WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasmapause

  1. Relationship of stable auroral red arcs to the plasmapause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleckner, E.W.; Smith, L.L.; Wildman, P.J.L.

    1974-01-01

    The relation between the plasmapause and the light ion trough offers a potential tie between the low and high altitude magnetosphere if the plasma distribution along the field lines between L = 2 to 6 region can be measured. The data from several simultaneous satellite-ground based measurements of ion density and plasmapause position were measured. (U.S.)

  2. Cluster observations of mid-latitude hiss near the plasmapause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Masson

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available In the vicinity of the plasmapause, around the geomagnetic equator, the four Cluster satellites often observe banded hiss-like electromagnetic emissions (BHE; below the electron gyrofrequency but above the lower hybrid resonance, from 2kHz to 10kHz. We show that below 4kHz, these waves propagate in the whistler mode. Using the first year of scientific operations of WHISPER, STAFF and WBD wave experiments on Cluster, we have identified the following properties of the BHE waves: (i their location is strongly correlated with the position of the plasmapause, (ii no MLT dependence has been found, (iii their spectral width is generally 1 to 2kHz, and (iv the central frequency of their emission band varies from 2kHz to 10kHz. All these features suggest that BHE are in fact mid-latitude hiss emissions (MLH. Moreover, the central frequency was found to be correlated with the Kp index. This suggests either that these banded emissions are generated in a given f/fce range, or that there is a Kp dependent Doppler shift between the satellites and a possible moving source of the MLH.

  3. Remote sensing the plasmasphere, plasmapause, plumes and other features using ground-based magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menk Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasmapause is a highly dynamic boundary between different magnetospheric particle populations and convection regimes. Some of the most important space weather processes involve wave-particle interactions in this region, but wave properties may also be used to remote sense the plasmasphere and plasmapause, contributing to plasmasphere models. This paper discusses the use of existing ground magnetometer arrays for such remote sensing. Using case studies we illustrate measurement of plasmapause location, shape and movement during storms; refilling of flux tubes within and outside the plasmasphere; storm-time increase in heavy ion concentration near the plasmapause; and detection and mapping of density irregularities near the plasmapause, including drainage plumes, biteouts and bulges. We also use a 2D MHD model of wave propagation through the magnetosphere, incorporating a realistic ionosphere boundary and Alfvén speed profile, to simulate ground array observations of power and cross-phase spectra, hence confirming the signatures of plumes and other density structures.

  4. Enhancement of low energy particle flux around plasmapause under quiet geomagnetic condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.

    2016-12-01

    Plasmapause is the boundary of the plasmaspheric region where cold plasma is dominant. In this boundary, the plasma density shows depletion to 1 10 on direction from the plasmasphere to magnetosphere and changes composition of energy distribution of particle. Some previous study provides that the location of the plasmapause expand beyond geosynchronous orbit under the quiet geomagnetic conditions. In this work, we study the changed characteristic of particle flux around the plasmapause using measurement from Van Allen Probes. On 23 April 2013, the satellites observed simultaneously proton and electron fluxes enhancement with E > 100 eV. During 12 hours prior to this event, the geomagnetic conditions were very quiet, Kp < 1, and geomagnetic storm did not occur. This event maintain for 15 minutes and only proton flux decrease rapidly in the magnetosphere. In this period SYM-H index enhanced abruptly in response to the impact of the dynamic pressure enhancement and AE index increased gradually up to about 200 nT. Electric field started to perturb in coincidence with enhancement of particle flux from the plasmapause. To explain the variation of low energy particle flux we will compare kinetic property of low energy particle by using velocity space distribution function at region of inner and outer boundary of the plasmapause.

  5. Observations of the universal instability at the plasmapause associated with micropulsations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, H.; Gurnett, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    A new model for short term geomagnetic pulsation was proposed. This geomagnetic pulsation is generated in plasmapause, and the local time is in the night side. The pulsation occurs in the recovery phase of magnetic storm, and the propagating path is the irregular structure of plasmapause. The generation mechanism is the universal instability. The spectrograms of the electric field (1.78 Hz - 178 kHz) and the magnetic field (1.78 Hz - 562 Hz) observed by the satellite HAWKEYE showed these characteristics, and these data strongly support the present new model. (Yoshimori, M.)

  6. Altitude variation of the plasmapause signature in the main ionospheric trough

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Benson, R. F.; Webb, P. A.; Truhlík, Vladimír; Bilitza, D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 16 (2009), s. 1669-1676 ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420603 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Plasmapause * Ionosphere * Midlatitude Trough Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2009

  7. The relationship between plasmapause, solar wind and geomagnetic activity between 2007 and 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbanac, G. [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Dept. of Geophysics; Pierrard, V. [Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (Space Physics and STCE), Brussels (Belgium); Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium). TECLIM, Earth and Life Inst.; Darrouzet, F. [Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (Space Physics and STCE), Brussels (Belgium); Rauch, J.L.; Decreau, P. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement et de l' Espace (LPC2E), Orleans (France); Bandic, M.

    2015-07-01

    Taking advantage of the Cluster satellite mission and especially the observations made by the instrument WHISPER to deduce the electron number density along the orbit of the satellites, we studied the relationships between the plasmapause positions (L{sub PP}) and the following L{sub PP} indicators: (a) solar wind coupling functions B{sub z} (Z component of the interplanetary magnetic field vector, B, in GSM system), BV (related to the interplanetary electric field; B is the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field vector, V is solar wind velocity), and dΦ{sub mp}/dt (which combines different physical processes responsible for the magnetospheric activity) and (b) geomagnetic indices Dst, Ap and AE. The analysis is performed separately for three magnetic local time (MLT) sectors (Sector1 - night sector (01:00-07:00MLT); Sector2 - day sector (07:00-16:00MLT); Sector3 - evening sector (16:00-01:00MLT)) and for all MLTs taken together. All L{sub PP} indicators suggest the faster plasmapause response in the postmidnight sector. Delays in the plasmapause responses (hereafter time lags) are approximately 2-27 h, always increasing from Sector1 to Sector3. The obtained fits clearly resolve the MLT structures. The variability in the plasmapause is the largest for low values of L{sub PP} indicators, especially in Sector2. At low activity levels, L{sub PP} exhibits the largest values on the dayside (in Sector2) and the smallest on the postmidnight side (Sector1). Displacements towards larger values on the evening side (Sector3) and towards lower values on the dayside (Sector2) are identified for enhanced magnetic activity. Our results contribute to constraining the physical mechanisms involved in the plasmapause formation and to further study the still not well understood related issues.

  8. The relationship between plasmapause, solar wind and geomagnetic activity between 2007 and 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbanac, G.; Rauch, J.L.; Decreau, P.; Bandic, M.

    2015-01-01

    Taking advantage of the Cluster satellite mission and especially the observations made by the instrument WHISPER to deduce the electron number density along the orbit of the satellites, we studied the relationships between the plasmapause positions (L PP ) and the following L PP indicators: (a) solar wind coupling functions B z (Z component of the interplanetary magnetic field vector, B, in GSM system), BV (related to the interplanetary electric field; B is the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field vector, V is solar wind velocity), and dΦ mp /dt (which combines different physical processes responsible for the magnetospheric activity) and (b) geomagnetic indices Dst, Ap and AE. The analysis is performed separately for three magnetic local time (MLT) sectors (Sector1 - night sector (01:00-07:00MLT); Sector2 - day sector (07:00-16:00MLT); Sector3 - evening sector (16:00-01:00MLT)) and for all MLTs taken together. All L PP indicators suggest the faster plasmapause response in the postmidnight sector. Delays in the plasmapause responses (hereafter time lags) are approximately 2-27 h, always increasing from Sector1 to Sector3. The obtained fits clearly resolve the MLT structures. The variability in the plasmapause is the largest for low values of L PP indicators, especially in Sector2. At low activity levels, L PP exhibits the largest values on the dayside (in Sector2) and the smallest on the postmidnight side (Sector1). Displacements towards larger values on the evening side (Sector3) and towards lower values on the dayside (Sector2) are identified for enhanced magnetic activity. Our results contribute to constraining the physical mechanisms involved in the plasmapause formation and to further study the still not well understood related issues.

  9. Influence of the Convection Electric Field Models on Predicted Plasmapause Positions During Magnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrard, V.; Khazanov, G.; Cabrera, J.; Lemaire, J.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, we determine how three well documented models of the magnetospheric electric field, and two different mechanisms proposed for the formation of the plasmapause influence the radial distance, the shape and the evolution of the plasmapause during the geomagnetic storms of 28 October 2001 and of 17 April 2002. The convection electric field models considered are: Mcllwain's E51) electric field model, Volland-Stern's model and Weimer's statistical model compiled from low-Earth orbit satellite data. The mechanisms for the formation of the plasmapause to be tested are: (i) the MHD theory where the plasmapause should correspond to the last-closed- equipotential (LCE) or last-closed-streamline (LCS), if the E-field distribution is stationary or time-dependent respectively; (ii) the interchange mechanism where the plasmapause corresponds to streamlines tangent to a Zero-Parallel-Force surface where the field-aligned plasma distribution becomes convectively unstable during enhancements of the E-field intensity in the nightside local time sector. The results of the different time dependent simulations are compared with concomitant EUV observations when available. The plasmatails or plumes observed after both selected geomagnetic storms are predicted in all simulations and for all E-field models. However, their shapes are quite different depending on the E-field models and the mechanisms that are used. Despite the partial success of the simulations to reproduce plumes during magnetic storms and substorms, there remains a long way to go before the detailed structures observed in the EUV observations during periods of geomagnetic activity can be accounted for very precisely by the existing E-field models. Furthermore, it cannot be excluded that the mechanisms currently identified to explain the formation of "Carpenter's knee" during substorm events, will', have to be revised or complemented in the cases of geomagnetic storms.

  10. The relationship between plasmapause, solar wind and geomagnetic activity between 2007 and 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Verbanac

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Taking advantage of the Cluster satellite mission and especially the observations made by the instrument WHISPER to deduce the electron number density along the orbit of the satellites, we studied the relationships between the plasmapause positions (LPP and the following LPP indicators: (a solar wind coupling functions Bz (Z component of the interplanetary magnetic field vector, B, in GSM system, BV (related to the interplanetary electric field; B is the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field vector, V is solar wind velocity, and dΦmp/dt (which combines different physical processes responsible for the magnetospheric activity and (b geomagnetic indices Dst, Ap and AE. The analysis is performed separately for three magnetic local time (MLT sectors (Sector1 – night sector (01:00–07:00 MLT; Sector2 – day sector (07:00–16:00 MLT; Sector3 – evening sector (16:00–01:00 MLT and for all MLTs taken together. All LPP indicators suggest the faster plasmapause response in the postmidnight sector. Delays in the plasmapause responses (hereafter time lags are approximately 2–27 h, always increasing from Sector1 to Sector3. The obtained fits clearly resolve the MLT structures. The variability in the plasmapause is the largest for low values of LPP indicators, especially in Sector2. At low activity levels,LPP exhibits the largest values on the dayside (in Sector2 and the smallest on the postmidnight side (Sector1. Displacements towards larger values on the evening side (Sector3 and towards lower values on the dayside (Sector2 are identified for enhanced magnetic activity. Our results contribute to constraining the physical mechanisms involved in the plasmapause formation and to further study the still not well understood related issues.

  11. Determination of the Earth's Plasmapause Location from the CE-3 EUVC Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Chen, Bo; Fok, Mei-Ching; Nakano, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    The Moon-based Extreme Ultraviolet Camera (EUVC) aboard China's Chang'e-3 (CE-3) mission has successfully imaged the entire Earth's plasmasphere for the first time from the side views on lunar surface. An EUVC image on 21 April 2014 is used in this study to demonstrate the characteristics and configurations of the Moon-based EUV imaging and to illustrate the determination algorithm of the plasmapause locations on the magnetic equator. The plasmapause locations determined from all the available EUVC images with the Minimum L Algorithm are quantitatively compared with those extracted from insitu observations (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, and Radiation Belt Storm Probes). Excellent agreement between the determined plasmapauses seen by EUVC and the extracted ones from other satellites indicates the reliability of the Moon-based EUVC images as well as the determination algorithm. This preliminary study provides an important basis for future investigation of the dynamics of the plasmasphere with the Moon-based EUVC imaging.

  12. Plasmapause Dynamics Observed During the 17 March and 28 June 2013 Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, R. L.; Coster, A. J.; Turner, D. L.; Nikoukar, R.; Lemon, C.; Roeder, J. L.; Shumko, M.; Bhatt, R.; Payne, C.; Bust, G. S.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's plasmasphere is a region of cold (T ≤ 1 eV), dense (n 101 to 104 cm-3) plasma located in the inner magnetosphere and coincident with a portion of the ionosphere that co-rotates with the planet in the geomagnetic field. Plasmaspheric plasma originates in the ionosphere and fills the magnetic flux tubes on which the corotation electric field dominates over the convection electric field. The corotation electric field results from Earth's spinning magnetic field while the convection electric field results from the solar wind driving of global plasma convection within the magnetosphere. The outer boundary of the plasmasphere is the plasmapause, and it corresponds to the transition region between corotation-driven vs. convection-driven plasmas. When the convection electric field is enhanced during active solar wind periods, such as magnetic storms, the plasmasphere can rapidly erode to L 2.5 or less. During subsequent quiet periods of low solar wind speed and weak interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), ionospheric outflow from lower altitudes refills the plasmasphere over the course of several days or more, with the plasmapause expanding to higher L-shells. The combination of convection, corotation, and ionospheric plasma outflow during and after a storm leads to characteristic features such as plasmaspheric shoulders, notches, and plumes. In this presentation, we focus on the dynamics of the plasmapause during two storms in 2013: March 17 and June 28. The minimum Dst for the two storms were -139 and -98 nT, respectively. We examine plasmapause dynamics utilizing data from an extensive global network of ground-based scientific GPS receivers ( 4000) and line-of-sight observations from the GPS receivers on the COSMIC and C/NOFS satellites, along with data from THEMIS and van Allen Probes, and Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter Radar. Using the various datasets, we will compare the pre-storm and storm-time plasmasphere. We will also examine the location, evolution

  13. Magnetospheric conditions at the time of enhanced wave-particle interactions near the plasmapause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, J.C.; Rosenberg, T.J.; Lanzerotti, L.J.

    1976-01-01

    The morphology of geomagnetic and particle disturbances occurring in the American sector during the 0700--1000 UT time interval on January 2, 1971, is examined. This period includes the VLF/X ray burst correlation event that was detected near the plasmapause at Lapprox.4 in the vicinity of Siple Station, Antarctica (Rosenberg et al., 1971; Foster and Rosenberg, 1976a). It is found that a sequence of substorm intensifications occurred (0730, 0820, 0850, and 0925 UT), successive intensifications tending to occur more westwardly than the preceding ones. The last intensification in the sequence was confined principally to latitudes higher than the nominal auroral zone. Injections of energetic electrons into the night side magnetosphere were observed at Lapprox.6.6 during the intensifications at approx.0820 and approx.0850 UT. The onset and pronounced temporal and spectral features of the electron precipitation at Lapprox.4 near dawn can be related to these electron injections when cross-L inward convection and azimuthal drit are considered. It is suggested that injected electrons penetrated at least to the region just outside the plasmapause during the substorm and that simultaneous electron precipitation and VLF wave generation were associated with the onset of cyclotron resonance interactions following the arrival of the electrons on the field line over Siple Station

  14. Cluster observations of EMIC triggered emissions in association with Pc1 waves near Earth's plasmapause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, J. S.; Grison, B.; Omura, Y.; Engebretson, M. J.; Dandouras, I.; Masson, A.; Adrian, M. L.; Santolík, O.; Décréau, P. M. E.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Constantinescu, D.

    2010-05-01

    The Cluster spacecraft were favorably positioned on the nightside near the equatorial plasmapause of Earth at L ˜ 4.3 on 30 March 2002 to observe electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) rising tone emissions in association with Pc1 waves at 1.5 Hz. The EMIC rising tone emissions were found to be left-hand, circularly polarized, dispersive, and propagating away from the equator. Their burstiness and dispersion of ˜30s/Hz rising out of the 1.5 Hz Pc1 waves are consistent with their identification as EMIC triggered chorus emissions, the first to be reported through in situ observations near the plasmapause. Along with the expected H+ ring current ions seen at higher energies (>300 eV), lower energy ions (300 eV and less) were observed during the most intense EMIC triggered emission events. Nonlinear wave-particle interactions via cyclotron resonance between the ˜2-10 keV H+ ions with temperature anisotropy and the linearly-amplified Pc1 waves are suggested as a possible generation mechanism for the EMIC triggered emissions.

