WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma-wall interactions yield

  1. Intense Magnetized Plasma-Wall Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Bruno S. [UNR; Fuelling, Stephan [UNR

    2013-11-30

    This research project studied wall-plasma interactions relevant to fusion science. Such interactions are a critical aspect of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) because flux compression by a pusher material, in particular the metal for the liner approach to MIF, involves strong eddy current heating on the surface of the pusher, and probably interactions and mixing of the pusher with the interior fuel during the time when fusion fuel is being burned. When the pusher material is a metal liner, high-energy-density conditions result in fascinating behavior. For example, "warm dense matter" is produced, for which material properties such as resistivity and opacity are not well known. In this project, the transformation into plasma of metal walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields was studied with an experiment driven by the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. The experiment was numerically simulated with using the MHRDR code. This simple, fundamental high-energy-density physics experiment, in a regime appropriate to MIF, has stimulated an important and fascinating comparison of numerical modeling codes and tables with experiment. In addition, we participated in developing the FRCHX experiment to compress a field-reversed-configuration (FRC) plasma with a liner, in collaboration with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratory and Los Alamos National Lab, and we helped develop diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. Last, but not least, this project served to train students in high-energy-density physics.

  2. Materials Analysis of Transient Plasma-Wall Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-13

    model showing the importance sputter and re-deposition. plasma, pulsed plasma, directed energy, transient wall interaction, high energy density...each equipped with a 25kV copper- vapor thyratron start switch capable of sub-microsecond triggering resolution. Each start switch is paired with a...sample exposure positions within the plasma jet. The probe utilizes a PCB Piezotronics model 113B21 pressure sensor modified to work in the plasma jet

  3. Level crossings, excess times and transient plasma-wall interactions in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsen, Audun

    2016-01-01

    Based on a stochastic model for intermittent fluctuations in the boundary region of magnetically confined plasmas, an expression for the level crossing rate is derived from the joint distribution of the process and its derivative. From this the average time spent by the process above a certain threshold level is obtained. This provides novel predictions of plasma-wall interactions due to transient transport events associated with radial motion of blob-like structures in the scrape-off layer.

  4. The plasma focus as a tool for plasma-wall-interaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, G.; Martinez, M.; Herrera, J. J. E.; Castillo, F.

    2015-03-01

    The study of the interaction of magnetized plasmas with candidate materials for fusion reactors, as for example tungsten, is a main topic in fusion research. Many studies simulate the plasma wall interaction using ion beams, while only a few use plasma simulators. Plasma foci can produce dense magnetized plasmas of deuterium and helium among other species. We used the plasma focus Fuego-Nuevo II, to expose tungsten samples to deuterium and helium plasmas. The samples were analysed by means of SEM, RBS and NRA, evidencing surface erosion, surface melting and retention of deuterium in a shallow surface layer of 250 nm amounting 6.5·1016 D/cm2. The plasma temperature has been measured at the position of the samples using a triple Langmuir probe and compared to calculations of a snowplow model. The modelling of the electrode to reach desired plasma parameters is discussed.

  5. Plasma-wall interaction data needs critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-11-01

    The Division of Development and Technology has sponsored a four day US-Japan workshop ''Plasma-Wall Interaction Data Needs Critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)'', held at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California on June 24 to 27, 1985. The workshop, which brought together fifty scientists and engineers from the United States, Japan, Germany, and Canada, considered the plasma-material interaction and high heat flux (PMI/HHF) issues for the next generation of magnetic fusion energy devices, the Burning Core Experiment (BCX). Materials options were ranked, and a strategy for future PMI/HHF research was formulated. The foundation for international collaboration and coordination of this research was also established. This volume contains the last three of the five technical sessions. The first of the three is on plasma materials interaction issues, the second is on research facilities and the third is from smaller working group meetings on graphite, beryllium, advanced materials and future collaborations.

  6. X-ray spectroscopic study of charge exchange phenomena in plasma-wall interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renner O.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jets of energetic ions launched at laser-burnt-through foils represent an efficient tool for investigation of plasma interaction with solid surfaces (plasma-wall interaction, PWI and for description of transient phenomena occurring close to the walls. Highly charged ions approaching the secondary target interpenetrate the near surface layer, collide with the counter-propagating matter and capture a large number of electrons. This results in a creation of atoms in highly excited Rydberg states or hollow ions with multiple inner vacancies; plasma jet and target ions may also undergo charge exchange (CE processes. We report PWI experiments with Al/Si(PMMA and Al/C targets irradiated at normal or oblique laser incidence. The distinct dip structures observed in red wings of Al Lyγ self-emission is interpreted in terms of CE between C6+ and Al12+ in the near-wall zone. The spectroscopic identification of CE phenomena is supported by results of analytical and numerical calculations.

  7. Edge and Plasma -Wall Interaction Diagnostics in the TJ-II Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F. L.; Tafalla, D.; Branas, B.; Hidalgo, A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Ortiz, P.

    2003-07-01

    The operation of the TJ-II stellarator, carried out under ECR heating conditions until now, the plasma edge parameters and those processes has been identified. Therefore, an important , has implieda careful control of partied e sources and the associated plasma-wall interaction processes. A clear coupling between the plasma edge parameters and those processes has been identified. Therefore, an important effort has been devoted to the development of dedicated diagnostics in both fields. Remarkable success has been attained in the development of atomic-beam based edge diagnostics, namely, thermal Li and supersonic He beams. In particular, fast (up to 200 Hz) sampling of temperature and density profiles has been made possible thorough an upgraded version of the pulsed, supersonic He beam diagnostic. In this paper, whorl devoted to the upgrading of these techniques is described. Also, preliminary experiments oriented to the validation of the collisional radiative models use din the beam-based diagnostic interpretaron as well as simulations of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) studies of level populations of electronically excited He atoms are shown. (Author) 17 refs.

  8. NATO Advanced Study Institute entitled Physics of Plasma-Wall Interactions in Controlled Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Behrisch, R; Physics of plasma-wall interactions in controlled fusion

    1986-01-01

    Controlled thermonuclear fusion is one of the possible candidates for long term energy sources which will be indispensable for our highly technological society. However, the physics and technology of controlled fusion are extremely complex and still require a great deal of research and development before fusion can be a practical energy source. For producing energy via controlled fusion a deuterium-tritium gas has to be heated to temperatures of a few 100 Million °c corres­ ponding to about 10 keV. For net energy gain, this hot plasma has to be confined at a certain density for a certain time One pro­ mising scheme to confine such a plasma is the use of i~tense mag­ netic fields. However, the plasma diffuses out of the confining magnetic surfaces and impinges on the surrounding vessel walls which isolate the plasma from the surrounding air. Because of this plasma wall interaction, particles from the plasma are lost to the walls by implantation and are partially reemitted into the plasma. In addition, wall...

  9. Plasma-Wall Interaction and Electron Temperature Saturation in Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Artem

    2005-10-01

    Existing Hall thruster models predict that secondary electron emission from the channel walls is significant and that the near-wall sheaths are space charge saturated. The plasma-wall interaction and its dependence on the discharge voltage and channel width were studied through the measurements of the electron temperature, plasma potential, and plasma density in a 2 kW Hall thruster [1,2]. The experimental electron-wall collision frequency is computed using the measured plasma parameters. For high discharge voltages, the deduced electron-wall collision frequency is much lower than the theoretical value obtained for the space charge saturated sheath regime, but larger than the wall recombination frequency. The observed electron temperature saturation appears to be directly associated with a decrease of the Joule heating, rather than with the enhancement of the electron energy loss at the walls due to a strong secondary electron emission. The channel width is shown to have a more significant effect on the axial distribution of the plasma potential than the discharge voltage. 1. Y. Raitses, D. Staack, M. Keidar, and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas 12, 057104 (2005). 2. Y. Raitses, D. Staack, A. Smirnov, and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas 12, 073507 (2005).

  10. Theory and Numerical Simulation of Plasma-wall Interactions in Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis

    2016-10-01

    Electric propulsion (EP) can be an enabling technology for many science missions considered by NASA because it can produce high exhaust velocities, which allow for less propellant mass compared to typical chemical systems. Over the last decade two EP technologies have emerged as primary candidates for several proposed science missions, mainly due to their superior performance and proven record in space flight: the Ion and Hall thrusters. As NASA looks ahead to increasingly ambitious science goals, missions demand higher endurance from the propulsion system. So, by contrast to the early years of development of these thrusters, when the focus was on performance, considerable focus today is shifting towards extending their service life. Considering all potentially life-limiting mechanisms in Ion and Hall thrusters two are of primary concern: (a) the erosion of the acceleration channel in Hall thrusters and (b) the erosion of the hollow cathode. The plasma physics leading to material wear in these devices are uniquely challenging. For example, soon after the propellant is introduced into the hollow cathode it becomes partially ionized as it traverses a region of electron emission. Electron emission involves highly non-linear boundary conditions. Also, the sheath size is typically many times smaller than the characteristic physical scale of the device, yet energy gained by ions through the sheath must be accounted for in the erosion calculations. The plasma-material interactions in Hall thruster channels pose similar challenges that are further exacerbated by the presence of a strong applied magnetic field. In this presentation several complexities associated with plasma-wall interactions in EP will be discussed and numerical simulation results of key plasma properties in two examples, Hall thrusters and hollow cathodes, will be presented.

  11. The in-situ diagnosis of plasma-wall interactions on magnetic fusion devices with accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Zachary

    2013-10-01

    We present the first in-situ, time-resolved measurements of low-Z isotope composition and deuterium retention over a large plasma-facing component (PFC) surface area in a magnetic fusion device. These critical measurements were made using a novel diagnostic technique based on the analysis of induced nuclear reactions from PFC surfaces on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Achieving an integrated understanding of plasma physics and materials science in magnetic fusion devices is severely hindered by a dearth of in-situ PFC surface diagnosis. Plasma-wall interactions, such as the erosion/redeposition of PFC material, the evolution of PFC surface isotope composition, and fusion fuel retention present significant plasma physics and materials science challenges for long pulse or steady-state devices. Our diagnostic uses a compact (~1 meter), high-current (~1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject ~1 MeV deuterons into the vacuum vessel. We control the tokamak's magnetic fields - in between plasma shots - to steer the deuterons to PFC surfaces, where they induce high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes in the first ~10 microns of material. Analysis of the induced gamma and neutron energy spectra provides quantitative reconstruction of PFC surface conditions. This nondestructive, in-situ technique achieves PFC surface composition measurements with plasma shot-to-shot time resolution and 1 centimeter spatial resolution over large PFC areas. Work supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-94ER54235 and Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  12. Plasma Wall Interaction Phenomena on Tungsten Armour Materials for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uytdenhouwen, I. [SCK.CEN - The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Massaut, V. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Van Oost, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-07-01

    One of the most attractive future complements to present energy sources is nuclear fusion. A large progress was made throughout the last decade from both the physical as the technological area leading to the construction of the ITER machine. One of the key issues that recently received a large interest at international level is focused on the Plasma Wall Interaction (PWI). One of the promising Plasma Facing Materials (PFM) are Tungsten (W) and Tungsten alloys. However, despite the worldwide use and industrial availability of W, the database of physical and mechanical properties is very limited. Especially after fusion relevant neutron irradiation and PWI phenomena, most of the properties are still unknown. The plasma fuel consists out of deuterium (D) and tritium (T). Tritium is radio-active and therefore an issue from the safety point of view. During steady-state plasma operation of future fusion power plants, the PFM need to extract a power density of {approx}10-20 MW/m{sup 2}. On top of this heat, transient events will deposit an additional non-negligible amount of energy (Disruptions, Vertical Displacement Events, Edge Localized Modes) during short durations. These severe heat loads cause cracking and even melting of the surface resulting in a reduced lifetime and the creation of dust. A contribution to the understanding of cracking phenomena under the severe thermal loads is described as well as the properties degradation under neutron irradiation. Several W grades were irradiated in the BR2 reactor (SCK.CEN) and the thermal loads were simulated with the electron-beam facility JUDITH (FZJ). Since knowledge should be gained about the Tritium retention in the PFM for safety and licensing reasons, a unique test facility at SCK.CEN is being set-up. The plasmatron VISION-I will simulate steady state plasmas for Tritium retention studies. The formation of surface cracks and dust, the initial porosity, neutron induced traps, re-deposited material - change the Tritium

  13. Spectral and spatial structure of extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser plasma-wall interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Stuik, R.; F. Bijkerk,; Shevelko, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation was observed during the interaction of low-temperature laser plasmas and wall materials. Laser plasmas with electron temperature T-e similar to 40 eV were created on massive solid targets (CF2 and Al) by an excimer KrF laser (248 nm/0.5 J/13 ns/1 Hz). The

  14. Global modelling of plasma-wall interaction in reversed field pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagatin, M.; Costa, S.; Ortolani, S.

    1989-04-01

    The impurity production and deuterium recycling mechanisms in ETA—BETA II and RFX are firstly discussed by means of a simple model applicable to a stationary plasma interacting with the wall. This gives the time constant and the saturation values of the impurity concentration as a function of the boundary temperature and density. If the latter is sufficiently high, the impurity buildup in the main plasma becomes to some extent stabilized by the shielding effect of the edge. A self-consistent global model of the time evolution of an RFP plasma interacting with the wall is then described. The bulk and edge parameters are derived by solving the energy and particle balance equations incorporating some of the basic plasma-surface processes, such as sputtering, backscattering and desorption. The application of the model to ETA-BETA II confirms the impurity concentrations of the light and metal impurities as well as the time evolution of the average electron density found experimentally under different conditions. The model is then applied to RFX, a larger RFP experiment under construction, whose wall will be protected by a full graphite armour. The time evolution of the discharge shows that carbon sputtering could increase Zeff to ~ 4, but without affecting significantly the plasma performance.

  15. Present status of plasma-wall interactions research and materials development activities in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-08-01

    It is well known in the fusion engineering community that the plasma confinement performance in magnetic fusion devices is strongly affected by edge-plasma interactions with surface components. These plasma-material interactions (PMI) include fuel particle recycling and impurity generation both during normal and off-normal operation. To understand and then to control PMI effects, considerable effort has been made, particularly over the last decade in US, supported by Department of Energy, Division of Development and Technology. Also, because plasma-facing components are generally expected to receive significant amount of heat due to plasma bombardment and run-away electrons, materials must tolerate high-heat fluxes (HHF). The HHF-component research has been conducted in parallel with PMI research. One strong motivation for these research activities is that DT-burning experiments are currently planned in the Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor (TFTR) in early 1990s. Several different but mutually complementary approaches have been taken in the PMI+HHF research. The first approach is to conduct PMI experiments using toroidal fusion devices such as TFTR. The second one is to simulate elemental processes involved in PMI using ion beams and electron beams, etc. The last one but not least is to use non-tokamak plasma facilities. Along with these laboratory activities, new materials have been developed and evaluated from the PMI+HHF point of view. In this paper, several major PMI+HHF research facilities in US and their activities are briefly reviewed. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, K.L. (ed.)

    1985-10-01

    This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well. (LSP)

  17. Plasma-wall interactions data compendium-1. ''Hydrogen retention property, diffusion and recombination coefficients database for selected plasma-facing materials''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwakiri, Hirotomo [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Matsuhiro, Kenjirou [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Hirooka, Yoshi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamamura, Yasunori [Okayama Univ. of Scinece, Okayama (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    A summary on the recent activities of the plasma-wall interactions database task group at the National Institute for Fusion Science is presented in this report. These activities are focused on the compilation of literature data on the key parameters related to wall recycling characteristics that affect dynamic particle balance during plasma discharges and also on-site tritium inventory. More specifically, in this task group a universal fitting formula has been proposed and successfully applied to help compile hydrogen implantation-induced retention data. Also, presented here are the data on hydrogen diffusion and surface recombination coefficients, both critical in modeling dynamic wall recycling behavior. Data compilation has been conducted on beryllium, carbon, tungsten and molybdenum, all currently used for plasma-facing components in magnetic fusion experiments. (author)

  18. Modelling of impurity transport and plasma-wall interaction in fusion devices with the ERO code: basics of the code and examples of application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschner, A.; Borodin, D.; Brezinsek, S.; Linsmeier, C.; Romazanov, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik, Juelich (Germany); Tskhakaya, D. [Fusion rate at OeAW, Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien (Austria); Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck (Austria); Kawamura, G. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan); Ding, R. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2016-08-15

    The 3D ERO code, which simulates plasma-wall interaction and impurity transport in magnetically confined fusion-relevant devices is described. As application, prompt deposition of eroded tungsten has been simulated at surfaces with shallow magnetic field of 3 T. Dedicated PIC simulations have been performed to calculate the characteristics of the sheath in front of plasma-exposed surfaces to use as input for these ERO simulations. Prompt deposition of tungsten reaches 100% at the highest electron temperature and density. In comparison to more simplified assumptions for the sheath the amount of prompt deposition is in general smaller if the PIC-calculated sheath is used. Due to friction with the background plasma the impact energy of deposited tungsten can be significantly larger than the energy gained in the sheath potential. (copyright 2016 The Authors. Contributions to Plasma Physics published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA Weinheim. This)

  19. Study of plasma-wall interactions in Tore-supra; Etude des phenomenes d'interaction plasma/paroi dans Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggieri, R

    2000-01-01

    In tokamaks the interaction between wall and plasma generates impurities that affect the thermonuclear fusion. This thesis is divided into 2 parts. The first part describes the physico-chemical processes that are involved in chemical erosion, the second part deals with the study of the wear of Tore-supra's walls due to chemical erosion. Chapter 1 presents the wall-plasma interaction and reviews the different processes between plasma and carbon that occur in Tore-supra. Chapter 2 considers the various crystallographic and electronic structures of the carbon that interferes with Tore-supra plasma, the evolution of these structures during irradiation and their temperature dependence are studied. Chapter 3 presents a crystallo-chemical study of graphite samples that have undergone different surface treatments: ionic bombardment, annealing and air exposure. This experimental study has been performed by using energy-loss spectroscopy. It is shown that air exposure modifies the crystallo-chemical structure of surfaces, so it is necessary to prevent air from contaminating wall samples from Tore-supra. Chapter 4 presents a parametric study of chemical erosion rate of plasma facing components (LPM) of Tore-supra. A relation such as Y{sub cd4}{alpha}{gamma}{sup -0.1} gives a good agreement for chemical erosion rate between measurements and the numerical values of the simulation. (A.C.)

  20. Suprathermal electron energy spectrum and nonlocally affected plasma-wall interaction in helium/air micro-plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, V. I.; Adams, S. F.; Miles, J. A.; Koepke, M. E.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.

