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Sample records for plasmasphere

  1. The Plasmasphere Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Carpenter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available As an inner magnetospheric phenomenon the plasmapause region is of interest for a number of reasons, one being the occurrence there of geophysically important interactions between the plasmas of the hot plasma sheet and of the cool plasmasphere. There is a need for a conceptual framework within which to examine and discuss these interactions and their consequences, and we therefore suggest that the plasmapause region be called the Plasmasphere Boundary Layer, or PBL. Such a term has been slow to emerge because of the complexity and variability of the plasma populations that can exist near the plasmapause and because of the variety of criteria used to identify the plasmapause in experimental data. Furthermore, and quite importantly in our view, a substantial obstacle to the consideration of the plasmapause region as a boundary layer has been the longstanding tendency of textbooks on space physics to limit introductory material on the plasmapause phenomenon to zeroth order descriptions in terms of ideal MHD theory, thus implying that the plasmasphere is relatively well understood. A textbook may introduce the concept of shielding of the inner magnetosphere from perturbing convection electric fields, but attention is not usually paid to the variety of physical processes reported to occur in the PBL, such as heating, instabilities, and fast longitudinal flows, processes which must play roles in plasmasphere dynamics in concert with the flow regimes associated with the major dynamo sources of electric fields. We believe that through the use of the PBL concept in future textbook discussions of the plasmasphere and in scientific communications, much progress can be made on longstanding questions about the physics involved in the formation of the plasmapause and in the cycles of erosion and recovery of the plasmasphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; plasma convection; MHD waves and instabilities

  2. Unsolved problems in plasmasphere refilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.

    2016-02-01

    The plasmasphere is a cold (~1 eV) plasma at middle to low magnetic latitudes surrounding the Earth. Its shape is dominated by Earth's magnetic field and its cross-field motion is dominated by electric fields. It is a highly coupled part of the inner magnetosphere. Storm time conditions erode the outer plasmasphere, transporting that plasma into the dayside magnetosheath region, leaving behind a region of greatly reduced plasma density that will refill from ionospheric outflow. The processes involved in refilling remain incompletely understood. In this commentary, outstanding questions about plasmaspheric refilling are summarized in the context of recent publications.

  3. Saturn's ionosphere and plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Luke Edward

    2008-01-01

    A number of puzzling phenomena were revealed when the Voyager spacecraft flew past Saturn in 1981 to measure the ionized portions (ionosphere) of its upper atmosphere (thermosphere). Most of these issues have remained unexplained in the intervening 25 years due to a lack of conclusive observational data. With the arrival of Cassini at Saturn in July 2004, however, a new era of observations began, providing the promise of fresh evidence and demanding the development of a contemporary theoretical framework in order to re-examine old mysteries and understand new discoveries. This dissertation presents studies of Saturn's ionosphere and inner plasmasphere based on new time-dependent photochemical and diffusive transport models that solve the ion equations of continuity in one dimension. Calculations are conducted within the overall framework of a self-consistent, three-dimensional general circulation model (GCM) of Saturn's thermosphere, and the results of these studies are combined with GCM results to provide the building blocks of a new comprehensive model, the Saturn-Thermosphere- Ionosphere-Model (STIM). The one-dimensional model calculations are used to constrain and investigate a number of unresolved issues and to make testable predictions based on those investigations. Five primary topics are addressed: (1) the additional loss processes required to bring predicted electron densities into agreement with observations, (2) the discrepancy between theory and observations regarding the diurnal variation of peak electron density, (3) the effects of shadowing by Saturn's rings on its ionosphere, (4) the yet unknown electron and ion temperatures at Saturn, and (5) the ionospheric contribution to Saturn's plasmasphere. The models show that a steady influx of water into Saturn's atmosphere--from its rings or icy satellites--is required to explain observed electron densities. Additionally, the time-variability of the water source may be the cause of frequently observed

  4. Whistler Wave Energy Flow in the Plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletzing, Craig; Santolik, Ondrej; Kurth, William; Hospodarsky, George; Christopher, Ivar; Bounds, Scott

    2016-07-01

    The measured wave properties of plasmaspheric hiss are important to constrain models of the generation of hiss as well as its propagation and amplification. For example, the generation mechanism for plasmaspheric hiss has been suggested to come from one of three possible mechanisms: 1) local generation and amplification, 2) whistlers from lightning, and 3) chorus emissions which have refracted into the plasmasphere. The latter two mechanisms are external sources which produce an incoherent hiss signature as the original waves mix in a stochastic manner, propagating in both directions along the background magnetic field. In contrast, local generation of plasmaspheric hiss within the plasmasphere should produce a signature of waves propagating away from the source region. For all three mechanisms scattering of energetic particles into the loss cone transfers some energy from the particles to the waves. By examining the statistical characteristics of the Poynting flux of plasmaspheric hiss, we can determine the properties of wave energy flow in the plasmasphere. We report on the statistics of observations from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) Waves instrument on the Van Allen Probes for periods when the spacecraft is inside the plasmasphere. We find that the Poynting flux associated with plasmaspheric hiss has distinct and unexpected radial structure which shows that there can be significant energy flow towards the magnetic equator. We show the properties of this electromagnetic energy flow as a function of position and frequency.

  5. Physics-based models of the plasmasphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pierrard, Vivane [BELGIUM; Goldstein, Jerry [SWRI; Andr' e, Nicolas [ESTEC/ESA; Kotova, Galina A [SRI, RUSSIA; Lemaire, Joseph F [BELGIUM; Liemohn, Mike W [U OF MICHIGAN; Matsui, H [UNIV OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent progress in physics-based models of the plasmasphere using the Auid and the kinetic approaches. Global modeling of the dynamics and inAuence of the plasmasphere is presented. Results from global plasmasphere simulations are used to understand and quantify (i) the electric potential pattern and evolution during geomagnetic storms, and (ii) the inAuence of the plasmasphere on the excitation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (ElvIIC) waves a.nd precipitation of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere. The interactions of the plasmasphere with the ionosphere a.nd the other regions of the magnetosphere are pointed out. We show the results of simulations for the formation of the plasmapause and discuss the inAuence of plasmaspheric wind and of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves for transport of plasmaspheric material. Theoretical formulations used to model the electric field and plasma distribution in the plasmasphere are given. Model predictions are compared to recent CLUSTER and MAGE observations, but also to results of earlier models and satellite observations.

  6. Density structures inside the plasmasphere: Cluster observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darrouzet, F.; Decreau, P.M.E.; De Keyser, J.;

    2004-01-01

    The electron density profiles derived from the EFW and WHISPER instruments on board the four Cluster spacecraft reveal density structures inside the plasmasphere and at its outer boundary, the plasmapause. We have conducted a statistical study to characterize these density structures. We focus...... on the plasmasphere crossing on I I April 2002, during which Cluster observed several density irregularities inside the plasmasphere, as well as a plasmaspheric plume. We derive the density gradient vectors from simultaneous density measurements by the four spacecraft. We also determine the normal velocity...... of the boundaries of the plume and of the irregularities from the time delays between those boundaries in the four individual density profiles, assuming they are planar. These new observations yield novel insights about the occurrence of density irregularities, their geometry and their dynamics. These in...

  7. Refilling the plasmasphere through the exospheric sieve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, J.; Huba, J.; Emmert, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    The ability to compute plasmasphere densities is critical to many space weather concerns. The sensitivity of refilling to the solar cycle is compelling because, paradoxically, refilling rates are generally lowest when the ionosphere is strongest. In the past, this has been attributed to a dearth of exosphere H at solar maximum. While H is needed to supply H + O+ -> H+ + O charge exchange, recent work demonstrates a significant sensitivity to O [1]. Results will be based on preliminary model-data comparisons using in situ Van Allen Probe EMFISIS data and the SAMI3 ionosphere/plasmasphere code. We will assess the impact of atmospheric composition (i.e., O and H) and solar activity (e.g., F10.7) on plasmasphere refilling rates and density following magnetic storms. SAMI3 (Sami3 is Also a Model of the Ionosphere) is a first-principles ionosphere/plasmasphere model. SAMI3 includes 7 ion species (H+, He+, O+, N+, O2+, N2+, NO+), each treated as a separate fluid, with temperature equations being solved for H+, He+, O+ and e- [2]. SAMI3 uses the empirical MSIS thermosphere/exosphere model to specify O and H densities. SAMI3 includes scaling factors that can be used to tune MSIS densities to bring them in line with measurements of satellite drag. Key inputs for this data-driven modeling are the thermosphere oxygen (O) and hydrogen (H) densities, and the F10.7 proxy for solar ultraviolet irradiance. [1 ]Krall, J., J. T. Emmert, F. Sassi, S. E. McDonald, and J. D. Huba (2016), Day-to-day variability in the thermosphere and its impact on plasmasphere refilling, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 121, doi:10.1002/2015JA022328. [2] Huba, J. and J. Krall (2013), Modeling the plasmasphere with SAMI3, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 6-10, doi:10.1029/2012GL054300 Research supported by NRL base funds.

  8. Turbulent Plasmaspheric Boundary Layer: Observables and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, Evgeny

    2014-10-01

    In situ satellite observations reveal strong lower hybrid/fast magnetosonic turbulence and broadband hiss-like VLF waves in the substorm subauroral geospace at and earthward of the electron plasmasheet boundary. These coincide with subauroral ion drifts/polarization streams (SAID/SAPS) in the plasmasphere and topside ionosphere. SAID/SAPS appear in ~10 min after the substorm onset consistent with the fast propagation of substorm injection fronts. The SAID channel follows the dispersionless cutoff of the energetic electron flux at the plasmapause. This indicates that the cold plasma maintains charge neutrality within the channel, thereby short-circuiting the injected plasma jet (injection fronts over the plasmasphere. Plasma turbulence leads to the circuit resistivity and magnetic diffusion as well as significant electron heating and acceleration. As a result, a turbulent boundary layer forms between the inner edge of the electron plasmasheet and plasmasphere. The SAID/SAPS-related VLF emissions appear to constitute a distinctive subset of substorm/storm-related VLF activity in the region co-located with freshly injected energetic ions inside the plasmasphere. Significant pitch-angle diffusion coefficients suggest that substorm SAID/SAPS-related VLF waves could be responsible for the alteration of the outer radiation belt boundary during (sub)storms. Supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  9. Evidence for Significant Local Generation of Plasmaspheric Hiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Bounds, S. R.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Santolik, O.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.; Omura, Y.; Summers, D.

    2014-12-01

    The source of plasmaspheric hiss has been an outstanding problem in inner magnetospheric radiation belt physics since the discovery of this whistler-mode emission. The generation mechanism for plasmaspheric hiss has been suggested to come from one of three possible mechanisms: 1) local generation and amplification, 2) whistlers from lightning, and 3) chorus emissions which have refracted into the plasmasphere. The latter two mechanisms are external sources which produce an incoherent hiss signature as the original waves mix in a stochastic manner, propagating in both directions along the background magnetic field. In contrast, local generation of plasmaspheric hiss within the plasmasphere should produce a signature of waves propagating away from the source region. We report observations from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) Waves insturment on the Van Allen Probes that clearly indicate that the Poynting flux associated with plasmaspheric hiss is frequently propagating away from the equator in the outer region of the plasmasphere. Initial statistics suggest that for more than 40% of the orbits of the Van Allen Probes, the plasmaspheric hiss is generated by a local source within the plasmasphere. We present examples of the signature of locally generated plasmaspheric hiss and show additional statistics of locally generated hiss occurrence.

  10. Banded electron structures in the plasmasphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, W.J.; Rubin, A.G.; Hardy, D.A.; Holeman, E.G.

    1995-05-01

    The low-energy plasma analyzer on CRRES has detected significant fluxes of 10-eV to 30-keV electrons trapped on plasmaspheric field lines. On energy versus time spectrograms these electrons appear as banded structures that can span the 2 < L < 6 range of magnetic shells. The authors present an example of banded electron structures, encountered in the nightside plasmasphere during the magnetically quiet January 30, 1991. Empirical analysis suggests that two clouds of low energy electrons were injected from the plasma sheet to L < 4 on January 26 and 27 while the convective electric field was elevated. The energies of electrons in the first cloud were greater than those in the second. DMSP F8 measurements show that after the second injection, the polar cap potential rapidly decreased from >50 to <20 kY. Subsequent encounters with the lower energy cloud on alternating CRRES orbits over the next 2 days showed a progressive, earthward movement of the electrons, inner boundary. Whistler and electron cyclotron harmonic emissions accompanied the most intense manifestations of cloud electrons. The simplest explanation of these measurements is that after initial injection, the AIfven boundary moved Outward, leaving the cloud electrons on closed drift paths. Subsequent fluctuations of the convective electric field penetrated the plasmasphere, transporting cloud elements inward. The magnetic shell distribution of electron temperatures in one of the banded structures suggests that radiative energy losses may be comparable in magnitude to gains due to adiabatic compression.

  11. Global Circulation and Impact of Plasmaspheric Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Fok, Mei-Ching; Chen, Sheng-Hsiem; Delcourt, Dominique C.; Fedder, Joel A.; Slinker, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    We report results from the global circulation model of Lyon, Fedder, and Mobarry with an embedded model of the inner magnetosphere including the plasmasphere. The combination is used to initiate large numbers of representative protons on the geosynchronous orbit L shell, to assign particle weightings, to track their: subsequent trajectories in the 3D fields. This permits us to study the global circulation of plasmaspheric plumes and to compare these with Polar observations from the dayside magnetopause region . A range of events is studied from an isolated period of SBz in the solar wind,to a large storm sequence. We consider effects on circulating plasma reaching the dayside reconnection X-line, the population of the plasma sheet with ionospheric protons and the generation of ring current pressure from this source, compared with solar wind, polar wind, and auroral wind sources. We find that the transient plasmaspheric plume source is large in terms of total fluence, but of modest proportions in terms of contribution to the ring current. Implications of this and other results for improved space weather modeling and prediction will be discussed.

  12. A New Global Core Plasma Model of the Plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is the first empirical model for thermal inner magnetospheric plasma designed to integrate previous models and observations into a continuous in value and gradient representation of typical total densities. New information about the plasmasphere, in particular, makes possible significant improvement. The IMAGE Mission Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has obtained the first observations of total plasma densities along magnetic field lines in the plasmasphere and polar cap. Dynamics Explorer 1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) has provided densities in temperatures in the plasmasphere for 5 ion species. These and other works enable a new more detailed empirical model of thermal in the inner magnetosphere that will be presented.

  13. Measurement and modeling of the refilling plasmasphere during 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, J.; Huba, J. D.; Jordanova, V. K.; Denton, R. E.; Carranza, T.; Moldwin, M. B.

    2016-03-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory SAMI3 (Sami3 is Also a Model of the Ionosphere) and the RAM-CPL (Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model-Cold PLasma) codes are used to model observed plasmasphere dynamics during 25 November 2001 to 1 December 2001 and 1-5 February 2001. Model results compare well to plasmasphere observations of electron and mass densities. Comparison of model results to refilling data and to each other shows good agreement, generally within a factor of 2. We find that SAMI3 plasmaspheric refilling rates and ion densities are sensitive to the composition and temperature of the thermosphere and exosphere, and to photoelectron heating. Results also support our previous finding that the wind-driven dynamo significantly impacts both refilling rates and plasmasphere dynamics during quiet periods.

  14. The Influence of the Solar Cycle on Plasmasphere Refilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, J.; Huba, J.

    2015-12-01

    During refilling, ionospheric plasma streams into the inner magnetosphere from both the northern and southern hemispheres. Plasmasphere refilling rates depend on both the ionospheric sources and on the thermalization of streaming ions. We use the NRL SAMI3 ionosphere/plasmasphere code[1] coupled to the NRLMSIS empirical atmosphere model and the HWM14 empirical wind model, to simulate H+, He+ and O+ populations in the plasmasphere. The SAMI3 ionosphere code includes 7 ion species (H+, He+, O+, N+, O2+, N2+, NO+), each treated as a separate fluid, with temperature equations being solved for H+, He+, O+ and e. Measurements show that refilling rates decrease with increasing solar activity, an effect reproduced by SAMI3 and its two-dimensional cousin, SAMI2. We find that the refilling rate and the resulting the plasmasphere electron content are sensitive to the thermospheric composition and temperature, as well as photoelectron heating and photoproduction rates. Depending on conditions, simulations suggest that the plasmaspheric contribution to the total electron content can either increase or decrease with solar activity, as represented by the daily and 81-day-average F10.7 indices. [1] Huba, J. and J. Krall, 2013, ``Modeling the plasmasphere with SAMI3'', Geophys. Res. Lett. 40, 6--10, doi:10.1029/2012GL054300 Research supported by NRL base funds and the NASA HSR program.

  15. Analysis of the IMAGE RPI electron density data and CHAMP plasmasphere electron density reconstructions with focus on plasmasphere modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzen, T.; Feltens, J.; Jakowski, N.; Galkin, I.; Reinisch, B.; Zandbergen, R.

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of the topside ionosphere and the plasmasphere contributes essentially to the overall Total Electron Content (TEC) budget affecting Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals. The plasmasphere can cause half or even more of the GNSS range error budget due to ionospheric propagation errors. This paper presents a comparative study of different plasmasphere and topside ionosphere data aiming at establishing an appropriate database for plasmasphere modelling. We analyze electron density profiles along the geomagnetic field lines derived from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite/Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) records of remote plasma sounding with radio waves. We compare these RPI profiles with 2D reconstructions of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere electron density derived from GNSS based TEC measurements onboard the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite. Most of the coincidences between IMAGE profiles and CHAMP reconstructions are detected in the region with L-shell between 2 and 5. In general the CHAMP reconstructed electron densities are below the IMAGE profile densities, with median of the CHAMP minus IMAGE residuals around -588 cm-3. Additionally, a comparison is made with electron densities derived from passive radio wave RPI measurements onboard the IMAGE satellite. Over the available 2001-2005 period of IMAGE measurements, the considered combined data from the active and passive RPI operations cover the region within a latitude range of ±60°N, all longitudes, and an L-shell ranging from 1.2 to 15. In the coincidence regions (mainly 2 ⩽ L ⩽ 4), we check the agreement between available active and passive RPI data. The comparison shows that the measurements are well correlated, with a median residual of ∼52 cm-3. The RMS and STD values of the relative residuals are around 22% and 21% respectively. In summary, the results encourage the application of IMAGE RPI data for

  16. Whistlers Observed Outside the Plasmasphere: Correlation to Plasmaspheric/Plasmapause Features and Implications for the Scattering of Radiation-Belt Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Mark L.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetospherically reflected, lightning-generated whistler waves are an important potential contributor to pitch-angle scattering loss processes of the electron radiation belts. While lightning-generated whistlers are a common feature at, and just inside, the plasmapause, they are infrequently observed outside the plasmasphere. As such, their potential contribution to outer radiation belt loss processes is more tenuous. Recently, Platino et al. [2005] has reported on whistlers observed outside the plasmasphere by Cluster. Here, we present correlative global observations of the plasmasphere, for the reported periods of Cluster-observed whistlers outside the plasmasphere, using IMAGE-EUV data. The intent of this study is to seek the underlying mechanisms that result in whistlers outside the plasmasphere and consequently the anticipated morphology and significance these waves may have on radiation belt dynamics.

  17. Response of plasmaspheric configuration to substorms revealed by Chang’e 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Han; Shen, Chao; Wang, Huaning; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Chen, Bo; Yan, Jun; Zou, Yongliao; Jorgensen, Anders M.; He, Fei; Yan, Yan; Zhu, Xiaoshuai; Huang, Ya; Xu, Ronglan

    2016-08-01

    The Moon-based Extreme Ultraviolet Camera (EUVC) of the Chang’e 3 mission provides a global and instantaneous meridian view (side view) of the Earth’s plasmasphere. The plasmasphere is one inner component of the whole magnetosphere, and the configuration of the plasmasphere is sensitive to magnetospheric activity (storms and substorms). However, the response of the plasmaspheric configuration to substorms is only partially understood, and the EUVC observations provide a good opportunity to investigate this issue. By reconstructing the global plasmaspheric configuration based on the EUVC images observed during 20–22 April 2014, we show that in the observing period, the plasmasphere had three bulges which were located at different geomagnetic longitudes. The inferred midnight transit times of the three bulges, using the rotation rate of the Earth, coincide with the expansion phase of three substorms, which implies a causal relationship between the substorms and the formation of the three bulges on the plasmasphere. Instead of leading to plasmaspheric erosion as geomagnetic storms do, substorms initiated on the nightside of the Earth cause local inflation of the plasmasphere in the midnight region.

  18. Plasmaspheric trough evolution under different conditions of subauroral ion drift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Fei; ZHANG XiaoXin; CHEN Bo; FOK MeiChing

    2012-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of the subauroral ion drift (SAID) in the ionosphere and the plasmaspheric trough evolution under different conditions of SAID were investigated in this paper,based on 566 SAID events observed by Akebono,Astrid-2,DE-2,and Freja satellites.The relationships between the latitudinal location of SAID and the Kp,AL,and Dst indices for these events were also discussed.It was found that the SAID events happened mainly at invariant latitude (ILAT) of 60.4° and magnetic local time (MLT) of 21.6 MLT and that 92.4% of the events happened when the Kp index was below 5.0,indicating a medium geomagnetic activity.The latitudinal half-width of SAID varied from 0.5° to 3.0° with a typical half-width of 1.0°.The SAID would happen at low latitudes if the geomagnetic activity was high.The effects of SAID on equatorial outer plasmasphere trough evolutions were studied with the dynamic global core plasma model (DGCPM) driven by the statistical results of SAID signatures.It was noted that locations,shapes and density of troughs vary with ILAT,MLT,latitudinal width,cross polar cap potential and lifetime of SAID events.The evolution of a trough is determined by the extent of SAID electric field penetrating into plasmasphere and not all SAID events can result in trough formations.

  19. Improved analysis of plasmasphere motion using the VLA radio interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Hoogeveen

    Full Text Available Observations using the very large (VLA radio interferometer during the past five years have enabled the discovery of a new type of plasmasphere disturbance, the magnetic eastward-directed wave. Previous work indicated these disturbances were likely frozen to the geomagnetic field as determined from their azimuth distributions. This work provides a method to explain more accurately the azimuth distribution, thereby allowing the calculation of the disturbances' location in the plasmasphere independently of the measured velocity. The measurable velocity due to corotation is calculated and subtracted from the measured trace velocity. This difference, or deviation from corotation, is attributed to electrodynamic convection; the measurement of plasmaspheric convection may lead to the eventual monitoring of mid-latitude electric fields. Disturbances are seen convecting predominantly westward, with the fastest having angular velocities greater than the anticorotating VLA line of sight. The direction of convection and conditions of observations indicate that the disturbances are likely the same phenomenon seen by the Los Alamos satellite beacon array.

  20. On the Origin of Whistler Mode Radiation in the Plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James L.; Boardsen, Scott; Garcia, Leonard; Taylor, W. W. L.; Fung, Shing F.; Reinisch, B. W.

    2004-01-01

    The origin of whistler mode radiation in the plasmasphere is examined from three years of plasma wave observations from the Dynamics Explorer and three years from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft. These data are used to construct plasma wave intensity maps of whistler mode radiation in the plasmasphere. The highest average intensities of the radiation in the wave maps show source locations and/or sites of wave amplification. Each type of emission is classified based on its magnetic latitude and longitude rather than any spectral feature. Equatorial electromagnetic (EM) emissions (approx. 30-330 Hz), plasmaspheric hiss (approx. 330 Hz - 3.3 kHz), chorus (approx. 2 kHz - 6 kHz), and VLF transmitters (approx. 10-50 kHz) are the main types of waves that are clearly delineated in the plasma wave maps. Observations of the equatorial EM emissions show that the most intense region is on or near the magnetic equator in the afternoon sector and that during times of negative B(sub z) (interplanetary magnetic field),the maximum intensity moves from L values of 3 to less than 2. These observations are consistent with the origin of this emission being particle-wave interactions in or near the magnetic equator. Plasmaspheric hiss shows high intensity at high latitudes and low altitudes (L shells from 2 to 4) and in the magnetic equator over L values from 2 to 3 in the early afternoon sector. The longitudinal distribution of the hiss intensity (excluding the enhancement at the equator) is similar to the distribution of lightning: stronger over continents than over the ocean, stronger in the summer than winter, and stronger on the dayside than nightside. These observations strongly support lightning as the dominant source for plasmaspheric hiss, which through particle-wave interactions, maintains the slot region in the radiation belts. The enhancement of hiss at the magnetic equator is consistent with particle-wave interactions. The chorus

  1. Detection of a plasmaspheric wind in the Earth's magnetosphere by the Cluster spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dandouras

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Plumes, forming at the plasmapause and released outwards, constitute a well-established mode for plasmaspheric material release to the Earth's magnetosphere. They are associated to active periods and the related electric field change. In 1992, Lemaire and Shunk proposed the existence of an additional mode for plasmaspheric material release to the Earth's magnetosphere: a plasmaspheric wind, steadily transporting cold plasmaspheric plasma outwards across the geomagnetic field lines, even during prolonged periods of quiet geomagnetic conditions. This has been proposed on a theoretical basis. Direct detection of this wind has, however, eluded observation in the past. Analysis of ion measurements, acquired in the outer plasmasphere by the CIS experiment onboard the four Cluster spacecraft, provide now an experimental confirmation of the plasmaspheric wind. This wind has been systematically detected in the outer plasmasphere during quiet and moderately active conditions, and calculations show that it could provide a substantial contribution to the magnetospheric plasma populations outside the Earth's plasmasphere. Similar winds should also exist on other planets, or astrophysical objects, quickly rotating and having an atmosphere and a magnetic field.

  2. Driving Plasmaspheric Electron Density Simulations During Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascuale, S.; Kletzing, C.; Jordanova, V.; Goldstein, J.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We test global convection electric field models driving plasmaspheric electron density simulations (RAM-CPL) during geomagnetic storms with in situ measurements provided by the Van Allen Probes (RBSP). RAM-CPL is the cold plasma component of the ring-current atmosphere interactions suite (RAM-SCB) and describes the evolution of plasma density in the magnetic equatorial plane near Earth. Geomagnetic events observed by the RBSP satellites in different magnetic local time (MLT) sectors enable a comparison of local asymmetries in the input electric field and output densities of these simulations. Using a fluid MHD approach, RAM-CPL reproduces core plasmaspheric densities (L<4) to less than 1 order of magnitude difference. Approximately 80% of plasmapause crossings, defined by a low-density threshold, are reproduced to within a mean radial difference of 0.6 L. RAM-CPL, in conjunction with a best-fit driver, can be used in other studies as an asset to predict density conditions in locations distant from RBSP orbits of interest.

  3. Wave-Particle Interactions in the Turbulent Plasmaspheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, Evgeny

    2012-10-01

    We present in situ satellite observations of plasmaspheric lower hybrid/fast magnetosonic turbulence and broadband hiss-like VLF emissions related with substorm subauroral ion drifts/polarization streams (SAID/SAPS) in the magnetosphere and topside ionosphere. SAID/SAPS appear in ˜10 min after the substorm onset consistent with the fast propagation of substorm injection fronts. The SAID channel follows the dispersionless cutoff of the energetic electron flux at the plasmapause. This indicates that the cold plasma maintains charge neutrality within the channel, thereby short-circuiting the injected plasmoid (injection front) over the plasmasphere. As with the well-documented plasmoid-magnetic barrier problem, plasma turbulence ensures the circuit resistivity and magnetic diffusion as well as significant electron heating and acceleration. The SAID/SAPS-related VLF emissions were used to simulate interactions with the outer zone electrons. These emissions appear to constitute a distinctive subset of substorm/storm-related VLF activity in the region co-located with freshly injected energetic ions equatorward of the plasma sheet boundary. Significant pitch-angle diffusion coefficients suggest that substorm SAID/SAPS-related VLF waves could be responsible for the alteration of the outer radiation belt boundary during (sub)storms.

  4. Plasmaspheric H+, He+, O+, He++, and O++ Densities and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort H.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal plasmaspheric densities and temperatures for five ion species have recently become available, even though these quantities were derived some time ago from the Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer onboard the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite over the years 1981-1984. The quantitative properties will be presented. Densities are found to have one behavior with lessor statistical variation below about L=2 and another with much greater variability above that Lshell. Temperatures also have a behavior difference between low and higher L-values. The density ratio He++/H+ is the best behaved with values of about 0.2% that slightly increase with increasing L. Unlike the He+/H+ density ratio that on average decreases with increasing Lvalue, the O+/H+ and O++/H+ density ratios have decreasing values below about L=2 and increasing average ratios at higher L-values. Hydrogen ion temperatures range from about 0.2 eV to several 10s of eV for a few measurements, although the bulk of the observations are of temperatures below 3 eV, again increasing with L-value. The temperature ratios of He+/H+ are tightly ordered around 1.0 except for the middle plasmasphere between L=3.5 and 4.5 where He+ temperatures can be significantly higher. The temperatures of He++, O+, and O++ are consistently higher than H+.

  5. Plasmaspheric H+, He+, He++, O+, and O++ Densities and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, G. L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal plasmaspheric densities and temperatures for five ion species have recently become available, even though these quantities were derived some time ago from the Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer onboard the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite over the years 1981-1984. The quantitative properties will be presented. Densities are found to have one behavior with lessor statistical variation below about L=2 and another with much greater variability above that Lshell. Temperatures also have a behavior difference between low and higher L-values. The density ratio He++/H+ is the best behaved with values of about 0.2% that slightly increase with increasing L. Unlike the He+/H+ density ratio that on average decreases with increasing Lvalue, the O+/H+ and O++/H+ density ratios have decreasing values below about L=2 and increasing average ratios at higher L-values. Hydrogen ion temperatures range from about 0.2 eV to several 10s of eV for a few measurements, although the bulk of the observations are of temperatures below 3 eV, again increasing with L-value. The temperature ratios of He+/H+ are tightly ordered around 1.0 except for the middle plasmasphere between L=3.5 and 4.5 where He+ temperatures can be significantly higher. The temperatures of He++, O+, and O++ are consistently higher than H+.

  6. Ultra low frequency waves observed by Double Star TC-1 in the plasmasphere boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The characteristic and properties of ULF waves in the plasmasphere boundary layer during two very quiet periods are present. The ULF waves were detected by Double Star TC-1 when the spacecraft passed through the plasmasphere in an outbound and inbound trajectories, respectively. A clear association between the ULF waves and periodic variations of energetic ions fluxes was observed. The ob-servations showed that the wave frequency was higher inside the plasmasphere than outside. The mechanism generating these ULF waves and possible diagnos-ing of the "classical plasmapause" location with the ULF wave were discussed.

  7. Investigating Plasmasphere Location during Relativistic Electron Precipitation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodger, L. A.; Millan, R. M.; Goldstein, J.; McCarthy, M. P.; Smith, D. M.; Sample, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    The plasmasphere plays a crucial role in the generation of different wave modes and their resonance conditions with radiation belt relativistic electrons. Meredith's (et. al., 2003) statistical study of resonant conditions for >2MeV electrons with EMIC waves found that the majority of these events occur in the vicinity of the plasmpause. The MAXIS and MINIS balloon observations found a distinct class of relativistic electron precipitation occurring at dusk, suggesting EMIC waves as a possible precipitation mechanism. We investigate the location of these relativistic electron precipitation events with respect to the plasmapause using data from IMAGE EUV, POLAR EFI, and a plasmapause test particle simulation driven by an electric field model with terms representing solar-wind-driven convection and ring-current-ionospheric coupling.

  8. Analysis of plasmaspheric plumes: CLUSTER and IMAGE observations and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darouzet, Fabien; DeKeyser, Johan; Decreau, Pierrette; Gallagher, Dennis; Pierrard, Viviane; Lemaire, Joseph; Dandouras, Iannis; Matsui, Hiroshi; Dunlop, Malcolm; Andre, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Plasmaspheric plumes have been routinely observed by CLUSTER and IMAGE. The CLUSTER mission provides high time resolution four-point measurements of the plasmasphere near perigee. Total electron density profiles can be derived from the plasma frequency and/or from the spacecraft potential (note that the electron spectrometer is usually not operating inside the plasmasphere); ion velocity is also measured onboard these satellites (but ion density is not reliable because of instrumental limitations). The EUV imager onboard the IMAGE spacecraft provides global images of the plasmasphere with a spatial resolution of 0.1 RE every 10 minutes; such images acquired near apogee from high above the pole show the geometry of plasmaspheric plumes, their evolution and motion. We present coordinated observations for 3 plume events and compare CLUSTER in-situ data (panel A) with global images of the plasmasphere obtained from IMAGE (panel B), and with numerical simulations for the formation of plumes based on a model that includes the interchange instability mechanism (panel C). In particular, we study the geometry and the orientation of plasmaspheric plumes by using a four-point analysis method, the spatial gradient. We also compare several aspects of their motion as determined by different methods: (i) inner and outer plume boundary velocity calculated from time delays of this boundary observed by the wave experiment WHISPER on the four spacecraft, (ii) ion velocity derived from the ion spectrometer CIS onboard CLUSTER, (iii) drift velocity measured by the electron drift instrument ED1 onboard CLUSTER and (iv) global velocity determined from successive EUV images. These different techniques consistently indicate that plasmaspheric plumes rotate around the Earth, with their foot fully co-rotating, but with their tip rotating slower and moving farther out.

  9. Calculation of the extreme ultraviolet radiation of the earth’s plasmasphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FOK; Mei-Ching

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic global core plasma model(DGCPM) is used in this paper to calculate the He+ density distribution of the Earth’s plasmasphere and to investigate the configurations and 30.4 nm radiation properties of the plasmasphere.Validation comparisons between the simulation results and IMAGE mission observations show:That the equatorial structure of the plasmapause is mainly located near 5.5 RE and the typical scale of plasmasphere shrinking or expansion within 10 min is approximately 0.1 RE;that the plasmaspheric shoulders are formed and rotate noon-ward from the dawn sector under the conditions of strong southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field(IMF);that the plasmaspheric plumes will rotate dawn-ward from the night sector and become narrow for the southward turning of the IMF.The simulated images from the lunar orbit show that the plasmasphere locating within the geocentric distance of 5.5 RE corresponds to field of view(FOV) of 10.7°×10.7° for the moon-based EUV imager,and that the 30.4 nm radiation intensity of the plasmasphere is 0.1-11.4 R.The plasmaspheric shoulders and plumes locating toward the moon-side are for the first time simulated with typical scale level of 0.1 RE from the side view of the moon.These simulated results provide an important theoretical basis for the lunar-based EUV camera design.

  10. Analysis of plasmaspheric plumes: CLUSTER and IMAGE observations and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darouzet, Fabien; DeKeyser, Johan; Decreau, Pierrette; Gallagher, Dennis; Pierrard, Viviane; Lemaire, Joseph; Dandouras, Iannis; Matsui, Hiroshi; Dunlop, Malcolm; Andre, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Plasmaspheric plumes have been routinely observed by CLUSTER and IMAGE. The CLUSTER mission provides high time resolution four-point measurements of the plasmasphere near perigee. Total electron density profiles can be derived from the plasma frequency and/or from the spacecraft potential (note that the electron spectrometer is usually not operating inside the plasmasphere); ion velocity is also measured onboard these satellites (but ion density is not reliable because of instrumental limitations). The EUV imager onboard the IMAGE spacecraft provides global images of the plasmasphere with a spatial resolution of 0.1 RE every 10 minutes; such images acquired near apogee from high above the pole show the geometry of plasmaspheric plumes, their evolution and motion. We present coordinated observations for 3 plume events and compare CLUSTER in-situ data (panel A) with global images of the plasmasphere obtained from IMAGE (panel B), and with numerical simulations for the formation of plumes based on a model that includes the interchange instability mechanism (panel C). In particular, we study the geometry and the orientation of plasmaspheric plumes by using a four-point analysis method, the spatial gradient. We also compare several aspects of their motion as determined by different methods: (i) inner and outer plume boundary velocity calculated from time delays of this boundary observed by the wave experiment WHISPER on the four spacecraft, (ii) ion velocity derived from the ion spectrometer CIS onboard CLUSTER, (iii) drift velocity measured by the electron drift instrument ED1 onboard CLUSTER and (iv) global velocity determined from successive EUV images. These different techniques consistently indicate that plasmaspheric plumes rotate around the Earth, with their foot fully co-rotating, but with their tip rotating slower and moving farther out.

  11. Evolution of chorus emissions into plasmaspheric hiss observed by Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; He, Yihua; Wygant, J. R.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.

    2016-05-01

    The two classes of whistler mode waves (chorus and hiss) play different roles in the dynamics of radiation belt energetic electrons. Chorus can efficiently accelerate energetic electrons, and hiss is responsible for the loss of energetic electrons. Previous studies have proposed that chorus is the source of plasmaspheric hiss, but this still requires an observational confirmation because the previously observed chorus and hiss emissions were not in the same frequency range in the same time. Here we report simultaneous observations form Van Allen Probes that chorus and hiss emissions occurred in the same range ˜300-1500 Hz with the peak wave power density about 10-5 nT2/Hz during a weak storm on 3 July 2014. Chorus emissions propagate in a broad region outside the plasmapause. Meanwhile, hiss emissions are confined inside the plasmasphere, with a higher intensity and a broader area at a lower frequency. A sum of bi-Maxwellian distribution is used to model the observed anisotropic electron distributions and to evaluate the instability of waves. A three-dimensional ray tracing simulation shows that a portion of chorus emission outside the plasmasphere can propagate into the plasmasphere and evolve into plasmaspheric hiss. Moreover, hiss waves below 1 kHz are more intense and propagate over a broader area than those above 1 kHz, consistent with the observation. The current results can explain distributions of the observed hiss emission and provide a further support for the mechanism of evolution of chorus into hiss emissions.

  12. A two-dimensional model of the plasmasphere - Refilling time constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Craig E.; Guiter, Steven M.; Thomas, Steven G.

    1993-01-01

    A 2D model of the plasmasphere has been developed to study the temporal evolution of plasma density in the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere. This model includes the supply and loss of hydrogen ions due to ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling as well as the effects of E x B convection. A parametric model describing the required coupling fluxes has been developed which utilizes empirical models of the neutral atmosphere, the ionosphere and the saturated plasmasphere. The plasmaspheric model has been used to examine the time it takes for the plasmasphere to refill after it has been depleted by a magnetic storm. The time it takes for the plasmasphere to reach 90 percent of its equilibrium level ranges from 3 days at L = 3 during solar minimum to as high as 100 days at L = 5 during solar maximum. Refilling is also dependent on the month of the year, with refilling requiring a longer period of time at solar maximum during June than during December for L greater than 3.2.

  13. Formation of plasmasphere in the non-ideal corotation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumin, Yurii

    It is well-known that the standard model of plasmasphere formation by the combined action of convection and the ideal corotation fields is too simplified and does not describe some important features. One of attempts to improve it was undertaken a few years ago in our paper [1], where we considered generation of the corotation field in the strongly-anisotropic magnetospheric plasma and took into account distortion of this field in high latitudes due to escape of the polarization charges along the open magnetic field lines. In the present report, we further develop the idea of refinement of the corotation field, particularly, by the consideration of the magnetic dipole inclined with respect to the rotation axis. It will be shown that all the above-mentioned improvements result in the more adequate description of the position of plasmapause both in the quiet and disturbed conditions. References: 1. Yu.V. Dumin. The Corotation Field in Collisionless Magnetospheric Plasma and Its Influence on Average Electric Field in the Lower Atmosphere. Advances in Space Research, v.30, p.2209 (2002).

  14. Real-time imaging of density ducts between the plasmasphere and ionosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Cairns, Iver H; Menk, Frederick W; Waters, Colin L; Erickson, Philip J; Trott, Cathryn M; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Morgan, John; Lenc, Emil; Offringa, Andre R; Bell, Martin E; Ekers, Ronald D; Gaensler, B M; Lonsdale, Colin J; Feng, Lu; Hancock, Paul J; Kaplan, David L; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Deshpande, A A; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Ord, S M; Prabu, T; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2015-01-01

    Ionization of the Earth's atmosphere by sunlight forms a complex, multi-layered plasma environment within the Earth's magnetosphere, the innermost layers being the ionosphere and plasmasphere. The plasmasphere is believed to be embedded with cylindrical density structures (ducts) aligned along the Earth's magnetic field, but direct evidence for these remains scarce. Here we report the first direct wide-angle observation of an extensive array of field-aligned ducts bridging the upper ionosphere and inner plasmasphere, using a novel ground-based imaging technique. We establish their heights and motions by feature-tracking and parallax analysis. The structures are strikingly organized, appearing as regularly-spaced, alternating tubes of overdensities and underdensities strongly aligned with the Earth's magnetic field. These findings represent the first direct visual evidence for the existence of such structures.

  15. Global MHD modeling of resonant ULF waves: Simulations with and without a plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Wiltberger, M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the plasmaspheric influence on the resonant mode coupling of magnetospheric ultralow frequency (ULF) waves using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. We present results from two different versions of the model, both driven by the same solar wind conditions: one version that contains a plasmasphere (the LFM coupled to the Rice Convection Model, where the Gallagher plasmasphere model is also included) and another that does not (the stand-alone LFM). We find that the inclusion of a cold, dense plasmasphere has a significant impact on the nature of the simulated ULF waves. For example, the inclusion of a plasmasphere leads to a deeper (more earthward) penetration of the compressional (azimuthal) electric field fluctuations, due to a shift in the location of the wave turning points. Consequently, the locations where the compressional electric field oscillations resonantly couple their energy into local toroidal mode field line resonances also shift earthward. We also find, in both simulations, that higher-frequency compressional (azimuthal) electric field oscillations penetrate deeper than lower frequency oscillations. In addition, the compressional wave mode structure in the simulations is consistent with a radial standing wave oscillation pattern, characteristic of a resonant waveguide. The incorporation of a plasmasphere into the LFM global MHD model represents an advance in the state of the art in regard to ULF wave modeling with such simulations. We offer a brief discussion of the implications for radiation belt modeling techniques that use the electric and magnetic field outputs from global MHD simulations to drive particle dynamics.

  16. Global MHD modeling of resonant ULF waves: Simulations with and without a plasmasphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudepierre, S G; Toffoletto, F R; Wiltberger, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the plasmaspheric influence on the resonant mode coupling of magnetospheric ultralow frequency (ULF) waves using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. We present results from two different versions of the model, both driven by the same solar wind conditions: one version that contains a plasmasphere (the LFM coupled to the Rice Convection Model, where the Gallagher plasmasphere model is also included) and another that does not (the stand-alone LFM). We find that the inclusion of a cold, dense plasmasphere has a significant impact on the nature of the simulated ULF waves. For example, the inclusion of a plasmasphere leads to a deeper (more earthward) penetration of the compressional (azimuthal) electric field fluctuations, due to a shift in the location of the wave turning points. Consequently, the locations where the compressional electric field oscillations resonantly couple their energy into local toroidal mode field line resonances also shift earthward. We also find, in both simulations, that higher-frequency compressional (azimuthal) electric field oscillations penetrate deeper than lower frequency oscillations. In addition, the compressional wave mode structure in the simulations is consistent with a radial standing wave oscillation pattern, characteristic of a resonant waveguide. The incorporation of a plasmasphere into the LFM global MHD model represents an advance in the state of the art in regard to ULF wave modeling with such simulations. We offer a brief discussion of the implications for radiation belt modeling techniques that use the electric and magnetic field outputs from global MHD simulations to drive particle dynamics.

  17. Interaction of ring current and radiation belt protons with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. 1: Diffusion coefficients and timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Rasmussen, C. E.; Miller, R. H.; Lyons, L. R.

    1994-01-01

    Protons that are convected into the inner magnetosphere in response to enhanced magnetic activity can resonate with ducted plasmaspheric hiss in the outer plasmasphere via an anomalous Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance. Plasmaspheric hiss is a right-hand-polarized electromagnetic emission that is observed to fill the plasmasphere on a routine basis. When plasmaspheric hiss is confined within field-aligned ducts or guided along density gradients, wave normal angles remain largely below 45 deg. This allows resonant interactions with ions at typical ring current and radiation belt energies to take place. Such field-aligned ducts have been observed both within the plasmasphere and in regions outside of the plasmasphere. Wave intensities are estimated using statistical information from studies of detached plasma regions. Diffusion coefficients are presented for a range of L shells and proton energies for a fixed wave distribution. Harmonic resonances in the range N = +/-100 are considered in order to include interactions between hiss at 100 Hz to 2 kHz frequencies, and protons in the energy range between approximately 10 keV and 1000 keV. Diffusion timescales are estimated to be of the order of tens of days and comparable to or shorter than lifetimes for Coulomb decay and charge exchange losses over most of the energy and spatial ranges of interest.

  18. Plasmasphere thermal structure as measured by ISEE-1 and DE-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, R. H.

    Characteristics of plasmaspheric ion thermal structure are presented from a statistical survey of low-energy of ion measurements made by the retarding ion mass spectrometer (RIMS) on the DE-1 satellite. Morning and evening results are compared to illustrate diurnal trends. Typical day side temperature range from about 4000 K in the inner plasmasphere to over 10,000 K in the outer plasmasphere, while corresponding evening side temperatures range from near 2000 K to over 10,000 K. Magnetic activity is found to affect the morning and evening sides somewhat differently. Temperatures are found to remain constant or increase with altitude along magnetic field lines, depending on local time and L shell. Thermal equilibrium between H(+) and He(+) prevails to a high degree throughout the plasmasphere. Ion temperatures from the Plasma Composition Experiment (PCE) on ISEE-1 are generally consistent with those from DE-1/RIMS, but are lower and tend to indicate more large scale structure on the day side.

  19. Observations of a Pc5 global (cavity/waveguide) mode outside the plasmasphere by THEMIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartinger, Michael; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Moldwin, Mark B.

    2012-01-01

    Standing fast mode waves known as global modes, or cavity/waveguide modes, have been extensively studied as a potential driver of monochromatic shear Alfven waves in the Earth's magnetosphere via the field line resonance (FLR) mechanism. However, their existence outside of the plasmasphere remain...

  20. Simultaneous disappearances of plasmaspheric hiss, exohiss, and chorus waves triggered by a sudden decrease in solar wind dynamic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nigang; Su, Zhenpeng; Gao, Zhonglei; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Funsten, H. O.; Wygant, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetospheric whistler mode waves are of great importance in the radiation belt electron dynamics. Here on the basis of the analysis of a rare event with the simultaneous disappearances of whistler mode plasmaspheric hiss, exohiss, and chorus triggered by a sudden decrease in the solar wind dynamic pressure, we provide evidences for the following physical scenarios: (1) nonlinear generation of chorus controlled by the geomagnetic field inhomogeneity, (2) origination of plasmaspheric hiss from chorus, and (3) leakage of plasmaspheric hiss into exohiss. Following the reduction of the solar wind dynamic pressure, the dayside geomagnetic field configuration with the enhanced inhomogeneity became unfavorable for the generation of chorus, and the quenching of chorus directly caused the disappearances of plasmaspheric hiss and then exohiss.

