WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasmas gas-filled targets

  1. Fabrication and testing of gas-filled targets for large-scale plasma experiments on nova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, G.F.; Rivers, C.J.; Spragge, M.R.; Wallace, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    The proposed next-generation ICF facility, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to produce energy gain from x-ray heated {open_quotes}indirect-drive{close_quotes} fuel capsules. For indirect-drive targets, laser light heats the inside of the Au hohlraum wall and produces x rays which in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Unlike Nova targets, in NIF-scale targets laser light will propagate through several millimeters of gas, producing a plasma, before impinging upon the Au hohlraum wall. The purpose of the gas-produced plasma is to provide sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively into the hohlraum cavity. Excessive expansion of the Au wall interacts with the laser pulse and degrades the drive symmetry of the capsule implosion. The authors have begun an experimental campaign on the Nova laser to study the effect of hohlraum gas on both laser-plasma interaction and implosion symmetry. In their current NIF target design, the calculated plasma electron temperature is T{sub e} {approx} 3 keV and the electron density is N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}.

  2. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  3. Experimental demonstration of low laser-plasma instabilities in gas-filled spherical hohlraums at laser injection angle designed for ignition target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ke; Li, Zhichao; Xie, Xufei; Chen, Yao-Hua; Zheng, Chunyang; Zhai, Chuanlei; Hao, Liang; Yang, Dong; Huo, Wen Yi; Ren, Guoli; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Yulong; Li, Sanwei; Yang, Zhiwen; Guo, Liang; Hou, Lifei; Liu, Yonggang; Wei, Huiyue; Liu, Xiangming; Cha, Weiyi; Jiang, Xiaohua; Mei, Yu; Li, Yukun; Deng, Keli; Yuan, Zheng; Zhan, Xiayu; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Xuewei; Liu, Jie; Du, Kai; Ding, Yongkun; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Wanguo; Chen, Xiaodong; Campbell, E. M.; He, Xian-Tu

    2017-03-01

    Octahedral spherical hohlraums with a single laser ring at an injection angle of 55∘ are attractive concepts for laser indirect drive due to the potential for achieving the x-ray drive symmetry required for high convergence implosions. Laser-plasma instabilities, however, are a concern given the long laser propagation path in such hohlraums. Significant stimulated Raman scattering has been observed in cylindrical hohlraums with similar laser propagation paths during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this Rapid Communication, experiments demonstrating low levels of laser-driven plasma instability (LPI) in spherical hohlraums with a laser injection angle of 55∘ are reported and compared to that observed with cylindrical hohlraums with injection angles of 28 .5∘ and 55∘, similar to that of the NIF. Significant LPI is observed with the laser injection of 28 .5∘ in the cylindrical hohlraum where the propagation path is similar to the 55∘ injection angle for the spherical hohlraum. The experiments are performed on the SGIII laser facility with a total 0.35 -μ m incident energy of 93 kJ in a 3 nsec pulse. These experiments demonstrate the role of hohlraum geometry in LPI and demonstrate the need for systematic experiments for choosing the optimal configuration for ignition studies with indirect drive inertial confinement fusion.

  4. Experimental demonstration of low laser-plasma instabilities in gas-filled spherical hohlraums at laser injection angle designed for ignition target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ke; Li, Zhichao; Xie, Xufei; Chen, Yao-Hua; Zheng, Chunyang; Zhai, Chuanlei; Hao, Liang; Yang, Dong; Huo, Wen Yi; Ren, Guoli; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Yulong; Li, Sanwei; Yang, Zhiwen; Guo, Liang; Hou, Lifei; Liu, Yonggang; Wei, Huiyue; Liu, Xiangming; Cha, Weiyi; Jiang, Xiaohua; Mei, Yu; Li, Yukun; Deng, Keli; Yuan, Zheng; Zhan, Xiayu; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Xuewei; Liu, Jie; Du, Kai; Ding, Yongkun; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Wanguo; Chen, Xiaodong; Campbell, E M; He, Xian-Tu

    2017-03-01

    Octahedral spherical hohlraums with a single laser ring at an injection angle of 55^{∘} are attractive concepts for laser indirect drive due to the potential for achieving the x-ray drive symmetry required for high convergence implosions. Laser-plasma instabilities, however, are a concern given the long laser propagation path in such hohlraums. Significant stimulated Raman scattering has been observed in cylindrical hohlraums with similar laser propagation paths during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this Rapid Communication, experiments demonstrating low levels of laser-driven plasma instability (LPI) in spherical hohlraums with a laser injection angle of 55^{∘} are reported and compared to that observed with cylindrical hohlraums with injection angles of 28.5^{∘} and 55^{∘}, similar to that of the NIF. Significant LPI is observed with the laser injection of 28.5^{∘} in the cylindrical hohlraum where the propagation path is similar to the 55^{∘} injection angle for the spherical hohlraum. The experiments are performed on the SGIII laser facility with a total 0.35-μm incident energy of 93 kJ in a 3 nsec pulse. These experiments demonstrate the role of hohlraum geometry in LPI and demonstrate the need for systematic experiments for choosing the optimal configuration for ignition studies with indirect drive inertial confinement fusion.

  5. X-ray Sources Generated from Gas-Filled Laser-Heated Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, C A; Grun, J; Decker, C D; Davis, J; Laming, J M; Feldman, U; Suter, L J; Landen, O L; Miller, M; Serduke, F; Wuest, C

    2000-06-06

    The X-ray sources in the 4-7 keV energy regime can be produced by laser-irradiating high-Z gas-filled targets with high-powered lasers. A series of experiments have been performed using underdense targets that are supersonically heated with {approx} 35 W of 0.35 {micro}m laser light. These targets were cylindrical Be enclosures that were filled with 1-2 atms of Xe gas. L-shell x-ray emission is emitted from the plasma and detected by Bragg crystal spectrometers and x-ray diodes. Absolute flux measurements show conversion efficiencies of {approx} 10% in the multi-kilovolt x-ray emission. These sources can be used as bright x-ray backlighters or for material testing.

  6. Soliton-plasma nonlinear dynamics in mid-IR gas-filled hollow-core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Selim; Markos, Christos; Bang, Ole

    2017-01-01

    We investigate numerically soliton-plasma interaction in a noble-gas-filled silica hollow-core anti-resonant fiber pumped in the mid-IR at 3.0 mu m. We observe multiple soliton self-compression stages due to distinct stages where either the self-focusing or the self-defocusing nonlinearity...... dominates. Specifically, the parameters may be tuned so the competing plasma self-defocusing nonlinearity only dominates over the Kerr self-focusing nonlinearity around the soliton self-compression stage, where the increasing peak intensity on the leading pulse edge initiates a competing self...

  7. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, C. A.; Blanchard, W. R.; Kozub, T. A.; Aristova, M.; McGahan, C.; Natta, S.; Pagdon, K.; Zelenty, J.

    2010-01-14

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber

  8. Simulation of beam-induced plasma in gas-filled rf cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kwangmin; Samulyak, Roman; Yonehara, Katsuya; Freemire, Ben

    2017-03-01

    Processes occurring in a radio-frequency (rf) cavity, filled with high pressure gas and interacting with proton beams, have been studied via advanced numerical simulations. Simulations support the experimental program on the hydrogen gas-filled rf cavity in the Mucool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab, and broader research on the design of muon cooling devices. space, a 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) code with atomic physics support, was used in simulation studies. Plasma dynamics in the rf cavity, including the process of neutral gas ionization by proton beams, plasma loading of the rf cavity, and atomic processes in plasma such as electron-ion and ion-ion recombination and electron attachment to dopant molecules, have been studied. Through comparison with experiments in the MTA, simulations quantified several uncertain values of plasma properties such as effective recombination rates and the attachment time of electrons to dopant molecules. Simulations have achieved very good agreement with experiments on plasma loading and related processes. The experimentally validated code space is capable of predictive simulations of muon cooling devices.

  9. Ablative implosion of high-aspect-ratio gas-filled targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasel, F.G.; Cortazar, O.D. (Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica); Piriz, A.R. (Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica)

    1991-11-01

    A simple analytical mode for the implosion of very thin spherical shell targets filled with fuel gas is developed. The shock trajectory in the fuel is described consistently with the shell acceleration, and two dimensionless parameters which govern the complete dynamics are found. The model applies to recent experiments focused on high neutron yield and provides a simple description of the main physical phenomena, which is in agreement with simulation and experiments. (author).

  10. The role of the gas/plasma plume and self-focusing in a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-power laser-plasma applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ciocarlan, C.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Abuazoum, S.; Wilson, R.; Aniculaesei, C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; 10.1063/1.4822333

    2013-01-01

    The role of the gas/plasma plume at the entrance of a gas-filled capillary discharge plasma waveguide in increasing the laser intensity has been investigated. Distinction is made between neutral gas and hot plasma plumes that, respectively, develop before and after discharge breakdown. Time-averaged measurements show that the on-axis plasma density of a fully expanded plasma plume over this region is similar to that inside the waveguide. Above the critical power, relativistic and ponderomotive selffocusing lead to an increase in the intensity, which can be nearly a factor of 2 compared with the case without a plume. When used as a laser plasma wakefield accelerator, the enhancement of intensity can lead to prompt electron injection very close to the entrance of the waveguide. Self-focusing occurs within two Rayleigh lengths of the waveguide entrance plane in the region, where the laser beam is converging. Analytical theory and numerical simulations show that, for a density of 3.01018 cm3, the peak normalized...

  11. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishkov, A. A.; Kornilov, S. Yu.; Rempe, N. G.; Shidlovskiy, S. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  12. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishkov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Kornilov, S. Yu., E-mail: kornilovsy@gmail.com; Rempe, N. G. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics (Russian Federation); Shidlovskiy, S. V. [Tomsk State University (Russian Federation); Shklyaev, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  13. Electron temperature measurements inside the ablating plasma of gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, M. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Jones, O.; Brown, G. V.; Regan, S. P.; Fournier, K. B.; Moore, A. S.; Ross, J. S.; Landen, O.; Kauffman, R. L.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J.; Jaquez, J.; Huang, H.; Hansen, S. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Bradley, D.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    The first measurement of the electron temperature (Te) inside a National Ignition Facility hohlraum is obtained using temporally resolved K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of a mid-Z tracer dot. Both isoelectronic- and interstage-line ratios are used to calculate the local Te via the collisional-radiative atomic physics code SCRAM [Hansen et al., High Energy Density Phys 3, 109 (2007)]. The trajectory of the mid-Z dot as it is ablated from the capsule surface and moves toward the laser entrance hole (LEH) is measured using side-on x-ray imaging, characterizing the plasma flow of the ablating capsule. Data show that the measured dot location is farther away from the LEH in comparison to the radiation-hydrodynamics simulation prediction using HYDRA [Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]. To account for this discrepancy, the predicted simulation Te is evaluated at the measured dot trajectory. The peak Te, measured to be 4.2 keV ± 0.2 keV, is ˜0.5 keV hotter than the simulation prediction.

  14. Electron temperature measurements inside the ablating plasma of gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrios, M. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Jones, O.; Brown, G. V.; Fournier, K. B.; Moore, A. S.; Ross, J. S.; Landen, O.; Kauffman, R. L.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Bradley, D.; Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Jaquez, J.; Huang, H. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Hansen, S. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The first measurement of the electron temperature (T{sub e}) inside a National Ignition Facility hohlraum is obtained using temporally resolved K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of a mid-Z tracer dot. Both isoelectronic- and interstage-line ratios are used to calculate the local T{sub e} via the collisional–radiative atomic physics code SCRAM [Hansen et al., High Energy Density Phys 3, 109 (2007)]. The trajectory of the mid-Z dot as it is ablated from the capsule surface and moves toward the laser entrance hole (LEH) is measured using side-on x-ray imaging, characterizing the plasma flow of the ablating capsule. Data show that the measured dot location is farther away from the LEH in comparison to the radiation-hydrodynamics simulation prediction using HYDRA [Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]. To account for this discrepancy, the predicted simulation T{sub e} is evaluated at the measured dot trajectory. The peak T{sub e}, measured to be 4.2 keV ± 0.2 keV, is ∼0.5 keV hotter than the simulation prediction.

  15. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration — Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment.

  16. The Berkeley gas-filled separator

    CERN Document Server

    Ninov, V; McGrath, C A

    1998-01-01

    The BGS is being constructed at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL in Berkeley. The magnetic configuration of the BGS will allow a large angular acceptance and good suppression of primary beam particles. BGS operates as a mass spectrometer with a A/ Delta A approximately =200 and as a gas filled separator at pressures between 0.1-50 hPa. The reaction products recoiling off a thin target will be collected with efficiencies from 10-80at the focal plane. A Monte Carlo simulation program of the ion transport through the gas-filled magnets in combination of 3-dimensional TOSCA field maps has been developed and reproduces closely the experimental behavior of BGS. (9 refs).

  17. Gas-filled double glazing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goesele, K.; Schuele, W.; Lakatos, B.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of the results of experiments the sonar and thermal properties of insulated double glazing filled with gas are tested. The sound insulation properties of double glazing can be improved by introducing a gas of a heavy specific weight, such as CO/sub 2/ or SF/sub 6/ into the hollow space. Even gases with a light specific weight produce an improvement in sound insulation; light gases diffuse outwards much more rapidly, however, and can thus be eliminated for practical purposes. The combination of a gas-filled space between the panes and the use of sufficiently heavy compound panes were tested. The thermal properties of insulated double glazing filled with specifically heavy gas gave favourable results with a lower heat transition coefficient. The use of gas to fill double glazing has a particularly favourable effect if the panes are given a heat-reflecting coating in synthetic frames.

  18. Early-time radiation flux symmetry optimization and its effect on gas-filled hohlraum ignition targets on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovich, J. L.; Dewald, E. L.; Pak, A.; Michel, P.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Landen, O.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is tied to our ability to control and minimize deviations from sphericity of the capsule implosion. Low-mode asymmetries of the hot spot result from the combined effect of radiation drive asymmetries throughout the laser pulse and initial roughness on the capsule surface. In this paper, we report on simulations and experiments designed to assess, measure, and correct the drive asymmetries produced by the early-time (≈first 2 ns or "picket") period of the laser pulse. The drive asymmetry during the picket is commonly thought to introduce distortions in the hot-spot shape at ignition time. However, a more subtle effect not previously considered is that it also leads to an asymmetry in shock velocity and timing, thereby increasing the fuel adiabat and reducing the margin for ignition. It is shown via hydrodynamic simulations that minimizing this effect requires that the early-time asymmetry be kept below 7.5% in the second Legendre mode (P2), thus keeping the loss of performance margin below ≈10% for a layered implosion. Asymmetries during the picket of the laser pulse are measured using the instantaneous self-emission of a high-Z re-emission sphere in place of an ignition capsule in a hohlraum with large azimuthal diagnostic windows. Three dimensional simulations using the code HYDRA (to capture the effect of non-azimuthal hohlraum features) coupled to a cross-beam energy transfer model [Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010)] are used to establish the surrogacy of the re-emit target and to assess the early-time drive symmetry. Calculations using this model exhibit the same sensitivity to variations in the relative input powers between the different cones of NIF beams as measured for the "Rev5" CH target [Haan et al., Phys Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)] and reported by Dewald et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235001 (2013)]. The same methodology applied to recently improved implosions using different

  19. Dynamics of the spectral behaviour of an ultrashort laser pulse in an argon-gas-filled capillary discharge-preformed plasma channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have reported the argon plasma waveguide produced in an alumina (Al2O3 capillary discharge and used to guide ultrashort laser pulses at intensities of the order of 1016  W/cm2. A one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD code was used to evaluate the average degree of ionization of Ar in the preformed plasma channel. The spectrum of the propagated laser pulse in the Ar plasma waveguide was not modified and was well reproduced by a particle-in-cell (PIC simulation under initial ion charge state of Ar3+ in the preformed plasma waveguide. The optimum timing for the laser pulse injection was around 150 ns after initiation of a discharge with a peak current of 200 A.

  20. Gas-filled separators - An overview

    CERN Document Server

    Leino, M

    2003-01-01

    Gas-filled recoil separators have been used in nuclear physics studies since the early fifties. Most notably, they have found use in the separation of evaporation residues of heavy and very heavy elements from unwanted background. Gas-filled separators, alone or coupled to a detector array, offer an efficient, fast, compact and relatively inexpensive solution for nuclear structure studies. A new application is the use of a gas-filled device as a pre-separator in the study of chemical properties of the heaviest elements. Other uses include systematic study of fusion evaporation cross sections and accelerator mass spectrometry. In this contribution, an overview on gas-filled recoil separators, their characteristics, fields of application and possible future developments is given.

  1. Supercontinuum generation in the vacuum ultraviolet through dispersive-wave and soliton-plasma interaction in a noble-gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolov, A.; Mak, K. F.; Frosz, M. H.; Travers, J. C.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the generation of a three-octave-wide supercontinuum extending from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to the near infrared, spanning at least 113-1000 nm (i.e., 11 -1.2 eV ), in He-filled hollow-core kagome-style photonic crystal fiber. Numerical simulations confirm that the main mechanism is an interaction between dispersive-wave emission and plasma-induced blue-shifted soliton recompression around the fiber zero dispersion frequency. The VUV part of the supercontinuum, the modeling of which proves to be coherent and possesses a simple phase structure, has sufficient bandwidth to support single-cycle pulses of 500 asec duration. We also demonstrate, in the same system, the generation of narrower-band VUV pulses through dispersive-wave emission, tunable from 120 to 200 nm with efficiencies exceeding 1 % and VUV pulse energies in excess of 50 nJ.

  2. Flammability of Gas-Filled Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ushkov Valentin Anatol'evich

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The regularities of flame propagation on the horizontal surface of gas-filled polymers are considered depending on the concentration of oxygen in the oxidizer flow. The values of the coefficients in the expression describing relationship between the rate of flame propagation on the surface of foams and oxygen concentration are obtained. It was shown that with the mass content of reactive organophosphorus compounds reaching 4.0...5.9%, non-smoldering resole foam plastics with high performance characteristics are obtained. It was found that in order to obtain moderately combustible polyurethane foams based on oxyethylated phosphorus-containing polyols, the phosphorus concentration should not exceed 3 % of mass. To obtain flame-retardant urea-formaldehyde foam cellular plastics, the concentration of phosphorus should not exceed 0.3 % of mass. Physical-mechanical properties and flammability indices of developed gas-filled polymers based on reactive oligomers are presented.

  3. Handbook for Gas Filled RF Cavity Aficionados'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollestrup, A.V.; Chung, Moses; Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The use of hydrogen gas filled RF cavities in muon cooling channels has been proposed by Rolland Johnson. Impressive results have been obtained toward attaining high voltage gradients and rapid training in preliminary tests done at the FNAL MTA facility. However, so far it has not been possible to test them under conditions where they were subject to the transversal of a high intensity particle beam. This note is an attempt to bring together a description of some of the pertinent physical processes that take place in the dilute plasma that is generated in the hydrogen gas by the beam. Two effects dominate. The first is that the free electrons generated can load down the cavity and transfer its energy to heating the gas. The second is a question of what happens to the plasma in the longer term. There is an enormous literature on the subject of the subject of dilute hydrogen plasmas and we can tap into this information in order to understand and predict the behavior of the cavity.

  4. Laser-Plasma Interactions in Drive Campaign targets on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Moody, J. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Lasinski, B. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meeker, D.; Michel, P. A.; Ralph, J.; Rosen, M. D.; Ross, J. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Storm, E.; Strozzi, D. J.; Williams, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The Drive campaign [D A Callahan et al., this conference] on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] has the focused goal of understanding and optimizing the hohlraum for ignition. Both the temperature and symmetry of the radiation drive depend on laser and hohlraum characteristics. The drive temperature depends on the coupling of laser energy to the hohlraum, and the symmetry of the drive depends on beam-to-beam interactions that result in energy transfer [P. A. Michel, S. H. Glenzer, L. Divol, et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010).] within the hohlraum. To this end, hohlraums are being fielded where shape (rugby vs. cylindrical hohlraums), gas fill composition (neopentane at room temperature vs. cryogenic helium), and gas fill density (increase of ∼ 150%) are independently changed. Cylindrical hohlraums with higher gas fill density show improved inner beam propagation, as should rugby hohlraums, because of the larger radius over the capsule (7 mm vs. 5.75 mm in a cylindrical hohlraum). Energy coupling improves in room temperature neopentane targets, as well as in hohlraums at higher gas fill density. In addition cross-beam energy transfer is being addressed directly by using targets that mock up one end of a hohlraum, but allow observation of the laser beam uniformity after energy transfer. Ideas such as splitting quads into “doublets” by re-pointing the right and left half of quads are also being pursued. LPI results of the Drive campaign will be summarized, and analyses of future directions presented.

  5. Accelerating Solitons in Gas-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Facao, M; Almeida, P

    2013-01-01

    We found the self-similar solitary solutions of a recently proposed model for propagation of pulses in gas filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers that includes a plasma induced nonlinearity. As anticipated for a simpler model and using a perturbation analysis, there are indeed stationary solitary waves that accelerate and self-shift to higher frequencies. However, if the plasma nonlinearity strength is large or the pulse amplitudes are small, the solutions have distinguished long tails and decay as they propagate.

  6. New Hadron Monitor By Using A Gas-Filled RF Resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab; Fasce, Giorgio [ECONA, Rome; Flanagan, Gene [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, Rolland [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Zwaska, Robert [Fermilab

    2015-05-01

    It is trend to build an intense neutrino beam facility for the fundamental physics research, e.g. LBNF at Fermilab, T2K at KEK, and CNGS at CERN. They have investigated a hadron monitor to diagnose the primary/secondary beam quality. The existing hadron monitor based on an ionization chamber is not robust in the high-radiation environment vicinity of MW-class secondary particle production targets. We propose a gas-filled RF resonator to use as the hadron monitor since it is simple and hence radiation robust in this environment. When charged particles pass through the resonator they produce ionized plasma via the Coulomb interaction with the inert gas. The beam-induced plasma changes the permittivity of inert gas. As a result, a resonant frequency in the resonator shifts with the amount of ionized electrons. The radiation sensitivity is adjustable by the inert gas pressure and the RF amplitude. The hadron profile will be reconstructed with a tomography technique in the hodoscope which consists of X, Y, and theta layers by using a strip-shaped gas resonator. The sensitivity and possible system design will be shown in this presentation.

  7. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-01

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  8. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  9. Recent Studies of Proton Drip-Line Nuclei Using the Berkeley Gas-Filled Separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.W.; Batchelder, J.C.; Ninov, V.; Gregorich, K.E.; Toth, K.S.; Bingham, C.R.; Piechaczek, A.; Xu, X.J.; Powell, J.; Joosten, R.; Cerny, J.

    1999-10-07

    The Berkeley Gas-filled Separator provides new research opportunities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's X-Inch Cyclotron. The use of this apparatus for the study of proton drip-line nuclides is discussed. Preliminary results of {sup 78}Kr bombardments of {sup 102}Pd targets at mid-target energies of 360, 375 and 385 MeV are presented. Improvements planned partially as a result of this measurement are also discussed.

  10. Improved Gas Filling and Sealing of an HC-PCF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Meras, Patrick; Chang, Daniel; Spiers, Gary

    2008-01-01

    An improved packaging approach has been devised for filling a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber (HC-PCF) with a gas, sealing the HC-PCF to retain the gas, and providing for optical connections and, optionally, a plumbing fitting for changing or augmenting the gas filling. Gas-filled HC-PCFs can be many meters long and have been found to be attractive as relatively compact, lightweight, rugged alternatives to conventional gas-filled glass cells for use as molecular-resonance frequency references for stabilization of lasers in some optical-metrology, lidar, optical-communication, and other advanced applications. Prior approaches to gas filling and sealing of HC-PCFs have involved, variously, omission of any attempt to connectorize the PCF, connectorization inside a vacuum chamber (an awkward and expensive process), or temporary exposure of one end of an HC-PCF to the atmosphere, potentially resulting in contamination of the gas filling. Prior approaches have also involved, variously, fusion splicing of HC-PCFs with other optical fibers or other termination techniques that give rise to Fresnel reflections of about 4 percent, which results in output intensity noise.

  11. Hydro-Coupling Effects on Compression Symmetry in Gas-Filled Hohlraum Experiments at the Omega Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewalds, E L; Pollaine, S W; Landen, O L; Amendt, P A; Turner, R E; Wallace, R; Campbell, K M; Glenzer, S H

    2003-08-26

    Ignition hohlraum designs use low Z gas fill to slow down the inward progress of high Z ablated plasma from the hohlraum walls preventing large laser spot motion and capsule drive asymmetries. In order to optimize the ignition design, the gas hydro-coupling effect to a fusion capsule asymmetry is presently being assessed in experiments at the Omega laser facility with gas filled hohlraums and foam balls. Our experiments measure the effects of the pressure spike that is generated by direct gas heating by the drive laser beams on the capsule surrogate for various hohlraum gas fill densities (0-2.5 mg/cc). To isolate the effect of the gas-hydro coupling pressure, we have begun by using plastic ''hohlraums'' to reduce the x-ray ablation pressure. The foam ball images measured by x-ray backlighting show increasing pole-hot pressure asymmetry for increasing gas pressure. In addition, the gas hydrodynamics is studied by imaging of a low concentration Xe gas fill dopant. The gas fill self-emission. shows the early pressure spike and its propagation towards the foam ball, as well as the gas stagnation on the holraum axis at later times, both contributing to the capsule asymmetry. These first gas hydro-coupling results are compared to LASNEX simulations.

  12. Dynamics of blueshifted floating pulses in gas filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Facao, M

    2013-01-01

    Frequency blueshifting was recently observed in light pulses propagating on gas filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers where a plasma has been produced due to photoionization of the gas. One of the propagation models that is adequate to describe the actual experimental observations is here investigated. It is a nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation with an extra term, to which we applied a self-similar change of variables and found its accelerating solitons. As in other NLS related models possessing accelerating solitons, there exist asymmetrical pulses that decay as they propagate in some parameter region that was here well defined.

  13. Method of Gas Filled Time of Flight in AMS Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Isobaric interference is the main problem to be overcome in determination the long-livedradioisotopes. Energy loss method was used to measurement of these nuclides, but in the low energyaccelerator, the △E-E method is limited. In order to improve the power of isobaric identification in theaccelerator mass spectrometric measurements, a gas-filled time-of-flight (GF-TOF) spectrometric detectorhas been designed and set up.

  14. Study of high pressure gas filled RF cavities for muon collider

    CERN Document Server

    Yonehara, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next-generation high-energy lepton collider machine. Operating an RF cavity in a multi-Tesla magnet is a critical requirement in a muon accelerator and a cooling channel. However, the maximum RF gradient in a vacuum RF cavity is strongly limited by an external magnetic field. Dense hydrogen gas filled RF cavity has been proposed since it is functional of generating a high RF accelerating gradient in a strong magnetic field and making an ionization cooling process at the same time. A critical issue of the cavity is a beam- induced plasma that consumes a considerable amount of RF power. The gas filled RF test cell was made and measured the RF loading due to a beam-induced plasma by using an intense proton beam at Fermilab. By doping an electronegative gas in dense hydrogen, the plasma loading effect is significantly mitigated. The result shows that the cavity is functional with a muon collider beam. Recent progress is shown in this presentation.

  15. Parameter monitoring system of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, Y S; Sukhov, A M

    2015-01-01

    PC-based one-crate monitoring and control system of the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) is considered. It is developed for the long-term experiments at the U400 FLNR cyclotron and is aimed at the synthesis of super heavy nuclei in heavy ion induced complete fusion reactions. Parameters related to: a) beam and cyclotron; b) separator by itself, c) detection system, d) target and entrance window are measured and stored in the protocol file of the experiment. Special attention is paid to generating the alarm signals and implementing further the appropriate procedures

  16. Computing at the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganov, Yuri S.; Polyakov, Alexandr N.

    2006-03-01

    Simulation codes for the spectra of heavy implanted nuclei, applications for online data visualization and real time PC-based algorithms are considered. Special attention is paid to the application of real time techniques for radical suppression of background products in heavy-ion-induced nuclear reactions at the U-400 cyclotron of the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions. The detection system of the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator (DGFRS) is also briefly described. Calculated heavy recoil spectra are compared with those measured in heavy-ion-induced nuclear reactions.

  17. Ion beam characteristics of the controlatron/zetatron family of the gas filled neutron tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, R.S.; Shope, L.A.; O' Neal, M.L.; Boers, J.E.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    A gas filled tube used to produce a neutron flux with the D(T,He/sup 4/)n reaction is described. Deuterium and tritium ions generated in a reflex discharge are extracted and accelerated to 100 keV by means of an accelerator electrode onto a deutero-tritide target electrode. The electrodes are designed to focus the ion beam onto the target. Total tube currents consisting of extracted ions, unsuppressed secondary electrons, and ions generated by interactions with the background gas are typically 100 mA. The characteristics of the extracted ion beam are discussed. Accelerating voltages greater than 50 kV are required to focus the beam through the accelerator aperture for configurations that give beams with the proper energy density onto the target. The perveance of the beam is discussed. Maximum perveance values are 2 to 20 nanopervs. Tube focusing and neutron production characteristics are described.

  18. A method of firing a gas filled switching tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryukhanevich G.I.; Kolesov, G.V.; Lebedev, V.B.; Prokhorenko, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    A method is proposed for firing a gas filled switching tube which involves injecting a laser pulse of picosecond duration with an energy level higher than the firing threshold of the switching tube to the spark gap of the tube to be fired. In order to improve the operational stability of the tube, after a time period equal to delta T (with respect to the point where the first laser pulse is fed to the spark gap), a primary supplementary pulse is fed to the gap; the power level of this pulse is selected to be at least half the power level of the first, and the time interval delta T is selected depending on the value of the experimentally determined minimum delay time (t3 min) of the tube during firing by a separately selected primary pulse in a ratio of .5t3 min is less than delta T is less than or equal to t3 min.

  19. Detection of fusion residues produced by inverse kinematic reactions using a gas-filled split-pole spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, J F; Beene, J R; Bierman, J D; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gomez-Campo, J D; Gross, C J; Halbert, M L; Harding, T J; McNab, A I; McNeal, S P; Varner, R L; Zhao, K

    1999-01-01

    A focal plane detector has been constructed for detecting fusion residues in a gas-filled Enge split-pole spectrograph. It provides position, timing and energy for particle identification. With a timing channel plate detector in the target chamber, the particle time-of-flight can be measured. This detector system is particularly suitable for studying fusion-evaporation reactions in inverse kinematics. (author)

  20. Gas Filled RF Resonator Hadron Beam Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab; Abrams, Robert [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Dinkel, Holly [U. Missouri, Columbia; Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Johnson, Rolland [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, Grigory [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Zwaska, Robert [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    MW-class beam facilities are being considered all over the world to produce an intense neutrino beam for fundamental particle physics experiments. A radiation-robust beam monitor system is required to diagnose the primary and secondary beam qualities in high-radiation environments. We have proposed a novel gas-filled RF-resonator hadron beam monitor in which charged particles passing through the resonator produce ionized plasma that changes the permittivity of the gas. The sensitivity of the monitor has been evaluated in numerical simulation. A signal manipulation algorithm has been designed. A prototype system will be constructed and tested by using a proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab.

  1. Propane decomposition and conversion into other hydrocarbons using metal target assisted laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosakhani, A.; Parvin, P.; Reyhani, A.; Mortazavi, S. Z.

    2017-01-01

    It is shown that the propane molecules are strongly decomposed in the metal assisted laser induced plasma based on the nano-catalytic adsorption. A Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser is employed to irradiate the propane gas filled in the control chamber in the presence of the reactive metals such as Ni, Fe, Pd, and Cu in order to study the effect of catalysts during the decomposition. The catalytic targets simultaneously facilitate the plasma formation and the decomposition events leading to generate a wide distribution of the light and heavy hydrocarbon molecules, mainly due to the recombination processes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography instruments support the findings by detecting the synthetic components. Furthermore, the optical emission spectroscopy of the laser induced plasma emissions realizes the real time monitoring of the reactions taking place during each laser shot. The subsequent recombination events give rise to the generation of a variety of the hydrocarbon molecules. The dissociation rate, conversion ratio, selectivity, and yield as well as the performance factor arise mainly from the catalytic effects of the metal species. Moreover, the ablation rate of the targets of interest is taken into account as a measure of the catalytic reactivity due to the abundance of the metal species ablated from the target. This leads to assess the better performance factor for Pd among four metal catalysts of interest during propane decomposition. Finally, the molecules such as ethane and ethylene are identified as the stable abundant species created during the successive molecular recombination processes.

  2. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Walls with Gas Filled Panel Insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Som S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Desjarlais, Andre Omer [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Atchley, Jerald Allen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Gas filled insulation panels (GFP) are very light weight and compact (when uninflated) advanced insulation products. GFPs consist of multiple layers of thin, low emittance (low-e) metalized aluminum. When expanded, the internal, low-e aluminum layers form a honeycomb structure. These baffled polymer chambers are enveloped by a sealed barrier and filled with either air or a low-conductivity gas. The sealed exterior aluminum foil barrier films provide thermal resistance, flammability protection, and properties to contain air or a low conductivity inert gas. This product was initially developed with a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The unexpanded product is nearly flat for easy storage and transport. Therefore, transportation volume and weight of the GFP to fill unit volume of wall cavity is much smaller compared to that of other conventional insulation products. This feature makes this product appealing to use at Army Contingency Basing, when transportation cost is significant compared to the cost of materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate thermal performance of walls, similar to those used at typical Barracks Hut (B-Hut) hard shelters, when GFPs are used in the wall cavities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) tested performance of the wall in the rotatable guarded hotbox (RGHB) according to the ASTM C 1363 standard test method.

  3. Development of a portable gas-filled ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, K. Y.; Cha, S. M.; Gwak, M. S. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    A new portable gas-filled ionization chamber has been designed and constructed at the Physics Department of Sung Kyun Kwan University. To overcome the maximum count rate of ∼ 10{sup 5} particles per second of a conventional ionization chamber, which utilizes a Frisch grid, and to enhance the portability of a detector, we adopted the design of multiple electrodes and modified it from the original designs by Kimura et al. and Chae et al. The new design utilizes a stack of multiple electrodes installed perpendicular to the optical beam axis. This configuration provides a fast response time for the detector, which is essential for high-rate counting. The device has been tested with a {sup 241}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 432.2 years) radioactive α source, which mainly emits 5.486-MeV (branching ratio of 85%) and 5.443-MeV (branching ratio of 13%) α particles. An energy resolution of 6.3% was achieved.

  4. Synthesis of superheavy elements at the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voinov, A. A., E-mail: voinov@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Collaboration: JINR (Dubna), LLNL (Livermore), ORNL (Oak Ridge), University of Tennessee (Knoxville), Vanderbilt University (Nashville), Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad) Collaboration

    2016-12-15

    A survey of experiments at the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator (Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna) aimed at the detection and study of the “island of stability” of superheavy nuclei produced in complete fusion reactions of {sup 48}Ca ions and {sup 238}U–{sup 249}Cf target nuclei is given. The problems of synthesis of superheavy nuclei, methods for their identification, and investigation of their decay properties, including the results of recent experiments at other separators (SHIP, BGS, TASCA) and chemical setups, are discussed. The studied properties of the new nuclei, the isotopes of elements 112–118, as well as the properties of their decay products, indicate substantial growth of stability of the heaviest nuclei with increasing number of neutrons in the nucleus as the magic number of neutrons N = 184 is approached.

  5. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For practical applications of magnetized target fusion, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Quasi-spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a quasi-spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). Theoretical analysis and computer modeling of the concept are presented. It is shown that, with the appropriate choice of the flow parameters in the liner and the target, the impact between the liner and the target plasma can be made to be shockless in the liner or to generate at most a very weak shock in the liner. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Carbohydrate plasma expanders for passive tumor targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Stefan; Caysa, Henrike; Kuntsche, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of carbohydrate plasma volume expanders as a novel polymer platform for tumor targeting. Many synthetic polymers have already been synthesized for targeted tumor therapy, but potential advantages of these carbohydrates include...

  7. Ultrasound detection in the Gulf menhaden requires gas-filled bullae and an intact lateral line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Maria; Montie, Eric W.; Mann, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Clupeiform fish species, including the Gulf menhaden (Brevoortia patronus) that belong to the subfamily Alosinae, can detect ultrasound. Clupeiform fishes are unique in that they have specialized gas-filled bullae in the head associated with the ear via the bulla membrane and with the lateral line...... via the lateral recess membrane. It has been hypothesized that the utricle of the inner ear is responsible for ultrasound detection through a specialized connection to the gas-filled bullae complex. Here, we show that the lateral line and its connection to the gas-filled bullae complex via the lateral...... recess are involved in ultrasound detection in Gulf menhaden. Removal of a small portion of the lateral line overlying the lateral recess membrane eliminates the ability of Gulf menhaden to detect ultrasound. We further show that the gas-filled bullae vibrates in response to ultrasound, that the gas...

  8. Use of the gas-filled-magnet technique for particle identification at low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K.K.; Jiang, C.L.; Paul, M. [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)

    1995-08-01

    Reaction studies of interest to astrophysics with radioactive ion beams will be done mainly in inverse reaction kinematics, i.e., heavy particles bombarding a hydrogen target. The low energy of the outgoing heavy reaction products makes particle identification with respect to mass and nuclear charge a major challenge. For the planned {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}) experiment one expects five different types of particles in the outgoing channels: {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O (from elastic scattering of {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O on {sup 12}C), {sup 15}O and {sup 15}N (from the {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O induced (p,{alpha}) reactions) and {sup 12}C recoils from the polypropylene target. While mass determination can be achieved easily by time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, a determination of the nuclear charge presents a challenge, especially if the energy of the particles is below 500 keV/u. We studied the gas-filled magnet technique for Z-identification of light ions between Z = 6-9. In a gas-filled magnet the particles move with an average charge state {bar q} which in one parameterization is given by {bar q} = Z ln(avZ{sup {alpha}})/ln(bZ{sup {beta}}) where Z is the nuclear charge of the ions and v their velocity. Introducing into the expression for the magnetic rigidity B{rho} = mv/{bar q} results in a Z dependence of B{rho} which is valid to very low velocities. As a magnet we used the Enge split-pole spectrograph which was filled with nitrogen gas at a pressure of 0.5 Torr. The particles were detected in the focal plane with a 50 x 10 cm{sup 2} parallel-grid-avalanche counter which measured TOF and magnetic rigidity. The mass and Z separation was tested with {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O beams at energies of about 600 keV/u and recoil particles ranging from {sup 12}C to {sup 19}F. The Z-separation obtained at these energies was {triangle}Z/Z = 0.28 which is sufficient to separate individual elements for Z < 10.

  9. The Evolution of the Gold Bubble in NIF Ignition Gas-Filled Hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marilyn; MacLaren, Steve; Widmann, Klaus; Meezan, Nathan; Hammer, James; Bell, Perry; Benedetti, Robin; Bradley, David; Callahan, Deborah; Dewald, Eduard; Doeppner, Tilo; Hinkel, Denise; Jones, Oggie; Landen, O. L.; Michel, Pierre; Milovich, Jose; Moody, John; Moore, Alastair

    2015-11-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the energy from 192 laser beams is converted to an x-ray drive in a gas-filled gold hohlraum. The x-ray drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The ViewFactor platform uses a truncated hohlraum to measure the x-ray drive from the capsule point-of-view. This platform also affords excellent diagnostic views of the hohlraum interior, in particular, of the region in which the outer beams deposit their energy (the ``gold bubble'') Time-resolved and time-integrated images in the hard x-ray range (>3 keV) reveal an 8-fold symmetry in the gold bubble. The Au plasma in the bubble from the eight 50 degree quads expands faster than that from the interleaved 44.5 degree quads. The variation in this structure with laser intensity, with pulse shape and cross beam energy transfer, and comparison to models, will be discussed. This work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Stabilization of gas-filled surge arrester’s characteristics by use of ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajović Dragan V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the stabilization of electrical discharges in gases by means of external ionizing radiation. Discharges in a gas-filled surge arrester model were studied in both passive and active regimes of the device. An originally developed model of the gas-filled surge arrester was used. Gas pressure and the interelectrode gap were the variable parameters in our measurements. Applied radiation types included α-particles, γ-rays, X-rays, and neutrons. Measurements were performed under highly controlled laboratory conditions. The combined measurement uncertainty of the applied procedure was estimated as being under the 5% level. The results obtained are followed by a theoretical explanation. The crucial result is the conclusion that ionizing radiation does not necessarily degrade the gas-filled surge arrester’s functionality but that it, rather, improves it under certain conditions.

  11. The use of the gas-filled magnet technique for the detection of medium mass ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueira, J.M., E-mail: figueira@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Laboratorio Tandar, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rehm, K.E. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Deibel, C.M. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Fernandez Niello, J.O. [Laboratorio Tandar, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad de San Martin, B1650BWA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Greene, J.; Jiang, C.L.; Lee, H.Y. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Marley, S.T. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Pardo, R.C. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Patel, N. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel); and others

    2012-04-01

    The use of the gas-filled magnet technique for the detection of intermediate mass (A{approx} 20-40) recoil nuclei produced in (p,{alpha}) reactions in inverse kinematics has been investigated. Through a series of calibration measurements with {sup 27}Al, {sup 28,29}Si and {sup 33}S beams the optimum parameterization for calculating the average charge-state distribution in a gas-filled magnet has been determined. By measuring the magnetic rigidity, the time-of-flight and the differential energy loss of the particles at the focal plane of a gas-filled Enge Split Pole spectrograph it was possible to separate and identify the (p,{alpha}) reaction products from elastically scattered particles at very small scattering angles. This technique was then tested by measuring the p({sup 33}S,{sup 30}P){alpha} and p({sup 37}K,{sup 34}Cl){alpha} reactions.

  12. Isobaric Identification Using Gas-Filled Time-of-Flight Measurements in an Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Yong-Jing; RUAN Xiang-Dong; HE Ming; WANG Hui-Juan; LI Guo-Qiang; WU Shao-Yong; DONG Ke-Jun; LIN Min; JIANG Shan

    2005-01-01

    @@ A gas-filled time-of-flight (GF-TOF) detector has been built and developed to improve the ability of isobaric identification in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements, and a time resolution (without gas filled)of better than 350ps is achieved. The GF-TOF detector is tested by means of measuring a standard AgCl(36Cl/Cl = 7.6 × 10-9g/g) sample with the 36Cl ion energy of 64, 49 and 33MeV, respectively. 36Cl and 36S particles were successfully separated in the TOF spectra output from the GF-TOF detector. The comparison between the gas-filled time-of-flight method and the △E - E method is described. Some results relative to the GF-TOF method are given as well.

  13. Carbohydrate plasma expanders for passive tumor targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Stefan; Caysa, Henrike; Kuntsche, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of carbohydrate plasma volume expanders as a novel polymer platform for tumor targeting. Many synthetic polymers have already been synthesized for targeted tumor therapy, but potential advantages of these carbohydrates include...... inexpensive synthesis, constant availability, a good safety profile, biodegradability and the long clinical use as plasma expanders. Three polymers have been tested for cytotoxicity and cytokine activation in cell cultures and conjugated with a near-infrared fluorescent dye: hydroxyethyl starches (HES 200 k......Da and HES 450 kDa) and dextran (DEX 500 kDa). Particle size and molecular weight distribution were determined by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). The biodistribution was investigated non-invasively in nude mice using multispectral optical imaging. The most promising polymer conjugate...

  14. New gas-filled mode of the large-acceptance spectrometer VAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, C., E-mail: schmitt@ganil.f [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Rejmund, M.; Navin, A.; Lecornu, B.; Jacquot, B.; France, G. de; Lemasson, A.; Shrivastava, A. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Greenlees, P.; Uusitalo, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014, Jyvaskyla (Finland); Subotic, K. [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Gaudefroy, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Theisen, Ch.; Sulignano, B. [CEA-Saclay DSM/IRFU/SPhN, F-91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L. [IPHC, UMR7178, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite Louis Pasteur, BP28, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2010-09-21

    A new gas-filled operation mode of the large-acceptance spectrometer VAMOS at GANIL is reported. A beam rejection factor greater than 10{sup 10} is obtained for the {sup 40}Ca+{sup 150}Sm system at 196 MeV. The unprecedented transmission efficiency for the evaporation residues produced in this reaction is estimated to be around 80% for {alpha}x n channels and above 95% for x ny p channels. A detailed study of the performance of the gas-filled VAMOS and future developments are discussed. This new operation mode opens avenues to explore the potential of fusion reactions in various kinematics.

  15. Effect of a transverse magnetic field on the generation of electron beams in the gas-filled diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, E. H.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2008-06-01

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field (0.080 and 0.016 T) on generation of an electron beam in the gas-filled diode is experimentally investigated. It is shown that, at voltage U = 25 kV across the diode and a low helium pressure (45 Torr), the transverse magnetic field influences the beam current amplitude behind a foil and its distribution over the foil cross section. At elevated pressures and under the conditions of ultrashort avalanche electron beam formation in helium, nitrogen, and air, the transverse magnetic field (0.080 and 0.016 T) has a minor effect on the amplitude and duration of the beam behind the foil. It is established that, when the voltage of the pulse generator reaches several hundreds of kilovolts, some runaway electrons (including the electrons from the discharge plasma near the cathode) are incident on the side walls of the diode.

  16. Simulations of indirectly driven gas-filled capsules at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Eder, D. C.; Pino, J. E.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Remington, B. A.; Rowley, D. P.; Yeamans, C. B.; Tipton, R. E.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Divol, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    Gas-filled capsules imploded with indirect drive on the National Ignition Facility have been employed as symmetry surrogates for cryogenic-layered ignition capsules and to explore interfacial mix. Plastic capsules containing deuterated layers and filled with tritium gas provide a direct measure of mix of ablator into the gas fuel. Other plastic capsules have employed DT or D{sup 3}He gas fill. We present the results of two-dimensional simulations of gas-filled capsule implosions with known degradation sources represented as in modeling of inertial confinement fusion ignition designs; these are time-dependent drive asymmetry, the capsule support tent, roughness at material interfaces, and prescribed gas-ablator interface mix. Unlike the case of cryogenic-layered implosions, many observables of gas-filled implosions are in reasonable agreement with predictions of these simulations. Yields of TT and DT neutrons as well as other x-ray and nuclear diagnostics are matched for CD-layered implosions. Yields of DT-filled capsules are over-predicted by factors of 1.4–2, while D{sup 3}He capsule yields are matched, as well as other metrics for both capsule types.

  17. On Stability of Targets for Plasma Jet Induced Magnetoinertial Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Samulyak, Roman; Kim, Hyoungekun

    2015-01-01

    The compression and stability of plasma targets for the plasma jet-induced magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF) have been investigated via large scale simulations using the FronTier code capable of explicit tracking of material interfaces. In the PJMIF concept, a plasma liner, formed by the merger of a large number of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on a magnetized plasma target and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. A multi-stage computational approach for simulations of the liner-target interaction and the compression of plasma targets has been developed to minimize computing time. Simulations revealed important features of the target compression process, including instability and disintegration of targets. The non-uniformity of the leading edge of the liner, caused by plasma jets as well as oblique shock waves between them, leads to instabilities during the target compression. By using front tracking, the evolution of targets has been studied in 3-dimensional simulations. Optimi...

  18. FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray spectrometer: Development of an instrumented gas-filled magnetic spectrometer at the ILL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, A.; Chebboubi, A.; Faust, H.; Jentschel, M.; Kessedjian, G.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Panebianco, S.; Sage, C.; Urban, W.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate thermal neutron-induced fission data are important for applications in reactor physics as well as for fundamental nuclear physics. FIPPS is the new FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray Spectrometer being developed at the Institut Laue Langevin for neutron-induced fission studies. FIPPS is based on the combination of a large Germanium detector array surrounding a fission target, a Time-Of-Flight detector and a Gas-Filled Magnet (GFM) to identify mass, nuclear charge and kinetic energy of one of the fission fragments. The GFM will be instrumented with a Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) for individual 3D tracking of the fragments. A conceptual design study of the new spectrometer is presented.

  19. FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray spectrometer: Development of an instrumented gas-filled magnetic spectrometer at the ILL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, A., E-mail: blanc@ill.fr [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Chebboubi, A.; Faust, H.; Jentschel, M. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Kessedjian, G. [LPSC CNRS/IN2P3, UJF Grenoble 1, INPG, Grenoble (France); Köster, U. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Materna, T.; Panebianco, S. [DSM/IRFU/SPhN, CEA Saclay (France); Sage, C. [LPSC CNRS/IN2P3, UJF Grenoble 1, INPG, Grenoble (France); Urban, W. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    2013-12-15

    Accurate thermal neutron-induced fission data are important for applications in reactor physics as well as for fundamental nuclear physics. FIPPS is the new FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray Spectrometer being developed at the Institut Laue Langevin for neutron-induced fission studies. FIPPS is based on the combination of a large Germanium detector array surrounding a fission target, a Time-Of-Flight detector and a Gas-Filled Magnet (GFM) to identify mass, nuclear charge and kinetic energy of one of the fission fragments. The GFM will be instrumented with a Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) for individual 3D tracking of the fragments. A conceptual design study of the new spectrometer is presented.

  20. Simulating thermo-mechanical interaction between a xenon gas-filled chamber and tungsten first-wall armor for the LIFE reactor design using the BUCKY 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heltemes, T A; Prochaska, A E; Moses, G A, E-mail: taheltemes@wisc.ed [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The BUCKY 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code has been used to simulate the dynamic thermo-mechanical interaction between a xenon gas-filled chamber and tungsten first-wall armor with an indirect-drive laser fusion target for the LIFE reactor design. Two classes of simulations were performed: (1) short-time (0-2 ms) simulations to fully capture the hydrodynamic effects of the introduction of the LIFE indirect-drive target x-ray and ion threat spectra and (2) long-time (2-70 ms) simulations starting with quiescent chamber conditions characteristic of those at 2 ms to estimate xenon plasma cooling between target implosions at 13 Hz. The short-time simulation results reported are: (1) the plasma hydrodynamics of the xenon in the chamber, (2) dynamic overpressure on the tungsten armor, and (3) time-dependent temperatures in the tungsten armor. The ramifications of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) vs. non-LTE opacity models are also addressed.

  1. Xe-containing fast gas mixtures for gas-filled detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophorou, L. G.; Maxey, D. V.; McCorkle, D. L.; Carter, J. G.

    1980-05-01

    Electron drift velocities are reported for XeCF 4, XeC 2H 2 and XeCF 4C 2H 2 mixtures. For a number of these mixtures the drift velocities are large (4 to 10 × 10 6 cm s -1) over a range of {E}/{P} values below 3.5 V cm -1 Torr -1. Such mixtures may find application in gas-filled detectors, especially those involving electromagnetic ionizing radiation.

  2. Demonstrated high performance of gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums on Omega

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, F.; Tassin, V.; Depierreux, S.; Gauthier, P.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Seytor, P.; Villette, B.; Lasinski, B.; Park, H. S.; Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Döppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Wallace, R.; Williams, E.; Michel, P.; Frenje, J.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Glebov, V.; Sorce, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Nikroo, A.; Giraldez, E.

    2014-07-01

    A direct experimental comparison of rugby-shaped and cylindrical shaped gas-filled hohlraums on the Omega laser facility demonstrates that higher coupling and minimal backscatter can be achieved in the rugby geometry, leading to significantly enhanced implosion performance. A nearly 50% increase of x-ray drive is associated with earlier bangtime and increase of neutron production. The observed drive enhancement from rugby geometry in this study is almost twice stronger than in previously published results.

  3. Demonstrated high performance of gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums on Omega

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, F.; Villette, B. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Michel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Giraldez, E. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Tassin, V.; Depierreux, S.; Gauthier, P.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Seytor, P.; Lasinski, B.; Park, H. S.; Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Döppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Wallace, R.; Williams, E.; and others

    2014-07-15

    A direct experimental comparison of rugby-shaped and cylindrical shaped gas-filled hohlraums on the Omega laser facility demonstrates that higher coupling and minimal backscatter can be achieved in the rugby geometry, leading to significantly enhanced implosion performance. A nearly 50% increase of x-ray drive is associated with earlier bangtime and increase of neutron production. The observed drive enhancement from rugby geometry in this study is almost twice stronger than in previously published results.

  4. Demonstrated high performance of gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums on Omega

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Tassin, V. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Depierreux, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Gauthier, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Masson-Laborde, P. E. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Monteil, M. C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Seytor, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Villette, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Lasinski, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Amendt, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doeppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hinkel, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wallace, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Williams, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Michel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu-Johnson, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Li, C. K. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Glebov, V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Sorce, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Stoeckl, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Giraldez, E. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-07-25

    A direct experimental comparison of rugby-shaped and cylindrical shaped gas-filled hohlraums on the Omega laser facility demonstrates that higher coupling and minimal backscatter can be achieved in the rugby geometry, leading to significantly enhanced implosion performance. A nearly 50% increase of x-ray drive is associated with earlier bangtime and increase of neutron production. The observed drive enhancement from rugby geometry in this study is almost twice stronger than in previously published results.

  5. Thermoregulated Nitric Cryosystem for Cooling Gas-Filled Detectors of Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zharkov I.P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryosystem for cooling and filling of gas-filled detectors of ionizing radiation with compressed inert gas on the basis of wide-nitrogen cryostat, which provides detetector temperature control in a range of 173 — 293 K and its stabilization with accuracy of ± 1°. The work was carried out within the Ukraine — NATO Program of Collaboration, Grant SfP #984655.

  6. Density threshold for plasma detachment in gas target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Mori, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Ohno, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Takagi, M. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Takamura, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Suzuki, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Park, J. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The simulated gas target divertor experiment has been performed to investigate the fundamental physics of plasma detachment in the linear plasma device, TPD-I, which has a high heat flux and high density plasma in steady state. The existence of a density threshold for plasma detachment was observed in our experiment. It is found that the electron-ion temperature relaxation process is a key to determine the density dependence of the plasma detachment. (orig.).

  7. Laser parametric instability experiments of a 3ω, 15 kJ, 6-ns laser pulse in gas-filled hohlraums at the Ligne d'Intégration Laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseaux, C.; Huser, G.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.; Alozy, E.; Villette, B.; Wrobel, R. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Henry, O.; Raffestin, D. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DAM, CESTA, F-33114 Le Barp (France)

    2015-02-15

    Experimental investigation of stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin (SBS) scattering have been obtained at the Ligne-d'Intégration-Laser facility (LIL, CEA-Cesta, France). The parametric instabilities (LPI) are driven by firing four laser beamlets (one quad) into millimeter size, gas-filled hohlraum targets. A quad delivers energy on target of 15 kJ at 3ω in a 6-ns shaped laser pulse. The quad is focused by means of 3ω gratings and is optically smoothed with a kinoform phase plate and with smoothing by spectral dispersion-like 2 GHz and/or 14 GHz laser bandwidth. Open- and closed-geometry hohlraums have been used, all being filled with 1-atm, neo-pentane (C{sub 5}H{sub 12}) gas. For SRS and SBS studies, the light backscattered into the focusing optics is analyzed with spectral and time resolutions. Near-backscattered light at 3ω and transmitted light at 3ω are also monitored in the open geometry case. Depending on the target geometry (plasma length and hydrodynamic evolution of the plasma), it is shown that, at maximum laser intensity about 9 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, Raman reflectivity noticeably increases up to 30% in 4-mm long plasmas while SBS stays below 10%. Consequently, laser transmission through long plasmas drops to about 10% of incident energy. Adding 14 GHz bandwidth to the laser always reduces LPI reflectivities, although this reduction is not dramatic.

  8. Utilizing Gas Filled Cavities for the Generation of an Intense Muon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys; Neuffer, David V.

    2015-05-01

    A key requirement for designing intense muon sources is operating rf cavities in multi-tesla magnetic fields. Recently, a proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that an rf cavity filed with high pressure hydrogen gas could meet this goal. In this study, rigorous simulation is used to design and evaluate the performance of an intense muon source with gas filled cavities. We present a new lattice design and compare our results with conventional schemes. We detail the influence of gas pressure on the muon production rate.

  9. Utilizing gas-filled cavities for the generation of an intense muon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Neuffer, David V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A key requirement for designing intense muon sources is operating rf cavities in multi-tesla magnetic fields. Recently, a proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that an rf cavity filed with high pressure hydrogen gas could meet this goal. In this study, rigorous simulation is used to design and evaluate the performance of an intense muon source with gas filled cavities. We present a new lattice design and compare our results with conventional schemes. We detail the influence of gas pressure on the muon production rate.

  10. R & D of a Gas-Filled RF Beam Profile Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, K. [Fermilab; Backfish, M. [Fermilab; Moretti, A. [Fermilab; Tollestrup, A. V. [Fermilab; Watts, A. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. M. [Fermilab; Abrams, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Cummings, M. A.; Dudas, A. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. P. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Liu, Q. [Case Western Reserve U.

    2017-05-01

    We report the R&D of a novel radiation-robust hadron beam profile monitor based on a gas-filled RF cavity for intense neutrino beam experiments. An equivalent RF circuit model was made and simulated to optimize the RF parameter in a wide beam intensity range. As a result, the maximum acceptable beam intensity in the monitor is significantly increased by using a low-quality factor RF cavity. The plan for the demonstration test is set up to prepare for future neutrino beam experiments.

  11. Ultraviolet Light Generation in Gas-Filled Kagome Photonic Crystal Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sílvia M. G.; Facão, Margarida; Ferreira, Mário F. S.

    2015-03-01

    Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fibers were found to be ideal for the occurrence of ultrafast non-linear optics. This article reports the optimal conditions for the generation of ultraviolet light using a gas filled kagome hollow-core-photonic crystal fiber. It is shown that by changing the pressure of the gas and the input pulse characteristics, the efficiency of conversion and quality of ultraviolet light can be improved, as well as tuning its central frequency. Results suggest that a highly coherent and tunable ultraviolet light source can be constructed, which can find numerous applications.

  12. BiCMOS amplifier-discriminator integrated circuit for gas-filled detector readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herve, C. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)]. E-mail: herve@esrf.fr; Dzahini, D. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Grenoble (France); Le Caer, T. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Richer, J.-P. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Grenoble (France); Torki, K. [Laboratoire TIMA, Grenoble (France)

    2005-03-21

    The paper presents a 16-channel amplifier-discriminator designed in BiCMOS technology. It will be used for the binary parallel readout of gas-filled detectors being designed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The circuit (named AMS211) has been manufactured. The measured transimpedance gain (400 K{omega}), bandwidth (25 MHz) and noise (1570 e{sup -}+95 e{sup -}/pF ENC) well match the simulated results. The discriminator thresholds are individually controlled by built-in Digital to Analogue Converter. The experience gained with a first prototype of readout electronics indicates that the AMS211 should meet our requirements.

  13. AMS Measurement of 36Cl With a Gas-filled Time of Flight Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUANYong-jing; HEMing; RUANXiang-dong; WANGHui-juan; LIGuo-qiang; WUShao-yong; WUWei-ming; JIANGShan

    2003-01-01

    In order to determine 36Cl and 36S with high sensitivity by AMS, the present study has been done.Difference of time flight in the gas dependences to total energy, gas pressure in the chamber, and the flight length for isobars. The time resolution (FWHM) of the detector system is 800 ps without gas-filled when the ion energy is 72 MeV. Time straggling is growth with the increase of gas pressure in the chamber.Time straggling caused by the gas pressure is shown in Fig.1.

  14. Automation of experiments at the Dubna gas-filled separator of recoil nuclei: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2015-03-01

    An application developed in Builder C++ (Windows) for the offline analysis of experimental data from the spectrometer of the gas-filled separator of recoil nuclei (Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions) based on the double-sided silicon strip detector is discussed. The automatic express method developed for calibrating 48 strips of the silicon position-sensitive detector based on the three most energetic spectral lines from the natYb + 48Ca▭*Th reaction is compared to the results produced by more rigorous calibration methods. The examples of spectra for this reaction and the results of filtering for the proposed calibration algorithm are given.

  15. Development of a Gas Filled Magnet spectrometer within the FIPPS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebboubi, A.; Kessedjian, G.; Faust, H.; Blanc, A.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Méplan, O.; Sage, C.; Serot, O.

    2016-06-01

    The Fission Product Prompt γ -ray Spectrometer, FIPPS, is under development to enable prompt γ -ray spectroscopy correlated with fission fragment identification. This will open new possibilities in the study of fission and of nuclear structure of neutron rich nuclei. FIPPS will consist of an array of γ and neutron detectors coupled with a fission fragment filter. The chosen solution for the filter is a Gas Filled Magnet (GFM). Both experimental and modeling work was performed in order to extract the key parameters of such a device and design the future GFM of the FIPPS project. Experiments performed with a GFM behind the LOHENGRIN spectrometer demonstrated the capability of additional beam purification.

