiated CHO-K1 cells in a clonogenic assay. Therefore, HS-1793 may be of value as a radioprotector to protect healthy tissue surrounding tumor cells during radiotherapy to obtain better tumor control with a higher dose. (author)

  19. Herpes virus and viral DNA synthesis in ultraviolet light-irradiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppey, J; Nocentini, S [Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. Curie

    1976-07-01

    The rate of virus DNA synthesis and the production of infectious virus are impaired in stationary monkey kidney CV-I cells irradiated with u.v. before infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). The inhibition of HSV multiplication is due to u.v.-induced damage in cell DNA. CV-I cells recover their capacity to support HSV growth during the 40 to 48 h after irradiation, and the final virus yield is enhanced by factor of 10. The time course of the recovery is similar to that of the excision repair process occurring in u.v.-irradiated mammalian cells. Caffeine, hydroxyurea and cycloheximide inhibit the recovery. Fluorodeoxyuridine is without effect. A small but significant amount of labelled dThd coming from irradiated cell DNA is incorporated into virus DNA. HSV specified thymidine kinase seems to be more effective for virus DNA synthesis in irradiated than in control cells.

  20. Molecular processes as basis for plasmid-mediated bacterial UV-light resistance and mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshkin, G.I.; Brukhanskij, G.V.; Skavronskaya, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    The increase of UV-resistance and UV-induced mutagenesis by lambda 1 pint intmid as well as molecular-genetic mechanisms of plasmid participation in reparation and DNA replication and its degradation after UV-irradiation in plasmid cells on pKM101 plasmid model have been investigated. Data testifying to the necessity of intmid integration in chromosome as obligatory stage of intmid participation in increasing UV-resistance of bacterial cells are obtained. It has been found that intmid raises UV-resistance of cells and increases respectively the UV-induced reverants efficiency. On the basis of the experiment data the conclusion is drawn that the intmid capacity to raise UV-resistance and, possibly, mutagenesis is bound not only with its integration into chromosome but also with pol A + chromosome replication by dependendent imtmid replication complex. It is shown that pKM101 plasmid ensures functioning in E coli cells of inducible, chloroamphenicol-resistant DNA replication, highly resistant to UV-light harmful effect and that the volume of excision reparation in E. coli cells carrying pKM101 plasmid is increased as compared with the volume of reparation in plasmid legs cells. The combination of the data obtained gives grounds to the authors to assume that inducible replication, inducible reparation of DNA and inducible decrease of DNA degradation determined by pKM101 plasmid may serve as recA + lexA + basis dependent increase of UV-resistance and mutagenesis and that these processes provide the possibility of functioning of integrative replication mechanism of plasmid participation in ensuring UV-resistance and mutagenesis of plants

  1. Involvement of DNA polymerase δ in DNA repair synthesis in human fibroblasts at late times after ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresler, S.L.; Gowans, B.J.; Robinson-Hill, R.M.; Hunting, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    DNA repair synthesis following UV irradiation of confluent human fibroblasts has a biphasic time course with an early phase of rapid nucleotide incorporation and a late phase of much slower nucleotide incorporation. The biphasic nature of this curve suggests that two distinct DNA repair systems may be operative. Previous studies have specifically implicated DNA polymerase δ as the enzyme involved in DNA repair synthesis occurring immediately after UV damage. In this paper, the authors describe studies of DNA polymerase involvement in DNA repair synthesis in confluent human fibroblasts at late times after UV irradiation. Late UV-induced DNA repair synthesis in both intact and permeable cells was found to be inhibited by aphidicolin, indicating the involvement of one of the aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerases, α or δ. In permeable cells, the process was further analyzed by using the nucleotide analogue (butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate, which inhibits DNA polymerase α several hundred times more strongly than it inhibits DNA polymerase δ. The (butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate inhibition curve for late UV-induced repair synthesis was very similar to that for polymerase δ. It appears that repair synthesis at late time after UV irradiation, like repair synthesis at early times, is mediated by DNA polymerase δ

  2. Radiation effect and response of DNA synthesis in lymphocytes induced by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yujie; Su Liaoyuan; Zou Huawei; Kong Xiangrong

    1999-01-01

    The ability of DNA synthesis in lymphocytes were measured by using 3 H-TdR incorporation method. This method was used to observe the damage of lymphocytes irradiated by several challenge doses (0.5-0.8 Gy) and adaptive response induced by previous low dose irradiation. The results show that DNA synthesis was inhibited by challenge dose of radiation and was adapted by previous 0.048 Gy irradiation

  3. Study of DNA damage with a new system for irradiation of samples in a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: mrgual@instec.c [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, InSTEC, Avenida Salvador Allende y Luaces, Quinta de Los Molinos, Plaza de la Revolucion, Havana, AP 6163 (Cuba); Milian, Felix M. [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, UESC (Brazil); Deppman, Airton [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Sao Paulo, IF-USP, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, no. 187, Ciudade Universitaria, Butanta, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Coelho, Paulo R.P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, we report results of a quantitative analysis of the effects of neutrons on DNA, and, specifically, the production of simple and double breaks of plasmid DNA in aqueous solutions with different concentrations of free-radical scavengers. The radiation damage to DNA was evaluated by electrophoresis through agarose gels. The neutron and gamma doses were measured separately with thermoluminescent detectors. In this work, we have also demonstrated usefulness of a new system for positioning and removing samples in channel BH3 of the IEA-R1 reactor at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (Brazil) without necessity of interrupting the reactor operation.

  4. Study on DNA Damage Induced by Neon Beam Irradiation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Dong; Li Wenjian; Wu Xin; Wang Jufang; Ma Shuang; Liu Qingfang; He Jinyu; Jing Xigang; Ding Nan; Dai Zhongying; Zhou Jianping

    2010-01-01

    Yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae was irradiated with different doses of 85 MeV/u 20 Ne 10+ to investigate DNA damage induced by heavy ion beam in eukaryotic microorganism. The survival rate, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA polymorphic were tested after irradiation. The results showed that there were substantial differences in DNA between the control and irradiated samples. At the dose of 40 Gy, the yeast cell survival rate approached 50%, DNA double-strand breaks were barely detectable, and significant DNA polymorphism was observed. The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene was amplified and sequenced. It was observed that base changes in the mutant were mainly transversions of T→G and T→C. It can be concluded that heavy ion beam irradiation can lead to change in single gene and may be an effective way to induce mutation.

  5. Study on DNA Damage Induced by Neon Beam Irradiation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dong; Li, Wenjian; Wu, Xin; Wang, Jufang; Ma, Shuang; Liu, Qingfang; He, Jinyu; Jing, Xigang; Ding, Nan; Dai, Zhongying; Zhou, Jianping

    2010-12-01

    Yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae was irradiated with different doses of 85 MeV/u 20Ne10+ to investigate DNA damage induced by heavy ion beam in eukaryotic microorganism. The survival rate, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA polymorphic were tested after irradiation. The results showed that there were substantial differences in DNA between the control and irradiated samples. At the dose of 40 Gy, the yeast cell survival rate approached 50%, DNA double-strand breaks were barely detectable, and significant DNA polymorphism was observed. The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene was amplified and sequenced. It was observed that base changes in the mutant were mainly transversions of T→G and T→C. It can be concluded that heavy ion beam irradiation can lead to change in single gene and may be an effective way to induce mutation.

  6. Characterization of DNA polymerase β from Danio rerio by overexpression in E. coli using the in vivo/in vitro compatible pIVEX plasmid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishikawa Mitsuru

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic DNA polymerase β (pol β, the polymerase thought to be responsible for DNA repair synthesis, has been extensively characterized in rats and humans. However, pol β has not been purified or enzymatically characterized from the model fish species Danio rerio (zebrafish. We used the in vitro/in vivo dual expression system plasmid, pIVEX, to express Danio rerio pol β (Danio pol β for biochemical characterization. Results Danio pol β encoded by the in vitro/in vivo-compatible pIVEX plasmid was expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3, BL21(DE3pLysS, and KRX, and in vitro as a C-terminal His-tagged protein. Danio pol β expressed in vitro was subject to proteolysis; therefore, bacterial overexpression was used to produce the protein for kinetic analyses. KRX cells were preferred because of their reduced propensity for leaky expression of pol β. The cDNA of Danio rerio pol β encodes a protein of 337 amino acids, which is 2-3 amino acids longer than other pol β proteins, and contains a P63D amino acid substitution, unlike mammalian pol βs. This substitution lies in a hairpin sequence within an 8-kDa domain, likely to be important in DNA binding. We performed extensive biochemical characterization of Danio pol β in comparison with rat pol β, which revealed its sensitivity to metal ion activators (Mn2+ and Mg2+, its optimum salt concentration (10 mM KCl and 50 mM NaCl, alkaline pH optimum (pH 9.0, and low temperature optimum (30°C. Substituting Mn2+ for Mg2+ resulted in 8.6-fold higher catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km. Conclusions Our characterization of pol β from a model fish organism contributes to the study of the function and evolution of DNA polymerases, which are emerging as important cellular targets for chemical intervention in the development of anticancer agents.

  7. Involvement of DNA polymerase beta in repair of ionizing radiation damage as measured by in vitro plasmid assays.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vens, C.; Hofland, I.; Begg, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Characteristic of damage introduced in DNA by ionizing radiation is the induction of a wide range of lesions. Single-strand breaks (SSBs) and base damages outnumber double-strand breaks (DSBs). If unrepaired, these lesions can lead to DSBs and increased mutagenesis. XRCC1 and DNA polymerase beta

  8. Comparison of two DNA microarrays for detection of plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance and virulence factor genes in clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Fiona

    2010-06-01

    A DNA microarray was developed to detect plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance (AR) and virulence factor (VF) genes in clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae. The array was validated with the following bacterial species: Escherichiacoli (n=17); Klebsiellapneumoniae (n=3); Enterobacter spp. (n=6); Acinetobacter genospecies 3 (n=1); Acinetobacterbaumannii (n=1); Pseudomonasaeruginosa (n=2); and Stenotrophomonasmaltophilia (n=2). The AR gene profiles of these isolates were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The DNA microarray consisted of 155 and 133 AR and VF gene probes, respectively. Results were compared with the commercially available Identibac AMR-ve Array Tube. Hybridisation results indicated that there was excellent correlation between PCR and array results for AR and VF genes. Genes conferring resistance to each antibiotic class were identified by the DNA array. Unusual resistance genes were also identified, such as bla(SHV-5) in a bla(OXA-23)-positive carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii. The phylogenetic group of each E. coli isolate was verified by the array. These data demonstrate that it is possible to screen simultaneously for all important classes of mobile AR and VF genes in Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae whilst also assigning a correct phylogenetic group to E. coli isolates. Therefore, it is feasible to test clinical Gram-negative bacteria for all known AR genes and to provide important information regarding pathogenicity simultaneously.

  9. Effect of cytokine-encoding plasmid delivery on immune response to Japanese encephalitis virus DNA vaccine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharati, Kaushik; Appaiahgari, Mohan Babu; Vrati, Sudhanshu

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that immunization of mice with plasmid pMEa synthesizing Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) envelope protein induced anti-JEV humoral and cellular immune responses. We now show that intra-muscular co-administration of mice with pMEa and pGM-CSF, encoding murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or pIL-2, encoding murine interleukin-2 given 4 days after pMEa, augmented anti-JEV antibody titers. This did not enhance the level of protection in immunized mice against JEV. However, intra-dermal co-administration of pMEa and pGM-CSF in mice using the gene gun, enhanced anti-JEV antibody titers resulting in an increased level of protection in mice against lethal JEV challenge.

  10. Analysis of DNA vulnerability to damage, repair and degradation in tissues of irradiated animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchenko, N.I.; Ivannik, B.P.

    1982-01-01

    Single-strand and paired ruptures of DNA were found to result in appearance of locally denaturated areas in its secondary structure and to disordered protein-DNA interaction. It was shown with the use of the viscosimeter method of measuring the molecular mass of single stranded high-polymeric DNA that cells of various tissues by the intensity of DNA repair can be divided into two groups, rapid- and slow-repair ones. Tissue specificity of enzyme function of the repair systems and systems responsible for post-irradiation DNA degradation depends on the activity of endonucleases synthesized by the cells both in health and in their irradiation-induced synthesis

  11. Effect of caffeine on the parameters of the motive and gamma-irradiated DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipov, N.D.; Kondrat'eva, O.P.; Erisman, Eh.V.

    1979-01-01

    The binding of caffeine with DNA and its pole as a DNA molecule protector against radiational damage have been studied. It is shown that with the ratio of DNA and caffeine concentrations used no complex formation occurs. The irradiation of the DNA solution by 1 krad dose of γ-rays causes only a few single-strand breaks which leads to the decrease in the volume macromolecules without changing its thermodynamic ligidity. The presence of caffeine in the DNA solution before its irradiation decreases considerably the extent of radiational damage

  12. Effect of 5-fluorodeoxyuridine on DNA replication in ultraviolet-irradiated HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozmanova, J.; Masek, F.; Synzynys, B.I.; Saenko, A.S.

    1985-11-05

    In HeLa cells precultivated for 6 hours with 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR) and for 18 hours in FUdR-free medium, DNA synthesis was much more resistant to UV irradiation than that of untreated cells. DNA synthesized in FUdR-pretreated and UV irradiated cells represents a semiconservative DNA replication and shows more rapid shift of the pulse-labelled chased DNA to high molecular weight. This DNA synthesis is not induced by synchronization of the cell cycle. It is assumed that either the changes of chromatine structure, or an enhanced level of some enzymes might be involved in the replication of the damaged template. (author).

  13. Evidence for DNA repair after ultraviolet irradiation of Petunia hybrida pollen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.F.; Linskens, H.F.; Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen; Katholike Universiteit Nijmegen

    1978-01-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation of Petunia hybrida pollen led to an unscheduled labelling of pollen DNA by 3 H-thymidine during the early stages of germination. Hydroxyurea increased this DNA labelling, while added boron, required absolutely for pollen germination, tube elongation and tube generative cell mitosis, was not needed for this repair-like DNA synthesis. (orig.) [de

  14. Cytological evidence for DNA chain elongation after UV irradiation in the S phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minka, D.F.; Nath, J.

    1981-01-01

    Human cells irradiated with UV light synthesize lower molecular weight DNA than unirradiated cells. This reduction in molecular weight is greater in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells than in normal cells. The molecular weight of DNA is further reduced by the addition of caffeine to XP cells. By several hours after irradiation, DNA fragments are barely detectable. Cells from excision-proficient and excision-deficient XP patients were studied autoradiographically to produce cytological evidence of DNA chain elongation. Replicate cultures with and without caffeine were synchronized and irradiated with UV light during the S phase. Caffeine was removed in G2, and the cells were labeled with 3 H-thymidine. Results showed significantly increased labeling during G2 of excision-deficient XP cells. Labeling was dependent on the time of irradiation and presence of caffeine. The XP variant cells had no increase in labeling for any irradiation time

  15. Sedimentation properties of DNA-membrane complexes and yield of DNA breaks at irradiation of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erzgraber, G.; Kozubek, S.; Lapidus, I.L.

    1985-01-01

    The dependence of the relative sedimentation velocity of DNA-membrane complexes on the dose of irradiation and time of incubation of Chinese Hamster cells is analysed. It is concluded that the initial part of the curve provides the information on the occurrence of single strand breaks in DNA; the position of the local maximum allows us to calculate the yield of DNA double strand breaks. The reparation decay constant can be estimated as well

  16. DNA-repair after irradiation of cells with gamma-rays and neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmann, H.

    1975-11-01

    The structural alterations of calf thymus DNA produced by neutron or gamma irradiation were observed by absorption spectra, sedimentation rate and viscosity measurements. Mixed neutron-gamma irradiation produced fewer single and double strand breaks compared with pure gamma irradiation. RBE-values for mixed neutron-gamma radiation were less than 1, and DNA damage decreased with increasing neutron dose rate. Repair processes of DNA occuring after irradiation were measured in mouse spleen suspensions and human lymphocytes using autoradiographic methods and gradient centrifugations. The number of labelled cells was smaller after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation than after gamma irradiation. The rejoining of strand breaks in alkaline and neutral sucrose was more efficient after gamma irradiation than after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation. Finally, the effect of detergents Tween 80 and Nonident P40 on unscheduled DNA synthesis was studied by autoradiography after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation (Dn=5 krad). The results showed that the DNA synthesis was inhibited by detergent solutions of 0.002%

  17. Parameters influencing the introduction of plasmid DNA into cells by the use of synthetic amphiphiles as a carrier system

    OpenAIRE

    van der Woude, Irene; Willy Visser, H.; ter Beest, Martin B.A.; Wagenaar, Anno; Ruiters, Marcel H.J.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Hoekstra, Dick

    1995-01-01

    Parameters that affect cellular transfection as accomplished by introducing DNA via carriers composed of cationic synthetic amphiphiles, have been investigated with the aim to obtain insight into the mechanism of DNA translocation. Such insight may be exploited in optimizing carrier properties of synthetic amphiphiles for molecules other than nucleic acids. In the present work, the interaction of vesicles composed of the cationic amphiphile dioleyloxy-propyl-trimethylammonium chloride (DOTMA)...

  18. Systematic analysis of DNA damage induction and DNA repair pathway activation by continuous wave visible light laser micro-irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Muster

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser micro-irradiation can be used to induce DNA damage with high spatial and temporal resolution, representing a powerful tool to analyze DNA repair in vivo in the context of chromatin. However, most lasers induce a mixture of DNA damage leading to the activation of multiple DNA repair pathways and making it impossible to study individual repair processes. Hence, we aimed to establish and validate micro-irradiation conditions together with inhibition of several key proteins to discriminate different types of DNA damage and repair pathways using lasers commonly available in confocal microscopes. Using time-lapse analysis of cells expressing fluorescently tagged repair proteins and also validation of the DNA damage generated by micro-irradiation using several key damage markers, we show that irradiation with a 405 nm continuous wave laser lead to the activation of all repair pathways even in the absence of exogenous sensitization. In contrast, we found that irradiation with 488 nm laser lead to the selective activation of non-processive short-patch base excision and single strand break repair, which were further validated by PARP inhibition and metoxyamine treatment. We conclude that these low energy conditions discriminated against processive long-patch base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair as well as double strand break repair pathways.

  19. Radiation induced bystander signals are independent of DNA damage and DNA repair capacity of the irradiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashino, Genro [Gray Cancer Institute, P.O. Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex HA6 2JR (United Kingdom); Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji [Division of Radiation Biology, Department of Radiology and Radiation Biology, Course of Life Sciences and Radiation Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-14 Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Matsuda, Naoki [Division of Radiation Biology and Protection, Center for Frontier Life Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8102 (Japan); Kodama, Seiji [Radiation Biology Laboratory, Radiation Research Center, Frontier Science Innovation Center, Organization for University-Industry-Government Cooperation, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan); Ono, Koji [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Watanabe, Masami [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Division of Radiation Life Science, Department of Radiation Life Science and Radiation Medical Science, Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Prise, Kevin M [Gray Cancer Institute, P.O. Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex HA6 2JR (United Kingdom) and Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7AB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: prise@gci.ac.uk

    2007-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating that irradiated cells produce signals, which interact with non-exposed cells in the same population. Here, we analysed the mechanism for bystander signal arising in wild-type CHO cells and repair deficient varients, focussing on the relationship between DNA repair capacity and bystander signal arising in irradiated cells. In order to investigate the bystander effect, we carried out medium transfer experiments after X-irradiation where micronuclei were scored in non-targeted DSB repair deficient xrs5 cells. When conditioned medium from irradiated cells was transferred to unirradiated xrs5 cells, the level of induction was independent of whether the medium came from irradiated wild-type, ssb or dsb repair deficient cells. This result suggests that the activation of a bystander signal is independent of the DNA repair capacity of the irradiated cells. Also, pre-treatment of the irradiated cells with 0.5% DMSO, which suppresses micronuclei induction in CHO but not in xrs5 cells, suppressed bystander effects completely in both conditioned media, suggesting that DMSO is effective for suppression of bystander signal arising independently of DNA damage in irradiated cells. Overall the work presented here adds to the understanding that it is the repair phenotype of the cells receiving bystander signals, which determines overall response rather than that of the cell producing the bystander signal.

  20. Influence of amino acids Shiff bases on irradiated DNA stability in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetyan, N H; Malakyan, M H; Bajinyan, S A; Torosyan, A L; Grigoryan, I E; Haroutiunian, S G

    2013-01-01

    To reveal protective role of the new Mn(II) complexes with Nicotinyl-L-Tyrosinate and Nicotinyl-L-Tryptophanate Schiff Bases against ionizing radiation. The DNA of the rats liver was isolated on 7, 14, and 30 days after X-ray irradiation. The differences between the DNA of irradiated rats and rats pre-treated with Mn(II) complexes were studied using the melting, microcalorimetry, and electrophoresis methods. The melting parameters and the melting enthalpy of rats livers DNA were changed after the X-ray irradiation: melting temperature and melting enthalpy were decreased and melting interval was increased. These results can be explained by destruction of DNA molecules. It was shown that pre-treatment of rats with Mn(II) complexes approximates the melting parameters to norm. Agarose gel electrophoresis data confirmed the results of melting studies. The separate DNA fragments were revealed in DNA samples isolated from irradiated animals. The DNA isolated from animals pre-treated with the Mn(II) chelates had better electrophoretic characteristics, which correspond to healthy DNA. Pre-treatment of the irradiated rats with Mn(II)(Nicotinil-L-Tyrosinate) and Mn(II)(Nicotinil-L-Tryptophanate)2 improves the DNA characteristics.

  1. Overproduction of single-stranded-DNA-binding protein specifically inhibits recombination of UV-irradiated bacteriophage DNA in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    Overproduction of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein (SSB) in uvr Escherichia coli mutants results in a wide range of altered phenotypes. (i) Cell survival after UV irradiation is decreased; (ii) expression of the recA-lexA regulon is slightly reduced after UV irradiation, whereas it is increased without irradiation; and (iii) recombination of UV-damaged lambda DNA is inhibited, whereas recombination of nonirradiated DNA is unaffected. These results are consistent with the idea that in UV-damaged bacteria, SSB is first required to allow the formation of short complexes of RecA protein and ssDNA that mediate cleavage of the LexA protein. However, in a second stage, SSB should be displaced from ssDNA to permit the production of longer RecA-ssDNA nucleoprotein filaments that are required for strand pairing and, hence, recombinational repair. Since bacteria overproducing SSB appear identical in physiological respects to recF mutant bacteria, it is suggested that the RecF protein (alone or with other proteins of the RecF pathway) may help RecA protein to release SSB from ssDNA

  2. Effects of DNA polymerase inhibitors on replicative and repair DNA synthesis in ultraviolet-irradiated HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, T.; Nakamura, H.; Tsutsui, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Yoshida, S.

    1982-01-01

    Aphidicolin specifically inhibits eukaryotic DNA polymerase α, while 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate (d 2 TTP) inhibits DNA polymerase ν and ν but not α. 1-ν-D-Arabinofuranosylcytosine 5'-triphosphate (araCTP) inhibits both DNA polymerase α and ν although to a different extent. Here we measured the effects of these inhibitors on repair DNA synthesis of U.V.-irradiated HeLa cells by two different methods. Firstly, aphidicolin, 1-ν-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (araC, a precursor of araCTP) and 2',3'-dideoxythimidine (d 2 Thd, a precursor of d 2 TTP) were added directly to the culture medium. In this case, aphidicolin and araC strongly inhibited replicative DNA synthesis of HeLa cells, and they also inhibited repair synthesis after U.V.-irradiation but to a much lesser extent. In contrast, high concentrations of d 2 Thd inhibited repair DNA synthesis to a higher extent than replicative DNA synthesis. Secondly, the active form of inhibitor, d 2 TTP, was microinjected directly into cytoplasm or nuclei or U.V.-irradiated HeLa cells. Microinjection of d 2 TTP effectively inhibited repair synthesis. The microinjection of d 2 TTP, into either cytoplasm or nucleus, strongly inhibited replicative synthesis. These results might indicate that multiple DNA polymerases are involved in repair synthesis as well as in replicative synthesis

  3. A comparison of the DNA and chromosome repair kinetics after #betta# irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hittelman, W.N.; Pollard, M.

    1982-01-01

    The kinetics of repair at the chromosome and DNA levels were compared after #betta# irradiation of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO). Induction and repair of DNA damage were measured by the alkaline and neutral elution techniques, while chromosome damage and repair were determined by the technique of premature chromosome condensation. During and after #betta# irradiation, significant DNA repair occurred within 2 min. This fast repair could be inhibited by EDTA and pyrophosphate and probably reflected polynucleotide ligase activity. A slower component of DNA repair was detected between 15 and 60 min after irradiation, by which time most of the DNA had been repaired. In contrast, chromosome repair was not detectable until 45 min after irradiation, and nearly half of the chromatid breaks were repaired by 60 min. Cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, prevented chromosome break repair, yet had no effect on the immediate formation of chromatid exchanges or DNA repair. These results suggest the following: (1) the rapidly repairing DNA lesions are not important in the repair of chromosomes; (2) chromosome damage involves only a minority of the DNA lesions measured by alkaline and neutral DNA elution; and (3) chromosome repair may involve more than simply the repair of damaged DNA that can be detected by the alkaline and neutral elution assays

  4. The effect of U.V.-irradiation on lambda DNA transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranade, S.S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of U.V.-irradiation of template DNA has been studied in vitro in the E.coli RNA polymerase system with native and U.V.-treated lambda DNA. Lambda DNA was more susceptible to U.V. than was calf-thymus DNA, yet a residual activity was observed at a U.V. dose of 0.5 x 10 4 erg/mm 2 . From the kinetic analysis of the reaction and the incorporation of lambda 32 P-labelled nucleoside triphosphates, it seems reasonable to conclude that U.V.-irradiation probably did not affect the DNA initiation sites, recognizable by RNA polymerase. The transcription products made with U.V.-irradiated lambda DNA were asymmetrical, and hybridized to the right half (R) and the left half (L) of lambda DNA with the ratio of R/L=4/1, and they showed a lower hybridizability than the transcripts with native lambda DNA. The initiation sites recognizable by RNA polymerase seemed to be the same on both native and U.V.-irradiated lambda DNA, though the transcription of U.V.-treated lambda DNA appeared to terminate with rather short RNA chains. (author)

  5. Ultrasound-mediated gene delivery of naked plasmid DNA in skeletal muscles : a case for bolus injections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes Sanches, P.; Muehlmeister, M.; Seip, R.; Kaijzel, E.L.; Loewik, C.; Boehmer, M.; Tiemann, K.; Grüll, H.

    2014-01-01

    Localized gene delivery has many potential clinical applications. However, the nucleic acids (e.g. pDNA and siRNA) are incapable of passively crossing the endothelium, cell membranes and other biological barriers which must be crossed to reach their intracellular targets. A possible solution is the

  6. Impairment of the DNA synthesis in roots of γ-irradiated seedlings, and the restorative processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golikova, O.P.; Mironyuk, T.J.

    1976-01-01

    Degradation of a prelabelled H 3 -DNA and post-irradiation incorporation of 2-C 14 -thymidine into root DNA of mung beans, peas, and horse beans, have been studied as a function of a radiation dose. A marked dose-dependent decrease in the activity of H 3 -DNA has been detected in γ-irradiated roots. As the radiation dose increases, the specific activity of 2-C 14 -DNA also increases in roots of beans and mung beans. A maximum increase is registered at a dose of 1500 rads. The effects observed are thought to be due to the restorative processes

  7. Detection of irradiation induced modifications in foodstuff DNA using 32p post-labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoey, B.M.; Swallow, A.J.; Margison, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    DNA post-labelling has been used successfully to detect damage to DNA caused by a range of damaging agents. The assay results in a fingerprint of changes induced in DNA which might, in principle, be useful as a test for the detection of the irradiation of foods. The authors present their DNA extraction and 32 p post-labelling methods from chicken or cooked prawn samples and their analysis method (High Performance liquid chromatography). It's hoped that these results could form the basis of a test to detect if foods have been irradiated

  8. Use of sperm plasmid DNA lipofection combined with REMI (restriction enzyme-mediated insertion) for production of transgenic chickens expressing eGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) or human follicle-stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel-Markowitz, Eliane; Gurevich, Michael; Shore, Laurence S; Katz, Adi; Stram, Yehuda; Shemesh, Mordechai

    2009-05-01

    Linearized p-eGFP (plasmid-enhanced green fluorescent protein) or p-hFSH (plasmid human FSH) sequences with the corresponding restriction enzyme were lipofected into sperm genomic DNA. Sperm transfected with p-eGFP were used for artificial insemination in hens, and in 17 out of 19 of the resultant chicks, the exogenous DNA was detected in their lymphocytes as determined by PCR and expressed in tissues as determined by (a) PCR, (b) specific emission of green fluorescence by the eGFP, and (c) Southern blot analysis. A complete homology was found between the Aequorea Victoria eGFP DNA and a 313-bp PCR product of extracted DNA from chick blood cells. Following insemination with sperm lipofected with p-hFSH, transgenic offspring were obtained for two generations as determined by detection of the transgene for human FSH (PCR) and expression of the gene (RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR) and the presence of the protein in blood (radioimmunoassay). Data demonstrate that lipofection of plasmid DNA with restriction enzyme is a highly efficient method for the production of transfected sperm to produce transgenic offspring by direct artificial insemination.

  9. Construction of Biologically Functional Bacterial Plasmids In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stanley N.; Chang, Annie C. Y.; Boyer, Herbert W.; Helling, Robert B.

    1973-01-01

    The construction of new plasmid DNA species by in vitro joining of restriction endonuclease-generated fragments of separate plasmids is described. Newly constructed plasmids that are inserted into Escherichia coli by transformation are shown to be biologically functional replicons that possess genetic properties and nucleotide base sequences from both of the parent DNA molecules. Functional plasmids can be obtained by reassociation of endonuclease-generated fragments of larger replicons, as well as by joining of plasmid DNA molecules of entirely different origins. Images PMID:4594039

  10. Detection of irradiated fresh, chilled, and frozen foods by the mitochondrial DNA method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machioni, E.; Bergaentzle, M.; Todoriki, S.; Hasselmann, C.; Kuntz, F.

    1996-01-01

    DNA molecules are very sensitive to ionising radiation, even at low doses. Strand breaks are easy to detect despite the generally low DNA content of foods, but such ruptures are not specific to radiation processing. Preliminary experiments showed that cellular DNA in beef underwent strong enzymatic degradation during storage at +4 o C and thus radiation effects could not be isolated. In order to make DNA strand rupture more specific to radiation (other than by deep freezing) it appears necessary to isolate the irradiated DNA from cell enzymes. This is the case for mitochondrial DNA which is protected from enzymatic degradation by the mitochondrial walls but not from radiation. It can, therefore, be assumed that DNA strand breaks in mitochondria will be specific to ionising radiation. The aim of this work is to develop and validate the proposed test on different food samples (meat and fish products) which are already or may be industrially irradiated in the near future. (author)

  11. Delivery of a survivin promoter-driven antisense survivin-expressing plasmid DNA as a cancer therapeutic: a proof-of-concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin KY

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kun-Yuan Lin,1 Siao Muk Cheng,2 Shing-Ling Tsai,2 Ju-Ya Tsai,1 Chun-Hui Lin,1 Chun Hei Antonio Cheung1,2 1Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC; 2Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC Abstract: Survivin is a member of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis proteins family. It is overexpressed in many different cancer types but not in the differentiated normal tissue. In addition, overexpression of survivin promotes cancer cell survival and induces chemotherapeutic drug resistance, making it an attractive target for new anticancer interventions. Despite survivin being a promising molecular target for anticancer treatment, it is widely accepted that survivin is only a “semi-druggable” target. Therefore, it is important to develop a new strategy to target survivin for anticancer treatment. In this study, we constructed a novel survivin promoter-driven full-length antisense survivin (pSur/AS-Sur expression plasmid DNA. Promoter activity assay revealed that the activity of the survivin promoter of pSur/AS-Sur correlated with the endogenous expression of survivin at the transcriptional level in the transfected A549, MDA-MB-231, and PANC-1 cancer cells. Western blot analysis showed that liposomal delivery of pSur/AS-Sur successfully downregulated the expression of survivin in A549, MBA-MB-231, and PANC-1 cells in vitro. In addition, delivery of pSur/AS-Sur induced autophagy, caspase-dependent apoptosis, and caspase-independent apoptosis as indicated by the increased LC3B-II conversion, autophagosome formation, caspase-9/-3 and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 cleavage, and apoptosis-inducing factor nuclear translocation in A549, MBA-MB-231, and PANC-1 cells. Importantly, liposomal delivery of pSur/AS-Sur was also capable of decreasing the proliferation of the survivin/MDR1 coexpressing multidrug-resistant KB-TAX50 cancer cells and

  12. Properties of an endonuclease activity in Micrococcus luteus acting on γ-irradiated DNA and on apurinic DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, G.; Haas, P.; Coquerelle, Th.; Hagen, U.