  15. Comparison of H+ and He+ plasmapause locations based on the resurrected and reevaluated OGO-5 ion composition data base

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Truhlík, Vladimír; Třísková, Ludmila; Benson, R. F.; Bilitza, D.; Grebowsky, J.; Richards, P. G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 119, NOV (2014), s. 27-34 ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11123 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : plasmasphere * plasmapause * FLIP * empirical model * OGO-5 Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.474, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ article /pii/S1364682614001321#

  16. Quantitative simulation of a magnetospheric substorm 3. Plasmaspheric electric fields and evolution of the plasmapause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiro, R.W.; Harel, M.; Wolf, R.A.; Reiff, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    Results of the Rice University substorm simulation have been used to investigate the penetration of substorm-associated electric fields into the plasmasphere. Near 4 R/sub E/ in the equatorial plane, our time dependent electric field model is characterized by eastward components in the dusk-midnight local time sector and westward components after midnight. Except for a small region just before dusk, the model predicts eastward electric field components throughout the daytime sector. The characteristic radial component is directed inward at all local times except for a small region just after dawn. These results compare favorably with available whistler and incoherent-scatter radar measurements obtained during magnetically disturbed periods. By assuming an initial plasmapause shape and by followig the computed E> x B> drift trajectories of plasma flux tubes from that initial boundary we have examined the short term evolution of the plasmapause during the substorm-like event of September 19, 1976. We find that narrow filamentary tails can be drawn out from the plasmasphere near dusk within hours of substorm onset. These tail-like appendages to the plasmasphere subsequently drift rapidly from the dusk sector toward the daytime magnetopause. Investigation of the large-scale time dependent flow of plasma in the evening sector indicates that some mid-latitude plasma flux tubes that drift eastward past the dusk terminator reverse their motion between dusk and midnight and begin to drift westward toward dusk. Such time dependent changes in flow trajectories may be related to the formation of F region ionization troughs

  17. Effects of energetic heavy ions on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave generation in the plasmapause region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozyra, J.U.; Cravens, T.E.; Nagy, A.F.; Fontheim, E.G.; Ong, R.S.B.

    1984-01-01

    An expression for the linear electromagnetic ion cyclotron convective growth rate has been derived, considering multiple ions in the energetic anisotropic component of the plasma (which provides the free energy for the instability) as well as in the cold component of the plasma. This represents a modification of recent treatments investigating electromagnetic ion cyclotron growth rates which have considered only hydrogen ions in the energetic component. Four major effects on the growth and propagation characteristics result from inclusion of heavy ions in the energetic component. Some wave growth occurs at low frequencies below the corresponding marginally unstable wave mode for each heavy ion. Enhanced quasi-monochronomatic peaks in the convective growth rate appear just below the O + and He + gyrofrequency and can be quite pronounced for certain plasma conditions. Stop bands, decreased group velocity and other effects normally attributed to cold heavy ions can be produced or enhanced by heavy ions in the energetic plasma component. Partial or complete suppression of wave growth at frequencies above the marginally unstable wave mode for a particular energetic heavy ion can greatly alter the growth rates that would occur in the absence of this energetic heavy ion. The expression for the linear electromagnetic ion cyclotron convective growth rate along with appropriate plasma parameters was used to investigate the nature of linear wave growth in the plasmapause region. The frequencies of peaks in the convective growth rate given by this model compare favorably with wave measurements in this region. It is conceivable that through wave-particle interactions, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves could supply the energy source for various plasmapause region phenomena such as the O + torus, the plasma cloak and stable auroral red arcs

  18. Electron precipitation and VLF emissions associated with cyclotron resonance interactions near the plasmapause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, J.C.; Rosenberg, T.J.

    1976-01-01

    Correlated bursts of bremsstrahlung X rays and VLF emissions were recorded for approx.25 min at Siple Station, Antarctica, on January 2, 1971. The burst occurred quasi-periodically with spectral power predominantly in the period range 4--12 s. A typical VLF burst consisted of 3--5 rising elements of approx.0.1-s duration separated by approx.0.15 s and was confined to the frequency range 1.5--3.8 kHz. Evidence is presented to show that the bursts were triggered by the low-frequency tail of whistlers propagating from the northern hemisphere. The interpretation of the observations in terms of an equatorial cyclotron resonance interaction occurring at the outer edge of the plasmapause on the L=4.2 field line, offered initially by Rosenberg et al. (1971), is given further support by the more extensive analysis presented here of the electron energy-wave frequency relationship in the bursts and the propagation times for the resonant waves and electrons. It is inferred from the X ray data that the equatorial flux of trapped electrons was probably anisotropic and near the stable trapping limit at the time of this event. It is suggested that an important effect of the trigger signal is the increase of the anisotropy of the resonant electrons. Wave growth rates calculated in the random phase approximation for electron pitch angle distributions that might apply in this event can explain certain features of the VLF and precipitation data during and between the bursts

  19. Electron precipitation induced by VLF noise bursts at the plasmapause and detected at conjugate ground stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingle, B.; Carpenter, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    A new type of wave-induced electron precipitation event has been identified. During observations at conjugate stations Siple, Antarctica, and Roberval, Canada (L-4.2), VLF noise bursts were found to be associated on a one-to-one basis with amplitude perturbations of subionispheric radio propagation. The amplitude perturbations are attributed to patches of enhanced ionization that extended below approx.80 km in the nighttime ionosphere and that were produced by precipitating electron bursts. Similar amplitude perturbations seen previously were correlated with whistlers that propagated within the plasmasphere. For the new events the driving waves were structured collections of rising elements that propagated just beyond the plasmapause at roughly 5-min intervals over a several-hour period. These noise bursts were of relatively long duration (approx.10 s) and strong intensity (inferred to be >30 pT at the equator). Triggering of the noise bursts appears to have been mostly by whistlers but changed in character with time. Some later bursts had narrowband precursors at constant frequencies possibly locked to power line harmonic radiation. The burst initiation characteristics suggest the existence of a variable threshold for rapid temporal growth in the magnetosphere controlled by the trapped electron dynamics. The temporal signatures of the amplitude perturbations show that precipitation was maintained over multiple bounces of the trapped magnetospheric electrons. In some cases these signatures include a new undershoot effect during the recovery phase lasting 2--5 min. This effect may have been related to cutoff of background drizzle precipitation. Precipitation effects were observed on both long (approx.10 Mm) and short (approx.1/2 Mm) subionospheric paths and were monitored simultaneously at the conjugate stations. Similarities in the perturbation signatures on long and short paths suggest that the form of the signatures was governed by ionospheric changes

  20. Comparison of H+ and He+ Plasmapause Locations Based on Resurrected and Reevaluated OGO-5 Ion Composition Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlik, Vladimir; Triskova, Ludmila; Benson, Robert F.; Bilitza, Dieter; Grebowsky, Joseph; Richards, Phil G.; Smilauer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Orbiting Geophysical Observatory 5 (OGO 5) magnetospheric ion-composition data (H+, He+ and O+) from an ion spectrometer (Sharp, 1969) have been retrieved from old magnetic tapes archived at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). The highly compressed binary format was converted into a user-friendly ASCII format and these data have been made available online. We have inspected reliability and consistency of this data set in state of the art current knowledge. Comparing with the climatological model IRI-2012 and the mathematical model FLIP a shift of absolute and relative ion densities with time was revealed. We have suggested a correction procedure of individual H+, He+ and O+ ion densities. Using the corrected data set, we investigated plasmapause locations based on density gradient in H+, and He+. Correlation coefficient of both locations was determined as approx. 0.886 and the typical difference (Delta)L approx. 0.1. The electron density at the He+ plasmapause location for all cases is >100/cu cm.

  1. The distribution of infered energetic electron loss with respect to plasmapause location: BARREL results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, A. J.; Malaspina, D.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    One of the long outstanding challenges of understanding the inner magnetosphere is accurately describing radiation belt dynamics. This enterprise can seem daunting as many have stated: "if you've seen one storm you've seen one storm". And although much progress has been made over the last half century since the discovery of the radiation belts, there is still ongoing debate about the relative importance of different loss and source mechanisms. Here we will consider one part of radiation belt dynamics, the loss of electrons ( 30 keV to MeV) to the upper atmosphere and endeavor to identify the relative importance of the different loss mechanisms. As demonstrated in often used cartoon diagrams, and previous studies, many radiation belt loss mechanisms such as chorus, hiss, and EMIC waves are thought to have specific MLT and L dependencies as well as dependence on geomagnetic conditions. Many of these loss mechanisms are identifiable through the energies and time scales in which they precipitate electrons. Thus we expect that the observed electron precipiation should follow similar MLT and L patterns as what caused the loss and not show something completely unexpected such as Atlantis rising out of the Columbia River. Here we will examine the location and geomagnetic conditions under which the Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation Belt Electron Loss (BARREL) inferred radiation belt electron precipitation. The BARREL mission consisted of 4 campaigns, two in Antarctica and 2 in Sweden, for a total of 55 launches. The flights conducted in Antarctica took advantage of the circumpolar winds allowing for the payloads to cross a range of L-values from L > 2.5 onto open field lines, while the Swedish campaigns were held during turn around where the balloons stayed near L = 5.8. We will present the distribution of precipitation with respect to L and MLT as well as with respect to the boundary of the plasmapause as new work has shown that this boundary clearly separates

  2. An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC and its relationship to field-aligned current, ring current, and plasmapause location determined using multiple spacecraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC is a latitudinally narrow channel of unstable F-region plasma with intense westward drift in the dusk-to-midnight sector ionosphere. AWFCs tend to overlap the equatorward edge of the auroral oval, and their life cycle is often synchronised to that of substorms: they commence close to substorm expansion phase onset, intensify during the expansion phase, and then decay during the recovery phase. Here we define for the first time the relationship between an AWFC, large-scale field-aligned current (FAC, the ring current, and plasmapause location. The Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER, a Southern Hemisphere HF SuperDARN radar, observed a jet-like AWFC during ~08:35 to 13:28 UT on 7 April 2001. The initiation of the AWFC was preceded by a band of equatorward expanding ionospheric scatter (BEES which conveyed an intense poleward electric field through the inner plasma sheet. Unlike previous AWFCs, this event was not associated with a distinct substorm surge; rather it occurred during an interval of persistent, moderate magnetic activity characterised by AL~−200 nT. The four Cluster spacecraft had perigees within the dusk sector plasmasphere, and their trajectories were magnetically conjugate to the radar observations. The Waves of High frequency and Sounder for Probing Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER instruments on board Cluster were used to identify the plasmapause location. The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE EUV experiment also provided global-scale observations of the plasmapause. The Cluster fluxgate magnetometers (FGM provided successive measurements specifying the relative location of the ring current and filamentary plasma sheet current. An analysis of Iridium spacecraft magnetometer measurements provided estimates of large-scale ionospheric FAC in relation to the AWFC evolution. Peak flows in the AWFC were located close to the peak of a Region 2

  3. Multi-satellite study of the excitation of Pc3 and Pc4-5 ULF waves and their penetration across the plasmapause during the 2003 Halloween superstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasis, G.; Daglis, I. A.; Mann, I. R.; Papadimitriou, C.; Zesta, E.; Georgiou, M.; Haagmans, R.; Tsinganos, K.

    2015-10-01

    We use multi-satellite and ground-based magnetic data to investigate the concurrent characteristics of Pc3 (22-100 mHz) and Pc4-5 (1-22 mHz) ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves on the 31 October 2003 during the Halloween magnetic superstorm. ULF waves are seen in the Earth's magnetosphere, topside ionosphere, and Earth's surface, enabling an examination of their propagation characteristics. We employ a time-frequency analysis technique and examine data from when the Cluster and CHAMP spacecraft were in good local time (LT) conjunction near the dayside noon-midnight meridian. We find clear evidence of the excitation of both Pc3 and Pc4-5 waves, but more significantly we find a clear separation in the L shell of occurrence of the Pc4-5 and Pc3 waves in the equatorial inner magnetosphere, separated by the density gradients at the plasmapause boundary layer. A key finding of the wavelet spectral analysis of data collected from the Geotail, Cluster, and CHAMP spacecraft and the CARISMA and GIMA magnetometer networks was a remarkably clear transition of the waves' frequency into dominance in a higher-frequency regime within the Pc3 range. Analysis of the local field line resonance frequency suggests that the separation of the Pc4-5 and Pc3 emissions across the plasmapause is consistent with the structure of the inhomogeneous field line resonance Alfvén continuum. The Pc4-5 waves are consistent with direct excitation by the solar wind in the plasma trough, as well as Pc3 wave absorption in the plasmasphere following excitation by upstream waves originating at the bow shock in the local noon sector. However, despite good solar wind coverage, our study was not able to unambiguously identify a clear explanation for the sharp universal time (UT) onset of the discrete frequency and large-amplitude Pc3 wave power.

  4. Multi-satellite study of the excitation of Pc3 and Pc4-5 ULF waves and their penetration across the plasmapause during the 2003 Halloween superstorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Balasis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We use multi-satellite and ground-based magnetic data to investigate the concurrent characteristics of Pc3 (22–100 mHz and Pc4-5 (1–22 mHz ultra-low-frequency (ULF waves on the 31 October 2003 during the Halloween magnetic superstorm. ULF waves are seen in the Earth's magnetosphere, topside ionosphere, and Earth's surface, enabling an examination of their propagation characteristics. We employ a time–frequency analysis technique and examine data from when the Cluster and CHAMP spacecraft were in good local time (LT conjunction near the dayside noon–midnight meridian. We find clear evidence of the excitation of both Pc3 and Pc4-5 waves, but more significantly we find a clear separation in the L shell of occurrence of the Pc4-5 and Pc3 waves in the equatorial inner magnetosphere, separated by the density gradients at the plasmapause boundary layer. A key finding of the wavelet spectral analysis of data collected from the Geotail, Cluster, and CHAMP spacecraft and the CARISMA and GIMA magnetometer networks was a remarkably clear transition of the waves' frequency into dominance in a higher-frequency regime within the Pc3 range. Analysis of the local field line resonance frequency suggests that the separation of the Pc4-5 and Pc3 emissions across the plasmapause is consistent with the structure of the inhomogeneous field line resonance Alfvén continuum. The Pc4-5 waves are consistent with direct excitation by the solar wind in the plasma trough, as well as Pc3 wave absorption in the plasmasphere following excitation by upstream waves originating at the bow shock in the local noon sector. However, despite good solar wind coverage, our study was not able to unambiguously identify a clear explanation for the sharp universal time (UT onset of the discrete frequency and large-amplitude Pc3 wave power.

  5. Quantifying the relationship between the plasmapause and the inner boundary of small-scale field-aligned currents, as deduced from Swarm observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, Balázs; Lühr, Hermann

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a statistical study of the equatorward boundary of small-scale field-aligned currents (SSFACs) and investigates the relation between this boundary and the plasmapause (PP). The PP data used for validation were derived from in situ electron density observations of NASA's Van Allen Probes. We confirmed the findings of a previous study by the same authors obtained from the observations of the CHAMP satellite SSFAC and the NASA IMAGE satellite PP detections, namely that the two boundaries respond similarly to changes in geomagnetic activity, and they are closely located in the near midnight MLT sector, suggesting a dynamic linkage. Dayside PP correlates with the delayed time history of the SSFAC boundary. We interpreted this behaviour as a direct consequence of co-rotation: the new PP, formed on the night side, propagates to the dayside by rotating with Earth. This finding paves the way toward an efficient PP monitoring tool based on an SSFAC index derived from vector magnetic field observations at low-Earth orbit.