  1. Determinations of ionosphere and plasmasphere electron content for an African chain of GPS stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzella, Andrew J., Jr.; Bosco Habarulema, John; Yizengaw, Endawoke

    2017-05-01

    The confluence of recent instrumentation deployments in Africa with developments for the determination of plasmasphere electron content using Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers has provided new opportunities for investigations in that region. This investigation, using a selected chain of GPS stations, extends the method (SCORPION) previously applied to a chain of GPS stations in North America in order to separate the ionosphere and plasmasphere contributions to the total electron content (TEC) during a day (24 July) in 2011. The results span latitudes from the southern tip of Africa, across the Equator, to the southern Arabian Peninsula, providing a continuous latitudinal profile for both the ionosphere and plasmasphere during this day.The peak diurnal vertical ionosphere electron content (IEC) increases from about 14 TEC units (1 TEC unit = 1016 electrons m-2) at the southernmost station to about 32 TEC units near the geographic equator, then decreases to about 28 TEC units at the Arabian Peninsula. The peak diurnal slant plasmasphere electron content (PEC) varies between about 4 and 7 TEC units among the stations, with a local latitudinal profile that is significantly influenced by the viewing geometry at the station location, relative to the magnetic field configuration. In contrast, the peak vertical PEC varies between about 1 and 6 TEC units among the stations, with a more uniform latitudinal variation.Comparisons to other GPS data analyses are also presented for TEC, indicating the influence of the PEC on the determination of latitudinal TEC variations and also on the absolute TEC levels, by inducing an overestimate of the receiver bias. The derived TEC latitudinal profiles, in comparison to global map profiles, tend to differ from the map results only about as much as the map results differ among themselves. A combination of ionosonde IEC and alternative GPS TEC measurements, which in principle permits a PEC determination through their difference, was

  2. The plasmasphere during a space weather event: first results from the PLASMON project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda Jan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of the first 18 months of the PLASMON project are presented. We have extended our three, existing ground-based measuring networks, AWDANet (VLF/whistlers, EMMA/SANSA (ULF/FLRs, and AARDDVARK (VLF/perturbations on transmitters’ signal, by three, eight, and four new stations, respectively. The extended networks will allow us to achieve the four major scientific goals, the automatic retrieval of equatorial electron densities and density profiles of the plasmasphere by whistler inversion, the retrieval of equatorial plasma mass densities by EMMA and SANSA from FLRs, developing a new, data assimilative model of plasmasphere and validating the model predictions through comparison of modeled REP losses with measured data by AARDDVARK network. The first results on each of the four objectives are presented through a case study on a space weather event, a dual storm sudden commencement which occurred on August 3 and 4, 2010.

  3. Plasmaspheric electron densities: the importance in modelling radiation belts and in SSA operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberger, János; Jorgensen, Anders; Koronczay, Dávid; Ferencz, Csaba; Hamar, Dániel; Steinbach, Péter; Clilverd, Mark; Rodger, Craig; Juhász, Lilla; Sannikov, Dmitry; Cherneva, Nina

    2016-04-01

    The Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer Network (AWDANet, Lichtenberger et al., J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008, A12201, doi:10.1029/2008JA013467) is able to detect and analyze whistlers in quasi-realtime and can provide equatorial electron density data. The plasmaspheric electron densities are key parameters for plasmasphere models in Space Weather related investigations, particularly in modeling charged particle accelerations and losses in Radiation Belts. The global AWDANet detects millions of whistlers in a year. The network operates since early 2002 with automatic whistler detector capability and it has been recently completed with automatic analyzer capability in PLASMON (http://plasmon.elte.hu, Lichtenberger et al., Space Weather Space Clim. 3 2013, A23 DOI: 10.1051/swsc/2013045.) Eu FP7-Space project. It is based on a recently developed whistler inversion model (Lichtenberger, J. J. Geophys. Res., 114, 2009, A07222, doi:10.1029/2008JA013799), that opened the way for an automated process of whistler analysis, not only for single whistler events but for complex analysis of multiple-path propagation whistler groups. The network operates in quasi real-time mode since mid-2014, fifteen stations provide equatorial electron densities that are used as inputs for a data assimilative plasmasphere model but they can also be used directly in space weather research and models. We have started to process the archive data collected by AWDANet stations since 2002 and in this paper we present the results of quasi-real-time and off-line runs processing whistlers from quiet and disturb periods. The equatorial electron densities obtained by whistler inversion are fed into the assimilative model of the plasmasphere providing a global view of the region for processed the periods

  4. Quantitative Simulation of a Magnetospheric Substorm. 3. Plasmaspheric Electric Fields and Evolution of the Plasmapause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-25

    plasmaspheric electric fields during magnetically disturbed periods are based on incoherent scatter radar results fromn St. Santin [ Testud et al., 1975...Millstone Hill radar results showing westward F-region ion drifts of almost 200 m/sec in the afternoon sector on 14 May, 1969. Testud et al. [1975...electrojet (AE) index. Testud et al. [1975] and Blanc et al. £1977] have both presented St. Santin backscatter measurements that show westward and

  5. Non-steady-state transport of superthermal electrons in the plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, George V.; Liemohn, Michael W.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Nagy, Andrew F.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical solutions to the time-dependent kinetic equation, which describes the transport of superthermal electrons in the splasmasphere between the two conjugate ionospheres, are presented. The model calculates the distribution function as a function of time, field-aligned distance, energy, and pitch-angle. The processes of refilling, depleting, and establishing steady-state conditions of superthermal electrons in the plasmasphere are discussed.

  6. Global-scale coherence modulation of radiation-belt electron loss from plasmaspheric hiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A W; Halford, A; Millan, R; McCarthy, M; Fennell, J; Sample, J; Woodger, L; Hospodarsky, G; Wygant, J R; Cattell, C A; Goldstein, J; Malaspina, D; Kletzing, C A

    2015-07-09

    Over 40 years ago it was suggested that electron loss in the region of the radiation belts that overlaps with the region of high plasma density called the plasmasphere, within four to five Earth radii, arises largely from interaction with an electromagnetic plasma wave called plasmaspheric hiss. This interaction strongly influences the evolution of the radiation belts during a geomagnetic storm, and over the course of many hours to days helps to return the radiation-belt structure to its 'quiet' pre-storm configuration. Observations have shown that the long-term electron-loss rate is consistent with this theory but the temporal and spatial dynamics of the loss process remain to be directly verified. Here we report simultaneous measurements of structured radiation-belt electron losses and the hiss phenomenon that causes the losses. Losses were observed in the form of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by hiss-scattered electrons colliding with the Earth's atmosphere after removal from the radiation belts. Our results show that changes of up to an order of magnitude in the dynamics of electron loss arising from hiss occur on timescales as short as one to twenty minutes, in association with modulations in plasma density and magnetic field. Furthermore, these loss dynamics are coherent with hiss dynamics on spatial scales comparable to the size of the plasmasphere. This nearly global-scale coherence was not predicted and may affect the short-term evolution of the radiation belts during active times.

  7. Remote sensing the plasmasphere, plasmapause, plumes and other features using ground-based magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menk Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasmapause is a highly dynamic boundary between different magnetospheric particle populations and convection regimes. Some of the most important space weather processes involve wave-particle interactions in this region, but wave properties may also be used to remote sense the plasmasphere and plasmapause, contributing to plasmasphere models. This paper discusses the use of existing ground magnetometer arrays for such remote sensing. Using case studies we illustrate measurement of plasmapause location, shape and movement during storms; refilling of flux tubes within and outside the plasmasphere; storm-time increase in heavy ion concentration near the plasmapause; and detection and mapping of density irregularities near the plasmapause, including drainage plumes, biteouts and bulges. We also use a 2D MHD model of wave propagation through the magnetosphere, incorporating a realistic ionosphere boundary and Alfvén speed profile, to simulate ground array observations of power and cross-phase spectra, hence confirming the signatures of plumes and other density structures.

  8. Data assimilation of plasmasphere and upper ionosphere using COSMIC/GPS slant TEC measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. J.; Guo, P.; Xu, T. L.; Fu, N. F.; Xu, X. S.; Jin, H. L.; Hu, X. G.

    2015-11-01

    Increasing total electron content (TEC) measurements from the low Earth orbiting satellites to Global Positioning System satellites flourish the exploration of the ionosphere and plasmasphere for decades. This paper indicates a method that 3-D Var is applied to assimilate precise orbit determination antenna TEC measurements of Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) satellites into the background global core plasma model (GCPM). The slant TEC data archived in the COSMIC Data Analysis and Archive Center from 500 km to 20,200 km are used to reconstruct a new electron density model. This model has a temporal resolution of 2 h and spatial resolutions of 2.5° in geomagnetic latitude, 5° in longitude, 50 km in the upper ionosphere, and several hundred kilometers in the plasmasphere. Preliminary results show that the data assimilation modifies the initial GCPM forecast to be better coincident with actual COSMIC measurements in internal quality check. Furthermore, independent validation with upper ionosphere-retrieved electron density and TEC of global ionosphere maps implies a reasonable improvement in the estimation of plasmaspheric electron density after the assimilation.

  9. Simulation of field-aligned H+ and He+ dynamics during late-stage plasmasphere refilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Fedder

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The refilling of the plasmasphere for 3≤L≤4 following a model storm is simulated over long times (days using the NRL ionosphere code SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere. Refilling is dependent on the supply of topside H+ and He+ ions with the result that H+ refilling rates decrease and He+ refilling rates generally increase with increasing F10.7 index. Both early- and late-stage refilling are affected by net ion flows from the warmer to the colder geomagnetic hemisphere. When these flows are strong, the ability of the "winter helium bulge" to increase He+ refilling rates is suppressed. When neutral winds are not included, refilling rates fall, typically by a factor of two. In most cases, late-stage He+ refilling is proportional to H+ refilling, with typical He+/H+ density ratios of 2% for solar minimum and 10% for solar maximum. For high values of F10.7, He+ refilling exhibits a strong diurnal variation so that the He+/H+ density ratio varies by as much as a factor of two during late-stage refilling. Finally if the plasmasphere is left undisturbed, the H+ density can refill for as long as five weeks at L=3 and ten weeks at L=4, with saturation densities nearly an order of magnitude greater than typical observed densities. This confirms that the plasmasphere at these L values rarely obtains saturation.

  10. Refilling process in the plasmasphere: a 3-D statistical characterization based on Cluster density observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lointier

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Cluster mission offers an excellent opportunity to investigate the evolution of the plasma population in a large part of the inner magnetosphere, explored near its orbit's perigee, over a complete solar cycle. The WHISPER sounder, on board each satellite of the mission, is particularly suitable to study the electron density in this region, between 0.2 and 80 cm−3. Compiling WHISPER observations during 1339 perigee passes distributed over more than three years of the Cluster mission, we present first results of a statistical analysis dedicated to the study of the electron density morphology and dynamics along and across magnetic field lines between L = 2 and L = 10. In this study, we examine a specific topic: the refilling of the plasmasphere and trough regions during extended periods of quiet magnetic conditions. To do so, we survey the evolution of the ap index during the days preceding each perigee crossing and sort out electron density profiles along the orbit according to three classes, namely after respectively less than 2 days, between 2 and 4 days, and more than 4 days of quiet magnetic conditions (ap ≤ 15 nT following an active episode (ap > 15 nT. This leads to three independent data subsets. Comparisons between density distributions in the 3-D plasmasphere and trough regions at the three stages of quiet magnetosphere provide novel views about the distribution of matter inside the inner magnetosphere during several days of low activity. Clear signatures of a refilling process inside an expended plasmasphere in formation are noted. A plasmapause-like boundary, at L ~ 6 for all MLT sectors, is formed after 3 to 4 days and expends somewhat further after that. In the outer part of the plasmasphere (L ~ 8, latitudinal profiles of median density values vary essentially according to the MLT sector considered rather than according to the refilling duration. The shape of these density profiles

  11. Kalman filter-based algorithms for monitoring the ionosphere and plasmasphere with GPS in near-real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, Adela; Carrano, Charles; Komjathy, Attila; Astilean, Adina; Letia, Tiberiu

    2009-01-01

    Data collected from a GPS receiver located at low latitudes in the American sector are used to investigate the performance of the WinTEC algorithm [Anghel et al., 2008a, Kalman filter-based algorithm for near realtime monitoring of the ionosphere using dual frequency GPS data. GPS Solutions, accepted for publication; for different ionospheric modeling techniques: the single-shell linear, quadratic, and cubic approaches, and the multi-shell linear approach. Our results indicate that the quadratic and cubic approaches perform much better than the single-shell and multi-shell linear approaches in terms of post-fit residuals. The performance of the algorithm for the cubic approach is then further tested by comparing the vertical TEC predicted by WinTEC and USTEC [Spencer et al., 2004. Ionospheric data assimilation methods for geodetic applications. In: Proceedings of IEEE PLANS, Monterey, CA, 26-29 April, pp. 510-517] at five North American stations. In addition, since the GPS-derived total electron content (TEC) contains contributions from both ionospheric and plasmaspheric sections of the GPS ray paths, in an effort to improve the accuracy of the TEC retrievals, a new data assimilation module that uses background information from an empirical plasmaspheric model [Gallagher et al., 1988. An empirical model of the Earth's plasmasphere. Advances in Space Research 8, (8)15-(8)24] has been incorporated into the WinTEC algorithm. The new Kalman filter-based algorithm estimates both the ionospheric and plasmaspheric electron contents, the combined satellite and receiver biases, and the estimation error covariance matrix, in a single-site or network solution. To evaluate the effect of the plasmaspheric component on the estimated biases and total TEC and to assess the performance of the newly developed algorithm, we compare the WinTEC results, with and without the plasmaspheric term included, at three GPS receivers located at different latitudes in the American sector, during

  12. Determination of global plasmaspheric electron density profile by tomographic approach using omega signals and ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, I.; Kasahara, Y.; Oya, H.

    2001-07-01

    It has been necessary requirements to determine the global electron density distribution in the plasmasphere with time resolutions, of less than a day. We have provided solutions to this requirement using the wave normal directions, delay time of Omega signals and the in situ electron density observed on-board the Japanese satellite Akebono (Sawada et al., Journal of Geophysical Research 98(11) (1993) 267, Kimura et al., Advance Space Research 15(2) (1995) 103, Advance Space Research 18(6) (1996) 279, Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 59 (1997) 1569). The present paper is intended to review our earlier studies.

  13. 3D Reconfigurable NoC Multiprocessor Portable Sounder for Plasmaspheric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    The paper describes the development of a prototype imaging sounder for studying the irregularities of the ionospheric plasma. Cutting edge three-dimensional reconfigurable logic has been implemented allowing highly-intensive scientific calculations to be performed in hardware. The new parallel processing algorithms implemented offer a significant amount of performance improvement in the range of 80% compared to existing digital sounder implementations. The current system configuration is taking into consideration the modern scientific needs for portability during scientific campaigns. The prototype acts as a digital signal processing experimentation platform for future larger-scale digital sounder instrumentations for measuring complex planetary plasmaspheric environments.

  14. Effects of plasmaspheric ion heating due to ionospheric and magnetospheric sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, Richard H.

    1996-01-01

    In an initial study, the He(+) observations from the Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer on Dynamics Explorer 1 (RIMS/DE 1) was examined for more than 120 transits of the plasmasphere in the fall of 1981. The He(+) to H(+) ratio was determined as it varied spatially over portions of the DE 1 orbit, and its variation with solar and magnetic activities and with local time, focusing specifically on the inner plasmasphere. These variations were compared along the L = 2 field line with calculations made by the Field Line Interhemispheric Plasma (FLIP) code. In a recently submitted paper, the He(+) to H(+) density ratio was examined for all the available data from 1981 to 1984 from the RIMS on DE 1. There are two basic characteristics of the ratio: one is that the ratio decreases with radial distance in the plasmasphere, and the other is the strong dependence of the density ratio on solar activity. In addition to the He(+)/H(+) ratio research, a phenomenon has been studied in the topside ionosphere which relates to the thermal coupling of the ionosphere to the plasmasphere. There is little or no correlation with magnetic and solar activity here. Another study has been directed toward the relation of plasma properties to the density gradients forming the plasmapause. The study has followed a two-pronged approach. First, the observations have been analyzed to determine what happens to the plasma properties across these boundary layers (density gradients). Second, comparisons were made with FLIP model calculations to determine how well the model is able to treat these conditions. Among the significant lessons learned in these studies are two that bear directly on the direction of future investigations in this area. First, composition cannot be viewed independently of thermal structure. Second, solar and magnetic activity effects are real; but the causal relationship between activity and effects is frequently quite complicated because several different processes appear to be

  15. Impact of the dipole tilt angle on the ionospheric plasma in the outer plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchaudon, Aurelie; Blelly, Pierre-Louis

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a new interhemispheric 16-moment based ionosphere model. This model describes the field-aligned transport of the multi-species ionospheric plasma (6 ions) from one hemisphere to the other, taking into account source processes at low altitudes (photoionization, chemistry) and coupling with suprathermal electrons. We simulate the convection and corotation transport of closed flux tubes in the outer plasmasphere for tilted/eccentric dipolar magnetic field configuration. We ran the model in solstice and equinox conditions and for two plasmapause boundary conditions: one corresponding to standard conditions with a stagnation point at 4.5 Earth radii (RE) and 15h Magnetic Local Time (MLT) and one corresponding to very quiet conditions with a stagnation point at 6 RE and 15h MLT. For each season/stagnation simulation, the model is run for 30 days before the equinox/solstice date in order to eliminate the transients. The goal is to study the combined effect of the tilt of the magnetic field and the rotation axis on the field-aligned dynamics and overall equilibrium of the subauroral ionosphere. In the classical representation of the plasmasphere, the ionosphere only depends on angular MLT sector. We will show that due to the tilt effect, this view is erroneous and no real dynamic equilibrium is reached, in particular close to the stagnation point where we can observe large day-to-day variations in the ionospheric parameters. Finally, we will present the temperatures anisotropy development along the flux tube for different positions of the stagnation point.

  16. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Electric Field, Ring Current, Plasmasphere, and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.; Liemohn, M. W.; Fok, M.-C.; Ridley, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Further development of our self-consistent model of interacting ring current (RC) ions and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is presented. This model incorporates large scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and treats self-consistently not only EMIC waves and RC ions, but also the magnetospheric electric field, RC, and plasmasphere. Initial simulations indicate that the region beyond geostationary orbit should be included in the simulation of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Additionally, a self-consistent description, based on first principles, of the ionospheric conductance is required. These initial simulations further show that in order to model the EMIC wave distribution and wave spectral properties accurately, the plasmasphere should also be simulated self-consistently, since its fine structure requires as much care as that of the RC. Finally, an effect of the finite time needed to reestablish a new potential pattern throughout the ionosphere and to communicate between the ionosphere and the equatorial magnetosphere cannot be ignored.

  17. ISEE 1 observations of thermal plasma in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during periods of quieting magnetic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, J.L.; Baugher, C.R.; Chappell, C.R.; Shelley, E.G.; Young, D.T.; Anderson, R.R.

    1981-11-01

    Thermal (< or approx. =100 electron volts) ion observations made with the plasma composition experiment on ISEE 1 are combined with plasma density profiles obtained from plasma frequency measurements made with the plasma wave experiment to conduct an investigation of thermal plasma behavior in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during periods of quieting magnetic activity. Normally, the principal thermal ion population in the plasmasphere consists of cold (kT< or approx. =1 eV), isotropic distributions with ion species in the order of dominance H/sup +/:He/sup +/:O/sup +/, while outside the plasmapause, the observed E< or approx. =100 eV ion distributions usually are field-aligned in structure, have characteristic energies E< or approx. =10 eV and H/sup +/:O/sup +/He/sup +/ order of dominance in fluxes. During periods in which the magnetic activity quiets, the above two regions are separated by a new region in which, at times, low-energy (approx.1-2 eV) H/sup +/ and He/sup +/ are found flowing along the magnetic field lines. On other occasions following quieting magnetic activity, pancake distributions (peak fluxes at 90/sup 0/ pitch angle) are observed in this region. Other complex distributions have been seen, and these complexities and the limitations of the data coverage preclude a satisfactory simple interpretation. It seems plausible to identify this region as the site of plasmasphere refilling. However, the data presumably also contain evidence of the quiet time rotation of the plasmasphere bulge region into the morning sector.

  18. A case study of storm commencement and recovery plasmaspheric electric fields near L=2.5 at equinox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. Balmforth (*

    Full Text Available Data from the VLF Doppler experiment at Faraday, Antarctica (65° S, 64° W are used to study the penetration of the high-latitude convection electric field to lower latitudes during severely disturbed conditions. Alterations of the electric field at L-values within the range 2.0 - 2.7 are studied for two cases at equinox (10 - 12 September 1986 and 1 - 3 May 1986. The recovery of the electric field is found to be approximately an exponential function of time. Values for the equatorial meridional E×B drift velocity, inferred from the data, are used as inputs to a model of the plasmasphere and ionosphere. The model and experimental results are used to investigate the post-storm alteration of ionospheric coupling processes. The magnitude of the effect of ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling fluxes on NmF2 values and the O+-H+ transition height is dependent on the local time of storm commencement, and on the orientation of the electric field. The coupling fluxes appear to have a maximum influence on ionospheric content during the main phase of geomagnetic activity that produces outward motion of plasmaspheric whistler ducts.

  19. Interaction of ring current and radiation belt protons with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. 2. Time evolution of the distribution function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Rasmussen, C. E.; Miller, R. H.; Villalon, E.

    1995-11-01

    The evolution of the bounce-averaged ring current/radiation belt proton distribution is simulated during resonant interactions with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. The plasmaspheric hiss is assumed to be generated by ring current electrons and to be damped by the energetic protons. Thus energy is transferred between energetic electrons and protons using the plasmaspheric hiss as a mediary. The problem is not solved self-consistently. During the simulation period, interactions with ring current electrons (not represented in the model) are assumed to maintain the wave amplitudes in the presence of damping by the energetic protons, allowing the wave spectrum to be held fixed. Diffusion coefficients in pitch angle, cross pitch angle/energy, and energy were previously calculated by Kozyra et al. (1994) and are adopted for the present study. The simulation treats the energy range, E>=80 keV, within which the wave diffusion operates on a shorter timescale than other proton loss processes (i.e., Coulomb drag and charge exchange). These other loss processes are not included in the simulation. An interesting result of the simulation is that energy diffusion maximizes at moderate pitch angles near the edge of the atmospheric loss cone. Over the simulation period, diffusion in energy creates an order of magnitude enhancement in the bounce-averaged proton distribution function at moderate pitch angles. The loss cone is nearly empty because scattering of particles at small pitch angles is weak. The bounce-averaged flux distribution, mapped to ionospheric heights, results in elevated locally mirroring proton fluxes. OGO 5 observed order of magnitude enhancements in locally mirroring energetic protons at altitudes between 350 and 1300 km and invariant latitudes between 50° and 60° (Lundblad and Soraas, 1978). The proton distributions were highly anisotropic in pitch angle with nearly empty loss cones. The similarity between the observed distributions and those resulting from this

  20. Full-wave model of D-region upward VLF coupling to whistlers in the plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Shao, X.; Lay, E. H.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric-lightning-to-plasmasphere VLF coupling via whistlers is key to understanding the problem of radiation-belt losses and the slot region. In the lowermost ionosphere, the "D-region" (roughly 60 - 100 km altitude), the coupling occurs between the VLF incident from the "vacuum" below, to the electron whistler capable of transiting upward through the E- and F-regions above. We have modified our successful and data-validated D-region VLF downward-reflection model to predict upward-coupled whistler waveforms recorded on topside satellites. The model has been run in production mode for predicting downward-reflected waveforms recorded at ground stations, but the model's internal calculation also fully describes the "penetrating" solution that merges into the oblique electron whistler. We have begun to test the model against VLF, three-dimensional electric-field recordings from the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) [Pfaff et al., 2010] on the C/NOFS satellite. VEFI's broadband recording and large on-board memory serendipitously provide an excellent platform for studying lightning whistlers in the plasmasphere. We have already demonstrated [Jacobson et al., 2011] that VEFI is superbly suited for testing transionospheric propagation, in conjunction with the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN; see www.wwlln.net) to provide groundtruth location/time of the lightning strokes. This poster will describe latest results. Jacobson, A. R., R. H. Holzworth, R. F. Pfaff, and M. P. McCarthy (2011), Study of oblique whistlers in the low-latitude ionosphere, jointly with the C/NOFS satellite and the World-Wide Lightning Location Network, Annales Geophysicae, 29, 851-863. Pfaff, R., D. Rowland, H. Freudenreich, K. Bromund, K. Le, M. Acuna, J. Klenzing, C. Liebrecht, S. Martin, W. J. Burke, N. C. Maynard, D. E. Hunton, P. A. Roddy, J. O. Ballenthin, and G. R. Wilson (2010), Observations of DC electric fields in the low-latitude ionosphere and their variations with

  1. Simulation of EMIC growth and propagation within the plasmaspheric plume density irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Soria-Santacruz Pich, M.; Spasojevic, M.

    2012-12-01

    In situ data from the Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer (MPA) instruments onboard the LANL spacecraft are used to study the growth and propagation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the presence of cold plasma irregularities in the plasmaspheric plume. The data corresponds to the 9 June 2001 event, a period of moderate geomagnetic activity with highly irregular density structure within the plume as measured by the MPA instrument at geosynchoronus orbit. Theory and observations suggest that EMIC waves are responsible for energetic proton precipitation, which is stronger during geomagnetically disturbed intervals. These waves propagate below the proton gyrofrequency, and they appear in three frequency bands due to the presence of heavy ions, which strongly modify wave propagation characteristics. These waves are generated by ion cyclotron instability of ring current ions, whose temperature anisotropy provides the free energy required for wave growth. Growth maximizes for field-aligned propagation near the equatorial plane where the magnetic field gradient is small. Although the wave's group velocity typically stays aligned with the geomagnetic field direction, wave-normal vectors tend to become oblique due to the curvature and gradient of the field. On the other hand, radial density gradients have the capability of guiding the waves and competing against the magnetic field effect thus favoring wave growth conditions. In addition, enhanced cold plasma density reduces the proton resonant energy where higher fluxes are available for resonance, and hence explaining why wave growth is favored at higher L-shell regions where the ratio of plasma to cyclotron frequency is larger. The Stanford VLF 3D Raytracer is used together with path-integrated linear growth calculations to study the amplification and propagation characteristics of EMIC waves within the plasmaspheric plume formed during the 9 June 2001 event. Cold multi-ion plasma is assumed for raytracing

  2. Resonant Scattering of Relativistic Outer Zone Electrons by Plasmaspheric Plume Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Zhen-Peng; ZHENG Hui-Nan

    2009-01-01

    The bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck equation is solved to study the relativistic electron phase space density(PSD)evolution in the outer radiation belt due to resonant interactions with plasmaspheric plume electromagnetic ion cyclotron(EMIC)waves.It is found that the PSDs of relativistic electrons can be depleted by 1-3 orders of magnitude in 5h,supporting the previous finding that resonant interactions with EMIC waves may account for the frequently observed relativistic electron flux dropouts in the outer radiation belt during the main phase of a storm.The significant precipitation Joss of ~Me V electrons is primarily induced by the EMIC waves in H~+ and He~+ bands.The rapid remove of highly relativistic electrons(>5 MeV)is mainly driven by the EMIC waves in O~+ band at lower pitch-angles,as well as the EMIC waves in H~+ and He~+ bands at larger pitch-angles.Moreover,a stronger depletion of relativistic electrons is found to occur over a wider pitch angle range when EMIC waves are centering relatively higher in the band.

  3. Spatial and temporal characteristics of poloidal waves in the terrestrial plasmasphere: a CLUSTER case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schäfer

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Oscillating magnetic field lines are frequently observed by spacecraft in the terrestrial and other planetary magnetospheres. The CLUSTER mission is a very suitable tool to further study these Alfvén waves as the four CLUSTER spacecraft provide for an opportunity to separate spatial and temporal structures in the terrestrial magnetosphere. Using a large scaled configuration formed by the four spacecraft we are able to detect a poloidal Ultra-Low-Frequency (ULF pulsation of the magnetic and electric field in order to analyze its temporal and spatial structures. For this purpose the measurements are transformed into a specific field line related coordinate system to investigate their specific amplitude pattern depending on the path of the CLUSTER spacecraft across oscillating field lines. These measurements are then compared with modeled spacecraft observations across a localized poloidal wave resonator in the dayside plasmasphere. A detailed investigation of theoretically expected poloidal eigenfrequencies allows us to specify the observed 16 mHz pulsation as a third harmonic oscillation. Based on this we perform a case study providing a clear identification of wave properties such as an spatial scale structure of about 0.67 RE, the azimuthal wave number m≈30, temporal evolution, and energy transport in the detected ULF pulsations.

  4. Comparison of the measured and modeled electron densities and temperatures in the ionosphere and plasmasphere during the period 25-29 June 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Abe, T.; Oyama, K.-I.

    2001-04-01

    We present a comparison of the electron density and temperature behavior measured in the ionosphere by the Millstone Hill incoherent-scatter radar during the period 25-29 June 1990, and in the plasmasphere within the Millstone Hill magnetic field flux tube by the instruments on board of the EXOS-D satellite in the Northern Hemisphere between 02:07:56 UT and 02:11:08 UT on 28 June 1990 with numerical model calculations from a time-dependent mathematical model of the Earth's ionosphere and plasmasphere. We have evaluated the value of the nighttime additional heating rate that should be added to the normal photoelectron heating in the electron energy equation in the plasmasphere region above 5000 km along the magnetic field line to explain the high electron temperature measured by the instruments on board of the EXOS-D satellite. The additional heating brings the measured and modeled electron temperatures into agreement with the plasmasphere and into very large disagreement with the ionosphere if the classical electron heat flux along magnetic field line is used in the model. The approach of Pavlov et al. (Annales Geophysicae 18 (2000) 1257-1272) based on an effective electron thermal conductivity coefficient along the magnetic field line, is used to explain the measured electron temperature in the ionosphere and plasmasphere. This approach leads to a heat flux which is less than that given by the classical Spitzer-Harm theory. The evaluated additional heating of electrons in the plasmasphere and the decrease of the thermal conductivity in the topside ionosphere and the greater part of the plasmasphere allow the model to accurately reproduce the electron temperatures observed by the instruments on board of the EXOS-D satellite in the plasmasphere and the Millstone Hill incoherent-scatter radar in the ionosphere. The resulting effect of vibrationally excited N2 and O2 on NmF2 is the decrease of the calculated daytime NmF2 up to a factor of 2. The modeled electron

  5. Akebono (EXOS-D) sounder data archive for studies of the ionosphere and plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, A.; Katoh, Y.; Obara, T.

    2016-12-01

    For the purpose of topside sounding of the ionosphere and active experiments of the plasma waves in geospace, a sounder system was installed on the Akebono (EXOS-D) satellite, which was operated in a period from 1989 to 2015. Through the long operation period, the sounder system was also operated successfully, and brought us 117,468 ionograms in a frequency range from 0.02-0.89 MHz and 31,936 ionograms in a frequency range from 0.3-11.4 MHz taken within 2.6 Re. In order to provide the data to world-wide researchers' use, we are preparing data archive of Akebono Sounder data in Common Data Format (CDF) and Planetary Data System (PDS) format. Calibrated ionograms will be provided as Level-2 data. In addition, we are going to perform echo trace of the ionograms, and derive the vertical profile of the electron number density below the satellite. The horizontal and vertical distribution of the number density of the topside ionosphere along the satellite path will be provided as Level-3 data. However, because we need some efforts in manual echo tracing with numerous ionograms, it will take some time to finish the release of Level-3 data. So, we are going to prepare another simplified Leve-3 data, which provides the horizontal and apparent (assuming light-speed propagation) vertical distribution of the reflection point of the echo at some fixed frequency. The dataset will be enough useful in finding irregular plasma structures around auroral ionosphere and storm-time plasmasphere.

  6. AUTOSCALA software improvements: topside-plasmasphere profiles and TEC model assisted by AIS ionosonde measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaroni, C.; Ippolito, A.; Scotto, C.; Ciraolo, L.

    2012-12-01

    The group of Upper Atmosphere Physics at INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) developed Autoscala, a computer program for automatic scaling of the critical frequency foF2 and other ionospheric parameters derived from ionograms. Autoscala includes a routine that automatically estimates the electron density profile below F layer peak height hmF2, by adjusting the parameters of a model according to the recorded ionogram [Scotto (2009)]. Recently we have introduced a new algorithm for modeling upper ionosphere and plasmasphere electron density profiles following the approach suggested by Kutiev et al. (2009). In particular, these model uses the parameters of F layer peak (foF2, hmF2, scale height at hmF2) to obtain scale heights that are useful to construct H- and O+ density profiles, and consequently N(h) profile (given as the sum of the former two). Integrating electron density profiles we are then able to obtain a real time TEC estimation above the considered ionospheric station. A first validation of the model is carried out for data measured at Rome ionospheric station (Italy, 41°54' N 12°28' E) using independent TEC measurements from GPS receivers. References: Scotto, C. (2009). Electron density profile calculation technique for Autoscala ionogram analysis. Advances in Space Research, 44(6), 756-766. doi:10.1016/j.asr.2009.04.037 Kutiev, I., Marinov, P., Belehaki, a., Reinisch, B., & Jakowski, N. (2009). Reconstruction of topside density profile by using the topside sounder model profiler and digisonde data. Advances in Space Research, 43(11), 1683-1687. doi:10.1016/j.asr.2008.08.017

  7. He+ dominance in the plasmasphere during geomagnetically disturbed periods: 1. Observational results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Wilford

    Full Text Available Observations made by the DMSP F10 satellite during the recovery phase from geomagnetic disturbances in June 1991 show regions of He+ dominance around 830 km altitude at 09:00 MLT. These regions are co-located with a trough in ionisation observed around 55° in the winter hemisphere. Plasma temperature and concentration observations made during the severe geomagnetic storm of 24 March 1991 are used as a case study to determine the effects of geomagnetic disturbances along the orbit of the F10 satellite. Previous explanations for He+ dominance in this trough region relate to the part of the respective flux tubes that is in darkness. Such conditions are not relevant for this study, since the whole of the respective flux tubes are sunlit. A new mechanism is proposed to explain the He+ dominance in the trough region. This mechanism is based on plasma transport and chemical reaction effects in the F-region and topside ionosphere, and on the time scales for such chemical reactions. Flux tubes previously depleted by geomagnetic storm effects refill during the recovery phase from the ionosphere as a result of pressure differences along the flux tubes. Following a geomagnetic disturbance, the He+ ion recovers quickly via the rapid photoionisation of neutral helium, in the F-region and the topside. The recovery of the O+ and H+ ions is less rapid. This is proposed as a result of the respective charge exchange reactions with neutral atomic hydrogen and oxygen. Preliminary model calculations support the proposed mechanism.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (storms and sub-storms, plasmasphere

  8. Transverse eV ion heating by random electric field fluctuations in the plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Mourenas, D.; Agapitov, O. V.; Blum, L.

    2017-02-01

    Charged particle acceleration in the Earth inner magnetosphere is believed to be mainly due to the local resonant wave-particle interaction or particle transport processes. However, the Van Allen Probes have recently provided interesting evidence of a relatively slow transverse heating of eV ions at distances about 2-3 Earth radii during quiet times. Waves that are able to resonantly interact with such very cold ions are generally rare in this region of space, called the plasmasphere. Thus, non-resonant wave-particle interactions are expected to play an important role in the observed ion heating. We demonstrate that stochastic heating by random transverse electric field fluctuations of whistler (and possibly electromagnetic ion cyclotron) waves could explain this weak and slow transverse heating of H+ and O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere. The essential element of the proposed model of ion heating is the presence of trains of random whistler (hiss) wave packets, with significant amplitude modulations produced by strong wave damping, rapid wave growth, or a superposition of wave packets of different frequencies, phases, and amplitudes. Such characteristics correspond to measured characteristics of hiss waves in this region. Using test particle simulations with typical wave and plasma parameters, we demonstrate that the corresponding stochastic transverse ion heating reaches 0.07-0.2 eV/h for protons and 0.007-0.015 eV/h for O+ ions. This global temperature increase of the Maxwellian ion population from an initial Ti˜0.3 eV could potentially explain the observations.

  9. Transverse eV Ion Heating by Random Electric Field Fluctuations in the Plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Mourenas, D.; Agapitov, O. V.; Blum, L.

    2017-01-01

    Charged particle acceleration in the Earth inner magnetosphere is believed to be mainly due to the local resonant wave-particle interaction or particle transport processes. However, the Van Allen Probes have recently provided interesting evidence of a relatively slow transverse heating of eV ions at distances about 2-3 Earth radii during quiet times. Waves that are able to resonantly interact with such very cold ions are generally rare in this region of space, called the plasmasphere. Thus, non-resonant wave-particle interactions are expected to play an important role in the observed ion heating. We demonstrate that stochastic heating by random transverse electric field fluctuations of whistler (and possibly electromagnetic ion cyclotron) waves could explain this weak and slow transverse heating of H+ and O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere. The essential element of the proposed model of ion heating is the presence of trains of random whistler (hiss) wave packets, with significant amplitude modulations produced by strong wave damping, rapid wave growth, or a superposition of wave packets of different frequencies, phases, and amplitudes. Such characteristics correspond to measured characteristics of hiss waves in this region. Using test particle simulations with typical wave and plasma parameters, we demonstrate that the corresponding stochastic transverse ion heating reaches 0.07-0.2 eV/h for protons and 0.007-0.015 eV/h for O+ ions. This global temperature increase of the Maxwellian ion population from an initial Ti approx. 0.3 eV could potentially explain the observations.

  10. SAMI3 prediction of the impact of the 21 August 2017 total solar eclipse on the ionosphere/plasmasphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huba, J. D.; Drob, D.

    2017-06-01

    We present quantitative predictions of the impact of the upcoming total solar eclipse on the ionosphere and plasmasphere using the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) model Sami3 is Also a Model of the Ionosphere (SAMI3). The eclipse will occur over the continental United States on 21 August 2017. Our simulation results indicate that in the vicinity of the eclipse (1) the total electron content (TEC) decreases by up to ˜ 5 TEC units (TECU; 1 TECU = ×1016 m-2) which is a ˜ 35% decrease in TEC, (2) the electron density decreases by a factor of ˜ 50% in the F region, (3) the electron temperature decreases by up to ˜800 K in the plasmasphere, and (4) the O+ velocity changes from ˜40 m s-1 upward to ˜20 m s-1 downward in the F region. Interestingly, the continental size modification of the ionospheric conductance modifies the global electric field, which should lead to measurable changes in the TEC in the southern conjugate hemisphere (≲1 TECU).

  11. Comparison of the measured and modelled electron densities and temperatures in the ionosphere and plasmasphere during 20-30 January, 1993

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    Full Text Available We present a comparison of the electron density and temperature behaviour in the ionosphere and plasmasphere measured by the Millstone Hill incoherent-scatter radar and the instruments on board of the EXOS-D satellite with numerical model calculations from a time-dependent mathematical model of the Earth's ionosphere and plasmasphere during the geomagnetically quiet and storm period on 20–30 January, 1993. We have evaluated the value of the additional heating rate that should be added to the normal photoelectron heating in the electron energy equation in the daytime plasmasphere region above 5000 km along the magnetic field line to explain the high electron temperature measured by the instruments on board of the EXOS-D satellite within the Millstone Hill magnetic field flux tube in the Northern Hemisphere. The additional heating brings the measured and modelled electron temperatures into agreement in the plasmasphere and into very large disagreement in the ionosphere if the classical electron heat flux along magnetic field line is used in the model. A new approach, based on a new effective electron thermal conductivity coefficient along the magnetic field line, is presented to model the electron temperature in the ionosphere and plasmasphere. This new approach leads to a heat flux which is less than that given by the classical Spitzer-Harm theory. The evaluated additional heating of electrons in the plasmasphere and the decrease of the thermal conductivity in the topside ionosphere and the greater part of the plasmasphere found for the first time here allow the model to accurately reproduce the electron temperatures observed by the instruments on board the EXOS-D satellite in the plasmasphere and the Millstone Hill incoherent-scatter radar in the ionosphere. The effects of the daytime additional plasmaspheric heating of electrons on the electron temperature and density are small at the F-region altitudes if the modified electron heat flux

  12. Enhancements of magnetospheric convection electric field associated with sudden commencements in the inner magnetosphere and plasmasphere regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinbori, A.; Ono, T.; Iizima, M.; Kumamoto, A.; Nishimura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Electric field variations in the inner magnetosphere and plasmasphere regions associated with sudden commencements (SCs) are investigated by using the observation data of the Akebono satellite which has been carried out more than 15 years since 1989. 117 of 153 SC events in the low-latitude (MLAT bi-polar waveform due to the passage of fast-mode hydromagnetic (HM) waves. The increase of the convection electric field takes place in the entire magnetic local time sector in the inner magnetosphere. The amplitude does not depend on L-value and magnetic local time but is proportional to the SC amplitude measured at Kakioka. The majority of the electric field enhancements persist for about 4 14 min. The origin of the convection electric field in the inner magnetosphere is a plasma motion caused by the compression of the magnetosphere due to the solar wind shock and discontinuity.

  13. ISEE 1 observations of thermal plasma in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during periods of quieting magnetic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Baugher, C. R.; Chappell, C. R.; Shelley, E. G.; Young, D. T.; Anderson, R. R.

    1981-11-01

    An investigation of thermal plasma behavior in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during periods of quieting magnetic activity was conducted by combining thermal ion observations made with the plasma composition experiment on ISEE 1 with plasma density profiles obtained from plasma frequency measurements made with the same satellite's plasma wave experiment. During periods in which the magnetic activity quiets, the two regions characterized by H(+):He(+):O(+) (isotropic) and H(+):O(+):He(+) (field-aligned) ion species distributions (in order of dominance) are separated by a new region in which low-energy H(+) and He(+) are found flowing along the magnetic field lines. At other times, following quieting magnetic activity, distributions having peak fluxes at 90 deg pitch angle are observed in this region.

  14. Intra-plasmaspheric wave power density deduced from long-term DEMETER measurements of terrestrial VLF transmitter wave amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauben, D.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U.

    2012-12-01

    We deduce the 3d intra-plasmaspheric distribution of VLF wave power between conjugate regions of strong VLF wave amplitudes as measured by DEMETER for high-power terrestrial VLF transmitters during its ~6-yr lifetime. We employ a mixed WKB/full-wave technique to solve for the primary and secondary electromagnetic and electrostatic waves which are transmitted and reflected from strong cold-plasma density gradients and posited irregularities, in order to match the respective end-point measured amplitude distributions. Energy arriving in the conjugate region and also escaping to other regions of the magnetosphere is note. The resulting 3d distribution allows improved estimates for the long-term average particle scattering induced by terrestrial VLF transmitters.

  15. Topside-plasmasphere electron density profiles model by using AIS ionosonde measurements and calibrates GPS TEC data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaroni, Claudio; Scotto, Carlo; Ippolito, Alessandro; Ciraolo, Luigi

    2013-04-01

    The Upper Atmosphere Physics group at INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) developed Autoscala, a computer program for automatic scaling of the critical frequency foF2 and other ionospheric parameters derived from ionograms. Autoscala includes a routine that automatically estimates the electron density profile below F layer peak height hmF2, by adjusting the parameters of a model according to the recorded ionogram [Scotto (2009)]. By integrating this profile we can estimate bottom-side total electron content (bTEC). By means of a calibration technique [Ciraolo et al. (2007)], we are able to obtain calibrated vertical TEC (vTEC) values from GPS measurements over a receiver station. This method permits to estimate biases of the received signal due to transmitter-receiver hardware configuration. These biases must be eliminated from the GPS data in order to calibrate the experimental slant total electron content (sTEC) along the satellite-receiver line-of-sight (LoS). The difference between vTEC and bottom-side TEC (bTEC) permits to evaluate electron content of the topside ionospheric region (tTEC). Starting from tTEC, bottom-side parameters (foF2, hmF2, scale height at hmF2) obtained by ionosonde and O+ - H+ transition level, we can solve a system of equations based on different ionospheric profiler (Chapman, sech-squared and exponential) the solution of which provides ion scale height [Stankov et al. (2003)]. This last factor is sufficient to establish the vertical distribution of electrons in topside and plasmasphere regions. Obtained vertical profiles could be used to develop a new model for real time estimation of TEC and topside electron density distribution. References: Scotto, C. (2009). Electron density profile calculation technique for Autoscala ionogram analysis. Advances in Space Research, 44(6), 756-766. doi:10.1016/j.asr.2009.04.037 Ciraolo, L., et al. "Calibration errors on experimental slant total electron content (TEC) determined with

  16. The CuSPED Mission: CubeSat for GNSS Sounding of the Ionosphere-Plasmasphere Electron Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jason N.; Keesee, Amy M.; Christian, John A.; Gu, Yu; Scime, Earl; Komjathy, Attila; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Pollock, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    The CubeSat for GNSS Sounding of Ionosphere-Plasmasphere Electron Density (CuSPED) is a 3U CubeSat mission concept that has been developed in response to the NASA Heliophysics program's decadal science goal of the determining of the dynamics and coupling of the Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and atmosphere and their response to solar and terrestrial inputs. The mission was formulated through a collaboration between West Virginia University, Georgia Tech, NASA GSFC and NASA JPL, and features a 3U CubeSat that hosts both a miniaturized space capable Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver for topside atmospheric sounding, along with a Thermal Electron Capped Hemispherical Spectrometer (TECHS) for the purpose of in situ electron precipitation measurements. These two complimentary measurement techniques will provide data for the purpose of constraining ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling models and will also enable studies of the local plasma environment and spacecraft charging; a phenomenon which is known to lead to significant errors in the measurement of low-energy, charged species from instruments aboard spacecraft traversing the ionosphere. This paper will provide an overview of the concept including its science motivation and implementation.

  17. Comparison of the measured and modeled electron densities and temperatures in the ionosphere and plasmasphere during 14-16 May 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Pavlova, N. M.