    1980-01-01

    A protein fraction from Micrococcus luteus with endonuclease activity against γ-irradiated DNA was isolated and characterized. An additional activity on apurinic sites could not be separated, either by sucrose gradient sedimentation or by gel filtration through Sephadex G 100. From gel filtration, a molecular weight of about 25 000 was calculated for both endonuclease activities. The endonuclease activity against γ-irradiated DNA was stimulated five-fold with 5 mM Mg ++ , whereas that against apurinic sites was less dependent on the Mg ++ concentration. 100 mM KCl inhibited the γ-ray endonuclease, but not the apurinic endonuclease activity. In γ-irradiated DNA the protein recognized 1.65 endonuclease sensitive sites per radiation-induced single-strand break, among which are 0.45 alkali labile lesions in the nucleotide strand. The was evaluated resulting in a Ksub(m)-value of 73 nM. (author)

  13. Properties of an endonuclease activity in Micrococcus luteus acting on. gamma. -irradiated DNA and on apurinic DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, G; Haas, P; Coquerelle, Th; Hagen, U [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Genetik und fuer Toxikologie von Spaltstoffen

    1980-01-01

    A protein fraction from Micrococcus luteus with endonuclease activity against ..gamma..-irradiated DNA was isolated and characterized. An additional activity on apurinic sites could not be separated, either by sucrose gradient sedimentation or by gel filtration through Sephadex G 100. From gel filtration, a molecular weight of about 25 000 was calculated for both endonuclease activities. The endonuclease activity against ..gamma..-irradiated DNA was stimulated five-fold with 5 mM Mg/sup + +/, whereas that against apurinic sites was less dependent on the Mg/sup + +/ concentration. 100 mM KCl inhibited the ..gamma..-ray endonuclease, but not the apurinic endonuclease activity. In ..gamma..-irradiated DNA the protein recognized 1.65 endonuclease sensitive sites per radiation-induced single-strand break, among which are 0.45 alkali labile lesions in the nucleotide strand. The was evaluated resulting in a Ksub(m)-value of 73 nM.

  14. Slow elimination of injured liver DNA bases of γ-irradiated old mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaziev, A.I.; Malakhov, L.V.; Fomenko, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    The paper presents a study of the elimination of injured bases from the liver DNA of old and young mice after their exposure to γ rays. The presented data show that if DNA from the liver of irradiated mice is treated with incision enzymes, its priming activity is increased. In the case of enzymatic treatment of DNA isolated 5 h after irradiation we find a great difference between the priming activity of the liver DNA of old and young mice. The reason for this difference is that the liver DNA of 20-month old mice 5 h after irradiation still has many unrepaired injured bases. These data indicated that the rate of incision of γ-injured DNA bases in the liver of old mice is lower than in the liver of young mice. In the liver of mice of different age the rate of restitution of DNA, single-strand breaks induced by γ rays in doses up to 100 Gy is the same. At the same time, the level of induced reparative synthesis of DNA in cells of an old organism is lower than in cells of a young organism. The obtained data suggest that reduction of the rate of elimination of modified bases from the cell DNA of 20-month old mice is due to reduction of the activity of the DNA repair enzymes or to restrictions in the chromatin in the access of these enzymes to the injured regions of DNA in the cells of old animals

  15. Determination of serum DNA concentration by enzyme immunoassay (ELISA) in gamma irradiated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabor, J; Misurova, E

    1987-01-01

    A sensitive and specific ELISA method was used to determine changes in the serum DNA concentration in rats at hours 6 and 9 and on the days 1, 3, 7, 10, 15 and 30 after acute whole-body gamma irradiation with a dose of 8 Gy. Changes in the DNA serum concentration were determined also on day 10 after irradiation with doses of 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 Gy. The present results indicate that the pattern of changes in the serum DNA concentration is characterized by an initial decrease, typical also of the leukocyte count, followed by a statistically significant increase in the DNA concentration on day 10 and in later periods of time. These data confirmed, in principle, the authors' previous findings on changes in the DNA concentration in the rat blood plasma after acute X-ray irradiation assessed by the fluorimetric method with ethidium bromide. (author). 4 figs., 14 refs.

  16. Organization of rat neuronal DNA as a function of dose, time after irradiation and age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaberaboansari, A.

    1989-01-01

    The organization of DNA and chromatin structure were examined in male Fisher 344 rat cerebellar neurons at various times from < 5 min to 2 years after exposure to ionizing radiation. Immediately after irradiation, the organization of neuronal DNA was altered. First, the DNA superhelical structure was changed due to removal of the topological constraints on the supercoiled DNA loops. Secondly, the accessibility of bulk neuronal DNA to digestion by micrococcal nuclease was increased. This increase in the m. nuclease sensitivity of bulk DNA did not depend on the oxygen concentration during irradiation. Thirdly, the accessibility of the nuclear matrix-associated DNA to digestion by DNase I was decreased. This decrease was most likely caused by masking the DNA with additional nuclear matrix-associated proteins. This increase in protein content was independent of oxygen, but inhibited if irradiations were performed at 4 degree C. The kinetics were consistent with the saturation kinetics observed for DNA repair in cerebellar neurons. Thus, these proteins may be associated with repair of radiation-induced DNA damage. The neuronal DNA/chromatin structure was restored to its unirradiated state by 24 hr after irradiation with biphasic kinetics having half-times similar to those reported for repair of radiation-induced DNA damage. However, the evidence suggested that residual DNA damage occurred in aging rats that had received a relatively high radiation dose at 4 months of age. In those rats, there was: (a) a decrease in the total nuclear protein content with age, (b) an increase in the digestibility of bulk DNA by m. nuclease with age, and (c) a reduction in the amount of nuclear matrix-associated proteins that persisted with age

  17. DNA Comet Assay. A simple screening technique for identification of some irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.A.; Khan, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    DNA Comet Assay method was carried out to detect irradiation treatment of some foods like meat, spices, beans and lentils. The fresh meat of cow and duck were irradiated up to radiation doses of 3 kGy, the spices (cardamoms and cumin black) were irradiated to radiation doses of 5, 10, 15 and 20 kGy while the beans (black beans and white beans) and lentils (red and green lentils) were irradiated to 0.5 and 1 kGy. All the foods were then analyzed for radiation treatment using simple microgel electrophoresis of single cells or nuclei (DNA Comet Assay). Sedimentation, lysis and staining times were adjusted to get optimized conditions for correct and easy analysis of each food. Using these optimized conditions, it was found out that radiation damaged DNA showed comets in case of irradiated food samples, whereas in non-treated food samples, round or conical spots of stained DNA were visible. Shape, length and intensity of these comets were also radiation dose dependent. Screening of unirradiated and irradiated samples by Comet Assay was successful in the case of all the foods under consideration under the optimized conditions of assay. Therefore, for different kinds of irradiated foods studied in the present study, the DNA Comet Assay can be used as a rapid, simple and inexpensive screening test. (author)

  18. Transfer of the lambdadv plasmid to new bacterial hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellenberger-Gujer, G.; Boy de la Tour, E.; Berg, D.E.

    1974-01-01

    Lambda dv, which was derived from bacteriophage lambda, replicates autonomously as a plasmid in Escherichia coli and consists of only the immunity region (imm/sup lambda/) and DNA replication genes (O, P) of the ancestral phage. Addition phages (lambda imm 21 --lambda dv) carry the lambda dv fragment inserted as a tandem duplication in their genome (sequence A imm 21 O P imm/sup lambda/ O P R) are formed as recombinants after lambda imm 21 infection of strains carrying lambda dv. Addition phages were used to transfer lambda dv to new bacterial hosts. Lambda dv transfer by excision of the lambda dv segment from the addition phage genome requires a bacterial Rec or a phage Red recombination system. Successful transfer is stimulated by uv irradiation of the addition phage before infection. Some properties of the newly transferred lambda dv plasmids are described. (U.S.)

  19. Co-administration of avian influenza virus H5 plasmid DNA with chicken IL-15 and IL-18 enhanced chickens immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kian-Lam; Jazayeri, Seyed Davoud; Yeap, Swee Keong; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu Mohamed; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Ideris, Aini; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2012-08-06

    DNA vaccines offer several advantages over conventional vaccines in the development of effective vaccines against avian influenza virus (AIV). However, one of the limitations of the DNA vaccine in poultry is that it induces poor immune responses. In this study, chicken interleukin (IL) -15 and IL-18 were used as genetic adjuvants to improve the immune responses induced from the H5 DNA vaccination in chickens. The immunogenicity of the recombinant plasmid DNA was analyzed based on the antibody production, T cell responses and cytokine production, following inoculation in 1-day-old (Trial 1) and 14-day-old (Trial 2) specific-pathogen-free chickens. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to explore the role of chicken IL-15 and IL-18 as adjuvants following the vaccination of chickens with the H5 DNA vaccine. The overall HI antibody titer in chickens immunized with pDis/H5 + pDis/IL-15 was higher compared to chickens immunized with pDis/H5 (p chickens exhibited a shorter time to achieve the highest HI titer in comparison to the inoculation of the 1-day-old chickens. The cellular immunity was assessed by the flow cytometry analysis to enumerate CD4+ and CD8 + T cells in the peripheral blood. The chickens inoculated with pDis/H5 + pDis/IL-15 demonstrated the highest increase in CD4+ T cells population relative to the control chickens. However, this study revealed that pDis/H5 + pDis/IL-15 was not significant (P > 0.05) in inducing CD8+ T cells. Meanwhile, with the exception of Trial 1, the flow cytometry results for Trial 2 demonstrated that the pDis/H5 + pDis/IL-18 inoculated group was able to trigger a higher increase in CD4+ T cells than the pDis/H5 group (P 0.05) in modulating CD8+ T cells population in both trials. The pDis/H5 + pDis/IL-15 inoculated group showed the highest IL-15 gene expression in both trials compared to other inoculated groups (P chicken IL-15 and IL-18,with pDis/H5 + pDis/IL-15 being a better vaccine candidate

  20. Presence of UV-endonuclease sensitive sites in daughter DNA of UV-irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambrosio, S.; Setlow, R.B.

    1978-02-01

    Asynchronous Chinese hamster cells were irradiated with 10 Jm -2 uv radiation and 0.25 to 4 hours later pulse-labeled with [ 3 H]thymidine. Cells synchronized by shaking off mitotic and G 1 cells were irradiated in either the G 1 -phase or S-phase of the cell cycle and pulse-labeled with [ 3 H]thymidine in the S-phase. After a 12 to 14 hour chase in unlabeled medium, the DNA was extracted, incubated with Micrococcus luteus uv-endonuclease and sedimented in alkaline sucrose. The number of endonuclease sensitive sites decreased as the time between uv irradiation and pulse-labeling of daughter DNA increased. Further, there were significantly less endonuclease sensitive sites in the daughter DNA from cells irradiated in the G 1 -phase than in the S-phase. These data indicate that very few, if any, dimers are transferred from parental DNA to daughter DNA and that the dimers detected in daughter DNA may be due to the irradiation of replicating daughter DNA before labeling

  1. Cooperation of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase with DNA polymerase α in the replication of ultraviolet-irradiated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, S.; Masaki, S.; Nakamura, H.; Morita, T.

    1981-01-01

    The amount of DNA synthesis in vitro with the ultraviolet-irradiated poly(dT).oligo(rA) template initiators catalysed by DNA polymerase α (Masaki, S. and Yoshida, S., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 521, 74-88) decreased with the dose of ultraviolet-irradiation. The ultraviolet irradiation to the template, however, did not affect the rate of incorporation of incorrect deoxynucleotides into the newly synthesized poly(dA). The addition of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase to this system enhanced the DNA synthesis to a level which is comparable to that of the control and it concomitantly increased the incorporation of the mismatched deoxynucleotide into the newly synthesized poly(dA) strands. On the other hand, with an unirradiated template initiator, the misincorporation was only slightly enhanced by the addition of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. The sizes of newly synthesized DNA measured by the sedimentation velocities were found to be smaller with the ultraviolet-irradiated templates but they increased to the control level with the addition of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase to the systems. These results suggest that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase can help DNA polymerase α to bypass thymine dimers in vitro by the formation of mismatched regions at the positions opposite to pyrimidine dimers on the template. (Auth.)

  2. Plasmid DNA linearization in the antibacterial action of a new fluorescent Ag nanoparticle-paracetamol dimer composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Amaresh Kumar; Sk, Md Palashuddin; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2011-10-01

    Herein, we report the generation of a composite comprised of p-hydroxyacetanilide dimer and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) by reaction of AgNO3 and p-hydroxyacetanilide. The formation of the composite was established by UV-vis, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction along with substantiation by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the composite exhibited an emission spectrum with a peak at 435 nm when excited by light of wavelength 320 nm. The composite showed superior antimicrobial activity with respect to its individual components against a wide range of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria at relatively low concentrations of Ag NPs and at which there was no apparent cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. Our results suggest that the composite strongly interacted with the bacterial cell walls leading to cell bursting. Interestingly, enhancement in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in bacteria was observed in the presence of the composite. It is proposed that the ROS generation led to oxidation of the dimer to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). The generated NAPQI acted as a DNA gyrase inhibitor causing cell death following linearization of DNA.Herein, we report the generation of a composite comprised of p-hydroxyacetanilide dimer and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) by reaction of AgNO3 and p-hydroxyacetanilide. The formation of the composite was established by UV-vis, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction along with substantiation by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the composite exhibited an emission spectrum with a peak at 435 nm when excited by light of wavelength 320 nm. The composite showed superior antimicrobial activity with respect to its individual components against a wide range of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria at relatively low concentrations of Ag NPs and at which there was no apparent cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. Our results suggest that the

  3. DNA double strand breaks in the acute phase after synchrotron pencilbeam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Palomo, C; Trippel, M; Schroll, C; Nikkhah, G; Schültke, E; Bräuer-Krisch, E; Requardt, H; Bartzsch, S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. At the biomedical beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), we have established a method to study pencilbeam irradiation in-vivoin small animal models. The pencilbeam irradiation technique is based on the principle of microbeam irradiation, a concept of spatially fractionated high-dose irradiation. Using γH2AX as marker, we followed the development of DNA double strand breaks over 48 hrs after whole brain irradiation with the pencilbeam technique. Method. Almost square pencilbeams with an individual size of 51 × 50 μm were produced with an MSC collimator using a step and shoot approach, while the animals were moved vertically through the beam. The center-to-center distance (ctc) was 400 μm, with a peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR) of about 400. Five groups of healthy adult mice received peak irradiation doses of either 330 Gy or 2,460 Gy and valley doses of 0.82 Gy and 6.15 Gy, respectively. Animals were sacrificed at 2, 12 and 48 hrs after irradiation. Results. DNA double strand breaks are observed in the path of the pencilbeam. The size of the damaged volume undergoes changes within the first 48 hours after irradiation. Conclusions. The extent of DNA damage caused by pencilbeam irradiation, as assessed by H2AX antibody staining, is dose- dependent

  4. Effect of UV-irradiation on DNA-membrane complex of Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chefranova, O.A.; Gaziev, A.I.

    1979-01-01

    The UV radiation effect on DNA membrane complex of Bacillus subtilis has been studied. Increase of DNA content in the DNA membrane complex in two strains of 168 and recA - and its decrease in the polA - strain are shown. The above effect in the first two stamms is suppressed with caffeine and correlates with the change in protein content in the DNA membrane complex, determined by a radioactive label, but not lipids in other words, fixation of DNA and membrane goes through proteins. Capability of DNA content increase in the DNA membrane complex after UV irradiation and subsequent bacteria incubation in a total medium correlates with the relative sensitivity of stamm UV sensitivity. It is suggested, that the reparation synthesis goes in cells on the membrane and that binding of DNA and the membrane is necessary for the normal DNA reparation process

  5. Effect of ATM heterozygosity on heritable DNA damage in mice following paternal F0 germline irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulch, Janet E.; Li, M.-W.; Raabe, Otto G.

    2007-01-01

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product maintains genome integrity and initiates cellular DNA repair pathways following exposures to genotoxic agents. ATM also plays a significant role in meiotic recombination during spermatogenesis. Fertilization with sperm carrying damaged DNA could lead to adverse effects in offspring including developmental defects or increased cancer susceptibility. Currently, there is little information regarding the effect of ATM heterozygosity on germline DNA repair and heritable effects of paternal germline-ionizing irradiation. We used neutral pH comet assays to evaluate spermatozoa 45 days after acute whole-body irradiation of male mice (0.1 Gy, attenuated 137 Cs γ rays) to determine the effect of ATM heterozygosity on delayed DNA damage effects of Type A/B spermatogonial irradiation. Using the neutral pH sperm comet assay, significant irradiation-related differences were found in comet tail length, percent tail DNA and tail extent moment, but there were no observed differences in effect between wild-type and ATM +/- mice. However, evaluation of spermatozoa from third generation descendants of irradiated male mice for heritable chromatin effects revealed significant differences in DNA electrophoretic mobility in the F 3 descendants that were based upon the irradiated F 0 sire's genotype. In this study, radiation-induced chromatin alterations to Type A/B spermatogonia, detected in mature sperm 45 days post-irradiation, led to chromatin effects in mature sperm three generations later. The early cellular response to and repair of DNA damage is critical and appears to be affected by ATM zygosity. Our results indicate that there is potential for heritable genetic or epigenetic changes following Type A/B spermatogonial irradiation and that ATM heterozygosity increases this effect

  6. Pyrimidine dimer sites associated with the daughter DNA strands in uv-irradiated human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, A R; Kirk-Bell, S [Sussex Univ., Brighton (UK)

    1978-03-01

    Pyrimidine dimer sites associated with the newly-synthesized DNA were detected during post-replication repair of DNA in uv-irradiated human fibroblasts. These pyrimidine dimer sites were inferred from a decrease in the molecular weight of pulse-labelled DNA after treatment with an extract of Micrococcus luteus containing uv-specific endonuclease activity. In DNA synthesized immediately after irradiation, the frequency of these daughter strand dimer sites was 7 to 20% of that in the parental DNA. Such sites were found in fibroblasts from normal donors and from xeroderma pigmentosum patients (with defects in excision-repair or post-replication repair). They were excised from the DNA of normal cells. As the time between uv irradiation and pulse-labelling was increased, the frequency of dimer sites associated with the labelled DNA decreased. If the pulse-label was delivered 6 h after irradiation of normal cells or excision-defective xeroderma pigmentosum cells, no dimer sites were detected in the labelled DNA. It has usually been assumed that daughter-strand dimer sites were the result of recombinational exchanges. The assay procedure used in these experiments and in similar experiments of others did not distinguish between labelled DNA containing pyrimidine dimers within the labelled section, and labelled DNA which did not contain pyrimidine dimers but was attached to unlabelled DNA which did contain dimers. The latter structures would arise during normal replication immediately following uv irradiation of mammalian cells. Calculations are presented which suggest that a significant proportion and conceivably all of the dimer sites associated with the daughter strands may have arisen in this way, rather than from recombinational exchanges as has been generally assumed.

  7. Pyrimidine dimer sites associated with the daughter DNA strands in UV-irradiated human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, A.R.; Kirk-Bell, S.

    1978-01-01

    Pyrimidine dimer sites associated with the newly-synthesized DNA were detected during post-replication repair of DNA in UV-irradiated human fibroblasts. These pyrimidine dimer sites were inferred from a decrease in the molecular weight of pulse-labelled DNA after treatment with an extract of Micrococcus luteus containing UV-specific endonuclease activity. In DNA synthesized immediately after irradiation the frequency of these daughter strand dimer sites was 7-20% of that in the parental DNA. Such sites were found in fibroblasts from normal donors and from xeroderma pigmentosum patients (with defects in excision-repair or post-replication repair). They were excised from the DNA of normal cells. As the time between UV-irradiation and pulse-labelling was increased, the frequency of dimer sites associated with the labelled DNA decreased. If the pulse-label was delivered 6 h after irradiation of normal cells or excision-defective xeroderma pigmentosum cells, no dimer sites were detected in the labelled DNA. It has usually been assumed that daughter-strand dimer sites were the result of recombinational exchanges. The assay procedure used in these experiments and in similar experiments of others did not distinguish between labelled DNA containing pyrimidine dimers within the labelled section, and labelled DNA which did not contain pyrimidine dimers but was attached to unlabelled DNA which did contain dimers. The latter structures would arise during normal replication immediately following UV-irradiation of mammalian cells. Calculations are presented which suggest that a significant proportion and conceivably all of the dimer sites associated with the daughter strands may have arisen in this way, rather than from recombinational exchanges as has been generally assumed. (author)

  8. Difference in melting profiles of gamma irradiated DNA from chicken erythrocytes and from Escherichia coli B/r

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopff, J.; Miller, G.; Leyko, W.

    1977-01-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation on melting curves of DNA from chicken erythrocytes and Escherichia coli B/r were compared. Considerable changes, following gamma irradiation in the case of chicken erythrocytes DNA and no changes in the case of DNA from Escherichia coli B/r were observed. To explain the lack of changes in gamma irradiated samples of DNA from Escherichia coli B/r it was assumed that the original effects of irradiation were obscured by the process of renaturation of DNA. To exclude the above mentioned effect, examination of gamma irradiated DNA from Escherichia coli B/r was carried out with the addition of formaldehyde immediately after irradiation of the sample. Using this procedure changes of melting profiles of DNA from Escherichia coli B/r were demonstrated. (author)

  9. Faulty DNA repair following ultraviolet irradiation in Fanconi's anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, P.K.; Parker, J.W.; O'Brien, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    Fibroblasts from a patient with Fanconi's anemia were deficient in their ability to excise uv-induced pyrimidine dimers from their DNA but were capable of single-strand break production and unscheduled DNA synthesis

  10. Superior induction of T cell responses to conserved HIV-1 regions by electroporated alphavirus replicon DNA compared to that with conventional plasmid DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Maria L; Mbewe-Mvula, Alice; Rosario, Maximillian; Johansson, Daniel X; Kakoulidou, Maria; Bridgeman, Anne; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo; Nicosia, Alfredo; Ljungberg, Karl; Hanke, Tomás; Liljeström, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Vaccination using "naked" DNA is a highly attractive strategy for induction of pathogen-specific immune responses; however, it has been only weakly immunogenic in humans. Previously, we constructed DNA-launched Semliki Forest virus replicons (DREP), which stimulate pattern recognition receptors and induce augmented immune responses. Also, in vivo electroporation was shown to enhance immune responses induced by conventional DNA vaccines. Here, we combine these two approaches and show that in vivo electroporation increases CD8(+) T cell responses induced by DREP and consequently decreases the DNA dose required to induce a response. The vaccines used in this study encode the multiclade HIV-1 T cell immunogen HIVconsv, which is currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Using intradermal delivery followed by electroporation, the DREP.HIVconsv DNA dose could be reduced to as low as 3.2 ng to elicit frequencies of HIV-1-specific CD8(+) T cells comparable to those induced by 1 μg of a conventional pTH.HIVconsv DNA vaccine, representing a 625-fold molar reduction in dose. Responses induced by both DREP.HIVconsv and pTH.HIVconsv were further increased by heterologous vaccine boosts employing modified vaccinia virus Ankara MVA.HIVconsv and attenuated chimpanzee adenovirus ChAdV63.HIVconsv. Using the same HIVconsv vaccines, the mouse observations were supported by an at least 20-fold-lower dose of DNA vaccine in rhesus macaques. These data point toward a strategy for overcoming the low immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in humans and strongly support further development of the DREP vaccine platform for clinical evaluation.

  11. Applying of centrifugal chromatography on DEAE cellulose and viscosity measurement to estimate damage caused by gamma irradiation in lymphocyte DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinski, R.

    1977-01-01

    DNA isolated from limphocytes of pig blood was irradiated by γ radiation in the range of 0.5-50 Krads. Changes caused by irradiation (single and double breaks) were determined by using viscosity measurement and centrifugal chromatography on DEAE cellulose. Study of DNA chromatograms showed possibility to apply centrifugal chromatography on DEAE cellulose to estimate changes caused by irradiation. (author)

  12. DNA apurinization and apyridinization in gamma-irradiated Bombyx mori embryos at various stages of development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agaev, F.A.; Vasil'ev, S.P.; Gaziev, A.I.

    1993-01-01

    A study was made of the formation and repair of apurine-apyridine sites in DNA of gamma-irradiated 3- and 7-day embryos of Bombix mori differing drastically in radiosensitivity. The kinetics of the postirradiation recovery of AP sites in DNA of 3- and 7-day Bombix mori embryos was heterogeneous and varied significantly

  13. Effect of irradiation on unscheduled DNA synthesis induced by 4-nitroquinoline in tracheal epithelium of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.F.; Kennedy, R.; Brooks, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was determined in rat epithelium by autoradiographic techniques to determine the influence of prior irradiation on the ability of the cells to repair mutagenic damage induced by 4-nitroquionoline (4NQO). UDS was stimulated by in vitro exposure to 4NPO. However, prior whole-body irradiation of rats with either 50 or 300 rad did not alter the UDS induced by 4NQO. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that irradiation can induce DNA repair enzymes in respiratory tract epithelium. 5 references, 3 figures

  14. Gamma-irradiation and neutron effect on DNA-membrane complexes of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapidus, I.L.; Nazarov, V.M.; Ehrtsgreber, G.

    1984-01-01

    The first results of radiobiological investigations in the biophysical channel of the JINR reactor IBR-2 are presented. Sedimentation behaviour of DNA-membrane complexes has been studied at irradiation of the Chinese hamster cells (VT9-4) in a wide dose range of 137 Cs γ-irradiation and neutrons. An earlier assumption of the authors on the role of DNA double-strand breaks in changing the relative sedimentation velocity of complexes at irradiation of cells with doses over 50 Gy has been confirmed

  15. Unscheduled DNA synthesis in spleen cells of mice exposed to low doses of total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuschl, H.; Kovac, R.; Hruby, E.

    1983-07-01

    Unscheduled DNA synthesis was induced by UV irradiation of spleen cells obtained from C 57 Bl mice after repeated total body irradiation of 0.05 Gy 60 Co (0.00125 Gy/mice) and determined autoradiographically. An enhancement in the ability for repair of UV induced DNA lesions was observed in cells of gamma irradiated animals. While the amount of 3 H-thymidine incorporated per cell was increased, the percentage of labeled cells remained unchanged. The present results are compared with previous data on low dose radiation exposure in men. (Author) [de

  16. DNA Damage Induction and Repair Evaluated in Human Lymphocytes Irradiated with X-Rays an Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedzwiedz, W.; Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.

    2000-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the kinetic of the DNA damage induction and their subsequent repair in human lymphocytes exposed to various types of radiation. PBLs cells were isolated from the whole blood of two young healthy male subjects and one skin cancer patient, and than exposed to various doses of low LET X-rays and high LET neutrons from 252 Cf source. To evaluate the DNA damage we have applied the single cell get electrophoresis technique (SCGE) also known as the comet assay. In order to estimate the repair efficiency, cells, which had been irradiated with a certain dose, were incubated at 37 o C for various periods of time (0 to 60 min). The kinetic of DNA damage recovery was investigated by an estimation of residual DNA damage persisted at cells after various times of post-irradiation incubation (5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 min). We observed an increase of the DNA damage (reported as a Tail DNA and Tail moment parameters) in linear and linear-quadratic manner, with increasing doses of X-rays and 252 Cf neutrons, respectively. Moreover, for skin cancer patient (Code 3) at whole studied dose ranges the higher level of the DNA damage was observed comparing to health subjects (Code 1 and 2), however statistically insignificant (for Tail DNA p=0.056; for Tail moment p=0.065). In case of the efficiency of the DNA damage repair it was observed that after 1 h of post-irradiation incubation the DNA damage induced with both, neutrons and X-rays had been significantly reduced (from 65% to 100 %). Furthermore, in case of skin cancer patient we observed lover repair efficiency of X-rays induced DNA damage. After irradiation with neutrons within first 30 min, the Tail DNA and Tail moment decreased of about 50%. One hour after irradiation, almost 70% of residual and new formed DNA damage was still observed. In this case, the level of unrepaired DNA damage may represent the fraction of the double strand breaks as well as more complex DNA damage (i.e.-DNA or DNA

  17. Excision of pyrimidine dimers from epidermal DNA and nonsemiconservative epidermal DNA synthesis following ultraviolet irradiation of mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowden, G.T.; Trosko, J.E.; Shapas, B.G.; Boutwell, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    Pyrimidine dimer production and excision in epidermal DNA were studied at five different dose levels of ultraviolet light in the skin of intact mice. Dimer production increased with dose up to 50,400 ergs/sq mm. Approximately 30 percent of the thymine-containing dimers were excised by 24 hr after irradiation at three lower dose levels of ultraviolet light. Nonsemiconservative DNA replication in ultraviolet-irradiated mouse skin was shown to continue for at least 18 hr. The rate of nonsemiconservative replication decreased with time, but did so slowly. The initial rates of nonsemiconservative replication increased with ultraviolet light dose levels up to about 4200 ergs/sq mm, after which the initial rates were decreased. Semiconservative epidermal DNA synthesis was shown to be inhibited by hydroxyurea, but hydroxyurea had no effect on ultraviolet light-induced nonsemiconservative DNA replication. The observed pyrimidine dimer excision and nonsemiconservative DNA replication suggest that in the intact mouse the cells of the epidermis are capable of DNA excision repair after ultraviolet irradiation of mouse skin

  18. A proposal of a novel DNA modification mechanism induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Toshitaka

    2016-01-01

    This article depicts a proposal of a novel DNA modification mechanism induced by irradiation, and is written as an award work from Japanese Society of Radiation Chemistry. The mechanism of DNA modification induced by K-shell photoabsorption of nitrogen and oxygen atoms was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements of calf thymus DNA film. The EPR intensities for DNA film were twofold times larger than those estimated based on the photoabsorption cross section. This suggests that the DNA film itself forms unpaired electron species through the excitation of enhanced electron recapturing, known as the postcollision interaction process. (author)

  19. Ultrasound-mediated gene delivery of naked plasmid DNA in skeletal muscles: a case for bolus injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Pedro Gomes; Mühlmeister, Mareike; Seip, Ralf; Kaijzel, Eric; Löwik, Clemens; Böhmer, Marcel; Tiemann, Klaus; Grüll, Holger

    2014-12-10

    Localized gene delivery has many potential clinical applications. However, the nucleic acids (e.g. pDNA and siRNA) are incapable of passively crossing the endothelium, cell membranes and other biological barriers which must be crossed to reach their intracellular targets. A possible solution is the use of ultrasound to burst circulating microbubbles inducing transient permeabilization of surrounding tissues which mediates nucleic acid extravasation and cellular uptake. In this study we report on an optimization of the ultrasound gene delivery technique. Naked pDNA (200 μg) encoding luciferase and SonoVue® microbubbles were co-injected intravenously in mice. The hindlimb skeletal muscles were exposed to ultrasound from a non-focused transducer (1 MHz, 1.25 MPa, PRI 30s) and injection protocols and total amounts as well as ultrasound parameters were systemically varied. Gene expression was quantified relative to a control using a bioluminescence camera system at day 7 after sonication. Bioluminescence ratios in sonicated/control muscles of up to 101× were obtained. In conclusion, we were able to specifically deliver genetic material to the selected skeletal muscles and overall, the use of bolus injections and high microbubble numbers resulted in increased gene expression reflected by stronger bioluminescence signals. Based on our data, bolus injections seem to be required in order to achieve transient highly concentrated levels of nucleic acids and microbubbles at the tissue of interest which upon ultrasound exposure should lead to increased levels of gene delivery. Thus, ultrasound mediated gene delivery is a promising technique for the clinical translation of localized drug delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A feasibility study of the use of DNA fragmentation as a method for detecting irradiation of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.L.; Bulford, B.B.

    1990-07-01

    The main conclusions of the study are: 1. Gamma-irradiation at doses of 1-10 kGy, as recommended for use in food irradiation, causes extensive fragmentation of DNA molecules. The degree of fragmentation increases with increasing doses of irradiation treatment. 2. Irradiation-induced DNA fragments can be rapidly separated from intact DNA using a simple ultra-filtration method. 3. The separated DNA fragments can be detected/quantified rapidly using the simple Invitrogen DNA DipStick procedure. Dot-blot assays based on probes to widely conserved genes (e.g. histone genes) may also prove of value, but will require further development. 4. As DNA is present in a wide range of foods, DNA fragmentation offers a potentially useful marker for the irradiation treatment of foods. The assay now requires assessment with DNA extracts of a variety of foods. (author)

  1. γ-irradiation induces radioresistant DNA synthesis in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synzynys, B.I.; Aminev, A.G.; Konstantinova, S.A.; Saenko, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    Cells of suspension HeLa culture at the logarithmic phase of growth were exposed to 60 Co-γ-rays (5 Gy), incubated in the nutritious medium, and in 4 h subjected to repeated irradiation: the dose-response function and the dynamics of DNA synthesis inhibition were determined. It was shown that DNA synthesis was inhibited to a lesser extent after preirradiation, in other words, DNA synthesis was radioresistant. A correlation between this synthesis and reproductive cell death is discussed

  2. Stimulation of DNA synthesis by 340nm/ 351nm UV laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meldrum, R.A.; Wharton, C.W.

    1991-01-01

    During preliminary experiments designed to test the feasibility of using a 'caged' DNA break trapping agent, the authors observed a stimulation of incorporation of 3 H-thymidine into DNA when cells were irradiated with low doses (100-1000J/m 2 ) of 351nm UV laser irradiation. This wavelength is used to photolyse 'caged' dideoxynucleotides in our fast time course measurements of DNA repair in mammalian cells. The dose at which this stimulation was observed is well below that at which measurable damage is detected. (author)

  3. Deficit in DNA content relative to histones in X-irradiated HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bases, R.; Mendez, F.; Neubort, S.