  16. Differentiated muscles are mandatory for gas-filling of the Drosophila airway system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At the end of development, organs acquire functionality, thereby ensuring autonomy of an organism when it separates from its mother or a protective egg. In insects, respiratory competence starts when the tracheal system fills with gas just before hatching of the juvenile animal. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of this process are not fully understood. Analyses of the phenotype of Drosophila embryos with malformed muscles revealed that they fail to gas-fill their tracheal system. Indeed, we show that major regulators of muscle formation like Lame duck and Blown fuse are important, while factors involved in the development of subsets of muscles including cardiac and visceral muscles are dispensable for this process, suggesting that somatic muscles (or parts of them are essential to enable tracheal terminal differentiation. Based on our phenotypic data, we assume that somatic muscle defect severity correlates with the penetrance of the gas-filling phenotype. This argues that a limiting molecular or mechanical muscle-borne signal tunes tracheal differentiation. We think that in analogy to the function of smooth muscles in vertebrate lungs, a balance of physical forces between muscles and the elasticity of tracheal walls may be decisive for tracheal terminal differentiation in Drosophila.

  17. Principles of separation: indications and therapeutic targets for plasma exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark E; Balogun, Rasheed A

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal "blood purification," mainly in the form of hemodialysis has been a major portion of the clinical activity of many nephrologists for the past 5 decades. A possibly older procedure, therapeutic plasma exchange, separates and then removes plasma as a method of removing pathogenic material from the patient. In contrast to hemodialysis, therapeutic plasma exchange preferentially removes biologic substances of high molecular weight such as autoantibodies or alloantibodies, antigen-antibody complexes, and Ig paraproteins. These molecular targets may be cleared through two alternative procedures: centrifugal separation and membrane separation. This review presents operational features of each procedure, with relevance to the nephrologist. Kinetics of removal of these plasma constituents are based on the principles of separation by the apheresis technique and by features specific to each molecular target, including their production and compartmentalization in the body. Molecular targets for common renal conditions requiring therapeutic plasma exchange are also discussed in detail.

  18. The size and structure of the laser entrance hole in gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M. B., E-mail: schneider5@llnl.gov; MacLaren, S. A.; Widmann, K.; Meezan, N. B.; Hammer, J. H.; Yoxall, B. E.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hsing, W. W.; Kervin, M. L.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; May, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-12-15

    At the National Ignition Facility, a thermal X-ray drive is created by laser energy from 192 beams heating the inside walls of a gold cylinder called a “hohlraum.” The x-ray drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The laser beams enter the hohlraum via laser entrance holes (LEHs) at each end. The LEH radius decreases as heated plasma from the LEH material blows radially inward but this is largely balanced by hot plasma from the high-intensity region in the center of the LEH pushing radially outward. The x-ray drive on the capsule is deduced by measuring the time evolution and spectra of the x-radiation coming out of the LEH and correcting for geometry and for the radius of the LEH. Previously, the LEH radius was measured using time-integrated images in an x-ray band of 3–5 keV (outside the thermal x-ray region). For gas-filled hohlraums, the measurements showed that the LEH radius is larger than that predicted by the standard High Flux radiation-hydrodynamic model by about 10%. A new platform using a truncated hohlraum (“ViewFactor hohlraum”) is described, which allows time-resolved measurements of the LEH radius at thermal x-ray energies from two views, from outside the hohlraum and from inside the hohlraum. These measurements show that the LEH radius closes during the low power part of the pulse but opens up again at peak power. The LEH radius at peak power is larger than that predicted by the models by about 15%–20% and does not change very much with time. In addition, time-resolved images in a >4 keV (non-thermal) x-ray band show a ring of hot, optically thin gold plasma just inside the optically thick LEH plasma. The structure of this plasma varies with time and with Cross Beam Energy Transfer.

  19. Plasma properties of laser—ablated Si target in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王象泰; 许炳璋; 等

    1996-01-01

    In plasma emission spectra produced by pulsed laser ablation of Si target in air under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium(LTE),the electron temperature and the electron number density are calculated.respectively,It seems that LTE is valid in early stage of the laser induced plasma evolution.

  20. Magnetized Target Fusion Propulsion: Plasma Injectors for MTF Guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2003-01-01

    To achieve increased payload size and decreased trip time for interplanetary travel, a low mass, high specific impulse, high thrust propulsion system is required. This suggests the need for research into fusion as a source of power and high temperature plasma. The plasma would be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) research consists of several related investigations into these topics. These include the orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the gun as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability are under investigation. One of the items under development is the plasma injector. This is a surface breakdown driven plasma generator designed to function at very low pressures. The performance, operating conditions and limitations of these injectors need to be determined.

  1. Convergent ablation measurements of plastic ablators in gas-filled rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Jalinaud, T.; Masse, L.; Galmiche, D.

    2015-10-01

    Indirect-drive implosions experiments were conducted on the Omega Laser Facility to test the performance of uniformly doped plastic ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion. The first convergent ablation measurements in gas-filled rugby hohlraums are reported. Ignition relevant limb velocities in the range from 150 to 300 μm .n s-1 have been reached by varying the laser drive energy and the initial capsule aspect ratio. The measured capsule trajectory and implosion velocity are in good agreement with 2D integrated simulations and a zero-dimensional modeling of the implosions. We demonstrate experimentally the scaling law for the maximum implosion velocity predicted by the improved rocket model [Y. Saillard, Nucl. Fusion 46, 1017 (2006)] in the high-ablation regime case.

  2. Development of a Gas Filled Magnet spectrometer coupled with the Lohengrin spectrometer for fission study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Materna T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The accurate knowledge of the fission of actinides is necessary for studies of innovative nuclear reactor concepts. The fission yields have a direct influence on the evaluation of the fuel inventory or the reactor residual power after shutdown. A collaboration between the ILL, LPSC and CEA has developed a measurement program on fission fragment distributions at ILL in order to measure the isotopic and isomeric yields. The method is illustrated using the 233U(n,f98Y reaction. However, the extracted beam from the Lohengrin spectrometer is not isobaric ions which limits the low yield measurements. Presently, the coupling of the Lohengrin spectrometer with a Gas Filled Magnet (GFM is studied at the ILL in order to define and validate the enhanced purification of the extracted beam. This work will present the results of the spectrometer characterisation, along with a comparison with a dedicated Monte Carlo simulation especially developed for this purpose.

  3. Signal-Pressure Curves of Cascaded Four-Wave Mixing in Gas-Filled Capillary by fs Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bao-Zhen; HUANG Zu-Qia

    2005-01-01

    The theoretical framework for the cascaded four waves mixing (CFWM) in gas-filled capillary by fs pulses is constructed. Based on the theoretical framework, the signal-pressure curves (SPC) of the CFWM in gas-filled capillary by fs pulses are calculated. With a comparison between the theoretical and experimental SPC we have discussed the influence of the walk-off and Phase modulation on the SPC. At the same time, we have discussed the possible origin of the first three peaks of the SPC.

  4. Advanced targets, diagnostics and applications of laser-generated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.

    2015-04-01

    High-intensity sub-nanosecond-pulsed lasers irradiating thin targets in vacuum permit generation of electrons and ion acceleration and high photon yield emission in non-equilibrium plasmas. At intensities higher than 1015 W/cm2 thin foils can be irradiated in the target-normal sheath acceleration regime driving ion acceleration in the forward direction above 1 MeV per charge state. The distributions of emitted ions in terms of energy, charge state and angular emission are controlled by laser parameters, irradiation conditions, target geometry and composition. Advanced targets can be employed to increase the laser absorption in thin foils and to enhance the energy and the yield of the ion acceleration process. Semiconductor detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer and streak camera can be employed as online plasma diagnostics to monitor the plasma parameters, shot by shot. Some applications in the field of the multiple ion implantation, hadrontherapy and nuclear physics are reported.

  5. Computational modelling of the interaction of shock waves with multiple gas-filled bubbles in a liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betney, M. R.; Tully, B.; Hawker, N. A.; Ventikos, Y.

    2015-03-01

    This study presents a computational investigation of the interactions of a single shock wave with multiple gas-filled bubbles in a liquid medium. This work illustrates how multiple bubbles may be used in shock-bubble interactions to intensify the process on a local level. A high resolution front-tracking approach is used, which enables explicit tracking of the gas-liquid interface. The collapse of two identical bubbles, one placed behind the other is investigated in detail, demonstrating that peak pressures in a two bubble arrangement can exceed those seen in single bubble collapse. Additionally, a parametric investigation into the effect of bubble separation is presented. It is found that the separation distance has a significant effect on both the shape and velocity of the main transverse jet of the second bubble. Extending this analysis to effects of relative bubble size, we show that if the first bubble is sufficiently small relative to the second, it may become entirely entrained in the second bubble main transverse jet. In contrast, if the first bubble is substantially larger than the second, it may offer it significant protection from the incident shock. This protection is utilised in the study of a triangular array of three bubbles, with the central bubble being significantly smaller than the outer bubbles. It is demonstrated that, through shielding of bubbles until later in the collapse process, pressures over five times higher than the maximum pressure observed in the single bubble case may be achieved. This corresponds to a peak pressure that is approximately 40 times more intense than the incident shock wave. This work has applications in a number of different fields, including cavitation erosion, explosives, targeted drug delivery/intensification, and shock wave lithotripsy.

  6. Standard practice for examination of seamless, gas-filled, steel pressure vessels using angle beam ultrasonics

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes a contact angle-beam shear wave ultrasonic technique to detect and locate the circumferential position of longitudinally oriented discontinuities and to compare the amplitude of the indication from such discontinuities to that of a specified reference notch. This practice does not address examination of the vessel ends. The basic principles of contact angle-beam examination can be found in Practice E 587. Application to pipe and tubing, including the use of notches for standardization, is described in Practice E 213. 1.2 This practice is appropriate for the ultrasonic examination of cylindrical sections of gas-filled, seamless, steel pressure vessels such as those used for the storage and transportation of pressurized gasses. It is applicable to both isolated vessels and those in assemblies. 1.3 The practice is intended to be used following an Acoustic Emission (AE) examination of stacked seamless gaseous pressure vessels (with limited surface scanning area) described in Test Met...

  7. Collapse and rebound of a gas-filled spherical bubble immersed in a diagnostic ultrasonic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymé-Bellegarda, E J

    1990-08-01

    This work is concerned with the influence of the finite-amplitude distortion of a driving diagnostic ultrasonic field on the collapse and rebound of a gas-filled spherical microbubble, present in the exposed compressible liquid. Such an analysis is especially important since one of the mechanisms for cavitation damage comes from the very large gas pressures generated at bubble collapse and in the subsequent pressure wave formed by bubble rebound. Gilmore's model [F.R. Gilmore, "The growth or collapse of a spherical bubble in a viscous compressible liquid," Hydrodynamics Lab. Rep. No. 26-4, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (1952)] for bubble dynamics is used to obtain the motion of the bubble interface when subjected to a pulsed diagnostic ultrasonic field of large amplitude. Knowledge of the bubble motion allows one to derive the pressure distribution around the bubble. Numerical results over a range of initial bubble sizes, acoustic pressures, and frequencies relevant to medical use show that the strength of the pressure spikes radiated by the rebounding bubble depends upon (i) the acoustic frequency (f), (ii) the initial bubble size (R0), and (iii) the magnitude of the pressure amplitude of the fundamental (PF) in a Fourier series description of the distorted pulse. As the pressure spikes propagate outward from the bubble wall, their strength is attenuated as the reciprocal of the distance from the center of collapse.

  8. Convergent ablation measurements with gas-filled rugby hohlraum on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Jalinaud, T.; Galmiche, D.

    2016-03-01

    Convergent ablation experiments with gas-filled rugby hohlraum were performed for the first time on the OMEGA laser facility. A time resolved 1D streaked radiography of capsule implosion is acquired in the direction perpendicular to hohlraum axis, whereas a 2D gated radiography is acquired at the same time along the hohlraum axis on a x-ray framing camera. The implosion trajectory has been measured for various kinds of uniformly doped ablators, including germanium-doped and silicon-doped polymers (CH), at two different doping fraction (2% and 4% at.). Our experiments aimed also at measuring the implosion performance of laminated capsules. A laminated ablator is constituted by thin alternate layers of un-doped and doped CH. It has been previously shown in planar geometry that laminated ablators could mitigate Rayleigh Taylor growth at ablation front. Our results confirm that the implosion of a capsule constituted with a uniform or laminated ablator behaves similarly, in accordance with post-shot simulations performed with the CEA hydrocode FCI2.

  9. Gas-filled Rugby hohlraum energetics and implosions experiments on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, Alexis; Philippe, F.; Tassin, V.; Seytor, P.; Monteil, M. C.; Villette, B.; Reverdin, C.

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments [1,2] have validated the x-ray drive enhancement provided by rugby-shaped hohlraums over cylinders in the indirect drive (ID) approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This class of hohlraum is the baseline design for the Laser Mégajoule program, is also applicable to the National Ignition Facility and could therefore benefit ID Inertial Fusion Energy studies. We have carried out a serie of energetics and implosions experiments with OMEGA ``scale 1'' rugby hohlraums [1,2]. For empty hohlraums these experiments provide complementary measurements of backscattered light along 42 cone, as well as detailed drive history. In the case of gas-filled rugby hohlraums we have also study implosion performance (symmetry, yield, bangtime, hotspot spectra...) using a high contrast shaped pulse leading to a different implosion regime and for a range of capsule convergence ratios. These results will be compared with FCI2 hydrocodes calculations and future experimental campaigns will be suggested. [4pt] [1] F. Philippe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 035004 (2010). [0pt] [2] H. Robey et al., Phys. Plasnas 17, 056313 (2010).

  10. Factors that affect the efficiency of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide transfection by insonated gas-filled lipid microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Lu, Cui-Tao

    2008-03-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors that affect the efficiency of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide(AS-ODNs) transfection by insonated gas-filled lipid microbubbles. Methods: Lipid microbubbles filled with two types of gases-air and C3F8, were prepared respectively. An AS-ODNs sequence HA824 and a breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3 were used to define the various operating variables determining the transfection efficiency of insonated microbubbles. Two mixing methods, three levels of mixing speed, different mixing durations and various ultrasound initiation time after mixing were examined respectively. Transfection efficiency was detected by fluorescence microscopy. Results: C3F8 microbubbles gave higher levels of AS-ODNs transfection efficiency than air microbubbles in all test conditions. Transfection efficiency resulted from mixing method A (incubation of HA824 and microbubbles before mixing cells) did not show significant difference with that of mixing method B (without incubation of HA824 and microbubbles before mixing cells). Mixing speed, duration of mixing and ultrasound initiation time after mixing were central to determining HA824 transfection efficiency in vitro. The optimum parameters for SK-BR-3 cells were found at a mixing speed of 40-50 rpm for 30-60 s with less than 60 s delay before ultrasound. Conclusion: Ultrasound-mediated AS-ODNs transfection enhanced by C3F8-filled lipid microbubbles represents an effective avenue for AS-ODNs transfer.

  11. Factors that affect the efficiency of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide transfection by insonated gas-filled lipid microbubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yingzheng [General Hospital of Beijing Military Command of PLA, Department of Clinical Pharmacology (China)], E-mail: lctuua@yahoo.com.cn; Lu Cuitao [Madam Medical Management Group (China)

    2008-03-15

    Objective: To investigate the factors that affect the efficiency of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide(AS-ODNs) transfection by insonated gas-filled lipid microbubbles. Methods: Lipid microbubbles filled with two types of gases-air and C{sub 3}F{sub 8}, were prepared respectively. An AS-ODNs sequence HA824 and a breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3 were used to define the various operating variables determining the transfection efficiency of insonated microbubbles. Two mixing methods, three levels of mixing speed, different mixing durations and various ultrasound initiation time after mixing were examined respectively. Transfection efficiency was detected by fluorescence microscopy. Results: C{sub 3}F{sub 8} microbubbles gave higher levels of AS-ODNs transfection efficiency than air microbubbles in all test conditions. Transfection efficiency resulted from mixing method A (incubation of HA824 and microbubbles before mixing cells) did not show significant difference with that of mixing method B (without incubation of HA824 and microbubbles before mixing cells). Mixing speed, duration of mixing and ultrasound initiation time after mixing were central to determining HA824 transfection efficiency in vitro. The optimum parameters for SK-BR-3 cells were found at a mixing speed of 40-50 rpm for 30-60 s with less than 60 s delay before ultrasound. Conclusion: Ultrasound-mediated AS-ODNs transfection enhanced by C{sub 3}F{sub 8}-filled lipid microbubbles represents an effective avenue for AS-ODNs transfer.

  12. Isobar Suppression by Photodetachment in a Gas-Filled RF Quadrupole Ion Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yuan; Havener, Aaron; Havener, Charles; Liang, Felix

    2005-01-01

    A novel method is described for selective suppression of isobar contaminants in negative radioactive ion beams. Negative ion beams extracted from an ion source were decelerated to low energies and injected into a gas-filled radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) ion guide where the ions were cooled and unwanted ions were selectively removed by non-resonant photodetachment with photons of sufficient energy. Simulation studies show that the laser-ion interaction time in a 40 cm long RFQ ion guide can be on the order of milliseconds, thus, high efficiency photodetachment is possible with commercially available CW lasers. There are a number of adjacent-Z species whose negative ions are such that photodetachment can be used to suppress the unwanted negative ion species while leaving the species of interest intact. Examples of particular interest include suppressing the 56Co- component in a mixed 56Ni- + 56Co- beam and the 17O- component in a mixed 17O- + 17F- beam. In a proof-of-principle experiment a CW Nd:YAG laser at...

  13. Universality of Coherent Raman Gain Suppression in Gas-Filled Broadband-Guiding Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, P.; Mridha, M. K.; Novoa, D.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2017-03-01

    As shown in the early 1960s, the gain in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is drastically suppressed when the rate of creation of phonons (via a pump-to-Stokes conversion) is exactly balanced by the rate of phonon annihilation (via a pump-to-anti-Stokes conversion). This occurs when the phonon coherence waves—synchronized vibrations of a large population of molecules—have identical propagation constants for both processes; i.e., they are phase-velocity matched. As recently demonstrated, hydrogen-filled photonic crystal fiber pumped in the vicinity of its zero-dispersion wavelength provides an ideal system for observing this effect. Here we report that Raman gain suppression is actually a universal feature of SRS in gas-filled hollow-core fibers and that it can strongly impair SRS even when the phase mismatch is high, particularly at high pump powers when it is normally assumed that nonlinear processes become more (not less) efficient. This counterintuitive result means that intermodal stimulated Raman scattering (for example, between LP01 and LP11 core modes) begins to dominate at high power levels. The results reported have important implications for fiber-based Raman shifters, amplifiers, or frequency combs, especially for operation in the ultraviolet, where the Raman gain is much higher.

  14. Research on interactions of plasma streams with CFC targets in the Rod Plasma Injector facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaloga Dobromil R.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper present results of optical spectroscopy studies of interactions of intense plasma streams with a solid target made of carbon fibre composite (CFC. The experiments were carried out within the Rod Plasma Injector (RPI IBIS facility. The optical measurements were performed first for a freely propagating plasma stream in order to determine the optimal operational parameters of this facility. Optical emission spectra (OES were recorded for different operational modes of the RPI IBIS device, and spectral lines were identified originating from the working gas (deuterium as well as some lines from the electrode material (molybdenum. Subsequently, optical measurements of plasma interacting with the CFC target were performed. In the optical spectra recorded with the irradiated CFC samples, in addition to deuterium and molybdenum lines, many carbon lines, which enabled to estimate erosion of the investigated targets, were recorded. In order to study changes in the irradiated CFC samples, their surfaces were analysed (before and after several plasma discharges by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS techniques. The analysis of the obtained SEM images showed that the plasma irradiation induces noticeable changes in the surface morphology, for example vaporisation of some carbon fibres and formation of microcracks. The obtained EDS images showed that upon the irradiated target surface, some impurity ions are also deposited, particularly molybdenum ions from the applied electrodes.

  15. Developments for transactinide chemistry experiments behind the gas-filled separator TASCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even, Julia

    2011-12-13

    Topic of this thesis is the development of experiments behind the gas-filled separator TASCA (TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus) to study the chemical properties of the transactinide elements. In the first part of the thesis, the electrodepositions of short-lived isotopes of ruthenium and osmium on gold electrodes were studied as model experiments for hassium. From literature it is known that the deposition potential of single atoms differs significantly from the potential predicted by the Nernst equation. This shift of the potential depends on the adsorption enthalpy of therndeposited element on the electrode material. If the adsorption on the electrode-material is favoured over the adsorption on a surface made of the same element as the deposited atom, the electrode potential is shifted to higher potentials. This phenomenon is called underpotential deposition. Possibilities to automatize an electro chemistry experiment behind the gas-filled separator were explored for later studies with transactinide elements. The second part of this thesis is about the in-situ synthesis of transition-metal-carbonyl complexes with nuclear reaction products. Fission products of uranium-235 and californium-249 were produced at the TRIGA Mainz reactor and thermalized in a carbon-monoxide containing atmosphere. The formed volatile metal-carbonyl complexes could be transported in a gas-stream. Furthermore, short-lived isotopes of tungsten, rhenium, osmium, and iridium were synthesised at the linear accelerator UNILAC at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. The recoiling fusion products were separated from the primary beam and the transfer products in the gas-filled separator TASCA. The fusion products were stopped in the focal plane of TASCA in a recoil transfer chamber. This chamber contained a carbon-monoxide - helium gas mixture. The formed metal-carbonyl complexes could be transported in a gas stream to various experimental setups. All

  16. Reliability of semiconductor and gas-filled diodes for over-voltage protection exposed to ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Koviljka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The wide-spread use of semiconductor and gas-filled diodes for non-linear over-voltage protection results in a variety of possible working conditions. It is therefore essential to have a thorough insight into their reliability in exploitation environments which imply exposure to ionizing radiation. The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of irradiation on over-voltage diode characteristics by exposing the diodes to californium-252 combined neutron/gamma radiation field. The irradiation of semiconductor over-voltage diodes causes severe degradation of their protection characteristics. On the other hand, gas-filled over-voltage diodes exhibit a temporal improvement of performance. The results are presented with the accompanying theoretical interpretations of the observed changes in over-voltage diode behaviour, based on the interaction of radiation with materials constituting the diodes.

  17. Design and fabrication of a data logger for atmospheric pressure, temperature and relative humidity for gas-filled detector development

    CERN Document Server

    Sahu, S; Rudra, Sharmili; Biswas, S; Mohanty, B; Sahu, P K

    2015-01-01

    A novel instrument has been developed to monitor and record the ambient pa- rameters such as temperature, atmospheric pressure and relative humidity. These parameters are very essential for understanding the characteristics such as gain of gas filled detectors like Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and Multi Wire Propor- tional Counter (MWPC). In this article the details of the design, fabrication and operation processes of the device has been presented.

  18. Third-Harmonic Generated in EH32 Mode of a Gas-Filled Waveguide by fs Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bao-Zhen; HUANG Zu-Qia

    2007-01-01

    In this paper it is reported for the first time that the third harmonic generated in EH32 mode of a gas-filled waveguide by fs pulses has higher generation efficiency. The new finding contrasts with the experiment in [C.G. Durfee Ⅲ, S. Backus, M.M. Murnane, and H.C. Kapteyn, Opt. Lett. 22 (1997) 1565]. Some possible factors, which produce the contradiction, are discussed briefly.

  19. Hybrid recoil mass analyzer at IUAC – First results using gas-filled mode and future plans

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Madhavan; S Nath; T Varughese; J Gehlot; A Jhingan; P Sugathan; A K Sinha; R Singh; K M Varier; M C Radhakrishna; E Prasad; S Kalkal; G Mohanto; J J Das; Rakesh Kumar; R P Singh; S Muralithar; R K Bhowmik; A Roy; Rajesh Kumar; S K Suman; A Mandal; T S Datta; J Chacko; A Choudhury; U G Naik; A J Malyadri; M Archunan; J Zacharias; S Rao; Mukesh Kumar; P Barua; E T Subramanian; K Rani; B P Ajith Kumar; K S Golda

    2010-08-01

    Hybrid recoil mass analyzer (HYRA) is a unique, dual-mode spectrometer designed to carry out nuclear reaction and structure studies in heavy and medium-mass nuclei using gas-filled and vacuum modes, respectively and has the potential to address newer domains in nuclear physics accessible using high energy, heavy-ion beams from superconducting LINAC accelerator (being commissioned) and ECR-based high current injector system (planned) at IUAC. The first stage of HYRA is operational and initial experiments have been carried out using gas-filled mode for the detection of heavy evaporation residues and heavy quasielastic recoils in the direction of primary beam. Excellent primary beam rejection and transmission efficiency (comparable with other gas-filled separators) have been achieved using a smaller focal plane detection system. There are plans to couple HYRA to other detector arrays such as Indian national gamma array (INGA) and 4 spin spectrometer for ER tagged spectroscopic/spin distribution studies and for focal plane decay measurements.

  20. The Gas-Filled-Magnet at PRIME Lab: Increased Sensitivity of Cosmogenic Nuclide Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffee, M. W.; Granger, D. E.; Woodruff, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), radionuclides produced either by cosmic-ray interactions or by nucleogenic means can be measured. Typical isotopic abundance ratios range from 1 x 10-10 to 1 x 10-15. The routinely measured radionuclides are 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, and 129I. Be-10, 26Al, and 36Cl have isobaric interferences that cannot be eliminated mass through mass analysis, but dE/dx techniques suppresses these isobars enough to allow successful measurements. There are compromises, the isobar for 26Al, 26Mg, precludes successful measurement of 26Al if AlO- is injected into the accelerator. Mg- doesn't form a stable negative ion so a 26Al measurement requires injection of 26Al-. But the Al- ion is formed inefficiently; secondary ion currents using Al- are ~ 10 times less than an AlO- secondary ion beam. Precision scales with count rate so precise measurement of the 26Al/Al for all but higher ratio samples is difficult. It has long been recognized that a gas-filled-magnet (GFM) could potentially improve the measurement of those radionuclides with intractable isobar interferences. A GFM works on the principle that each element of an isobar pair, e.g. 26Mg and 26Al, has a different average charge state as it traverses a gas (3-4 Torr of N2) contained within the vacuum jacket of a magnet. The magnet steers each species with its own momentum-to-charge ratio on its own distinct radius of curvature. The magnet can be tuned to allow the isotope of interest into a dE/dx detector; most of the isobar doesn't make it into the detector. Using the PRIME Lab GFM we are now able to routinely run 26Al with a precision that is comparable to that obtained with 10Be. We are also using the GFM for routine measurements of 10Be and 36Cl. Although the improvement for these nuclides is not as pronounced as it is for 26Al, the GFM has improved the detection sensitivity for both. Our 10Be background is now ~ 5 x 10-16 and for 36Cl we can now run the source more

  1. Plasma properties of RF magnetron sputtering system using Zn target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nafarizal, N.; Andreas Albert, A. R.; Sharifah Amirah, A. S.; Salwa, O.; Riyaz Ahmad, M. A. [Microelectronic and Nanotechnology - Shamsuddin Research Centre (MiNT-SRC), Faculty of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia)

    2012-06-29

    In the present work, we investigate the fundamental properties of magnetron sputtering plasma using Zn target and its deposited Zn thin film. The magnetron sputtering plasma was produced using radio frequency (RF) power supply and Argon (Ar) as ambient gas. A Langmuir probe was used to collect the current from the plasma and from the current intensity, we calculate the electron density and electron temperature. The properties of Zn sputtering plasma at various discharge conditions were studied. At the RF power ranging from 20 to 100 W and gas pressure 5 mTorr, we found that the electron temperature was almost unchanged between 2-2.5 eV. On the other hand, the electron temperature increased drastically from 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} to 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3} when the discharge gas pressure increased from 5 to 10 mTorr. The electron microscope images show that the grain size of Zn thin film increase when the discharge power is increased. This may be due to the enhancement of plasma density and sputtered Zn density.

  2. Front surface structured targets for enhancing laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Joseph; George, Kevin; Ji, Liangliang; Yalamanchili, Sasir; Simonoff, Ethan; Cochran, Ginevra; Daskalova, Rebecca; Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Lewis, Nathan; Schumacher, Douglass

    2016-10-01

    We present recent progress made using front surface structured interfaces for enhancing ultrashort, relativistic laser-plasma interactions. Structured targets can increase laser absorption and enhance ion acceleration through a number of mechanisms such as direct laser acceleration and laser guiding. We detail experimental results obtained at the Scarlet laser facility on hollow, micron-scale plasma channels for enhancing electron acceleration. These targets show a greater than three times enhancement in the electron cutoff energy as well as an increased slope temperature for the electron distribution when compared to a flat interface. Using three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we have modeled the interaction to give insight into the physical processes responsible for the enhancement. Furthermore, we have used PIC simulations to design structures that are more advantageous for ion acceleration. Such targets necessitate advanced target fabrication methods and we describe techniques used to manufacture optimized structures, including vapor-liquid-solid growth, cryogenic etching, and 3D printing using two-photon-polymerization. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-14-1-0085.

  3. IR emission from the target during plasma magnetron sputter deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cormier, P.-A. [GREMI, Université d' Orléans, 14 rue d' Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex2 (France); Thomann, A.-L., E-mail: anne-lise.thomann@univ-orleans.fr [GREMI, Université d' Orléans, 14 rue d' Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex2 (France); Dolique, V. [LMA, Université Claude Bernard Lyon I 7 Avenue Pierre de Coubertin, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Balhamri, A. [ChIPS, Université de Mons, 20 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Université Hassan 1, École Supérieure de Technologie, 218 Berrechid (Morocco); Dussart, R.; Semmar, N.; Lecas, T.; Brault, P. [GREMI, Université d' Orléans, 14 rue d' Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex2 (France); Snyders, R. [ChIPS, Université de Mons, 20 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Materia Nova R and D Center, Avenue Corpernic 1, Mons (Belgium); Konstantinidis, S. [Materia Nova R and D Center, Avenue Corpernic 1, Mons (Belgium)

    2013-10-31

    In this article, energy flux measurements at the substrate location are reported. In particular, the energy flux related to IR radiation emanating from the titanium (10 cm in diam.) target surface is quantified during magnetron sputter deposition processes. In order to modulate the plasma–target surface interaction and the radiative energy flux thereof, the working conditions were varied systematically. The experiments were performed in balanced and unbalanced magnetic field configurations with direct current (DC), pulsed DC and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. The power delivered to the plasma was varied too, typically from 100 to 800 W. Our data show that the IR contribution to the total energy flux at the substrate increases with the supplied sputter power and as the discharge is driven in a pulse regime. In the case of HiPIMS discharge generated with a balanced magnetic field, the energy flux associated to the IR radiation produced by the target becomes comparable to the energy flux originating from collisional processes (interaction of plasma particles such as ions, electron, sputtered atoms etc. with the substrate). From IR contribution, it was possible to estimate the rise of the target surface temperature during the sputtering process. Typical values found for a titanium target are in the range 210 °C to 870 °C. - Highlights: • During magnetron sputtering process the heated target emits IR radiation. • We follow in real time the energy transferred to the deposited film by IR radiation. • IR radiation can be the main energy contribution in balanced pulsed processes. • IR radiation might affect the deposition process and the final film properties.

  4. Laser absorption and electron propagation in rippled plasma targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-10-01

    Efficient absorption of laser energy and the collimated propagation of relativistic electron beams (generated by the laser target interaction) in plasma are two issues which are of significant importance for applications such as fast ignition scheme of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It is shown with the help of 2-D Particle- In- Cell simulations that introducing density ripples transverse to the laser propagation direction enhances the efficiency of laser power absorption. Furthermore, the density ripples are also instrumental in suppressing the Weibel instability of the propagating electron beam (which is responsible for the divergence of the beam). A physical understanding of the two effects is also provided.

  5. Ultrafast Mid-IR Nonlinear Optics in Gas-filled Hollow-core Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Selim

    action of self-focusing self-phase modulation (SPM) and anomalous GVD allows strong soliton self-compression down to sub-single cycle duration inside HC-AR fiber. The peak intensity at the maximum temporal compression can reach over 1014 W/cm2 which is sufficient to ionize the gas and form a plasma. We...

  6. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  7. Ion current extracted from a self ignition plasma around the target immersed in a pulsed rf ICP methane plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Mizuno, Giichiro; Takagi, Toshinori; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Horibe, Hiroshi; Yukimura, Ken

    2003-05-01

    When a pulsed voltage is applied to a target immersed in plasma, the surrounding medium of the target is self-ignited under an appropriate discharge condition. For a three-dimensional substrate, ion implantation and deposition of the plasma species are promising to be uniformly attained by the self-ignition plasma. A retained dose of conformal ion implantation may increase with the self-ignition plasma generated in the target-immersed plasma. Ion are extracted from both the target-immersed plasma and the self-ignition plasma. In this research, a stainless steel target with a diameter of 140 mm and a thickness of 18 mm was immersed in a pulsed inductively coupled methane plasma to which a pulse voltage of -400 V to -10 kV with a width of 12 μs was repeatedly applied. The self-ignition plasma was generated at the voltage higher than about -1.2 kV. It was found that the shape of the current waveform changes by varying the applied voltage due to the change of the current from the self-ignition plasma.

  8. Wavelength scaling of terahertz radiation in plasma gas targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hang; Huang, Suxia; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Liangliang

    2016-11-01

    In our experiments, terahertz radiation via two-color generated laser plasma gas targets is studied using nitrogen and the noble gases (helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon) as the generation media. Carried out at the infrared beam of the advanced laser light source, we studied the effects of different pump wavelengths (between 1200 nm and 1600 nm) on THz generation. Terahertz pulse energy is measured as functions of input pulse energy, gas species, gas pressure. The experimental results show that the terahertz pulse energy approach a maximum value of 0.0578 μJ per pulse in xenon gas when the input 1600 nm pulse energy is 0.4 mJ per pulse.

  9. Targeted discovery and validation of plasma biomarkers of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Catherine; Zhou, Yong; Dator, Romel; Ginghina, Carmen; Zhao, Yanchun; Movius, James; Peskind, Elaine; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Quinn, Joseph; Galasko, Douglas; Stewart, Tessandra; Shi, Min; Zhang, Jing

    2014-11-07

    Despite extensive research, an unmet need remains for protein biomarkers of Parkinson's disease (PD) in peripheral body fluids, especially blood, which is easily accessible clinically. The discovery of such biomarkers is challenging, however, due to the enormous complexity and huge dynamic range of human blood proteins, which are derived from nearly all organ systems, with those originating specifically from the central nervous system (CNS) being exceptionally low in abundance. In this investigation of a relatively large cohort (∼300 subjects), selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assays (a targeted approach) were used to probe plasma peptides derived from glycoproteins previously found to be altered in the CNS based on PD diagnosis or severity. Next, the detected peptides were interrogated for their diagnostic sensitivity and specificity as well as the correlation with PD severity, as determined by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). The results revealed that 12 of the 50 candidate glycopeptides were reliably and consistently identified in plasma samples, with three of them displaying significant differences among diagnostic groups. A combination of four peptides (derived from PRNP, HSPG2, MEGF8, and NCAM1) provided an overall area under curve (AUC) of 0.753 (sensitivity: 90.4%; specificity: 50.0%). Additionally, combining two peptides (derived from MEGF8 and ICAM1) yielded significant correlation with PD severity, that is, UPDRS (r = 0.293, p = 0.004). The significance of these results is at least two-fold: (1) it is possible to use a targeted approach to identify otherwise very difficult to detect CNS related biomarkers in peripheral blood and (2) the novel biomarkers, if validated in independent cohorts, can be employed to assist with clinical diagnosis of PD as well as monitoring disease progression.

  10. Tunable vacuum-UV to visible ultrafast pulse source based on gas-filled Kagome-PCF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Ka Fai; Travers, John C; Hölzer, Philipp; Joly, Nicolas Y; Russell, Philip St J

    2013-05-06

    An efficient and tunable 176-550 nm source based on the emission of resonant dispersive radiation from ultrafast solitons at 800 nm is demonstrated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF). By careful optimization and appropriate choice of gas, informed by detailed numerical simulations, we show that bright, high quality, localized bands of UV light (relative widths of a few percent) can be generated at all wavelengths across this range. Pulse energies of more than 75 nJ in the deep-UV, with relative bandwidths of ~3%, are generated from pump pulses of a few μJ. Excellent agreement is obtained between numerical and experimental results. The effects of positive and negative axial pressure gradients are also experimentally studied, and the coherence of the deep-UV dispersive wave radiation numerically investigated.

  11. Improved method for determination of the suppression of isobars in a gas-filled rf quadrupole ion guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, P; Hanstorp, D; Lindahl, A O [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Havener, C C; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yun, E-mail: pontus.andersson@physics.gu.s [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 208, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    An improved measurement of the limit of isobar suppression by photodetachment has been made. A gas-filled rf quadrupole ion guide was used to slow down negative ions for the purpose of acquiring long interaction times with the applied laser light. A Nd:YAG laser beam (1064nm) was used to selectively deplete a beam of Co{sup -} ions inside the rf ion guide and the remaining ions was probed using photodetachment by another Nd:YAG laser and a neutral detector. The neutral detection system allowed for a detection limit more than one order of magnitude better than the previous measurements. With this improved detection method, we show that the suppression of Co{sup -} ions was at least four orders of magnitude.

  12. Magnetic discharge accelerating diode for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators based on inertial confinement of ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovskij, K. I.; Shikanov, A. E.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Shatokhin, V. L.; Isaev, A. A.; Martynenko, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with magnetic discharge diode module with inertial electrostatic ions confinement for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators. The basis of the design is geometry with the central hollow cathode surrounded by the outer cylindrical anode and electrodes made of permanent magnets. The induction magnitude about 0.1-0.4 T in the central region of the discharge volume ensures the confinement of electrons in the space of hollow (virtual) cathode and leads to space charge compensation of accelerated ions in the centre. The research results of different excitation modes in pulsed high-voltage discharge are presented. The stable form of the volume discharge preserveing the shape and amplitude of the pulse current in the pressure range of 10-3-10-1 Torr and at the accelerating voltage up to 200 kV was observed.

  13. Portable optical frequency standard based on sealed gas-filled hollow-core fiber using a novel encapsulation technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triches, Marco; Brusch, Anders; Hald, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A portable stand-alone optical frequency standard based on a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber is developed to stabilize a fiber laser to the 13C2H2 P(16) (ν1 + ν3) transition at 1542 nm using saturated absorption. A novel encapsulation technique is developed to permanently seal...... the hollow-core fiber with easy light coupling, showing negligible pressure increase over two months. The locked laser shows a fractional frequency instability below 8 × 10−12 for an averaging time up to 104 s. The lock-point repeatability over one month is 2.6 × 10−11, corresponding to a standard deviation...

  14. Simultaneous Bunching and Precooling Muon Beams with Gas-Filled RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Kevin; Johnson, Rolland P; Neuffer, David V; Roberts, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    High-gradient, pressurized RF cavities are investigated as a means to improve the capture efficiency, to effect phase rotation to reduce momentum spread, and to reduce the angular divergence of a muon beam. Starting close to the pion production target to take advantage of the short incident proton bunch, a series of pressurized RF cavities imbedded in a strong solenoidal field is used to capture, cool, and bunch the muon beam. We discuss the anticipated improvements from this approach to the first stage of a muon cooling channel as well as the requirements of the RF cavities needed to provide high gradients while operating in intense magnetic and radiation fields.

  15. Generation and compression of a target plasma for magnetized target fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Sheehey, P.T. [and others

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is intermediate between the two very different approaches to fusion: inertial and magnetic confinement fusion (ICF and MCF). Results from collaboration with a Russian MTF team on their MAGO experiments suggest they have a target plasma suitable for compression to provide an MTF proof of principle. This LDRD project had tow main objectives: first, to provide a computational basis for experimental investigation of an alternative MTF plasma, and second to explore the physics and computational needs for a continuing program. Secondary objectives included analytic and computational support for MTF experiments. The first objective was fulfilled. The second main objective has several facets to be described in the body of this report. Finally, the authors have developed tools for analyzing data collected on the MAGO a nd LDRD experiments, and have tested them on limited MAGO data.

  16. Static and dynamic characteristics of plasma detachment in gas target scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, N.; Tanaka, M.; Mori, S.; Ohno, N.; Takagi, M.; Takamura, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Suzuki, H.

    1997-12-31

    A simulated gas target divertor experiment has been performed to investigate fundamental physics of plasma detachment in the linear plasma device, TPD-I, which has a high heat flux and high density plasma in steady and pulse state. The existence of density threshold for plasma detachment was observed in our experiment. It is found that the electron-ion temperature relaxation process is a key to determine the density dependence of the plasma detachment. Furthermore, the preliminary experimental results for dynamic behavior of the detached plasma for heat pulse plasma are shown. (author)

  17. High pressure gas filled RF cavity beam test at the Fermilab Mucool test area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemire, Ben

    With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built. As part of the accelerator, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated within a short amount of time. Muons are generated with a huge phase space, so radio frequency cavities placed in strong magnetic fields are required to bunch, focus, and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary. To successfully operate RF cavities in strong magnetic fields, the cavity can be filled with a high pressure gas in order to mitigate breakdown. The gas has the added benefit of providing cooling for the beam. The electron-ion plasma created in the cavity by the beam absorbs energy and degrades the accelerating electric field of the cavity. As electrons account for the majority of the energy loss in the cavity, their removal in a short time is highly desirable. The addition of an electronegative dopant gas can greatly decrease the lifetime of an electron in the cavity. Measurements in pure hydrogen of the energy consumption of electrons in the cavity range in 10-18 and 10-16 joules per RF cycle per electron. When hydrogen doped with dry air is used, measurements of the power consumption indicate an energy loss range of 10-20 to 10-18 joules per RF cycle per ion, two orders of magnitude improvement over non-doped measurements. The lifetime of electrons in a mixture of hydrogen gas and dry air has been measured from cooling-channel for either machine.

  18. Plasma block acceleration via double targets driven by an ultraintense circularly polarized laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanxia; Wang, Jiaxiang; Qi, Xin; Li, Meng; Xing, Yifan; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Wenjun

    2017-03-01

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, plasma block acceleration via radiation pressure from an ultraintense circularly polarized laser pulse with intensity I ≈ 10 22 W / cm 2 is investigated based on a double-target scheme, in which the targets are composed of a pre-target with a relatively low plasma density and a main target with a high plasma density. It has been demonstrated that an appropriately selected pre-target can help to greatly enhance the charge separation field in the main target, which then leads to generation of a strongly accelerated and well directed plasma block with proton energy in GeV magnitude. This result can have potential applications in the plasma block ignition of proton-born fusion.

  19. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, Nigel Oswald [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of ~17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, ~200 g/cm3 and ~20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases ~350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios.

  20. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, N.O.

    1996-10-01

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of {approximately}17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, {approximately}200 g/cm{sup 3} and {approximately}20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases {approximately}350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios.

  1. Effective noninvasive zygosity determination by maternal plasma target region sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently very few noninvasive molecular genetic approaches are available to determine zygosity for twin pregnancies in clinical laboratories. This study aimed to develop a novel method to determine zygosity by using maternal plasma target region sequencing. METHODS: We constructed a statistic model to calculate the possibility of each zygosity type using likelihood ratios ( Li and empirical dynamic thresholds targeting at 4,524 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs loci on 22 autosomes. Then two dizygotic (DZ twin pregnancies,two monozygotic (MZ twin pregnancies and two singletons were recruited to evaluate the performance of our novel method. Finally we estimated the sensitivity and specificity of the model in silico under different cell-free fetal DNA (cff-DNA concentration and sequence depth. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: We obtained 8.90 Gbp sequencing data on average for six clinical samples. Two samples were classified as DZ with L values of 1.891 and 1.554, higher than the dynamic DZ cut-off values of 1.162 and 1.172, respectively. Another two samples were judged as MZ with 0.763 and 0.784 of L values, lower than the MZ cut-off values of 0.903 and 0.918. And the rest two singleton samples were regarded as MZ twins, with L values of 0.639 and 0.757, lower than the MZ cut-off values of 0.921 and 0.799. In silico, the estimated sensitivity of our noninvasive zygosity determination was 99.90% under 10% total cff-DNA concentration with 2 Gbp sequence data. As the cff-DNA concentration increased to 15%, the specificity was as high as 97% with 3.50 Gbp sequence data, much higher than 80% with 10% cff-DNA concentration. SIGNIFICANCE: This study presents the feasibility to noninvasively determine zygosity of twin pregnancy using target region sequencing, and illustrates the sensitivity and specificity under various detecting condition. Our method can act as an alternative approach for zygosity determination of twin pregnancies in clinical

  2. High harmonic generation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckl, O. H.; Baer, C. R. E.; Kränkel, C.; Marchese, S. V.; Schapper, F.; Holler, M.; Südmeyer, T.; Robinson, J. S.; Tisch, J. W. G.; Couny, F.; Light, P.; Benabid, F.; Keller, U.

    2009-10-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) of intense infrared laser radiation (Ferray et al., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 21:L31, 1988; McPherson et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 4:595, 1987) enables coherent vacuum-UV (VUV) to soft-X-ray sources. In the usual setup, energetic femtosecond laser pulses are strongly focused into a gas jet, restricting the interaction length to the Rayleigh range of the focus. The average photon flux is limited by the low conversion efficiency and the low average power of the complex laser amplifier systems (Keller, Nature 424:831, 2003; Südmeyer et al., Nat. Photonics 2:599, 2008; Röser et al., Opt. Lett. 30:2754, 2005; Eidam et al., IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 15:187, 2009) which typically operate at kilohertz repetition rates. This represents a severe limitation for many experiments using the harmonic radiation in fields such as metrology or high-resolution imaging. Driving HHG with novel high-power diode-pumped multi-megahertz laser systems has the potential to significantly increase the average photon flux. However, the higher average power comes at the expense of lower pulse energies because the repetition rate is increased by more than a thousand times, and efficient HHG is not possible in the usual geometry. So far, two promising techniques for HHG at lower pulse energies were developed: external build-up cavities (Gohle et al., Nature 436:234, 2005; Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94:193, 2005) and resonant field enhancement in nanostructured targets (Kim et al., Nature 453:757, 2008). Here we present a third technique, which has advantages in terms of ease of HHG light extraction, transverse beam quality, and the possibility to substantially increase conversion efficiency by phase-matching (Paul et al., Nature 421:51, 2003; Ren et al., Opt. Express 16:17052, 2008; Serebryannikov et al., Phys. Rev. E (Stat. Nonlinear Soft Matter Phys.) 70:66611, 2004; Serebryannikov et al., Opt. Lett. 33:977, 2008; Zhang et al., Nat. Phys. 3

  3. Analyses of the plasma generated by laser irradiation on sputtered target for determination of the thickness used for plasma generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaki, Masafumi, E-mail: masafumi.kumaki@riken.jp [Cooperative Major in Nuclear Energy, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Ikeda, Shunsuke; Sekine, Megumi; Munemoto, Naoya [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Cinquegrani, David [American Nuclear Society, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Washio, Masakazu [Cooperative Major in Nuclear Energy, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    In Brookhaven National Laboratory, laser ion source has been developed to provide heavy ion beams by using plasma generation with 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser irradiation onto solid targets. The laser energy is transferred to the target material and creates a crater on the surface. However, only the partial material can be turned into plasma state and the other portion is considered to be just vaporized. Since heat propagation in the target material requires more than typical laser irradiation period, which is typically several ns, only the certain depth of the layers may contribute to form the plasma. As a result, the depth is more than 500 nm because the base material Al ions were detected. On the other hand, the result of comparing each carbon thickness case suggests that the surface carbon layer is not contributed to generate plasma.

  4. Integrated processing of contrast pulse sequencing ultrasound imaging for enhanced active contrast of hollow gas filled silica nanoshells and microshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Casey N; Liberman, Alexander; Paul Martinez, H; Barback, Christopher V; Mattrey, Robert F; Blair, Sarah L; Trogler, William C; Kummel, Andrew C; Wu, Zhe

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing developments in the field of contrast-enhanced ultrasound both in the creation of new contrast agents and in imaging modalities. These contrast agents have been employed to study tumor vasculature in order to improve cancer detection and diagnosis. An in vivo study is presented of ultrasound imaging of gas filled hollow silica microshells and nanoshells which have been delivered intraperitoneally to an IGROV-1 tumor bearing mouse. In contrast to microbubbles, this formulation of microshells provided strong ultrasound imaging signals by shell disruption and release of gas. Imaging of the microshells in an animal model was facilitated by novel image processing. Although the particle signal could be identified by eye under live imaging, high background obfuscated the particle signal in still images and near the borders of the tumor with live images. Image processing techniques were developed that employed the transient nature of the particle signal to selectively filter out the background signal. By applying image registration, high-pass, median, threshold, and motion filtering, a short video clip of the particle signal was compressed into a single image, thereby resolving the silica shells within the tumor. © 2012 American Vacuum Society.

  5. Understanding fast neutrons utilizing a water Cherenkov detector and a gas-filled detector at the soudan underground laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Chiranjibi

    Many experiments are currently searching for Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs), a well-motivated class of hypothetical dark matter candidates. These direct dark matter detection experiments are located in deep underground to shield from cosmic-ray muons and the fast neutrons they produce. Fast neutrons are particularly dangerous to WIMP detectors because they can penetrate a WIMP-search experiment's neutron shielding. Once inside, these fast neutrons can interact with high-Z material near the WIMP detector, producing slower neutrons capable of mimicking the expected WIMP signal. My research uses two detectors located in Soudan Underground Laboratory to understand fast neutron production by muons in an underground environment: a water-Cherenkov detector sensitive to fast neutrons; and a gas-filled detector sensitive to charged particles like muons. The different kinds of selection criterion and their efficiencies are reported in this thesis. This thesis estimate the number of high energy neutron-like candidates associated with a nearby muon by using data from both detector systems.

  6. Coherent Population Trapping Resonances in Buffer Gas-filled Cs Vapor Cells with Push-Pull Optical Pumping

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiaochi; Guérandel, Stéphane; Gorecki, Christophe; de Clercq, Emeric; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2013-01-01

    We report on a theoretical study and experimental characterization of coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances in buffer gas-filled vapor cells with push-pull optical pumping (PPOP) on Cs D1 line. We point out that the push-pull interaction scheme is identical to the so-called lin per lin polarization scheme. Expressions of the relevant dark states, as well as of absorption, are reported. The experimental setup is based on the combination of a distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser, a pigtailed intensity Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator (MZ EOM) for optical sidebands generation and a Michelson-like interferometer. A microwave technique to stabilize the transfer function operating point of the MZ EOM is implemented for proper operation. A CPT resonance contrast as high as 78% is reported in a cm-scale cell for the magnetic-field insensitive clock transition. The impact of the laser intensity on the CPT clock signal key parameters (linewidth - contrast - linewidth/contrast ratio) is reported for three ...

  7. FIBER LASER CONSTRUCTION AND THEORY INCLUDING FIBER BRAGG GRATINGS Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs) and applications of gas filled PCFs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, Jacob O. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-08

    The principles used in fiber lasers have been around for a while but it is only within the past few years that fiber lasers have become commercially available and used in high power laser applications. This paper will focus on the basic design principles of fiber lasers, including fiber Bragg gratings, principles of operation, and forms of non-linear effects. It will describe the type and associated doping of the fiber used and difficult designs used to guide energy from the pump to the active medium. Topics covered include fiber laser design, fiber Bragg gratings, materials used, differences in quantum energy loss, thermo-optical effects, stimulated Raman scattering, Brillouin scattering, photonic crystal fibers and applications of gas filled Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs). Thanks to fiber lasers, the energy required to produce high power lasers has greatly dropped and as such we can now produce kW power using a standard 120V 15A circuit. High power laser applications are always requiring more power. The fiber laser can now deliver the greater power that these applications demand. Future applications requiring more power than can be combined using standard materials or configurations will need to be developed to overcome the high energy density and high non-linear optical scattering effects present during high power operations.

  8. Measurement of plasma momentum exerted on target by a small helicon plasma thruster and comparison with direct thrust measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Komuro, Atsushi; Ando, Akira

    2015-02-01

    Momentum, i.e., force, exerted from a small helicon plasma thruster to a target plate is measured simultaneously with a direct thrust measurement using a thrust balance. The calibration coefficient relating a target displacement to a steady-state force is obtained by supplying a dc to a calibration coil mounted on the target, where a force acting to a small permanent magnet located near the coil is directly measured by using a load cell. As the force exerted by the plasma flow to the target plate is in good agreement with the directly measured thrust, the validity of the target technique is demonstrated under the present operating conditions, where the thruster is operated in steady-state. Furthermore, a calibration coefficient relating a swing amplitude of the target to an impulse bit is also obtained by pulsing the calibration coil current. The force exerted by the pulsed plasma, which is estimated from the measured impulse bit and the pulse width, is also in good agreement with that obtained for the steady-state operation; hence, the thrust assessment of the helicon plasma thruster by the target is validated for both the steady-state and pulsed operations.

  9. Reaching High-Yield Fusion with a Slow Plasma Liner Compressing a Magnetized Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D D; Parks, P B

    2008-03-18

    Dynamics of the compression of a magnetized plasma target by a heavy liner made of partially ionized high high-Z material is discussed. A 'soft-landing' (shockless) mode of the liner deceleration is analyzed. Conclusion is drawn that such mode is possible for the liners whose thickness at the time of the first contact with the target is smaller than, roughly, 10% of the initial (un-compressed) target radius. A combination of the plasma liner with one or two glide cones allows for a direct access to the area near the center of the reactor chamber. One can then generate plasma target inside the plasma liner at the optimum time. The other advantage of the glide cones is that they can be used to deliver additional fuel to the center of the target near the point of a maximum compression and thereby increase the fusion yield.

  10. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberger, H., E-mail: Hubertus.Bromberger@mpsd.mpg.de; Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C. [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Günther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Calegari, F. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Cavalleri, A. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Rd. Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-31

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  11. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Bromberger, H; Belli, F; Liu, H; Calegari, F; Chavez-Cervantes, M; Li, M T; Lin, C T; Abdolvand, A; Russell, P St J; Cavalleri, A; Travers, J C; Gierz, I

    2015-01-01

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few {\\mu}J energy generate vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  12. Theoretical Description of the Third Order Parametric Wave Mixing in a Gas-Filled Capillary of Femto-Second Laser Pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bao-Zhen; HUANG Zu-Qia

    2004-01-01

    The theoretical signal-pressure curves are calculated from approximate analytical solutions of the coupledequations describing the third order parametric wave mixing in a gas-filled capillary of femto-second laser pulses. Thecomparison with the corresponding experimental curves suggests that the following three factors exert important influ-ences on the degree of fitting between the theoretical and experimental results: the walk-off, the phase modulation, andthe third order harmonic of idler pulse.

  13. First results from simultaneous 527 nm and 351 nm probe beam interactions in a long scalelength plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J. D.; MacKinnon, A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Froula, D.; Gregori, G.; Berger, R. L.; Campbell, K.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Suter, L. J.; Williams, E. A.; Bahr, R.; Seka, W.

    2002-11-01

    We investigate the stimulated Raman and Brillouin backscattered light from simultaneous 527 nm and 351 nm probe beams incident on a long scalelength ignition-like plasma. These experiments are important for both determining backscattering physics mechanisms and for evaluating laser power loss expected in planned ignition experiments. The plasma is formed using 18 kJ of 351 nm light from the Omega laser in a 1 ns pulse incident on a gas-filled balloon target. The two probe beams, which are delayed 0.5 ns relative to the plasma forming beams, are separated by 42^rc, have vacuum intensity of CO2 plasma. We describe the experimental results and simulations using the LASNEX hydrodynamic code and the pF3D laser-plasma wave propagation code. Work performed under the auspicies of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W--7405--ENG--48.

  14. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samulyak, Roman V. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Parks, Paul [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  15. Evaporation and Vapor Shielding of CFC Targets Exposed to Plasma Heat Fluxes Relevant to ITER ELMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research, TRINITI, Kostromskaya, 12A, 79, RU-142092 Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Landman, I. [FZK-Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association Euratom-FZK, Technik und Umwelt, Postfach 3640, D-7602l Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Carbon-fibre composite (CFC) is foreseen presently as armour material for the divertor target in ITER. During the transient processes such as instabilities of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) the target as anticipated will be exposed to the plasma heat loads of a few MJ/m{sup 2} on the time scale of a fraction of ms, which causes an intense evaporation at the target surface and contaminates tokamak plasma by evaporated carbon. The ITER transient loads are not achievable at existing tokamaks therefore for testing divertor armour materials other facilities, in particular plasma guns are employed. In the present work the CFC targets have been tested for ITER at the plasma gun facility MK- 200 UG in Troitsk by ELM relevant heat fluxes. The targets in the applied magnetic field up to 2 T were irradiated by hydrogen plasma streams of diameter 6 - 8 cm, impact ion energy 2 - 3 keV, pulse duration 0.05 ms and energy density varying in the range 0.05 - 1 MJ/m{sup 2}. Primary attention has been focused on the measurement of evaporation threshold and investigation of carbon vapor properties. Fast infrared pyrometer, optical and VUV spectrometers, framing cameras and plasma calorimeters were applied as diagnostics. The paper reports the results obtained on the evaporation threshold of CFC, the evaporation rate of the carbon fibers oriented parallel and perpendicular to the exposed target surface, the velocity of carbon vapor motion along and across the magnetic field lines, and the parameters of carbon plasma such as temperature, density and ionization state measured up to the distance 15 cm at varying plasma load. First experimental results on investigation of the vapor shield onset conditions are presented also. (authors)

  16. Physics of laser fusion. Vol. I. Theory of the coronal plasma in laser-fusion targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, C.E.

    1981-12-01

    This monograph deals with the physics of the coronal region in laser fusion targets. The corona consists of hot plasma which has been evaporated from the initially solid target during laser heating. It is in the corona that the laser light is absorbed by the target, and the resulting thermal energy is conducted toward cold high-density regions, where ablation occurs. The topics to be discussed are theoretical mechanisms for laser light absorption and reflection, hot-electron production, and the physics of heat conduction in laser-produced plasmas. An accompanying monograph by H. Ahlstrom (Vol.II) reviews the facilities, diagnostics, and data from recent laser fusion experiments.

  17. Fundamental Study of Nuclear Pumped Laser Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-23

    rate of up to 2pps. The plasma cell/gas- handling system obtains base pressures of 5xlO 8 Torr prior to high purity gas fill. The plasma cell is...synchronization problems, etc.). Due to the exceptional reproducibility of e-beam characteristics, todate , only prefire has caused data rejection. IV. Recent

  18. The target for the new plasma/wall experiment Magnum-PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M.A. van den, E-mail: m.a.vandenberg@rijnhuizen.nl [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Brons, S.; Kruijt, O.G.; Scholten, J.; Pasquet, R.; Smeets, P.H.M. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Schweer, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, IEF-4, Euratom association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); De Temmerman, G. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    The construction of Magnum-PSI is in its final stage. The aim is to provide a controlled and highly accessible linear plasma device to perform the basic plasma-surface interaction research needed for the design of the plasma facing components of future fusion devices. This contribution will focus on the thermal challenges imposed by those extreme conditions on the design of the target holder of Magnum-PSI. The target holder is designed to allow the exposure of large size targets with variable inclination angles with respect to the magnetic field. A test set up was made to test different interlayers (grafoil, soft metal sheets) and improve the thermal contact between the target and the heat sink. In addition, a modular target holder for sequential exposure of smaller size targets has been designed. Finite element modeling using the ANSYS code was used to optimize the cooling geometry and to predict the temperature profiles due to the heat load of the plasma. Experiments were done on the Pilot-PSI linear device to validate the thermal calculations. Calorimetry and infrared thermography were used to experimentally measure the temperature profile on the target and the heat deposition.

  19. Modeling of RF Magnetron Plasma in N2 with dielectric target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeltier, Steven; Revel, Adrien; Sabary, Frédéric; Secouard, Christophe; Minea, Tiberiu

    2016-09-01

    Thin film batteries technology requires a solid electrolyte suitable for its operation. One option is to use LiPON deposited from Li3PO4 target by radio frequency magnetron sputtering in nitrogen plasma. Despite the successful implementation of this technology, the processes occurring into the plasma and at the substrate during deposition need to be well understood. Modelling is an interesting approach to study the undergoing phenomena such as the quantification of plasma species, the potential evolution in the reactor, the shape of the racetrack and the trajectories of sputtered species. The present results are obtained from two models, (i) a 0D model which describes the plasma kinetic and (ii) a 2D model assuming the axial symmetry. The latter uses a Particle-In-Cell Monte-Carlo approach and self-consistently describes the plasma creation and charged particles trajectories in the reactor. The geometry and the magnetic field correspond to a real CEA-LETI reactor .The dielectric target is 6'' diameter. Radiofrequency polarization of the target is taken into account in the model. Results on the evolution of ions density in plasma, the electric-field and the self-bias on the target, are discussed.