    2004-01-01

    The electron density and temperature in the ionosphere and plasmasphere measured by the Millstone Hill incoherent-scatter radar and the instruments on board of the EXOS-D satellite are compared with calculations from a time-dependent mathematical model of the Earth's ionosphere and plasmasphere during 14-16 May 1991. Use of [O]/[N2] correction factors with the NRLMSISE-00 model of the neutral atmosphere was found to bring the modeled and measured F-region main peak electron densities into agreement. It was found that the nighttime additional heating rate should be added to the normal photoelectron heating in the electron energy equation, in the nighttime plasmasphere region, in order for the model to reproduce the observed high plasmaspheric electron temperature within the Millstone Hill magnetic field flux tube in the Northern Hemisphere. The additional heating brings the measured and modeled electron temperatures into agreement in the plasmasphere and into a very large disagreement in the ionosphere, if the classical electron heat flux along magnetic field lines is used. An approach of Pavlov et al. (2000, 2001) based on a new effective electron thermal conductivity coefficient along the magnetic field line and the evaluated additional heating of electrons in the plasmasphere is used to explain the observed electron temperature in the ionosphere and plasmasphere. This approach leads to a heat flux which is less than that given by the classical theory. The effects of the additional plasmaspheric heating of electrons on the electron temperature and density are small at the F-region altitudes if the modified electron heat flux is used. We found that the resulting effect of vibrationally excited N2 and O2 on NmF2 is the decrease of the calculated NmF2 by up to a factor of about 2.7 by day and up to a factor of about 2.5 by night. The modeled electron temperature is very sensitive to the electron density, and this decrease in electron density results in an increase of

  18. New method in computer simulations of electron and ion densities and temperatures in the plasmasphere and low-latitude ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    Full Text Available A new theoretical model of the Earth’s low- and mid-latitude ionosphere and plasmasphere has been developed. The new model uses a new method in ionospheric and plasmaspheric simulations which is a combination of the Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches in model simulations. The electron and ion continuity and energy equations are solved in a Lagrangian frame of reference which moves with an individual parcel of plasma with the local plasma drift velocity perpendicular to the magnetic and electric fields. As a result, only the time-dependent, one-dimension electron and ion continuity and energy equations are solved in this Lagrangian frame of reference. The new method makes use of an Eulerian computational grid which is fixed in space co-ordinates and chooses the set of the plasma parcels at every time step, so that all the plasma parcels arrive at points which are located between grid lines of the regularly spaced Eulerian computational grid at the next time step. The solution values of electron and ion densities Ne and Ni and temperatures Te and Ti at the Eulerian computational grid are obtained by interpolation. Equations which determine the trajectory of the ionospheric plasma perpendicular to magnetic field lines and take into account that magnetic field lines are "frozen" in the ionospheric plasma are derived and included in the new model. We have presented a comparison between the modeled NmF2 and hmF2 and NmF2 and hmF2 which were observed at the anomaly crest and close to the geomagnetic equator simultaneously by the Huancayo, Chiclayo, Talara, Bogota, Panama, and Puerto Rico ionospheric sounders during the 7 October 1957 geomagnetically quiet time period at solar maximum. The model calculations show that there is a need to revise the model local time dependence of the equatorial upward E × B drift velocity given by Scherliess and Fejer (1999 at solar maximum during quiet

  19. GEOS 1 observations of low-energy ions in the earth's plasmasphere - A study on composition, and temperature and density structure under quiet geomagnetic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Geiss, J.; Balsiger, H.; Young, D. T.

    Data are presented on the composition and the temperature (T) and density (N) distributions of the earth's plasmasphere ionic population, obtained from GEOS 1 thermal-ion data. In deriving the N and T of the ions, a novel technique was employed, which is based on the modulation of the count rates by the spacecraft's spin. It was found that, for the major ion species H(+) and He(+), the relative density abundance He(+)/H(+) value of several percent was fairly common; the H(+) and He(+) ions are generally in thermal equilibrium, with temperatures varying between 4000 and 15,000 K, with a tendency to increase with L value. A comparison of the thermal structure obtained with those obtained by the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE and the Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer on DE 1 showed no systematic difference between the 'energy' techniques used in these studies and the present 'angular' technique.

  20. Large-Amplitude Transmitter-Associated and Lightning-Associated Whistler Waves in the Earth's Inner Plasmasphere at L less than 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A.; Cattell, C.; Wygant, J.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Schreiner, S.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.

    2011-01-01

    We report observations of very large amplitude whistler mode waves in the Earth fs nightside inner radiation belt enabled by the STEREO Time Domain Sampler. Amplitudes range from 30.110 mV/m (zero ]peak), 2 to 3 orders of magnitude larger than previously observed in this region. Measurements from the peak electric field detector (TDSMax) indicate that these large ]amplitude waves are prevalent throughout the plasmasphere. A detailed examination of high time resolution electric field waveforms is undertaken on a subset of these whistlers at L 100 keV) electrons on a time scale of <1 s and thus may be an important previously unaccounted for source of energization or pitch ]angle scattering in the inner radiation belt.

  1. Electron loss rates from the outer radiation belt caused by the filling of the outer plasmasphere: the calm before the storm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Measurements from 7 spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit are analyzed to determine the decay rate of the number density of the outer electron radiation belt prior to the onset of high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms. Superposed-data analysis is used wan(?) a collection of 124 storms. When there is a calm before the storm, the electron number density decays exponentially before the storm with a 3.4-day e-folding time: beginning about 4 days before storm onset, the density decreases from {approx}4x10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} to {approx}1X 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}. When there is not a calm before the storm, the number-density decay is very smalL The decay in the number density of radiation-belt electrons is believed to be caused by pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the atmospheric loss cone as the outer plasmasphere fills during the calms. While the radiation-belt electron density decreases, the temperature of the electron radiation belt holds approximately constant, indicating that the electron precipitation occurs equally at all energies. Along with the number density decay, the pressure of the outer electron radiation belt decays and the specific entropy increases. From the measured decay rates, the electron flux to the atmosphere is calculated and that flux is 3 orders of magnitude less than thermal fluxes in the magnetosphere, indicating that the radiation-belt pitch-angle scattering is 3 orders weaker than strong diffusion. Energy fluxes into the atmosphere are calculated and found to be insufficient to produce visible airglow.

  2. Optical design of moon-based earth's plasmaspheric extreme ultraviolet imager%月基地球等离子体层极紫外成像仪的光学设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈波; 何飞

    2011-01-01

    According to the 30. 4 nm radiation properties of the earth' s plasmasphere, an earth' s plasmaspheric extreme ultraviolet imaging method based on the moon was researched for the first time. The technical parameters of the extreme ultraviolet imager used in the lunar surface were determined, and its field of view is 15°, angular resolution is 0. 1° and the entrance pupil area is larger than 70 cm2. By combining a single spherical multilayer mirror and a spherical microchannel plate photon counting imaging detector, the extrame ultraviolet imager was designed. The ray tracing of designed extreme ultraviolet imager with multilayer optics was also performed. Results show that the radii of the blur spots are 0. 210, 0. 204, 0. 204, and 0. 207 mm respectively at 0,3,5, and 7. 5°, which are basically identical at different field of views. In woking on the lunar surface, the imager has a visionscope of 15. 0 Re to cover the main body of the earth's plasmasphere and a spatial resolution of 0. 10 RE that can reveal the main details of the earth' s plasmasphere. It provides a high quality imaging method for the observation of earths plasmasphere.%依据地球等离子体层在30.4 nm的辐射特性,首次以月球为观测点进行地球等离子体层极紫外波段成像观测方法研究.确定了在月球表面使用的极紫外成像仪的技术参数,给出了视场角为15°、角分辨率为0.1°、入瞳面积>70 cm2的极紫外成像仪的结构形式,采用单球面多层膜反射镜与球面微通道板光子计数成像探测器相结合的方式设计了极紫外成像仪.对设计的极紫外多层膜光学系统成像仪进行光线追迹,弥散斑半径分别为0.210 mm(0°视场)、0.204 mm(3°视场)、0.204 mm(5°视场)、0.207 mm(7.5°视场),对应的角分辨率为0.08°,弥散斑在不同视场角度基本均匀,其结果满足设计要求.该仪器可在月球表面工作,获得视场范围为15.0 RE,覆盖地球等离子体层主

  3. The Upgraded European Digital Upper Atmosphere Server: new DIAS products for the high latitude ionosphere, the topside ionosphere and the plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belehaki, Anna; Kutiev, Ivan; Zolesi, Bruno; Tsagouri, Ioanna; Dialetis, Dimitris; Marinov, Pencho; Fidanova, Stefka; Cander, Lili; Pietrella, Marco; Tziotziou, Kostas; Lykiardopoulos, Angelos

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge of the state of the upper atmosphere, and in particular its ionized part, is very important in several applications affected by space weather, especially the communications and navigation systems that rely on radio transmission. To better classify the ionosphere and forecast its disturbances over Europe, a data and model infrastructure platform called the European Digital Upper Atmosphere Server (DIAS) has been established in the National Observatory of Athens by a European consortium formed around eight ionospheric stations, and funded by the European Commission. The DIAS system operates since 2006 and the basic products that are delivered are real-time and historical ionograms, frequency plots and maps of the ionosphere on the foF2, M(3000)F2, MUF and bottomside electron density, as well as long term and short term forecasting up to 24 hour ahead. The DIAS system supports more than 500 subscribed users, including telecommunication companies, satellite operators, space agencies, radio amateurs, research organizations and the space weather scientific community. In 2012 the system has been upgraded, in close collaboration between the National Observatory of Athens, the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, with funding from the ESA/SSA Programme. The first group of new products results from the implementation of the TaD model (Topside Sounder Model assisted by Digisonde) that makes possible the generation of maps of the electron density at heights up to GNSS orbits, and of TEC and partial TEC maps (topside and plasmaspheric) over Europe. The TaD is based on the simple empirical functions for the transition height, the topside electron density scale height and their ratio, based on the Alouette/ISIS database, and models separately the oxygen, hydrogen and helium ions density profiles. The model takes as input the plasma characteristics at the height of maximum electron concentration that are provided in real

  4. Deduction of the global density of plasmasphere reconstructed from the EUV images using CT method 2.Three dimensional parallel-beam ART reconstruction%利用EUV模拟观测和CT方法重建均匀等离子体层全球密度分布——三维ART重建和地球遮挡效应研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金鑫; 李亮; 陈志强; 徐荣栏; 黄娅; 张丽

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we built up a three dimensional model for the density distribution of earth plasmasphere. According to the physical procedure of 30. 4 nm EUV detection, a numerical method was proposed which simulates the satellite imaging the plasmasphere along a circular orbit. To reconstruct the density distribution in such occasion a modified ART reconstruction method was worked out. Results showed that our method reconstructs the model very well.%本文对地球等离子体层和电离层进行了三维建模,并模拟卫星对30.4 nm极紫外线的探测过程,取得圆轨道平行束情况下的投影数据.采用改进的ART算法对所得数据进行三维重建,获得等离子体层的空间密度分布.结果表明,在投影角度覆盖180°的情况下,重建结果很好地再现了模型中空间各点的数值.文章对实验结果从CT重建方法的角度进行了讨论及分析.

  5. Plasmaspheric, Faraday and Total Electron Contents, 1977 and 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    in) ’r cnj ON 0l ’N - ’ in U"- - ko -O r- j rn cc C) t i if LO nt U- - U)w r-- r-- 0 co j-’ w0’In’.ko D IfV) r- w cr w = Fl. r. o vino Co N r-f cj...Ito 10 mi O’O)C i )c)nf V, LONC IA koi o.2 L 101,vc c N- CIN-v O’-’CWi0)tW ONNC CDIN JCOS vInO ’.N O0%O J) *CD CD ~~~ ~ ~ (, N-f 44..-44- . 1 I- k

  6. Modification of a very large thermal-vacuum test chamber for ionosphere and plasmasphere simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, O. L.

    1978-01-01

    No large-volume chamber existed which could simulate the ion and electron environment of near-earth space. A very large thermal-vacuum chamber was modified to provide for the manipulation of the test volume magnetic field and for the generation and monitoring of plasma. Plasma densities of 1 million particles per cu cm were generated in the chamber where a variable magnetic flux density of up to 0.00015 T (1.5 gauss) was produced. Plasma temperature, density, composition, and visual effects were monitored, and plasma containment and control were investigated. Initial operation of the modified chamber demonstrated a capability satisfactory for a wide variety of experiments and hardware tests which require an interaction with the plasma environment. Potential for improving the quality of the simulation exists.

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of Empirical Parameters in the Ionosphere-Plasmasphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    drift that is calculated within the model. The most significant results from this comparison occur during the day near Mada - gascar (45◦E) and in the...cases. Although the decrease near Mada - gascar occurs for this case with a maximum decrease of 50% (29 TECU) at 0600UT, the increase in the Southeast

  8. Plasmaspheric dynamics resulting from the hallowe'en 2003 geomagnetic storms

    OpenAIRE

    Kale, Z.C.; Mann, I. R.; C. L. Waters; Vellante, M.; T. L. Zhang; Honary, Farideh

    2009-01-01

    Cross-phase-derived plasma mass density trends during the Hallowe'en 2003 geomagnetic storms are presented for 38° magnetic latitude 63° (1.61 ≤ L ≤ 5.10), using data from the SAMNET (Subauroral Magnetometer Network), BGS (British Geological Survey), and SEGMA (South European Geomagnetic Array), ground-based magnetometer arrays in Europe. At all latitudes monitored, a rapid increase of total mass density is observed immediately following the initial storm sudden commencement at 0611 UT on 29 ...

  9. A Study of Artificial Modification of the VLF Propagation Characteristics of the Plasmasphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    belig deselored 2. IIKI I )1\\t’ss1 s DsIM ’s s IIL stItIO\\ it , t + It I lie eqi’ititus dtecrihng tine dill’sioin1 Of ’seseral g uses ll in .u iniiilt...atmosphere control , the floss, a stale of dilf u- hesgi-lrs The~c lhi’tttat Aiti Lie thi, e rok co"- . r sis e expansion csists. intei "it isle ItuIincal...size of the hole is controlled by the expansion and trans- Cobhustion port of the injected exhaust vapors. All of the temnperature ("L) 3250 2869

  10. Longitudinal variation in the ionosphere-plasmasphere system at the minimum of solar and geomagnetic activity: Investigation of temporal and latitudinal dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, Maxim V.; Klimenko, Vladimir V.; Zakharenkova, Irina E.; Vesnin, Artem M.; Cherniak, Iurii V.; Galkin, Ivan A.

    2016-12-01

    We use the Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) as the first-principle calculation of the physical system state, the quick-run ionospheric electron density model (NeQuick) as the climatology background, and the International Reference Ionosphere-based Real-Time Assimilative Model for a global view of the ionospheric weather during a quiet period of the December 2009 solstice. The model computations are compared to the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) radio occultation profiles, CHAMP and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment in situ densities, and GPS total electron content (TEC). It is shown that the plasma density in the ionosphere is generally larger in the American/Atlantic longitudinal sector at any local time. The high-latitude density enhancements are visible in the GSM TIP output at different altitudes but are not reproduced by the NeQuick empirical model. Given that observational data confirm an existence of the high-latitude areas where ionospheric densities are elevated in the altitude range between 300 and 480 km, we conclude that the NmF2 maximum in the GSM TIP output can be trusted. Indeed, such high-latitude NmF2, ionospheric electron content, and TEC maxima in the American longitude sector form on the proper places as shown by the GSM TIP data, COSMIC and GPS observations. According to our results, the high-latitude maximum of NmF2 (1) manifests itself only when the integration over LT or UT of the global maps for 22 December 2009 includes nighttime, i.e., supporting an argument of its close association with the Weddell Sea Anomaly, and (2) also appears in the Ne distribution at altitudes above the F2 peak.

  11. Effects of the ring current and plasmasphere on ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere based on the GEMSIS-RC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, K.; Amano, T.; saito, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Matsumoto, Y.; Umeda, T.; Miyashita, Y.; Ebihara, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Acceleration mechanisms of electrons to cause drastic variation of the Earth's outer radiation belt is one of outstanding issues of the geospace researches. While the radial diffusion of the electrons driven by ULF waves has been considered as one of the candidate mechanisms, efficiency of the mechanism under realistic ULF characteristics and distribution is far from understood. GEMSIS (Geospace Environment Modeling System for Integrated Studies) of STEL, Nagoya University, is the observation-based modeling project for understanding energy and mass transportation from the Sun to the Earth in the geospace environment. Aiming at understanding the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere during the geospace storms, the GEMSIS-Magnetosphere working team has developed a new physics-based model for the global dynamics of the ring current (GEMSIS-RC model). The GEMSIS-RC model is a self-consistent and kinetic numerical simulation code solving the five-dimensional collisionless drift-kinetic equation for the ring-current ions in the inner-magnetosphere coupled with Maxwell equations. We applied the GEMSIS-RC model for simulation of global distribution of ULF waves to test its capability of describing fast time scale phenomena like SCs and ULF waves. Two cases of background profile, i.e., cases without/with plasmapause in the simulation domain, are compared. The result shows that existence of plasmapause strengthens ULFs outside the plasmapause and widens the MLT region where the E_r (toroidal) component is excited from initially-given E_phi (poloidal) component. Comparison between runs with/without ring current ions show that the existence of hot ring current ions can deform and amplify the original sinusoidal waveforms. The deformation causes the energy cascade to higher frequency range (Pc4 and Pc3 ranges). The cascade is more pronounced in the high beta case. Combination with GEMSIS-RB model reproduced rapid radial transport by the drift resonance for ions with drift period of 600 seconds as theoretically expected.

  12. The physics of thermal plasma in the magnetosphere; Proceedings of Symposium 9 of the 26th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Toulouse, France, June 30-July 11, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, C. R. (Editor); Gringauz, K. I. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The conference presents papers on the shape, dynamics, and thermal structure of the plasmasphere and plasmapause; the ionosphere as a supplier of plasma to the earth's magnetosphere; the modeling and remote sensing of thermal plasma in the earth's magnetosphere; and magnetospheric cold plasmas as a medium for wave generation and propagation. Particular attention is given to whistler studies of plasmasphere shape and dynamics, plasmasphere thermal structure as measured by ISEE-1 and DE-1, low-energy ion flows into the magnetosphere, field-aligned flows of ionospheric plasma in the magnetosphere, and field-aligned plasmaspheric flows at moderate latitudes. Papers are also presented on the effects of a tailward stretching geomagnetic field on the drift motion of plasma particles in the magnetospheric equatorial plane, ion cyclotron waves observed near the plasmapause, and the response of energetic particles to nightside magnetic pulsations as seen by AMPTE/CCE.

  13. Two cases of atmospheric escape in the Solar System: Titan and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandouras, I.

    2012-01-01

    Escape into space of the constituents of a planetary upper atmosphere can occur either in the form of neutral gas (thermal escape or non-thermal escape), or in the form of plasma. The long-term stability of an atmosphere results from the balance between source and escape rates. Two cases will be examined: Titan and Earth. Titan is the second largest planetary satellite in the Solar System and is the only one that has an atmosphere as substantial as that of the Earth. Titan's nitrogen rich atmosphere is embedded within Saturn's magnetosphere, and is directly bombarded by energetic ions due to Titan's lack of a significant intrinsic magnetic field. In addition to thermal escape, energy input from Saturn's magnetosphere and from Solar UV radiation can drive several non-thermal escape mechanisms in Titan's upper atmosphere: sputtering, dissociation and dissociative ionization of molecular nitrogen producing pick-up ions, photochemical production of fast neutrals etc. Earth also constantly loses matter, mostly in the form of H+ and O+ ions, through various outflow processes from the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. Most of the ions are low-energy (plasma reservoir is the plasmasphere, which is a toroidal region encircling the Earth and containing cold and dense plasma. Plasma plumes, forming in the outer plasmasphere and released outwards, constitute a well-established mode for plasmaspheric material release to the magnetosphere. They are associated to geomagnetically active periods and the related electric field change. In 1992 Lemaire and Shunk proposed the existence of an additional mode for plasmaspheric material release and escape: a plasmaspheric wind, steadily transporting cold plasmaspheric plasma outwards across the geomagnetic field lines. This has been proposed on a theoretical basis. Direct detection of this wind has, however, eluded observation in the past. Analysis of ion measurements, acquired in the outer plasmasphere by the CIS experiment onboard the

  14. The nighttime winter anomaly (NWA) effect in the american sector as a consequence of interhemispheric ionospheric coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, M.; Jakowski, N.

    1988-06-01

    The nighttime winter anomaly (NWA) effect was observed during solar minimum conditions at the American sector by means of ionospheric electron content and vertical sounding measurements in Havana (Cuba). An effective interhemispheric transport of plasma is suggested to explain enhanced northern nighttime ionization during winter solstice. To elucidate this effect, an adequate physicalnumerical model of the coupled system ionosphere-plasmasphere is presented and applied to a corotating tube of plasma at L=1.5 in the American sector. The NWA can be explained by theoretically derived higher tube content during the December solstice and accordingly by more intense nighttime fluxes from the plasmasphere, compared to the June solstice.

  15. Long-term analysis of ionospheric polar patches based on CHAMP TEC data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noja, M.; Stolle, Claudia; Park, J.

    2013-01-01

    Total electron content (TEC) from LEO satellites offers great possibility to sound the upper ionosphere and plasmasphere. This paper describes a method to derive absolute TEC observations aboard CHAMP considering multipath effects and receiver differential code bias. The long-term data set of 9...

  16. The importance of neutral hydrogen for the maintenance of the midlatitude winter nighttime ionosphere: Evidence from IS observations at Kharkiv, Ukraine, and field line interhemispheric plasma model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, D. V.; Richards, P. G.; Bogomaz, O. V.; Chernogor, L. F.; Truhlik, V.; Emelyanov, L. Ya.; Chepurnyy, Ya. M.; Domnin, I. F.

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the causes of nighttime enhancements in ionospheric density that are observed in winter by the incoherent scatter radar at Kharkiv, Ukraine. Calculations with a comprehensive physical model reveal that large downward ion fluxes from the plasmasphere are the main cause of the enhancements. These large fluxes are enabled by large upward H+ fluxes into the plasmasphere from the conjugate summer hemisphere during the daytime. The nighttime downward H+ flux at Kharkiv is sensitive to the thermosphere model H density, which had to be increased by factors of 2 to 3 to obtain model-data agreement for the topside H+ density. Other studies support the need for increasing the thermosphere model H density for all seasons at solar minimum. It was found that neutral winds are less effective than plasmaspheric fluxes for maintaining the nighttime ionosphere. This is partly because increased equatorward winds simultaneously oppose the downward H+ flux. The model calculations also reveal the need for a modest additional heat flow from the plasmasphere in the afternoon. This source could be the quiet time ring current.

  17. On the role of collective interactions in asymmetric ring current formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Bespalov

    Full Text Available The contribution of resonant wave-particle interactions to the formation and decay of the magnetospheric ring current is analysed in the framework of a self-consistent set of equations which take into account azimuthal plasmasphere asymmetry. It is shown that the cyclotron interaction of westward drifting energetic protons with Alfven waves in the evening-side plasmaspheric bulge region leads to the formation of a ring current asymmetry located near 18:00 MLT. The time-scale of this asymmetry is determined by the proton drift time through the plasmaspheric bulge and is about 1 - 3 h. A symmetrical ring current decays mainly due to charge exchange processes. The theory is compared with known experimental data on ions and waves in the ring current and on low-latitude magnetic disturbances. New low-latitude magnetometer data on the magnetic storm of 24 - 26 July 1986 are also discussed. The model presented explains the observed localization of an asymmetrical ring current loop in the evening sector and the difference in relaxation time-scales of the asymmetry and the Dst index. It also explains measured wave turbulence levels in the evening-side plasmasphere and wave observation statistics.

  18. Global Ionospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-29

    phenomena near the plasmasphere boundary. A number of advances were made in active experiments, especially with the HAARP facility. This included...observations of optical emission generated by the HAARP facility 250 km away 19 vi Illustrations (cont.) 11...Synergistic utilization of the HAARP facility built and operated by our section at AFRL has also been carried out under this task, producing a

  19. Investigations of the Nature and Behavior of Plasma-Density Disturbances That May Impact GPS and Other Transionospheric Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    artificially by means of high-frequency (HF) heating of the ionosphere in the HF Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ). The first-year efforts included...measurement of TEC and scintillation at Ascension Island; preliminary assessment of plasmaspheric contribution to TEC; and coordinating development of a variety of diagnostic instruments for HAARP .

  20. NRL SSD Research Achievements: 19601970. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    conic section is the instrument field of view, looking outward through the Earth’s shadow into the sunlit plasmasphere. Fig. 60s.1.5 – 3D...First complete solution of the resonance radiation transport problem in optically thick media The transport of resonance radiation in very thick

  1. Amplification of exo-hiss into low-frequency chorus following substorm injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Z.; Su, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Whistler-mode chorus waves contribute significantly to the acceleration of radiation belt electrons. Chorus with frequency below 0.1 fce (fce is the equatorial electron gyro-frequency) has been identified as the low-frequency chorus. How such low-frequency chorus waves are generated remains an unanswered question. Here we propose a new candidate generation mechanism that exo-hiss waves can serve as the source of low-frequency chorus. Exo-hiss is usually believed to be the leaked plasmaspheric hiss from the high-density plasmasphere into the low-density plasmatrough. Both Van Allen Probes observations and linear instability analyses support that exo-hiss can be effectively amplified into low-frequency chorus by the substorm-injected anisotropic electrons at energies around 100 keV.

  2. On the mechanism of the post-midnight winter NmF2 enhancements: dependence on solar activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Y. Leschinskaya

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the NmF2 peak formation at different levels of solar activity is analyzed using Millstone Hill IS radar observations. The hmF2 nighttime increase due to thermospheric winds and the downward plasmaspheric fluxes are the key processes responsible for the NmF2 peak formation. The electron temperature follows with the opposite sign the electron density variations in this process. This mechanism provides a consistency with the Millstone Hill observations on the set of main parameters. The observed decrease of the nighttime NmF2 peak amplitude with solar activity is due to faster increasing of the recombination efficiency compared to the plasmaspheric flux increase. The E×B plasma drifts are shown to be inefficient for the NmF2 nighttime peak formation at high solar activity.Key words: Ionosphere (ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; mid-latitude ionosphere; plasma temperature and density

  3. A DE-1/whistler study of the thermal plasma structure and dynamics in the dusk bulge sector of the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research was to obtain new understanding of the thermal plasma structure and dynamics of the plasmasphere bulge region of the magnetosphere, with special emphasis on the erosion process that results in a reduction in plasmasphere size and on the manner in which erosion leads to the presence of patches of dense plasma in the middle and outer afternoon-dusk magnetosphere. Case studies involving data from the DE 1, GEOS 2, and ISEE 1 satellites and from ground whistler stations Siple, Halley, and Kerguelen were used. A copy of the published paper entitled 'A case study of plasma structure in the dusk sector associated with enhanced magnetospheric convection,' is included.

  4. An ISEE/Whistler model of equatorial electron density in the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, D. L.; Anderson, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to an empirical model of equatorial electron density in the magnetosphere covering the L range 2.25-8. Although the model is primarily intended for application to the local time interval 00-15 MLT, a way to extend the model to the 15-24-MLT period is presented. The model describes, in piecewise fashion, the 'saturated' plasmasphere, the region of steep plasmapause gradients, and the plasma trough. Within the plasmasphere the model profile can be expressed as logne - Sigma-xi, where x1 = -0.3145L + 3.9043 is the principal or 'reference' term, and additional terms account for: a solar cycle variation with a peak at solar maximum; an annual variation with a December maximum; and a semiannual variation with equinoctial maxima.

  5. Source regions of whistlers detected in the American, African/European and Western Pacific sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koronczay, David; Steinbach, Peter; Lichtenberger, Janos

    2016-04-01

    AWDANet is a recently completed network for automatic whistler detection and analysis. Here we investigate whistler measurements from its first years of operation, analyzing the time distribution of whistlers detected at various stations in Western Antarctica, Southern Africa, Europe and the Western Pacific region. Whistlers detected on the ground are thought to originate in their magnetic conjugate location, travelling through the plasmasphere before returning to the ground. We carry out a correlation analysis, comparing the occurrence of whistler events to lightning strokes using multiple lightning databases, including WWLLN (World Wide Lightning Location Network), to locate the events' source region. Our results can lead to a better understanding of the source regions and mechanisms of whistlers observed on the ground. This knowledge can improve their use as a tool to probe the plasmasphere.

  6. Global Effects of the Interplanetary Shock Propagation through the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere: 3D Hybrid Kinetic ModelingA.S. Lipatov {1}, D.G. Sibeck {2}{1} GPHI UMBC/NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA {2} NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    We use a new hybrid kinetic model to simulate the response of ring current, outer radiation belt, and plasmasphere particle populations to impulsive interplanetary shocks. Since particle distributions attending the interplanetary shock waves and in the ring current and radiation belts are non-Maxwellian, wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energy transport within the inner magnetosphere. Finite gyroradius effects become important in mass loading the shock waves with the background plasma in the presence of higher energy ring current and radiation belt ions and electrons. Initial results show that the shock causes strong deformations in the global structure of the ring current, radiation belt, and plasmasphere. The ion velocity distribution functions at the shock front, in the ring current, and in the radiation belt help us to determine energy transport through the Earth's inner magnetosphere. We compare our predictions with THEMIS and Van Allen Probes spacecraft observations.

  7. SAPS onset timing during substorms and the westward traveling surge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, Evgeny, V.

    2016-07-01

    We present multispacecraft observations in the magnetosphere and conjugate ionosphere of the onset time of subauroral polarization streams (SAPS) and tens of keV ring current injections on the duskside in three individual substorms. This is probably the first unequivocal determination of the substorm SAPS onset timing. The time lag between the SAPS and substorm onsets is much shorter than the gradient-curvature drift time of ˜10 keV ions in the plasmasphere. It seemingly depends on the propagation time of substorm-injected plasma from the dipolarization onset region to the plasmasphere, as well as on the SAPS position. These observations suggest that fast onset SAPS and ring current injections are causally related to the two-loop system of the westward traveling surge.

  8. 3D Reconfigurable NoC Multiprocessor Imaging Interferometer for Space Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the development of an imaging interferometer for long-term observations of solar activity related events. Heliospheric physics phenomena are responsible for causing irregularities to the ionospheric-magnetospheric plasmasphere. Distinct signatures of these events are captured and studied over long periods of time deducting crucial conclusions about the short-term Space Weather and in the long run about Space Climate. The new prototype features an eight-channel implementation. The available hardware resources permit a 256- channel configuration for accurate beam scanning of the Earth's plasmasphere. A dual-polarization scheme has been implemented for obtaining accurate measurements. The system is based on state-of-the-art three-dimensional reconfigurable logic and exhibits a performance increase in the range of 70% compared to similar instruments in operation. Special circuits allow measurements of the most intense heliospheric physics events to be fully captured and analyzed.

  9. Analysis of observational data from Extreme Ultra-Violet Camera onboard Chang'E-3 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Hua-Ning; He, Han; He, Fei; Chen, Bo; Feng, Jian-Qing; Ping, Jin-Song; Shen, Chao; Xu, Rong-Lan; Zhang, Xiao-Xin

    2016-02-01

    The Extreme Ultra-Violet Camera (hereafter EUVC) is a scientific payload onboard the lander of the Chang'E-3 (hereafter CE-3) mission launched on December 1st, 2013. Centering on a spectral band around 30.4 nm, EUVC provides the global images of the Earth's plasmasphere from the meridian view, with a spatial resolution of 0.1 R_{oplus} in 150 × 150 pixels and a cadence of 10 minutes. Along with the data being publicly released online, some unsettled issues in the early stage have been clarified, including the geometrical preparations, the refined approach on the coefficient K for the background, and the alignment among the images. A demo of data after all the above processes is therefore presented as a guidance for users who are studying the structure and dynamics of the plasmasphere.

  10. Global effects of transmitted shock wave propagation through the Earth's inner magnetosphere: First results from 3-D hybrid kinetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2016-09-01

    We use a new hybrid kinetic model to simulate the response of ring current, outer radiation belt, and plasmaspheric particle populations to impulsive interplanetary shocks. Since particle distributions attending the interplanetary shock waves and in the ring current and radiation belts are non-Maxwellian, wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energy transport within the inner magnetosphere. Finite gyroradius effects become important in mass loading the shock waves with the background plasma in the presence of higher energy ring current and radiation belt ions and electrons. Initial results show that shocks cause strong deformations in the global structure of the ring current, radiation belt, and plasmasphere. The ion velocity distribution functions at the shock front, in the ring current, and in the radiation belt help us determine energy transport through the Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  11. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's Contributions to Space Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since the mid-l970's, the Space Plasma Physics Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has contributed critical instrumentation to numerous satellite and sounding rocket missions exploring the plasmas of near-Earth space. This talk will review major discoveries in Earth's ionosphere, plasmasphere, and magnetosphere directly attributable to the researchers of the Space Plasma Physics Group and the significance of these discoveries to the field of plasma physics.

  12. Influence of the Earth s Corotation Field on the Atmospheric Electricity: Latitudinal Variation and Response to the Solar Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumin, Y.

    Influence of the magnetospheric convection field on the atmospheric electricity is widely studied, both theoretically and experimentally, from the early 1970s. On the other hand, a considerably less attention was paid to the effects of plasmaspheric corotation field, since it was usually believed that the electric field of corotation of the solid Earth is fitted smoothly to the corotation field of plasmasphere, so that no potential difference is formed between them in the lower atmosphere. A conjecture on the important role of corotation field in the global atmospheric-electric circuit was done a few years ago in [P.A. Bespalov, Yu.V. Chugunov, J. Atmos. Terr. Phys., 1996, v.58, p.601] and several subsequent works. Unfortunately, because of using an oversimplified model of plasmasphere (in the form of a spherically-symmetric envelope with isotropic conductivity and rigid-body rotation), no reliable numerical estimates were derived, and no comparison with experimental distributions of the atmospheric electric field could be conducted. The main aim of the present report is to study the corotation effects in the framework of a considerably more realistic analytical model, where conductivity of the plasmasphere is strongly anisotropic, and the magnetic field lines are substantially distorted (stretched to "infinity") in the polar regions. Escape of polarization electric charges along the distorted field lines results in appreciable decrease (by 10-15 V/m) in the average atmospheric electric field at high latitudes. Such phenomenon was experimentally discovered as early as the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958) but was not quantitatively explained by now. Yet another interesting effect following from our model is changing the high-latitude electric field due to variations in the degree of distortion of the magnetic field lines at different levels of the solar activity. These transient changes in the atmospheric electricity should be symmetric about the noon

  13. Initial thermal plasma observations from ISEE-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugher, C. R.; Chappell, C. R.; Horwitz, J. L.; Shelley, E. G.; Young, D. T.

    1980-09-01

    The initial measurements of magnetospheric thermal ions by the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE-1 are presented to demonstrate the surprising variety in this plasma population. The data provide evidence that the adiabatic mapping of the high latitude ionosphere to the equatorial plasma trough provides an insufficient description of the origin, transport, and accumulation processes which supply low energy ions to the outer plasmasphere and plasma trough.

  14. Explaining the dynamics of the ultra-relativistic third Van Allen radiation belt

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Ian R.; Ozeke, L. G.; Murphy, Kyle R; Clauderpierre, S. G.; Turner, D. L.; Baker, D. N.; Rae, I. J.; Kale, A; Milling, David; Boyd, A. J.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; H. J. Singer; Dimitrakoudis, S.; Daglis, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts over 50 years ago, an explanation for their complete dynamics has remained elusive. Especially challenging is understanding the recently discovered ultra-relativistic third electron radiation belt. Current theory asserts that loss in the heart of the outer belt, essential to the formation of the third belt, must be controlled by high-frequency plasma wave–particle scattering into the atmosphere, via whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss,...

  15. Novel Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission Observations with Artificial Airglow Using RF Excitation with HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briczinski, S. J., Jr.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Michell, R.; Hampton, D. L.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Neutral hydrogen plays an important role in determining the state of the plasmasphere and its response to forcing from geomagnetic storms. Hydrogen's solar cycle variation is counterintuitive: there is more hydrogen at solar minimum at 300 km that there is at solar maximum. Similarly there is more hydrogen in winter than in summer and hydrogen density maximizes in the morning. In this presentation we describe these variations and consider some possible causes for them.

  16. Space-borne imaging observation of the terrestrial upper atmosphere by ISS-IMAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akinori; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Sakanoi, Takeshi

    ISS-IMAP (Ionosphere, Mesosphere, upper Atmosphere, and Plasmasphere mapping) mission is a space-borne mission on the international space station (ISS) to elucidate the mesoscale structures in the ionosphere, the mesosphere, and the plasmasphere by imaging observations. ISS-IMAP measures the following three parameters: (1) distribution of the atmospheric gravity wave in the mesopause (87km), the ionospheric E-region (95km), and the ionospheric F-region (250km) (2) distribution of the ionized atmosphere in the ionospheric F-region (3) distribution of O+ and He+ ions in the ionosphere and plasmasphere. After the initial check outs, its observation was started in October 2012. ISS-IMAP consists of two imaging instruments on the Exposed Facility of Japanese Experiment Module of the International Space Station, EF of ISS-JEM. Visible-light and infrared spectrum imager (VISI) observes the Mesosphere and the Ionosphere. Extra ultraviolet imager (EUVI) observes the Ionosphere and the Plasmasphere. VISI observes the airglow of 730nm (OH, Alt. 85km), 762nm (O2, Alt. 95km), and 630nm (O, Alt. 250km) in the Nadir direction. The global distributions of the airglow structures whose scale size is 50-500km in the nightside of the Mesosphere and the Ionosphere have been obtained by the VISI observation. EUVI measures the resonant scattering of 30.4nm [He+] and 83.4nm [O+]. Its field- of-view is 15 degrees, and points the limb of the Earth to observe the vertical distribution of the ions. The continuous observation of ISS-IMAP started in October 2012. The coordinated observation between ISS-IMAP and the several ground-based instruments have been carried out to elucidate the coupling process between the lower atmosphere and the upper atmosphere by the wave structures in this scale.

  17. Etude de la magnétosphère terrestre par l'analyse multipoint des données de la mission CLUSTER. Contributions à la caractérisation des frontières et de la magnétosphère interne

    OpenAIRE

    Darrouzet, Fabien

    2006-01-01

    CLUSTER is the first space mission dedicated to the three-dimensional study of the terrestrial magnetosphere. Its polar orbit and four spacecraft tetrahedron formation allow it to make in situ measurements in various regions of the magnetosphere, in particular in the plasmasphere. This PhD thesis brings together several studies on plasma structures encountered by the CLUSTER spacecraft along their orbit, during the time period 2001-2004. The physical quantity analysed here is mainly the elect...

  18. Storm-Time Strong Field-Aligned Ion Upflow in Region of the SED Plume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Zhi-Gang; DENG Xiao-Hua; WANG Jing-Fang

    2008-01-01

    report the observations from the GPS TEC and DMSP F-13 satellites showing that very strong upward field-aligned (FA) ion velocity and flux in the outer region of the storm-enhanced density (SED) occurred in the event of the geomagnetic storm on 29-31 May 2003. By a method of coordinate transformation, upward FA ion velocities in excess of 250m/s are obtained from the observations of the DMSP F-13 satellite. Further, an FA ion flux is estimated to be about 4.5×1013ions/m2s in the dusk sector. The estimated FA ion velocity and flux provide a powerful direct proof to support the scenario that there is a strong coupling of particles between the ionosphere and plasmasphere in the region of the SED plume. In the process, FA ion flux transports from the ionosphere to the plasmasphere in the region of the SED plume. Therefore, the plume of SED in the ionosphere provides an important source to the enhanced density of O+ in the storm-time plasmasphere.

  19. The Extreme Ultraviolet Imagers (EUVIs): Earth-observing telescopes on International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uji, Kentaro; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Murakami, Go; Yamazaki, Atsushi

    2012-11-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Imagers (EUVIs) were launched on 21st July 2012 as payloads to the Exposed Facility of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM-EF) on the International Space Station. The EUVIs are parts of the IMAP (Ionosphere, Mesosphere, upper Atmosphere, and Plasmasphere mapping) mission to observe the Earth's upper atmosphere, mesosphere, ionosphere, thermosphere and plasmasphere. The other part of IMAP is a visible and near-infrared spectral imager (VISI). In this mission, we install two independent and identical telescopes. One telescope detects the terrestrial EUV emission from O+ (at the wavelength of 83.4 nm), and the other one detects He+ (30.4 nm). At the altitude of approximately 400 km, the two telescopes direct towards the Earth's limb to look at the ionosphere and plasmasphere from the inside-out. The maximum spatial resolution is 0.1° and time resolution is 1 minute. The optical instruments consist of multilayer coated mirrors which are optimized for 30.4 nm, metallic thin filters and 5-stage microchannel plates to pick up photon events efficiently. In our presentation, we report the mission overview, the instruments and the result of ground calibrations.

  20. An impenetrable barrier to ultrarelativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D N; Jaynes, A N; Hoxie, V C; Thorne, R M; Foster, J C; Li, X; Fennell, J F; Wygant, J R; Kanekal, S G; Erickson, P J; Kurth, W; Li, W; Ma, Q; Schiller, Q; Blum, L; Malaspina, D M; Gerrard, A; Lanzerotti, L J

    2014-11-27

    Early observations indicated that the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts could be separated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons of moderate energy (less than about one megaelectronvolt) often populate both zones, with a deep 'slot' region largely devoid of particles between them. There is a region of dense cold plasma around the Earth known as the plasmasphere, the outer boundary of which is called the plasmapause. The two-belt radiation structure was explained as arising from strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary, with the inner edge of the outer radiation zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location. Recent observations have revealed unexpected radiation belt morphology, especially at ultrarelativistic kinetic energies (more than five megaelectronvolts). Here we analyse an extended data set that reveals an exceedingly sharp inner boundary for the ultrarelativistic electrons. Additional, concurrently measured data reveal that this barrier to inward electron radial transport does not arise because of a physical boundary within the Earth's intrinsic magnetic field, and that inward radial diffusion is unlikely to be inhibited by scattering by electromagnetic transmitter wave fields. Rather, we suggest that exceptionally slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle scattering deep inside the Earth's plasmasphere can combine to create an almost impenetrable barrier through which the most energetic Van Allen belt electrons cannot migrate.

  1. Landau damping of magnetospherically reflected whistlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    Unducted VLF signals produced by lightning activity can form a population of magnetospherically reflected (MR) whistlers in the inner magnetosphere. It has been suggested recently that in the absence of significant attenuation such waves could merge into a broadband continuum with sufficient intensity to account for plasmaspheric hiss. To test this conjecture we have evaluated the path-integrated attenuation of MR whistlers along representative ray paths using the HOTRAY code. Using a realistic plasma distribution modeled on in-situ data, we find that the majority of MR waves experience significant damping after a few transits across the equator. This is primarily due to Landau resonance with suprathermal (0.1-1 keV) electrons. The attenuation is most pronounced for waves that propagate through the outer plasmasphere; this can readily account for the infrequent occurrence of multiple-hop MR waves for L greater than or equal to 3.5. Selected waves that originate at intermediate latitudes (15 deg is less than or equal to lambda is less than or equal to 35 deg) and whose ray paths are confined to the inner plasma- sphere may experience up to 10 magnetospheric reflections before substantial attentuation occurs. These waves should form the population of observed MR waves. Wave attenuation becomes more pronounced at higher frequencies; this can account for the absence of multiple-hop waves above 5 kHz. Weakly attenuated MR waves tend to migrate outward to the L shell, where their frequency is comparable to the equatorial lower hybrid frequency. The enhanced concentration of waves due to a merging of ray paths would produce a spectral feature that rises in frequency at lower L. This is quite distinct from the reported properties of plasmaspheric hiss, which maintains a constant frequency band throughout the entire plasmasphere. Furthermore, in the absence of mode conversion, waves below 500 Hz, which often form an important if not dominant part of the spectral properties

  2. High Resolution Spectral Analysis of Hiss and Chorus Emissions in Ground Based Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Aliabad, S. P.; Golkowski, M.; Gibby, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic evolution of the radiation belts is believed to be controlled in large part by two separate but related classes of naturally occurring plasma waves: ELF/VLF chorus and hiss emissions. Although whistler mode chorus has been extensively studied since the first reports by Storey in 1953, the source mechanism and properties are still subjects of active research. Moreover, the origin of plasmaspheric hiss, the electromagnetic emission believed to be responsible for the gap between the inner and outer radiation belts, has been debated for over four decades. Although these waves can be observed in situ on spacecraft, ground-based observing stations can provide orders of magnitude higher data volumes and decades long data coverage essential for certain long-term and statistical studies of wave properties. Recent observational and theoretical works suggest that high resolution analysis of the spectral features of both hiss and chorus emissions can provide insight into generation processes and be used to validate existing theories. Application of the classic Fourier (FFT) technique unfortunately yields a tradeoff between time and frequency resolution. In additional to Fourier spectra, we employ novel methods to make spectrograms with high time and frequency resolutions, independently using minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR). These techniques are applied to ground based data observations of hiss and chorus made in Alaska. Plasmaspheric hiss has been widely regarded as a broadband, structure less, incoherent emission. We quantify the extent to which plasmaspheric hiss can be a coherent emission with complex fine structure. Likewise, to date, researchers have differentiated between hiss and chorus coherency primarily using qualitative "naked eye" approaches to amplitude spectra. Using a quantitative approach to observed amplitude and we present more rigorous classification criteria for these emissions.

  3. Relativistic radiation belt electron responses to GEM magnetic storms: Comparison of CRRES observations with 3-D VERB simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shprits, Yuri; Subbotin, Dmitriy; Ni, Binbin

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the dynamics of relativistic electron acceleration, loss, and transport in the Earth's radiation belt during magnetic storms is a challenging task. The U.S. National Science Foundation's Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) has identified five magnetic storms for in-depth study that occurred during the second half of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) mission in the year 1991. In this study, we show the responses of relativistic radiation belt electrons to the magnetic storms by comparing the time-dependent 3-D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) simulations with the CRRES MEA 1 MeV electron observations in order to investigate the relative roles of the competing effects of previously proposed scattering mechanisms at different storm phases, as well as to examine the extent to which the simulations can reproduce observations. The major scattering processes in our model are radial transport due to Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) electromagnetic fluctuations, pitch angle and energy diffusion including mixed diffusion by whistler mode chorus waves outside the plasmasphere, and pitch angle scattering by plasmaspheric hiss inside the plasmasphere. The 3-D VERB simulations show that during the storm main phase and early recovery phase the estimated plasmapause is located deep in the inner region, indicating that pitch angle scattering by chorus waves can be a dominant loss process in the outer belt. We have also confirmed the important role played by mixed energy-pitch angle diffusion by chorus waves, which tends to reduce the fluxes enhanced by local acceleration, resulting in comparable levels of computed and measured fluxes. However, we cannot reproduce the more pronounced flux dropout near the boundary of our simulations during the main phase, which indicates that non-adiabatic losses may extend toL-shells lower than our simulation boundary. We also provide a detailed description of simulations for each of the GEM storm events.