    1976-01-01

    The DNA and histone content of HeLa S-3 cell cultures was measured by direct mass assays 21 hours after 1000 rad of X-irradiation, when the cells were arrested in G2 phase. The nuclear DNA content of such cultures was found to be deficient (73 per cent of control values). In contrast, the synthesis of nuclear histones persisted, and the total histone content was close to 100 per cent of control values. When synchronously-growing cultures were irradiated in mid-S phase and examined 3.5 hours later in G2 phase, both DNA and histone content were equal to control values. (author)

  4. Decreased cell survival and DNA repair capacity after UVC irradiation in association with down-regulation of GRP78/BiP in human RSa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Ling; Kita, Kazuko; Wano, Chieko; Wu Yuping; Sugaya, Shigeru; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to extensive studies on the roles of molecular chaperones, such as heat shock proteins, there are only a few reports about the roles of GRP78/BiP, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced molecular chaperone, in mammalian cell responses to DNA-damaging stresses. To investigate whether GRP78/BiP is involved in resistance to a DNA-damaging agent, UVC (principally 254 nm in wavelength), we established human cells with down-regulation of GRP78/BiP by transfection of human RSa cells with antisense cDNA for GRP78/BiP. We found that the transfected cells showed higher sensitivity to UVC-induced cell death than control cells transfected with the vector alone. In the antisense-cDNA transfected cells, the removal capacities of the two major types of UVC-damaged DNA (thymine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts) in vivo and DNA synthesis activity of whole cell extracts to repair UVC-irradiated plasmids in vitro were remarkably decreased compared with those in the control cells. Furthermore, the antisense-cDNA transfected cells also showed slightly higher sensitivity to cisplatin-induced cell death than the control cells. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage is primarily repaired by nucleotide excision repair, like UVC-induced DNA damage. The present results suggest that GRP78/BiP plays a protective role against UVC-induced cell death possibly via nucleotide excision repair, at least in the human RSa cells tested

  5. Effect of arsenite on the DNA repair of UV-irradiated Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee-Chen, S.F.; Yu, C.T.; Jan, K.Y. (Academia Sinica, Taipei, (Taiwan). Institute of Zoology)

    1992-01-01

    Arsenite, an ubiquitous human carcinogen, has been shown to enhance the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity and clastogenicity of UV light in mammalian cells. Arsenite may exert its co-genotoxic effects by inhibiting DNA repair. Results from alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation show that arsenite did not accumulate UV-induced DNA strand breaks in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) K1 cells as aphidicolin plus hydroxyurea (HU) did. These data indicate that arsenite did not inhibit the activity of DNA polymerase [alpha] in UV repair. Treatment with arsenite before UV irradiation slightly reduced the DNA strand breaks accumulated by cytosine [beta]-D-arabinofuranoside (AraC) plus HU. This effect implies that arsenite only slightly inhibited the incision of UV-induced DNA adducts. The low molecular weight DNA accumulated by post-UV incubation with AraC plus HU shifted to high molecular weight upon the incubation of cells in drug-free medium, but this shifting was prohibited by the presence of arsenite. This suggests that arsenite inhibited the rejoining of DNA strand breaks. When a pulse-chase labelling procedure was applied on UV-irradiated cells, the chain elongation of nascent DNA was strongly inhibited by post-incubation with arsenite. These data show that arsenite inhibited post-replication repair in UV-irradiated cells. Therefore, the steps inhibited by arsenite in UV-induced cells. Therefore, the steps inhibited by arsenite in UV-induced DNA repair in CHO K1 cells are different from human fibroblasts. (author).

  6. Effect of arsenite on the DNA repair of UV-irradiated Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee-Chen, S.F.; Yu, C.T.; Jan, K.Y.

    1992-01-01

    Arsenite, an ubiquitous human carcinogen, has been shown to enhance the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity and clastogenicity of UV light in mammalian cells. Arsenite may exert its co-genotoxic effects by inhibiting DNA repair. Results from alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation show that arsenite did not accumulate UV-induced DNA strand breaks in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) K1 cells as aphidicolin plus hydroxyurea (HU) did. These data indicate that arsenite did not inhibit the activity of DNA polymerase α in UV repair. Treatment with arsenite before UV irradiation slightly reduced the DNA strand breaks accumulated by cytosine β-D-arabinofuranoside (AraC) plus HU. This effect implies that arsenite only slightly inhibited the incision of UV-induced DNA adducts. The low molecular weight DNA accumulated by post-UV incubation with AraC plus HU shifted to high molecular weight upon the incubation of cells in drug-free medium, but this shifting was prohibited by the presence of arsenite. This suggests that arsenite inhibited the rejoining of DNA strand breaks. When a pulse-chase labelling procedure was applied on UV-irradiated cells, the chain elongation of nascent DNA was strongly inhibited by post-incubation with arsenite. These data show that arsenite inhibited post-replication repair in UV-irradiated cells. Therefore, the steps inhibited by arsenite in UV-induced cells. Therefore, the steps inhibited by arsenite in UV-induced DNA repair in CHO K1 cells are different from human fibroblasts. (author)

  7. Use of SCGE method for detection of DNA comet in irradiated samples of poultry and shrimp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajaei, R.; Hosseini, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    DNA in food may sustain damage by gamma irradiation.This damage can be detected by a sensitive technique, called single cell gel electrophoresis. This is a simple and low-cost technique for rapid screening of the cells of irradiated foodstuffs. For this purpose, poultry and shrimp samples were irradiated by the 60 Co gamma radiation. The radiation doses for poultry were 2,5 and 7 kGy and for shrimp were 3 and 7kGy, respectively. The irradiation samples were compared with those of unirradiated types (control). In addition, the effects of shelf-life and temperature were considered on the poultry samples only. We have found that this technique is easily applicable for identification of irradiated from unirradiated samples and it is found to be irrespective of the applied dose. It is worth mentioning that any DNA change arising from any source, for example temperature fluctuation, may be detected by the single cell gel electrophoresis technique

  8. Effect of degradative plasmid CAM-OCT on responses of Pseudomonas bacteria to UV light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBeth, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of plasmid CAM-OCT on responses to UV irradiation was compared in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in Pseudomonas putida, and in Pseudomonas putida mutants carrying mutations in UV response genes. CAM-OCT substantially increased both survival and mutagenesis in the two species. P. aeruginosa strains without CAM-OCT exhibited much higher UV sensitivity than did P. putida strains. UV-induced mutagenesis of plasmid-free P. putida was easily detected in three different assays (two reversion assays and one forward mutation assay), whereas UV mutagenesis of P. aeruginosa without CAM-OCT was seen only in the forward mutation assay. These results suggest major differences in DNA repair between the two species and highlight the presence of error-prone repair functions on CAM-OCT. A number of P. putida mutants carrying chromosomal mutations affecting either survival or mutagenesis after UV irradiation were isolated, and the effect of CAM-OCT on these mutants was determined. All mutations producing a UV-sensitive phenotype in P. putida were fully suppressed by the plasmid, whereas the plasmid had a more variable effect on mutagenesis mutations, suppressing some and producing no suppression of others. On the basis of the results reported here and results obtained by others with plasmids carrying UV response genes, it appears that CAM-OCT may differ either in regulation or in the number and functions of UV response genes encoded

  9. DNA vaccination with a plasmid encoding LACK-TSA fusion against Leishmania major infection in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maspi, N; Ghaffarifar, F; Sharifi, Z; Dalimi, A; Khademi, S Z

    2017-12-01

    Vaccination would be the most important strategy for the prevention and elimination of leishmaniasis. The aim of the present study was to compare the immune responses induced following DNA vaccination with LACK (Leishmania analogue of the receptor kinase C), TSA (Thiol-specific-antioxidant) genes alone or LACK-TSA fusion against cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). Cellular and humoral immune responses were evaluated before and after challenge with Leishmania major (L. major). In addition, the mean lesion size was also measured from 3th week post-infection. All immunized mice showed a partial immunity characterized by higher interferon (IFN)-γ and Immunoglobulin G (IgG2a) levels compared to control groups (pTSA fusion. Mean lesion sizes reduced significantly in all immunized mice compared with control groups at 7th week post-infection (pTSA and TSA groups than LACK group after challenge (pTSA antigens against CL. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that a bivalent vaccine can induce stronger immune responses and protection against infectious challenge with L. major.

  10. Measurement of DNA-protein crosslinks in mammalian cells without X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantt, R.; Stephens, E.V.; Davis, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    To study the mechanisms of formation and repair of DNA-protein crosslinks in mammalian cells, the best general method to assay these lesions is the Kohn membrane alkaline elution procedure. Use of this sensitive technique requires the introduction of random strand breaks in the DNA by X-irradiation to reduce the very high molecular weight so that it elutes off the filter at an appropriate rate. This report describes an alternative method for fragmenting the DNA in the absence of X-irradiation equipment. Convenient reproducible elution rates of DNA from various mouse and human cells in culture without X-irradiation result from elution through polyvinyl chloride filters with 75 mM sodium hydroxide (0.33 ml/min) instead of the standard 20 mM EDTA-tetrapropylammonium hydroxide, pH 12.2 (0.03 to 0.04 ml/min). Dose-dependent retardation of the DNA elution was observed over the range 0 to 30 microM trans-platinum(II)diamminedichloride, and proteinase K treatment during cell lysis restored the elution rate to that of the untreated control cell DNA. In the absence of X-irradiation, this elution method measures DNA-protein crosslinks with higher sensitivity and equivalent reproducibility as the air-burst procedure

  11. Implication of the E. coli K12 uvrA and recA genes in the repair of 8-methoxypsoralen-induced mono adducts and crosslinks on plasmid DNA; Implicacion de los genes uvrA de E. coli K12 en la reparacion de monoaductos y entrecruzamien tos inducidos en DNA plasmidico por 8-metoxipso raleno mas luz ultravioleta A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramio, J M; Bauluz, C; Vidania, R de

    1986-07-01

    Genotoxicity of psoralen damages on plasmid DNA has been studied. pBR322 DNA was randomly modified with several concentrations of 8-methoxypsoralen plus 365 nm-UV light. After transformation into E. coli strains (wild-type, uvrA and recA) plasmid survival and mutagenesis were analyzed. To study the influence of the SOS response on plasmid recovery, preirradiation of the cells was performed. In absence of cell preirradiation, crosslinks were not repaired in any strain. Mono adducts were also lethal but in part removed by the excision-repair pathway. Preirradiation of the cells significantly. increased plasmid recovery in recA+ celia. In uvrA- only the mutagenic pathway seemed to be involved in the repair of the damaged DNA. Wild type strain showed the highest increase in plasmid survival, involving the repair of mono adducts and some fraction of crosslinks mainly through an error-free repair pathway. This suggests an enhancement of the excision repair promoted by the induction of SOS functions. (Author) 32 refs.

  12. Damage of DNA and plasma membranes in murine lymphoma cells irradiated under aerobic or hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wlodek, D.

    1983-01-01

    A review of the knowledge of radiation effects on cell membranes and DNA and of repair mechanisms of radiation lesions is given. Investigations of properties of plasma membranes in L5178Y-S and L5178Y-R cells (surface charge, fluidity, transport of amino acids) indicate that there is no direct connection between membrane lesions and reproductive death. It was also found that in irradiated cells of both L5178Y-strains the rate of DNA chain elongation is the same, similarly as the amount of the initial DNA lesions and the rate of repair processes. Difference in the level of DNA synthesis inhibition is not proportional to the lethal effect. The results are also reported point to the difference between L5178Y-S and L5178Y-R cells in susceptibility of post-irradiation DNA synthesis to factors modifying chromatin conformation, such as inhibitors of (ADP-ribose) n polymerase. 221 refs. (author)

  13. Characterization of damage in γ-irradiated and OsO4-treated DNA using methoxyamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liuzzi, M.; Talpaert-Borle, M.

    1988-01-01

    Unlabelled and radiolabelled methoxyamine have been used to characterize DNA damage caused by γ-rays or by the chemical reagent osmium tetroxide (OsO 4 ). Both treatments introduce in DNA a number of methoxyamine-binding sites proportional to the dose. Whereas the number of these sites remains constant after the OsO 4 treatment it increases during postirradiation incubation; the postirradiation appearance of methoxyamine-binding sites is enhanced by the presence of methoxyamine. OsO 4 treatment and γ-irradiation also induce the formation of alkali-labile sites in DNA. Whereas the number of these sites remains constant after OsO 4 treatment, it increases during postirradiation incubation and an alkaline medium accelerates their formation. A fraction of the alkali-labile sites found in γ-irradiated DNA is methoxyamine-labile; by contrast, the OsO 4 -treated DNA is stable in the presence of methoxyamine. (author)

  14. Formation of DNA-protein crosslinks in gamma-irradiated chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee, L.K.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma-irradiation of chromatin in vitro and in vivo induces DNA-protein crosslinks which are stable to salt and detergent treatment. The efficiency of crosslink formation is 100 times greater in irradiated isolated chromatin than in chromatin irradiated in cells before isolation. Gamma-irradiation of isolated chromatin in the presence of radical scavengers shows that OH . is the most effective radical for the promotion of crosslinking whereas e/sub aq//sup -/ and O/sub 2//sup -/ are essentially ineffective. For chromatin irradiated in the cell before isolation, fewer crosslinks are formed in air than in an atmosphere of nitrogen; the greatest effect is found in cells irradiated in an atmosphere of nitrous oxide, suggesting that OH . may be involved in the formation of crosslinks in vivo. On the basis of comparing radiation-induced crosslinking in whole chromating (DNA, H1 histone, the core histones - H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 - and non-histone chromosomal proteins) and in a chromatin subunit (DNA and the core histones), the authors identified the core histones as the specific chromosomal proteins predominantly involved in crosslinking to DNA

  15. Creation of DNA bank on the irradiated people and their descendants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusinova, G.G.; Adamova, G.V.; Okladnikova, N.D.

    2000-01-01

    Now special interest in the scientific world acquiring the researches on influence of radiation and estimation of the remote consequences of an irradiation on a genome of the man with the help of modern molecular-genetic methods. The decision of this problem has connected with reception and preservation of a hereditary material at cohorts who were exposed to an irradiation. Such cohort are the workers of the first atomic enterprise in Russia. In period of starting of this enterprise the workers were exposed by a chronic irradiation and combined radiation (Pu-239) in more then permissible doses. Now average age of these workers exceed 65 years. With the purpose of study of genetic consequences of an irradiation in Branch N 1 the Biophysics Institute Russian Federation (Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region) DNA Bank is creating. The methodological and methodical bases of its creation are developed. The creation of DNA Bank will enable widely to use the saved genetic material in the newest techniques for the analysis mini - and microsatellite DNA, structural genes (genes of a reparation and stress-response genes), both in somatic (parents), and in germinal cells of the individuals (descendants). The selection of families for DNA study is rather wide - one of the parents is irradiated or both parents have exposed to radiation. DNA, received from sputum and blood serum of the workers with incorporation Pu (the group of risk) will allow to investigate a role of some genes (K-ras, p16, p53) in development of tumor process. (author)

  16. The DNA 'comet assay' as a rapid screening technique to control irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerda, H.; Delincee, H.; Haine, H.; Rupp, H.

    1997-01-01

    The exposure of food to ionizing radiation is being progressively used in many countries to inactivate food pathogens, to eradicate pests, and to extend shelf-life, thereby contributing to a safer and more plentiful food supply. To ensure free consumer choice, irradiated food will be labelled as such, and to enforce labelling, analytical methods to detect the irradiation treatment in the food product itself are desirable. In particular, there is a need for simple and rapid screening methods for the control of irradiated food. The DNA comet assay offers great potential as a rapid tool to detect whether a wide variety of foodstuffs have been radiation processed. In order to simplify the test, the agarose single-layer set-up has been chosen, using a neutral protocol. Interlaboratory blind trials have been successfully carried out with a number of food products, both of animal and plant origin. This paper presents an overview of the hitherto obtained results and in addition the results of an intercomparison test with seeds, dried fruits and spices are described. In this intercomparison, an identification rate of 95% was achieved. Thus, using this novel technique, an effective screening of radiation-induced DNA fragmentation is obtained. Since other food treatments also may cause DNA fragmentation, samples with fragmented DNA suspected to have been irradiated should be analyzed by other validated methods for irradiated food, if such treatments which damage DNA cannot be excluded

  17. UV irradiation and autoclave treatment for elimination of contaminating DNA from laboratory consumables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefrides, Lisa A; Powell, Mark C; Donley, Michael A; Kahn, Roger

    2010-02-01

    Laboratories employ various approaches to ensure that their consumables are free of DNA contamination. They may purchase pre-treated consumables, perform quality control checks prior to casework, and use in-house profile databases for contamination detection. It is better to prevent contamination prior to DNA typing than identify it after samples are processed. To this end, laboratories may UV irradiate or autoclave consumables prior to use but treatment procedures are typically based on killing microorganisms and not on the elimination of DNA. We report a systematic study of UV and autoclave treatments on the persistence of DNA from saliva. This study was undertaken to determine the best decontamination strategy for the removal of DNA from laboratory consumables. We have identified autoclave and UV irradiation procedures that can eliminate nanogram quantities of contaminating DNA contained within cellular material. Autoclaving is more effective than UV irradiation because it can eliminate short fragments of contaminating DNA more effectively. Lengthy autoclave or UV irradiation treatments are required. Depending on bulb power, a UV crosslinker may take a minimum of 2h to achieve an effective dose for elimination of nanogram quantities of contaminating DNA (>7250mJ/cm(2)). Similarly autoclaving may also take 2h to eliminate similar quantities of contaminating DNA. For this study, we used dried saliva stains to determine the effective dose. Dried saliva stains were chosen because purified DNA as well as fresh saliva are less difficult to eradicate than dried stains and also because consumable contamination is more likely to be in the form of a collection of dry cells.

  18. Assessment of DNA damage induced by terrestrial UV irradiation of dried bloodstains: forensic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ashley; Sims, Lynn M; Ballantyne, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Few publications have detailed the nature of DNA damage in contemporary (i.e. non-ancient) dried biological stains. The chief concern, from a forensic standpoint, is that the damage can inhibit polymerase-mediated primer extension, ultimately resulting in DNA typing failure. In the work described here, we analyzed the effects of UVA and UVB irradiation on cell-free solubilized DNA, cell-free dehydrated DNA and dehydrated cellular DNA (from bloodstains). After UV exposure ranging from 25 J cm(-2) to 1236 J cm(-2), we assayed for the presence of bipyrimidine photoproducts (BPPPs), oxidative lesions and strand breaks, correlating the damage with the inhibition of STR profiling. Subsequent to irradiation with either UVA and UVB, the incidence of BPPPs, oxidative products and strand breaks were observed in decreasing quantities as follows: cell-free solubilized DNA>cell-free dehydrated DNA>bloodstain DNA. UVA irradiation did not result in even the partial loss of a STR profile in any sample tested. Somewhat different results were observed after genetic analysis of UVB exposed samples, in that the ability to produce a complete STR profile was affected earliest in bloodstain DNA, next in cell-free solubilized DNA and not at all in cell-free dehydrated DNA. Therefore, it is likely that other types of damage contributed to allele-drop-out in these samples but remained undetected by our assays, whereby the endonucleases did not react with the lesions or the presence of the lesions was masked by strand breaks. Under the conditions of the study, strand breaks appeared to be the predominant types of damage that ultimately resulted in DNA typing failure from physiological stains, although some evidence suggested oxidative damage may have played a role as well. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Slow elimination of DNA damaged bases in the liver of old gamma-irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaziev, A I; Malakhova, L V; Fomenko, L A [AN SSSR, Pushchino-na-Oke. Inst. Biologicheskoj Fiziki

    1981-01-01

    Elimination of the DNA damaged bases in the liver of old and young mice after their gamma-irradiation is studied. It is established that the incision rate of DNA gamma-damaged bases in the liver of old mice is lower than in the liver of the young ones. It is supposed to be connected with the decrease of the activity of DNA reparation ferments or with the presence of limitations in chromatin for the access of these ferments to the damaged parts of DNA in the cells of old animals.

  20. Electron paramagnetic relaxation studies of free radicals in. gamma. -irradiated DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwabara, M; Yoshi, G [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)

    1980-01-01

    Using the continuous microwave power saturation method the T/sub 1/ spin-lattice relaxation time and T/sub 2/ spin-spin relaxation time for DNA radicals (measured at 297/sup 0/K) are reported. Identical experiments carried out on thymidine-5'-monophosphate sodium salt (TMP) and deoxycytidine-5'-monophosphate sodium salt (dCMP) are also reported. Irradiated DNA produces TMP radicals on the base moiety and dCMP radicals on the sugar moiety. Comparing the relaxation times of DNA with those of TMP and dCMP provided a reliable analysis of the nature of DNA radicals.

  1. Double strand breaks in DNA in vivo and in vitro after 60Co-γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huelsewede, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The questions of what the correlation is between double strand breaks in DNA in the cell and lethal radiation damage and by means of which possible mechanisms DNA double strand breaks could occur were studied. E. coli served as test system. In addition to this the molecular weight of the DNA from irradiated E. coli as a function of the radiation dose under various conditions was measured. This data was compared on the one hand to the survival of the cell and on the other hand to the formation of DNA double strand breaks in an aqueous buffer system, which in its ionic characteristics was similar to cell fluids. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Co-administration of plasmid expressing IL-12 with 14-kDa Schistosoma mansoni fatty acid-binding protein cDNA alters immune response profiles and fails to enhance protection induced by Sm14 DNA vaccine alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Cristina T; Pacífico, Lucila G G; Barsante, Michele M; Rassi, Tatiana; Cassali, Geovanni D; Oliveira, Sérgio C

    2006-08-01

    Schistosomiasis is an endemic disease that affects 200 million people worldwide. DNA-based vaccine is a promising strategy to induce protective immunity against schistosomiasis, since both humoral and cellular immune responses are involved in parasite elimination. In this study, we evaluated the ability of Sm14 cDNA alone or in association with a plasmid expressing murine interleukin (IL)-12 to induce protection against challenge infection. Mice were immunized with four doses of the DNA vaccine and the levels of protection were determined by worm burden recovery after challenge infection. Specific antibody production to rSm14 was determined by ELISA, and cytokine production was measured in splenocyte culture supernatants stimulated with rSm14 and in bronchoalveolar lavage of vaccinated mice after challenge infection. DNA immunization with pCI/Sm14 alone induced 40.5% of worm reduction. However, the use of pCI/IL-12 as adjuvant to pCI/Sm14 immunization failed to enhance protection against challenge infection. Protection induced by pCI/Sm14 immunization correlates with specific IgG antibody production against Sm14, Th1 type of immune response with high levels of interferon (IFN)-gamma and low levels of IL-4 in splenocyte culture supernatants and in bronchoalveolar lavage after challenge infection. IL-12 co-administration with pCI/Sm14 induced a significant production of nitric oxide in splenocyte culture supernatants and also lymphocyte suppression, with reduced percentage of T cells producing IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

  3. Edaravone protects human peripheral blood lymphocytes from γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liming; Liu, Yinghui; Dong, Liangliang; Chu, Xiaoxia

    2015-03-01

    Radiation-induced cellular injury is attributed primarily to the harmful effects of free radicals, which play a key role in irradiation-induced apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the radioprotective efficacy of edaravone, a licensed clinical drug and a powerful free radical scavenger that has been tested against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes in studies of various diseases. Edaravone was pre-incubated with lymphocytes for 2 h prior to γ-irradiation. It was found that pretreatment with edaravone increased cell viability and inhibited generation of γ-radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in lymphocytes exposed to 3 Gy γ-radiation. In addition, γ-radiation decreased antioxidant enzymatic activity, such as superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, as well as the level of reduced glutathione. Conversely, treatment with 100 μM edaravone prior to irradiation improved antioxidant enzyme activity and increased reduced glutathione levels in irradiated lymphocytes. Importantly, we also report that edaravone reduced γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis through downregulation of Bax, upregulation of Bcl-2, and consequent reduction of the Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. The current study shows edaravone to be an effective radioprotector against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in lymphocytes in vitro. Finally, edaravone pretreatment significantly reduced DNA damage in γ-irradiated lymphocytes, as measured by comet assay (% tail DNA, tail length, tail moment, and olive tail moment) (p edaravone offers protection from radiation-induced cytogenetic alterations.

  4. DNA repair in gamma-and UV-irradiated Escherichia coli treated with caffeine and acriflavine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhestyanikov, V.D.; Savel'eva, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of the postradiation effect of caffeine and acriflavine on the survival rate and DNA repair in E. coli exposed to γ- and UV-radiation. When added to postradiation growth medium caffeine and acriflavine lower the survival rate of γ-irradiated radioresistant strains, B/r and Bsub(s-1)γR, and UV-irradiated UV-resistant strain B/r, and do not appreciably influence the survival of strains that are sensitive to γ- and UV-radiation. The survival rate of UV-irradiated mutant BsUb(s-1) somewhat increases in the presence of caffeine. Caffeine and acriflavine inhibit repair of single-stranded DNA breaks induced in strain B/r by γ-radiation (slow repair) and UV light. Acriflavine arrests a recombination branch of postreplication repair of DNA in E. coli Bsub(s-1)γR Whereas caffeine does not influence this process

  5. In vitro production of thymine dimer by ultroviolet irradiation of DNA from mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yein, F.S.; Stenesh, J.

    1989-01-01

    Thymine dimer was produced in vitro by ultraviolet irradiation of DNA, isolated from the mesophile Bacillus licheniformis and the thermophile B. stearothermophilus. Irradiation was performed at three different temperaturs (35, 45 and 55 C) and the thymine dimer was isolated and determined. An HPLC procedure was developed that permitted temperature was greater for the thermophile than for the mesophile. Formation of thymine dimer increased with temperature for both organisms but more so for the thermophile; over the temperature range of 35-55 C, the average increase in thymine dimer production for the themrophile was about 4-times that for the mesophile. The melting out temperature, as a function of increasing irradiation temperature, was essentially unchanged for the mesophilic DNA, but decreased progressively for the thermophilic DNA. These results are discussed in terms of the macromolecular theory of to the macromolecular theory of the thermophily. (author). 31 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  6. Inhibition of excision repair of DNA in u.v.-irradiated Escherichia coli by phenethyl alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, A.; Yonei, S.

    1985-01-01

    Membrane-specific drugs such as procaine and chlorpromazine have been shown to inhibit excision repair of DNA in u.v.-irradiated E. coli. One possible mechanism is that, if association of DNA with the cell membrane is essential for excision repair, this process may be susceptible to drugs affecting the structure of cell membranes. We examined the effect of phenethyl alcohol, which is a membrane-specific drug and known to dissociate the DNA-membrane complex, on excision repair of DNA in u.v.-irradiated E. coli cells. The cells were irradiated with u.v. light and then held at 30 0 C in buffer (liquid-holding) in the presence or absence of phenethyl alcohol. It was found that phenethyl alcohol inhibits the liquid-holding recovery in both wild-type and recA strains, corresponding to its dissociating action on the DNA-membrane complex. Thus, the association of DNA with cell membrane is an important factor for excision repair in E. coli. Procaine did not show the dissociating effect, suggesting that at least two different mechanisms are responsible for the involvement of cell membrane in excision repair of DNA in E. coli. (author)

  7. Inhibition of DNA repair in ultraviolet-irradiated human cells by hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.A.; Carrier, W.L.; Smith, D.P.; Regan, J.D.; Blevins, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    The effect on DNA repair in ultraviolet-irradiated human skin fibroblasts by hydroxyurea has been examined in this study using three independent methods for measuring DNA repair: the 5-bromodeoxyuridine photolysis assay which measures DNA repair replication, chromatographic measurement of thymine-containing dimers, and measurement of specific ultraviolet-endonuclease-sensitive sites in irradiated DNA. Little effect on hydroxyurea was observed at the concentration of 2mM, which is often used to inhibit semiconservative DNA synthesis; however, 10 mM hydroxyurea resulted in marked inhibition (65-70%) of excision repair. This inhibition was accompanied by a possible doubling in the size of the repaired region. The accumulation of large numbers of single-strand breaks following ultraviolet irradiation and hydroxyurea incubation seen by other investigators was not observed with the normal skin fibroblasts used in this study. A comparison of hydroxyurea effects on the different DNA repair assays indicates inhibition of one step in DNA repair also results in varying degrees of inhibition of other steps as well. (Auth.)

  8. Enzymatic induction of DNA double-strand breaks in γ-irradiated Escherichia coli K-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonura, T.; Smith, K.C.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1975-01-01

    The polA1 mutation increases the sensitivity of E. coli K-12 to killing by γ-irradiation in air by a factor of 2.9 and increases the yield of DNA double-strand breaks by a factor of 2.5. These additional DNA double-strand breaks appear to be due to the action of nucleases in the polA1 strain rather than to the rejoining of radiation-induced double-strand breaks in the pol + strain. This conclusion is based upon the observation that γ-irradiation at 3 0 did not affect the yield of DNA double-strand breaks in the pol + strain, but decreased the yield in the polA1 strain by a factor of 2.2. Irradiation of the polA1 strain at 3 0 followed by incubation at 3 0 for 20 min before plating resulted in approximately a 1.5-fold increase in the D 0 . The yield of DNA double-strand breaks was reduced by a factor of 1.5. The pol + strain, however, did not show the protective effect of the low temperature incubation upon either survival or DNA double-strand breakage. We suggest that the increased yield of DNA double-strand breaks in the polA 1 strain may be the result of the unsuccessful excision repair of ionizing radiation-induced dna base damage

  9. Inhibition of DNA repair in ultraviolet-irradiated human cells by hydroxyurea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, A.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN); Blevins, R.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Smith, D.P.; Regan, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    The effect on DNA repair in ultraviolet-irradiated human skin fibroblasts by hydroxyurea has been examined in this study using three independent methods for measuring DNA repair: the 5-bromodeoxyuridine photolysis assay which measures DNA repair replication, chromatographic measurement of thymine-containing dimers, and measurement of specific ultraviolet-endonuclease-sensitive sites in irradiated DNA. Little effect of hydroxyurea was observed at the concentration of 2 mM, which is often used to inhibit semiconservative DNA synthesis; however, 10 mM hydroxyurea resulted in marked inhibition (65 to 70%) of excision repair. This inhibition was accompanied by a possible doubling in the size of the repaired region. The accumulation of large numbers of single-strand breaks following ultraviolet irradiation and hydroxyurea incubation seen by other investigators was not observed with the normal skin fibroblasts used in this study. A comparison of hydroxyurea effects on the different DNA repair assays indicates inhibition of one step in DNA repair also results in varying degrees of inhibition of other steps as well.

  10. Structural alterations of the DNA in cerebellar neurons after whole-brain irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, K.T.; Winstein, R.E.; Kaufman, K.; Ritter, P.

    1981-01-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 260 to 280 g were whole-brain-irradiated with x-ray doses of 433, 867, 1083, 1300, 1516, and 1713 rad. Over the next 2.25 years rats were killed at various times, and the state of the DNA in their cerebellar neurons was examined by sedimentation through alkaline sucrose gradients in reorienting zonal rotors. The data were analyzed as the percentage of the sedimenting DNA with sedimentation coefficients greater than 300 S, an arbitrarily selected category of no defined molecular significance. The general pattern at all doses consisted first of a slow return to the unirradiated DNA state that was relatively dose dependent. This was followed by an increase in the amount of DNA sedimenting >300 S; both the extent and time course of this increase appeared to be dose dependent. Finally, the DNA degraded at a relatively dose independent rate. There was little change in the neuronal DNA from unirradiated rats during this study. The data suggest that increases in the amount of fast-sedimenting DNA observed 30 to 80 weeks after low to moderate doses of whole-brain irradiation represent a type of DNA damage rather than repair and that this damage ultimately results in degradation of the neuronal DNA and death of the rat

  11. Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Normal Tissues After Fractionated Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Fricke, Andreas; Wendorf, Juliane; Stuetzel, Annika; Kuehne, Martin; Ong, Mei Fang; Lipp, Peter; Ruebe, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: There is increasing evidence that genetic factors regulating the recognition and/or repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are responsible for differences in radiosensitivity among patients. Genetically defined DSB repair capacities are supposed to determine patients' individual susceptibility to develop adverse normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. In a preclinical murine model, we analyzed the impact of different DSB repair capacities on the cumulative DNA damage in normal tissues during the course of fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Different strains of mice with defined genetic backgrounds (SCID -/- homozygous, ATM -/- homozygous, ATM +/- heterozygous, and ATM +/+ wild-type mice) were subjected to single (2 Gy) or fractionated irradiation (5 x 2 Gy). By enumerating γH2AX foci, the formation and rejoining of DSBs were analyzed in organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding tissues (lung, kidney, and heart). Results: In repair-deficient SCID -/- and ATM -/- homozygous mice, large proportions of radiation-induced DSBs remained unrepaired after each fraction, leading to the pronounced accumulation of residual DNA damage after fractionated irradiation, similarly visible in early- and late-responding tissues. The slight DSB repair impairment of ATM +/- heterozygous mice was not detectable after single-dose irradiation but resulted in a significant increase in unrepaired DSBs during the fractionated irradiation scheme. Conclusions: Radiation-induced DSBs accumulate similarly in acute- and late-responding tissues during fractionated irradiation, whereas the whole extent of residual DNA damage depends decisively on the underlying genetically defined DSB repair capacity. Moreover, our data indicate that even minor impairments in DSB repair lead to exceeding DNA damage accumulation during fractionated irradiation and thus may have a significant impact on normal tissue responses in clinical

  12. [Protective Effect of S-isopentenyl-L-cysteine against DNA Damage in Irradiated Mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi-sheng; Yu, Guang-yun; He, Xin; Jiang, Ming; Chu, Xiao-fei; Zhao, Shu-yi; Fan, Sai-jun; Liu, Pei-xun

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the protective effect of S-isopentenyl-L-cysteine,a new cysteine derivative,on DNA damage induced by radiation by using acute radiation injury animal models. Forty ICR mice were randomly divided into five groups:the control group,1.0Gy gamma irradiation group,1.0Gy gamma irradiation combined with S-isopentenyl-L-cysteine group,7.2Gy gamma irradiation group,and 7.2Gy gamma irradiation combined with S-isopentenyl-L-cysteine group,with 8 mice in each group.The comet assay and bone marrow polychromatic micronucleus experiments were performed to evaluate the double-strand DNA breaks in ICR mice exposed to 1.0 and 7.2Gy gamma-ray, respectively. The tail DNA percentage,tail length,tail moment,and olive tail moment of peripheral blood lymphocytes in 7.2Gy gamma irradiation group were significantly higher than that of the control group (PL-cysteine group was significantly less than that of 7.2Gy gamma irradiation group (PL-cysteine before irradiation,the micronucleus rate of ICR mice exposed to 1.0 and 7.2Gy gamma-ray decreased from (39.5000 ± 3.3141)‰ to (28.1667±4.1345)‰ (P=0.033) and from (76.5000 ± 4.6242)‰ to (22.8333 ± 3.6553)‰(P=0.000),respectively. The bone marrow polychromatic micronucleus experiment indicated that the value of polychromatic erythrocyte (PCE)/normochromatic erythrocyte(NCE) of ICR mice exposed to 1.0 and 7.2Gy gamma-ray was less than the control group(PL-cysteine before irradiation was significantly higher than the corresponding groups (PL-cysteine has a good protective effect against DNA damage induced by radiation.