  20. Analysis of conductive target influence in plasma jet experiments through helium metastable and electric field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darny, T.; Pouvesle, J.-M.; Puech, V.; Douat, C.; Dozias, S.; Robert, Eric

    2017-04-01

    The use of cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets for in vivo treatments implies most of the time plasma interaction with conductive targets. The effect of conductive target contact on the discharge behavior is studied here for a grounded metallic target and compared to the free jet configuration. In this work, realized with a plasma gun, we measured helium metastable HeM (23S1) concentration (by laser absorption spectroscopy) and electric field (EF) longitudinal and radial components (by electro-optic probe). Both diagnostics were temporally and spatially resolved. Mechanisms after ionization front impact on the target surface have been identified. The remnant conductive ionized channel behind the ionization front electrically transiently connects the inner high voltage electrode to the target. Due to impedance mismatching between the ionized channel and the target, a secondary ionization front is initiated and rapidly propagates from the target surface to the inner electrode through this ionized channel. This leads to a greatly enhanced HeM production inside the plasma plume and the capillary. Forward and reverse dynamics occur with further multi reflections of more or less damped ionization fronts between the inner electrode and the target as long as the ionized channel is persisting. This phenomenon is very sensitive to parameters such as target distance and ionized channel conductivity affecting electrical coupling between these two and evidenced using positive or negative voltage polarity and nitrogen admixture. In typical operating conditions for the plasma gun used in this work, it has been found that after the secondary ionization front propagation, when the ionized channel is conductive enough, a glow like discharge occurs with strong conduction current. HeM production and all species excitation, especially reactive ones, are then driven by high voltage pulse evolution. The control of forward and reverse dynamics, impacting on the production of the glow

  1. Propagation velocities of laser-produced plasmas from copper wire targets and water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyo-Dong; Alexander, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the plasma propagation velocities resulting from KrF laser irradiation of copper wire target (75 microns diameter) and water droplets (75 microns diameter) at irradiance levels ranging from 25 to 150 GW/sq cm. Plasma propagation velocities were measured using a streak camera system oriented orthogonally to the high-energy laser propagation axis. Plasma velocities were studied as a function of position in the focused beam. Results show that both the shape of the plasma formation and material removal from the copper wire are different and depend on whether the targets are focused or slightly defocused (approximately = 0.5 mm movement in the beam axis). Plasma formation and its position relative to the target is an important factor in determining the practical focal point during high-energy laser interaction with materials. At irradiance of 100 GW/sq cm, the air plasma has two weak-velocity components which propagate toward and away from the incident laser while a strong-velocity component propagates away from the laser beam as a detonation wave. Comparison of the measured breakdown velocities (in the range of 2.22-2.27 x 10(exp 5) m/s) for air and the value calculated by the nonlinear breakdown wave theory at irradiance of 100 GW/sq cm showed a quantitative agreement within approximately 50% while the linear theory and Gaussian pulse theory failed. The detonation wave velocities of plasma generated from water droplets and copper wire targets for different focused cases were measured and analyzed theoretically. The propagation velocities of laser-induced plasma liquid droplets obtained by previous research are compared with current work.

  2. Measurement of MTF Target Plasma Temperature Using Filtered Photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Lindemuth, P.T. Sheehey Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico Abstract Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is an approach to fusion...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 8. PERFORMING...S!;;;e = r, riode fRdiode(E)Tfitrer(E)x J p asma J:rea E=leV (I) X pspectrum ( E • X )dEdfJ.( A diode • X )dV (X) where sdiode is the signal of

  3. Electromagnetic Confined Plasma Target for Interaction Studies with Intense Laser Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielbauer, B; Ursescu, U; Trotsenko, S; Spillmann, U; Schuch, R; Stohlker, T; Kuhl, T; Borneis, S; Schenkel, T; McDonald, J; Schneider, D

    2006-08-09

    The paper describes a novel application of an electron beam ion trap as a plasma target facility for intense laser-plasma interaction studies. The low density plasma target ({approx}10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3}) is confined in a mobile cryogenic electromagnetic charged particle trap, with the magnetic confinement field of 1-3T maintained by a superconducting magnet. Ion plasmas for a large variety of ion species and charge states are produced and maintained within the magnetic field and the space charge of an energetic electron beam in the ''Electron Beam Ion Trap'' (EBIT) geometry. Intense laser beams (optical lasers, x-ray lasers and upcoming ''X-Ray Free Electron Lasers'' (XFEL)) provide strong time varying electromagnetic fields (>10{sup 12} V/cm in femto- to nano-sec pulses) for interactions with electromagnetically confined neutral/non-neutral plasmas. The experiments are aimed to gain understanding of the effects of intense photon fields on ionization/excitation processes, the ionization balance, as well as photon polarization effects. First experimental scenarios and tests with an intense laser that utilize the ion plasma target are outlined.

  4. Enhancement of the maximum proton energy by funnel-geometry target in laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Fan, Dapeng; Li, Yuxiao

    2016-09-01

    Enhancement of the maximum proton energy using a funnel-geometry target is demonstrated through particle simulations of laser-plasma interactions. When an intense short-pulse laser illuminate a thin foil target, the foil electrons are pushed by the laser ponderomotive force, and then form an electron cloud at the target rear surface. The electron cloud generates a strong electrostatic field, which accelerates the protons to high energies. If there is a hole in the rear of target, the shape of the electron cloud and the distribution of the protons will be affected by the protuberant part of the hole. In this paper, a funnel-geometry target is proposed to improve the maximum proton energy. Using particle-in-cell 2-dimensional simulations, the transverse electric field generated by the side wall of four different holes are calculated, and protons inside holes are restricted to specific shapes by these field. In the funnel-geometry target, more protons are restricted near the center of the longitudinal accelerating electric field, thus protons experiencing longer accelerating time and distance in the sheath field compared with that in a traditional cylinder hole target. Accordingly, more and higher energy protons are produced from the funnel-geometry target. The maximum proton energy is improved by about 4 MeV compared with a traditional cylinder-shaped hole target. The funnel-geometry target serves as a new method to improve the maximum proton energy in laser-plasma interactions.

  5. 2D simulations of hohlraum targets for laser-plasma experiments and ion stopping measurement in hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basko, M.M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany). ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI; Maruhn, J.; Tauschwitz, Anna [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Novikov, V.G.; Grushin, A.S. [Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    An attractive way to create uniform plasma states at high temperatures and densities is by using hohlraums - cavities with heavy-metal walls that are either directly or indirectly heated by intense laser pulses to x-ray temperatures of tens and hundreds electron volts. A sample material, whose plasma state is to be studied, can be placed inside such a hohlraum (usually in the form of a low-density foam) and uniformly heated to a high temperature. In this case a high-Z hohlraum enclosure serves a double purpose: it prevents the hot plasma from rapid disassembly due to hydrodynamic expansion and, at the same time, suppresses its rapid radiative cooling by providing high diffusive resistivity for X-rays. Of course, both the inertial and the thermal confinement of high-temperature plasmas can be achieved only for a limited period of time - on the order of nanoseconds for millimeter-scale hohlraums. Some time ago such hohlraum targets were proposed for measurements of the stopping power of hot dense plasmas for fast ions at GSI (Darmstadt). Theoretical modeling of hohlraum targets has always been a challenging task for computational physics because it should combine multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations with the solution of the spectral transfer equation for thermal radiation. In this work we report on our latest progress in this direction, namely, we present the results of 2D (two-dimensional) simulations with a newly developed radiation-hydrodynamics code RALEF-2D of two types of the hohlraum targets proposed for experiments on the PHELIX laser at GSI. The first configuration is a simple spherical hohlraum with gold walls and empty interior, which has two holes - one for laser beam entrance, and the other for diagnostics. The hohlraums of this type have already been used in several experimental sessions with the NHELIX and PHELIX lasers at GSI. The second type is a two-chamber cylindrical hohlraum with a characteristic {omega}-shaped cross-section of the enclosure

  6. Methods of Generation and Detailed Characterization of Millimeter-Scale Plasmas Using a Gasbag Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志超; 尹强; 朱芳华; 郭亮; 袁鹏; 刘慎业; 丁永坤; 郑坚; 蒋小华; 王哲斌; 杨冬; 章欢; 李三伟; 王峰; 彭晓世

    2011-01-01

    Gasbag targets are useful for the research of laser-plasma interactions in inertial confinement fusion,especial in the laser overlapping regime.We report that on the Shengguang-Ⅱ laser facility,millimeter-scale plasm are successfully generated by four 0.35 μm laser beams using a gasbag target.Multiple diagnostics are applied to characterize the millimeter-scale plasmas in detail.The images from the x-ray pinhole cameras confirm that millimeter-scale plasmas are indeed created.An optical Thomson scattering system diagnoses the electron temperature of the CH filling plasmas by probing the thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations,which indicates that the electron temperature has a 600eV fiat roof in 0.7-1.3ns.Another key parameter,i.e.the electron density of the millimeter-scale plasmas,is inferred by the spectrum of the back stimulated Raman scattering of an addition 0.53 μm laser beam.The inferred electron density keeps stable at 0.1nc in early time consistent with the controlled filling pressure and splits into a higher density in late time,which is attributed to the blast wave entering in the SRS interaction region.%Gasbag targets are useful for the research of laser-plasma interactions in inertial confinement fusion, especially in the laser overlapping regime. We report that on the Shengguang-S laser facility, millimeter-scale plasmas are successfully generated by four 0.35 \\im laser beams using a gasbag target. Multiple diagnostics are applied to characterize the millimeter-scale plasmas in detail. The images from the x-ray pinhole cameras confirm that millimeter-scale plasmas are indeed created. An optical Thomson scattering system diagnoses the electron temperature of the CH filling plasmas by probing the thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations, which indicates that the electron temperature has a 600eV flat roof in 0.7-1.3ns. Another key parameter, I.e. The electron density of the millimeter-scale plasmas, is inferred by the spectrum of the back stimulated Raman

  7. Neutral Beam Source and Target Plasma for Development of a Local Electric Field Fluctuation Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, M. R.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Rhodes, A. T.; Winz, G. R.

    2016-10-01

    A new diagnostic measuring local E-> (r , t) fluctuations is being developed for plasma turbulence studies in tokamaks. This is accomplished by measuring fluctuations in the separation of the π components in the Hα motional Stark spectrum. Fluctuations in this separation are expected to be Ẽ / ẼEMSE 10-3EMSE 10-3 . In addition to a high throughput, high speed spectrometer, the project requires a low divergence (Ω 0 .5°) , 80 keV, 2.5 A H0 beam and a target plasma test stand. The beam employs a washer-stack arc ion source to achieve a high species fraction at full energy. Laboratory tests of the ion source demonstrate repeatable plasmas with Te 10 eV and ne 1.6 ×1017 m-3, sufficient for the beam ion optics requirements. Te and ne scalings of the ion source plasma are presented with respect to operational parameters. A novel three-phase resonant converter power supply will provide 6 mA/cm2 of 80 keV H0 at the focal plane for pulse lengths up to 15 ms, with low ripple δV / 80 keV 0.05 % at 280 kHz. Diagnostic development and validation tests will be performed on a magnetized plasma test stand with 0.5 T field. The test chamber will utilize a washer-stack arc source to produce a target plasma comparable to edge tokamak plasmas. A bias-plate with programmable power supply will be used to impose Ẽ within the target plasma. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-89ER53296.

  8. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-08-09

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated.

  9. Design and modeling of ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, S.W.; Pollaine, S.M.; Lindl, J.D.; Suter, L.J.; Berger, R.L.; Powers, L.V.; Alley, W.E.; Amendt, P.A.; Futterman, J.A.; Levedahl, W.K.; Rosen, M.D.; Rowley, D.P.; Sacks, R.A.; Shestakov, A.I.; Strobel, G.L.; Tabak, M.; Weber, S.V.; Zimmerman, G.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Krauser, W.J.; Wilson, D.C.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Harris, D.B.; Hoffman, N.M.; Wilde, B.H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Several targets are described that in simulations give yields of 1--30 MJ when indirectly driven by 0.9--2 MJ of 0.35 {mu}m laser light. The article describes the targets, the modeling that was used to design them, and the modeling done to set specifications for the laser system in the proposed National Ignition Facility. Capsules with beryllium or polystyrene ablators are enclosed in gold hohlraums. All the designs utilize a cryogenic fuel layer; it is very difficult to achieve ignition at this scale with a noncryogenic capsule. It is necessary to use multiple bands of illumination in the hohlraum to achieve sufficiently uniform x-ray irradiation, and to use a low-{ital Z} gas fill in the hohlraum to reduce filling of the hohlraum with gold plasma. Critical issues are hohlraum design and optimization, Rayleigh--Taylor instability modeling, and laser--plasma interactions.

  10. Enhanced electron yield from a laser-plasma accelerator using high-Z gas jet targets

    CERN Document Server

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Li, Song; Sokollik, Thomas; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of the multi-hundred MeV electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, neon and argon gas jet plasmas in a laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment was carried out. The charge measurement has been made via imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a 14-bit charge coupled device (CCD) which was cross-calibrated with nondestructive electronics-based method. Within given laser and plasma parameters, we found that laser-driven low Z- gas jet targets generate high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with reasonable yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which were observed from high-Z gas jets at higher densities reached much higher yield. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in high-Z gases, especially in the argon gas jet target where we received the highest yield of ~ 3 nC

  11. Video Views and Reviews: Golgi Export, Targeting, and Plasma Membrane Caveolae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews videos from "Molecular Biology of the Cell (MBC)" depicting various aspects of plasma membrane (PM) dynamics, including the targeting of newly synthesized components and the organization of those PM invaginations called caveolae. The papers accompanying these videos describe, respectively, the constitutive…

  12. BN coatings deposition by magnetron sputtering of B and BN targets in electron beam generated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenetskikh, A. S.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Koryakova, O. V.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2017-05-01

    Boron nitride coatings were deposited by reactive pulsed magnetron sputtering of B and BN targets (50 kHz, 10 µs for B; 13.56 MHz for BN) at 2-20 mA/cm2 ion current density on the substrate. The effect of electron beam generated plasma on characteristics of magnetron discharge and phase composition of coatings was studied.

  13. Recompletion of gas filled caverns at underground storage facilities of Verbundnetz Gas AG; Umruestungen gasgefuellter Kavernen auf Untergrundspeichern der Verbundnetz Gas AG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pischner, M.; Rehmer, K.P. [Untergrundspeicher- und Geotechnologie-Systeme GmbH, Mittenwalde (Germany); Arnold, C. [VNG Verbundnetz Gas AG, Leipzig (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    In 1991 the Verbundnetz Gas AG (VNG AG) has started to modernize outdated installations of the underground gas storage cavern near Bernburg and Bad Lauchstaedt (Germany). On 33 caverns, which were mostly leached during the 70s and 80s of the last century, the old wellheads have been replaced by new ones. In some cases even the production string has been replaced or a new head housing was installed. The reasons and technical suppositions for these measures will be explained. Most of the modifications have been made above gas filled caverns and have been safe despite of the high pressures. The packer-system developed by Untergrundspeicher- und Geotechnologie-Systeme GmbH (UGS GmbH) and VNG AG will be presented. Furthermore the technical procedures are grouped and described. Experiences and development over the years will be outlined. Working above gas filled caverns instead of flooding them before, allowed to reduce the total costs to less than one third. (orig.)

  14. Damage to preheated tungsten targets after multiple plasma impacts simulating ITER ELMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garkusha, I.E. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)], E-mail: garkusha@ipp.kharkov.ua; Bandura, A.N.; Byrka, O.V.; Chebotarev, V.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Landman, I. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Makhlaj, V.A. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Pestchanyi, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tereshin, V.I. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-04-30

    The behavior of a preheated at 650 deg. C tungsten targets under repetitive ELM-like plasma pulses is studied in simulation experiments with the quasi-stationary plasma accelerator QSPA Kh-50. The targets have been exposed up to 350 pulses of the duration 0.25 ms and the surface heat loads either 0.45 MJ/m{sup 2} or 0.75 MJ/m{sup 2}, which is below and above the melting threshold, respectively. The development of surface morphology of the exposed targets as well as cracking and swelling at the surface is discussed. First comparisons of obtained experimental results with corresponding numerical simulations of the code PEGASUS-3D are presented.

  15. Only a fraction of patients with ischaemic diseases or diabetes are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggaard-Andersen, Niels; Freiberg, Jacob J; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that individuals in the general population with and without ischaemic cardiovascular disease, or with diabetes, are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids.......We tested the hypothesis that individuals in the general population with and without ischaemic cardiovascular disease, or with diabetes, are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids....

  16. Only a fraction of patients with ischaemic diseases or diabetes are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggaard-Andersen, Niels; Freiberg, Jacob J; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that individuals in the general population with and without ischaemic cardiovascular disease, or with diabetes, are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids.......We tested the hypothesis that individuals in the general population with and without ischaemic cardiovascular disease, or with diabetes, are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids....

  17. Potential cellular targets and antibacterial efficacy of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkawareek, Mahmoud Y; Gorman, Sean P; Graham, William G; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2014-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (APNTP) has been gaining increasing interest as a new alternative antibacterial approach. Although this approach has demonstrated promising antibacterial activity, its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. Mechanistic elucidation of the antimicrobial activity will facilitate development and rational optimisation of this approach for potential medical applications. In this study, the antibacterial efficacy of an in-house-built APNTP jet was evaluated alongside an investigation of the interactions between APNTP and major cellular components in order to identify the potential cellular targets involved in plasma-mediated bacterial destruction mechanisms. The investigated plasma jet exhibited excellent, rapid antibacterial activity against a selected panel of clinically significant bacterial species including Bacillus cereus, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, all of which were completely inactivated within 2 min of plasma exposure. Plasma-mediated damaging effects were observed, to varying degrees, on all of the investigated cellular components including DNA, a model protein enzyme, and lipid membrane integrity and permeability. The antibacterial efficacy of APNTP appears to involve a multiple-target mechanism, which potentially reduces the likelihood of emergence of microbial resistance towards this promising antimicrobial approach. However, cellular membrane damage and resulting permeability perturbation was found to be the most likely rate-determining step in this mechanism.

  18. Target optimization for desired X-ray spectra produced by laser plasma accelerated electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobok, Maxim; Brantov, Andrey; Bychenkov, Valery

    2016-10-01

    Different regimes of electron acceleration from low-density targets are investigated using three-dimensional numerical simulations. Multiple spatial target density profiles were examined, including laser pre-pulse modified targets. The size of the plasma corona is shown to be one of the main parameters characterizing the temperature and number of hot electrons, which determine the yield of X-ray radiation and its hardness. The generation of X-ray radiation by laser accelerated electrons, which impact the converter target located behind the laser target, was studied. The X-ray spectra were computed using Monte-Carlo simulations. This work was partially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research 16-02-00088-a.

  19. Scattered light diagnostics of overdense plasma cavity in solid targets irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, A A; Zhidkov, A G; Uesaka, M; Kinoshita, K; Platonov, K Yu

    2002-09-01

    The light scattered backward from a target illuminated by ultraintense laser pulses carries important information about the nonlinear laser-plasma interaction. We analyze the usefulness of this information by plasma corona analysis with the help of an analytical model we developed, and particle-in-cell simulation. The spectrum of scattered light is shown to be shifted, to be broadened, and to be modulated, in comparison with the initial laser spectrum, and the spectral shift is an indicator of laser pulse contrast ratio.

  20. Experimental investigation of laser-produced-plasma EUV source based on liquid target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Li-hong; NI Qi-liang; CHEN Bo

    2005-01-01

    A laser-produced plasma(LPP) source was built using liquid as target and a Nd:YAG laser as the irradiation laser, and the LPP source's radiation with ethanol and acetone target respectively was measured by an AXUV100 silicon photodiode combined with a McPHERSON model 247 grazing incidence monochromator of the resolution Δλ≤0.075 nm and the wavelength scanning interval 0.5 nm. Both ethanol and acetone target LPP source had EUV emission at 11~20 nm wavelength. The comparison between the spectra of the two kinds of target materials shows that all the two kinds of target source's spectra are the result of oxygen ions' transitions under current source's parameters, but the spectrum intensity from different target sources is different. The spectra intensity from the ethanol target is higher than that from the acetone target. In addition, the target liquid is forced into the vacuum chamber by the background pressure supported by the connected external high pressure gas, and the influence of the background pressure on the source's intensity is investigated.

  1. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation of the impulse delivering from laser-produced plasma to solid target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yan-Nan; Yang Bo; Zhu Jin-Rong; Shen Zhong-Hua; Lu Jian; Ni Xiao-Wu

    2008-01-01

    A plasma is produced in air by using a high-intensity Q-switch Nd:YAG pulsed laser to irradiate a solid target,and the impulses delivering from the plasma to the target are measured at different laser power densities. Analysing the formation process of laser plasma and the laser supported detonation wave (LSDW) and using fluid mechanics theory and Pirri's methods, an approximately theoretical solution of the impulse delivering from the plasma to the target under our experimental condition is found. Furthermore, according to the formation time of plasma and the variation of pressure in plasma in a non-equilibrium state, a physical model of the interaction between the pulse laser and the solid target is developed. The plasma evolutions with time during and after the laser pulse irradiating the target are simulated numerically by using a three-dimensional difference scheme. And the numerical solutions of the impulse delivering from the plasma to the target are obtained. A comparison among the theoretical, numerical and experimental results and their analyses are performed. The experimental results are explained reasonably. The consistency between numerical results and experimental results implies that the numerical calculation model used in this paper can well describe the mechanical action of the laser on the target.

  2. Differential proteomics of human seminal plasma: A potential target for searching male infertility marker proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Anil Kumar; Sooch, Balwinder Singh; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2012-04-01

    The clinical fertility tests, available in the market, fail to define the exact cause of male infertility in almost half of the cases and point toward a crucial need of developing better ways of infertility investigations. The protein biomarkers may help us toward better understanding of unknown cases of male infertility that, in turn, can guide us to find better therapeutic solutions. Many clinical attempts have been made to identify biomarkers of male infertility in sperm proteome but only few studies have targeted seminal plasma. Human seminal plasma is a rich source of proteins that are essentially required for development of sperm and successful fertilization. This viewpoint article highlights the importance of human seminal plasma proteome in reproductive physiology and suggests that differential proteomics integrated with functional analysis may help us in searching potential biomarkers of male infertility.

  3. Three sources and three components of success in detection of ultra-rare alpha decays at the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil separator

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, Y S

    2015-01-01

    General philosophy of procedure of detecting rare events in the recent experiments with 48Ca projectile at the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator(DGFRS) aimed to the synthesis of superheavy elements (SHE) has been reviewed. Specific instruments and methods are under consideration. Some historical sources of the successful experiments for Z=112-118 are considered too. Special attention is paid to application of method of active correlations in heavy-ion induced complete fusion nuclear reactions. Example of application in Z=115 experiment is presented. Brief description of the 243Am + 48Ca -> 291-x115+xn experiment is presented too. Some attention is paid to the role of chemical experiments in discoveries of SHEs. The DGFRS detection/monitoring system is presented in full firstly.

  4. Dramatic Raman Gain Suppression in the Vicinity of the Zero Dispersion Point in Gas-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Bauerschmidt, Sebastian T; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-01-01

    In 1964 Bloembergen and Shen predicted that Raman gain could be suppressed if the rates of phonon creation and annihilation (by inelastic scattering) exactly balance. This is only possible if the momentum required for each process is identical, i.e., phonon coherence waves created by pump-to-Stokes scattering are identical to those annihilated in pump-to-anti-Stokes scattering. In bulk gas cells, this can only be achieved over limited interaction lengths at an oblique angle to the pump axis. Here we report a simple system that provides dramatic Raman gain suppression over long collinear path-lengths in hydrogen. It consists of a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber whose zero dispersion point is pressure-adjusted to lie close to the pump laser wavelength. At a certain precise pressure, generation of Stokes light in the fundamental mode is completely suppressed, allowing other much weaker nonlinear processes to be explored.

  5. Non-Invasive Prenatal Diagnosis of Lethal Skeletal Dysplasia by Targeted Capture Sequencing of Maternal Plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Dan

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of cell-free foetal DNA in the plasma of pregnant women, many non-invasive prenatal testing assays have been developed. In the area of skeletal dysplasia diagnosis, some PCR-based non-invasive prenatal testing assays have been developed to facilitate the ultrasound diagnosis of skeletal dysplasias that are caused by de novo mutations. However, skeletal dysplasias are a group of heterogeneous genetic diseases, the PCR-based method is hard to detect multiple gene or loci simultaneously, and the diagnosis rate is highly dependent on the accuracy of the ultrasound diagnosis. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using targeted capture sequencing to detect foetal de novo pathogenic mutations responsible for skeletal dysplasia.Three families whose foetuses were affected by skeletal dysplasia and two control families whose foetuses were affected by other single gene diseases were included in this study. Sixteen genes related to some common lethal skeletal dysplasias were selected for analysis, and probes were designed to capture the coding regions of these genes. Targeted capture sequencing was performed on the maternal plasma DNA, the maternal genomic DNA, and the paternal genomic DNA. The de novo pathogenic variants in the plasma DNA data were identified using a bioinformatical process developed for low frequency mutation detection and a strict variant interpretation strategy. The causal variants could be specifically identified in the plasma, and the results were identical to those obtained by sequencing amniotic fluid samples. Furthermore, a mean of 97% foetal specific alleles, which are alleles that are not shared by maternal genomic DNA and amniotic fluid DNA, were identified successfully in plasma samples.Our study shows that capture sequencing of maternal plasma DNA can be used to non-invasive detection of de novo pathogenic variants. This method has the potential to be used to facilitate the prenatal diagnosis

  6. Improved detection specificity for plasma proteins by targeting cysteine-containing peptides with photo-SRM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjalbert, Quentin; Girod, Marion; Simon, Romain; Jeudy, Jérémy; Chirot, Fabien; Salvador, Arnaud; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Lemoine, Jérôme

    2013-03-01

    Targeted mass spectrometry using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) has emerged as an alternative to immunoassays for protein quantification owing to faster development time and higher multiplexing capability. However, the SRM strategy is faced with the high complexity of peptide mixtures after trypsin digestion of whole plasma or the cellular proteome that most of the time causes contamination, irremediably, by interfering compounds in the transition channels monitored. This problem becomes increasingly acute when the targeted protein is present at a low concentration. In this work, the merit of laser-induced photo-dissociation in the visible region at 473 nm implemented in an hybrid quadrupole linear ion-trap mass spectrometer (photo-SRM) was evaluated for detection specificity of cysteine-containing peptides in a group of plasma proteins after tagging with a dabcyl chromophore. Compared with conventional SRM, photo-SRM chromatograms have improved detection specificity for most of peptides monitored. Comparison of the signals obtained for the best proteotypic peptides in SRM mode and those recorded by photo-SRM of cysteine-containing peptides for the same proteins reveals either increased (up to 10-fold) or similar signal to photo-SRM detection. Finally, photo-SRM has extended response linearity across a calibration plot obtained by diluting human plasma in rat plasma, down to the lowest concentrations. Hence, photo-SRM may advantageously complement conventional SRM in assay of proteins in complex biological matrices.

  7. Enhanced Proton Acceleration by an Ultrashort Laser Interaction with Structured Dynamic Plasma Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Zigler, A; Botton, M; Nahum, E; Schleifer, E; Baspaly, A; Pomerantz, Y; Abicht, F; Branzel, J; Priebe, G; Steinke, S; Andreev, A; Schnuerer, M; Sandner, W; Gordon, D; Sprangle, P; Ledingham, K W D

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a notably enhanced acceleration of protons to high energy by relatively modest ultrashort laser pulses and structured dynamical plasma targets. Realized by special deposition of snow targets on sapphire substrates and using carefully planned pre-pulses, high proton yield emitted in a narrow solid angle with energy above 21MeV were detected from a 5TW laser. Our simulations predict that using the proposed scheme protons can be accelerated to energies above 150MeV by 100TW laser systems.

  8. Experimental studies of the effect target geometry on the evolution of laser produced plasma plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Cuyler; Anderson, Austin; Iratcabal, Jeremy; Dutra, Eric; Covington, Aaron

    2016-10-01

    The expansion of the laser plumes was shown to be dependent on the initial target geometry. A 16 channel framing camera was used to record the plume shape and propagation speeds were determined from analysis of the images. Plastic targets were manufactured using different methods including 3D printing, CNC machining and vacuum casting. Preliminary target designs were made using a 3D printer and ABS plastic material. These targets were then tested using a 3 J laser with a 5 ns duration pulse. Targets with a deep conical depression were shown to produce highly collimated plumes when compared to flat top targets. Preliminary results of these experiments will be discussed along with planned future experiments that will use the indented targets with a 30 J laser with a 0.8 ns duration pulse in preparation for pinched laser plume experiments at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. Other polymers that are readily available in a deuterated form will also be explored as part of an effort to develop a cost effective plasma plume target for follow on neutron production experiments. Dr. Austin Anderson.

  9. EUV and debris characteristics of a laser-plasma tin-dioxide colloidal target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubodera, Shoichi; Kaku, Masanori; Touge, Shunsuke; Katto, Masahito

    2008-10-01

    Characteristics of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and debris emissions as well as debris reduction have been investigated for a laser-produced plasma (LPP) EUV source by using a colloidal/liquid jet target containing tin dioxide nanoparticles and tin chloride. The amount of deposited debris on a silicon witness plate was determined by a total laser energy irradiated onto a target. Double-pulse laser irradiation was effective for improving the EUV conversion efficiency as a result of plasma regulation. It was, however, not effective for reducing the deposited debris from a colloidal target with nanoparticles. In situ low-temperature heating of the witness plate was effective to reduce the amount of deposited debris. Room-temperature photon processing using an incoherent vacuum ultraviolet excimer lamp at 126 nm deoxidized a deposited tin oxide layer. In addition to these active debris reduction methods, the use of a tin chloride liquid target at a certain concentration passively reduced the amount of deposited debris as a result of production of chlorine atoms that sputtered and/or etched deposition. The EUV CE of more than 1% was observed from a tin chloride target by using double-pulse laser irradiation.

  10. [Experimental investigation of laser plasma soft X-ray source with gas target].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qi-liang; Gong, Yan; Lin, Jing-quan; Chen, Bo; Cao, Jian-lin

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a debris-free laser plasma soft X-ray source with a gas target, which has high operating frequency and can produce strong soft X-ray radiation. The valve of this light source is drived by a piezoelectrical ceramic whose operating frequency is up to 400 Hz. In comparison with laser plasma soft X-ray sources using metal target, the light source is debris-free. And it has higher operating frequency than gas target soft X-ray sources whose nozzle is controlled by a solenoid valve. A channel electron multiplier (CEM) operating in analog mode is used to detect the soft X-ray generated by the laser plasma source, and the CEM's output is fed to to a charge-sensitive preamplifier for further amplification purpose. Output charges from the CEM are proportional to the amplitude of the preamplifier's output voltage. Spectra of CO2, Xe and Kr at 8-14 nm wavelength which can be used for soft X-ray projection lithography are measured. The spectrum for CO2 consists of separate spectral lines originate mainly from the transitions in Li-like and Be-like ions. The Xe spectrum originating mainly from 4d-5f, 4d-4f, 4d-6p and 4d-5p transitions in multiply charged xenon ions. The spectrum for Kr consists of separate spectral lines and continuous broad spectra originating mainly from the transitions in Cu-, Ni-, Co- and Fe-like ions.

  11. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Ogawa, Takenori; Uemura, Mamoru; Shumulinsky, Gary; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Ravi, Rajani; Sidransky, David; Keidar, Michael; Trink, Barry

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min-1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines.

  12. Design and Demonstration of a Material-Plasma Exposure Target Station for Neutron Irradiated Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Juergen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Aaron, A. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bell, Gary L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burgess, Thomas W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ellis, Ronald James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giuliano, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kiggans, James O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lessard, Timothy L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ohriner, Evan Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perkins, Dale E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Varma, Venugopal Koikal [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Fusion energy is the most promising energy source for the future, and one of the most important problems to be solved progressing to a commercial fusion reactor is the identification of plasma-facing materials compatible with the extreme conditions in the fusion reactor environment. The development of plasma–material interaction (PMI) science and the technology of plasma-facing components are key elements in the development of the next step fusion device in the United States, the so-called Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF). All of these PMI issues and the uncertain impact of the 14-MeV neutron irradiation have been identified in numerous expert panel reports to the fusion community. The 2007 Greenwald report classifies reactor plasma-facing materials (PFCs) and materials as the only Tier 1 issues, requiring a “. . . major extrapolation from the current state of knowledge, need for qualitative improvements and substantial development for both the short and long term.” The Greenwald report goes on to list 19 gaps in understanding and performance related to the plasma–material interface for the technology facilities needed for DEMO-oriented R&D and DEMO itself. Of the 15 major gaps, six (G7, G9, G10, G12, G13) can possibly be addressed with ORNL’s proposal of an advanced Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment. Establishing this mid-scale plasma materials test facility at ORNL is a key element in ORNL’s strategy to secure a leadership role for decades of fusion R&D. That is to say, our end goal is to bring the “signature facility” FNSF home to ORNL. This project is related to the pre-conceptual design of an innovative target station for a future Material–Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX). The target station will be designed to expose candidate fusion reactor plasma-facing materials and components (PFMs and PFCs) to conditions anticipated in fusion reactors, where PFCs will be exposed to dense high-temperature hydrogen plasmas providing steady

  13. Design and Demonstration of a Material-Plasma Exposure Target Station for Neutron Irradiated Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Juergen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Aaron, A. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bell, Gary L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burgess, Thomas W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ellis, Ronald James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giuliano, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kiggans, James O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lessard, Timothy L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ohriner, Evan Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perkins, Dale E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Varma, Venugopal Koikal [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Fusion energy is the most promising energy source for the future, and one of the most important problems to be solved progressing to a commercial fusion reactor is the identification of plasma-facing materials compatible with the extreme conditions in the fusion reactor environment. The development of plasma–material interaction (PMI) science and the technology of plasma-facing components are key elements in the development of the next step fusion device in the United States, the so-called Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF). All of these PMI issues and the uncertain impact of the 14-MeV neutron irradiation have been identified in numerous expert panel reports to the fusion community. The 2007 Greenwald report classifies reactor plasma-facing materials (PFCs) and materials as the only Tier 1 issues, requiring a “. . . major extrapolation from the current state of knowledge, need for qualitative improvements and substantial development for both the short and long term.” The Greenwald report goes on to list 19 gaps in understanding and performance related to the plasma–material interface for the technology facilities needed for DEMO-oriented R&D and DEMO itself. Of the 15 major gaps, six (G7, G9, G10, G12, G13) can possibly be addressed with ORNL’s proposal of an advanced Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment. Establishing this mid-scale plasma materials test facility at ORNL is a key element in ORNL’s strategy to secure a leadership role for decades of fusion R&D. That is to say, our end goal is to bring the “signature facility” FNSF home to ORNL. This project is related to the pre-conceptual design of an innovative target station for a future Material–Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX). The target station will be designed to expose candidate fusion reactor plasma-facing materials and components (PFMs and PFCs) to conditions anticipated in fusion reactors, where PFCs will be exposed to dense high-temperature hydrogen plasmas providing steady

  14. Measurement of Neutrons Produced by Beam-Target Interactions via a Coaxial Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauble, Scott; Poehlmann, Flavio; Rieker, Gregory; Cappelli, Mark

    2011-10-01

    This poster presents a method to measure neutron yield from a coaxial plasma accelerator. Stored electrical energies between 1 and 19 kJ are discharged within a few microseconds across the electrodes of the coaxial gun, accelerating deuterium gas samples to plasma beam energies well beyond the keV energy range. The focus of this study is to examine the interaction of the plasma beam with a deuterated target by designing and fabricating a detector to measure neutron yield. Given the strong electromagnetic pulse associated with our accelerator, indirect measurement of neutrons via threshold-dependent nuclear activation serves as both a reliable and definitive indicator of high-energy particles for our application. Upon bombardment with neutrons, discs or stacks of metal foils placed near the deuterated target undergo nuclear activation reactions, yielding gamma-emitting isotopes whose decay is measured by a scintillation detector system. By collecting gamma ray spectra over time and considering nuclear cross sections, the magnitude of the original neutron pulse is inferred.

  15. Evaluation of a relativistic electron ring system as a plasma target for buildup of compact-toroid configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condit, W.C.

    1980-06-26

    A review of the idea of using plasma-loaded electron rings as buildup targets for future compact-toroid machines is presented. Present experiments at Cornell University and Nagoya University are analyzed, and the need for auxiliary heating to reach interesting temperatures is described. Consideration of the effect of two-stream instability, toroidal field, and plasma containment are discussed.

  16. Comparative study of radiation emission without and with target in a 2.2 kJ plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair, E-mail: mzubairkhan-um76@yahoo.com [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia and Department of Physics, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-03-24

    The radiation emission in a 2.2 kJ Mather-type dense plasma focus device is investigated using a five channel BPX65 PIN diode spectrometer. Estimated X-ray associated with the hollow anode without and with target in Argon gas medium is compared. At optimum conditions, the radiation emission from the system is found to be strongly influenced with target in hollow anode and the filling gas pressure. The maximum X-ray yield in 4π sr was obtained in case of hollow anode in argon gas medium with target 'Lead' due to interaction of electron beam. Results indicated that an appropriate design of hollow anode with target could enhance the radiation emission by more intense interaction of expected electron beam with target. The outcomes are helpful in designing a plasma focus with enhanced X-ray radiation with improved shot to shot reproducibility in plasma focus device.

  17. Strategies to target long-lived plasma cells for treating hemophilia A inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao Lien; Lyle, Meghan J; Shin, Simon C; Miao, Carol H

    2016-03-01

    Long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) can persistently produce anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies which disrupt therapeutic effect of FVIII in hemophilia A patients with inhibitors. The migration of plasma cells to BM where they become LLPCs is largely controlled by an interaction between the chemokine ligand CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4. AMD3100 combined with G-CSF inhibit their interactions, thus facilitating the mobilization of CD34(+) cells and blocking the homing of LLPCs. These reagents were combined with anti-CD20 to reduce B-cells and the specific IL-2/IL-2mAb (JES6-1) complexes to induce Treg expansion for targeting anti-FVIII immune responses. Groups of mice primed with FVIII plasmid and protein respectively were treated with the combined regimen for six weeks, and a significant reduction of anti-FVIII inhibitor titers was observed, associated with the dramatic decrease of circulating and bone marrow CXCR4(+) plasma cells. The combination regimens are highly promising in modulating pre-existing anti-FVIII antibodies in FVIII primed subjects.

  18. Triple nuclear reactions (d, n) in laser-generated plasma from deuterated targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Lorenzo; Cutroneo, Mariapompea

    2017-06-01

    Measurements performed at Prague Asterix Laser System laboratory have permitted to study nuclear reactions in plasma produced by high intensity laser pulses (1016 W/cm2) accelerating high energetic ions. In particular, the laser irradiation of deuterated polyethylene (CD2) primary target, as thin foils, has produced the ion acceleration of C and D ions, and the presence of a thick LiD secondary target has produced nuclear reaction events due to the deuteron-deuteron, deuterons-lithium, and deuteron-carbon interactions. Fast and slow neutrons have been obtained mainly from the nuclear reactions 7Li(d, n)8Be, 2H(d, n)3He, and 12C(d, n)13N. Plasma monitoring and measurements of kinetic energies of produced particles in different directions were obtained using many detectors. The analyses were based on a semiconductor time-of-flight technique, an electric and magnetic ion deflection in a Thomson spectrometer, and ion track detectors. The maximum yields of neutrons produced in the used experimental conditions were evaluated to be about 4 × 108 and 3 × 108 neutrons/laser shot at energies of 14 MeV and 2.4 MeV, from the D-Li and D-D reactions, respectively, while the production of low energy neutrons from the third D-C reaction was negligible.

  19. Target dependent femtosecond laser plasma implantation dynamics in enabling silica for high density erbium doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrappan, Jayakrishnan; Murray, Matthew; Kakkar, Tarun; Petrik, Peter; Agocs, Emil; Zolnai, Zsolt; Steenson, D. P.; Jha, Animesh; Jose, Gin

    2015-09-01

    Chemical dissimilarity of tellurium oxide with silica glass increases phase separation and crystallization tendency when mixed and melted for making a glass. We report a novel technique for incorporating an Er3+-doped tellurite glass composition into silica substrates through a femtosecond (fs) laser generated plasma assisted process. The engineered material consequently exhibits the spectroscopic properties of Er3+-ions, which are unachievable in pure silica and implies this as an ideal material for integrated photonics platforms. Formation of a well-defined metastable and homogeneous glass structure with Er3+-ions in a silica network, modified with tellurite has been characterized using high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and structural analyses using HRTEM, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and laser excitation techniques, confirm that such fs-laser plasma implanted glasses may be engineered for significantly higher concentration of Er3+-ions without clustering, validated by the record high lifetime-density product 0.96 × 1019 s.cm-3. Characterization of planar optical layers and photoluminescence emission spectra were undertaken to determine their thickness, refractive indices and photoluminescence properties, as a function of Er3+ concentration via different target glasses. The increased Er3+ content in the target glass enhance the refractive index and photoluminescence intensity of the modified silica layer whilst the lifetime and thickness decrease.

  20. Tracking of buried layers during plasma-assisted femtosecond laser drilling of compound targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhvaniya, I. A., E-mail: irina.zhvaniya@physics.msu.ru; Garmatina, A. A.; Makarov, I. A.; Gordienko, V. M. [Faculty of Physics and International Laser Center, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991, GSP-1, 1-2 Leninskiye Gory, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-28

    It was shown that drilling of multi-layered target placed in the air by tightly focused femtosecond laser radiation with high fluence (up to 1000 J/cm{sup 2}) can be monitored online using plasma-induced X-ray emission and second harmonic of incident laser radiation. The technique based on X-rays registration is appeared to be more flexible than the method based on detection of second harmonic since its accuracy depends crucially on the target type. We demonstrated that the X-ray signal clearly indicates the transition from one layer to another during the microdrilling of targets consisting of 2–4 layers of titanium foil when a laser beam is focused beneath the target surface at a depth comparable to the layer thickness. The diagnostics of microchannel production in the chicken eggshell was performed for the first time. It was found that the presence of albumen beneath the shell accounts for longtime generation of X-ray pulses.

  1. Tracking of buried layers during plasma-assisted femtosecond laser drilling of compound targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhvaniya, I. A.; Garmatina, A. A.; Makarov, I. A.; Gordienko, V. M.

    2016-07-01

    It was shown that drilling of multi-layered target placed in the air by tightly focused femtosecond laser radiation with high fluence (up to 1000 J/cm2) can be monitored online using plasma-induced X-ray emission and second harmonic of incident laser radiation. The technique based on X-rays registration is appeared to be more flexible than the method based on detection of second harmonic since its accuracy depends crucially on the target type. We demonstrated that the X-ray signal clearly indicates the transition from one layer to another during the microdrilling of targets consisting of 2-4 layers of titanium foil when a laser beam is focused beneath the target surface at a depth comparable to the layer thickness. The diagnostics of microchannel production in the chicken eggshell was performed for the first time. It was found that the presence of albumen beneath the shell accounts for longtime generation of X-ray pulses.

  2. HRP facility for fabrication of ITER vertical target divertor full scale plasma facing units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visca, Eliseo, E-mail: eliseo.visca@enea.it [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Roccella, S. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Candura, D.; Palermo, M. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16152 Genova (Italy); Rossi, P.; Pizzuto, A. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Sanguinetti, G.P. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16152 Genova (Italy); Mancini, A.; Verdini, L.; Cacciotti, E.; Cerri, V.; Mugnaini, G.; Reale, A.; Giacomi, G. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • R&D activities for the manufacturing of ITER divertor high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC). • ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components. • ENEA and ANSALDO NUCLEARE jointly participate to the European program for the qualification of the manufacturing technology for the ITER divertor IVT. • Successful manufacturing by HRP (Hot Radial Pressing) of first full-scale full-W armored IVT qualification prototype. - Abstract: ENEA and Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A. (ANN) have being deeply involved in the European development activities for the manufacturing of the ITER Divertor Inner Vertical Target (IVT) plasma-facing components. During normal operation the heat flux deposited on the bottom segment of divertor is 5–10 MW/m{sup 2} but the capability to remove up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} during transient events of 10 s must also be demonstrated. In order to fulfill ITER requirements, ENEA has set up and widely tested a manufacturing process, named Hot Radial Pressing (HRP). The last challenge is now to fabricate full-scale prototypes of the IVT, aimed to be qualified for the next step, i.e. the series production. On the basis of the experience of manufacturing hundreds of small mock-ups, ENEA designed and installed a new suitable HRP facility. The objective of getting a final shaped plasma facing unit (PFU) that satisfies these requirements is an ambitious target because tolerances set by ITER/F4E are very tight. The setting-up of the equipment started with the fabrication of full scale and representative ‘dummies’ in which stainless steel instead of CFC or W was used for monoblocks. The results confirmed that dimensions were compliant with the required tolerances. The paper reports a brief description of the innovative HRP equipment and the dimensional check results after HRP of the first full-scale full-W PFU.

  3. Damage to Preheated Tungsten Targets after Multiple Plasma Impacts Simulating ITER ELMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garkusha, I.E.; Bandura, A.N.; Byrka, O.V.; Chebotarev, V.V.; Makhlay, V.A.; Tereshin, V.I. [Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology, Inst. of Plasma Physics of National Science Center, Akademicheskaya street, 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S. [FZK-Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association Euratom-FZK, Technik und Umwelt, Postfach 3640, D-7602 1 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The energy loads onto ITER divertor surfaces associated with the Type I ELMs are expected to be up to 1 MJ/m{sup 2} during 0.1-0.5 ms, with the number of pulses about 103 per discharge. Tungsten is a candidate material for major part of the surface, but its brittleness can result in substantial macroscopic erosion after the repetitive heat loads. To minimize the brittle destruction, tungsten may be preheated above the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. In this work the behavior of preheated tungsten targets under repetitive ELM-like plasma pulses is studied in simulation experiments with the quasi-stationary plasma accelerator QSPA Kh-50. The targets have been exposed up to 450 pulses of the duration 0.25 ms and the heat loads either 0.45 MJ/m{sup 2} or 0.75 MJ/m{sup 2}, which is respectively below and above the melting threshold. During the exposures the targets were permanently kept preheated at 650 deg. C by a heater at target backside. In the course of exposures the irradiated surfaces were examined after regular numbers of pulses using the SEM and the optical microscopy. The profilometry, XRD, microhardness and weight loss measurements have been performed, as well as comparisons of surface damages after the heat loads both below and above the melting threshold. It is obtained that macro-cracks do not develop on the preheated surface. After the impacts with surface melting, a fine mesh of intergranular microcracks has appeared. The width of fine intergranular cracks grows with pulse number, achieving 1-1.5 microns after 100 pulses, and after 210 pulses the crack width increases up to 20 microns, which is comparable with grain sizes. Threshold changes in surface morphology resulting in corrugation structures and pits on the surface as well as importance of surface tension in resulted 'micro-brush' structures are discussed. Further evolution of the surface pattern is caused by loss of separated grains on exposed

  4. A robust, single-injection method for targeted, broad-spectrum plasma metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kefeng; Naviaux, Jane C; Bright, A Taylor; Wang, Lin; Naviaux, Robert K

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics is a powerful emerging technology for studying the systems biology and chemistry of health and disease. Current targeted methods are often limited by the number of analytes that can be measured, and/or require multiple injections. We developed a single-injection, targeted broad-spectrum plasma metabolomic method on a SCIEX Qtrap 5500 LC-ESI-MS/MS platform. Analytical validation was conducted for the reproducibility, linearity, carryover and blood collection tube effects. The method was also clinically validated for its potential utility in the diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) using a cohort of 22 males CFS and 18 age- and sex-matched controls. Optimization of LC conditions and MS/MS parameters enabled the measurement of 610 key metabolites from 63 biochemical pathways and 95 stable isotope standards in a 45-minute HILIC method using a single injection without sacrificing sensitivity. The total imprecision (CVtotal) of peak area was 12% for both the control and CFS pools. The 8 metabolites selected in our previous study (PMID: 27573827) performed well in a clinical validation analysis even when the case and control samples were analyzed 1.5 years later on a different instrument by a different investigator, yielding a diagnostic accuracy of 95% (95% CI 85-100%) measured by the area under the ROC curve. A reliable and reproducible, broad-spectrum, targeted metabolomic method was developed, capable of measuring over 600 metabolites in plasma in a single injection. The method might be a useful tool in helping the diagnosis of CFS or other complex diseases.

  5. Circulating MicroRNAs in Plasma of Hepatitis B e Antigen Positive Children Reveal Liver-Specific Target Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Thilde Nordmann; Jacobsen, Kari Stougaard; Mirza, Aashiq Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. Hepatitis B e antigen positive (HBeAg-positive) children are at high risk of severe complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis. Liver damage is caused by the host immune response to infected hepatocytes, and we hypothesise that specific microRNAs play a role...... with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and in healthy controls, candidate microRNAs with aberrant plasma expressions in HBeAg-positive children were identified. MicroRNAs targeting liver-specific genes were selected based on bioinformatics analysis and validated by qRT-PCR using plasma samples from 34 HBe...... in this complex interaction between virus and host. The study aimed to identify microRNAs with aberrant plasma expressions in HBeAg-positive children and with liver-specific target genes. Methods. By revisiting our previous screen of microRNA plasma levels in HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative children...

  6. Excimer laser produced plasmas in copper wire targets and water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyo-Dong; Alexander, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Elastically scattered incident radiation (ESIR) from a copper wire target illuminated by a KrF laser pulse at lambda = 248 nm shows a dinstinct two-peak structure which is dependent on the incident energy. The time required to reach the critical electron density (n(sub c) approximately = 1.8 x 10(exp 22) electrons/cu cm) is estimated at 11 ns based on experimental results. Detailed ESIR characteristics for water have been reported previously by the authors. Initiation of the broadband emission for copper plasma begins at 6.5 +/- 1.45 ns after the arrival of the laser pulse. However, the broadband emission occurs at 11 +/- 0.36 ns for water. For a diatomic substance such as water, the electron energy rapidly dissipates due to dissociation of water molecules, which is absent in a monatomic species such as copper. When the energy falls below the excitation energy of the lowest electron state for water, it becomes a subexcitation electron. Lifetimes of the subexcited electrons to the vibrational states are estimated to be of the order of 10(exp -9) s. In addition, the ionization potential of copper (440-530 nm) is approximately 6 eV, which is about two times smaller than the 13 eV ionization potential reported for water. The higher ionization potential contributes to the longer observed delay time for plasma formation in water. After initiation, a longer time is required for copper plasma to reach its peak value. This time delay in reaching the maximum intensity is attributed to the energy loss during the interband transition in copper.

  7. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPases:Targets of oxidative stress in brain aging and neurodegeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asma; Zaidi

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase(PMCA)pumps play an important role in the maintenance of precise levels of intracellular Ca2+[Ca2+]i,essential to the functioning of neurons.In this article,we review evidence showing age-related changes of the PMCAs in synaptic plasma membranes(SPMs).PMCA activity and protein levels in SPMs diminish progressively with increasing age. The PMCAs are very sensitive to oxidative stress and undergo functional and structural changes when exposed to oxidants of physiological relevance.The major signatures of oxidative modification in the PMCAs are rapid inactivation,conformational changes,aggregation, internalization from the plasma membrane and proteolytic degradation.PMCA proteolysis appears to be mediated by both calpains and caspases.The predominance of one proteolytic pathway vs the other,the ensuing pattern of PMCA degradation and its consequence on pump activity depends largely on the type of insult,its intensity and duration.Experimental reduction of PMCA expression not only alters the dynamics of cellular Ca2+ handling but also has a myriad of downstream conse-quences on various aspects of cell function,indicating a broad role of these pumps.Age-and oxidation-related down-regulation of the PMCAs may play an important role in compromised neuronal function in the aging brain and its several-fold increased susceptibility to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease,and stroke.Therapeutic approaches that protect the PMCAs and stabilize[Ca2+]i homeostasis may be capable of slowing and/or preventing neuronal degeneration.The PMCAs are therefore emerging as a new class of drug targets for therapeutic interventions in various chronic degenerative disorders.

  8. Progress in the Design of the Stabilized Liner Compressor for MTF/MIF Plasma Target Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, Sherry; Frese, Michael; Turchi, Peter; Gale, Don

    2016-10-01

    The Stabilized Liner Compressor (SLC) seeks to extend concepts for repetitive, rotationally stabilized, liquid-metal liners driven by free-pistons to much higher drive pressures (25 vs 5 kpsi) and faster implosion speeds (2000 vs 100 m/s) than previously demonstrated. Such extension is needed to enable experiments with magnetized-plasma targets presently offering sizes and lifetimes of 10's cm diam and 10's microsec. SLC represents the confluence of several difficult technologies, including pulsed high pressures, high-speed rotating machinery and alkali-metal (Na, NaK) handling. Solution of the two-dimensional, unsteady, compressible flow of a rotating liquid-metal liner requires advanced numerical techniques. We report the use of the 2-1/2 dimensional MHD code MACH2 to explore flow options, including magnetic flux compression, and to provide pulsed pressure distributions for mechanical design. Supported by ARPA-E ALPHA Program.

  9. Melt layer behavior of metal targets irradiatead by powerful plasma streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, A. N.; Byrka, O. V.; Chebotarev, V. V.; Garkusha, I. E.; Makhlaj, V. A.; Solyakov, D. G.; Tereshin, V. I.; Wuerz, H.

    2002-12-01

    In this paper melt layer erosion of metal targets under pulsed high-heat loads is studied. Experiments with steel, copper, aluminum and titanium samples were carried out in two plasma accelerator devices with different time durations of the heat load. The surfaces of the resolidified melt layers show a considerable roughness with microcraters and ridge like relief on the surface. For each material the mass loss was determined. Melt layer erosion by melt motion was clearly identified. However it is masked by boiling, bubble expansion and bubble collapse and by formation of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The experimental results can be used for validation of numerical codes which model melt layer erosion of metallic armour materials in off-normal events, in tokamaks.

  10. Laser-Driven Ion Acceleration from Plasma Micro-Channel Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, D. B.; Pukhov, A.; Yi, L. Q.; Zhou, H. B.; Yu, T. P.; Yin, Y.; Shao, F. Q.

    2017-02-01

    Efficient energy boost of the laser-accelerated ions is critical for their applications in biomedical and hadron research. Achiev-able energies continue to rise, with currently highest energies, allowing access to medical therapy energy windows. Here, a new regime of simultaneous acceleration of ~100 MeV protons and multi-100 MeV carbon-ions from plasma micro-channel targets is proposed by using a ~1020 W/cm2 modest intensity laser pulse. It is found that two trains of overdense electron bunches are dragged out from the micro-channel and effectively accelerated by the longitudinal electric-field excited in the plasma channel. With the optimized channel size, these “superponderomotive” energetic electrons can be focused on the front surface of the attached plastic substrate. The much intense sheath electric-field is formed on the rear side, leading to up to ~10-fold ionic energy increase compared to the simple planar geometry. The analytical prediction of the optimal channel size and ion maximum energies is derived, which shows good agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations.

  11. Collision of an Arched Plasma-Filled Flux Rope with a Target Cloud of Initially Neutral Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwaitayakornkul, Pakorn; Bellan, Paul M.

    2015-11-01

    The Caltech solar loop experiment apparatus had been used to create an arched plasma-filled flux rope that expands to collide with a pre-injected initially-neutral gas. We investigated such a situation in two regimes: (i) plasma made by heavy gas impacting a much lighter neutral gas cloud and (ii) a light-gas plasma impacting much heavier neutral gas. The neutral gas became ionized immediately upon impact. In regime (i), multiple shock layers were formed in the target cloud; these magnetized collisionless shocks are relevant to solar physics as such shocks develop ahead of Coronal Mass Ejections and occur in Co-rotating Interaction Regions. In regime (ii), plasma expansion was inhibited. In both cases, fast camera images, magnetic probe measurements, and spectroscopy data will be reported. The analysis of plasma and shock expansion, as well as associated density and temperature changes, will be presented.

  12. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal trisomy 21 by allelic ratio analysis using targeted massively parallel sequencing of maternal plasma DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary J W Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasma DNA obtained from a pregnant woman contains a mixture of maternal and fetal DNA. The fetal DNA proportion in maternal plasma is relatively consistent as determined using polymorphic genetic markers across different chromosomes in euploid pregnancies. For aneuploid pregnancies, the observed fetal DNA proportion measured using polymorphic genetic markers for the aneuploid chromosome would be perturbed. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of analyzing single nucleotide polymorphisms using targeted massively parallel sequencing to detect such perturbations in mothers carrying trisomy 21 fetuses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DNA was extracted from plasma samples collected from fourteen pregnant women carrying singleton fetuses. Hybridization-based targeted sequencing was used to enrich 2 906 single nucleotide polymorphism loci on chr7, chr13, chr18 and chr21. Plasma DNA libraries with and without target enrichment were analyzed by massively parallel sequencing. Genomic DNA samples of both the mother and fetus for each case were genotyped by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis. For the targeted regions, the mean sequencing depth of the enriched samples was 225-fold higher than that of the non-enriched samples. From the targeted sequencing data, the ratio between fetus-specific and shared alleles increased by approximately 2-fold on chr21 in the paternally-derived trisomy 21 case. In comparison, the ratio is decreased by approximately 11% on chr21 in the maternally-derived trisomy 21 cases but with much overlap with the ratio of the euploid cases. Computer simulation revealed the relationship between the fetal DNA proportion, the number of informative alleles and the depth of sequencing. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Targeted massively parallel sequencing of single nucleotide polymorphism loci in maternal plasma DNA is a potential approach for trisomy 21 detection. However, the method appears to be less

  13. Modification of polylactic acid surface using RF plasma discharge with sputter deposition of a hydroxyapatite target for increased biocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tverdokhlebov, S.I., E-mail: tverd@tpu.ru [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Bolbasov, E.N.; Shesterikov, E.V. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Antonova, L.V.; Golovkin, A.S.; Matveeva, V.G. [Federal State Budgetary Institution Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Disease, 6 Sosnovy Blvd, Kemerovo 650002 (Russian Federation); Petlin, D.G.; Anissimov, Y.G. [Griffith University, School of Natural Sciences, Engineering Dr., Southport, QLD 4222 (Australia)

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • The treatment by plasma of radio-frequency magnetron discharge with hydroxyapatite target sputtering improves the biocompatibility of PLLA surface. • The treatment significantly increases the roughness of PLLA surface. • The formation of rough highly porous surface is due to the etching and crystallization processes on PLLA surface during treatment. • Maximum concentration of the ions from the sputtered target is achieved at 60 s of the plasma treatment. - Abstract: Surface modification of polylactic acid (PLLA) by plasma of radio-frequency magnetron discharge with hydroxyapatite target sputtering was investigated. Increased biocompatibility was demonstrated using studies with bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. Atomic force microscopy demonstrates that the plasma treatment modifies the surface morphology of PLLA to produce rougher surface. Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that changes in the surface morphology are caused by the processes of PLLA crystallization. Fluorescent X-ray spectroscopy showed that the plasma treatment also changes the chemical composition of PLLA, enriching it with ions of the sputtered target: calcium, phosphorus and oxygen. It is hypothesized that these surface modifications increase biocompatibility of PLLA without increasing toxicity.

  14. Burning the DT-plasma with inert impurities and non-cryogenic ICF-target with solid fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Gus'kov S.Yu.; Il'in D.V.; Sherman V.E.

    2013-01-01

    The ignition criterion, ignition energy and gain of DT-plasma of ICF-target in the presence of impurities of light atoms such as beryllium, carbon and lithium at their arbitrary concentration are found. It is shown that the most promising type of non-cryogenic solid thermonuclear fuel is DT-hydride of beryllium (BeDT). It is suggested to apply the targets with such a fuel as: (1) Fast-ignited ICF-target at the ignition energy of 25–50 kJ and compression driver energy of 2–3 MJ; (2) ICF-target...

  15. Modeling of linear divertor plasma simulator experiments with three-dimensional target structure by using EMC3-eIRENE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwabara, T. [Institute of Materials and Systems for Sustainability, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Kobayashi, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); SOKENDAI (The Graduate University For Advanced Studies), Toki (Japan); Kawamura, G. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Ohno, N.; Nishikata, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Feng, Y. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Garching/Greifswald (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    We have adapted the EMC3-EIRENE code for modeling of a linear divertor plasma simulator in order to demonstrate plasma-wall interactions with three-dimensional (3D) effects. 3D distributions of hydrogen plasma and neutrals can be successfully calculated for four different types of target plates: a V-shaped target, inclined targets with open and closed structures, and a planer target. Hydrogen atoms and molecules are accumulated more effectively in the V-shaped target plate, leading to a higher electron density with lower electron temperature than the planar target plate. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Spectroscopy of reactive species produced by low-energy atmospheric-pressure plasma on conductive target material surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiromasa; Sakakita, Hajime; Kato, Susumu; Kim, Jaeho; Kiyama, Satoru; Fujiwara, Masanori; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Okazaki, Toshiya; Ikehara, Sanae; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Ikehara, Yuzuru

    2016-10-01

    A method for blood coagulation using low-energy atmospheric-pressure plasma (LEAPP) is confirmed as an alternative procedure to reduce tissue damage caused by heat. Blood coagulation using LEAPP behaves differently depending on working gas species; helium is more effective than argon in promoting fast coagulation. To analyse the difference in reactive species produced by helium and argon plasma, spectroscopic measurements were conducted without and with a target material. To compare emissions, blood coagulation experiments using LEAPP for both plasmas were performed under almost identical conditions. Although many kinds of reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals and excited nitrogen molecules were observed with similar intensity in both plasmas, intensities of nitrogen ion molecules and nitric oxide molecules were extremely strong in the helium plasma. It is considered that nitrogen ion molecules were mainly produced by penning ionization by helium metastable. Near the target, a significant increase in the emissions of reactive species is observed. There is a possibility that electron acceleration was induced in a local electric field formed on the surface. However, in argon plasma, emissions from nitrogen ion were not measured even near the target surface. These differences between the two plasmas may be producing the difference in blood coagulation behaviour. To control the surrounding gas of the plasma, a gas-component-controllable chamber was assembled. Filling the chamber with O2/He or N2/He gas mixtures selectively produces either reactive oxygen species or reactive nitrogen species. Through selective treatments, this chamber would be useful in studying the effects of specific reactive species on blood coagulation.