  4. The Role of Plasma in Radiation Belt Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, J. M.; Bonnell, J. W.; Kurth, W. S.; Millan, R. M.; Goldstein, J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Blake, J. B.; Denton, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The radiation belts are zones of relativistic electrons encircling the Earth. Their radial structure is controlled by the competition between source and loss processes. Most commonly, a two-belt structure prevails, though a more complicated three-belt structure - an inner belt plus two outer electron belts - have repeatedly been observed. The plasma conditions that enable and enhance loss-facilitating wave activity in the inner magnetosphere are still under discussion. Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves (EMIC) when the total plasma density is large (i.e., in the plasmasphere and plume). However, there is evidence that this interaction may be not as strong as thought, and that instead the field-aligned motion of lower energy ring current ions (up to a few 10's keV) may play a key role. Similarly, the exact influence of large heavy ion (O+) concentrations remains unsettled. We use 2.5+ years of Van Allen Probes observations to study the region of plasmasphere-outer belt overlap (and its vicinity). By now, the Van Allen Probes provide a complete and very dense coverage of the complete magnetosphere inside geosynchronous orbit We focus our interest on understanding the plasma conditions that can favor EMIC wave growth. We investigate the temperature anisotropy A (modified by plasma β) of the warm/hot plasma, and contrast it with the location specifics of the plasmasphere (i.e., very high total density) and the occurrence of high O+ concentrations in the overlap regions with the radiation belt(s). We present both average conditions for all parameters during a variety of geomagnetic conditions, and highlight specific loss and overlap events in an effort to establish favorable plasma conditions for relativistic electron loss during those times.

  5. Ultra low frequency waves impact on radiation belt energetic particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    One of the most fundamental important issues in the space physics is to understand how solar wind energy transports into the inner magnetosphere.Ultra low frequency(ULF)wave in the magnetosphere and its impact on energetic particles,such as the wave-particle resonance,modulation,and particle acceleration,are extremely important topics in the Earth’s radiation belt dynamics and solar wind― magnetospheric coupling.In this review,we briefly introduce the recent advances on ULF waves study. Further,we will explore the density structures and ion compositions around the plasmaspheric boundary layer(PBL)and discuss its possible relation to the ULF waves.

  6. Measurement of visible and UV emission from Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP), on Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The charge exchange of plasmaspheric ions and exospheric H and O and of solar wind ions with exospheric and interplanetary H are sources of precipitating neutrals whose faint emission may be observed by the imaging spectrometric observatory during dark periods of the SL-1 orbit. Measurements of the interactions of these precipitating atoms with the thermosphere are needed to evaluate the heating and ionization effects on the atmosphere as well as the selective loss of i energetic ions from the sources (predominantly the ring current).

  7. Ultra low frequency waves impact on radiation belt energetic particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG QiuGang; HAO YongQiang; WANG YongFu

    2009-01-01

    One of the most fundamental important issues in the space physics is to understand how solar wind energy transports into the inner magnetosphere.Ultra low frequency(ULF)wave in the magnetosphere and its impact on energetic particles,such as the wave-particle resonance,modulation,and particle acceleration,are extremely important topics in the Earth's radiation belt dynamics and solar windmagnetospheric coupling.In this review,we briefly introduce the recent advances on ULF waves study.Further,we will explore the density structures and ion compositions around the plasmaspheric boundary layer(PBL)and discuss its possible relation to the ULF waves.

  8. Possible scenarios that the New Horizons spacecraft may find in its close encounter with Pluto

    CERN Document Server

    Durand-Manterola, Hector Javier

    2015-01-01

    Next year, 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft will have a close encounter with Pluto. In the present study we discuss some possibilities regarding what the spacecraft may encounter during its approach to Pluto. Among them we should include: the presence of geological activity due to heat generated by tides; the unlikely presence of an intrinsic magnetic field; the possibility of a plasmasphere and a plasmapause; the position of an ionopause; the existence of an ionospheric trans-terminator flow similar to that at Venus and Mars; and the presence of a Magnus force that produces a deflection of Pluto plasma wake. This deflection oscillates up and down in its orbit around the sun.

  9. A Revolutionary Aeronomy Concept to Explore the Coupling of the Solar-Terrestrial System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, James

    2014-01-01

    The Geospace Dynamics Observatory (GDO) mission observes the near-Earth region in space called Geospace with unprecedented resolution, scale and sensitivity. At a distance of 60 Earth Radii (Re) in a near-polar circular orbit and at approximately 27-day period, GDO images the earth's full disk with: (1) a three-channel far ultraviolet imager, (2) an extreme ultraviolet imager of the plasmasphere, and (3) a spectrometer in the near to far ultraviolet range that probes any portion of the disk and simultaneously observes the limb.

  10. Imaging and Forecasting of Ionospheric Structures and Their System Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-27

    Radiation Belt Remediation (RBR) studies were done and many of them remain active. The results of two HAARP heating experiments with the digisonde at...LORERS, Plasmasphere, HAARP , Cal/Val, Drift Software, ARTIST 4.5 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. UMITATION OF 1. NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...STATION OBSERVATIONS 1 1.3 VLF INDUCED ELECTRON PITCH ANGLE SCATTERING (IEPAS) 2 1.4 HAARP CAMPAIGN 2 1.5 DRIFT SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT 2 1.6 DISS SUPPORT

  11. Particles, waves and storms in geospace: Recent advances and persistent gaps in our comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daglis, Ioannis A.

    2016-07-01

    The terrestrial magnetosphere features plasma populations with a wide dynamic range of energies, spanning more than 8 orders of magnitude -- from ≃V in the plasmasphere to tens of MeV in the outer Van Allen belt and hundreds of MeV in the inner Van Allen belt. A wealth of in-situ measurements of particles and waves, and ground-based measurements of waves, has shaped a comprehensive understanding of the interactions of the various plasma populations with electromagnetic waves during geospace magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms. We shall discuss recent advances and persistent gaps in our comprehension of inner magnetosphere dynamics.

  12. Structure of the plasmapause from ISEE 1 low-energy ion and plasma wave observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T.; Horwitz, J. L.; Anderson, R. R.; Chappell, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low-energy ion pitch angle distributions are compared with plasma density profiles in the near-earth magnetosphere using ISEE 1 observations. The classical plasmapause determined by the sharp density gradient is not always observed in the dayside region, whereas there almost always exists the ion pitch angle distribution transition from cold, isotropic to warm, bidirectional, field-aligned distributions. In the nightside region the plasmapause density gradient is typically found, and it normally coincides with the ion pitch angle distribution transition. The sunward motion of the plasma is found in the outer part of the 'plasmaspheric' plasma in the dusk bulge region.

  13. Use of the thin sheath approximation for obtaining ion temperatures from the ISEE 1 limited aperture RPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, R. H.; Baugher, C. R.; Chappell, C. R.

    1982-07-01

    A procedure for analyzing low-energy (less than approximately 100 eV) ion data from the plasma composition experiment on ISEE 1 is set forth. The method is based on a derived analytic expression for particle flux to a limited aperture retarding potential analyzer (RPA) in the thin sheath approximation, which makes allowance for some effects of a charged spacecraft on plasma particle trajectories. Calculations using simulated data are employed in testing the efficacy and accuracy of the technique. On the basis of an analysis of these calculation results and the mathematical model, the method is seen as being able to provide accurate ion temperatures from all good plasmaspheric RPA data. It is noted that corresponding densities and spacecraft potentials should be accurate when spacecraft potentials are negative but that they are subject to error for positive spacecraft potentials, particularly when ion Mach numbers are much less than 1. An analysis of data from a representative ISEE 1 pass produces a plasmasphere temperature profile that is consistent in overall structure with previous observations.

  14. Spatial dependence of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves triggered by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J.-H.; Lee, D.-Y.; Noh, S.-J.; Kim, H.; Choi, C. R.; Lee, J.; Hwang, J.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, using the multisatellite (the Van Allen Probes and two GOES satellites) observations in the inner magnetosphere, we examine two electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave events that are triggered by Pdyn enhancements under prolonged northward interplanetary magnetic field quiet time preconditions. For both events, the impact of enhanced Pdyn causes EMIC waves at multiple points. However, we find a strong spatial dependence that EMIC waves due to enhanced Pdyn impact can occur at multiple points (likely globally but not necessarily everywhere) but with different wave properties. For Event 1, three satellites situated at a nearly same dawnside zone but at slightly different L shells see occurrence of EMIC waves but in different frequencies relative to local ion gyrofrequencies and with different polarizations. These waves are found inside or at the outer edge of the plasmasphere. Another satellite near noon observes no dramatic EMIC wave despite the strongest magnetic compression there. For Event 2, the four satellites are situated at widely separated magnetic local time zones when they see occurrence of EMIC waves. They are again found at different frequencies relative to local ion gyrofrequencies with different polarizations and all outside the plasmasphere. We propose two possible explanations that (i) if triggered by enhanced Pdyn impact, details of ion cyclotron instability growth can be sensitive to local plasma conditions related to background proton distributions, and (ii) there can be preexisting waves with a specific spatial distribution, which determines occurrence and specific properties of EMIC waves depending on satellite's relative position after an enhanced Pdyn arrives.

  15. Using the cold plasma dispersion relation and whistler mode waves to quantify the antenna sheath impedance of the Van Allen Probes EFW instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, D. P.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Bounds, S. R.; Averkamp, T. F.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.; Santolík, O.; Watt, C. E. J.

    2016-05-01

    Cold plasma theory and parallel wave propagation are often assumed when approximating the whistler mode magnetic field wave power from electric field observations. The current study is the first to include the wave normal angle from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science package on board the Van Allen Probes in the conversion factor, thus allowing for the accuracy of these assumptions to be quantified. Results indicate that removing the assumption of parallel propagation does not significantly affect calculated plasmaspheric hiss wave powers. Hence, the assumption of parallel propagation is valid. For chorus waves, inclusion of the wave normal angle in the conversion factor leads to significant alterations in the distribution of wave power ratios (observed/ calculated); the percentage of overestimates decreases, the percentage of underestimates increases, and the spread of values is significantly reduced. Calculated plasmaspheric hiss wave powers are, on average, a good estimate of those observed, whereas calculated chorus wave powers are persistently and systematically underestimated. Investigation of wave power ratios (observed/calculated), as a function of frequency and plasma density, reveals a structure consistent with signal attenuation via the formation of a plasma sheath around the Electric Field and Waves spherical double probes instrument. A simple, density-dependent model is developed in order to quantify this effect of variable impedance between the electric field antenna and the plasma interface. This sheath impedance model is then demonstrated to be successful in significantly improving agreement between calculated and observed power spectra and wave powers.

  16. Plasma Density and Radio Echoes in the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, W.

    1995-01-01

    This project provided a opportunity to study a variety of interesting topics related to radio sounding in the magnetosphere. The results of this study are reported in two papers which have been submitted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research and Radio Science, and various aspects of this study were also reported at meetings of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) at Baltimore, Maryland and the International Scientific Radio Union (URSI) at Boulder, Colorado. The major results of this study were also summarized during a one-day symposium on this topic sponsored by Marshall Space Flight Center in December 1994. The purpose of the study was to examine the density structure of the plasmasphere and determine the relevant mechanisms for producing radio echoes which can be detected by a radio sounder in the magnetosphere. Under this study we have examined density irregularities, biteouts, and outliers of the plasmasphere, studied focusing, specular reflection, ducting, and scattering by the density structures expected to occur in the magnetosphere, and predicted the echoes which can be detected by a magnetospheric radio sounder.

  17. The story of plumes: the development of a new conceptual framework for understanding magnetosphere and ionosphere coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, Mark B.; Zou, Shasha; Heine, Tom

    2016-12-01

    The name "plume" has been given to a variety of plasma structures in the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere. Some plumes (such as the plasmasphere plume) represent elevated plasma density, while other plumes (such as the equatorial F region plume) represent low-density regions. Despite these differences these structures are either directly related or connected in the causal chain of plasma redistribution throughout the system. This short review defines how plumes appear in different measurements in different regions and describes how plumes can be used to understand magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The story of the plume family helps describe the emerging conceptual framework of the flow of high-density-low-latitude ionospheric plasma into the magnetosphere and clearly shows that strong two-way coupling between ionospheric and magnetospheric dynamics occurs not only in the high-latitude auroral zone and polar cap but also through the plasmasphere. The paper briefly reviews, highlights and synthesizes previous studies that have contributed to this new understanding.

  18. Statistical Features of EMIC Waves Observed on Van Allen Probes in the Inner Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D. Y.; Roh, S. J.; Cho, J.; Shin, D. K.; Hwang, J.; Kim, K. C.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are one of the key plasma waves that can affect charged particle dynamics in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. Knowledge of global distribution of the EMIC waves is critical for accurately assessing the significance of its interaction with charged particles. With the Van Allen Probes EMFISIS observations, we have surveyed EMIC events for ~2.5 years period. We have identified well-defined, banded wave activities only, as distinguished from broad band wave activities. We have obtained global distribution of occurrence of the identified waves with distinction between H- and He-bands. We compare it with previous observations such as THEMIS and CRRES. For the identified events we have drawn all the basic wave properties including wave frequency, polarization, wave normal angle. In addition, we have distinguished the EMIC events that occur inside the plasmasphere and at the plasmapause from those outside the plasmasphere. Finally, we have tested solar wind and geomagnetic dependence of the wave events. We give discussions about implications of these observations on wave generation mechanism and interaction with radiation belt electrons.

  19. Automatic Detection of Omega Signals Captured by the Poynting Flux Analyzer (PFX) on Board the Akebono Satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Suarjaya, I Made Agus Dwi; Goto, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    The Akebono satellite was launched in 1989 to observe the Earth's magnetosphere and plasmasphere. Omega was a navigation system with 8 ground stations transmitter and had transmission pattern that repeats every 10 s. From 1989 to 1997, the PFX on board the Akebono satellite received signals at 10.2 kHz from these stations. Huge amounts of PFX data became valuable for studying the propagation characteristics of VLF waves in the ionosphere and plasmasphere. In this study, we introduce a method for automatic detection of Omega signals from the PFX data in a systematic way, it involves identifying a transmission station, calculating the delay time, and estimating the signal intensity. We show the reliability of the automatic detection system where we able to detect the omega signal and confirmed its propagation to the opposite hemisphere along the Earth's magnetic field lines. For more than three years (39 months), we detected 43,734 and 111,049 signals in the magnetic and electric field, respectively, and demons...

  20. The Roles of Transport and Wave-Particle Interactions on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua

    2011-01-01

    Particle fluxes in the radiation belts can vary dramatically during geomagnetic active periods. Transport and wave-particle interactions are believed to be the two main types of mechanisms that control the radiation belt dynamics. Major transport processes include substorm dipolarization and injection, radial diffusion, convection, adiabatic acceleration and deceleration, and magnetopause shadowing. Energetic electrons and ions are also subjected to pitch-angle and energy diffusion when interact with plasma waves in the radiation belts. Important wave modes include whistler mode chorus waves, plasmaspheric hiss, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and magnetosonic waves. We investigate the relative roles of transport and wave associated processes in radiation belt variations. Energetic electron fluxes during several storms are simulated using our Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model. The model includes important transport and wave processes such as substorm dipolarization in global MHD fields, chorus waves, and plasmaspheric hiss. We discuss the effects of these competing processes at different phases of the storms and validate the results by comparison with satellite and ground-based observations. Keywords: Radiation Belts, Space Weather, Wave-Particle Interaction, Storm and Substorm

  1. Conjugate ground and multisatellite observations of compression-related EMIC Pc1 waves and associated proton precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usanova, M. E.; Mann, I. R.; Kale, Z. C.; Rae, I. J.; Sydora, R. D.; Sandanger, M.; Søraas, F.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Fornacon, K.-H.; Matsui, H.; Puhl-Quinn, P. A.; Masson, A.; Vallières, X.

    2010-07-01

    We present coordinated ground satellite observations of solar wind compression-related dayside electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves from 25 September 2005. On the ground, dayside structured EMIC wave activity was observed by the CARISMA and STEP magnetometer arrays for several hours during the period of maximum compression. The EMIC waves were also registered by the Cluster satellites for half an hour, as they consecutively crossed the conjugate equatorial plasmasphere on their perigee passes at L ˜ 5. Simultaneously, conjugate to Cluster, NOAA 17 passed through field lines supporting EMIC wave activity and registered a localized enhancement of precipitating protons with energies >30 keV. Our observations suggest that generation of the EMIC waves and consequent loss of energetic protons may last for several hours while the magnetosphere remains compressed. The EMIC waves were confined to the outer plasmasphere region, just inside the plasmapause. Analysis of lower-frequency Pc5 waves observed both by the Cluster electron drift instrument (EDI) and fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) instruments and by the ground magnetometers show that the repetitive structure of EMIC wave packets observed on the ground cannot be explained by the ultra low frequency (ULF) wave modulation theory. However, the EMIC wave repetition period on the ground was close to the estimated field-aligned Alfvénic travel time. For a short interval of time, there was some evidence that EMIC wave packet repetition period in the source region was half of that on the ground, which further suggests bidirectional propagation of wave packets.

  2. Automatic Detection of Omega Signals Captured by the Poynting Flux Analyzer (PFX on Board the Akebono Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Made Agus Dwi Suarjaya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Akebono satellite was launched in 1989 to observe the Earth’s magnetosphere and plasmasphere. Omega was a navigation system with 8 ground stations transmitter and had transmission pattern that repeats every 10 s. From 1989 to 1997, the PFX on board the Akebono satellite received signals at 10.2 kHz from these stations. Huge amounts of PFX data became valuable for studying the propagation characteristics of VLF waves in the ionosphere and plasmasphere. In this study, we introduce a method for automatic detection of Omega signals from the PFX data in a systematic way, it involves identifying a transmission station, calculating the delay time, and estimating the signal intensity. We show the reliability of the automatic detection system where we able to detect the omega signal and confirmed its propagation to the opposite hemisphere along the Earth’s magnetic field lines. For more than three years (39 months, we detected 43,734 and 111,049 signals in the magnetic and electric field, respectively, and demonstrated that the proposed method is powerful enough for the statistical analyses.

  3. Plasma and Energetic Particle Behaviors During Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection at the Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. H.; Zhang, H.; Zong, Q.-G.; Otto, A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Wang, Y.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Daly, P.W.; Reme, H.

    2014-01-01

    The factors controlling asymmetric reconnection and the role of the cold plasma population in the reconnection process are two outstanding questions. We present a case study of multipoint Cluster observations demonstrating that the separatrix and flow boundary angles are greater on the magnetosheath than on the magnetospheric side of the magnetopause, probably due to the stronger density than magnetic field asymmetry at this boundary. The motion of cold plasmaspheric ions entering the reconnection region differs from that of warmer magnetosheath and magnetospheric ions. In contrast to the warmer ions, which are probably accelerated by reconnection in the diffusion region near the subsolar magnetopause, the colder ions are simply entrained by ??×?? drifts at high latitudes on the recently reconnected magnetic field lines. This indicates that plasmaspheric ions can sometimes play only a very limited role in asymmetric reconnection, in contrast to previous simulation studies. Three cold ion populations (probably H+, He+, and O+) appear in the energy spectrum, consistent with ion acceleration to a common velocity.

  4. Empirical estimates and theoretical predictions of the shorting factor for the THEMIS double-probe electric field instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califf, S.; Cully, C. M.

    2016-07-01

    Double-probe electric field measurements on board spacecraft present significant technical challenges, especially in the inner magnetosphere where the ambient plasma characteristics can vary dramatically and alter the behavior of the instrument. We explore the shorting factor for the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms electric field instrument, which is a scale factor error on the measured electric field due to coupling between the sensing spheres and the long wire booms, using both an empirical technique and through simulations with varying levels of fidelity. The empirical data and simulations both show that there is effectively no shorting when the spacecraft is immersed in high-density plasma deep within the plasmasphere and that shorting becomes more prominent as plasma density decreases and the Debye length increases outside the plasmasphere. However, there is a significant discrepancy between the data and theory for the shorting factor in low-density plasmas: the empirical estimate indicates ~0.7 shorting for long Debye lengths, but the simulations predict a shorting factor of ~0.94. This paper systematically steps through the empirical and modeling methods leading to the disagreement with the intention of motivating further study on the topic.

  5. EMIC Waves in the Inner Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usanova, M.; Mann, I. R.; Drozdov, A.; Orlova, K.; Shprits, Y.; Darrouzet, F.; Ergun, R.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave excitation in the inner magnetosphere has been the focus of extensive study over the past few decades, not only because of the role played by EMIC waves in ring current dynamics but also because of their potential importance for scattering radiation belt electrons into the atmosphere. Theory predicts that regions of enhanced cold dense plasma density embedded in relatively low background magnetic field (such as the outer equatorial plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plumes) should aid EMIC wave growth. Also, enhanced plasma density lowers the energy threshold for the resonant pitch angle scattering of outer radiation belt electrons such that EMIC waves can interact with electrons with energies below 1 MeV and hence could be a potentially important radiation belt loss mechanism. EMIC wave normal angle and polarization are also important properties that control the efficiency of their interaction with energetic particles. We will review recent statistical and single-event studies and focus on new understanding of EMIC wave characteristics and generation mechanisms in the inner equatorial magnetosphere - information extremely important for understanding energetic particle dynamics and in particular, for radiation belt and ring current modeling.

  6. Near-equatorial pitch angle diffusion of energetic electrons by oblique whistler waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalon, E. (Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (USA)); Burke, W.J. (Geophysics Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA (USA))

    1991-06-01

    The pitch angle scattering of trapped, energetic electrons by obliquely propagating whistler waves in the equatorial regions of the plasmasphere is investigated. Storm-injected electrons moving along field lines near the equator interact with electromagnetic waves whose frequencies are Doppler-shifted to some harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. The wave normals are distributed almost parallel to the geomagnetic field. Waves grow from the combined contributions of a large reservoir of energetic electrons that are driven into the loss cone by the highest-harmonic interactions permitted to them. Relativistic, quasi-linear theory is applied to obtain self-consistent equations describing the temporal evolution of waves and particles over time scales which are longer than the particle bounce time and group time delay of the waves. The equilibrium solutions and their stability are studied, considering the reflection of the waves by the ionosphere and the coupling of multiple harmonic resonances. The contributions of nonlocal wave sources are also included in the theory. Numerical computations based on the authors theoretical analysis for regions inside the plasmasphere (L{le}2) and near the plasmapause (L{approximately}4.5) and for the first three harmonic resonances are presented.

  7. Inner magnetosphere coupling: Recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usanova, M. E.; Shprits, Y. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of the inner magnetosphere is strongly governed by the interactions between different plasma populations that are coupled through large-scale electric and magnetic fields, currents, and wave-particle interactions. Inner magnetospheric plasma undergoes self-consistent interactions with global electric and magnetic fields. Waves excited in the inner magnetosphere from unstable particle distributions can provide energy exchange between different particle populations in the inner magnetosphere and affect the ring current and radiation belt dynamics. The ionosphere serves as an energy sink and feeds the magnetosphere back through the cold plasma outflow. The precipitating inner magnetospheric particles influence the ionosphere and upper atmospheric chemistry and affect climate. Satellite measurements and theoretical studies have advanced our understanding of the dynamics of various plasma populations in the inner magnetosphere. However, our knowledge of the coupling processes among the plasmasphere, ring current, radiation belts, global magnetic and electric fields, and plasma waves generated within these systems is still incomplete. This special issue incorporates extended papers presented at the Inner Magnetosphere Coupling III conference held 23-27 March 2015 in Los Angeles, California, USA, and includes modeling and observational contributions addressing interactions within different plasma populations in the inner magnetosphere (plasmasphere, ring current, and radiation belts), coupling between fields and plasma populations, as well as effects of the inner magnetosphere on the ionosphere and atmosphere.

  8. Van Allen Probes observations of EMIC events triggered by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D. Y.; Cho, J.; Roh, S. J.; Shin, D. K.; Hwang, J.; Kim, K. C.; Choi, C.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are one of the key plasma waves that can affect charged particle dynamics in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. One of the generation mechanisms of EMIC waves has long been known to be due to magnetospheric compression due to impact by enhanced solar wind dynamic pressure Pdyn. With the Van Allen Probes observations, we have identified 4 EMIC wave events that are triggered by Pdyn enhancements under northward IMF, prolonged quiet time conditions. We find the following features of the EMIC events. (1) They are triggered immediately at the Pdyn impact and remain active during the same period as the enhanced Pdyn duration. (2) They occur in either H band or He band or both. (3) Two events occur inside the plasmasphere and the other two outside the plasmasphere. (4) The wave polarization, either R or L, are highly elliptical, being close to be linear. (5) The wave normal angles are quite large, well away from being field-aligned. (6) About 10 - 50 keV proton fluxes indicate enhanced flux state with ~90 deg-peaked anisotropy in velocity distribution after the Pdyn impact. (7) From low altitude NOAA POES satellite observations of particles we find no obvious evidence for relativistic electron precipitation due to these Pdyn-triggered EMIC events. We will discuss implications of these observations on wave generation mechanism and interaction with radiation belt electrons.

  9. Instrument technology for magnetosphere plasma imaging from high Earth orbit. Design of a radio plasma sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, D. Mark; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of radio sounding techniques for the study of the ionospheric plasma dates back to G. Briet and M. A. Tuve in 1926. Ground based swept frequency sounders can monitor the electron number density (N(sub e)) as a function of height (the N(sub e) profile). These early instruments evolved into a global network that produced high-resolution displays of echo time delay vs frequency on 35-mm film. These instruments provided the foundation for the success of the International Geophysical Year (1958). The Alouette and International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) programs pioneered the used of spaceborne, swept frequency sounders to obtain N(sub e) profiles of the topside of the ionosphere, from a position above the electron density maximum. Repeated measurements during the orbit produced an orbital plane contour which routinely provided density measurements to within 10%. The Alouette/ISIS experience also showed that even with a high powered transmitter (compared to the low power sounder possible today) a radio sounder can be compatible with other imaging instruments on the same satellite. Digital technology was used on later spacecraft developed by the Japanese (the EXOS C and D) and the Soviets (Intercosmos 19 and Cosmos 1809). However, a full coherent pulse compression and spectral integrating capability, such as exist today for ground-based sounders (Reinisch et al., 1992), has never been put into space. NASA's 1990 Space Physics Strategy Implementation Study "The NASA Space Physics Program from 1995 to 2010" suggested using radio sounders to study the plasmasphere and the magnetopause and its boundary layers (Green and Fung, 1993). Both the magnetopause and plasmasphere, as well as the cusp and boundary layers, can be observed by a radio sounder in a high-inclination polar orbit with an apogee greater than 6 R(sub e) (Reiff et al., 1994; Calvert et al., 1995). Magnetospheric radio sounding from space will provide remote density measurements of

  10. Fast damping of ultralow frequency waves excited by interplanetary shocks in the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengrui; Rankin, Robert; Zong, Qiugang

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of Cluster spacecraft data shows that intense ultralow frequency (ULF) waves in the inner magnetosphere can be excited by the impact of interplanetary shocks and solar wind dynamic pressure variations. The observations reveal that such waves can be damped away rapidly in a few tens of minutes. Here we examine mechanisms of ULF wave damping for two interplanetary shocks observed by Cluster on 7 November 2004 and 30 August 2001. The mechanisms considered are ionospheric joule heating, Landau damping, and waveguide energy propagation. It is shown that Landau damping provides the dominant ULF wave damping for the shock events of interest. It is further demonstrated that damping is caused by drift-bounce resonance with ions in the energy range of a few keV. Landau damping is shown to be more effective in the plasmasphere boundary layer due to the higher proportion of Landau resonant ions that exist in that region.

  11. Lidar and CTIPe model studies of the fast amplitude growth with altitude of the diurnal temperature "tides" in the Antarctic winter lower thermosphere and dependence on geomagnetic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Weichun; Chu, Xinzhao; Lu, Xian; Chen, Cao; Fuller-Rowell, Timothy J.; Codrescu, Mihail; Richmond, Arthur D.

    2015-02-01

    Four years of lidar observations at McMurdo reveal that the fast amplitude growth with altitude of diurnal temperature tides from 100 to 110 km during Antarctic winters, exceeding that of the freely propagating tides from the lower atmosphere, increases in strength with the Kp magnetic activity index. Simulations with the Coupled Thermosphere Ionosphere Plasmasphere Electrodynamics (CTIPe) model reproduce the lidar observations and exhibit concentric ring structures of diurnal amplitudes encircling the south geomagnetic pole and overlapping the auroral zone. These findings point to a magnetospheric source origin. Mechanistic studies using CTIPe show that the adiabatic cooling/heating associated with Hall ion drag is the dominant source of this feature, while Joule heating is a minor contributor due to the counteraction by Joule-heating-induced adiabatic cooling. The sum of total dynamical effects and Joule heating explains ~80% of the diurnal amplitudes. Auroral particle heating, lower atmosphere tides, and direct solar heating have minor contributions.

  12. Swarm Products and Space Weather Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolle, Claudia; Olsen, Nils; Martini, Daniel

    and plasmaspheric electron content and GPS and accelerometer data are used to derive information on thermospheric density.Continuous data sets from LEO satellites, such as Swarm, and often combined with ground observations have been useful in developing empirical models of the temporal occurrence and local......, continuous radio navigation and communication (e.g., Galileo, GPS) through the development of severe ionospheric plasma gradients, e.g., during geomagnetic storms.This paper will discuss opportunities from LEO satellites for imaging the actual state of the magnetosphere and upper atmosphere for applications......The Swarm satellite constellation mission provides high precision magnetic field data and models and other observations that enable us to explore near Earth space for example in terms of in situ electron density and electric fields. On board GPS observables can be used for sounding ionospheric...

  13. Strong localized variations of the low-altitude energetic electron fluxes in the evening sector near the plasmapause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Titova

    Full Text Available Specific type of energetic electron precipitation accompanied by a sharp increase in trapped energetic electron flux are found in the data obtained from low-altitude NOAA satellites. These strongly localized variations of the trapped and precipitated energetic electron flux have been observed in the evening sector near the plasmapause during recovery phase of magnetic storms. Statistical characteristics of these structures as well as the results of comparison with proton precipitation are described. We demonstrate the spatial coincidence of localized electron precipitation with cold plasma gradient and whistler wave intensification measured on board the DE-1 and Aureol-3 satellites. A simultaneous localized sharp increase in both trapped and precipitating electron flux could be a result of significant pitch-angle isotropization of drifting electrons due to their interaction via cyclotron instability with the region of sharp increase in background plasma density.

    Key words. Ionosphere (particle precipitation; wave-particle interaction Magnetospheric Physics (plasmasphere

  14. Recent Developments in the Radiation Belt Environment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, M.-C.; Glocer, A.; Zheng, Q.; Horne, R. B.; Meredith, N. P.; Albert, J. M.; Nagai, T.

    2010-01-01

    The fluxes of energetic particles in the radiation belts are found to be strongly controlled by the solar wind conditions. In order to understand and predict the radiation particle intensities, we have developed a physics-based Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model that considers the influences from the solar wind, ring current and plasmasphere. Recently, an improved calculation of wave-particle interactions has been incorporated. In particular, the model now includes cross diffusion in energy and pitch-angle. We find that the exclusion of cross diffusion could cause significant overestimation of electron flux enhancement during storm recovery. The RBE model is also connected to MHD fields so that the response of the radiation belts to fast variations in the global magnetosphere can be studied.Weare able to reproduce the rapid flux increase during a substorm dipolarization on 4 September 2008. The timing is much shorter than the time scale of wave associated acceleration.

  15. Survey of ELF-VLF plasma waves in outer radiation belt observed by Cluster STAFF-SA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pokhotelov

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Various types of plasma waves have profound effects on acceleration and scattering of radiation belt particles. For the purposes of radiation belt modeling it is necessary to know statistical distributions of plasma wave parameters. This paper analyzes four years of plasma wave observations in the Earth's outer radiation belt obtained by the STAFF-SA experiment on board Cluster spacecraft. Statistical distributions of spectral density of different plasma waves observed in ELF-VLF range (chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, magnetosonic waves are presented as a function of magnetospheric coordinates and geomagnetic activity indices. Comparison with other spacecraft studies supports some earlier conclusions about the distribution of chorus and hiss waves and helps to remove the long-term controversy regarding the distribution of equatorial magnetosonic waves. This study represents a step towards the development of multi-spacecraft database of plasma wave activity in radiation belts.

  16. Radiation Belt Environment Model: Application to Space Weather and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics and variability of the radiation belts are of great scientific and space weather significance. A physics-based Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model has been developed to simulate and predict the radiation particle intensities. The RBE model considers the influences from the solar wind, ring current and plasmasphere. It takes into account the particle drift in realistic, time-varying magnetic and electric field, and includes diffusive effects of wave-particle interactions with various wave modes in the magnetosphere. The RBE model has been used to perform event studies and real-time prediction of energetic electron fluxes. In this talk, we will describe the RBE model equation, inputs and capabilities. Recent advancement in space weather application and artificial radiation belt study will be discussed as well.

  17. Dynamics of the earth's radiation belts and inner magnetosphere (geophysical monograph series)

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of the Earth's Radiation Belts and Inner Magnetosphere draws together current knowledge of the radiation belts prior to the launch of Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RPSP) and other imminent space missions, making this volume timely and unique. The volume will serve as a useful benchmark at this exciting and pivotal period in radiation belt research in advance of the new discoveries that the RPSP mission will surely bring. Highlights include the following: a review of the current state of the art of radiation belt science; a complete and up-to-date account of the wave-particle interactions that control the dynamical acceleration and loss processes of particles in the Earth's radiation belts and inner magnetosphere; a discussion emphasizing the importance of the cross-energy coupling of the particle populations of the radiation belts, ring current, and plasmasphere in controlling the dynamics of the inner magnetosphe...

  18. Multifrequency Compressional Magnetic Field Oscillations and Their Relation to Multiharmonic Toroidal Standing Alfvén Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K.; Waters, C. L.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Smith, C. W.; Glassmeier, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    The power spectrum of the compressional component of magnetic field observed by the Van Allen Probes spacecraft near the magnetospheric equator in the dayside plasmasphere sometimes exhibits regularly spaced multiple peaks at frequencies below 50 mHz. We show by detailed analysis of events observed on two separate days in early 2014 that the frequencies change smoothly with the radial distance of the spacecraft and appear at or very near the frequencies of the odd harmonics of mutiharmonic toroidal standing Alfvén waves seen in the azimuthal component of the magnetic field. Even though the compressional component had low amplitude on one of the selected days, its spectral properties are highlighted by computing the ratio of the spectral powers of time series data obtained from spatially separated two Van Allen Probes spacecraft. The spectral similarity of the compressional and azimuthal components suggests that the compressional component contain field line resonance characteristics.

  19. Multifrequency compressional magnetic field oscillations and their relation to multiharmonic toroidal mode standing Alfvén waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazue; Waters, Colin; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Kletzing, Craig A.; Kurth, William S.; Smith, Charles W.

    2015-12-01

    The power spectrum of the compressional component of magnetic fields observed by the Van Allen Probes spacecraft near the magnetospheric equator in the dayside plasmasphere sometimes exhibits regularly spaced multiple peaks at frequencies below 50 mHz. We show by detailed analysis of events observed on two separate days in early 2014 that the frequencies change smoothly with the radial distance of the spacecraft and appear at or very near the frequencies of the odd harmonics of mutiharmonic toroidal mode standing Alfvén waves seen in the azimuthal component of the magnetic field. Even though the compressional component had a low amplitude on one of the selected days, its spectral properties are highlighted by computing the ratio of the spectral powers of time series data obtained from two spatially separated Van Allen Probes spacecraft. The spectral similarity of the compressional and azimuthal components suggests that the compressional component contains field line resonance characteristics.

  20. Performance evaluation of IRI-2007 at equatorial latitudes and its Matlab version for GNSS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satya Srinivas, V.; Sarma, A. D.; Swamy, K. C. T.; Satyanarayana, K.

    2013-11-01

    International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model is the widely used empirical model for ionospheric predictions, especially TEC which is an important parameter for radio navigation and communication. The Fortran based IRI-2007 does not support real-time interactive visualization and debugging. Therefore, the source code is converted into Matlab and is validated for the purposes of this study. This facilitates easy representation of results and for near real-time implementation of IRI in the applications including spacecraft launching, now casting, pseudolite based navigation systems etc. In addition, the vertical delay results over the equatorial region derived from IRI and GPS data of three IGS stations namely Libreville (Garbon, Africa), Brasilia (Brazil, South America) and Hyderabad (India, Asia) are compared. As the IRI model does not account for plasmasphere TEC, the vertical delays are underestimated compared to vertical delays of GPS signals. Therefore, the model should be modified accordingly for precise TEC estimation.

  1. Modelling of Geomagnetic Storm Effects in the Ionosphere of East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. A. Zherebtsov; O.M. Pirog; N.M. Polekh; E. B. Romanova; A.V. Tashchilin

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents simulated results of the ionospheric behavior during few geomagnetic storms,which were occurred in the different seasons. The numerical model for ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling was used to interpret the observed variation of ionosphere structure. Reasons why the positive storms are dominant in the winter whereas the negative ones are dominant in the summer season present the special interest for the mid-latitude ionosphere. A theoretical analysis of the processes controlling the ionospheric response to the geomagnetic storms has showed a good agreement between the simulated results and measurements, as well as the crucial role of the neutral composition variations to fit the calculated and the observed ionospheric parameters.

  2. Near-equatorial pitch angle diffusion of energetic electrons by oblique whistler waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, Elena; Burke, William J.

    1991-06-01

    The pitch angle scattering of trapped, energetic electrons by obliquely propagating whistler waves in the equatorial regions of the plasmasphere is investigated. Storm-injected electrons moving along field lines near the equator interact with electromagnetic waves whose frequencies are Doppler-shifted to some harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. The wave normals are distributed almost parallel to the geomagnetic field. Waves grow from the combined contributions of a large reservoir of energetic electrons that are driven into the loss cone by the highest-harmonic interactions permitted to them. Relativistic, quasi-linear theory is applied to obtain self-consistent equations describing the temporal evolution of waves and particles over time scales which are longer than the particle bounce time and group time delay of the waves. The equilibrium solutions and their stability are studied, considering the reflection of the waves by the ionsphere and the coupling of multiple harmonic resonances.

  3. Moon Connection with MEGA and Giant Earthquakes in Subduction Zones during One Solar Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, M. T.; Azevedo, A. T.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated in this paper the possible influences of the moon on earthquakes during one Solar cycle. The Earth - Moon gravitational force produces a variation in the perigee force that may trigger seismological events. The oscillation force creates a wave that is generated by the moon rotation around the earth, which takes a month. The wave complete a cycle after 13- 14 months in average and the period is roughly 5400 hours as calculated. The major moon phases which are New and Full Moon is when the perigee force is stronger. The Solar Wind charges the Moon during the New phases. The plasmasphere charges the satellite during the Full Moon. Both create the Spring Tides what affects mostly the subduction zones connected with the Mega and Giant events in Pacific areas. Moon - Earth connections are resilient in locations with convergent tectonic plates. Inserted:

  4. Non-thermal hydrogen atoms in the terrestrial upper thermosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianqi; Waldrop, Lara

    2016-12-06

    Model predictions of the distribution and dynamical transport of hydrogen atoms in the terrestrial atmosphere have long-standing discrepancies with ultraviolet remote sensing measurements, indicating likely deficiencies in conventional theories regarding this crucial atmospheric constituent. Here we report the existence of non-thermal hydrogen atoms that are much hotter than the ambient oxygen atoms in the upper thermosphere. Analysis of satellite measurements indicates that the upper thermospheric hydrogen temperature, more precisely the mean kinetic energy of the atomic hydrogen population, increases significantly with declining solar activity, contrary to contemporary understanding of thermospheric behaviour. The existence of hot hydrogen atoms in the upper thermosphere, which is the key to reconciling model predictions and observations, is likely a consequence of low atomic oxygen density leading to incomplete collisional thermalization of the hydrogen population following its kinetic energization through interactions with hot atomic or ionized constituents in the ionosphere, plasmasphere or magnetosphere.

  5. Convection Electric Field Observations by THEMIS and the Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califf, S.; Li, X.; Bonnell, J. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Malaspina, D.; Hartinger, M.; Thaller, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present direct electric field measurements made by THEMIS and the Van Allen Probes in the inner magnetosphere, focusing on the large-scale, near-DC convection electric field. The convection electric field drives plasma Earthward from the tail into the inner magnetosphere, playing a critical role in forming the ring current. Although it is normally shielded deep inside the magnetosphere, during storm times this large-scale electric field can penetrate to low L values (L mechanism for ~100 keV electron injection into the slot region and inner radiation belt. The relationship of the convection electric field with the plasmasphere is also important for understanding the dynamic outer radiation belt, as the plasmapause boundary has been strongly correlated with the dynamic variation of the outer radiation belt electrons.

  6. Correlation between convection electric fields in the nightside magnetosphere and several wave and particle phenomena during two isolated substorms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, D. L.; Fraser-Smith, A. C.; Unwin, R. S.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Heacock, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    Correlation of several magnetoionospheric wave and particle phenomena previously linked observationally to magnetospheric substorms and inferred to involve convection electric fields with whistler measurements of convection activity during two relatively isolated substorms. The events occurred at about 0600 UT on July 15, 1965, and about 0500 UT on Oct. 13, 1965. The correlated phenomena include cross-L inward plasma drifts near midnight within the plasmaphere, diffuse auroral radar echoes observed near the dusk meridian, IPDP micropulsations (intervals of pulsations of diminishing period) in the premidnight sector, apparent contractions and expansions of the plasma sheet at about 20 earth radii in the magnetotail, and Pc 1/Pi 1 micropulsation events near or before midnight. Two new vlf phenomena occurred during the October 13 event - a noise band within the plasmasphere associated with a convecting whistler path, and ?hisslers,' falling-tone auroral-hiss forms repeated at intervals of about 2 sec.

  7. Electromagnetic radiation trapped in the magnetosphere above the plasma frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Shaw, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electromagnetic noise band is frequently observed in the outer magnetosphere by the Imp 6 spacecraft at frequencies from about 5 to 20 kHz. This noise band generally extends throughout the region from near the plasmapause boundary to near the magnetopause boundary. The noise typically has a broadband field strength of about 5 microvolts/meter. The noise band often has a sharp lower cutoff frequency at about 5 to 10 kHz, and this cutoff has been identified as the local electron plasma frequency. Since the plasma frequency in the plasmasphere and solar wind is usually above 20 kHz, it is concluded that this noise must be trapped in the low-density region between the plasmapause and magnetopause boundaries. The noise bands often contain a harmonic frequency structure which suggests that the radiation is associated with harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency.

  8. Automated determination of electron density from electric field measurements on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Kurth, William; Spasojevic, Maria; Shprits, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper-hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurements made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, f_{uhr}, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detections. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform an initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the EMFISIS instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  9. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed near the oxygen cyclotron frequency by ISEE 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, B. J.; Samson, J. C.; Hu, Y. D.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    The first results of observations of ion cyclotron waves by the elliptically orbiting ISEE 1 and 2 pair of spacecraft are reported. The most intense waves (8 nT) were observed in the outer plasmasphere where convection drift velocities were largest and the Alfven velocity was a minimum. Wave polarization is predominantly left-handed with propagation almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and the spectral slot and polarization reversal predicted by cold plasma propagation theory are identified in the wave data. Computations of the experimental wave spectra during the passage through the plasmapause show that the spectral slots relate to the local plasma parameters, possibly suggesting an ion cyclotron wave growth source near the spacecraft. A regular wave packet structure seen over the first 30 min of the event is attributed to the modulation of this energy source by the Pc 5 waves seen at the same time.

  10. Impact of Uncertainty in Solar Forcing on TEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Ja Soon; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Codrescu, Mihail; Fedrizzi, Mariangel; Mays, M. Leila; Taktakishvilli, Aleksandre; Kuznetsova, Maria; Rastätter, Lutz

    2016-07-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), which is an interagency partnership to enable, support and perform the research and development for next-generation space science and space weather models, has been leading community-wide model validation efforts for Ionosphere/Thermosphere (IT) models along with other models that cover different domains of the Sun-Earth system such as heliosphere and magnetosphere. Uncertainty quantification plays a critical role in model validation. As a preliminary study on uncertainty analysis, we investigate how uncertainty in external forcing such as the solar radio flux at 10.7 cm (F10.7 index) and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) impacts on the IT model results during geomagnetic storm times (e.g., 2013 Mar. event). For this study, CTIPe (Coupled Thermosphere Ionosphere Plasmasphere Electrodynamics) model is used. In this paper, we focus on the impact of the uncertainty of the parameters (F10.7 and IMF) on regional TEC (North American sector).

  11. Simultaneous measurements from the Millstone Hill radar and the Active satellite during the SAID/SAR arc event of the March 1990 CEDAR storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Förster

    Full Text Available During a nearby passage of the Active satellite above the Millstone Hill radar on 21 March 1990 at local sunset, the satellite and the radar performed simultaneous measurements of upper ionospheric parameters in nearly the same spatial volume. For this purpose the radar carried out a special azimuth-elevation scan to track the satellite. Direct comparisons of radar data and in situ satellite measurements have been carried out quite rarely. In this case, the coincidence of co-ordinated measurements and active ionospheric-magnetospheric processes during an extended storm recovery phase presents a unique occasion resulting in a very valuable data set. The measurements show generally good agreement both during quiet prestorm and storm conditions and the combination of radar and satellite observations gives a more comprehensive picture of the physical processes involved. We find a close relationship between the rapid westward ion drift peak at subauroral latitudes (SAID event and the occurrence of a stable auroral red (SAR arc observed after sunset by an all-sky imager and reported in an earlier study of this event. The SAID electric field is caused by the penetration of energetic ions with energies between about 1 keV and 100 keV into the outer plasmasphere to a latitude equatorward of the extent of the plasmasheet electrons. Charge separation results in the observed polarisation field and the SAID. Unusually high molecular ion densities measured by the satellite at altitudes of 700-870 km at subauroral and auroral latitudes point on strong upward-directed ion acceleration processes and an intense neutral gas upwelling. These structures are collocated with a narrow trough in electron density and an electron temperature peak as observed simultaneously by the radar and the satellite probes.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; plasma temperature and density; Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere.

  12. Similarity and differences in morphology and mechanisms of the foF2 and TEC disturbances during the geomagnetic storms on 26-30 September 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, Maxim V.; Klimenko, Vladimir V.; Zakharenkova, Irina E.; Ratovsky, Konstantin G.; Korenkova, Nina A.; Yasyukevich, Yury V.; Mylnikova, Anna A.; Cherniak, Iurii V.