  6. Quantitative Simulation of a Magnetospheric Substorm. 3. Plasmaspheric Electric Fields and Evolution of the Plasmapause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-25

    plasmaspheric electric fields during magnetically disturbed periods are based on incoherent scatter radar results fromn St. Santin [ Testud et al., 1975...Millstone Hill radar results showing westward F-region ion drifts of almost 200 m/sec in the afternoon sector on 14 May, 1969. Testud et al. [1975...electrojet (AE) index. Testud et al. [1975] and Blanc et al. £1977] have both presented St. Santin backscatter measurements that show westward and

  7. Evidence of conversion from Z-mode waves to the electromagnetic L-O mode waves at the plasmapause detected by JIKIKEN (EXOS-B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Hiroshi; Morioka, Akira

    1982-01-01

    JIKIKEN satellite that has the initial perigee and apogee of 250 km and 30,050 km, respectively, and has an inclination of -31 0 has passed through critical regions where the AKR spectra were carved out by the plasma surounding the satellite, at least five times during a period from January 31, 1979, to June 21, 1980. On all these occasions the usual type of AKR spectra are disclosed to show cutoff phenomena at the local Z-cutoff frequency indicating a continuation crossing over the local X-cutoff frequency from the high frequency side down to the Z mode wave frequency range rather than to be cut at the local X-cutoff frequency; i.e., the AKR waves consist of the spectra that continuously cover the frequency range corresponding to Z-mode and L-O mode waves when the observation is made near the source region. The most posible mechanism that can give cinsistent interpretations to this spectra characteristics is the mode conversion theory; i.e., the plasma waves generated in the form of the hybrid mode waves in the source regions is converted into the Z-mode wave which propagates towards dense plasma regions where the wave frequency coincides with the local plasma frequency and a part of the energy of Z-mode waves is transported to the L-O mode waves that can escape towards outer space. This conversion mechanism gives also a self-consistent interpretation of previously presented evidences reported as the cutoff phenomena of AKR near the local electron cyclotron frequency, using the mechanism of the propagation of the Z-mode waves. There is no confliction between the conversion mechanism of the AKR generation and the previous polarization observation carried out by the Voyager spacecrafts because there remains wide variety of the selection of the source region that are pertinent to give the possiblity of the LH polarization waves as the results of the conversion of the radiation waves from the Z-mode to the L-O mode in the northern polar regions. (author)

  8. Effects of magnetic storm phases on F layer irregularities below the auroral oval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarons, J.; Gurgiolo, C.; Rodger, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of F-layer irregularity development and intensity were obtained between September and October 1981, primarily over subauroral latitudes in the area of the plasmapause. The results reveal the descent of the auroral irregularity region to include subauroral latitudes in the general area of the plasmapause during the main phases of a series of magnetic storms. Irregularities were found primarily at lower latitudes during the subauroral or plasmapause storm. A model for the subauroral irregularities in recovery phases of magnetic storms is proposed in which energy stored in the ring current is slowly released. 27 references

  9. Magnetospheric radio sounding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondoh, Tadanori; Nakamura, Yoshikatsu; Koseki, Teruo; Watanabe, Sigeaki; Murakami, Toshimitsu

    1977-01-01

    Radio sounding of the plasmapause from a geostationary satellite has been investigated to observe time variations of the plasmapause structure and effects of the plasma convection. In the equatorial plane, the plasmapause is located, on the average, at 4 R sub(E) (R sub(E); Earth radius), and the plasma density drops outwards from 10 2 -10 3 /cm 3 to 1-10/cm 3 in the plasmapause width of about 600 km. Plasmagrams showing a relation between the virtual range and sounding frequencies are computed by ray tracing of LF-VLF waves transmitted from a geostationary satellite, using model distributions of the electron density in the vicinity of the plasmapause. The general features of the plasmagrams are similar to the topside ionograms. The plasmagram has no penetration frequency such as f 0 F 2 , but the virtual range of the plasmagram increases rapidly with frequency above 100 kHz, since the distance between a satellite and wave reflection point increases rapidly with increasing the electron density inside the plasmapause. The plasmapause sounder on a geostationary satellite has been designed by taking account of an average propagation distance of 2 x 2.6 R sub(E) between a satellite (6.6 R sub(E)) and the plasmapause (4.0 R sub(E)), background noise, range resolution, power consumption, and receiver S/N of 10 dB. The 13-bit Barker coded pulses of baud length of 0.5 msec should be transmitted in direction parallel to the orbital plane at frequencies for 10 kHz-2MHz in a pulse interval of 0.5 sec. The transmitter peak power of 70 watts and 700 watts are required respectively in geomagnetically quiet and disturbed (strong nonthermal continuum emissions) conditions for a 400 meter cylindrical dipole of 1.2 cm diameter on the geostationary satellite. This technique will open new area of radio sounding in the magnetosphere. (auth.)

  10. The Plasmasphere Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Carpenter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available As an inner magnetospheric phenomenon the plasmapause region is of interest for a number of reasons, one being the occurrence there of geophysically important interactions between the plasmas of the hot plasma sheet and of the cool plasmasphere. There is a need for a conceptual framework within which to examine and discuss these interactions and their consequences, and we therefore suggest that the plasmapause region be called the Plasmasphere Boundary Layer, or PBL. Such a term has been slow to emerge because of the complexity and variability of the plasma populations that can exist near the plasmapause and because of the variety of criteria used to identify the plasmapause in experimental data. Furthermore, and quite importantly in our view, a substantial obstacle to the consideration of the plasmapause region as a boundary layer has been the longstanding tendency of textbooks on space physics to limit introductory material on the plasmapause phenomenon to zeroth order descriptions in terms of ideal MHD theory, thus implying that the plasmasphere is relatively well understood. A textbook may introduce the concept of shielding of the inner magnetosphere from perturbing convection electric fields, but attention is not usually paid to the variety of physical processes reported to occur in the PBL, such as heating, instabilities, and fast longitudinal flows, processes which must play roles in plasmasphere dynamics in concert with the flow regimes associated with the major dynamo sources of electric fields. We believe that through the use of the PBL concept in future textbook discussions of the plasmasphere and in scientific communications, much progress can be made on longstanding questions about the physics involved in the formation of the plasmapause and in the cycles of erosion and recovery of the plasmasphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; plasma convection; MHD waves and instabilities

  11. The Plasmasphere Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Carpenter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available As an inner magnetospheric phenomenon the plasmapause region is of interest for a number of reasons, one being the occurrence there of geophysically important interactions between the plasmas of the hot plasma sheet and of the cool plasmasphere. There is a need for a conceptual framework within which to examine and discuss these interactions and their consequences, and we therefore suggest that the plasmapause region be called the Plasmasphere Boundary Layer, or PBL. Such a term has been slow to emerge because of the complexity and variability of the plasma populations that can exist near the plasmapause and because of the variety of criteria used to identify the plasmapause in experimental data. Furthermore, and quite importantly in our view, a substantial obstacle to the consideration of the plasmapause region as a boundary layer has been the longstanding tendency of textbooks on space physics to limit introductory material on the plasmapause phenomenon to zeroth order descriptions in terms of ideal MHD theory, thus implying that the plasmasphere is relatively well understood. A textbook may introduce the concept of shielding of the inner magnetosphere from perturbing convection electric fields, but attention is not usually paid to the variety of physical processes reported to occur in the PBL, such as heating, instabilities, and fast longitudinal flows, processes which must play roles in plasmasphere dynamics in concert with the flow regimes associated with the major dynamo sources of electric fields. We believe that through the use of the PBL concept in future textbook discussions of the plasmasphere and in scientific communications, much progress can be made on longstanding questions about the physics involved in the formation of the plasmapause and in the cycles of erosion and recovery of the plasmasphere. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; plasma convection; MHD waves and instabilities

  12. VLF emissions and whistlers observed during geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondoh, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Nishizaki, R.; Nagayama, M.

    1974-01-01

    Whistler-triggered emissions and a narrowband hiss are described which were observed over Japan by ISIS 2 during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm of August 9, 1972. The characteristics of the narrowband hiss and increases in the whistler rate during the storm are discussed, and the ISIS-2 data are compared with data on whistler cutoffs and VLF noise breakups obtained by OGO 4 and Alouette I. Since the whistlers and narrowband hiss are usually observed inside and outside the plasmapause, it is thought that the plasmapause may have been located near the low-latitude end of the narrowband hiss during the main phase of the storm. It is suggested that the increases in the whistler rate may have been caused by the formation of whistler ducts in the disturbed plasmapause.

  13. Signatures of the low-latitude Pi 2 pulsations in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam Ghamry

    2012-06-01

    The result shows that the Pi 2 observed in the main phase of the geomagnetic storm have larger frequency than those observed in the recovery phase. These results excluded the field line resonance and the plasmapause surface as a possible generation mechanism, and suggest the cavity resonance as a possible generation mechanism of the Pi 2 pulsations at low latitude stations in Egypt.

  14. Electromagnetic radiation trapped in the magnetosphere above the plasma frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Shaw, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electromagnetic noise band is frequently observed in the outer magnetosphere by the Imp 6 spacecraft at frequencies from about 5 to 20 kHz. This noise band generally extends throughout the region from near the plasmapause boundary to near the magnetopause boundary. The noise typically has a broadband field strength of about 5 microvolts/meter. The noise band often has a sharp lower cutoff frequency at about 5 to 10 kHz, and this cutoff has been identified as the local electron plasma frequency. Since the plasma frequency in the plasmasphere and solar wind is usually above 20 kHz, it is concluded that this noise must be trapped in the low-density region between the plasmapause and magnetopause boundaries. The noise bands often contain a harmonic frequency structure which suggests that the radiation is associated with harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency.

  15. Research in magnetospheric wave phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barfield, J.N.

    1975-01-01

    During the last 4 years a number of developments have occurred which have led to an increased understanding of the role of wave phenomena in the physical processes of the magnetosphere. While the studies span the frequency regime from millihertz to the electron gyrofrequency, the developments to be discussed in this paper have in common that they have added substantially to the understanding of the controlling processes, regions, and boundaries in the magnetosphere. The topics discussed are the increased awareness and documentation of the role of the plasmapause in micropulsation generation and propagation; the establishment of the role of ion cyclotron waves in the wave-particle interactions at the plasmapause; the discovery of magnetospheric electrostatic waves with ω = (3/2)Ω/sub -/; the discovery and preliminary identification of the source of plasmaspheric hiss; and the analysis of storm time Pc 5 waves as observed on the satellites ATS 1 and Explorer 45. (auth)

  16. Wave excitation in the experiment with an electron beam at the Dzhajkiken Exos-B Japanese satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavashima, N.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment on investigation of beam-plasma interaction in the magnetosphere is carried out at the ''Dzhajkiken (Exos-B)'' japanese satellite. 100-200 eV and 0.25-1 μA electron beam was injected into the magnetosphere. Using LF and HF detectors in low altitude range waves with the frequencies close to the upper hybrid and electron frequencies are recorded. Beyond the plasmapause the satellite was charged to the potential corresponding to the beam energy

  17. Magnetosphere VLF observation by satellite ISIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondo, Tadanori; Nakamura, Yoshikatsu; Watanabe, Shigeaki; Murakami, Toshimitsu

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of the VLF (50 Hz -- 30 kHz) electric field data from the satellite ISIS, the following works carried out in The Radio Research Laboratories are described: deuteron whistler and whistler duct, detection of plasmapause by LHR hiss, and the origin of 5 kHz hiss at low/middle latitudes. The deuteron whistlers are observable distinctly only at low latitude because of gyro-frequency and the frequency resolution of spectral analyzers. Whistler echo occurs when a whistler moves back and forth through a duct along the line of magnetic force, so it is considered that the ISIS satellite crosses the duct. The variation in ion composition around plasmapause obtained through LHR hiss is explainable by the plasamapause position and the magnetic storm effect on the plasamapause. Concerning the narrow band hiss of 5 kHz +- 1.0 kHz frequently observed on the ground at low/middle latitudes, it may occur around plasmapause, propagate through the ionosphere and then to the ground in waveguide mode, or otherwise, it may occur above the ionosphere and then propagate directly to the ground penetrating through the ionosphere. (J.P.N.)

  18. Detailed observations of the source of terrestrial narrowband electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed observations are presented of a region near the terrestrial plasmapause where narrowband electromagnetic radiation (previously called escaping nonthermal continuum radiation) is being generated. These observations show a direct correspondence between the narrowband radio emissions and electron cyclotron harmonic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency. In addition, electromagnetic radiation propagating in the Z-mode is observed in the source region which provides an extremely accurate determination of the electron plasma frequency and, hence, density profile of the source region. The data strongly suggest that electrostatic waves and not Cerenkov radiation are the source of the banded radio emissions and define the coupling which must be described by any viable theory.

  19. A long-lived refilling event of the slot region between the Van Allen radiation belts from Nov 2004 to Jan 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.

    2015-12-01

    A powerful relativistic electron enhancement in the slot region between the inner and outer radiation belts is investigated by multi-satellites measurements. The measurement from Space Particle Component Detectors (SPCDs) aboard Fengyun-1 indicates that the relativistic electron (>1.6MeV) flux began to enhance obviously on early 10 November with the flux peak fixed at L~3.0. In the next day, the relativistic electron populations increased dramatically. Subsequently, the flux had been enhancing slowly, but unceasingly, until 17 November, and the maximum flux reached up to 7.8×104 cm-2·sr-1·s-1 at last. The flux peak fixed at L~3.0 and the very slow decay rate in this event make it to be an unusual long-lived slot region refilling event. We trace the cause of the event back to the interplanetary environment and find that there were two evident magnetic cloud constructions: dramatically enhanced magnetic field strength and long and smooth rotation of field vector from late 7 to 8 November and from late 9 to 10 November, respectively; solar wind speed increased in 'step-like' fashion on late 7 November and persisted the level of high speed >560 km·s-1 for about 124 hours. Owed to the interplanetary disturbances, very strong magnetic storms and substorms occurred in the magnetosphere. Responding to the extraordinarily magnetic perturbations, the plasmasphere shrank sharply. The location of plasmapause inferred from Dst indicates that the plasmapause shrank inward to as low as L~2.5. On account of these magnetospheric conditions, strong chorus emissions are expected near the earth. In fact, the STAFF on Cluster mission measured intensive whistler mode chorus emissions on 10 and 12 November, corresponding to the period of the remarkable enhancement of relativistic electron. Furthermore, we investigate the radial profile of phase space density (PSD) by electron flux from multi-satellites, and the evolution of the phase space density profile reveals that the local

  20. Wave excitation in electron beam experiment on Japanese satellite JIKIKEN (EXOS-B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, N.

    1982-01-01

    Beam-plasma interaction experiment has been made in the magnetosphere by emitting an electron beam (100-200 eV, 0.25-1.0 mA) from the satellite JIKIKEN (EXOS-B). Various types of wave emission are detected by LF and HF wave detectors. Waves near at upper-hybrid frequency and at electron cyclotron frequency are detected in a low L-value region, which will be useful diagnostic means for plasma density and magnetic field. Vehicle charging up to the beam energy is also observed outside the plasmapause

  1. EMIC triggered chorus emissions in Cluster data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grison, Benjamin; Santolík, Ondřej; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Masson, A.; Engebretson, M. J.; Pickett, J. S.; Omura, Y.; Robert, P.; Nomura, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 3 (2013), s. 1159-1169 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E12026; GA ČR(CZ) GPP209/11/P848; GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11122 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284520 - MAARBLE Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : EMIC wave * triggered emission * plasmapause Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jgra.50178/abstract

  2. Cluster observations of reflected EMIC-triggered emission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grison, Benjamin; Darrouzet, F.; Santolík, Ondřej; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Masson, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 9 (2016), s. 4164-4171 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/12/2394; GA MŠk(CZ) LH15304 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1401 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : EMIC * triggered emission * wave reflection * plasmapause Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.253, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL069096/full

  3. Polar observations of electron density distribution in the Earth’s magnetosphere. 2. Density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Using spacecraft potential measurements of the Polar electric field experiment, we investigate electron density variations of key plasma regions within the magnetosphere, including the polar cap, cusp, trough, plasmapause, and auroral zone. The statistical results were presented in the first part of this study, and the present paper reports detailed structures revealed by individual satellite passes. The high-altitude (> 3 RE polar cap is generally one of the most tenuous regions in the magnetosphere, but surprisingly, the polar cap boundary does not appear as a steep density decline. At low altitudes (1 RE in summer, the polar densities are very high, several 100 cm-3 , and interestingly, the density peaks at the central polar cap. On the noonside of the polar cap, the cusp appears as a dense, 1–3° wide region. A typical cusp density above 4 RE distance is between several 10 cm-3 and a few 100 cm-3 . On some occasions the cusp is crossed multiple times in a single pass, simultaneously with the occurrence of IMF excursions, as the cusp can instantly shift its position under varying solar wind conditions, similar to the magnetopause. On the nightside, the auroral zone is not always detected as a simple density cavity. Cavities are observed but their locations, strengths, and sizes vary. Also, the electric field perturbations do not necessarily overlap with the cavities: there are cavities with no field disturbances, as well as electric field disturbances observed with no clear cavitation. In the inner magnetosphere, the density distributions clearly show that the plasmapause and trough densities are well correlated with geomagnetic activity. Data from individual orbits near noon and midnight demonstrate that at the beginning of geomagnetic disturbances, the retreat speed of the plasmapause can be one L-shell per hour, while during quiet intervals the plasmapause can expand anti-earthward at the same speed. For the trough region, it is found

  4. AMPTE/CCE observations of the plasma composition below 17 keV during the September 4, 1984 magnetic storm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelley, E.G.; Klumpar, D.M.; Peterson, W.K.; Ghielmetti, A.; Balsiger, H.; Geiss, J.; Rosenbauer, H.; Bern Universitaet, Switzerland; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Aeronomie, Katlenburg, West Germany)

    1985-01-01

    Observations from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment on the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft during the magnetic storm of 4-5 September 1984 reveal that significant injection of ions of terrestrial origin accompanied the storm development. The compression of the magnetosphere at storm sudden commencement carried the magnetopause inside the CCE orbit clearly revealing the shocked solar wind plasma. A build up of suprathermal ions is observed near the plasmapause during the storm main phase and recovery phase. Pitch angle distributions in the ring current during the main phase show differences between H(+) and O(+) that suggest mass dependent injection, transport and/or loss processes. 9 references

  5. Wave--particle interactions in the magnetosphere and ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    Two distinct aspects of the interaction between waves and particles in the earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere were discussed at the Yosemite Conference on Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling; these will be briefly reviewed. Intense field-aligned currents flow between the ionosphere and magnetosphere at auroral latitudes. Under certain conditions these currents can become unstable, permitting potential drops to be established along the field lines. The present status of experimental evidence favoring such parallel electric fields is somewhat controversial. Theoretical models for their origin invoke regions of anomalous resistivity or electrostatic double layers. To date it is impossible to distinguish between these alternatives on the basis of experimental data. The nonadiabatic behavior of magnetospheric ring current particles during geomagnetic storms is largely controlled by wave-particle processes. During the storm main phase, intense fluctuating convection electric fields are responsible for injecting trapped particles into the outer radiation zone. The outer radiation zone also moves in closer to the earth following the storm time compression of the plasmapause. Simultaneous pitch angle scattering by higher-frequency plasma turbulence causes precipitation loss near the strong diffusion limit throughout the outer magnetosphere. During the storm recov []ry phase the plasmapause slowly moves out toward its prestorm location; energetic particle loss at such times appears to be dominated by cyclotron resonant scattering from electromagnetic turbulence. (auth)

  6. A survey of plasma irregularities as seen by the midlatitude Blackstone SuperDARN radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A. J.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Baker, J. B. H.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Greenwald, R. A.; Lester, M.