  17. Two-dimensional temperature distribution inside a hemispherical bowl-shaped target for plasma source ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成森; 王艳辉; 王德真

    2005-01-01

    One important parameter for the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) process is the target temperature obtained during the surface modification. Because the power input to the target being implanted can be large, its temperature is quite high. The target temperature prediction is useful, whether the high temperature is required in the experiment.In addition, there is likely to be temperature variation across the target surface, which can lead to locally different surface properties. In this paper, we have presented a model to predict and explain the temperature distribution on a hemispherical bowl-shaped vessel during plasma source ion implantation. A two-dimensional fluid model to derive both the ion flux to the target and the energy imparted to the substrate by the ions in the plasma sheath simulation is employed. The calculated energy input and radiative heat loss are used to predict the temperature rise and variation inside the sample in the thermal model. The shape factor of the target for radiation is taken into account in the radiative energy loss. The influence of the pulse duration and the pulsing frequency on the temperature distribution is investigated in detail. Our work shows that at high pulsing frequencies the temperature of the bowl will no longer rise with the increase of the pulsing frequency.

  18. Optical spectroscopy of free-propagating plasma and its interaction with tungsten targets in PF-1000 facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Malinowski, K. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, IPJ, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Sadowski, M.J. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, IPJ, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)] [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, IPPLM, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Kubkowska, M.; Jakubowska, K.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, IPPLM, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Garkusha, I.E.; Ladygina, M.; Tereshin, V.I. [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC KIPT, 61-108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2011-07-01

    The paper reports on optical spectroscopy of pulsed plasma streams during their free propagation within a vacuum chamber and their interaction with tungsten targets. Experiments were performed with the PF-1000 facility and particular attention was paid to improvements in spectroscopic diagnostics techniques. In contrary to preliminary studies, the recent spectroscopic measurements of the free plasma streams were carried out perpendicular to the z-axis and at a larger distance from the electrode outlet. The center of the observation quartz-window was located at z = 30 cm in order to observe first a pure deuterium-plasma stream, and later on some heavy impurities which might reach that distance with a delay induced by differences in their production and time-of-flight. The recorded spectral lines were identified by means of a Kurucz database. It was confirmed that at the pure D{sub 2}-filling the PF-1000 facility emits first the deuterium-plasma stream and one can observe intense deuterium Balmer lines, but at a distance z = 30 cm, after about 2 microseconds there appear many impurity lines originating mainly from the Cu-electrodes, i.e. Cu-lines. The second part of the experiment concerned the spectroscopic measurements of metal plasma 'pillow' produced by the plasma stream impinging upon a solid target made of pure tungsten. The described measurements enabled the most intense spectral lines to be identified. This document is composed of an abstract followed by the slides of the presentation

  19. Collision Experiment of an Arched Plasma-Filled Flux Rope and a Target Cloud of Initially Neutral Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwaitayakornkul, Pakorn; Bellan, Paul; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai

    2016-10-01

    Shocks occur in the co-rotating interaction regions just beyond the solar corona, in the corona during CME events, and when the solar wind impacts Earth's magnetosphere. The Caltech solar loop experiment investigates shock physics by creating an arched plasma-filled flux rope that expands to collide with a pre-injected, initially-neutral gas. We focus the investigation on the situation of a heavy-gas plasma (Argon) impacting a much lighter neutral gas cloud (Hydrogen). The neutral gas target cloud ionizes immediately upon being impacted and plasma-induced shock waves propagate in the target cloud away from the impact region. Analysis of data from magnetic probes, Langmuir probes, a fast camera, and spectroscopic measurements will be presented. The measurements suggest that a thin, compressed, ionized layer of hydrogen is formed just downstream of the Argon plasma loop and that thin, supersonic shocks form further downstream and propagate obliquely away from the plasma loop. Numerical simulation of an ideal MHD plasma is underway to enable comparison of the measurements with the predictions of MHD theory.

  20. WNK4 inhibits plasma membrane targeting of NCC through regulation of syntaxin13 SNARE formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woo Young; Park, Hyun Woo; Han, Jung Woo; Lee, Min Goo; Kim, Joo Young

    2013-12-01

    WNK4, a serine/threonine kinase, plays a critical role in the expression of membrane proteins in the cell surface; however, the underlying mechanism of WNK4 is not clear. Here, we demonstrate that WNK4 inhibits the fusion of plasma membrane delivering vesicle with sorting/recycling endosome through disrupting SNARE formation of syntaxin13, an endosomal t-SNARE and VAMP2, the v-SNARE in plasma membrane delivering vesicle. Their interaction and co-localization were enhanced by hyperosmotic stimulation which is known for WNK4 activation. The kinase domain of WNK4 interacts with the transmembrane domain (TM) of syntaxin13 and this interaction was abolished when the TM was replaced with that of syntaxin16. Interestingly, cell fractionation using sucrose gradients revealed that WNK4 inhibited the formation of the syntaxin13/VAMP2 SNARE complex in the endosomal compartment, but not syntaxin16/VAMP2 or syntaxin13/VAMP7. Syntaxin13 was not phosphorylated by WNK4 and WNK4KI also showed the same binding strength and similar inhibitory regulation on SNARE formation of syntaxin13. Physiological relevance of this mechanism was proved with the expression of NCC (Na(+) C1(-) co-transporter) in the cell surface. The inhibiting activity of WNK4 on surface expression of NCC was abolished by syntaxin13 siRNA transfection. These results suggest that WNK4 attenuates PM targeting of NCC proteins through regulation of syntaxin13 SNARE complex formation with VAMP2 in recycling and sorting endosome. © 2013.

  1. Thomson scattering from laser plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J D; Alley, W E; De Groot, J S; Estabrook, K G; Glenzer, S H; Hammer, J H; Jadaud, J P; MacGowan, B J; Rozmus, W; Suter, L J; Williams, E A

    1999-01-12

    Thomson scattering has recently been introduced as a fundamental diagnostic of plasma conditions and basic physical processes in dense, inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Experiments at the Nova laser facility [E. M. Campbell et al., Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] have demonstrated accurate temporally and spatially resolved characterization of densities, electron temperatures, and average ionization levels by simultaneously observing Thomson scattered light from ion acoustic and electron plasma (Langmuir) fluctuations. In addition, observations of fast and slow ion acous- tic waves in two-ion species plasmas have also allowed an independent measurement of the ion temperature. These results have motivated the application of Thomson scattering in closed-geometry inertial confinement fusion hohlraums to benchmark integrated radiation-hydrodynamic modeling of fusion plasmas. For this purpose a high energy 4{omega} probe laser was implemented recently allowing ultraviolet Thomson scattering at various locations in high-density gas-filled hohlraum plasmas. In partic- ular, the observation of steep electron temperature gradients indicates that electron thermal transport is inhibited in these gas-filled hohlraums. Hydrodynamic calcula- tions which include an exact treatment of large-scale magnetic fields are in agreement with these findings. Moreover, the Thomson scattering data clearly indicate axial stagnation in these hohlraums by showing a fast rise of the ion temperature. Its timing is in good agreement with calculations indicating that the stagnating plasma will not deteriorate the implosion of the fusion capsules in ignition experiments.

  2. Modification of polylactic acid surface using RF plasma discharge with sputter deposition of a hydroxyapatite target for increased biocompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Bolbasov, E. N.; Shesterikov, E. V.; Antonova, L. V.; Golovkin, A. S.; Matveeva, V. G.; Petlin, D. G.; Anissimov, Y. G.

    2015-02-01

    Surface modification of polylactic acid (PLLA) by plasma of radio-frequency magnetron discharge with hydroxyapatite target sputtering was investigated. Increased biocompatibility was demonstrated using studies with bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. Atomic force microscopy demonstrates that the plasma treatment modifies the surface morphology of PLLA to produce rougher surface. Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that changes in the surface morphology are caused by the processes of PLLA crystallization. Fluorescent X-ray spectroscopy showed that the plasma treatment also changes the chemical composition of PLLA, enriching it with ions of the sputtered target: calcium, phosphorus and oxygen. It is hypothesized that these surface modifications increase biocompatibility of PLLA without increasing toxicity.

  3. Stereolithography based method of creating custom gas density profile targets for high intensity laser-plasma experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, S W; He, Z; McGuffey, C; Schumaker, W; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R

    2012-07-01

    Laser based stereolithography methods are shown to be useful for production of gas targets for high intensity laser-plasma interaction experiments. A cylindrically symmetric nozzle with an opening of approximately 100 μm and a periodic attachment of variable periodicity are outlined in detail with associated density profile characterization. Both components are durable within the limits of relevant experiments.

  4. Hydrodynamic simulations of long-scale-length plasmas for two-plasmon-decay planar-target experiments on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodov, A. A.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Myatt, J. F.; Epstein, R.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shaw, J.; Hohenberger, M.; Bates, J. W.; Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Turnbull, D. P.; Barrios, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    The two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability can be detrimental for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion because it generates high-energy electrons that can preheat the target, thereby reducing target performance. Hydrodynamic simulations to design a new experimental platform to investigate TPD and other laser-plasma instabilities relevant to direct-drive-ignition implosions at the National Ignition Facility are presented. The proposed experiments utilize planar plastic targets with an embedded Mo layer to characterize generation of hot electrons through Mo Kα fluorescence and hard x-ray emission. Different laser-irradiation geometries approximate conditions near both the equator and the pole of a polar-direct-drive implosion.

  5. Assessment of Two Immunodepletion Methods: Off-Target Effects and Variations in Immunodepletion Efficiency May Confound Plasma Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhavinkumar B.; Barrero, Carlos A.; Braverman, Alan; Kim, Phillip D.; Jones, Kelly A.; Chen, Dian Er; Bowler, Russell P.; Merali, Salim; Kelsen, Steven G.; Yeung, Anthony T.

    2012-01-01

    Immunodepletion of abundant plasma proteins increases the depth of proteome penetration by mass spectrometry. However, the nature and extent of immunodepletion and the effect of off-target depletion on the quantitative comparison of the residual proteins have not been critically addressed. We performed mass spectrometry label-free quantitation to determine which proteins were immunodepleted and by how much. Two immunodepletion resins were compared: Qproteome (Qiagen) which removes albumin+immunoglobulins and Seppro IgY14+SuperMix (Sigma-Aldrich) which removes 14 target proteins plus a number of unidentified proteins. Plasma collected by P100 proteomic plasma collection tubes (BD) from 20 human subjects was individually immunodepleted to minimize potential variability, prior to pooling. The abundant proteins were quantified better when using only albumin+immunoglobulins removal (Qproteome) while lower abundance proteins were evaluated better using exhaustive immunodepletion (Seppro IgY14+SuperMix). The latter resin removed at least 155 proteins, 38% of the plasma proteome in protein number and 94% of plasma protein in mass. The depth of immunodepletion likely accounts for the effectiveness of this resin in revealing low abundance proteins. However, the more profound immunodepletion achieved with the IgY14+SuperMix may lead to false-positive fold-changes between comparison groups if the reproducibility and efficiency of the depletion of a given protein is not considered. PMID:23082855

  6. Burning the DT-plasma with inert impurities and non-cryogenic ICF-target with solid fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gus'kov S.Yu.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The ignition criterion, ignition energy and gain of DT-plasma of ICF-target in the presence of impurities of light atoms such as beryllium, carbon and lithium at their arbitrary concentration are found. It is shown that the most promising type of non-cryogenic solid thermonuclear fuel is DT-hydride of beryllium (BeDT. It is suggested to apply the targets with such a fuel as: (1 Fast-ignited ICF-target at the ignition energy of 25–50 kJ and compression driver energy of 2–3 MJ; (2 ICF-target spark-ignited by 15–20 MJ heavy ion driver; (3 Spark-ignited target by 5–7 MJ laser as a neutron source for hybrid fusion-fission.

  7. Investigation of interactions of intense plasma streams with tungsten and carbon fibre composite targets in the PF-1000 facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubkowska, Monika; Skladnik-Sadowska, Elzbieta; Kwiatkowski, Roch; Malinowski, Karol; Kowalska-Strzęciwilk, Ewa; Paduch, Marian; Sadowski, Marek J.; Pisarczyk, Tadeusz; Chodukowski, Tomasz; Kalinowska, Zofia; Zielinska, Ewa; Scholz, Marek

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the results of research on interactions of pulsed plasma streams, as generated by the PF-1000 facility, with solid targets made of tungsten or carbon fibre composite. The device was equipped with a modified inner electrode with a central tungsten insert of 50 mm in diameter. The PF-1000 experimental chamber was filled with pure deuterium at p0 = 1.47 hPa. At the charging voltage U0 = 24 kV, the maximum current amounted to 1.8 MA in about 5.5 μs after the discharge initiation. The investigated targets were located on the z-axis, at a distance of 9 cm from the inner electrode end. For plasma diagnostics, optical emission spectroscopy, 16-frame laser interferometry and a soft x-ray measuring system of four silicon pin diodes were used. It was observed that plasma streams reached the target about 100 ns after the maximum compression and generated a plasma pillow at the sample surface, as proved from time-resolved optical spectra.

  8. A unified model to determine the energy partitioning between target and plasma in nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galasso, G., E-mail: germano.galasso@gmail.com [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Mechanics and Mechatronics, Getreidemarkt 9, 1060 Vienna (Austria); KAI Kompetenzzentrum GmbH, Europastrasse 8, 9524 Villach (Austria); Kaltenbacher, M. [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Mechanics and Mechatronics, Getreidemarkt 9, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Tomaselli, A. [Department of Electrical, Computer and Biomedical Engineering, University of Pavia, via Ferrata 5, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Scarpa, D. [INFN Legnaro National Laboratories, viale dell' Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)

    2015-03-28

    In semiconductor industry, pulsed nanosecond lasers are widely applied for the separation of silicon wafers. Here, the high intensities employed activate a cascade of complex multi-physical and multi-phase mechanisms, which finally result in the formation of a laser induced plasma, shielding the target from the incoming laser beam. Such induced plasma plume, by preventing the laser to effectively reach the target, reduces the overall efficiency and controllability of the ablation process. Modelling can be a useful tool in the optimization of industrial laser applications, allowing a deeper understanding of the way the laser energy distributes between target and induced plasma. Nevertheless, the highly multi-physical character of laser ablation poses serious challenges on the implementation of the various mechanisms underlying the process within a common modelling framework. A novel strategy is here proposed in order to simulate in a simplified, yet physically consistent way, a typical industrial application as laser ablation of silicon wafers. Reasonable agreement with experimental findings is obtained. Three fundamental mechanisms have been identified as the main factors influencing the accuracy of the numerical predictions: the transition from evaporative to volumetric mass removal occurring at critical temperature, the collisional and radiative processes underlying the initial plasma formation stage and the increased impact of the liquid ejection mechanism when a sub-millimeter laser footprint is used.

  9. Non-targeted plasma metabolome of early and late lactation gilts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea A Rempel

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Female pigs nursing their first litter (first-parity gilts have increased energy requirements not only to support their piglets, but they themselves are still maturing. Non-targeted plasma metabolomics were used to investigate the differences between 1 post-farrowing and weaning (early or late lactation, 2 degree of body condition loss after lactation (extreme or minimal, and 3 interactions; to potentially identify compounds or pathways that could aide in alleviating energetic demands of lactation in gilts. Twenty first-parity gilts were selected with similar (P ≥ 0.4475 number of piglets born and nursed, and similar (P ≥ 0.3141 body condition traits (e.g. body weight and backfat thickness post-farrowing, yet exhibited minimal or extreme loss (P ≤ 0.0094 in body weight (8.6 ± 1.48 kg and 26.1 ± 1.90 kg, respectively and backfat thickness (1.3 ± 0.67 mm and 4.7 ± 0.86 mm, respectively following lactation (weaning. Plasma samples from first-parity gilts at post-farrowing and weaning were investigated using UPLC-MS and GC-MS to generate a comprehensive metabolic profile. Each approach yielded approximately 700 detected compounds. An ANOVA was performed on each detected compound in R for time of collection, body condition change, and the interaction, followed by a false discovery correction. Two unknown compounds were different (P ≤ 0.05 for extreme versus minimal body condition change. Several compound differences (P ≤ 0.05 were identified between post-farrowing and weaning. Thirty-two compounds detected by UPLC-MS had at least a log2 fold-change of ±1.0 while only 18 compounds had a log2 fold-change of ±0.6 for the significant GC-MS compounds. Annotation implicated various metabolic pathways. Creatinine was greater at weaning (P = 0.0224 and others have reported increased serum concentrations of creatinine in response to body weight loss. Hippurate and caprolactam, associated with protein catabolism, were also greater (P ≤ 0

  10. Pre-plasma effect on energy transfer from laser beam to shock wave generated in solid target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarczyk, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Badziak, J.; Borodziuk, S.; Chodukowski, T.; Kasperczuk, A.; Parys, P.; Rosinski, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Gus' kov, S. Yu.; Demchenko, N. N. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, 53 Leninsky Ave., 119 991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Batani, D.; Antonelli, L.; Folpini, G.; Maheut, Y. [Université Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, Talence (France); Baffigi, F.; Cristoforetti, G.; Gizzi, L. A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory at INO-CNR, Pisa (Italy); Krousky, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, v.v.i., ZaSlovankou 3, 182 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); and others

    2014-01-15

    Efficiency of the laser radiation energy transport into the shock wave generated in layered planar targets (consisting of massive Cu over coated by thin CH layer) was investigated. The targets were irradiated using two laser pulses. The 1ω pulse with the energy of ∼50 J produced a pre-plasma, imitating the corona of the pre-compressed inertial confinement fusion target. The second main pulse used the 1ω or 3ω laser harmonics with the energy of ∼200 J. The influence of the pre-plasma on parameters of the shock wave was determined from the crater volume measurements and from the electron density distribution measured by 3-frame interferometry. The experimental results show that the energy transport by fast electrons provides a definite contribution to the dynamics of the ablative process, to the shock wave generation, and to the ablation pressure in dependence on the target irradiation conditions. The strong influence of the pre-plasma on the investigated process was observed in the 1ω case. Theoretical analysis supports the explanation of experimental results.

  11. Pre-plasma effect on energy transfer from laser beam to shock wave generated in solid target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarczyk, T.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Kalinowska, Z.; Badziak, J.; Batani, D.; Antonelli, L.; Folpini, G.; Maheut, Y.; Baffigi, F.; Borodziuk, S.; Chodukowski, T.; Cristoforetti, G.; Demchenko, N. N.; Gizzi, L. A.; Kasperczuk, A.; Koester, P.; Krousky, E.; Labate, L.; Parys, P.; Pfeifer, M.; Renner, O.; Smid, M.; Rosinski, M.; Skala, J.; Dudzak, R.; Ullschmied, J.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2014-01-01

    Efficiency of the laser radiation energy transport into the shock wave generated in layered planar targets (consisting of massive Cu over coated by thin CH layer) was investigated. The targets were irradiated using two laser pulses. The 1ω pulse with the energy of ˜50 J produced a pre-plasma, imitating the corona of the pre-compressed inertial confinement fusion target. The second main pulse used the 1ω or 3ω laser harmonics with the energy of ˜200 J. The influence of the pre-plasma on parameters of the shock wave was determined from the crater volume measurements and from the electron density distribution measured by 3-frame interferometry. The experimental results show that the energy transport by fast electrons provides a definite contribution to the dynamics of the ablative process, to the shock wave generation, and to the ablation pressure in dependence on the target irradiation conditions. The strong influence of the pre-plasma on the investigated process was observed in the 1ω case. Theoretical analysis supports the explanation of experimental results.

  12. Amino-terminal cysteine residues differentially influence RGS4 protein plasma membrane targeting, intracellular trafficking, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Guillaume; Singh, Kevin; Dissanayake, Kaveesh; Mighiu, Alexandra S; Nurmohamed, Aliya; Heximer, Scott P

    2012-08-17

    Regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins are potent inhibitors of heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. RGS4 attenuates G-protein activity in several tissues. Previous work demonstrated that cysteine palmitoylation on residues in the amino-terminal (Cys-2 and Cys-12) and core domains (Cys-95) of RGS4 is important for protein stability, plasma membrane targeting, and GTPase activating function. To date Cys-2 has been the priority target for RGS4 regulation by palmitoylation based on its putative role in stabilizing the RGS4 protein. Here, we investigate differences in the contribution of Cys-2 and Cys-12 to the intracellular localization and function of RGS4. Inhibition of RGS4 palmitoylation with 2-bromopalmitate dramatically reduced its localization to the plasma membrane. Similarly, mutation of the RGS4 amphipathic helix (L23D) prevented membrane localization and its G(q) inhibitory function. Together, these data suggest that both RGS4 palmitoylation and the amphipathic helix domain are required for optimal plasma membrane targeting and function of RGS4. Mutation of Cys-12 decreased RGS4 membrane targeting to a similar extent as 2-bromopalmitate, resulting in complete loss of its G(q) inhibitory function. Mutation of Cys-2 did not impair plasma membrane targeting but did partially impair its function as a G(q) inhibitor. Comparison of the endosomal distribution pattern of wild type and mutant RGS4 proteins with TGN38 indicated that palmitoylation of these two cysteines contributes differentially to the intracellular trafficking of RGS4. These data show for the first time that Cys-2 and Cys-12 play markedly different roles in the regulation of RGS4 membrane localization, intracellular trafficking, and G(q) inhibitory function via mechanisms that are unrelated to RGS4 protein stabilization.

  13. Comparison of plasma parameters and line emissions of laser-induced plasmas of an aluminum target using single and orthogonal double nanosecond/picosecond pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobral, H., E-mail: martin.sobral@ccadet.unam.mx; Sanginés, R.

    2014-04-01

    The emission of laser-induced plasma on aluminum targets in air was investigated with nanosecond- and picosecond-pulsed Nd:YAG laser emitting at the fundamental wavelength. Orthogonal double pulse in pre-ablation and reheating configurations was also performed where the picosecond laser was employed to ablate the target. Ablation fluences were kept fixed at 100 J cm{sup −2} regardless of the laser pulse duration. Time integrated emission spectroscopy was employed to determine the plasma emission; thus, picosecond laser ablation provided larger figures than the nanosecond one. The emission was further enhanced when double pulse schemes were used. This enhancement was analyzed as a function of interpulse delays. Electron density and temperature evolutions were determined from time delays of 150 ns after the ablation plasma onset. Results are discussed in terms of the ablation rate. - Highlights: • A comparison of LIBS signal keeping constant the ablation fluence is performed. • Emission of ps laser ablation is up to four-fold enlarged compared with ns pulses. • Drilling ablation efficiency is 6 times larger with ps compared with ns pulses. • LIBS sensitivity with ps pulse ablation is equivalent to that of ns double pulse configuration.

  14. Characterization of a UV VUV light source based on a gas-target ns-laser-produced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palma, Tonia M.; Borghese, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    We report measurements of the temporal and spatial evolution of plasmas, produced on gaseous targets by focused ns-Nd:YAG laser. Characterization of the UV-VUV light source includes time-resolved visualization of the spatial growth and the spectroscopic signatures of plasmas produced on pulsed, supersonic jets of helium, argon, nitrogen and xenon gases into a vacuum chamber. Photon fluxes of up to 1012 photons cm-2 nm-1/pulse have been measured in the wavelength region 100-260 nm within the first 30 ns following the laser pulse. Also discussed for comparison are plasma signatures in helium, argon and nitrogen gases at standard temperature and pressure. The results indicate availability of photon fluxes, at typical laser repetition rates, that are at least one order of magnitude higher than those achieved from commercial c.w. lamp light sources.

  15. Circulating MicroRNAs in Plasma of Hepatitis B e Antigen Positive Children Reveal Liver-Specific Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilde Nordmann Winther

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Hepatitis B e antigen positive (HBeAg-positive children are at high risk of severe complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis. Liver damage is caused by the host immune response to infected hepatocytes, and we hypothesise that specific microRNAs play a role in this complex interaction between virus and host. The study aimed to identify microRNAs with aberrant plasma expressions in HBeAg-positive children and with liver-specific target genes. Methods. By revisiting our previous screen of microRNA plasma levels in HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative children with chronic hepatitis B (CHB and in healthy controls, candidate microRNAs with aberrant plasma expressions in HBeAg-positive children were identified. MicroRNAs targeting liver-specific genes were selected based on bioinformatics analysis and validated by qRT-PCR using plasma samples from 34 HBeAg-positive, 26 HBeAg-negative, and 60 healthy control children. Results. Thirteen microRNAs showed aberrant plasma expressions in HBeAg-positive children and targeted liver-specific genes. In particular, three microRNAs were upregulated and one was downregulated in HBeAg-positive children compared to HBeAg-negative and healthy control children, which showed equal levels. Conclusion. The identified microRNAs might impact the progression of CHB in children. Functional studies are warranted, however, to elucidate the microRNAs’ role in the immunopathogenesis of childhood CHB.

  16. Effect of plasma inhomogeneity on ion acceleration when an ultra-intense laser pulse interacts with a foil target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, A.A.; Platonov, K.Yu. [Institute for Laser Physics, SC Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zhidkov, A.G. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Sasaki, A. [Advanced Photon Research Center JAERI, Kizu-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Fast electrons generated via the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with a solid target can produce multi-MeV ions from laser-induced plasmas. These fast ions can be used for various applications ranging from the ion implantation to the stimulation of nuclear reactions. The most important point here is the efficiency of production of such fast ions. We analyse in detail, with the help of an analytical model and particle-in-cell simulations, the most efficient acceleration mechanisms including the ponderomotive force driving and acceleration by the shock wave, and compare the electrostatic ion acceleration at the front side and at the rear side of a foil target. We also determine the optimal plasma density distribution shaped by the laser pre-pulse. (author)

  17. Generation and characterization of plasma channels in gas puff targets using soft X-ray radiography technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachulak, P. W., E-mail: wachulak@gmail.com; Bartnik, A.; Jarocki, R.; Fok, T.; Węgrzyński, Ł.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M.; Jabczyński, J.; Fiedorowicz, H. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-10-15

    We present our recent results of a formation and characterization of plasma channels in elongated krypton and xenon gas puff targets. The study of their formation and temporal expansion was carried out using a combination of a soft X-ray radiography (shadowgraphy) and pinhole camera imaging. Two high-energy short laser pulses were used to produce the channels. When a pumping laser pulse was shaped into a line focus, using cylindrical and spherical lenses, the channels were not produced because much smaller energy density was deposited in the gas puff target. However, when a point focus was obtained, using just a spherical lens, the plasma channels appeared. The channels were up to 9 mm in length, had a quite uniform density profile, and expanded in time with velocities of about 2 cm/μs.

  18. Targeting cancer cells with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by atmospheric-pressure air plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hak Jun Ahn

    Full Text Available The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS including H2O2, Ox, OH-, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells.

  19. Study of the laser-plasma acceleration of ion beams with enhanced quality: The effects of nanostructured targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Reza

    2017-06-01

    Production of high-quality ion beams by intense laser-plasma interactions represents a rapidly evolving field of interest. In this paper, a nanostructured target is proposed to generate laser-driven quasi-monoenergetic ion beams with considerably reduced energy spread and enhanced peak energy. Linearly polarized, 40-fs laser pulses of intensity 8.5 × 1020 W cm-2 were considered to irradiate simple carbon foil and nanostructured targets. The proposed target consists of a thin layer of relatively high-Z atom (Ti) with a depression on its back surface which is filled by a nanosize disc of a low-Z atom (C). Reliable and reproducible results of multi-parametric Particle-in-Cell simulations show that by using a composed nanostructured target with optimum physical properties, a quasi-monoenergetic ion beam can be generated with a narrow band energy spectrum peaking at energies higher than 20 MeV. In addition, the forward-accelerated beam of low-Z carbon ions exhibits a considerably reduced transverse emittance in comparison with the ion beam obtained in the condition of a simple foil. The proposed nanostructured target can efficiently contribute to the generation of high-quality ion beams which are critical in newly growing applications and physics of laser-plasma accelerators.

  20. NF-κB2 mutation targets survival, proliferation and differentiation pathways in the pathogenesis of plasma cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy Brian A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal NF-κB2 activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells. However, a causal role for aberrant NF-κB2 signaling in the development of plasma cell tumors has not been established. Also unclear is the molecular mechanism that drives the tumorigenic process. We investigated these questions by using a transgenic mouse model with lymphocyte-targeted expression of p80HT, a lymphoma-associated NF-κB2 mutant, and human multiple myeloma cell lines. Methods We conducted a detailed histopathological characterization of lymphomas developed in p80HT transgenic mice and microarray gene expression profiling of p80HT B cells with the goal of identifying genes that drive plasma cell tumor development. We further verified the significance of our findings in human multiple myeloma cell lines. Results Approximately 40% of p80HT mice showed elevated levels of monoclonal immunoglobulin (M-protein in the serum and developed plasma cell tumors. Some of these mice displayed key features of human multiple myeloma with accumulation of plasma cells in the bone marrow, osteolytic bone lesions and/or diffuse osteoporosis. Gene expression profiling of B cells from M-protein-positive p80HT mice revealed aberrant expression of genes known to be important in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma, including cyclin D1, cyclin D2, Blimp1, survivin, IL-10 and IL-15. In vitro assays demonstrated a critical role of Stat3, a key downstream component of IL-10 signaling, in the survival of human multiple myeloma cells. Conclusions These findings provide a mouse model for human multiple myeloma with aberrant NF-κB2 activation and suggest a molecular mechanism for NF-κB2 signaling in the pathogenesis of plasma cell tumors by coordinated regulation of plasma cell generation, proliferation and survival.

  1. Acceleration of protons in plasma produced from a thin plastic or aluminum target by a femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Zaras-Szydlowska, A.; Ryc, L.; Torrisi, L.; Szydlowski, A.; Malinowska, A.; Kaczmarczyk, B.; Makowski, J.; Torrisi, A.

    2016-05-01

    The acceleration of protons in plasma produced from thin mylar (3.5 μ m) and aluminum (2 μm) targets by a 45-fs laser pulses with the energy of 400 mJ and the intensity of up to 1019 W/cm2 was investigated. Characteristics of forward-accelerated protons were measured by the time-of-flight method. In the measurements, special attention was paid to the dependence of proton beam parameters on the laser focus position (FP) in relation to the target surface which resulted in the intensity change within a factor of ~ 10. It was observed that in the case of using the Mylar target, the dependence of both the maximum (Epmax) and the mean (langleEprangle) proton energy on |Δx| is clearly non-symmetric with regard to the point where FP = 0 (the focal plane on the target surface) and highest proton energies are achieved when the focal plane is situated in front of the target. In particular, for the target with the thickness of 3.5 μ m Epmax reached 2.2 MeV for FP = +50 μm while for FP = 0 and FP = -100 μm the maximum proton energies reached only 1.6 MeV and 1.3 MeV, respectively. For the aluminum target of 2 μm thickness Ep changed only within ~ 40% and the highest proton energies reached 2.4 MeV.

  2. Hepatocyte growth factor activator is a potential target proteinase for Kazal-type inhibitor in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słowińska, Mariola; Bukowska, Joanna; Hejmej, Anna; Bilińska, Barbara; Kozłowski, Krzysztof; Jankowski, Jan; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    A peculiar characteristic of turkey seminal plasma is the increased activity of serine proteinases. It is of interest if the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor controls the activity of turkey seminal plasma proteinases. Pure preparations of the Kazal-type inhibitor and anti-Kazal-type inhibitor monospecific immunoglobulin Gs were used as ligands in affinity chromatography for proteinase isolation from turkey seminal plasma. Gene expression and the immunohistochemical detection of the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor in the reproductive tract of turkey toms are described. The hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) was identified in the binding fraction in affinity chromatography. Hepatocyte growth factor activator activity was inhibited by the Kazal-type inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner. This protease was a primary physiological target for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. Numerous proteoforms of HGFA were present in turkey seminal plasma, and phosphorylation was the primary posttranslational modification of HGFA. In addition to HGFA, acrosin was a target proteinase for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. In seminal plasma, acrosin was present only in complexes with the Kazal-type inhibitor and was not present as a free enzyme. The single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor was specific for the reproductive tract. The germ cell-specific expression of Kazal-type inhibitors in the testis indicated an important function in spermatogenesis; secretion by the epithelial cells of the epididymis and the ductus deferens indicated that the Kazal-type inhibitor was an important factor involved in the changes in sperm membranes during maturation and in the maintenance of the microenvironment in which sperm maturation occurred and sperm was stored. The role of HGFA in these processes remains to be established.

  3. Effect of Non-Uniform Divertor Target Properties on Scrape-off Layer Plasma Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba, Fabio; Tskhakaya, David; Holzmueller-Steinacker, Ulrike; Schupfer, Nikolaus; Stanojevic, Mladen; Kuhn, Siegbert

    2000-10-01

    It is well known that plasma in contact with a solid wall develops a boundary layer, which typically consists of a thin Debye sheath adjacent to the wall and a more extended presheath providing the transition to the unperturbed plasma [1,2]. As the physical interaction of the plasma with the surrounding universe is mainly localized in this region, it may be expected that this boundary layer, which sensitively controls particle and energy fluxes to and from the plasma, plays an important role in determining the properties of the overall plasma equilibrium. On the other hand, it is generally assumed that the details of the adopted boundary-layer models do not influence dramatically the overall SOL behavior. However, little quantitative literature is actually available on the subject [3]. The purpose of this paper is to make a contribution towards clarifying this issue. In particular, we will use the B2.5 code [4] for studying the influence of non-uniformity of the effective secondary-electron emission coefficient (ESEEC) on the plasma parameters in the SOL.

  4. Laser plasma interaction in rugby-shaped hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Philippe, F.; Tassin, V.; Monteil, M.-C.; Gauthier, P.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Seytor, P.; Teychenne, D.; Loiseau, P.; Freymerie, P.

    2014-10-01

    Rugby shaped-hohlraum has proven to give high performance compared to a classical similar-diameter cylinder hohlraum. Due to this performance, this hohlraum has been chosen as baseline ignition target for the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ). Many experiments have therefore been performed during the last years on the Omega laser facility in order to study in details the rugby hohlraum. In this talk, we will discuss the interpretation of these experiments from the point of view of the laser plasma instability problem. Experimental comparisons have been done between rugby, cylinder and elliptical shape rugby hohlraums and we will discuss how the geometry differences will affect the evolution of laser plasma instabilities (LPI). The efficiency of laser smoothing techniques on these instabilities will also be discussed as well as gas filling effect. The experimental results will be compared with FCI2 hydroradiative calculations and linear postprocessing with Piranah. Experimental Raman and Brillouin spectrum, from which we can infer the location of the parametric instabilities, will be compared to simulated ones, and will give the possibility to compare LPI between the different hohlraum geometries.

  5. Joint Experiments on X-ray/Particle Emission from Plasmas Produced by Laser Irradiating Nano Structured Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, H.; Allam, S. H.; Chaurasia, S.; Dhareshwar, L.; El-Sherbini, Th. M.; Kunze, H.-J.; Mank, G.; McDaniel, D. H.; Rosinski, M.; Ryc, L.; Stewart, B.; Wolowski, J.; Abd El-Ghany, H.; Abd El-Latif, G.; Abd El-Rahim, F. M.; Bedrane, Z.; Diab, F.; Farrag, A.; Hedwig, R.; Helal, A.; Pardede, M.; Refaie, A.; Sharkawy, H.; El-khatim, A., Sir

    2008-04-01

    The 1st Joint (Host Laboratory) Experiment on laser plasma involving more than twenty scientists from eight countries has been carried out at the Laser and New Materials Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Egypt. It was co-ordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and supported through the IAEA and the ICTP (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste). The main experimental programme was aimed at characterising the possible enhancement of x-ray and particle emission from plasmas produced by laser incidence on nano-structured targets. Laser beams at 1.064 μm of 250 mJ and 532 nm of 165 mJ focused at the target surface using a nanosecond laser type Quantel were used in the present study. In the present experiments nano-copper structures evaporated onto copper bulk disks and nano-gold structures evaporated onto gold ones were used. The thickness of the nano-materials on their bulk material was 1 μm. An ion collector and x-ray semiconductor diode were used to study the ion and x-ray emission, respectively. Both were positioned at the same port at 90° with respect to the target surface and at 90 cm from the surface in the case of the ion collector and 55 cm in the case of the x-ray detector. These experiments were performed at vacuum pressures of (5—8)×10-6 mbar. Comparison of both studies in the case of nano structured targets and bulk targets were performed at different laser fluencies (1×109-1×1012 W/cm2) on the target. A 20% increase of the X-ray emission for nano gold with respect to bulk gold was observed, however, the x-ray emission in the of nano copper and copper was the same.

  6. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology.

  7. Prepulse-induced shock waves in the gas jet target of a laser plasma EUV radiation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbaruk, A. V.; Gritskevich, M. S.; Kalmykov, S. G.; Mozharov, A. M.; Sasin, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    In experiments with a laser-plasma EUV-radiation source, the main IR Nd:YAG laser pulse was preceded by that of a UV KrF excimer laser. Dramatic modulations of EUV plasma emissivity have been observed at long interpulse times, from hundreds of nanoseconds up to microseconds. To discover the nature of these prepulse-produced long-living perturbations of the target, a fluid dynamics numerical simulation of the Xe gas jet has been carried out. The prepulse has been found to generate a quasi-spherical shock wave with a thin dense front layer and a vast rarefied inside area. In the course of time, the front expands and simultaneously drifts downstream along with the gas. Depending on the interpulse time, the IR laser beam either intersects the dense layer or propagates within the rarefied gas cavity whereby the above-mentioned variations in the plasma emission can be explained. The possibilities of making use of the discovered phenomena to enhance the observed EUV plasma brightness are discussed.

  8. Ionization-induced asymmetric self-phase modulation and universal modulational instability in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Travers, John C; Russell, Philip St J; Biancalana, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We study theoretically the propagation of relatively long pulses with ionizing intensities in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with a Raman-inactive gas. Due to photoionization, previously unknown types of asymmetric self-phase modulation and `universal' modulational instabilities existing in both normal and anomalous dispersion regions appear. We also show that it is possible to spontaneously generate a plasma-induced continuum of blueshifting solitons, opening up new possibilities for pushing supercontinuum generation towards shorter and shorter wavelengths.

  9. Fast imaging of laser induced plasma emission of vanadium dioxide (VO2) target

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to fully optimise the synthesis of vanadium oxide nanostructures using pulsed laser deposition. We will attempt to realise this by studying the mechanism of the plasma formation and expansion during the pulsed...

  10. TARGET:?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James M Acton

    2014-01-01

      By 2003. as military planners had become worried that the country's long-range conventional weapons, such as cruise missiles, might be too slow to reach hypothetical distant targets that needed to be struck urgently...

  11. Understanding the dynamics of photoionization-induced nonlinear effects and solitons in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammed F.; Biancalana, Fabio

    2011-12-01

    We present the details of our previously formulated model [Saleh , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.203902 107, 203902 (2011)] that governs pulse propagation in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled by an ionizable gas. By using perturbative methods, we find that the photoionization process induces the opposite phenomenon of the well-known Raman self-frequency redshift of solitons in solid-core glass fibers, as was recently experimentally demonstrated [Hölzer , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.203901 107, 203901 (2011)]. This process is only limited by ionization losses, and leads to a constant acceleration of solitons in the time domain with a continuous blueshift in the frequency domain. By applying the Gagnon-Bélanger gauge transformation, multipeak “inverted gravitylike” solitary waves are predicted. We also demonstrate that the pulse dynamics shows the ejection of solitons during propagation in such fibers, analogous to what happens in conventional solid-core fibers. Moreover, unconventional long-range nonlocal interactions between temporally distant solitons, unique of gas plasma systems, are predicted and studied. Finally, the effects of higher-order dispersion coefficients and the shock operator on the pulse dynamics are investigated, showing that the conversion efficiency of resonant radiation into the deep UV can be improved via plasma formation.

  12. EUV and debris characteristics of a laser-plasma tin dioxide nano-particle colloidal jet target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Masanori; Suetake, Sumihiro; Senba, Yusuke; Katto, Masahito; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2008-03-01

    Debris characteristics and its reduction have been investigated for a laser-produced plasma (LPP) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source using a colloidal jet target containing tin dioxide nano-particles. Dominant deposited debris on a witness plate was found to have a form of oxidized tin (SnO x) originated from nano-particles. Quantitative debris amounts were determined by total laser energy irradiated onto a target, not by laser irradiation modes, such as single or double pulse irradiation. In-situ low-temperature (100°C) heating of a plate was effective to reduce the deposited debris amount, since colloidal debris was easily vaporized by the heat. Another approach to remove the deposited debris was roomtemperature photon processing using incoherent vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission at 126 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis has shown that the deposited SnOx debris layer was deoxidized by the 126 nm VUV photon energy.

  13. Ionic Debye Screening in Dense Liquid Plasmas Observed for Li+p,d Reactions with Liquid Li Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Kasagi; H.Yonemura; Y.Toriyabe; A.Nakagawa; T.Sugawara; WANG Tie-shan

    2009-01-01

    Thick target yields of a particles emitted in the ~6Li(d,a)~4 He and ~7Li(p,a)~4 He reactions were measured for Li target in the solid and liquid phase.Observed reaction rates for the liquid Li are always larger than those for the solid.This suggests that the stopping power of hydrogen ion in the liquid Li metal might be smaller than in the solid.Using the empirically obtained stopping power for the liquid Li,we have deduced the screening potentials of the Li+p and Li+d reactions in both phases.The deduced screening potential for the liquid Li is about 500 eV larger than for the solid.This difference is attributed to the effect of liquefied Li~+ ions.It is concluded that the ionic screening is much stronger than the electronic screening in a low-temperature dense plasmas.

  14. Target Surface Area Effects on Hot Electron Dynamics from High Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-19

    amuch higher peak current of hot electronswhich induced current in parallel wires through strong electric andmagneticfield growth . In theHERCULES shots...interaction. This was consistent with an induced current resulting from the growth and decay of a magnetic field of the form ( ) ( )»B t r I t r...Alternatively, direct current would be expected to scale exponentially , while an expanding plasma could be expected to scale as r1 2. It is of interest to note

  15. Plasma clearance of hemoglobin and haptoglobin in mice and effect of CD163 gene targeting disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzerodt, Anders; Kjolby, Mads; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Maniecki, Maciej; Svendsen, Pia; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2013-06-10

    In humans, plasma haptoglobin (Hp) and the macrophage receptor CD163 promote a fast scavenging of hemoglobin (Hb). In the present study, we have compared the mouse and human CD163-mediated binding and uptake of Hb and HpHb complex in vitro and characterized the CD163-mediated plasma clearance of Hb in CD163 gene knockout mice and controls. Contrary to human Hp, mouse Hp did not promote high-affinity binding to CD163. This difference between mouse and man was evident both by analysis of the binding of purified proteins and by ligand uptake studies in CD163-transfected cells. Plasma clearance studies in mice showed a fast clearance (half-life few minutes) of fluorescently labeled mouse Hb with the highest uptake in the kidney and liver. HPLC analysis of serum showed that the clearance curve exhibited a two-phase decay with a faster clearance of Hb than plasma-formed HpHb. In CD163-deficient mice, the overall clearance of Hb was slightly slower and followed a one-phase decay. In conclusion, mouse Hp does not promote high-affinity binding of mouse Hb to CD163, and noncomplexed mouse Hb has a higher CD163 affinity than human Hb has. Moreover, CD163-mediated uptake in mice seems to only account for a part of the Hb clearance. The new data further underscore the fact that the Hp system in man seems to have a broader and more sophisticated role. This has major implications in the translation of data on Hb metabolism from mouse to man.

  16. Differential Impact of Plasma Proteins on the Adhesion Efficiency of Vascular-Targeted Carriers (VTCs) in Blood of Common Laboratory Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdee, Katawut; Sobczynski, Daniel J; Onyskiw, Peter J; Eniola-Adefeso, Omolola

    2015-12-16

    Vascular-targeted carrier (VTC) interaction with human plasma is known to reduce targeted adhesion efficiency in vitro. However, the role of plasma proteins on the adhesion efficiency of VTCs in laboratory animals remains unknown. Here, in vitro blood flow assays are used to explore the effects of plasma from mouse, rabbit, and porcine on VTC adhesion. Porcine blood exhibited a strong negative plasma effect on VTC adhesion while no significant plasma effect was found with rabbit and mouse blood. A brush density poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) on VTCs was effective at improving adhesion of microsized, but not nanosized, VTCs in porcine blood. Overall, the results suggest that porcine models, as opposed to mouse, can serve as better models in preclinical research for predicting the in vivo functionality of VTCs for use in humans. These considerations hold great importance for the design of various pharmaceutical products and development of reliable drug delivery systems.

  17. Photoionization-induced emission of tunable few-cycle mid-IR dispersive waves in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Novoa, David; Travers, John C; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the emission of few-cycle dispersive waves in the mid-infrared using hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled with noble gas. The underlying mechanism is the formation of a plasma cloud by a self-compressed, sub-cycle pump pulse. The resulting free-electron population modifies the fiber dispersion, allowing phase-matched access to dispersive waves at otherwise inaccessible frequencies, well into the mid-IR. Remarkably, the pulses generated turn out to have durations of the order of two optical cycles. In addition, this ultrafast emission, which occurs even in the absence of a zero dispersion point between pump and mid-IR wavelengths, is tunable over a wide frequency range simply by adjusting the gas pressure. These theoretical results pave the way to a new generation of compact, fiber-based sources of few-cycle mid-IR radiation.

  18. Supercontinuum generation and tunable ultrafast emission in the vacuum ultraviolet using noble-gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolov, Alexey; Frosz, Michael H; Travers, John C; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-01-01

    We report on the generation of a three-octave supercontinuum extending from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to the near-infrared, spanning at least 113 to 1000 nm (i.e., 11 to 1.2 eV), in He-filled hollow-core kagome-style photonic crystal fiber. The same system also permits generation of narrower-band VUV radiation tunable from 113 to 200 nm with efficiencies exceeding 1% and VUV pulse energies in excess of 50 nJ. Modeling confirms that the mechanism involves soliton self-compression to sub-femtosecond pulse durations, dispersive-wave emission and the plasma-induced soliton self-frequency blue-shift. The bandwidth of the generated VUV light, which modeling shows to be coherent, is sufficient to support 500 as single-cycle pulses.

  19. Photoionization-Induced Emission of Tunable Few-Cycle Midinfrared Dispersive Waves in Gas-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, D; Cassataro, M; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2015-07-17

    We propose a scheme for the emission of few-cycle dispersive waves in the midinfrared using hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled with noble gas. The underlying mechanism is the formation of a plasma cloud by a self-compressed, subcycle pump pulse. The resulting free-electron population modifies the fiber dispersion, allowing phase-matched access to dispersive waves at otherwise inaccessible frequencies, well into the midinfrared. Remarkably, the pulses generated turn out to have durations of the order of two optical cycles. In addition, this ultrafast emission, which occurs even in the absence of a zero dispersion point between pump and midinfrared wavelengths, is tunable over a wide frequency range simply by adjusting the gas pressure. These theoretical results pave the way to a new generation of compact, fiber-based sources of few-cycle midinfrared radiation.

  20. Target-selective homologous recombination cloning for high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies from single plasma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobe Masaharu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular cloning of functional immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells is one of the most promising technologies for the rapid development of monoclonal antibody drugs. However, the proper insertion of PCR-amplified immunoglobulin genes into expression vectors remains an obstacle to the high-throughput production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Results We developed a single-step cloning method, target-selective homologous recombination (TS-HR, in which PCR-amplified immunoglobulin variable genes were selectively inserted into vectors, even in the presence of nonspecifically amplified DNA. TS-HR utilizes Red/ET-mediated homologous recombination with a target-selective vector (TS-vector with unique homology arms on its termini. Using TS-HR, immunoglobulin variable genes were cloned directly into expression vectors by co-transforming unpurified PCR products and the TS-vector into E. coli. Furthermore, the high cloning specificity of TS-HR allowed plasmids to be extracted from pools of transformed bacteria without screening single colonies for correct clones. We present a one-week protocol for the production of recombinant mouse monoclonal antibodies from large numbers of single plasma cells. Conclusion The time requirements and limitations of traditional cloning procedures for the production of recombinant immunoglobulins have been significantly reduced with the development of the TS-HR cloning technique.

  1. Interaction of a self-focused laser beam with a DT fusion target in a plasma-loaded cone-guided ICF scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedjalil, N.; Mehrangiz, M.; Jafari, S.; Ghasemizad, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the interaction of a self-focused laser beam with a DT fusion target in a plasma-loaded cone-guided ICF scheme has been presented. We propose here to merge a plasma-loaded cone with the precompressed DT target in order to strongly focus the incident laser beam on the core to improve the fusion gain. The WKB approximation is used to derive a differential equation that governs the evolution of beamwidth of the incident laser beam with the distance of propagation in the plasma medium. The effects of initial plasma and laser parameters, such as initial plasma electron temperature, initial radius of the laser beam, initial laser beam intensity and plasma density, on self-focusing and defocusing of the Gaussian laser beam have been studied. Numerical results indicate that with increasing the plasma frequency (or plasma density) in the cone, the laser beam will be self-focused noticeably, while for a thinner laser beam (with small radius), it will diverge as propagate in the cone. By evaluating the energy deposition of the relativistic electron ignitors in the fuel, the importance of electron transportation in the cone-attached shell was demonstrated. Moreover, by lessening the least energy needed for ignition, the electrons coupling with the pellet enhances. Therefore, it increases the fusion efficiency. In this scheme, with employing a plasma-loaded cone, the fusion process improves without needing an ultrahigh-intensity laser beam in a conventional ICF.

  2. Research of laser plasma X-ray spectrum from spherical targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparyan, P.D. [RFNC-VNIIEF, Mira Avenue 37, 607190 Sarov (Russian Federation); Gusikhina, I.A. [RFNC-VNIIEF, Mira Avenue 37, 607190 Sarov (Russian Federation); Lobanova, Yu.L. [RFNC-VNIIEF, Mira Avenue 37, 607190 Sarov (Russian Federation); Zhidkov, N.V. [RFNC-VNIIEF, Mira Avenue 37, 607190 Sarov (Russian Federation); Subbotin, A.N. [RFNC-VNIIEF, Mira Avenue 37, 607190 Sarov (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: subbotin@otd470.vniief.ru; Tsoi, E.S. [RFNC-VNIIEF, Mira Avenue 37, 607190 Sarov (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-21

    The paper describes the results of measurements carried out at VNIIEF on a laser facility ISKRA-5 with spherical targets of different type. Spectra of X-rays are measured with the aid of cylindrical Ni/C multilayer mirror (MM). To absolutely normalize the results of spectral measurements, there is additionally registered X-rays by semiconductor detectors with different filters. Detectors' serviceability at operation in the mode of deep current saturation is demonstrated. Experimental and calculation data of spectrum of target X-rays are presented and compared.

  3. Fabrication of a nanocarrier system through self-assembly of plasma protein and its tumor targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Guangming; Zhi, Feng; Wang, Kaikai; Tang, Xiaolei; Yuan, Ahu; Zhao, Lili; Ding, Dawei; Hu, Yiqiao

    2011-07-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles hold great promise as a nanocarrier system for targeted drug delivery. The objective of this study was to explore the possibility of preparing size controllable albumin nanoparticles using the disulfide bond breaking reagent β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME). The results showed that the protein concentration and temperature had positive effects on the sizes of the albumin nanoparticles, while pH had a negative effect on the rate of nanoparticle formation. The addition of β-ME induced changes in HSA secondary structure and exposed the hydrophobic core of HSA, leading to the formation of nanoparticles. Human serum albumin nanoparticles could be internalized by MCF-7 cells and mainly accumulated in cytoplasm. After injection in tumor bearing mice, the HSA nanoparticles accumulated in tumor tissues, demonstrating the targeting ability of the nanoparticles. Therefore, human serum albumin can be fabricated into nanoparticles by breaking the disulfide bonds and these nanoparticles exhibit high tumor targeting ability. Human serum albumin nanoparticles could be ideal for the targeted delivery of pharmacologically active substances.

  4. Synthesis and quantitative analysis of plasma-targeted metabolites of catechin and epicatechin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Jack W; Redan, Benjamin W; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Reuhs, Bradley L; Cooper, Bruce R; Harwood, John S; Shulaev, Vladimir; Pasinetti, Giulio; Dixon, Richard A

    2015-03-04

    Grape seed polyphenolic extract (GSPE) rich in the flavan-3-ols (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin beneficially modulates Alzheimer's Disease phenotypes in animal models. The parent molecules in the extract are converted to a series of methylated and glucuronidated derivatives. To fully characterize these metabolites and establish a robust quantitative assay of their levels in biological fluids, we have implemented a partial synthetic approach utilizing chemical methylation followed by enzymatic glucuronidation. Liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to assign unequivocal structures to the compounds. An analytical method using solid-phase extraction and LC-MS/MS in selective reaction monitoring mode (SRM) was validated for their quantitation in plasma. These studies provide a basis for improvements in future work on the bioavailability, metabolism, and mechanism of action of metabolites derived from dietary flavan-3-ols in a range of interventions.

  5. High efficiency proton beam generation through target thickness control in femtosecond laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. S.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Booth, N.; Carroll, D. C.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Murphy, C. D.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L.

    2014-05-01

    Bright proton beams with maximum energies of up to 30 MeV have been observed in an experiment investigating ion sheath acceleration driven by a short pulse (<50 fs) laser. The scaling of maximum proton energy and total beam energy content at ultra-high intensities of ˜1021 W cm-2 was investigated, with the interplay between target thickness and laser pre-pulse found to be a key factor. While the maximum proton energies observed were maximised for μm-thick targets, the total proton energy content was seen to peak for thinner, 500 nm, foils. The total proton beam energy reached up to 440 mJ (a conversion efficiency of 4%), marking a significant step forward for many laser-driven ion applications. The experimental results are supported by hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations.

  6. Electron-Molecule Cross Sections for Plasma Applications: the Role of Internal Energy of the Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitelli, M.; Celiberto, R.

    The role of internal excitation in affecting electron-molecule cross sections is analyzed for H2, N2 and O2 systems. Particula emphasis is given to the role of vibrational energy in affecting both resonant and non-resonant electron molecule cross sections. In general for resonant transitions the cross sections dramatically depends on the initial vibrational quantum number of the target, while a minor effect if found for direct (non-resonant) transitions. Cross sections in this last case reflect the form of Franck-Condon factors and Franck-Condon densities linking the relevant boun-bound or bound-continuum transitions. A similar behaviour is presented when the target is electronically excited. In this case, however, the enhancement of cross section is much higher.

  7. Hybrid-PIC modeling of laser-plasma interactions and hot electron generation in gold hohlraum walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Rose, D. V.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2017-06-01

    hohlraums should be stable to both two plasmon decay and stimulated Raman scattering instabilities for intensities ≤ 10 15 W/cm2. In gas-filled hohlraums, shocks may be induced in the blowoff gold plasma, which leads to more complex density and temperatures profiles. The resulting effect on LPI stability depends strongly on the details of the profile, and it is possible for the gas-filled hohlraum to become unstable to two plasmon decay at 1015 W/cm2 if the quarter-critical surface reaches temperatures exceeding 1 keV.

  8. The Arabidopsis nitrate transporter AtNRT2.1 is targeted to the root plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Franck; Wirth, Judith; Dorbe, Marie-France; Lejay, Laurence; Krapp, Anne; Gojon, Alain; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise

    2007-08-01

    Arabidopsis AtNRT2.1 protein is the best characterized high affinity nitrate transporter in higher plants. However, nothing is known about its sub-cellular localization. In this work, we used GFP imaging to follow the targeting of the AtNRT2.1 protein to the different cell membranes. A polyclonal antibody was also raised against a peptide derived from the AtNRT2.1 sequence. Comparison of wild type and mutant plant extracts showed that this antibody recognized specifically the AtNRT2.1 protein. Microsomal membranes were fractionated on sucrose gradients and immunological detections were performed on the different fractions. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the AtNRT2.1 protein is located in the plasma membrane of the root cells.

  9. Binding of human myeloperoxidase to red blood cells: Molecular targets and biophysical consequences at the plasma membrane level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorudko, Irina V; Sokolov, Alexey V; Shamova, Ekaterina V; Grigorieva, Daria V; Mironova, Elena V; Kudryavtsev, Igor V; Gusev, Sergey A; Gusev, Alexander A; Chekanov, Andrey V; Vasilyev, Vadim B; Cherenkevich, Sergey N; Panasenko, Oleg M; Timoshenko, Alexander V

    2016-02-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an oxidant-producing enzyme that can also bind to cellular surface proteins. We found that band 3 protein and glycophorins A and B were the key MPO-binding targets of human red blood cells (RBCs). The interaction of MPO with RBC proteins was mostly electrostatic in nature because it was inhibited by desialation, exogenic sialic acid, high ionic strength, and extreme pH. In addition, MPO failed to interfere with the lectin-induced agglutination of RBCs, suggesting a minor role of glycan-recognizing mechanisms in MPO binding. Multiple biophysical properties of RBCs were altered in the presence of native (i.e., not hypochlorous acid-damaged) MPO. These changes included transmembrane potential, availability of intracellular Ca(2+), and lipid organization in the plasma membrane. MPO-treated erythrocytes became larger in size, structurally more rigid, and hypersensitive to acidic and osmotic hemolysis. Furthermore, we found a significant correlation between the plasma MPO concentration and RBC rigidity index in type-2 diabetes patients with coronary heart disease. These findings suggest that MPO functions as a mediator of novel regulatory mechanism in microcirculation, indicating the influence of MPO-induced abnormalities on RBC deformability under pathological stress conditions.

  10. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Macrophages by Targeting Both the Virus and the Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Keidar, Michael; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is a specific type of partially ionized gas that is less than 104°F at the point of application. It was recently shown that CAP can be used for decontamination and sterilization, as well as anti-cancer treatment. Here, we investigated the effects of CAP on HIV-1 replication in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). We demonstrate that pre-treatment of MDM with CAP reduced levels of CD4 and CCR5, inhibiting virus-cell fusion, viral reverse transcription and integration. In addition, CAP pre-treatment affected cellular factors required for post-entry events, as replication of VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1, which by-passes HIV receptor-mediated fusion at the plasma membrane during entry, was also inhibited. Interestingly, virus particles produced by CAP-treated cells had reduced infectivity, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of CAP extended to the second cycle of infection. These results demonstrate that anti-HIV activity of CAP involves the effects on target cells and the virus, and suggest that CAP may be considered for potential application as an anti-HIV treatment. PMID:27783659

  11. Urethral glands of the male mouse contain secretory component and immunoglobulin A plasma cells and are targets of testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, M B; Ren, H P; Russell, L D; Prins, G S; Parr, E L

    1992-12-01

    The occurrence and possible functions of mucosal immunity in the male urogenital tract have not been extensively investigated. In this study we used immunolabeling to localize secretory component (SC) and immunoglobulin (Ig) A in the urogenital tract of the male mouse. SC was located in the ventral prostate, while SC and IgA plasma cells were both detected in the urethral glands in the pelvic and bulbous portions of the urethra. SC and IgA were not observed elsewhere in the urogenital tract. We also examined the ventral prostate and urethral glands of sham-castrated, oil-treated castrated, and testosterone-treated castrated mice. There was a striking reduction in the size of the ventral prostate and urethral glands in oil-treated castrates compared to the other two groups, based on gross and histological morphology. Morphometric analysis showed that the cell and nuclear sizes of the urethral gland acinar cells were reduced after castration and restored to normal size by testosterone treatment. Androgen receptors (AR) were localized in the nuclei of urethral gland cells by immunocytochemistry using anti-AR antibodies. Labeling of SC and IgA plasma cells was similar in the urethral glands and ventral prostates of sham- and testosterone-treated castrates, but was reduced or absent at these sites in oil-treated castrates. These studies show that the ventral prostate and urethral glands may be sites for secretory immunity in the male murine urogenital tract, and that the urethral glands are targets for testosterone.

  12. Plasma characterization of the gas-puff target source dedicated for soft X-ray microscopy using SiC detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrisi Alfio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An Nd:YAG pulsed laser was employed to irradiate a nitrogen gas-puff target. The interaction gives rise to the emission of soft X-ray (SXR radiation in the ‘water window’ spectral range (λ= 2.3÷4.4 nm. This source was already successfully employed to perform the SXR microscopy. In this work, a Silicon Carbide (SiC detector was used to characterize the nitrogen plasma emission in terms of gas-puff target parameters. The measurements show applicability of SiC detectors for SXR plasma characterization.