    2017-08-01

    This study presents an analysis of the ground-based observations and model simulations of ionospheric electron density disturbances at three longitudinal sectors (eastern European, Siberian and American) during geomagnetic storms that occurred on 26-30 September 2011. We use the Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) to reveal the main mechanisms influencing the storm-time behavior of the total electron content (TEC) and the ionospheric F2 peak critical frequency (foF2) during different phases of geomagnetic storms. During the storm's main phase the long-lasting positive disturbances in TEC and foF2 at sunlit mid-latitudes are mainly explained by the storm-time equatorward neutral wind. The effects of eastward electric field can only explain the positive ionospheric storm in the first few hours of the initial storm phase. During the main phase the ionosphere was more changeable than the plasmasphere. The positive disturbances in the electron content at the plasmaspheric heights (800-20 000 km) at high latitudes can appear simultaneously with the negative disturbances in TEC and foF2. The daytime positive disturbances in foF2 and TEC occurred at middle and low latitudes and at the Equator due to n(O) / n(N2) enhancement during later stage of the main phase and during the recovery phase of the geomagnetic storm. The plasma tube diffusional depletion and negative disturbances in electron and neutral temperature were the main formation mechanisms of the simultaneous formation of the positive disturbances in foF2 and negative disturbances in TEC at low latitudes during the storm's recovery phase.

  13. Global characteristics of the upper transition height derived from the topside Alouette/ISIS topside sounder electron density profiles, the Formosat-3/COSMIC density profiles and the IRI ion composition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlik, Vladimir; Triskova, Ludmila; Benson, Robert; Bilitza, Dieter; Chu, Philip; Richards, Phil G.; Wang, Yongli

    The upper transition height (Ht) (the altitude of the transition from heavy atomic ions to light ions or in the simplest form the transition from O+ to H+) is an important parameter, representing the boundary between the ionosphere and the plasmasphere. Ht is very sensitive to various geophysical parameters, like solar and magnetic activity and strongly depends on latitude and local time. There were numerous studies of this parameter in past decades. In spite of these efforts, no model satisfactorily represents this parameter so far. Moreover, surprising evidence of very low transition heights during the last prolonged solar minimum, of a level never obtained before, have been reported. We investigate the upper transition height on the global scale. We made progress in processing large data sets of Ht deduced from the Alouette/ISIS topside sounder and from the Formosat-3/COSMIC vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h) using the theoretical Global Plasma Ionosphere Density (GPID) model (Webb and Essex, 2004) and a revised non-linear function describing the scale height vs. altitude (Titheridge, 1976) to fit the vertical density profiles to the observed profiles and to determine the upper transition height. Since both methods require the plasma temperatures and their gradients as input, these are calculated using the IRI2012 model. Both methods are verified using a large amount of electron and ion density profiles simulated by the FLIP theoretical model and their accuracy is discussed. We compare the results from Alouette/ISIS and Formosat-3/COSMIC and present a global distribution of the calculated Ht and its dependence on geophysical parameters. Finally we compare it with Ht calculated using the IRI ion composition model. Titheridge, J.E., 1976. Ion Transition Heights from Topside Electron-Density Profiles. Planetary and Space Science 24 (3), 229-245. Webb, P.A., Essex, E.A., 2004. A dynamic global model of the plasmasphere. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar

  14. Modeling the ionosphere-thermosphere response to a geomagnetic storm using physics-based magnetospheric energy input: OpenGGCM-CTIM results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Hyunju Kim; Zesta, Eftyhia; Fedrizzi, Mariangel; Shi, Yong; Raeder, Joachim; Codrescu, Mihail V.; Fuller-Rowell, Tim J.

    2016-06-01

    The magnetosphere is a major source of energy for the Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere (IT) system. Current IT models drive the upper atmosphere using empirically calculated magnetospheric energy input. Thus, they do not sufficiently capture the storm-time dynamics, particularly at high latitudes. To improve the prediction capability of IT models, a physics-based magnetospheric input is necessary. Here, we use the Open Global General Circulation Model (OpenGGCM) coupled with the Coupled Thermosphere Ionosphere Model (CTIM). OpenGGCM calculates a three-dimensional global magnetosphere and a two-dimensional high-latitude ionosphere by solving resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with solar wind input. CTIM calculates a global thermosphere and a high-latitude ionosphere in three dimensions using realistic magnetospheric inputs from the OpenGGCM. We investigate whether the coupled model improves the storm-time IT responses by simulating a geomagnetic storm that is preceded by a strong solar wind pressure front on August 24, 2005. We compare the OpenGGCM-CTIM results with low-earth-orbit satellite observations and with the model results of Coupled Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Plasmasphere electrodynamics (CTIPe). CTIPe is an up-to-date version of CTIM that incorporates more IT dynamics such as a low-latitude ionosphere and a plasmasphere, but uses empirical magnetospheric input. OpenGGCM-CTIM reproduces localized neutral density peaks at ~ 400 km altitude in the high-latitude dayside regions in agreement with in situ observations during the pressure shock and the early phase of the storm. Although CTIPe is in some sense a much superior model than CTIM, it misses these localized enhancements. Unlike the CTIPe empirical input models, OpenGGCM-CTIM more faithfully produces localized increases of both auroral precipitation and ionospheric electric fields near the high-latitude dayside region after the pressure shock and after the storm onset, which in turn

  15. Similarity and differences in morphology and mechanisms of the foF2 and TEC disturbances during the geomagnetic storms on 26–30 September 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Klimenko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an analysis of the ground-based observations and model simulations of ionospheric electron density disturbances at three longitudinal sectors (eastern European, Siberian and American during geomagnetic storms that occurred on 26–30 September 2011. We use the Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP to reveal the main mechanisms influencing the storm-time behavior of the total electron content (TEC and the ionospheric F2 peak critical frequency (foF2 during different phases of geomagnetic storms. During the storm's main phase the long-lasting positive disturbances in TEC and foF2 at sunlit mid-latitudes are mainly explained by the storm-time equatorward neutral wind. The effects of eastward electric field can only explain the positive ionospheric storm in the first few hours of the initial storm phase. During the main phase the ionosphere was more changeable than the plasmasphere. The positive disturbances in the electron content at the plasmaspheric heights (800–20 000 km at high latitudes can appear simultaneously with the negative disturbances in TEC and foF2. The daytime positive disturbances in foF2 and TEC occurred at middle and low latitudes and at the Equator due to n(O ∕ n(N2 enhancement during later stage of the main phase and during the recovery phase of the geomagnetic storm. The plasma tube diffusional depletion and negative disturbances in electron and neutral temperature were the main formation mechanisms of the simultaneous formation of the positive disturbances in foF2 and negative disturbances in TEC at low latitudes during the storm's recovery phase.

  16. The relationship between the plasmapause and outer belt electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; De Pascuale, S.; Funsten, H. O.; Jaynes, A. N.; Jahn, J.-M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Li, W.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2016-09-01

    We quantify the spatial relationship between the plasmapause and outer belt electrons for a 5 day period, 15-20 January 2013, by comparing locations of relativistic electron flux peaks to the plasmapause. A peak-finding algorithm is applied to 1.8-7.7 MeV relativistic electron flux data. A plasmapause gradient finder is applied to wave-derived electron number densities >10 cm-3. We identify two outer belts. Outer belt 1 is a stable zone of >3 MeV electrons located 1-2 RE inside the plasmapause. Outer belt 2 is a dynamic zone of plasma density. Belt 1 decayed on hiss timescales prior to a disturbance on 17 January and suffered only a modest dropout, perhaps owing to shielding by the plasmasphere. Afterward, the partially depleted belt 1 continued to decay at the initial rate. Belt 2 was emptied out by strong disturbance-time losses but restored within 24 h. For global context we use a plasmapause test particle simulation and derive a new plasmaspheric index Fp, the fraction of a circular drift orbit inside the plasmapause. We find that the locally measured plasmapause is (for this event) a good proxy for the globally integrated opportunity for losses in cold plasma. Our analysis of the 15-20 January 2013 time interval confirms that high-energy electron storage rings can persist for weeks or even months if prolonged quiet conditions prevail. This case study must be followed up by more general study (not limited to a 5 day period).

  17. Coupling of Pi2 wave energy in the inner magnetosphere as inferred from low-latitude ground observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN DeSheng; YANG HuiGen; CHEN ZhuoTian; C. P. NIELSEN

    2008-01-01

    Taking advantage of high time-resolution (1 s) geomagnetic field measurements obtained at low-latitude stations, we investigated frequency differences of Pi2 pul-sations between the dayside and the nightside. Firstly, we examined two Pi2 cases globally observed by multiple ground stations and found that the dominant fre-quency peaks at the dayside showed latitudinal dependence, I.e., the higher (lower) frequency peak was predominant at lower (higher) latitude. We also noticed that the dominant Pi2 frequency on the nightaide was apparently higher than that on the dayside. We argue that the multiple frequency peaks observed on the ground are harmonics of a plasmaspheric cavity resonance mode (CRM) and that the latitu-dinal dependence of the dominant frequency peaks may result from the energy coupling between the CRM and field line resonance (FLR) occurred in the near Earth space. We also argue that the frequency difference between the dayside and the nightaide could be caused by the reason that a higher harmonic was observed in the nightaide plasmasphere but was not effectively observed in the dayside. In addition, we statistically examined 829 Pi2 events that were simultaneously re-corded at Kakioka (KAK, Maglat=27.2°) and Jicamarca (JIC, Maglat=0.0°), the two stations separated by~10 h in local time (LT) and one of them (JIC) is located at the dip equator. We found that the Pi2 frequency observed at KAK on the nightside was higher than that observed at JIC on the dayside on average. After investigating the occurrence histogram of the frequency difference (△f=fJIC-fKAK) for the events si-multaneously observed at KAK and JIC, we found that close to half of the events had the identical frequency (|△f|<1.0 mHz). The statistical results are consistent with the facts reflected by case studies.

  18. Coupling of Pi2 wave energy in the inner magnetosphere as inferred from low-latitude ground observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.; P.; NIELSEN

    2008-01-01

    Taking advantage of high time-resolution (1 s) geomagnetic field measurements obtained at low-latitude stations, we investigated frequency differences of Pi2 pul-sations between the dayside and the nightside. Firstly, we examined two Pi2 cases globally observed by multiple ground stations and found that the dominant fre-quency peaks at the dayside showed latitudinal dependence, i.e., the higher (lower) frequency peak was predominant at lower (higher) latitude. We also noticed that the dominant Pi2 frequency on the nightside was apparently higher than that on the dayside. We argue that the multiple frequency peaks observed on the ground are harmonics of a plasmaspheric cavity resonance mode (CRM) and that the latitu-dinal dependence of the dominant frequency peaks may result from the energy coupling between the CRM and field line resonance (FLR) occurred in the near Earth space. We also argue that the frequency difference between the dayside and the nightside could be caused by the reason that a higher harmonic was observed in the nightside plasmasphere but was not effectively observed in the dayside. In addition, we statistically examined 829 Pi2 events that were simultaneously re-corded at Kakioka (KAK, Maglat=27.2°) and Jicamarca (JIC, Maglat=0.0°), the two stations separated by ~10 h in local time (LT) and one of them (JIC) is located at the dip equator. We found that the Pi2 frequency observed at KAK on the nightside was higher than that observed at JIC on the dayside on average. After investigating the occurrence histogram of the frequency difference (△f=fJIC-fKAK) for the events si-multaneously observed at KAK and JIC, we found that close to half of the events had the identical frequency (|△f |<1.0 mHz). The statistical results are consistent with the facts reflected by case studies.

  19. Are Ring Current Ions Lost in Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  20. Effect of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  1. Determination of the ionospheric foF2 using a stand-alone GPS receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, Dudy D.; Haralambous, Haris; Oikonomou, Christina; Kuntjoro, Wedyanto

    2017-09-01

    The critical frequency of ionospheric F2 layer (foF2) is a measure of the highest frequency of radio signal that may be reflected back by the F2 layer, and it is associated with ionospheric peak electron density in the F2 layer. Accurate long-term foF2 variations are usually derived from ionosonde observations. In this paper, we propose a new method to observe foF2 using a stand-alone global positioning system (GPS) receiver. The proposed method relies on the mathematical equation that relates foF2 to GPS observations. The equation is then implemented in the Kalman filter algorithm to estimate foF2 at every epoch of the observation (30-s rate). Unlike existing methods, the proposed method does not require any additional information from ionosonde observations and does not require any network of GPS receivers. It only requires as inputs the ionospheric scale height and the modeled plasmaspheric electron content, which practically can be derived from any existing ionospheric/plasmaspheric model. We applied the proposed method to estimate long-term variations of foF2 at three GPS stations located at the northern hemisphere (NICO, Cyprus), the southern hemisphere (STR1, Australia) and the south pole (SYOG, Antarctic). To assess the performance of the proposed method, we then compared the results against those derived by ionosonde observations and the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 model. We found that, during the period of high solar activity (2011-2012), the values of absolute mean bias between foF2 derived by the proposed method and ionosonde observations are in the range of 0.2-0.5 MHz, while those during the period of low solar activity (2009-2010) are in the range of 0.05-0.15 MHz. Furthermore, the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) values during high and low solar activities are in the range of 0.8-0.9 MHz and of 0.6-0.7 MHz, respectively. We also noticed that the values of absolute mean bias and RMSE between foF2 derived by the proposed method and the

  2. Polar observations of electron density distribution in the Earth’s magnetosphere. 1. Statistical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    , except at 14–17 MLT, where the average density remains constant. At all MLT sectors the range of the density varies by more than 3 orders of magnitude, since the geostationary orbit may cut through different plasma regions, such as the plasma sheet, trough, and plasmasphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; plasmasphere; polar cap phenomena

  3. A long-lived refilling event of the slot region between the Van Allen radiation belts from Nov 2004 to Jan 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.

    2015-12-01

    A powerful relativistic electron enhancement in the slot region between the inner and outer radiation belts is investigated by multi-satellites measurements. The measurement from Space Particle Component Detectors (SPCDs) aboard Fengyun-1 indicates that the relativistic electron (>1.6MeV) flux began to enhance obviously on early 10 November with the flux peak fixed at L~3.0. In the next day, the relativistic electron populations increased dramatically. Subsequently, the flux had been enhancing slowly, but unceasingly, until 17 November, and the maximum flux reached up to 7.8×104 cm-2·sr-1·s-1 at last. The flux peak fixed at L~3.0 and the very slow decay rate in this event make it to be an unusual long-lived slot region refilling event. We trace the cause of the event back to the interplanetary environment and find that there were two evident magnetic cloud constructions: dramatically enhanced magnetic field strength and long and smooth rotation of field vector from late 7 to 8 November and from late 9 to 10 November, respectively; solar wind speed increased in 'step-like' fashion on late 7 November and persisted the level of high speed >560 km·s-1 for about 124 hours. Owed to the interplanetary disturbances, very strong magnetic storms and substorms occurred in the magnetosphere. Responding to the extraordinarily magnetic perturbations, the plasmasphere shrank sharply. The location of plasmapause inferred from Dst indicates that the plasmapause shrank inward to as low as L~2.5. On account of these magnetospheric conditions, strong chorus emissions are expected near the earth. In fact, the STAFF on Cluster mission measured intensive whistler mode chorus emissions on 10 and 12 November, corresponding to the period of the remarkable enhancement of relativistic electron. Furthermore, we investigate the radial profile of phase space density (PSD) by electron flux from multi-satellites, and the evolution of the phase space density profile reveals that the local

  4. Analyzing Electric Field Morphology Through Data-Model Comparisons of the GEM IM/S Assessment Challenge Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, Michael W.; Ridley, Aaron J.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Gallagher, Dennis L.; Thomsen, Michelle F.; Henderson, Michael G.; Denton, Michael H.; Brandt, Pontus C.; Goldstein, Jerry

    2006-01-01

    The storm-time inner magnetospheric electric field morphology and dynamics are assessed by comparing numerical modeling results of the plasmasphere and ring current with many in situ and remote sensing data sets. Two magnetic storms are analyzed, April 22,2001 and October 21-23,2001, which are the events selected for the Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) Inner Magnetosphere/Storms (IM/S) Assessment Challenge (IMSAC). The IMSAC seeks to quantify the accuracy of inner magnetospheric models as well as synthesize our understanding of this region. For each storm, the ring current-atmosphere interaction model (RAM) and the dynamic global core plasma model (DGCPM) were run together with various settings for the large-scale convection electric field and the nightside ionospheric conductance. DGCPM plasmaspheric parameters were compared with IMAGE-EUV plasmapause extractions and LANL-MPA plume locations and velocities. RAM parameters were compared with Dst*, LANL-MPA fluxes and moments, IMAGE-MENA images, and IMAGE-HENA images. Both qualitative and quantitative comparisons were made to determine the electric field morphology that allows the model results to best fit the plasma data at various times during these events. The simulations with self-consistent electric fields were, in general, better than those with prescribed field choices. This indicates that the time-dependent modulation of the inner magnetospheric electric fields by the nightside ionosphere is quite significant for accurate determination of these fields (and their effects). It was determined that a shielded Volland-Stern field description driven by the 3-hour Kp index yields accurate results much of the time, but can be quite inconsistent. The modified Mcllwain field description clearly lagged in overall accuracy compared to the other fields, but matched some data sets (like Dst*) quite well. The rankings between the simulations varied depending on the storm and the individual data sets, indicating that

  5. Solar Wind Compression Generation of Coincident EMIC and Whistler Mode Chorus and Hiss Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Alexa; Mann, Ian

    2016-07-01

    Electron radiation belt dynamics are controlled by the competition of multiple acceleration and loss mechanisms. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC), chorus, and hiss waves have all been implicated as potential loss mechanisms of radiation belt electrons along with Chorus waves proposed as a mechanism for accelerating the lower energy source population to MeV energies. Understanding the relative importance of these waves as well as where and under what conditions they are generated is vital to predicting radiation belt dynamics. Although the size of the solar wind compression on 9 January 2014 event discussed here was modest, it has given us an opportunity to observe clearly how a magnetospheric compression can lead to the generation of EMIC, chorus, and hiss waves. The ICME generated shock encountered the Earth's magnetosphere on 9 January 2014 at ~20:11 UT, and the Van Allen Probes observe the coincident excitation of EMIC and Chorus waves outside the plasmasphere, and hiss weaves inside the plasmasphere. As the shock encountered the magnetosphere, an electric field impulse was observed to generate an increase in temperature anisotropy for both ions and electrons. This increased temperature anisotropy led to increased wave growth on both the ion and electron cyclotron branches. The simultaneous generation of multiple types of waves may lead to significant impacts on the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons, especially during geomagnetic compressions observed during the substorms, and the storm sudden commencement and main phases of geomagnetic storms, as well as during quiet time sudden impulse events. For example, the excitation of both EMIC and chorus waves at the same place, and at the same time, may complicate studies seeking a causal connection between specific individual plasma wave bursts and observations of particle precipitation into the atmosphere. During this relatively small event BARREL had three payloads in conjunction with the Van

  6. Multi-Spacecraft Data Assimilation and Reanalysis During the THEMIS and Van Allen Probes Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerman, A. C.; Shprits, Y.; Kondrashov, D. A.; Podladchikova, T.; Drozdov, A.; Subbotin, D.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's radiation belts are a dynamic system, controlled by competition between source, acceleration, loss and transport of particles. Solar wind pressure enhancements and outward transport are responsible for loss of electrons to the magnetopause, while wave-particle interactions inside the magnetosphere, driven by solar wind pressure and velocity variations, may lead to acceleration and radial diffusion of 10's of keV to MeV energy electrons, and pitch-angle scattering loss to the atmosphere. An understanding of the mechanisms behind the observed dynamics is critical to accurate modeling and hence forecasting of radiation belt conditions, important for design, and protection of our space-borne assets. The Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) model solves the Fokker-Planck diffusion equation in three dimensional invariant coordinates, which allows one to more effectively separate adiabatic and non-adiabatic changes in the radiation belt electron population. The model includes geomagnetic storm intensity dependent parameterizations of the following dominant magnetospheric waves: day- and night-side chorus, plasmaspheric hiss (in the inner magnetosphere and inside the plume region), lightning and anthropogenic generated waves, and electro-magnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, also inside of plasmaspheric plumes. The model is used to forecast the future state of the radiation belt electron population, while real-time data may be used to update the current state of the belts through assimilation with the model. The Kalman filter provides a computationally inexpensive method to assimilate data with a model, while taking into account the errors associated with each. System identification is performed to determine the model and observational bias and errors. The Kalman filter outputs an optimal estimate of the actual system state and the Kalman-gain weighted corrections (innovation) may be used to identify systematic differences between data and the model. Careful

  7. Modeling the ionosphere-thermosphere response to a geomagnetic storm using physics-based magnetospheric energy input: OpenGGCM-CTIM results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor Hyunju Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The magnetosphere is a major source of energy for the Earth’s ionosphere and thermosphere (IT system. Current IT models drive the upper atmosphere using empirically calculated magnetospheric energy input. Thus, they do not sufficiently capture the storm-time dynamics, particularly at high latitudes. To improve the prediction capability of IT models, a physics-based magnetospheric input is necessary. Here, we use the Open Global General Circulation Model (OpenGGCM coupled with the Coupled Thermosphere Ionosphere Model (CTIM. OpenGGCM calculates a three-dimensional global magnetosphere and a two-dimensional high-latitude ionosphere by solving resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD equations with solar wind input. CTIM calculates a global thermosphere and a high-latitude ionosphere in three dimensions using realistic magnetospheric inputs from the OpenGGCM. We investigate whether the coupled model improves the storm-time IT responses by simulating a geomagnetic storm that is preceded by a strong solar wind pressure front on August 24, 2005. We compare the OpenGGCM-CTIM results with low-earth-orbit satellite observations and with the model results of Coupled Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Plasmasphere electrodynamics (CTIPe. CTIPe is an up-to-date version of CTIM that incorporates more IT dynamics such as a low-latitude ionosphere and a plasmasphere, but uses empirical magnetospheric input. OpenGGCM-CTIM reproduces localized neutral density peaks at ~ 400 km altitude in the high-latitude dayside regions in agreement with in situ observations during the pressure shock and the early phase of the storm. Although CTIPe is in some sense a much superior model than CTIM, it misses these localized enhancements. Unlike the CTIPe empirical input models, OpenGGCM-CTIM more faithfully produces localized increases of both auroral precipitation and ionospheric electric fields near the high-latitude dayside region after the pressure shock and after the storm onset

  8. Remote Sensing of Ionosphere by IONOLAB Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Feza

    2016-07-01

    Ionosphere is a temporally and spatially varying, dispersive, anisotropic and inhomogeneous medium that is characterized primarily by its electron density distribution. Electron density is a complex function of spatial and temporal variations of solar, geomagnetic, and seismic activities. Ionosphere is the main source of error for navigation and positioning systems and satellite communication. Therefore, characterization and constant monitoring of variability of the ionosphere is of utmost importance for the performance improvement of these systems. Since ionospheric electron density is not a directly measurable quantity, an important derivable parameter is the Total Electron Content (TEC), which is used widely to characterize the ionosphere. TEC is proportional to the total number of electrons on a line crossing the atmosphere. IONOLAB is a research group is formed by Hacettepe University, Bilkent University and Kastamonu University, Turkey gathered to handle the challenges of the ionosphere using state-of-the-art remote sensing and signal processing techniques. IONOLAB group provides unique space weather services of IONOLAB-TEC, International Reference Ionosphere extended to Plasmasphere (IRI-Plas) model based IRI-Plas-MAP, IRI-Plas-STEC and Online IRI-Plas-2015 model at www.ionolab.org. IONOLAB group has been working for imaging and monitoring of ionospheric structure for the last 15 years. TEC is estimated from dual frequency GPS receivers as IONOLAB-TEC using IONOLAB-BIAS. For high spatio-temporal resolution 2-D imaging or mapping, IONOLAB-MAP algorithm is developed that uses automated Universal Kriging or Ordinary Kriging in which the experimental semivariogram is fitted to Matern Function with Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). For 3-D imaging of ionosphere and 1-D vertical profiles of electron density, state-of-the-art IRI-Plas model based IONOLAB-CIT algorithm is developed for regional reconstruction that employs Kalman Filters for state

  9. An initial response of magnetic fields at geosynchronous orbit to Pi 2 onset as observed from the dip-equator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Saka

    Full Text Available Fluxgate magnetometer data recorded at the dip-equator (Huancayo, Peru; 1.44°N, 355.9° in geomagnetic coordinates; 12.1°S, 75.2°W in geographic coordinates; L = 1.00 with higher accuracy of timing (0.1 s and amplitude resolution (0.01 nT were utilized to survey an onset of Pi 2 pulsations in the midnight sector (2100–0100 LT during PROMIS (Polar Region and Outer Magnetosphere International Study periods (1 March–20 June, 1986. It is found that changing field line magnitude and vector as observed by magnetometer on board the synchronous satellites in the midnight sector often takes place simultaneously with the onset of Pi 2 pulsations at the dip-equator. The field disturbances that follow thereafter tend to last for some time both at the geosynchronous altitudes and the dip-equator. In this report, we examine the initial response of the field lines in space, and attempt to classify how the field line vector changed in the meridional plane.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics · Magnetospheric configuration and dynamics · MHD waves and instabilities · Plasmasphere

  10. Four-point high time resolution information on electron densities by the electric field experiments (EFW on Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pedersen

    Full Text Available For accurate measurements of electric fields, spherical double probes are electronically controlled to be at a positive potential of approximately 1 V relative to the ambient magnetospheric plasma. The spacecraft will acquire a potential which balances the photoelectrons escaping to the plasma and the electron flux collected from the plasma. The probe-to-plasma potential difference can be measured with a time resolution of a fraction of a second, and provides information on the electron density over a wide range of electron densities from the lobes (~ 0.01 cm-3 to the magnetosheath (>10 cm-3 and the plasmasphere (>100 cm-3. This technique has been perfected and calibrated against other density measurements on GEOS, ISEE-1, CRRES, GEOTAIL and POLAR. The Cluster spacecraft potential measurements opens the way for new approaches, particularly near boundaries and gradients where four-point measurements will provide information never obtained before. Another interesting point is that onboard data storage of this simple parameter can be done for complete orbits and thereby will provide background information for the shorter full data collection periods on Cluster. Preliminary calibrations against other density measurements on Cluster will be reported.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers Space plasma physics (spacecraft sheaths, wakes, charging; instruments and techniques

  11. Storm time equatorial plasma bubble zonal drift reversal due to disturbance Hall electric field over the Brazilian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. M.; Abdu, M. A.; Souza, J. R.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Batista, I. S.; Denardini, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of equatorial ionospheric plasma bubbles over Brazilian sector during two magnetic storm events are investigated in this work. The observations were made at varying phases of magnetic disturbances when the bubble zonal drift velocity was found to reverse westward from its normally eastward velocity. Calculation of the zonal drift based on a realistic low-latitude ionosphere modeled by the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model showed on a quantitative basis a clear competition between vertical Hall electric field and disturbance zonal winds on the variations observed in the zonal velocity of the plasma bubble. The Hall electric field arising from enhanced ratio of field line-integrated conductivities, ΣH/ΣP, is most often generated by an increase in the integrated Hall conductivity, arising from enhanced energetic particle precipitation in the South American Magnetic Anomaly region for which evidence is provided from observation of anomalous sporadic E layers over Cachoeira Paulista and Fortaleza. Such sporadic E layers are also by themselves evidence for the development of the Hall electric field that modifies the zonal drift.

  12. C/NOFS-VEFI results on magnetic-latitude control over coupling of lightning-generated VLF into zero-hop whistlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Holzworth, R.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Heelis, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    The C/NOFS satellite had a low-inclination (13 deg) orbit and provided multi-year observations (2008 - 2015) of the innermost plasmasphere within 26 deg of the magnetic equator. We report on VEFI (Vector Electric Field Instrument) recordings of zero-hop whistler-wave electric fields in this low-latitude region. We describe evidence regarding the VLF coupling variabilities, in particular versus magnetic latitude. We rely critically on data provided by the CINDI (C/NOFS Ion and Neutral Drift Investigation) measurements of the ion-composition, and by WWLLN (World-Wide Lightning-Location Network) groundtruthing of lightning-VLF source location, energy, and time. This low-latitude region has been predicted to permit only reduced VLF coupling, due essentially to a Snell's Law total reflection from the underside of the ionosphere. Nonetheless various studies of VLF coupling at discrete frequencies (from naval VLF transmitters) indicate that there is some intermittent, anomalous coupling not predicted by a simple Snell's Law. We address this problem using broadband illumination by lightning-generated VLF.

  13. RAM-SCB Simulations of Electron Transport and Plasma Wave Scattering During the October 2012 double-dip Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, V.

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms for particle injection in the near-Earth space environment and their subsequent trapping or loss have been studied for many years, however, their theoretical evaluation and implementation in numerical models remain challenging. We address these outstanding questions using our RAM-SCB model that couples the kinetic ring current-atmosphere interactions model with an Euler potential-based three-dimensional plasma equilibrium code. We simulate wave-particle interactions on a global scale using L and MLT-dependent event-specific wave models and investigate the fast dropout of the radiation belts during the October 2012 "double-dip" storm event. The calculated cold plasma densities with a coupled time-dependent 2-D plasmasphere model show good agreement with in situ EMFISIS observations along the Van Allen Probes' orbits. The simulated with RAM-SCB precipitating electron fluxes are compared with measurements of electron precipitation by multiple NOAA satellites during the investigated storm event. The combined effects from radial transport and scattering by plasma waves on ring current and radiation belt dynamics are evaluated.

  14. International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) geotail mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, R.; Sizemore, K. O.

    1991-01-01

    The Geotail spacecraft will be provided by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) and will provide a Delta Launch Vehicle, tracking support by the Deep Space Network (DSN), and data processing support by GSFC. In exchange, ISAS will reserve part of the payload for NASA instruments together with a certain number of investigators from the United States. As the solar wind flows toward the Earth, some of the energy is modified by the Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere. This interaction causes the flow to be altered, creating a plasmasphere, plasma sheet, and ring currents in the Earth's Geomagnetic Tail region. The result is a series of distinct regions which affect processes on the Earth. By traversing the tail region to a variety of depths, Geotail will be able to determine the size, position, and other properties of these regions. When correlated with information obtained from the other ISAS spacecraft, Geotail data should help to provide a more complete understanding of how the solar processes affect the Earth's environment. The flight profile is given, and information is presented in tabular form on the following topics: DSN support, frequency assignments, telemetry, command, and tracking support responsibility.

  15. Magnetosonic resonances in the magnetospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonovich, A. S.; Kozlov, D. A.

    2013-05-01

    A problem of coupling between fast and slow magnetosonic waves in Earth's magnetosphere (magnetosonic resonance) is examined. Propagation both slow magnetosonic wave and Alfven wave can easily be canalized along the magnetic field line direction. The main difference between the two is that slow magnetosonic waves dissipate strongly due to their interaction with the background plasma ions, whose temperature is above the electron temperature. In Earth's magnetosphere, however, there is a region where the dissipation of slow magnetosonic waves can be weak—the inner plasmasphere. The slow magnetosonic waves generated there can be registered directly. In other regions, with strong dissipation of slow magnetosonic waves, their signature may be detected through their impact on the Alfven resonance at frequencies for which the resonant Alfven and slow magnetosonic waves exist simultaneously in the magnetosphere. Owing to their strong coupling with the background plasma ions, resonant slow magnetosonic waves can transfer the energy and impulse from the solar wind to the magnetospheric plasma ions via fast magnetosonic waves penetrating into the tail lobes. A problem of resonant conversion of fast magnetosonic waves into slow magnetosonic oscillations in a magnetosphere with dipole-like magnetic field is also examined.

  16. Magnetospheric ';magic' frequencies excited by subsolar magnetosheath jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, M. O.; Hartinger, M.; Horbury, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Statistical and event studies have shown that magnetospheric ULF waves are often observed at persistent discrete Pc5 frequencies known as ';magic' frequencies [see Menk 2011 for a recent review]. While typically assumed to be global (cavity/waveguide) modes, another interpretation is that of magnetopause surface eigenmodes, which may be excited by localised pressure enhancements in the magnetosheath. To distinguish between these hypotheses, we identify transient jets in the magnetosheath (which occur about 2% of the time, predominantly downstream of the quasi-parallel shock) and statistically investigate the spectral response of the magnetospheric magnetic field at geostationary orbit. The broadband jets do indeed excite waves at the ';magic' frequencies, with both direct and resonant driving. We show that the expected fundamental frequencies of magnetopause surface eigenmodes have two preferential values over a wide range of upstream conditions, corresponding to fast and slow solar wind, and that their harmonics are in good agreement with the ';magic' frequencies. We also show that the waves are largely inconsistent with global (cavity/waveguide) modes outside the plasmasphere. Thus we conclude that the ';magic' frequencies are most likely due to magnetopause surface eigenmodes. Menk, F. W., Magnetospheric ULF waves: A review, in The dynamic magnetosphere, edited by W. Lui and M. Fujimoto, IAGA Special Sopron Book Series, pp. 223-256, Springer-Verlag Berlin, doi:10.1007/978-94-007-0501-2_13, 2011.

  17. Wave "Coherency" and Implications for Wave-Particle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Singh Lakhina, Gurbax; Bhanu, Remya; Lee, Lou-Chuang

    2016-07-01

    Wave "coherency" was introduced in 2009 by Tsurutani et al. (JGR, doi:10.1029/2008JA013353, 2009) to describe the waves detected in the ~10 to 100 ms duration subelements which are the fundamental components of ~0.1 to 0.5 s chorus "elements". In this talk we will show examples of what we mean by coherency, quasi-coherency and incoherency for a variety of magnetospheric plasma waves. We will show how to measure coherency/quasicoherency quantitatively for electromagnetic whistler mode chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, plasmaspheric hiss and linearly polarized magnetosonic waves. If plasma waves are coherent, their interactions with resonant particles will be substantially different. Specific examples will be used to show that the pitch angle scattering rates for energetic charged particles is roughly 3 orders of magnitude faster than the Kennel-Petschek diffusion (which assumes incoherent waves) rate. We feel that this mechanism is the only one that can explain ~ 0.1- 0.5 s bremsstrahlung x-ray microbursts.

  18. Longitudinal difference in total electron content over the East Asian region: Feature and explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shimei; Xiao, Zuo; Zhao, Biqiang; Zhang, Donghe; Hao, Yongqiang

    2016-10-01

    The mechanism of the longitudinal difference of ionospheric electron density is in general attributed to the thermospheric wind effect modulated by the local geomagnetic declination. Although this mechanism is tested in many case studies, there are other possible factors such as solar activity and so on which still need further investigations. In this paper, TEC data from two Chinese GPS stations located at almost same geographic latitudes but with a wide longitude span (~38°) are used to study the morphological features of longitudinal differences under various geophysical conditions. A parameter Rew is defined as a normalized measure of the TEC difference between the two stations. All the observed temporal variations of Rew are analyzed statistically, with the results showing that negative east-west differences (Western TEC>Eastern TEC) in the noontime are pronounced during Day of Year (DoY) 90-270, while nighttime positive differences (Western TEClongitudinal dependence of the plasmaspheric downward flux should also be taken into consideration in explaining the longitudinal differences in the ionosphere.

  19. A search for interplanetary He II, 304-A emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paresce, F.; Fahr, H.; Lay, G.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of a region of the sky around the antisolar direction in the earth's shadow was surveyed by the extreme ultraviolet telescope on the Apollo-Soyuz mission, whose 170-620 A channel is primarily sensitive to the H II, 304-A and He I, 584-A resonance. A sharp decrease in intensity was found as the line of sight sweeps into the shadow region. Once the line of sight is contained within the shadow, a residual signal above instrumental background was observed that was independent of view direction and spacecraft position. An upper limit at the 2sigma confidence level to a possible He II, 304-A component that can escape detection by the instrument corresponds to 0.002 R, or to a column density of 10 to the 9th ions/sq cm scattering at line center. The brightest possible sources for such emissions are multiple scattering from plasmaspheric He(+) in the shadow and scattering from He(+) created by the photoionization of the interstellar wind neutral helium.

  20. Self-Consistent Ring Current/Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    The self-consistent treatment of the RC ion dynamics and EMIC waves, which are thought to exert important influences on the ion dynamical evolution, is an important missing element in our understanding of the storm-and recovery-time ring current evolution. For example, the EMlC waves cause the RC decay on a time scale of about one hour or less during the main phase of storms. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies 21 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the modeling of EMIC waves is critical and timely issue in magnetospheric physics. This study will generalize the self-consistent theoretical description of RC ions and EMIC waves that has been developed by Khazanov et al. [2002, 2003] and include the heavy ions and propagation effects of EMIC waves in the global dynamic of self-consistent RC - EMIC waves coupling. The results of our newly developed model that will be presented at the meeting, focusing mainly on the dynamic of EMIC waves and comparison of these results with the previous global RC modeling studies devoted to EMIC waves formation. We also discuss RC ion precipitations and wave induced thermal electron fluxes into the ionosphere.

  1. Dispersion equations for field-aligned cyclotron waves in axisymmetric magnetospheric plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Grishanov

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we derive the dispersion equations for field-aligned cyclotron waves in two-dimensional (2-D magnetospheric plasmas with anisotropic temperature. Two magnetic field configurations are considered with dipole and circular magnetic field lines. The main contribution of the trapped particles to the transverse dielectric permittivity is estimated by solving the linearized Vlasov equation for their perturbed distribution functions, accounting for the cyclotron and bounce resonances, neglecting the drift effects, and assuming the weak connection of the left-hand and right-hand polarized waves. Both the bi-Maxwellian and bi-Lorentzian distribution functions are considered to model the ring current ions and electrons in the dipole magnetosphere. A numerical code has been developed to analyze the dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves in an electron-proton magnetospheric plasma with circular magnetic field lines, assuming that the steady-state distribution function of the energetic protons is bi-Maxwellian. As in the uniform magnetic field case, the growth rate of the proton-cyclotron instability (PCI in the 2-D magnetospheric plasmas is defined by the contribution of the energetic ions/protons to the imaginary part of the transverse permittivity elements. We demonstrate that the PCI growth rate in the 2-D axisymmetric plasmasphere can be significantly smaller than that for the straight magnetic field case with the same macroscopic bulk parameters.

  2. Total electron content obtained from the USU-GAIM data assimilation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherliess, Ludger; Eccles, Vince; Schunk, Robert; Zhu, Lie; Gardner, Larry

    2016-07-01

    Physics-based data assimilation models have been used in meteorology and oceanography for several decades and are now also prevalent for specifications and forecasts of the ionosphere. This increased use of ionospheric data assimilation models coincides with the increase in data suitable for assimilation. At USU we have developed several different data assimilation models, including the Global Assimilation on Ionospheric Measurements Gauss-Markov (GAIM-GM) and Full Physics (GAIM-FP) models. Both models assimilate a variety of different data types, including ground-based GPS/TEC, occultation, bottomside electron density profiles from ionosondes, in-situ electron densities, and space-based UV radiance measurements and provide specifications and forecasts on a spatial grid that can be global, regional, or local. The GAIM-GM model is a simpler model that uses the physics-based Ionosphere Forecast Model (IFM) as a background model but uses a statistical process in the Kalman filter. The GAIM-FP model is a more sophisticated model that uses a physics-based ionosphere-plasmasphere model (IPM) and an Ensemble Kalman filter. The primary GAIM-FP output is in the form of 3-dimensional electron density distributions from 90 km to near geosynchronous altitude. The 3-d densities can be used to obtain the total electron content (TEC) over the globe. We will present the differences and similarities of TEC obtained from our models and compare them with independent observations.

  3. Explaining the dynamics of the ultra-relativistic third Van Allen radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, I. R.; Ozeke, L. G.; Murphy, K. R.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Turner, D. L.; Baker, D. N.; Rae, I. J.; Kale, A.; Milling, D. K.; Boyd, A. J.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Singer, H. J.; Dimitrakoudis, S.; Daglis, I. A.; Honary, F.

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts over 50 years ago, an explanation for their complete dynamics has remained elusive. Especially challenging is understanding the recently discovered ultra-relativistic third electron radiation belt. Current theory asserts that loss in the heart of the outer belt, essential to the formation of the third belt, must be controlled by high-frequency plasma wave-particle scattering into the atmosphere, via whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, or electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. However, this has failed to accurately reproduce the third belt. Using a data-driven, time-dependent specification of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves we show for the first time how the third radiation belt is established as a simple, elegant consequence of storm-time extremely fast outward ULF wave transport. High-frequency wave-particle scattering loss into the atmosphere is not needed in this case. When rapid ULF wave transport coupled to a dynamic boundary is accurately specified, the sensitive dynamics controlling the enigmatic ultra-relativistic third radiation belt are naturally explained.

  4. Investigating the source of near-relativistic and relativistic electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. L.; O'Brien, T. P.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S.; Gkioulidou, M.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.

    2017-01-01

    Using observations from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we study the role of sudden particle enhancements at low L shells (SPELLS) as a source of inner radiation belt electrons. SPELLS events are characterized by electron intensity enhancements of approximately an order of magnitude or more in less than 1 day at L belt electrons under quiet/average conditions. During SPELLS events, the evolution of electron distributions reveals an enhancement of phase space density that can exceed 3 orders of magnitude in the slot region and continues into the inner radiation belt, which is evidence that these events are an important - and potentially dominant - source of inner belt electrons. Electron fluxes from September 2012 through February 2016 reveal that SPELLS occur frequently ( 2.5/month at 200 keV), but the number of observed events decreases exponentially with increasing electron energy for ≥100 keV. After SPELLS events, the slot region reforms due to slow energy-dependent decay over several day time scales, consistent with losses due to interactions with plasmaspheric hiss. Combined, these results indicate that the peaked phase space density distributions in the inner electron radiation belt result from an "on/off," geomagnetic-activity-dependent source from higher radial distances.

  5. Parametric validations of analytical lifetime estimates for radiation belt electron diffusion by whistler waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Artemyev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The lifetimes of electrons trapped in Earth's radiation belts can be calculated from quasi-linear pitch-angle diffusion by whistler-mode waves, provided that their frequency spectrum is broad enough and/or their average amplitude is not too large. Extensive comparisons between improved analytical lifetime estimates and full numerical calculations have been performed in a broad parameter range representative of a large part of the magnetosphere from L ~ 2 to 6. The effects of observed very oblique whistler waves are taken into account in both numerical and analytical calculations. Analytical lifetimes (and pitch-angle diffusion coefficients are found to be in good agreement with full numerical calculations based on CRRES and Cluster hiss and lightning-generated wave measurements inside the plasmasphere and Cluster lower-band chorus waves measurements in the outer belt for electron energies ranging from 100 keV to 5 MeV. Comparisons with lifetimes recently obtained from electron flux measurements on SAMPEX, SCATHA, SAC-C and DEMETER also show reasonable agreement.

  6. The causes of the hardest electron precipitation events seen with SAMPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David M.; Casavant, Eric P.; Comess, Max D.; Liang, Xinqing; Bowers, Gregory S.; Selesnick, Richard S.; Clausen, Lasse B. N.; Millan, Robyn M.; Sample, John G.

    2016-09-01

    We studied the geomagnetic, plasmaspheric, and solar wind context of relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events seen with the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), Proton Electron Telescope (PET) to derive an exponential folding energy E0 for each event. Events with E0750 keV near dusk (1400 500 keV ("hard REP"), we estimate that roughly 45% of the whole population has the distributions of geomagnetic and solar wind parameters associated with EMIC waves, while 55% does not. We hypothesize that the latter events may be caused by current sheet scattering (CSS), which can be mistaken for EMIC wave scattering in that both simultaneously precipitate MeV electrons and keV protons. Since a large number of MeV electrons are lost in the near-midnight hard REP events, and in the large number of E0< 400 keV events that show no dusk-like peak at all, we conclude that CSS should be studied further as a possibly important loss channel for MeV electrons.

  7. Introduction to the special issue on history development of solar terrestrial sciences including auroral sub-storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, N.; Parks, G.; Svalgaard, L.; Kamide, Y.; Lui, T.

    2016-12-01

    Solar terrestrial (ST) sciences started centuries ago and branched into different disciplines. Starting with naked eye to highly sophisticated novel experimental techniques, observations have revealed the secrets of the Sun, heliosphere, magnetosphere, plasmasphere, and ionosphere-atmosphere components of the ST system. Theories and theoretical models have been developed for the different components independently and together. World-wide efforts under different umbrella are being persuaded to understand the challenges of the ST system. The onset problem and role of O+ ions in sub-storm physics are two issues that are hotly debated. The onset problem is whether sub-storm is triggered by magnetic reconnection in the tail region at 15-20 Re or by a current disruption at ~12 Re. The issue on O+ role is whether O+ ions affect the dynamics of sub-storms under magnetic storm and non-storm conditions differently. This special issue of Geoscience Letters contains a collection of 15 papers on the history and development of solar terrestrial sciences including auroral sub-storms. Over half of the papers are based on the presentations in a session on the same topic organized at the AOGS (Asia Oceania geosciences Society) General Assembly held in Singapore during 02-07 August 2015. The rest of the papers from outside the assembly also falls within the theme of the special issue. The papers are organized in the order of history and development of ST coupling, sub-storms, and outer heliosphere.

  8. Evidence of standing waves during a Pi2 pulsation event observed on Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Collier

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Observations of Pi2 pulsations at middle and low latitudes have been explained in terms of cavity mode resonances, whereas transients associated with field-aligned currents appear to be responsible for the high latitude Pi2 signature.

    Data from Cluster are used to study a Pi2 event observed at 18:09 UTC on 21 January 2003, when three of the satellites were within the plasmasphere (L=4.7, 4.5 and 4.6 while the fourth was on the plasmapause or in the plasmatrough (L=6.6. Simultaneous pulsations at ground observatories and the injection of particles at geosynchronous orbit corroborate the occurrence of a substorm.

    Evidence of a cavity mode resonance is established by considering the phase relationship between the orthogonal electric and magnetic field components associated with radial and field-aligned standing waves. The relative phase between satellites located on either side of the geomagnetic equator indicates that the field-aligned oscillation is an odd harmonic. Finite azimuthal Poynting flux suggests that the cavity is effectively open ended and the azimuthal wave number is estimated as m~13.5.

  9. Simulation of mode conversion process from upper-hybrid waves to LO-mode waves in the vicinity of the plasmapause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Kalaee

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the role of the mode conversion process in the generation mechanism of LO-mode waves in the equatorial region of the plasmasphere, we have investigated the linear mode conversion process among upper-hybrid-resonance (UHR-mode, Z-mode and LO-mode waves by a numerical simulation solving Maxwell's equations and the equation of motion of a cold electron fluid. The wave coupling process occurring in the cold magnetized plasma are examined in detail. In order to give a realistic initial plasma condition in the numerical experiments, we use initial parameters inferred from observation data obtained around the generation region of LO-mode waves obtained by the Akebono satellite. A density gradient is estimated from the observed UHR frequency, and wave normal angles are estimated from the dispersion relation of cold plasma by comparing observed wave electric fields. Then, we perform numerical experiments of mode conversion processes using the density gradient of background plasma and the wave normal angle of incident upper hybrid mode waves determined from the observation results. We found that the characteristics of reproduced LO-mode waves in each simulation run are consistent with observations.