    2012-02-01

    The Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) is a chain of HF radars that monitor plasma dynamics in the ionosphere. In recent years, SuperDARN has expanded to midlatitudes in order to provide enhanced coverage during geomagnetically active periods. A new type of backscatter from F region plasma irregularities with low Doppler velocity has been frequently observed on the nightside during quiescent conditions. Using three years of data from the Blackstone, VA radar, we have implemented a method for extracting this new type of backscatter from routine observations. We have statistically characterized the occurrence properties of the Sub Auroral Ionospheric Scatter (SAIS) events, including the latitudinal relationships to the equatorward edge of the auroral oval and the ionospheric projection of the plasmapause. We find that the backscatter is confined to local night, occurs on ≈70% of nights, is fixed in geomagnetic latitude, and is equatorward of both the auroral region and the plasmapause boundary. We conclude that SAIS irregularities are observed within a range of latitudes that is conjugate to the inner magnetosphere (plasmasphere).

  7. Wave and plasma measurements and GPS diagnostics of the main ionospheric trough as a hybrid method used for Space Weather purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rothkaehl

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The region of the main ionospheric trough is a unique region of the ionosphere, where different types of waves and instabilities can be generated. This region of the ionosphere acts like a lens, focusing a variety of indicators from the equator of plasmapause and local ionospheric plasma. This paper reports the results of monitoring the mid-latitude trough structure, dynamics and wave activity. For these purposes, the data gathered by the currently-operating DEMETER satellite and past diagnostics located on IK-19, Apex, and MAGION-3 spacecraft, as well as TEC measurements were used. A global-time varying picture of the ionospheric trough was reconstructed using the sequence of wave spectra registered and plasma measurements in the top-side ionosphere. The authors present the wave activity from ULF frequency band to the HF frequency detected inside the trough region and discuss its properties during geomagnetic disturbances. It is thought that broadband emissions are correlated with low frequency radiation, which is excited by the wave-particle interaction in the equatorial plasmapause and moves to the ionosphere along the geomagnetic field line. In the ionosphere, the suprathermal electrons can interact with these electrostatic waves and excite electron acoustic waves or HF longitudinal plasma waves.

    Furthermore, the electron density trough can provide useful data on the magnetosphere ionosphere dynamics and morphology and, in consequence, can be used for Space Weather purposes.

  8. Ground-satellite study of wave-particle correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C.G.; Lin, C.S.; Parks, G.K.

    1981-01-01

    Very low frequency (VLF) waves recorded at Siple, Antarctica (Lapprox.4; 84 0 W, geographic), are compared with low-energy ( 0 W, near the outer edge of the nominal ''viewing area'' of the Siple VLF receiver, which is estimated to be Lapprox.2-6 and +- 20 0 longitude. The results reveal two distinct types of chorus observed at Siple. One type is closely correlated with enhanced fluxes of >5-keV electrons detected at the synchronous altitude, and its generation region is inferred to be outside the plasmapause. The chorus upper cutoff frequency increases with time in a characteristic manner, consistent with the expected adiabatic motion of injected electrons in cyclotron resonance with the waves. The second type of chorus, which we refer to as ''plasmaspheric chorus,'' occurs inside the plasmapause, has no apparent relationship to particle injection at the synchronous altitude and shows clear evidence of being triggered by whistlers, power line radiation, and other signals. The two different types of chorus are readily distinguishable in frequency-time spectrograms

  9. Charge exchange in a planetary corona - Its effect on the distribution and escape of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The theory for a spherical collisionless planetary corona is extended to include charge-exchange collisions between H(+) and H, which are assumed to constitute intermingled gases with different kinetic temperatures. The treatment is based on the conventional concept of a critical level (or exobase) above which the only collisions considered in the Boltzmann equation are those that resonantly exchange charge. Although the geometry treated is an oversimplification for a real planet, numerical examples are given for an idealized earth and Venus. For earth, an ion temperature of 4 times the neutral temperature, an ion density at the exobase of 14,000 per cu cm, and a plasmapause at 1.5 earth radii will raise the escape flux of H by a factor of 6. The total H above the exobase is changed by less than 1%. For Venus, conditions are examined that would account for the peculiar H distribution observed from Mariner 5. The plasma conditions required are not obviously outrageous by terrestrial standards, but the Mariner 5 ionosphere measurements did not show a high plasmapause at, say, 1.25 or 1.5 planetary radii, a fact that might argue against a charge-exchange model.

  10. Wave and plasma measurements and GPS diagnostics of the main ionospheric trough as a hybrid method used for Space Weather purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rothkaehl

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The region of the main ionospheric trough is a unique region of the ionosphere, where different types of waves and instabilities can be generated. This region of the ionosphere acts like a lens, focusing a variety of indicators from the equator of plasmapause and local ionospheric plasma. This paper reports the results of monitoring the mid-latitude trough structure, dynamics and wave activity. For these purposes, the data gathered by the currently-operating DEMETER satellite and past diagnostics located on IK-19, Apex, and MAGION-3 spacecraft, as well as TEC measurements were used. A global-time varying picture of the ionospheric trough was reconstructed using the sequence of wave spectra registered and plasma measurements in the top-side ionosphere. The authors present the wave activity from ULF frequency band to the HF frequency detected inside the trough region and discuss its properties during geomagnetic disturbances. It is thought that broadband emissions are correlated with low frequency radiation, which is excited by the wave-particle interaction in the equatorial plasmapause and moves to the ionosphere along the geomagnetic field line. In the ionosphere, the suprathermal electrons can interact with these electrostatic waves and excite electron acoustic waves or HF longitudinal plasma waves. Furthermore, the electron density trough can provide useful data on the magnetosphere ionosphere dynamics and morphology and, in consequence, can be used for Space Weather purposes.

  11. Warm and hot electron distribution in the inner magnetosphere and the plasmasheet region related to the magnetospheric indices and the solar wind parameters: a statistical study form the NOAA POES TED and MEPED data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscher, Daniel; Rochel Grimald, Sandrine

    2013-04-01

    Using DMSP satellites, low altitude measurements has demonstrated to give a good picture of the plasmasheet population. The NOAA POES satellites are a constellation of five spacecraft orbiting in a polar orbit between 800 and 850 km and covering a wide L-shell range. They provide fourteen years of data without interruption which allow to make statistical study of the inner magnetosphere and the plasmasheet population. Moreover, since 2002, three of the NOAA POES satellites are located at different local times allowing to deduce the plasmasheet properties, even for huge magnetic activity. This paper present a statistical study of the warm and hot electron density over an energy range [0.16 ; 300] keV and between 1 and 12 Re. We present here maps in Mac Ilwain L paramater / MLT and we use the magnetic indices and solar wind parameter to classify our observations. The results show a clear motion of the plasmapause when Kp increase, which is in agreement with previous results, but it also show changes of the plasmapause shape and strong density variations in the night side sector. Moreover, a clear link between the solar wind parameters, in particular Bz, and the density distribution has been established. Unexpected distributions have been observed in the dayside and will be discussed here.

  12. Time development of drift wave with loss-cone in an inhomogeneous low β plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, R.P.; Sharan, R.R.; Prasad, Ramesh; Mishra, S.P.; Tiwari, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    Using particle aspect analysis, a generalized dispersion relation for the time-dependent electrostatic drift waves propagating through inhomogeneous low β magnetoplasma (β being the ratio of plasma pressure to the magnetic pressure) has been derived in the presence of the loss-cone distribution index (J). The dispersion characteristics and time-dependent growth/damping rates of the wave have been computed. The distribution index seems to modify the dispersion characteristics and hence the growth rate. The computed growth rate is time-dependent, increasing with the increase of time, while the growth rate decreases with the increase of the loss-cone distribution index. In the case when growth rate increasing sufficiently with time, becomes comparable to the real frequency of the wave, the present linear theory loses its validity. The applicability of the result for the space plasma has been indicated particularly for the parameters suited to plasmapause region. (author). 30 refs., 5 figs

  13. Cluster observations of reflected EMIC-triggered emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, B.; Darrouzet, F.; Santolík, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Masson, A.

    2016-05-01

    On 19 March 2001, the Cluster fleet recorded an electromagnetic rising tone on the nightside of the plasmasphere. The emission was found to propagate toward the Earth and toward the magnetic equator at a group velocity of about 200 km/s. The Poynting vector is mainly oblique to the background magnetic field and directed toward the Earth. The propagation angle θk,B0 becomes more oblique with increasing magnetic latitude. Inside each rising tone θk,B0 is more field aligned for higher frequencies. Comparing our results to previous ray tracing analysis we conclude that this emission is a triggered electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave generated at the nightside plasmapause. We detect the wave just after its reflection in the plasmasphere. The reflection makes the tone slope shallower. This process can contribute to the formation of pearl pulsations.

  14. Ray tracing study of rising tone EMIC-triggered emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzelka, Miroslav; Santolík, Ondřej; Grison, Benjamin; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    ElectroMagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) triggered emissions have been subject of extensive theoretical and experimental research in last years. These emissions are characterized by high coherence values and a frequency range of 0.5 - 2.0 Hz, close to local helium gyrofrequency. We perform ray tracing case studies of rising tone EMIC-triggered emissions observed by the Cluster spacecraft in both nightside and dayside regions off the equatorial plane. By comparison of simulated and measured wave properties, namely wave vector orientation, group velocity, dispersion and ellipticity of polarization, we determine possible source locations. Diffusive equilibrium density model and other, semi-empirical models are used with ion composition inferred from cross-over frequencies. Ray tracing simulations are done in cold plasma approximation with inclusion of Landau and cyclotron damping. Various widths, locations and profiles of plasmapause are tested.

  15. Characterization of Nightside Mid-latitude Irregularities Observed with the Blackstone SuperDARN Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Ribeiro, A. J.; Baker, J. B.; Greenwald, R. A.; Newell, P. T.

    2009-12-01

    The new mid-latitude SuperDARN radars at Wallops Island and Blackstone observe strong coherent backscattering on an almost nightly basis from latitudes that appear to be subauroral. One study has demonstrated an excellent correlation with the occurrence of density and temperature gradients within the ionospheric projection of the plasmapause (Greenwald et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. [2006]). We have processed all the data collected with the Blackstone radar since its inception in February 2008 for a characterization of the occurrence and properties of ‘plasmapause’ scatter. We have determined the local time and Kp dependencies of the activity and the relation of the spatial distribution of the irregularities to magnetospheric boundaries and ionospheric density gradients. We establish that the irregularities are a feature of the quiet-time subauroral ionosphere and provide a valuable diagnostic of the electric fields in the inner magnetosphere.

  16. Antarctic observations available for IMS correlative analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rycroft, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    A review is provided of the wide-ranging observational programs of 25 stations operating on and around the continent of Antarctica during the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS). Attention is given to observations of geomagnetism, short period fluctuations of the earth's electromagnetic field, observations of the ionosphere and of whistler mode signals, observational programs in ionospheric and magnetospheric physics, upper atmosphere physics observations, details of magnetospheric programs conducted at Kerguelen, H-component magnetograms, magnetic field line oscillations, dynamic spectra of whistlers, and the variation of plasmapause position derived from recorded whistlers. The considered studies suggest that, in principle, if the level of magnetic activity is known, predictions can be made concerning the time at which the trough occurs, and the shape and the movement of the main trough

  17. Density structures inside the plasmasphere: Cluster observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darrouzet, F.; Decreau, P.M.E.; De Keyser, J.

    2004-01-01

    The electron density profiles derived from the EFW and WHISPER instruments on board the four Cluster spacecraft reveal density structures inside the plasmasphere and at its outer boundary, the plasmapause. We have conducted a statistical study to characterize these density structures. We focus...... on the plasmasphere crossing on I I April 2002, during which Cluster observed several density irregularities inside the plasmasphere, as well as a plasmaspheric plume. We derive the density gradient vectors from simultaneous density measurements by the four spacecraft. We also determine the normal velocity...... of the boundaries of the plume and of the irregularities from the time delays between those boundaries in the four individual density profiles, assuming they are planar. These new observations yield novel insights about the occurrence of density irregularities, their geometry and their dynamics. These in...

  18. Space plasma physics stationary processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Akira

    1989-01-01

    During the 30 years of space exploration, important discoveries in the near-earth environment such as the Van Allen belts, the plasmapause, the magnetotail and the bow shock, to name a few, have been made. Coupling between the solar wind and the magnetosphere and energy transfer processes between them are being identified. Space physics is clearly approaching a new era, where the emphasis is being shifted from discoveries to understanding. One way of identifying the new direction may be found in the recent contribution of atmospheric science and oceanography to the development of fluid dynamics. Hydrodynamics is a branch of classical physics in which important discoveries have been made in the era of Rayleigh, Taylor, Kelvin and Helmholtz. However, recent progress in global measurements using man-made satellites and in large scale computer simulations carried out by scientists in the fields of atmospheric science and oceanography have created new activities in hydrodynamics and produced important new discover...

  19. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed near the oxygen cyclotron frequency by ISEE 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, B. J.; Samson, J. C.; Hu, Y. D.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    The first results of observations of ion cyclotron waves by the elliptically orbiting ISEE 1 and 2 pair of spacecraft are reported. The most intense waves (8 nT) were observed in the outer plasmasphere where convection drift velocities were largest and the Alfven velocity was a minimum. Wave polarization is predominantly left-handed with propagation almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and the spectral slot and polarization reversal predicted by cold plasma propagation theory are identified in the wave data. Computations of the experimental wave spectra during the passage through the plasmapause show that the spectral slots relate to the local plasma parameters, possibly suggesting an ion cyclotron wave growth source near the spacecraft. A regular wave packet structure seen over the first 30 min of the event is attributed to the modulation of this energy source by the Pc 5 waves seen at the same time.

  20. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed near the oxygen cyclotron frequency by ISEE 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, B.J.; Samson, J.C.; Hu, Y.D.; McPherron, R.L.; Russell, C.T.

    1992-01-01

    Pc 2 electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves at 0.1 waves at 0.1 Hz, near the oxygen cyclotron frequency, have been observed by ISEE 1 and 2 between L = 7.6 and 5.8 on an inbound near-equatorial pass in the dusk sector. The waves occurred in a thick plasmapause of width ∼ 1.5 R E and penetrated ∼1 R E into the plasmasphere. Wave onset was accompanied by significant increases in the thermal (0-100 eV) He + and the warm (0.1-16 keV/e) O + and He + heavy ion populations. The most intense waves (8 nT) were observed in the outer plasmasphere where convection drift velocities (E x B)/B 2 were largest and the Alfven velocity was a minimum. Wave polarization is predominantly left-handed with propagation almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and the spectral slot and polarization reversal predicted by cold plasma propagation theory are identified in the wave data. Poynting fluxes calculated during the first 15 min of the event show wave energy propagation directions both parallel and antiparallel to the field. Computations of the experimental wave spectra during the passage through the plasmapause show that the spectral slots relate to local plasma parameters, possibly suggesting an ion cyclotron wave growth source near the spacecraft. A regular wave packet structure seen over the first 30 min of the event may be attributed to the modulation of this energy source by the Pc 5 waves seen at the same time. Overall, the results are considered an example of an electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave-particle interaction occurring during the outer plasmasphere refilling process at the time of the substorm recovery phase

  1. A very bright SAR arc: implications for extreme magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Baumgardner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the polar aurora visible during geomagnetic storms, stable auroral red (SAR arcs offer a sub-visual manifestation of direct magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I coupling at midlatitudes. The SAR arc emission at 6300 Å is driven by field-aligned magnetospheric energy transport from ring current/plasmapause locations into the ionosphere-thermosphere system. The first SAR arc was observed at the dawn of the space age (1956, and the typical brightness levels and occurrence patterns obtained from subsequent decades of observations appear to be consistent with the downward heat conduction theory, i.e., heated ambient F-layer electrons excite oxygen atoms to produce a spectrally pure emission. On very rare occasions, a SAR arc has been reported to be at brightness levels visible to the naked eye. Here we report on the first case of a very bright SAR arc (~13 kilo-Rayleighs observed by four diagnostic systems that sampled various aspects of the sub-auroral domain near Millstone Hill, MA, on the night of 29 October 1991: an imaging spectrograph, an all-sky camera, an incoherent scatter radar (ISR, and a DMSP satellite. Simulations of emission using the ISR and DMSP data with the MSIS neutral atmosphere succeed in reproducing the brightness levels observed. This provides a robust confirmation of M-I coupling theory in its most extreme aeronomic form within the innermost magnetosphere (L~2 during a rare superstorm event. The unusually high brightness value appears to be due to the rare occurrence of the heating of dense ionospheric plasma just equatorward of the trough/plasmapause location, in contrast to the more typical heating of the less dense F-layer within the trough.