    2016-10-01

    Details of ground-state and excited-state neutral atoms and molecules in an atmospheric-pressure micro-discharge plasma may be obtained by plasma electron spectroscopy (PLES), based on a wall probe. The presence and transport of energetic (suprathermal) electrons, having a nonlocal origin, are responsible for electrostatic charging of the plasma boundary surfaces to potentials many times that associated with the ambient electron kinetic energy. The energy-flux distribution function is shown to be controllable for applications involving analysis of composition and processes taking place in a multiphase (plasma-gas-solid), chemically reactive, interaction region.

  1. Plasma-wall-interaction in ECRIS II

    CERN Document Server

    Mannel, C; Wiesemann, K

    1999-01-01

    In an ECR-discharge, where the plasma is confined inside a copper-resonator by a simple magnetic mirror, it could be shown that sputtering of wall material has an important influence upon the plasma [1]. Spectroscopic measurements in ECRIS II with a copper vessel confirmed this model. Evidence for the presence of copper atoms and ions in the plasma could be found by ion extraction as well as with VUV-spectrometry. In a nitrogen discharge by adding helium as a mixing-gas we found that the extracted current of Cu-ions decreased and measured line intensities of copper emission lines dropped down. [1] D. Meyer, "Einfluss der Plasmainstabilitaet auf die Produktion hochgeladener Ionen in einer ECR-Entladung", Dissertation, Bochum, 1997

  2. Development and application of a tree-code in simulation scenarios of the plasma-wall interaction; Entwicklung und Anwendung eines Tree-Codes in Simulationsszenarios der Plasma-Wand-Wechselwirkung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberich, Benjamin

    2012-03-15

    Processes in the plasma edge layer of magnetic fusion devices occur on widely disparate length- and time-scales. Also recently developed features in this particular region, such as stochastic magnetic fields, underline the necessity for three dimensional, full-kinetic simulation tools. Contemporary programs often deploy ad hoc assumptions and approximations for microscopic phenomena for which self-consistent ab initio models in principle exist, but are still computationally too expensive or complex to implement. Recently, mesh-free methods have matured into a new class of tools for such first-principles computations which thanks to their geometric flexibility are highly promising for tackling complicated TOKAMAK regions. In this work we have develop the massively parallel Tree-Code PEPC-B (Pretty Efficient Parallel Coulomb solver) into a new tool for plasma material interaction studies. After a brief overview of the working principles of Tree-Codes two main topic groups are addressed: First the leap-frog Boris integration scheme is discussed and its numerical limitations are pointed out. To overcome these limitations the method is enhanced to a guiding-center integrator. As a proof of principal, numerical experiments are conducted reproducing the anticipated drift kinetic aspects of particle orbits. It turns out that this new technique is much less sensitive to large time steps than the original concept was. One major drawback of mesh-free methods which hinders their direct use for plasma-edge simulations is the difficulty in representing solid structures and associated boundary conditions. Therefore, an alternative concept is proposed using charge carrying Wall-Particles, which fits naturally in the mesh-free doctrine. These developments incorporate the second main topic group of this report. To prove the physical correctness of this new idea, a quasi one dimensional plasma-wall interface scenario is chosen. By studying the system with great detail, good agreement

  3. Soft photon yield in nuclear interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kokoulina, E

    2015-01-01

    First results of study of a soft photon yield at Nuclotron (LHEP, JINR) in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 3.5 GeV per nucleon are presented. These photons are registered by an BGO electromagnetic calorimeter built by SVD-2 Collaboration. The obtained spectra confirm the excessive yield in the energy region less than 50 MeV in comparison with theoretical estimations and agree with previous experiments at high-energy interactions.

  4. Soft photon yield in nuclear interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokoulina, E.

    2016-01-01

    First results of the study of a soft photon yield in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 3.5 GeV per nucleon at Nuclotron (LHEP, JINR) are presented. These photons are registered by an BGO electromagnetic calorimeter built by the SVD-2 Collaboration. The obtained spectra confirm the excessive yield in the energy region less than 50 MeV in comparison with theoretical estimations and agree with previous experiments at high-energy interactions.

  5. Soft photon yield in nuclear interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokoulina E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available First results of the study of a soft photon yield in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 3.5 GeV per nucleon at Nuclotron (LHEP, JINR are presented. These photons are registered by an BGO electromagnetic calorimeter built by the SVD-2 Collaboration. The obtained spectra confirm the excessive yield in the energy region less than 50 MeV in comparison with theoretical estimations and agree with previous experiments at high-energy interactions.

  6. Genotype by Environment Interaction (G x E) and Grain Yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-08-31

    Aug 31, 2014 ... Genotype by Environment Interaction and Grain yield stability analysis of Ethiopian ..... common bean (Abeya et al., 2008); for durum wheat. (Alamnie et al. .... A thesis presented in accordance with the requirements for the ...

  7. Interaction hybrid × planting date for oil yield in sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balalić Igor M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the effects of hybrids and planting dates as well as their interaction on oil yield in sunflower for three-year experiment (2005, 2006, 2007. Three sunflower hybrids (Miro, Rimi and Pobednik and eight planting dates were included in the experiment. AMMI (Additive Main Effects and Multiplicative Interaction analysis is one of the mainly used multiplicative models, which evaluates main effects and also interaction. The interaction was detected by using AMMI1 biplot. Oil yield was predominantly influenced by the year of growing (58.9%, then by planting date (12.9% and by hybrid (10.7%. All interactions were significant as well. AMMI ANOVA showed high significance of both IPC1 and IPC2. The contribution of IPC1 was 77.5%. Hybrids Miro and Pobednik showed no significant differences in the mean values, which were higher than average. However, the hybrid Miro showed the highest stability for oil yield. Hybrid Rimi, with the lowest mean value, was the most unstable for the examined character. Oil yield was higher in earlier than in later planting dates. Graphical presentation of AMMI1 in the form of biplot could facilitate the choice of stable hybrids and planting dates for desired characters in sunflower.

  8. Interactions of climatic factors affecting milk yield and composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, A.K.; Rodriguez, L.A.; Wilcox, C.J.; Collider, R.J.; Bachman, K.C.; Martin, F.G.

    1988-01-01

    Objectives were to evaluate effects of interactions of maximum temperature, minimum relative humidity, and solar radiation on milk yield and constituent traits. Effects of climate variables and their interactions were significant but small in most cases. Second order regression models were developed for several variables. Six were examined in detail: Holstein and Jersey milk yields, Holstein fat and Feulgen-DNA reflectance percent, and Jersey protein percent and yield. Maximum temperature had greatest influence on each response, followed by minimum relative humidity and solar radiation. Optimum conditions for milk production were at maximum temperatures below 19. 4/degree/C, increasing solar radiation, and minimum relative humidity between 33.4 and 78.2% (cool sunny days, moderate humidity). Maximum Holstein fat percent of 3.5% was predicted for maximum temperatures below 30.8/degree/C, minimum relative humidity below 89%, and solar radiation below 109 Langleys; actual mean Holstein fat percent was 3. 35%. Optimum climatic conditions for Jersey protein percent were at maximum temperature of 10.6/degree/C with solar radiation at 300 Langleys and relative humidity at 16% (cool sunny days, low humidity). Because noteworthy interactions existed between climate effects, response surface methodology was suitable for determining optimum climatic conditions for milk production.

  9. Effect of Mineral and Microbe Interactions on Biomass Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, S. A.; Block, K. A.; Katz, A.; Gottlieb, P.

    2016-12-01

    The ecological feedback of microbes (bacteria and viruses) in association with minerals is virtually unexplored in the context of characterizing how carbon cycles in the terrestrial ecosystem. These interactions include the ability for bacteriophage to control bacteria populations, the ability of minerals to provide a substrate for bacteria growth, and the effect of minerals on bacteriophage viability. We investigate bacteriophage aggregation with minerals in the clay size fraction (virus experiments, bacteriophage Φ6 was suspended with the minerals smectite, illite, kaolinite, and goethite at low divalent cation concentrations so aggregation was in the reaction limited colloidal aggregation (RLCA) regime, at neutral pH and room temperature conditions. Virus remained viable at a 1:1 virus-clay ratio for clays, and at an approximate 100:1 ratio for goethite. However, the number of plaque forming units was reduced by 99%. Electron micrographs show viable as well as partially disassembled virus, similar to the results found by Block et al. 2014. We found that inactivation of a 4 x 1011 cm-3 concentration of bacteriophage Φ6 by smectite, illite, kaolinite, and goethite, required a minimum sediment concentration of 1.5 x 1011 cm-3, 1.4 x 1011 cm-3, 2.5 x 1011 cm-3, and 1.1 x 109 cm-3, respectively. Mineral biofilms were generated by suspension of tropical soil clays with gram-positive and gram-negative microbes and characterized by x-ray diffraction and imaged by electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Mineral biomass produced by gram negative organisms were subjected to virus infection to determine influence of minerals on community resilience. Lastly, we report biomass yield in each instance to quantify the influence of mineral composition on total biomass production.

  10. Interaction Effects of Planting Date and Weed Competition on Yield and Yield Components of Three white Bean Cultivars in Semirom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yadavi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Unsuitable planting and weed competition are the most important factors that greatly reduce the yield of bean. In order to study the effect of planting date on yield and yield components of three white bean cultivars in weed infest and weed free condition a factorial experiment with randomized complete block design and three replications was carried out at Semirom in 2009. The treatments were planting date (May10, May 25 and June 9 and white bean cultivars (Shekofa, Pak and Daneshkade and two levels of weed infestation (weedy and weed free. Results showed that planting date, weed competition and cultivars had significant effects on yield and yield components of white bean. The 30-day delay in planting date reduced the number of pods per plant, seeds per pod, 100 seed weight and biological yield of white bean cultivars, 22.5, 18, 20.1 and 22.5 percent respectively. Also weed competition, reduced the number of seeds per pod, 100 seed weight and biological yield respectively by 13.5, 5.7 and 27.1 percent. Result of planting date and weed competition interaction effects indicated that the weed competition decreased grain yield (53% in third planting date more than others and delay in planting date was companion with increasing weed density and dry weight in flowering stage of bean. Also Shekofa cultivar had highest grain yield (3379 kg/ha at the first planting date and weed free condition.

  11. Interaction Between Phosphorus and Zinc on the Biomass Yield and Yield Attributes of the Medicinal Plant Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuntal Das

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A greenhouse experiment was conducted at the Indian Institute of Horticultural Research (IIHR, Bangalore to study the interaction effect between phosphorus (P and zinc (Zn on the yield and yield attributes of the medicinal plant stevia. The results show that the yield and yield attributes have been found to be significantly affected by different treatments. The total yield in terms of biomass production has been increased significantly with the application of Zn and P in different combinations and methods, being highest (23.34 g fresh biomass in the treatment where Zn was applied as both soil (10 kg ZnSO4/ha and foliar spray (0.2% ZnSO4. The results also envisaged that the different yield attributes viz. height, total number of branches, and number of leaves per plant have been found to be varied with treatments, being highest in the treatment where Zn was applied as both soil and foliar spray without the application of P. The results further indicated that the yield and yield attributes of stevia have been found to be decreased in the treatment where Zn was applied as both soil and foliar spray along with P suggesting an antagonistic effect between Zn and P.

  12. Construction of the plasma-wall experiment Magnum-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; Koppers, W. R.; van Eck, H. J. N.; van Rooij, G. J.; W. J. Goedheer,; de Groot, B.; Al, R.; Graswinckel, M. F.; van den Berg, M. A.; Kruyt, O.; Smeets, P.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Vijvers, W.; Scholten, J.; van de Pol, M.; Brons, S.; Melissen, W.; Van der Grift, T.; Koch, R.; Schweer, B.; Samm, U.; Philipps, V.; Engeln, R. A. H.; D.C. Schram,; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Kleyn, A. W.

    2010-01-01

    The FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen is constructing Magnum-PSI: a magnetized (3 T), steady-state, large area (80 cm(2)) high-flux (up to 10(24) H+ ions m(-2) s(-1)) plasma generator. Magnum-PSI will be a highly accessible laboratory experiment in which the interaction of magnetized plasm

  13. Construction of the plasma-wall experiment Magnum-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; Koppers, W.R.; van Eck, H.J.N.; van Rooij, G.J.; Goedheer, W.J.; de Groot, B.; Al, R.; Graswinckel, M.F.; van den Berg, M.A.; Kruyt, O.; Smeets, P.; van der Meiden, H.J.; Vijvers, W.; Scholten, J.; van de Pol, M.; Brons, S.; Melissen, W.; van der Grift, T.; Koch, R.; Schweer, B.; Samm, U.; Philipps, V.; Engeln, R.A.H.; Schram, D.C.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Kleyn, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    The FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen is constructing Magnum-PSI; a magnetized (3 T), steady-state, large area (80 cm2) high-flux (up to 1024 H+ ions m−2 s−1) plasma generator. Magnum-PSI will be a highly accessible laboratory experiment in which the interaction of magnetized plasma with d

  14. Genotype by environment interactions and yield stability of stem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2011-06-01

    Jun 1, 2011 ... stability of stem borer resistant maize hybrids in Kenya. Yoseph .... additive model with environments as the only main effects. A two- ..... silage dry matter content of 18 Dutch maize varieties. However .... Genetic components of yield ... modification, and protein quality of hybrid and open-pollinated quality.

  15. genotype by environment interaction and grain yield stability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT: Genotypes by environment (GXE) interactions are almost unanimously considered to be ... important tool in plant breeding and this has to be ..... Pakistan Journal of Biological Sci- ... mosome Engineering and Crop Improvement.

  16. Effects of Genotype by Environment Interactions on Milk Yield, Energy Balance, and Protein Balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerda, B.; Ouweltjes, W.; Sebek, L.B.J.; Windig, J.J.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in genetic merit for milk yield are associated with increases in mobilization of body reserves. This study assessed the effects of genotype by environment (GxE) interactions on milk yield and energy and protein balances. Heifers (n = 100) with high or low genetic merit for milk yield were

  17. Nuclear enhancement of the photon yield in cosmic ray interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kachelriess, Michael; Ostapchenko, Sergey S

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the nuclear enhancement factor has been used since the beginning of gamma-ray astronomy. It provides a simple and convenient way to account for the contribution of nuclei (A>1) in cosmic rays (CRs) and in the interstellar medium (ISM) to the diffuse gamma-ray emission. An accurate treatment of the dominant emission process, such as hadronic interactions of CRs with the ISM, enables one to study CR acceleration processes, CR propagation in the ISM, and provides a reliable background model for searches of new phenomena. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) launched in 2008 provides excellent quality data in a wide energy range 30 MeV - 1 TeV where the diffuse emission accounts for the majority of photons. Exploiting its data to the fullest requires a new study of the processes of gamma-ray production in hadronic interactions. In this paper we point out that several commonly used studies of the nuclear enhancement factor miss to account for the spectrally averaged energy loss fraction which ...

  18. Interactions between temperature and drought in global and regional crop yield variability during 1961-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiu, Michael; Ankerst, Donna P; Menzel, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Inter-annual crop yield variation is driven in large parts by climate variability, wherein the climate components of temperature and precipitation often play the biggest role. Nonlinear effects of temperature on yield as well as interactions among the climate variables have to be considered. Links between climate and crop yield variability have been previously studied, both globally and at regional scales, but typically with additive models with no interactions, or when interactions were included, with implications not fully explained. In this study yearly country level yields of maize, rice, soybeans, and wheat of the top producing countries were combined with growing season temperature and SPEI (standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index) to determine interaction and intensification effects of climate variability on crop yield variability during 1961-2014. For maize, soybeans, and wheat, heat and dryness significantly reduced yields globally, while global effects for rice were not significant. But because of interactions, heat was more damaging in dry than in normal conditions for maize and wheat, and temperature effects were not significant in wet conditions for maize, soybeans, and wheat. Country yield responses to climate variability naturally differed between the top producing countries, but an accurate description of interaction effects at the country scale required sub-national data (shown only for the USA). Climate intensification, that is consecutive dry or warm years, reduced yields additionally in some cases, however, this might be linked to spillover effects of multiple growing seasons. Consequently, the effect of temperature on yields might be underestimated in dry conditions: While there were no significant global effects of temperature for maize and soybeans yields for average SPEI, the combined effects of high temperatures and drought significantly decreased yields of maize, soybeans, and wheat by 11.6, 12.4, and 9.2%, respectively.

  19. Effects of B, Mo, Zn, and Their Interactions on Seed Yield of Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Mei; SHI Lei; XU Fang-Sen; LU Jian-Wei; WANG Yun-Hua

    2009-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of boron (B), molybdenum (Mo), zinc (Zn) and their interactions on seed yield and yield formation of rapeseed (Brassiea napus L. war. Huashuang 4). Application of B fertilizer to a sandy soil increased the seed yield by 46.1% compared to the control and also created a considerably higher seed yield than the two treatments solely applying Mo and Zn fertilizers, which suggested that B was a main constraint for the seed yield of Huashuang 4 in this experiment. The effect of B fertilizer on the seed yield was attributed to an increase in the number of seeds per silique and siliques per plant. The combined application of B with Mo or Zn resulted in higher seed yield than the application of B, Mo or Zn alone, and the seed yield of the B+Mo+Zn treatment was the highest in all treatments, 68.1% above the control. Dry matter accumulation of seed followed a typical S-shaped curve and it was higher in plants supplied with B than in plants without B. A small but significant increase in the seed oil content and an improvement in the oil quality were also observed in all treatments compared with the control. These results suggested that optimal micronutrient application could provide both yield and quality advantages for rapeseed in poor soil.

  20. Interaction complexity matters: disentangling services and disservices of ant communities driving yield in tropical agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgoss, Arno; Tscharntke, Teja; Rumede, Alfianus; Fiala, Brigitte; Seidel, Hannes; Shahabuddin, Saleh; Clough, Yann

    2014-01-22

    Owing to complex direct and indirect effects, impacts of higher trophic levels on plants is poorly understood. In tropical agroecosystems, ants interact with crop mutualists and antagonists, but little is known about how this integrates into the final ecosystem service, crop yield. We combined ant exclusion and introduction of invasive and native-dominant species in cacao agroecosystems to test whether (i) ant exclusion reduces yield, (ii) dominant species maximize certain intermediate ecosystem services (e.g. control of specific pests) rather than yield, which depends on several, cascading intermediate services and (iii) even, species-rich ant communities result in highest yields. Ants provided services, including reduced leaf herbivory and fruit pest damage and indirect pollination facilitation, but also disservices, such as increased mealybug density, phytopathogen dissemination and indirect pest damage enhancement. Yields were highest with unmanipulated, species-rich, even communities, whereas ant exclusion decreased yield by 27%. Introduction of an invasive-dominant ant decreased species density and evenness and resulted in 34% lower yields, whereas introduction of a non-invasive-dominant species resulted in similar species density and yields as in the unmanipulated control. Species traits and ant community structure affect services and disservices for agriculture in surprisingly complex ways, with species-rich and even communities promoting highest yield.