  10. Opto-mechanisms design of extreme-ultraviolet camera onboard Chang E lunar lander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaohui; Chen, Bo; Song, Kefei; Wang, Xiaodong; Liu, Shijie; Yang, Liang; Hu, Qinglong; Qiao, Ke; Zhang, Liping; Wu, Guodong; Yu, Ping

    2014-06-30

    The extreme-ultraviolet camera mounted on the Lander of China Chang-E lunar exploration project launched in 2013 is the first instrument used to imaging from the lunar surface to the whole plasmasphere around the earth. Taking into account both the lunar environment conditions and the weight and volume constraints, a single spherical mirror and a spherical microchannel plate detector make up the compact optical system. An optimized opto-mechanical design was presented using Finite Element Analysis Model, and the detail design for the important assemblies of the 2-axis platform, the primary mirror, the aperture door mechanism and MCP detector were all specially addressed for their environmental adaptability and reliability. Tests of mechanical characteristics have demonstrated that the position and pointing accuracy and its stability meets the operation requirements of 2'. Vibration results have shown that the EUVC has adequate stiffness and strength safety margin to survive in launch and the moon environments. The imaging performance with the resolution of 0.08° is measured after vibration, in agreement with the predicted performance.

  11. Observations of Ion Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection for Northward IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Michael O.; Moore, Thomas E.; Fuselier, S.; Lockwood, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic merging at Earth's magnetopause produces distinct mixtures of ions and electrons as well as signatures in their distribution functions. High resolution measurements allow for the separation of the different distributions and quantification of their characteristics. This provides details on the temporal and spatial nature of the merging site and the resulting history of the merged fields. The event of May 29, 1996 resulted in remote observations of the effects of reconnection on both magnetosheath and magnetosphere populations for a period of approximately three hours. Three-dimensional ion distributions obtained by the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment on the Polar spacecraft show that field lines threading the spacecraft's location in the northern cusp region contained a mix of D-shaped ions from the magnetosheath and accelerated magnetospheric ions both moving parallel to the local magnetic field. This mix of ions resulted from transmission of magnetosheath ions across the magnetopause at speeds greater than the de-Hoffman-Teller speed and the reflection of cold, slow-moving plasmasphere-like ions at the magnetopause. These observations are used to conclude that these field lines were connected to the ionosphere in the northern hemisphere and, southward of the spacecraft, the interplanetary magnetic field and crossed the magnetopause in the equatorial region southward of the spacecraft.

  12. Space Electron Density Gradient Studies using a 3D Embedded Reconfigurable Sounder and ESA/NASA CLUSTER Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides a direct comparison between data captured by a new embedded reconfigurable digital sounder, different ground-based ionospheric sounders spread around Europe and the ESA/NASA CLUSTER mission. The CLUSTER mission consists of four identical space probes flying in a formation that allows measurements of the electron density gradient in the local magnetic field. Both the ground-based and the spacecraft instrumentations assist in studying the motion, geometry and boundaries of the plasmasphere. The comparison results are in accordance to each other. Some slight deviations among the captured data were expected from the beginning of this investigation. These small discrepancies are reasonable and seriatim analyzed. The results of this research are significant, since the level of the plasma's ionization, which is related to the solar activity, dominates the propagation of electromagnetic waves through it. Similarly, unusually high solar activity presents serious hazards to orbiting satellites, spaceborne instrumentation, satellite communications and infrastructure located on the Earth's surface. Long-term collaborative study of the data is required to continue, in order to identify and determine the enhanced risk in advance. This would allow scientists to propose an immediate cure.

  13. Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, R. W.; Scherliess, L.; Sojka, J. J.; Thompson, D. C.; Anderson, D. N.; Codrescu, M.; Minter, C.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Heelis, R. A.; Hairston, M.; Howe, B. M.

    2001-12-01

    The ionosphere is a highly dynamic medium that can vary significantly from day to day and from hour to hour at a given location, and these variations can have detrimental effects on military and civilian systems. In an effort to minimize or circumvent the detrimental effects, a physics-based data assimilation model of the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere is under development with funding from the DoD MURI program. Two university consortia are involved, with USU and USC as the lead institutions. When completed, the GAIM (Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements) model will provide specifications and forecasts on a spatial grid that can be global, regional, or local (50 km x 50 km). GAIM will use a physics-based ionosphere-plasmasphere model and a Kalman filter as a basis for assimilating a diverse set of real-time (or near real-time) measurements. Some of the data to be assimilated include in situ density measurements from satellites, ionosonde electron density profiles, occultation data, ground-based GPS TECs, TECs between ground stations and LEO satellites with radio beacons, and line-of-sight UV emissions from selected satellites. The resulting specifications and forecasts will be in the form of 3-dimensional electron density distributions from 90 km to geosynchronous altitude (35,000 km). An initial form of GAIM already exists and recent results from the USU consortium will be presented.

  14. Global dynamic evolution of the cold plasma inferred with neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Shprits, Yuri; Spasojevic, Maria

    2017-04-01

    The electron number density is a fundamental parameter of plasmas and is critical for the wave-particle interactions. Despite its global importance, the distribution of cold plasma and its dynamic dependence on solar wind conditions remains poorly quantified. Existing empirical models present statistical averages based on static geomagnetic parameters, but cannot reflect the dynamics of the highly structured and quickly varying plasmasphere environment, especially during times of high geomagnetic activity. Global imaging provides insights on the dynamics but quantitative inversion to electron number density has been lacking. We propose an empirical model for reconstruction of global dynamics of the cold plasma density distribution based only on solar wind data and geomagnetic indices. We develop a neural network that is capable of globally reconstructing the dynamics of the cold plasma density distribution for L shells from 2 to 6 and all local times. We utilize the density database obtained using the NURD algorithm [Zhelavskaya et al., 2016] in conjunction with solar wind data and geomagnetic indices to train the neural network. This study demonstrates how the global dynamics can be reconstructed from local in-situ observations by using machine learning tools. We describe aspects of the validation process in detail and discuss the selected inputs to the model and their physical implication.

  15. Detailed study of Pi2 damped oscillations from low latitude magnetic observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Jayashree; Arora, Kusumita; Nagarajan, Nandini

    2017-03-01

    The study of low latitude damped Pi2 oscillations (40-150 s) are investigated using archived data from Choutuppal (CPL), geomagnetic observatory, operated by CSIR-NGRI, Hyderabad, India. The period of investigation is during solar cycle 21 (1975-1983). All the Pi2 events identified during this period are subjected to detailed analysis for their association with substorm and non-substorm events. It is interesting to note that there is equal probability of occurrence of Pi2s with or without a substorm. The Pi2 frequencies associated with substorms showed an increased value in the post-midnight sector than compared to the Pre-midnight sectors. The non-substorm Pi2s are seen to be associated with lower levels of geomagnetic activity. The corresponding period of Pi2s decreases with increasing level of activity. While the generation of Pi2s are generally attributed to substorm onset, it is seen that the quiet time non-substorm events are related to plasmaspheric cavity mode resonances at low latitudes.

  16. Observations of Ion Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection for Northward IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Michael O.; Moore, Thomas E.; Fuselier, S.; Lockwood, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic merging at Earth's magnetopause produces distinct mixtures of ions and electrons as well as signatures in their distribution functions. High resolution measurements allow for the separation of the different distributions and quantification of their characteristics. This provides details on the temporal and spatial nature of the merging site and the resulting history of the merged fields. The event of May 29, 1996 resulted in remote observations of the effects of reconnection on both magnetosheath and magnetosphere populations for a period of approximately three hours. Three-dimensional ion distributions obtained by the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment on the Polar spacecraft show that field lines threading the spacecraft's location in the northern cusp region contained a mix of D-shaped ions from the magnetosheath and accelerated magnetospheric ions both moving parallel to the local magnetic field. This mix of ions resulted from transmission of magnetosheath ions across the magnetopause at speeds greater than the de-Hoffman-Teller speed and the reflection of cold, slow-moving plasmasphere-like ions at the magnetopause. These observations are used to conclude that these field lines were connected to the ionosphere in the northern hemisphere and, southward of the spacecraft, the interplanetary magnetic field and crossed the magnetopause in the equatorial region southward of the spacecraft.

  17. Global, Energy-Dependent Ring Current Response During Two Large Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Burch, J. L.; De Pascuale, S.; Fuselier, S. A.; Genestreti, K. J.; Kurth, W. S.; LLera, K.; McComas, D. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Valek, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Two recent large (~200 nT) geomagnetic storms occurred during 17--18 March 2015 and 22--23 June 2015. The global, energy-dependent ring current response to these two extreme events is investigated using both global imaging and multi-point in situ observations. Energetic neutral atom (ENA) imaging by the Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission provides a global view of ring current ions. Local measurements are provided by two multi-spacecraft missions. The two Van Allen Probes measure in situ plasma (including ion composition) and fields at ring current and plasmaspheric L values. The recently launched Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) comprises four spacecraft that have just begun to measure particles (including ion composition) and fields at outer magnetospheric L-values. We analyze the timing and energetics of the stormtime evolution of ring current ions, both trapped and precipitating, using TWINS ENA images and in situ data by the Van Allen Probes and MMS.

  18. The structure of standing Alfvén waves in a dipole magnetosphere with moving plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Kozlov

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The structure and spectrum of standing Alfvén waves were theoretically investigated in a dipole magnetosphere with moving plasma. Plasma motion was simulated with its azimuthal rotation. The model's scope allowed for describing a transition from the inner plasmasphere at rest to the outer magnetosphere with convecting plasma and, through the magnetopause, to the moving plasma of the solar wind. Solutions were found to equations describing longitudinal and transverse (those formed, respectively, along field lines and across magnetic shells structures of standing Alfvén waves with high azimuthal wave numbers m>>1. Spectra were constructed for a number of first harmonics of poloidal and toroidal standing Alfvén waves inside the magnetosphere. For charged particles with velocities greatly exceeding the velocity of the background plasma, an effective parallel wave component of the electric field appears in the region occupied by such waves. This results in structured high-energy-particle flows and in the appearance of multiband aurorae. The transverse structure of the standing Alfvén waves' basic harmonic was shown to be analogous to the structure of a discrete auroral arc.

  19. Large-scale variation of electron parameters from Quasi-Thermal Noise during WIND perigees in the Earth's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issautier, Karine; Ongala-Edoumou, Samuel; Moncuquet, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The quasi-thermal noise (QTN) method consists in measuring the electrostatic fluctuations produced by the thermal motion of the ambient particles. This noise is detected with a sensitive wave receiver and measured at the terminal of a passive electric antenna, which is immersed in a stable plasma. The analysis of the so-called QTN provides in situ measurements, mainly the total electron density, with a good accuracy, and thermal temperature in a large number of space media. We create a preliminary electron database to analyse the anti-correlation between electron density and temperature deduced from WIND perigees in the Earth's plasmasphere. We analyse the radio power spectra measured by the Thermal Noise Receiver (TNR), using the 100-m long dipole antenna, onboard WIND spacecraft. We develop a systematic routine to determine the electron density, core and halo temperature and the magnitude of the magnetic field based on QTN in Bernstein modes. Indeed, the spectra are weakly banded between gyroharmonics below the upper hybrid frequency, from which we derive the local electron density. From the gyrofrequency determination, we obtain an independent measure of the magnetic field magnitude, which is in close agreement with the onboard magnetometer.

  20. Proton whistler interactions near the equator in the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, Elena; Burke, William J.

    1993-08-01

    The interactions of energetic protons with whistlers propagating near the quasi-electrostatic limit are investigated using a test-particle Hamiltonian formalism. Near the equator the protons interact with the waves which appear Doppler-shifted to some harmonic of their cyclotron frequency. In an inhomogeneous geomagnetic field the spacing between cyclotron harmonic resonances is very small. The Hamiltonian equations of motion are solved including multiple independent harmonics for each resonance. The wave frequency varies as a function of the distance along the field line, with only one frequency being resonant at a given point. Thus the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field is compensated by the frequency variation. The proton whistler interactions satisfy the conditions for second-order resonances for all the harmonics. The resonances may also overlap in phase space, leading to significant changes in the protons energies and pitch angles. The combined contributions of positive and negative harmonics allow protons to diffuse toward smaller pitch angles. Numerical calculations applying this formalism to parameters relevant to the plasmasphere and controlled VLF transmission experiments are presented.

  1. Proton whistler interactions near the equator in the radiation belts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalon, E. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Burke, W.J. [Geophysics Directorate, Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The interactions of energetic protons with whistlers propagating near the quasi-electrostatic limit, are investigated using a test particle, Hamiltonian formalism. The authors assume that wave packets exist with finite bandwidths of frequencies, which are close to the equatorial electron gyrofrequency and propagate obliquely with respect to the geomagnetic field. Near the equator the protons interact with the waves which appear Doppler shifted to some harmonic of their cyclotron frequency. In an inhomogeneous geomagnetic field the spacing between cylotron harmonic resonances is very small. The Hamiltonian equations of motion are solved including multiple, independent harmonics for each resonance. The wave frequency varies as a function of the distance along the field line, with only one frequency being resonant at a given point. Thus the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field is compensated by the frequency variation. The proton whistler interactions satisfy the conditions for second-order resonances for all the harmonics. The resonances may also overlap in phase space, leading to significant changes in the protons energies and pitch angles. The combined contributions of positive and negative harmonics allow protons to diffuse toward smaller pitch angles. Numerical calculations applying this formalism to parameters relevant to the plasmasphere and controlled VLF transmission experiments are presented. 34 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Multi-instrument observations of the solar eclipse on 20 March 2015 and its effects on the ionosphere over Belgium and Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankov, Stanimir M.; Bergeot, Nicolas; Berghmans, David; Bolsée, David; Bruyninx, Carine; Chevalier, Jean-Marie; Clette, Frédéric; De Backer, Hugo; De Keyser, Johan; D'Huys, Elke; Dominique, Marie; Lemaire, Joseph F.; Magdalenić, Jasmina; Marqué, Christophe; Pereira, Nuno; Pierrard, Viviane; Sapundjiev, Danislav; Seaton, Daniel B.; Stegen, Koen; Van der Linden, Ronald; Verhulst, Tobias G. W.; West, Matthew J.

    2017-08-01

    A total solar eclipse occurred on 20 March 2015, with a totality path passing mostly above the North Atlantic Ocean, which resulted in a partial solar eclipse over Belgium and large parts of Europe. In anticipation of this event, a dedicated observational campaign was set up at the Belgian Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence (STCE). The objective was to perform high-quality observations of the eclipse and the associated effects on the geospace environment by utilising the advanced space- and ground-based instrumentation available to the STCE in order to further our understanding of these effects, particularly on the ionosphere. The study highlights the crucial importance of taking into account the eclipse geometry when analysing the ionospheric behaviour during eclipses and interpreting the eclipse effects. A detailed review of the eclipse geometry proves that considering the actual obscuration level and solar zenith angle at ionospheric heights is much more important for the analysis than at the commonly referenced Earth's surface or at the plasmaspheric heights. The eclipse occurred during the recovery phase of a strong geomagnetic storm which certainly had an impact on (some of) the ionospheric characteristics and perhaps caused the omission of some "low-profile" effects. However, the analysis of the ionosonde measurements, carried out at unprecedented high rates during the eclipse, suggests the occurrence of travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). Also, the high temporal and spatial resolution measurements proved very important in revealing and estimating some finer details of the delay in the ionospheric reaction and the ionospheric disturbances.

  3. Magnotospheric imaging of high latitude ion outflows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Garrido

    Full Text Available High latitude ion outflows mostly consist of upward streaming O+ and He+ emanating from the ionosphere. At heights above 1000 km, these flows consist of cold and hot components which resonantly scatter solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV light, however, the ion populations respond differently to Doppler shifting resulting from the large relative velocities between the ions and the Sun. The possibility of optical detection of the Doppler effect on the scattering rate will be discussed for the O+ (83.4 nm ions. We have contrasted the EUV solar resonance images of these outflows by simulations of the 30.4 nm He+ and 83.4 nm O+ emissions for both quiet and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. Input data for the 1000 km level has been obtained from the EICS instrument aboard the Dynamics Explorer satellite. Our results show emission rates of 50 and 56 milli-Rayleighs at 30.4 nm for quiet and disturbed conditions and 65 and 75 milli-Rayleighs at 83.4 nm for quiet and disturbed conditions, respectively, obtained for a polar orbiting satellite and viewing radially outward. We also find that an imager at an equatorial distance of 9 RE or more is in a favourable position for detecting ion outflows, particularly when the plasmapause is depressed in latitude. However, an occultation disk is necessary to obscure the bright plasmaspheric emissions.

  4. Abnormal distribution of ionospheric electron density during November 2004 super-storm by 3D CT reconstructions from IGS and LEO/GPS observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Rui; XU JiSheng; MA ShuYing; XIONG Chao; Lühr H.

    2012-01-01

    Using time-dependent 3D tomography method,the electron density distributions in the low-latitude ionosphere during November 2004 super-storm are reconstructed from GPS observations of joint ground-based IGS network and onboard CHAMP/GRACE satellites.The reconstructed electron densities are validated by satellite in situ measurements of CHAMP and GRACE satellites.It is indicated by computer tomography (CT) reconstructions that the long-lived positive storm phase during the first main phase of the storm (November 8) is mainly attributed to enhancement of electron density in the upper F region above the F2 peak.It is found by the CT imaging that the top-hat-like F2-3 double layers occurred in the equatorial ionization anomaly region during the main phase of the storm (at forenoon of November 8).The structures of column-like enhanced electron density are found at the time near the minimum of Dst and in the longitudinal sector about 157°E,which extend from the topside ionosphere toward plasmasphere,reaching at least about 2000 km as high.Their footprints stand on the two peaks of the EIA.

  5. Space Weather Effects Produced by the Ring Current Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganushkina, Natalia; Jaynes, Allison; Liemohn, Michael

    2017-10-01

    One of the definitions of space weather describes it as the time-varying space environment that may be hazardous to technological systems in space and/or on the ground and/or endanger human health or life. The ring current has its contributions to space weather effects, both in terms of particles, ions and electrons, which constitute it, and magnetic and electric fields produced and modified by it at the ground and in space. We address the main aspects of the space weather effects from the ring current starting with brief review of ring current discovery and physical processes and the Dst-index and predictions of the ring current and storm occurrence based on it. Special attention is paid to the effects on satellites produced by the ring current electrons. The ring current is responsible for several processes in the other inner magnetosphere populations, such as the plasmasphere and radiation belts which is also described. Finally, we discuss the ring current influence on the ionosphere and the generation of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC).

  6. Modeling storm-time electrodynamics of the low-latitude ionosphere thermosphere system: Can long lasting disturbance electric fields be accounted for?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Naomi; Sazykin, Stanislav; Spiro, Robert W.; Anderson, David; Anghel, Adela; Wolf, Richard A.; Toffoletto, Frank R.; Fuller-Rowell, Timothy J.; Codrescu, Mihail V.; Richmond, Arthur D.; Millward, George H.

    2007-07-01

    Storm-time ionospheric disturbance electric fields are studied for two large geomagnetic storms, March 31, 2001 and April 17 18, 2002, by comparing low-latitude observations of ionospheric plasma drifts with results from numerical simulations based on a combination of first-principles models. The simulation machinery combines the Rice convection model (RCM), used to calculate inner magnetospheric electric fields, and the coupled thermosphere ionosphere plasmasphere electrodynamics (CTIPe) model, driven, in part, by RCM-computed electric fields. Comparison of model results with measured or estimated low-latitude vertical drift velocities (zonal electric fields) shows that the coupled model is capable of reproducing measurements under a variety of conditions. In particular, our model results suggest, from theoretical grounds, a possibility of long-lasting penetration of magnetospheric electric fields to low latitudes during prolonged periods of enhanced convection associated with southward-directed interplanetary magnetic field, although the model probably overestimates the magnitude and duration of such penetration during extremely disturbed conditions. During periods of moderate disturbance, we found surprisingly good overall agreement between model predictions and data, with penetration electric fields accounting for early main phase changes and oscillations in low-latitude vertical drift, while the disturbance dynamo mechanism becomes increasingly important later in the modeled events. Discrepancies between the model results and the observations indicate some of the difficulties in validating these combined numerical models, and the limitations of the available experimental data.

  7. Investigating the Relationship of EMIC Waves and Relativistic Electron Precipitation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodger, L. A.; Millan, R. M.; Goldstein, J.; McCarthy, M. P.; Smith, D. M.; Sample, J. G.

    2007-05-01

    EMIC waves are generated and driven by anisotropic ring current protons. These unstable protons are injected into the inner magnetosphere by increased earthward convection during periods of elevated geomagnetic activity. A study by Meredith et al. (2003) showed EMIC wave events resonant with radiation belt electrons of energies less then 2MeV were located near the plasmapause in high density regions typical of the plasmaspheric plume. This study seeks to investigate the theory of relativistic electron precipitation (REP) due to wave particle interaction with EMIC waves. REP events were detected by balloon borne instrumentation during the MAXIS and MINIS balloon campaigns conducted in Jan. of 2000 and 2005 respectively. The location of these events with respect to the plasmapause will be explored using a plasmapause test particle simulation code and IMAGE EUV data. Also, data provided by the LANL satellite MPA instrument will be used to investigate the temperature anisotropy of ring current protons that may drive EMIC waves in the region of detected REP.

  8. Space weather forecasting with a Multimodel Ensemble Prediction System (MEPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, R. W.; Scherliess, L.; Eccles, V.; Gardner, L. C.; Sojka, J. J.; Zhu, L.; Pi, X.; Mannucci, A. J.; Butala, M.; Wilson, B. D.; Komjathy, A.; Wang, C.; Rosen, G.

    2016-07-01

    The goal of the Multimodel Ensemble Prediction System (MEPS) program is to improve space weather specification and forecasting with ensemble modeling. Space weather can have detrimental effects on a variety of civilian and military systems and operations, and many of the applications pertain to the ionosphere and upper atmosphere. Space weather can affect over-the-horizon radars, HF communications, surveying and navigation systems, surveillance, spacecraft charging, power grids, pipelines, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA's) Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS). Because of its importance, numerous space weather forecasting approaches are being pursued, including those involving empirical, physics-based, and data assimilation models. Clearly, if there are sufficient data, the data assimilation modeling approach is expected to be the most reliable, but different data assimilation models can produce different results. Therefore, like the meteorology community, we created a Multimodel Ensemble Prediction System (MEPS) for the Ionosphere-Thermosphere-Electrodynamics (ITE) system that is based on different data assimilation models. The MEPS ensemble is composed of seven physics-based data assimilation models for the ionosphere, ionosphere-plasmasphere, thermosphere, high-latitude ionosphere-electrodynamics, and middle to low latitude ionosphere-electrodynamics. Hence, multiple data assimilation models can be used to describe each region. A selected storm event that was reconstructed with four different data assimilation models covering the middle and low latitude ionosphere is presented and discussed. In addition, the effect of different data types on the reconstructions is shown.

  9. Electric Fields Associated with Deep Injections of 10s to 100s keV Electrons in the Inner Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califf, S.; Li, X.; Jaynes, A. N.; Zhao, H.; Malaspina, D.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations by HOPE and MagEIS onboard the Van Allen Probes show frequent penetration of 10s to 100s keV electrons through the slot region and into the inner belt, resulting in an abundant electron population below L=3. The conventional picture is that the source populations of these 10s to 100s keV electrons originate in the plasma sheet and are injected (along with plasma sheet ions) into the inner magnetosphere either through enhancements in the large-scale convection electric field and/or through earthward propagating dipolarization fronts associated with substorms. In such cases the inward radial limit of the injections should coincide with the plasmapause. However, these electron injections often extend inside the plasmasphere, are observed far earthward of the typically accepted "flow-braking" region for dipolarization fronts, and occur at much lower L shells than injections of ions with similar energies. We investigate the electric fields associated with these deep electron injections using data from the Van Allen Probes and THEMIS in order to shed light on the underlying mechanisms that allow them to penetrate so far into the inner magnetosphere.

  10. ULF fluctuations of the geomagnetic field and ionospheric sounding measurements at low latitudes during the first CAWSES campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Villante

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of ULF geomagnetic field fluctuations at low latitudes during the first CAWSES campaign (29 March-3 April 2004. During the whole campaign, mainly in the prenoon sector, a moderate Pc3-4 pulsation activity is observed, clearly related to interplanetary upstream waves. On 3 April, in correspondence to the Earth's arrival of a coronal mass ejection, two SIs are observed whose waveforms are indicative of a contribution of the high-latitude ionospheric currents to the low-latitude ground field. During the following geomagnetic storm, low frequency (Pc5 waves are observed at discrete frequencies. Their correspondence with the same frequencies detected in the radial components of the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind speed suggests that Alfvénic solar wind fluctuations may act as direct drivers of magnetospheric fluctuations. A cross-phase analysis, using different pairs of stations, is also presented for identifying field line resonant frequencies and monitoring changes in plasmaspheric mass density. Lastly, an analysis of ionospheric vertical soundings, measured at the Rome ionosonde station (41.8° N, 12.5° E, and vertical TEC measurements deduced from GPS signals within an European network shows the relation between the ULF resonances in the inner magnetosphere and thermal plasma density variations during geomagnetically quiet conditions, in contrast to various storm phases at the end of the CAWSES campaign.

  11. Generation of lower and upper bands of electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves in the Van Allen radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; He, Yihua; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.

    2017-06-01

    Electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves generated by the electron loss cone distribution can produce efficient scattering loss of plasma sheet electrons, which has a significant effect on the dynamics in the outer magnetosphere. Here we report two ECH emission events around the same location L≈ 5.7-5.8, MLT ≈ 12 from Van Allen Probes on 11 February (event A) and 9 January 2014 (event B), respectively. The spectrum of ECH waves was centered at the lower half of the harmonic bands during event A, but the upper half during event B. The observed electron phase space density in both events is fitted by the subtracted bi-Maxwellian distribution, and the fitting functions are used to evaluate the local growth rates of ECH waves based on a linear theory for homogeneous plasmas. ECH waves are excited by the loss cone instability of 50 eV-1 keV electrons in the lower half of harmonic bands in the low-density plasmasphere in event A, and 1-10 keV electrons in the upper half of harmonic bands in a relatively high-density region in event B. The current results successfully explain observations and provide a first direct evidence on how ECH waves are generated in the lower and upper half of harmonic frequency bands.

  12. Inversion of photometric He+ (30.4 nm) intensities to obtain He+ distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Dante E.; Smith, Roger W.; Marsh, C. A.; Christensen, Andrew B.; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    1993-07-01

    Radiation at He(superscript +) at 30.4 nm, which is emitted close to the Earth, comes from three distinct regions; the ionosphere, the plasmasphere and the polar cap. Published observational data on He(superscript +) 30.4 nm have shown that the intensities from polar regions are relatively smaller than the other regions. Polar emissions are believed to be due to resonant scattering of ion outflow in sunlight. A 1982 rocket flight from Poker Flat, Alaska has shown that line-of-sight 30.4 nm emission rates are relatively strong in the direction of the pole. Since the roll of the rocket afforded many different observing directions, we have used the variety of viewing geometries to extract ionospheric source densities from the photometric intensity data. We have assumed that the He(superscript +) densities vary with distance along dipole field lines according to a particular functional form, and then we proceeded to extract the source densities by a matrix inversion method. The results give density variations over a range of latitudes including samples from each of the regions mentioned above. The method obtains good fits of the observed profiles of intensity versus observation angle.

  13. Ducted whistler-mode signals received at two widely spaced locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Clilverd

    Full Text Available Whistler-mode signals from a single VLF transmitter that have propagated in the same duct, have been observed simultaneously at Faraday, Antarctica (65°S, 64°W and Dunedin, New Zealand (46°S, 171°E. The signals received have group-delay times that differ in the order of 10 ms, which can be explained by the differences in southern-hemisphere sub-ionospheric propagation time from duct exit region to receiver for the two sites. This difference has been used to determine the location of the duct exit region, with confirmation provided by arrival-bearing information from both sites. The whistler-mode signals typically occur one or two days after geomagnetic activity, with Kpgeq5. The sub-ionospheric-propagation model, LWPC, is used to estimate the whistler-mode power radiated from the duct exit region. These results are then combined with estimated loss values for ionospheric and ducted transmission to investigate the role of wave-particle amplification or absorption. On at least half of the events studied, plasmaspheric amplification of the signals appears to be needed to explain the observed whistler-mode signal strengths.

  14. Ionosphere-magnetosphere studies using ground based VLF radio propagation technique: an Indian example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Subhas

    Since IGY period (1957-58), natural and artificially produced Very Low Frequency (VLF) elec-tromagnetic radiations are being recorded at large number of ground stations all over the world and on-board satellites to study various radio wave-thermal/energetic plasma interactive pro-cesses related to earth's ionosphere-plasmasphere-magnetosphere environment. The terrestrial propagation of these VLF radio waves are primarily enabled through the earth ionosphere wave guide (EIWG) mode to long horizontal distances around the globe and ducted along the ge-omagnetic field lines into the conjugate hemisphere through the plasmasphere-magnetosphere regions. The time frequency spectra of the received signals indicate presence of dispersion (wave/group velocities changing with frequency) and various cut-off frequencies based on the width of the EIWG, electron gyro and plasma frequencies etc., providing several types of received signals like whistlers, chorus, tweeks, hiss and hisslers which can be heard on loud-speakers/earphones with distinguishing audio structures. While the VLF technique has been a very effective tool for studying middle and high latitude phenomena, the importance of the similar and anomalous observations over the Indian low latitude stations provide potentially new challenges for their scientific interpretation and modelling. The ducted and non-ducted magnetospheric propagation, pro-longitudinal (PL) mode, low latitude TRIMPI/TLE (Tran-sient Luminous Emissions) or other effects of wave-particle/wave-wave interactions, effects due to ionospheric irregularities and electric fields, full wave solutions to D-region ionisation per-turbations due to solar and stellar energetic X-and γ ray emissions during normal and flaring conditions are a few problems which have been addressed in these low latitude studies over India. Since the conjugate points of Indian stations lie over the Indian oceanic region, the VLF propagation effects would be relatively free from

  15. Radiation belt electron acceleration during the 17 March 2015 geomagnetic storm: Observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Zhang, X.-J.; Li, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Kanekal, S. G.; Angelopoulos, V.; Green, J. C.; Goldstein, J.

    2016-06-01

    Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. During the largest storm over the past decade (17 March 2015), relativistic electrons experienced fairly rapid acceleration up to ~7 MeV within 2 days after an initial substantial dropout, as observed by Van Allen Probes. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during the recovery phase of this large storm using a 3-D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the observed and simulated electron evolution, we found that chorus plays a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV near the developing peak location and produces characteristic flat-top pitch angle distributions. By only including radial diffusion, the simulation underestimates the observed electron acceleration, while radial diffusion plays an important role in redistributing electrons and potentially accelerates them to even higher energies. Moreover, plasmaspheric hiss is found to provide efficient pitch angle scattering losses for hundreds of keV electrons, while its scattering effect on > 1 MeV electrons is relatively slow. Although an additional loss process is required to fully explain the overestimated electron fluxes at multi-MeV, the combined physical processes of radial diffusion and pitch angle and energy diffusion by chorus and hiss reproduce the observed electron dynamics remarkably well, suggesting that quasi-linear diffusion theory is reasonable to evaluate radiation belt electron dynamics during this big storm.

  16. On the numerical modelling of VLF chorus dynamical spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nunn

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the use of a one-dimensional Vlasov Hybrid Simulation (VHS computer code to simulate the dynamical spectra (i.e. frequency versus time spectrograms of ELF/VLF chorus signals (from ~a fraction to ~10 kHz. Recently excellent measurements of chorus have been made in the source region close to the geomagnetic equator aboard the four spacecraft Cluster mission. Using Cluster data for wave amplitude, which is up to 300 pT, local gyrofrequency, cold plasma density, and L-shell, observed chorus signals are reproduced with remarkable fidelity and, in particular, sweep rates in the range 1–10 kHz result as observed. Further, we find that the sweep rate is a falling function of increasing cold plasma density, again in accord with observations. Finally, we have satisfactorily simulated the rather rare falling frequency elements of chorus which are sometimes observed aboard Cluster in the generation region. For both rising and falling chorus we have presented detailed structural analyses of the generation regions. The main contributor to the frequency sweep rate is primarily the establishment of wave number/frequency gradients across the generation region by the out of phase component of the resonant particle current. The secondary contributor is the shortening of the wavelength of resonant particle current relative to that of the wave field. In view of the close agreement between observation and simulation, we conclude that nonlinear electron cyclotron resonance is indeed the mechanism underlying the generation of chorus signals just outside the plasmasphere.

  17. Ionospheric midlatitude electric current density inferred from multiple magnetic satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, R. M.; Whaler, K. A.; Macmillan, S.; Beggan, C.; Olsen, N.; Spain, T.; Aruliah, A.

    2013-09-01

    A method for inferring zonal electric current density in the mid-to-low latitude F region ionosphere is presented. We describe a method of using near-simultaneous overflights of the Ørsted and CHAMP satellites to define a closed circuit for an application of Ampère's integral law to magnetic data. Zonal current density from sources in only the region between the two satellites is estimated for the first time. Six years of mutually available vector magnetic data allows overlaps spanning the full 24 h range of local time twice. Solutions are computed on an event-by-event basis after correcting for estimates of main and crustal magnetic fields. Current density in the range ±0.1 μA/m2 is resolved, with the distribution of electric current largely matching known features such as the Appleton anomaly. The currents appear unmodulated at times of either high-negative Dst or high F10.7, which has implications for any future efforts to model their effects. We resolve persistent current intensifications between geomagnetic latitudes of 30 and 50° in the postmidnight, predawn sector, a region typically thought to be relatively free of electric currents. The cause of these unexpected intensifications remains an open issue. We compare our results with current density predictions made by the Coupled Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Plasmasphere model, a self-consistent, first-principles, three-dimensional numerical dynamic model of ionospheric composition and temperatures. This independent validation of our current density estimates highlights good agreement in the broad spatiotemporal trends we identify, which increases confidence in our results.

  18. Joule Heating, Particle Precipitation and Dynamical Heating as Possible Tidal Sources in the Antarctic Winter Lower Thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, W.; Chu, X.; Lu, X.; Chen, C.; Yu, Z.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Richmond, A. D.; Codrescu, M.

    2014-12-01

    Winter temperature tides observed by lidar at McMurdo (77.8°S, 166.7°E), Antarctica, show less than 3 K diurnal and semidiurnal tidal amplitude below 100 km. However, above 100 km, the diurnal and semidiurnal tidal amplitudes grow super-exponentially and can reach at least 15 K near 110 km, which are exceeding that of the freely propagating tides originating from the lower atmosphere. Such fast growth exists for all Kp index cases and diurnal amplitude increases to 15-30 K at 110 km with larger Kp indices corresponding to larger tidal amplitudes and faster growth rates. Combining with the slopes of diurnal tidal phases being steeper above 100 km, and the tidal phases barely changing with altitude from 100 to 106 km, it indicates that in-situ tidal sources may exist near or above 100 km. In this paper, we utilize the coupled thermosphere ionosphere plasmasphere electrodynamics (CTIPe) model to investigate possible sources/mechanisms that lead to the fast amplitude growth of tides in the polar winter region. Joule heating, particle precipitation, and dynamical heating are likely to be the dominant thermospheric tidal sources, according to CTIPe model. Interestingly, the CTIPe tidal amplitudes induced by these sources form a concentric pattern with its center located at the geomagnetic pole, implying that the geomagnetic activity may play an important role. Furthermore, dynamical heating, which includes adiabatic heating/cooling and vertical advection, is likely to be the explanation of the fast growth of diurnal tidal amplitudes even under quiet condition of geomagnetic activity as observed by lidar. We also found that the tides propagating from the lower atmosphere is a minor factor for the fast increase of thermospheric diurnal tides in Antarctica.

  19. Global High-Latitude Conductivity Modeling: New Data and Improved Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranaghan, R. M.; Knipp, D. J.; Matsuo, T.; Godinez, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    The ionospheric conductivity distribution is essential for understanding the coupling in the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere (MIT) system. Hall conductivities, which regulate ionospheric current flow in the direction perpendicular to both the background magnetic field and the electric field, exert control over magnetospheric configuration, including transport within the plasmasphere and reconnection in the magnetotail [Lotko et al., 2014]. Pedersen conductivities control electric field variability and, in turn, determine the distribution and intensity of Joule heating, a prominent source of upper atmospheric temperature and neutral density enhancement. Contemporary conductivity modeling techniques rely on limiting assumptions and are 2-dimensional by design. Typically these models assume Maxwellian incoming particle energy distributions and simplistic current closure paths within an ionospheric 'shell' located at 110 km. We have developed a method to: 1) eliminate these assumptions and 2) allow 3-dimensional conductivity analysis using particle energy spectra provided by Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites. A sequential non-linear procedure then regresses the conductivities derived from DMSP data on the same basis functions used in the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure to obtain a realistic form of the covariance model, with the goal to integrate 3-dimensional conductivity analysis into the AMIE procedure. This addresses one of the primary sources of uncertainty within AMIE, and will ultimately allow more accurate characterization of high-latitude ionospheric electrodynamics. We present 3-dimensional conductivity distributions derived from satellite observations and global maps of these conductivities for the year 2010. References:Lotko, W., et al. (2014), Ionospheric control of magnetotail reconnection, Science, 345(6193), 184-187, doi:10.1126/science.1252907.

  20. The effects of nitric oxide cooling and the photodissociation of molecular oxygen on the thermosphere/ionosphere system over the Argentine Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Wells

    Full Text Available In the past the global, fully coupled, time-dependent mathematical model of the Earth's thermosphere/ionosphere/plasmasphere (CTIP has been unable to reproduce accurately observed values of the maximum plasma frequency, foF2, at extreme geophysical locations such as the Argentine Islands during the summer solstice where the ionosphere remains in sunlight throughout the day. This is probably because the seasonal dependence of thermospheric cooling by 5.3 µm nitric oxide has been neglected and the photodissociation of O2 and heating rate calculations have been over-simplified. Now we have included an up-to-date calculation of the solar EUV and UV thermospheric heating rate, coupled with a new calculation of a diurnally varying O2 photodissociation rate, in the model. Seasonally dependent 5.3 µm nitric oxide cooling is also included. With these important improvements, it is found that model values of foF2 are in substantially better agreement with observation. The height of the F2-peak is reduced throughout the day, but remains within acceptable limits of values derived from observation, except at around 0600 h LT. We also carry out two studies of the sensitivity of the upper atmosphere to changes in the magnitude of nitric oxide cooling and photodissociation rates. We find that hmF2 increases with increased heating, whilst foF2 falls. The converse is true for an increase in the cooling rate. Similarly increasing the photodissociation rate increases both hmF2 and foF2. These changes are explained in terms of changes in the neutral temperature, composition and neutral wind.

  1. A unified approach to inner magnetospheric state prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortnik, J.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-03-01

    This brief technique paper presents a method of reconstructing the global, time-varying distribution of some physical quantity Q that has been sparsely sampled at various locations within the magnetosphere and at different times. The quantity Q can be essentially any measurement taken on the satellite including a variety of waves (chorus, hiss, magnetosonic, and ion cyclotron), electrons of various energies ranging from cold to relativistic, and ions of various species and energies. As an illustrative example, we chose Q to be the electron number density (inferred from spacecraft potential) measured by three Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) probes between 2008 and 2014 and use the SYM-H index, taken at a 5 min cadence for the 5 h preceding each observed data point as the main regressor, although the predictor can also be any suitable geomagnetic index or solar wind parameter. Results show that the equatorial electron number density can be accurately reconstructed throughout the whole of the inner magnetosphere as a function of space and time, even capturing the dynamics of elementary plasmaspheric plume formation and corotation, suggesting that the dynamics of various other physical quantities could be similarly captured. For our main model, we use a simple, fully connected feedforward neural network with two hidden layers having sigmoidal activation functions and an output layer with a linear activation function to perform the reconstruction. The training is performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and gives typical RMS errors of ~1.7 and regression of >0.93, which is considered excellent. We also present a discussion on the different applications and future extensions of the present model, for modeling various physical quantities.

  2. Extremely field-aligned cool electrons in the dayside outer magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozer, F. S.; Agapitov, O. A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Hull, A.; Larson, D.; Lejosne, S.; McFadden, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    For 200 days in 2016 while Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms D (THEMIS-D) was in the dayside, equatorial magnetosphere, its electron energy coverage was modified such that the first 15 energy steps covered the range of 1-30 eV and 16 steps covered energies to 30 keV. These measurements were free of backgrounds from photoelectrons, secondaries, or ionospheric plasma plumes. Three energy bands of electrons were observed: cold electrons having energies below 1 eV (plasmaspheric plumes measured by the spacecraft potential); cool electrons, defined as electrons having energies of 1-25 eV; and hot electrons having energies of 25 eV to 30 keV. The cool electron fluxes at fixed radial distances varied by an order of magnitude from one orbit to the next. These fluxes often increased with increasing radial distance, suggesting an external source. They were extremely field aligned, having pitch angle ratios (flux at 0-20° and 160-180° divided by the flux at 80-100°) greater than 100. Evidence is presented that they resulted from cusp electrons moving from open to closed magnetospheric field lines due to their E × B/B2 drift. They constituted the majority of the electron energy density at such times and places. They were not associated with magnetopause reconnection because they were not observed at the magnetopause, but they were observed as far as 3 RE inside of it. Their occurrence probability in the outer magnetosphere was 50% in June and 10% in September, suggesting a dayside source attributed to the tilt of the northern cusp toward the Sun during the summer.

  3. The Aneutronic Rodless Ultra Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Celso

    2016-10-01

    The replacement of the metal centre-post in spherical tokamaks (STs) by a plasma centre-post (PCP, the TF current carrier) is the ideal scenario for a ST reactor. A simple rodless ultra low aspect-ratio tokamak (RULART) using a screw-pinch PCP ECR-assisted with an external solenoid has been proposed in the most compact RULART [Ribeiro C, SOFE-15]. There the solenoid provided the stabilizing field for the PCP and the toroidal electrical field for the tokamak start-up, which will stabilize further the PCP, acting as stabilizing closed conducting surface. Relative low TF will be required. The compactness (high ratio of plasma-spherical vessel volume) may provide passive stabilization and easier access to L-H mode transition. It is presented here: 1) stability analysis of the PCP (initially MHD stable due to the hollow J profile); 2) tokamak equilibrium simulations, and 3) potential use for aneutronic reactions studies via pairs of proton p and boron 11B ion beams in He plasmas. The beams' line-of-sights sufficiently miss the sources of each other, thus allowing a near maximum relative velocities and reactivity. The reactions should occur close to the PCP mid-plane. Some born alphas should cross the PCP and be dragged by the ion flow (higher momentum exchange) towards the anode but escape directly to a direct electricity converter. Others will reach evenly the vessel directly or via thermal diffusion (favourable heating by the large excursion 2a), leading to the lowest power wall load possible. This might be a potential hybrid direct-steam cycle conversion reactor scheme, nearly aneutronic, and with no ash or particle retention problems, as opposed to the D-T thermal reaction proposals.

  4. The Great Geospace Observatory and Simultaneous Missions of Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Eric; Brandt, Pontus; Siebeck, David; Spann, James; Lester, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A predictive understanding of the sun to geospace environment is one of the main goals of ILWS. This can only be achieved through a "system-level" approach, meaning long-term, simultaneous, continuous observations across the relevant scales of the magnetosphere and ionosphere/thermosphere (IT). To date such an approach, which must involve simultaneous, multi-scale, global imaging of different geospace regions, has not been carried out for a complete geomagnetic storm. Such imagery, now routine for the Solar community, is of critical scientific importance and captures public imagination. Its absence in geospace studies has limited the growth and impact of geospace science. In this presentation, we discuss a concept called the Great Geospace Observatory, which would involve coordinated geospace imaging through an international effort of multiple, simultaneous Missions of Opportunity. In this way, the cost would be spread among different agencies as well as putting remote sensors in vantage points optimized for each type of imaging. 24/7 auroral imaging from weather satellites on Molniya (or similar) orbits, EUV imaging of the plasmasphere from high-inclination orbits, continuous and global ENA imaging from geosynchronous commercial satellites, and continuous X-ray imaging of the cusp and magnetosheath from a high-altitude dedicated probe would quantitatively track system-level dynamics at through substorms, sawtooth events, steady magnetospheric convection, and storms; studying energy and mass coupling between the solar wind, magnetosphere, and the upper atmosphere. In our minds, The Great Geospace Observatory represents the next strategic step for ILWS and needs to be seriously considered.

  5. Reproducing the observed energy-dependent structure of Earth's electron radiation belts during storm recovery with an event-specific diffusion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, J.-F.; Reeves, G. D.; Cunningham, G. S.; Loridan, V.; Denton, M.; Santolík, O.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C. A.; Turner, D. L.; Henderson, M. G.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    We present dynamic simulations of energy-dependent losses in the radiation belt "slot region" and the formation of the two-belt structure for the quiet days after the 1 March storm. The simulations combine radial diffusion with a realistic scattering model, based data-driven spatially and temporally resolved whistler-mode hiss wave observations from the Van Allen Probes satellites. The simulations reproduce Van Allen Probes observations for all energies and L shells (2-6) including (a) the strong energy dependence to the radiation belt dynamics (b) an energy-dependent outer boundary to the inner zone that extends to higher L shells at lower energies and (c) an "S-shaped" energy-dependent inner boundary to the outer zone that results from the competition between diffusive radial transport and losses. We find that the characteristic energy-dependent structure of the radiation belts and slot region is dynamic and can be formed gradually in ~15 days, although the "S shape" can also be reproduced by assuming equilibrium conditions. The highest-energy electrons (E > 300 keV) of the inner region of the outer belt (L ~ 4-5) also constantly decay, demonstrating that hiss wave scattering affects the outer belt during times of extended plasmasphere. Through these simulations, we explain the full structure in energy and L shell of the belts and the slot formation by hiss scattering during storm recovery. We show the power and complexity of looking dynamically at the effects over all energies and L shells and the need for using data-driven and event-specific conditions.

  6. Modeling and analysis of GPS-TEC low latitude climatology during the 24th solar cycle using empirical orthogonal functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbakuti, J. R. K. Kumar; Venkata Ratnam, D.