  2. A very bright SAR arc: implications for extreme magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Baumgardner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the polar aurora visible during geomagnetic storms, stable auroral red (SAR arcs offer a sub-visual manifestation of direct magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I coupling at midlatitudes. The SAR arc emission at 6300 Å is driven by field-aligned magnetospheric energy transport from ring current/plasmapause locations into the ionosphere-thermosphere system. The first SAR arc was observed at the dawn of the space age (1956, and the typical brightness levels and occurrence patterns obtained from subsequent decades of observations appear to be consistent with the downward heat conduction theory, i.e., heated ambient F-layer electrons excite oxygen atoms to produce a spectrally pure emission. On very rare occasions, a SAR arc has been reported to be at brightness levels visible to the naked eye. Here we report on the first case of a very bright SAR arc (~13 kilo-Rayleighs observed by four diagnostic systems that sampled various aspects of the sub-auroral domain near Millstone Hill, MA, on the night of 29 October 1991: an imaging spectrograph, an all-sky camera, an incoherent scatter radar (ISR, and a DMSP satellite. Simulations of emission using the ISR and DMSP data with the MSIS neutral atmosphere succeed in reproducing the brightness levels observed. This provides a robust confirmation of M-I coupling theory in its most extreme aeronomic form within the innermost magnetosphere (L~2 during a rare superstorm event. The unusually high brightness value appears to be due to the rare occurrence of the heating of dense ionospheric plasma just equatorward of the trough/plasmapause location, in contrast to the more typical heating of the less dense F-layer within the trough.

  3. Wide-banded NTC radiation: local to remote observations by the four Cluster satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. E. Décréau

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cluster multi-point mission offers a unique collection of non-thermal continuum (NTC radio waves observed in the 2–80 kHz frequency range over almost 15 years, from various view points over the radiating plasmasphere. Here we present rather infrequent case events, such as when primary electrostatic sources of such waves are embedded within the plasmapause boundary far from the magnetic equatorial plane. The spectral signature of the emitted electromagnetic waves is structured as a series of wide harmonic bands within the range covered by the step in plasma frequency encountered at the boundary. Developing the concept that the frequency distance df between harmonic bands measures the magnetic field magnitude B at the source (df = Fce, electron gyrofrequency, we analyse three selected events. The first one (studied in Grimald et al., 2008 presents electric field signatures observed by a Cluster constellation of small size (~ 200 to 1000 km spacecraft separation placed in the vicinity of sources. The electric field frequency spectra display frequency peaks placed at frequencies fs = n df (n being an integer, with df of the order of Fce values encountered at the plasmapause by the spacecraft. The second event, taken from the Cluster tilt campaign, leads to a 3-D view of NTC waves ray path orientations and to a localization of a global source region at several Earth radii (RE from Cluster (Décréau et al., 2013. The measured spectra present successive peaks placed at fs ~ (n+ 1/2 df. Next, considering if both situations might be two facets of the same phenomenon, we analyze a third event. The Cluster fleet, configured into a constellation of large size (~ 8000 to 25 000 km spacecraft separation, allows us to observe wide-banded NTC waves at different distances from their sources. Two new findings can be derived from our analysis. First, we point out that a large portion of the plasmasphere boundary layer, covering a large range of magnetic

  4. Plasmasphere dynamics in the duskside bulge region: A new look at old topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, D. L.; Giles, B. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Decreau, P. M. E.; Anderson, R. R.; Persoon, A. M.; Smith, A. J.; Corcuff, Y.; Canu, P.

    1993-01-01

    Data acquired during several multiday periods in 1982 at ground stations Siple, Halley, and Kerguelen and on satellites Dynamics Explorer 1, International Sun Earth Explorer 1, and GEOS 2 have been used to investigate thermal plasma structure and dynamics in the duskside plasmasphere bulge region of the Earth. The distribution of thermal plasma in the dusk bulge sector is difficult to describe realistically, in part because of the time integral manner in which the thermal plasma distribution depends upon on the effects of bulk cross-B flow and interchange plasma flows along B. While relatively simple MHD models can be useful for qualitatively predicting certain effects of enhanced convection on a quiet plasmasphere, such as an initial sunward entrainment of the outer regions, they are of limited value in predicting the duskside thermal plasma structures that are observed. Furthermore, use of such models can be misleading if one fails to realize that they do not address the question of the formation of the steep plasmapause profile or provide for a possible role of instabilities or other irreversible processes in plasmapause formation. Our specific findings, which are based both upon the present case studies and upon earlier work, include the following: (1) during active periods the plasmasphere appears to become divided into two entities, a main plasmasphere and a duskside bulge region. (2) in the aftermath of an increase in convection activity, the main plasmasphere tends (from a statistical point of view) to become roughly circular in equatorial cross section, with only a slight bulge at dusk; (3) the abrupt westward edge of the duskside bulge observed from whistlers represents a state in the evolution of sunward extending streamers; (4) in the aftermath of a weak magnetic storm, 10 to 30% of the plasma 'removed' from the outer plasmasphere appears to remain in the afternoon-dusk sector beyond the main plasmasphere. (5) outlying dense plasma structures may

  5. Snapshots of high-latitude electrodynamics using Viking and DMSP F7 observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, G.T.; Blomberg, L.G.; Stasiewicz, K.; Murphree, J.S.; Pottelette, R.; Zanetti, L.J.; Potemra, T.A.; Hardy, D.A.; Rich, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    Simultandeous observations by the Viking an the DMSP F7 satellites have been used as input to a new method to obtain snapshot pictures of the auroral electrodynamics. In particular, an ''instantaneous'' global equipotential (or convection) pattern is calculated from distributions of field-aligned current and conductivity which are qualitatively consistent with the Viking auroral imager data and quantitatively consistent with magnetic field and particle data from the two satellites. This convection pattern, which is of the normal two-cell type, with a weak dusk cell and a strong, elongated crescent-shape dawn cell (consistent with positive interplanetary magnetic field B/sub y/), agrees well with the Viking electric field data. The model and the observed potential profiles agree nicely along the entire Viking orbit except for two intervals above acceleration regions where deviations are to be expected (due to parallel electric fields). These regions are characterized by U-shaped potential minima, upward field-aligned currents, upgoing ion beams, and relatively intense auroral kilometric radiation. Thus, the model results are consistent with the Viking observations not only on a global scale but also on the scale of the auroral acceleration regions. The corresponding convection in the magnetosphere is obtained from a simple projection to the equatorial plane of the deduced two-cell convection pattern. From this location of the plasmapause is inferred. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  6. Physics-based models of the plasmasphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pierrard, Vivane [BELGIUM; Goldstein, Jerry [SWRI; Andr' e, Nicolas [ESTEC/ESA; Kotova, Galina A [SRI, RUSSIA; Lemaire, Joseph F [BELGIUM; Liemohn, Mike W [U OF MICHIGAN; Matsui, H [UNIV OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent progress in physics-based models of the plasmasphere using the Auid and the kinetic approaches. Global modeling of the dynamics and inAuence of the plasmasphere is presented. Results from global plasmasphere simulations are used to understand and quantify (i) the electric potential pattern and evolution during geomagnetic storms, and (ii) the inAuence of the plasmasphere on the excitation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (ElvIIC) waves a.nd precipitation of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere. The interactions of the plasmasphere with the ionosphere a.nd the other regions of the magnetosphere are pointed out. We show the results of simulations for the formation of the plasmapause and discuss the inAuence of plasmaspheric wind and of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves for transport of plasmaspheric material. Theoretical formulations used to model the electric field and plasma distribution in the plasmasphere are given. Model predictions are compared to recent CLUSTER and MAGE observations, but also to results of earlier models and satellite observations.

  7. Preliminary results of proton ring current observations in time of magnetic perturbations with the 'Molniya-1' satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grechin, A.N.; Kovrygina, L.M.; Kovtyukh, A.S.

    1975-01-01

    The experimental results of observation on the injection of the annular current protons (30< Esub(r)<380 KeV) into the radiation band during the storm on October 28, 1973 and three storms on January 1, 1974, July 12 and 21, 1974, with the maximum values of Dsup(st) of 65, 30, and 20γ, respectively, are described. During the main phases of the storms the assymetry of the annular current of protons relative to the mid-day-mid-night meridian was observed. The injection of the particles was being accompanied by variation of the shape of the spectrum on the internal edge of the annular current. The possible effect of the ion-cyclotron instability on the formation of the initial edge of the annular current has been analyzed. Immediately after the main phases of the storms on July 12 and 21, 1974, a gap in the spectum within the pre-mid-night sector, with the energies amounting to several dozens of KeV was observed. The formation of this gap may be explained by the development of the instability which results in the pinch-angular diffusion of protons and their decay in the region of plasmapause

  8. An unambiguous determination of the propagation of a compressional Pc 5 wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, N.; McPherron, R.L.; Kivelson, M.G.; Williams, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    During a 3-hour interval on August 21 and 22, 1978, a compressional Pc 5 event was observed by the ISEE-1 magnetometer and medium energetic particle experiment instrument. The finite Larmor radii of the energetic protons allow the authors to determine unambiguously both the azimuthal and radial components of the phase velocity, and consequently the wave length and the azimuthal wave number. A 2nπ ambiguity in evaluating the phase velocity is removed by finding a consistent and physically reasonable solution for different energy channels. As the spacecraft approached the plasmapause, a quasi-sinusoidal wave form having a 165-s period was observed; it was found to be propagating azimuthally westward with a phase velocity of about 33 km/s and an azimuthal wave number of 60. In the outer magnetosphere, more irregular wave forms were observed. These waves also porpagated azimuthally westward and may possibly have had a small earthward (radial) component of phase velocity. To examine the effect of heavy ions on the estimated wavelength, the authors have derived the perturbation of differential flux by calculating the first-order perturbed phase space distribution of plasma consisting of two ion species. They found that, for the detector they used, the effect is very small even there is a significant fraction of heavy ions present. In all cases the modulation amplitude of ion fluxes decreases with an increasing ratio of the ion Larmor radius to the wavelength

  9. The role of cold plasma and its composition on the growth of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelling, J. M.; Johnson, J.; Engebretson, M. J.; Kim, E. H.; Tian, S.

    2017-12-01

    While it is currently well accepted that the free energy for growth of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in Earth's magnetosphere comes from unstable configurations of hot anisotropic ions that are injected into the ring current, several questions remain about what controls the instability. A recent study of the occurrence of EMIC waves relative to the plasmapause in Vallen Probes Data showed that plasma density gradients or enhancements were not the dominant factor in determining the site of EMIC wave generation [Tetrick et al. 2017]. However, the factors that control wave growth on each of the branches are not fully understood. For example, in some cases, the measured anisotropy is not adequate to explain local instability, and the relative importance of the density and composition of a cold plasma population is still uncertain. Several intervals of EMIC wave activity are analyzed to determine the role of a cold population in driving instability on each of the wave branches. This study utilizes the WHAMP (Waves in Homogeneous Anisotropic Magnetized Plasma) stability code with plasma distributions optimized to fit the observed distributions including temperature anisotropy, loss cone, and ring beam populations.

  10. HEOS-2 observations of the boundary layer from the magnetopause to the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formisano, V.

    1980-01-01

    HEOS-2 low energy electron data (10 eV - 3.7 keV) from the LPS Frascati plasma experiment have been used to identify three different magnetospheric electron populations. Magnetosheath-like electron energy spectra (35-50 eV) are characteristic of the plasma mantle, entry layer and cusps from the magnetopause down to 2-3 Rsub(E). Plasma sheet electrons (energy > 1 keV) are found at all local times, with strong intensities in the early morning quadrant and weaker intensities in the afternoon quadrant. The plasma sheet shows a well defined inner edge at all local times and latitudes, the inner edge coinciding probably with the plasmapause. The plasma sheet does not reach the magnetopause, but it is separated from it by a boundary layer electron population that is very distinct from the other two electron populations, most electrons having energies 100-300 eV. These three electron populations are mapped from the magnetopause down to the high latitude near earth regions. The boundary layer extends along the magnetopause up to 5-7 Rsub(E) above the equator; at higher latitudes it follows the magnetic lines of force and it is found closer and closer to the earth. (author)

  11. Overview of Emic Triggered Chorus Emissions in Cluster Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, B.; Pickett, J. S.; Omura, Y.; Santolik, O.; Engebretson, M. J.; Dandouras, I. S.; Masson, A.; Decreau, P. M.; Adrian, M. L.; Cornilleau Wehrlin, N.

    2010-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) triggered emissions have been recently observed onboard the Cluster spacecraft close to the plasmapause in the equatorial region of the magnetosphere (Pickett et al., 2010). The nonlinear mechanism of the wave amplification is the same as for the well known whistler-mode chorus emissions (Omura et al., 2010). The EMIC triggered emissions appear as risers: electromagnetic structures that have a positive frequency drift with time. They can thus be considered as the EMIC analogue of rising frequency whistler-mode chorus emissions. In addition, they propagate away from the magnetic equator. These EMIC risers are not common in Cluster data. We present an overview of the properties of all the identified cases. Risers can be sorted out in two groups: in the first one the starting frequency of EMIC emissions is close to one half of the local proton gyrofrequency and the risers have a clear left-hand polarization. In the second group the risers have an opposite polarization with a starting frequency close to one half of the He+ gyrofrequency. Most of the cases have been detected close to 22 MLT (magnetic local time). This dependence will be investigated to determine if it is linked to the orbit effects or if there is a physical cause.

  12. EMIC triggered chorus emissions in Cluster data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, B.; SantolíK, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Masson, A.; Engebretson, M. J.; Pickett, J. S.; Omura, Y.; Robert, P.; Nomura, R.

    2013-03-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) triggered chorus emissions have recently been a subject of several experimental, theoretical and simulation case studies, noting their similarities with whistler-mode chorus. We perform a survey of 8 years of Cluster data in order to increase the database of EMIC triggered emissions. The results of this is that EMIC triggered emissions have been unambiguously observed for only three different days. These three events are studied in detail. All cases have been observed at the plasmapause between 22 and 24 magnetic local time (MLT) and between - 15° and 15° magnetic latitude (λm). Triggered emissions are also observed for the first time below the local He+ gyrofrequency (fHe+). The number of events is too low to produce statistical results, nevertheless we point out a variety of common properties of those waves. The rising tones have a high level of coherence and the waves propagate away from the equatorial region. The propagation angle and degree of polarization are related to the distance from the equator, whereas the slope and the frequency extent vary from one event to the other. From the various spacecraft separations, we determine that the triggering process is a localized phenomenon in space and time. However, we are unable to determine the occurrence rates of these waves. Small frequency extent rising tones are more common than large ones. The newly reported EMIC triggered events are generally observed during periods of large AE index values and in time periods close to solar maximum.

  13. Cluster observations and simulations of He+ EMIC triggered emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, B.; Shoji, M.; Santolik, O.; Omura, Y.

    2012-12-01

    EMIC triggered emissions have been reported in the inner magnetosphere at the edge of the plasmapause nightside [Pickett et al., 2010]. The generation mechanism proposed by Omura et al. [2010] is very similar to the one of the whistler chorus emissions and simulation results agree with observations and theory [Shoji et Omura, 2011]. The main characteristics of these emissions generated in the magnetic equatorial plane region are a frequency with time dispersion and a high level of coherence. The start frequency of previously mentioned observations is above half of the proton gyrofrequency. It means that the emissions are generated on the proton branch. On the He+ branch, generation of triggered emissions, in the same region, requests more energetic protons and the triggering process starts below the He+ gyrofrequency. It makes their identification in Cluster data rather difficult. Recent simulation results confirm the possibility of EMIC triggered emission on the He+ branch. In the present contribution we propose to compare a Cluster event to simulation results in order to investigate the possibility to identify observations to a He+ triggered emission. The impact of the observed waves on particle precipitation is also investigated.