  1. Genotype by environment interaction for seed yield per plant in rapeseed using AMMI model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Marjanović-Jeromela

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess genotype by environment interaction for seed yield per plant in rapeseed cultivars grown in Northern Serbia by the AMMI (additive main effects and multiplicative interaction model. The study comprised 19 rapeseed genotypes, analyzed in seven years through field trials arranged in a randomized complete block design, with three replicates. Seed yield per plant of the tested cultivars varied from 1.82 to 19.47 g throughout the seven seasons, with an average of 7.41 g. In the variance analysis, 72.49% of the total yield variation was explained by environment, 7.71% by differences between genotypes, and 19.09% by genotype by environment interaction. On the biplot, cultivars with high yield genetic potential had positive correlation with the seasons with optimal growing conditions, while the cultivars with lower yield potential were correlated to the years with unfavorable conditions. Seed yield per plant is highly influenced by environmental factors, which indicates the adaptability of specific genotypes to specific seasons.

  2. Genotype x environment interactions for seed yield and its components in sesame (Sesame indicum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaresan.D and N. Nadarajan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to analyze the genotype by environment (GxE interaction effect on yield and its components insesame grown in three environments by using AMMI analysis. The mean square were significant for genotypes, environments,GxE interaction for the characters viz., number of capsules, 1000 seed weight and single plant yield. The genotypes namelyPSR 2007 x Co1, Si 42 x Co 1, Si 42 x VRI 1, AHT 123 x VRI 1, B 203 x SVPR 1 and YLM 4030 x SVPR 1 recorded highmean but low interaction effect which are desirable for releasing as stable hybrids. The genotypes OMT 30 x VRI 1, OMT 30x SVPR 1 and DPI 1424 x VRI 1 exhibited high interaction effect and are suitable for specific environments

  3. Gene interactions and genetics for yield and its attributes in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. K. PARIHAR; G. P. DIXIT; DEEPAK SINGH

    2016-12-01

    Grain yield is a complex character representing a multiplicative end product of many yield attributes. However, understanding the genetics and inheritance that underlies yield and its component characters pose a prerequisite to attain the actual yieldpotential of any crop species. The knowledge pertaining to gene actions and interactions is likely to direct and strengthen the crop breeding programmes. With this objective, the present investigation was undertaken by using six generations derived from three different crosses in grass pea. The study underscores the significance of additive–dominance model, gene action involved in inheritance of quantitative characters and heritability. Of note, nonallelic interactions influencing the traits were detected by both scaling test and joint scaling test, indicating the inadequacy of the additive–dominance model alone in explaining the manifestation of complex traits such as yield. Besides, additive (d) and dominance (h) gene effects, different types of interallelic interactions (i, j, l) contributed towards the inheritance of traits in the given crosses. Nevertheless, predominanceof additive variance suggests a difference between homozygotes at a locus with positive and negative alleles being distributed between the parents. Duplicate epistasis was prevalent in most of the cases for traits like plant height, seeds/pod,100-seed weight and pod width. In view of the diverse gene actions, i.e. additive, dominant and epistasis, playing important roles in the manifestation of complex traits like yield, we advocate implementation of population improvement techniques inparticular reciprocal recurrent selection to improve productivity gains in grass pea.

  4. Linkages and Interactions Analysis of Major Effect Drought Grain Yield QTLs in Rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Vikram

    Full Text Available Quantitative trait loci conferring high grain yield under drought in rice are important genomic resources for climate resilient breeding. Major and consistent drought grain yield QTLs usually co-locate with flowering and/or plant height QTLs, which could be due to either linkage or pleiotropy. Five mapping populations used for the identification of major and consistent drought grain yield QTLs underwent multiple-trait, multiple-interval mapping test (MT-MIM to estimate the significance of pleiotropy effects. Results indicated towards possible linkages between the drought grain yield QTLs with co-locating flowering and/or plant height QTLs. Linkages of days to flowering and plant height were eliminated through a marker-assisted breeding approach. Drought grain yield QTLs also showed interaction effects with flowering QTLs. Drought responsiveness of the flowering locus on chromosome 3 (qDTY3.2 has been revealed through allelic analysis. Considering linkage and interaction effects associated with drought QTLs, a comprehensive marker-assisted breeding strategy was followed to develop rice genotypes with improved grain yield under drought stress.

  5. Interpreting genotype × environment interactions for grain yield of rainfed durum wheat in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Mohammadi; Ezatollah Farshadfar; Ahmed Amri

    2015-01-01

    Clustering genotype × environment (GE) interactions and understanding the causes of GE interactions are among the most important tasks in crop breeding programs. Pattern analysis (cluster and ordination techniques) was applied to analyze GE interactions for grain yield of 24 durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum) genotypes (breeding lines and old and new cultivars) along with a popular bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivar grown in 21 different rainfed environments during the 2010–2013 cropping seasons. To investigate the causes of GE interaction, several genotypic and environmental covariables were used. In a combined ANOVA, environment was the predominant source of variation, accounting for 81.2%of the total sum of squares (TSS), and the remaining TSS due to the GE interaction effect was almost seven times that of the genetic effect. Cluster analysis separated the environments into four groups with similar discriminating ability among genotypes, and genotypes into five groups with similar patterns in yield performance. Pattern analysis confirmed two major environmental clusters (cold and warm), and allowed the discrimination and characterization of genotype adaptation. Within the cold-environment cluster, several subclusters were identified. The breeding lines were most adapted to moderate and warm environments, whereas the old varieties were adapted to cold environments. The results indicated that winter rainfall and plant height were among the environmental and genotypic covariables, respectively, that contributed most to GE interaction for grain yield in rainfed durum wheat.

  6. Interpreting genotype × environment interactions for grain yield of rainfed durum wheat in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Mohammadi; Ezatollah Farshadfar; Ahmed Amri

    2015-01-01

    Clustering genotype × environment(GE) interactions and understanding the causes of GE interactions are among the most important tasks in crop breeding programs. Pattern analysis(cluster and ordination techniques) was applied to analyze GE interactions for grain yield of 24 durum wheat(Triticum turgidum L. var. durum) genotypes(breeding lines and old and new cultivars) along with a popular bread wheat(Triticum aestivum) cultivar grown in 21 different rainfed environments during the 2010–2013 cropping seasons. To investigate the causes of GE interaction, several genotypic and environmental covariables were used. In a combined ANOVA, environment was the predominant source of variation,accounting for 81.2% of the total sum of squares(TSS), and the remaining TSS due to the GE interaction effect was almost seven times that of the genetic effect. Cluster analysis separated the environments into four groups with similar discriminating ability among genotypes, and genotypes into five groups with similar patterns in yield performance.Pattern analysis confirmed two major environmental clusters(cold and warm), and allowed the discrimination and characterization of genotype adaptation. Within the cold-environment cluster, several subclusters were identified. The breeding lines were most adapted to moderate and warm environments, whereas the old varieties were adapted to cold environments. The results indicated that winter rainfall and plant height were among the environmental and genotypic covariables, respectively, that contributed most to GE interaction for grain yield in rainfed durum wheat.

  7. Issues Arising from Plasma-Wall Interactions in Inner-Class Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, William R.

    1999-06-23

    This section reviews physical processes involved in the implantation of energetic hydrogen into plasma facing materials and its subsequent diffusion, release, or immobilization by trapping or precipitation within the material. These topics have also been discussed in previous reviews. The term hydrogen or H is used here generically to refer to protium, deuterium or tritium.

  8. Scientific report. Plasma-wall interaction studies related to fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temmerman, G. De

    2006-07-01

    This scientific report summarises research done on erosion and deposition mechanisms affecting the optical reflectivity of potential materials for use in the mirrors used in fusion reactors. Work done in Juelich, Germany, at the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland, the JET laboratory in England and in Basle is discussed. Various tests made with the mirrors are described. Results obtained are presented in graphical and tabular form and commented on. The influence of various material choices on erosion and deposition mechanisms is discussed.

  9. Edge and divertor plasma: detachment, stability, and plasma-wall interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Lee, Wonjae; Phsenov, A. A.; Smirnov, R. D.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Stepanenko, A. A.; Zhang, Yanzeng

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents an overview of the results of studies on a wide range of the edge plasma related issues. The rollover of the plasma flux to the target during progressing detachment process is shown to be caused by the increase of the impurity radiation loss and volumetric plasma recombination, whereas the ion-neutral friction, although important for establishing the necessary edge plasma conditions, does not contribute per se to the rollover of the plasma flux to the target. The processes limiting the power loss by impurity radiation are discussed and a simple estimate of this limit is obtained. Different mechanisms of meso-scale thermal instabilities driven by impurity radiation and resulting in self-sustained oscillations in the edge plasma are identified. An impact of sheared magnetic field on the dynamics of the blobs and ELM filaments playing an important role in the edge and SOL plasma transport is discussed. Trapping of He, which is an intrinsic impurity for the fusion plasmas, in the plasma-facing tungsten material is considered. A newly developed model, accounting for the generation of additional He traps caused by He bubble growth, fits all the available experimental data on the layer of nano-bubbles observed in W under irradiation by low energy He plasma.

  10. Mathematical Analyses for the Influence of Soil Conditions and Nutrient Interactions on Cotton Yields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGJIANHUI; HUCHANGQING; 等

    1996-01-01

    The influence of soil chemical properties and soil nutrition on cotton yields was studied by means of establishing mathematical models.The nultivarate quadratic regression equations developed by a stepwise regression method not only presented the single effect of soil factors but also displayed the interaction(synergistic or antagonistic) of soil nutrients.The effect of individual factor and the way of nutrient interaction were further analysed by the path analysis method.The results showed that among major factors affecting cotton yields,there existed the interactions between macronutrients(available P× available K),and between macronutrients and microelements(N×Zn,P×Mo,P×Cu,P×Zn,K×Mo)besides the single effect of soil pH,total P ,available Cu and available Zn.

  11. AMMI Model for Interpreting Clone-Environment Interaction in Starch Yield of Cassava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHOLIHIN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the interaction between clone and environment for starch yield in six month-old plants of cassava clones based on additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI model. The experiments were conducted on mineral soil in four different locations: Lumajang (inceptisol, Kediri (entisol, Pati (alfisol, and Tulangbawang (ultisol. The experiments were carried out during 2004-2005, using a split plot design withthree replications. The main plots were the simple and the improved technology. The clones used were fifteen clones. Parameter recorded was starch yield (kg/ha of the 6 month old plants. The data were analyzed using the AMMI model. Based on the AMMI analysis, environmental factors being important in determining the stability of the starch yield were soil density for subsoil, pH of topsoil, and the maximum air humidity four months after planting. The clones of CMM97001-87, CMM97002-183, CMM97011-191, CMM97006-44, and Adhira 4 were identified as stable clones in starch yield within 6 month-old plants. CMM97007-235 was adapted to maximum relative humidity 4 months after planting and to lower pH of topsoil, whereas, MLG 10311 was adapted to lower bulk density. The mean starch yield of MLG 10311 was the highest six months after planting.

  12. Final-state interactions in the process anti pp {yields} pK{sup +} {Lambda}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeder, M.; Borodina, E.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gast, W.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Kilian, K.; Mertens, M.; Ritman, J.; Roderburg, E.; Sefzick, T.; Wintz, P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Clement, H.; Doroshkevich, E.; Ehrhardt, K.; Erhardt, A. [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); University of Tuebingen, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Eyrich, W.; Kober, L.; Krapp, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Haidenbauer, J.; Hanhart, C. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Juelich (Germany); Hauenstein, F.; Klaja, P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Schroeder, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Sibirtsev, A. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Wuestner, P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronik, Juelich (Germany); Collaboration: The COSY-TOF Collaboration

    2013-12-15

    The possibility to determine the p{Lambda} scattering length from the final-state interaction in the reaction anti pp {yields} pK{sup +} {Lambda} is investigated experimentally. From a transversely polarized measurement, the K{sup +} analyzing power (A{sub N}) which, in principle, allows one to extract the spin triplet scattering length is studied. An unexpected energy dependence of the forward/backward symmetric part of A{sub N} is found. The influence of N {sup *} resonances on the p {Lambda} invariant mass spectrum is investigated by exploiting the large acceptance for the process anti pp {yields} pK{sup +} {Lambda} {yields} pK{sup +} p{pi}{sup -} and is found to be the main source of uncertainty for determining the p{Lambda} scattering length. (orig.)

  13. Gene interactions and genetics of blast resistance and yield attributes in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. Divya; A. Biswas; S. Robin; R. Rabindran; A. John Joel

    2014-08-01

    Blast disease caused by the pathogen Pyricularia oryzae is a serious threat to rice production. Six generations viz., P1, P2, F1, F2, B1 and B2 of a cross between blast susceptible high-yielding rice cultivar ADT 43 and resistant near isogenic line (NIL) CT13432-3R, carrying four blast resistance genes Pi1, Pi2, Pi33 and Pi54 in combination were used to study the nature and magnitude of gene action for disease resistance and yield attributes. The epistatic interaction model was found adequate to explain the gene action in most of the traits. The interaction was complementary for number of productive tillers, economic yield, lesion number, infected leaf area and potential disease incidence but duplicate epistasis was observed for the remaining traits. Among the genotypes tested under epiphytotic conditions, gene pyramided lines were highly resistant to blast compared to individuals with single genes indicating that the nonallelic genes have a complementary effect when present together. The information on genetics of various contributing traits of resistance will further aid plant breeders in choosing appropriate breeding strategy for blast resistance and yield enhancement in rice.

  14. Co-pyrolysis characteristics of microalgae Isochrysis and Chlorella: Kinetics, biocrude yield and interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bingwei; Wang, Xin; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2015-12-01

    Co-pyrolysis characteristics of Isochrysis (high lipid) and Chlorella (high protein) were investigated qualitatively and quantitatively based on DTG curves, biocrude yield and composition by individual pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis. DTG curves in co-pyrolysis have been compared accurately with those in individual pyrolysis. An interaction has been detected at 475-500°C in co-pyrolysis based on biocrude yields, and co-pyrolysis reaction mechanism appear three-dimensional diffusion in comparison with random nucleation followed by growth in individual pyrolysis based on kinetic analysis. There is no obvious difference in the maximum biocrude yields for individual pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis, but carboxylic acids (IC21) decreased and N-heterocyclic compounds (IC12) increased in co-pyrolysis. Simulation results of biocrude yield by Components Biofuel Model and Kinetics Biofuel Model indicate that the processes of co-pyrolysis comply with those of individual pyrolysis in solid phase by and large. Variation of percentage content in co-pyrolysis and individual pyrolysis biocrude indicated interaction in gas phase.

  15. Seed yield components and their potential interaction in grasses - to what extend does seed weigth influence yield?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelt, B; Gislum, R

    2010-01-01

     In a first-year seed crop of red fescue (Festuca rubra L.) the degree of lodging was controlled by the use of Moddus (Trinexapac-ethyl). Seed weight was found to increase by the decreasing degree of lodging prior to harvest. The higher seed weights were accompanied by higher yields even though t...

  16. THE GENOTYPES X ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION FOR STARCH YIELD IN NINE-MONTH OLD CASSAVA PROMISING CLONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sholihin Sholihin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cassava (Manihot esculenta is planted in dry areas with different environmental conditions, therefore the yield is varied. The aim of the study was to analyze the genotype x environment interaction for starch yield in 9-month old cassava promising clones. The experiment was conducted on mineral soils in four different locations, i.e. Lumajang-East Java (Inceptisols, Kediri-East Java (Entisols, Pati-Central Java (Alfisols, and Tulangbawang-Lampung (Ultisols during 2004- 2005. The experiment was arranged in split plot design with three replications. The main plots were cultivation techniques, i.e. simple technology and improved technology, whereas the subplots were 15 cassava promising clones. Starch yield of 9- month old cassava plants was analysed using the additive maineffects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI. The results showed that environmental factors determined the stability of starch yield were soil bulk density on subsoil, the number of rainy days at fifth month, minimum air temperature at fourth month, and minimum air humidity at seventh month. CMM97002-183, Adira 4, CMM97007-145, CMM97007-235, Malang 2, CMM97002-36, and CMM97006-44 were identified as the stable cassava clones for starch yield in 9-month old. Average starch yield of Adira 4 was the third after MLG 10311 and CMM 97006-52. The CMM97006-52 was adapted to the soils having high P2O5 content on topsoil, high minimum air temperature at 4 and 5 months after planting, high minimum relative humidity at 7 months after planting, low total rainfall at 5 months after planting, and low number of rainy days at 5 and 8 months after planting. MLG 10311 was adapted to low soil bulk density. The average starch yield of MLG 10311 was the highest at 9 months after planting. The study implies that advanced trials for CMM 977006-52 and MLG 10311 clones are needed, so the clones can be released as new varieties of cassava. In selection and evaluation, the bulk density on subsoil is needed

  17. Synergistic interactions of ecosystem services: florivorous pest control boosts crop yield increase through insect pollination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Insect pollination and pest control are pivotal functions sustaining global food production. However, they have mostly been studied in isolation and how they interactively shape crop yield remains largely unexplored. Using controlled field experiments, we found strong synergistic effects of insect pollination and simulated pest control on yield quantity and quality. Their joint effect increased yield by 23%, with synergistic effects contributing 10%, while their single contributions were 7% and 6%, respectively. The potential economic benefit for a farmer from the synergistic effects (12%) was 1.8 times greater than their individual contributions (7% each). We show that the principal underlying mechanism was a pronounced pest-induced reduction in flower lifetime, resulting in a strong reduction in the number of pollinator visits a flower receives during its lifetime. Our findings highlight the importance of non-additive interactions among ecosystem services (ES) when valuating, mapping or predicting them and reveal fundamental implications for ecosystem management and policy aimed at maximizing ES for sustainable agriculture. PMID:26865304

  18. Picosecond Neutron Yields from Ultra-Intense Laser-Target Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, C. Leland; Fuchs, Julien

    2009-11-01

    High-flux neutron sources for neutron imaging and materials analysis applications have typically been provided by accelerator-based (Spallation Neutron Source) and reactor-based (High Flux Isotope Reactor) neutron sources. A novel approach is to use ultra-intense (> 10^18 W/cm^2) laser-target interactions to generate picosecond, collimated neutrons. Here we examine the feasibility of a source based on current (LULI) and upcoming laser facility capabilities. A Monte-Carlo code calculates angular and energy distributions of neutrons generated by D-D fusion events occurring within a deuterated target for a given incident beam of D+ ions. The parameters of the deuteron beam are well understood from laser-plasma and laser-target studies relevant to fast-ignition fusion. Expected neutron yields are presented in comparison to conventional neutron sources, previous experimental neutron yields, and within the context of neutron shielding safety requirements.