    2017-10-01

    The Total Electron Content (TEC) is an essential component describing the temporal and spatial characteristics of the ionosphere. In this paper, an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) model is constructed by using ground based Global Navigational Satellite System (GNSS) TEC observation data at the Bangalore International GNSS Service (IGS) station (geographic - 13.02° N, 77.57° E; geomagnetic latitude 4.4° N) during an extended period (2009-2016) in the 24th solar cycle. EOF model can be decomposed into base functions and its corresponding coefficients. These decomposed modes well represented the influence of solar and geomagnetic activity towards TEC. The first three EOFs modes constitute about 98% of the total variance of the observed data sets. The Fourier Series Analysis (FSA) is carried out to characterize the solar-cycle, annual and semi-annual dependences by modulating the first three EOF coefficients with solar (F10.7) and geomagnetic (Ap and Dst) indices. The TEC model is validated during daytime and nighttime conditions as well as under different solar activity and geomagnetic conditions. A positive correlation (0.85) of averaged daily GPS-TEC with averaged daily F10.7 strongly supports those time-varying characteristics of the ionosphere features depends on the solar activity. Further, the validity and reliability of EOF model is verified by comparing with the GPS-TEC data, and standard global ionospheric models (International Reference Ionosphere, IRI2016 and Standard Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model, SPIM). The performances of the standard ionospheric models are marked to be relatively better during High Solar Activity (HSA) periods as compared to the Low Solar Activity (LSA) periods.

  7. Assessment of IRI and IRI-Plas models over the African equatorial and low-latitude region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebiyi, S. J.; Adimula, I. A.; Oladipo, O. A.; Joshua, B. W.

    2016-07-01

    A reliable ionospheric specification by empirical models is important to mitigate the effects of the ionosphere on the operations of satellite-based positioning and navigation systems. This study evaluates the capability of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) and IRI extended to the plasmasphere (IRI-Plas) models in predicting the total electron content (TEC) over stations located in the southern hemisphere of the African equatorial and low-latitude region. TEC derived from Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements were compared with TEC predicted by both the IRI-Plas 2015 model and the three topside options of the IRI 2012 model (i.e., NeQuick (NeQ), IRI 2001 corrected factor (IRI-01 Corr), and the IRI 2001(IRI-01)). Generally, the diurnal and the seasonal structures of modeled TEC follow quite well with the observed TEC in all the stations, although with some upward and downward offsets observed during the daytime and nighttime. The prediction errors of both models exhibit latitudinal variation and these showed seasonal trends. The values generally decrease with increase in latitude. The TEC data-model divergence of both models is most significant at stations in the equatorial region during the daytime and nighttime. Conversely, both models demonstrate most pronounced convergence during the nighttime at stations outside the equatorial region. The IRI-Plas model, in general, performed better in months and seasons when the three options of the IRI model underestimate TEC. Factors such as the height limitation of the IRI model, the inaccurate predictions of the bottomside and topside electron density profiles were used to explain the data-model discrepancies.

  8. The rudiments of a theory of solar wind/magnetosphere coupling derived from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    2008-08-01

    A formula that expresses the dayside reconnection rate in terms of upstream solar wind parameters is derived and tested. The derivation is based on the hypothesis that dayside reconnection is governed by local plasma parameters and that whatever controls those parameters controls the reconnection rate. The starting point of the derivation is the Cassak-Shay formula (from energy conservation principles), which expresses the dayside reconnection rate in terms of four parameters: the magnetic field strengths Bm and Bs in the magnetosphere and magnetosheath and the plasma mass densities ρm and ρs in the magnetosphere and magnetosheath. Using the Rankine-Hugoniot relations at the bow shock and an analysis of the magnetosheath flow, three of these parameters are expressed in terms of upstream solar wind parameters. These three expressions are then used in the Cassak-Shay formula to obtain the "solar wind control function." The interpretation of the control function is that solar wind pressure largely sets the reconnection rate. The solar wind magnetic field enters into the control function because of a bow shock Mach number dependence. The onset of a "plasmasphere effect" occurs when ρm > MA0.87ρsolarwind, wherein the magnetosphere begins to exert control over solar wind/magnetosphere coupling. Using the OMNI2 data set and seven geomagnetic indices, the solar wind control function is tested on its ability to describe the variance in the geomagnetic indices. The control function is found to be successful, statistically as good as the best "solar wind driver function" in the literature. This picture opens a new pathway to understanding and calculating solar wind/magnetosphere coupling.

  9. AF-GEOSpace Version 2.5: Space Environment Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmer, R. V.; Hall, T.; Roth, C.; Ling, A.; Ginet, G. P.; Madden, D.

    2010-12-01

    AF-GEOSpace is a graphics-intensive software program with space environment models and applications developed by the Space Weather Center of Excellence at AFRL. The software addresses a wide range of physical domains, e.g., solar disturbance propagation, geomagnetic field and radiation belt configurations, auroral particle precipitation, and ionospheric scintillation. AF-GEOSpace has become a platform for developing and prototyping space weather visualization products. The new AF-GEOSpace Version 2.5 (release scheduled for 2010) expands on the content of Version 2.1 by including modules addressing the following new topics: (1) energetic proton maps for the South Atlantic Anomaly (from Ginet et al. [2007]), (2) GPS scintillation outage simulation tools, (3) magnetopause location determination (Shue et al. [1998]), (4) a plasmasphere model (Global Core Plasma Model, 2009 version based on Gallagher et al. [2000]), (5) a standard ionospheric model (International Reference Ionosphere 2007), (6) the CAMMICE/MICS model of inner magnetosphere plasma population (based on Roeder et al. [2005]), (7) magnetic field models (e.g., Tsyganenko and Sitnov [2005]), and (8) loading and displaying externally-produced 3D gridded data sets within AF-GEOSpace. Improvements to existing Version 2.1 capabilities include: (1) a 2005 update to the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity model of Smart and Shea [2003], (2) a 2005 update to the ionospheric scintillation Wide-Band Model (WBMOD) of Secan and Bussey [1994], and (3) improved magnetic field flux mapping options for the existing set of AF-GEOSpace radiation belt models. A basic review of these new AF-GEOSpace capabilities will be provided. To obtain a copy of the software, please contact the first author.

  10. Energetic particle counterparts for geomagnetic pulsations of Pc1 and IPDP types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Yahnina

    Full Text Available Using the low-altitude NOAA satellite particle data, we study two kinds of localised variations of energetic proton fluxes at low altitude within the anisotropic zone equatorward of the isotropy boundary. These flux variation types have a common feature, i.e. the presence of precipitating protons measured by the MEPED instrument at energies more than 30 keV, but they are distinguished by the fact of the presence or absence of the lower-energy component as measured by the TED detector on board the NOAA satellite. The localised proton precipitating without a low-energy component occurs mostly in the morning-day sector, during quiet geomagnetic conditions, without substorm injections at geosynchronous orbit, and without any signatures of plasmaspheric plasma expansion to the geosynchronous distance. This precipitation pattern closely correlates with ground-based observations of continuous narrow-band Pc1 pulsations in the frequency range 0.1–2 Hz (hereafter Pc1. The precipitation pattern containing the low energy component occurs mostly in the evening sector, under disturbed geomagnetic conditions, and in association with energetic proton injections and significant increases of cold plasma density at geosynchronous orbit. This precipitation pattern is associated with geomagnetic pulsations called Intervals of Pulsations with Diminishing Periods (IPDP, but some minor part of the events is also related to narrow-band Pc1. Both Pc1 and IPDP pulsations are believed to be the electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves generated by the ion-cyclotron instability in the equatorial plane. These waves scatter energetic protons in pitch angles, so we conclude that the precipitation patterns studied here are the particle counterparts of the ion-cyclotron waves.

    Key words. Ionosphere (particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating – Space plasma physics (wave-particle interactions

  11. Radial dependence of ionization losses of protons of the Earth's radiation belts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovtyukh, A.S. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Phyiscs

    2016-04-01

    Coulomb losses and charge exchange of protons are considered in detail. On the basis of modern models of the plasmasphere and the exosphere, the radial dependences of the rates of ionization losses of protons, with μ from 0.3 to 10 keV nT{sup -1}, of the Earth's radiation belts near the equatorial plane are calculated for quiet periods. For calculation of Coulomb losses of protons we used data of ISEE-1 satellite (protons with energy from 24 to 2081 keV) on L from 3 to 9, data of Explorer-45 satellite (protons with energy from 78.6 to 872 keV) on L from 3 to 5 and data of CRRES satellite (protons with energy from 1 to 100 MeV) on L ≤ 3 (L is the McIlwain parameter). It is shown that with decreasing L the rate of ionization losses of protons of the radiation belts is reduced; for protons with μ > 1.2 keV nT{sup -1} in a narrow region (ΔL ∝ 0.5) in the district of plasmapause in this dependence may form a local minimum of the rate. We found that the dependence from μ of the boundary on L between Coulomb losses and charge exchange of the trapped protons with hydrogen atoms is well approximated by the function L{sub b} = 4.71μ{sup 0.32}, where [μ] = keV nT{sup -1}. Coulomb losses dominate at L < L{sub b}(μ), and at L > L{sub b}(μ) dominates charge exchange of protons. We found the effect of subtracting the Coulomb losses from the charge exchange of protons of the radiation belts at low μ and L, which can simulate a local source of particles.

  12. POLAR spacecraft observations of helium ion angular anisotropy in the Earth's radiation belts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. N. Spjeldvik

    Full Text Available New observations of energetic helium ion fluxes in the Earth's radiation belts have been obtained with the CAMMICE/HIT instrument on the ISTP/GGS POLAR spacecraft during the extended geomagnetically low activity period April through October 1996. POLAR executes a high inclination trajectory that crosses over both polar cap regions and passes over the geomagnetic equator in the heart of the radiation belts. The latter attribute makes possible direct observations of nearly the full equatorial helium ion pitch angle distributions in the heart of the Earth's radiation belt region. Additionally, the spacecraft often re-encounters the same geomagnetic flux tube at a substantially off-equatorial location within a few tens of minutes prior to or after the equatorial crossing. This makes both the equatorial pitch angle distribution and an expanded view of the local off-equatorial pitch angle distribution observable. The orbit of POLAR also permitted observations to be made in conjugate magnetic local time sectors over the course of the same day, and this afforded direct comparison of observations on diametrically opposite locations in the Earth's radiation belt region at closely spaced times. Results from four helium ion data channels covering ion kinetic energies from 520 to 8200 KeV show that the distributions display trapped particle characteristics with angular flux peaks for equatorially mirroring particles as one might reasonably expect. However, the helium ion pitch angle distributions generally flattened out for equatorial pitch angles below about 45°. Significant and systematic helium ion anisotropy difference at conjugate magnetic local time were also observed, and we report quiet time azimuthal variations of the anisotropy index.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles · trapped; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; plasmasphere

  13. Modeling of Occurrence and Dynamics of Sub-Auroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) During Storm and Non-Storm Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazykin, S. Y.; Huba, J.; Coster, A. J.; Wolf, R.; Erickson, P. J.; Reiff, P. H.; Hairston, M. R.; Shepherd, S. G.; Baker, J. B. H.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Califf, S.

    2016-12-01

    Occurrence and evolution of Sub-Auroral Polarization Stream, or SAPS, structures, defined here as latitudinally narrow channels of enhanced westward convection flows in the evening ionosphere equatorward of the auroral electron precipitation boundary, is the subject of the ongoing CEDAR-GEM focus study. In this paper, we present simulation results of several event intervals selected for the focus study, obtained with the SAMI3-RCM ionosphere-magnetosphere coupled model. We simulate intervals that include quiet-times, storm main phases, and storm recovery phases, as well as non-storm intervals with variations in the high-latitude convection. We compare simulation results with multi-instrument observations. In the ionosphere, these include mid-latitude SuperDARN Doppler flow velocities, DMSP topside ionospheric ExB drifts, Millstone Hill incoherent scatter flow velocities and F-region densities, and ground-based GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) maps. Magnetospheric data used for model comparison are electric field and cold plasma densities from Van Allen Probes and plasma and fields measurements by the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) probes. Through comparing modeling results and data, we address the following questions: (1) Can observed occurrence of SAPS be predicted by the model based on time history of magnetospheric activity? (2) To what extent does non-linear ionospheric feedback affect dynamics of SAPS? (3) How does the preconditioning of the background ionosphere (specifically, night-time main ionospheric trough) affect SAPS dynamics? (4) How does presence of SAPS structures in the global ionospheric convection pattern affect storm-time plasma re-distribution (e.g., storm-enhanced densities (or SEDs), plasmaspheric plumes, traveling ionospheric disturbances (or TIDs))?

  14. Annual and seasonal variations in the low-latitude topside ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Z. Su

    Full Text Available Annual and seasonal variations in the low-latitude topside ionosphere are investigated using observations made by the Hinotori satellite and the Sheffield University Plasmasphere Ionosphere Model (SUPIM. The observed electron densities at 600 km altitude show a strong annual anomaly at all longitudes. The average electron densities of conjugate latitudes within the latitude range ±25° are higher at the December solstice than at the June solstice by about 100 during daytime and 30 during night-time. Model calculations show that the annual variations in the neutral gas densities play important roles. The model values obtained from calculations with inputs for the neutral densities obtained from MSIS86 reproduce the general behaviour of the observed annual anomaly. However, the differences in the modelled electron densities at the two solstices are only about 30 of that seen in the observed values. The model calculations suggest that while the differences between the solstice values of neutral wind, resulting from the coupling of the neutral gas and plasma, may also make a significant contribution to the daytime annual anomaly, the E×B drift velocity may slightly weaken the annual anomaly during daytime and strengthen the anomaly during the post-sunset period. It is suggested that energy sources, other than those arising from the 6 difference in the solar EUV fluxes at the two solstices due to the change in the Sun-Earth distance, may contribute to the annual anomaly. Observations show strong seasonal variations at the solstices, with the electron density at 600 km altitude being higher in the summer hemisphere than in the winter hemisphere, contrary to the behaviour in NmF2. Model calculations confirm that the seasonal behaviour results from effects caused by transequatorial component of the neutral wind in the direction summer hemisphere to winter hemisphere.

  15. THE DOUBLE PULSAR ECLIPSES. I. PHENOMENOLOGY AND MULTI-FREQUENCY ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, R. P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Lyutikov, M. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Kramer, M. [Max Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ferdman, R. D. [University of Manchester, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Camilo, F. [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Possenti, A., E-mail: breton@astro.utoronto.ca [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Poggio dei Pini, strada 54, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy)

    2012-03-10

    The double pulsar PSR J0737-3039A/B displays short, 30 s eclipses that arise around conjunction when the radio waves emitted by pulsar A are absorbed as they propagate through the magnetosphere of its companion pulsar B. These eclipses offer a unique opportunity to directly probe the magnetospheric structure and the plasma properties of pulsar B. We have performed a comprehensive analysis of the eclipse phenomenology using multi-frequency radio observations obtained with the Green Bank Telescope. We have characterized the periodic flux modulations previously discovered at 820 MHz by McLaughlin et al. and investigated the radio frequency dependence of the duration and depth of the eclipses. Based on their weak radio frequency evolution, we conclude that the plasma in pulsar B's magnetosphere requires a large multiplicity factor ({approx}10{sup 5}). We also found that, as expected, flux modulations are present at all radio frequencies in which eclipses can be detected. Their complex behavior is consistent with the confinement of the absorbing plasma in the dipolar magnetic field of pulsar B as suggested by Lyutikov and Thompson and such a geometric connection explains that the observed periodicity is harmonically related to pulsar B's spin frequency. We observe that the eclipses require a sharp transition region beyond which the plasma density drops off abruptly. Such a region defines a plasmasphere that would be well inside the magnetospheric boundary of an undisturbed pulsar. It is also two times smaller than the expected standoff radius calculated using the balance of the wind pressure from pulsar A and the nominally estimated magnetic pressure of pulsar B.

  16. Simulation of energy-dependent electron diffusion processes in the Earth's outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Nishimura, Y.; Zhang, X.-J.; Reeves, G. D.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Henderson, M. G.; Spence, H. E.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-05-01

    The radial and local diffusion processes induced by various plasma waves govern the highly energetic electron dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts, causing distinct characteristics in electron distributions at various energies. In this study, we present our simulation results of the energetic electron evolution during a geomagnetic storm using the University of California, Los Angeles 3-D diffusion code. Following the plasma sheet electron injections, the electrons at different energy bands detected by the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) instruments on board the Van Allen Probes exhibit a rapid enhancement followed by a slow diffusive movement in differential energy fluxes, and the radial extent to which electrons can penetrate into depends on energy with closer penetration toward the Earth at lower energies than higher energies. We incorporate radial diffusion, local acceleration, and loss processes due to whistler mode wave observations to perform a 3-D diffusion simulation. Our simulation results demonstrate that chorus waves cause electron flux increase by more than 1 order of magnitude during the first 18 h, and the subsequent radial extents of the energetic electrons during the storm recovery phase are determined by the coupled radial diffusion and the pitch angle scattering by EMIC waves and plasmaspheric hiss. The radial diffusion caused by ULF waves and local plasma wave scattering are energy dependent, which lead to the observed electron flux variations with energy dependences. This study suggests that plasma wave distributions in the inner magnetosphere are crucial for the energy-dependent intrusions of several hundred keV to several MeV electrons.

  17. Calculating Total Electron Content under the presence of the Aurora Borealis in Fairbanks, Alaska, and Kiruna, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, H.; Ehteshami, A.; Edgar, B.

    2015-12-01

    With the presence of the ionosphere and plasmasphere interacting with geomagnetic storms, scattering effects can be seen by the signals sent to and by GPS/GLONASS satellites. To quantify this dispersive effect, scientists look into what the culprit is that causes this signal bias on an atomic level. Results have shown that the concentration of oscillating electrons is directly proportional to the amount of bias the signal from a point on earth to a GPS satellite witnesses. This is called the Total Electron Content (TEC) of a specified path, measured in electrons per meters squared (. In this project, the process of collecting and analyzing TEC units was kept the same as the previous methods while keeping the cost below $3,000. Using a dual-frequency GNSS receiver from Javad, Triumph-2, the project team recorded a series of 24 hour interval data logs as the receiver stored incoming signals from any reachable satellite. Because of the dispersive media in the ionosphere, the signal witnesses a bend in its path causing a delay, called the Slant TEC (sTEC). Using libraries from GPStk and TEQC, we analyzed RINEX files to view the differential phase and differential pseudorange frequency to compute slant TEC units (sTECU). Using the obtained data, we analyzed the difference between the sTEC units collected in Houston, Texas to the ones collected in Fairbanks, Alaska. Afterwards, the project will continue on another balloon in Kiruna, Sweden at the Esrange Space Center. The receiver will be in flight this time on a 48 hour flight.

  18. Multimodel comparison of the ionosphere variability during the 2009 sudden stratosphere warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedatella, N. M.; Fang, T.-W.; Jin, H.; Sassi, F.; Schmidt, H.; Chau, J. L.; Siddiqui, T. A.; Goncharenko, L.

    2016-07-01

    A comparison of different model simulations of the ionosphere variability during the 2009 sudden stratosphere warming (SSW) is presented. The focus is on the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere simulated by the Ground-to-topside model of the Atmosphere and Ionosphere for Aeronomy (GAIA), Whole Atmosphere Model plus Global Ionosphere Plasmasphere (WAM+GIP), and Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model eXtended version plus Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (WACCMX+TIMEGCM). The simulations are compared with observations of the equatorial vertical plasma drift in the American and Indian longitude sectors, zonal mean F region peak density (NmF2) from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) satellites, and ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) total electron content (TEC) at 75°W. The model simulations all reproduce the observed morning enhancement and afternoon decrease in the vertical plasma drift, as well as the progression of the anomalies toward later local times over the course of several days. However, notable discrepancies among the simulations are seen in terms of the magnitude of the drift perturbations, and rate of the local time shift. Comparison of the electron densities further reveals that although many of the broad features of the ionosphere variability are captured by the simulations, there are significant differences among the different model simulations, as well as between the simulations and observations. Additional simulations are performed where the neutral atmospheres from four different whole atmosphere models (GAIA, HAMMONIA (Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere), WAM, and WACCMX) provide the lower atmospheric forcing in the TIME-GCM. These simulations demonstrate that different neutral atmospheres, in particular, differences in the solar migrating semidiurnal tide, are partly responsible for the differences in the simulated

  19. Investigating storm-enhanced density and polar tongue of ionization development during the 22 October 1999 great storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Ildiko; Lovell, Brian C.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate large-scale plasma density increases occurring during the 22 October 1999 great storm and focus on storm-enhanced density (SED) and polar tongue of ionization (TOI) development. Observations include two-hourly Global Ionosphere Map series coupled with multi-instrument in situ, space-based, and ground-based data plots, with Super Dual Auroral Radar Network two-cell convection maps and with model-generated neutral wind vector maps. Results demonstrate the equatorial electrojet events occurring in the Australian and American sectors, the high-density plasma features, and their underlying plasma transportation processes. During the main phase, a series of four prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) events occurred with subauroral polarization stream E field development forming a plasmaspheric drainage plume. These E field events caused the repeated development of equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), SED bulge, and SED plume during the local dusk-midnight hours in those sectors that covered these local times. Showing a westward movement in accordance with their local time dependence, the EIA-SED structure developed first in the American sector, later on over the Pacific, and finally in the Australian sector. The SED plume plasma found its way into the polar cap through the dayside cusp region, created in the north some large polar cap enhancements reaching up to seven times of the quiet time levels, and evolved in each hemisphere into a polar TOI. We speculate that the enhanced growth of EIA, transporting high-density solar-produced plasma to the SED bulge via strong net eastward E field effects, and the mechanical effects of equatorward neutral winds contributed to the polar TOI's increasingly better development.

  20. World Encircling Tectonic Vortex Street - Geostreams Revisited: The Southern Ring Current EM Plasma-Tectonic Coupling in the Western Pacific Rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leybourne, Bruce; Smoot, Christian; Longhinos, Biju

    2014-05-01

    approximately at the boundary of the plasmasphere and the outer magnetosphere. Induction power of geo-magnetic storms, are linked to ring current strength, and depend on the speed of solar eruptions, along with the dynamic pressure, strength and orientation of the IMF.

  1. Longitudinal Variation in GPS -TEC and Topside Electron Density Associated with the Wave Number Four Structures over South American Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, P. A.; Abdu, M. A.; Souza, J. R.; Bailey, G. J.; Shume, E. B.; Denardini, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Recent observations of the low-latitude ionospheric electron density have revealed a longitudinal structure in the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) intensity, which is characterized by a wave number-four pattern when plotted at a constant-local-time frame. It has been proposed that neutral wind driven dynamo electric fields from the E-region due to non migrating tidal modes are responsible for this pattern. In the present work we have used measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) to investigate the four peaks structure in the topside electron density of the low latitude ionosphere. We also compare the climatology of the Total Electron Content (TEC) as observed by GPS receivers in two equatorial stations over South America, São Luís (2.33 S, 315.8E, declination = -19 degree) in Brazil and Arequipa (16.5S, 288.5E, declination = 0.5 degree) in Peru. TEC variations for three solar activity levels (high, moderate and low) have been analyzed. TEC values over São Luís are found to be larger than that ones over Arequipa independent of the season, local time and solar cycle conditions. We estimated the vertical plasma drifts over these stations using magnetometer data during daytime and using ionosonde data for evening hours. We fed the Sheffield University Plasmasphere Ionosphere Model (SUPIM) with this drifts in an attempt to partially explain the differences in the TEC over these stations. The SUPIM was also used to evaluate the effect of thermospheric wind to cause the four peaks structure in the plasma density. Therefore, we analyze the equatorial ionospheric response to combined effects of thermospheric neutral winds and zonal electric field causing the longitudinal variation in TEC observed in the South American longitude sector.

  2. Radial dependence of ionization losses of protons of the Earth's radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtyukh, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Coulomb losses and charge exchange of protons are considered in detail. On the basis of modern models of the plasmasphere and the exosphere, the radial dependences of the rates of ionization losses of protons, with μ from 0.3 to 10 keV nT-1, of the Earth's radiation belts near the equatorial plane are calculated for quiet periods. For calculation of Coulomb losses of protons we used data of ISEE-1 satellite (protons with energy from 24 to 2081 keV) on L from 3 to 9, data of Explorer-45 satellite (protons with energy from 78.6 to 872 keV) on L from 3 to 5 and data of CRRES satellite (protons with energy from 1 to 100 MeV) on L ≤ 3 (L is the McIlwain parameter). It is shown that with decreasing L the rate of ionization losses of protons of the radiation belts is reduced; for protons with μ > 1.2 keV nT-1 in a narrow region (ΔL ˜ 0.5) in the district of plasmapause in this dependence may form a local minimum of the rate. We found that the dependence from μ of the boundary on L between Coulomb losses and charge exchange of the trapped protons with hydrogen atoms is well approximated by the function Lb = 4.71μ0.32, where [μ] = keV nT-1. Coulomb losses dominate at L Lb(μ) dominates charge exchange of protons. We found the effect of subtracting the Coulomb losses from the charge exchange of protons of the radiation belts at low μ and L, which can simulate a local source of particles.

  3. The impact of exospheric neutral dynamics on ring current decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Gruntman, M.; Bailey, J. J.; Toth, G.

    2015-12-01

    The geocorona plays an important role in the energy budget of the Earth's inner magnetosphere since charge exchange of energetic ions with exospheric neutrals makes the exosphere act as an energy sink for ring current particles. Long-term ring current decay following a magnetic storm is mainly due to these electron transfer reactions, leading to the formation energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) that leave the ring current system on ballistic trajectories. The number of ENAs emitted from a given region of space depends on several factors, such as the energy and species of the energetic ion population in that region and the density of the neutral gas with which the ions undergo charge exchange. However, the density and structure of the exosphere are strongly dependent on changes in atmospheric temperature and density as well as charge exchange with the ions of plasmaspheric origin, which depletes the geocorona (by having a neutral removed from the system). Moreover, the radiation pressure exerted by solar far-ultraviolet photons pushes the geocoronal hydrogen away from the Earth in an anti-sunward direction to form a tail of neutral hydrogen. TWINS ENA images provide a direct measurement of these ENA losses and therefore insight into the dynamics of the ring current decay through interactions with the geocorona. We assess the influence of geocoronal neutrals on ring current formation and decay by analysis of the predicted ENA emissions using 6 different geocoronal models and simulations from the HEIDI ring current model during storm time. Comparison with TWINS ENA images shows that the location of the peak ENA enhancements is highly dependent on the distribution of geocoronal hydrogen density. We show that the neutral dynamics has a strong influence on the time evolution of the ring current populations as well as on the formation of energetic neutral atoms.

  4. Polarized X-ray Scattering and Birefringence in Magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchas, Joseph; Baring, Matthew G.

    2017-01-01

    Interest in radiative processes in the super-strong magnetic regime germane to magnetars has grown over the last two decades. These processes have an inherently anisotropic and polarization-dependent character. Of particular interest is the resonant cyclotron scattering domain, where the Compton cross section is enhanced by orders of magnitude very near the cyclotron frequency -- for electrons in magnetar atmospheres, this is above 10 MeV in energy, and for protons this can be at 1-10 keV. The Compton process is dominant in the highly optically thick environs of magnetar atmospheres, and also in the magnetospheric locales for the production of the hard X-ray bursts. The detailed forms of X-ray spectra will depend intimately on the character of the Compton cross section and the emission zone geometry. The practical determination of the rate of Compton scattering depends on the polarization configuration of incoming photons. This in turn is sensitive to the details of radiation dispersion and transport in hot plasmaspheres near neutron stars. This birefringent dispersion present in strongly-magnetized plasmas can profoundly influence the determination of scattering probabilities. Such polarization transfer is usually addressed by simplifying to the transfer two normal mode intensities. The assumptions involved in this simplification such as orthonormality and "large Faraday depolarization" are valid for a wide range of parameter space, but are known to break down in important cases, such as near a cyclotron resonance. We explore the polarization transfer problem for Compton scattering including the regime where Faraday depolarization is not large. Accordingly, plasma birefringence and the generalized Faraday effect are considered explicitly as part of the transfer problem. Spectra generated from two Monte Carlo models of the transfer problem are presented, one treating isothermal atmospheres in the normal X-ray band, and the other addressing hard X-ray flares in

  5. Multi-instrument observations of the solar eclipse on 20 March 2015 and its effects on the ionosphere over Belgium and Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stankov Stanimir M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A total solar eclipse occurred on 20 March 2015, with a totality path passing mostly above the North Atlantic Ocean, which resulted in a partial solar eclipse over Belgium and large parts of Europe. In anticipation of this event, a dedicated observational campaign was set up at the Belgian Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence (STCE. The objective was to perform high-quality observations of the eclipse and the associated effects on the geospace environment by utilising the advanced space- and ground-based instrumentation available to the STCE in order to further our understanding of these effects, particularly on the ionosphere. The study highlights the crucial importance of taking into account the eclipse geometry when analysing the ionospheric behaviour during eclipses and interpreting the eclipse effects. A detailed review of the eclipse geometry proves that considering the actual obscuration level and solar zenith angle at ionospheric heights is much more important for the analysis than at the commonly referenced Earth’s surface or at the plasmaspheric heights. The eclipse occurred during the recovery phase of a strong geomagnetic storm which certainly had an impact on (some of the ionospheric characteristics and perhaps caused the omission of some “low-profile” effects. However, the analysis of the ionosonde measurements, carried out at unprecedented high rates during the eclipse, suggests the occurrence of travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs. Also, the high temporal and spatial resolution measurements proved very important in revealing and estimating some finer details of the delay in the ionospheric reaction and the ionospheric disturbances.

  6. On the dynamics of large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances over Europe on 20 November 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borries, Claudia; Jakowski, Norbert; Kauristie, Kirsti; Amm, Olaf; Mielich, Jens; Kouba, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Ionospheric disturbances, often associated with geomagnetic storms, may cause threats to radio systems used for communication and navigation. One example is the super storm on 20 November 2003, when plenty of strong and unusual perturbations were reported. This paper reveals additional information on the dynamics in the high-latitude ionosphere over Europe during this storm. Here analyses of wavelike traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) over Europe are presented, based on estimates of the total electron content (TEC) derived from ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) measurements. These TIDs are ionospheric signatures of thermospheric surges initiated by space weather events. The source region of these TIDs is characterized by enhanced spatial gradients, TEC depression, strong uplift of the F2 layer, the vicinity of the eastward auroral electrojet, and strong aurora E layers. Joule heating is identified as the most probable driver for the TIDs observed over Europe during 20 November 2003. The sudden heating of the thermosphere leads to strong changes in the pressure and thermospheric wind circulation system, which in turn generates thermospheric wind surges observed as TID signatures in the TEC. Either the dissipation of the eastward auroral electrojet or particle precipitation are considered as the source mechanism for the Joule heating. In the course of the storm, the TEC observations show a southward shift of the source region of the TIDs. These meridional dislocation effects are obviously related to a strong compression of the plasmasphere. The presented results demonstrate the complex interaction processes in the thermosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere system during this extreme storm.

  7. Rapid enhancement of low-energy (shocks based on two Van Allen Probes case studies: Implications for source regions and heating mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Chao; Li, Wen; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Zong, Qiugang; Ma, Qianli; Bortnik, Jacob; Thorne, Richard M.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.; Kletzing, Craig A.; Wygant, John R.; Nicolls, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between interplanetary (IP) shocks and the Earth's magnetosphere manifest many important space physics phenomena including low-energy ion flux enhancements and particle acceleration. In order to investigate the mechanisms driving shock-induced enhancement of low-energy ion flux, we have examined two IP shock events that occurred when the Van Allen Probes were located near the equator while ionospheric and ground observations were available around the spacecraft footprints. We have found that, associated with the shock arrival, electromagnetic fields intensified, and low-energy ion fluxes, including H+, He+, and O+, were enhanced dramatically in both the parallel and perpendicular directions. During the 2 October 2013 shock event, both parallel and perpendicular flux enhancements lasted more than 20 min with larger fluxes observed in the perpendicular direction. In contrast, for the 15 March 2013 shock event, the low-energy perpendicular ion fluxes increased only in the first 5 min during an impulse of electric field, while the parallel flux enhancement lasted more than 30 min. In addition, ionospheric outflows were observed after shock arrivals. From a simple particle motion calculation, we found that the rapid response of low-energy ions is due to drifts of plasmaspheric population by the enhanced electric field. However, the fast acceleration in the perpendicular direction cannot solely be explained by E × B drift but betatron acceleration also plays a role. Adiabatic acceleration may also explain the fast response of the enhanced parallel ion fluxes, while ion outflows may contribute to the enhanced parallel fluxes that last longer than the perpendicular fluxes.

  8. The importance of energetic particle injections and cross-energy and -species interactions to the acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons in Earth's outer radiation belt (invited talk)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Drew; Gkioulidou, Matina; Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr; Gabrielse, Christine; Runov, Andrei; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2014-05-01

    Earth's radiation belts provide a natural laboratory to study a variety of physical mechanisms important for understanding the nature of energetic particles throughout the Universe. The outer electron belt is a particularly variable population, with drastic changes in relativistic electron intensities occurring on a variety of timescales ranging from seconds to decades. Outer belt variability ultimately results from the complex interplay between different source, loss, and transport processes, and all of these processes are related to the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere. Currently, an unprecedented number of spacecraft are providing in situ observations of the inner magnetospheric environment, including missions such as NASA's THEMIS and Van Allen Probes and ESA's Cluster and operational monitors such as NOAA's GOES and POES constellations. From a sampling of case studies using multi-point observations, we present examples showcasing the significant importance of two processes to outer belt dynamics: energetic particle injections and wave-particle interactions. Energetic particle injections are transient events that tie the inner magnetosphere to the near-Earth magnetotail; they involve the rapid inward transport of plasmasheet particles into the trapping zone in the inner magnetosphere. We briefly review key concepts and present new evidence from Van Allen Probes, GOES, and THEMIS of how these injections provide: 1. the seed population of electrons that are subsequently accelerated locally to relativistic energies in the outer belt and 2. the source populations of ions and electrons that produce a variety of ULF and VLF waves, which are also important for driving outer belt dynamics via wave-particle interactions. Cases of electron acceleration by chorus waves, losses by plasmaspheric hiss and EMIC waves, and radial transport driven by ULF waves will also be presented. Finally, we discuss the implications of this developing picture of the system, namely how

  9. Highly resolved effects of whistler-mode hiss waves in March 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, J. F.; Santolik, O.; Reeves, G. D.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present a simulation of effects of whistler-mode waves on radiation belt electrons for the entire month of March 2013. Frequency dependent wave intensities as well as ambient plasma density are obtained from the EMFISIS Waves instrument onboard the Van Allen Probes using fine temporal (8 hours) and spatial (0.1L) resolutions. Pitch angle diffusion that produces electron scattering is computed using the Lyons et al. [1972] model, from L=1.8 to L=5.5 and energy in [0.05, 6] MeV. Electron lifetimes are deduced from the steady state of electron pitch angle diffusion. Such a computation requires 4000 thousands processors during 10 hours. It leads to a fine description of the hiss effects in the plasmasphere and in its exterior neighborhood. Losses follow a complex and dynamic filamentary structure, imposed by the wave properties (mainly frequency and amplitude), that sculpts the slot as such. Their daily structure in the (E-L) plane is characteristic [Lyons & Thorne, 1973], dynamic, and similar to recent slot observations from the Van Allen probes [Reeves et al., 2015]. Low energy electrons are less influenced by intense hiss scattering below L=4, which favors their travel down to the vicinity of the Earth, explaining thus the existence of a wide inner belt. On the other hand MeV electrons evolve in a more hostile environment that will depopulate them as they migrate from L~5 down to L~2.5. Ultra-relativistic electrons are not sensible to hiss waves before two and three Earth radii.

  10. Ground-based Magnetometer Array Science for IHY: Opportunities for an Array in Africa within the UNBSS Developing Nations Small Instrument Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, I. R.; Milling, D. K.; Moldwin, M.; Yizengaw, E.

    2005-12-01

    Arrays of ground-based magnetometers provide the capability for the meso- and global-scale monitoring of current systems and waves in the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Recent advances in the processing of multiple time series magnetometer array data allows the inversion of standing Alfven eigenfrequencies for the purposes of monitoring density depletion and refilling dynamics in the plasmasphere, plasmapause and plasmatrough regions. In addition, mid-latitude magnetometer arrays can also allow the monitoring of the ULF waves which are implicated in the transport and acceleration of MeV energy electrons in the radiation belts, as well as monitoring the penetration of asymmetric ring current and substorm current systems to mid- and low-latitudes during storms. Fluxgate magnetometer technology is relatively inexpensive, and the data sets are small allowing relatively easy collection of data through the low-band-width internet connections. However, the accumulation of magnetometer data into nation-, continental- and global-scale array coverage provides a powerful tool for pursuing IHY science objectives. We present examples of how these concepts might be exploited through the UN Developing Nations Small Instrument program with the creation, coordination and operation of an IHY Magnetometer Array (IHYMag). The IHY science focus on storms also ensures that mid-latitude and even equatorial developing nations coverage would ensure IHYMag data is a valuable resource for IHY scientists. African locations offer a prime opportunity to expand the global magnetometer coverage into this region during IHY. Technology being developed for instrument development and data collection for the CARISMA formerly CANOPUS) magnetometer array expansion, including planned use of solar and/or wind turbine power at the remote BACK magnetometer site in the CARISMA array, might also form a basis for the hardware development which could be used to support a Developing Nations Small

  11. Ionospheric response to sudden stratospheric warming events at low and high solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tzu-Wei; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Wang, Houjun; Akmaev, Rashid; Wu, Fei

    2014-09-01

    The sensitivity of the ionospheric response to a sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event has been examined under conditions of low and high solar activity through simulations using the whole atmosphere model (WAM) and the global ionosphere plasmasphere model (GIP). During non-SSW conditions, simulated daytime mean vertical drifts at the magnetic equator show similar solar activity dependence as an empirical model. Model results of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) and equatorial vertical drift for the January 2009 major SSW, which occurred at very low solar activity conditions, show reasonable agreement with observations. The simulations demonstrate that the E region dynamo is capable of creating the semidiurnal variation of vertical drift. WAM and GIP were also run at high solar activity conditions, using the same lower atmosphere conditions as present in the January 2009 SSW event. The simulations indicate that the amplitude and phase of migrating tides in the dynamo region during the event have similar magnitudes for both solar flux conditions. However, comparing the ionospheric responses to a major SSW under low and high solar activity periods, it was found that the changes in the ionospheric vertical drifts and relative changes in TEC decreased with increasing solar activity. The simulations indicate that the F region dynamo becomes more important throughout the daytime and contributes to the upward drift in the afternoon during the event when the solar activity is higher. Our test simulations also confirm that the increase of the ionospheric conductivity associated with increasing solar activity is responsible for the decrease of vertical drift changes during an SSW. In particular, first, the increase in F region conductivity allows the closure of E region currents through the F region, reducing the polarization electric field before noon. Second, the F region dynamo contributes an upward drift postnoon, maintaining upward drifts till after sunset

  12. First results from the Cluster wideband plasma wave investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Gurnett

    Full Text Available In this report we present the first results from the Cluster wideband plasma wave investigation. The four Cluster spacecraft were successfully placed in closely spaced, high-inclination eccentric orbits around the Earth during two separate launches in July – August 2000. Each spacecraft includes a wideband plasma wave instrument designed to provide high-resolution electric and magnetic field wave-forms via both stored data and direct downlinks to the NASA Deep Space Network. Results are presented for three commonly occurring magnetospheric plasma wave phenomena: (1 whistlers, (2 chorus, and (3 auroral kilometric radiation. Lightning-generated whistlers are frequently observed when the spacecraft is inside the plasmasphere. Usually the same whistler can be detected by all spacecraft, indicating that the whistler wave packet extends over a spatial dimension at least as large as the separation distances transverse to the magnetic field, which during these observations were a few hundred km. This is what would be expected for nonducted whistler propagation. No case has been found in which a strong whistler was detected at one spacecraft, with no signal at the other spacecraft, which would indicate ducted propagation. Whistler-mode chorus emissions are also observed in the inner region of the magnetosphere. In contrast to lightning-generated whistlers, the individual chorus elements seldom show a one-to-one correspondence between the spacecraft, indicating that a typical chorus wave packet has dimensions transverse to the magnetic field of only a few hundred km or less. In one case where a good one-to-one correspondence existed, significant frequency variations were observed between the spacecraft, indicating that the frequency of the wave packet may be evolving as the wave propagates. Auroral kilometric radiation, which is an intense radio emission generated along the auroral field lines, is frequently observed over the polar regions. The

  13. 2015 Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School Research Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowee, Misa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chen, Yuxi [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Desai, Ravindra [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom); Hassan, Ehab [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Kalmoni, Nadine [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom); Lin, Dong [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Depascuale, Sebastian [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Hughes, Randall Scott [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zhou, Hong [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-11-24

    The fifth Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School was held June 1st - July 24th, 2015, at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). With renewed support from the Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures (IGPPS) and additional support from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science, we hosted a new class of five students from various U.S. and foreign research institutions. The summer school curriculum includes a series of structured lectures as well as mentored research and practicum opportunities. Lecture topics including general and specialized topics in the field of space weather were given by a number of researchers affiliated with LANL. Students were given the opportunity to engage in research projects through a mentored practicum experience. Each student works with one or more LANL-affiliated mentors to execute a collaborative research project, typically linked with a larger ongoing research effort at LANL and/or the student’s PhD thesis research. This model provides a valuable learning experience for the student while developing the opportunity for future collaboration. This report includes a summary of the research efforts fostered and facilitated by the Space Weather Summer School. These reports should be viewed as work-in-progress as the short session typically only offers sufficient time for preliminary results. At the close of the summer school session, students present a summary of their research efforts. Titles of the papers included in this report are as follows: Full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of whistler wave generation, Hybrid simulations of the right-hand ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in a sub-Alfvénic plasma flow, A statistical ensemble for solar wind measurements, Observations and models of substorm injection dispersion patterns, Heavy ion effects on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: hybrid study, Simulating plasmaspheric electron densities with a two

  14. Inside ESPAS - How ESPAS works to let you share and find near-Earth space data

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    The ESPAS near-Earth Space Data Infrastructure for e-Science, brings together access to heterogeneous data from ground and space based instruments sensing the Earth's atmosphere, ionosphere, magnetosphere and plasmasphere. The purpose is to encourage the exploitation of multi-instrument, multi-point science data for analysis and to support the development and improvement of models. Use cases will show how Space Environment scientists can make use of ESPAS to get homogenized access to the ESPAS data repositories. They will demonstrate how search criteria can be flexibly combined to find and retrieve relevant, available datasets no matter where those data are actually hosted. Searches can encompass ground and space based data sets. The design and implementation of the ESPAS system will be outlined, describing the ESPAS Data Model and the ESPAS Ontology. Further use cases will demonstrate the tools available to data providers in order to conveniently register datasets with ESPAS. The ESPAS data portal supports finding and retrieving data from many, distributed data providers. Metadata is the key to this ESPAS interoperability and is underpinned by the ESPAS Data Model. To describe data results, such that ESPAS users can find data of interest across diverse data sets, the metadata must answer key questions about how those data results were created, such as: what, where, when, how and who. The ESPAS Data Model models the data description by defining a series of key concepts to answer such questions. The observation is the key concept at the centre of the ESPAS Data Model, where the observation is the act that results in the estimation of the values of a property (that is the act that results in data). The ESPAS Data Model is built strictly and entirely on ISO 19100 series geographic information standards, particularly the ISO 19156 Observations and Measurements standard. Consistent metadata in ESPAS is supported by the ESPAS Ontology. This defines a series of

  15. Deduction of the rates of radial diffusion of protons from the structure of the Earth's radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtyukh, Alexander S.

    2016-11-01

    From the data on the fluxes and energy spectra of protons with an equatorial pitch angle of α0 ≈ 90° during quiet and slightly disturbed (Kp ≤ 2) periods, I directly calculated the value DLL, which is a measure of the rate of radial transport (diffusion) of trapped particles. This is done by successively solving the systems (chains) of integrodifferential equations which describe the balance of radial transport/acceleration and ionization losses of low-energy protons of the stationary belt. This was done for the first time. For these calculations, I used data of International Sun-Earth Explorer 1 (ISEE-1) for protons with an energy of 24 to 2081 keV at L = 2-10 and data of Explorer-45 for protons with an energy of 78.6 to 872 keV at L = 2-5. Ionization losses of protons (Coulomb losses and charge exchange) were calculated on the basis of modern models of the plasmasphere and the exosphere. It is shown that for protons with μ from ˜ 0.7 to ˜ 7 keV nT-1 at L ≈ 4.5-10, the functions of DLL can be approximated by the following equivalent expressions: DLL ≈ 4.9 × 10-14μ-4.1L8.2 or DLL ≈ 1.3 × 105(EL)-4.1 or DLL ≈ 1.2 × 10-9fd-4.1, where fd is the drift frequency of the protons (in mHz), DLL is measured in s-1, E is measured in kiloelectronvolt and μ is measured in kiloelectronvolt per nanotesla. These results are consistent with the radial diffusion of particles under the action of the electric field fluctuations (pulsations) in the range of Pc6 and contradict the mechanism of the radial diffusion of particles under the action of sudden impulses (SIs) of the magnetic field and also under the action of substorm impulses of the electric field. During magnetic storms DLL increases, and the expressions for DLL obtained here can change completely.

  16. An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC and its relationship to field-aligned current, ring current, and plasmapause location determined using multiple spacecraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC is a latitudinally narrow channel of unstable F-region plasma with intense westward drift in the dusk-to-midnight sector ionosphere. AWFCs tend to overlap the equatorward edge of the auroral oval, and their life cycle is often synchronised to that of substorms: they commence close to substorm expansion phase onset, intensify during the expansion phase, and then decay during the recovery phase. Here we define for the first time the relationship between an AWFC, large-scale field-aligned current (FAC, the ring current, and plasmapause location. The Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER, a Southern Hemisphere HF SuperDARN radar, observed a jet-like AWFC during ~08:35 to 13:28 UT on 7 April 2001. The initiation of the AWFC was preceded by a band of equatorward expanding ionospheric scatter (BEES which conveyed an intense poleward electric field through the inner plasma sheet. Unlike previous AWFCs, this event was not associated with a distinct substorm surge; rather it occurred during an interval of persistent, moderate magnetic activity characterised by AL~−200 nT. The four Cluster spacecraft had perigees within the dusk sector plasmasphere, and their trajectories were magnetically conjugate to the radar observations. The Waves of High frequency and Sounder for Probing Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER instruments on board Cluster were used to identify the plasmapause location. The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE EUV experiment also provided global-scale observations of the plasmapause. The Cluster fluxgate magnetometers (FGM provided successive measurements specifying the relative location of the ring current and filamentary plasma sheet current. An analysis of Iridium spacecraft magnetometer measurements provided estimates of large-scale ionospheric FAC in relation to the AWFC evolution. Peak flows in the AWFC were located close to the peak of a Region 2

  17. Registering parameters and granules of wave observations: IMAGE RPI success story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkin, I. A.; Charisi, A.; Fung, S. F.; Benson, R. F.; Reinisch, B. W.