  14. Electrodynamics of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in the nightside subauroral zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streltsov, A.V.; Foster, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Results from a numerical study of the oscillations of the electric field measured by the Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar in the E-layer of the nightside subauroral ionosphere during the geomagnetic storm of May 25, 2000 are presented. The frequencies of these oscillations correspond to the discrete frequencies of geomagnetic pulsations usually attributed to the field line resonances or global cavity modes at a high-latitude auroral zone, but they are well below the fundamental eigenfrequency of the subauroral magnetosphere. It is shown that these oscillations can be interpreted as an ionospheric footprint of the surface Alfven waves generated at the equatorial magnetosphere on a steep transverse gradient in the background plasma density associated with the inner edge of the plasmapause developed during strong geomagnetic storms/substorms. This density gradient together with the ionospheric Pedersen conductivity defines the location and amplitude of the electric field in the E-layer: the amplitude of the field is proportional to the amplitude of the density inhomogeneity and inversely proportional to its scale-size and the ionospheric conductivity. Interaction of the large amplitude perpendicular electric field with the low-conducting ionosphere can cause the ionospheric feedback instability, which leads to the formation of small-scale, intense structures in the electric field and the parallel current density in the subauroral magnetosphere

  15. Nonlinear Scattering of VLF Waves in the Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Chris; Rudakov, Leonid; Ganguli, Guru; Mithaiwala, Manish

    2014-10-01

    Electromagnetic VLF waves, such as whistler mode waves, control the lifetime of trapped electrons in the radiation belts by pitch-angle scattering. Since the pitch-angle scattering rate is a strong function of the wave properties, a solid understanding of VLF wave sources and propagation in the magnetosphere is critical to accurately calculate electron lifetimes. Nonlinear scattering (Nonlinear Landau Damping) is a mechanism that can strongly alter VLF wave propagation [Ganguli et al. 2010], primarily by altering the direction of propagation, and has not been accounted for in previous models of radiation belt dynamics. Laboratory results have confirmed the dramatic change in propagation direction when the pump wave has sufficient amplitude to exceed the nonlinear threshold [Tejero et al. 2014]. Recent results show that the threshold for nonlinear scattering can often be met by naturally occurring VLF waves in the magnetosphere, with wave magnetic fields of the order of 50-100 pT inside the plasmapause. Nonlinear scattering can then dramatically alter the macroscopic dynamics of waves in the radiation belts leading to the formation of a long-lasting wave-cavity [Crabtree et al. 2012] and, when amplification is present, a multi-pass amplifier [Ganguli et al. 2012]. By considering these effects, the lifetimes of electrons can be dramatically reduced. This work is supported by the Naval Research Laboratory base program.

  16. Trajectory traces of charged particles in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejiri, M.

    1978-01-01

    The characteristic enhancements of ring current particles with energies of about 1--1000keV, associated with magnetospheric substorms, were observed by Explorer 45 (S 3 -A) around the plasmapause in the afternoon to midnight region and showed the characteristic structure called a 'noise' in the proton spectrograms. This paper examines the time developing characteristics of newly injected particles in the magnetosphere under a recently proposed convection electric field and a dipole magnetic field. Approximate equations of a bounce period, a second adiabatic invariant, and a bounce-averaged azimuthal velocity are given with an error of less than about 10 -3 for all pitch angles. The complete set of flow patterns of 90 0 pitch angles is also described by means of inflection lines through whicch radial and/or azimuthal drifts change their directions and where particle velocities show their local minima, i.e., the flow becomes sluggish. These particle tracings in the magnetosphere, from which time dependent particle fronts can be constructed, give the basic concept and mechanics to explain the complex and dynamical properties of the magnetic storm time particle enhancements

  17. Snapshots of high-latitude electrodynamics using Viking and DMSP/F7 observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, G.T.; Blomberg, L.G.; Murphree, J.S.; Pottelette, R.; Zanetti, L.J.; Potemra, T.A.; Hardy, D.A.; Rich, F.J.

    1988-02-01

    Simultaneous observations by the Viking and the DMSP/F7 satellites have been used in a new method to obtain snapshot pictures of the auroral electrodynamics. In particular, an 'instantaneous' global equipotential (or convection) pattern is calculated using field-aligned current and conductivity distributions that are qualitatively consistent with the Viking auroral imager data and quantitatively consistent with magnetic field and particle data from the two satellites. This convection pattern which is of the normal two-cell type, with a weak dusk cell and a strong, elongated crescent-shaped dawn cell (consistent with positive IMF B y ) agrees well with the Viking electric field data. The model and the observed potential profiles agree nicely along the entire Viking orbit except for two intervals above acceleration regions where deviations are to be expected (due to parallel electric fields). These regions are characterized by: U-shaped potential minima, upward field-aligned currents, upgoing ion beams and relatively intense AKR. The model results are thus consistent with the Viking observations not only on a global scale but also on the scale size of the auroral acceleration regions. The corresponding convection in the magnetosphere is illustrated by a simple projection of the deduced two-cell convection pattern to the equatorial plane. From this the instantaneous location of the plasmapause is inferred. (authors)

  18. Rocket observations of the precipitation of electrons by ground VLF transmitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoldy, R.L.; Kintner, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    Below an altitude of 400 km or less over the NASA Wallops Island range, stably trapped particles do not exist because of the South Atlantic Anomaly. In an experiment to measure scattered electrons at these altitudes (NASA flight 36:013), electron detectors clearly measured two monoenergetic electron peaks above the low background. The two monoernergetic peaks are attributed to the resonant interaction of electrons with VLF waves from Navy ground transmitters at Cutler, Maine, and Annapolis, Maryland. The transmitter signals were measured with electric and magnetic receivers aboard the rocket, and their propagation through the ionosphere and correlation with the precipitated electrons are discussed. In addition, energetic ions were also measured to be in the bounce loss cone during this rocket flight. Because of increased geomagnetic activity, it apears that the ring current extended inward to at least the L=2.5 magnetic shell and enhanced convection eroded the plasmasphere. The inward movement or compression of the plasmapause is consistent with a steep gradient in the equatorial cold plasma density and a localized equatorial interaction region needed to account for the monoenergetic elecrtron precipitation. The role of the geomagnetic activity in ''priming'' the trapped electron population for cyclotron resonance with VLF waves such that there is continuous scattering into the bounce loss cone remains uncertain. copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  19. Properties of ELF electromagnetic waves in and above the earth's ionosphere deduced from plasma wave experiments on the OV1-17 and Ogo 6 satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, M.C.; Tsurutani, B.T.; Mozer, F.S.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of ac electric field data obtained on board the OV1-17 satellite and ac magnetic field data obtained on board the Ogo 6 satellite has been made during the northern hemisphere spring and summer of 1969 with the purpose of studying extreme low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves above the earth's ionosphere. The results are in basic agreement with a number of previous ground-based and low-altitude satellite experiments in that the peak signal was observed at high latitudes outside the statistical location of the plasmapause on the day side of the earth, that ELF chorus was very often observed in conjunction with the steady ELF hiss emissions, that the winter hemisphere signal was considerably smaller than that observed in summer or in equinoctial months, and that the emission strength and region of occurrence are asymmetric about magnetic noon. Observations of such strong hiss signals outside the plasmasphere are somewhat surprising in light of Ogo 3 and Ogo 5 measurements which show steady ELF hiss to be closely confined to the plasmasphere at high altitudes during normal circumstances. The present study supports the hypothesis that hiss leaks out of the plasmasphere and refracts downward into the lower ionosphere; such a model predicts the observed summer-winter asymmetry and the poleward skewing of the ELF peak signal strength with decreasing altitude

  20. Radio sounding of the magnetosphere from a lunar-based VLF array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James L.; Fung, Shing F.

    1994-01-01

    Using a lunar-based active radio transmitter and receiver system operating in the 'free space' wave modes, we can obtain much information on the structures and dynamics of remote magnetospheric plasma regions in a way similar to ionosondes. Powerful, narrow-band electromagnetic pulses can be transmitted over a wide frequency range (from 10 kHz to 1 MHz). The signals would be refracted and reflected off magnetospheric structures such as the plasmapause, plasmasheet, magnetopause, and the high and low latitude boundary layers. With a series of long dipole antennas, ranging in size from 400 m to 20 km with an output voltage ranging from 6 kV to less than 0.2 kV, a target plasma region at up to 100 R(sub E) can be explored. We illustrate this remote sensing technique by using the plasmasphere as a remote target, and modeling the propagations of the sounder transmitted and received pulses by ray tracing calculations.

  1. A storm-time plasmasphere evolution study using data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoukar, R.; Bust, G. S.; Bishop, R. L.; Coster, A. J.; Lemon, C.; Turner, D. L.; Roeder, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we study the evolution of the Earth's plasmasphere during geomagnetic active periods using the Plasmasphere Data Assimilation (PDA) model. The total electron content (TEC) measurements from an extensive network of global ground-based GPS receivers as well as GPS receivers on-board Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) satellites and Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite are ingested into the model. Global Core Plasma model, which is an empirical plasmasphere model, is utilized as the background model. Based on the 3D-VAR optimization, the PDA assimilative model benefits from incorporation of regularization techniques to prevent non-physical altitudinal variation in density estimates due to the limited-angle observational geometry. This work focuses on the plasmapause location, plasmasphere erosion time scales and refilling rates during the main and recovery phases of geomagnetic storms as estimated from the PDA 3-dimensional global maps of electron density in the ionosphere/plasmasphere. The comparison between the PDA results with in-situ density measurements from THEMIS and Van Allen Probes, and the RCM-E first-principle model will be also presented.

  2. Development of a methodology for deriving Plasmaspheric Total Electron Content from In-Situ electron density measurements in highly eccentric equatorial orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhique, Aliyuthuman; Buckley, Andrew; Gough, Paul; Sussex Space Science Centre Team

    2017-10-01

    The contribution of the Upper Plasmasphere (defined as the altitudes above semi-synchronous orbit height to the Plasmapause height) to the TEC has been and continues to be un-quantified. The PEACE instrument in the Chinese - ESA Double Star TC1 satellite, the mission's orbit's high eccentricity, low perigee, high apogee and the resulting smaller incident angle while in the above altitude range provide the ideal geometric opportunity to build a methodology and to utilize its empirical in-situ electron density measurements to determine the Upper Plasmaspheric TEC component. Furthermore, the variation of the Inclination Angle of TC1 makes it a suitable equatorial mission confined to the Near-Equatorial region, ie 200 - 250 on either sides of the magnetic equator. As the most pronounced absolute TEC values and variations are within this region, it offers an excellent opportunity to build a Upper Plasmaspheric TEC database. This research generates such, first-ever database along its orbital path, using a methodology of approximation equating arcs of the orbits to straight-line TEC Bars, utilizing complex mathematics, also enabling the determination of the whole Plasmaspheric TEC from any eccentric orbital probe. Presented the paper in 15th International Workshop on Technical and Scientific Aspects of MST radar (MST15/iMST2)'' and ``18th EISCAT Symposium (EISCAT18)'' in Tokyo, Japan and The Royal Astronomical Society National Astronomy Meeting 2017.

  3. Structure of small-scale standing azimuthal Alfven waves interacting with high-energy particles in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimushkin, D.Yu.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of bounce-drift instability on the structure of small-scale azimuthal Alfven waves in the magnetosphere is studied with allowance for the curvature of the geomagnetic field lines. The pressure of the background plasma is assumed to be zero. As early as 1993, Leonovich and Mazur showed that Alfven waves with m>>1, being standing waves along magnetic field lines, propagate, at the same time, across the magnetic surfaces. As these waves propagate through the magnetosphere, they interact with a group of high-energy particles and, thereby, are amplified with a growth rate dependent on the radial coordinate, i.e., a coordinate perpendicular to the magnetic sheaths. Near the Alfven resonance surface, the growth rate approaches zero, and the waves are damped completely due to the energy dissipation in the ionosphere. As the growth rate increases, the maximum of the wave amplitude is displaced to the Alfven resonance region and the most amplified waves are those whose magnetic field vectors oscillate in the azimuthal direction. Among the waves excited in a plasma resonator that is formed near the plasmapause, the most amplified are those with radial polarization

  4. Wave excitation in electron beam experiment on Japanese satellite JIKIKEN (EXOS-B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, N.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter reports on a beam-plasma interaction experiment conducted in the magnetosphere by emitting an electron beam (100-200 eV, 0.25-1.0 mA) from the JIKIKEN satellite. Topics considered include instrumentation, wave excitation, and the charging of the satellite. Various types of wave emission are detected by low frequency and high frequency wave detectors. Waves near upper-hybrid frequency and at electron cyclotron frequency are detected in a low L-value region, which will be useful diagnostic means for plasma density and magnetic field. Vehicle charging up to the beam energy is observed outside the plasmapause. The main objectives of the Controlled Beam Experiment (CBE) are to control the satellite potential by an electron beam emission, and to study the wave excitation (linear and non-linear wave phenomena due to the beam-plasma interaction). It is concluded that waves excited in the beamplasma interaction are strongly dependent on plasma and other parameters in the magnetosphere so that it will provide important knowledge of the magnetosphere plasma processes

  5. Global view of F-region electron density and temperature at solar maximum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brace, L.H.; Theis, R.F.; Hoegy, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer-2 is permitting the first measurements of the global structure of the F-regions at very high levels of solar activity (S>200). Selected full orbits of Langmuir probe measurements of electron temperature, T/sub e/, and density, N/sub e/, are shown to illustrate this global structure and some of the ionospheric features that are the topic of other papers in this issue. The ionospheric thermal structure is of particular interest because T/sub e/ is a sensitive indicator of the coupling of magnetospheric energy into the upper atmosphere. A comparison of these heating effects with those observed at solar minimum shows that the magnetospheric sources are more important at solar maximum, as might have been expected. Heating at the cusp, the auroral oval and the plasma-pause is generally both greater and more variable. Electron cooling rate calculations employing low latitude measurements indicate that solar extreme ultraviolet heating of the F region at solar maximum is enhanced by a factor that is greater than the increase in solar flux. Some of this enhanced electron heating arises from the increase in electron heating efficiency at the higher N/sub e/ of solar maximum, but this appears insufficient to completely resolve the discrepancy

  6. Auroral kilometric radiation and magnetospheric substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Akira; Oya, Hiroshi

    1980-01-01

    The auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) and its relation to the development of the magnetospheric substorm have been studied based on the data obtained by JIKIKEN (EXOS-B) satellite. The occurrence of AKR is closely correlated to the intense UHR emission outside the plasmapause at the satellite position; the evidence clearly suggests that the development of the field aligned current system is associated with AKR generated at the upward current region and with the UHR emission at the downward current region. The drifting plasma due to the electric field that is generated in the magnetosphere at the moment of the magnetospheric substorm is derived from the frequency change of the plasma waves. The enhancement of the westward electric field in the duskside magnetosphere is detected simultaneously with the appearence of AKR. The altitude of the center of the AKR source region varies with intimate relation to the substorm activity suggesting that the generation of AKR is taking place in the region where the polar ionosphere and the magnetosphere are predominantly coupling through the precipitating or up going particles. From the fine structure of the dynamic spectra of AKR, it is suggested that the source of AKR might be closely related to the double layer type electric field along the magnetic field. (author)

  7. Magnetic storm effects on the mid-latitude plasmasphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.J.; Clilverd, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Whistler mode group delays observed at Faraday, Antarctica (65 o S,64 0 W) decrease after the onset of magnetic storms, and slowly recover to normal levels in 1 or 2 days. This is interpreted as a decrease (typically of ∼50%) and recovery of the plasmaspheric electron density at L = 2.5. Within 1 day of the main phase of storms with K p (max) between 6 and 8, the number of observed whistler ducts increases by a factor of 2 or 3, recovering in a few days. During the most intense storms (K p > 8) the duct number decreases. The frequency of occurrence of observed whistler mode signals increases during storms, due probably to enhanced ionospheric propagation of the signals; the storm time dependence implies that there is no link with the apparent increase in duct numbers. The amplitudes of received whistler mode signals are increased by up to a factor of 10 during storms: this is interpreted in terms of magnetospheric amplification through wave-particle interactions, though the evidence suggests that amplification is not necessarily the mechanism by which increased duct numbers are observed. There appears to be a real increase in the duct formation rate, consistent with Walker's (1978) theory in which ring current penetration of the plasmasphere creates a preferential region for duct formation 1.5 R E inside the plasmapause. (author)

  8. Movements of the mid-latitude ionospheric trough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodger, A.S.; Pinnock, M.