  19. ROOTSTOCK-SCION INTERACTION: 1. EFFECT ON THE YIELD COMPONENTS OF CABERNET SAUVIGNON GRAPEVINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBERTO MIELE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The interaction between rootstock, scion and environment can induce different responses to the grapevine physiology. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the rootstock effect on the yield components of Cabernet Sauvignon (CS grapevine grown in the Serra Gaúcha viticultural region. The experimental design was completely randomized blocks, with 15 treatments, three replicates and ten vines per plot. The results show that all variables evaluated were significantly affected by the year and the rootstock. The CS/Solferino was among other combinations influenced by the year and had higher significant yield/ vine. Indeed, it was higher than that CS/Rupestris du Lot, CS/101-14 Mgt., CS/3309 C, CS/5BB K, CS/161- 49 C, CS/1103 P. and CS/Isabel. The number of clusters/bud, per burst bud and per vine and the weight of clusters were affected by the rootstock as well. Pruning weight/vine, yield/pruning weight, leaf area/vine, leaf area index and leaf area/fresh fruit weight are variables related to the physiology of grapevine which were also affected by the rootstock. In general, rootstocks had adapted well to the environment where the experiment was carried out, giving vigor and high yield to Cabernet Sauvignon grapevine, which means that they may be used by grape growers in this region. However, the choice of the right rootstock depends on various aspects, such as those related to the soil characteristics, climate conditions, grape varieties, and even clones, and production purposes.

  20. Genotype × environment interaction effects on early fresh storage root yield and related traits in cassava

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robooni; Tumuhimbise; Rob; Melis; Paul; Shanahan; Robert; Kawuki

    2014-01-01

    Cassava(Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important root crop worldwide. It exhibits substantial differential genotypic responses to varying environmental conditions, a phenomenon termed genotype × environment interaction(GEI). A significant GEI presents challenges in the selection of superior genotypes. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of genotype,environment and GEI on early fresh storage root yield(FSRY) and related traits in cassava.Accordingly, 12 cassava genotypes were evaluated in a randomised complete block design at three contrasting locations(Jinja, Nakasongola and Namulonge) in Uganda. Trials were harvested nine months after planting and the data collected were analysed using the additive main effects and multiplicative interaction(AMMI) model. The AMMI analysis of variance showed significant variation among genotypes for early FSRY and all other traits assessed.Locations were significantly different for all traits except for cassava brown streak disease root necrosis. The GEI effect was non-significant for early FSRY, but significant for other traits. For early FSRY, 48.5% of the treatment sum of squares was attributable to genotypes, 27.3% to environments, and 24.1% to GEI, indicating a predominance of genotypic variation for this trait.Predominance of genotypic variation was also observed for all the other traits. A majority of the genotypes(67%) had low interaction effects with locations for early FSRY, with Akena, CT2, CT4 and NASE14 being the most stable genotypes for the trait. Significant negative correlation was observed between cassava mosaic disease severity and early FSRY and storage root number,indicating significant negative effects of cassava mosaic disease on early FSRY and stability in cassava. The information generated will inform future selection initiatives for superior early-yielding cassava genotypes combining resistance to cassava mosaic and brown streak diseases in Uganda.

  1. Genotype × environment interaction effects on early fresh storage root yield and related traits in cassava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robooni Tumuhimbise

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz is an important root crop worldwide. It exhibits substantial differential genotypic responses to varying environmental conditions, a phenomenon termed genotype × environment interaction (GEI. A significant GEI presents challenges in the selection of superior genotypes. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of genotype, environment and GEI on early fresh storage root yield (FSRY and related traits in cassava. Accordingly, 12 cassava genotypes were evaluated in a randomised complete block design at three contrasting locations (Jinja, Nakasongola and Namulonge in Uganda. Trials were harvested nine months after planting and the data collected were analysed using the additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI model. The AMMI analysis of variance showed significant variation among genotypes for early FSRY and all other traits assessed. Locations were significantly different for all traits except for cassava brown streak disease root necrosis. The GEI effect was non-significant for early FSRY, but significant for other traits. For early FSRY, 48.5% of the treatment sum of squares was attributable to genotypes, 27.3% to environments, and 24.1% to GEI, indicating a predominance of genotypic variation for this trait. Predominance of genotypic variation was also observed for all the other traits. A majority of the genotypes (67% had low interaction effects with locations for early FSRY, with Akena, CT2, CT4 and NASE14 being the most stable genotypes for the trait. Significant negative correlation was observed between cassava mosaic disease severity and early FSRY and storage root number, indicating significant negative effects of cassava mosaic disease on early FSRY and stability in cassava. The information generated will inform future selection initiatives for superior early-yielding cassava genotypes combining resistance to cassava mosaic and brown streak diseases in Uganda.

  2. Sedimentation of Reversibly Interacting Macromolecules with Changes in Fluorescence Quantum Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sumit K.; Zhao, Huaying; Schuck, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation with fluorescence detection has emerged as a powerful method for the study of interacting systems of macromolecules. It combines picomolar sensitivity with high hydrodynamic resolution, and can be carried out with photoswitchable fluorophores for multi-component discrimination, to determine the stoichiometry, affinity, and shape of macromolecular complexes with dissociation equilibrium constants from picomolar to micromolar. A popular approach for data interpretation is the determination of the binding affinity by isotherms of weight-average sedimentation coefficients, sw. A prevailing dogma in sedimentation analysis is that the weight-average sedimentation coefficient from the transport method corresponds to the signal- and population-weighted average of all species. We show that this does not always hold true for systems that exhibit significant signal changes with complex formation - properties that may be readily encountered in practice, e.g., from a change in fluorescence quantum yield. Coupled transport in the reaction boundary of rapidly reversible systems can make significant contributions to the observed migration in a way that cannot be accounted for in the standard population-based average. Effective particle theory provides a simple physical picture for the reaction-coupled migration process. On this basis we develop a more general binding model that converges to the well-known form of sw with constant signals, but can account simultaneously for hydrodynamic co-transport in the presence of changes in fluorescence quantum yield. We believe this will be useful when studying interacting systems exhibiting fluorescence quenching, enhancement or Forster resonance energy transfer with transport methods.

  3. Genotype × Environment Interactions of Yield Traits in Backcross Introgression Lines Derived from Oryza sativa cv. Swarna/Oryza nivara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Divya; Subrahmanyam, Desiraju; Badri, Jyothi; Raju, Addanki Krishnam; Rao, Yadavalli Venkateswara; Beerelli, Kavitha; Mesapogu, Sukumar; Surapaneni, Malathi; Ponnuswamy, Revathi; Padmavathi, G.; Babu, V. Ravindra; Neelamraju, Sarla

    2016-01-01

    Advanced backcross introgression lines (BILs) developed from crosses of Oryza sativa var. Swarna/O. nivara accessions were grown and evaluated for yield and related traits. Trials were conducted for consecutive three seasons in field conditions in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Data on yield traits under irrigated conditions were analyzed using the Additive Main Effect and Multiplicative Interaction (AMMI), Genotype and Genotype × Environment Interaction (GGE) and modified rank-sum statistic (YSi) for yield stability. BILs viz., G3 (14S) and G6 (166S) showed yield stability across the seasons along with high mean yield performance. G3 is early in flowering with high yield and has good grain quality and medium height, hence could be recommended for most of the irrigated locations. G6 is a late duration genotype, with strong culm strength, high grain number and panicle weight. G6 has higher yield and stability than Swarna but has Swarna grain type. Among the varieties tested DRRDhan 40 and recurrent parent Swarna showed stability for yield traits across the seasons. The component traits thousand grain weight, panicle weight, panicle length, grain number and plant height explained highest genotypic percentage over environment and interaction factors and can be prioritized to dissect stable QTLs/ genes. These lines were genotyped using microsatellite markers covering the entire rice genome and also using a set of markers linked to previously reported yield QTLs. It was observed that wild derived lines with more than 70% of recurrent parent genome were stable and showed enhanced yield levels compared to genotypes with higher donor genome introgressions.

  4. EVALUATION OF MARKETABLE LEAF YIELD OF FLUTED PUMPKIN IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS USING ADDITIVE MAIN EFFECTS AND MULTIPLICATIVE INTERACTION (AMMI MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayeun L. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the yield stability and to analyse the Genotype by Environment Interaction (GEI of twenty five genotypes of fluted pumpkin genotypes. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications under four environments using Additive Main effects and Multiplicative Interaction (AMMI analysis. The mean squares of the analysis of variance revealed significant genotype, environment and GEI on marketable leaf yield per plant. AMMI analysis revealed that the major contributions to treatment sum of squares were environments (3.24%, GEI (46.90% and genotypes (49.70%, respectively, suggesting that the marketable leaf yield of the genotypes were under the major genotypic effects of GEI. The first two principal component axes (PCA 1 and 2 cumulatively contributed 93.50% of the total GEI and were significant (p ≤ 0.01. The biplot accounted for 85.82% of the total variation. The AMMI model identified genotypes Ftn44, Ftk20, and Fts34 as most stable, while Fta39 with highest yield (398.80g/plant had the largest negative interaction. The best genotype with respect to Abeokuta location was Ftw21 while Fta39 was the best for Akure area. Therefore, these genotypes can be recommended according to their specific adaptation areas. Abeokuta in the 2012 and 2013 had positive interaction values of 14.38 and 9.46 respectively whereas Akure in 2012 and 2013 recorded negative interaction values of -5.03 and -18.81 respectively. Akure 2013 was the most discriminating environment and had the highest mean yield thus it is considered as a very good environment for cultivation of fluted pumpkin for marketable leaf yield.

  5. Principal coordinate analysis of genotype × environment interaction for grain yield of bread wheat in the semi-arid regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabaghnia Naser

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-environmental trials have significant main effects and significant multiplicative genotype × environment (GE interaction effect. Principal coordinate analysis (PCOA offers a more appropriate statistical analysis to deal with such situations, compared to traditional statistical methods. Eighteen bread wheat genotypes were grown in four semi-arid regions over three year seasons to study the GE interaction and yield stability and obtained data on grain yield were analyzed using PCOA. Combined analysis of variance indicated that all of the studied effects including the main effects of genotype and environments as well as the GE interaction were highly significant. According to grand means and total mean yield, test environments were grouped to two main groups as high mean yield (H and low mean yield (L. There were five H test environments and six L test environments which analyzed in the sequential cycles. For each cycle, both scatter point diagram and minimum spanning tree plot were drawn. The identified most stable genotypes with dynamic stability concept and based on the minimum spanning tree plots and centroid distances were G1 (3310.2 kg ha-1 and G5 (3065.6 kg ha-1, and therefore could be recommended for unfavorable or poor conditions. Also, genotypes G7 (3047.2 kg ha-1 and G16 (3132.3 kg ha-1 were located several times in the vertex positions of high cycles according to the principal coordinates analysis. The principal coordinates analysis provided useful and interesting ways of investigating GE interaction of barley genotypes. Finally, the results of principal coordinates analysis in general confirmed the breeding value of the genotypes, obtained on the basis of the yield stability evaluation.

  6. Interactions of viruses in Cowpea: effects on growth and yield parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiwo MA

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study was carried out to investigate the effects of inoculating three cowpea cultivars: "OLO II", "OLOYIN" and IT86D-719 with three unrelated viruses: Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV, genus Potyvirus, Cowpea mottle virus (CMeV, genus Carmovirus and Southern bean mosaic virus (SBMV, genus Sobemovirus singly and in mixture on growth and yield of cultivars at 10 and 30 days after planting (DAP. Generally, the growth and yield of the buffer inoculated control plants were significantly higher than those of the virus inoculated plants. Inoculation of plants at an early age of 10 DAP resulted in more severe effect than inoculations at a later stage of 30 DAP. The average values of plant height and number of leaves produced by plants inoculated 30 DAP were higher than those produced by plants inoculated 10 DAP. Most of the plants inoculated 10 DAP died and did not produce seeds. However, " OLOYIN" cultivar was most tolerant and produced reasonable yields when infected 30 DAP. The effect of single viruses on growth and yield of cultivars showed that CABMV caused more severe effects in IT86D-719, SBMV had the greatest effect on "OLO II" while CMeV induced the greatest effect on "OLOYIN". Yield was greatly reduced in double infections involving CABMV in combination with either CMeV or SBMV in "OLOYIN" and "OLO II", however, there was complete loss in yield of IT86D-719. Triple infection led to complete yield loss in all the three cultivars.

  7. INTERACTION OF ELEVATED CO 2 AND MOISTURE STRESS ON BLACKGRAM GROWTH AND YIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vagheera

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted with blackgram ( Vigna mungo L. Hepper cv T-9 in Open top chambers (OTCs to assess the impact of moisture deficit and its interacti on with two levels of CO 2 (550ppm and 700ppm on biomass and seed yield. At flowering stage mois ture deficit was imposed by withholding irrigation. Both elevated CO 2 levels improved the total biomass and the ex tent of improvement was 2.7% and 23.5% under irrigated conditions, while 9.0% and 26.1% under moisture stress conditions at 550ppm and 700ppm of CO 2 respectively. Higher improvement in seed yield than biomass at both elevated CO 2 levels was recorded and under irrigated condition the seed yield improved by 26.3% and 58.9% while under moisture deficit conditions by 9.0% and 34.7% at 550ppm and 700ppm respectiv ely. Though moisture deficit reduced the total biomass, seed yield and HI at all CO 2 levels, however the magnitude of reduction was less at elevated CO 2 levels. The ameliorative effect of enhanced CO 2 concentrations under moisture deficit cond ition was observed through better pod number in blackgram as compared with ambient control which reflected as higher seed yield.

  8. Interaction effect of phosphorus and boron on yield and quality of lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Zaman Chowdhury

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Proper nutrition is essential for satisfactory crop growth and production. A field experiment was conducted at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University, to evaluate yield and quality of Grand Rapids lettuce using various levels of phosphorus and boron. Treatment combination of 120 kg ha-1 of phosphorus and 2 kg ha-1 of boron has significantly increased plant height, leaf number, leaf length, plant canopy, capsules plant-1, seeds capsule-1, seeds number plant-1, seed yield ha-1, germination (%, planting value (%, moisture (%, purity (%, dry matter (% and 1000 seed weight. Most of the treatment combinations performed better than control treatments in all parameter. The finding could be helpful to determine the precise levels of phosphorus and boron to improve the yield and quality of lettuce.

  9. Sugarcane trash management assessed by the interaction of yield with soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Carlos Dalchiavon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, sugarcane plays an important global role, particularly with a view to alternative energy sources. Thus, in a sugarcane field of the mill Vale do Paraná S/A Álcool e Açúcar, Rubineia, São Paulo State, managed under two green cane harvest systems (cane trash left on and cane trash removed from the soil, Pearson and spatial correlations between the sugarcane yield (variety RB855035 in the third cut and soil physical and chemical properties were studied to identify the property best correlated with stalk yield and the best harvest method. For this purpose, two geostatistical grids (121 sampling points on 1.30 ha were installed on a eutrophic Red Argisol (homogeneous slope of 0.065 m m-1, in 2011, to determine the properties: stalk yield and sugarcane plant population, and soil resistance to penetration, gravimetric moisture, bulk density, and carbon stock, in the layers 0-0.20 and 0.20-0.40 m. The data were analyzed by descriptive, linear correlation and geostatistical analysis. In both treatments, the property stand density was best correlated with sugarcane yield (r = 0.725 in the trash mulching treatment - TM and r = 0.769 in the trash removal treatment - TR. However, in relation to the soil properties, bulk density (0-0.20 m was best correlated (r = 0.305 in TM, r = 0.211 in TR. Similarly, from the spatial point of view, stand density was the property that best explained the sugarcane yield. However, in the TM treatment the density (0.20-0.40 m was the only soil property spatially correlated with stalk yield. The carbon stock in the soil of the TM was 11.5 % higher than in the TR treatment. Results of the TM treatment were best, also with regard to soil management and conservation.

  10. [Effects of interaction between vermicompost and probiotics on soil nronerty, yield and quality of tomato].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fei; Zhu, Tong-bin; Teng, Ming-jiao; Chen, Yue; Liu, Man-qiang; Hu, Feng; Li, Hui-xin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of two strains of probiotic bacteria (Bacillus megaterium BM and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BA) combined with chemical fertilizers and vermicompost on the soil property, the yield and quality of tomato. The results showed that under the same nutrient level, vermicompost significantly increased the yield, soluble sugar and protein contents of fruit, the soil pH and available phosphorus when compared with chemical fertilizers. Vermicompost combined with probiotics not only increased the tomato yield, soluble sugar, protein and vitamin C contents, sugar/acid ratio of fruit, and reduced the organic acid and nitrate nitrogen contents of fruit, also increased the soil pH and nitrate nitrogen content, and reduced soil electric conductivity when compared with vermicompost treatment. This improved efficiency was better than that by chemical fertilizers combined with probiotics. For BA and BM applied with chemical fertilizers or vermicompost, both stains had no significant effect on tomato quality. When co-applied with vermicompost, BA and BM showed significant difference in tomato yield. High soil available phosphorus content was determined when BM was combined with chemical fertilizers, while high soil available potassium content was obtained when BA was combined with vermicompost. Our results suggested that probiotics and vermicompost could be used as alternatives of chemical fertilizers in tomato production and soil fertility improvement.

  11. The {Xi}{sup -} + d {yields} n + {Lambda} + {Lambda} reaction as a probe of the {Lambda}{Lambda} interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afnan, I.R. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Adelaide (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1998-08-24

    Within the framework of the Faddeev equations we demonstrate that a {Lambda}{Lambda}-{Xi}N interaction that gives a {Lambda}{Lambda} scattering length comparable to the nn scattering length, and the binding energy of {sub {Lambda}{Lambda}}{sup 6}He as an {alpha}{Lambda}{Lambda}-{alpha}{Xi}N system, produces a final-state interaction peak in the neutron spectrum for the reaction {Xi}{sup -}d{yields}n{Lambda}{Lambda}. This suggests that this reaction could be used to constrain the {Lambda}{Lambda} scattering length. (orig.) 24 refs.

  12. Genotype x environment interactions for yield components of broomcorn [Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikora Vladimir

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation was to study the ecological stability of yield components (weight of undressed and trashed panicle and seed weight per panicle in fourteen varieties of broomcorn. Our current varieties was compared with our old, Hungarian and American varieties. Investigations were carried out under field conditions in a micro trial set up in a randomized block design providing five replications in seven ecologically different years. Stability parameters were computed using the model of Eberhart and Russell (1966. The results of this investigation showed that the genotypes differed in stability parameters for the characters studied. Variety Sava show good stability in all growing conditions. Variety Neoplanta plus was adapted to favorable and variety Reform to unfavorable conditions. Varieties with best performances in regard to yield components did not also show best stability. .