  13. Content of DNA in cancerous tumours of the breast before and after large-fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiukashvili, N N

    1976-07-01

    The article presents the results of microspectrophotometric investigation of DNA in different cancerous tumors of the breast gland before and after large-fractionated irradiation. The study of quantitative content of DNA in the non-irradiated tumors of the breast of different histological structure showed that parenchymatous cells are characterized by a definite variety in the DNA content with a different level of their polyploidy. This points to the fact that different histological forms of the breast cancer are distinguished by the character of the components differentiation. The comparative assessment of the ploidity of the cancerous cells of irradiated and non-irradiated tumors revealed that under the changed conditions of co-existence in all histological forms of cancer new modal classes of the cells develop and general quantity of the DNA content decreases. This testifies to the fact that the histological forms of the breast cancer are not equal sensitive tumors. A microspectrophotometric study of the breast tumors makes it possible to reveal the injury of the malignant tumor cells in the initial period of irradiation, when it is difficult to discover clear-cut dystrophical changes during histological investigation.

  14. Detection of irradiation treatment of foods using DNA 'comet assay'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Hasan M.; Delincee, Henry

    1998-06-01

    Microgel electrophoresis of single cells (DNA comet assay) has been investigated to detect irradiation treatment of some food samples. These samples of fresh and frozen rainbow trout, red lentil, gram and sliced almonds were irradiated to 1 or 2 kGy using 10 MeV electron beam from a linear accelerator. Rainbow trout samples yielded good results with samples irradiated to 1 or 2 kGy showing fragmentation of DNA and, therefore, longer comets with no intact cells. Unirradiated samples showed shorter comets with a significant number of intact cells. For rainbow trout stored in a freezer for 11 days the irradiated samples can still be discerned by electrophoresis from unirradiated samples, however, the unirradiated trouts also showed some longer comets besides some intact cells. Radiation treatment of red lentils can also be detected by this method, i.e. no intact cells in 1 or 2 kGy irradiated samples and shorter comets and some intact cells in unirradiated samples. However, the results for gram and sliced almond samples were not satisfactory since some intact DNA cells were observed in irradiated samples as well. Probably, incomplete lysis has led to these deviating results.

  15. The involvement of nuclear nucleases in rat thymocyte DNA degradation after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonova, L.V.; Nelipovich, P.A.; Umansky, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in thymocytes of irradiated rats were studied. It was shown that thymocyte nuclei contain at least two nucleases that cleave DNA between nucleosomes - a Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ -dependent nuclease and an acidic one which does not depend on bivalent ions. 2 and 3 h after irradiation at a dose of 10 Gy the initial rate of DNA cleavage by Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ -dependent nuclease in isolated nuclei increased three and seven times, respectively, but the kinetics of DNA digestion by acidic nuclease did not change. The experiments with cycloheximide indicated that Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ -dependent endonuclease turns over at a high rate. The activity of the cytoplasmic acidic and Mg 2+ -dependent nucleases was shown to increase (by 40 and 50%, respectively) 3h after irradiation. The effect is caused by the de novo synthesis of the nucleases. At the same time the activity of nuclear nucleases did not essentially change. The chromatin isolated from rat thymocytes 3 h after irradiation did not differ in its sensitivity to some exogenic nucleases (DNAase I, micrococcal nuclease and nuclease from Serratia marcescens) from the control. Thus, Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ -dependent endonuclease seems to be responsible for the postirradiation internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in dying thymocytes. (Auth.)

  16. Determination of thymine glycol residues in irradiated or oxidized DNA by formation of methylglyceric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellenberg, K.A.; Shaeffer, J.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of DNA solutions with X-irradiation various oxidants including hydrogen peroxide plus ferrous ion, hydrogen peroxide plus copper ion and ascorbate, permanganate, or sonication in the presence of dissolved oxygen all produced varying amounts of thymine glycol residues. After denaturing the DNA with heat, the glycol residues were reduced and labeled at the 6 position with tritium- labeled sodium borohydride. Subsequent reaction with anhydrous methanolic HCl gave a quantitative yield of the methyl ester of methylglyceric acid, which was determined by thin layer chromatography. The method, developed using thymidine as a model, was used to ascertain the requirements for glycol formation in DNA. It was shown that hydroxyl radical generating systems, permanganate, X-irradiation, or sonication in presence of oxygen were required, but hydrogen peroxide in the absence of iron or copper and ascorbate was inactive. Application to determination of DNA damage in vivo is being explored

  17. Repair and replication of DNA in hereditary (bilateral) retinoblastoma cells after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Char, D.; Charles, W.C.; Rand, N.

    1982-01-01

    Fibroblasts from patients with hereditary retinoblastoma reportedly exhibit increased sensitivity to killing by X-rays. Although some human syndromes with similar or greater hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents (e.g., X-rays, ultraviolet light, and chemical carcinogens), such as xeroderma pigmentosum, are deficient in DNA repair, most do not have such clearly demonstrable defects in repair. Retinoblastoma cells appear to be normal in repairing single-strand breaks and performing repair replication after X-irradiation and also in synthesizing poly(adenosine diphosphoribose). Semiconservative DNA replication in these cells, however, is slightly more resistant than normal after X-irradiation, suggesting that continued replication of damaged parental DNA could contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. This effect is small, however, and may be a consequence rather than a cause of the fundamental enzymatic abnormality in retinoblastoma that causes the tumorigenesis

  18. Automatic analysis of flow cytometric DNA histograms from irradiated mouse male germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampariello, F.; Mauro, F.; Uccelli, R.; Spano, M.

    1989-01-01

    An automatic procedure for recovering the DNA content distribution of mouse irradiated testis cells from flow cytometric histograms is presented. First, a suitable mathematical model is developed, to represent the pattern of DNA content and fluorescence distribution in the sample. Then a parameter estimation procedure, based on the maximum likelihood approach, is constructed by means of an optimization technique. This procedure has been applied to a set of DNA histograms relative to different doses of 0.4-MeV neutrons and to different time intervals after irradiation. In each case, a good agreement between the measured histograms and the corresponding fits has been obtained. The results indicate that the proposed method for the quantitative analysis of germ cell DNA histograms can be usefully applied to the study of the cytotoxic and mutagenic action of agents of toxicological interest such as ionizing radiations.18 references

  19. Dissociation of histone and DNA synthesis in x-irradiated HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bases, R.; Mendez, F.

    1971-01-01

    Although histone synthesis and DNA synthesis are normally very well coordinated in HeLa cells, their histone synthesis proved relatively resistant to inhibition by ionizing radiation. During the first 24 h after 1,000 R the rate of cellular DNA synthesis progressively fell to small fractions of control values while histone synthesis with much less relative reduction. Acrylamide gel electropherograms of the acid soluble nuclear histones synthesized by irradiated HeLa cells were qualitatively normal

  20. Cell sensitivity to irradiation and DNA repair processes. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubek, S.; Krasavin, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new model of DNA single-strand break (SSB) and double-strand break (DSB) induction by radiations of different linear energy transfer (LET) has been developed. Utilizing quadratic dependence of the dose that delta-electrons depart in the track of heavy particles the fraction of heavy particle energy deposited in the target of DNA dimensions has been calculated. SSBs arise from energy depositions in one strand of DNA, direct DSBs arise from two SSBs on opposite strands of DNA in the track of one particle. It is concluded that DSB's induced by γ-radiation are mostly of enzymatic origin, meanwhile DSB's induced by high-LET radiation are direct DSB's. The dependence of radiosensitivity D 0 -1 on LET (L) for isogenic mutants of E. coli with different sensitivity to γ-radiation has been determined on the bases of the model and considering microscopic energy fluctuations. The shape of D 0 -1 (L) function is formed both by physical characteristics of radiation and by the ability of cells to repair some types of DNA damage. The model provides a basis for further investigation. (author)

  1. Test of models for replication of SV40 DNA following UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    The replication of SV40 DNA immediately after irradiation of infected monkey cells has been examined. SV40 DNA synthesis is inhibited in a UV fluence-dependent fashion, and the synthesis of completely replicated (Form I) SV40 molecules is more severely inhibited than is total SV40 DNA synthesis. Two models for DNA replication-inhibition have been tested. Experimental results have been compared to those predicted by mathematical models derived to describe two possible molecular mechanisms of replication inhibition. No effect of UV irradiation on the uptake and phosphorylation of 3 H-thymidine nor on the size of the intracellular deoxythymidine triphosphate pool of SV40-infected cells have been observed, validating the use of 3 H-thymidine incorporation as a measure of DNA synthesis in this system. In vitro studies have been performed to further investigate the mechanism of dimer-specific inhibition of completion of SV40 DNA synthesis observed in in vivo. The results of these studies are consistent with a mechanism of discontinuous synthesis past dimer sites, but it is equally possible that the mechanism of DNA replication of UV-damaged DNA in the in vitro system is different from that which occurs in vivo

  2. Far UV irradiation of DNA in the presence of proteins, amino acids or peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcom, L.L.; Rains, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The DNA of bacteriophage SPO2c12 was subjected to 254 nm irradiation in solutions containing lysozyme or histone. The sensitivity of phage DNA to biological inactivation by UV increased as the amount of lysozyme bound per DNA strand increased. Although binding constants could not be measured for the DNA-histone interaction, this protein had a protective effect which was greater under conditions which cause enhanced binding. No crosslinking of either protein could be detected. Irradiation was also performed in the presence of various amino acids and short peptides. These were chosen to include amino acids which: (1) are positively charged, (2) absorb UV of this wavelength or (3) form UV-induced crosslinks to DNA. None of the amino acids tested affected sensitivity of the DNA to biological inactivation. Peptides containing a UV-absorbing amino acid and a positively charged amino acid enhanced sensitivity. For each of these peptides, a mixture of the constituent amino acids had the same effect as the peptide itself. Under the conditions used, no evidence for formation of DNA-amino acid crosslinks was found. The results indicate that proteins and peptides can sensitize DNA to UV inactivation by mechanisms other than covalent crosslink formation. (author)

  3. DNA damage by ethylbenzenehydroperoxide formed from carcinogenic ethylbenzene by sunlight irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, Chitose; Uchida, Takafumi; Midorikawa, Kaoru; Murata, Mariko; Hiraku, Yusuke; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Ueda, Koji; Kojima, Nakao; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2003-01-01

    Ethylbenzene, widely used in human life, is a non-mutagenic carcinogen. Sunlight-irradiated ethylbenzene caused DNA damage in the presence of Cu 2+ , but unirradiated ethylbenzene did not. A Cu + -specific chelator bathocuproine inhibited DNA damage and catalase showed a little inhibitory effect. The scopoletin assay revealed that peroxides and H 2 O 2 were formed in ethylbenzene exposed to sunlight. These results suggest that Cu + and alkoxyl radical mainly participate in DNA damage, and H 2 O 2 partially does. When catalase was added, DNA damage at thymine and cytosine was inhibited. Ethylbenzenehydroperoxide, identified by GC/MS analysis, induced the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 ' -deoxyguanosine and caused DNA damage at consecutive guanines, as observed with cumenehydroperoxide. Equimolar concentrations of H 2 O 2 and acetophenone were produced by the sunlight-irradiation of 1-phenylethanol, a further degraded product of ethylbenzene. These results indicate a novel pathway that oxidative DNA damage induced by the peroxide and H 2 O 2 derived from sunlight-irradiated ethylbenzene may lead to expression of the carcinogenicity

  4. Molecular mechanisms of induced mutagenesis. Replication in vivo of bacteriophage phiX174 single-stranded, ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA in intact and irradiated host cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillet-Fauquet, P; Defais, M; Radman, M [Brussels Univ. (Belgium)

    1977-11-25

    Genetic analysis has revealed that radiation and many chemical mutagens induce in bacteria an error-prone DNA repair process which is responsible for their mutagenic effect. The biochemical mechanism of this inducible error-prone repair has been studied by analysis of the first round of DNA synthesis on ultraviolet light-irradiated phiX174 DNA in both intact and ultraviolet light-irradiated host cells. Intracellular phiX174 DNA was extracted, subjected to isopycnic CsCl density-gradient analysis, hydroxylapatite chromatography and digestion by single-strand-specific endonuclease S/sub 1/. Ultraviolet light-induced photolesions in viral DNA cause a permanent blockage of DNA synthesis in intact Escherichia coli cells. However, when host cells were irradiated and incubated to induce fully the error-prone repair system, a significant fraction of irradiated phiX174 DNA molecules can be fully replicated. Thus, inducible error-prone repair in E.coli is manifested by an increased capacity for DNA synthesis on damaged phiX174 DNA. Chloramphenicol (100 ..mu.. g/ml), which is an inhibitor of the inducible error-prone DNA repair, is also an inhibitor of this particular inducible DNA synthesis.

  5. Development of a Novel Reference Plasmid for Accurate Quantification of Genetically Modified Kefeng6 Rice DNA in Food and Feed Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reference plasmids are an essential tool for the quantification of genetically modified (GM events. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR is the most commonly used method to characterize and quantify reference plasmids. However, the precision of this method is often limited by calibration curves, and qPCR data can be affected by matrix differences between the standards and samples. Here, we describe a digital PCR (dPCR approach that can be used to accurately measure the novel reference plasmid pKefeng6 and quantify the unauthorized variety of GM rice Kefeng6, eliminating the issues associated with matrix effects in calibration curves. The pKefeng6 plasmid was used as a calibrant for the quantification of Kefeng6 rice by determining the copy numbers of event- (77 bp and taxon-specific (68 bp fragments, their ratios, and their concentrations. The plasmid was diluted to five different concentrations. The third sample (S3 was optimized for the quantification range of dPCR according to previous reports. The ratio between the two fragments was 1.005, which closely approximated the value certified by sequencing, and the concentration was found to be 792 copies/μL. This method was precise, with an RSD of ~3%. These findings demonstrate the advantages of using the dPCR method to characterize reference materials.

  6. PFGE analysis of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA repair process in human osteosarcoma cells irradiated by X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jianping; Majima, H.; Yamaguchi, C.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human osteosarcoma cells irradiated by X-ray, the DNA DSBs repair process and the tumour cell radiosensitivity. Methods: Two cell lines of human osteosarcoma, Rho0 and 143. B were used. Initial DNA damage of DSBs by X-ray irradiation was measured using clamped homogeneous electrical field (CHEF) electrophoresis. Results: X-ray-induced DNA DSBs of human osteosarcoma cells after CHEF-electrophoresis increased linearly with the irradiation dose between 0 and 50 Gy. The repair of DNA DSBs in human osteosarcoma cells increased with the post-irradiation incubation time. In contrast to 14.3B cell line at the same dose point, much more DNA DSBs were induced in Rho0 cell line after X-ray irradiation. Conclusion: CHEF pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PEGE) is a sensitive method for the determination of radiation-induced DNA DSBs in high molecular weight DNA of human osteosarcoma cells. Radiation-induced DNA DSBs of osteosarcoma increase with the dose in a linear manner. After incubation, both Rho0 cell line and 143. B cell line can repair the DNA DSBs. Between two cell lines of human osteosarcoma, Rho0 and 143.B, Rho0 cell line is more sensitive to ionizing radiation than 143.B line

  7. Enhancement of DNA-transfection frequency by X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Ryota; Fushimi, Kazuo; Hiraki, Yoshio; Namba, Masayoshi [Okayama University Medical School (Japan). Institute of Cellular and Molecular Biology

    1997-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of DNA transfection into human cells following X-ray irradiation. We transfected plasmid DNA (pSV2neo) into human cells, HeLa and PA-1, by either calcium phosphate precipitation or the lipofection method immediately after irradiating the cells with various doses of X-rays. The transfection frequency was evaluated by counting the number of G418-resistant colonies. When circular plasmid DNA was used, irradiation up to a dose of 2 Gy dose-dependently increased the transfection frequency, which reached a maximum of 5 to 10-fold that of the control unirradiated cells. When linear plasmid DNA was used, the transfection frequency was 2 times higher than that of circular DNA. All five of the clones that were randomly chosen expressed the transfected neo gene. In addition, the pSV2neo gene was randomly integrated into the genomic DNA of each clone. These findings indicate that X-ray treatment can facilitate foreign DNA transfer into human cells and that radiation-induced DNA breaks may promote the insertion of foreign DNA into host DNA. The enhancement of DNA transfection with X-rays may be instrumental in practicing gene therapy. (author)

  8. Enhancement of DNA-transfection frequency by X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Ryota; Fushimi, Kazuo; Hiraki, Yoshio; Namba, Masayoshi

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of DNA transfection into human cells following X-ray irradiation. We transfected plasmid DNA (pSV2neo) into human cells, HeLa and PA-1, by either calcium phosphate precipitation or the lipofection method immediately after irradiating the cells with various doses of X-rays. The transfection frequency was evaluated by counting the number of G418-resistant colonies. When circular plasmid DNA was used, irradiation up to a dose of 2 Gy dose-dependently increased the transfection frequency, which reached a maximum of 5 to 10-fold that of the control unirradiated cells. When linear plasmid DNA was used, the transfection frequency was 2 times higher than that of circular DNA. All five of the clones that were randomly chosen expressed the transfected neo gene. In addition, the pSV2neo gene was randomly integrated into the genomic DNA of each clone. These findings indicate that X-ray treatment can facilitate foreign DNA transfer into human cells and that radiation-induced DNA breaks may promote the insertion of foreign DNA into host DNA. The enhancement of DNA transfection with X-rays may be instrumental in practicing gene therapy. (author)

  9. Postreplicational formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks in UV-irradiated Escherichia coli uvrB cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tzuchien V.; Smith, K.C.

    1986-01-01

    The number of DNA double-strand breaks formed in UV-irradiated uvrB recF recB cells correlates with the number of unrepaired DNA daughter-strand gaps, and is dependent on DNA synthesis after UV-irradiation. These results are consistent with the model that the DNA double-strand breaks that are produced in UV-irradiated excision-deficient cells occur as the result of breaks in the parental DNA opposite unrepaired DNA daughter-strand gaps. By employing a temperature-sensitive recA200 mutation, we have devised an improved assay for studying the formation and repair of these DNA double-strand breaks. Possible mechanisms for the postreplication repair of DNA double-strand breaks are discussed. (Auth.)

  10. Dielectric behavior of irradiated and nonirradiadiated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-crotonic acid interaction in 5% dextrose solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erginun, M.

    1980-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ex. thymus, dissolved in 5% dextrose, was exposed to gamma radiation at doses between 0-5000 Rads. Crotonic acid dissolved in 5% dextrose was added to this irradiated DNA at t=0 and t=24 hrs after irradiation, in concentrations between 0-1.000 mg/ml. The dielectric behavior of the DNA-irradiation-crotonic acid interaction was investigated at T=20 0 C by pH, permittivity (dielectric constant) and conductivity measurements. The pH, permittivity and conductivity measurements exhibit that the effective and critical conditions for the DNA-irradiation-crotonic acid interaction are; low doses of irradiation (350 Rad.), low concentrations of crotonic acid (0.05-0.100 mg/ml) and the addition of crotonic acid 24 hours after the irradiation. These results support and are in good agreement with those results observed with mammalian cells and laboratory animals when the chemical carcinogens are given in conjunction with radiation

  11. Transformation of ultraviolet-irradiated human fibroblasts by simian virus 40 is enhanced by cellular DNA repair functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Human fibroblasts irradiated with ultraviolet light were either tested for survival (colony formation) or infected with simian virus 40 and examined for transformation (foci formation). For normal cell cultures, the fractions of surviving colonies which were also transformed increased with increasing irradiation dose. In contrast, little increase in the transformation of ultraviolet-irradiated repair-deficient (xeroderma pigmentosum and xeroderma pigmentosum variant) cells was observed. Similar experiments with xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells treated with caffeine following irradiation indicated that, under these conditions, the deficient cells produced more transformants among the survivors of ultraviolet irradiation than did unirradiated cells. These results suggest (1) that DNA repair functions, not DNA damage per se, are required for enhanced viral transformation in normal cells; (2) that functions involved in excision repair and functions needed for replication of ultraviolet-damaged DNA appear necessary for this stimulation; and (3) that blocking DNA replication in ultraviolet-irradiated xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells by caffeine enhances viral transformation. (Auth.)

  12. Inhibiting the repair of DNA damage induced by gamma irradiation in rat thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, J.A.; Stark, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    This study assessed the ability of 11 established and potential radiosensitizing agents to retard the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage with a view to enhancing the immunosuppressive effects of in vivo lymphoid irradiation. The capability of irradiated rat thymocytes to repair DNA damage was assessed by an adaptation of the fluorimetric unwinding method. Three compounds, 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB), novobiocin and flavone-8-acetic acid (FAA), inhibited repair significantly. We also report the effect of low-dose irradiation combined with repair inhibitors on the relationship between DNA strand breaks, fragmentation, cell viability and use of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). DNA fragmentation was increased by 1 mM/l FAA, 1 mM/l novobiocin and 50 μM/l RS-61443 within 3 h of incubation. The latter two compounds also proved cytotoxic. All three drugs augmented the effect of ionizing radiation on the use of NAD. Of the agents investigated, FAA showed the most promise for augmenting the immunosuppressive action of irradiation at nontoxic, pharmacokinetically achievable concentrations. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  13. The restoration of DNA-membrane complex of Bacillus subtilis after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chefranova, O.A.; Gaziev, A.I.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that structural damages arising in DNA-membrane complexes (DMA) of Bacillus subtillis after γ-irradiation are reversible in the postradiation period. The ability of bacteria to restore radiation damage of DMA correlates with their radiosensitivity. DMA restoration process is supposed to depend on the products of PoIA and rec A genes

  14. Application of the DNA comet assay for detection of irradiated meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruszewski, M.; Iwanenko, T.; Wojewodzka, M.; Malec-Czechowska, K.; Dancewicz, A. M.; Szot, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Radiation induces damage to the DNA. This damage (fragmentation) can be assessed in the irradiated food using Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE), known as DNA comet assay. Fragmentation of DNA may also be caused by improper storage of meat and repeated freezing and thawing. This makes identification of irradiated meat by this assay not reliable enough. In order to know the scale of the processes imitating radiation effects in DNA of the comets, their shape and lengths were examined in both irradiated and unirradiated fresh meat (D = 1.5 or 3.0 kGy) stored at 4 o C or frozen (-21 o ) up to 5 months. Comets formed upon SCGE were stained with DAPI or silver and examined in fluorescent or light microscope. They were divided arbitrarily into 4 classes. Comets of IV class were found quite often in fresh meat stored at 4 o C. In meat samples that were irradiated and stored frozen, comets of class I, II and III were observed. The negative comet test is univocal. Positive comet test, however, needs confirmation. The meat should be subjected to further analysis with other validated methods. (author)

  15. DNA double strand breaks and Hsp70 expression in proton irradiated living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, Anja; Reinert, Tilo; Tanner, Judith; Butz, Tilman

    2007-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells can be directly provoked by ionising radiation. DSBs can be visualized by immunostaining the phosphorylated histone γH2AX. Our concern was to test the feasibility of γH2AX staining for a direct visualization of single proton hits. If single protons produce detectable foci, DNA DSBs could be used as 'biological track detectors' for protons. Ionising radiation can also damage proteins indirectly by inducing free radicals. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) help to refold or even degrade the damaged proteins. The level of the most famous heat shock protein Hsp70 is increased by ionising radiation. We investigated the expression of γH2AX and Hsp70 after cross and line patterned irradiation with counted numbers of 2.25 MeV protons on primary human skin fibroblasts. The proton induced DSBs appear more delocalised than it was expected by the ion hit accuracy. Cooling the cells before the irradiation reduces the delocalisation of DNA DSBs, which is probably caused by the reduced diffusion of DNA damaging agents. Proton irradiation seems to provoke protein damages mainly in the cytoplasm indicated by cytoplasmic Hsp70 aggregates. On the contrary, in control heat shocked cells the Hsp70 was predominantly localized in the cell nucleus. However, the irradiated area could not be recognized, all cells on the Si 3 N 4 window showed a homogenous Hsp70 expression pattern

  16. DNA double strand breaks and Hsp70 expression in proton irradiated living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Anja [Institute for Experimental Physics II, University of Leipzig (Germany) and Faculty of Biology, Pharmacy and Psychology, University of Leipzig (Germany)]. E-mail: afiedler@uni-leipzig.de; Reinert, Tilo [Institute for Experimental Physics II, University of Leipzig (Germany); Tanner, Judith [Clinic and Polyclinic for Radiation Oncology, University of Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Butz, Tilman [Institute for Experimental Physics II, University of Leipzig (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells can be directly provoked by ionising radiation. DSBs can be visualized by immunostaining the phosphorylated histone {gamma}H2AX. Our concern was to test the feasibility of {gamma}H2AX staining for a direct visualization of single proton hits. If single protons produce detectable foci, DNA DSBs could be used as 'biological track detectors' for protons. Ionising radiation can also damage proteins indirectly by inducing free radicals. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) help to refold or even degrade the damaged proteins. The level of the most famous heat shock protein Hsp70 is increased by ionising radiation. We investigated the expression of {gamma}H2AX and Hsp70 after cross and line patterned irradiation with counted numbers of 2.25 MeV protons on primary human skin fibroblasts. The proton induced DSBs appear more delocalised than it was expected by the ion hit accuracy. Cooling the cells before the irradiation reduces the delocalisation of DNA DSBs, which is probably caused by the reduced diffusion of DNA damaging agents. Proton irradiation seems to provoke protein damages mainly in the cytoplasm indicated by cytoplasmic Hsp70 aggregates. On the contrary, in control heat shocked cells the Hsp70 was predominantly localized in the cell nucleus. However, the irradiated area could not be recognized, all cells on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} window showed a homogenous Hsp70 expression pattern.

  17. Abnormal recovery of DNA replication in ultraviolet-irradiated cell cultures of Drosophila melanogaster which are defective in DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.C.; Boyd, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    Cell cultures prepared from embryos of a control stock of Drosophila melanogaster respond to ultraviolet light with a decline and subsequent recovery both of thymidine incorporation and in the ability to synthesize nascent DNA in long segments. Recovery of one or both capacities is absent or diminished in irradiated cells from ten nonallelic mutants that are defective in DNA repair and from four of five nonallelic mutagen-sensitive mutants that exhibit normal repair capabilities. Recovery of thymidine incorporation is not observed in nine of ten DNA repair-defective mutants. On the other hand, partial or complete recovery of incorporation is observed in all but one repair-proficient mutagen-sensitive mutant. (orig./AJ) [de

  18. DNA repair in Bloom's syndrome skin fibroblasts after ultraviolet light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Takayuki; Inoue, Masao; Kawashima, Hiroko; Yagi, Takashi; Takebe, Hiraku.

    1981-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts from a patient with Bloom's syndrome (86NoKi) were assayed for various DNA repair activities after ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation. Cultured fibroblasts as well as lymphocytes obtained from this patient showed a high frequency of spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs). There was no significant difference between 86NoKi fibroblasts and skin fibroblasts from normal donors in the sensitivity to UV as measured by inactivation of colony forming activity, the capacity of host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated virus, and the amount of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) after UV irradiation. However, the yield of UV-induced SCEs in 86NoKi cells was significantly higher than that in normal cells. (author)

  19. Accumulation of DNA damage and cell death after fractionated irradiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáčová, M.; Rudolfová, G.; Tichý, Adam; Bačíková, Alena; Mutná, D.; Havelek, R.; Vávrová, J.; Odrážka, K.; Lukášová, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 175, č. 6 (2011), s. 708-718 ISSN 0033-7587 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/1022; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA DSB * apoptosis * cellular senescence Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.684, year: 2011

  20. Highly efficient gene delivery by mRNA electroporation in human hematopoietic cells: superiority to lipofection and passive pulsing of mRNA and to electroporation of plasmid cDNA for tumor antigen loading of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tendeloo, V F; Ponsaerts, P; Lardon, F; Nijs, G; Lenjou, M; Van Broeckhoven, C; Van Bockstaele, D R; Berneman, Z N

    2001-07-01

    Designing effective strategies to load human dendritic cells (DCs) with tumor antigens is a challenging approach for DC-based tumor vaccines. Here, a cytoplasmic expression system based on mRNA electroporation to efficiently introduce tumor antigens into DCs is described. Preliminary experiments in K562 cells using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene revealed that mRNA electroporation as compared with plasmid DNA electroporation showed a markedly improved transfection efficiency (89% versus 40% EGFP(+) cells, respectively) and induced a strikingly lower cell toxicity (15% death rate with mRNA versus 51% with plasmid DNA). Next, mRNA electroporation was applied for nonviral transfection of different types of human DCs, including monocyte-derived DCs (Mo-DCs), CD34(+) progenitor-derived DCs (34-DCs) and Langerhans cells (34-LCs). High-level transgene expression by mRNA electroporation was obtained in more than 50% of all DC types. mRNA-electroporated DCs retained their phenotype and maturational potential. Importantly, DCs electroporated with mRNA-encoding Melan-A strongly activated a Melan-A-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clone in an HLA-restricted manner and were superior to mRNA-lipofected or -pulsed DCs. Optimal stimulation of the CTL occurred when Mo-DCs underwent maturation following mRNA transfection. Strikingly, a nonspecific stimulation of CTL was observed when DCs were transfected with plasmid DNA. The data clearly demonstrate that Mo-DCs electroporated with mRNA efficiently present functional antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T cells. Therefore, electroporation of mRNA-encoding tumor antigens is a powerful technique to charge human dendritic cells with tumor antigens and could serve applications in future DC-based tumor vaccines.

  1. Biological significance of the focus on DNA damage checkpoint factors remained after irradiation of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Suzuki, Keiji

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews recent reports on the focus formation and participation to checkpoint of (such phosphorylated (P-d) as below) ATM and H2AX, MDC1, 53BP1 and NBS1, and discusses their role in DNA damage checkpoint induction mainly around authors' studies. When the cell is irradiated by ionizing radiation, the subtype histone like H2AX is P-d and the formed focus', seen in the nucleus on immuno-fluorographic observation, represents the P-d H2AX at the damaged site of DNA. The role of P-d ATM (the product of causative gene of ataxia-telangiectasia mutation, a protein kinase) has been first shown by laser beam irradiation. Described are discussions on the roles and functions after irradiation in focus formation and DNA damage checkpoint of P-d H2AX (a specific histone product by the radiation like γ-ray as above), P-d ATM, MDC1 (a mediator of DNA damage check point protein 1), 53BP1, (a p53 binding protein) and NBS1 (the product of the causative gene of Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome). Authors have come to point out the remained focal size increase as implications of the efficient repair of damaged DNA, and the second cycled p53 accumulation, of tumor suppression. Thus evaluation of biological significance of these aspects, scarcely noted hitherto, is concluded important. (S.I.)

  2. Structural changes of ultraviolet-irradiated DNA derived from hydrodynamic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triebel, H.; Reinert, K.E.; Baeer, H.; Lang, H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reports on sedimentation and viscosity measurements performed on ultraviolet-irradiated DNA from T7 phage and calf thymus. From the hydrodynamic data the relative changes in the mean molecular weight, radius of gyration, and effective Kuhn statistical segment length were calculated. The results show that ultraviolet irradiation (254 nm) leads to a significant decrease of the effective statistical segment length of DNA which may be due to small local helix kinks (produced by the generation of photodimers) and a local increase of chain flexibility. Alterations in the overall DNA conformation may be observed even at low fluence where the mean molecular weight almost stays constant. The locally distorted helix regions possibly may serve as recognition sites in the first step of excision repair. (Auth.)