  13. Advances in the treatment of monoclonal gammopaties: The emerging role of targeted therapy in plasma cell dyscrasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo M Roccaro

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Aldo M Roccaro1, Irene M Ghobrial1, Simona Blotta1, Steven P Treon1, Michele Malagola2, Kenneth C Anderson1, Paul G Richardson1, Domenico Russo21Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 2Unit of Blood Diseases and Cell Therapies, University of Brescia Medical School, Brescia, ItalyAbstract: The paradigm for the treatment of monoclonal gammopaties has dramatically changed: therapeutic options in multiple myeloma (MM have evolved from the introduction of melphalan and prednisone in the 1960s, high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation in the late 1980s and 1990s, to the rapid introduction of small novel molecules within the last seven years. Based on the understanding of the complex interaction of the MM cells with the bone marrow microenvironment and the signaling pathways that are dysregulated in this process, a number of novel therapeutic agents are now available. Specifically, three novel agents with a specific-targeted anti-MM activity, have been FDA-approved for the treatment of this disease, namely Bortezomib, thalidomide, and lenalidomide which are now all playing a key role in the treatment of MM. The success of targeted therapy in MM has since led to the development and investigation of more than 30 new compounds in this disease and in other plasma cell dyscrasias such as Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia and primary amyloidosis, both in the preclinical settings and as part of clinical trials.Keywords: monoclonal gammopaties, targeted therapies

  14. Analysis Method for Permeability Characteristics of Gas-filled Coal Based on Considering Adsorption Effect%基于考虑吸附作用影响的含瓦斯煤渗透特性分析方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志刚; 胡千庭

    2015-01-01

    基于前期的实验研究成果,得出考虑吸附作用影响的瓦斯渗流方程,在此基础上,建立了钻孔稳定流动状态下的瓦斯渗流模型,并采用数学物理的方法推导出钻孔单向稳定流状态下的解析解,获得了基于考虑吸附作用影响的含瓦斯煤渗透特性分析方法,为研究钻孔瓦斯涌出规律提供了技术支撑。%A gas seepage equation with considering the adsorption effect was obtained according to the earlier experimental results, on this basis a gas seepage model under stable hole flow state was established, the analytical solution under the condition of the hole unidirectional stable flow was derived by the method of mathematical physics, and based on considering the adsorption effect, the analysis method for the permeability characteristics of gas-filled coal was obtained, all of these provided technical support for the research on gas emission law of boreholes.

  15. Enhancement of osseointegration by direct coating of rhBMP-2 on target-ion induced plasma sputtering treated SLA surface for dental application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungwon; Park, Cheonil; Moon, Byeong-Seok; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Jang, Tae-Sik

    2016-11-23

    Owing to the excellent bioactive properties of recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMPs), dentistry considers them as a fascinating adjuvant alternative for enhancing bone regeneration and bone-to-implant junction in the early implantation stages. However, stable loading and delivery efficiency of rhBMPs on the implant surfaces involve major concerns because of the harsh wearing condition under load during implantation. In this study, to achieve successful rhBMP-2 delivery, a nanoporous surface structure is introduced on the sandblasting with large grit and acid-etching (SLA)-treated titanium (Ti) surface via the tantalum (Ta) target-ion induced plasma sputtering (TIPS) technique. Unlike oxidation-induced surface nanoporous fabrications on a Ti surface, TIPS-treated surfaces provide excellent structural unity of the nanoporous structure with the substrate due to their etching-based fabrication mechanism. SLA/TIPS-treated Ti exhibits distinct nanoporous structures on the microscale surface geometry and better hydrophilicity compared with SLA-treated Ti. A sufficiently empty nanoporous surface structure combined with the hydrophilic property of SLA/TIPS-treated Ti facilitates the formation of a thick and uniform coating layer of rhBMP-2 on the surface without any macro- and microcoagulation. Compared with the SLA-treated Ti surface, the amount of coated rhBMP-2 increases up to 63% on the SLA/TIPS-treated Ti surface. As a result, the in vitro pre-osteoblast cell response of the SLA/TIPS-treated Ti surface, especially cell adhesion and differentiation behaviors, improves remarkably. A bone-regenerating direct comparison between the rhBMP-2-coated SLA-treated and SLA/TIPS-treated Ti is conducted on a defective dog mandible model. After 8 weeks of implantation surgery, SLA/TIPS-treated Ti with rhBMP-2 exhibits a better degree of contact area for the implanted bone, which mineralizes new bones around the implant. Quantitative results of bone-in-contact ratio

  16. Target particle and heat loads in low-triangularity L-mode plasmas in JET with carbon and beryllium/tungsten walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, M., E-mail: mathias.groth@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Espoo (Finland); Brezinsek, S. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Belo, P. [Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Association EURATOM-IST, Lisbon (Portugal); Corrigan, G. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Harting, D.; Wiesen, S. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Beurskens, M.N.A.; Brix, M. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Clever, M.; Coenen, J.W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Eich, T. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Garching (Germany); Flanagan, J.; Giroud, C. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Huber, A. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Jachmich, S. [Association “EURATOM Belgium State”, Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Brussels (Belgium); Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Lowry, C. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Maggi, C.F. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Garching (Germany); Marsen, S. [Max-Planck-Institut for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald (Germany); and others

    2013-07-15

    Divertor radiation profiles, and power and particle fluxes to the target have been measured in attached JET L-mode plasmas with carbon and beryllium/tungsten wall materials. In the beryllium/tungsten configuration, factors of 2–3 higher power loads and peak temperatures at the low field side target were observed in high-recycling scrape-off layer conditions, whilst in close-to-sheath-limited conditions almost identical plasmas were obtained. The 30% reduction in total radiation with the beryllium/tungsten wall is consistent with a reduction of carbon as the dominant impurity radiator; however similar ion current to the plates, emission from recycling neutrals and neutral pressures in the pumping plenum were measured. Simulations with the EDGDE2/EIRENE code of these plasmas indicate a reduction of the total divertor radiation when carbon is omitted, but significantly higher power loads in high-recycling and detached conditions are predicted than measured.

  17. Target particle and heat loads in low-triangularity L-mode plasmas in JET with carbon and beryllium/tungsten walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groth, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Belo, P.; Corrigan, G.; Harting, D.; Wiesen, S.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Brix, M.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Eich, T.; Flanagan, J.; Giroud, C.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Lowry, C.; Maggi, C. F.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A. G.; Sergienko, G.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Sirinelli, A.; Stamp, M. F.; van Rooij, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Divertor radiation profiles, and power and particle fluxes to the target have been measured in attached \\{JET\\} L-mode plasmas with carbon and beryllium/tungsten wall materials. In the beryllium/tungsten configuration, factors of 2–3 higher power loads and peak temperatures at the low field side tar

  18. Proteomic identification of protein targets for 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14-prostaglandin J2 in neuronal plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Yamamoto

    Full Text Available 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14-prostaglandin J(2 (15d-PGJ(2 is one of factors contributed to the neurotoxicity of amyloid β (Aβ, a causative protein of Alzheimer's disease. Type 2 receptor for prostaglandin D(2 (DP2 and peroxysome-proliferator activated receptorγ (PPARγ are identified as the membrane receptor and the nuclear receptor for 15d-PGJ(2, respectively. Previously, we reported that the cytotoxicity of 15d-PGJ(2 was independent of DP2 and PPARγ, and suggested that 15d-PGJ(2 induced apoptosis through the novel specific binding sites of 15d-PGJ(2 different from DP2 and PPARγ. To relate the cytotoxicity of 15d-PGJ(2 to amyloidoses, we performed binding assay [(3H]15d-PGJ(2 and specified targets for 15d-PGJ(2 associated with cytotoxicity. In the various cell lines, there was a close correlation between the susceptibilities to 15d-PGJ(2 and fibrillar Aβ. Specific binding sites of [(3H]15d-PGJ(2 were detected in rat cortical neurons and human bronchial smooth muscle cells. When the binding assay was performed in subcellular fractions of neurons, the specific binding sites of [(3H]15d-PGJ(2 were detected in plasma membrane, nuclear and cytosol, but not in microsome. A proteomic approach was used to identify protein targets for 15d-PGJ(2 in the plasma membrane. By using biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2, eleven proteins were identified as biotin-positive spots and classified into three different functional proteins: glycolytic enzymes (Enolase2, pyruvate kinase M1 (PKM1 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, molecular chaperones (heat shock protein 8 and T-complex protein 1 subunit α, cytoskeletal proteins (Actin β, F-actin-capping protein, Tubulin β and Internexin α. GAPDH, PKM1 and Tubulin β are Aβ-interacting proteins. Thus, the present study suggested that 15d-PGJ(2 plays an important role in amyloidoses not only in the central nervous system but also in the peripheral tissues.

  19. The role of aspartic acid residues 405 and 416 of the kidney isotype of sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter 1 in its targeting to the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucher, Volodymyr; Li, Emily Y.; Conforti, Laura; Zahedi, Kamyar A.

    2012-01-01

    The NH2 terminus of the sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter 1 (NBCe1) plays an important role in its targeting to the plasma membrane. To identify the amino acid residues that contribute to the targeting of NBCe1 to the plasma membrane, polarized MDCK cells were transfected with expression constructs coding for green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged NBCe1 NH2-terminal deletion mutants, and the localization of GFP-tagged proteins was analyzed by confocal microscopy. Our results indicate that the amino acids between residues 399 and 424 of NBCe1A contain important sequences that contribute to its localization to the plasma membrane. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that GFP-NBCe1A mutants D405A and D416A are retained in the cytoplasm of the polarized MDCK epithelial cells. Examination of functional activities of D405A and D416A reveals that their activities are reduced compared with the wild-type NBCe1A. Similarly, aspartic acid residues 449 and 460 of pancreatic NBCe1 (NBCe1B), which correspond to residues 405 and 416 of NBCe1A, are also required for its full functional activity and accurate targeting to the plasma membrane. In addition, while replacement of D416 with glutamic acid did not affect the targeting or functional activity of NBCe1A, substitution of D405 with glutamic acid led to the retention of the mutated protein in the intracellular compartment and impaired functional activity. These studies demonstrate that aspartic acid residues 405 and 416 in the NH2 terminus of NBCe1A are important in its accurate targeting to the plasma membrane. PMID:22442137

  20. Numerical and experimental characterization of a plasma induced on a solid target by an intense pulsed multi-MeV e-beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribière, M.; Maisonny, R.; d'Almeida, T.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the interaction of an intense pulsed multi MeV electron beam with a solid target on the ASTERIX high voltage generator using a set of numerical and experimental tools. Physical mechanisms occurring at various stages are examined, from electron beam dynamics to X-ray production, including plasma generation at the solid target surface. First, the electron beam characteristics are determined using 2D axisymmetric Particle-In-Cell calculations and a good agreement is found between calculated and measured current and voltage profiles. Calculated electron beam characteristics serve as an input to a 3D Monte-Carlo code in order to simulate the dose distribution within the solid target. The plasma produced at the target surface upon interaction with the electron beam is diagnosed and quantitatively characterized through UV-visible emission spectroscopy. Plasma species are identified and spectroscopy data are analyzed based on a 1D radiative transfer model, allowing electron density and temperature profiles to be inferred. Such combined numerical and experimental investigation is promising for gaining insight into physical mechanisms occurring upon the interaction between high energy electrons and solid targets.

  1. Damage of target edges in brush-like geometry in the course of ELM-like plasma pulses in QSPA Kh-50

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhlaj, V. A.; Garkusha, I. E.; Aksenov, N. N.; Bazylev, B.; Byrka, O. V.; Chebotarev, V. V.; Landman, I.; Herashchenko, S. S.; Staltsov, V. V.

    2015-08-01

    Castellated edges of macro-brush armour elements of ITER divertor can be a source of molten/solid dust particles which are injected into the plasma. The targets that combined in brush-like geometry have been irradiated under different inclination angles in QSPA Kh-50. The cubic brushes element has typical size of 1 cm. The titanium was used to investigate dynamics of mountains' formation. The onset of dust particles ejection from the exposed castellated targets has been studied. Formation of resolidified bridges through the gaps of brush-like targets due to the melt motion is studied in dynamics. With following plasma impacts such resolidified bridges became additional source of dust.

  2. Damage of target edges in brush-like geometry in the course of ELM-like plasma pulses in QSPA Kh-50

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhlaj, V.A., E-mail: makhlay@ipp.kharkov.ua [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Garkusha, I.E.; Aksenov, N.N. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Bazylev, B. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IHM, 76344 Karlsruhe (Germany); Byrka, O.V.; Chebotarev, V.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Landman, I. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IHM, 76344 Karlsruhe (Germany); Herashchenko, S.S.; Staltsov, V.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2015-08-15

    Castellated edges of macro-brush armour elements of ITER divertor can be a source of molten/solid dust particles which are injected into the plasma. The targets that combined in brush-like geometry have been irradiated under different inclination angles in QSPA Kh-50. The cubic brushes element has typical size of 1 cm. The titanium was used to investigate dynamics of mountains’ formation. The onset of dust particles ejection from the exposed castellated targets has been studied. Formation of resolidified bridges through the gaps of brush-like targets due to the melt motion is studied in dynamics. With following plasma impacts such resolidified bridges became additional source of dust.

  3. 多层结构船舶机舱火灾烟气充填数值计算%Numerical calculation of fire flue gas filling in ship engine room with multilayer structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亮; 苏石川

    2011-01-01

    Based on large eddy simulation, the filtered balance equations and the Smagorinsky subgrid-scale model of fire in ship engine room with multilayer structure were established. Second-order finite difference method was used to disperse spatial variables, explicit second-order predictor-corrector scheme method was used to disperse flow variables, and explicit second-order Runge-Kutta method was used to disperse time variables. Velocity field, temperature field, flue gas concentration and the height of flue gas layer were solved respectively, and the change laws of fire flue gas filling in ship engine rooms with multilayer structure and monolayer structure were analyzed. Analysis result shows that the spread speed and area of flue gas in multilayer structure are greater than those in monolayer structure. When ship engine room with monolayer structure is full of flue gas, filling time is 200 s, while the filling time of ship engine room with multilayer structure is 1 500 s. Under two structures, the temperatures of cold air layer and hot flue gas layer almost increase at first then decrease, the maximum temperatures at the tops of ship engine rooms are 170 ℃, 250 ℃ respectively, however, the maximum temperatures at the bottoms of ship engine rooms are 175 ℃, 100 ℃ respectively. 3 tabs, 5 figs, 15 refs.%应用大涡模拟技术,建立了多层结构船舶机舱火灾的过滤平衡方程组与Smagorinsky亚格子模型。采用二阶有限差分法对空间变量进行离散,采用显式二阶预估校中法对流动变量进行离散,采用显式二阶Runge-Kutta法对时间变量进行离散,分别求解了速度场、温度场、烟气浓度与烟气层高度,比较了多层结构与单层结构船舶机舱火灾烟气充填变化规律。分析结果表明:多层结构烟气蔓延速度与面积大于单层结构烟气蔓延速度与面积;在单层结构中,烟气在200s时快速充满整个舱室,在多层结构中,烟气在1500s

  4. Implementation and Optimization of a Plasma Beam Combiner at NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, R. K.; Turnbull, D. P.; London, R. A.; Wilks, S. C.; Michel, P. A.; Dunlop, W. H.; Moody, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Fournier, K. B.

    2015-11-01

    The seeded SBS process that is known to effectively amplify beams in ignition targets has recently been used to design a target to combine the power and energy of many beams of the NIF facility into a single beam by intersecting them in a gas. The demand for high-power beams for a variety of applications at NIF makes a demonstration of this process attractive. We will describe the plan for empirically optimizing a combiner that uses a gas-filled balloon heated by 10 quads of beams, and pumped by 5 additional frequency-tuned quads to amplify a single beam or quad. The final empirical optimization of beam wavelengths will be determined by using up to three colors in each shot. Performance and platform compatibility will also be optimized by considering designs with a CH gas fill that can be fielded at room temperature as well as a He gas fill to minimize absorption in the combiner. The logic, diagnostic configuration, and backscatter risk mitigation from two shots presently planned for NIF will also be described. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Non-thermal plasma with 2-deoxy-D-glucose synergistically induces cell death by targeting glycolysis in blood cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Neha; Lee, Su Jae; Choi, Tae Gyu; Baik, Ku Youn; Uhm, Han Sup; Kim, Chung Hyeok; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we show the selective and efficient anti-cancer effects of plasma (at a low dose) when cell metabolic modifiers are also included. 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), a glycolytic inhibitor, was used with effective doses of non-thermal plasma, synergistically attenuating cell metabolic viability and inducing caspase-dependent and independent cell death. The combination treatment decreased the intracellular ATP and lactate production in various types of blood cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, our findings suggest that 2-DG enhances the efficacy and selectivity of plasma and induces the synergistic inhibition of cancer cell growth by targeting glycolysis and apoptosis. Specifically, this treatment strategy demonstrated an enhanced growth inhibitory effect of plasma in the presence of a metabolic modifier that was selective against cancer cells, not non-malignant cells. This is the first study to report the advantage of combining plasma with 2-DG to eradicate blood cancer cells. Finally, we conclude that 2-DG with non-thermal plasma may be used as a combination treatment against blood cancer cells.

  6. Large-scale inference of protein tissue origin in gram-positive sepsis plasma using quantitative targeted proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, Erik; Kilsgård, Ola; Hauri, Simon; Smeds, Emanuel; Herwald, Heiko; Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan

    2016-01-06

    The plasma proteome is highly dynamic and variable, composed of proteins derived from surrounding tissues and cells. To investigate the complex processes that control the composition of the plasma proteome, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy to infer the origin of proteins detected in murine plasma. The strategy relies on the construction of a comprehensive protein tissue atlas from cells and highly vascularized organs using shotgun mass spectrometry. The protein tissue atlas was transformed to a spectral library for highly reproducible quantification of tissue-specific proteins directly in plasma using SWATH-like data-independent mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the method can determine drastic changes of tissue-specific protein profiles in blood plasma from mouse animal models with sepsis. The strategy can be extended to several other species advancing our understanding of the complex processes that contribute to the plasma proteome dynamics.

  7. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Park, J. -K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Marmar, E. S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahn, J. -W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berkery, J. W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Canik, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ferraro, N. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); King, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazerson, S. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom). Euratom/CCFE Association; Logan, N. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lore, J. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menard, J. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shafer, M. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paz-Soldan, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Reiman, A. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Rice, J. E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Volpe, F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Wang, Z. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Wolfe, S. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  8. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Park, J. -K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Marmar, E. S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahn, J. -W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berkery, J. W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Canik, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ferraro, N. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); King, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazerson, S. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom). Euratom/CCFE Association; Logan, N. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lore, J. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menard, J. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shafer, M. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paz-Soldan, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Reiman, A. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Rice, J. E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Volpe, F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Wang, Z. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Wolfe, S. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  9. Paradigm shifts in plasma processing and application of fundamental kinetics to problems targeting 5 nm technology device technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee

    2016-09-01

    It is often said that semiconductor technology is approaching the end of scaling. While fundamental device limits do approach, plasma etching has been doing the heavy lifting to supplement the basic limits in lithography. RF plasmas, pulsing in many forms, diffusion plasmas are but a few of the important developments over the last 20 years that have succeeded in the seemingly impossible tasks. The commonality of these plasmas is being self-consistent: their near-Boltzmann EEDf maintains ionization with its tail while providing charge-balance with its Te . To control the plasma chemistry is to control its EEDf; the entanglement of ionization with charge-balance in self-consistent plasmas places a constraint on the decoupling of plasma chemistry from ionization. Example like DC/RF parallel-plate hybridizes stochastic heating with DC-cathode injected e- -beam. While such arrangement offers some level of decoupling, it raised more questions than what it helped answered along the lines of beam-plasma instabilities, bounce-resonance ionization, etc. Pure e- -beam plasmas could be a drastic departure from the self-consistent plasmas. Examples like the NRL e- -beam system and the more recent TEL NEP (Nonambipolar e- Plasma) show strong decoupling of Te from ionization but it is almost certain, many more questions lurk: the functions connecting collisional relaxation with instabilities, the channels causing the dissociation of large fluorocarbons (controlling the ion-to- radical ratio), the production of the damaging deep UV in e- -beam plasmas, etc., and the list goes on. IADf is one factor on feature-profile and IEDf determines the surgical surface-excitation governing the selectivity, and both functions have Ti as the origin; what controls the e- -beam plasmas' Ti ? RF-bias has served well in applications requiring energetic excitation but, are there ways to improve the IEDf tightness? What are the adverse side-effects of ``improved IEDf''? Decades ago an infant RF-plasma

  10. Role of the HIV-1 Matrix Protein in Gag Intracellular Trafficking and Targeting to the Plasma Membrane for Virus Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruba H Ghanam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 encodes a polypeptide called Gag that is able to form virus-like particles (VLPs in vitro in the absence of any cellular or viral constituents. During the late phase of the HIV-1 infection, Gag polyproteins are transported to the plasma membrane (PM for assembly. In the past two decades, in vivo, in vitro and structural studies have shown that Gag trafficking and targeting to the PM are orchestrated events that are dependent on multiple factors including cellular proteins and specific membrane lipids. The matrix (MA domain of Gag has been the focus of these studies as it appears to be engaged in multiple intracellular interactions that are suggested to be critical for virus assembly and replication. The interaction between Gag and the PM is perhaps the most understood. It is now established that the ultimate localization of Gag on punctate sites on the PM is mediated by specific interactions between the MA domain of Gag and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5P2, a minor lipid localized on the inner leaflet of the PM. Structure-based studies revealed that binding of PI(4,5P2 to MA induces minor conformational changes, leading to exposure of the myristyl (myr group. Exposure of the myr group is also triggered by binding of calmodulin, enhanced by factors that promote protein self-association like the capsid domain of Gag, and is modulated by pH. Despite the steady progress in defining both the viral and cellular determinants of retroviral assembly and release, Gag’s intracellular interactions and trafficking to its assembly sites in the infected cell are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the structural and functional role of MA in HIV replication.

  11. 'Water window' compact, table-top laser plasma soft X-ray sources based on a gas puff target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachulak, P.W., E-mail: wachulak@gmail.co [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Rudawski, P.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-05-15

    We have developed compact, high repetition, table-top soft-X-ray sources, based on a gas puff target, emitting in 'water window' spectral range at lambda = 2.88 nm from nitrogen gas target or, in 2-4 nm range of wavelengths, from argon gas target. Double stream gas puff target was pumped optically by commercial Nd:YAG laser, energy 0.74 J, pulse time duration 4 ns. Spatial distribution of laser-produced plasma was imaged using a pinhole camera. Using transmission grating spectrometer, argon and nitrogen emission spectra were obtained, showing strong emission in the 'water window' spectral range. Using AXUV100 detector the flux measurements of the soft-X-ray pulses were carried out and are presented. These debris free sources are table-top alternative for free electron lasers and synchrotron installations. They can be successfully employed in microscopy, spectroscopy and metrology experiments among others.

  12. Investigation of laser produced x-ray plasma created from high pressure gas-puff target using Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki [School of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Daido, Hiroyuki; Choi, I.W. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering] (and others)

    2000-03-01

    We characterize a laser produced gas puff plasma for soft x-ray generation. Strong emission in 11.4 nm wavelength region was observed, using krypton and xenon gas puff targets irradiated by a Nd:YAG laser with an energy of 0.7 J/8 ns. Space resolved x-ray spectral measurement indicated that the source size on the Rayleigh length and the gas density profile. (author)

  13. The output factor correction as function of the photon beam field size - direct measurement and calculation from the lateral dose response functions of gas-filled and solid detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, Daniela; Delfs, Björn; Meyners, Jutta; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Looe, Hui Khee

    2017-08-28

    The first aim of this study has been to extend the systematic experimental study of the field size dependence of the output factor correction for three micro-ionization chambers (PTW 31014, PTW 31022 and IBA Razor chamber), two silicon diodes (PTW 60017 and IBA Razor Diode) and the synthetic diamond detector microDiamond (PTW 60019) in a 6 MV photon beam down to an effective field side length of 2.6mm, and to summarize the present knowledge of this factor by treating it as a function of the dosimetric field size. In order to vary the dosimetric field size over this large range, output factors measurements were performed at source-to-surface distances of 60cm and 90cm. Since the output factors obtained with the organic scintillation detector Exradin W1 (Standard Imaging, Middleton, USA) at all field sizes closely agreed with those measured by EBT3 radiochromic films (ISP Corp, Wayne, USA), the scintillation detector served as the reference detector. The measured output correction factors reflect the influences of the volume averaging and density effects upon the uncorrected output factor values. In case of the microDiamond detector these opposing influences result in output factor correction values less than 1 for moderately small field sizes and larger than 1 for very small field sizes. Our results agree with most of the published experimental as well as Monte-Carlo simulated data within detector-specific limits of uncertainty. The dosimetric field side length has been identified as a reliable determinant of the output factor correction, and typical functional curve shapes of the field-size dependent output factor correction vs. dosimetric field side length have been associated with gas-filled, silicon diode and synthetic diamond detectors. The second aim of this study has been a novel, semi-empirical approach to calculate the field-size dependent output correction factors of small photon detectors by convolving film measured true dose profile data with measured

  14. Increased plasma C-reactive protein level predicts rapid progression of non-target atherosclerotic lesions in patients with stable angina after stenting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yan-lu; MA Wei-hua; YAO Min; LIU Hai-bo; WU Yong-jian; CHEN Jue; YOU Shi-jie; DAI Jun; XIA Ran; GAO Run-lin; LI Jian-jun; XU Bo; ZHUCheng-gang; YANG Yue-jin; CHEN Ji-lin; QIAO Shu-bing; YUAN Jin-qing; QIN Xue-wen

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in predicting rapid progression of atherosclerotic lesions has been intensively studied in unstable coronary artery disease, the data from patients with stable angina (SA) are largely absent. The present study evaluated a middle-size patient cohort who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent implantation and follow-up coronary angiography (CAG) and tested the hypothesis that increased plasma level of high-sensitive CRP would indicate rapid progression of de novo non-target coronary artery lesions in Chinese patients with SA.Methods The study population comprised of 311 consecutive patients with chronic SA who underwent coronary stent implantation on initial admission and angiographic follow-up ((8.5±1.2) months). Rapid angiographic progression of non-target lesion was angiographically assessed and the patients were classified into two groups according to whether the progression existed or not. The relation of plasma CRP levels to the progression of atherosclerosis was investigated.Results Baseline demographic, clinical, and angiographic data were similar in patients with and without progression.Rapid angiographic progression of non-target lesions occurred in 136 patients (43.7%) at follow-up: 77 had a ≥10%diameter reduction of pre-existing stenosis ≥50%, 26 had a ≥30% diameter reduction of a pre-existing stenosis <50%, 64 developed a new lesion ≥30% in a previously normal segment, and 4 had progression of a lesion to total occlusion.Progression of non-target lesions was not associated with target lesion restenosis formation. High-sensitive CRP levels were markedly higher in progression patients than in non-progression ones (1.60 (0.80-3.46) mg/L vs. 0.96 (0.55-1.87)mg/L, P <0.001). Multivariate regression analysis showed that plasma CRP independently predicted rapid angiographic progression of non-target lesions (P=0.001). High-sensitive CRP levels above 1.32 mg

  15. Properties of plasma induced by pulsed CO2 laser on a copper target under different ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanovic, M.; Momcilovic, M.; Ciganovic, J.; Rankovic, D.; Savovic, J.; Milovanovic, D.; Stoiljkovic, M.; Pavlovic, M. S.; Trtica, M.

    2014-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was applied for investigation of copper plasma induced by a nanosecond transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm. The effect of the background gas (air, Ar, He and N2) and pressure (1-25 mbar) on plasma formation was examined. The plasma shielding effect was more pronounced for background gases with lower ionization potential than for He. The increase of He pressure from 1 to 25 mbar resulted in fivefold increase of Cu atomic line intensity.

  16. Momentum, Heat, and Neutral Mass Transport in Convective Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Liquid Systems and Implications for Aqueous Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Lindsay, Alexander; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 $\\mu$m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results fro...

  17. Performance of a plasma window for a high pressure differentially pumped deuterium gas target for mono-energetic fast neutron production - Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, A. de; Hershcovitch, A.; Franklyn, C.B.; Straaten, S. van; Guzek, J. E-mail: jguzek@debeers.co.za

    2000-09-01

    The reactions D(d,n){sup 3}He and T(d,n){sup 4}He are frequently used for production of the mono-energetic or quasi mono-energetic neutron beams but successful applications are often limited by the intensity of the generated neutron beams. The development of a suitable neutron source for such applications as studies of resonance phenomena, fast neutron radiography, selective fast neutron activation, explosives and contraband detection and others, depends on the output ion current of the accelerator and the design of the target system. A practical solution for a high pressure gas target was previously developed and successfully implemented at De Beers Diamond Research Laboratory in Johannesburg (Guzek et al., 1999), but it is limited to applications using low (<20%) duty cycle accelerators. The concept of a plasma window for the separation of a high pressure gas target region and accelerator vacuum, that was originally developed by Hershcovitch (1995) for electron welding applications, may be suitable for operation with continuous wave accelerators at high particle current output. Preliminary test results, which have been performed with various gases (argon, helium and deuterium), indicate that implementation of the plasma window into a gas target system, for the production of intense mono-energetic fast neutron beams will be achievable.

  18. Pulsed laser ablation of wire-shaped target in a thin water jet: effects of plasma features and bubble dynamics on the PLAL process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Aglio, Marcella; De Giacomo, Alessandro; Kohsakowski, Sebastian; Barcikowski, Stephan; Wagener, Philipp; Santagata, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, emission spectroscopy and fast imaging surveys during pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) for nanoparticles (NPs) production have been used, in order to provide further details about the process involved and the potentialities offered by a wire-shaped sample ablated in a flowing water jet. This kind of set-up has been explored because the laser ablation efficiency in water increases when a thin water layer and a wire-shaped target are used. In order to understand the physical processes causing the increasing ablation efficiency, both the laser-induced plasma and bubble dynamics generated in a flowing liquid jet have been analysed. The plasma parameters and the bubble behaviour in such a system have been compared with those observed in conventional PLAL experiments, where either a bulk or a wire-shaped target is immersed in bulk water. From the data presented here it is evidenced that the plasma and shockwave induced during the breakdown process can play a direct role in the ablation efficiency variation observed. With regard to the cavitation bubbles evolving near a free surface (the interface between water and air) it should be noted that these have to be treated with caution as a consequence of the strong influence played in these circumstances by the boundary of the water jet during its expansion dynamics. The effects due to the size of the liquid layer, the presence of the water/air interface, the liquid characteristics, the target shape, the plasma evolution and the bubble dynamics together with their outcomes on the NPs’ production, are presented and discussed.

  19. Investigation of the effect of laser parameters on the target, plume and plasma behavior during and after laser-solid interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancalie, A.; Ciobanu, S. S.; Sporea, D.

    2017-09-01

    A detailed theoretical and experimental analysis is performed for a wide range of laser operating conditions, typical for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation (LA) experiments on copper metallic target. The plasma parameters were experimentally estimated from the line intensities ratio which reflects the relative population of neutral excited species in the plasma. In the case of LA experiments the highest temperature observed was 8210 ± 370 K. In case of LIBS measurements, a maximum temperature of 8123 K has been determined. The experimental results are in good agreement with a stationary, hydrodynamic model. We have theoretically investigated the plasma emission based on the generalized collisional-radiative model as implemented in the ADAS interconnected set of computer codes and data collections. The ionic population density distribution over the ground and excited states into the cooper plasma is graphically displayed as output from the code. The theoretical line intensity ratios are in good agreement with experimental values for the electron density and temperature range measured in our experiments.

  20. Characteristics of plasma induced by interaction of a free-oscillated laser pulse with a coal target in air and combustible gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qiansuo; Peng, Zhimin [Laboratory of High Temperature Gas Dynamics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bei-si-huan-xi-lu No.15, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Plasma in the air is successfully induced by a free-oscillated Nd:YAG laser pulse with a peak power of 10{sup 2-3} W. The initial free electrons for the cascade breakdown process are from the ablated particles from the surface of a heated coal target, likewise induced by the focused laser beam. The laser field compensates the energy loss of the plasma when the corresponding temperature and the images are investigated by fitting the experimental spectra of B{sup 2} sum {sup +} {yields} X{sup 2} sum {sup +} band of CN radicals in the plasma with the simulated spectra and a 4-frame CCD camera. The electron density is estimated using a simplified Kramer formula. As this interaction occurs in a gas mixture of hydrogen and oxygen, the formation and development of the plasma are weakened or restrained due to the chaining branch reaction in which the OH radicals are accumulated and the laser energy is consumed. Moreover, this laser ignition will initiate the combustion or explosion process of combustible gas and the minimum ignition energy is measured at different initial pressures. The differences in the experimental results compared to those induced by a nanosecond Q-switched laser pulse with a peak power of 10{sup 6-8} W are also discussed. (author)

  1. Models of plasma membrane organization can be applied to mitochondrial membranes to target human health and disease with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza Shaikh, Saame; Brown, David A

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), abundant in fish oil, have potential for treating symptoms associated with inflammatory and metabolic disorders; therefore, it is essential to determine their fundamental molecular mechanisms. Recently, several labs have demonstrated the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exerts anti-inflammatory effects by targeting the molecular organization of plasma membrane microdomains. Here we briefly review the evidence that DHA reorganizes the spatial distribution of microdomains in several model systems. We then emphasize how models on DHA and plasma membrane microdomains can be applied to mitochondrial membranes. We discuss the role of DHA acyl chains in regulating mitochondrial lipid-protein clustering, and how these changes alter several aspects of mitochondrial function. In particular, we summarize effects of DHA on mitochondrial respiration, electron leak, permeability transition, and mitochondrial calcium handling. Finally, we conclude by postulating future experiments that will augment our understanding of DHA-dependent membrane organization in health and disease.

  2. Numerical simulation on gas explosions in compression compartment of gas filling station%加气站压缩机间气体爆炸数值模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴运逸; 雷海丽

    2013-01-01

    加气站压缩机间安全设计时,需要评估内部气体爆炸危害,确定爆炸能量和影响因素。采用CFD技术,建立加气站压缩机间三维模型,模拟不同点火源位置、泄压板不同泄压压力和重量下,压缩机间气体爆炸时的爆炸压力及火焰传播行为。结果表明点火源位置以及泄压参数是影响加气站压缩机间气体爆炸的重要因素;点火源位置距离压缩机间放空位置越近,爆炸压力越小;对于泄压参数,爆炸压力与泄压板开启压力和重量之间均为正比关系。为减缓压缩机间内的气体爆炸危害,需要合理布置点火源位置,选择容重轻、泄压压力小的泄压材料,并同时需要考虑爆炸导致的物体破碎危害以及火焰次生灾害。%The hazards of gas explosion in compression compartment should be assessed , and explosion energy as well as influence factors should be determined for the safety design of compression compartment in gas filling sta -tion.In this study, numerical simulation was adopted to build 3D model of compression compartment and simulate gas explosion pressure and flame propagation behavior under different ignition point location , open-pressure and weight of relief panels .The results showed that the ignition point location relative to the location of the vent opening and relief panel ’ s characteristics is very important for gas explosion in compression compartment .The nearer the ignition point location is away from the venting opening location , the smaller the caused explosion pressure will be . For the relief panel , explosion pressure is proportional with the open-pressure and the weight of relief panel .Be-sides the rational distribution of ignition source and the adoption of relief panel with less unit weight and relief pres -sure, the crushing material damage and secondary hazard of flame should also be noticed in order to mitigate the hazard of gas explosion .

  3. Plasma membrane targeting by short chain sphingolipids inserted in liposomes improves anti-tumor activity of mitoxantrone in an orthotopic breast carcinoma xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro Pedrosa, Lília R; van Tellingen, Olaf; Soullié, Thomas; Seynhaeve, Ann L; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Verheij, Marcel; Koning, Gerben A

    2015-08-01

    Mitoxantrone (MTO) is clinically used for treatment of various types of cancers providing an alternative for similarly active, but more toxic chemotherapeutic drugs such as anthracyclines. To further decrease its toxicity MTO was encapsulated into liposomes. Although liposomal drugs can accumulate in target tumor tissue, they still face the plasma membrane barrier for effective intracellular delivery. Aiming to improve MTO tumor cell availability, we used short chain lipids to target and modulate the tumor cell membrane, promoting MTO plasma membrane traversal. MTO was encapsulated in liposomes containing the short chain sphingolipid (SCS), C8-Glucosylceramide (C8-GluCer) or C8-Galactosylceramide (C8-GalCer) in their bilayer. These new SCS-liposomes containing MTO (SCS-MTOL) were tested in vivo for tolerability, pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, tumor drug delivery by intravital microscopy and efficacy, and compared to standard MTO liposomes (MTOL) and free MTO. Liposomal encapsulation decreased MTO toxicity and allowed administration of higher drug doses. SCS-MTOL displayed increased clearance and lower skin accumulation compared to standard MTOL. Intratumoral liposomal drug delivery was heterogeneous and rather limited in hypoxic tumor areas, yet SCS-MTOL improved intracellular drug uptake in comparison with MTOL. The increased MTO availability correlated well with the improved antitumor activity of SCS-MTOL in a MDAMB-231 breast carcinoma model. Multiple dosing of liposomal MTO strongly delayed tumor growth compared to free MTO and prolonged mouse survival, whereas among the liposomal MTO treatments, C8-GluCer-MTOL was most effective. Targeting plasma membranes with SCS improved MTO tumor availability and thereby therapeutic activity and represents a promising approach to improve MTO-based chemotherapy.

  4. Momentum, heat, and neutral mass transport in convective atmospheric pressure plasma-liquid systems and implications for aqueous targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alexander; Anderson, Carly; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 μ m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results from this study include the presence of a 10 K temperature drop in the gas boundary layer adjacent to the interface that arises from convective cooling. Though the temperature magnitudes may vary among atmospheric discharge types (different amounts of plasma-gas heating), this relative difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures is expected to be present for any system in which convection is significant. Accounting for the resulting difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures has a significant impact on reaction kinetics; factor of two changes in terminal aqueous species concentrations like H2O2, NO2- , and NO3- are observed in this study if the effect of evaporative cooling is not included.

  5. Statistical analysis of particle flux flowing into the end-target in between attached and detached states in the linear divertor plasma simulator NAGDIS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, SOKENDAI, Toki (Japan); Ohno, N.; Onda, T.; Takeyama, K.; Tsuji, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Kajita, S.; Kuwabara, T. [Institute of Materials and Systems for Sustainability, Nagoya University (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    We have investigated the particle flux flowing into the axisymmetric end-target in the transient state from attached to detached divertor conditions in the linear plasma device NAGDIS-II. In the transient state, a dramatic decrease of the mean particle flux and a large-amplitude fluctuation with negative and positive spikes were observed. We have analyzed the fluctuation with a newly suggested analysis technique: pre-multiplied cubic spectrum with the wavelet transform. Analysis result indicates that these spikes consist of a few kilohertz components. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Influence of plasma loading in a hybrid muon cooling channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, B.; Stratakis, D.; Yonehara, K.

    2015-05-03

    In a hybrid 6D cooling channel, cooling is accomplished by reducing the beam momentum through ionization energy loss in wedge absorbers and replenishing the momentum loss in the longitudinal direction with gas-filled rf cavities. While the gas acts as a buffer to prevent rf breakdown, gas ionization also occurs as the beam passes through the pressurized cavity. The resulting plasma may gain substantial energy from the rf electric field which it can transfer via collisions to the gas, an effect known as plasma loading. In this paper, we investigate the influence of plasma loading on the cooling performance of a rectilinear hybrid channel. With the aid of numerical simulations we examine the sensitivity in cooling performance and plasma loading to key parameters such as the rf gradient and gas pressure.

  7. Microwave-driven plasmas in Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, L. L.; Leroy, O.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Debord, B.; Gerome, F.; Jamier, R.; Benabid, F.

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports on a novel solution to ignite and maintain micro-plasmas in gas-filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibres (HC-PCFs), using CW microwave excitation (2.45 GHz). The original concept is based on a surfatron, generating argon micro-plasmas of few centimetres in length within a 100 μm core-diameter Kagome HC-PCF, at ~1 mbar on-gap gas-pressure using low powers (core diameter, pressure and electron density). Work supported by ANR and DGA (ASTRID-2011-UVfactor) and by FCT (Pest-OE/SADG/LA0010/2011).

  8. The impact of low-Z impurities on x-ray conversion efficiency from laser-produced plasmas of low-density gold foam targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yunsong; Shang, Wanli; Yang, Jiamin; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Wenhai; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Zhan, Xiayu; Du, Huabing; Deng, Bo; Pu, Yikang

    2013-12-01

    It is an important approach to improve the x-ray conversion efficiency of laser-ablated high-Z plasmas by using low initial density materials for various applications. However, unavoidable low-Z impurities in the manufacture process of low-density high-Z foam targets will depress this effect. A general easy-to-use analytical model based on simulations was developed to evaluate the quantitative impact of impurities within the gold foam target on laser to x-ray conversion efficiency. In addition, the x-ray conversion efficiencies of 1 g/cm3 gold foams with two different initial contents of impurities were experimentally investigated. Good agreements have been achieved between the model results and experiments.

  9. Absolute densities of Cu, Zn, Sn, and S atoms in magnetron sputtering plasmas employing a Cu2ZnSnS4 target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafarizal, Nayan; Sasaki, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    Absolute densities of Cu, Zn, Sn, and S atoms in magnetron sputtering plasmas were measured by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. A stoichiometric Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) target was used in this work. It was found that, at various Ar pressures, the S density ranged between (2-8) × 1010 cm-3, the Cu and Sn densities ranged between (0.6-3) × 1010 cm-3, and the Zn density ranged between (2-3) × 109 cm-3. The effective depositing flux, which was evaluated from the absolute densities and the sticking probabilities, was comparable with that evaluated from the deposition rate of the CZTS film. However, the composition ratio of Cu, Zn, Sn, and S in the gas phase deviated from the ideal stoichiometry of CZTS. We discussed the possible mechanisms for the difference among the element compositions of the target, the deposited film, and the gas-phase densities.

  10. High-brightness laser plasma soft X-ray source using a double-stream gas puff target irradiated with the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Juha, L.; Jungwirth, K.; Kralikova, B.; Krasa, J.; Kubat, P.; Pfeifer, M.; Pina, L.; Prchal, P.; Rohlena, K.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Horvath, M.; Wawer, J

    2004-01-14

    High brightness laser plasma soft X-ray source based on a recently developed double-stream gas puff target irradiated with 0.5 ns laser pulses with energies up to 700 J from the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) is presented. The gas puff target was created by pulsed injection of xenon into a hollow stream of helium using an electromagnetic valve system with the double-nozzle setup. Soft X-ray emission was measured using the transmission grating spectrograph coupled to a CCD camera and the calibrated silicon photodiodes. The absolute soft X-ray production was determined to be 160 J for 540 J of laser energy, giving the soft X-ray conversion efficiency of about 30%. The source has been used in initial experiments on soft X-ray ablation of organic polymers and elemental solids.

  11. Recent advancements in the "water-window" microscopy with laser-plasma SXR source based on a double stream gas-puff target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, P. W.

    2016-09-01

    An overview of our recent developments, regarding "water-window" soft X-ray (SXR) microscopy based on a laser-plasma double stream gas puff target sources is presented. The work, presented herein, describes two approaches to SXR microscopy. The first one is a low spatial resolution, achromatic SXR microscopy, employing Wolter type-I objective. The second one is a nanometer spatial resolution SXR microscopy, with the use of a Fresnel zone plate objective, for imaging various objects with quasimonochromatic light, emitted from a double stream gas puff target based short wavelength source. The developments regarding both systems are presented, as well as the possible applications, for which the SXR microscope was already employed. Such compact, table-top size, laboratory type microscopy setups may be employed in the near future for complementary-like studies to other, often used, microscopy techniques.

  12. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Structure of flows due to interaction of CO2 laser pulse pairs with a target in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeev, A. A.; Nikolashina, L. I.; Potashkin, M. N.; Prokopenko, N. V.

    1991-06-01

    An analysis is made of two pulses from an electric-discharge CO2 laser, of 6-12 μs duration and separated in time, incident on a target surrounded by air of normal density. The main attention is concentrated on breakdown of air by the second pulse at a boundary separating the "cold gas" and the plasma generated by the first pulse ("hot gas"). A gasdynamic system of waves is then generated. It consists of an absorption wave traveling along the cold gas opposite to the laser radiation and a wave propagating along the hot gas toward the target. The best agreement between the theory and experiment is obtained employing a model in which an absorption wave travels along the hot gas in an overcompressed detonation regime. The density of the radiation flux needed to maintain such a wave is 20-30% of the average density of the laser radiation flux carried by the second pulse.

  13. Enhanced X-ray emission from laser-produced gold plasma by double pulses irradiation of nano-porous targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, R.

    2017-02-01

    Enhancement of the soft X-ray emission including free-free, free-bound and bound-bound emissions from Au nano-porous targets irradiated by single and double laser pulses is studied through numerical simulations. Laser pulses of duration 2 ns are used in calculations considering different prepulse intensities and a fixed intensity of 1013 Wcm-2 for the main pulse. The effects of prepulse intensity and time separation between laser pulses are studied for targets of different porosities. Results show that the X-ray yield can be enhanced significantly by a nano-porous target having optimum initial density. Such enhancement can be more improved when double laser pulses with appropriate delay time and intensities irradiate nano-porous targets. It is shown that the enhancement will be reduced when the prepulse intensity is greater than a specific value.

  14. Lab-scale EUV nano-imaging employing a gas-puff-target source: image quality versus plasma radiation characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter we report a desk-top microscopy reaching 50nm spatial resolution in very compact setup using a gas-puff laser plasma EUV source. We present the study of source bandwidth influence on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscope spatial resolution. EUV images of object obtained by illumination with variable bandwidth EUV radiation were compared in terms of knife-edge spatial resolution to study the wide bandwidth parasitic influence on spatial resolution in the EUV microscopy.

  15. Potentiation of the bioavailability of blueberry phenolic compounds by co-ingested grape phenolic compounds in mice, revealed by targeted metabolomic profiling in plasma and feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudonné, Stéphanie; Dal-Pan, Alexandre; Dubé, Pascal; Varin, Thibault V; Calon, Frédéric; Desjardins, Yves

    2016-08-10

    The low bioavailability of dietary phenolic compounds, resulting from poor absorption and high rates of metabolism and excretion, is a concern as it can limit their potential beneficial effects on health. Targeted metabolomic profiling in plasma and feces of mice supplemented for 15 days with a blueberry extract, a grape extract or their combination revealed significantly increased plasma concentrations (3-5 fold) of blueberry phenolic metabolites in the presence of a co-ingested grape extract, associated with an equivalent decrease in their appearance in feces. Additionally, the repeated daily administration of the blueberry-grape combination significantly increased plasma phenolic concentrations (2-3-fold) compared to animals receiving only a single acute dose, with no such increase being observed with individual extracts. These findings highlight a positive interaction between blueberry and grape constituents, in which the grape extract enhanced the absorption of blueberry phenolic compounds. This study provides for the first time in vivo evidence of such an interaction occurring between co-ingested phenolic compounds from fruit extracts leading to their improved bioavailability.

  16. Targeted silencing of DNA-specific B cells combined with partial plasma cell depletion displays additive effects on delaying disease onset in lupus-prone mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova-Ganeva, K A; Gesheva, V V; Todorov, T A; Voll, R E; Vassilev, T L

    2013-11-01

    Targeting autoreactive B lymphocytes at any stage of their differentiation could yield viable therapeutic strategies for treating autoimmunity. All currently used drugs, including the most recently introduced biological agents, lack target specificity. Selective silencing of double-stranded DNA-specific B cells in animals with spontaneous lupus has been achieved previously by the administration of a chimeric antibody molecule that cross-links their DNA-reactive B cell immunoglobulin receptors with inhibitory FcγIIb (CD32) receptors. However, long-lived plasmacytes are resistant to this chimeric antibody as well as to all conventional treatments. Bortezomib (a proteasome inhibitor) depletes most plasma cells and has been shown recently to suppress disease activity in lupus mice. We hypothesized that the co-administration of non-toxic doses of bortezomib, that partially purge long-lived plasma cells, together with an agent that selectively silences DNA-specific B cells, should have additive effects in an autoantibody-mediated disease. Indeed, our data show that the simultaneous treatment of lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice with suboptimal doses of bortezomib plus the chimeric antibody resulted in the prevention or the delayed appearance of the disease manifestations as well as in a prolonged survival. The effect of the combination therapy was significantly stronger than that of the respective monotherapies and was comparable to that observed after cyclophosphamide administration.

  17. Modification of pLL/DNA complexes with a multivalent hydrophilic polymer permits folate-mediated targeting in vitro and prolonged plasma circulation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Christopher M; Pechar, Michal; Oupicky, David; Ulbrich, Karel; Seymour, Leonard W

    2002-01-01

    Gene delivery vectors based on poly(L-lysine) and DNA (pLL/DNA complexes) have limited use for targeted systemic application in vivo since they bind cells and proteins non-specifically. In this study we have attempted to form folate-targeted vectors with extended systemic circulation by surface modification of pLL/DNA complexes with hydrophilic polymers. pLL/DNA complexes were stabilised by surface modification with a multivalent reactive polymer based on alternating segments of poly(ethylene glycol) and tripeptides bearing reactive ester groups. Folate moieties were incorporated into the vectors either by direct attachment of folate to the polymer or via intermediate poly(ethylene glycol) spacers of 800 and 3400 Da. Polymer-coated complexes show similar morphology to uncoated complexes, their zeta potential is decreased towards zero, serum protein binding is inhibited and aqueous solubility is substantially increased. Intravenous (i.v.) administration to mice of coated complexes produced extended systemic circulation, with up to 2000-fold more DNA measured in the bloodstream after 30 min compared with simple pLL/DNA complexes. In further contrast to simple pLL/DNA complexes, coated complexes do not bind blood cells in vivo. Folate receptor targeting is shown to mediate targeted association with HeLa cells in vitro, leading to increased transgene expression. We demonstrate for the first time that DNA uptake via the folate receptor is dependent on pEG spacer length, with the transgene expression relatively independent of the level of internalised DNA. We show increased systemic circulation, decreased blood cell and protein binding, and folate-targeted transgene expression using pLL/DNA complexes surface-modified with a novel multireactive hydrophilic polymer. This work provides the basis for the development of plasma-circulating targeted vectors for in vivo applications. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Technical note: Protozoa-specific antibodies raised in sheep plasma bind to their target protozoa in the rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Y J; Rea, S M; Popovski, S; Skillman, L C; Wright, A-D G

    2014-12-01

    Binding of IgG antibodies to Entodinium spp. in the rumen of sheep (Ovis aries) was investigated by adding IgG, purified from plasma, directly into the rumen. Plasma IgG was sourced from sheep that had or had not been immunized with a vaccine containing whole fixed Entodinium spp. cells. Ruminal fluid was sampled approximately 2 h after each antibody dosing. Binding of protozoa by a specific antibody was detected using an indirect fluorescent antibody test. An antibody titer in the ruminal fluid was determined by ELISA, and the concentration of ruminal fluid ammonia-N and ruminal pH were also determined. Entodinium spp. and total protozoa from IgG-infused sheep were enumerated by microscopic counts. Two-hourly additions of IgG maintained a low antibody titer in the rumen for 12 h and the binding of the antibody to the rumen protozoa was demonstrated. Increased ammonia-N concentrations and altered ruminal fluid pH patterns indicated that additional fermentation of protein was occurring in the rumen after addition of IgG. No reduction in numbers of Entodinium spp. was observed (P>0.05). Although binding of antibodies to protozoa has been demonstrated in the rumen, it is unclear how much cell death occurred. On the balance of probability, it would appear that the antibody was degraded or partially degraded, and the impact of this on protozoal populations and the measurement of a specific titer is also unclear.

  19. Development of an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer for fast density profile measurements of dense plasmas generated by beam-target interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dan [National Security Technol., LLC, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berninger, M; Meidinger, A; Stutman, Dan; Valdivia, Maria Pia

    2015-05-01

    For the first time an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer is being developed that will use a flash tube source and fast detector for dynamic density gradient measurements. In Talbot-Lau moire deflectometry, an x-ray grating makes an image of itself on a second grating (the Talbot effect) to produce a moire pattern on a detector. The test object is placed between these gratings, with variations in index of refraction changing the pattern. A third grating in front of an incoherent x-ray source produces an array of coherent sources. With a 150 kV x-ray flash tube as the source, the gratings are placed in a glancing angle setup for performance at ~60 keV. The detector is a gated CCD with a fast scintillator for x-ray conversion. This diagnostic, designed for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, measures the density profile of dense plasma plumes ejected from beam-target interactions. DARHT has two high-current, pulsed, inductive linear electron accelerators with bremsstrahlung targets at the end of each beam line to create 2-D radiographic images of hydrodynamic tests. One multi-pulse accelerator has up to four beam pulses striking the same target within 2 μs. Computer simulations that model target evolution and ejected material between pulses are used to design these targets for optimal radiographic performance; the x-ray deflectometer will directly measure density gradients in the ejected plumes and provide the first experimental constraints to these models. During the first year, currently underway, the diagnostic systems are being designed. In year two, the flash tube and fast detector will be deployed at DARHT for radiographic imaging while the deflectometer is built and tested on the bench with a continuous source. Finally, in year three, the fast deflectometer will be installed on DARHT and density measurements will be performed.

  20. High-k gadolinium scandate on Si obtained by high pressure sputtering from metal targets and in-situ plasma oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampillón, M. A.; San Andrés, E.; Feijoo, P. C.; Fierro, J. L. G.

    2017-03-01

    This article studies the physical and electrical behavior of Gd2‑x Sc x O3 layers grown by high pressure sputtering from metallic Gd and Sc targets. The aim is to obtain a high permittivity dielectric for microelectronic applications. The films were obtained by the deposition of a metallic nanolaminate of Gd and Sc alternating layers, which is afterwards in-situ oxidized by plasma. The oxide films obtained were close to stoichiometry, amorphous and with minimal interfacial regrowth. By fabricating metal–insulator–semiconductor capacitors we found that a moderate temperature annealing is needed to enhance permittivity, which reaches a high value of 32 while keeping moderate leakage. Finally, the feasibility of interface scavenging in this material with Ti gate electrodes is also demonstrated.

  1. Functionalization of alkyne-terminated thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon nanoparticles with targeting peptides and antifouling polymers: effect on the human plasma protein adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chang-Fang; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Bonduelle, Colin; Rytkönen, Jussi; Raula, Janne; Almeida, Sérgio; Närvänen, Ale; Salonen, Jarno J; Lecommandoux, Sebastien; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2015-01-28

    Porous silicon (PSi) nanomaterials combine a high drug loading capacity and tunable surface chemistry with various surface modifications to meet the requirements for biomedical applications. In this work, alkyne-terminated thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (THCPSi) nanoparticles were fabricated and postmodified using five bioactive molecules (targeting peptides and antifouling polymers) via a single-step click chemistry to modulate the bioactivity of the THCPSi nanoparticles, such as enhancing the cellular uptake and reducing the plasma protein association. The size of the nanoparticles after modification was increased from 176 to 180-220 nm. Dextran 40 kDa modified THCPSi nanoparticles showed the highest stability in aqueous buffer. Both peptide- and polymer-functionalized THCPSi nanoparticles showed an extensive cellular uptake which was dependent on the functionalized moieties presented on the surface of the nanoparticles. The plasma protein adsorption study showed that the surface modification with different peptides or polymers induced different protein association profiles. Dextran 40 kDa functionalized THCPSi nanoparticles presented the least protein association. Overall, these results demonstrate that the "click" conjugation of the biomolecules onto the alkyne-terminated THCPSi nanoparticles is a versatile and simple approach to modulate the surface chemistry, which has high potential for biomedical applications.

  2. Targeted In Situ Gene Correction of Dysfunctional APOE Alleles to Produce Atheroprotective Plasma ApoE3 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Papaioannou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading worldwide cause of death. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE is a 34-kDa circulating glycoprotein, secreted by the liver and macrophages with pleiotropic antiatherogenic functions and hence a candidate to treat hypercholesterolaemia and atherosclerosis. Here, we describe atheroprotective properties of ApoE, though also potential proatherogenic actions, and the prevalence of dysfunctional isoforms, outline conventional gene transfer strategies, and then focus on gene correction therapeutics that can repair defective APOE alleles. In particular, we discuss the possibility and potential benefit of applying in combination two technical advances to repair aberrant APOE genes: (i an engineered endonuclease to introduce a double-strand break (DSB in exon 4, which contains the common, but dysfunctional, ε2 and ε4 alleles; (ii an efficient and selectable template for homologous recombination (HR repair, namely, an adeno-associated viral (AAV vector, which harbours wild-type APOE sequence. This technology is applicable ex vivo, for example to target haematopoietic or induced pluripotent stem cells, and also for in vivo hepatic gene targeting. It is to be hoped that such emerging technology will eventually translate to patient therapy to reduce CVD risk.

  3. Plasma Processes : A simple and efficient levitation technique for noncontact coating of inertial confinement fusion targets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Mishra; R K Khardekar; Rashmi Chouhan; R K Gupta

    2000-11-01

    A simple and very efficient gas jet levitation technique for levitating inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been developed. A low velocity gas jet through diverging nozzle generates precisely controlled low Reynolds number flow pattern, capable of levitating polymer microballoons up to 2500 m diameter. Different shaped diverging nozzle are investigated, satisfactory levitation is achieved with simple conical shapes. With this setup microballoon can be levitated for hours with excellent stability, continuous rotation and at the desired height (reproducible with in less than 100 m). The height of stabilization depends upon cone angle of diverging nozzle and velocity of levitating gas. This technique is very robust and highly insensitive to external disturbances like nonuniform temperature fields and vibrations. This setup is very economical to fabricate, easy to operate and can be used efficiently in various spray coating application involving plastic and metallic layers on microballoons.

  4. Spatial Organization of the Cytoskeleton enhances Cargo Delivery to Specific Target Areas on the Plasma Membrane of Spherical Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Hafner, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular transport is vital for the proper functioning and survival of a cell. Cargo (proteins, vesicles, organelles, etc.) is transferred from its place of creation to its target locations via molecular motor assisted transport along cytoskeletal filaments. The transport efficiency is strongly affected by the spatial organization of the cytoskeleton, which constitutes an inhomogeneous, complex network. In cells with a centrosome microtubules grow radially from the central microtubule organizing center towards the cell periphery whereas actin filaments form a dense meshwork, the actin cortex, underneath the cell membrane with a broad range of orientations. The emerging ballistic motion along filaments is frequently interrupted due to constricting intersection nodes or cycles of detachment and reattachment processes in the crowded cytoplasm. In order to investigate the efficiency of search strategies established by the cell's specific spatial organization of the cytoskeleton we formulate a random velocity...

  5. Calcium-dependent modulation and plasma membrane targeting of the AKT2 potassium channel by the CBL4/ CIPK6 calcium sensor/protein kinase complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katrin Held; Jean-Baptiste Thibaud; J(o)rg Kudla; Francois Pascaud; Christian Eckert; Pawel Gajdanowicz; Kenji Hashimoto; Claire Corratgé-Faillie; Jan Niklas Offenborn; Beno(i)t Lacombe; Ingo Dreyer

    2011-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channel function is fundamental to many physiological processes. However, components and mechanisms regulating the activity of plant K+ channels remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the calcium (Ca2+)sensor CBL4 together with the interacting protein kinase CIPK6 modulates the activity and plasma membrane (PM)targeting of the K+ channel AKT2 from Arabidopsis thaliana by mediating translocation of AKT2 to the PM in plant cells and enhancing AKT2 activity in oocytes. Accordingly, akt2, cbl4 and cipk6 mutants share similar developmental and delayed flowering pheuotypes. Moreover, the isolated regulatory C-terminal domain of CIPK6 is sufficient for mediating CBL4- and Ca2+-dependent channel translocation from the endoplasmic reticulum membrane to the PM by a novel targeting pathway that is dependent on dual lipid modifications of CBL4 by myristoylation and palmitoylation. Thus, we describe a critical mechanism of ion-channel regulation where a Ca2+ sensor modulates K+ channel activity by promoting a kinase interaction-dependent but phosphorylation-independent translocation of the channel to the PM.

  6. Determination of major, minor and trace elements in rock samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Progress in the utilization of borate glasses as targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Tácito Dantas F.; Escalfoni, Rainério, Jr.; da Fonseca, Teresa Cristina O.; Miekeley, Norbert

    2011-05-01

    The present work is a continuation of a research study performed at our laboratory aiming at the multielement analysis of rock samples (basalts and shale) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in combination with laser ablation using borate glasses as analytical targets. Argon, nitrogen-argon mixtures and helium were evaluated as cell gases, the latter confirming its better performance. Different operational parameters of the laser, such as gas flow, energy, focus, scanning speed and sampling frequency were optimized. External calibration was made with standards prepared by fusion of geological reference materials (basalts 688 and BCR-2, obsidian SRM 278, and shale SGR-1) of different mass fractions in the meta-tetra borate matrix. Coefficients of determination ( R2) were > 0.99 for 30 elements from o total of 40 determined. Method validation was then performed using additional certified reference materials (BHVO-2, BIR-1, SCo-1) produced as borate targets in a similar way. Accuracies were better than 10% for most of the elements studied and analytical precisions, calculated from the residual standard deviations of calibration curves were, typically, between 6% and 10%. Additionally, the semiquantitative TotalQuant® technique was applied, which gave, within the expected uncertainty for this calibration technique, concordant results when compared to the quantitative external calibration procedure. Both methods were then used for the analysis of marine shale samples, which are of great geological interest in petroleum prospecting.