  13. Salinity and phosphorus interactions on growth, yield and nutrient uptake by berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mahmood gholer ata

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of different levels of salinity and phosphorus on the growth and yield of berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum, an experiment using a factorial experiment conducted carried out based on completely randomized block design with four levels of salinity (S1=0, 12, S2=2, S3=6 and S4=10 dS/m and two levels of phosphorus (P1=10 and P2=30 ppm with four replicates under green house conditions. Different levels of salinity have been provided from NaCl, MgCl2, Na2SO4 and MgSO4 with weight proportional respectively 2:1:1:1. The treatments of phosphorus provided from KH2PO4 sources. The traits such as growth indexes (leaf area, plant height and shoot diameter at three different stages, shoot and root dry matters, root to shoot ratio, total length of root, nutrient elements (N, P, K and Na in shoot and potassium to sodium ratio in shoot were measured. The salinity was applied using saline water with the above-mentioned electrical conductivities. Generally, by increasing salinity and phosphorus levels, all the measured traits were reduced and increased, respectively. Furthermore, at the high level of salinity, increased available phosphorus improves clover yield. So it seems that in saline soils, where there is no possibility for soil leaching and amending, application of phosphorus fertilizers can lead to a good growth and production in clover yield.

  14. Neutron reflectometry yields distance-dependent structures of nanometric polymer brushes interacting across water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Loureiro, Ignacio; Scoppola, Ernesto; Bertinetti, Luca; Barbetta, Aurelio; Fragneto, Giovanna; Schneck, Emanuel

    2017-08-30

    The interaction between surfaces displaying end-grafted hydrophilic polymer brushes plays important roles in biology and in many wet-technological applications. In this context, the conformation of the brushes upon their mutual approach is crucial, because it affects interaction forces and the brushes' shear-tribological properties. While this aspect has been addressed by theory, experimental data on polymer conformations under confinement are difficult to obtain. Here, we study interacting planar brushes of hydrophilic polymers with defined length and grafting density. Via ellipsometry and neutron reflectometry we obtain pressure-distance curves and determine distance-dependent polymer conformations in terms of brush compression and reciprocative interpenetration. While the pressure-distance curves are satisfactorily described by the Alexander-de-Gennes model, the pronounced brush interpenetration as seen by neutron reflectometry motivates detailed simulation-based studies capable of treating brush interpenetration on a quantitative level.

  15. Coupled electrostatic and material surface stresses yield anomalous particle interactions and deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, B. A., E-mail: bkemp@astate.edu; Nikolayev, I. [College of Engineering, Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, Arkansas 72467 (United States); Sheppard, C. J. [College of Sciences and Mathematics, Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, Arkansas 72467 (United States)

    2016-04-14

    Like-charges repel, and opposite charges attract. This fundamental tenet is a result of Coulomb's law. However, the electrostatic interactions between dielectric particles remain topical due to observations of like-charged particle attraction and the self-assembly of colloidal systems. Here, we show, using both an approximate description and an exact solution of Maxwell's equations, that nonlinear charged particle forces result even for linear material systems and can be responsible for anomalous electrostatic interactions such as like-charged particle attraction and oppositely charged particle repulsion. Furthermore, these electrostatic interactions and the deformation of such particles have fundamental implications for our understanding of macroscopic electrodynamics.

  16. The target for the new plasma/wall experiment Magnum-PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M.A. van den, E-mail: m.a.vandenberg@rijnhuizen.nl [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Brons, S.; Kruijt, O.G.; Scholten, J.; Pasquet, R.; Smeets, P.H.M. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Schweer, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, IEF-4, Euratom association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); De Temmerman, G. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    The construction of Magnum-PSI is in its final stage. The aim is to provide a controlled and highly accessible linear plasma device to perform the basic plasma-surface interaction research needed for the design of the plasma facing components of future fusion devices. This contribution will focus on the thermal challenges imposed by those extreme conditions on the design of the target holder of Magnum-PSI. The target holder is designed to allow the exposure of large size targets with variable inclination angles with respect to the magnetic field. A test set up was made to test different interlayers (grafoil, soft metal sheets) and improve the thermal contact between the target and the heat sink. In addition, a modular target holder for sequential exposure of smaller size targets has been designed. Finite element modeling using the ANSYS code was used to optimize the cooling geometry and to predict the temperature profiles due to the heat load of the plasma. Experiments were done on the Pilot-PSI linear device to validate the thermal calculations. Calorimetry and infrared thermography were used to experimentally measure the temperature profile on the target and the heat deposition.

  17. The hydrodynamic interaction of two small freely-moving particles in a Couette flow of a yield stress fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouznia, Mohammadhossein; Metzger, Bloen; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Hormozi, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    The flows of non-Newtonian slurries, often suspensions of noncolloidal particles in yield stress fluids, are ubiquitous in many natural phenomena and industrial processes. Investigating the microstructure is essential allowing the refinement of macroscopic equations for complex suspensions. One important constraint on the dynamics of a Stokesian suspension is reversibility, which is not necessarily valid for complex fluids. The interaction of two particles in a reversing shear flow of complex fluids is a guide to understand the behavior of complex suspensions. We study the hydrodynamic interaction of two small freely-moving spheres in a linear flow field of yield stress fluids. An important point is that non-Newtonian fluid effects can be varied and unusual. Depending on the shear rate, even a yield stress fluid might show hysteresis, shear banding and elasticity at the local scales that need to be taken into account. We study these effects with the aid of conventional rheometry, Particle Image Velocimetry and Particle Tracking Velocimetry in an original apparatus. We show our preliminary experimental results. NSF.

  18. Interactive effects of SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ on the yield of snap beans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, J.P.

    1979-12-07

    During the summers of 1977 and 1978 two experiments were conducted testing the effects of SO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 2/ + O/sub 3/ on the yield of snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The crops were planted in the field and fumigated with the gases within a minimum-interference facility developed by personnel of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. By providing a gradient of pollutant concentration along the planted rows, a continuum of treatments could be studied and the results analyzed by regression analysis. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the dose-response functions for snap beans and the pollutant treatments; (2) determine if synergistic responses occurred in the presence of SO/sub 2/ + O/sub 3/; and (3) evaluate how well the two runs of the experiment replicated each other. No significant differences were found between the SO/sub 2/ and the combined gas treatments in either year. There is strong evidence for a lack of interaction between SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ in affecting bean yields in the field. The small differences between the two treatments in yield reductions, on the order of 10%, also corroborates this conclusion. This result is in opposition to earlier findings demonstrating a substantial difference in yield reduction between H/sub 2/S and H/sub 2/S + O/sub 3/. (ERB)

  19. Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (BLUP) for regional yield trials: a comparison to additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepho, H P

    1994-11-01

    Multilocation trials are often used to analyse the adaptability of genotypes in different environments and to find for each environment the genotype that is best adapted; i.e. that is highest yielding in that environment. For this purpose, it is of interest to obtain a reliable estimate of the mean yield of a cultivar in a given environment. This article compares two different statistical estimation procedures for this task: the Additive Main Effects and Multiplicative Interaction (AMMI) analysis and Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (BLUP). A modification of a cross validation procedure commonly used with AMMI is suggested for trials that are laid out as a randomized complete block design. The use of these procedure is exemplified using five faba bean datasets from German registration trails. BLUP was found to outperform AMMI in four of five faba bean datasets.

  20. The physics of quadrupole interactions in crystals. Quadrupole interactions observed in the 1{sup +} {yields} 0{sup +}{gamma}-ray transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldting, G. [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel); Anderssen, S.S.; Lane, G.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1995-11-01

    For many people the nuclear interaction with the electric quadrupole is not as easily understood as the magnetic dipole interaction. This is partly due to the use of Racah algebra in conventional quadrupole interaction calculations. Although this is a powerful technique that provides a neat summation over the m-substates of both the initial nuclear state and the emitted radiation, the formalism does tend to `hide` some of the details and interesting features of the interaction. Therefore, to improve our understanding of these processes with an emphasis on the physical characteristics, these notes will detail the calculation of quadrupole interactions with both polarised and aligned nuclei without using Racah algebra. To make these calculations manageable only the 1{sup +}{yields} 0{sup +}{gamma}-ray transition is considered. The J{sup {pi}} =1{sup +} state has only 3 substates (m = -1,0,+1), and the parity and angular momentum selection rules allow only M1 magnetic dipole transitions. The calculation has led to some explanations of the difference between the aligned and polarized quadrupole interactions, which is the orientation of the quantization axis with respect to the equatorial plane.

  1. Interactive effects of water and controlled release urea on nitrogen metabolism, accumulation, translocation, and yield in summer maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanghao; Zhao, Bin; Dong, Shuting; Zhang, Jiwang; Liu, Peng; Vyn, Tony J.

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the interactive effects of water and N from controlled release urea (CRU) on N metabolism, accumulation, translocation, and yield in Zhengdan958 (a summer maize cultivar planted widely in China), three water levels (adequate water W3, mild water stress W2, severe water stress W1) and four amounts of CRU (N) (N0, N1, N2, and N3 were 0, 105, 210, and 315 kg N ha-1, respectively) were carried out under the waterproof shed and soil column conditions. The results showed that yield, N metabolism, accumulation, and translocation were significantly affected by water, CRU, and their interactions after tasseling. Yields showed an increasing trend in response to N rates from 100.2 to 128.8 g plant-1 under severe water stress (W1), from 124.7 to 174.6 g plant-1 under mild water stress (W2), and from 143.7 to 177.0 g plant-1 under adequate water conditions (W3). There was an associated optimum amount of N for each water level. Under W1 and W2, N3 treatments showed significant advantages in three N metabolism enzymes' activities and the N accumulations, and yield and its components were highest. But the nitrogen harvest index (NHI) of N3 had no significant difference with other nitrogen treatments. Under W3, the N translocation efficiency (NTE) and N translocation conversion rate (NTCR) of N2 in stem and leaf were higher than those of N3, but the N metabolism enzymes' activities and yields of N2 and N3 had no significant difference, which indicated that N2 was superior to N3. The N3 treatment under W2 and N2 under W3 increased the N accumulation capacity in maize grain as well as the N translocation to grain that contributed to the increase of 1000-gain weight and grains per ear after tasseling. Under this experimental condition, a CRU rate of 225 kg ha-1 was the best treatment when the soil moisture content was 75 ± 5% of field capacity, but an N rate of 300 kg ha-1 was superior when soil moisture content was maintained at 55 ± 5% of field capacity during the

  2. Genotype × Environment Interaction of Mosaic Disease, Root Yields and Total Carotene Concentration of Yellow-Fleshed Cassava in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert G. Maroya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-one yellow-fleshed cassava genotypes were evaluated over two years in five major cassava growing agroecological zones in Nigeria. The trials were established in a randomized complete block design with four replications to assess genotype performance and Genotype × Environment interaction for cassava mosaic disease (CMD, fresh and dry root yield (FYLD; DYLD, root dry matter content (DMC, and total carotene concentration (TCC. Combined analysis of variance showed significant differences (P<0.001 among genotypes (G, environment (E, and Genotype × Environment interaction (GE for all the traits tested. For reaction to CMD, the best genotypes showing stable resistance were TMS 07/0539 and TMS 07/0628. For root yield, the best genotypes were TMS 01/1368 and TMS 07/0553. Genotype TMS 07/0593 was the best for DMC and TCC across the 10 environments. Variation among genotypes accounted for most of the Total Sum of Squares for CMD (72.1% and TCC (34.4%. Environmental variation accounted for most of the Total Sum of Squares for FYLD (42.8%, DYLD (39.6%, and DMC (29.2%. This study revealed that TMS 07/0593 has the highest and most stable TCC, DMC with the lowest CMD severity score and appeared to be the best genotype.

  3. Interactions of tallow and hay particle size on yield and composition of milk from lactating Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, T C; Bertrand, J A; Bridges, W C

    1998-05-01

    An 18-wk lactation study was conducted to determine whether the effects of tallow on the lactation performance of dairy cows were influenced by particle size of hay in the ration. A total mixed ration containing 50% concentrate, 25% corn silage, and 25% alfalfa hay (dry matter basis) was fed to Holstein cows. Four total mixed rations were developed based on differences in the percentage of tallow in the concentrate and particle size of alfalfa hay: 1) 0% tallow, long-cut hay; 2) 0% tallow, short-cut hay; 3) 5% tallow, long-cut hay; and 4) 5% tallow, short-cut hay. Ration had no effect on dry matter intake, body weight gain or change in body condition score. Tallow increased milk and milk protein yields but reduced milk protein concentration. However, the effects of tallow on milk and milk protein yields were the same, regardless of hay length in the ration. A tendency for an interaction of tallow and hay particle size was detected for fat-corrected milk (FCM) because tallow increased FCM more when hay was short. Ration had no effect on volatile fatty acids in ruminal samples collected via a stomach tube. In this study, the effects of tallow on milk yield and composition from Holstein cows were the same, regardless of hay particle size in the ration. The tendency for tallow to increase FCM more when hay was short suggests at least a limited role of forage particle size in the determination of how fat supplements in dairy rations affect lactation performance.

  4. The impact of long-range electron-hole interaction on the charge separation yield of molecular photocells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati Aram, Tahereh; Ernzerhof, Matthias; Asgari, Asghar; Mayou, Didier

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the effects of charge carrier interaction and recombination on the operation of molecular photocells. Molecular photocells are devices where the energy conversion process takes place in a single molecular donor-acceptor complex attached to electrodes. Our investigation is based on the quantum scattering theory, in particular on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation; this minimizes the complexity of the problem while providing useful and non-trivial insight into the mechanism governing photocell operation. In this study, both exciton pair creation and dissociation are treated in the energy domain, and therefore there is access to detailed spectral information, which can be used as a framework to interpret the charge separation yield. We demonstrate that the charge carrier separation is a complex process that is affected by different parameters, such as the strength of the electron-hole interaction and the non-radiative recombination rate. Our analysis helps to optimize the charge separation process and the energy transfer in organic solar cells and in molecular photocells.

  5. Hard spectator interactions in B {yields} {pi}{pi} at order {alpha}{sup 2}{sub s}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilipp, V.

    2007-05-31

    In the present thesis I discuss the hard spectator interaction amplitude in B {yields} {pi}{pi} at NLO i.e. at O({alpha}{sup 2}{sub s}). This special part of the amplitude, whose LO starts at O({alpha}{sub s}), is defined in the framework of QCD factorization. QCD factorization allows to separate the short- and the long-distance physics in leading power in an expansion in {lambda}{sub QCD}/m{sub b}, where the short-distance physics can be calculated in a perturbative expansion in {alpha}{sub s}. Compared to other parts of the amplitude hard spectator interactions are formally enhanced by the hard collinear scale {radical}({lambda}{sub QCD}m{sub b}), which occurs next to the mb-scale and leads to an enhancement of {alpha}{sub s}. From a technical point of view the main challenges of this calculation are due to the fact that we have to deal with Feynman integrals that come with up to five external legs and with three independent ratios of scales. These Feynman integrals have to be expanded in powers of {delta}{sub QCD}/m{sub b}. I discuss integration by parts identities to reduce the number of master integrals and differential equations techniques to get their power expansions. A concrete implementation of integration by parts identities in a computer algebra system is given in the appendix. Finally I discuss numerical issues like scale dependence of the amplitudes and branching ratios. It turns out that the NLO contributions of the hard spectator interactions are important but small enough for perturbation theory to be valid. (orig.)

  6. Hard spectator interactions in B {yields} {pi}{pi} at order {alpha}{sup 2}{sub s}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilipp, V.

    2007-05-31

    In the present thesis I discuss the hard spectator interaction amplitude in B {yields} {pi}{pi} at NLO i.e. at O({alpha}{sup 2}{sub s}). This special part of the amplitude, whose LO starts at O({alpha}{sub s}), is defined in the framework of QCD factorization. QCD factorization allows to separate the short- and the long-distance physics in leading power in an expansion in {lambda}{sub QCD}/m{sub b}, where the short-distance physics can be calculated in a perturbative expansion in {alpha}{sub s}. Compared to other parts of the amplitude hard spectator interactions are formally enhanced by the hard collinear scale {radical}({lambda}{sub QCD}m{sub b}), which occurs next to the mb-scale and leads to an enhancement of {alpha}{sub s}. From a technical point of view the main challenges of this calculation are due to the fact that we have to deal with Feynman integrals that come with up to five external legs and with three independent ratios of scales. These Feynman integrals have to be expanded in powers of {delta}{sub QCD}/m{sub b}. I discuss integration by parts identities to reduce the number of master integrals and differential equations techniques to get their power expansions. A concrete implementation of integration by parts identities in a computer algebra system is given in the appendix. Finally I discuss numerical issues like scale dependence of the amplitudes and branching ratios. It turns out that the NLO contributions of the hard spectator interactions are important but small enough for perturbation theory to be valid. (orig.)

  7. Interactive effects of elevated CO2 concentration and irrigation on photosynthetic parameters and yield of maize in Northeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanchao Meng

    Full Text Available Maize is one of the major cultivated crops of China, having a central role in ensuring the food security of the country. There has been a significant increase in studies of maize under interactive effects of elevated CO2 concentration ([CO2] and other factors, yet the interactive effects of elevated [CO2] and increasing precipitation on maize has remained unclear. In this study, a manipulative experiment in Jinzhou, Liaoning province, Northeast China was performed so as to obtain reliable results concerning the later effects. The Open Top Chambers (OTCs experiment was designed to control contrasting [CO2] i.e., 390, 450 and 550 µmol·mol(-1, and the experiment with 15% increasing precipitation levels was also set based on the average monthly precipitation of 5-9 month from 1981 to 2010 and controlled by irrigation. Thus, six treatments, i.e. C550W+15%, C550W0, C450W+15%, C450W0, C390W+15% and C390W0 were included in this study. The results showed that the irrigation under elevated [CO2] levels increased the leaf net photosynthetic rate (Pn and intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci of maize. Similarly, the stomatal conductance (Gs and transpiration rate (Tr decreased with elevated [CO2], but irrigation have a positive effect on increased of them at each [CO2] level, resulting in the water use efficiency (WUE higher in natural precipitation treatment than irrigation treatment at elevated [CO2] levels. Irradiance-response parameters, e.g., maximum net photosynthetic rate (Pnmax and light saturation points (LSP were increased under elevated [CO2] and irrigation, and dark respiration (Rd was increased as well. The growth characteristics, e.g., plant height, leaf area and aboveground biomass were enhanced, resulting in an improved of yield and ear characteristics except axle diameter. The study concluded by reporting that, future elevated [CO2] may favor to maize when coupled with increasing amount of precipitation in Northeast China.