  3. Role of the inhibitors of angiotensin renin system on the DNA integrity of irradiated spermatozoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spadella, Maria A.; Mansano, Naira S.; Schwarz, Franciele C.; Viani, Gustavo A.; Chies, Agnaldo B.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation action in the testes can significantly affect the reproductive capacity due to oxidative stress generated; phenomenon in which there is evidence of involvement of the Renin Angiotensin System (RAS). This study evaluated the role of AT1 receptor inhibitors, in mitigating the radioinduced DNA damage sperm from semen samples left vas deferens. Male Wistar rats were divided into six experimental groups: Control, 5Gy, Telmisartan (12mg/kg/day) and Losartan (34mg/kg/2x/day), 5 Gy + Telmisartan and 5 Gy + Losartan. The results showed increase in the percentage of sperm with fragmented DNA in irradiated groups when compared to controls, which was not reversed in the irradiated and treated groups. The radiation of 5Gy (single dose) affected the DNA-protein complex of the sperm and the treatments did not influence in reversing this damage, considering the experimental protocol used. (author)

  4. Resistance to DNA denaturation in irradiated Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts is linked to cell shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, P.L.; Vanderbyl, S.; MacPhail, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    Exponentially growing Chinese hamster V79-171b lung fibroblasts seeded at high density on plastic (approximately 7 x 10(3) cells/cm2) flatten, elongate, and produce significant amounts of extracellular fibronectin. When lysed in weak alkali/high salt, the rate of DNA denaturation following exposure to ionizing radiation is exponential. Conversely, cells plated at low density (approximately 7 x 10(2) cells/cm2) on plastic are more rounded 24 h later, produce little extracellular fibronectin, and display unusual DNA denaturation kinetics after X-irradiation. DNA in these cells resists denaturation, as though constraints to DNA unwinding have developed. Cell doubling time and distribution of cells in the growth cycle are identical for both high and low density cultures as is cell survival in response to radiation damage. The connection between DNA conformation and cell shape was examined further in low density cultures grown in conditioned medium. Under these conditions, cells at low density were able to elongate, and DNA denaturation of low density cultures was identical to that of high density cultures. Conversely, cytochalasin D, which interferes with actin polymerization causing cells to round up and release fibronectin, allowed development of constraints in high density cultures. These results suggest that DNA conformation is sensitive to changes in cell shape which result when cells are grown in different environments. However, these changes in DNA conformation detected by the DNA unwinding assay do not appear to play a direct role in radiation-induced cell killing

  5. New approaches to detect 8-hydroxyguanine in γ-irradiated cellular DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Nan; Tamae, Kazuyoshi; Hirano, Takeshi; Kasai, Hiroshi; Kunugita, Naoki

    2003-01-01

    This report describes an assay to detect 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine 5'-monophosphate (8-OH-dGMP) in cellular DNA by modification of enzyme treatment after DNA extraction, using a high-performance liquid chromatography system equipped with an electrochemical detector (HPLC-ECD). This modification greatly reduces the measured background level of 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OH-Gua) in DNA, and improves the HPLC-ECD sensitivity to measure oxidative DNA damage. The 8-OH-Gua value in the DNA was expressed by the ratio of 8-OH-dGMP to deoxycytidine 5'-monophosphate (dCMP). Background level of 8-OH-Gua in DNA under our conditions was several times lower than that by a previous method. The human lung carcinoma cells (A549) were exposed to γ-rays of 20-100 Gy. A dose-dependent increase in oxidative DNA damage of 8-OH-Gua was observed. Furthermore, using commercial FITC-kit of an immunohistochemical type procedure, 8-OH-Gua was clearly detected in A549 cells and the fluorescence intensity of cells with oxidative DNA damage increased with the doses of γ-irradiation. Using an 8-OH-Gua repair activity assay, we also found that γ-rays decreased the repair enzyme activity. We conclude that the 8-OH-Gua level in human cellular DNA increases partly by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and partly by the inhibition of repair activity for 8-OH-Gua. (author)

  6. SU-E-T-05: Comparing DNA Strand Break Yields for Photons under Different Irradiation Conditions with Geant4-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pater, P; Bernal, M; Naqa, I El; Seuntjens, J

    2012-06-01

    To validate and scrutinize published DNA strand break data with Geant4-DNA and a probabilistic model. To study the impact of source size, electronic equilibrium and secondary electron tracking cutoff on direct relative biological effectiveness (DRBE). Geant4 (v4.9.5) was used to simulate a cylindrical region of interest (ROI) with r = 15 nm and length = 1.05 mm, in a slab of liquid water of 1.06 g/cm 3 density. The ROI was irradiated with mono-energetic photons, with a uniformly distributed volumetric isotropic source (0.28, 1.5 keV) or a plane beam (0.662, 1.25 MeV), of variable size. Electrons were tracked down to 50 or 10 eV, with G4-DNA processes and energy transfer greater than 10.79 eV was scored. Based on volume ratios, each scored event had a 0.0388 probability of happening on either DNA helix (break). Clusters of at least one break on each DNA helix within 3.4 nm were found using a DBSCAN algorithm and categorized as double strand breaks (DSB). All other events were categorized as single strand breaks (SSB). Geant4-DNA is able to reproduce strand break yields previously published. Homogeneous irradiation conditions should be present throughout the ROI for DRBE comparisons. SSB yields seem slightly dependent on the primary photon energy. DRBEs show a significant increasing trend for lower energy incident photons. A lower electron cutoff produces higher SSB yields, but decreases the SSB/DSB yields ratio. The probabilistic and geometrical DNA models can predict equivalent results. Using Geant4, we were able to reproduce previously published results on the direct strand break yields of photon and study the importance of irradiation conditions. We also show an ascending trend for DRBE with lower incident photon energies. A probabilistic model coupled with track structure analysis can be used to simulate strand break yields. NSERC, CIHR. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Site-specific deletions of chromosomally located DNA segments with the multimer resolution system of broad-host-range plasmid RP4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Claus; Eberl, Leo; Sanchezromero, Juan M.

    1995-01-01

    The multimer resolution system (mrs) of the broad-host-range plasmid RP4 has been exploited to develop a general method that permits the precise excision of chromosomal segments in a variety of gram-negative bacteria. The procedure is based on the site-specific recombination between two directly ...

  8. DNA damage in synchronized hela cells irradiated with ultraviolet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downes, C.S.; Collins, A.R.S.; Johnson, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    The lethal effect of uv radiation on HeLa cells is least in mitosis and greatest in late G 1 -early S. Photochemical damage to HeLa DNA, as measured by thymine-containing dimer formation and by alkaline sucrose sedimentation, also increases from mitosis towards early S phase. Computer simulations of uv absorption by an idealized HeLa cell at different stages of the cell cycle indicate that changes in damage could be due solely to changes in chromatin geometry. But survival is not exclusively a function of damage

  9. Protective effect of gingerol on leucocyte and bone marrow DNA of 60Co γ-rays irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Zhenfei; Zhou Yu; Geng Yanyan; Zeng Xianyin

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the effect of gingerol on peripheral leucocyte and bone marrow DNA of 60 Co γ-rays irradiated mice was developed., Twenty-four healthy healthy female Kunming mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: control, gingerol, irradiation and gingerol + irradiation group. Gingerol group and gingerol + irradiation group were given gingerol intragastrically once a day for five days. Irradiation group and gingerol + irradiation group were suffered from 5 Gy 60 Co γ-rays irradiation at the rate of 1.2 Gy/min on the 6 th day. Blood samples, spleens, livers and thigh bones were collected to be measured after 48 h. The results showed that, compared with irradiation group, gingerol + irradiation group had significantly higher spleen index (p 60 Co γ-rays irradiated mice. (authors)

  10. Studies on the expression of plasmid-borne genes in the endosymbiotic state of Rhizobium leguminosarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, A.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The subject matter of the research reported in this thesis is the role of plasmid-borne genes of Rhizobium in symbiosis and nitrogen fixation. Plasmid DNA was isolated from Rhizobium leguminosarum strain PRE and the expression of plasmid DNA in nitrogen

  11. A change in the composition of supramolecular DNA-bound phospholipids in thymus and liver of gamma-irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasichkova, Z.I.; Strazhevskaya, N.B.

    1984-01-01

    The composition of supramolecular DNA (SM DNA)-bound phospholipids (PL) of thymus and liver of intact rats and those 2 min, 2, 6 and 24 h after γ-irradiation (9.7 Gy) was studied. In norm, supramolecular DNA of the thymus was shown to contain 6.7 μg PL/mg DNA, and that of the liver, 6.1 μg PL/mg DNA, the main components of PL being cardiolipin (CL) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PEA). Substantial changes were detected in the PL composition of SM DNA of γ,irradiated rat organs. During the postirradiation period the concentration of PEA and CL in thymus SM DNA changed symbatically and irreversibly decAeased to traces; whereas in SM DNA of the liver, their concentrations changed antibatically and decreased only to a definite level thus maintaining the necessary ''lipid volume''. It was shown that PL were not restored in SM DNA of the radiopesistant liver

  12. DNA instability, paternal irradiation and leukaemia in children around Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baverstock, K.F.

    1991-01-01

    The chemical instability of DNA under physiological conditions requires that cells have highly developed processes for repairing stochastic single-strand damage. It is proposed here that provided ionising-radiation-induced single-strand damage does not occur at a rate sufficient to perturb the dynamic steady state between degradation and repair, it can be regarded as 'irrelevant' to biological effect, leaving double-strand damage and DNA-protein crosslinks as 'relevant' damage to biological effect. At dose rates of ∼ 0.05 Gy/min low-LET radiation the rate of induced single-strand damage equals that of the spontaneous damage, and in this region a transition, with increasing dose-rate, from constant effect to increasing effect, will be expected. This is observed in studies of specific locus mutation by radiation in the male mouse. The application of this biophysical principle governing the influence of radiation dose-rate, to the association observed between paternal preconceptional dose to Sellafield workers and childhood leukaemia in their offspring, shows that the likelihood of a casual relationship is extremely remote. (author)

  13. Sub-nuclear irradiation, in-vivo microscopy and single-molecule imaging to study a DNA Polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria, G; Mansilla, S; Belluscio, L; Speroni, J; D' Alessio, C; Gottifredi, V [Fundacion Leloir, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Essers, J; Kanaar, R [Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    When the DNA is damaged in cells progressing through S phase, replication blockage can be avoided by TLS (Translesion DNA synthesis). This is an auxiliary replication mechanism that relies on the function of specialized polymerases that accomplish DNA damage bypass. An example of a classical TLS polymerase is Pol {eta} ({eta}). The current model implies that Pol {eta} activity is circumscribed to S-phase. Here we perform a systematic characterization of Pol {eta} behaviour after DNA-damage. We show that Pol {eta} is recruited to UV-induced DNA lesions in cells outside S phase including cells permanently arrested in G1. This observation was confirmed by different sub-nuclear damage strategies including global UV irradiation, local UV irradiation and local multi-photon laser irradiation of single nuclei in living cells. By local UV irradiation and alpha particle irradiation we evaluated the potential connection between Pol h recruitment to DNA lesions outside S phase and Homologous recombination repair (HRR) or Nucleotide excision repair (NER). Finally, we employ a single-molecule imaging approach (known as DNA fiber-assay) to determine how Pol h influences the progression of the replication fork. Our data reveals that the re-localization of Pol {eta} to DNA lesions might be temporally and mechanistically uncoupled from replicative DNA synthesis and from DNA damage processing. (authors)

  14. Sub-nuclear irradiation, in-vivo microscopy and single-molecule imaging to study a DNA Polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, G.; Mansilla, S.; Belluscio, L.; Speroni, J.; D'Alessio, C.; Gottifredi, V.; Essers, J.; Kanaar, R.

    2009-01-01

    When the DNA is damaged in cells progressing through S phase, replication blockage can be avoided by TLS (Translesion DNA synthesis). This is an auxiliary replication mechanism that relies on the function of specialized polymerases that accomplish DNA damage bypass. An example of a classical TLS polymerase is Pol η (eta). The current model implies that Pol η activity is circumscribed to S-phase. Here we perform a systematic characterization of Pol η behaviour after DNA-damage. We show that Pol η is recruited to UV-induced DNA lesions in cells outside S phase including cells permanently arrested in G1. This observation was confirmed by different sub-nuclear damage strategies including global UV irradiation, local UV irradiation and local multi-photon laser irradiation of single nuclei in living cells. By local UV irradiation and alpha particle irradiation we evaluated the potential connection between Pol h recruitment to DNA lesions outside S phase and Homologous recombination repair (HRR) or Nucleotide excision repair (NER). Finally, we employ a single-molecule imaging approach (known as DNA fiber-assay) to determine how Pol h influences the progression of the replication fork. Our data reveals that the re-localization of Pol η to DNA lesions might be temporally and mechanistically uncoupled from replicative DNA synthesis and from DNA damage processing. (authors)

  15. Investigations of the conformation of DNA, native or alterated by irradiation, with ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zierenberg, B.

    1971-01-01

    An extension of the range of scattering angles in the direction of smaller angles (up to delta = 12 0 ) made it possible to successfully use the light scattering methods for the determination of DNA molecular weights >= 3 x 10 6 . In order to determine the conformation of native DNA in solution, different molecular weights were prepared by ultrasonic degradation. According to their hyperchromicity, these preparations are practically native. When native DNA in solution is irradiated with UV light of the wavelength lambda = 313 nm, two different photoreactions may occur: a) double and single strand breaks leading to degradation of the DNA molecule, and b) dimerisation of neighbouring thymine bases. The two reactions are independent of each other. In the presence of acetophenone as photosensitizer, the reaction type a) is greater by a factor 4 (in terms of single-strand breaks), while the reaction type b) is greater by a factor 16. The number of thymidine dimers per single strand break amounts to 100 for photosensitized reactions and to 25 for non-photosensitized reactions. The number of single strand breaks in terms of the quantum flux of 1 μ Einstein absorbed by the DNA is greater by a factor 3 during irradiation with UV light lambda = 254 nm as compared to the wavelength lambda = 313 nm. At this wavelength, DNA degradation starts at absorption energies as low as >= 2 x 10 7 erg/cm 3 . Light scattering and measurements with DNA containing thymidine dimers indicated neither a change in the total conformation nor a noticeable change in the microstructure. The hyperchromicity of the DNA was also unchanged. From these experimental results, it is concluded that the double helix of DNA is essentially stable to thymidine dimerisation. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Comparison of DNA comet assay and germination test (half-embryo-test) in gamma-irradiated cherry seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todoroki, Setsuko; Hayashi, Toru

    2002-01-01

    Cherry fruits were irradiated with gamma-rays at doses up to 200Gy (effective dose for disinfestation of codling moth), and DNA strand break in seed embryos was investigated by using alkaline comet assay. Immediately after irradiation (≥100Gy), DNA from embryos produced comets with a long and wide tail due to fragmentation. In control cells, DNA relaxed and produced comet with very short tail (with few strand break). After 72h storage, DNA from fruits irradiated at 200 Gy showed comets with little tail and tail moment of comets was same as un-irradiated control. These results indicate that the strand breaks of DNA caused by irradiation in fresh seed embryo are repaired during storage. On the contrary, the ability of germination lost by irradiation did not restored, a dose of 100Gy and more retarded shoot elongation. In cherries irradiated at 100Gy, the shooting percentage was less than 50% at 4th day after incubation. Germination test (Half embryo test) can be discriminate between irradiated and un-irradiated cherries. (author)

  17. A COMPARISON OF DNA DAMAGE PROBES IN TWO HMEC LINES WITH X-IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisnewski, C.L.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Rosen, C.J.; Chang, P.Y.; Blakely, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we investigated γH2AXser139 and 53BP1ser25, DNA damage pathway markers, to observe responses to radiation insult. Two Human Mammary Epithelial Cell (HMEC) lines were utilized to research the role of immortalization in DNA damage marker expression, HMEC HMT-3522 (S1) with an infi nite lifespan, and a subtype of HMEC 184 (184V) with a fi nite lifespan. Cells were irradiated with 50cGy X-rays, fi xed with 4% paraformaldehyde after 1 hour repair at 37°C, and processed through immunofl uorescence. Cells were visualized with a fl uorescent microscope and images were digitally captured using Image-Pro Plus software. The 184V irradiated cells exhibited a more positive punctate response within the nucleus for both DNA damage markers compared to the S1 irradiated cells. The dose and time course will be expanded in future studies to augment the preliminary data from this research. It is important to understand whether the process of transformation to immortalization compromises the DNA damage sensor and repair process proteins of HMECs in order to understand what is “normal” and to evaluate the usefulness of cell lines as experimental models.

  18. A comparison of DNA damage probes in two HMEC lines withX-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisnewski, Christy L.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Rosen, ChristoperJ.; Chang, Polly Y.; Blakely, Eleanor A.

    2007-01-19

    In this study, we investigated {gamma}H2AX{sup ser139} and 53BP1{sup ser25}, DNA damage pathway markers, to observe responses to radiation insult. Two Human Mammary Epithelial Cell (HMEC) lines were utilized to research the role of immortalization in DNA damage marker expression, HMEC HMT-3522 (S1) with an infinite lifespan, and a subtype of HMEC 184 (184V) with a finite lifespan. Cells were irradiated with 50 cGy X-rays, fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde after 1 hour repair at 37 C, and processed through immunofluorescence. Cells were visualized with a fluorescent microscope and images were digitally captured using Image-Pro Plus software. The 184V irradiated cells exhibited a more positive punctate response within the nucleus for both DNA damage markers compared to the S1 irradiated cells. We will expand the dose and time course in future studies to augment the preliminary data from this research. It is important to understand whether the process of transformation to immortalization compromises the DNA damage sensor and repair process proteins of HMECs in order to understand what is 'normal' and to evaluate the usefulness of cell lines as experimental models.

  19. DNA comet assay to identify different freezing temperatures of irradiated liver chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Renato C.; Mozeika, Michel A.; Fanaro, Gustavo B.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.H.; Marchioni, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The cold chain is a succession of steps which maintain the food at low temperature. The thawed food never be frozen again and the best solution being to consume it quickly to avoid the microorganism growth which causes decay and nutrients damage. One of most important point is that freezing process, unlike irradiation, do not destroy microorganisms, only inactive them as long as they remain in a frozen state. The Comet Assay is an original test used to detect irradiated foods that's recognize the DNA damage and can then be used to control the overall degradation of the food and in a certain extend to evaluate the damage caused by irradiation, different forms of freeze and storage time on liver chicken cells. Different freezing temperatures were used, deep freeze -196 deg C and slow freeze -10 deg C. Samples were irradiated in a 60 Co irradiator with 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5 kGy radiation doses. Fast freezing technique induces a low percent of DNA degradation comparing to slow freezing technique. This procedure could be a good choose to chicken freezing processing. (author)

  20. DNA comet assay to identify different freezing temperatures of irradiated liver chicken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Renato C.; Mozeika, Michel A.; Fanaro, Gustavo B.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: renatocduarte@yahoo.com.br; Marchioni, Eric [Universite de Strasbourg, Illkirch (France). Faculte de Pharmacie. Lab. de Chimie Analytique et Sciences de l' Aliment

    2009-07-01

    The cold chain is a succession of steps which maintain the food at low temperature. The thawed food never be frozen again and the best solution being to consume it quickly to avoid the microorganism growth which causes decay and nutrients damage. One of most important point is that freezing process, unlike irradiation, do not destroy microorganisms, only inactive them as long as they remain in a frozen state. The Comet Assay is an original test used to detect irradiated foods that's recognize the DNA damage and can then be used to control the overall degradation of the food and in a certain extend to evaluate the damage caused by irradiation, different forms of freeze and storage time on liver chicken cells. Different freezing temperatures were used, deep freeze -196 deg C and slow freeze -10 deg C. Samples were irradiated in a {sup 60}Co irradiator with 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5 kGy radiation doses. Fast freezing technique induces a low percent of DNA degradation comparing to slow freezing technique. This procedure could be a good choose to chicken freezing processing. (author)

  1. Effects of radiation on DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braddock, M.

    1985-07-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH radical) is the most damaging radical produced by the effect of ionizing radiation in water. The rate of reaction of the OH radical with purified, native and isodisperse DNA has been determined as compared with calf thymus DNA. This has been achieved by direct observation of the rate of formation of the DNA-OH radical adduct, and by competition with SCN - . Results obtained from direct observation are consistent with calculations which have been performed using the encounter frequency model of Braams and Ebert. However, results obtained for OH radical with DNA derived from competition plots suggest a rate constant somewhat lower than that obtained from direct observation. The relative merits of both techniques are discussed. In order to study the effect of energy deposited directly in the DNA, dry films of purified plasmid DNA have been irradiated in a system where the indirect effects of radical interaction have been minimized. The present results indicate that with different molecular lengths of plasmid DNA, non-random breakage may occur, and that additional damage may be brought about at sites of previously existing damage. Differences in the sensitivity of plasmid DNA molecules of varying lengths to radiation induced double strand breaks have been demonstrated. (author)

  2. Hybridization change of DNA and nuclear RNA synthesized immediately after ionizing irradiation in spleen cells isolated from 615 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Ziqiang

    1986-01-01

    DNA hybridization with nuclear RNA(nRNA) synthesized immediately after 60 Co Gamma-irradiation in the spleen cells freshly isolated from inbred line 615 mice was investigated, using the technique of Gillespie and Spiegelman. In RNA/DNA hybridization percentage experiment, it was showed that the hybridization of normal DNA with labelled nRNA synthesized in irradiated cells reached the saturation point at a much faster rate than with labelled normal nRNA. The hybridization percentage of nRNA synthesized in irradiated cells was higher than that of normal nRNA during the different reaction time before the saturation point of DNA with nRNA synthesized in irradiated cells, but it was lower than that of normal nRNA after the zone of high repetitive DNA sequences was stimulated, however, the transcription of some base sequences in the zone of low repetitive DNA sequences was seriously inhibited. Measurements of the exhaustion rates of pulse-labelled nRNA were carried out as described by Greene and Flickinger Biochim. In these studies, pulse-labelled nRNA synthesized in unirradiated and irradiated cells were compared by exhausion with DNA at hybridization time of 4 or 24 hours, When the hybridization time was 4 hours, the nRNA synthesized in irradiated cells displayed a faster exhaustion rate than the control nRNA. But if the hybridization time was 24 hours, the exhaustion rate of nRNA synthesized in irradiated cells reduced. These results demostrated that Gamma-irradiation changed the proportion of transcription of some nRNA species and implayed that the sensitivities of the transcription activeties of the different repetitive DNA sequences to Gamma-irradiation were different, and so were the transcription activeties of the different base sequences in the same repetitive DNA sequences

  3. DNA damage focus analysis in blood samples of minipigs reveals acute partial body irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lamkowski

    Full Text Available Radiation accidents frequently involve acute high dose partial body irradiation leading to victims with radiation sickness and cutaneous radiation syndrome that implements radiation-induced cell death. Cells that are not lethally hit seek to repair ionizing radiation (IR induced damage, albeit at the expense of an increased risk of mutation and tumor formation due to misrepair of IR-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs. The response to DNA damage includes phosphorylation of histone H2AX in the vicinity of DSBs, creating foci in the nucleus whose enumeration can serve as a radiation biodosimeter. Here, we investigated γH2AX and DNA repair foci in peripheral blood lymphocytes of Göttingen minipigs that experienced acute partial body irradiation (PBI with 49 Gy (± 6% Co-60 γ-rays of the upper lumbar region. Blood samples taken 4, 24 and 168 hours post PBI were subjected to γ-H2AX, 53BP1 and MRE11 focus enumeration. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL of 49 Gy partial body irradiated minipigs were found to display 1-8 DNA damage foci/cell. These PBL values significantly deceed the high foci numbers observed in keratinocyte nuclei of the directly γ-irradiated minipig skin regions, indicating a limited resident time of PBL in the exposed tissue volume. Nonetheless, PBL samples obtained 4 h post IR in average contained 2.2% of cells displaying a pan-γH2AX signal, suggesting that these received a higher IR dose. Moreover, dispersion analysis indicated partial body irradiation for all 13 minipigs at 4 h post IR. While dose reconstruction using γH2AX DNA repair foci in lymphocytes after in vivo PBI represents a challenge, the DNA damage focus assay may serve as a rapid, first line indicator of radiation exposure. The occurrence of PBLs with pan-γH2AX staining and of cells with relatively high foci numbers that skew a Poisson distribution may be taken as indicator of acute high dose partial body irradiation, particularly when samples are available

  4. Utilization of DNA comet assay and half embryo test to identify irradiated lentil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, Maria Fernanda; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Legumes make an important contribution to human nutrition on a worldwide basis. Insect infestation cause extensive damage to stored grains. Over the last few decades some countries adopted food irradiation as a safe food process. Radiation's processing on foods improves hygienic quality and extends their shelf life. The use of radiation treatment to reduce the microbial population and thereby extend the shelf life in legumes has been reported in many papers. Irradiation has been shown to be an effective pest control method for these commodities and a good alternative to prohibited methyl bromide. Radiation disinfestation can facilitate trade in foods that often harbor insect pests of quarantine importance. Although the wholesomeness of irradiated food is no longer a question there is a need for irradiation control in the international trade of foods, in order to enhance the consumer confidence in the regulation. As a screening methods to identify irradiated lentils, processed by e-beam as a food treatment to disinfestation, the DNA Comet Assay and Half Embryo tests were performed. The methodologies used in this work are based upon biological changes that occur in Brazilian lentils. The samples were irradiated in an electron beam accelerator facility of Radiation Dynamics Inc., USA (E=1,5 MeV, l=25 mA). The irradiation doses were 0,7; 1,4 and 3,0 kGy at dry conditions. The thickness of samples was less than 0,5 cm. A sensitive technique to detect DNA fragmentation is the microgel electrophoresis of single cells or nuclei, also called 'comet assay'. Since the large molecule of DNA is an easy target for ionizing radiation, changes in DNA offer potential as a detection method. It is restricted to foods that have not been subjected to heat or other treatments, which also cause DNA fragmentation. Lentil samples were crushed with a mortar and pestle and was transferred to 3ml ice-cold PBS. This suspension was stirred for 5 minutes and filtered. 100μl cell

  5. Epigenetic changes of Arabidopsis genome associated with altered DNA methyltransferase and demethylase expressions after gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Eun; Cho, Eun Ju; Kim, Ji Hong; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jin Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    DNA methylation at carbon 5 of cytosines is a hall mark of epigenetic inactivation and heterochromatin in both plants and mammals. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation has two roles that protect the genome from selfish DNA elements and regulate gene expression. Plant genome has three types of DNA methyltransferase, METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1), DOMAINREARRANGED METHYLASE (DRM) and CHROMOMETHYLASE 3 (CMT3) that are capable of methylating CG, CHG (where H is A, T, or C) and CHH sites, respectively. MET1 is a maintenance DNA methyltransferase that controls CG methylation. Two members of the DRM family, DRM1 and DRM2, are responsible for de novo methylation of CG, CHG, and CHH sites but show a preference for CHH sites. Finally, CMT3 principally carries out CHG methylation and is involved in both de novo methylation and maintenance. Alternatively, active DNA demethylation may occur through the glycosylase activity by removing the methylcytosines from DNA. It may have essential roles in preventing transcriptional silencing of transgenes and endogenous genes and in activating the expression of imprinted genes. DNA demetylation in Arabidopsis is mediated by the DEMETER (DME) family of bifunctional DNA glycosylase. Three targets of DME are MEA (MEDEA), FWA (FLOWERING WAGENINGEN), and FIS2 (FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED 2). The DME family contains DEMETER-LIKE 2 (DML2), DML3, and REPRESSOR OF SILENING 1 (ROS1). DNA demetylation by ROS1, DML2, and DML3 protect the hypermethylation of specific genome loci. ROS1 is necessary to suppress the promoter methylation and the silencing of endogenous genes. In contrast, the function of DML2 and DML3 has not been reported. Several recent studies have suggested that epigenetic alterations such as change in DNA methylation and histone modification should be caused in plant genomes upon exposure to ionizing radiation. However, there is a lack of data exploring the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, the present study aims to characterize and

  6. Epigenetic changes of Arabidopsis genome associated with altered DNA methyltransferase and demethylase expressions after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Eun; Cho, Eun Ju; Kim, Ji Hong; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jin Hong

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation at carbon 5 of cytosines is a hall mark of epigenetic inactivation and heterochromatin in both plants and mammals. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation has two roles that protect the genome from selfish DNA elements and regulate gene expression. Plant genome has three types of DNA methyltransferase, METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1), DOMAINREARRANGED METHYLASE (DRM) and CHROMOMETHYLASE 3 (CMT3) that are capable of methylating CG, CHG (where H is A, T, or C) and CHH sites, respectively. MET1 is a maintenance DNA methyltransferase that controls CG methylation. Two members of the DRM family, DRM1 and DRM2, are responsible for de novo methylation of CG, CHG, and CHH sites but show a preference for CHH sites. Finally, CMT3 principally carries out CHG methylation and is involved in both de novo methylation and maintenance. Alternatively, active DNA demethylation may occur through the glycosylase activity by removing the methylcytosines from DNA. It may have essential roles in preventing transcriptional silencing of transgenes and endogenous genes and in activating the expression of imprinted genes. DNA demetylation in Arabidopsis is mediated by the DEMETER (DME) family of bifunctional DNA glycosylase. Three targets of DME are MEA (MEDEA), FWA (FLOWERING WAGENINGEN), and FIS2 (FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED 2). The DME family contains DEMETER-LIKE 2 (DML2), DML3, and REPRESSOR OF SILENING 1 (ROS1). DNA demetylation by ROS1, DML2, and DML3 protect the hypermethylation of specific genome loci. ROS1 is necessary to suppress the promoter methylation and the silencing of endogenous genes. In contrast, the function of DML2 and DML3 has not been reported. Several recent studies have suggested that epigenetic alterations such as change in DNA methylation and histone modification should be caused in plant genomes upon exposure to ionizing radiation. However, there is a lack of data exploring the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, the present study aims to characterize and

  7. DNA repair capacity and rate of excision repair in UV-irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masao; Takebe, Hiraku.

    1978-01-01

    Repair capacities of five mammalian cell strains were measured by colony-forming ability, HCR of UV-irradiated virus, UDS, pyrimidine dimer excision, and semi-conservative DNA replication. Colony-forming ability of UV-irradiated cells was high for human amnion FL cells and mouse L cells, slightly low for African green monkey CV-1 cells, and extremely low for xeroderma pigmentosum cells. HCR of UV-irradiated Herpes simplex virus was high in CV-1 cells, FL and normal human fibroblast cells, low in both XP and L cells. The amount of UDS was high in FL and normal human fibroblast cells, considerably low in CV-1 cells, and essentially no UDS was observed in XP cells. Rate of UDS after UV-irradiation was slower for CV-1 cells than FL and human fibroblast cells. Rate of the excision of thymine-containing dimers from the acid-insoluble fraction during post-irradiation incubation of the cells was rapid in FL and normal human cells and slow in CV-1 cells, and no excision took place in XP cells. Semi-conservative DNA synthesis was reduced after UV-irradiation in all cell lines, but subsequently recovered in FL, normal human and CV-1 cells. The onset of recovery was 4 h after UV-irradiation for FL and normal human cells, but about 6 h for CV-1 cells. The apparent intermediate repair of CV-1 cells except for HCR may be related to the slow rate of excision repair. ''Patch and cut'' model is more favorable than ''cut and patch'' model to elucidate these results. (auth.)

  8. Enzymatic quantification of strand breaks of DNA induced by vacuum-UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takashi

    1986-01-01

    Hind3 digested plasmid DNA dried on an aluminum plate was irradiated by vacuum-UV at 160 and 195 nm using a synchrotron irradiation system. A change induced in the DNA, presumably a single strand break, was quantified by the aid of the strand break-derived stimulation of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase activity. The end group of strand breaks so induced was recognized by the enzyme as effectively as that by DNase 1 treatment, suggesting a nicking as the major lesion inflicted on the DNA. The fluence (UV) dependent stimulation of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase activity was much higher upon 160 nm irradiation than upon 195 nm irradiation. (Auth.)

  9. Analysis of native cellular DNA after heavy ion irradiation: DNA double-strand breaks in CHO-K1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, J.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Kraft, G.

    1994-11-01

    A fast assay for the detection of DNA double-strand breaks was developed involving constant field gel electrophoresis (Taucher-Scholz et al., 1994) and densitometric scanning of agarose gels stained with ethidium bromide. With this technique, DSB induction was investigated after irradiation of CHO cells with carbon ions with LET values between 14 keV/μm and 400 keV/μm. In parallel, a computer code was developed to simulate both the principle of the electrophoretic detection of DNA double-strand breaks and the action of radiations of different ionization density. The results of the experiments and the calculations are presented here and compared with each other. (orig./HSI)

  10. Effect and adaptive response of lymphocytes DNA induced by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Zeji; Su Liaoyuan; Tian Hailin

    1994-09-01

    Fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU) was conducted and was proved to be an optimal method for studying DNA strand breaks induced by low dose irradiation. The linear dose response curve was obtained. The minimum detected dose was 0.3 Gy. There was no effect of low dose γ-rays (0.5∼8.0 cGy) on DNA strand breaks of quiescent and mitogen-induced lymphocytes. The 0.5∼4.0 cGy γ-rats could induce adaptive response of lymphocytes' DNA strand breaks, especially, at the doses of 2.0 and 4.0 cGy. The challenge doses of 5∼20 Gy could make the adaptive response appearance, and the 15 Gy was the best one. The 3-AB could powerfully inhibit the adaptive response. The repair of DNA strand breaks (37 degree C, 15∼60 min) caused by 15 Gy γ-rays could be promoted by the low dose γ-ray irradiation (2.0 cGy), but no difference was found at 37 degree C, 120 min

  11. Ex vivo irradiation of human blood to determine DNA damage using molecular techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, Angel; Agapito, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Biological dosimetry is the assessment of absorbed dose in individuals exposed to ionizing radiation from blood samples based on the radiation induced damage in cellular DNA. The aim of this study was to determine the damage in the DNA through the assessment of an experimental ex vivo assay using irradiated samples of human blood cells. For this purpose, blood samples were irradiated at low doses (<100 mGy) considering the following parameters: blood volume (3mL), temperature (37 °C) and incubation time (0.5, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h). Dose values were: 0, 12.5, 25 and 50 mGy using Cesium -137 gamma rays at 662 keV and a dose rate of 38.46 mGy/h. The qualitative damage in the genomic DNA was determined using agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the p53 gene in a sequence of 133 pb of exon 7, related to the protein that acts in the cell repair process. The results of the qualitative analysis showed no degradation of genomic DNA; also an increase in the DNA concentration was observed up to the fourth hour of incubation, finding maximum values for all doses in the two samples. As a conclusion, the effects of ionizing radiation at doses used in this experiment do not generate a detectable damage, by means of molecular techniques such as those used in the present study. (authors).

  12. Formation of double-strand breaks in DNA of γ-irradiated bacteria depending on the function of fast repair processes of DNA single-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, S.I.; Gaziev, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks in DNA of γ-irradiated ( 60 Co)Ex coli bacteria depending on the function of fast repair processes of DNA single-strand breaks, is investigated. The profiles of sedimentation of DNA Ex coli cells, irradiated at 0-2 deg C in the salt medium and in EDTA-borate buffer, are presented. It is shown that when irradiating cells in EDTA-borate buffer, the output of single- and double strand breaks in DNA is much higher than in the case of their irradiation in the minimum salt medium. The dependence of output of single-strand and double-strand breaks depending on the radiatier doze of E coli cells in the salt medium and EDTA-borate buffer, is studied. The supposition is made on the presence of a regulative interaction between the accumulation of DNA single-breaks and their repair with the formation of double-strand breaks. The functionating of fast and superfast repair processes considerably affects the formation of double-strand breaks in DNA of a bacterium cell. A considerable amount of double-breaks registered immediately after irradiation forms due to a close position of single-strand breaks on the opposite DNA strands

  13. Unscheduled DNA synthesis after β-irradiation of mouse skin in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuyama, Akira; Tanooka, Hiroshi

    1986-01-01

    The skin of ICR mouse was irradiated with β-rays from 90 Sr- 90 Y with surface doses up to 30 krad. Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was measured by autoradiography after labeling the skin with radioactive thymidine using the forceps-clamping method. The level of UDS in epithelial cells of the skin was detected as an increasing function of radiation dose. Fibroblastic cells, compared with epithelial cells and hair follicle cells at the same depth of the skin, showed a lower level of UDS, indicating a lower DNA repair activity in fibroblasts. Cancer risk of the skin was discussed. (Auth.)