  7. Determination of major, minor and trace elements in rock samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Progress in the utilization of borate glasses as targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Tacito Dantas F. [Departmento de Quimica da Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Estadual de Goias (UEG) (Brazil); Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Brasilia (IFB) (Brazil); Escalfoni, Rainerio [Departmento de Quimica da Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Centro de Pesquisas Leopoldo A. Miguez de Mello da Petrobras (CENPES) (Brazil); Fonseca, Teresa Cristina O. da [Centro de Pesquisas Leopoldo A. Miguez de Mello da Petrobras (CENPES) (Brazil); Miekeley, Norbert, E-mail: miekeley@puc-rio.br [Departmento de Quimica da Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    The present work is a continuation of a research study performed at our laboratory aiming at the multielement analysis of rock samples (basalts and shale) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in combination with laser ablation using borate glasses as analytical targets. Argon, nitrogen-argon mixtures and helium were evaluated as cell gases, the latter confirming its better performance. Different operational parameters of the laser, such as gas flow, energy, focus, scanning speed and sampling frequency were optimized. External calibration was made with standards prepared by fusion of geological reference materials (basalts 688 and BCR-2, obsidian SRM 278, and shale SGR-1) of different mass fractions in the meta-tetra borate matrix. Coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}) were > 0.99 for 30 elements from o total of 40 determined. Method validation was then performed using additional certified reference materials (BHVO-2, BIR-1, SCo-1) produced as borate targets in a similar way. Accuracies were better than 10% for most of the elements studied and analytical precisions, calculated from the residual standard deviations of calibration curves were, typically, between 6% and 10%. Additionally, the semiquantitative TotalQuant (registered) technique was applied, which gave, within the expected uncertainty for this calibration technique, concordant results when compared to the quantitative external calibration procedure. Both methods were then used for the analysis of marine shale samples, which are of great geological interest in petroleum prospecting.

  8. Spatial organization of the cytoskeleton enhances cargo delivery to specific target areas on the plasma membrane of spherical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Anne E.; Rieger, Heiko

    2016-12-01

    Intracellular transport is vital for the proper functioning and survival of a cell. Cargo (proteins, vesicles, organelles, etc) is transferred from its place of creation to its target locations via molecular motor assisted transport along cytoskeletal filaments. The transport efficiency is strongly affected by the spatial organization of the cytoskeleton, which constitutes an inhomogeneous, complex network. In cells with a centrosome microtubules grow radially from the central microtubule organizing center towards the cell periphery whereas actin filaments form a dense meshwork, the actin cortex, underneath the cell membrane with a broad range of orientations. The emerging ballistic motion along filaments is frequently interrupted due to constricting intersection nodes or cycles of detachment and reattachment processes in the crowded cytoplasm. In order to investigate the efficiency of search strategies established by the cell’s specific spatial organization of the cytoskeleton we formulate a random velocity model with intermittent arrest states. With extensive computer simulations we analyze the dependence of the mean first passage times for narrow escape problems on the structural characteristics of the cytoskeleton, the motor properties and the fraction of time spent in each state. We find that an inhomogeneous architecture with a small width of the actin cortex constitutes an efficient intracellular search strategy.

  9. Raman backscatter as a remote laser power sensor in high-energy-density plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Moody, J D; Divol, L; Michel, P; Robey, H F; LePape, S; Ralph, J; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H; Kirkwood, R K; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Nikroo, A; Williams, E A

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) is used as a remote sensor to quantify the instantaneous laser power after transfer from outer to inner cones that cross in a National Ignition Facility (NIF) gas-filled hohlraum plasma. By matching SRS between a shot reducing outer vs a shot reducing inner power we infer that ~half of the incident outer-cone power is transferred to inner cones, for the specific time and wavelength configuration studied. This is the first instantaneous non-disruptive measure of power transfer in an indirect drive NIF experiment using optical measurements.

  10. Impaired plasma membrane targeting or protein stability by certain ATP1A2 mutations identified in sporadic or familial hemiplegic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavraz, Neslihan N; Dürr, Katharina L; Koenderink, Jan B; Freilinger, Tobias; Bamberg, Ernst; Dichgans, Martin; Friedrich, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in three different genes have been implicated in familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), two of them code for neuronal voltage-gated cation channels, CACNA1A and SCN1A, while the third encodes ATP1A2, the alpha(2)-isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase's catalytic subunit, thus classifying FHM as an ion channel/ion transporter disorder. The Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase maintains the physiological gradients for Na(+) and K(+) ions and is therefore critical for the activity of ion channels and transporters involved in neurotransmitter uptake or Ca(2+) signaling. Diverse functional abnormalities have been identified for disease-linked ATP1A2 mutations, which reach far beyond simple loss-of-function. We have shown recently that ATP1A2 mutations frequently lead to changes in the enzyme's voltage-dependent properties, kinetics or apparent cation affinities. Here, we present functional data on a so far uncharacterized set of ATP1A2 mutations (G301R, R908Q and P979L) upon expression in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293FT cells, and provide evidence for a novel pathophysiological mechanism. Whereas the G301R mutant was inactive, no functional changes were observed for mutants R908Q and P979L in the oocyte expression system. However, the R908Q mutant was less effectively expressed in the plasma membrane of oocytes, making it the first missense mutation to result in defective plasma membrane targeting. Notably, the P979L mutant exhibited the same cellular expression profile as the wild-type protein, both in Xenopus oocytes and in transfected HEK293FT cells grown at 28 degrees C, but much less P979L protein was found upon cell growth at 37 degrees C, showing for the first time that temperature-sensitive effects on protein stability can underlie ATP1A2 loss-of-function.

  11. [The spectra of a laser-produced plasma source with CO2, O2 and CF4 liquid aerosol spray target].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qi-Liang; Chen, Bo

    2008-11-01

    A laser-produced plasma (LPP) source with liquid aerosol spray target and nanosecond laser was developed, based on both soft X-ray radiation metrology and extreme ultraviolet projection lithography (EUVL). The LPP source is composed of a stainless steel solenoid valve whose temperature can be continuously controlled, a Nd : YAG laser with pulse width, working wavelength and pulse energy being 7 ns, 1.064 microm and 1J respectively, and a pulse generator which can synchronously control the valve and the laser. A standard General Valve Corporation series 99 stainless steel solenoid valve with copper gasket seals and a Kel-F poppet are used in order to minimize leakage and poppet deformation during high-pressure cryogenic operation. A close fitting copper cooling jacket surrounds the valve body. The jacket clamps a copper coolant carrying tube 3 mm in diameter, which is fed by an automatically pressurized liquid nitrogen-filled dewar. The valve temperature can be controlled between 77 and 473 K. For sufficiently high backing pressure and low temperature, the valve reservoir gas can undergo a gas-to-liquid phase transition. Upon valve pulsing, the liquid is ejected into a vacuum and breaks up into droplets, which is called liquid aerosol spray target. For the above-mentioned LPP source, firstly, by the use of Cowan program on the basis of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, the authors computed the radiative transition wavelengths and probabilities in soft X-ray region for O4+, O5+, O6+, O7+, F5+, F6+ and F7+ ions which were correspondingly produced from the interaction of the 10(11)-10(12) W x cm(-2) power laser with liquid O2, CO2 and CF4 aerosol spray targets. Secondly, the authors measured the spectra of liquid O2, CO2 and CF4 aerosol spray target LPP sources in the 6-20 nm band for the 8 x 10(11) W x cm(-2) laser irradiance. The measured results were compared with the Cowan calculated results ones, and the radiative transition wavelength and probability for the

  12. Cell-Free DNA Analysis of Targeted Genomic Regions in Maternal Plasma for Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing of Trisomy 21, Trisomy 18, Trisomy 13, and Fetal Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumbaris, George; Kypri, Elena; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Achilleos, Achilleas; Mina, Petros; Neofytou, Maria; Velissariou, Voula; Christopoulou, Georgia; Kallikas, Ioannis; González-Liñán, Alicia; Benusiene, Egle; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Marek, Pietryga; Santana, Alfredo; Nagy, Nikoletta; Széll, Márta; Laudanski, Piotr; Papageorgiou, Elisavet A; Ioannides, Marios; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2016-06-01

    There is great need for the development of highly accurate cost effective technologies that could facilitate the widespread adoption of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT). We developed an assay based on the targeted analysis of cell-free DNA for the detection of fetal aneuploidies of chromosomes 21, 18, and 13. This method enabled the capture and analysis of selected genomic regions of interest. An advanced fetal fraction estimation and aneuploidy determination algorithm was also developed. This assay allowed for accurate counting and assessment of chromosomal regions of interest. The analytical performance of the assay was evaluated in a blind study of 631 samples derived from pregnancies of at least 10 weeks of gestation that had also undergone invasive testing. Our blind study exhibited 100% diagnostic sensitivity and specificity and correctly classified 52/52 (95% CI, 93.2%-100%) cases of trisomy 21, 16/16 (95% CI, 79.4%-100%) cases of trisomy 18, 5/5 (95% CI, 47.8%-100%) cases of trisomy 13, and 538/538 (95% CI, 99.3%-100%) normal cases. The test also correctly identified fetal sex in all cases (95% CI, 99.4%-100%). One sample failed prespecified assay quality control criteria, and 19 samples were nonreportable because of low fetal fraction. The extent to which free fetal DNA testing can be applied as a universal screening tool for trisomy 21, 18, and 13 depends mainly on assay accuracy and cost. Cell-free DNA analysis of targeted genomic regions in maternal plasma enables accurate and cost-effective noninvasive fetal aneuploidy detection, which is critical for widespread adoption of NIPT. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  13. Haploid genetic screens identify an essential role for PLP2 in the downregulation of novel plasma membrane targets by viral E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T Timms

    Full Text Available The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus gene products K3 and K5 are viral ubiquitin E3 ligases which downregulate MHC-I and additional cell surface immunoreceptors. To identify novel cellular genes required for K5 function we performed a forward genetic screen in near-haploid human KBM7 cells. The screen identified proteolipid protein 2 (PLP2, a MARVEL domain protein of unknown function, as essential for K5 activity. Genetic loss of PLP2 traps the viral ligase in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is unable to ubiquitinate and degrade its substrates. Subsequent analysis of the plasma membrane proteome of K5-expressing KBM7 cells in the presence and absence of PLP2 revealed a wide range of novel K5 targets, all of which required PLP2 for their K5-mediated downregulation. This work ascribes a critical function to PLP2 for viral ligase activity and underlines the power of non-lethal haploid genetic screens in human cells to identify the genes involved in pathogen manipulation of the host immune system.

  14. Haploid genetic screens identify an essential role for PLP2 in the downregulation of novel plasma membrane targets by viral E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T Timms

    Full Text Available The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus gene products K3 and K5 are viral ubiquitin E3 ligases which downregulate MHC-I and additional cell surface immunoreceptors. To identify novel cellular genes required for K5 function we performed a forward genetic screen in near-haploid human KBM7 cells. The screen identified proteolipid protein 2 (PLP2, a MARVEL domain protein of unknown function, as essential for K5 activity. Genetic loss of PLP2 traps the viral ligase in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is unable to ubiquitinate and degrade its substrates. Subsequent analysis of the plasma membrane proteome of K5-expressing KBM7 cells in the presence and absence of PLP2 revealed a wide range of novel K5 targets, all of which required PLP2 for their K5-mediated downregulation. This work ascribes a critical function to PLP2 for viral ligase activity and underlines the power of non-lethal haploid genetic screens in human cells to identify the genes involved in pathogen manipulation of the host immune system.

  15. Exp erimental research on laser-pro duced Gd target plasma source for 6.7 nm lithography%Gd靶激光等离子体6.7 nm光源的实验研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦银萍; 谢卓; 宋晓林; 田勇; 林景全

    2015-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography at λ = 6.7 nm is a challenging subject for next generation semiconductor lithography beyond 13.5 nm. The availability of strong radiation at the operating wavelength and low-debris of the plasma source are the two most important aspects for the development of laser-produced Gd plasma source at 6.7 nm. In this paper, experimental research on the extreme ultraviolet source based on the laser-produced Gd plasma is performed. Strong radiation near 6.7 nm from the source has been obtained, which is attributed to the n=4–n=4 transitions in Gd ions that overlap to yield an intense unresolved transition array (UTA). Dependence of spectral variation near the strong emission region of Gd plasma on the incident laser power density and detection angles is given. It is found that the intensity of EUV radiation around 6.7 nm is increased with increasing laser power density, and the emission peak around 7.1 nm increases faster than that of emission peak around 6.7 nm after the laser intensity reaching 6.4 × 1011 W/cm2, which is ascribed to the unique spectroscopic behavior of Gd ions. In addition, the energy of the ion debris from laser-produced Gd plasma source as well as the angular distribution of the ion yield off the target normal are measured with Faraday cup. Results show that the ion energy corresponding to the peak position of Gd ion energy distribution is about 2.6 keV at 10◦ off the target normal, and the yield of Gd ions decreases with the increase of the angle from the target normal. Furthermore, the stopping ability of an ambient magnetic field for ion debris from laser Gd plasma source is evaluated, and the result shows that the energetic Gd ion can be effectively mitigated by applying a 0.9 T magnetic field.

  16. High-resolution measurement, line identification, and spectral modeling of the K{beta} spectrum of heliumlike argon emitted by a laser-produced plasma using a gas-puff target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skobelev, I.Y.; Faenov, A.Y.; Dyakin, V.M. [Multicharged Ion Spectra Data Center, VNIIFTRI, Mendeleevo, 141570 (Russia); Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Szczurek, M. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 01-489 Warsaw (Poland); Beiersdorfer, P.; Nilsen, J.; Osterheld, A.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    1997-03-01

    We present an analysis of the spectrum of satellite transitions to the He-{beta} line in ArXVII. High-resolution measurements of the spectra from laser-heated Ar-gas-puff targets are made with spectral resolution of 10000 and spatial resolution of better than 50 {mu}m. These are compared with tokamak measurements. Several different lines are identified in the spectra and the spectral analysis is used to determine the plasma parameters in the gas-puff laser-produced plasma. The data complement those from tokamak measurements to provide more complete information on the satellite spectra. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. The role of parallel heat transport in the relation between upstream scrape-off layer widths and target heat flux width in H-mode plasmas of NSTX.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, J W; Boedo, J A; Maingi, R; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2009-01-05

    The physics of parallel heat transport was tested in the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) plasma of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000) and S. M. Kaye, et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, S168 (2005)] tokamak by comparing the upstream electron temperature (T{sub e}) and density (n{sub e}) profiles measured by the mid-plane reciprocating probe to the heat flux (q{sub {perpendicular}}) profile at the divertor plate measured by an infrared (IR) camera. It is found that electron conduction explains the near SOL width data reasonably well while the far SOL, which is in the sheath limited regime, requires an ion heat flux profile broader than the electron one to be consistent with the experimental data. The measured plasma parameters indicate that the SOL energy transport should be in the conduction-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} (radial distance from the separatrix location) < 2-3 cm. The SOL energy transport should transition to the sheath-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm. The T{sub e}, n{sub e}, and q{sub {perpendicular}} profiles are better described by an offset exponential function instead of a simple exponential. The conventional relation between mid plane electron temperature decay length ({lambda}{sub Te}) and target heat flux decay length ({lambda}{sub q}) is {lambda}{sub Te} = 7/2{lambda}{sub q}, whereas the newly-derived relation, assuming offset exponential functional forms, implies {lambda}{sub Te} = (2-2.5){lambda}{sub q}. The measured values of {lambda}{sub Te}/{lambda}{sub q} differ from the new prediction by 25-30%. The measured {lambda}{sub q} values in the far SOL (R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm) are 9-10cm, while the expected values are 2.7 < {lambda}{sub q} < 4.9 cm (for sheath-limited regime). We propose that the ion heat flux profile is substantially broader than the electron heat flux profile as an explanation for this discrepancy in the far SOL.

  18. Time-resolved spatial distribution of plasma in the ablation of a Ba₀.₆Sr₀.₄TiO₃ target by 25 ns KrF ultraviolet laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagrange, J. F.; Wolfman, J.; Motret, O. [Groupe de Recherche en Matériaux, microélectronique, Acoustique et Nanotechnologies (GREMAN) - UMR 7347 CNRS-CEA, Université François Rabelais de Tours, Faculté des Sciences and Techniques, Parc Grandmont - bât. E – 37200 Tours (France); Hermann, J. [Laboratoire Lasers, Plasmas et Procédés Photoniques (LP3), UMR 6182 CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, 163 Avenue de Luminy, C. 917 - 13288 Marseille (France)

    2014-10-07

    We performed radially and longitudinally time-resolved plasma analysis during pulsed laser deposition of Ba₀.₆Sr₀.₄TiO₃ thin films. The plasma is shown to be optically thick and strongly non-uniform during the early expansion phase and the resonance line Ba II (455.4 nm) is strongly self-reversed during this time. Plasma temperature and electron density were obtained by comparing experimental emission spectra with the spectral radiance computed for a non-uniform plasma in local thermal equilibrium.

  19. Preferential CTL targeting of Gag is associated with relative viral control in long-term surviving HIV-1 infected former plasma donors from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingming Jia; Quanbi Zhao; Dan Li; Hong Peng; Marcus Altfeld; Bruce D Walker; Xu G Yu; Yiming Shao; Kunxue Hong; Jianping Chen; Yuhua Ruan; Zhe Wang; Bing Su; Guoliang Ren; Xiaoqing Zhang; Zhen Liu

    2012-01-01

    It is generally believed that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play a critical role in limiting the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and in determining the outcome of the infection,and this effect may partly depend on which HIV product is preferentially targeted.To address the correlation between HIV-1-specific CTL responses and virus replication in a cohort of former plasma donors (FPDs),143 antiretroviral therapy naive FPDs infected with HIV-1 clade B' strains were assessed for HIV-1-specific CTL responses with an IFN-γElispot assay at single peptide level by using overlapping peptides (OLPs) covering the whole consensus clade B proteome.By using a Spearman's rank correlation analysis,we found that the proportion of Gag-specific CTL responses among the total virus-specific CTL activity was inversely correlated with viral loads while being positively correlated to CD4 counts,as opposed to Pol- and Env-specific responses that were associated with increased viral loads and decreased CD4 counts,In addition,Vpr-specifc CTL responses showed a similar protective effect with Gag responses,but with a much lower frequency of recognition.Significantly,we also observed an association between HLA-A*30/B*13/Cw*06 haplotype and lower viral loads that was probably due to restricted Gag-specific CTL responses.Thus,our data demonstrate the prominent role of Gag-specific CTL responses in disease control.The advantage of HLA-A*30/B*13/Cw*06 haplotype in viral control may be associated with the contribution of Gag-specific CTL responses in the studied individuals.

  20. Effect of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in plasma membrane targets in immature rat testis: ionic channels and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Leila; Zamoner, Ariane; Gonçalves, Renata; Zanatta, Ana Paula; Bouraïma-Lelong, Hélène; Bois, Camille; Carreau, Serge; Silva, Fátima Regina Mena Barreto

    2011-11-01

    1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25D(3)) is critical for the maintenance of normal reproduction since reduced fertility is observed in vitamin D-deficient male rats. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 1,25D(3) in 30-day-old rat testicular plasma membrane targets (calcium uptake and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP) activity), as well as to highlight the role of protein kinases in the mechanism of action of 1,25D(3). The results demonstrated that 1,25D(3) induced a fast increase in calcium uptake in rat testis through a nongenomic mechanism of action. This effect was dependent on PKA, PKC and MEK. Moreover, ionic channels, such as ATP- and Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels and Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels, are involved in the mechanism of action. The use of BAPTA-AM showed that [Ca(2+)](i) was also implicated, and the incubation with digoxin produced an increase in (45)Ca(2+) uptake indicating that the effect of 1,25D(3) may also result from Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibition. In addition, 1,25D(3) was able to increase the GGTP activity. Considered together, our results indicate a PKA/PKC/MEK-dependent 1,25D(3) pathway as well as ionic involvement leading to (45)Ca(2+) uptake in immature rat testis. These findings demonstrate that 1,25D(3) stimulates calcium uptake and increases GGTP activity which may be involved in male reproductive functions.

  1. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, M.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Carvou, E.; Menneveux, J.; Yu, J.; Ouf, F.-X.; Carles, S.; Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S.; Perez, J.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Lavisse, L.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O2-N2 gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2-5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O2 percentage in the O2-N2 gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  2. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J.B.A. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Jouvard, J.-M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Carvou, E. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Menneveux, J.; Yu, J. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ouf, F.-X. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sureté Nucléaire IRSN/PSN-RES/SCA/LPMA BP 68, 91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Carles, S. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Perez, J. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Marco de Lucas, M.C., E-mail: delucas@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); and others

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • NPs formed in a plasma-plume during laser irradiation of metals (Al, Ti, Ag) were studied. • In situ SAXS and ex situ TEM, XRD and Raman spectra were measured. • NPs size decreased when increasing the O{sub 2} fraction in a controlled O{sub 2}+N{sub 2} atmosphere. • The oxidation of metal NPs in the plasma restricts the increase of the size of the NPs. - Abstract: The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O{sub 2}–N{sub 2} gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2–5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O{sub 2} percentage in the O{sub 2}–N{sub 2} gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  3. Synthesis of high Al content Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N ternary films by pulsed laser co-ablation of GaAs and Al targets assisted by nitrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Hua; You, Qinghu [Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Hu, Zhigao; Guo, Shuang [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning [Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu, Jiada, E-mail: jdwu@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films were synthesized by co-ablation of an Al target and a GaAs target. • Nitrogen plasma was used to assist the synthesis of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N ternary films. • The Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films are slightly rich in N with an Al content above 0.6. • The Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films are hexagonal wurtzite in crystal structure. • The Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films have an absorption edge of 260 nm and a band gap of 4.7 eV. - Abstract: We present the synthesis of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N ternary films by pulsed laser co-ablation of a polycrystalline GaAs target and a metallic Al target in the environment of nitrogen plasma which provides nitrogen for the films and assists the formation of nitride films. Field emission scanning electron microscopy exposes the smooth surface appearance and dense film structure. X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy reveal the hexagonal wurtzite structure. Optical characterization shows high optical transmittance with an absorption edge of about 260 nm and a band gap of 4.7 eV. Compositional analysis gives the Al content of about 0.6. The structure and optical properties of the Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films are compared with those of binary GaN and AlN films synthesized by ablating GaAs or Al target with the same nitrogen plasma assistance.

  4. Beam cooling using a gas-filled RFQ ion guide

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, S; De Saint-Simon, M; Jacotin, M; Képinski, J F; Lunney, M D

    1999-01-01

    A radiofrequency quadrupole mass filter is being developed for use as a high-transmission beam cooler by operating it in buffer gas at high pressure. Such a device will increase the sensitivity of on-line experiments that make use of weakly produced radioactive ion beams. We present simulations and some preliminary measurements for a device designed to cool the beam for the MISTRAL RF mass spectrometer on- line at ISOLDE. The work is carried out partly within the frame of the European Community research network: EXOTRAPS. (9 refs).

  5. A novel gas-filled detector for synchrotron radiation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocsis, Menyhert [ESRF BP 220 38043 Grenoble (France)]. E-mail: kocsis@esrf.fr; Boesecke, P. [ESRF BP 220 38043 Grenoble (France); Carbone, D. [ESRF BP 220 38043 Grenoble (France); Herve, C. [ESRF BP 220 38043 Grenoble (France); Becker, B. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Diawara, Y. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Durst, R. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Khazins, D. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); He, B. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Medved, S. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Sedov, V. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Thorson, T. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Wachter, G. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    We describe in this paper the performance under synchrotron radiation of a sealed gaseous detector, Vantec-1, operating at high pressure and less prone to discharges. It is consequently operating at high gain (>10{sup 5}) at high local counting rates up to 10{sup 6} cps/mm{sup 2}. To achieve these characteristics, a thin resistive layer is used on a glass plate between the mesh and the readout anode. The performance achieved with this detector is suited for applications in X-ray diffraction and synchrotron radiation. This detector has shown high reliability over time under harsh synchrotron radiation environment and robustness in manufacturing environment.

  6. Laser ablation of (GeSe2)100-x(Sb2Se3)x chalcogenide glasses: Influence of the target composition on the plasma plume dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimiciuc, S.; Boidin, R.; Bulai, G.; Gurlui, S.; Nemec, P.; Nazabal, V.; Focsa, C.

    2017-10-01

    The dynamics and properties of the (GeSe2)100-x(Sb2Se3)x laser-induced plasma were investigated by fast ICCD imaging and space- and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The experiments were performed at 10-6 Torr background pressure, using the second harmonic (532 nm) of the Nd-YAG laser (10 ns, 10 Hz). For all investigated samples, the ICCD images revealed a splitting of the plasma plume into three components with distinct dynamics. Based on OES measurements, the first and second plasma structures were found to be represented mainly by ionic and neutral species, respectively. As the Sb2Se3 content of the samples increases, the three structures present an increase in their velocities. This dynamic variation and also the compositional dependence of the excitation temperature obtained from Boltzmann plots were correlated to the changes in the structure and electrical/thermal properties of the bulk chalcogenide glasses.

  7. Registration of RF Plasma Radiation in Ultra-Violet Range by Solar-blind Photoreceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Kuok, Shi; Malakhov, Yury; Korotkikh, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    A spectrum response of a photoreceptor to the RF plasma radiation is determined in the present work by means of a spectrophotometer utilizing a gas-filled photoreceptor. A continuous radiation spectrum was observed in the wavelength interval of 190 - 270 nm. The photoreceptor allows measuring of absolute radiation taking into account the spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptor and the values of quantum output for the given wavelength. A continuous spectrum was observed in all three orders of magnitude of diffraction. Develop and test a technique for measuring the intensity of the plasma radiation in the UV wavelength range measured amount of discharge pulses can be used to determine the spectral sensitivity range of UV radiation receivers. Professor.

  8. An immunomodulating fatty acid analogue targeting mitochondria exerts anti-atherosclerotic effect beyond plasma cholesterol-lowering activity in apoe(-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Vik

    Full Text Available Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA is a hypolipidemic antioxidant with immunomodulating properties involving activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs and proliferation of mitochondria. This study aimed to penetrate the effect of TTA on the development of atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein (apo-E(-/- mice fed a high-fat diet containing 0.3% TTA for 12 weeks. These mice displayed a significantly less atherosclerotic development vs control. Plasma cholesterol was increased by TTA administration and triacylglycerol (TAG levels in plasma and liver were decreased by TTA supplementation, the latter, probably due to increased mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and reduced lipogenesis. TTA administration also changed the fatty acid composition in the heart, and the amount of arachidonic acid (ARA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA was reduced and increased, respectively. The heart mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxidase (NOS-2 was decreased in TTA-treated mice, whereas the mRNA level of catalase was increased. Finally, reduced plasma levels of inflammatory mediators as IL-1α, IL-6, IL-17, TNF-α and IFN-γ were detected in TTA-treated mice. These data show that TTA reduces atherosclerosis in apoE(-/- mice and modulates risk factors related to atherosclerotic disorders. TTA probably acts at both systemic and vascular levels in a manner independent of changes in plasma cholesterol, and triggers TAG catabolism through improved mitochondrial function.

  9. Non-targeted plasma metabolomic profile at early and late lactation in parity 1 dams with diverging body composition at weaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lactation is an extremely energy demanding event, impacting naïve dams to a greater extent as they are still physiologically immature. The objective of the current study was to determine if a unique plasma metabolome exists at early and late lactation from first parity gilts having similar body meas...

  10. Development of distributed target

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Hai Jun; Li Qin; Zhou Fu Xin; Shi Jin Shui; Ma Bing; Chen Nan; Jing Xiao Bing

    2002-01-01

    Linear introduction accelerator is expected to generate small diameter X-ray spots with high intensity. The interaction of the electron beam with plasmas generated at the X-ray converter will make the spot on target increase with time and debase the X-ray dose and the imaging resolving power. A distributed target is developed which has about 24 pieces of thin 0.05 mm tantalum films distributed over 1 cm. due to the structure adoption, the distributed target material over a large volume decreases the energy deposition per unit volume and hence reduces the temperature of target surface, then reduces the initial plasma formalizing and its expansion velocity. The comparison and analysis with two kinds of target structures are presented using numerical calculation and experiments, the results show the X-ray dose and normalized angle distribution of the two is basically the same, while the surface of the distributed target is not destroyed like the previous block target

  11. The Role of Sub-Target in the Transversely Excited Atmospheric Pressure CO 2 Laser-Induced Shock-Wave Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliyanti, Maria; Hedwig, Rinda; Kurniawan, Hendrik; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    1998-12-01

    A transversely excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser pulse (50 mJ, 100 ns) was focused on silicon grease which is painted on a copper plate as a subtarget with a power density of 6 GW/cm2 under reduced pressure. The comparison of the characteristics of the induced laser plasma between two cases, with subtarget and without subtarget was made. It is proved that the emission spectrum assigned to the silicon atom can be detected only for the case with the subtarget. It is also proved that in the absence of the subtarget, the gushing speed of the atom is very low, while for the case with subtarget, the gushing speed of atoms becomes very fast. It is shown that the setting of subtarget is very effective for producing laser-induced shock wave plasma and it is very effective for the realize quantitative analysis of a soft material.

  12. Differentiation between naproxen, naproxen-protein conjugates, and naproxen-lysine in plasma via micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography : a new approach in the bioanalysis of drug targeting preparations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, C.; Reichen, J; Visser, Jan; Meijer, D.K F; Thormann, W

    1997-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy through the targeting of drugs is a promising new approach that requires adequate analytical methods capable of differentiating between the free drug the drug carrier, and metabolites. Using micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC), we report the separation of naproxen

  13. In-situ small-angle x-ray scattering study of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavisse, L.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Girault, M.; Potin, V.; Andrzejewski, H.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Bourgeois, S. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Avenue A. Savary, BP 47870-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Le Garrec, J.-L.; Carles, S.; Mitchell, J. B. A. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Universite de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Hallo, L. [CEA CESTA, 15 Avenue des Sablieres CS 60001, 33116 Le Barp Cedex (France); Perez, J. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Decloux, J. [Kaluti System, Optique et Laser, Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, 91400 Orsay (France)

    2012-04-16

    Small angle x-ray scattering was used to probe in-situ the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume generated by pulsed laser irradiation of a titanium metal surface under atmospheric conditions. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were characterized as function of laser irradiance. Two families of nanoparticles were identified with sizes on the order of 10 and 70 nm, respectively. These results were confirmed by ex-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments.

  14. Formation of a fine-dispersed liquid-metal target under the action of femto- and picosecond laser pulses for a laser-plasma radiation source in the extreme ultraviolet range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinokhodov, A Yu; Krivokorytov, M S [EUV Labs, Ltd., Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Koshelev, K N; Krivtsun, V M; Sidelnikov, Yu V; Medvedev, V V; Kompanets, V O; Melnikov, A A; Chekalin, S V [Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-31

    We report the results of studying the dynamics of deformation and fragmentation of liquid-metal droplets under the action of ultrashort laser pulses. The experiments have been performed to optimise the shape of the droplet target used in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation sources based on the laser-produced plasma using the pre-pulse technology. The pre-pulse is generated by a system incorporating a master Ti : sapphire oscillator and a regenerative amplifier, allowing one to vary the pulse duration from 50 fs to 50 ps. The power density of laser radiation at the droplet target, averaged over the pulse duration and spatial coordinates, has reached 3 × 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. The production of liquid-metal droplets has been implemented by means of a droplet generator based on a nozzle with a ring piezoceramic actuator. The droplet material is the eutectic indium – tin alloy. The droplet generator could operate in the droplet and jet regime with a maximal rate of stable operation 5 and 150 kHz, respectively. The spatial stability of droplet position σ = 1% – 2% of its diameter is achieved. The size of the droplets varied within 30 – 70 μm, their velocity was 2 – 8 m s{sup -1} depending on the operation regime. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  15. Laser-driven magnetic-flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotchev, O V; Chang, P Y; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Polomarov, O; Frenje, J; Li, C K; Manuel, M J-E; Petrasso, R D; Rygg, J R; Séguin, F H; Betti, R

    2009-11-20

    The demonstration of magnetic field compression to many tens of megagauss in cylindrical implosions of inertial confinement fusion targets is reported for the first time. The OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2] was used to implode cylindrical CH targets filled with deuterium gas and seeded with a strong external field (>50 kG) from a specially developed magnetic pulse generator. This seed field was trapped (frozen) in the shock-heated gas fill and compressed by the imploding shell at a high implosion velocity, minimizing the effect of resistive flux diffusion. The magnetic fields in the compressed core were probed via proton deflectrometry using the fusion products from an imploding D3He target. Line-averaged magnetic fields between 30 and 40 MG were observed.

  16. INTERACTION OF RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Increase in the amplitude of hf currents during exposure of a neutral target to microsecond CO2 laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, A. A.; Losev, Leonid L.; Meshalkin, E. A.

    1988-09-01

    High-frequency electric currents were generated by irradiation of a metal target with CO2 laser pulses. It was found that the region where the ambient gas was photoionized had a decisive influence on the hf current amplitude. A method for increasing the amplitude of the current by creating an auxiliary laser jet on the target was proposed and used. An hf current of up to 1 A amplitude was observed at a frequency of 75 MHz and this current lasted for 1.5 μs.

  17. Palm top plasma focus device as a portable pulsed neutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, R K; Niranjan, Ram; Mishra, P; Srivastava, R; Rawool, A M; Kaushik, T C; Gupta, Satish C

    2013-06-01

    Development of a palm top plasma focus device generating (5.2 ± 0.8) × 10(4) neutrons∕pulse into 4π steradians with a pulse width of 15 ± 3 ns is reported for the first time. The weight of the system is less than 1.5 kg. The system comprises a compact capacitor bank, a triggered open air spark gap switch, and a sealed type miniature plasma focus tube. The setup is around 14 cm in diameter and 12.5 cm in length. The energy driver for the unit is a capacitor bank of four cylindrical commercially available electrolytic capacitors. Each capacitor is of 2 μF capacity, 4.5 cm in diameter, and 9.8 cm in length. The cost of each capacitor is less than US$ 10. The internal diameter and the effective length of the plasma focus unit are 2.9 cm and 5 cm, respectively. A DC to DC converter power supply powered by two rechargeable batteries charges the capacitor bank to the desired voltage and also provides a trigger pulse of -15 kV to the spark gap. The maximum energy of operation of the device is 100 J (8 μF, 5 kV, 59 kA) with deuterium gas filling pressure of 3 mbar. The neutrons have also been produced at energy as low as 36 J (3 kV) of operation. The neutron diagnostics are carried out with a bank of (3)He detectors and with a plastic scintillator detector. The device is portable, reusable, and can be operated for multiple shots with a single gas filling.

  18. MiR-199a is overexpressed in plasma of type 2 diabetes patients which contributes to type 2 diabetes by targeting GLUT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shuang-Tong; Li, Chun-Lin; Tian, Hui; Li, Jian; Pei, Yu; Liu, Yu; Gong, Yan-Ping; Fang, Fu-Sheng; Sun, Ban-Ruo

    2014-12-01

    Decreased GLUT4 expression and impaired GLUT4 cell membrane translocation are involved in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) pathogenesis so the factors impacting GLUT4 expression may be associated with T2DM. In this study, we identified four miRNAs: miR-31, miR-93, miR-146a, and miR-199a which suppress GLUT4 expression in HEK293T cells. Subsequently, we determined expression of these four miRNAs in plasma samples of T2DM patients, T2DM susceptible individuals, and healthy controls and found miR-199a was overexpressed in patients' plasma compared with healthy control. Because the miR-199a binding site in GLUT4 3'UTR is highly conserved among vertebrates, we detected the glucose uptake in rat L6 myoblast cells through gain- and loss-of-function of miR-199a. We found that miR-199a can repress glucose uptake in L6 cells, which was rescued by GLUT4 overexpression. These results indicate that T2DM patients may have a high level miR-199a that reduce GLUT4 expression and contribute to the insulin resistance. Hence, miR-199a may be a novel biomarker for risk estimation and classification in T2DM patients.

  19. Targeting of conserved gag-epitopes in early HIV infection is associated with lower plasma viral load and slower CD4+ T cell depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Carina L.; Milush, Jeffrey M.; Buggert, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether the character of the immunodominant HIV-Gag peptide (variable or conserved) targeted by CD8+ T cells in early HIV infection would influence the quality and quantity of T cell responses, and whether this would affect the rate of disease progression. Treatment-naive ...

  20. The Vasopressin Type-2 Receptor and Prostaglandin Receptors EP2 and EP4 can Increase Aquaporin-2 Plasma Membrane Targeting Through a cAMP Independent Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Emma Tina Bisgaard; Moeller, Hanne Bjerregaard; Assentoft, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Apical membrane targeting of the collecting duct water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is essential for body water balance. As this event is regulated by Gs coupled 7-transmembrane receptors such as the vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R) and the prostanoid receptors EP2 and EP4, it is believed to be cA...

  1. Particle acceleration by plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ogata, A

    2002-01-01

    Plasma acceleration is carried out by using potential of plasma wave. It is classified by generation method of plasma wave such as the laser wake-field acceleration and the beat wave acceleration. Other method using electron beam is named the plasma wake-field acceleration (or beam wake-field acceleration). In this paper, electron acceleration by laser wake-field in gas plasma, ion source by laser radiation of solid target and nanoion beam generation by one component of plasma in trap are explained. It is an applicable method that ions, which run out from the solid target irradiated by laser, are used as ion source of accelerator. The experimental system using 800 nm laser, 50 mJ pulse energy and 50 fs pulse width was studied. The laser intensity is 4x10 sup 1 sup 6 Wcm sup - sup 2 at the focus. The target film of metal and organic substance film was used. When laser irradiated Al target, two particles generated, in front and backward. It is new fact that the neutral particle was obtained in front, because it...

  2. Mitigation of stimulated Raman scattering in hohlraum plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, J L; Montgomery, D S; Rose, H A; Goldman, S R [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Froula, D H; Ross, J S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Stevenson, R M [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Lushnikov, P M [Department of Mathematics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)], E-mail: jkline@lanl.gov

    2008-05-15

    One aspect of recent research to control Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) in hohlraum plasmas is the investigation of risk mitigation strategies for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion. Experimental tests of these strategies, based on prior theoretical and experimental knowledge of SRS, are performed in hohlraum experiments. In the last year, two strategies have been investigated. The first is the use of high Z dopants to reduce SRS backscatter. Forward stimulated Brillouin scattering (FSBS) could lead to beam spray reducing SRS. Since FSBS depends on the electron temperature and thermal effects depend strongly on Z{sup 2}, a small amount of a high Z dopant, 1-2%, can have a large effect. Experiments have been conducted at the Omega laser to test this theory by varying the amount of Xe dopant in neo-pentane gas filled hohlraums. The experimental measurements do show a decrease in SRS backscatter as Xe dopant is added. However, there are still uncertainties regarding the responsible mechanism since increases inverse-Bremsstrahlung absorption of the SRS light may play a role. The second strategy investigated is using high k{lambda}{sub D} plasmas to reduce SRS backscatter. Experiments conducted at the Omega laser facility in hohlraum plasmas determined the critical onset intensity for a range of k{lambda}{sub D}. A scaling of the critical onset intensity as a function of k{lambda}{sub D} has been determined.

  3. Obtaining the high-current low-energy electron beams in the systems with a plasma emitter

    CERN Document Server

    Devyatkov, V N; Shchanin, P M

    2001-01-01

    Using gas filled diodes with arc and glow-discharge base plasma emitters one investigated into generation and transfer of high-current electron beams. Using a diode with arc discharge base plasma emitter at 15 kV accelerating voltage one obtained a space charge compensated with up to 1 kA current compressed by proper magnetic field from 8 cm diameter up to 1 cm and transported at over 20 cm distance with 70% efficiency. Using a diode with a glow-discharge one obtained a 80 A current and up to 100 A/cm current density beam. In a weak axial magnetic field with B=0.015 T induction such a beam is transported at 30 cm distance

  4. Numerical simulations of output pulse extraction from a high-power microwave compressor with a plasma switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlapakovski, Anatoli; Beilin, Leonid; Bliokh, Yuri; Donskoy, Moshe; Krasik, Yakov E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Hadas, Yoav [Department of Applied Physics, Rafael, PO Box 2250, Haifa 31021 (Israel); Schamiloglu, Edl [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Numerical simulations of the process of electromagnetic energy release from a high-power microwave pulse compressor comprising a gas-filled cavity and interference switch were carried out. A microwave plasma discharge in a rectangular waveguide H-plane tee was modeled with the use of the fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code MAGIC. The gas ionization, plasma evolution, and interaction with RF fields accumulated within the compressor were simulated using different approaches provided by the MAGIC code: particle-in-cell approach accounting for electron-neutral collisions, gas conductivity model based on the concept of mobility, and hybrid modeling. The dependences of the microwave output pulse peak power and waveform on parameters that can be controlled in experiments, such as an external ionization rate, RF field amplitude, and background gas pressure, were investigated.

  5. Plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Hu, G. [Globalstar LP, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  6. The Expected Cardiovascular Benefit of Plasma Cholesterol Lowering with or Without LDL-C Targets in Healthy Individuals at Higher Cardiovascular Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Henpin Yue Cesena

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: There is controversy whether management of blood cholesterol should be based or not on LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c target concentrations. Objectives: To compare the estimated impact of different lipid-lowering strategies, based or not on LDL-c targets, on the risk of major cardiovascular events in a population with higher cardiovascular risk. Methods: We included consecutive individuals undergoing a routine health screening in a single center who had a 10-year risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD ≥ 7.5% (pooled cohort equations, ACC/AHA, 2013. For each individual, we simulated two strategies based on LDL-c target (≤ 100 mg/dL [Starget-100] or ≤ 70 mg/dL [Starget-70] and two strategies based on percent LDL-c reduction (30% [S30%] or 50% [S50%]. Results: In 1,897 subjects (57 ± 7 years, 96% men, 10-year ASCVD risk 13.7 ± 7.1%, LDL-c would be lowered from 141 ± 33 mg/dL to 99 ± 23 mg/dL in S30%, 71 ± 16 mg/dL in S50%, 98 ± 9 mg/dL in Starget-100, and 70 ± 2 mg/dL in Starget-70. Ten-year ASCVD risk would be reduced to 8.8 ± 4.8% in S50% and 8.9 ± 5.2 in Starget-70. The number of major cardiovascular events prevented in 10 years per 1,000 individuals would be 32 in S30%, 31 in Starget-100, 49 in S50%, and 48 in Starget-70. Compared with Starget-70, S50% would prevent more events in the lower LDL-c tertile and fewer events in the higher LDL-c tertile. Conclusions: The more aggressive lipid-lowering approaches simulated in this study, based on LDL-c target or percent reduction, may potentially prevent approximately 50% more hard cardiovascular events in the population compared with the less intensive treatments. Baseline LDL-c determines which strategy (based or not on LDL-c target is more appropriate at the individual level.

  7. Indirect-drive inertial fusion targets for two-sided heavy-ion illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remizov, G. N.; Romanov, Yu. A.; Ryabikina, N. A.; Shagaliev, R. M.; Vakhlamova, L. L.; Vatulin, V. V.; Vinokurov, O. A.; Bock, R.; Kang, K.-H.; Maruhn, J. A.

    The properties of heavy-ion induced fusion targets with two-sided illumination and with the converters placed completely inside the hohlraum have been investigated using integrated simulations based on the SATURN and MIMOZA code packages in order to check the results obtained with the view factor method in previous work, which is briefly reviewed. Separate converter simulations show the importance of an accurate treatment of radiation transport and also demonstrate that a converter efficiency of 40 - 80% can be achieved easily depending on the detailed converter material and geometry. For the complete target, a gas fill is shown to be necessary and it turned out to be very important to allow some of the radiation shields to become partially transparent during the evolution. In the most favorable case, an asymmetry in the temperature on the capsule of about 5% was achieved, leading to a reduction of the neutron yield by a factor of 7 compared to an ideally symmetric situation.

  8. Full validation and application of an ultra high performance liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric procedure for target screening and quantification of 34 antidepressants in human blood plasma as part of a comprehensive multi-analyte approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remane, Daniela; Meyer, Markus R; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Maurer, Hans H

    2011-06-01

    Multi-analyte procedures are of great interest in clinical and forensic toxicology making the analytical process much simpler, faster, and cheaper and allow monitoring of analytes of different drug classes in one single body sample. The aim of the present study was to validate an ultra high performance liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric approach for fast target screening and quantification of 34 antidepressants in plasma after simple liquid-liquid extraction as part of a multi-analyte procedure for over 130 drugs. The validation process including recovery, matrix effects, process efficiency, ion suppression/enhancement of co-eluting analytes (already published), selectivity, cross talk, accuracy and precision, stabilities, and limits of quantification and detection showed that the approach was selective, sensitive, accurate, and precise for 28 of the 34 tested drugs. The applicability was successfully tested by analyzing authentic plasma samples and external quality control samples. Furthermore, it could be shown that time- and cost-saving one-point calibration was applicable for 21 drugs for daily routine and especially in emergency cases.

  9. Plasma miR-185 is decreased in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and might suppress tumor migration and invasion by targeting RAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Rongrong; Chen, Wen; Wang, Huimin; Ju, Shaoqing; Cong, Hui; Sun, Baolan; Jin, Qin; Chu, Shaopeng; Xu, Lili; Cui, Ming

    2015-11-01

    The receptor for advanced-glycation end products (RAGE) is upregulated in various cancers and has been associated with tumor progression, but little is known about its expression and regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Here, we describe miR-185, which represses RAGE expression, and investigate the biological role of miR-185 in ESCC. In this study, we found that the high level of RAGE expression in 29 pairs of paraffin-embedded ESCC tissues was correlated positively with the depth of invasion by immunohistochemistry, suggesting that RAGE was involved in ESCC. We used bioinformatics searches and luciferase reporter assays to investigate the prediction that RAGE was regulated directly by miR-185. Besides, overexpression of miR-185 in ESCC cells was accompanied by 27% (TE-11) and 49% (Eca-109) reduced RAGE expression. The effect was further confirmed in RAGE protein by immunofluorescence in both cell lines. The effects were reversed following cotransfection with miR-185 and high-level expression of the RAGE vector. Furthermore, the biological role of miR-185 in ESCC cell lines was investigated using assays of cell viability, Ki-67 staining, and cell migration and invasion, as well as in a xenograft model. We found that overexpression of miR-185 inhibited migration and invasion by ESCC cells in vitro and reduced their capacity to develop distal pulmonary metastases in vivo partly through the RAGE/heat shock protein 27 pathway. Interestingly, in clinical specimens, the level of plasma miR-185 expression was decreased significantly (P = 0.002) in patients with ESCC [0.500; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.248-1.676] compared with healthy controls (2.410; 95% CI 0.612-5.671). The value of the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.73 (95% CI 0.604-0.855). In conclusion, our findings shed novel light on the role of miR-185/RAGE in ESCC metastasis, and plasma miR-185 has potential as a novel diagnostic biomarker

  10. Development and Demonstration of a Device to Determine Thrust by Measuring the Force on a Target Plate in the Exhaust of a Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin

    2004-01-01

    A device has been developed to measure the force on a target plate by an impacting beam of charged and neutral particles. This device, an impact thrust stand, was developed to allow thrusters at low TRL, levels to be easily tested without the expense of developing a flight prototype of the thruster to be placed on a conventional thrust stand. The impact thrust stand was developed for the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) but has been tested and calibrated using several devices including Hall thrusters. The calibration and comparison of the impact thrust stand against conventional thrust stands will be discussed in this paper.

  11. Small-size plasma diode with a transparent internal cathode for neutron generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikanov, A. E.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Kozlovskii, K. I.; Shatokhin, V. L.

    2015-01-01

    A discharge plasma system for neutron generation based on the concept of inertial electrostatic confinement is considered. The system is made in the form of a gas-filled (1-60 Pa) diode with a composite hollow cathode placed at its center symmetrically to an embracing hollow cylindrical anode. Preionization of the discharge gap and an original design of the electrode system with a transparent central part make it possible to initiate a pulse high-voltage (100-150 kV) volume discharge in the ion oscillation mode. Estimates of the neutron emission in such a deuterium-filled diode show the feasibility of generating a pulse with a neutron yield on the order of 105 in the reaction D( d, n)3He, which is confirmed in experiments with an optimized geometry of the electrodes.

  12. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with hexapole collision cell: figures of merit and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, S.F. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Zentralabteilung fuer Chemische Analysen]|[Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk (Belarus); Becker, J.S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Zentralabteilung fuer Chemische Analysen

    2000-11-01

    The use of gas-filled multipole collision cells represents important progress in ICP-MS instrumentation. It enables an increase in element sensitivity based on the improvement of ion transmission efficiency from near thermalization and collisional focusing of ions. In addition, gas-phase ion-molecule chemistry can be applied in order to reduce mass spectral interferences via charge transfer reaction of interfering ions with reaction gas or via fragmentation of interfering molecular ions by collision-induced dissociation. The application of a hexapole collision cell in quadrupole based ICP-MS (HEX-ICP-QMS) was studied systematically in order to characterize the analytical figures of merit of this approach. Additionally, the performance of different solution introduction systems as well as an inductively coupled plasma shielded torch was studied for use with HEX-ICP-QMS. (orig.)

  13. Plasma harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    Preface; Why plasma harmonics? A very brief introduction Early stage of plasma harmonic studies - hopes and frustrations New developments in plasma harmonics studies: first successes Improvements of plasma harmonics; Theoretical basics of plasma harmonics; Basics of HHG Harmonic generation in fullerenes using few-cycle pulsesVarious approaches for description of observed peculiarities of resonant enhancement of a single harmonic in laser plasmaTwo-colour pump resonance-induced enhancement of odd and even harmonics from a tin plasmaCalculations of single harmonic generation from Mn plasma;Low-o

  14. Dynamin-like protein 1 at the Golgi complex: a novel component of the sorting/targeting machinery en route to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonekamp, Nina A; Vormund, Kerstin; Jacob, Ralf; Schrader, Michael

    2010-12-10

    The final step in the liberation of secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) involves the mechanical action of the large GTPase dynamin as well as conserved dynamin-independent fission mechanisms, e.g. mediated by Brefeldin A-dependent ADP-ribosylated substrate (BARS). Another member of the dynamin family is the mammalian dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1/Drp1) that is known to constrict and tubulate membranes, and to divide mitochondria and peroxisomes. Here, we examined a potential role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex. DLP1 localized to the Golgi complex in some but not all cell lines tested, thus explaining controversial reports on its cellular distribution. After silencing of DLP1, an accumulation of the apical reporter protein YFP-GL-GPI, but not the basolateral reporter VSVG-SP-GFP at the Golgi complex was observed. A reduction in the transport of YFP-GL-GPI to the plasma membrane was confirmed by surface immunoprecipitation and TGN-exit assays. In contrast, YFP-GL-GPI trafficking was not disturbed in cells silenced for BARS, which is involved in basolateral sorting and trafficking of VSVG-SP-GFP in COS-7 cells. Our data indicate a new role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex and thus a role for DLP1 as a novel component of the apical sorting machinery at the TGN is discussed.

  15. Dynamin-like protein 1 at the Golgi complex: A novel component of the sorting/targeting machinery en route to the plasma membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonekamp, Nina A. [Centre for Cell Biology and Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Vormund, Kerstin; Jacob, Ralf [Department of Cell Biology and Cell Pathology, University of Marburg, Robert-Koch-Str. 6, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Schrader, Michael, E-mail: mschrader@ua.pt [Centre for Cell Biology and Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2010-12-10

    The final step in the liberation of secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) involves the mechanical action of the large GTPase dynamin as well as conserved dynamin-independent fission mechanisms, e.g. mediated by Brefeldin A-dependent ADP-ribosylated substrate (BARS). Another member of the dynamin family is the mammalian dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1/Drp1) that is known to constrict and tubulate membranes, and to divide mitochondria and peroxisomes. Here, we examined a potential role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex. DLP1 localized to the Golgi complex in some but not all cell lines tested, thus explaining controversial reports on its cellular distribution. After silencing of DLP1, an accumulation of the apical reporter protein YFP-GL-GPI, but not the basolateral reporter VSVG-SP-GFP at the Golgi complex was observed. A reduction in the transport of YFP-GL-GPI to the plasma membrane was confirmed by surface immunoprecipitation and TGN-exit assays. In contrast, YFP-GL-GPI trafficking was not disturbed in cells silenced for BARS, which is involved in basolateral sorting and trafficking of VSVG-SP-GFP in COS-7 cells. Our data indicate a new role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex and thus a role for DLP1 as a novel component of the apical sorting machinery at the TGN is discussed.

  16. Enhancement of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Infection by Seminal Plasma and Semen Amyloids Implicates a New Target for the Prevention of HSV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lilith; Ortiz, Tatiana; Tang, Qiyi

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesviruses cause different infectious diseases, resulting in world-wide health problems. Sexual transmission is a major route for the spread of both herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and -2. Semen plays an important role in carrying the viral particle that invades the vaginal or rectal mucosa and, thereby, initiates viral replication. Previously, we demonstrated that the amyloid fibrils semenogelin (SEM) and semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI), and seminal plasma (SP) augment cytomegalovirus infection (Tang et al., J. Virol 2013). Whether SEM or SEVI amyloids or SP could also enhance other herpesvirus infections has not been examined. In this study, we found that the two amyloids as well as SP strongly enhance both HSV-1 and -2 infections in cell culture. Along with SP, SEM and SEVI amyloids enhanced viral entry and increased infection rates by more than 10-fold, as assessed by flow cytometry assay and fluorescence microscopy. Viral replication was increased by about 50- to 100-fold. Moreover, viral growth curve assays showed that SEM and SEVI amyloids, as well as SP, sped up the kinetics of HSV replication such that the virus reached its replicative peak more quickly. The interactions of SEM, SEVI, and SP with HSVs are direct. Furthermore, we discovered that the enhancing effects of SP, SEM, and SEVI can be significantly reduced by heparin, a sulfated polysaccharide with an anionic charge. It is probable that heparin abrogates said enhancing effects by interfering with the interaction of the viral particle and the amyloids, which interaction results in the binding of the viral particles and both SEM and SEVI. PMID:25903833

  17. Enhancement of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV Infection by Seminal Plasma and Semen Amyloids Implicates a New Target for the Prevention of HSV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilith Torres

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesviruses cause different infectious diseases, resulting in world-wide health problems. Sexual transmission is a major route for the spread of both herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 and -2. Semen plays an important role in carrying the viral particle that invades the vaginal or rectal mucosa and, thereby, initiates viral replication. Previously, we demonstrated that the amyloid fibrils semenogelin (SEM and semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI, and seminal plasma (SP augment cytomegalovirus infection (Tang et al., J. Virol 2013. Whether SEM or SEVI amyloids or SP could also enhance other herpesvirus infections has not been examined. In this study, we found that the two amyloids as well as SP strongly enhance both HSV-1 and -2 infections in cell culture. Along with SP, SEM and SEVI amyloids enhanced viral entry and increased infection rates by more than 10-fold, as assessed by flow cytometry assay and fluorescence microscopy. Viral replication was increased by about 50- to 100-fold. Moreover, viral growth curve assays showed that SEM and SEVI amyloids, as well as SP, sped up the kinetics of HSV replication such that the virus reached its replicative peak more quickly. The interactions of SEM, SEVI, and SP with HSVs are direct. Furthermore, we discovered that the enhancing effects of SP, SEM, and SEVI can be significantly reduced by heparin, a sulfated polysaccharide with an anionic charge. It is probable that heparin abrogates said enhancing effects by interfering with the interaction of the viral particle and the amyloids, which interaction results in the binding of the viral particles and both SEM and SEVI.

  18. The CELLULOSE-SYNTHASE LIKE C (CSLC) Family of Barley Includes Members that Are Integral Membrane Proteins Targeted to the Plasma Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenny M. Dwivany; Dina Yuli; Rachel A. Burton; Neil J. Shirley; Sarah M. Wilson; Geoffrey B. Fincher; Antony Bacic; Ed Newbigin; Monika S. Doblin

    2009-01-01

    The CELLULOSESYNTHASE-LIKE C(CSLC) family is an ancient lineage within the CELLULOSE SYNTHASE/CEL-LULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE (CESA/CSL) polysaccharide synthase superfamily that is thought to have arisen before the diver-gence of mosses and vascular plants. As studies in the flowering plant Arabidopsis have suggested synthesis of the (1,4)-β-glucan backbone of xyloglucan (XyG), a wall polysaccharide that tethers adjacent cellulose microfibrils to each other, as a probable function for the CSLCs, CSLC function was investigated in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), a species with low amounts of XyG in its walls. Four barley CSLC genes were identified (designated HvCSLC1-4). Phylogenetic analysis reveals three well supported clades of CSLCs in flowering plants, with barley having representatives in two of these clades. The four barley CSLCs were expressed in various tissues, with in situ PCR detecting transcripts in all cell types of the coleoptile and root, including cells with primary and secondary cell walls. Co-expression analysis showed that HvCSLC3 was coor-dinately expressed with putative XyG xylosyltransferase genes. Both immuno-EM and membrane fractionation showed that HvCSLC2 was located in the plasma membrane of barley suspension-cultured cells and was not in internal membranes such as endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus. Based on our current knowledge of the sub-cellular locations of poly-saccharide synthesis, we conclude that the CSLC family probably contains more than one type of polysaccharide synthase.

  19. A plasma membrane-targeted cytosolic domain of STIM1 selectively activates ARC channels, an arachidonate-regulated store-independent Orai channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jill L; Shuttleworth, Trevor J

    2012-01-01

    The Orai family of calcium channels includes the store-operated CRAC channels and store-independent, arachidonic acid (AA)-regulated ARC channels. Both depend on STIM1 for their activation but, whereas CRAC channel activation involves sensing the depletion of intracellular calcium stores via a luminal N terminal EF-hand of STIM1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, ARC channels are exclusively activated by the pool of STIM1 that constitutively resides in the plasma membrane (PM). Here, the EF-hand is extracellular and unlikely to ever lose its bound calcium, suggesting that STIM1-dependent activation of ARC channels is very different from that of CRAC channels. We now show that attachment of the cytosolic portion of STIM1 to the inner face of the PM via an N terminal Lck-domain sequence is sufficient to enable normal AA-dependent activation of ARC channels, while failing to allow activation of store-operated CRAC channels. Introduction of a point mutation within the Lck-domain resulted in the loss of both PM localization and ARC channel activation. Reversing the orientation of the PM-anchored STIM1 C terminus via a C-terminal CAAX-box fails to support either CRAC or ARC channel activation. Finally, the Lck-anchored STIM1 C-terminal domain also enabled the exclusive activation of the ARC channels following physiological agonist addition. These data demonstrate that simple tethering of the cytosolic C-terminal domain of STIM1 to the inner face of the PM is sufficient to allow the full, normal and exclusive activation of ARC channels, and that the N-terminal regions of STIM1 (including the EF-hand domain) play no significant role in this activation.

  20. The Expected Cardiovascular Benefit of Plasma Cholesterol Lowering with or Without LDL-C Targets in Healthy Individuals at Higher Cardiovascular Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesena, Fernando Henpin Yue; Laurinavicius, Antonio Gabriele; Valente, Viviane A; Conceição, Raquel D; Santos, Raul D; Bittencourt, Marcio S

    2017-06-01

    There is controversy whether management of blood cholesterol should be based or not on LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c) target concentrations. To compare the estimated impact of different lipid-lowering strategies, based or not on LDL-c targets, on the risk of major cardiovascular events in a population with higher cardiovascular risk. We included consecutive individuals undergoing a routine health screening in a single center who had a 10-year risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) ≥ 7.5% (pooled cohort equations, ACC/AHA, 2013). For each individual, we simulated two strategies based on LDL-c target (≤ 100 mg/dL [Starget-100] or ≤ 70 mg/dL [Starget-70]) and two strategies based on percent LDL-c reduction (30% [S30%] or 50% [S50%]). In 1,897 subjects (57 ± 7 years, 96% men, 10-year ASCVD risk 13.7 ± 7.1%), LDL-c would be lowered from 141 ± 33 mg/dL to 99 ± 23 mg/dL in S30%, 71 ± 16 mg/dL in S50%, 98 ± 9 mg/dL in Starget-100, and 70 ± 2 mg/dL in Starget-70. Ten-year ASCVD risk would be reduced to 8.8 ± 4.8% in S50% and 8.9 ± 5.2 in Starget-70. The number of major cardiovascular events prevented in 10 years per 1,000 individuals would be 32 in S30%, 31 in Starget-100, 49 in S50%, and 48 in Starget-70. Compared with Starget-70, S50% would prevent more events in the lower LDL-c tertile and fewer events in the higher LDL-c tertile. The more aggressive lipid-lowering approaches simulated in this study, based on LDL-c target or percent reduction, may potentially prevent approximately 50% more hard cardiovascular events in the population compared with the less intensive treatments. Baseline LDL-c determines which strategy (based or not on LDL-c target) is more appropriate at the individual level. Há controvérsias sobre se o controle do colesterol plasmático deve ou não se basear em metas de concentração de colesterol LDL (LDL-c). Comparar o impacto estimado de diferentes estratégias hipolipemiantes, baseadas ou não em metas de LDL-c, sobre o

  1. Stark Broadening Analysis Using Optical Spectroscopy of the Dense Plasma Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Patrick; Bennett, Nikki; Dutra, Eric; Hagen, E. Chris; Hsu, Scott; Hunt, Gene; Koch, Jeff; Waltman, Tom; NSTec DPF Team

    2015-11-01

    To aid in validating numerical modeling of MA-class dense plasma focus (DPF) devices, spectroscopic measurements of the Gemini Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) were performed using deuterium and deuterium/dopant (argon/krypton) gas. The spectroscopic measurements were made using a fiber-coupled spectrometer and streak camera. Stark line-broadening analysis was applied to the deuterium beta emission (486 nm) in the region near the breakdown of the plasma and during the run-down and run-in phases of the plasma evolution. Densities in the range of 1e17 to low 1e18 cm-3 were obtained. These values are in agreement with models of the DPF performed using the LSP code. The spectra also show a rise and fall with time, indicative of the plasma sheath passing by the view port. Impurity features were also identified in the spectra which grew in intensity as the gas inside the DPF was discharged repeatedly without cycling. Implications of this impurity increase for D-T discharges (without fresh gas fills between every discharge) will be discussed. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946, and by Los Alamos National Laboratory, under Contract no. DE-AC52-06NA25396 with the U.S. Department of Energy. DOE/NV/25946-2515.