  8. Effect of genotype and genotype by environment interaction on total cyanide content, fresh root, and starch yield in farmer-preferred cassava landraces in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtunguja, Mariam K; Laswai, Henry S; Kanju, Edward; Ndunguru, Joseph; Muzanila, Yasinta C

    2016-11-01

    High starch yield is the most important trait for commercialized cassava starch production. Furthermore, cyanide present in cassava roots poses a health challenge in the use of cassava for food. Cassava genotypes have varying maturity periods that are also environmental dependent. This study aimed at identifying suitable cultivars and optimum time of harvest to maximize starch production across three environments. The study found significant difference between genotypes, locations, harvest period, and all the interactions (P ≤ 0.001) for all traits analyzed. Kiroba recorded high starch yields of 17.4, 12.7, and 8.2 t ha(-1) at Chambezi, Amani, and Magadu, respectively. Kilusungu recorded highest cyanide content of 300-400 ppm across all locations but Kiroba recorded highest values of 800 ppm, 15 months after planting at Chambezi. Genotype by environment (GGE) biplot analysis revealed that Kiroba was a superior cultivar in terms of starch yield. Kilusungu recorded highest cyanide content and average starch yield, therefore suitable for use in starch production. The study confirmed effect of genotype and genotype by environment interaction, Kiroba cultivar was superior in terms of starch yield and maximum starch yield was obtained at 9 months after planting. Nyamkagile and Kibandameno had the lowest cyanide content across all environments.

  9. Interactive effects of salinity and N on pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) yield, water use efficiency and root zone and drainage salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to determine the salt tolerance of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) under greenhouse conditions and to examine the interactive effects of salinity and nitrogen (N) fertilizer levels on yield. The present study shows the effects of optimal and suboptimal N fertilizer levels (270 ...

  10. QTL-based analysis of genotype-by-environment interaction for grain yield of rice in stress and non-stress environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manneh, B.; Stam, P.; Struik, P.C.; Bruce-Oliver, S.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.

    2007-01-01

    Use of DNA-based markers can accelerate cultivar development in variable cultivation environments since, in contrast to phenotype, DNA markers are environment-independent. In an effort to elucidate the genetic basis of genotype-by-environment interaction (G x E) for yield of rice (Oryza sativa L.),

  11. Genotype-environment interaction and phenotypic stability for girth growth and rubber yield of Hevea clones in São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalves Paulo de Souza

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The best-yielding, best vigour and most stable Hevea clones are identified by growing clones in different environments. However, research on the stability in Hevea brasiliensis (Willd. Adr. ex Juss. Muell.-Arg. is scarce. The objectives of this work were to assess genotype-environment interaction and determine stable genotypes. Stability analysis were performed on results for girth growth and rubber yield of seven clones from five comparative trials conducted over 10 years (girth growth and four years (rubber yield in São Paulo State, Brazil. Stability was estimated using the Eberhart and Russell (1966 method. Year by location and location variability were the dominant sources of interactions. The stability analysis identified GT 1 and IAN 873 as the most stable clones for girth growth and rubber yield respectively since their regression coefficients were almost the unity (b = 1 and they had one of the lowest deviations from regressions (S2di. Their coefficient of determination (R² was as high as 89.5% and 89.8% confirming their stability. In contrast, clones such as PB 235, PR 261, and RRIM 701 for girth growth and clones such as GT 1 for rubber yield with regression coefficients greater than one were regarded as sensitive to environment changes.

  12. Interactions of Nitrogen Source and Rate and Weed Removal Timing Relative to Nitrogen Content in Corn and Weeds and Corn Grain Yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Alexandra M; Everman, Wesley J; Jordan, David L; Heiniger, Ronnie W; Smyth, T Jot

    2017-01-01

    Adequate fertility combined with effective weed management is important in maximizing corn (Zea mays L.) grain yield. Corn uptake of nitrogen (N) is dependent upon many factors including weed species and density and the rate and formulation of applied N fertilizer. Understanding interactions among corn, applied N, and weeds is important in developing management strategies. Field studies were conducted in North Carolina to compare corn and weed responses to urea ammonium nitrate (UAN), sulfur-coated urea (SCU), and composted poultry litter (CPL) when a mixture of Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats.) and large crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis L.) was removed with herbicides at heights of 8 or 16 cm. These respective removal timings corresponded with 22 and 28 days after corn planting or V2 and V3 stages of growth, respectively. Differences in N content in above-ground biomass of corn were noted early in the season due to weed interference but did not translate into differences in corn grain yield. Interactions of N source and N rate were noted for corn grain yield but these factors did not interact with timing of weed control. These results underscore that timely implementation of control tactics regardless of N fertility management is important to protect corn grain yield.

  13. Interactions of Nitrogen Source and Rate and Weed Removal Timing Relative to Nitrogen Content in Corn and Weeds and Corn Grain Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Knight

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adequate fertility combined with effective weed management is important in maximizing corn (Zea mays L. grain yield. Corn uptake of nitrogen (N is dependent upon many factors including weed species and density and the rate and formulation of applied N fertilizer. Understanding interactions among corn, applied N, and weeds is important in developing management strategies. Field studies were conducted in North Carolina to compare corn and weed responses to urea ammonium nitrate (UAN, sulfur-coated urea (SCU, and composted poultry litter (CPL when a mixture of Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats. and large crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis L. was removed with herbicides at heights of 8 or 16 cm. These respective removal timings corresponded with 22 and 28 days after corn planting or V2 and V3 stages of growth, respectively. Differences in N content in above-ground biomass of corn were noted early in the season due to weed interference but did not translate into differences in corn grain yield. Interactions of N source and N rate were noted for corn grain yield but these factors did not interact with timing of weed control. These results underscore that timely implementation of control tactics regardless of N fertility management is important to protect corn grain yield.

  14. Simulation of soybean genotype-by-environment interactions for yield under irrigation in the Midsouth with DSSAT-CROPGRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynamic crop models that incorporate the effect of environmental variables can potentially explain yield differences associated with location, year, planting date, and cultivars with different growing cycles. Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Mer.) cultivar coefficients for the DSSAT-CROPGRO model were cali...

  15. The {Lambda}{Lambda} interaction and the reaction {Xi}{sup -}+d {yields} n+{Lambda}+{Lambda}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, S.B.; Afnan, I.R. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Bedford Park (Australia); Gibson, B.F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1998-03-02

    In this report we present results of a theoretical study of the hypernucleus {sub {Lambda}{Lambda}}{sup 6}He and the reaction {Xi}d{yields}n{Lambda}{Lambda} whereby we examine the sensitivity of the calculations to details of the {Lambda}{Lambda} potential, and the coupling between the {Lambda}{Lambda} and the {Xi}N channels. (orig.) 8 refs.

  16. Interactive Role of Fungicides and Plant Growth Regulator (Trinexapac on Seed Yield and Oil Quality of Winter Rapeseed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ijaz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the role of growth regulator trinexapac and fungicides on growth, yield, and quality of winter rapeseed (Brassica napus L.. The experiment was conducted simultaneously at different locations in Germany using two cultivars of rapeseed. Five different fungicides belonging to the triazole and strobilurin groups, as well as a growth regulator trinexapac, were tested in this study. A total of seven combinations of these fungicides and growth regulator trinexapac were applied at two growth stages of rapeseed. These two stages include green floral bud stage (BBCH 53 and the course of pod development stage (BBCH 65. The results showed that plant height and leaf area index were affected significantly by the application of fungicides. Treatments exhibited induced photosynthetic ability and delayed senescence, which improved the morphological characters and yield components of rape plants at both locations. Triazole, in combination with strobilurin, led to the highest seed yield over other treatments at both experimental locations. Significant effects of fungicides on unsaturated fatty acids of rapeseed oil were observed. Fungicides did not cause any apparent variation in the values of free fatty acids and peroxide of rapeseed oil. Results of our study demonstrate that judicious use of fungicides in rapeseed may help to achieve sustainable farming to obtain higher yield and better quality of rapeseed.

  17. Flavor-dependent eigenvolume interactions in hadron resonance gas and its implications for hadron yields at LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Alba, P; Gorenstein, M I; Stoecker, H

    2016-01-01

    We study the eigenvolume effects in the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model on hadron yields at zero chemical potential. Using different mass-volume relations for strange and nonstrange hadrons we observe a remarkable improvement in the quality of the fit of the mean hadron multiplicities measured by the ALICE Collaboration in the central Pb+Pb collisions at the collision energy $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 2.76$~TeV. The fit within the point-particle HRG yields $\\chi^2 / N_{\\rm dof} \\simeq 27.1 / 8$ while the corresponding calculation within the eigevolume HRG with smaller radii for heavier strange hadrons yields a remarkably small $\\chi^2 / N_{\\rm dof} \\simeq 0.42 / 6$. This effect appears to be rather insensitive to the details in the implementation of the HRG model, including the variations in the hadron list, as well the variations in the excluded-volume mechanism. Our result shows that there are no anomalies in the description of the heavy-ion hadron yield data at LHC within the HRG model, as long as physical exte...

  18. How sensitive are the thermal fits to heavy-ion hadron yield data to the modeling of the eigenvolume interactions?

    CERN Document Server

    Vovchenko, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The hadron-resonance gas (HRG) model with eigenvolume corrections is employed to fit the hadron yield data of the NA49 collaboration for central Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 6.3, 7.6, 8.8, 12.3, and 17.3 GeV, the hadron midrapidity yield data of the STAR collaboration for Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV, and the hadron midrapidity yield data of the ALICE collaboration for Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2760 GeV. The influence of the EV corrections is studied within two different formulations of the EV HRG model. For the case of the point-particle HRG the extracted values of temperature and chemical potential are consistent with previous findings. The situation is very different when we apply the eigenvolume corrections with mass-proportional eigenvolumes $v_i \\sim m_i$, fixed to different values of the proton hard-core radius of $r_p$. At given bombarding energy the EV HRG model fits do not just yield a single $T-\\mu_B$ pair, but a whole range of $T-\\mu_B$ pairs. These pairs form...

  19. pH dependent salinity-boron interactions impact yield, biomass, evapotranspiration and boron uptake in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil pH is known to influence many important biochemical processes in plants and soils, however its role in salinity - boron interactions affecting plant growth and ion relations has not been examined. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the interactive effects of salinity, boron and soil ...

  20. Interactions of proteins with biogenic iron oxyhydroxides and a new culturing technique to increase biomass yields of neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, Roman A; Edwards, Katrina J

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophilic, bacterial iron-oxidation remains one of the least understood energy-generating biological reactions to date. One of the reasons it remains under-studied is because there are inherent problems with working with iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), including low biomass yields and interference from the iron oxides in the samples. In an effort to circumvent the problem of low biomass, a new large batch culturing technique was developed. Protein interactions with biogenic iron oxides were investigated confirming that such interactions are strong. Therefore, a protein extraction method is described to minimize binding of proteins to biogenic iron oxides. The combination of these two methods results in protein yields that are appropriate for activity assays in gels and for proteomic profiling.

  1. Further evidence for pomeron-quark interactions: Observation of large. Lambda. sup 0 polarization in pp yields (. Lambda. sup 0 K sup + )p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkes, T. (Max-Planck Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)); Alitti, J.; Cheze, J.B.; Povh, B.; Zsembery, J. (Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Bonino, R.; Erhan, S.; Medinnis, M.; Schlein, P.E.; Sherwood, P.; Zweizig, J.G. (Univ. California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Smith, A.M. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); R608 Collaboration

    1992-06-04

    We report an analysis of the diffractive reaction pp{yields}({Lambda}{sup 0}K{sup +})p, measured at r{radical}s=63 GeV in an open geometry forward spectrometer experiment at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings. In the rest frame of the ({Lambda}{sup 0}K{sup +}) system, which has nearly the beam momentum of 31.4 GeV, the {Lambda}{sup 0} is observed to be sharply peaked forward, similar to earlier observations in the reaction pp{yields}({Lambda}{sup 0}{phi}{sup 0}K{sup +})p, which were interpreted as the first direct evidence for pomeron-quark interactions. A smaller backward peak is also observed which may be evidence for pomeron-diquark interactions. The polarization of the {Lambda}{sup 0} increases to more than 60% when the diffractive mass reaches {approx equal}2.8 GeV. (orig.).

  2. Interactions of proteins with biogenic iron oxyhydroxides and a new culturing technique to increase biomass yields of neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Barco, Roman A.; Edwards, Katrina J

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophilic, bacterial iron-oxidation remains one of the least understood energy-generating biological reactions to date. One of the reasons it remains under-studied is because there are inherent problems with working with iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), including low biomass yields and interference from the iron oxides in the samples. In an effort to circumvent the problem of low biomass, a new large batch culturing technique was developed. Protein interactions with biogenic iron oxides wer...

  3. Genotype-environment interaction and analysis of yield stability in trial with tomato crop in drought condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Boicet Fabre

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work was developed in the UBPC “The Coast”, belonging to the Miscellaneous Crops Enterprise of Campechuela municipality, Granma province, during the period from November to March of the year 2010 – 2011. It was carried out in a reddish brown fersialitic soil, according with the new genetic classification of the soils of Cuba MINAGRI, (2000, with the objective of studying and evaluating the influence of different organic fertilizers in the growth, development and yield in the cultivation of onion, variety Texas Early Grain. For this reason it was necessary to work on blocks with 4 treatments and 4 replies. The treatments applied were: treatment 1 (vermicompost, treatment 2 (cow dung, treatment 3 (cachaça and treatment 4 (control, those were applied in a solid way. The growth variables that were evaluated were number of leaves, height of the plant, equatorial diameter, polar diameter and fresh weight of the bulb. The yield was also evaluated in t.ha -1 per treatment. High yields are achieved with the application of organic fertilizer, among 27 and 30 t.ha -1, this is an alternative for the sustainable production of this product which is highly demanded by the population.

  4. Climate Change: Precipitation and Plant Nutrition Interactions on Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Yield in North-Eastern Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    László Phd, M., ,, Dr.

    2009-04-01

    1979. The main conclusions were as follows: 1. The experiment years (1962-1963, 1964-1965, 1966-1967, 1968-1969, 1970-1971, 1972-1973, 1974-1975, 1976-1977, 1978-1979) were characterised by frequent extremes of climate. Seven years had an average rainfall, one year had an over rainfall and one year had a very dry by Hungarian traditional and RISSAC-HAS (Márton 2001b) new potato ecological standards. 2. The unfavorable effects of climate anomalies (drought, over-abundance of water in the topsoil) on the yield formation, yield quantity of potato depended decisively on the time of year when they were experienced and the period for which they lasted. 3. Precipitation deficiency (droughts) in the winter could not be counterbalanced by average rainfall during the vegetation period, and its effect on the yield was similar to that of summer drought. 4. Yield was influenced by rainfall to a greater extent than by 0-150 kg ha-1 nitrogen and NP, NK, NPK, NPKMg combinations. 5. Drought and over rainfall negative effects were decreased by increasing N- doses and its combinations of potassium, phosphorous and magnesium from 13 to 32%. 6. It was found the polynomial correlation between rainfall and yield could be observed in the case of N: Y'=380.18-2.95x+0.0056x2, n=72, R2=0.95, NP: Y'=387.19-3.04x+0.0059x2, n=72, R2=0.96, NK: Y'=381.65-2.95x+0.0056x2, n=72, R2=0.95, NPK: Y'=390.87-3.07x+0.0060x2, n=72, R2=0.96 and NPKMg: Y'=390.45-3.06x+0.0059x2, n=72, R2=0.96 nutrition systems. The optimum yields ranges between 17-20 t ha-1 at 280-330 mm of rainfall. Key words: climate change, rainfall, potato, N, NP, NK, NPK, NPKMg, yield Introduction: Climate change was recognized as a serious environmental issue. The build up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and the inertia in trends in emissions means that we can expect significant changes for at least the next few decades and probably for the future time. Annual temperatures over Europe warm at a rate of between 0.1 0C decade-1 and 0

  5. Random regression models to account for the effect of genotype by environment interaction due to heat stress on the milk yield of Holstein cows under tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Mário L; Bignardi, Annaiza Braga; Pereira, Rodrigo Junqueira; Menéndez-Buxadera, Alberto; El Faro, Lenira

    2016-02-01

    The present study had the following objectives: to compare random regression models (RRM) considering the time-dependent (days in milk, DIM) and/or temperature × humidity-dependent (THI) covariate for genetic evaluation; to identify the effect of genotype by environment interaction (G×E) due to heat stress on milk yield; and to quantify the loss of milk yield due to heat stress across lactation of cows under tropical conditions. A total of 937,771 test-day records from 3603 first lactations of Brazilian Holstein cows obtained between 2007 and 2013 were analyzed. An important reduction in milk yield due to heat stress was observed for THI values above 66 (-0.23 kg/day/THI). Three phases of milk yield loss were identified during lactation, the most damaging one at the end of lactation (-0.27 kg/day/THI). Using the most complex RRM, the additive genetic variance could be altered simultaneously as a function of both DIM and THI values. This model could be recommended for the genetic evaluation taking into account the effect of G×E. The response to selection in the comfort zone (THI ≤ 66) is expected to be higher than that obtained in the heat stress zone (THI > 66) of the animals. The genetic correlations between milk yield in the comfort and heat stress zones were less than unity at opposite extremes of the environmental gradient. Thus, the best animals for milk yield in the comfort zone are not necessarily the best in the zone of heat stress and, therefore, G×E due to heat stress should not be neglected in the genetic evaluation.

  6. Two rhizobacterial strains, individually and in interactions with Rhizobium sp., enhance fusarial wilt control, growth, and yield in pigeon pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Swarnalee; Morang, Pranjal; Kumar S, Nishanth; Dileep Kumar, B S

    2014-09-01

    A Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain, RRLJ 04, and a Bacillus cereus strain, BS 03, were tested both individually and in combination with a Rhizobium strain, RH 2, for their ability to enhance plant growth and nodulation in pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L.) under gnotobiotic, greenhouse and field conditions. Both of the rhizobacterial strains exhibited a positive effect on growth in terms of shoot height, root length, fresh and dry weight, nodulation and yield over the non-treated control. Co-inoculation of seeds with these strains and Rhizobium RH 2 also reduced the number of wilted plants, when grown in soil infested with Fusarium udum. Gnotobiotic studies confirmed that the suppression of wilt disease was due to the presence of the respective PGPR strains. Seed bacterization with drug-marked mutants of RRLJ 04 and BS 03 confirmed their ability to colonize and multiply along the roots. The results suggest that co-inoculation of these strains with Rhizobium strain RH 2 can be further exploited for enhanced growth, nodulation and yield in addition to control of fusarial wilt in pigeon pea.