  14. Identification of irradiated wheat by germination test, DNA comet assay and electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Adilson C.; Freund, Maria Teresa L.; Villavicencio, Ana Lúcia C. H.; Delincée, Henry; Arthur, Valter

    2002-03-01

    In several countries, there has been an increase in the use of radiation for food processing thus improving the quality and sanitary conditions, inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms, delaying the natural aging process and so extending product lifetime. The need to develop analytical methods to detect these irradiated products is also increasing. The goal of this research was to identify wheat irradiated using different radiation doses. Seeds were irradiated with a gamma 60Co source (Gammacell 220 GC) in the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura and the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. Dose rate used were 1.6 and 5.8kGy/h. Applied doses were 0.0, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, and 2.0kGy. After irradiation, seeds were analysed over a 6 month period. Three different detection methods were employed to determine how irradiation had modified the samples. Screening methods consisted of a germination test measuring the inhibition of shooting and rooting and analysis of DNA fragmentation. The method of electron spin resonance spectroscopy allowed a better dosimetric evaluation. These techniques make the identification of irradiated wheat with different doses possible.

  15. Drug resistance plasmids in Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus reuteri.

    OpenAIRE

    Vescovo, M; Morelli, L; Bottazzi, V

    1982-01-01

    Sixteen strains of Lactobacillus reuteri and 20 strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus were tested for resistance to 22 antibiotics by using commercially available sensitivity disks. Evidence suggesting linkage of these resistances to plasmids was obtained by "curing" experiments with acridine dyes and high growth temperatures. Examination of plasmid patterns of agarose gel electrophoresis provided further evidence of loss in plasmid DNA under curing conditions in some of the strains examined.

  16. Irradiation effects on electrical properties of DNA solution/Al Schottky diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2018-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has emerged as one of the most exciting organic material and as such extensively studied as a smart electronic material since the last few decades. DNA molecules have been reported to be utilized in the fabrication of small-scaled sensors and devices. In this current work, the effect of alpha radiation on the electrical properties of an Al/DNA/Al device using DNA solution was studied. It was observed that the carrier transport was governed by electrical interface properties at the Al-DNA interface. Current ( I)-voltage ( V) curves were analyzed by employing the interface limited Schottky current equations, i.e., conventional and Cheung and Cheung's models. Schottky parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance were also determined. The extracted barrier height of the Schottky contact before and after radiation was calculated as 0.7845, 0.7877, 0.7948 and 0.7874 eV for the non-radiated, 12, 24 and 36 mGy, respectively. Series resistance of the structure was found to decline with the increase in the irradiation, which was due to the increase in the free radical root effects in charge carriers in the DNA solution. Results pertaining to the electronic profiles obtained in this work may provide a better understanding for the development of precise and rapid radiation sensors using DNA solution.

  17. Replication of UV-irradiated DNA in human cell extracts: Evidence for mutagenic bypass of pyrimidine dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.C.; Kunkel, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have examined the efficiency and fidelity of simian virus 40-origin-dependent replication of UV-irradiated double-stranded DNA in extracts of human cells. Using as a mutational target the α-complementation domain of the Escherichia coli lacZ gene in bacteriophage M13mp2DNA, replication of undamaged DNA in HeLa cell extracts was highly accurate, whereas replication of DNA irradiated with UV light (280-320 nm) was both less efficient and less accurate. Replication was inhibited by irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. Nonetheless, covalently closed, monomer-length circular products were generated that were resistant to digestion by Dpn I, showing that they resulted from semiconservative replication. These products were incised by T4 endonuclease V, whereas the undamaged replication products were not, suggesting that pyrimidine dimers were bypassed during replication. When replicated, UV-irradiated DNA was used to transfect an E. coli α-complementation host strain to score mutant M13mp2 plaques, the mutant plaque frequency was substantially higher than that obtained with either unirradiated, replicated DNA, or unreplicated, UV-irradiated DNA. Both the increased mutagenicity and the inhibition of replication associated with UV irradiation were reversed by treatment of the irradiated DNA with photolyase before replication. Sequence analysis of mutants resulting from replication of UV-irradiated DNA demonstrated that most mutants contained C → T transition errors at dipyrimidine sites. A few mutants contained 1-nt frameshift errors or tandem double CC → TT substitutions. The data are consistent with the interpretation that pyrimidine dimers are bypassed during replication by the multiprotein replication apparatus in human cell extracts and that this bypass is mutagenic primarily via misincorporation of dAMP opposite a cytosine (or uracil) in the dimer. 56 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Semi-conservative synthesis of DNA in UV-sensitive mutant cells of Chinese hamster after UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikhanskaya, F.L.; Khrebtukova, I.A.; Manuilova, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of the rate of semi-conservative DNA synthesis in asynchronous UV-resistant (clone V79) and UV-sensitive clones (VII and XII) of Chinese hamster cells after UV-irradiation. In all 3 clones studied, UV-irradiation (5-30 J/m 2 ) induced a decrease in the rate of DNA synthesis during the subsequent 1-2 h. In the resistant clone (V79) recovery of DNA synthesis rate started after the first 2 h post-irradiation (5 J/m 2 ) and by the 3rd hour reached its maximum value, which constituted 70% of that observed in control, non-irradiated cells. The UV-sensitive mutant clones VII and XII showed no recovery in the rate of DNA synthesis during 6-7 h post-irradiation. The results obtained show that the survival of cells is correlated with the ability of DNA synthesis to recover after UV-irradiation in 3 clones studied. The observed recovery of UV-inhibited DNA synthesis in mutant clones may be due to certain defects in DNA repair. (orig.)

  19. Depression of DNA synthesis rate following hyperthermia, gamma irradiation, cyclotron neutrons and mixed modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.J.; Muehlensiepen, H.; Porschen, W.; Feinendegen, L.E.; Dietzel, F.

    1978-01-01

    The incorporation of the thymidine analogue I-UdR is proportional to the activity of DNA synthesis. The maximum depression of 125-I-UdR incorporation occurs approximately 4 hours after all kinds of treatment. The increase which follow reflects cell processes like reoxygeneration, recovery, recycling and recruitment (although a direct relation is not yet demonstrable). The degree of depression 4 hours after treatment and the time required needs to reach control level is dependent on dose and radiation quaility but no such dependence could be clearly seen for the times of hyperthermia treatment we used. Neutron irradiation and the combination gamma irradiation + hyperthermia show a higher depression and a slower return to normal than gamma irradiation at the same dose. (orig.) [de

  20. Effects of caffeine on DNA repair of UV-irradiated Dictyostelium discoideum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, T.; Okaichi, K.; Ohashi, Y.; Nozu, K.

    1981-01-01

    Caffeine enhances the UV-killing of amoeboid cells of NC-4, but UV-irradiated γs-13 is insensitive to caffeine. UV-irradiated NC-4 becomes insensitive to the effect of caffeine during a postirradiation incubation in buffer for about 90 min, but γs-13 remains unchanged in the sensitivity to caffeine throughout the incubation for 180 min. Amoeboid cells of γs-13 can remove pyrimidine dimers as well as NC-4 even in the presence of caffeine. Caffeine inhibits rejoining of strand-breaks of DNA in UV-irradiated NC-4, but the rejoining in γs-13 is insensitive to caffeine. (author)

  1. Characterization of Erwinia amylovora strains from different host plants using repetitive-sequences PCR analysis, and restriction fragment length polymorphism and short-sequence DNA repeats of plasmid pEA29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barionovi, D; Giorgi, S; Stoeger, A R; Ruppitsch, W; Scortichini, M

    2006-05-01

    The three main aims of the study were the assessment of the genetic relationship between a deviating Erwinia amylovora strain isolated from Amelanchier sp. (Maloideae) grown in Canada and other strains from Maloideae and Rosoideae, the investigation of the variability of the PstI fragment of the pEA29 plasmid using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and the determination of the number of short-sequence DNA repeats (SSR) by DNA sequence analysis in representative strains. Ninety-three strains obtained from 12 plant genera and different geographical locations were examined by repetitive-sequences PCR using Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus, BOX and Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic primer sets. Upon the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean analysis, a deviating strain from Amelanchier sp. was analysed using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) analysis and the sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene. This strain showed 99% similarity to other E. amylovora strains in the 16S gene and the same banding pattern with ARDRA. The RFLP analysis of pEA29 plasmid using MspI and Sau3A restriction enzymes showed a higher variability than that previously observed and no clear-cut grouping of the strains was possible. The number of SSR units reiterated two to 12 times. The strains obtained from pear orchards showing for the first time symptoms of fire blight had a low number of SSR units. The strains from Maloideae exhibit a wider genetic variability than previously thought. The RFLP analysis of a fragment of the pEA29 plasmid would not seem a reliable method for typing E. amylovora strains. A low number of SSR units was observed with first epidemics of fire blight. The current detection techniques are mainly based on the genetic similarities observed within the strains from the cultivated tree-fruit crops. For a more reliable detection of the fire blight pathogen also in wild and ornamentals Rosaceous plants the genetic

  2. Gamma irradiation does not induce detectable changes in DNA methylation directly following exposure of human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Lahtz

    Full Text Available Environmental chemicals and radiation have often been implicated in producing alterations of the epigenome thus potentially contributing to cancer and other diseases. Ionizing radiation, released during accidents at nuclear power plants or after atomic bomb explosions, is a potentially serious health threat for the exposed human population. This type of high-energy radiation causes DNA damage including single- and double-strand breaks and induces chromosomal rearrangements and mutations, but it is not known if ionizing radiation directly induces changes in the epigenome of irradiated cells. We treated normal human fibroblasts and normal human bronchial epithelial cells with different doses of γ-radiation emitted from a cesium 137 ((137Cs radiation source. After a seven-day recovery period, we analyzed global DNA methylation patterns in the irradiated and control cells using the methylated-CpG island recovery assay (MIRA in combination with high-resolution microarrays. Bioinformatics analysis revealed only a small number of potential methylation changes with low fold-difference ratios in the irradiated cells. These minor methylation differences seen on the microarrays could not be verified by COBRA (combined bisulfite restriction analysis or bisulfite sequencing of selected target loci. Our study shows that acute γ-radiation treatment of two types of human cells had no appreciable direct effect on DNA cytosine methylation patterns in exposed cells.

  3. Induction of unscheduled DNA synthesis on the nuclear matrix of rat hepatocytes after whole-body γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezlepkin, V.G.; Malinovskij, Yu.Yu.; Kuznetsova, E.A.; Namvar, R.A.; Gaziev, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    DNA synthesis in hepatocytes was studied by incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine administered of portal vein of γ-irradiated (80 Gy) rats. It was shown that the rate of replicative DNA synthesis decreased in hepatocytes of the regenerating liver and unscheduled DNA synthesis was induced at the nuclear matrix of resting cells of the intact liver. In addition to repair synthesis, DNA synthesis resembling replicative one (''aberrant'' DNA synthesis) accounts for a considerable fraction of γ-radiation-induced synthesis of DNA at the nuclear matrix

  4. Plasmid marker rescue transformation proceeds by breakage-reunion in Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinrauch, Y.; Dubnau, D.

    1987-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis carrying a plasmid which replicates with a copy number of about 1 was transformed with linearized homologous plasmid DNA labeled with the heavy isotopes 2 H and 15 N, in the presence of 32 Pi and 6-(p-hydroxyphenylazo)-uracil to inhibit DNA replication. Plasmid DNA was isolated from the transformed culture and fractionated in cesium chloride density gradients. The distribution of total and donor plasmid DNA was examined, using specific hybridization probes. The synthesis of new DNA, associated with the integration of donor moiety, was also monitored. Donor-specific sequences were present at a density intermediate between that of light and hybrid DNA. This recombinant DNA represented 1.4% of total plasmid DNA. The latter value corresponded well with the transforming activity (1.7%) obtained for the donor marker. Newly synthesized material associated with plasmid DNA at the recombinant density amounted to a minor portion of the recombinant plasmid DNA. These data suggest that, like chromosomal transformation, plasmid marker rescue transformation does not require replication for the integration of donor markers and, also like chromosomal transformation, proceeds by a breakage-reunion mechanism. The extent of donor DNA replacement of recipient DNA per plasmid molecule of 54 kilobases (27 kilobase pairs) was estimated as 16 kilobases

  5. Inhibition of polymerases-alpha and -beta completely blocks DNA repair induced by UV irradiation in cultured mouse neuronal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licastro, F.; Sarafian, T.; Verity, A.M.; Walford, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of hydroxyurea, aphidicolin and dideoxythymidine on UV-induced DNA repair of mouse neuronal granular cells were studied. Aphidicolin, which is considered a specific inhibitor of polymerase-alpha, decreased spontaneous DNA synthesis by 93% and totally suppressed DNA repair. Dideoxythymidine, an inhibitor of polymerase-beta, was more potent in decreasing scheduled DNA synthesis than aphidicolin, and also completely blocked the UV-induced DNA repair. Hydroxyurea, a specific inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, inhibited scheduled DNA synthesis, but unscheduled DNA synthesis after UV irradiation was always well detectable. Our data suggest that in neuronal cells from 5 to 10 days old mice both polymerases-alpha and -beta are required for both DNA synthesis and repair. These two enzymes may act jointly in filling up the gaps along the DNA molecule and elongating the DNA chain

  6. The effect of calcium salts on Dna-ase and Rna-ase activity of irradiated plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslanova, S.V.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of the post-radiation factor helping the restoration of radiation damages in the early sorts of cotton plant 1306'DV Goss. hirsutum was studied. In particular the action of treating the irradiated seed in the solution of calcium salts on the functional state of alcaline and acid forms of nucleases in cellular components was investigated. The dry seed of cotton was irradiated with gamma-rays at dose of 30 krad. It was found that irradiation of the dry seed at the radiosensitive organ (roots) increased the acid DNA-ase in the cellular nuclei, in the radioresistant (leaves) - the alcaline DNA-ase and RNA-ase. With irradiation both forms of DNA-ase in the mitochondriae diminished. After treatment of the irradiated seed in the solution of calcium salts the activity of acid nucleases and alcaline enzymes remained normal

  7. A constitutive damage specific DNA-binding protein is synthesized at higher levels in UV-irradiated primate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschfeld, S.; Levine, A.S.; Ozato, K.; Protic, M.

    1990-01-01

    Using a DNA band shift assay, we have identified a DNA-binding protein complex in primate cells which is present constitutively and has a high affinity for UV-irradiated, double-stranded DNA. Cells pretreated with UV light, mitomycin C, or aphidicolin have higher levels of this damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex, suggesting that the signal for induction can either be damage to the DNA or interference with cellular DNA replication. Physiochemical modifications of the DNA and competition analysis with defined substrates suggest that the most probable target site for the damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex is a 6-4'-(pyrimidine-2'-one)-pyrimidine dimer: specific binding could not be detected with probes which contain -TT- cyclobutane dimers, and damage-specific DNA binding did not decrease after photoreactivation of UV-irradiated DNA. This damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex is the first such inducible protein complex identified in primate cells. Cells from patients with the sun-sensitive cancer-prone disease, xeroderma pigmentosum (group E), are lacking both the constitutive and the induced damage-specific DNA-binding activities. These findings suggest a possible role for this DNA-binding protein complex in lesion recognition and DNA repair of UV-light-induced photoproducts

  8. DNA comet assay as a rapid detection method of irradiated bovine meat by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin-Huachaca, Nelida Simona; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The presence in food of pathogenic microorganisms, such as Salmonella species, Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Listeria Monocytogenes or Yersinia enterolitica, is a problem of growing concern to public health authorities all over the world. Thus, irradiation of certain prepackaged meat products such as ground beef, minced meat, and hamburgers may help in controlling meatborne pathogens and parasites. Pathogenic microorganisms and parasites in meat products, which are commonly consumed raw, are of particular importance, Up to now, only electron-beam accelerators and gamma-ray cells have been used for commercial applications. At the international conference on 'The Acceptance, Control of, and Trade in Irradiated Food', it was recommended that governments should encourage research into detection methods (Anon, 1989), Already five international standards are available to food control agencies. A number of physical, chemical, and biological techniques of detection of irradiated foods have been discussed in the literature. A rapid and inexpensive screening test employing DNA Comet Assay to identify radiation treatment of food has been described by Cerda et al. (1997). This method is restricted to foods that have not been subjected to heat or other treatments, which also induce DNA fragmentation. Advantages are its simplicity, low cost and speed of measurement. This method was proposed to the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) as a screening protocol (presumptive) and not as a proof (definitive). The DNA comet assay have been yielded good results with chicken, pork, fish meat, exotic meat, hamburgers, fruits and cereals. In this work we studied a DNA fragmentation of bovine meat irradiated by electron beam. Experimental: Bovine meat was purchased in local shops in Sao Paulo. Irradiation was performed with electron beam of accelerator facility of Radiation Dynamics Inc., USA (E=1,5 MeV, l=25 mA). The irradiation doses were 3,5; 4,5, 5,5, and 7

  9. DNA biosynthesis content and intensiveness in mice thymus at early periods following fast neutron irradiation with different energy rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indyk, V.M.; Antonenko, G.I.; Parnovskaya, N.V.

    1988-01-01

    Biosynthesis of dna of the thymic glands of animals irradiated by fast neutrons with different energy values in the early post-irradiation period is investigated. It is shown that the rate of mass recovery in organs, their cellular nature, dna content and indices of their specific activity have the dose and time dependences, as well as they considerably differ at different neutron energies and different quality radiation. With the increase of neutron energy value their biological effectiveness decreases

  10. Induction and repair of strand breaks and 3'-hydroxy terminals in the DNA of mouse brain following gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, K.; Furuno, I.; Yada, T.; Matsudaira, H.

    1978-01-01

    DNA was isolated from mouse brain after in vivo γ-ray irradiation, treated with endonuclease S 1 from Aspergillus oryzae if necessary, and analysed further by alkaline and neutral sucrose gradient centrifugation. In parallel, its template activity was determined by DNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.7, enzyme A of Klenow from Escherichia coli) assay as described previously. Similar experiments were performed with cultured mouse leukaemia cells (L5178Y) irradiated in vitro at 0 0 C. (Auth.)

  11. Xeroderma pigmentosum variants have a slow recovery of DNA synthesis after irradiation with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Thomas, G.H.; Park, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Human cells (normal and xeroderma pigmentosum variant) irradiated with ultraviolet light and pulse-labelled with [ 3 H]thymidine underwent transient decline and recovery of molecular weights of newly synthesized DNA and rates of [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation. The ability of synthesize normal-sized DNA recovered more rapidly in both cell types than thymidine incorporation. During recovery cells steadily increased in their ability to replicate normalsized DNA on damaged templates. The molecular weight versus time curves fitted exponential functions with similar rate constants in normal and heterozygous xeroderma pigmentosum cells, but with a slower rate in two xeroderma pigmentosum variant cell lines. Caffeine added during the post-irradiation period eliminated the recovery of molecular weights in xeroderma pigmentsoum variant but not in normal cells. The recovery of the ability to synthesize normal-sized DNA represents a combination of a number of cellular regulatory processes, some of which are constitutive, and one of which is altered in the xeroderma pigmentosum variant such that recovery becomes slow and caffeine sensitive. (Auth.)

  12. Post-irradiation degradation of DNA in electron and neutron-irradiated E. coli B/r; the effect of the radiation sensitizer metronidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramp, W A; George, A M; Howlett, J [Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK). M.R.C. Cyclotron Unit

    1976-04-01

    Suspensions of E.coli B/r were irradiated under aerobic and anoxic conditions with electrons (7 to 8 MeV, 2 and 20 krad/min, MRC linear accelerator), or with neutrons (average energy 7.5 MeV, 2 krad/min, MRC cyclotron) in an investigation of the effects of the radiosensitizer, metronidazole (Flagyl, 5 or 10 mM) on survival and DNA degradation. These results are compared with those for another electron affinic radiosensitizer, indane trione. Survival studies yielded enhancement ratios, for anoxic irradiation only, of 1.7 (5mM) and 1.9 (10mM) for electrons, and 1.2 (5mM and 10mM) for neutrons. Unlike indane trione, metronidazole had no pronounced inhibitory effect on post-irradiation DNA degradation, either when incubated with the bacteria before irradiation or when present during irradiation. When present under anoxic conditions of irradiation with electrons, some enhancement of degradation was observed. DNA degradation was reduced at higher doses, with a pronounced maxiumum effect, for neutrons as well as for electrons. Metronidazole allowed this degradation to continue and showed some sensitizing action, but did not prevent the decrease in total degradation at high doses. It is therefore difficult to correlate DNA degradation with cell-depth.

  13. Strand breaks, base release and post-irradiation changes in DNA γ-irradiated in dilute O2-saturated aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.F.; Kuo, I.

    1976-01-01

    Gamma irradiation of DNA in dilute O 2 -saturated aqueous solution releases free bases and damaged bases from the macromolecule. The yields of these products were measured after column chromatographic separation. For double stranded DNA the immediate yield of bases varies from G = 0.012 for cytosine to G = 0.033 for adenine. The yields of released bases increase with post-irradiation time (the majority of the increase occurs in the first 2 hrs.) to yields in the range of G = 0.07 +- 0.012. Yields of two released damaged thymine radiation products from γ-irradiated 3 H thymine labelled DNA also increased with post-irradiation time. Strand breaks were measured in γ-irradiated single stranded DNA the initial yield G = 0.02 was low but increased with time to G = 0.07. No direct correlation between strand-break production and release of low molecular weight products is possible. The findings are discussed in terms of damage to DNA in vivo and its enzymatic repair

  14. The role of DNA polymerase I in liquid holding recovery of UV-irradiated Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, M.-S.; Patrick, M.H.

    1977-01-01

    Excision of cyclobutyl dipyrimidines from, and accumulation of strand interruptions in, DNA of different strains of E.coli K12 were determined during liquid holding recovery after UV irradiation. The extent of Pyr Pyr excision was the same (20 to 25%) for both a polA mutant (E.coli P3478) and its parental wild type strain (E.coli W3110); however, single strand interruptions accumulated during liquid holding of polA cells, but not in the parental strain. In contrast, excision was greatly reduced in a mutant (KMBL 1789) which is defective in the 5' → 3' exonucleolytic function of DNA polymerase I. These data suggest that excision and resynthesis during liquid holding are carried out primarily, if not entirely, by DNA polymerase I. It is further concluded that excision alone is both a necessary and sufficient condition to elicit liquid holding recovery, and that this excision requires a functional polymerase I 5' → 3' exonuclease. (author)

  15. Endonuclease α from Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows increased activity on ultraviolet irradiated native DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, D.W.; Haynes, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    Endonuclease α isolated from the nucleus of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a DNA endonuclease which has been shown to act preferentially on denatured T7 DNA. The purified enzyme is more active with UV-irradiated native T7 DNA than with unirradiated substrate. The relation between damage, measured by pyrimidine dimer concentration, and excess endonuclease activity is most readily explained by local denaturation caused by the presence of pyrimidine dimers. When three radiation sensitive mutants of yeast were tested for the level of endonuclease α present, none were found lacking the enzyme. However, nuclei of strain rad 1-1, a mutant that may be defective in heteroduplex repair as well as excision repair, were found to contain reduced levels of the endonuclease. (orig./AJ) [de

  16. Role of DNA polymerase I in liquid holding recovery of uv-irradiated Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, M S; Patrick, M H [Texas Univ., Dallas (USA)

    1977-09-01

    Excision of cyclobutyl dipyrimidines from, and accumulation of strand interruptions in DNA of different strains of E.coli K12 were determined during liquid holding recovery after uv irradiation. The extent of Pyr <> Pyr excision was the same (20 to 25%) for both a polA mutant (E.coli P3478) and its parental wild type strain (E.coli W3110); however, single strand interruptions accumulated during liquid holding of polA cells, but not in the parental strain. In contrast, excision was greatly reduced in a mutant (KMBL 1789) which is defective in the 5' ..-->.. 3' exonucleolytic function of DNA polymerase I. These data suggest that excision and resynthesis during liquid holding are carried out primarily, if not entirely, by DNA polymerase I. It is further concluded that excision alone is both a necessary and sufficient condition to elicit liquid holding recovery, and that this excision requires a functional polymerase I 5' ..-->.. 3' exonuclease.

  17. Cytosine modifications after gamma irradiation in aerated aqueous solution of Escherichia coli DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polverelli, M.

    1983-04-01

    After gamma irradiation of cytosine in aerated aqueous solution and utilization of various spectrometric methods (mass spectrometry, proton nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectrometry) about ten new radiolysis products were identified. The formation of N-glycolylbiuret in H 2 18 O aqueous solution of irradiated cytosine at pH 4,5 indicated that the preferred 18 OH hydroxyl radical attack was at C-5. The formation of trans 1-carbamoyl-4,5 dihydroxyimidazolidin-2 oxo which is the major product after cytosine pyrimidine ring rearrangement took place preferentially at neutral pH, while N-glycolylbiuret predominated at pH 4,5. The deamination pathway was predominant when cytosine was irradiated at acidic pH values (pH 2 ) or in copper complexes. The development of a new acid hydrolysis method using fluorhydric acid stabilized in pyridine made easier the evaluation of cytosine modifications after gamma irradiation in aerated aqueous solution of E. Coli DNA- 14 C-2 cytosine. This hydrolytic agent removed the modified bases from the polynucleotidic chain. A difference was found between the proportion of radiolytic products removed by acid hydrolysis and by irradiation of the free base in solution [fr

  18. Survival and DNA repair in ultraviolet-irradiated haploid and diploid cultured frog cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freed, J.J.; Hoess, R.H.; Angelosanto, F.A.; Massey, H.C. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Survival and repair of DNA following ultraviolet (254-nm) radiation have been investigated in ICR 2A, a cultured cell line from haploid embryos of the grassfrog, Rana pipiens. Survival curves from cells recovering in the dark gave mean lethal dose value (D 0 ) in the range 1.5-1.7 Jm -2 for both haploid and diploid cell stocks. The only significant difference observed between haploids and diploids was in the extent of the shoulder at low fluence (Dsub(q)), the value for exponentially multiplying diploid cells (3.0 Jm -2 ) being higher than that found for haploids (1.2 Jm -2 ). Irradiation of cultures reversibly blocked in the G1 phase of the cell cycle gave survival-curve coefficients indistinguishable between haploids and diploids. Post-irradiation exposure to visible light restored colony-forming capacity and removed chromatographically estimated pyrimidine dimers from DNA at the same rates. After fluences killing 90% of the cells, complete restoration of survival was obtained after 60-min exposure to 500 foot-candles, indicating that in this range lethality is entirely photoreversible and therefore attributable to pyrimidine dimers in DNA. Dimer removal required illumination following ultraviolet exposure, intact cells and physiological temperature, implying that the photoreversal involved DNA photolyase activity. Excision-repair capacity was slight, since no loss of dimers could be detected chromoatographically during up to 48 h incubation in the dark and since autoradiographically detected 'unscheduled DNA synthesis' was limited to a 2-fold increase saturated at 10 Jm -2 . These properties make ICR 2A frog cells useful to explore how DNA-repair pathways influence mutant yield. (Auth.)

  19. Dynamics of termination during in vitro replication of ultraviolet-irradiated DNA with DNA polymerase III holoenzyme of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shwartz, H.; Livneh, Z.

    1987-01-01

    During in vitro replication of UV-irradiated single-stranded DNA with Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III holoenzyme termination frequently occurs at pyrimidine photodimers. The termination stage is dynamic and characterized by at least three different events: repeated dissociation-reinitiation cycles of the polymerase at the blocked termini; extensive hydrolysis of ATP to ADP and inorganic phosphate; turnover of dNTPs into dNMP. The reinitiation events are nonproductive and are not followed by further elongation. The turnover of dNTPs into dNMPs is likely to result from repeated cycles of insertion of dNMP residues opposite the blocking lesions followed by their excision by the 3'----5' exonucleolytic activity of the polymerase. Although all dNTPs are turned over, there is a preference for dATP, indicating that DNA polymerase III holoenzyme has a preference for inserting a dAMP residue opposite blocking pyrimidine photodimers. We suggest that the inability of the polymerase to bypass photodimers during termination is due to the formation of defective initiation-like complexes with reduced stability at the blocked termini

  20. Role of isolated and clustered DNA damage and the post-irradiating repair process in the effects of heavy ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuyama, Yuka; Terato, Hiroaki; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Ide, Hiroshi; Yasui, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage is a specific type of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. Any type of ionizing radiation traverses the target DNA molecule as a beam, inducing damage along its track. Our previous study showed that clustered DNA damage yields decreased with increased linear energy transfer (LET), leading us to investigate the importance of clustered DNA damage in the biological effects of heavy ion beam radiation. In this study, we analyzed the yield of clustered base damage (comprising multiple base lesions) in cultured cells irradiated with various heavy ion beams, and investigated isolated base damage and the repair process in post-irradiation cultured cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were irradiated by carbon, silicon, argon and iron ion beams with LETs of 13, 55, 90 and 200 keV µm -1 , respectively. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the cells with enzymatic treatments indicated that clustered base damage yields decreased as the LET increased. The aldehyde reactive probe procedure showed that isolated base damage yields in the irradiated cells followed the same pattern. To analyze the cellular base damage process, clustered DNA damage repair was investigated using DNA repair mutant cells. DNA double-strand breaks accumulated in CHO mutant cells lacking Xrcc1 after irradiation, and the cell viability decreased. On the other hand, mouse embryonic fibroblast (Mef) cells lacking both Nth1 and Ogg1 became more resistant than the wild type Mef. Thus, clustered base damage seems to be involved in the expression of heavy ion beam biological effects via the repair process. (author)

  1. Plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Gerdes, Kenn

    2000-01-01

    Recent major advances in the understanding of prokaryotic DNA segregation have been achieved by using fluorescence microscopy to visualize the localization of cellular components. Plasmids and bacterial chromosomes are partitioned in a highly dynamic fashion, suggesting the presence of a mitotic...

  2. DNA Comet Assay and Changes in Microflora Load as Screening Methods to Detect Irradiated Food in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammad, A.A.; Abo El Nour, S.A.; Ibrahim, H.M.; Osman, M.E.; Abo El- Nasr, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study the microgel electrophoresis of single cells (DNA Comet Assay), and changes in microflora load were applied to detect irradiation treatment of strawberries and fresh-deboned chicken produced in Egypt. Strawberry samples were irradiated at 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0 kGy, stored at 4 degree C±1 and analyzed at 0 and 7 days post.-irradiation. Fresh- deboned chicken meat samples were exposed to 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0 kGy, stored at 4 degree C±1 and analyzed at 0, 7, 14 and 21 days post-irradiation. After electrophoresis performance, the accridine orange stain slides were seen under fluorescent microscope and the DNA comets were evaluated by photographic and image analysis. Changes in microflora load of irradiated samples were also evaluated. In all irradiated samples, the DNA fragments stretched or migrated out of the cells towards the anode of the agrose gel and appeared as a “comets” with tail. Whereas, DNA comets of all non-irradiated samples were almost intact, round without tail or had very short tail. Values of DNA % in tails and the tail length increased with increasing irradiation dose and storage times. The DNA comet assay could successfully be used to detect radiation treatment of strawberry and deboned-chicken meat samples up to 7 and 21 days post-irradiation, respectively. The absence of gram-negative bacteria and enterobacteriaceae group as well as the very low count of fungi (mostly yeasts) might be considered another evidence of radiation treatment of strawberries and fresh-deboned chicken.

  3. Plasmids encoding PKI(1-31), a specific inhibitor of cAMP-stimulated gene expression, inhibit the basal transcriptional activity of some but not all cAMP-regulated DNA response elements in JEG-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, J R; Deutsch, P J; Price, D J; Habener, J F; Avruch, J

    1989-11-25

    Plasmids that encode a bioactive amino-terminal fragment of the heat-stable inhibitor of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKI(1-31), were employed to characterize the role of this protein kinase in the control of transcriptional activity mediated by three DNA regulatory elements in the JEG-3 human placental cell line. The 5'-flanking sequence of the human collagenase gene contains the heptameric sequence, 5'-TGAGTCA-3', previously identified as a "phorbol ester" response element. Reporter genes containing either the intact 1.2-kilobase 5'-flanking sequence from the human collagenase gene or just the 7-base pair (bp) response element, when coupled to an enhancerless promoter, each exhibit both cAMP and phorbol ester-stimulated expression in JEG-3 cells. Cotransfection of either construct with plasmids encoding PKI(1-31) inhibits cAMP-stimulated but not basal- or phorbol ester-stimulated expression. Pretreatment of cells with phorbol ester for 1 or 2 days abrogates completely the response to rechallenge with phorbol ester but does not alter the basal expression of either construct; cAMP-stimulated expression, while modestly inhibited, remains vigorous. The 5'-flanking sequence of the human chorionic gonadotropin-alpha subunit (HCG alpha) gene has two copies of the sequence, 5'-TGACGTCA-3', contained in directly adjacent identical 18-bp segments, previously identified as a cAMP-response element. Reporter genes containing either the intact 1.5 kilobase of 5'-flanking sequence from the HCG alpha gene, or just the 36-bp tandem repeat cAMP response element, when coupled to an enhancerless promoter, both exhibit a vigorous cAMP stimulation of expression but no response to phorbol ester in JEG-3 cells. Cotransfection with plasmids encoding PKI(1-31) inhibits both basal and cAMP-stimulated expression in a parallel fashion. The 5'-flanking sequence of the human enkephalin gene mediates cAMP-stimulated expression of reporter genes in both JEG-3 and CV-1 cells. Plasmids

  4. Caspase-3 activation and DNA damage in pig skin organ culture after solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacqueville, Daniel; Mavon, Alain

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, a convenient and easy-to-handle skin organ culture was developed from domestic pig ears using polycarbonate Transwell culture inserts in 12-well plate. This alternative model was then tested for its suitability in analyzing the short-term effects of a single solar radiation dose (from 55 to 275 kJ.m(-2)). Differentiation of the pig skin was maintained for up to 48 h in culture, and its morphology was similar to that of fresh human skin. Solar irradiation induced a significant release of the cytosolic enzymes lactate dehydrogenase and extracellular signal-related kinase 2 protein in the culture medium 24 h after exposure. These photocytotoxic effects were associated with the formation of sunburn cells, thymine dimers and DNA strand breaks in both the epidermis and dermis. Interestingly, cell death was dose dependent and associated with p53 protein upregulation and strong caspase-3 activation in the basal epidermis. None of these cellular responses was observed in non-irradiated skin. Finally, topical application of a broad-spectrum UVB + A sunfilter formulation afforded efficient photoprotection in irradiated explants. Thus, the ex vivo pig ear skin culture may be a useful tool in the assessment of solar radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, and for evaluating the efficacy of sunscreen formulations.