    1982-01-01

    A new method for monitoring the position and movement of large ionospheric structures is described. The technique uses data from an ionosonde nominally operating at vertical incidence, but relies on there being present a significant gradient in electron concentration. The position and dynamics of the poleward edge of the mid-latitude trough over Halley Bay, Antarctica (L = 4.2) is investigated using this method. Analyses show that the trough moves rapidly equatorward over Halley Bay in the early evening hours, during geomagnetically active periods. For magnetically quiet periods, the trough is not observed till after midnight, when its equatorward motion is comparatively slow. These results showed marked differences from those predicted from published empirical relationships describing variations in trough position with time, particularly before midnight. Changes in the position of the plasma pause with time, determined from two theoretical models and from observations are compared with these results for the trough. Also, one case study is presented in which there is determination of the positions of both the trough and the plasmapause over a 7 h period. Similarities and differences in their relative positions and movements of the two features are identified and their possible causes are briefly discussed. (author)

  9. Whistler Triggered Upper Band Chorus Observed in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, P.; Golkowski, M.

    2017-12-01

    VLF radiation from lightning discharges is one of several sources of energy injection into the inner magnetosphere from the Earth. Lightning discharges initially produce a broadband impulse or `sferic' but after propagation in the dispersive magnetosphere this waveform soon becomes quasi narrow band with the characteristic spectrographic form of the whistler. Most of the lightning induced VLF wave energy injected into the magnetosphere will be unducted with a k-vector which becomes increasingly oblique. Although unducted radiation is ubiquitous throughout the inner magnetosphere, it is generally of a low amplitude due to Landau damping and is not expected to produce strong nonlinear phenomena such as triggered emissions and chorus waves. However, VLF wave energy ducted or trapped in field-aligned plasma density enhancements can have relatively large amplitudes due to focusing and also linear cyclotron resonance growth. Therefore high amplitude ducted whistler waves can trigger a number of complex nonlinear phenomena. These include the triggering of VLF emissions and triggering of VLF hiss or chorus. Such phenomena are generally considered to result from nonlinear electron cyclotron phase trapping. Observation of such VLF emissions triggered by natural whistlers have been reported since the 1970s in Antarctica. We present observations of whistlers triggered upper band chorus emission from Alaska. Dispersion analyze of whistlers determine the L-shell range to be 4.5 clear frequency band gap between upper and lower band of the observed chorus emissions. The observations point to ducted chorus generation in the vicinity of the plasmapause boundary.

  10. Conversion of electrostatic upper hybrid emissions to electromagnetic O and X mode waves in the Earth's magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budden, K.G.; Jones, D.

    1987-01-01

    The linear conversion of electrostatic upper hybrid emissions via the Z mode to electromagnetic ordinary (O) mode waves has for some time been invoked for the source of Terrestrial and Saturnian myriametric and Jovian kilometric radiations. The conversion occurs by virtue of the emissions' propagation in concentration gradients, and for it to be efficient it is necessary for the gradient to be normal to the ambient magnetic field. Suitable concentration gradients are believed to occur at the plasmapause and at the magnetopause. Ray theory predicts only O mode production whereas full wave theory in a cold plasma shows that both O and X (extraordinary) mode are produced, their relative intensities depending on the plasma parameters. Full wave theory in a warm plasma, besides yielding more accurate information on the O and X modes also provides an insight into the effect of conversion on the source plasma wave. Results obtained from these three levels of theory are compared using plasma parameters derived from wave experiments on spacecraft

  11. Conversion of electrostatic upper hybrid emissions to electromagnetic O and X mode waves in the Earth's magnetosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budden, K.G.; Jones, D.

    1987-02-01

    The linear conversion of electrostatic upper hybrid emissions via the Z mode to electromagnetic ordinary (O) mode waves has for some time been invoked for the source of Terrestrial and Saturnian myriametric and Jovian kilometric radiations. The conversion occurs by virtue of the emissions' propagation in concentration gradients, and for it to be efficient it is necessary for the gradient to be normal to the ambient magnetic field. Suitable concentration gradients are believed to occur at the plasmapause and at the magnetopause. Ray theory predicts only O mode production whereas full wave theory in a cold plasma shows that both O and X (extraordinary) mode are produced, their relative intensities depending on the plasma parameters. Full wave theory in a warm plasma, besides yielding more accurate information on the O and X modes also provides an insight into the effect of conversion on the source plasma wave. Results obtained from these three levels of theory are compared using plasma parameters derived from wave experiments on spacecraft.

  12. Prediction Model of the Outer Radiation Belt Developed by Chungbuk National University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Kyu Shin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Earth’s outer radiation belt often suffers from drastic changes in the electron fluxes. Since the electrons can be a potential threat to satellites, efforts have long been made to model and predict electron flux variations. In this paper, we describe a prediction model for the outer belt electrons that we have recently developed at Chungbuk National University. The model is based on a one-dimensional radial diffusion equation with observationally determined specifications of a few major ingredients in the following way. First, the boundary condition of the outer edge of the outer belt is specified by empirical functions that we determine using the THEMIS satellite observations of energetic electrons near the boundary. Second, the plasmapause locations are specified by empirical functions that we determine using the electron density data of THEMIS. Third, the model incorporates the local acceleration effect by chorus waves into the one-dimensional radial diffusion equation. We determine this chorus acceleration effect by first obtaining an empirical formula of chorus intensity as a function of drift shell parameter L*, incorporating it as a source term in the one-dimensional diffusion equation, and lastly calibrating the term to best agree with observations of a certain interval. We present a comparison of the model run results with and without the chorus acceleration effect, demonstrating that the chorus effect has been incorporated into the model to a reasonable degree.

  13. Electrostatic noise bands associated with the electron gyrofrequency and plasma frequency in the outer magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    Naturally occurring noise bands near the electron plasma frequency are frequently detected by the University of Iowa plasma wave experiment on the IMP 6 satellite in the region from just inside the plasmapause to radial distances of about 10 earth radii in the outer magnetosphere. The electric field strength of these noise bands is usually small with electric field spectral densities near 10 -15 volts 2 meter -2 Hz -1 . A wave magnetic field has been detected only in a few unusually intense cases, and in these cases the magnetic field energy density is several orders of magnitude smaller than the electric field energy density. The bands are observed at all magnetic latitudes covered by the IMP 6 orbit (parallelγ/sub m/parallel less than or equal to 45 0 ) and appear to be a permanent feature of the outer magnetosphere. They are found at all local times and occur least frequently in the quadrant from 18 to 24 hours. The bands appear to consist of two distinct spectral types, diffuse and narrow. In both types the center frequency of the noise band is bounded by consecutive harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency, and the bands occur most often between harmonics that are near the local electron plasma frequency. These bands appear to merge continuously into two types of plasma wave emissions that are found in dissimilar regions of the magnetosphere (upper hybrid resonance noise, also called Region 3 noise, inside the plasmasphere and (n + 1/2)f/sub g/ harmonics in the outer magnetosphere). It is suggested that this smooth merging is caused by changes in the plasma wave dispersion relation that occur as the spacecraft moves from the cold plasma within the plasmasphere into the warm non-Maxwellian plasma found in the outer magnetosphere

  14. Equilibrium and linear analysis of rotating plasmas: fluid and guiding center results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacono, R.

    1990-06-01

    This work is devoted to the equilibrium and stability of rotating plasmas. Apart from its theoretical interest, this subject has become of practical importance in fusion research, due to the use in recent tokamak experiments of auxiliary heating methods such as neutral-beam injection, which can produce large plasma flows. Flow velocities up to the ion sound speed have been measured on different machines and new phenomena associated with the flow, such as distorsions of the plasma equilibrium profiles, have been observed. As a consequence, flows must be included in the macroscopic description of plasma equilibrium, which is the basis for the analysis and the design of magnetic confinement machines, and the stability properties of equilibria with flows need to be investigated. Here, attention is centered on toroidal confinement machines and in particular on tokamaks. However, some of the results to be presented may be of interest also for other domains (strong mass flows also occur in astrophysical and geophysical contexts such as in the Jovian magnetosphere or in the Earth's magnetopause and plasmapause. It should be noted that equilibrium and, in particular, stability with flows are poorly understood at present. Therefore, many of the questions we will consider are of quite a general nature. We are not yet at the point where quantitative comparisons with specific experiments can be made. Even the choice of a convenient model to study plasma flow is far from being evident. So far most of the theoretical investigations have used the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, which is one of the simplest descriptions of a plasma. In this work, however, it will be shown that, for rotating plasmas, the 'simple' MHD model can give very complicated and physically meaningless results, while more 'complicated' models can provide a simpler and more realistic description of the plasma behaviour. 65 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Propagation of EMIC triggered emissions toward the magnetic equatorial plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, B.; Santolik, O.; Pickett, J. S.; Omura, Y.; Engebretson, M. J.; Dandouras, I. S.; Masson, A.; Decreau, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2011-12-01

    EMIC triggered emissions are observed close to the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere at locations where EMIC waves are commonly observed: close to the plasmapause region and in the dayside magnetosphere close to the magnetopause. Their overall characteristics (frequency with time dispersion, generation mechanism) make those waves the EMIC analogue of rising frequency whistler-mode chorus emissions. In our observations the Poynting flux of these emissions is usually clearly arriving from the equatorial region direction, especially when observations take place at more than 5 degrees of magnetic latitude. Simulations have also confirmed that the conditions of generation by interaction with energetic ions are at a maximum at the magnetic equator (lowest value of the background magnetic field along the field line). However in the Cluster case study presented here the Poynting flux of EMIC triggered emissions is propagating toward the equatorial region. The large angle between the wave vector and the background magnetic field is also unusual for this kind of emission. The rising tone starts just above half of the He+ gyrofrequency (Fhe+) and it disappears close to Fhe+. At the time of detection, the spacecraft magnetic latitude is larger than 10 degrees and L shell is about 4. The propagation sense of the emissions has been established using two independent methods: 1) sense of the parallel component of the Poynting flux for a single spacecraft and 2) timing of the emission detections at each of the four Cluster spacecraft which were in a relatively close configuration. We propose here to discuss this unexpected result considering a reflection of this emission at higher latitude.

  16. A generation mechanism for chorus emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Y. Trakhtengerts

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A chorus generation mechanism is discussed, which is based on interrelation of ELF/VLF noise-like and discrete emissions under the cyclotron wave-particle interactions. A natural ELF/VLF noise radiation is excited by the cyclotron instability mechanism in ducts with enhanced cold plasma density or at the plasmapause. This process is accompanied by a step-like deformation of the energetic electron distribution function in the velocity space, which is situated at the boundary between resonant and nonresonant particles. The step leads to the strong phase correlation of interacting particles and waves and to a new backward wave oscillator (BWO regime of wave generation, when an absolute cyclotron instability arises at the central cross section of the geomagnetic trap, in the form of a succession of discrete signals with growing frequency inside each element. The dynamical spectrum of a separate element is formed similar to triggered ELF/VLF emission, when the strong wavelet starts from the equatorial plane. The comparison is given of the model developed using some satellite and ground-based data. In particular, the appearance of separate groups of chorus signals with a duration 2-10 s can be connected with the preliminary stage of the step formation. BWO regime gives a succession period smaller than the bounce period of energetic electrons between the magnetic mirrors and can explain the observed intervals between chorus elements.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Energetic particles · trapped. Space plasma physics (wave-particle interactions; waves and instabilities

  17. A generation mechanism for chorus emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Y. Trakhtengerts

    Full Text Available A chorus generation mechanism is discussed, which is based on interrelation of ELF/VLF noise-like and discrete emissions under the cyclotron wave-particle interactions. A natural ELF/VLF noise radiation is excited by the cyclotron instability mechanism in ducts with enhanced cold plasma density or at the plasmapause. This process is accompanied by a step-like deformation of the energetic electron distribution function in the velocity space, which is situated at the boundary between resonant and nonresonant particles. The step leads to the strong phase correlation of interacting particles and waves and to a new backward wave oscillator (BWO regime of wave generation, when an absolute cyclotron instability arises at the central cross section of the geomagnetic trap, in the form of a succession of discrete signals with growing frequency inside each element. The dynamical spectrum of a separate element is formed similar to triggered ELF/VLF emission, when the strong wavelet starts from the equatorial plane. The comparison is given of the model developed using some satellite and ground-based data. In particular, the appearance of separate groups of chorus signals with a duration 2-10 s can be connected with the preliminary stage of the step formation. BWO regime gives a succession period smaller than the bounce period of energetic electrons between the magnetic mirrors and can explain the observed intervals between chorus elements.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Energetic particles · trapped. Space plasma physics (wave-particle interactions; waves and instabilities

  18. Magnetospheric conditions near the equatorial footpoints of proton isotropy boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sergeev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Data from a cluster of three THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms spacecraft during February–March 2009 frequently provide an opportunity to construct local data-adaptive magnetospheric models, which are suitable for the accurate mapping along the magnetic field lines at distances of 6–9 Re in the nightside magnetosphere. This allows us to map the isotropy boundaries (IBs of 30 and 80 keV protons observed by low-altitude NOAA POES (Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites to the equatorial magnetosphere (to find the projected isotropy boundary, PIB and study the magnetospheric conditions, particularly to evaluate the ratio KIB (Rc/rc; the magnetic field curvature radius to the particle gyroradius in the neutral sheet at that point. Special care is taken to control the factors which influence the accuracy of the adaptive models and mapping. Data indicate that better accuracy of an adaptive model is achieved when the PIB distance from the closest spacecraft is as small as 1–2 Re. For this group of most accurate predictions, the spread of KIB values is still large (from 4 to 32, with the median value KIB ~13 being larger than the critical value Kcr ~ 8 expected at the inner boundary of nonadiabatic angular scattering in the current sheet. It appears that two different mechanisms may contribute to form the isotropy boundary. The group with K ~ [4,12] is most likely formed by current sheet scattering, whereas the group having KIB ~ [12,32] could be formed by the resonant scattering of low-energy protons by the electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC waves. The energy dependence of the upper K limit and close proximity of the latter event to the plasmapause locations support this conclusion. We also discuss other reasons why the K ~ 8 criterion for isotropization may fail to work, as well as a possible relationship between the two scattering mechanisms.

  19. Observations of lower hybrid cavities in the inner magnetosphere by the Cluster and Viking satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tjulin

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Observations by the Viking and Cluster satellites at altitudes up to 35000km show that Lower Hybrid Cavities (LHCs are common in the inner magnetosphere. LHCs are density depletions filled with waves in the lower hybrid frequency range. The LHCs have, until recently, only been found at altitudes up to 2000km. Statistics of the locations and general shape of the LHCs is performed to obtain an overview of some of their properties. In total, we have observed 166 LHCs on Viking during 27h of data, and 535 LHCs on Cluster during 87h of data. These LHCs are found at invariant latitudes from the auroral region to the plasmapause. A comparison with lower altitude observations shows that the LHC occurrence frequency does not scale with the flux tube radius, so that the LHCs are moderately rarer at high altitudes. This indicates that the individual LHCs do not reach from the ionosphere to 35000km altitude, which gives an upper bound for their length. The width of the LHCs perpendicular to the geomagnetic field at high altitudes is a few times the ion gyroradius, consistent with observations at low altitudes. The estimated depth of the density depletions vary with altitude, being larger at altitudes of 20000-35000km (Cluster, 10-20%, smaller around 1500-13000km (Viking and previous Freja results, a few percent and again larger around 1000km (previous sounding rocket observations, 10-20%. The LHCs in the inner magnetosphere are situated in regions with background electrostatic hiss in the lower hybrid frequency range, consistent with investigations at low altitudes. Individual LHCs observed at high altitudes are stable at least on time scales of 0.2s (about the ion gyro period, which is consistent with previous results at lower altitudes, and observations by the four Cluster satellites show that the occurrence of LHCs in a region in space is a stable phenomenon, at least on time scales of an hour.

  20. Variation Process of Radiation Belt Electron Fluxes due to Interaction With Chorus and EMIC Rising-tone Emissions Localized in Longitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Y.; Omura, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Using results of test particle simulations of a large number of electrons interacting with a pair of chorus emissions, we create Green's functions to model the electron distribution function after all of the possible interactions with the waves [Omura et al., 2015]. Assuming that the waves are generated in a localized range of longitudes in the dawn side, we repeat taking the convolution integral of the Green's function with the distribution function of the electrons injected into the generation region of the localized waves. From numerical and theoretical analyses, we find that electron acceleration process only takes place efficiently below 4 MeV. Because extremely relativistic electrons go through the wave generation region rapidly due to grad-B0 and curvature drift, they don't have enough interaction time to be accelerated. In setting up the electrons after all interaction with chorus emissions as initial electron distribution function, we also compute the loss process of radiation belt electron fluxes due to interaction with EMIC rising-tone emissions generated in a localized range of longitudes in the dusk side [Kubota and Omura,2017]. References: (1) Omura, Y., Y. Miyashita, M. Yoshikawa, D. Summers, M. Hikishima, Y. Ebihara, and Y. Kubota (2015), Formation process of relativistic electron flux through interaction with chorus emissions in the Earth's inner magnetosphere, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 120, 9545-9562, doi:10.1002/2015JA021563. (2) Kubota, Y., and Y. Omura (2017), Rapid precipitation of radiation belt electrons induced by EMIC rising tone emissions localized in longitude inside and outside the plasmapause, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 122, 293-309, doi:10.1002/2016JA023267.