  7. Interaction Effect of CO2 Enrichment and Nutritional Conditions on Physiological Characteristics, Essential Oil and Yield of Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud SHOOR

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide enrichment and nutritional improvement can increase photosynthesis and growth of different crops. The aim of the present study was to assess interaction effects of CO2 enrichment and fertilizer on physiological characteristics and lemon balm essential oil. Experimental units were composed of CO2 at 380, 700, and 1050 ppm with and without manure and N fertilizer application. A continuous increasing trend of individual plant leaf area, total dry weight accumulation and relative growth ratio were recorded with CO2 enrichment. When CO2 was elevated from 380 to 1050 ppm, the values of height (24.3%, SPAD reading (2.7%, essential oil yield (26.3% and final yield (65.3% were increased, unlike, stomatal conductance (35.2% and essential oil percentage (53% were decreased. The highest and the lowest values (except for oil percentage were obtained under N and no fertilizer application, respectively. Except for SPAD, interaction between CO2 enrichment and each fertilizer on all measured characteristics had a significant effect, so that CO2 effect was intensified by applying each fertilizer. Therefore, it can be concluded that when temperature increase caused by rising CO2 is not considered or there is not a limitation for resources, CO2 enrichment will improve lemon balm biomass and essential oil yield.

  8. Farnesylated and methylated KRAS4b: high yield production of protein suitable for biophysical studies of prenylated protein-lipid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, William K; Esposito, Dominic; Abreu Blanco, Maria; Alexander, Patrick; Bindu, Lakshman; Bittner, Cammi; Chertov, Oleg; Frank, Peter H; Grose, Carissa; Jones, Jane E; Meng, Zhaojing; Perkins, Shelley; Van, Que; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Fivash, Matthew; Nissley, Dwight V; McCormick, Frank; Holderfield, Matthew; Stephen, Andrew G

    2015-11-02

    Prenylated proteins play key roles in several human diseases including cancer, atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. KRAS4b, which is frequently mutated in pancreatic, colon and lung cancers, is processed by farnesylation, proteolytic cleavage and carboxymethylation at the C-terminus. Plasma membrane localization of KRAS4b requires this processing as does KRAS4b-dependent RAF kinase activation. Previous attempts to produce modified KRAS have relied on protein engineering approaches or in vitro farnesylation of bacterially expressed KRAS protein. The proteins produced by these methods do not accurately replicate the mature KRAS protein found in mammalian cells and the protein yield is typically low. We describe a protocol that yields 5-10 mg/L highly purified, farnesylated, and methylated KRAS4b from insect cells. Farnesylated and methylated KRAS4b is fully active in hydrolyzing GTP, binds RAF-RBD on lipid Nanodiscs and interacts with the known farnesyl-binding protein PDEδ.

  9. A Review of the Applications of Chitin and Its Derivatives in Agriculture to Modify Plant-Microbial Interactions and Improve Crop Yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell G. Sharp

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, a greater knowledge of chitin chemistry, and the increased availability of chitin-containing waste materials from the seafood industry, have led to the testing and development of chitin-containing products for a wide variety of applications in the agriculture industry. A number of modes of action have been proposed for how chitin and its derivatives can improve crop yield. In addition to direct effects on plant nutrition and plant growth stimulation, chitin-derived products have also been shown to be toxic to plant pests and pathogens, induce plant defenses and stimulate the growth and activity of beneficial microbes. A repeating theme of the published studies is that chitin-based treatments augment and amplify the action of beneficial chitinolytic microbes. This article reviews the evidence for claims that chitin-based products can improve crop yields and the current understanding of the modes of action with a focus on plant-microbe interactions.

  10. Atomic data for controlled fusion research. Volume III. Particle interactions with surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, E.W.

    1985-02-01

    This report provides a handbook of data concerning particle solid interactions that are relevant to plasma-wall interactions in fusion devices. Published data have been collected, assessed, and represented by a single functional relationship which is presented in both tabular and graphical form. Mechanisms reviewed here include sputtering, secondary electron emission, particle reflection, and trapping.

  11. Investigations on the C1q-calreticulin-phosphatidylserine interactions yield new insights into apoptotic cell recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Païdassi, Helena; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Verneret, Mélanie; Gaboriaud, Christine; Houen, Gunnar; Duus, Karen; Ling, Wai Li; Arlaud, Gérard J; Frachet, Philippe

    2011-04-29

    Both C1q and calreticulin (CRT) are involved in the recognition of apoptotic cells. CRT was initially characterized as a receptor for the C1q collagen-like fragment (CLF), whereas C1q was shown to bind apoptotic cells through its globular region (GR). Using purified CRT and recombinant CRT domains, we now provide unambiguous experimental evidence that, in addition to its CLF, the C1q GR also binds CRT and that both types of interactions are mediated by the CRT globular domain. Surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed that the C1q CLF and GR domains each bind individually to immobilized CRT and its globular domain with K(D) values of (2.6-8.3) × 10(-7) M. Further evidence that CRT binds to the C1q GR was obtained by electron microscopy. The role of CRT in the recognition of apoptotic HeLa cells by C1q was analyzed. The C1q GR partially colocalized with CRT on the surface of early apoptotic cells, and siRNA (small interfering RNA)-induced CRT deficiency resulted in increased apoptotic cell binding to C1q. The interaction between CRT and phosphatidylserine (PS), a known C1q ligand on apoptotic cells, was also investigated. The polar head of PS was shown to bind to CRT with a 10-fold higher affinity (K(D)=1.5 × 10(-5) M) than that determined for C1q, and, accordingly, the C1q GR-PS interaction was impaired in the presence of CRT. Together, these observations indicate that CRT, C1q, and PS are all closely involved in the uptake of apoptotic cells and strongly suggest a combinatorial role of these three molecules in the recognition step.

  12. Introduction of an electron push-pull system yields a planar Red Kaede fluorescence protein chromophore analogue stabilized by a C = O… interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashish Singh; Basanta Kumar Rajbongshi; Gurunath Ramanathan

    2015-05-01

    Crystal structures of four red kaede fluorescence protein chromophore analogues are reported here. Molecules I-III adopt a non-planar geometry stabilized by … stacking and hydrogen bonding. Introduction of an electron push-pull system induces molecule IV to be planar and a C = O… supramolecular interaction is observed as well. Strong electron withdrawing and donating groups also ensure formation of a higher order two and three dimensional supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonds in molecules I and IV. All the analogues exhibit good photoluminescence properties and emit in the red region with excellent quantum yields.

  13. Plasma-wall interactions data compendium-2. ''Hydrogen retention property, diffusion and recombination coefficients database for selected plasma-facing materials''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuhiro, Kenjirou [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Iwakiri, Hirotomo [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Hirooka, Yoshi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamamura, Yasunori [Okayama Univ. of Scinece, Okayama (Japan); Morita, Kenji [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    This report will present additional data to those included in the previous report of this series. These new data are on the hydrogen (deuterium) trapping properties of graphite materials. The units on the data on hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and surface recombination coefficients have been updated to adopt the SI unit system. Also, the graphic representations of previously compiled data on hydrogen (deuterium) retention have been improved for better understanding. For the sake of completeness, this report will present all these data in the improved format. (author)

  14. Interacting agricultural pests and their effect on crop yield: application of a Bayesian decision theory approach to the joint management of Bromus tectorum and Cephus cinctus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilai N Keren

    Full Text Available Worldwide, the landscape homogeneity of extensive monocultures that characterizes conventional agriculture has resulted in the development of specialized and interacting multitrophic pest complexes. While integrated pest management emphasizes the need to consider the ecological context where multiple species coexist, management recommendations are often based on single-species tactics. This approach may not provide satisfactory solutions when confronted with the complex interactions occurring between organisms at the same or different trophic levels. Replacement of the single-species management model with more sophisticated, multi-species programs requires an understanding of the direct and indirect interactions occurring between the crop and all categories of pests. We evaluated a modeling framework to make multi-pest management decisions taking into account direct and indirect interactions among species belonging to different trophic levels. We adopted a Bayesian decision theory approach in combination with path analysis to evaluate interactions between Bromus tectorum (downy brome, cheatgrass and Cephus cinctus (wheat stem sawfly in wheat (Triticum aestivum systems. We assessed their joint responses to weed management tactics, seeding rates, and cultivar tolerance to insect stem boring or competition. Our results indicated that C. cinctus oviposition behavior varied as a function of B. tectorum pressure. Crop responses were more readily explained by the joint effects of management tactics on both categories of pests and their interactions than just by the direct impact of any particular management scheme on yield. In accordance, a C. cinctus tolerant variety should be planted at a low seeding rate under high insect pressure. However as B. tectorum levels increase, the C. cinctus tolerant variety should be replaced by a competitive and drought tolerant cultivar at high seeding rates despite C. cinctus infestation. This study exemplifies the

  15. In situ delipidation of low-density lipoproteins in capillary electrochromatography yields apolipoprotein B-100-coated surfaces for interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ulivo, Lucia; Chen, Jie; Meinander, Kristoffer; Oörni, Katariina; Kovanen, Petri T; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2008-12-01

    An electrochromatographic method was developed for the in situ delipidation of intact low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles immobilized on the inner wall of a 50-microm inner diameter silica capillary. In this method, the immobilized LDL particles were delipidated with nonionic surfactant Nonidet P-40 at pH 7.4 and 25 degrees C, resulting in an apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100)-coated capillary surface. The mobility of the electroosmotic flow marker dimethyl sulfoxide gave information about the surface charge, and the retention factors of beta-estradiol, testosterone, and progesterone were informative of the surface hydrophobicity. The calculated distribution coefficients of the steroids produced specific information about the affinity interactions of the steroids, with capillary surfaces coated either with intact LDL particles or with apoB-100. Delipidation with Nonidet P-40 resulted in a strong decrease in the hydrophobicity of the LDL coating. Atomic force microscopy images confirmed the loss of lipids from the LDL particles and the presence of apoB-100 protein coating. The in situ delipidation of LDL particles in capillaries represents a novel approach for the isolation of immobilized apoB-100 and for the determination of its pI value. The technique requires extremely low quantities of LDL particles, and it is simple and fast.

  16. Source/sink interactions underpin crop yield: the case for trehalose 6-phosphate/SnRK1 in improvement of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, David W; Paul, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Considerable interest has been evoked by the analysis of the regulatory pathway in carbohydrate metabolism and cell growth involving the non-reducing disaccharide trehalose (TRE). TRE is at small concentrations in mesophytes such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Triticum aestivum, excluding a role in osmoregulation once suggested for it. Studies of TRE metabolism, and genetic modification of it, have shown a very wide and more important role of the pathway in regulation of many processes in development, growth, and photosynthesis. It has now been established that rather than TRE, it is trehalose 6-phosphate (T6P) which has such profound effects. T6P is the intermediary in TRE synthesis formed from glucose-6-phosphate and UDP-glucose, derived from sucrose, by the action of trehalose phosphate synthase. The concentration of T6P is determined both by the rate of synthesis, which depends on the sucrose concentration, and also by the rate of breakdown by trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase which produces TRE. Changing T6P concentrations by genetically modifying the enzymes of synthesis and breakdown has altered photosynthesis, sugar metabolism, growth, and development which affect responses to, and recovery from, environmental factors. Many of the effects of T6P on metabolism and growth occur via the interaction of T6P with the SnRK1 protein kinase system. T6P inhibits the activity of SnRK1, which de-represses genes encoding proteins involved in anabolism. Consequently, a large concentration of sucrose increases T6P and thereby inhibits SnRK1, so stimulating growth of cells and their metabolic activity. The T6P/SnRK1 mechanism offers an important new view of how the distribution of assimilates to organs, such as developing grains in cereal plants, is achieved. This review briefly summarizes the factors determining, and limiting, yield of wheat (particularly mass/grain which is highly conserved) and considers how T6P/SnRK1 might function to determine grain yield and might be

  17. Yields of nuclear fragments in the interactions of carbon nuclei with a beryllium target at a projectile energy of 0.6 GeV per nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, B. M.; Alexeev, P. N.; Borodin, Yu. A.; Bulychjov, S. A.; Gudima, K. K.; Dukhovskoy, I. A.; Krutenkova, A. P.; Kulikov, V. V.; Martemianov, M. A.; Matsyuk, M. A.; Mashnik, S. G.; Turdakina, E. N.; Khanov, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    The yields of long-lived nuclear fragments at an angle of 3.5° that originate fromthe fragmentation of carbon ions with an energy of T 0 = 0.6 GeV per nucleon on a berylliumtarget were measured in the FRAGMexperiment at the ITEP TWA heavy-ion accelerator. The momentum spectra of these fragments cover both the fragmentation-maximum region and the cumulative region. The respective differential cross sections change by about five orders of magnitude. The momentum distributions of fragments in the laboratory frame and their kinetic-energy distributions in the rest frame of the fragmenting nucleus are used to test the predictions of four models of ion-ion interactions: BC, INCL++, LAQGSM03.03, and QMD.

  18. A selection strategy to accommodate genotype-by-environment interaction for grain yield of wheat: managed-environments for selection among genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M; Woodruff, D R; Eisemann, R L; Brennan, P S; Delacy, I H

    1995-03-01

    Selection for grain yield among wheat lines is complicated by large line-by-environment (L × E) interactions in Queensland, Australia. Early generation selection is based on an evaluation of many lines in a few environments. The small sample of environments, together with the large L × E interaction, reduces the realised response to selection. Definition of a series of managed-environments which provides discrimination among lines, which is relevant to the target production-environments, and can be repeated over years, would facilitate early generation selection. Two series of managed-environments were conducted. Eighteen managed-environments were generated in Series-1 by manipulating nitrogen and water availability, together with the sowing date, at three locations. Nine managed-environments based on those from Series-1 were generated in Series-2. Line discrimination for grain yield in the managed-environments was compared to that in a series of 16 random production-environments. The genetic correlation between line discrimination in the managed-environments and that in the production-environments was influenced by the number and combination of managed-environments. Two managed-environment selection regimes, which gave a high genetic correlation in both Series-1 and 2, were identified. The first used three managed-environments, a high input (low water and nitrogen stress) environment with early sowing at three locations. The second used six managed-environments, a combination of a high input (low water and nitrogen stress) and medium input (water and nitrogen stress) with early sowing at three locations. The opportunities for using managed-environments to provide more reliable selection among lines in the Queensland wheat breeding programme and its potential limitations are discussed.

  19. Estimation of Ce 4f-5d Interaction by Analysis of Partial Fluorescence Yield at the Ce L3 Edge of CeO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonai, Hironori; Sasabe, Norimasa; Uozumi, Takayuki; Kawamura, Naomi; Mizumaki, Masaichiro

    2017-09-01

    Partial fluorescence yield (PFY) spectroscopy, which corresponds to a high-resolution version of the X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), is experimentally performed at the Ce L3 edge of CeO2, and the result is theoretically analyzed using an impurity Anderson model (IAM). In order to estimate the Ce 4f-5d interaction Ufd, we employ a semi-empirical IAM framework based on the local density approximation+U method; Slater-Koster parameters describing the valence of CeO2 are estimated by band mapping within the linear combination of atomic orbitals scheme, and the resulting realistic valence structure is considered in the IAM analysis. The global structure of the PFY-XAS result, which consists of the Ce 2p3/2 → 5d dipole transition and the Ce 2p3/2 → 4f quadrupole transition, is excellently reproduced by the calculation. The Ufd value is estimated to be 3.0 eV. We emphasize that the sensitivity of PFY-XAS to Ufd makes it a good ruler for obtaining the Ufd values of Ce compounds.

  20. Genetic progress in Dutch crop yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijk, H.C.A.; Ittersum, van M.K.; Withagen, J.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Crop yields are a result of interactions between genetics, environment and management (G × E × M). As in the Netherlands differences between potential yield and actual farm yields (yield gaps) are relatively small, progress in genetic potential is essential to further increase farm yields. In this p

  1. Seed set, berry weight, and yield interactions in highbush blueberry cultivars (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) ‘Bluecrop’ and ‘Duke’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yields and berry weights of two widely grown, commercial, highbush blueberry cultivars, ‘Bluecrop’ and ‘Duke’, were evaluated for 3 or more harvests every season over ten years, and seed set was determined at each harvest over the last four. Across 10 years, yield and berry weight had no significant...

  2. Original Inventions based on Chemical scaffolds and electro-physical activity-derived biosimilars interacting with specialties in biology yielding platforms for analysis in virology and antiviral compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaji N

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Original inventions in developing countries, in terms of number of patents filed, granted and that are taken to useful applications as well as in terms of publications of high impact remain relatively lower [1,2] compared to that of developed nations. The reasons could be attributed to lack of importance given to basic research in funding, the number of institutes involved, limited technical support or expertise available etc [1]. Though such initiatives may take a long time to yield fruits, one of the parallel steps we considered worth was to take the original inventions from Japan, born out of basic research in one field, taken through an application-oriented inter disciplinary interactive research in healthcare, thereby paving way for novel solutions. Thus was conceived, the Inventions- Inter-Disciplinary Interactions and Solutions (IIDIAS, an academic session as a part of the one-day International stem cell meet organized every year in the month of October by Nichi-In Centre for Regenerative Medicine (NCRM, an academic Institute based in Chennai, India. In the IIDIAS session, based on original invention(s presented as a prelude in brief, original interdisciplinary interactive research work based on the original invention by NCRM and/or its collaborators are presented by the faculty of the relevant institute. That will be followed by an interactive session in which the potential solutions based on the above accomplishments would be discussed. The IIDIAS session 2014 was based on the following two inventions: A bio-film-based biosimilar invented by an electro-physicist A unique polymer invented by a chemical engineer Inventions and Interdisciplinary Interactions: Invention –I: The bio-film-based biosimilar invented by an electro-physicist: An electro physicist with the Kyoto University, Japan, Dr Nobuyuki Yamaji observed during his experiments that plants and mammalian tissues secrete a layer of fluid after getting hit by

  3. How accurately do maize crop models simulate the interactions of atmospheric CO2 concentration levels with limited water supply on water use and yield?

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study assesses the ability of 21 crop models to capture the impact of elevated CO2 concentration ([CO218 ]) on maize yield and water use as measured in a 2-year Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment experiment conducted at the Thünen Institute in Braunschweig, Germany (Manderscheid et al. 2014). D...

  4. Low temperature lignocellulose pretreatment: effects and interactions of pretreatment pH are critical for maximizing enzymatic monosaccharide yields from wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads; Johansen, Katja S.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2011-01-01

    C for 10 min. The maximal enzymatic glucose and xylose yields from the solid, pretreated wheat straw fraction were obtained after pretreatments at the most extreme pH values (pH 1 or pH 13) at the maximum pretreatment temperature of 140 degrees C. Surface response models revealed significantly...