  5. Interaction of spermine with DNA, vitamin C and bovine serum albumin in the unirradiated and gamma irradiated states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, S.N.; Lal, C.; Bhardwaj, R.; Chaturvedi, S.; Chaudhury, N.K.

    2006-01-01

    Structural deformability of spermine with radiation dose (maximum 10 Gy) has been proved. Complex formation of spermine with DNA, vitamin C and BSA took place. Calibration and radiation-induced absorption changes in spermine by ninhydrin reagent has been followed quantitatively. Interaction of vitamin C with DNA and their radiation-induced changes have been reported. Interaction of spermine with DNA in the unirradiated and gamma irradiated states in 10 -3 M phosphate buffer and water have been compared. Addition of spermine and vitamin C to DNA makes DNA structure more condensed. Bovine serum albumin also binds with spermine and protects it from radiation-induced degradation. (author)

  6. Endonuclease activities in extracts of Micrococcus luteus that act on. gamma. -irradiated DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoen-Bopp, A; Schaefer, G; Hagen, U [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Strahlenbiologie

    1977-03-01

    Several protein fractions containing endonuclease activity against ..gamma..-irradiated DNA (..gamma..-endonuclease) were isolated from M.luteus. The crude extract was eluted on a phosphocellulose column and chromatographed on TEAE cellulose and subsequently on hydroxypatite. Five peaks of ..gamma..-endonuclease were obtained from each preparation. Repeated experiments showed comparable chromatographic behaviour of the fractions. There was no detectable activity of uv-endonuclease in the fractions with ..gamma..-endonuclease but a small contamination of endonuclease against unirradiated DNA and against DNA with apurinic sites. The ..gamma..-endonuclease was stimulated by, but was not dependent on, magnesium. Several tests for endonuclease activity have been used: the analysis of strand breaks in calf-thymus DNA or in PM2 DNA, and the determination of end-groups formed by endonuclease, either 3'OH end-groups or phosphomonoester end groups. From the results obtained it can be assumed that the strand breaks induced by the ..gamma..-endonuclease carry 3'OH and 5' phosphate end groups.

  7. Free radicals from irradiated lyophilized DNA: influence of water of hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huettermann, J.; Roehrig, M.; Koehnlein, W.

    1992-01-01

    Lyophilized DNA equilibrated with water vapour at various relative humidities (0-95% H 2 O or D 2 O) was X-irradiated at 77 K and analysed for free radicals by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in the temperature range 77-280 K. Analysis of spectra according to variation in humidity, microwave power and temperature generally yielded a doublet and a triplet spectrum at 77 K. The doublet partially converted into the 5-thymyl radical (TH . ). DNA containing deuterated thymine (dTDNA) revealed that the doublet of ''normal'' DNA should be composed of two similar doublets, one of which should be assigned to the thymine anion, the other possibly the cytosine anion. The triplet signal was more stable and could be related to the guanine cation or its deprotonated successor. Several other patterns were detected among them an allyl radical in highly aquated DNA (95% humidity). Other features occurred either predominantly or exclusively in DNA equilibrated above 66% relative humidity and were ascribed to an influence of the secondary structure. (author)

  8. The technology of large-scale pharmaceutical plasmid purification ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-01-04

    Jan 4, 2010 ... DNA vaccine, the cost of purification must be decreased. Although commonly .... Three mice were killed every 4 days interval. Tissues of heart, liver, .... Now, methods such as chromatography had good prospects in plasmid ...

  9. Fragmentation of chromatin DNA in mouse thymus cells after whole body γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Kang; Liu Xueying; Zhu Xuefen

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of soluble chromatin in mouse thymus nuclei after whole body γ-irradiation were investigated by means of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After deproteinization and electrophoresis eight regular DNA bands were revealed. The molecular weights of these bands were estimated by comparing their migration rates with those of the standard fragments obtained from PBR 322 digested completely by restrictive endonuclease Hae III. The molecular weight of the first band was calculated to be 186 base pairs corresponding approximately to the size of DNA fragment from a single nucleosome, and those of other bands appeared to be its multiples. The results suggested that the disintegration of chromatin DNA after γ-irradiation might have occurred at the linkage regions of chromatin. The autolysis product of normal thymus chromatin under sterile condition were also analyzed and its electrophoretic pattern was found to be just the same as that of the postirradiation product. It seems, therefore, that the endonuclease existing in normal tissues might be responsible for the postirradiation chromatin degradation. The mechanism of this kind of enzymatic digestion remains to be elucidated in further investigation. (author)

  10. Quantitation of pyrimidine dimers in DNA from UVB-irradiated alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaite, F.E.; Sutherland, B.M.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Depletion of stratospheric ozone will increase the solar ultraviolet radiation in the range from 290-320 nm (UVB) that reaches the surface of the earth, placing an increased UV burden on exposed organisms. One consequence of increased UVB may be decreased productivity of crop plants. A principal lesion caused by UV in DNA is the cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimer. We have adapted a method for measuring these dimers in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA for use in UV-irradiated plants. We find that biologically relevant doses of broad band UVB radiation induce easily detectable frequencies of pyrimidine dimers in the DNA of irradiated alfalfa sprout leaves and that the dose response for dimer formation is linear up to doses of at least 690 J/m 2 . We also find easily measurable frequencies of dimers in the leaves of seedlings grown in glass filtered sunlight but not exposed to additional UVB, suggesting that significant number of dimers are formed in plants exposed to normal sunlight. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. Medium from X-rayed cultures induces DNA strand-breaks in non-irradiated HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, T.; Okuyama, K.; Tanizaki, Y.

    2002-01-01

    There is growing evidence to indicate that several types of responses are induced by ionizing radiation in non-irradiated cells. Such bystander effects include the killing of non-irradiated cells, the induction of sister chromatid exchanges and chromosomal aberrations, and the induction of gene mutations and chromosomal instability and enhanced cell growth. In the present study, we assessed whether the medium from irradiated cultures can induce DNA strand-breaks in non-irradiated cells, using single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay). HeLa cells in culture were irradiated with 0.5 to 8 Gy of 140 kVp X-rays and one hour later, the medium was taken from the irradiated culture, passed through a filter and transferred to the parallel culture of non-irradiated HeLa cells as non-target cells. After incubation for 30 min, the comet assay was performed under alkaline and neutral conditions. Such treatments resulted in a dose-dependent increase in tail moment under either alkaline or neutral condition, indicating the induction of DNA single- or double-strand breaks, respectively. It was also shown that the clonogenic survival was reduced in the cells cultured in the medium from irradiated cultures. Such a change was not detected at all when medium alone was irradiated. These results provided disputed evidence that irradiated cells released certain genotoxic factor(s) into the culture medium that can induce DNA strand breaks leading to cell death. Our results suggest that physical contact between irradiated and non-irradiated cells may not be necessary for the bystander effects observed in this study. It appears that bystander responses may be mediated by multiple mechanisms

  12. Damage induced by hydroxyl radicals generated in the hydration layer of γ-irradiated frozen aqueous solution of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Hideki; Matsuda, Akira; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Iida, Yoshiharu.

    1996-01-01

    Aqueous DNA solutions with or without the spin trap α-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) were exposed to γ-rays at 77 K. After thawing the solutions, three experiments were carried out to confirm the generation of OH radicals in the hydration layer of DNA and to examine whether they act as an inducer of DNA strand breaks and base alterations. Observation with the EZR-spin tapping method showed ESR signals from PBN-OH adducts in the solution containing PBN and DNA, but there were few signals in the solution containing PBN alone, suggesting that reactive OH radicals were produced in the hydration layer of γ-irradiated DNA and were effectively scavenged by PBN, and that unreactive OH radicals were produced in the free water layer of γ-irradiated DNA. Agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA proved that PBN had no effect on the formation of strand breaks, whereas examination with the high-performance liquid chromatography-eloctrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) method showed that PBN suppressed the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). From these results it was concluded that OH radicals generated in the hydration layer of γ-irradiated DNA did not induce DNA strand breaks but induced base alterations. (author)

  13. Sister chromatid exchanges in X-ray irradiated blood lymphocytes from patients with hereditary diseases with radioresistant DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleskach, N.M.; Andriadze, M.I.; Mikhel'son, V.M.; Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray irradiation induced sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in blood lymphocytes from patient with Down's syndrome and adult progeria (in both the cases radioresistant DNA synthesis takes place). In normal lymphocytes (in which ionizing radiation inhibits the replicative synthesis of DNA) the rate of SCE rises with the rise of radiation dose. Thus, the rate of SCE in X-ray irradiated lymphocytes is in reverse dependence with radioresistance of replicative synthesis of DNA. The data obtained are explained in accordance with the replicative hypothesis of the SCE nature (Painter, 1980a): in cells of patients with Down's syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum from 2 and progeria of adults the time of existence of partly replicated clusters of replicons is decreased due to radioresistant replicative synthesis of DNA, but the presence of partly replicated clusters of replicons in necessary for SCE formation. Therefore the rate of SCF in X-irradiated cells of these patients decreases

  14. Size and frequency of gaps in newly synthesized DNA of xeroderma pigmentosum human cells irradiated with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghini, R.; Cordeiro-Stone, M.; Schumacher, R.I.

    1981-01-01

    Native newly synthesized DNA from human cells (xeroderma pigmentosum type) irradiated with ultraviolet light releases short pieces of DNA (L-DNA) when incubated with the single-strand specific S 1 nuclease. This is not observed in the case of unirradiated cells. Previous experiments had shown that the L-DNA resulted from the action of S 1 nuclease upon gaps, i.e., single-stranded DNA discontinuities in larger pieces of double-stranded DNA. We verified that the duplex L-DNA, that arises from the inter-gap regions upon S 1 nuclease treatment, has a size which approximates the distance between two pyrimidine dimers on the same strand. A method was devised to measure the size of the gaps. These parameters have been considered in the proposition of a model for DNA synthesis on a template containing pyrimidine dimers

  15. Selective tumor cell death induced by irradiated riboflavin through recognizing DNA G-T mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yi; Zhao, Yongyun; Chen, Lianqi; Wu, Jiasi; Chen, Gangyi; Li, Sheng; Zou, Jiawei; Chen, Rong; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Fan; Tang, Zhuo

    2017-09-06

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) has been thought to be a promising antitumoral agent in photodynamic therapy, though the further application of the method was limited by the unclear molecular mechanism. Our work reveals that riboflavin was able to recognize G-T mismatch specifically and induce single-strand breaks in duplex DNA targets efficiently under irradiation. In the presence of riboflavin, the photo-irradiation could induce the death of tumor cells that are defective in mismatch repair system selectively, highlighting the G-T mismatch as potential drug target for tumor cells. Moreover, riboflavin is a promising leading compound for further drug design due to its inherent specific recognition of the G-T mismatch. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  17. Participation of gene RAD54 in the repair of DNA damages induced by #betta#-rays in cells od Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachenko, V.P.; Tkachenko, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    Plasmid pKM101 has been observed to sensitize Escherichia coli wild strain to gamma-radiation inactivation effect. E. coli strains with DNA A-mutation are more sensitive to ionizing radiation as compared to wild strains. The plasmid effect relative to the gamma radiation lethal effect does not depend on the plasmid position in respect to the chromosome (autonomous or integrated), which makes it different from the plasmid effect relative to the UV-radiation inactivation - and mutagenic effect. The plasmid pKM101 sensitization of DNA A-strains to gamma-radiation is negligible The gamma-radiation induction of reversions in E. coli wild strain and DNA A-strain to independence of tryptophan is completely dependent on the pKM101 plasmid presence. As in the case of UV-irradiation, the induction of mutants in DNA A-strains by gamma-radiation is possible only if the plasmid has not been integrated into the chromosome before the irradiation

  18. Mechanism of replication of ultraviolet-irradiated single-stranded DNA by DNA polymerase III holoenzyme of Escherichia coli. Implications for SOS mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livneh, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Replication of UV-irradiated oligodeoxynucleotide-primed single-stranded phi X174 DNA with Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III holoenzyme in the presence of single-stranded DNA-binding protein was investigated. The extent of initiation of replication on the primed single-stranded DNA was not altered by the presence of UV-induced lesions in the DNA. The elongation step exhibited similar kinetics when either unirradiated or UV-irradiated templates were used. Inhibition of the 3'----5' proofreading exonucleolytic activity of the polymerase by dGMP or by a mutD mutation did not increase bypass of pyrimidine photodimers, and neither did purified RecA protein influence the extent of photodimer bypass as judged by the fraction of full length DNA synthesized. Single-stranded DNA-binding protein stimulated bypass since in its absence the fraction of full length DNA decreased 5-fold. Termination of replication at putative pyrimidine dimers involved dissociation of the polymerase from the DNA, which could then reinitiate replication at other available primer templates. Based on these observations a model for SOS-induced UV mutagenesis is proposed

  19. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on the rate and sequence of DNA replication in synchronized Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyn, R.E.; Hewitt, R.R.; Thomson, L.F.; Humphrey, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet light (uv) irradiation on the rate of DNA replication in synchronized Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were investigated. A technique for measuring semiconservative DNA replication was employed that involved growing the cells in medium containing 5-bromodeoxyuridine and subsequently determining the amount of DNA that acquired hybrid buoyant density in CsCl density gradients. One of the advantages of this technique was that it allowed a characterization of the extent of DNA replication as well as rate after irradiation. It was found that while there was a dose-dependent reduction in the rate of DNA replication following uv-irradiation, doses of up to 10 J/m 2 (which produce many dimers per replicon) did not prevent the ultimate replication of the entire genome. Hence, we conclude that dimers cannot be absolute blocks to DNA replication. In order to account for the total genome replication observed, a mechanism must exist that allows genome replication between dimers. The degree of reduction in the rate of replication by uv was the same whether the cells were irradiated at the Gl-S boundary or 1 h into S-phase. Previous work had shown that cells in early S-phase are considerably more sensitive to uv than cells at the G1-S boundary. Experiments specifically designed to test for reiterative replication showed that uv does not induce a second round of DNA replication within the same S-phase

  20. Nucleotide Sequences and Comparison of Two Large Conjugative Plasmids from Different Campylobacter species

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Batchelor, Roger A; Pearson, Bruce M; Friis, Lorna M; Guerry, Patricia; Wells, Jerry M

    2004-01-01

    .... Both plasmids are mosaic in structure, having homologues of genes found in a variety of different commensal and pathogenic bacteria, but nevertheless, showed striking similarities in DNA sequence...

  1. Binding of antibodies to dsDNA by UVB-irradiated spermatozoa in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollina, U; Schaarschmidt, H; Thiel, W; Knopf, B

    1986-08-01

    Human spermatozoa were exposed to monochromatic UVB light (300 nm) at a dosage range from 1-10/sup 3/ J/m/sup 2/ (xenon-mercury short-arc lamp) and 10/sup -2/-10/sup -1/ J/m/sup 2/ (xenon lamp). UVB irradiation >= 10 J/m/sup 2/ resulted in a subsequent binding of antibodies to double-stranded (ds) DNA. A strong homogeneous head fluorescence was visible. There was no immunoglobulin class restriction. The results were discussed in regards to lupus antigen expression by UV light.

  2. Influence on DNA repair inhibitors on dominant lethal factors after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engl, D.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were performed in order to test the hypothesis of a correlation between ionizing radiation and DNA repair inhibition under in vivo conditions. In a biometrically planned dominant lethal test on mice, the repair inhibition on the male gametes by butazolidine, TWEEN 80 and vitamin A was studied after gamma irradiation at 20 rad/10 min. No effect was observed in the case of butazolidine and TWEEN 80, whereas the influence of a high concentration of vitamin A (1 million IE/kg) was just at the statistical significancy threshold. (G.G.)

  3. Role of gene 59 of bacteriophage T4 in repair of uv-irradiated and alkylated DNA in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, R.; Wu, J.L.; Yeh, Y.C.

    1975-01-01

    Nonsense mutants in gene 59 (amC5, am HL628) were used to study the role of this gene in the repair of uv-damaged and alkylated DNA of bacteriophage T4 in vivo. The higher sensitivity to uv irradiation and alkylation of gene 59 mutants after exposure to these agents was established by a comparison of the survival fractions with wild type. Zonal centrifugal analysis of both parental and nascent mutant intracellular DNA molecules after uv irradiation showed that immediately after exposure the size of single-stranded DNA fragments was the same as the wild-type intracellular DNA. However, the capability of rejoining fragmented intracellular DNA was greatly reduced in the mutant. In contrast, the wild-type-infected cells under the same condition resumed DNA replication and repaired its DNA to normal size. Methyl methanesulfonate induced more randomly fragmented intracellular DNA, when compared to uv irradiation. The rate of rejoining under these conditions as judged from their sedimentation profiles was also greatly reduced in mutant-infected cells. Further evidence is presented that uv repair is not a simple consequence of arrested DNA replication, which is a phenotype of the mutant when infected in a nonpermissive host, Escherichia coli B(su - ), but rather that the DNA repair function of gene 59 is independent of the replication function. These and other data presented indicate that a product(s) of gene 59 is essential for both repair of uv lesions and repair of alkylation damage of DNA in vivo. It is suggested that gene 59 may have two functions during viral development: DNA replication and replication repair of DNA molecules

  4. Roles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerases Poleta and Polzeta in response to irradiation by simulated sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozmin, Stanislav G; Pavlov, Youri I; Kunkel, Thomas A; Sage, Evelyne

    2003-08-01

    Sunlight causes lesions in DNA that if unrepaired and inaccurately replicated by DNA polymerases yield mutations that result in skin cancer in humans. Two enzymes involved in translesion synthesis (TLS) of UV-induced photolesions are DNA polymerase eta (Poleta) and polymerase zeta (Polzeta), encoded by the RAD30A and REV3 genes, respectively. Previous studies have investigated the TLS roles of these polymerases in human and yeast cells irradiated with monochromatic, short wavelength UVC radiation (254 nm). However, less is known about cellular responses to solar radiation, which is of higher and mixed wavelengths (310-1100 nm) and produces a different spectrum of DNA lesions, including Dewar photoproducts and oxidative lesions. Here we report on the comparative cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of simulated sunlight (SSL) and UVC radiation on yeast wild-type, rad30Delta, rev3Delta and rev3Delta rad30Delta strains. The results with SSL support several previous interpretations on the roles of these two polymerases in TLS of photodimers and (6-4) photoproducts derived from studies with UVC. They further suggest that Poleta participates in the non-mutagenic bypass of SSL-dependent cytosine-containing Dewar photoproducts and 8-oxoguanine, while Polzeta is mainly responsible for the mutagenic bypass of all types of Dewar photoproducts. They also suggest that in the absence of Polzeta, Poleta contributes to UVC- and SSL-induced mutagenesis, possibly by the bypass of photodimers containing deaminated cytosine.

  5. Enhanced unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated human skin explants treated with T4N5 liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarosh, D.B.; Kibitel, J.T.; Green, L.A.; Spinowitz, A.

    1991-01-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes cultured from explants of skin cancer patients, including biopsies from xeroderma pigmentosum patients, were ultraviolet light-irradiated and DNA repair synthesis was measured. Repair capacity was much lower in xeroderma pigmentosum patients than in normal patients. The extent of DNA repair replication did not decline with the age of the normal patient. Treatment with T4N5 liposomes containing a DNA repair enzyme enhanced repair synthesis in both normal and xeroderma pigmentosum keratinocytes in an irradiation- and liposome-dose dependent manner. These results provide no evidence that aging people or skin cancer patients are predisposed to cutaneous malignancy by a DNA repair deficiency, but do demonstrate that T4N5 liposomes enhance DNA repair in the keratinocytes of the susceptible xeroderma pigmentosum and skin cancer population

  6. Synthesis and structure elucidation of a copper(II) Schiff-base complex: in vitro DNA binding, pBR322 plasmid cleavage and HSA binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Ahmad, Musheer; Afzal, Mohd; Zaki, Mehvash; Bharadwaj, Parimal K

    2014-11-01

    New copper(II) complex with Schiff base ligand 4-[(2-Hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzylidene)-amino]-benzoic acid (H₂L) was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies which revealed that the complex 1 exist in a distorted octahedral environment. In vitro CT-DNA binding studies were performed by employing different biophysical technique which indicated that the 1 strongly binds to DNA in comparison to ligand via electrostatic binding mode. Complex 1 cleaves pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway and recognizes minor groove of DNA double helix. The HSA binding results showed that ligand and complex 1 has ability to quench the fluorescence emission intensity of Trp 214 residue available in the subdomain IIA of HSA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. I. Delayed inhibition of DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolmach, L.J.; Jones, R.W.; Busse, P.M.

    1977-01-01

    Treatment of HeLa S3 cells with 1 mM caffeine delays progression through G1 by 1.5 hours but causes no other detectable inhibition of cell progression; it sometimes results in a large stimulation of thymidine incorporation. When this concentration is applied to cells that have been irradiated with 1-krad doses of 220-kV x rays, there is a marked suppression of both the inhibition of DNA synthesis and G2 arrest induced by the radiation. Larger doses require higher concentrations of caffeine to suppress the inhibition of DNA synthesis. Delaying addition until the rate of synthesis is at its minimum (1.5 hours after irradiation with 1 krad) results in a slightly accelerated recovery of the rate. Treatment before or during irradiation is without effect on the inhibition. Removal of the caffeine as late as 6 hours after its addition at the time of irradiation results in a prompt inhibition in DNA synthesis that mimics that observed immediately after irradiation in the absence of caffeine. These findings raise the possibility that the depression in rate of DNA systhesis might not result from radiation damage introduced into the replicon initiation system, but rather may be an indirect consequence of damage residing elsewhere in the irradiated cell

  8. Effect of inhibition of DNA synthesis on recovery of X-irradiated L5178Y-S cells. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapiszewska, M.; Lange, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    Irradiated L5178Y-S cells (LY-S) were characterized by an exponential survival curve and the potentiation effect of split -dose irradiation. Previously it was found that in LY-S cells the reduction of DNA replicative synthesis rate affected the balance between the fixation and repair of sublethal damage (SLD) and of potentially lethal damage (PLD) in favor of repair. It was found now that a block of DNA synthesis by aphidicolin (APC), an inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha, was sufficient to protect LY-S cells from fixation of PLD and SLD induced by X-rays. Treatment with APC 0.5 μg/ml for 2 h, efficiently inhibited DNA replication (95%) with minimal effect on survival. Inhibition of DNA synthesis by combined irradiation and APC was not significantly different from APC treatment alone. The level of protection by APC was dependent on the length of time between irradiation and APC application. An opposite effect was observed when the drug treatment had preceded irradiation: The killing effect of X-ray increased. The effect of aphidicolin treatment remained even after removal of APC and was dependent on the drug concentration and time between drug removal and irradiaton. These results are interpreted as indicating that X-ray damage was fixed in LY-S cells, because of their lack of ability to maintain the nucleotide pool balance, and that fixation took place during progression through the cell cycle. (author). 6 figs., 22 refs

  9. Investigation of irradiated rats DNA in the presence of Cu(II) chelates of amino acids Schiff bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetyan, N H; Torosyan, A L; Malakyan, M; Bajinyan, S A; Haroutiunian, S G

    2016-01-01

    The new synthesized Cu(II) chelates of amino acids Schiff bases were studied as a potential radioprotectors. Male albino rats of Wistar strain were exposed to X-ray whole-body irradiation at 4.8 Gy. This dose caused 30% mortality of the animals (LD30). The survival of animals exposed to radiation after preliminary administration of 10 mg/kg Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tyrosinate)2 or Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tryptophanate)2 prior to irradiation was registered about 80 and 100% correspondingly. Using spectrophotometric melting and agarose gel electrophoresis methods, the differences between the DNA isolated from irradiated rats and rats pretreated with Cu(II) chelates were studied. The fragments of DNA with different breaks were revealed in DNA samples isolated from irradiated animals. While, the repair of the DNA structure was observed for animals pretreated with the Cu(II) chelates. The results suggested that pretreatment of the irradiated rats with Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tyrosinate)2 and Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tryptophanate)2 compounds improves the liver DNA characteristics.

  10. Differential Salt-Induced Dissociation of the p53 Protein Complexes with Circular and Linear Plasmid DNA Substrates Suggest Involvement of a Sliding Mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebest, Peter; Brázdová, Marie; Fojta, Miroslav; Pivoňková, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 2 (2015), s. 3163-3177 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2076; GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G151 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : TUMOR-SUPPRESSOR P53 * CISPLATIN -DAMAGED DNA * SUPERCOILED DNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.257, year: 2015

  11. Inhibition of DNA repair by whole body irradiation induced nitric oxide leads to higher radiation sensitivity in lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Deepak; Santosh Kumar, S.; Raghu, Rashmi; Maurya, D.K.; Sainis, K.B.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: It is well accepted that the sensitivity of mammalian cells is better following whole body irradiation (WBI) as compared to that following in vitro irradiation. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Following WBI, the lipid peroxidation and cell death were significantly higher in lymphocytes as compared to that in vitro irradiated lymphocytes. Further, WBI treatment of tumor bearing mice resulted in a significantly higher inhibition of EL-4 cell proliferation as compared to in vitro irradiation of EL-4 cells. The DNA repair was significantly slower in lymphocytes obtained from WBI treated mice as compared to that in the cells exposed to same dose of radiation in vitro. Generation of nitric oxide following irradiation and also its role in inhibition of DNA repair have been reported, hence, its levels were estimated under both WBI and in vitro irradiation conditions. Nitric oxide levels were significantly elevated in the plasma of WBI treated mice but not in the supernatant of in vitro irradiated cells. Addition of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a nitric oxide donor to in vitro irradiated cells inhibited the repair of DNA damage and sensitized cells to undergo cell death. It also enhanced the radiation-induced functional impairment of lymphocytes as evinced from suppression of mitogen-induced IL-2, IFN-γ and bcl-2 mRNA expression. Administration of N G -nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester(L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, to mice significantly protected lymphocytes against WBI-induced DNA damage and inhibited in vivo radiation-induced production of nitric oxide. Our results indicated that nitric oxide plays a role in the higher radiosensitivity of lymphocytes in vivo by inhibiting repair of DNA damage

  12. Effect of low dose pre-irradiation on DNA damage and genetic material damage caused by high dosage of cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hongsheng; Zhu Jingjuan; Shang Qingjun; Wang Zhuomin; Cui Fuxian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose γ-rays pre-irradiation on the induction of DNA damage and genetic material damage in peripheral lymphocytes by high dosage of cyclophosphamide (CTX). Methods: Male Kunming strain mice were randomly divided into five groups: control group, sham-irradiated group, low dose irradiated group(LDR group), cyclophosphamide chemotherapy group(CTX group) and low dose irradiation combined with chemotherapy group(LDR + CTX group). After being feeded for one week, all the mice were implanted subcutaneously with S180 cells in the left groin (control group excluded). On days 8 and 11, groups of LDR and LDR + CTX were administered with 75 mGy of whole-body irradiation, 30 h later groups CTX and LDR + CTX were injected intraperitoneally 3.0 mg cyclophosphamide. All the mice were sacrificed on day 13. DNA damage of the peripheral lymphocytes was analyzed using single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Genetic material damage was analyzed using micronucleus frequency(MNF) of polychromatoerythrocytes(PCE) in bone marrow. Results: (1) Compared with control group and sham-irradiated group, the DNA damage of peripheral lymphocytes in CTX group were increased significantly (P 0.05). Conclusions: (1) High- dosage of CTX chemotherapy can cause DNA damage in peripheral lymphocytes. 75 mGy y-irradiation before chemotherapy may have certain protective effect on DNA damage. (2) CTX has potent mutagenic effect, giving remarkable rise to MNF of PCE. 75 mGy γ-ray pre-irradiation has not obvious protection against genetic toxicity of high-dose CTX chemotherapy. (authors)

  13. Comparative proteomics reveals key proteins recruited at the nucleoid of Deinococcus after irradiation-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouthier de la Tour, Claire; Passot, Fanny Marie; Toueille, Magali; Servant, Pascale; Sommer, Suzanne; Mirabella, Boris; Blanchard, Laurence; Groot, Arjan de; Guerin, Philippe; Armengaud, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The nucleoids of radiation-resistant Deinococcus species show a high degree of compaction maintained after ionizing irradiation. We identified proteins recruited after irradiation in nucleoids of Deinococcus radiodurans and Deinococcus deserti by means of comparative proteomics. Proteins in nucleoid-enriched fractions from unirradiated and irradiated Deinococcus were identified and semi quantified by shotgun proteomics. The ssDNA-binding protein SSB, DNA gyrase subunits GyrA and GyrB, DNA topoisomerase I, RecA recombinase, UvrA excinuclease, RecQ helicase, DdrA, DdrB, and DdrD proteins were found in significantly higher amounts in irradiated nucleoids of both Deinococcus species. We observed, by immunofluorescence microscopy, the subcellular localization of these proteins in D. radiodurans, showing for the first time the recruitment of the DdrD protein into the D. radiodurans nucleoid. We specifically followed the kinetics of recruitment of RecA, DdrA, and DdrD to the nucleoid after irradiation. Remarkably, RecA proteins formed irregular filament-like structures 1 h after irradiation, before being redistributed throughout the cells by 3 h post-irradiation. Comparable dynamics of DdrD localization were observed, suggesting a possible functional interaction between RecA and DdrD. Several proteins involved in nucleotide synthesis were also seen in higher quantities in the nucleoids of irradiated cells, indicative of the existence of a mechanism for orchestrating the presence of proteins involved in DNA metabolism in nucleoids in response to massive DNA damage. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD00196. (authors)

  14. Ultrasonic irradiation enhanced the ability of Fluorescein-DA-Fe(III) on sonodynamic and sonocatalytic damages of DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiong; Chen, Xia; Jia, Lizhen; Wang, Yi; Sun, Ying; Huang, Xingjun; Shen, Yuxiang; Wang, Jun

    2017-11-01

    The interaction of DNA with Bis [N,N-bis (carboxymethyl) aminomethyl] fluorescein-Ferrous(III) (Fluorescein-DA-Fe(III)) with dual functional (sonodynamic and sonocatalytic) activity was studied by UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and viscosity measurements. And then, the damage of DNA caused by Fluorescein-DA-Fe(III) under ultrasonic irradiation (US) was researched by agarose gel electrophoresis and cytotoxicity assay. Meanwhile, some influenced factors such as ultrasonic irradiation time and Fluorescein-DA-Fe(III) concentration on the damage degree of DNA molecules were also examined. As a control, for Bis [N,N-bis (carboxymethyl) aminomethyl] fluorescein (Fluorescein-DA), the same experiments were carried out. The results showed that both Fluorescein-DA-Fe(III) and Fluorescein-DA can interact with DNA molecules. Under ultrasonic irradiation, Fluorescein-DA shows sonodynamic activity, which can damage DNA molecules. While, in the presence of Fe(III) ion, the Fluorescein-DA-Fe(III) displays not only sonodynamic activity but also sonocatalytic activity under ultrasonic irradiation, which injures DNA more serious than Fluorescein-DA. The researches confirmed the dual function (sonodynamic activity and sonocatalytic activity) of Fluorescein-DA-Fe(III) and expanded the usage of Fluorescein-DA-Fe(III) as a sonosensitizer in sonodynamic therapy (SDT). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chondroitin sulfate-polyethylenimine copolymer-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as an efficient magneto-gene carrier for microRNA-encoding plasmid DNA delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yu-Lun; Chou, Han-Lin; Liao, Zi-Xian; Huang, Shih-Jer; Ke, Jyun-Han; Liu, Yu-Sheng; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Wang, Li-Fang

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNA-128 (miR-128) is an attractive therapeutic molecule with powerful glioblastoma regulation properties. However, miR-128 lacks biological stability and leads to poor delivery efficacy in clinical applications. In our previous study, we demonstrated two effective transgene carriers, including polyethylenimine (PEI)-decorated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as well as chemically-conjugated chondroitin sulfate-PEI copolymers (CPs). In this contribution, we report optimized conditions for coating CPs onto the surfaces of SPIONs, forming CPIOs, for magneto-gene delivery systems. The optimized weight ratio of the CPs and SPIONs is 2 : 1, which resulted in the formation of a stable particle as a good transgene carrier. The hydrodynamic diameter of the CPIOs is ~136 nm. The gel electrophoresis results demonstrate that the weight ratio of CPIO/DNA required to completely encapsulate pDNA is >=3. The in vitro tests of CPIO/DNA were done in 293 T, CRL5802, and U87-MG cells in the presence and absence of an external magnetic field. The magnetofection efficiency of CPIO/DNA was measured in the three cell lines with or without fetal bovine serum (FBS). CPIO/DNA exhibited remarkably improved gene expression in the presence of the magnetic field and 10% FBS as compared with a gold non-viral standard, PEI/DNA, and a commercial magnetofection reagent, PolyMag/DNA. In addition, CPIO/DNA showed less cytotoxicity than PEI/DNA and PolyMag/DNA against the three cell lines. The transfection efficiency of the magnetoplex improved significantly with an assisted magnetic field. In miR-128 delivery, a microRNA plate array and fluorescence in situ hybridization were used to demonstrate that CPIO/pMIRNA-128 indeed expresses more miR-128 with the assisted magnetic field than without. In a biodistribution test, CPIO/Cy5-DNA showed higher accumulation at the tumor site where an external magnet is placed nearby.MicroRNA-128 (miR-128) is an attractive therapeutic molecule

  16. Application of methylation in improving plasmid transformation into Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huilin; Xu, Linlin; Rong, Qianyu; Xu, Zheng; Ding, Yunfei; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Yulong; Li, Boqing; Ji, Xiaofei

    2018-05-23

    Helicobacter pylori is an important gastrointestinal pathogen. Its strains possess different levels of powerful restriction modification systems, which are significant barriers to genetic tools used for studying the role of functional genes in its pathogenesis. Methylating vectors in vitro was reported as an alternative to overcome this barrier in several bacteria. In this study we used two H. pylori-E. coli shuttle plasmids and several single/double-crossover homologous recombination gene-targeting plasmids, to test the role of methylation in H. pylori transformation. According to our results, transformants could be obtained only after shuttle plasmids were methylated before transformation. It is helpful in gene complementation and over-expression although at a low frequency. The frequency of gene-targeting transformation was also increased after methylation, especially for the single-crossover recombination plasmids, the transformants of which could only be obtained after methylation. For the double-crossover recombination targeting plasmids, the initial yield of transformants was 0.3-0.8 × 10 2 CFUs per microgram plasmid DNA. With the help of methylation, the yield was increased to 0.4-1.3 × 10 2 CFUs per microgram plasmid DNA. These results suggest that in vitro methylation can improve H. pylori transformation by different plasmids, which will benefit the pathogenic mechanism research. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine protects thyroid cells against DNA damage induced by external and internal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, Tomomi; Shimamura, Mika; Nagayama, Yuji

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and micronuclei (MN) induced by internal and external irradiation using a rat thyroid cell line PCCL3. In internal irradiation experiments, ROS and DSB levels increased immediately after 131 I addition and then gradually declined, resulting in very high levels of MN at 24 and 48 h. NAC administration both pre- and also post- 131 I addition suppressed ROS, DSB and MN. In external irradiation experiments with a low dose (0.5 Gy), ROS and DSB increased shortly and could be prevented by NAC administration pre-, but not post-irradiation. In contrast, external irradiation with a high dose (5 Gy) increased ROS and DSB in a bimodal way: ROS and DSB levels increased immediately after irradiation, quickly returned to the basal levels and gradually rose again after >24 h. The second phase was in parallel with an increase in 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal. The number of MN induced by the second wave of ROS/DSB elevations was much higher than that by the first peak. In this situation, NAC administered pre- and post-irradiation comparably suppressed MN induced by a delayed ROS elevation. In conclusion, a prolonged ROS increase during internal irradiation and a delayed ROS increase after external irradiation with a high dose caused serious DNA damage, which were efficiently prevented by NAC. Thus, NAC administration even both after internal or external irradiation prevents ROS increase and eventual DNA damage.