  2. Dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortov, Vladimir E; Khrapak, Aleksei G; Molotkov, Vladimir I; Petrov, Oleg F [Institute for High Energy Densities, Associated Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khrapak, Sergei A [Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany)

    2004-05-31

    The properties of dusty plasmas - low-temperature plasmas containing charged macroparticles - are considered. The most important elementary processes in dusty plasmas and the forces acting on dust particles are investigated. The results of experimental and theoretical investigations of different states of strongly nonideal dusty plasmas - crystal-like, liquid-like, gas-like - are summarized. Waves and oscillations in dusty plasmas, as well as their damping and instability mechanisms, are studied. Some results on dusty plasma investigated under microgravity conditions are presented. New directions of experimental research and potential applications of dusty plasmas are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  3. Optical diagnostics of femtosecond laser plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉同; 张杰; 陈黎明; 夏江帆; 腾浩; 赵理曾; 林景全; 李英骏; 魏志义; 王龙; 江文勉

    2001-01-01

    Optical diagnostics of evolution of plasmas produced by ultrashort laser pulses is carried out using a femtosecond probing beam. The time sequence of plasma shadowgrams and interferograms are obtained. The filamentation instability in high_density region induces the local density modification. Large_scale toroidal magnetic fields confine plasma expansion in the transverse direction, resulting in the formation of a plasma jet. The plasma expansion along the target normal direction is found to scale as 1 2.

  4. Rice calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK17 targets plasma membrane intrinsic protein and sucrose phosphate synthase and is required for a proper cold stress response

    KAUST Repository

    Almadanim, M. Cecília

    2017-01-19

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in plant tolerance mechanisms to abiotic stresses. Although CDPKs are recognized as key messengers in signal transduction, the specific role of most members of this family remains unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that OsCPK17 plays a role in rice cold stress response by analyzing OsCPK17 knockout, silencing, and overexpressing rice lines under low temperature. Altered OsCPK17 gene expression compromises cold tolerance performance, without affecting the expression of key cold stress-inducible genes. A comparative phosphoproteomic approach led to the identification of six potential in vivo OsCPK17 targets, which are associated with sugar and nitrogen metabolism, and with osmotic regulation. To test direct interaction, in vitro kinase assays were performed, showing that the sucrose phosphate synthase OsSPS4, and the aquaporin OsPIP2;1/OsPIP2;6 are phosphorylated by OsCPK17 in a calcium-dependent manner. Altogether, our data indicates that OsCPK17 is required for a proper cold stress response in rice, likely affecting the activity of membrane channels and sugar metabolism.

  5. Matriptase and prostasin are expressed in human skin in an inverse trend over the course of differentiation and are targeted to different regions of the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsin Lai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Matriptase and prostasin, acting as a tightly coupled proteolytic cascade, were reported to be required for epidermal barrier formation in mouse skin. Here we show that, in human skin, matriptase and prostasin are expressed with an inverse pattern over the course of differentiation. Matriptase was detected primarily in epidermal basal keratinocytes and the basaloid cells in the outer root sheath of hair follicles and the sebaceous gland, where prostasin was not detected. In contrast, prostasin was detected primarily in differentiated cells in the epidermal granular layer, the inner root sheath of hair follicles, and the sebaceous gland, where matriptase expression is negligible. While co-expressed in the middle stage of differentiation, prostasin was detected as polarized patches, and matriptase at intercellular junctions. Targeting to different subcellular localizations is also observed in HaCaT human keratinocytes, in which matriptase was detected primarily at intercellular junctions, and prostasin primarily on membrane protrusion. Furthermore, upon induction of zymogen activation, free active prostasin remains cell-associated and free active matriptase is rapidly shed into the extracellular milieu. Our data suggest that matriptase and prostasin likely function as independent entities in human skin rather than as a tightly coupled proteolytic cascade as observed in mouse skin.

  6. Matriptase and prostasin are expressed in human skin in an inverse trend over the course of differentiation and are targeted to different regions of the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Hsin; Chang, Shun-Cheng; Chen, Yen-Ju; Wang, Yi-Jie J.; Lai, Ying-Jun J.; Chang, Hsiang-Hua D.; Berens, Eric B.; Johnson, Michael D.; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Matriptase and prostasin, acting as a tightly coupled proteolytic cascade, were reported to be required for epidermal barrier formation in mouse skin. Here we show that, in human skin, matriptase and prostasin are expressed with an inverse pattern over the course of differentiation. Matriptase was detected primarily in epidermal basal keratinocytes and the basaloid cells in the outer root sheath of hair follicles and the sebaceous gland, where prostasin was not detected. In contrast, prostasin was detected primarily in differentiated cells in the epidermal granular layer, the inner root sheath of hair follicles, and the sebaceous gland, where matriptase expression is negligible. While co-expressed in the middle stage of differentiation, prostasin was detected as polarized patches, and matriptase at intercellular junctions. Targeting to different subcellular localizations is also observed in HaCaT human keratinocytes, in which matriptase was detected primarily at intercellular junctions, and prostasin primarily on membrane protrusion. Furthermore, upon induction of zymogen activation, free active prostasin remains cell-associated and free active matriptase is rapidly shed into the extracellular milieu. Our data suggest that matriptase and prostasin likely function as independent entities in human skin rather than as a tightly coupled proteolytic cascade as observed in mouse skin. PMID:27543057

  7. Two-wavelength LIDAR Thomson scattering for ITER core plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, P.; Gowers, C.; Salzmann, H.

    2017-07-01

    Our proposal for a LIDAR Thomson scattering system to measure Te and ne profiles in the ITER core plasma, is based on experience with the LIDAR system on JET, which is still operational after 30 years. The design uses currently available technology and complies with the measurement requirements given by ITER. In addition, it offers the following advantages over the conventional imaging approach currently being adopted by ITER: 1) No gas fill of the vessel required for absolute calibration. 2) Easier alignment. 3) Measurements over almost the complete plasma diameter. 4) Two mirrors only as front optics. For a given laser wavelength the dynamic range of the Te measurements is mainly limited by the collection optics' transmission roll-off in the blue and the range of spectral sensitivity of the required fast photomultipliers. With the originally proposed Ti:Sapphire laser, measurements of the envisaged maximum temperature of 40 keV are marginally possible. Here we present encouraging simulation results on the use of other laser systems and on the use of two lasers with different wavelength. Alternating two wavelengths was proposed already in 1997 as a method for calibrating the transmission of the collection system. In the present analysis, the two laser pulses are injected simultaneously. We find that the use of Nd:YAG lasers operated at fundamental and second harmonic, respectively, yields excellent results and preserves the spectral recalibration feature.

  8. 激光黑腔靶等离子体相互作用研究现状和发展趋势%Present Status and Development Trends in Interaction Study on Laser HohlraumTarget and Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张家泰

    2001-01-01

    综述近年来围绕美国的“国家点火装置”(NIF)所开展的大尺度激光腔靶等离子体相互作用研究,结合国内的研究,对抑制受激布里渊散射(SBS)减少散射光、抑制受激拉曼散射(SRS)减少超热电子、成丝(FI)以及激光均匀辐照方法进行了深入的分析和综述。评述了研究现状和取得的成果,还分析了该领域的发展趋势,提出了我国惯性约束聚变(ICF)等离子体研究应该注意的一些问题和建议。%Study on interaction of large size laser hohlraum target and plasmas performed around NIF is reviewed, and analyses in-depth and comprehensive description were made on the suppression of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) to reduce the scattering light,suppression of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) to reduce the super thermal electrons,filamentation and the methods to get uniform laser irradiation incorporating with our own research results.The research status and the results achieved were reviewed,the development trend in this field was analyzed,and some problems and suggestions to which attention should be paid in the ICF plasma research in our country were put forward.

  9. Variation of plasma parameters in a modified mode of plasma production in a double plasma device

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Phukan; M K Mishra; B K Saikia; M Chakraborty

    2010-03-01

    A modified mode of plasma production in a double plasma device is presented and plasma parameters are controlled in this configuration. Here plasma is produced by applying a discharge voltage between the hot filaments in the source (cathode) and the target magnetic cage (anode) of the device. In this configuration, the hot electron emitting filaments are present only in the source and the magnetic cage of this is kept at a negative bias such that due to the repulsion of the cage bias, the primary electrons can go to the grounded target and produce plasma there. The plasma parameters can be controlled by varying the voltages applied to the source magnetic cage and the separation grid of the device.

  10. Overview of recent tritium target filling, layering, and material testing at Los Alamos national laboratory in support of inertial fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebey, P. S.; Dole, J. M.; Geller, D. A.; Hoffer, J. K.; Morris, J.; Nobile, A.; Schoonover, J. R.; Wilson, D. [MS-C927, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Bonino, M.; Harding, D.; Sangster, C.; Shmayda, W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics LLE, Univ. of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Nikroo, A.; Sheliak, J. D. [General Atomics GA (United States); Burmann, J.; Cook, B.; Letts, S.; Sanchez, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL (United States)

    2008-07-15

    The Tritium Science and Engineering (AET-3) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performs a variety of activities to support Inertial Fusion (IF) research - both to further fundamental fusion science and to develop technologies in support of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power generation. Inertial fusion ignition target designs have a smooth spherical shell of cryogenic Deuterium-Tritium (DT) solid contained within a metal or plastic shell that is a few mm in diameter. Fusion is attained by imploding these shells under the symmetric application of energy beams. For IFE targets the DT solid must also survive the process of injecting it into the power plant reactor. Non-ignition IF targets often require a non-cryogenic DT gas fill of a glass or polymeric shell. In this paper an overview will be given of recent LANL activities to study cryogenic DT layering, observe tritium exposure effects on IF relevant materials, and fill targets in support of IF implosion experiments. (authors)

  11. Experiments with laser heated cavity targets for the investigation of heavy ion-plasma interaction; Experimente mit lasergeheizten Hohlraeumen fuer die Untersuchung der Wechselwirkung von Schwerionen mit ionisierter Materie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaumann, G.

    2007-07-01

    This dissertation research aims to develop a cavity as a converter for laser radiation into soft X-rays, and to characterise this thermal radiation. The concept of indirect heating allows for the production of a spatially homogenous plasma at solid state density. For the purpose of this research, the Nhelix laser system has been extended by a second oscillator with a shorter pulse length, and the optical system layout has been redesigned for both beams. This dissertation presents data on the energy loss of Ar-ions in plasma targets generated by direct heating of carbon foils with the Nhelix laser. Due to the use of a new ion detector, the energy resolution ({delta}E/E{approx}0.1%) and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurements were improved. Measurements with thin carbon foil showed the maximum energy loss in the plasma to be 31% above the energy loss in comparison with the cold foil. The transparency of thin carbon foils for laser light has been investigated as a function of foil thickness and pulse length, which resulted in a maximum laser pulse length applicable for a certain foil thickness and laser intensity. an interferometer was developed and constructed, with which the electron density could be determined with spatial resolution, and for the first time also at different times during the experiment. This diagnostic provides images of the interference pattern with a time difference of 1.5 ns and allows determination of the free electron density up to a maximum density of 2 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. In order to characterise the cavity radiation, a spectrometer with high time resolution was developed and calibrated in terms of absolute intensity units with a deuterium-lamp. While the laser heats the cavity, the rise in temperature was measured with a time resolution <1 ns up to a maximal radiation temperature of 73{+-}8 eV/k{sub B} (85 x 10{sup 4} C). For this particular cavity geometry, conversion efficiency (with time resolution) of laser energy to thermal

  12. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO THE 80TH ANNIVERSARY OF ACADEMICIAN N G BASOV'S BIRTH: A capillary discharge plasma source of intense VUV radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel'man, Igor I.; Shevelko, A. P.; Yakushev, O. F.; Knight, L. V.; Turley, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    The results of investigation of a capillary discharge plasma, used as a source of intense VUV radiation and soft X-rays, are presented. The plasma was generated during the discharge of low-inductance condensers in a gas-filled ceramic capillary. Intense line radiation was observed in a broad spectral range (30-400 Å) in various gases (CO2, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe). The absolute radiation yield for the xenon discharge was ~5 mJ (2π sr)-1 pulse-1 within a spectral band of width 9 Å at 135 Å. Such a radiation source can be used for various practical applications, such as EUV projection lithography, microscopy of biological objects in a 'water window', reflectometry, etc.

  13. Plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, DG

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Waves discusses the basic development and equations for the many aspects of plasma waves. The book is organized into two major parts, examining both linear and nonlinear plasma waves in the eight chapters it encompasses. After briefly discussing the properties and applications of plasma wave, the book goes on examining the wave types in a cold, magnetized plasma and the general forms of the dispersion relation that characterize the waves and label the various types of solutions. Chapters 3 and 4 analyze the acoustic phenomena through the fluid model of plasma and the kinetic effects. Th

  14. Plasma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, S A; ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    Plasma Astrophysics is a translation from the Russian language; the topics discussed are based on lectures given by V.N. Tsytovich at several universities. The book describes the physics of the various phenomena and their mathematical formulation connected with plasma astrophysics. This book also explains the theory of the interaction of fast particles plasma, their radiation activities, as well as the plasma behavior when exposed to a very strong magnetic field. The text describes the nature of collective plasma processes and of plasma turbulence. One author explains the method of elementary

  15. High-power rotating wheel targets at RIKEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Atsushi E-mail: ayoshida@rarfaxp.riken.go.jp; Morita, Kousuke; Morimoto, Kouji; Kaji, Daiya; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ozawa, Akira; Tanihata, Isao

    2004-03-21

    Two kinds of rotating wheel targets for high-power heavy ion reaction have been developed. One is a thick disk target with water-cooling being developed for the in-flight RI beam separator (BigRIPS). An in-beam test was performed using {sup 40}Ar beam at 24 AMeV, 1.9 particle {mu}A, with the beam spot size 3 mm in diameter, resulting 0.25 GW/m{sup 2} beam power stopped at the surface of carbon disk 2 mm in thickness and 260 mm in diameter. It performed stably without melting. A simulation study has been developed and its possibility for the use of BigRIPS is discussed. The second is a thin target foil mounted on a wheel disk which rotates in He cooling gas of 13.32-133.2 Pa. Its main use is in fusion reactions to search for super-heavy elements by using the gas-filled recoil separator (GARIS). A typical foil is Pb or Bi of 200-300 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} in thickness evaporated onto a carbon backing foil of 30 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} thickness, and covered by evaporated carbon of 10 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} thickness. It can withstand long use under high-intensity {sup 64}Ni beam at 311 MeV, and 0.5 particle {mu}A.

  16. An improved low-temperature equation of state model for integrated IFE target-chamber response simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heltemes, Thad; Moses, Gregory

    2010-11-01

    A new quotidian equation of state model (QEOS) has been developed to perform integrated inertial fusion energy (IFE) target explosion-chamber response simulations. This QEOS model employs a scaled binding energy model for the ion EOS and utilizes both n- and l-splitting for determining the ionization state and electron EOS. This QEOS model, named BADGER, can perform both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE EOS calculations. BADGER has been integrated with the 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code BUCKY to simulate the chamber response of an exploding indirect-drive deuterium-tritium (DT) target, xenon gas-filled chamber and tungsten first-wall armor. The simulated system is a prototypical configuration for the LIFE reactor study being conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  17. MHD simulations of Plasma Jets and Plasma-surface interactions in Coaxial Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2016-10-01

    Coaxial plasma accelerators belong to a class of electromagnetic acceleration devices which utilize a self-induced Lorentz force to accelerate magnetized thermal plasma to large velocities ( 40 Km/s). The plasma jet generated as a result, due to its high energy density, can be used to mimic the plasma-surface interactions at the walls of thermonuclear fusion reactors during an Edge Localized Mode (ELM) disruption event. We present the development of a Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation tool to describe the plasma acceleration and jet formation processes in coaxial plasma accelerators. The MHD model is used to study the plasma-surface impact interaction generated by the impingement of the jet on a target material plate. The study will characterize the extreme conditions generated on the target material surface by resolving the magnetized shock boundary layer interaction and the viscous/thermal diffusion effects. Additionally, since the plasma accelerator is operated in vacuum conditions, a novel plasma-vacuum interface tracking algorithm is developed to simulate the expansion of the high density plasma into a vacuum background in a physically consistent manner.

  18. Production of field-reversed mirror plasma with a coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, C.W.; Shearer, J.W.

    The use of a coaxial plasma gun to produce a plasma ring which is directed into a magnetic field so as to form a field-reversed plasma confined in a magnetic mirror. Plasma thus produced may be used as a target for subsequent neutral beam injection or other similarly produced and projected plasma rings or for direct fusion energy release in a pulsed mode.

  19. The diverse applications of plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukul; Dubey, Shivani; Darwhekar, Gajanan; Jain, Sudhir Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Plasma being the fourth state of matter has always been an attraction for Physicists and Chemists. With the advent of time, plasma energy has been recognized in having widening horizons in the field of Biomedical Sciences. Plasma medicine can be subdivided into three main fields; Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure direct plasma for medical therapy; Plasma-assisted modification of bio-relevant surfaces and Plasma-based bio-decontamination and sterilization. The basis of the research is that as it has free carrier molecules, it has the ability to target specific cells and regulate functions like wound healing. Plasma does not harm healthy human cells but can kill bacteria and possibly even cancer cells to help treat various diseases. Nosocomial infection control, prevention and containment of contagious diseases, disinfection of medical devices, surface treatment (heat and UV sensitive surfaces) are research of interest. Recent success in generating plasma at very low temperature ie. Cold plasma makes the therapy painless. It has the ability to activate cellular responses and important mechanisms in the body. They target specific molecules such as prothrombin for blood coagulation, cytokines for killing bacteria, and angiogenesis for tissue regeneration. Plasma has bactericidal, fungicidal and virucidal properties. Plasma technology has flourishing future in diverse fields like Textiles, Nanofabrication, Automotives, Waste management, Microbiology, Food Hygiene, Medical Science like Skin treatments, sterilisation of wounds, Hand disinfection, Dental treatments etc. Food hygiene using plasma can be achieved in disinfection of food containers, food surface disinfection, hygiene in food handling, preparation and packaging. Therefore Plasma is most promising field for budding Scientist for fluorishing research in Biological Sciences.

  20. The diverse applications of plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Mukul, E-mail: mukulsharma@acropolis.edu.in; Darwhekar, Gajanan, E-mail: gdarwhekar@acropolis.edu.in [Acropolis Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research, Indore MP India (India); Dubey, Shivani, E-mail: dubeyshivani08@rediffmail.com [Mata Gujri College of Professional Studies, Indore MP India (India); Jain, Sudhir Kumar, E-mail: sudhirkjain1@rediffmail.com [School of Studies in Microbiology, Vikram University, Ujjain MP India (India)

    2015-07-31

    Plasma being the fourth state of matter has always been an attraction for Physicists and Chemists. With the advent of time, plasma energy has been recognized in having widening horizons in the field of Biomedical Sciences. Plasma medicine can be subdivided into three main fields; Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure direct plasma for medical therapy; Plasma-assisted modification of bio-relevant surfaces and Plasma-based bio-decontamination and sterilization. The basis of the research is that as it has free carrier molecules, it has the ability to target specific cells and regulate functions like wound healing. Plasma does not harm healthy human cells but can kill bacteria and possibly even cancer cells to help treat various diseases. Nosocomial infection control, prevention and containment of contagious diseases, disinfection of medical devices, surface treatment (heat and UV sensitive surfaces) are research of interest. Recent success in generating plasma at very low temperature ie. Cold plasma makes the therapy painless. It has the ability to activate cellular responses and important mechanisms in the body. They target specific molecules such as prothrombin for blood coagulation, cytokines for killing bacteria, and angiogenesis for tissue regeneration. Plasma has bactericidal, fungicidal and virucidal properties. Plasma technology has flourishing future in diverse fields like Textiles, Nanofabrication, Automotives, Waste management, Microbiology, Food Hygiene, Medical Science like Skin treatments, sterilisation of wounds, Hand disinfection, Dental treatments etc. Food hygiene using plasma can be achieved in disinfection of food containers, food surface disinfection, hygiene in food handling, preparation and packaging. Therefore Plasma is most promising field for budding Scientist for fluorishing research in Biological Sciences.

  1. Plasma parameters controlled by remote electron shower in a double plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M. K.; Phukan, A.

    2012-07-01

    The principal feature of this experiment is the electron showers consisting of three tungsten wires embedded by the plasma, which are heated up consequently emitting electrons inside the diffused plasma to control the plasma parameters in the discharge section of a double plasma device. These cold electrons emitted by the heated filament are free from maintenance of discharge which is sustained in the source section. The target plasma, where electrons are injected is produced as a result of diffusion from the source section. It is found that, plasma density and plasma potential can be effectively controlled in this way.

  2. Window decompression in laser-heated MagLIF targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, Daniel; Peterson, Kyle; Sefkow, Adam

    2015-11-01

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept requires pre-magnetized fuel to be pre-heated with a laser before undergoing compression by a thick solid liner. Recent experiments and simulations suggest that yield has been limited to date by poor laser preheat and laser-induced mix in the fuel region. In order to assess laser energy transmission through the pressure-holding window, as well as resultant mix, we modeled window disassembly under different conditions using 1D and 2D simulations in both Helios and HYDRA. We present results tracking energy absorption, time needed for decompression, risk of laser-plasma interaction (LPI) that may scatter laser light, and potential for mix from various window thicknesses, laser spot sizes and gas fill densities. These results indicate that using thinner windows (0.5-1 μm windows) and relatively large laser spot radii (600 μm and above) can avoid deleterious effects and improve coupling with the fuel. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under DE-AC04- 94AL85000.

  3. Polar-drive experiments with shimmed targets on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, F. J.; Radha, P. B.; Bonino, M. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Epstein, R.; Skupsky, S.; Giraldez, E.

    2012-10-01

    Polar-drive experiments are being performed on OMEGA in preparation for future ignition attempts using the same method on the National Ignition Facility. This work presents results from a series of experiments employing shimmed shells whose shape (thinner at the target equator) is used to further compensate for the oblique illumination present in the polar-drive beam configuration. Implosion experiments were performed with multiple-picket laser pulses from 40 OMEGA beams driving gas-filled, shimmed shells. The implosions were diagnosed with x-ray backlighting, fusion yield, and reaction particle spectra from which the implosion symmetry, areal density, and core conditions are inferred. The compressed shell shape determined from framed x-ray radiography is compared to that predicted by the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO. The benefits of using a shimmed target for polar-drive implosions are less oblique illumination, better low-mode implosion symmetry, and are clearly demonstrated by these experiments. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  4. Plasma Lens for Muon and Neutrino Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn,S.A.; Korenev, S.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M.; Gallardo, J.C.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B.M.

    2008-06-23

    The plasma lens is examined as an alternate to focusing horns and solenoids for use in a neutrino or muon beam facility. The plasma lens concept is based on a combined high-energy lens/target configuration. The current is fed at electrodes located upstream and downstream from the target where pion capturing is needed. The current flows primarily in the plasma, which has a lower resistivity than the target. A second plasma lens section, with an additional current feed, follows the target to provide shaping of the plasma for optimum focusing. The plasma lens is immersed in an additional solenoid magnetic field to facilitate the plasma stability. The geometry of the plasma is shaped to provide optimal pion capture. Simulations of this plasma lens system have shown a 25% higher neutrino production than the horn system. Plasma lenses have the additional advantage of negligible pion absorption and scattering by the lens material and reduced neutrino contamination during anti-neutrino running. Results of particle simulations using plasma lens will be presented.

  5. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  6. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  7. Initial Tests of a Plasma Beam Combiner at NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, R. K.; Turnbull, D. P.; Chapman, T. D.; Wilks, S. C.; London, R. A.; Berger, R. L.; Michel, P. A.; Divol, L.; Dunlop, W. H.; MacGowan, B. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Blue, B. E.; NIF Team

    2016-10-01

    The seeded forward SBS process that is known to effectively amplify beams in ignition targets has recently been used to design and test a target to combine the power and energy of many beams of the NIF facility into a single beam by intersecting them in an ionized gas. The demand for high-power beams for a variety of applications at NIF makes a demonstration of this process attractive. We will describe experiments using a gas-filled balloon heated by 10 quads of beams, and pumped by additional frequency-tuned quads to amplify a single beam. The beam energy is indicated by gated x-ray images of both the spots produced by the transmitted pump and probe beams and the spot produced by a non-interacting quad of beams when they terminate on a foil. The first experiment produced a high brightness seed beam with significant reductions in brightness of the pumping beams, consistent with their depletion by energy transfer to the seed. Additional experiments studying spot brightness with varying pump power to determine total delivered seed beam energy and power will be discussed as available. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Plasma Antenna

    OpenAIRE

    N M Vijay

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental base of plasma antenna is the use of an ionized medium as a conductor. The plasma antenna is a radiofrequency antenna formed by a plasma columns, Filaments or sheets, which are excited by a surface wave. The relevance of this device is how rapidly it can be turned on and off, only applying an electrical pulse. Besides its wide carrier frequency, the great directivity and controllable antenna shape. Otherwise a disadvantage is that it needs energy to be ionized....

  9. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drummond, James E

    2013-01-01

    A historic snapshot of the field of plasma physics, this fifty-year-old volume offers an edited collection of papers by pioneering experts in the field. In addition to assisting students in their understanding of the foundations of classical plasma physics, it provides a source of historic context for modern physicists. Highly successful upon its initial publication, this book was the standard text on plasma physics throughout the 1960s and 70s.Hailed by Science magazine as a ""well executed venture,"" the three-part treatment ranges from basic plasma theory to magnetohydrodynamics and microwa

  10. A new ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric approach for the therapeutic drug monitoring of the multi-targeted anti-folate pemetrexed in plasma from lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.W. Meesters (Roland); R. Cornelissen (Robin); R.J. van Klaveren (Rob); R. de Jonge (Robert); E. den Boer (Ethan); J. Lindemans (Jan); T.M. Luider (Theo)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAn analytical assay has been developed and validated for ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric determination of pemetrexed concentrations in plasma using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-triple quadrupole-tandem mass spectrometry. Patient plasma samples spiked with

  11. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong [Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-101, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Tang Zhiping [CAS Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  12. A contoured gap coaxial plasma gun with injected plasma armature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah J.; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael W.; Brockington, Samuel; Elton, Raymond

    2009-08-01

    A new coaxial plasma gun is described. The long term objective is to accelerate 100-200 μg of plasma with density above 1017 cm-3 to greater than 200 km/s with a Mach number above 10. Such high velocity dense plasma jets have a number of potential fusion applications, including plasma refueling, magnetized target fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, high energy density plasmas, and others. The approach uses symmetric injection of high density plasma into a coaxial electromagnetic accelerator having an annular gap geometry tailored to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. The injected plasma is generated by numerous (currently 32) radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of the angled annular injection region of the accelerator. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling identified electrode profiles that can achieve the desired plasma jet parameters. The experimental hardware is described along with initial experimental results in which approximately 200 μg has been accelerated to 100 km/s in a half-scale prototype gun. Initial observations of 64 merging injector jets in a planar cylindrical testing array are presented. Density and velocity are presently limited by available peak current and injection sources. Steps to increase both the drive current and the injected plasma mass are described for next generation experiments.

  13. A contoured gap coaxial plasma gun with injected plasma armature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, F Douglas; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah J; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael W; Brockington, Samuel; Elton, Raymond

    2009-08-01

    A new coaxial plasma gun is described. The long term objective is to accelerate 100-200 microg of plasma with density above 10(17) cm(-3) to greater than 200 km/s with a Mach number above 10. Such high velocity dense plasma jets have a number of potential fusion applications, including plasma refueling, magnetized target fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, high energy density plasmas, and others. The approach uses symmetric injection of high density plasma into a coaxial electromagnetic accelerator having an annular gap geometry tailored to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. The injected plasma is generated by numerous (currently 32) radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of the angled annular injection region of the accelerator. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling identified electrode profiles that can achieve the desired plasma jet parameters. The experimental hardware is described along with initial experimental results in which approximately 200 microg has been accelerated to 100 km/s in a half-scale prototype gun. Initial observations of 64 merging injector jets in a planar cylindrical testing array are presented. Density and velocity are presently limited by available peak current and injection sources. Steps to increase both the drive current and the injected plasma mass are described for next generation experiments.

  14. Detached divertor plasmas in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, L.D.; Borrass, K.; Corrigan, G.; Gottardi, N.; Lingertat, J.; Loarte, A.; Simonini, R.; Stamp, M.F.; Taroni, A. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Stangeby, P.C. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Inst. for Aerospace Studies

    1994-07-01

    In simulations with high radiated power fractions, it is possible to produce the drop in ion current to the divertor targets typical of detached plasmas. Despite the fact that these experiments are performed on beryllium target tiles, radiation from deuterium and beryllium cannot account for the measured power losses. The neutral deuterium levels in the SOL in these plasmas are higher than the model predicts. This may be due to leakage from the divertor or to additional wall sources related to the non-steady nature of these plasmas. In contrast, a surprisingly high level of carbon is present in these discharges; higher even than would be predicted are the divertor target tiles pure carbon. This level may well be large enough to produce the measured radiation. (authors). 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Atrial natriuretic peptides in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens P; Holst Hansen, Lasse; Terzic, Dijana

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of cardiac natriuretic peptides in plasma has gained a diagnostic role in the assessment of heart failure. Plasma measurement is though hampered by the marked instability of the hormones, which has led to the development of analyses that target N-terminal fragments from the prohormone....... These fragments are stable in plasma and represent surrogate markers of the actual natriuretic hormone. Post-translational processing of the precursors, however, is revealing itself to be a complex event with new information still being reported on proteolysis, covalent modifications, and amino acid...

  16. Plasma chromograninx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens P; Hilsted, Linda M; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk assessment remains difficult in elderly patients. We examined whether chromogranin A (CgA) measurement in plasma may be valuable in assessing risk of death in elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure in a primary care setting. A total of 470 patients (mean age 73 years......) were followed for 10 years. For CgA plasma measurement, we used a two-step method including a screening test and a confirmative test with plasma pre-treatment with trypsin. Cox multivariable proportional regression and receiver-operating curve (ROC) analyses were used to assess mortality risk...... of follow-up showed significant additive value of CgA confirm measurements compared with NT-proBNP and clinical variables. CgA measurement in the plasma of elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure can identify those at increased risk of short- and long-term mortality....

  17. Plasma Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center has developed two solvent-free precision cleaning techniques: plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2), that has equal performance, cost parity, and no environmental liability, as compared to existing solvent cleaning methods.

  18. Plasma confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Hazeltine, R D

    2003-01-01

    Detailed and authoritative, this volume examines the essential physics underlying international research in magnetic confinement fusion. It offers readable, thorough accounts of the fundamental concepts behind methods of confining plasma at or near thermonuclear conditions. Designed for a one- or two-semester graduate-level course in plasma physics, it also represents a valuable reference for professional physicists in controlled fusion and related disciplines.

  19. Capillary plasma jet: A low volume plasma source for life science applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topala, I., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Faculty of Physics, Iasi Plasma Advanced Research Center (IPARC), Bd. Carol I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Nagatsu, M., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)

    2015-02-02

    In this letter, we present results from multispectroscopic analysis of protein films, after exposure to a peculiar plasma source, i.e., the capillary plasma jet. This plasma source is able to generate very small pulsed plasma volumes, in kilohertz range, with characteristic dimensions smaller than 1 mm. This leads to specific microscale generation and transport of all plasma species. Plasma diagnosis was realized using general electrical and optical methods. Depending on power level and exposure duration, this miniature plasma jet can induce controllable modifications to soft matter targets. Detailed discussions on protein film oxidation and chemical etching are supported by results from absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and microscopy techniques. Further exploitation of principles presented here may consolidate research interests involving plasmas in biotechnologies and plasma medicine, especially in patterning technologies, modified biomolecule arrays, and local chemical functionalization.

  20. An ISOLDE target unit

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    A good dozen different targets are available for ISOLDE, made of different materials and equipped with different kinds of ion-sources, according to the needs of the experiments. Each separator (GPS: general purpose; HRS: high resolution) has its own target. Because of the high radiation levels, robots effect the target changes, about 80 times per year. In the standard unit shown in picture _01, the target is the cylindrical object in the front. It contains uranium-carbide kept at a temperature of 2200 deg C, necessary for the isotopes to be able to escape. At either end, one sees the heater current leads, carrying 700 A. The Booster beam, some 3E13 protons per pulse, enters the target from left. The evaporated isotope atoms enter a hot-plasma ion source (the black object behind the target). The whole unit sits at 60 kV potential (pulsed in synchronism with the arrival of the Booster beam) which accelerates the ions (away from the viewer) towards one of the 2 separators.

  1. 2-D studies of Relativistic electron beam plasma instabilities in an inhomogeneous plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, Chandrashekhar; Patel, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    Relativistic electron beam propagation in plasma is fraught with several micro instabilities like two stream, filamentation etc., in plasma. This results in severe limitation of the electron transport through a plasma medium. Recently, however, there has been an experimental demonstration of improved transport of Mega Ampere of electron currents (generated by the interaction of intense laser with solid target) in a carbon nanotube structured solid target [Phys. Rev Letts. 108, 235005 (2012)]. This then suggests that the inhomogeneous plasma (created by the ionization of carbon nano tube structured target) helps in containing the growth of the beam plasma instabilities. This manuscript addresses this issue with the help of a detailed analytical study and simulations with the help of 2-D Particle - In - Cell code. The study conclusively demonstrates that the growth rate of the dominant instability in the 2-D geometry decreases when the plasma density is chosen to be inhomogeneous, provided the scale length 1/ks...

  2. plasma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puač Nevena

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will present results for plasma sterilization of planktonic samples of two reference strains of bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. We have used a plasma needle as a source of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma in all treatments. This device is already well characterized by OES, derivative probes and mass spectrometry. It was shown that power delivered to the plasma is bellow 2 W and that it produces the main radical oxygen and nitrogen species believed to be responsible for the sterilization process. Here we will only present results obtained by electron paramagnetic resonance which was used to detect the OH, H and NO species. Treatment time and power delivered to the plasma were found to have the strongest influence on sterilization. In all cases we have observed a reduction of several orders of magnitude in the concentration of bacteria and for the longest treatment time complete eradication. A more efficient sterilization was achieved in the case of gram negative bacteria.

  3. Plasma metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Crowther, J M

    1997-01-01

    Many methods are currently used for the production of thin metal films. However, all of these have drawbacks associated with them, for example the need for UHV conditions, high temperatures, exotic metal precursors, or the inability to coat complex shaped objects. Reduction of supported metal salts by non-isothermal plasma treatment does not suffer from these drawbacks. In order to produce and analyse metal films before they become contaminated, a plasma chamber which could be attached directly to a UHV chamber with XPS capability was designed and built. This allowed plasma treatment of supported metal salts and surface analysis by XPS to be performed without exposure of the metal film to the atmosphere. Non-equilibrium plasma treatment of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride using hydrogen as the feed gas resulted in a 95% pure gold film, the remaining 5% of the film being carbon. If argon or helium were used as the feed gases during plasma treatment the resultant gold films were 100% pure. Some degree of s...

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation study of plasma jets and plasma-surface contact in coaxial plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2017-06-01

    Recent experiments by Loebner et al. [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 44, 1534 (2016)] studied the effect of a hypervelocity jet emanating from a coaxial plasma accelerator incident on target surfaces in an effort to mimic the transient loading created during edge localized mode disruption events in fusion plasmas. In this paper, we present a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical model to simulate plasma jet formation and plasma-surface contact in this coaxial plasma accelerator experiment. The MHD system of equations is spatially discretized using a cell-centered finite volume formulation. The temporal discretization is performed using a fully implicit backward Euler scheme and the resultant stiff system of nonlinear equations is solved using the Newton method. The numerical model is employed to obtain some key insights into the physical processes responsible for the generation of extreme stagnation conditions on the target surfaces. Simulations of the plume (without the target plate) are performed to isolate and study phenomena such as the magnetic pinch effect that is responsible for launching pressure pulses into the jet free stream. The simulations also yield insights into the incipient conditions responsible for producing the pinch, such as the formation of conductive channels. The jet-target impact studies indicate the existence of two distinct stages involved in the plasma-surface interaction. A fast transient stage characterized by a thin normal shock transitions into a pseudo-steady stage that exhibits an extended oblique shock structure. A quadratic scaling of the pinch and stagnation conditions with the total current discharged between the electrodes is in qualitative agreement with the results obtained in the experiments. This also illustrates the dominant contribution of the magnetic pressure term in determining the magnitude of the quantities of interest.

  5. Laser plasma interaction on rugby hohlraum on the Omega Laser Facility: Comparisons between cylinder, rugby, and elliptical hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Tassin, V.; Philippe, F.; Gauthier, P.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Neuville, C.; Villette, B.; Laffite, S.; Seytor, P.; Fremerye, P.; Seka, W.; Teychenné, D.; Debayle, A.; Marion, D.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.

    2016-02-01

    Gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums have demonstrated high performances compared to a classical similar diameter cylinder hohlraum with a nearly 40% increase of x-ray drive, 10% higher measured peak drive temperature, and an increase in neutron production. Experimental comparisons have been done between rugby, cylinder, and elliptical hohlraums. The impact of these geometry differences on the laser plasma instabilities is examined. Using comparisons with hydrodynamic simulations carried out with the code FCI2 and postprocessed by Piranah, we have been able to reproduce the stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering spectrum of the different beams. Using a methodology based on a statistical analysis for the gain calculations, we show that the behavior of the laser plasma instabilities in rugby hohlraums can be reproduced. The efficiency of laser smoothing techniques to mitigate these instabilities are discussed, and we show that while rugby hohlraums exhibit more laser plasma instabilities than cylinder hohlraum, the latter can be mitigated in the case of an elliptical hohlraum.

  6. Plasma dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Rincon, F; Schekochihin, A A; Valentini, F

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire Universe and, through their dynamical interactions with matter, affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. How primordial cosmological seed fields arose and were further amplified to $\\mu$Gauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs, is a major theoretical puzzle still largely unconstrained by observations. Extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to collisional magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic-field growth and its sustainment through an efficient dynamo instability driven by chaotic motions is possible in such plasmas is not known. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a six-dimensional phase space necessary to answer this question have until recently remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic-field a...

  7. Atomic processes in high-density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R.M.

    1982-12-21

    This review covers dense atomic plasmas such as that produced in inertial confinement fusion. The target implosion physics along with the associated atomic physics, i.e., free electron collision phenomena, electron states I, electron states II, and nonequilibrium plasma states are described. (MOW)

  8. Plasma medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This comprehensive text is suitable for researchers and graduate students of a 'hot' new topic in medical physics. Written by the world's leading experts,  this book aims to present recent developments in plasma medicine, both technological and scientific, reviewed in a fashion accessible to the highly interdisciplinary audience consisting of doctors, physicists, biologists, chemists and other scientists, university students and professors, engineers and medical practitioners. The book focuses on major topics and covers the physics required to develop novel plasma discharges relevant for medic

  9. Plasma physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Part I: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Plasma ChemistryPlasma in Nature, in the Laboratory, and in IndustryOccurrence of Plasma: Natural and Man MadeGas DischargesPlasma Applications, Plasmas in IndustryPlasma Applications for Environmental ControlPlasma Applications in Energy ConversionPlasma Application for Material ProcessingBreakthrough Plasma Applications in Modern TechnologyElementary Processes of Charged Species in PlasmaElementary Charged Particles in Plasma and Their Elastic and Inelastic CollisionsIonization ProcessesMechanisms of Electron Losses: The Electron-Ion RecombinationEl

  10. Shock induced cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Jonathan; Doyle, Hugo; Tully, Brett; Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Ramasamy, Rohan; Parkin, James; Edwards, Tom; Hawker, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Results from the experimental investigation of cavity collapse driven by a strong planar shock (>6km/s) are presented. Data from high speed framing cameras, laser backlit diagnostics and time-resolved pyromety are used to validate the results of hydrodynamic front-tracking simulations. As a code validation exercise, a 2-stage light gas gun was used to accelerate a 1g Polycarbonate projectile to velocities exceeding 6km/s; impact with a PMMA target containing a gas filled void results in the formation of a strong shockwave with pressures exceeding 1Mbar. The subsequent phenomena associated with the collapse of the void and excitation of the inert gas fill are recorded and compared to simulated data. Variation of the mass density and atomic number of the gas fill is used to alter the plasma parameters furthering the extent of the code validation.

  11. Antiproton Target

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  12. Scaling mechanisms of vapour/plasma shielding from laser-produced plasmas to magnetic fusion regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizyuk, Tatyana; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-02-01

    The plasma shielding effect is a well-known mechanism in laser-produced plasmas (LPPs) reducing laser photon transmission to the target and, as a result, significantly reducing target heating and erosion. The shielding effect is less pronounced at low laser intensities, when low evaporation rate together with vapour/plasma expansion processes prevent establishment of a dense plasma layer above the surface. Plasma shielding also loses its effectiveness at high laser intensities when the formed hot dense plasma plume causes extensive target erosion due to radiation fluxes back to the surface. The magnitude of emitted radiation fluxes from such a plasma is similar to or slightly higher than the laser photon flux in the low shielding regime. Thus, shielding efficiency in LPPs has a peak that depends on the laser beam parameters and the target material. A similar tendency is also expected in other plasma-operating devices such as tokamaks of magnetic fusion energy (MFE) reactors during transient plasma operation and disruptions on chamber walls when deposition of the high-energy transient plasma can cause severe erosion and damage to the plasma-facing and nearby components. A detailed analysis of these abnormal events and their consequences in future power reactors is limited in current tokamak reactors. Predictions for high-power future tokamaks are possible only through comprehensive, time-consuming and rigorous modelling. We developed scaling mechanisms, based on modelling of LPP devices with their typical temporal and spatial scales, to simulate tokamak abnormal operating regimes to study wall erosion, plasma shielding and radiation under MFE reactor conditions. We found an analogy in regimes and results of carbon and tungsten erosion of the divertor surface in ITER-like reactors with erosion due to laser irradiation. Such an approach will allow utilizing validated modelling combined with well-designed and well-diagnosed LPP experimental studies for predicting

  13. Magnetoresistive waves in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, F. S.; Hunter, R. O., Jr.; Pereira, N. R.; Tajima, T.

    1982-10-01

    The self-generated magnetic field of a current diffusing into a plasma between conductors can magnetically insulate the plasma. Propagation of magnetoresistive waves in plasmas is analyzed. Applications to plasma opening switches are discussed.

  14. HL-2A Tokamak Plasma Visible Light Imaging System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGYinjia; FENGZhen; LUOCuiwen; CHENGLiaoyuan

    2003-01-01

    Visible imagery is extremely useful to overview the edge and divertor structure. The plasma configuration and the position of the strike lines on the target plates can be also observed by imaging technique. By imaging the edge or core plasma with visible emission in the desired wavelength band, usually with a “tangential” view, the plasma position can be determined in principle.

  15. Effect of Energetic Plasma Flux on Flowing Liquid Lithium Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Jung, Soonwook; Christenson, Michael; Fiflis, Peter; Xu, Wenyu; Szott, Mathew; Ruzic, David

    2014-10-01

    An operational liquid lithium system with steady state flow driven by thermo-electric magneto-hydrodynamic force and capable of constantly refreshing the plasma exposed surface have been demonstrated at U of I. To evaluate the system performance in reactor relevant conditions, specifically to understand the effect of disruptive plasma events on the performance of the liquid metal PFCs, the setup was integrated to a pulsed plasma generator. A coaxial plasma generator drives the plasma towards a theta pinch which preferentially heats the ions, simulating ELM like flux, and the plasma is further guided towards the target chamber which houses the flowing lithium system. The effect of the incident flux is examined using diagnostic tools including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, rogowski coils, Ion energy analyzers, and fast frame spectral image acquisition with specific optical filters. The plasma have been well characterized and a density of ~1021 m-3, with electron temperature ~10 - 20 eV is measured, and final plasma velocities of 34 - 74 kms-1 have been observed. Calorimetric measurements using planar molybdenum targets indicate a maximum plasma energy (with 6 kV plasma gun and 20 kV theta pinch) of 0.08 MJm-2 with plasma divergence effects resulting in marginal reduction of 40 +/- 23 J in plasma energy. Further results from the other diagnostic tools, using the flowing lithium targets and the planar targets coated with lithium will be presented. DOE DE-SC0008587.

  16. Electrosurgical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Kenneth R.; McMillen, Donald F.; Woloszko, Jean

    2005-06-01

    Electrosurgical medical devices based on repetitively pulsed nonequilibrium micron-scale to millimetre-scale plasma discharges in saline solutions are described. The formation of vapour layers (bubbles) around active electrodes appears to be a common feature at moderate (<300 V rms) voltages, and dissociation, excitation and ionization of the vapour in these bubbles produces chemical conditions that are thought to be the source of beneficial tissue removal and treatment. Experimental data are discussed, as are the results of modelling efforts of the plasma chemistry. Hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen atoms and other species are observed spectroscopically and their interactions with collagen, a common component of tissue encountered in surgical situations, are considered. Several pathways by which hydroxyl radicals interacting with collagen can lead to tissue removal are discussed.

  17. Electrosurgical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalder, Kenneth R; McMillen, Donald F; Woloszko, Jean [ArthroCare Corp., Sunnyvale, CA 94085-3523 (United States)

    2005-06-07

    Electrosurgical medical devices based on repetitively pulsed nonequilibrium micron-scale to millimetre-scale plasma discharges in saline solutions are described. The formation of vapour layers (bubbles) around active electrodes appears to be a common feature at moderate (<300 V rms) voltages, and dissociation, excitation and ionization of the vapour in these bubbles produces chemical conditions that are thought to be the source of beneficial tissue removal and treatment. Experimental data are discussed, as are the results of modelling efforts of the plasma chemistry. Hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen atoms and other species are observed spectroscopically and their interactions with collagen, a common component of tissue encountered in surgical situations, are considered. Several pathways by which hydroxyl radicals interacting with collagen can lead to tissue removal are discussed.

  18. A Physics Exploratory Experiment on Plasma Liner Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Momentum flux for imploding a target plasma in magnetized target fusion (MTF) may be delivered by an array of plasma guns launching plasma jets that would merge to form an imploding plasma shell (liner). In this paper, we examine what would be a worthwhile experiment to do in order to explore the dynamics of merging plasma jets to form a plasma liner as a first step in establishing an experimental database for plasma-jets driven magnetized target fusion (PJETS-MTF). Using past experience in fusion energy research as a model, we envisage a four-phase program to advance the art of PJETS-MTF to fusion breakeven Q is approximately 1). The experiment (PLX (Plasma Liner Physics Exploratory Experiment)) described in this paper serves as Phase I of this four-phase program. The logic underlying the selection of the experimental parameters is presented. The experiment consists of using twelve plasma guns arranged in a circle, launching plasma jets towards the center of a vacuum chamber. The velocity of the plasma jets chosen is 200 km/s, and each jet is to carry a mass of 0.2 mg - 0.4 mg. A candidate plasma accelerator for launching these jets consists of a coaxial plasma gun of the Marshall type.

  19. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cairns, R A

    1985-01-01

    This book is intended as an introduction to plasma physics at a level suitable for advanced undergraduates or beginning postgraduate students in physics, applied mathematics or astrophysics. The main prerequisite is a knowledge of electromagnetism and of the associated mathematics of vector calculus. SI units are used throughout. There is still a tendency amongst some plasma physics researchers to· cling to C.g.S. units, but it is the author's view that universal adoption of SI units, which have been the internationally agreed standard since 1960, is to be encouraged. After a short introductory chapter, the basic properties of a plasma con­ cerning particle orbits, fluid theory, Coulomb collisions and waves are set out in Chapters 2-5, with illustrations drawn from problems in nuclear fusion research and space physics. The emphasis is on the essential physics involved and (he theoretical and mathematical approach has been kept as simple and intuitive as possible. An attempt has been made to draw attention t...

  20. Plasma pharmacy - physical plasma in pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Woedtke, Th; Haertel, B; Weltmann, K-D; Lindequist, U

    2013-07-01

    During the last years the use of physical plasma for medical applications has grown rapidly. A multitude of findings about plasma-cell and plasma-tissue interactions and its possible use in therapy have been provided. One of the key findings of plasma medical basic research is that several biological effects do not result from direct plasma-cell or plasma-tissue interaction but are mediated by liquids. Above all, it was demonstrated that simple liquids like water or physiological saline, are antimicrobially active after treatment by atmospheric pressure plasma and that these effects are attributable to the generation of different low-molecular reactive species. Besides, it could be shown that plasma treatment leads to the stimulation of specific aspects of cell metabolism and to a transient and reversible increase of diffusion properties of biological barriers. All these results gave rise to think about another new and innovative field of medical plasma application. In contrast to plasma medicine, which means the direct use of plasmas on or in the living organism for direct therapeutic purposes, this field - as a specific field of medical plasma application - is called plasma pharmacy. Based on the present state of knowledge, most promising application fields of plasma pharmacy might be: plasma-based generation of biologically active liquids; plasma-based preparation, optimization, or stabilization of - mainly liquid - pharmaceutical preparations; support of drug transport across biological barriers; plasma-based stimulation of biotechnological processes.

  1. Photoaffinity Labeling of Plasma Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Otagiri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Photoaffinity labeling is a powerful technique for identifying a target protein. A high degree of labeling specificity can be achieved with this method in comparison to chemical labeling. Human serum albumin (HSA and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP are two plasma proteins that bind a variety of endogenous and exogenous substances. The ligand binding mechanism of these two proteins is complex. Fatty acids, which are known to be transported in plasma by HSA, cause conformational changes and participate in allosteric ligand binding to HSA. HSA undergoes an N-B transition, a conformational change at alkaline pH, that has been reported to result in increased ligand binding. Attempts have been made to investigate the impact of fatty acids and the N-B transition on ligand binding in HSA using ketoprofen and flunitrazepam as photolabeling agents. Meanwhile, plasma AGP is a mixture of genetic variants of the protein. The photolabeling of AGP with flunitrazepam has been utilized to shed light on the topology of the protein ligand binding site. Furthermore, a review of photoaffinity labeling performed on other major plasma proteins will also be discussed. Using a photoreactive natural ligand as a photolabeling agent to identify target protein in the plasma would reduce non-specific labeling.

  2. Experimental investigation of vapor shielding effects induced by ELM-like pulsed plasma loads using the double plasma gun device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, I.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a unique experimental device of so-called double plasma gun, which consists of two magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) devices, in order to clarify effects of vapor shielding on material erosion due to transient events in magnetically confined fusion devices. Two ELM-like pulsed plasmas produced by the two MCPG devices were injected into a target chamber with a variable time difference. For generating ablated plasmas in front of a target material, an aluminum foil sample in the target chamber was exposed to a pulsed plasma produced by the 1st MCPG device. The 2nd pulsed plasma was produced with a time delay of 70 μs. It was found that a surface absorbed energy measured by a calorimeter was reduced to ∼66% of that without the Al foil sample. Thus, the reduction of the incoming plasma energy by the vapor shielding effect was successfully demonstrated in the present experiment.

  3. Experimental investigation of vapor shielding effects induced by ELM-like pulsed plasma loads using the double plasma gun device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, I., E-mail: eu13z002@steng.u-hyogo.ac.jp; Kikuchi, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2015-08-15

    We have developed a unique experimental device of so-called double plasma gun, which consists of two magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) devices, in order to clarify effects of vapor shielding on material erosion due to transient events in magnetically confined fusion devices. Two ELM-like pulsed plasmas produced by the two MCPG devices were injected into a target chamber with a variable time difference. For generating ablated plasmas in front of a target material, an aluminum foil sample in the target chamber was exposed to a pulsed plasma produced by the 1st MCPG device. The 2nd pulsed plasma was produced with a time delay of 70 μs. It was found that a surface absorbed energy measured by a calorimeter was reduced to ∼66% of that without the Al foil sample. Thus, the reduction of the incoming plasma energy by the vapor shielding effect was successfully demonstrated in the present experiment.

  4. Impurity-induced divertor plasma oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, R. D., E-mail: rsmirnov@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Kukushkin, A. S. [NRC “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Two different oscillatory plasma regimes induced by seeding the plasma with high- and low-Z impurities are found for ITER-like divertor plasmas, using computer modeling with the DUSTT/UEDGE and SOLPS4.3 plasma-impurity transport codes. The oscillations are characterized by significant variations of the impurity-radiated power and of the peak heat load on the divertor targets. Qualitative analysis of the divertor plasma oscillations reveals different mechanisms driving the oscillations in the cases of high- and low-Z impurity seeding. The oscillations caused by the high-Z impurities are excited near the X-point by an impurity-related instability of the radiation-condensation type, accompanied by parallel impurity ion transport affected by the thermal and plasma friction forces. The driving mechanism of the oscillations induced by the low-Z impurities is related to the cross-field transport of the impurity atoms, causing alteration between the high and low plasma temperature regimes in the plasma recycling region near the divertor targets. The implications of the impurity-induced plasma oscillations for divertor operation in the next generation tokamaks are also discussed.

  5. Impurity-induced divertor plasma oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, R. D.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-01-01

    Two different oscillatory plasma regimes induced by seeding the plasma with high- and low-Z impurities are found for ITER-like divertor plasmas, using computer modeling with the DUSTT/UEDGE and SOLPS4.3 plasma-impurity transport codes. The oscillations are characterized by significant variations of the impurity-radiated power and of the peak heat load on the divertor targets. Qualitative analysis of the divertor plasma oscillations reveals different mechanisms driving the oscillations in the cases of high- and low-Z impurity seeding. The oscillations caused by the high-Z impurities are excited near the X-point by an impurity-related instability of the radiation-condensation type, accompanied by parallel impurity ion transport affected by the thermal and plasma friction forces. The driving mechanism of the oscillations induced by the low-Z impurities is related to the cross-field transport of the impurity atoms, causing alteration between the high and low plasma temperature regimes in the plasma recycling region near the divertor targets. The implications of the impurity-induced plasma oscillations for divertor operation in the next generation tokamaks are also discussed.

  6. Targeted phototherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonun Sanga

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional phototherapy uses a whole body cabinet or body part machines for the hand, foot or scalp. It has many disadvantages, due to which new phototherapy techniques have been developed. These new techniques are called targeted phototherapy. They include excimer laser, the intense pulse light (IPL system, photodynamic therapy, and an ultraviolet (UV light source with a sophisticated delivery system which is easy to operate by hand. The mechanisms of action of targeted phototherapy systems are similar to those in conventional UVB/UVA therapy. They have many advantages including lower risk of side effects, avoidance of exposure of unnecessary sites, faster response, and shorter duration of treatment. But they also have disadvantages such as high costs and inability to use them for extensive areas. This review article discusses targeted phototherapy, its mechanisms of action, and advantages and disadvantages in comparison to conventional phototherapy.

  7. Investigation of Early Plasma Evolution Induced by Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen B.

    2012-01-01

    Early plasma is generated owing to high intensity laser irradiation of target and the subsequent target material ionization. Its dynamics plays a significant role in laser-material interaction, especially in the air environment1-11. Early plasma evolution has been captured through pump-probe shadowgraphy1-3 and interferometry1,4-7. However, the studied time frames and applied laser parameter ranges are limited. For example, direct examinations of plasma front locations and electron number den...

  8. Targeted Learning

    CERN Document Server

    van der Laan, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    The statistics profession is at a unique point in history. The need for valid statistical tools is greater than ever; data sets are massive, often measuring hundreds of thousands of measurements for a single subject. The field is ready to move towards clear objective benchmarks under which tools can be evaluated. Targeted learning allows (1) the full generalization and utilization of cross-validation as an estimator selection tool so that the subjective choices made by humans are now made by the machine, and (2) targeting the fitting of the probability distribution of the data toward the targe

  9. Experimental study of plasma window

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Liang, Shi; Kun, Zhu; Yuan-Rong, Lu

    2013-01-01

    Plasma window is an advanced apparatus which can work as the interface between vacuum and high pressure region. It can be used in many applications which need atmosphere-vacuum interface, such as gas target, electron beam welding, synchrotron radiation and spallation neutron source. A test bench of plasma window is constructed in Peking University. A series of experiments and corresponding parameter measurements have been presented in this article. The experiment result indicates the feasibility of such a facility acting as an interface between vacuum and high pressure region.

  10. Antimicrobial outcomes in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Stalder, Kenneth R.; Woloszko, Jean

    2015-03-01

    Plasma is referred to as the fourth state of matter and is frequently generated in the environment of a strong electric field. The result consists of highly reactive species--ions, electrons, reactive atoms and molecules, and UV radiation. Plasma Medicine unites a number of fields, including Physics, Plasma Chemistry, Cell Biology, Biochemistry, and Medicine. The treatment modality utilizes Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP), which is able to sterilize and treat microbes in a nonthermal manner. These gas-based plasma systems operate at close to room temperature and atmospheric pressure, making them very practical for a range of potential treatments and are highly portable for clinical use throughout the health care system. The hypothesis is that gas based plasma kills bacteria, fungus, and viruses but spares mammalian cells. This paper will review systematic work which shows examples of systems and performance in regards to antimicrobial effects and the sparing of mammalian cells. The mechanism of action will be discussed, as well as dosing for the treatment of microbial targets, including sterilization processes, another important healthcare need. In addition, commercial systems will be overviewed and compared, along with evidence-based, patient results. The range of treatments cover wound treatment and biofilms, as well as antimicrobial treatment, with little chance for resistance and tolerance, as in drug regimens. Current clinical studies include applications in dentistry, food treatment, cancer treatment, wound treatment for bacteria and biofilms, and systems to combat health care related infections.

  11. Plasma generated during underwater pulsed laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jacek; Chrzanowska, Justyna; Moscicki, Tomasz; Radziejewska, Joanna; Stobinski, Leszek; Szymanski, Zygmunt

    2017-09-01

    The plasma induced during underwater pulsed laser ablation of graphite is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The results of the experiment show that the maximum plasma temperature of 25000 K is reached 20 ns from the beginning of the laser pulse and decreases to 6500 K after 1000 ns. The observed OH absorption band shows that the plasma plume is surrounded by the thin layer of dissociated water vapour at a temperature around 5500 K. The hydrodynamic model applied shows similar maximum plasma temperature at delay times between 14 ns and 30 ns. The calculations show also that already at 14th ns, the plasma electron density reaches 0.97·1027 m-3, which is the critical density for 1064 nm radiation. At the same time the plasma pressure is 2 GPa, which is consisted with earlier measurements of the peak pressure exerted on a target in similar conditions.

  12. Simulating plasma production from hypervelocity impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Alex; Close, Sigrid; Mathias, Donovan

    2015-09-01

    Hypervelocity particles, such as meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and are energetic enough to vaporize and ionize themselves and as well as a portion of the target material. The resulting plasma rapidly expands into the surrounding vacuum. While plasma measurements from hypervelocity impacts have been made using ground-based technologies such as light gas guns and Van de Graaff dust accelerators, some of the basic plasma properties vary significantly between experiments. There have been both ground-based and in-situ measurements of radio frequency (RF) emission from hypervelocity impacts, but the physical mechanism responsible and the possible connection to the impact-produced plasma are not well understood. Under certain conditions, the impact-produced plasma can have deleterious effects on spacecraft electronics by providing a new current path, triggering an electrostatic discharge, causing electromagnetic interference, or generating an electromagnetic pulse. Multi-physics simulations of plasma production from hypervelocity impacts are presented. These simulations incorporate elasticity and plasticity of the solid target, phase change and plasma formation, and non-ideal plasma physics due to the high density and low temperature of the plasma. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is used to perform a continuum dynamics simulation with these additional physics. By examining a series of hypervelocity impacts, basic properties of the impact produced plasma plume (density, temperature, expansion speed, charge state) are determined for impactor speeds between 10 and 72 km/s. For a large range of higher impact speeds (30-72 km/s), we find the temperature is unvarying at 2.5 eV. We also find that the plasma plume is weakly ionized for impact speeds less than 14 km/s and fully ionized for impact speeds greater than 20 km/s, independent of impactor mass. This is the same velocity threshold for the detection of RF emission in recent Van de Graaff

  13. Ultra high performance liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric multi-analyte procedure for target screening and quantification in human blood plasma: validation and application for 31 neuroleptics, 28 benzodiazepines, and Z-drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remane, Daniela; Meyer, Markus R; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Maurer, Hans H

    2011-09-01

    For fast and reliable screening, identification, and quantification of as many analytes as possible, multi-analyte approaches are very useful in clinical and forensic toxicology. Using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, such an approach has been developed for blood plasma analysis after simple liquid-liquid extraction. In the present paper, validation and application is described for 31 neuroleptics, 28 benzodiazepines, and Z-drugs (zaleplone, zolpidem, and zopiclone). The validation parameters included recovery, matrix effects, process efficiency, ion suppression/enhancement of co-eluting analytes, selectivity, crosstalk, accuracy and precision, stabilities, and limits of quantification and detection. The results showed that the approach was selective, sensitive, accurate, and precise for 24 neuroleptics and 21 benzodiazepines and Z-drugs. The remaining analytes were unstable and/or too low dosed. Cost- and time-saving one-point calibration was applicable only for half of the analytes. The applicability was successfully shown for most of the drugs by analyzing authentic plasma samples and external quality control samples.