    2015-12-01

    . Numerical data products include plasmagram-derived records containing signatures of local and remote signal propagation, as well as field-aligned profiles of electron density in the plasmasphere. Registered granules of RPI observations are available in ESPAS for their content-targeted search and retrieval.

  18. The Ionosphere Real-Time Assimilative Model, IRTAM - A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, Bodo; Galkin, Ivan; Huang, Xueqin; Vesnin, Artem; Bilitza, Dieter

    2014-05-01

    Ionospheric models are generally unable to correctly predict the effects of space weather events on the ionosphere. Taking advantage of today's real-time availability of measured electron density profiles of the bottomside ionosphere, we have developed a technique "IRTAM" to specify real-time foF2 and hmF2 global maps. The measured data arrive at the Lowell GIRO Data Center (LGDC) from some ~70 ionosonde stations of the Global Ionosphere Radio Observatory (GIRO) [Reinisch and Galkin, 2011], usually at a 15 min cadence, and are ingested in LGDC's databases (http://ulcar.uml.edu/DIDBase/). We use the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) electron density model [Bilitza et al., 2011] as the background model. It is an empirical monthly median model that critically depends on the correct values of the F2 layer peak height hmF2 and density NmF2 (or critical frequency foF2). The IRI model uses the so-called CCIR (or URSI) coefficients for the specification of the median foF2 and hmF2 maps. IRTAM assimilates the measured GIRO data in IRI by "adjusting" the CCIR coefficients on-the-fly. The updated maps of foF2 and hmF2 for the last 24 hours before now-time are continuously displayed on http://giro.uml.edu/RTAM [Galkin et al., 2012]. The "adjusted" bottomside profiles can be extended to the topside by using the new Vary-Chap topside profile model [Nsumei et al., 2012] which extends the profile from hmF2 to the plasmasphere. References Bilitza D., L.-A. McKinnell, B. Reinisch, and T. Fuller-Rowell (2011), The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) today and in the future, J. Geodesy, 85:909-920, DOI 10.1007/s00190-010-0427-x Galkin, I. A., B. W. Reinisch, X. Huang, and D. Bilitza (2012), Assimilation of GIRO Data into a Real-Time IRI, Radio Sci., 47, RS0L07, doi:10.1029/2011RS004952. Nsumei, P., B. W. Reinisch, X. Huang, and D. Bilitza (2012), New Vary-Chap profile of the topside ionosphere electron density distribution for use with the IRI Model and the GIRO real time

  19. Thermospheric winds and temperatures above Mawson, Antarctica, observed with an all-sky imaging, Fabry-Perot spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Anderson

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A new all-sky imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometer has been installed at Mawson station (67°36' S, 62°52' E, Antarctica. This instrument is capable of recording independent spectra from many tens of locations across the sky simultaneously. Useful operation began in March 2007, with spectra recorded on a total of 186 nights. Initial analysis has focused on the large-scale daily and average behavior of winds and temperatures derived from observations of the 630.0 nm airglow line of atomic oxygen, originating from a broad layer centered around 240 km altitude, in the ionospheric F-region.

    The 1993 Horizontal Wind Model (HWM93, NRLMSISE-00 atmospheric model, and the Coupled Thermosphere/Ionosphere Plasmasphere (CTIP model were used for comparison. During the geomagnetically quiet period studied, observed winds and temperatures were generally well modelled, although temperatures were consistently higher than NRLMSISE-00 predicted, by up to 100 K. CTIP temperatures better matched our data, particularly later in the night, but predicted zonal winds which were offset from those observed by 70–180 ms−1 westward. During periods of increased activity both winds and temperatures showed much greater variability over time-scales of less than an hour. For the active night presented here, a period of 45 min saw wind speeds decrease by around 180 ms−1, and temperatures increase by approximately 100 K. Active-period winds were poorly modelled by HWM93 and CTIP, although observed median temperatures were in better agreement with NRLMSISE-00 during such periods.

    Average behavior was found to be generally consistent with previous studies of thermospheric winds above Mawson. The collected data set was representative of quiet geomagnetic and solar conditions. Geographic eastward winds in the afternoon/evening generally continued until around local midnight, when winds turned equatorward. Geographic meridional and

  20. Operational Space Weather Models: Trials, Tribulations and Rewards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, R. W.; Scherliess, L.; Sojka, J. J.; Thompson, D. C.; Zhu, L.

    2009-12-01

    There are many empirical, physics-based, and data assimilation models that can probably be used for space weather applications and the models cover the entire domain from the surface of the Sun to the Earth’s surface. At Utah State University we developed two physics-based data assimilation models of the terrestrial ionosphere as part of a program called Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM). One of the data assimilation models is now in operational use at the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) in Omaha, Nebraska. This model is a Gauss-Markov Kalman Filter (GAIM-GM) model, and it uses a physics-based model of the ionosphere and a Kalman filter as a basis for assimilating a diverse set of real-time (or near real-time) measurements. The physics-based model is the Ionosphere Forecast Model (IFM), which is global and covers the E-region, F-region, and topside ionosphere from 90 to 1400 km. It takes account of five ion species (NO+, O2+, N2+, O+, H+), but the main output of the model is a 3-dimensional electron density distribution at user specified times. The second data assimilation model uses a physics-based Ionosphere-Plasmasphere Model (IPM) and an ensemble Kalman filter technique as a basis for assimilating a diverse set of real-time (or near real-time) measurements. This Full Physics model (GAIM-FP) is global, covers the altitude range from 90 to 30,000 km, includes six ions (NO+, O2+, N2+, O+, H+, He+), and calculates the self-consistent ionospheric drivers (electric fields and neutral winds). The GAIM-FP model is scheduled for delivery in 2012. Both of these GAIM models assimilate bottom-side Ne profiles from a variable number of ionosondes, slant TEC from a variable number of ground GPS/TEC stations, in situ Ne from four DMSP satellites, line-of-sight UV emissions measured by satellites, and occultation data. Quality control algorithms for all of the data types are provided as an integral part of the GAIM models and these models take account of

  1. Topside Ionosphere Plasma Bubbles Seen in He+ Density: Results and Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorova, Larisa; Filippov, Sergey

    He (+) density depletions, considered as fossil equatorial plasma bubble signatures, were involved in this study. They are usually detected in the topside ionosphere (approx. 1000 km) deeply inside the plasmasphere (L=1.3-3). a) The question about an opportunity to detect the topside plasma bubbles of equatorial origin in their separate plasma component (He (+) ) is investigated. There are the indications [Sidorova, ASR, 2004, 2007; Sidorova and Filippov, JASTP, 2012] that there is genetic connection between the He (+) density depletions and the equatorial plasma bubbles. For validation of this idea the characteristic times of the main photochemical and electro-dynamical processes, in which the plasma bubbles and their minor ion component (He (+) ) are involved, have been calculated and compared. The model estimations, obtained in SAMIS3 (3D model of equatorial spread F) and kindly presented by J. Huba (USA), are also used for the investigation. It was revealed that the plasma bubbles, reaching the “ceiling” heights, can exist within 2-3 days and that there is principal opportunity to observe them in the separate plasma component (He (+) ). (b) The longitudinal statistics of the He (+) density depletions (P), calculated for all seasons and both hemispheres (20-50(°) INVLAT), were obtained. It was revealed that the most of the P plots have “wave-like” structure with well-defining four peaks. The peaks are the most pronounced in the NH during March equinox/December solstice and in the SH during March equinox/June solstice. Similar wave number 4 longitudinal structure has recently been found in the low-latitude ionosphere density distribution [Immel et al., GRL, 2006; England et al., GRL, 2006; Jin et al., JGR, 2008]. It is assumed that the longitudinal plasma density variations appear due to the modulated vertical Е×В drift. It is supposed that solar thermal tides excited in the troposphere induce zonal perturbation electric fields, which are added to the

  2. Multiple harmonic ULF waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer: Instability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, R. E.; Engebretson, M. J.; Keiling, A.; Walsh, A. P.; Gary, S. P.; DéCréAu, P. M. E.; Cattell, C. A.; RèMe, H.

    2010-12-01

    Multiple-harmonic electromagnetic waves in the ULF band have occasionally been observed in Earth's magnetosphere, both near the magnetic equator in the outer plasmasphere and in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) in Earth's magnetotail. Observations by the Cluster spacecraft of multiple-harmonic electromagnetic waves with fundamental frequency near the local proton cyclotron frequency, Ωcp, were recently reported in the plasma sheet boundary layer by Broughton et al. (2008). A companion paper surveys the entire magnetotail passage of Cluster during 2003, and reports 35 such events, all in the PSBL, and all associated with elevated fluxes of counterstreaming ions and electrons. In this study we use observed pitch angle distributions of ions and electrons during a wave event observed by Cluster on 9 September 2003 to perform an instability analysis. We use a semiautomatic procedure for developing model distributions composed of bi-Maxwellian components that minimizes the difference between modeled and observed distribution functions. Analysis of wave instability using the WHAMP electromagnetic plasma wave dispersion code and these model distributions reveals an instability near Ωcp and its harmonics. The observed and model ion distributions exhibit both beam-like and ring-like features which might lead to instability. Further instability analysis with simple beam-like and ring-like model distribution functions indicates that the instability is due to the ring-like feature. Our analysis indicates that this instability persists over an enormous range in the effective ion beta (based on a best fit for the observed distribution function using a single Maxwellian distribution), β', but that the character of the instability changes with β'. For β' of order unity (for instance, the observed case with β' ˜ 0.4), the instability is predominantly electromagnetic; the fluctuating magnetic field has components in both the perpendicular and parallel directions, but the

  3. Possible biophysical mechanism of the effect of the solar activity on the human central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, G. A.; Mikhailov, Y. M.

    Numerous studies, beginning with Tchizhevsky's works, demonstrated the undeniable effect of the solar activity on the human body. A possible geophysical mechanism of the effect of the solar activity on the human body was proposed by Vladimirsky. In this mechanism solar disturbances (powerful chromospheres flares) cause "magnetosphere and plasmasphere disturbances on the Earth (sudden magnetic storms), which are accompanied by a change in the spectrum of the electromagnetic field on the Earth's surface in the extremely low frequency band. In its turn, this brings about shifts in the phisiological indices of the human body". In this model, the human body is regarded as a self-oscillating system affected by external geophysical factors. We also adhere to the main principles of this model but refine the part of this model that describes the change in the spectrum of the electromagnetic field on the Earth's surface in the extremely low frequency band. Unlike Vladimirsky model, we regard the human is not as a self-oscillating system but as one of two coupled oscillating system with discrete resonance frequencies in the human-habitat ensemble. Solar processes and their induced changes in one of the two coupled oscillating systems, specifically, the habitat play the role of an external force. Such an approach is based on the fact that the brain rhythms have the following definite frequencies: the alpha rhythm, 8-13 Hz; the beta rhythm, 14-30 Hz; the gamma rhythm, above 30 Hz; the delta rhythm, 1.5-3 Hz; and the theta rhythm, 4-7 Hz. On the other hand, the natural electromagnetic field on the Earth's surface in the extremely low frequency band also has a quite distinct resonance distribution. There are so-called Schuman resonances of the cavity formed by the Earth's surface and the lower boundary of the ionosphere (the D and E layers) at f1=10.6; f2=18.3; f3=25.9; f4=33.5; f5=41.1 Hz. These resonance frequencies are variable and most sensitive to variations of the

  4. Analysis of ionospheric TEC from GNSS observables over the Turkish region and predictability of IRI and SPIM models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Kutubuddin; Corumluoglu, Ozsen; Panda, Sampad Kumar

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigates the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) variations in the lower mid-latitude Turkish region from the Turkish Permanent GNSS Network (TPGN) and International GNSS Services (IGS) observations during the period from January 2015 to December 2015. The corresponding TEC predicted by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI 2012) and Standard Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model (SPIM), and interpolated from Global Ionosphere Maps (GIMs) are evaluated to realize their reliability over the region. We studied the diurnal and monthly behavior of TEC and the relative TEC deviations along with the upper and lower quartiles to represent its spatio-temporal variability. The diurnal variation of GNSS-derived TEC indicates its maximum peak value around 10.00 UT which decreases gradually to attain minimum value after midnight. The monthly maximum value of TEC is observed in March followed by May and August, and the lowest value is seen during September. Studies show that the monthly relative deviation of TEC variability lies in the range of -1 to 4 units for all stations with the maximum difference between positive and negative variability remaining around 5. The studies also cover seasonal variation, grand-mean of ionospheric TEC and TEC intensity from the TPGN. The seasonal ionospheric VTEC pattern over all stations depicts slight increment in VTEC distribution during March equinox compared to September equinox. The December solstice perceived relatively higher VTEC than June solstice. The overall of VTEC values enhanced at all stations towards end of the year 2015 compare to mid of year due the high solar activity. The maximum grand-mean of VTEC is registered in March equinox while the lowest value is seen in September irrespective of all stations. The measured grand-mean intensity variations of VTEC values are in ascending phase during March, May, August and November months, but in descending phase during February, April, June and September

  5. Development of a novel sweeping Langmuir probe instrument for monitoring the upper ionosphere on board a pico-satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranvier, Sylvain; De Keyser, Johan; Cardoen, Pepijn; Pieroux, Didier

    2014-05-01

    A novel Langmuir probe instrument, which will fly on board the Pico-Satellite for Atmospheric and Space Science Observations (PICASSO), is under development at the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy. PICASSO was initiated to join the QB50 project as scientific in-orbit demonstrator. The sweeping Langmuir probe (SLP) instrument is designed to measure both plasma density and electron temperature at an altitude varying from about 400 km up to 700 km from a high inclination orbit. Therefore, the plasma density is expected to fluctuate over a wide range, from about 1e6/m³ at high latitude and high altitude up to 1e12/m³ at low/mid latitude and low altitude. The electron temperature is expected to lie between approximately 1000 K and 3000 K. Given the high inclination of the orbit, the SLP instrument will allow a global monitoring of the ionosphere with a maximum spatial resolution of the order of 150 m. The main goals are to study 1) the ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling, 2) the subauroral ionosphere and corresponding magnetospheric features, 3) auroral structures, 4) polar caps, and 5) ionospheric dynamics via coordinated observations with EISCAT's heating radar. To achieve the scientific objectives described above, the instrument includes four thin cylindrical probes whose electrical potential is swept in such a way that both plasma density and electron temperature can be derived. In addition, since at least two probes will be out of the spacecraft's wake at any given time, differential measurements can be performed to increase the accuracy. Along the orbit, the Debye length is expected to vary from a few millimetres up to a few meters. Due to the tight constraints in terms of mass and volume inherent to pico-satellites, the use of long booms, which would guarantee that the probes are outside the sheath of the spacecraft (several Debye lengths away), is not possible. Consequently, the probes might be in the sheath of the spacecraft in polar regions. Extensive

  6. Effects of ring current ions on the ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere based on a 5-D drift kinetic ring current model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, K.; Amano, T.; Saito, S.; Kamiya, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Keika, K.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial inner magnetosphere is the region where different plasma regimes over a wide range of energy such as the plasmasphere, ring current, and radiation belt coexist. Among them, the ring current carries most of plasma pressure and is thus responsible for deformation of the magnetic field. Since the deformation changes drift paths of charged particles including the ring current ions, it is important to describe this coupling between the ring current and electric/magnetic fields self-consistently. It is known that short-timescale phenomena such as ULF waves and substorm related ion injections from the plasma sheet play important roles in the inner magnetospheric dynamics during magnetic storms. While ULF waves contribute to the radial transport of relativistic electrons to form the radiation belt, the ion injections contribute to excitation of storm-time Pc5 ULF waves as well as to plasma supply to the ring current from the magnetotail. Aiming at a self-consistent description of the coupling between ring current ions and electric/magnetic fields, we have developed a global ring current model (GEMSIS-RC model). The model is a self-consistent and kinetic numerical simulation code solving the five-dimensional collisionless drift-kinetic equation for the ring-current ions coupled with Maxwell equations. Without assuming a force-balanced equilibrium, the GEMSIS-RC model allows the force-imbalance to exist, which generates induced electric field through the polarization current. In this study, we applied the GEMSIS-RC model for simulation of ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere with a focus on the short-timescale phenomena described above. Comparison between runs with/without ring current ions show that the existence of hot ring current ions can deform and amplify the original sinusoidal waveforms. The deformation causes the energy cascade to higher frequency range (Pc4 and Pc3 ranges). The cascade is more pronounced in high plasma beta cases. It is also shown that

  7. Analysis of the positive ionospheric response to a moderate geomagnetic storm using a global numerical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Namgaladze

    Full Text Available Current theories of F-layer storms are discussed using numerical simulations with the Upper Atmosphere Model, a global self-consistent, time dependent numerical model of the thermosphere-ionosphere-plasmasphere-magnetosphere system including electrodynamical coupling effects. A case study of a moderate geomagnetic storm at low solar activity during the northern winter solstice exemplifies the complex storm phenomena. The study focuses on positive ionospheric storm effects in relation to thermospheric disturbances in general and thermospheric composition changes in particular. It investigates the dynamical effects of both neutral meridional winds and electric fields caused by the disturbance dynamo effect. The penetration of short-time electric fields of magnetospheric origin during storm intensification phases is shown for the first time in this model study. Comparisons of the calculated thermospheric composition changes with satellite observations of AE-C and ESRO-4 during storm time show a good agreement. The empirical MSISE90 model, however, is less consistent with the simulations. It does not show the equatorward propagation of the disturbances and predicts that they have a gentler latitudinal gradient. Both theoretical and experimental data reveal that although the ratio of [O]/[N2] at high latitudes decreases significantly during the magnetic storm compared with the quiet time level, at mid to low latitudes it does not increase (at fixed altitudes above the quiet reference level. Meanwhile, the ionospheric storm is positive there. We conclude that the positive phase of the ionospheric storm is mainly due to uplifting of ionospheric F2-region plasma at mid latitudes and its equatorward movement at low latitudes along geomagnetic field lines caused by large-scale neutral wind circulation and the passage of travelling atmospheric disturbances (TADs. The calculated zonal electric field disturbances also help

  8. Exos-B/Siple Station VLF wave-particle interaction experiments: 1. General description and wave-particle correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, I.; Hashimoto, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Mukai, T.; Bell, T.F.; Inan, U.S.; Helliwell, R.A.; Katsufrakis, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    In situ measurements of both energetic particles and VLF waves have been carried out in a joint program involving the Japanese satellite EXOS-B and the Siple Station VLF transmitter. A general description of the experiment is given as well as some results concerning wave-particle correlations. Detailed analysis of the observed wave characteristics is given in a companion paper. Correlations of electron flux and pitch angle anisotropy in the energy range from 85 eV to 6.9 keV with waves in a range from 300 Hz to 9 kHz are examined. These electrons sometimes have a pitch angle distributions with a peak flux at 90/sup 0/ pitch angle (so-called pancake distribution). On five passes out of a total of 50 during the summer campaign in 1979, the energy of the electrons that showed a high pitch angle anisotropy shifted upward as the satellite moved into the plasmasphere, crossing the plasmapause in the equatorial region. In two cases out of five, strong Siple signals were observed in the geomagnetic equatorial region just outside the plasmapause, in association with such a pancake pitch angle distribution of electrons. The Siple signals are most likely amplified by the cyclotron instability due to the high pitch angle anisotropy (HPAA), although the flux of resonant electrons was relatively small. For three other cases of HPAA, the satellite location was so far away from the Siple meridian that the signal level, even if amplified, was too weak to be detected by the satellite. Emissions associated with Siple signals were detected on five (two equatorial and three high latitude) passes, which were all confined on 6 days after a large magnetic storm. On the days when the Siple triggered emissions were observed, the pitch angle anisotropy was low, but the electron flux at resonant energies in the equatorial region was four or five times larger than that on other non-triggering days in all energy channels from 85 eV to 6.9 keV.

  9. Calibration of imaging parameters for space-borne airglow photography using city light positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, Yuta; Saito, Akinori; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.

    2016-09-01

    A new method for calibrating imaging parameters of photographs taken from the International Space Station (ISS) is presented in this report. Airglow in the mesosphere and the F-region ionosphere was captured on the limb of the Earth with a digital single-lens reflex camera from the ISS by astronauts. To utilize the photographs as scientific data, imaging parameters, such as the angle of view, exact position, and orientation of the camera, should be determined because they are not measured at the time of imaging. A new calibration method using city light positions shown in the photographs was developed to determine these imaging parameters with high accuracy suitable for airglow study. Applying the pinhole camera model, the apparent city light positions on the photograph are matched with the actual city light locations on Earth, which are derived from the global nighttime stable light map data obtained by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellite. The correct imaging parameters are determined in an iterative process by matching the apparent positions on the image with the actual city light locations. We applied this calibration method to photographs taken on August 26, 2014, and confirmed that the result is correct. The precision of the calibration was evaluated by comparing the results from six different photographs with the same imaging parameters. The precisions in determining the camera position and orientation are estimated to be ±2.2 km and ±0.08°, respectively. The 0.08° difference in the orientation yields a 2.9-km difference at a tangential point of 90 km in altitude. The airglow structures in the photographs were mapped to geographical points using the calibrated imaging parameters and compared with a simultaneous observation by the Visible and near-Infrared Spectral Imager of the Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Upper Atmosphere, and Plasmasphere mapping mission installed on the ISS. The comparison shows good agreements and supports the validity

  10. A Circumpolar Stratospheric Telescope for Observations of Planets - FUJIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Makoto; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Shoji, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Yuji; Watanabe, Makoto; Nakano, Toshihiko; Maeda, Atsunori; Nakamoto, Junpei; Imai, Masataka; Gouda, Yuya

    It is important to conduct long-term continuous observations of time-dependent events in planetary atmospheres and plasmaspheres. The aim of the FUJIN project is to carry out continuous observations of planets using a telescope that is lifted by a balloon to the polar stratosphere. The FUJIN-1 experiment was organized at Taiki Aerospace Research Field in Taiki-cho, Hokkaido, Japan, from May to June 2013, but the experiment was canceled due to a failure found in the balloon operation system provided by JAXA. However, the results of various prelaunch ground tests clearly established the feasibility of the experiment. We have recently begun organizing the FUJIN-2 experiment, in which scientific observations of planets will be conducted in the Arctic. Wind speed in the stratosphere is very low during April and May. The FUJIN-2 experiment will be conducted during this period in 2015 at ESRANGE in Kiruna, Sweden, since this is when Venus will be in the most favorable position for observations. The gondola will be recovered somewhere in the Scandinavian peninsula after one or two days of continuous observations. In summer, an eastern circumpolar wind is dominant in the stratosphere. If a balloon is flown under these conditions, it will take a week to fly from Kiruna to Alaska and more than two weeks for it to fly back to Scandinavia along a constant-latitude path around the Earth. We are currently organizing another experiment (FUJIN-3) involving such a circumpolar flight that will be conducted in 2017 or later. The system used in FUJIN-2 will also be used for FUJIN-3, but with the inclusion of a high-sensitivity CCD camera and a liquid-crystal tunable filter. Venus, Jupiter, and Mercury will be the planets of interest for FUJIN-3. Moreover, a next-generation stratospheric telescope with a meter-class aperture, a mobile gondola to approach the center of the polar vortex, and a super-pressure balloon for year-round observations are being studied to upgrade the FUJIN system

  11. Perspective of the study on the ring current - past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The study of the ring current has a long history going back to the early 20th century. The ring current was predicted by Carl Stoermer to explain the equatorward movement of the auroral zone during magnetic storms. In 1917, Adolf Schmidt introduced the concept of the ring current to explain the global decrease of the geomagnetic field. Since then, number of studies have been accomplished in the context of the growth and recovery of magnetic storms. Observations have shown that protons and oxygen ions with energies 1 - 100 keV significantly increase during the storm main phase, which are most likely the major contributor to the storm-time ring current. When the loss of the ions dominates the injection of them, the storm recovery phase takes place. Immediate problems are the origin, transport and loss of the ions. All these relevant processes are essential to understand the growth and decay of the ring current. Derived problems, for example, include the entry of solar wind plasma into the magnetosphere, the outflow of ionospheric ions, generation of the convection electric field, influence of substorm-associated electric field, and pitch angle scattering of ions. Recalling that the ring current is the diamagnetic current, we shall consider the force balance and stress carefully. Generation of field-aligned currents is one of the consequences, which might redistribute the state of the inner magnetosphere including the plasmasphere, the ring current and the radiation belts. The ring current may also have a large influence on the geomagnetically induced current (GIC) on the ground at mid- and low-latitudes. The magnetic storms can be easily identified by looking at magnetograms, but the processes behind the magnetic storms cannot be easily understood because the processes depend on each other. From this sense, we shall pay much attention to the detailed function of each process as well as its role on the overall system. Dealing with the ring current as a complex system

  12. Satellite Constellations for Space Weather and Ionospheric Studies: Overview of the COSMIC and COSMIC-2 Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, W. S.; Pedatella, N. M.; Weiss, J.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements from constellations of low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites are proving highly useful for ionospheric science and space weather studies. The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC), a joint US/Taiwan mission launched in April 2006, is a six micro-satellite constellation carrying Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) receivers. COSMIC has collected a large amount of useful data from these scientific payloads and is still currently collecting up to 1,000 RO measurement events per day on average. The GPS RO dual-frequency L-band phase and amplitude measurements can be used to observe absolute Total Electron Content (TEC) and scintillation on lines of sight between the LEO and GPS satellites, and electron density profiles via the RO method. The large number and complete global and local time coverage of COSMIC data are allowing scientists to observe ionospheric and plasmaspheric phenomena that are difficult to see with other instruments. The success of COSMIC has prompted U.S. agencies and Taiwan to execute a COSMIC follow-on mission (called COSMIC-2) that will put twelve satellites with GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) RO payloads into orbit on two launches in the 2017-20 time frame. The first launch in 2017 will place six satellites in a 520-km altitude 24 deg inclination orbit, which is ideal for low latitude ionospheric research and space weather forecasting. The planned second launch (not currently funded) places six additional satellites in a 750 km 72 deg inclination orbit to provide global coverage and increased sampling density. COSMIC-2 will make use of an advanced radio occultation receiver with an innovative beam-forming antenna design, and is expected to produce at least 10,000 high-quality atmospheric and ionospheric profiles per day from GPS and GLONASS signals to support operational weather prediction, climate monitoring, and space weather forecasting. Each COSMIC-2 spacecraft

  13. Major revision of sunspot number: implication for the ionosphere models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaeva, Tamara

    2016-07-01

    Recently on 1st July, 2015, a major revision of the historical sunspot number series has been carried out as discussed in [Clette et al., Revisiting the Sunspot Number. A 400-Year Perspective on the Solar Cycle, Space Science Reviews, 186, Issue 1-4, pp. 35-103, 2014). The revised SSN2.0 dataset is provided along with the former SSN1.0 data at http://sidc.oma.be/silso/. The SSN2.0 values exceed the former conventional SSN1.0 data so that new SSNs are greater in many cases than the solar radio flux F10.7 values which pose a problem of SSN2.0 implementation as a driver of the International Reference Ionosphere, IRI, its extension to plasmasphere, IRI-Plas, NeQuick model, Russian Standard Ionosphere, SMI. In particular, the monthly predictions of the F2 layer peak are based on input of the ITU-R (former CCIR) and URSI maps. The CCIR and URSI maps coefficients are available for each month of the year, and for two levels of solar activity: low (SSN = 0) and high (SSN = 100). SSN is the monthly smoothed sunspot number from the SSN1.0 data set used as an index of the level of solar activity. For every SSN different from 0 or 100 the critical frequency foF2 and the M3000F2 radio propagation factor used for the peak height hmF2 production may be evaluated by an interpolation. The ionospheric proxies of the solar activity IG12 index or Global Electron Content GEC12 index, driving the ionospheric models, are also calibrated with the former SSN1.0 data. The paper presents a solar proxy intended to calibrate SSN2.0 data set to fit F10.7 solar radio flux and/or SSN1.0 data series. This study is partly supported by TUBITAK EEEAG 115E915.

  14. Effect of Ionosphere on Geostationary Communication Satellite Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Esra; Arikan, Feza; Gulgonul, Senol

    2016-07-01

    Geostationary orbit (GEO) communications satellites allow radio, television, and telephone transmissions to be sent live anywhere in the world. They are extremely important in daily life and also for military applications. Since, satellite communication is an expensive technology addressing crowd of people, it is critical to improve the performance of this technology. GEO satellites are at 35,786 kilometres from Earth's surface situated directly over the equator. A satellite in a geostationary orbit (GEO) appears to stand still in the sky, in a fixed position with respect to an observer on the earth, because the satellite's orbital period is the same as the rotation rate of the Earth. The advantage of this orbit is that ground antennas can be fixed to point towards to satellite without their having to track the satellite's motion. Radio frequency ranges used in satellite communications are C, X, Ku, Ka and even EHG and V-band. Satellite signals are disturbed by atmospheric effects on the path between the satellite and the receiver antenna. These effects are mostly rain, cloud and gaseous attenuation. It is expected that ionosphere has a minor effect on the satellite signals when the ionosphere is quiet. But there are anomalies and perturbations on the structure of ionosphere with respect to geomagnetic field and solar activity and these conditions may cause further affects on the satellite signals. In this study IONOLAB-RAY algorithm is adopted to examine the effect of ionosphere on satellite signals. IONOLAB-RAY is developed to calculate propagation path and characteristics of high frequency signals. The algorithm does not have any frequency limitation and models the plasmasphere up to 20,200 km altitude, so that propagation between a GEO satellite and antenna on Earth can be simulated. The algorithm models inhomogeneous, anisotropic and time dependent structure of the ionosphere with a 3-D spherical grid geometry and calculates physical parameters of the

  15. 月基极紫外相机光机结构设计%Design of optical-mechanical structure for lunar-based extreme ultraviolet camera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王智; 李朝辉

    2011-01-01

    To monitor and research 30.4 nm radiation generated by the plasmasphere,a lunar-basedExtreme Ultraviolet(EUV)camera was developed.A multilayer mirror optical system and a 30.4 nmphoton counting detector were adopted as the main body of the camera,and a two-dimensional tracingmechanism drived by a stepping motor was used to trace the earth.Aim to the vibration and impactfrom the process of satellite launching,orbit changes from earth'S to moon'S,moon landing,and thecruel temperature environment of the moon.The optical-mechanical design of EUV camera gave a con-sideration to the environmental adaptability.After the optimization by finite element analysis,it showsthat the first order resonant frequency of the optical-mechanical structure iS 49.3 Hz with the massless than 15 kg,the motion mechanism operates freely within-50~+80℃,and the mirror surfaceaccuracy(RMS)is 13.44 nm(<14 nm)under the load of uniform temperature drop of 50℃.Those results meet the technical requirements of the camera.%为了对地球等离子体层产生的30.4 nm辐射进行全方位的长期监视和观测,研制了月基极紫外相机.相机主体采用多层膜单反射镜光学系统以及30.4 nm球面光子探测器的结构形式,跟踪机构采用俯仰-方位模式,由步进电机驱动实现对地球的捕获.针对卫星发射、地月变轨、月表着陆过程中的振动冲击以及月表残酷的温度环境,月基极紫外相机的光机结构设计考虑了环境(力学、温度)适应性,有限元分析结果表明,光机结构在整机质量<15 kg条件下,一阶谐振频率为49.3 Hz;运动机构在-50~+80℃运转自如;在50℃均匀温降载荷作用下反射镜面形精度RMS值为13.44nm(<14 nm),满足相机的技术指标要求.

  16. Subauroral red arcs as a conjugate phenomenon: comparison of OV1-10 satellite data with numerical calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    Full Text Available This study compares the OV1-10 satellite measurements of the integral airglow intensities at 630 nm in the SAR arc regions observed in the northern and southern hemisphere as a conjugate phenomenon, with the model results obtained using the time-dependent one-dimensional mathematical model of the Earth ionosphere and plasmasphere (the IZMIRAN model during the geomagnetic storm of the period 15–17 February 1967. The major enhancements to the IZMIRAN model developed in this study are the inclusion of He+ ions (three major ions: O+, H+, and He+, and three ion temperatures, the updated photochemistry and energy balance equations for ions and electrons, the diffusion of NO+ and O2+ ions and O(1D and the revised electron cooling rates arising from their collisions with unexcited N2, O2 molecules and N2 molecules at the first vibrational level. The updated model includes the option to use the models of the Boltzmann or non-Boltzmann distributions of vibrationally excited molecular nitrogen. Deviations from the Boltzmann distribution for the first five vibrational levels of N2 were calculated. The calculated distribution is highly non-Boltzmann at vibrational levels v > 2 and leads to a decrease in the calculated electron density and integral intensity at 630 nm in the northern and southern hemispheres in comparison with the electron density and integral intensity calculated using the Boltzmann vibrational distribution of N2. It is found that the intensity at 630 nm is very sensitive to the oxygen number densities. Good agreement between the modelled and measured intensities is obtained provided that at all altitudes of the southern hemisphere a reduction of about factor 1.35 in MSIS-86 atomic oxygen densities is included in the IZMIRAN model with the non-Boltzmann vibrational distribution of N2

  17. PICASSO-SLP: a Langmuir probe instrument for monitoring the upper ionosphere on board a pico-satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranvier, Sylvain; Anciaux, Michel; Cardoen, Pepijn; Gamby, Emmanuel; Bonnewijn, Sabrina; De Keyser, Johan; Echim, Marius; Pieroux, Didier

    2016-04-01

    A novel Langmuir probe instrument, which will fly on board the Pico-Satellite for Atmospheric and Space Science Observations (PICASSO), is under development at the Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy. PICASSO, an ESA in-orbit demonstrator, is a triple unit CubeSat of dimensions 340.5x100x100 mm. The sweeping Langmuir probe (SLP) instrument, which includes four thin cylindrical probes whose electrical potential is swept, is designed to measure both plasma density and electron temperature at an altitude varying from about 400 km up to 700 km from a high inclination orbit. Therefore, the plasma density is expected to fluctuate over a wide range, from about 1e8/m³ at high latitude and high altitude up to several times 1e12/m³ at low/mid latitude and low altitude. The electron temperature is expected to lie between approximately 1.000 K and 10.000 K. Given the high inclination of the orbit, the SLP instrument will allow a global monitoring of the ionosphere with a maximum spatial resolution of the order of 150 m for the electron density and temperature, and up to a few meters for electron density only. The main goals are to study 1) the ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling, 2) the subauroral ionosphere and corresponding magnetospheric features, 3) auroral structures, 4) polar caps, 5) for the density, the multi-scale behaviour, spectral properties and turbulence of processes typical for the auroral regions, and 6) ionospheric dynamics via coordinated observations with EISCAT's heating radar. Along the orbit, the Debye length is expected to vary from a few millimetres up to a few meters. Due to the tight constraints in terms of mass and volume inherent to pico-satellites, the use of long booms, which would guarantee that the probes are outside the sheath of the spacecraft (several Debye lengths away), is not possible. Consequently, the probes might be in the sheath of the spacecraft in polar regions. Extensive modelling and simulations of the sheath effects on the

  18. Solar Wind Activity Dependence of the Occurrence of Field-Line Resonance at low Latitudes (L~1.3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaki, S.; Kawano, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.; Seto, M.; Iijima, M.; Yumoto, K.

    2002-12-01

    It is known that the field line resonance (FLR below) is caused by hydromagnetic waves in the magnetosphere. The fundamental field line eigenfrequency can be expressed by the magnetic field line length, the magnetic field intensity, and the plasma density at the magnetic field line. We can measure the fundamental field line eigenfrequency by ground-based observation. The field line length and the magnetic field intensity can be calculated from some magnetic field model (such as the IGRF model) of the magnetosphere. Then, it is possible that the plasma density at the magnetic field line is determined by these factors. The final aim of this study is to monitor and study time-dependent changes in the plasmaspheric plasma distributions by using ground magnetic field observations. For this purpose, we are working in the following three research phases. The first phase is to confirm the possibility of identifying FLR at low-latitudes (L~1.3). The second phase is to examine the correlation between FLR and solar wind parameters. The third phase is to estimate the plasma density from the FLR data, and monitor the density in a continuous manner. We are now in the third phase, and we report here the results of the first two phase. In the first phase, in order to investigate features of FLR close to the Earth, we installed three magnetometers in Japan at L~1.3 (at Kawatabi, Zaou, and Iitate), and started observing ULF geomagnetic pulsations. Each adjacent stations are separated in latitude by 50 to 100 km. The magnetic field data from these stations and Kakioka geomagnetic observatory, Japan, were analyzed by using the amplitude-ratio method and the cross-phase method. As a result, we identified FLR events whose frequency decreased with decreasing geomagnetic latitude; we infer that this feature was caused by heavy ion mass loading to low-L field lines. In the second phase, we studied the dependence of the occurrence probability of the above-identified FLR events on solar wind

  19. Investigations of the auroral luminosity distribution and the dynamics of discrete auroral forms in a historical retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, Y. I.; Vorobjev, V. G.; Zverev, V. L.; Förster, M.

    2014-05-01

    conceptions about the succession of discrete auroral forms and their dynamics during disturbance intervals. This ranges from Birkeland's polar elementary storms, over the prospect of a fixed auroral pattern up to the auroral substorm model. The classic schemes of the spatial distribution and motion of discrete auroral forms during single substorms are shown in Fig. 20 (expansive and recovery phases) and Fig. 21 (creation, expansive and recovery phases). In this review we discuss various models of bulge formation, in particular as a result of new formation of arcs about 50-100 km poleward of previously existing auroral structures (Fig. 24). Discrete steps in the development of an expanding bulge are separated by 1-3 min from each other. The model of successive activations confines only to a ~40° longitudinal portion of the magnetotail (Fig. 28). We consider differences in the development of single substorms and substorms during magnetic storms. The structure and dynamics of auroras during steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) periods are dealt with in Sect. 8. A generalised scheme of the auroral distribution during SMC periods is shown in Fig. 34. Separate sections describe discrete auroras in the polar cap (Sect. 5), and the diffuse luminosity equatorward of the auroral oval (Sect. 9). Visual observations of diffuse auroral forms at midlatitudes suggest that the whole latitudinal interval between the auroral oval and the stable auroral red (SAR) arc is filled up with diffuse luminosity. SAR arcs with intensities of several tens of Rayleigh enclose systematically the region of diffuse luminosity; they are positioned at the border of the plasmasphere.

  20. Europlanet NA2 Science Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, Ari-Matti; Szego, Karoly; Genzer, Maria; Schmidt, Walter; Krupp, Norbert; Lammer, Helmut; Kallio, Esa; Haukka, Harri

    2013-04-01

    workshops and in addition there were numerous smaller NA2 WG meetings during the conferences (EPSC, EGU, etc.) and other events. The total number of NA2 meetings and workshops was 37. There were three NA2 supported ISSI workshops within the Europlanet project. The first ISSI workshop "Comparison of the plasma-spheres of Mars, Venus, and Titan" organized by K. Szego was held in December 2009. The second workshop "Quantifying the Martian Geochemical Reservoirs" by M. Toplis was held in April 2011. The third one, themed "Giant Planet Magnetodiscs and Aurorae" by N. Krupp, N. Achilleos and C. Arridge, was in November 2012. All three ISSI workshops were selected by the ISSI scientific committee to be organized within the frame of ISSI/Europlanet agreement and held in Bern. The main objective of the Expert Exchange Program was to support the activities of Europlanet RI with experts whenever needed. The programme provided funding for short visits (up to one week) of expert with the goal of improving infrastructure facilities and services offered to the scientific community by the Europlanet RI participant (contractor) laboratories or institutes. Between July 2009 and September 2012 26 applications were selected. Acknowledgement: Europlanet RI was funded by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Program, grant 228319 "Capacities Specific Programme" - Research Infrastructures Action. References: [1] http://www.europlanet-ri.eu/ [2] https://europlanet-scinet.fi/

  1. Demeter high resolution observations of the ionospheric thermal plasma response to magnetospheric energy input during the magnetic storm of November 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Séran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available High resolution Demeter plasma and wave observations were available during one of the geomagnetic storms of November 2004 when the ionospheric footprint of the plasmasphere was pushed below 64 degrees in the midnight sector. We report here onboard observations of thermal/suprathermal plasma and HF electric field variations with a temporal resolution of 0.4 s, which corresponds to a spatial resolution of 3 km. Local perturbations of the plasma parameters at the altitude of 730 km are analysed with respect to the variation of the field-aligned currents, electron and proton precipitation and large-scale electric fields, measured in-situ by Demeter and by remote optical methods from the IMAGE/Polar satellites.

    Flow monitoring in the 21:00 and 24:00 MLT sectors during storm conditions reveals two distinct regions of O+ outflow, i.e. the region of the field-aligned currents, which often comprises few layers of opposite currents, and the region of velocity reversal toward dusk at sub-auroral latitudes. Average upward O+ velocities are identical in both local time sectors and vary between 200 and 450 m s−1, with an exception of a few cases of higher speed (~1000 m s−1 outflow, observed in the midnight sector. Each individual outflow event does not indicate any heating process of the thermal O+ population. On the contrary, the temperature of the O+, outflowing from auroral latitudes, is found to be even colder than that of the ambient ion plasma. The only ion population which is observed to be involved in the heating is the O+ with energies a few times higher than the thermal energy. Such a population was detected at sub-auroral latitudes in the region of duskward flow reversal. Its temperature raises up to a few eV inside the layer of sheared velocity.

    A deep decrease in the H+ density at heights and latitudes, where, according to the IRI model

  2. F-region ionospheric perturbations in the low-latitude ionosphere during the geomagnetic storm of 25-27 August 1987

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kawamura

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available We have presented a comparison between the modeled NmF2 and hmF2, and NmF2 and hmF2 which were observed at the equatorial anomaly crest and close to the geomagnetic equator simultaneously by the Akita, Kokubunji, Yamagawa, Okinawa, Manila, Vanimo, and Darwin ionospheric sounders and by the middle and upper atmosphere (MU radar (34.85° N, 136.10° E during the 25-27 August 1987 geomagnetically storm-time period at low solar activity near 201°, geomagnetic longitude. A comparison between the electron and ion temperatures measured by the MU radar and those produced by the model of the ionosphere and plasmasphere is presented. The corrections of the storm-time zonal electric field, EΛ, from 16:30 UT to 21:00 UT on 25 August bring the modeled and measured hmF2 into reasonable agreement. In both hemispheres, the meridional neutral wind, W, taken from the HWW90 wind model and the NRLMSISE-00 neutral temperature, Tn, and densities are corrected so that the model results agree with the ionospheric sounders and MU radar observations. The geomagnetic latitude variations in NmF2 on 26 August differ significantly from those on 25 and 27 August. The equatorial plasma fountain undergoes significant inhibition on 26 August. This suppression of the equatorial anomaly on 26 August is not due to a reduction in the meridional component of the plasma drift perpendicular to the geomagnetic field direction, but is due to the action of storm-time changes in neutral winds and densities on the plasma fountain process. The asymmetry in W determines most of the north-south asymmetry in hmF2 and NmF2 on 25 and 27 August between about 01:00-01:30 UT and about 14:00 UT when the equatorial anomaly exists in the ionosphere, while asymmetries in W, Tn, and neutral densities relative to the geomagnetic equator are responsible for the north-south asymmetry in NmF2 and hmF2 on 26 August. A theory of the primary mechanisms causing the morning and evening peaks in the electron

  3. Comparison of the measured and modeled electron densities, and electron and ion temperatures in the low-latitude ionosphere during 19-21 March 1988

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We have presented a comparison between the modeled NmF2 and hmF2, and NmF2 and hmF2 which were observed at the equatorial anomaly crest and close to the geomagnetic equator simultaneously by the Akita, Kokubunji, Yamagawa, Okinawa, Chung-Li, Manila, Vanimo, and Darwin ionospheric sounders and by the middle and upper atmosphere (MU radar at Shigaraki (34.85°N, 136.10°E, Japan during the 19-21 March 1988 geomagnetically quiet time period at moderate solar activity near approximately the same geomagnetic meridian of 201°. A comparison between the electron, Te, and ion, Ti, temperatures measured by the MU radar and those produced by the model of the ionosphere and plasmasphere is presented for 19-21 March 1988. It is shown that there is a large disagreement between the measured and modeled hmF2 from about 07:00 UT to about 11:00 UT if the equatorial ExB drift given by Scherliess and Fejer (1999 is used. The required equatorial upward ExB drift is weaker from 03:14 UT to 11:14 UT than that given by Scherliess and Fejer (1999 for the studied time period. The required modification of the ExB drift weakens the effect of the fountain in NmF2 bringing the modeled and measured hmF2 and NmF2, into reasonable agreement. The depth of the equatorial NmF2 trough in the calculated NmF2 is approximately consistent with the measured depth if the modified equatorial ExB drift is used. It has been found that the north-south asymmetries in the observed NmF2 and hmF2 about the geomagnetic equator are mainly caused by the asymmetry in the neutral wind about the geomagnetic equator. In the Northern Hemisphere, the meridional neutral wind taken from the HWW90 wind model and the NRLMSISE-00 atomic oxygen density are corrected so that the model results agree with the ionospheric sounders and MU radar observations. A theory of the primary mechanisms causing the latitude dependence of the

  4. COST 296 scientific results designed for operational use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pezzopane

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The main objective of the COST 296 Action «Mitigation of Ionospheric Effects on Radio Systems» is the establishment/

    improvement of ionospheric services by coordinating the development of specific algorithms, models,

    and tools capable of operating in a near-real-time mode.

    Key elements of these activities are contributions related to monitoring, modelling, and imaging of customer-relevant

    ionospheric quantities. COST stimulates, coordinates, and supports Europe’s goals of development and

    global cooperation by providing high quality information and knowledge of ionospheric and plasmaspheric conditions

    enabling high quality and reliable operation of radio systems.

    It also provides a platform for sharing such tools as algorithms or models, and for the joint development of advanced

    technologies. It takes advantage of many national and European service initiatives, for example DIAS

    (http://dias.space.noa.gr, SWACI (http://w3swaci.dlr.de, ESWUA (http://www.eswua.ingv.it/ingv, RWC-Warsaw

    (http://www.cbk.waw.pl/rwc, the COST Prompt Ionospheric Database http://www.wdc.rl.ac.uk/cgibin/

    digisondes/cost_database.pl, http://www.izmiran.ru/services, and others.