  18. Transient and stable expression of marker genes in cotransformed Petunia protoplasts in relation to X-ray and UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benediktsson, I.; Köhler, F.; Schieder, O.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation of protoplasts with X-rays or ultraviolet light does not seem to influence the level of transient expression of foreign DNA in Petunia protoplasts, whereas the number of stably transformed colonies is significantly raised. This may indicate that irradiation influences integration and/or the expression of marker genes and does not result in enhanced uptake rates of plasmids into protoplasts and cell nuclei. Co-transformation with plasmids carrying a gene for kanamycin resistance (neomycin phosphotransferase II) and a gene for hygromycin resistance (hygromycin phosphotransferase) revealed that the cotransformation rates were not stimulated by irradiation when measuring expression

  19. Damage to plasmid DNA produced by 60Co-gamma radiation and subsequent repair processes in E. coli with and without SOS induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bien, M.

    1986-01-01

    This study was carried out to provide information on the question as to whether radiation-induced separation of double-stranded DNA in E. coli is followed by repair processes leading to the formation of replicable material. For the detection of those double-strand breaks, E. coli was first transformed using enzymatically linearised dBR 322-DNA. This served as a reference standard to compare the transformations using radiated DNA. DNA was either exposed to increasing doses of 60 Co-gamma radiation or separated into one oc-fraction and one lin-fraction following exposure to 30 Gy. The DNA samples thus obtained were then used to transform three different strains of E. coli (wild strain, SFX, SFXrecA - ). In order to improve the repair yield, the cells were additionally SOS-induced using ultraviolet radiation. The mutation rates were a measure of the number of errors occurring during the various repair processes. Restriction analysis was carried out to characterise the resulting mutants in greater detail. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Ternary complex of plasmid DNA with NLS-Mu-Mu protein and cationic niosome for biocompatible and efficient gene delivery: a comparative study with protamine and lipofectamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematollahi, Mohammad Hadi; Torkzadeh-Mahanai, Masoud; Pardakhty, Abbas; Ebrahimi Meimand, Hossein Ali; Asadikaram, Gholamreza

    2017-10-28

    Non-viral gene delivery methods are considered due to safety and simplicity in human gene therapy. Since the use of cationic peptide and niosome represent a promising approach for gene delivery purposes we used recombinant fusion protein and cationic niosome as a gene carrier. A multi-domain fusion protein including nuclear localization motif (NLS) and two DNA-binding (Mu) domains, namely NLS-Mu-Mu (NMM) has been designed, cloned and expressed in E. coli DE3 strain. Afterward, the interested protein was purified by affinity chromatography. Binary vectors based on protein/DNA and ternary vectors based on protein/DNA/niosome were prepared. Protamine was used as a control. DNA condensing properties of NMM and protamine were evaluated by various experiments. Furthermore, we examined cytotoxicity, hemolysis and transfection potential of the binary and ternary complexes in HEK293T and MCF-7 cell lines. Protamine and Lipofectamine™2000 were used as positive controls, correspondingly. The recombinant NMM was expressed and purified successfully and DNA was condensed efficiently at charge ratios that were not harmful to cells. Peptidoplexes showed transfection efficiency (TE) but ternary complexes had higher TE. Additionally, NMM ternary complex was more efficient compared to protamine ternary vectors. Our results showed that niosomal ternary vector of NMM is a promising non-viral gene carrier to achieve an effective and safe carrier system for gene therapy.

  1. Hypothermia postpones DNA damage repair in irradiated cells and protects against cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, Brandon J.; Dickey, Jennifer S.; Nakamura, Asako J.; Redon, Christophe E.; Parekh, Palak; Griko, Yuri V.; Aziz, Khaled; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Bonner, William M.; Martin, Olga A.

    2011-01-01

    Hibernation is an established strategy used by some homeothermic organisms to survive cold environments. In true hibernation, the core body temperature of an animal may drop to below 0 o C and metabolic activity almost cease. The phenomenon of hibernation in humans is receiving renewed interest since several cases of victims exhibiting core body temperatures as low as 13.7 o C have been revived with minimal lasting deficits. In addition, local cooling during radiotherapy has resulted in normal tissue protection. The experiments described in this paper were prompted by the results of a very limited pilot study, which showed a suppressed DNA repair response of mouse lymphocytes collected from animals subjected to 7-Gy total body irradiation under hypothermic (13 o C) conditions, compared to normothermic controls. Here we report that human BJ-hTERT cells exhibited a pronounced radioprotective effect on clonogenic survival when cooled to 13 o C during and 12 h after irradiation. Mild hypothermia at 20 and 30 o C also resulted in some radioprotection. The neutral comet assay revealed an apparent lack on double strand break (DSB) rejoining at 13 o C. Extension of the mouse lymphocyte study to ex vivo-irradiated human lymphocytes confirmed lower levels of induced phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) and persistence of the lesions at hypothermia compared to the normal temperature. Parallel studies of radiation-induced oxidatively clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs) revealed partial repair at 13 o C compared to the rapid repair at 37 o C. For both γ-H2AX foci and OCDLs, the return of lymphocytes to 37 o C resulted in the resumption of normal repair kinetics. These results, as well as observations made by others and reviewed in this study, have implications for understanding the radiobiology and protective mechanisms underlying hypothermia and potential opportunities for exploitation in terms of protecting normal tissues against radiation.

  2. Plasmid-mediated UV-protection in Streptococcus lactis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopin, M.C.; Rouault, A. (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Rennes (France). Lab. de Recherches de Technologie Laitiere); Moillo-Batt, A. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), Hopital de Pontchaillon, 35 - Rennes (France))

    1985-02-01

    Streptococcus lactis strain IL594 contains 9 plasmids, designated pIL1 to pIL9. On the basis of protoplast-induced curing experiments the authors showed that derivatives containing pIL7 were resistant to UV-irradiation while derivatives lacking pIL7 were sensitive. The pIL7-determined UV-protection was confirmed by co-transfer of the plasmid and of the character into a plasmid-free derivative of S. lactis IL594. Moreover, prophage induction required higher UV-fluence in this derivative carrying pIL7 than in the plasmid-free strain. This is the first report of a plasmid-mediated UV-protection in group N streptococci.

  3. Plasmid-mediated UV-protection in Streptococcus lactis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopin, M.-C.; Rouault, A.

    1985-01-01

    Streptococcus lactis strain IL594 contains 9 plasmids, designated pIL1 to pIL9. On the basis of protoplast-induced curing experiments the authors showed that derivatives containing pIL7 were resistant to UV-irradiation while derivatives lacking pIL7 were sensitive. The pIL7-determined UV-protection was confirmed by cotransfer of the plasmid and of the character into a plasmid-free derivative of S. lactis IL594. Moreover, prophage induction required higher UV-fluence in this derivative carrying pIL7 than in the plasmid-free strain. This is the first report of a plasmid-mediated UV-protection in group N streptococci. (orig.)

  4. Yeast transformation mediated by Agrobacterium strains harboring an Ri plasmid: comparative study between GALLS of an Ri plasmid and virE of a Ti plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shinji; Sato, Yukari; Momota, Naoto; Tanaka, Katsuyuki; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2012-07-01

    Agrobacterium strains containing a Ti plasmid can transfer T-DNA not only to plants but also to fungi, including the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, no Agrobacterium strain harboring an Ri plasmid has been evaluated in fungal transformation. Some Ri plasmids have GALLS , instead of virE1 and virE2. GALLS protein can functionally substitute in plant transformation for a structurally different protein VirE2. In this study, we compared the yeast transformation ability among Agrobacterium donors: a strain containing a Ti plasmid, strains harboring either an agropine-type or a mikimopine-type Ri plasmid, and a strain having a modified Ri plasmid supplemented with a Ti plasmid type virE operon. Agrobacterium strains possessing GALLS transformed yeast cells far less efficiently than the strain containing virE operon. Production of GALLS in recipient yeast cells improved the yeast transformation mediated by an Agrobacterium strain lacking neither GALLS nor virE operon. A reporter assay to detect mobilization of the proteins fused with Cre recombinase revealed that VirE2 protein is much more abundant in yeast cells than GALLS. Based on these results, we concluded that the low yeast transformability mediated by Agrobacterium strains having the Ri plasmid is because of low amount of mobilized GALLS in yeast cells. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Replication of UV-irradiated single-stranded DNA by DNA polymerase III holoenzyme of Escherichia coli: evidence for bypass of pyrimidine photodimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livneh, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Replication of UV-irradiated circular single-stranded phage M13 DNA by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6) and DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (EC 2.7.7.7) in the presence of single-stranded DNA binding protein yielded full-length as well as partially replicated products. A similar result was obtained with phage G4 DNA primed with E. coli DNA primase, and phage phi X174 DNA primed with a synthetic oligonucleotide. The fraction of full-length DNA was several orders of magnitude higher than predicted if pyrimidine photodimers were to constitute absolute blocks to DNA replication. Recent models have suggested that pyrimidine photodimers are absolute blocks to DNA replication and that SOS-induced proteins are required to allow their bypass. Our results demonstrate that, under in vitro replication conditions, E. coli DNA polymerase III holoenzyme can insert nucleotides opposite pyrimidine dimers to a significant extent, even in the absence of SOS-induced proteins

  6. Application of EPR spectrometry, thermoluminescence, analyses of DNA damage and germination power for detection of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malec-Czechowska, K.; Stachowicz, W.; Dancewicz, A.M.; Szot, Z.

    1999-01-01

    The results of our own detection of irradiation in various foods: meat, poultry, fishes, spices, dried fruits, mushrooms, crops, fresh fruits and food additives are presented. The techniques for detection whether foods have been irradiated or not, such as EPR spectrometry, thermoluminescence (TL), DNA damage by ''comet'' method and ability for germination of grains has been discussed. The applicability of particular technique to specific foodstuffs has been indicated. (author)

  7. Effect of gamma irradiation on DNA and nucleohistone in vitro under physiological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, S.N.; Lazar Mathew, T.

    2000-01-01

    Pentose sugar and histones have been shown to deplete from DNA and nucleohistone (DNH) on gamma irradiation in a dose-dependent and biphasic manner in EDTA buffer while depletion of inorganic phosphorus (Pi) is a linear function of dose. In DNA, the depletion of sugar is more compared to that of Pi for 100 Gy. In DNH for 100 Gy the order of depletion is histone > sugar > Pi. With 0.9% sodium chloride as solvent, for a total dose of 100 Gy, variation in the amount of sugar and protein depletion were observed when the dose rates were varied. From DNH at higher dose rate of radiation (i.e. 2.92 Gy/sec), sugar depletion was 4 times and total histone depletion was 2.5 times than that for lower dose rate (i.e. 0.0156 Gy/sec). Pi depletion was found to be not dependent upon dose rate. Percentage hyperchromicity and hyperfluorophoricity for DNH decreased with increase in concentration both in 0.9% sodium chloride and standard saline citrate in the pH range 6.14 to 7.67, the values being higher in the former than in latter. DNA also showed consistent hyperchromicity with increase radiation dose in EDTA buffer at ionic strength of 2.00. (author)

  8. DNA Damage in Melania Snail (Semisulcospira libertine) Irradiated with Gamma Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); An, Kwang Guk [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nili, Mohammad [Dawnesh Radiation Research Institute, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    Generally radiological protection has focused on human. But International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) requires the effect data of ionizing radiation on nonhuman biota for the radiological protection of the environment. The choice of a melania snail as a model for environmental biomonitoring of radiation genotoxicity took into account that invertebrates represent one of aquatic species. The comet assay or single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay, first introduced by Ostling and Johanson, was used to detect DNA single strand breaks and to investigate the application of this technique as a tool for aquatic biomonitoring. Comet assay offers considerable advantages over some other assays used in DNA damage detection, such as chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid Exchange and the micronucleus test, since there is no need for cells to be in a dividing state. Other advantages are its rapidity, relatively low coast, and wide applicability to virtually any nucleated cell type. In this study, we evaluated DNA damage in cells of Semisulcospira libertina after irradiation with {sup 60}Co gamma radiation by using the comet assay

  9. Induction of UV photoproducts and DNA damage by solar simulator UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfreys, A.; Henderson, L.; Clingen, P.

    1997-01-01

    The recent increased incidence of skin cancer and the depletion of the ozone layer has increased interest in the ultraviolet (UV) component of natural sunlight and its role in the induction of skin cancer. Previous research on UV radiation has concentrated on UVC (254nm) but, as only UVB and UVA are present in natural sunlight, its relevance is unknown. We have investigated the induction of two forms of direct DNA damage - the pyrimidine dimer and the (6-4) photoproduct - in human DNA repair deficient XP-G (Xeroderma pigmentosum group G) lymphoblastoid cells following exposure to simulated sunlight. As exposure to natural sunlight is highly variable, a solar simulator lamp was used which is known to mimic natural sunlight at midday in Central Europe. Cells were irradiated on ice to minimise DNA repair and the relative induction of pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts was measured using specific monoclonal antibodies and a computer assisted image analysis system. A time dependent increase in both cyclobutane dimer and (6-4) photoproduct antibody binding sites was seen. The increases in pyrimidine dimer and (6-4) photoproduct antibody binding sites differed to that reported with natural sunlight in the UK but was similar to that seen with a similar solar simulator lamp

  10. Base residue release from 3H-thymine labeled DNA in irradiated E. coli under conditions of enzyme inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, R.C.; Zimbrick, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    E. coli C and E. coli K12 cells were incorporated with ( 3 H-C-6)-thymine, irradiated with 60 Co-gamma rays, and then variously treated with EDTA and lysed with sodium lauryl sulfate. The 3 H-material released from DNA was then measured by Sephadex G-10 gel filtration. Because the focus of this work was the examination of the radiolytic lesions within the DNA, an attempt was made to exclude enzymatic contributions to in vivo product yields from these cells which were irradiated in the presence and absence of O 2

  11. Study of serotonin effect on the yield of some damages in DNA after ultraviolet and x-ray irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, Eh.V.; Frajkin, G.Ya.

    1985-01-01

    Using thin-layer two-dimensional chromatography serotonin effect on the yield of thymine dimers and appearance of n-glycoside strand breaks in DNA (thymine yield) after ultraviolet and X-ray irradiation is studied. It is shown that bound with DNA serotonin decreases formation of induced by ultraviolet thymine dimers but doesn't affect on the quantity of N-glycoside bond breaks in thymidine residues caused by X radiation. The obtained data are discussed in relation to the problem on mechanisms of realization of serotonin protective effect in the processes of yeast Saccharomyces photoprotection from ultraviolet and X-ray irradiation lethal effect

  12. Alkali-labile sites and post-irradiation effects in single-stranded DNA induced by H radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, M.V.M.; Heuvel, N. van; Woldhuis, J.; Loman, H.

    1978-01-01

    Single-stranded phiX174 DNA in aqueous solutions has been irradiated in the absence of oxygen, under conditions in which H radicals react with the DNA. It was shown that H radical reactions result in breaks, which contribute approximately 10 per cent inactivation. Further, two types of alkali-labile sites were formed. One was lethal and gave rise to single-strand breaks by alkali and was most probably identical with post-irradiation heat damage and contributed about 33 per cent to the inactivation mentioned above. The other consisted of non-lethal damage, partly dihydropyrimidine derivatives, and was converted to lethal damage by alkali. This followed from experiments in which the DNA was treated with osmium-tetroxide, which oxidized thymine to 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine. Treatment with alkali of this DNA gave the same temperature dependence as found for the non-lethal alkali-labile sites in irradiated DNA. A similar temperature dependence was found for dihydrothymine and irradiated pyrimidines with alkali. (author)

  13. DNA preservation in silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yawen; Zheng, Zhaozhu; Gong, He; Liu, Meng; Guo, Shaozhe; Li, Gang; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kaplan, David L

    2017-06-27

    The structure of DNA is susceptible to alterations at high temperature and on changing pH, irradiation and exposure to DNase. Options to protect and preserve DNA during storage are important for applications in genetic diagnosis, identity authentication, drug development and bioresearch. In the present study, the stability of total DNA purified from human dermal fibroblast cells, as well as that of plasmid DNA, was studied in silk protein materials. The DNA/silk mixtures were stabilized on filter paper (silk/DNA + filter) or filter paper pre-coated with silk and treated with methanol (silk/DNA + PT-filter) as a route to practical utility. After air-drying and water extraction, 50-70% of the DNA and silk could be retrieved and showed a single band on electrophoretic gels. 6% silk/DNA + PT-filter samples provided improved stability in comparison with 3% silk/DNA + filter samples and DNA + filter samples for DNA preservation, with ∼40% of the band intensity remaining at 37 °C after 40 days and ∼10% after exposure to UV light for 10 hours. Quantitative analysis using the PicoGreen assay confirmed the results. The use of Tris/borate/EDTA (TBE) buffer enhanced the preservation and/or extraction of the DNA. The DNA extracted after storage maintained integrity and function based on serving as a functional template for PCR amplification of the gene for zinc finger protein 750 (ZNF750) and for transgene expression of red fluorescence protein (dsRed) in HEK293 cells. The high molecular weight and high content of a crystalline beta-sheet structure formed on the coated surfaces likely accounted for the preservation effects observed for the silk/DNA + PT-filter samples. Although similar preservation effects were also obtained for lyophilized silk/DNA samples, the rapid and simple processing available with the silk-DNA-filter membrane system makes it appealing for future applications.

  14. Magnesium-DNA interactions and the possible relation of magnesium to carcinogenesis. Irradiation and free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassopoulou, J; Theophanides, T

    2002-04-01

    Magnesium deficiency causes renal complications. The appearance of several diseases is related to its depletion in the human body. In radiotherapy, as well as in chemotherapy, especially in treatment of cancers with cis-platinum, hypomagnesaemia is observed. The site effects of chemotherapy that are due to hypomagnesaemia are decreased using Mg supplements. The role of magnesium in DNA stabilization is concentration dependent. At high concentrations there is an accumulation of Mg binding, which induces conformational changes leading to Z-DNA, while at low concentration there is deficiency and destabilization of DNA. The biological and clinical consequences of abnormal concentrations are DNA cleavage leading to diseases and cancer. Carcinogenesis and cell growth are also magnesium-ion concentration dependent. Several reports point out that the interaction of magnesium in the presence of other metal ions showed that there is synergism with Li and Mn, but there is magnesium antagonism in DNA binding with the essential metal ions in the order: Zn>Mg>Ca. In the case of toxic metals such as Cd, Ga and Ni there is also antagonism for DNA binding. It was found from radiolysis of deaerated aqueous solutions of the nucleoside 5'-guanosine monophosphate (5'-GMP) in the presence as well as in the absence of magnesium ions that, although the addition of hydroxyl radicals (*OH) has been increased by 2-fold, the opening of the imidazole ring of the guanine base was prevented. This effect was due to the binding of Mg2+ ions to N7 site of the molecule by stabilizing the five-member ring imitating cis-platinum. It was also observed using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and Fast Atom Bombardment mass spectrometry that *OH radicals subtract H atoms from the C1', C4' and C5' sites of the nucleotide. Irradiation of 5'-GMP in the presence of oxygen (2.5 x 10(-4) M) shows that magnesium is released from the complex. There is spectroscopic evidence that

  15. Inhibition of in vitro SV40 DNA replication by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, G.; Wood, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage was found to inhibit SV40 origin-dependent DNA synthesis carried out by soluble humancell extracts. Replication of SV40-based plasmids was reduced to approx. 35% of that in unirradiated controls after irradiation with 50-100 J/m 2 germicidal ultraviolet light, where an average of 3-6 pyrimidine dimer photoproducts were formed per plasmid circle. Inhibition of the DNA helicase activity of T antigen (required for initiation of replication in the in vitro system) was also investigated, and was only significant after much higher fluences, 1000-5000 J/m 2 . The data indicate that DNA damage by ultraviolet light inhibits DNA synthesis in cell-free extracts principally by affecting components of the replication complex other than the DNA helicase activity of T antigen. The soluble system could be used to biochemically investigate the possible bypass or tolerance of DNA damage during replication (author). 21 refs.; 2 figs

  16. Study on DNA damages induced by UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan Hong Van; Dinh Ba Tuan; Tran Tuan Anh; Nguyen Thuy Ngan; Ta Bich Thuan; Vo Thi Thuong Lan; Tran Minh Quynh; Nguyen Thi Thom

    2015-01-01

    DNA damages in Escherichia coli (E. coli) exposed to UV radiation have been investigated. After 30 min of exposure to UV radiation of 5 mJ/cm"2, the growth of E. coli in LB broth medium was about only 10% in compared with non-irradiated one. This results suggested that the UV radiation caused the damages for E. coli genome resulted in reduction in its growth and survival, and those lesions can be somewhat recovered. For both solutions of plasmid DNAs and E. coli cells containing plasmid DNA, this dose also caused the breakage on single and double strands of DNA, shifted the morphology of DNA plasmid from supercoiled to circular and linear forms. The formation of pyrimidine dimers upon UV radiation significantly reduced when the DNA was irradiated in the presence of Ganoderma lucidum extract. Thus, studies on UV-induced DNA damage at molecular level are very essential to determine the UV radiation doses corresponding to the DNA damages, especially for creation and selection of useful radiation-induced mutants, as well as elucidation the protective effects of the specific compounds against UV light. (author)

  17. Effect of X-irradiation on DNA binding activity of NF-kB in EL-4 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Shujie; Jin Shunzi; Liu Shuzheng

    2002-01-01

    Changes in time course of the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB as well as the subcellular localization of p65 subunit and expression of IκBα in EL-4 cells after irradiation with 2 Gy and 0.075 Gy X-rays were examined using electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively. Results showed that the increases in DNA-binding activity of NF-κB p50/p50 and p50/p65 were induced by both 0.075 Gy and 2 Gy X-rays. However, the amplitude of the increase in activity of the two dimers was different after irradiation with the two doses of X-rays. After irradiation with 0.075 Gy, the increase in p50/p65 activity was higher than that of p50/p50 activity. After irradiation with 2 Gy, the situation was reversed. Irradiation with both 2 Gy and 0.075 Gy induced an increase in the rate of p65 nuclear translocation and the degradation of IκBα before the increase of its expression, but the degree of these changes after different dose irradiation was different. These results suggest that the transcriptional regulation of NF-κB changes with irradiation dose, resulted in the difference in responses of cells

  18. Protective effects of vitamin E on microcephaly in rats X-irradiated in utero: DNA, lipid peroxide and confronting cisternae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Harumi; Iwasaki, Setsuo; Inomata, Kenichirou; Nasu, Fumio; Nishimura, Shigeru

    1986-06-01

    Fetuses from rats given either water or 0.03% D,L-..cap alpha..-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E) as a drinking fluid and X-irradiated with 100 rad on gestational day 13 were examined on gestational day 21. Mean cerebral weight which was significantly reduced by the X-irradiation was increased by vitamin E supplementation but the level did not reach that in sham-irradiated controls. Administration of vitamin E caused an increase in DNA concentration which was significantly reduced by X-irradiation with water treatment. An increase in the mean level of lipid peroxide formation was observed in the water-treated, X-irradiated group in the sample at zero time but not in the vitamin E-treated, X-irradiated group. In the cytoplasm of fetal cerebral neurons from X-irradiated dams with vitamin E supplementation, confronting cisternae were frequently observed between two nuclear envelopes. Confronting cisternae may be considered as a repair mechanism of vitamin E against X-irradiated neuronal damage in the fetal cerebrum. This study provides evidence of the protection by vitamin E of neuronal development in X-irradiated fetuses, through its antioxidant properties, against attacks by free radicals and/or lipid peroxide. 35 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 table.

  19. Comparative Immunogenicity in Rhesus Monkeys of DNA Plasmid, Recombinant Vaccinia Virus, and Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vectors Expressing a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gag Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Casimiro, Danilo R.; Chen, Ling; Fu, Tong-Ming; Evans, Robert K.; Caulfield, Michael J.; Davies, Mary-Ellen; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Minchun; Huang, Lingyi; Harris, Virginia; Freed, Daniel C.; Wilson, Keith A.; Dubey, Sheri; Zhu, De-Min; Nawrocki, Denise

    2003-01-01

    Cellular immune responses, particularly those associated with CD3+ CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), play a primary role in controlling viral infection, including persistent infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Accordingly, recent HIV-1 vaccine research efforts have focused on establishing the optimal means of eliciting such antiviral CTL immune responses. We evaluated several DNA vaccine formulations, a modified vaccinia virus Ankara vector, and a replication-defecti...

  20. Étude des dommages induits dans l'ADN par irradiation laser X-UV à 21.2 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassou, K.; Ros, D.; Kazamias, S.; Klisnick, A.; Jamelot, G.; Guilbaud, O.; Rus, B.; Kozlová, M.; Polan, J.; Präg, A. R.; Stupka, M.; Eot-Houllier, G.; Sage, E.; Begusová, M.; Stísová, V.; Du Penhoat, M.-A. H.; Touati, A.; Chétioui, A.

    2005-06-01

    We report the preliminary result of the application of the collisional Ne-like soft x-ray laser as radiation source to induce DNA damage. The goal of this experiment was a test bed study of the damage yields induced by soft x-ray radiation in dried plasmid DNA sample. The saturated Ne-like soft x-ray laser available at the PALS facility, delivering several millijoules in a single 100 ps pulse at 21.2 nm was used to irradiate two different plasmids: pSP189 and pBS. The study is centered on the dose effect leading to single and double strand break in DNA.

  1. Formation and reparation of the AP-sites into DNA from the gamma-irradiated embryo of bombyx mori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agaev, F.A.; Gaziyev, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: It is well known that radiosensitivity of an organism is in dependence on the DNA reparation systems functioning into cells. Sharp difference in the radioresistance of silkworm embryo at different stage of growth showed by us earlier (Agaev F.A. et al, 1991) can provide to suggest that DNA reparation system into cells of 3-daily embryo (more radiosensitive stage) and 7-daily embryo (more radioresistance stage) may be functioning with various efficiency. It was shown that quantity of the AP-sites (i.e. apurine and apirimidine sites) registered into DNA of 3-daily embryo is 1,2 - 1,4 time more, that into DNA of 7-daily embryo g-irradiated at the same dozes. The increasing of the difference between the registered AP-sites into DNA of 3- and 7-daily embryo has been observed also at the increasing of the radiation doze. At the postradiation incubation of the 3- and 7- daily embryo the lowering of AP-sites quantity into DNA was observed. This fact allowed to testify that the reparation system of damages, such as DNA-apurinization and apirimidinization are functioned into these embryo cells. At the same time the rate of the AP-sites reparation into embryo cells is varied. For example, the remanent quantity of AP-sites into DNA of 7-daily embryo after 45 min of postradiation period consists of 30% those registered immediately after embryo irradiation. The remanent quantity of AP-sites into DNA of 3-daily embryo is lowered on 50%. The difference in the rate of cells reparation is keeping at the constant level irrespective of g-irradiation doze. The binding reaction between the /14 centigrade/-methoxyamine and AP-sites in DNA in vitro has been showed that the reparation time of the 50% AP-sites for 3-daily embryo is 45 min and for 7-daily embryo is 30 min in respective to registered value at once after 100 Gy irradiation doze. In spite of essential difference in the both AP-sites formation into DNA of 3- and 7-daily embryo at once after irradiation and the

  2. Structural analysis of the ParR/parC plasmid partition complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ringgaard, Simon; Mercogliano, Christopher P

    2007-01-01

    Accurate DNA partition at cell division is vital to all living organisms. In bacteria, this process can involve partition loci, which are found on both chromosomes and plasmids. The initial step in Escherichia coli plasmid R1 partition involves the formation of a partition complex between the DNA...

  3. A new optimized formulation of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles intended for gene delivery: development, characterization and DNA binding efficiency of TCERG1 expression plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fàbregas, Anna; Sánchez-Hernández, Noemí; Ticó, Josep Ramon; García-Montoya, Encarna; Pérez-Lozano, Pilar; Suñé-Negre, Josep M; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Suñé, Carlos; Miñarro, Montserrat

    2014-10-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are being considered as a new approach for therapeutics for many known diseases. In addition to drug delivery, their use as non-viral vectors for gene delivery can be achieved by the inclusion of cationic lipids, which provide a positive surface potential that favours binding to the DNA backbone. This work is based on the idea that the optimization of the components is required as the first step in simplifying the qualitative and quantitative composition of SLNs as much as possible without affecting the essential properties that define SLNs as optimal non-viral vectors for gene delivery. We selected the best lipids and surfactants in terms of particle size and zeta potential and characterized the properties of the resulting nanoparticles using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The SLNs had a particle size of approximately 120 nm and a positive surface charge of 42 mV. In addition, we analysed the main physicochemical characteristics of the bulk components of the nanoparticles using X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and mass spectrometry (MS). The suitability of the optimized SLNs for DNA binding was evaluated after the lyophilisation process using a carboxyl-terminal region of the TCERG1 gene, a human factor that has been implicated in several diseases. We show that the SLNs presented high efficiency in the binding of DNA, and importantly, they presented no toxicity when assayed in an in vivo system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. DNA replication in ultraviolet light irradiated Chinese hamster cells: the nature of replicon inhibition and post-replication repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doniger, J.

    1978-01-01

    DNA replication in ultraviolet light irradiated Chinese hamster cells was studied using techniques of DNA fiber autoradiography and alkaline sucrose sedimentation. Bidirectionally growing replicons were observed in the autoradiograms independent of the irradiation conditions. After a dose of 5 J/m 2 at 254 nm the rate of fork progression was the same as in unirradiated cells, while the rate of replication was reduced by 50%. After a dose of 10J/m 2 the rate of fork progression was reduced 40%, while the replication rate was only 25% of normal. Therefore, at low doses of ultraviolet light irradiation, the inhibition of DNA replication is due to reduction in the number of functioning replicons, while at higher doses the rate of fork progression is also slowed. Those replicons which no longer function after irradiation are blocked in fork movement rather than replicon initiation. After irradiation, pulse label was first incorporated into short nascent strands, the average size of which was approximately equal to the distance between pyrimidine dimers. Under conditions where post-replication repair occurs these short strands were eventually joined into larger pieces. Finally, the data show that slowing post-replication repair with caffeine does not slow fork movement. The results presented here support the post-replication repair model of 'gapped synthesis' and rule out a major role for 'replicative bypass'. (author)

  5. Plasmid-Mediated Antimicrobial Resistance in Staphylococci and Other Firmicutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Stefan; Shen, Jianzhong; Wendlandt, Sarah; Fessler, Andrea T; Wang, Yang; Kadlec, Kristina; Wu, Cong-Ming

    2014-12-01

    In staphylococci and other Firmicutes, resistance to numerous classes of antimicrobial agents, which are commonly used in human and veterinary medicine, is mediated by genes that are associated with mobile genetic elements. The gene products of some of these antimicrobial resistance genes confer resistance to only specific members of a certain class of antimicrobial agents, whereas others confer resistance to the entire class or even to members of different classes of antimicrobial agents. The resistance mechanisms specified by the resistance genes fall into any of three major categories: active efflux, enzymatic inactivation, and modification/replacement/protection of the target sites of the antimicrobial agents. Among the mobile genetic elements that carry such resistance genes, plasmids play an important role as carriers of primarily pl