  14. Hot Electron Diagnostic in a Solid Laser Target by Buried K-Shell Fluorer Technique from Ultra-Intense (3x1020W/cm2,< 500 J) Laser-Plasma Interactions on the Petawatt Laser at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuike, K.; Key, M.H.; Hatchett, S.P.; Snavely, R.A.

    2000-06-29

    Characterization of hot electron production (a conversion efficiency from laser energy into electrons) in ultra intense laser-solid target interaction, using 1.06 {micro}m laser light with an intensity of up to 3 x 10{sup 20}W cm{sup -2} and an on target laser energy of {le}500 J, has been done by observing K{sub {beta}} as well as K{sub {alpha}} emissions from a buried Mo layer in the targets, which are same structure as in the previous 100 TW experiments but done under less laser intensity and energy conditions ({le} 4 x 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2} and {le} 30 J). The conversion efficiency from the laser energy into the energy, carried by hot electrons, has been estimated to be {approx}50%, which are little bit higher than the previous less laser energy ({approx} 20 J) experiments, yet the x-ray emission spectra from the target has change drastically, i.e., gamma flash.

  15. Antitumor action of non thermal plasma sources, DBD and Plasma Gun, alone or in combined protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Eric; Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Le Pape, Alain; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel

    2012-10-01

    The presentation deals with the assessment on two non thermal plasma sources developed and optimized for oncology applications. The first plasma source is a floating-electrode dielectric barrier discharge powered at a few hundreds of Hz which deliver air-plasma directly on the surface of cell culture medium in dishes or on the skin or organs of mice bearing cancer tumors. The second plasma source, so called Plasma Gun, is a plasma jet source triggered in noble gas, transferred in high aspect ratio and flexible capillaries, on targeting cells or tumors after plasma transfer in air through the ``plasma plume'' generated at the capillary outlet. In vitro evidence for massive cancer cell destruction and in vivo tumor activity and growth rate reductions have been measured with both plasma sources. DNA damages, cell cycle arrests and apoptosis induction were also demonstrated following the application of any of the two plasma source both in vitro and in vivo. The comparison of plasma treatment with state of the art chemotherapeutic alternatives has been performed and last but not least the benefit of combined protocols involving plasma and chemotherapeutic treatments has been evidenced for mice bearing orthotopic pancreas cancer and is under evaluation for the colon tumors.

  16. Edge and divertor plasma: detachment, stability, and plasma-wall interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Lee, Wonjae; Phsenov, A. A.; Smirnov, R. D.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Stepanenko, A. A.; Zhang, Yanzeng

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents an overview of the results of studies on a wide range of the edge plasma related issues. The rollover of the plasma flux to the target during progressing detachment process is shown to be caused by the increase of the impurity radiation loss and volumetric plasma recombination, whereas the ion-neutral friction, although important for establishing the necessary edge plasma conditions, does not contribute per se to the rollover of the plasma flux to the target. The processes limiting the power loss by impurity radiation are discussed and a simple estimate of this limit is obtained. Different mechanisms of meso-scale thermal instabilities driven by impurity radiation and resulting in self-sustained oscillations in the edge plasma are identified. An impact of sheared magnetic field on the dynamics of the blobs and ELM filaments playing an important role in the edge and SOL plasma transport is discussed. Trapping of He, which is an intrinsic impurity for the fusion plasmas, in the plasma-facing tungsten material is considered. A newly developed model, accounting for the generation of additional He traps caused by He bubble growth, fits all the available experimental data on the layer of nano-bubbles observed in W under irradiation by low energy He plasma.

  17. Images of the gold bubble feature in NIF Gas-Filled Ignition Hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S. A.; Widmann, K.; Meezan, N. B.; Hammer, J. H.; Yoxall, B. E.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Edwards, M. J.; Guymer, T. M.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hsing, W. W.; Kervin, M. L.; Landen, O. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Palmer, N. E.; Teruya, A. T.

    2016-05-01

    The ViewFactor experiments at the National Ignition Facility use a truncated hohlraum to allow excellent diagnostic views of the interior of the hohlraum. Time-integrated, hard x-ray (3-5 keV) images show the region where the laser deposits its energy at peak power. These images show a three-dimensional structure in the region where the outer beams deposit their energy (the ”gold bubble”) which varies with pulse shape and cross beam energy transfer. The images from two-dimensional simulations have similar trends but show some discrepancies.

  18. Supernova Feedback and the Hot Gas Filling Fraction of the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Miao; Cen, Renyue; Bryan, Greg L; Naab, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Supernovae are the most energetic among stellar feedback processes, and are crucial for regulating the interstellar medium (ISM) and launching galactic winds. We explore how supernova remnants (SNRs) create a multiphase medium by performing high resolution, 3D hydrodynamical simulations at various SN rates, $S$, and ISM average densities, $n$. We find that the evolution of a SNR in a self-consistently generated three-phase ISM is qualitatively different from that in a uniform or a two-phase warm/cold medium. By traveling faster and further in the cooling-inefficient hot phase, the spatial-temporal domain of a SNR is enlarged by $>10^{2.5}$ in a hot-dominated multiphase medium (HDMM) compared to the uniform case. We then examine the resultant ISM as we vary $n$ and $S$, finding that a steady state can only be achieved when the hot gas volume fraction \\fvh $\\lesssim 0.6\\pm 0.1$. Above that, overlapping SNRs render connecting topology of the hot gas, and such a HDMM is subjected to thermal runaway with growing p...

  19. High-performance, non-CFC-based thermal insulation: Gas filled panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-04-01

    Because of the forthcoming phase-out of CFCs and to comply with the more stringent building and appliance energy-use standards, researchers in industry and in the public sector are pursuing the development of non-CFC-based, high-performance insulation materials. This report describes the results of research and development of one alternative insulation material: highly insulating GFPs. GFPs insulate in two ways: by using a gas barrier envelope to encapsulate a low-thermal-conductivity gas or gas mixture (at atmospheric pressure), and by using low-emissivity baffles to effectively eliminate convective and radiative heat transfer. This approach has been used successfully to produce superinsulated windows. Unlike foams or fibrous insulations, GFPs are not a homogeneous material but rather an assembly of specialized components. The wide range of potential applications of GFPs (appliances, manufactured housing, site-built buildings, refrigerated transport, and so on) leads to several alternative embodiments. While the materials used for prototype GFPs are commercially available, further development of components may be necessary for commercial products. With the exception of a description of the panels that were independently tested, specific information concerning panel designs and materials is omitted for patent reasons; this material is the subject of a patent application by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  20. Microcontroller based system for electrical breakdown time delay measurement in gas-filled devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejović, Milić M.; Denić, Dragan B.; Pejović, Momčilo M.; Nešić, Nikola T.; Vasović, Nikola

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents realization of a digital embedded system for measuring electrical breakdown time delay. The proposed system consists of three major parts: dc voltage supply, analog subsystem, and a digital subsystem. Any dc power source with the range from 100 to 1000 V can be used in this application. The analog subsystem should provide fast and accurate voltage switching on the testing device as well as transform the signals that represent the voltage pulse on the device and the device breakdown into the form suitable for detection by a digital subsystem. The insulated gate bipolar transistor IRG4PH40KD driven by TC429 MOSFET driver is used for high voltage switching on the device. The aim of a digital subsystem is to detect the signals from the analog subsystem and to measure the elapsed time between their occurrences. Moreover, the digital subsystem controls various parameters that influence time delay and provides fast data storage for a large number of measured data. For this propose, we used the PIC18F4550 microcontroller with a full-speed compatible universal serial bus (USB) engine. Operation of this system is verified on different commercial and custom made gas devices with different structure and breakdown mechanisms. The electrical breakdown time delay measurements have been carried out as a function of several parameters, which dominantly influence electrical breakdown time delay. The obtained results have been verified using statistical methods, and they show good agreement with the theory. The proposed system shows good repeatability, sensitivity, and stability for measuring the electrical breakdown time delay.

  1. Standard practice for examination of seamless, Gas-Filled, pressure vessels using acoustic emission

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides guidelines for acoustic emission (AE) examinations of seamless pressure vessels (tubes) of the type used for distribution or storage of industrial gases. 1.2 This practice requires pressurization to a level greater than normal use. Pressurization medium may be gas or liquid. 1.3 This practice does not apply to vessels in cryogenic service. 1.4 The AE measurements are used to detect and locate emission sources. Other nondestructive test (NDT) methods must be used to evaluate the significance of AE sources. Procedures for other NDT techniques are beyond the scope of this practice. See Note 1. Note 1—Shear wave, angle beam ultrasonic examination is commonly used to establish circumferential position and dimensions of flaws that produce AE. Time of Flight Diffraction (TOFD), ultrasonic examination is also commonly used for flaw sizing. 1.5 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.6 This standa...

  2. Gas-filled cell as a narrow bandwidth bandpass filter in the VUV wavelength range

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2011-01-01

    We propose a method for spectrally filtering radiation in the VUV wavelength range by means of a monochromator constituted by a cell filled with a resonantly absorbing rare gas. Around particular wavelengths, the gas exhibits narrow-bandwidth absorbing resonances following the Fano profile. In particular, within the photon energy range 60 eV - 65 eV, the correlation index of the Fano profiles for the photo-ionization spectra in Helium is equal to unity, meaning that the minimum of the cross-section is exactly zero. For sufficiently large column density in the gas cell, the spectrum of the incoming radiation will be attenuated by the background cross-section of many orders of magnitude, except for those wavelengths close to the point where the cross-section is zero. Remarkable advantages of a gas monochromator based on this principle are simplicity, efficiency and narrow-bandwidth. A gas monochromator installed in the experimental hall of a VUV SASE FEL facility would enable the delivery of a single-mode VUV l...

  3. Gas-filled parasymphyseal pubic cyst associated with degenerative joint disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, J.P.; Spouge, A.R. [London Health Science Centre, Diagnostic Imaging University Hospital, London, ON (Canada)

    2007-06-15

    Parasymphyseal cysts are a rare and poorly understood entity. This case report describes a gas-containing parasymphyseal cystic lesion associated with degenerative change and vacuum phenomenon in the pubic symphysis. The mass was discovered incidentally in a 72-year-old asymptomatic male who underwent a transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate and the nature of the lesion was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). We hypothesize that the gas within the parasymphyseal cystic mass arose from a vacuum phenomenon in the pubic symphysis, with subsequent extrusion of gas from the joint into the cyst itself. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the existence of this entity to avoid unnecessary surgery for patients. (orig.)

  4. A gas-filled abdominal cyst in an elderly woman: A giant colonic diverticulum case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina del Pozo

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Because of its rarity and variable and non-specific clinical presentation, the diagnosis of GCD depends mainly on imaging findings. The gold standard treatment is surgical resection of the GCD and the compromised colon with primary anastomosis when possible.

  5. Laser frequency standards based on gas-filled hollow-core fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triches, Marco

    the advent of frequency combs, an optical frequency reference may be used to stabilize the comb in order to achieve an optical clock, which has better specifications than standard Rb and Cs atomic clocks. The realization of such an optical frequency reference is based on the laser frequency stabilization......,since the advent of the photonic crystal fiber technology, many studies have been performed using various hollow-core fibers used as vapor cells. This hollow-core fiber approach is also meeting the needs of the remote sensing applications, which require size and weight reductions with respect to the conventional......-air Raman scattering, eliminating the remaining obstacle for the implementation of the technology in the laser machining industry. This thesis presents the development of a compact fiber-based optical frequency standard using acetylene-filled hollow-core fibers. The study focuses both on the technical...

  6. Microcontroller based system for electrical breakdown time delay measurement in gas-filled devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejovic, Milic M.; Denic, Dragan B.; Pejovic, Momcilo M.; Nesic, Nikola T.; Vasovic, Nikola [Faculty of Electronic Engineering, University of Nis, Aleksandra Medvedeva 14, 18000 Nis (Serbia)

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents realization of a digital embedded system for measuring electrical breakdown time delay. The proposed system consists of three major parts: dc voltage supply, analog subsystem, and a digital subsystem. Any dc power source with the range from 100 to 1000 V can be used in this application. The analog subsystem should provide fast and accurate voltage switching on the testing device as well as transform the signals that represent the voltage pulse on the device and the device breakdown into the form suitable for detection by a digital subsystem. The insulated gate bipolar transistor IRG4PH40KD driven by TC429 MOSFET driver is used for high voltage switching on the device. The aim of a digital subsystem is to detect the signals from the analog subsystem and to measure the elapsed time between their occurrences. Moreover, the digital subsystem controls various parameters that influence time delay and provides fast data storage for a large number of measured data. For this propose, we used the PIC18F4550 microcontroller with a full-speed compatible universal serial bus (USB) engine. Operation of this system is verified on different commercial and custom made gas devices with different structure and breakdown mechanisms. The electrical breakdown time delay measurements have been carried out as a function of several parameters, which dominantly influence electrical breakdown time delay. The obtained results have been verified using statistical methods, and they show good agreement with the theory. The proposed system shows good repeatability, sensitivity, and stability for measuring the electrical breakdown time delay.

  7. Detecting leaks in gas-filled pressure vessels using acoustic resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, K. A.; Moldover, M. R.; Mehl, J. B.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that a leak from a large, unthermostatted pressure vessel into ambient air can be detected an order of magnitude more effectively by measuring the time dependence of the ratio p/f2 than by measuring the ratio p/T. Here f is the resonance frequency of an acoustic mode of the gas inside the pressure vessel, p is the pressure of the gas, and T is the kelvin temperature measured at one point in the gas. In general, the resonance frequencies are determined by a mode-dependent, weighted average of the square of the speed-of-sound throughout the volume of the gas. However, the weighting usually has a weak dependence on likely temperature gradients in the gas inside a large pressure vessel. Using the ratio p/f2, we measured a gas leak (dM/dt)/M ≈ - 1.3 × 10-5 h-1 = - 0.11 yr-1 from a 300-liter pressure vessel filled with argon at 450 kPa that was exposed to sunshine-driven temperature and pressure fluctuations as large as (dT/dt)/T ≈ (dp/dt)/p ≈ 5 × 10-2 h-1 using a 24-hour data record. This leak could not be detected in a 72-hour record of p/T. (Here M is the mass of the gas in the vessel and t is the time.)

  8. Raman-free nonlinear optical effects in high pressure gas-filled hollow core PCF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, M; Wong, G K L; Chang, W; Joly, N Y; Russell, P St J

    2013-02-25

    The effective Kerr nonlinearity of hollow-core kagomé-style photonic crystal fiber (PCF) filled with argon gas increases to ~15% of that of bulk silica glass when the pressure is increased from 1 to 150 bar, while the zero dispersion wavelength shifts from 300 to 900 nm. The group velocity dispersion of the system is uniquely pressure-tunable over a wide range while avoiding Raman scattering-absent in noble gases-and having an extremely high optical damage threshold. As a result, detailed and well-controlled studies of nonlinear effects can be performed, in both normal and anomalous dispersion regimes, using only a fixed-frequency pump laser. For example, the absence of Raman scattering permits clean observation, at high powers, of the interaction between a modulational instability side-band and a soliton-created dispersive wave. Excellent agreement is obtained between numerical simulations and experimental results. The system has great potential for the realization of reconfigurable supercontinuum sources, wavelength convertors and short-pulse laser systems.

  9. Gas-Filled Hollow Core Fiber Lasers Based on Population Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    levels of C2H2 with the pump ( optical parametric oscillator in the telecom C band) and observed lasing transitions. The fiber ends were housed in...FA9550-10-1-0515 FA9550-10-1-0515 AFOSR unlimited Hollow-core Optical Fiber Gas LASer (HOFGLAS) have been created, and explored in pulsed mode with...were created. HOFGLAS, Optically -pumped gas lasers, photonic crystal fiber , microstructured fiber , hollow-core fiber , mid-IR lasers, IR lasers, fiber

  10. Hydrogen gas filling into an actual tank at high pressure and optimization of its thermal characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md. Tawhidul Islam; Monde, Masanori; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2009-09-01

    Gas with high pressure is widely used at present as fuel storage mode for different hydrogen vehicles. Different types of materials are used for constructing these hydrogen pressure vessels. An aluminum lined vessel and typically carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials are commercially used in hydrogen vessels. An aluminum lined vessel is easy to construct and posses high thermal conductivity compared to other commercially available vessels. However, compared to CFRP lined vessel, it has low strength capacity and safety factors. Therefore, nowadays, CFRP lined vessels are becoming more popular in hydrogen vehicles. Moreover, CFRP lined vessel has an advantage of light weight. CFRP, although, has many desirable properties in reducing the weight and in increasing the strength, it is also necessary to keep the material temperature below 85 °C for maintaining stringent safety requirements. While filling process occurs, the temperature can be exceeded due to the compression works of the gas flow. Therefore, it is very important to optimize the hydrogen filling system to avoid the crossing of the critical limit of the temperature rise. Computer-aided simulation has been conducted to characterize the hydrogen filling to optimize the technique. Three types of hydrogen vessels with different volumes have been analyzed for optimizing the charging characteristics of hydrogen to test vessels. Gas temperatures are measured inside representative vessels in the supply reservoirs (H2 storages) and at the inlet to the test tank during filling.

  11. Strong Raman-induced non-instantaneous soliton interactions in gas-filled photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Marini, Andrea; Biancalana, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an analytical model based on the perturbation theory in order to study the optical propagation of two successive intense solitons in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled with Raman-active gases. Based on the time delay between the two solitons, we have found that the trailing soliton dynamics can experience unusual nonlinear phenomena such as spectral and temporal soliton oscillations and transport towards the leading soliton. The overall dynamics can lead to a spatiotemporal modulation of the refractive index with a uniform temporal period and a uniform or chirped spatial period.

  12. DSSSD based Spectrometer of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, Yu S

    2016-01-01

    Recently, in the DGFRS related experiments the discoveries of new superheavy elements 114 to 118 were successfully performed. As concerns to a background radical suppression in those experiments it was namely Active correlations method which was applied to this goal. Note, that application of DSSSD detector allows one to apply this method more effectively, although with some difficulties due to neighbor strips edge effects. Present version of the DGFRS spectrometer is presented. Shapes of ER registered energy spectra in the nat Yb+48Ca reaction are presented. First results of its application in the 240Pu+48Ca=Fl complete fusion nuclear reaction are presented too. Conclusion, that edge effects are to a first approximation explained by the role of inter strips area is drawn.

  13. Metrological and operational performance of measuring systems used in vehicle compressed natural gas filling stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velosa, Jhonn F.; Abril, Henry; Garcia, Luis E. [CDT de GAS (Venezuela). Gas Technological Development Center Corporation

    2008-07-01

    Corporation CDT GAS financially supported by the Colombian government through COLCIENCIAS, carried out a study aimed at designing, developing and implementing in Colombia a calibration and metrological verification 'specialized service' for gas meters installed at dispensers of filling stations using compressed natural gas. The results permitted the identification of improving opportunities (in measuring systems, equipment and devices used to deliver natural gas) which are focused on achieving the highest security and reliability of trading processes of CNG for vehicles. In the development of the first stage of the project, metrological type variables were initially considered, but given the importance of the measuring system and its interaction with the various elements involving gas supply to the filling station, the scope of the work done included aspects related to the operational performance, that is, those influencing the security of the users and the metrological performance of the measuring system. The development of the second stage counted on the collaboration of national companies from the sector of CNG for vehicles, which permitted the carrying out of multiple calibrations to the measuring systems installed in the CNG dispensers, thus achieving, in a concrete way, valid and reliable technological information of the implemented procedures. (author)

  14. NON-INTRUSIVE SENSOR FOR GAS FILL VERIFICATION OF INSULATED GLASS WINDOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Freedman; Paul L. Kebabian; Richard R. Romano; James Woodroffe

    2003-10-01

    A sensor capable of measuring the amount of oxygen (an unwanted component that is only present because of improper filling or seal failure) within an argon-filled insulated glass window has been designed, built and successfully tested. It operates by using the optical absorption of oxygen in the atmospheric A-band centered at 762 nm. Light emitted by an argon-filled surface glow discharge lamp is Zeeman-tuned on and off an oxygen absorption line using an AC-modulated electromagnet. In the presence of oxygen, the change in the measured intensity of the lamp, obtained using standard demodulation techniques, is proportional to the oxygen column density. Measurements using an industry-standard insulated glass window indicate that the sensor can measure the amount of oxygen in a nominally argon-filled IG window (with a window gap of 10 mm) with a precision of 0.50% oxygen using a 16 second integration time. This level of precision is well within the limits required by the IG window manufacturing industry for proper monitoring of newly manufactured window units.

  15. High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the Fermilab MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The high energy physics community is continually looking to push the limits with respect to the energy and luminosity of particle accelerators. In the realm of leptons, only electron colliders have been built to date. Compared to hadrons, electrons lose a large amount of energy when accelerated in a ring through synchrotron radiation. A solution to this problem is to build long, straight accelerators for electrons, which has been done with great success. With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, building longer, more powerful accelerators is not the most enticing option. Muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a much smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built with higher attainable energy than any present electron collider. As part of the accelerator, but separate from the collider, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. The possibility of a high energy, high luminosity muon collider and an abundant, precise source of neutrinos is an attractive one. The technological challenges of building a muon accelerator are many and diverse. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated to the desired energy within a short amount of time. This requirement places strict requisites on the type of acceleration and focusing that can be used. Muons are generated as tertiary beams with a huge phase space, so strong magnetic fields are required to capture and focus them. Radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed to capture, bunch and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary for capture and focusing.

  16. Microcontroller based system for electrical breakdown time delay measurement in gas-filled devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejović, Milić M; Denić, Dragan B; Pejović, Momčilo M; Nešić, Nikola T; Vasović, Nikola

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents realization of a digital embedded system for measuring electrical breakdown time delay. The proposed system consists of three major parts: dc voltage supply, analog subsystem, and a digital subsystem. Any dc power source with the range from 100 to 1000 V can be used in this application. The analog subsystem should provide fast and accurate voltage switching on the testing device as well as transform the signals that represent the voltage pulse on the device and the device breakdown into the form suitable for detection by a digital subsystem. The insulated gate bipolar transistor IRG4PH40KD driven by TC429 MOSFET driver is used for high voltage switching on the device. The aim of a digital subsystem is to detect the signals from the analog subsystem and to measure the elapsed time between their occurrences. Moreover, the digital subsystem controls various parameters that influence time delay and provides fast data storage for a large number of measured data. For this propose, we used the PIC18F4550 microcontroller with a full-speed compatible universal serial bus (USB) engine. Operation of this system is verified on different commercial and custom made gas devices with different structure and breakdown mechanisms. The electrical breakdown time delay measurements have been carried out as a function of several parameters, which dominantly influence electrical breakdown time delay. The obtained results have been verified using statistical methods, and they show good agreement with the theory. The proposed system shows good repeatability, sensitivity, and stability for measuring the electrical breakdown time delay.

  17. Temporal condensed matter physics in gas-filled photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Tran, Truong X; Marini, Andrea; Belli, Federico; Abdolvand, Amir; Biancalana, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Raman effect in gases can generate an extremely long-living wave of coherence that can lead to the establishment of an almost perfect periodic variation of the medium refractive index. We show theoretically and numerically that the equations, regulate the pulse propagation in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled by Raman-active gas, are exactly identical to a classical problem in quantum condensed matter physics -- but with the role of space and time reversed -- namely an electron in a periodic potential subject to a constant electric field. We are therefore able to infer the existence of Wannier-Stark ladders, Bloch oscillations, and Zener tunneling, phenomena that are normally associated with condensed matter physics only, now realized with purely optical means in the temporal domain.

  18. Target Space $\

    CERN Document Server

    Huggett, Nick

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the significance of T-duality in string theory: the indistinguishability with respect to all observables, of models attributing radically different radii to space -- larger than the observable universe, or far smaller than the Planck length, say. Two interpretational branch points are identified and discussed. First, whether duals are physically equivalent or not: by considering a duality of the familiar simple harmonic oscillator, I argue that they are. Unlike the oscillator, there are no measurements 'outside' string theory that could distinguish the duals. Second, whether duals agree or disagree on the radius of 'target space', the space in which strings evolve according to string theory. I argue for the latter position, because the alternative leaves it unknown what the radius is. Since duals are physically equivalent yet disagree on the radius of target space, it follows that the radius is indeterminate between them. Using an analysis of Brandenberger and Vafa (1989), I explain wh...

  19. Laser Plasmas : Plasma dynamics from laser ablated solid lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debarati Bhattacharya

    2000-11-01

    Emission plasma plume generated by pulsed laser ablation of a lithium solid target by a ruby laser (694 nm, 20 ns, 3 J) was subjected to optical emission spectroscopy: time and space resolved optical emission was characterised as a function of distance from the target surface. Propagation of the plume was studied through ambient background of argon gas. Spectroscopic observations can, in general, be used to analyse plume structure with respect to an appropriate theoretical plasma model. The plume expansion dynamics in this case could be explained through a shock wave propagation model wherein, the experimental observations made were seen to fit well with the theoretical predictions. Spectral information derived from measurement of peak intensity and line width determined the parameters, electron temperature (e) and electron number density e, typically used to characterise laser produced plasma plume emission. These measurements were also used to validate the assumptions underlying the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model, invoked for the high density laser plasma under study. Some interesting results pertaining to the analysis of plume structure and spatio-temporal behaviour of e and e along the plume length will be presented and discussed.

  20. Progress in plasma liner modeling for MIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loverich, John; Hakim, Ammar; Zhou, Sean

    2009-11-01

    Magnetic confinement fusion and inertial confinement fusion represent the two extremes in terms of density and confinement time in fusion energy research. Both approaches have been studied extensively through the decades pushing technology to the limits. An alternative fusion approach exists between these regimes called magnetized target fusion. In magnetized target fusion longer confinement times are achieved than in ICF through the use of strong magnetic fields, the long confinement time reduces the required plasma density to reach ignition--the approach has advantages over MFE in that it is much more compact and higher density. This work explores computationally a form of magnetized target implosion using a plasma liner. This concept is to be compared with solid liner implosion approach which may not be commercially viable as a reactor due to the ``standoff'' problem, portions of the device are destroyed with each target implosion. We present simulation results of plasma liner formation, jet merging, and plasma jet magnetized target interaction using a fluid plasma code (TxFluids) developed at Tech-X corporation.

  1. Fast ion beam-plasma interaction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breun, R A; Ferron, J R

    1979-07-01

    A device has been constructed for the study of the interaction between a fast ion beam and a target plasma of separately controllable parameters. The beam of either hydrogen or helium ions has an energy of 1-4 keV and a total current of 0.5-2 A. The beam energy and beam current can be varied separately. The ion source plasma is created by a pulsed (0.2-10-ms pulse length) discharge in neutral gas at up to 3 x 10(-3) Torr. The neutrals are pulsed into the source chamber, allowing the neutral pressure in the target region to remain less than 5 x 10(-5) Torr at a 2-Hz repetition rate. The creation of the source plasma can be described by a simple set of equations which predict optimum source design parameters. The target plasma is also produced by a pulsed discharge. Between the target and source chambers the beam is neutralized by electrons drawn from a set of hot filaments. Currently under study is an unstable wave in a field-free plasma excited when the beam velocity is nearly equal to the target electron thermal velocity (v(beam) approximately 3.5 x 10(7) cm/s, Te = 0.5 eV).

  2. Two-dimensional studies of relativistic electron beam plasma instabilities in an inhomogeneous plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita, E-mail: amita@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Patel, Kartik [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Relativistic electron beam propagation in plasma is fraught with several micro instabilities like two stream, filamentation, etc., in plasma. This results in severe limitation of the electron transport through a plasma medium. Recently, however, there has been an experimental demonstration of improved transport of Mega Ampere of electron currents (generated by the interaction of intense laser with solid target) in a carbon nanotube structured solid target [G. Chatterjee et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 235005 (2012)]. This then suggests that the inhomogeneous plasma (created by the ionization of carbon nanotube structured target) helps in containing the growth of the beam plasma instabilities. This manuscript addresses this issue with the help of a detailed analytical study and 2-D Particle-In-Cell simulations. The study conclusively demonstrates that the growth rate of the dominant instability in the 2-D geometry decreases when the plasma density is chosen to be inhomogeneous, provided the scale length 1/k{sub s} of the inhomogeneous plasma is less than the typical plasma skin depth (c/ω{sub 0}) scale. At such small scale lengths channelization of currents is also observed in simulation.

  3. Update on design simulations for NIF ignition targets, and the rollup of all specifications into an error budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haan, S. W.; Herrmann, M. C.; Salmonson, J. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Munro, D. H.; Pollaine, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Suter, L. J.

    2007-08-01

    Targets intended to produce ignition on NIF are being simulated and the simulations are used to set specifications for target fabrication and other program elements. Recent design work has focused on designs that assume only 1.0 MJ of laser energy instead of the previous 1.6 MJ. To perform with less laser energy, the hohlraum has been redesigned to be more efficient than previously, and the capsules are slightly smaller. Three hohlraum designs are being examined: gas fill, SiO2 foam fill, and SiO2 lined. All have a cocktail wall, and shields mounted between the capsule and the laser entrance holes. Two capsule designs are being considered. One has a graded doped Be(Cu) ablator, and the other graded doped CH(Ge). Both can perform acceptably with recently demonstrated ice layer quality, and with recently demonstrated outer surface roughness. Complete tables of specifications are being prepared for both targets, to be completed this fiscal year. All the specifications are being rolled together into an error budget indicating adequate margin for ignition with the new designs. The dominant source of error is hohlraum asymmetry at intermediate modes 4 8, indicating the importance of experimental techniques to measure and control this asymmetry.

  4. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  5. ORION laser target diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K. [Plasma Physics Department, Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-10-15

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  6. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Composition and dynamics of an erosion plasma produced by microsecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Grishina, V. G.; Derkach, O. N.; Sebrant, A. Yu; Stepanova, M. A.

    1995-08-01

    The ion and energy compositions were determined and the dynamics was studied of an erosion plume formed by microsecond CO2 laser pulses incident on a graphite target. The ionic emission lines were used to find the electron density and temperature of the plasma on the target surface. The temperature of the plasma source did not change throughout the line emission time (4 μs). At the plasma recombination stage the lines of the C II, C III, and C IV ions were accompanied by bands of the C2 molecule near the target surface and also near the surface of an substrate when a plasma flow interacted with it. Ways were found for controlling the plume expansion anisotropy and for producing plasma flows with controlled parameters by selection of the conditions during formation of a quasisteady erosion plasma flow.

  7. Plasma Free Metanephrines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Plasma Free Metanephrines Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Plasma Metanephrines Formal name: Fractionated Plasma Free Metanephrines (Metanephrine ...

  8. Improved plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  9. Overview of current applications in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Stalder, Kenneth R.

    2017-02-01

    Plasma medicine is a rapidly growing field of treatment, with the number and type of medical applications growing annually, such as dentistry, cancer treatment, wound treatment, Antimicrobial (bacteria, biofilm, virus, fungus, prions), and surface sterilization. Work promoting muscle and blood vessel regeneration and osteointegration is being investigated. This review paper will cover the latest treatments using gas-based plasmas in medicine. Disinfection of water and new commercial systems will also be reviewed, as well as vaccine deactivation. With the rapid increase in new investigators, development of new devices and systems for treatment, and wider clinical applications, Plasma medicine is becoming a powerful tool in in the field of medicine. There are a wide range of Plasma sources that allows customization of the effect. These variations include frequency (DC to MHz), voltage capacity (kV), gas source (He, Ar; O2, N2, air, water vapor; combinations), direct/indirect target exposure, and water targets.

  10. Particles formation in an expanding plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lescoute, E.; Hallo, L.; Chimier, B.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Stenz, C. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., CELIA, CNRS-CEA, 33 - Talence (France); Hebert, D.; Chevalier, J.M.; Rullier, J.L.; Palmier, S. [CEA Centre d' Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques d' Aquitaine, 33 - Le Barp (France)

    2009-08-15

    Interaction of a laser beam with a target generates a high velocity expanding plasma plume, solid debris and liquid nano- and micro-particles. They are produced from plasma recombination and vapor condensation and can be deposited on optical elements located nearby the target. Two distinct kinds of particles were observed depending on the temperature achieved in the plasma plume: large micrometer-size fragments for temperatures lower than the critical temperature, and very small nanometer-size particles for higher temperatures. The paper presents experimental observations of fragments and nano-particles in plasma plumes and a comparison with models. A good agreement has been found for nano-particle sizes and distributions. This simple modeling can also be used for nuclei production in the nanosecond time scale. Our estimates show that particle size can be correlated to laser wavelength and fluences.

  11. Plasma driven neutron/gamma generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Antolak, Arlyn

    2015-03-03

    An apparatus for the generation of neutron/gamma rays is described including a chamber which defines an ion source, said apparatus including an RF antenna positioned outside of or within the chamber. Positioned within the chamber is a target material. One or more sets of confining magnets are also provided to create a cross B magnetic field directly above the target. To generate neutrons/gamma rays, the appropriate source gas is first introduced into the chamber, the RF antenna energized and a plasma formed. A series of high voltage pulses are then applied to the target. A plasma sheath, which serves as an accelerating gap, is formed upon application of the high voltage pulse to the target. Depending upon the selected combination of source gas and target material, either neutrons or gamma rays are generated, which may be used for cargo inspection, and the like.

  12. Plasma physics and fusion plasma electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bers, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is a ubiquitous state of matter at high temperatures. The electrodynamics of plasmas encompasses a large number of applications, from understanding plasmas in space and the stars, to their use in processing semiconductors, and their role in controlled energy generation by nuclear fusion. This book covers collective and single particle dynamics of plasmas for fully ionized as well as partially ionized plasmas. Many aspects of plasma physics in current fusion energy generation research are addressed both in magnetic and inertial confinement plasmas. Linear and nonlinear dynamics in hydrodynamic and kinetic descriptions are offered, making both simple and complex aspects of the subject available in nearly every chapter. The approach of dividing the basic aspects of plasma physics as "linear, hydrodynamic descriptions" to be covered first because they are "easier", and postponing the "nonlinear and kinetic descriptions" for later because they are "difficult" is abandoned in this book. For teaching purpose...

  13. 二异丙酚靶控输注血药浓度与听觉诱发电位指数的相关性%Relationship of auditory evoked potential (AAI) index and plasma concentration during propofol administered by target-controlled infusion (TCI)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓丽云; 郭晋铎; 贺萍; 赵丽; 赵嘉训

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship between auditory evoked potential (AAI) index and plasma concentration of propofol administered by target-controlled infusion (TCI) in Chinese.Methods Ten ASA Ⅰ~Ⅱ tumor patients (5 males,5 females) scheduled for elective abdominal surgery under general anesthesia was enrolled in this study.Age ranged from 34 to 61 years,body weight from 52 to 79 kg and height from 155 to 178 cm.Radial artery was cannulated for blood sampling.The patients were premeditated with intravenous injection Midazolam 0.06 mg/L.Anesthesia was induced by fentanyl 2μg/kg,vecuronium 0.1 mg/kg and TCI of propofol which the target plasm concentration was set at 3 mg/L.After intubation,the target plasma concentration of propofol was adjusted at 1.7~2.5 mg/L.Vecuronium was continuous infusions at 2~3mg/h.Anesthesia was maintained with fentanyl-TCI of propofol-vecuronium and inhalation of 0.5 MAC isoflurane.The TCI system was composed of Base Primea company orchestra infusion pump using,the schnider pharmacokinetics model.ECG,Bp,HR,PETCO2,SpO2 and TETISO were monitored during anesthesia.Danmeter company A-line depth of anesthesia monitor recorded AAI index.Blood samples were taken at induction of anesthesia (To baseline),1,3,5,10,15,30,60 min (T1-7) and after cessation of infusion 10 and 20 min (T9-10).Plasma propofol concentration were determinated by fluorescence photometry.Results Compared with target concentrations,the measured concentrations of propofol were significantly lower during TCI(P<0.05).There was negative correlation between AAI and plasma propofol concentrations(r=-0.818,P<0.01).Conclusion On base of the Schnider pharmacokinetics model,the target propofol concentrations are not paralleled to plasma propofol concentrations which is descending with time prolongation.From negative correlation between AAI index and plasma propofol concentrations,AAI index will reflect indirectly plasma propofol concentrations.%目的 探讨二异丙酚

  14. The effect of MEP pathway and other inhibitors on the intracellular localization of a plasma membrane-targeted, isoprenylable GFP reporter protein in tobacco BY-2 cells [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/yx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hartmann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We have established an in vivo visualization system for the geranylgeranylation of proteins in a stably transformed tobacco BY-2 cell line, based on the expression of a dexamethasone-inducible GFP fused to the carboxy-terminal basic domain of the rice calmodulin CaM61, which naturally bears a CaaL geranylgeranylation motif (GFP-BD-CVIL. By using pathway-specific inhibitors it was demonstrated that inhibition of the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP pathway with known inhibitors like oxoclomazone and fosmidomycin, as well as inhibition of the protein geranylgeranyltransferase type 1 (PGGT-1, shifted the localization of the GFP-BD-CVIL protein from the membrane to the nucleus. In contrast, the inhibition of the mevalonate (MVA pathway with mevinolin did not affect the localization. During the present work, this test system has been used to examine the effect of newly designed inhibitors of the MEP pathway and inhibitors of sterol biosynthesis such as squalestatin, terbinafine and Ro48-8071. In addition, we also studied the impact of different post-prenylation inhibitors or those suspected to affect the transport of proteins to the plasma membrane on the localization of the geranylgeranylable fusion protein GFP-BD-CVIL.

  15. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 1010 J/m3. The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of

  16. Optical Properties of Relativistic Plasma Mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Vincenti, H; Kahaly, S; Martin, Ph; Quéré, F

    2013-01-01

    The advent of ultrahigh-power femtosecond lasers creates a need for optical components suitable to handle ultrahigh light intensities. Due to the unavoidable laser-induced ionization of matter, these components will have to be based on a plasma medium. An archetype of such optical elements is a plasma mirror, created when an intense femtosecond laser pulse impinges on a solid target. It consists of a dense plasma, formed by the laser field itself, which specularly reflects the main part of the pulse. Plasma mirrors have major potential applications as active optical elements to manipulate the temporal and spatial properties of intense laser beams, in particular for the generation of intense attosecond pulses of light. We investigate the basic physics involved in the deformation of a plasma mirror resulting from the light pressure exerted by the ultraintense laser during reflection, by deriving a simple model of this fundamental process, which we validate both numerically and experimentally. The understanding ...

  17. Progress In Plasma Accelerator Development for Dynamic Formation of Plasma Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Cassibry, Jason T.; Griffin, Steven; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An experimental plasma accelerator for magnetic target fusion (MTF) applications under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The accelerator is a coaxial pulsed plasma thruster (Figure 1). It has been tested experimentally and plasma jet velocities of approx.50 km/sec have been obtained. The plasma jet has been photographed with 10-ns exposure times to reveal a stable and repeatable plasma structure (Figure 2). Data for velocity profile information has been obtained using light pipes and magnetic probes embedded in the gun walls to record the plasma and current transit respectively at various barrel locations. Preliminary spatially resolved spectral data and magnetic field probe data are also presented. A high speed triggering system has been developed and tested as a means of reducing the gun "jitter". This jitter is being characterized and future work for second generation "ultra-low jitter" gun development is being identified.

  18. Plasma Accelerator Development for Dynamic Formation of Plasma Liners: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An experimental plasma accelerator for magnetic target fusion (MTF) applications under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The accelerator is a pulsed plasma thruster and has been tested experimentally and plasma jet velocities of approximately 50 km/sec have been obtained. The plasma jet structure has been photographed with 10 ns exposure times to reveal a stable and repeatable plasma structure. Data for velocity profile information has been obtained using light pipes embedded in the gun walls to record the plasma transit at various barrel locations. Preliminary spatially resolved spectral data and magnetic field probe data are also presented. A high speed triggering system has been developed and tested as a means of reducing the gun "jitter". This jitter is being characterized and future work for second generation "ultra-low jitter" gun development is being identified.

  19. Plasma-filled applied B ion diode experiments using a plasma opening switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renk, T. J.

    1994-12-01

    In order for a plasma opening switch (POS) to open quickly and transfer power efficiently from an inductively charged vacuum transmission line to an applied B ion diode, the load impedance of the ion diode may be required to have an initial low impedance phase. A plasma-filled diode has such an impedance history. To test the effect of a plasma-filled diode on POS-diode coupling, a drifting plasma was introduced from the cathode side of an applied B ion diode operated on the LION accelerator (1.5 MV, 4 Ohm, 40 ns) at Cornell University. This plasma readily crossed the 2.1 T magnetic insulation field of the diode, and resulted in both increased diode electrical power, and an increased ability of the ion beam to remove material from a target. The plasma did not appear to have a noticeable effect on local beam steering angle.

  20. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  1. Divertor plasma conditions and neutral dynamics in horizontal and vertical divertor configurations in JET-ILW low confinement mode plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, M., E-mail: mathias.groth@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Otakaari 4, Espoo (Finland); Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK4 – Plasma Physik, Jülich (Germany); Belo, P. [Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Association EURATOM/IST, Lisbon (Portugal); Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Brix, M. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Calabro, G. [Association EURATOM-ENEA, Frascati (Italy); Chankin, A. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Clever, M.; Coenen, J.W. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK4 – Plasma Physik, Jülich (Germany); Corrigan, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Drewelow, P. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Greifswald (Germany); Guillemaut, C. [Association EURATOM CEA, CEA/DSM/IRFM, Cadarache (France); Harting, D. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Huber, A. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK4 – Plasma Physik, Jülich (Germany); Jachmich, S. [Association ‘Euratom-Belgian state’, Ecole Royale Militaire, Brussels (Belgium); Järvinen, A. [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Otakaari 4, Espoo (Finland); Kruezi, U.; Lawson, K.D. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Lehnen, M. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK4 – Plasma Physik, Jülich (Germany); ITER Organisation, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); and others

    2015-08-15

    Measurements of the plasma conditions at the low field side target plate in JET ITER-like wall ohmic and low confinement mode plasmas show minor differences in divertor plasma configurations with horizontally and vertically inclined targets. Both the reduction of the electron temperature in the vicinity of the strike points and the rollover of the ion current to the plates follow the same functional dependence on the density at the low field side midplane. Configurations with vertically inclined target plates, however, produce twice as high sub-divertor pressures for the same upstream density. Simulations with the EDGE2D-EIRENE code package predict significantly lower plasma temperatures at the low field side target in vertical than in horizontal target configurations. Including cross-field drifts and imposing a pumping by-pass leak at the low-field side plate can still not recover the experimental observations.

  2. International movement of plasma and plasma contracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, A

    2005-01-01

    Plasma fractionation is a global business characterised by technological stability, increasing consolidation and a high level of regulatory oversight. All these factors affect the ease with which plasma derivatives can be accessed in the world market. As domestic regulatory measures in the first world blood economies become increasingly resonant to the precautionary approach, the availability of plasma as a raw material, as well as its cost, become an increasingly significant component in the cost of the final product. This decreases the amount of plasma which fractionators are able to allocate for export activities. Also, regulatory standards in the country of manufacture will reflect priorities in that country which may not be similar to those in export markets, but which will affect entry to those markets. While many countries possess a fractionation capacity, the limiting factor in supply worldwide is the amount of plasma available, and nationalistic drivers for each country to have its own plant are inimical to product safety and supply. Rather, the provision of sufficient supplies of domestic plasma should be the focus of resource allocation, with a choice of an appropriate contract fractionator. However, contract fractionation too may be affected by domestic considerations unrelated to the needs of the country of plasma origin. This chapter will review the global plasma market and the influences on plasma and plasma product movement across national borders. Problems in ensuring adequate safety and supply will be identified, and some tentative approaches to the amelioration of current barriers to the provision of plasma derivatives will be outlined.

  3. Particle-in-cell modeling for MJ scale dense plasma focus with varied anode shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, A., E-mail: link6@llnl.gov; Halvorson, C., E-mail: link6@llnl.gov; Schmidt, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, Las Vegas, NV 89030 (United States); Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R. [Voss Scientific LLC, Albuquerque NM 87108 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Megajoule scale dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinches with deuterium gas fill are compact devices capable of producing 10{sup 12} neutrons per shot but past predictive models of large-scale DPF have not included kinetic effects such as ion beam formation or anomalous resistivity. We report on progress of developing a predictive DPF model by extending our 2D axisymmetric collisional kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations from the 4 kJ, 200 kA LLNL DPF to 1 MJ, 2 MA Gemini DPF using the PIC code LSP. These new simulations incorporate electrodes, an external pulsed-power driver circuit, and model the plasma from insulator lift-off through the pinch phase. To accommodate the vast range of relevant spatial and temporal scales involved in the Gemini DPF within the available computational resources, the simulations were performed using a new hybrid fluid-to-kinetic model. This new approach allows single simulations to begin in an electron/ion fluid mode from insulator lift-off through the 5-6 μs run-down of the 50+ cm anode, then transition to a fully kinetic PIC description during the run-in phase, when the current sheath is 2-3 mm from the central axis of the anode. Simulations are advanced through the final pinch phase using an adaptive variable time-step to capture the fs and sub-mm scales of the kinetic instabilities involved in the ion beam formation and neutron production. Validation assessments are being performed using a variety of different anode shapes, comparing against experimental measurements of neutron yield, neutron anisotropy and ion beam production.

  4. Plasma flow interaction with ITER divertor related surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dojčinović, Ivan P.

    2010-11-01

    It has been found that the plasma flow generated by quasistationary plasma accelerators can be used for simulation of high energy plasma interaction with different materials of interest for fusion experiments. It is especially important for the studies of the processes such as ELMs (edge localized modes), plasma disruptions and VDEs (vertical displacement events), during which a significant part of the confined hot plasma is lost from the core to the SOL (scrape off layer) enveloping the core region. Experiments using plasma guns have been used to assess erosion from disruptions and ELMs. Namely, in this experiment modification of different targets, like tungsten, molybdenum, CFC and silicon single crystal surface by the action of hydrogen and nitrogen quasistationary compression plasma flow (CPF) generated by magnetoplasma compressor (MPC) has been studied. MPC plasma flow with standard parameters (1 MJ/m2 in 0.1 ms) can be used for simulation of transient peak thermal loads during Type I ELMs and disruptions. Analysis of the targets erosion, brittle destruction, melting processes, and dust formation has been performed. These surface phenomena are results of specific conditions during CPF interaction with target surface. The investigations are related to the fundamental aspects of high energy plasma flow interaction with different material of interest for fusion. One of the purposes is a study of competition between melting and cleavage of treated solid surface. The other is investigation of plasma interaction with first wall and divertor component materials related to the ITER experiment.

  5. Communication through Plasma Sheaths

    CERN Document Server

    Korotkevich, A O; Zakharov, V E

    2007-01-01

    We wish to transmit messages to and from a hypersonic vehicle around which a plasma sheath has formed. For long distance transmission, the signal carrying these messages must be necessarily low frequency, typically 2 GHz, to which the plasma sheath is opaque. The idea is to use the plasma properties to make the plasma sheath appear transparent.

  6. Introduction to plasma dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Morozov, A I

    2013-01-01

    As the twenty-first century progresses, plasma technology will play an increasing role in our lives, providing new sources of energy, ion-plasma processing of materials, wave electromagnetic radiation sources, space plasma thrusters, and more. Studies of the plasma state of matter not only accelerate technological developments but also improve the understanding of natural phenomena. Beginning with an introduction to the characteristics and types of plasmas, Introduction to Plasma Dynamics covers the basic models of classical diffuse plasmas used to describe such phenomena as linear and shock w

  7. Collisionless plasmas in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Belmont, Gerard; Mottez, Fabrice; Pantellini, Filippo; Pelletier, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Collisionless Plasmas in Astrophysics examines the unique properties of media without collisions in plasma physics. Experts in this field, the authors present the first book to concentrate on collisionless conditions in plasmas, whether close or not to thermal equilibrium. Filling a void in scientific literature, Collisionless Plasmas in Astrophysics explains the possibilities of modeling such plasmas, using a fluid or a kinetic framework. It also addresses common misconceptions that even professionals may possess, on phenomena such as "collisionless (Landau) damping". Abundant illustrations

  8. Cold plasma inactivation of chronic wound bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Nasir, N; Lee, B K; Yap, S S; Thong, K L; Yap, S L

    2016-09-01

    Cold plasma is partly ionized non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure. It has been recognized as an alternative approach in medicine for sterilization of wounds, promotion of wound healing, topical treatment of skin diseases with microbial involvement and treatment of cancer. Cold plasma used in wound therapy inhibits microbes in chronic wound due to its antiseptic effects, while promoting healing by stimulation of cell proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells. In this study, two types of plasma systems are employed to generate cold plasma: a parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge and a capillary-guided corona discharge. Parameters such as applied voltage, discharge frequency, treatment time and the flow of the carrier gas influence the cold plasma chemistry and therefore change the composition and concentration of plasma species that react with the target sample. Chronic wound that fails to heal often infected by multidrug resistant organisms makes them recalcitrant to healing. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are two common bacteria in infected and clinically non-infected wounds. The efficacies of the cold plasma generated by the two designs on the inactivation of three different isolates of MRSA and four isolates of P. aeruginosa are reported here.

  9. Microwave diagnostics of atmospheric plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David

    Plasma treatment of biological tissues has tremendous potential due to the wide range of applications. Most plasmas have gas temperatures which greatly exceed room temperature. These are often utilized in electro-surgery for cutting and coagulating tissue. Another type of plasma, referred to as cold atmospheric plasma, or CAP, is characterized by heavy particle temperatures which are at or near room temperature. Due to this lack of thermal effect, CAP may provide less invasive medical procedures. Additionally, CAP have been demonstrated to be effective at targeting cancer cells while minimizing damage to the surrounding tissue. A recently fabricated Microwave Electron Density Device (MEDD) utilizes microwave scattering on small atmospheric plasmas to determine the electron plasma density. The MEDD can be utilized on plasmas which range from a fraction of a millimeter to several centimeters at atmospheric pressure when traditional methods cannot be applied. Microwave interferometry fails due to the small size of the plasma relative to the microwave wavelength which leads to diffraction and negligible phase change; electrostatic probes introduce very strong perturbation and are associated with difficulties of application in strongly-collisional atmospheric conditions; and laser Thomson scattering is not sensitive enough to measure plasma densities less than 1012 cm-3. The first part of this dissertation provides an overview of two types of small atmospheric plasma objects namely CAPs and plasmas utilized in the electro-surgery. It then goes on to describe the fabrication, testing and calibration of the MEDD facility. The second part of this dissertation is focused on the application of the MEDD and other diagnostic techniques to both plasma objects. A series of plasma images that illustrate the temporal evolution of a discharge created by an argon electrosurgical device operating in the coagulation mode and its behavior was analyzed. The discharge of the argon

  10. Wakes in Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ian Norman

    Plasma wave wakes, which are the collective oscillatory response near the plasma frequency to the propagation of particles or electromagnetic waves through a plasma, play a critical role in many plasma processes. New results from backwards stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS), in which wakes with phase velocities much less than the speed of light are induced by the beating of counter-propagating light waves, and from electron beam stopping, in which the wakes are produced by the motion of relativistically propagating electrons through the dense plasma, are discussed. Both processes play important roles in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In BSRS, laser light is scattered backwards out of the plasma, decreasing the energy available to compress the ICF capsule and affecting the symmetry of where the laser energy hits the hohlraum wall in indirect drive ICF. The plasma wave wake can also generate superthermal electrons that can preheat the core and/or the ablator. Electron beam stopping plays a critical role in the Fast Ignition (FI) ICF concept, in which a beam of relativistic electrons is used to heat the target core to ignition temperatures after the compression stage. The beam stopping power determines the effectiveness of the heating process. This dissertation covers new discoveries on the importance of plasma wave wakes in both BSRS and electron beam stopping. In the SRS studies, 1D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations using OSIRIS are performed, which model a short-duration (˜500/ω0 --1FWHM) counter-propagating scattered light seed pulse in the presence of a constant pump laser with an intensity far below the absolute instability threshold for plasma waves undergoing Landau damping. The seed undergoes linear convective Raman amplification and dominates over the amplification of fluctuations due to particle discreteness. The simulation results are in good agreement with results from a coupled-mode solver when special relativity and the effects of finite size PIC

  11. A high-efficiency superhydrophobic plasma separator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changchun; Liao, Shih-Chuan; Song, Jinzhao; Mauk, Michael G; Li, Xuanwen; Wu, Gaoxiang; Ge, Dengteng; Greenberg, Robert M; Yang, Shu; Bau, Haim H

    2016-02-01

    To meet stringent limit-of-detection specifications for low abundance target molecules, a relatively large volume of plasma is needed for many blood-based clinical diagnostics. Conventional centrifugation methods for plasma separation are not suitable for on-site testing or bedside diagnostics. Here, we report a simple, yet high-efficiency, clamshell-style, superhydrophobic plasma separator that is capable of separating a relatively large volume of plasma from several hundred microliters of whole blood (finger-prick blood volume). The plasma separator consists of a superhydrophobic top cover with a separation membrane and a superhydrophobic bottom substrate. Unlike previously reported membrane-based plasma separators, the separation membrane in our device is positioned at the top of the sandwiched whole blood film to increase the membrane separation capacity and plasma yield. In addition, the device's superhydrophobic characteristics (i) facilitates the formation of well-defined, contracted, thin blood film with a high contact angle; (ii) minimizes biomolecular adhesion to surfaces; (iii) increases blood clotting time; and (iv) reduces blood cell hemolysis. The device demonstrated a "blood in-plasma out" capability, consistently extracting 65 ± 21.5 μL of plasma from 200 μL of whole blood in less than 10 min without electrical power. The device was used to separate plasma from Schistosoma mansoni genomic DNA-spiked whole blood with a recovery efficiency of >84.5 ± 25.8%. The S. mansoni genomic DNA in the separated plasma was successfully tested on our custom-made microfluidic chip by using loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method.

  12. Colloidal Plasmas : Basic physics of colloidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C B Dwivedi

    2000-11-01

    Colloidal plasma is a distinct class of the impure plasmas with multispecies ionic composition. The distinction lies in the phase distribution of the impurity-ion species. The ability to tailor the electrostatic interactions between these colloidal particles provides a fertile ground for scientists to investigate the fundamental aspects of the Coulomb phase transition behavior. The present contribution will review the basic physics of the charging mechanism of the colloidal particles as well as the physics of the collective normal mode behavior of the general multi-ion species plasmas. Emphasis will be laid on the clarification of the prevailing confusing ideas about distinct qualities of the various acoustic modes, which are likely to exist in colloidal plasmas as well as in normal multi-ion species plasmas. Introductory ideas about the proposed physical models for the Coulomb phase transition in colloidal plasma will also be discussed.

  13. Developing target injection and tracking for inertial fusion energy power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, D. T.; Alexander, N. B.; Gibson, C. R.; Nobile, A.; Petzoldt, R. W.; Siegel, N. P.; Thompson, L.

    2001-05-01

    Fuelling of a commercial inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant consists of supplying about 500 000 fusion targets each day. The most challenging type of target in this regard is that for laser driven direct drive IFE power plants. Spherical capsules with cryogenic DT fuel must be injected into the centre of a reaction chamber operating at temperatures as high as 1500° C and possibly containing as much as 0.5 torr of xenon fill gas. The DT layer must remain highly symmetric, have a smooth inner ice surface finish and reach the chamber centre (CC) at a temperature of about 18.5 K. This target must be positioned at the centre of the chamber with a placement accuracy of +/-5 mm. The accuracy of alignment of the laser driver beams and the target in its final position must be within +/-20 μm. All this must be repeated six times per second. The method proposed to meet these requirements is to inject the targets into the reaction chamber at high speed ( approx 400 m/s), track them, and hit them in flight with steerable driver beams. The challenging scientific and technological issues associated with this task are being addressed through a combination of analyses, modelling, materials property measurements and demonstration tests with representative injection equipment. Measurements of relevant DT properties are planned at Los Alamos National Laboratory. An experimental target injection and tracking system is now being designed to support the development of survivable targets and demonstrate successful injection scenarios. Analyses of target heating are under way. Calculations have shown that a direct drive target must have a highly reflective outer surface to prevent excess heating by thermal radiation. In addition, heating by hot chamber fill gas during injection far outweighs that by the thermal radiation. It is concluded that the dry wall, gas filled reaction chambers must have gas pressures and wall temperatures less than previously assumed in order to prevent

  14. A differentially pumped argon plasma in the linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI: gas flow and dynamics of the ionized fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, H. J. N.; Hansen, T. A. R.; Kleyn, A. W.; van der Meiden, H. J.; D.C. Schram,; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma

    2011-01-01

    Magnum-PSI is a linear plasma generator designed to reach the plasma-surface interaction (PSI) regime of ITER and nuclear fusion reactors beyond ITER. To reach this regime, the influx of cold neutrals from the source must be significantly lower than the plasma flux reaching the target. This is

  15. A differentially pumped argon plasma in the linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI: gas flow and dynamics of the ionized fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, H. J. N.; Hansen, T. A. R.; Kleyn, A. W.; van der Meiden, H. J.; D.C. Schram,; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma

    2011-01-01

    Magnum-PSI is a linear plasma generator designed to reach the plasma-surface interaction (PSI) regime of ITER and nuclear fusion reactors beyond ITER. To reach this regime, the influx of cold neutrals from the source must be significantly lower than the plasma flux reaching the target. This is achie

  16. Laser Plasmas : Multiple charge states of titanium ions in laser produced plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Shukla; S Bandhyopadhyay; V N Rai; A V Kilpio; H C Pant

    2000-11-01

    An intense laser radiation (1012 to 1014 W/cm-2) focused on the solid target creates a hot (≥ 1 keV) and dense plasma having high ionization state. The multiple charged ions with high current densities produced during laser matter interaction have potential application in accelerators as an ion source. This paper presents generation and detection of highly stripped titanium ions (Ti) in laser produced plasma. An Nd:glass laser (KAMETRON) delivering 50 J energy ( = 0.53 m) in 2.5 ns was focused onto a titanium target to produce plasma. This plasma was allowed to drift across a space of ∼ 3 m through a diagnostic hole in the focusing mirror before ions are finally detected with the help of electrostatic ion analyzer. Maximum current density was detected for the charge states of +16 and +17 of Ti ions for laser intensity of ∼ 1014 W/cm-2.

  17. Fast photography of plasma formed by laser ablation of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedanovska, E.; Ivkovic, M.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present results of the temporal and spatial analysis of laser induced plasma performed by use of ICCD fast photography. The plasma is formed by excimer laser ablation of aluminum target in vacuum, air or different pressures of argon and helium. It is shown how the plasma luminous intensity and duration depends on gas pressure. The obtained time dependence of wave propagation distance is also compared with predictions given by the blast wave and drag-force theory also.

  18. Nonlinear plasma wave in magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanov, Sergei V. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region 141700 (Russian Federation); Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Hosokai, Tomonao; Zhidkov, Alexei G. [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kodama, Ryosuke [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Nonlinear axisymmetric cylindrical plasma oscillations in magnetized collisionless plasmas are a model for the electron fluid collapse on the axis behind an ultrashort relativisically intense laser pulse exciting a plasma wake wave. We present an analytical description of the strongly nonlinear oscillations showing that the magnetic field prevents closing of the cavity formed behind the laser pulse. This effect is demonstrated with 3D PIC simulations of the laser-plasma interaction. An analysis of the betatron oscillations of fast electrons in the presence of the magnetic field reveals a characteristic “Four-Ray Star” pattern.

  19. Elements of plasma technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Chiow San

    2016-01-01

    This book presents some fundamental aspects of plasma technology that are important for beginners interested to start research in the area of plasma technology . These include the properties of plasma, methods of plasma generation and basic plasma diagnostic techniques. It also discusses several low cost plasma devices, including pulsed plasma sources such as plasma focus, pulsed capillary discharge, vacuum spark and exploding wire; as well as low temperature plasmas such as glow discharge and dielectric barrier discharge which the authors believe may have potential applications in industry. The treatments are experimental rather than theoretical, although some theoretical background is provided where appropriate. The principles of operation of these devices are also reviewed and discussed.

  20. Rare-earth plasma light source for VUV applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, G; Carroll, P K; McLlrath, T J; Ginter, M L

    1981-09-01

    A compact versatile light source for producing VUV radiation from laser produced plasmas is described. Measurements of the spectral irradiance from CO(2) laser-produced plasmas on targets of gadolinium and ytterbium in the 115-220-nm range are given, and a comparison is made with analogous results obtained using a ruby laser.