  1. Data Prospecting with CORPRAL: Pre-attentive Vision Model at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkin, I. A.; Reinisch, B. W.; Khmyrov, G. M.; Kozlov, A. V.; Grinstein, J.; Fung, S. F.

    2005-12-01

    The Cognitive Online Rpi Plasmagram Rating Algorithm (CORPRAL) is the automated data prospecting tool developed to find interesting examples of signal propagation in the 1.2 million plasmagram image archive from the Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) onboard the IMAGE spacecraft. The RPI instrument is a spaceborne radar whose transmitted radio waves may reflect from important magnetospheric structures, such as the plasmapause and the magnetopause, and return to the spacecraft location to be detected. The CORPRAL prospector draws attention of the human analysts to the RPI plasmagrams that contain traces of remote reflections (~18% of all images), thus helping to relieve the search efforts in the otherwise overwhelming RPI data repository. To find the echo traces in plasmagrams, CORPRAL employs a pre-attentive vision model that replicates human ability to identify important objects in the field of view without willful concentration of attention. The importance of such objects is determined by their `saliency', the ability to stand out against the background. The saliency evaluation is done subconsciously, without a priori concepts of the object shape. The RPI imagery dataset providesd an excellent testbed for studies of the model performance on low saliency objects immersed in irregular background noise. The paper discusses results of statistical evaluation of the CORPRAL performance on a collection of ~25,000 plasmagram images interpreted manually. Overall accuracy of plasmagram interpretation varies depending on the applied measuring program but remains in the mid-90% range. As the prevalence of plasmagrams that contain traces goes below 10%, we do observe lower positive predicted values (PPV) of the CORPRAL analysis (~50%), indicating that automatically selected plasmagrams are interesting only with 50% chance. We will discuss future development efforts and provide examples and scenarios where RPI data prospecting is instrumental in knowledge discovery.

  2. Cross-scale observations of the 2015 St. Patrick's day storm: THEMIS, Van Allen Probes, and TWINS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present cross-scale magnetospheric observations of the 17 March 2015 (St. Patrick's Day) storm, by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes), and Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS), plus upstream ACE/Wind solar wind data. THEMIS crossed the bow shock or magnetopause 22 times and observed the magnetospheric compression that initiated the storm. Empirical models reproduce these boundary locations within 0.7 R E . Van Allen Probes crossed the plasmapause 13 times; test particle simulations reproduce these encounters within 0.5 R E . Before the storm, Van Allen Probes measured quiet double-nose proton spectra in the region of corotating cold plasma. About 15 min after a 0605 UT dayside southward turning, Van Allen Probes captured the onset of inner magnetospheric convection, as a density decrease at the moving corotation-convection boundary (CCB) and a steep increase in ring current (RC) proton flux. During the first several hours of the storm, Van Allen Probes measured highly dynamic ion signatures (numerous injections and multiple spectral peaks). Sustained convection after ~1200 UT initiated a major buildup of the midnight-sector ring current (measured by RBSP A), with much weaker duskside fluxes (measured by RBSP B, THEMIS a and THEMIS d). A close conjunction of THEMIS d, RBSP A, and TWINS 1 at 1631 UT shows good three-way agreement in the shapes of two-peak spectra from the center of the partial RC. A midstorm injection, observed by Van Allen Probes and TWINS at 1740 UT, brought in fresh ions with lower average energies (leading to globally less energetic spectra in precipitating ions) but increased the total pressure. Finally, the cross-scale measurements of 17 March 2015 contain significant spatial, spectral, and temporal structure.

  3. Nonlinear VLF Wave Physics in the Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, C. E.; Tejero, E. M.; Ganguli, G.; Mithaiwala, M.; Rudakov, L.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kletzing, C.

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic VLF waves, such as whistler mode waves, both control the lifetime of trapped electrons in the radiation belts by pitch-angle scattering and are responsible for the energization of electrons during storms. Traditional approaches to understanding the influence of waves on trapped electrons have assumed that the wave characteristics (frequency spectrum, wave-normal angle distribution, etc.) were both stationary in time and amplitude independent from event to event. In situ data from modern satellite missions, such as the Van Allen probes, are showing that this assumption may not be justified. In addition, recent theoretical results [Crabtree et al. 2012] show that the threshold for nonlinear wave scattering can often be met by naturally occurring VLF waves in the magnetosphere, with wave magnetic fields of the order of 50-100 pT inside the plasmapause. Nonlinear wave scattering (Nonlinear Landau Damping) is an amplitude dependent mechanism that can strongly alter VLF wave propagation [Ganguli et al. 2010], primarily by altering the direction of propagation. Laboratory results have confirmed the dramatic change in propagation direction when the pump wave has sufficient amplitude to exceed the nonlinear threshold [Tejero et al. 2014]. Nonlinear scattering can alter the macroscopic dynamics of waves in the radiation belts leading to the formation of a long-lasting wave-cavity [Crabtree et al. 2012] and, when amplification is present, a multi-pass amplifier [Ganguli et al., 2012]. Such nonlinear wave effects can dramatically reduce electron lifetimes. Nonlinear wave dynamics such as these occur when there are more than one wave present, such a condition necessarily violates the assumption of traditional wave-normal analysis [Santolik et al., 2003] which rely on the plane wave assumption. To investigate nonlinear wave dynamics using modern in situ data we apply the maximum entropy method [Skilling and Bryan, 1984] to solve for the wave distribution function

  4. The first year of observations of Jupiter's magnetosphere from Juno's Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valek, P. W.; Allegrini, F.; Angold, N. G.; Bagenal, F.; Bolton, S. J.; Chae, K.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Ebert, R. W.; Gladstone, R.; Kim, T. K. H.; Kurth, W. S.; Levin, S.; Louarn, P.; Loeffler, C. E.; Mauk, B.; McComas, D. J.; Pollock, C. J.; Reno, M. L.; Szalay, J. R.; Thomsen, M. F.; Weidner, S.; Wilson, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Juno observations of the Jovian plasma environment are made by the Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE) which consists of two nearly identical electron sensors - JADE-E - and an ion sensor - JADE-I. JADE-E measures the electron distribution in the range of 100 eV to 100 keV and uses electrostatic deflection to measure the full pitch angle distribution. JADE-I measures the composition separated energy per charge in the range of 10 eV / q to 46 keV / q. The large orbit - apojove 110 Rj, perijove 1.05 Rj - allows JADE to periodically cross through the magnetopause into the magnetosheath, transverse the outer, middle, and inner magnetosphere, and measures the plasma population down to the ionosphere. We present here in situ plasma observations of the Jovian magnetosphere and topside ionosphere made by the JADE instrument during the first year in orbit. Dawn-side crossings of the plasmapause have shown a general dearth of heavy ions except during some intervals at lower magnetic latitudes. Plasma disk crossings in the middle and inner magnetosphere show a mixture of heavy and light ions. During perijove crossings at high latitudes when Juno was connected to the Io torus, JADE-I observed heavy ions with energies consistent with a corotating pickup population. In the auroral regions the core of the electron energy distribution is generally from about 100 eV when on field lines that are connected to the inner plasmasheet, several keVs when connected to the outer plasmasheet, and tens of keVs when Juno is over the polar regions. JADE has observed upward electron beams and upward loss cones, both in the north and south auroral regions, and downward electron beams in the south. Some of the beams are of short duration ( 1 s) implying that the magnetosphere has a very fine spatial and/or temporal structure within the auroral regions. Joint observations with the Waves instrument have demonstrated that the observed loss cone distributions provide sufficient growth rates

  5. A Parametric Study of the Cold Plasma Refilling Rate on the Plasmasphere and Inner Magnetosphere Dynamics during the 17-March-2013 and 28-June-2013 Magnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, C.; Bishop, R. L.; Coster, A. J.; Nikoukar, R.; Chen, M.; Turner, D. L.; Roeder, J. L.; Shumko, M.; Payne, C.; Bhatt, R.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is a complex process, and researchers must consider a number of factors: particle transport in the electric and magnetic fields drives plasma from the high latitude tail to the mid-latitude inner magnetosphere; particle precipitation into the ionosphere, which is frequently driven by wave-particle interactions, enhances the ionospheric conductivities; feedback of the ionospheric conductivities on the electric fields determines how well the convection electric field penetrates to the mid-latitude ionosphere; and the erosion and refilling of cold plasma in the plasmasphere substantially determines the mass of plasma on magnetospheric field lines and the subsequent wave environment that drives particle precipitation. While we model all of these processes, in this presentation we focus on the role of the plasmasphere and its role in M-I coupling. We present RCM-E simulations in which particle transport through self-consistent fields controls the drainage of the plasmasphere, an outflow model determines the plasmasphere refilling rate, and electron and ion precipitation influences the electric field by enhancing the ionospheric conductivity. The plasmasphere significantly affects the spatial structure of the wave environment and electron precipitation rates. This impacts the dynamics of the sub-auroral polarization stream (SAPS) in the pre-midnight region equatorward of the auroral boundary, which itself drives erosion of the plasmasphere through strong westward electric fields near the plasmapause. We present comparisons with Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, the Plasmasphere Data Assimilation (PDA) model, and line-of-sight observations from Millstone Hill ISR and space-based GPS receivers, showing how our modeled plasmasphere compares with observational data during the 17-March-2013 and 28-June-2013 magnetic storms. To better understand refilling, we focus particular attention on densities in the recently-depleted flux tubes in the

  6. Electrostatic interaction between Interball-2 and the ambient plasma. 1. Determination of the spacecraft potential from current calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bouhram

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The Interball-2 spacecraft travels at altitudes extending up to 20 000 km, and becomes positively charged due to the low-plasma densities encountered and the photoemission on its sunlit surface. Therefore, a knowledge of the spacecraft potential Fs is required for correcting accurately thermal ion measurements on Interball-2. The determination of Fs  is based on the balance of currents between escaping photoelectrons and incoming plasma electrons. A three-dimensional model of the potential structure surrounding Interball-2, including a realistic geometry and neglecting the space-charge densities, is used to find, through particle simulations, current-voltage relations of impacting plasma electrons Ie (Fs and escaping photoelectrons Iph (Fs . The inferred relations are compared to analytic relationships in order to quantify the effects of the spacecraft geometry, the ambient magnetic field B0 and the electron temperature Te . We found that the complex geometry has a weak effect on the inferred currents, while the presence of B0 tends to decrease their values. Providing that the photoemission saturation current density Jph0 is known, a relation between Fs and the plasma density Ne can be derived by using the current balance. Since Jph0 is critical to this process, simultaneous measurements of Ne from Z-mode observations in the plasmapause, and data on the potential difference Fs  - Fp  between the spacecraft and an electric probe (p are used in order to reverse the process. A value Jph0 ~ = 32 µAm-2 is estimated, close to laboratory tests, but less than typical measurements in space. Using this value, Ne and Fs  can be derived systematically from electric field measurements without any additional calculation. These values are needed for correcting the distributions of low-energy ions measured by the Hyperboloid experiment on Interball-2. The effects of the potential structure on ion trajectories reaching Hyperboloid are discussed

  7. Plasma gradient effects on double-probe measurements in the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects on double-probe electric field measurements induced by electron density and temperature gradients are investigated. We show that on some occasions such gradients may lead to marked spurious electric fields if the probes are assumed to lie at the same probe potential with respect to the plasma. The use of a proper bias current will decrease the magnitude of such an error. When the probes are near the plasma potential, the magnitude of these error signals, ∆E, can vary as ∆E ~ Te(∆ne/ne+0.5∆Te, where Te is the electron temperature, ∆ne/ne the relative electron density variation between the two sensors, and ∆Te the electron temperature difference between the two sensors. This not only implies that the error signals will increase linearly with the density variations but also that such signatures grow with Te, i.e., such effects are 10 times larger in a 10-eV plasma than in a 1-eV plasma. This type of error is independent of the probe separation distance provided the gradient scale length is much larger than this distance. The largest errors occur when the probes are near to the plasma potential. At larger positive probe potentials with respect to the plasma potential, the error becomes smaller if the probes are biased, as is usually the case with spherical double-probe experiments in the tenuous magnetospheric plasmas. The crossing of a plasma boundary (like the plasmapause or magnetopause yields an error signal of a single peak. During the crossing of a small structure (e.g., a double layer the error signal appears as a bipolar signature. Our analysis shows that errors in double-probe measurements caused by plasma gradients are not significant at large scale (»1 km plasma boundaries, and may only be important in cases where small-scale (<1 km, internal gradient structures exist. Bias currents tailored for each plasma parameter regime (i.e., variable bias current would o1q1improve the double-probe response to gradient

  8. Refilling process in the plasmasphere: a 3-D statistical characterization based on Cluster density observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lointier

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Cluster mission offers an excellent opportunity to investigate the evolution of the plasma population in a large part of the inner magnetosphere, explored near its orbit's perigee, over a complete solar cycle. The WHISPER sounder, on board each satellite of the mission, is particularly suitable to study the electron density in this region, between 0.2 and 80 cm−3. Compiling WHISPER observations during 1339 perigee passes distributed over more than three years of the Cluster mission, we present first results of a statistical analysis dedicated to the study of the electron density morphology and dynamics along and across magnetic field lines between L = 2 and L = 10. In this study, we examine a specific topic: the refilling of the plasmasphere and trough regions during extended periods of quiet magnetic conditions. To do so, we survey the evolution of the ap index during the days preceding each perigee crossing and sort out electron density profiles along the orbit according to three classes, namely after respectively less than 2 days, between 2 and 4 days, and more than 4 days of quiet magnetic conditions (ap ≤ 15 nT following an active episode (ap > 15 nT. This leads to three independent data subsets. Comparisons between density distributions in the 3-D plasmasphere and trough regions at the three stages of quiet magnetosphere provide novel views about the distribution of matter inside the inner magnetosphere during several days of low activity. Clear signatures of a refilling process inside an expended plasmasphere in formation are noted. A plasmapause-like boundary, at L ~ 6 for all MLT sectors, is formed after 3 to 4 days and expends somewhat further after that. In the outer part of the plasmasphere (L ~ 8, latitudinal profiles of median density values vary essentially according to the MLT sector considered rather than according to the refilling duration. The shape of these density profiles indicates that magnetic flux tubes are not

  9. Radial diffusion with outer boundary determined by geosynchronous measurements: Storm and post-storm intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, F.; Haines, P.; Hudson, M.; Kress, B.; Freidel, R.; Kanekal, S.

    2007-12-01

    . After calculating the phase space density time evolution for the two storms and post-injection interval (March 31 - May 31, 1991), we compare results with SAMPEX measurements. A better match with SAMPEX measurements is obtained with a variable outer boundary, also with a Kp-dependent diffusion coefficient, and finally with an energy and L-dependent loss term (Summers et al., JGR, 2004), than with a time-independent diffusion coefficient and a simple Kp-parametrized loss rate and location of the plasmapause. Addition of a varying outer boundary which incorporates measured fluxes at geosynchronous orbit using L* has the biggest effect of the three parametrized variations studied. 1Vampola, A.L., 1996, The ESA Outer Zone Electron Model Update, Environment Modelling for Spaced-based Applications, ESA SP-392, ESTEC, Nordwijk, NL, pp. 151-158, W. Burke and T.-D. Guyenne, eds.

  10. Observational evidence of competing source, loss, and transport processes for relativistic electrons in Earth's outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Drew; Mann, Ian; Usanova, Maria; Rodriguez, Juan; Henderson, Mike; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Morley, Steven; Claudepierre, Seth; Li, Wen; Kellerman, Adam; Boyd, Alexander; Kim, Kyung-Chan

    source in the plasma sheet, and chorus waves. We show how sudden losses during outer belt dropout events are dominated at higher L-shells (L>~4) by magnetopause shadowing and outward radial transport, which is effective over the full ranges of energy and equatorial pitch angle of outer belt electrons, but at lower L-shells near the plasmapause, energy and pitch angle dependent losses can also occur and are consistent with rapid scattering by interactions between relativistic electrons and EMIC waves. We show cases demonstrating how these different processes occur simultaneously during active periods, with relative effects that vary as a function of L-shell and electron energy and pitch angle. Ultimately, our results highlight the complexity of competing source/acceleration, loss, and transport processes in Earth’s outer radiation belt and the necessity of using multipoint observations to disambiguate between them for future studies.