  5. Growth, yield and quality attributes of a tropical potato variety (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Kufri chandramukhi) under ambient and elevated carbon dioxide and ozone and their interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sumita; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2014-03-01

    The present study was designed to study the growth and yield responses of a tropical potato variety (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Kufri chandramukhi) to different levels of carbon dioxide (382 and 570ppm) and ozone (50 and 70ppb) in combinations using open top chambers (OTCs). Plants were exposed to three ozone levels in combination with ambient CO2 and two ozone levels at elevated CO2. Significant increments in leaf area and total biomass were observed under elevated CO2 in combination with ambient O3 (ECO2+AO3) and elevated O3 (ECO2+EO3), compared to the plants grown under ambient concentrations (ACO2+AO3). Yield measured as fresh weight of potato also increased significantly under ECO2+AO3 and ECO2+EO3. Yield, however, reduced under ambient (ACO2+AO3) and elevated ozone (ACO2+EO3) compared to ACO2 (filtered chamber). Number, fresh and dry weights of tubers of size 35-50mm and>50mm used for direct consumption and industrial purposes, respectively increased maximally under ECO2+AO3. Ambient as well as elevated levels of O3 negatively affected the growth parameters and yield mainly due to reductions in number and weight of tubers of sizes >35mm. The quality of potato tubers was also modified under different treatments. Starch content increased and K, Zn and Fe concentrations decreased under ECO2+AO3 and ECO2+EO3 compared to ACO2+AO3. Starch content reduced under ACO2+AO3 and ACO2+EO3 treatments compared to ACO2. These results clearly suggest that elevated CO2 has provided complete protection to ambient O3 as the potato yield was higher under ECO2+AO3 compared to ACO2. However, ambient CO2 is not enough to protect the plants under ambient O3 levels. Elevated CO2 also provided protection against elevated O3 by improving the yield. Quality of tubers is modified by both CO2 and O3, which have serious implications on human health at present and in future.

  6. Ultraviolet-B and photosynthetically active radiation interactively affect yield and pattern of monoterpenes in leaves of peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behn, Helen; Albert, Andreas; Marx, Friedhelm; Noga, Georg; Ulbrich, Andreas

    2010-06-23

    Solar radiation is a key environmental signal in regulation of plant secondary metabolism. Since metabolic responses to light and ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure are known to depend on the ratio of spectral ranges (e.g., UV-B/PAR), we examined effects of different UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) levels and ratios on yield and pattern of monoterpenoid essential oil of peppermint. Experiments were performed in exposure chambers, technically equipped for realistic simulation of natural climate and radiation. The experimental design comprised four irradiation regimes created by the combination of two PAR levels including or excluding UV-B radiation. During flowering, the highest essential oil yield was achieved at high PAR (1150 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) and approximate ambient UV-B radiation (0.6 W m(-2)). Regarding the monoterpene pattern, low PAR (550 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) and the absence of UV-B radiation led to reduced menthol and increased menthone contents and thereby to a substantial decrease in oil quality. Essential oil yield could not be correlated with density or diameter of peltate glandular trichomes, the epidermal structures specialized on biosynthesis, and the accumulation of monoterpenes. The present results lead to the conclusion that production of high quality oils (fulfilling the requirements of the Pharmacopoeia Europaea) requires high levels of natural sunlight. In protected cultivation, the use of UV-B transmitting covering materials is therefore highly recommended.

  7. Contribution to the study of {pi}{sup -} + p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} + n and {pi}{sup -} + p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} + {pi} + n reactions at the energies of the maxima of the {pi}-nucleon interaction in the T = 1/2 state total cross section; Contribution a l'etude des reactions {pi}{sup -} + p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} + n et {pi}{sup -} + p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} + n aux energies des maxima de la section efficace totale de l'interaction {pi}{sup -} nucleon dans l'etat de spin isobarique T = 1/2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turlay, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    In the first part of this experiment, we determined the total cross section for processes yielding only neutral particles, from 300 to 1600 MeV. For this, we counted the number of incident {pi}{sup -}, as defined by a counter telescope, which interact in a liquid-hydrogen target without giving charged particles in a 4{pi} counter surrounding the target. In the second part of this experiment, we have separated the reaction {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} n and {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0} n between 300 and 1100 MeV, by supposing that only these two reactions was realized by placing lead absorbers between the target and 4{pi} counter and by comparing the counting rate for neutral events with and without lead. The transmission thus measured is a function of the average number of photons produced and therefore of the ratio between the two neutral channels, {pi}{sup 0} n and {pi}{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0} n. In the last section of this work, we discuss the experimental results and compare them to those obtained by other authors in the study of photoproduction and the {pi}-nucleon interaction. (author) [French] Dans une premiere partie de cette experience, nous determinons la section efficace totale des processus ne donnant naissance qu'a des particules neutres de 300 et 1 600 MeV. Pour cela nous comptons le nombre de {pi}{sup -}, defini par un telescope incident, qui interagissent dans une cible d'hydrogene liquide sans donner de particules chargees dans un compteur 4{pi} entourant cette cible. Dans la deuxieme partie de l'experience nous avons separe les reactions {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} n et {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0} n entre 300 et 1 600 MeV en supposant que seules ces deux voies soient importantes a ces energies. La separation de ces deux reactions a ete realisee en placant des ecrans de plomb entre la cible et le compteur 4 {pi}, et en comparant les traces de comptage des evenements a secondaires neutres

  8. The Ozone Component of Global Change:Potential Effects on Agricultural and Horticultural Plant Yield,Product Quality and Interactions with Invasive Species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fitzgerald Booker; Russell Muntifering; Margaret McGrath; Kent Burkey; Dennis Decoteau; Edwin Fiscus; William Manning; Sagar Krupa; Arthur Chappelka; David Grantz

    2009-01-01

    The productivity,product quality and competitive ability of important agricultural and horticultural plants in many regions of the world may be adversely affected by current and anticipated concentrations of groundlevel ozone (O3).Exposure to elevated O3 typically results in suppressed photosynthesis,accelerated senescence,decreased growth and lower yields.Various approaches used to evaluate O3 effects generally concur that current yield losses range from 5% to 15% among sensitive plants.There is,however,considerable genetic variability in plant responses to O3.To illustrate this,we show that ambient O3 concentrations in the eastern United States cause substantially different levels of damage to otherwise similar snap bean cultivars.Largely undesirable effects of O3 can also occur in seed and fruit chemistry as well as in forage nutritive value,with consequences for animal production.Ozone may alter herbicide efficacy and foster establishment of some invasive species.We conclude that current and projected levels of O3 in many regions worldwide are toxic to sensitive plants of agricultural and horticultural significance.Plant breeding that incorporates O3 sensitivity into selection strategies will be increasingly necessary to achieve sustainable production with changing atmospheric composition,while reductions in O3 precursor emissions will likely benefit world food production and reduce atmospheric concentrations of an important greenhouse gas.

  9. The ozone component of global change: potential effects on agricultural and horticultural plant yield, product quality and interactions with invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Fitzgerald; Muntifering, Russell; McGrath, Margaret; Burkey, Kent; Decoteau, Dennis; Fiscus, Edwin; Manning, William; Krupa, Sagar; Chappelka, Arthur; Grantz, David

    2009-04-01

    The productivity, product quality and competitive ability of important agricultural and horticultural plants in many regions of the world may be adversely affected by current and anticipated concentrations of ground-level ozone (O3). Exposure to elevated O3 typically results in suppressed photosynthesis, accelerated senescence, decreased growth and lower yields. Various approaches used to evaluate O3 effects generally concur that current yield losses range from 5% to 15% among sensitive plants. There is, however, considerable genetic variability in plant responses to O3. To illustrate this, we show that ambient O3 concentrations in the eastern United States cause substantially different levels of damage to otherwise similar snap bean cultivars. Largely undesirable effects of O3 can also occur in seed and fruit chemistry as well as in forage nutritive value, with consequences for animal production. Ozone may alter herbicide efficacy and foster establishment of some invasive species. We conclude that current and projected levels of O3 in many regions worldwide are toxic to sensitive plants of agricultural and horticultural significance. Plant breeding that incorporates O3 sensitivity into selection strategies will be increasingly necessary to achieve sustainable production with changing atmospheric composition, while reductions in O3 precursor emissions will likely benefit world food production and reduce atmospheric concentrations of an important greenhouse gas.

  10. Influence of watershed-climate interactions on stream temperature, sediment yield, and metabolism along a land use intensity gradient in Indonesian Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kimberly M.; Curran, Lisa M.; Ponette-González, Alexandra G.; Ratnasari, Dessy; Ruspita; Lisnawati, Neli; Purwanto, Yadi; Brauman, Kate A.; Raymond, Peter A.

    2014-06-01

    Oil palm plantation expansion into tropical forests may alter physical and biogeochemical inputs to streams, thereby changing hydrological function. In West Kalimantan, Indonesia, we assessed streams draining watersheds characterized by five land uses: intact forest, logged forest, mixed agroforest, and young (10 years) oil palm plantation. We quantified suspended sediments, stream temperature, and metabolism using high-frequency submersible sonde measurements during month-long intervals between 2009 and 2012. Streams draining oil palm plantations had markedly higher sediment concentrations and yields, and stream temperatures, compared to other streams. Mean sediment concentrations were fourfold to 550-fold greater in young oil palm than in all other streams and remained elevated even under base flow conditions. After controlling for precipitation, the mature oil palm stream exhibited significantly greater sediment yield than other streams. Young and mature oil palm streams were 3.9°C and 3.0°C warmer than the intact forest stream (25°C). Across all streams, base flow periods were significantly warmer than times of stormflow, and these differences were especially large in oil palm catchments. Ecosystem respiration rates were also influenced by low precipitation. During an El Niño-Southern Oscillation-associated drought, the mature oil palm stream consumed a maximum 21 g O2 m-2 d-1 in ecosystem respiration, in contrast with 2.8 ± 3.1 g O2 m-2 d-1 during nondrought sampling. Given that 23% of Kalimantan's land area is occupied by watersheds similar to those studied here, our findings inform potential hydrologic outcomes of regional periodic drought coupled with continued oil palm plantation expansion.

  11. STUDYING GXE INTERACTION UNDER DIFFERENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM AND YIELD LEVEL USING LINEAR-BILINEAR MODELS: THE CASE OF CIMMYT INTERMEDIATE TO LATE HYBRIDS TRAILS IN EASTERN AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girma Taye

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available CIMMYT, with national programs, conducts selection of stress-tolerant genotypes under managed stress conditions; this investigation is expected to add information to the existing knowledge. Data sets used in this study comes from Intermediate to Late Hybrid Trails (ILHT conducted in five Eastern and Central Africa (ECA countries from 2008 to 2011. Trials, ranging from 18 in 2009 to 29 in 2010 were used. Trials are categorized into four management systems and two yield levels. Variance Components, broad sense heritability (H, Site Regression (SREG, Genotypic Regression (GREG, Completely Multiplicative Model (COMM and Factor Analytic (FA models were fitted. Results are discussed and compared with those stated in literature. We argue that it is preferable to first fit the fixed effect models before proceeding to the mixed effect model, as the former shows the level of complexity of the GE component and number of Axis required to explain it. The fixed effect model, SREG2, is preferable for trails targeting to compare hybrids with checks. From the GGE biplots it was noted that the first two PC did not account for sufficient percentage of variation for all years which witnessed complexity in the GE component for this data. Nevertheless, since PC1 accounted for large percentage of variation than PC2, the plot still gives some idea of which hybrids are favored and where. Most importantly, location of genotypes along PC1 can serve for judging yielding potential of the genotypes to guide in selection decision. Equivalence between Finlay – Wilkinson and GREG was established. The few environmental covariables obtained for 2009 was used to fit Partial Least Square (PLS regression. The result indicated complexity in the GE component, as PLS latent factors accounted for small percentage of variation. It was recommended to use information from SREG2, GREG2 and FA(1 models in order to identify stable genotype.

  12. 甘蔗品种的区试蔗茎产量和蔗糖分与环境互作效应分析%Genotype, Environment and Their Interactive Effects on Yield and Sugar of Sugarcane Regional Trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈学宽; 刘家勇; 范源洪; 吴才文; 赵俊; 赵培方

    2009-01-01

    利用AMMI(主效可加互作乘积)模型及双标图、D_i(品种稳定性参数)以及相应表现型值与D_i值的聚类分析,对2005~2006年14个甘蔗品种云南5个试点的2年新植1年宿根甘蔗品种区域化试验蔗茎产量和蔗糖分进行基因环境互作研究分析.结果表明:①产量与环境的互作效应显著,稳定性好的品种有云瑞99-113、德蔗93-94等;甘蔗糖分与环境互作效应较小,稳定性好的品种有云瑞99-113、云蔗98-236等.②根据AMMI双标图,提出了参试品种在参试点的适应性.③根据平均产量和糖分及其D_i值聚类分析,参试品种可分为5类.基于AMMI的互作稳定性分析和聚类分析为蔗区甘蔗新品种的推广应用提供了依据.%The yield and sugar of 14 varieties from 5 sites of the Yunnan regional trials in 2004-2006 (2 years of planting and 1 year of ratoon crops) were analyzed using additive main effects multiplicative interaction (AMMI) model and its biplot, stability of varieties parameters(represented by D_i),mean yield and sugar and their D_i values. The results of genotype and environment interaction (G×E) showed that (i) Some varieties had the significant effects and good stabilities, such as YR99-113, DZ93-94 based on the interaction between cane yield and environment; and some varieties had the little effects and good stabilities, such as YR99-113,YZ98-236, based on the interaction between sugar and environment; (ii) The adaptabilities of the varieties for trail regions were indicated by analysis of biplot of AMMI model; (iii) The varieties were hierarchically clustered into 5 types based on the mean yield and sugar and their D_i value. The analysis based on AMMI and hierarchical clustering should be good contribution to new sugarcane varieties in appropriate regions.

  13. EFFECT OF CHEMICAL AND ORGANIC SOIL FERTILIZERS AND THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH SOME FOLIAR FERTILIZERS ON GROWTH AND YIELD OF BROAD BEAN (VICIA FABA L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Husain JASIM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Field experiment was conducted at the field of Agriculture College, Al-Qasim Green University at the agricultural season 2014/2015 to study the effect of two soil fertilizers (compound 18-18-18- at the rate of 200 kg.ha-1and sheep manure as organic fertilizer at the rate of 10 tons.ha-1 as well as control, and their interaction with foliar fertilizer of sea weed extract and urea as well as control (without the spray on broad bean plants. Randomized Complete Block Design was used with three replication. The experimental unit contained 3 ridges (3m long and 80 cm apart, planted on both sides at distance of 25 cm in saline soil (9.6dS.m-1. The results showed that chemical or organic soil fertilization led to increase plant height, plant branches number, plant leaves, leaf chlorophyll content and leaf percentage content of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium significantly compared to control treatment. Add compost Chemical. On the other foliar fertilizer caused a significant increase in all traits above compared to control (without spraying. The interaction between soil and foliar fertilizers had a significant effect on all traits above.

  14. Protein interaction analysis of senataxin and the ALS4 L389S mutant yields insights into senataxin post-translational modification and uncovers mutant-specific binding with a brain cytoplasmic RNA-encoded peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig L Bennett

    Full Text Available Senataxin is a large 303 kDa protein linked to neuron survival, as recessive mutations cause Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia type 2 (AOA2, and dominant mutations cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 4 (ALS4. Senataxin contains an amino-terminal protein-interaction domain and a carboxy-terminal DNA/RNA helicase domain. In this study, we focused upon the common ALS4 mutation, L389S, by performing yeast two-hybrid screens of a human brain expression library with control senataxin or L389S senataxin as bait. Interacting clones identified from the two screens were collated, and redundant hits and false positives subtracted to yield a set of 13 protein interactors. Among these hits, we discovered a highly specific and reproducible interaction of L389S senataxin with a peptide encoded by the antisense sequence of a brain-specific non-coding RNA, known as BCYRN1. We further found that L389S senataxin interacts with other proteins containing regions of conserved homology with the BCYRN1 reverse complement-encoded peptide, suggesting that such aberrant protein interactions may contribute to L389S ALS4 disease pathogenesis. As the yeast two-hybrid screen also demonstrated senataxin self-association, we confirmed senataxin dimerization via its amino-terminal binding domain and determined that the L389S mutation does not abrogate senataxin self-association. Finally, based upon detection of interactions between senataxin and ubiquitin-SUMO pathway modification enzymes, we examined senataxin for the presence of ubiquitin and SUMO monomers, and observed this post-translational modification. Our senataxin protein interaction study reveals a number of features of senataxin biology that shed light on senataxin normal function and likely on senataxin molecular pathology in ALS4.

  15. Interactive effect of supplemental ultraviolet B and elevated ozone on seed yield and oil quality of two cultivars of linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) carried out in open top chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ruchika; Agrawal, Shashi B

    2013-03-30

    Current scenarios of global climate change predict a significant increase in ultraviolet B (UV-B) and tropospheric ozone (O₃) in the near future. Both UV-B and O₃ can have detrimental effects on the productivity and yield quality of important agricultural crops. The present study was conducted to investigate the individual and interactive effects of supplemental UV-B (sUV-B) (ambient + 7.2 kJ m⁻² day⁻¹) and O₃ (ambient + 10 ppb) on the yield and oil quality of two cultivars of linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.). The mean monthly ambient O₃ concentration varied from 27.7 to 59.0 ppb during the experimental period. O₃ affected fruit formation, while sUV-B was mainly responsible for ovule abortion. Seed sugar and protein contents showed maximum reduction in O₃-treated plants, while mineral nutrient levels were most affected by sUV-B + O₃ treatment. Rancid oil of low nutritional quality and containing long-chain fatty acids was favoured along with a decrease in oil content. sUV-B and O₃ individually as well as in combination caused deterioration of the yield and quality of oil and seeds of linseed. However, the individual effect of O₃ was more damaging than the effect of sUV-B or sUV-B + O₃, and cultivar T-397 performed better than Padmini. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Low-Yield Cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Division of Reproductive Health More CDC Sites Low-Yield Cigarettes Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... they compensate when smoking them. Smokers Who Use Low-Yield Cigarettes Many smokers consider smoking low-yield ...

  17. Effect of Nitrogen and Rhizobium Interaction on Growth, Nodule Development and Yield in Soybean%氮和根瘤菌交互作用对大豆生长、结瘤及产量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程鹏; 王金生; 刘丽君; 年海; 林蔚刚; 王红蕾; 吴俊江

    2013-01-01

      采用根瘤菌拌种,以氮素及根瘤菌为试验因素设置处理,随机区组设计,研究了氮和根瘤菌交互作用对大豆根瘤生长及大豆产量和品质的影响。结果表明,接入的根瘤菌能有效的增加大豆植株的结瘤数量,而施入大量的氮肥则产生抑制作用。根瘤菌的接入对大豆R3期生物量的积累产生一定的促进作用。在接入根瘤菌的条件下,施入氮肥单个根瘤体积增大;不施入氮肥,单个根瘤体积变小。产量构成因子综合作用的结果使得接种根瘤菌与施入氮肥相比,更能提高大豆的产量。%The interactive effects of rhizobium inoculation and nitrogen application on nodule development, yield and quality of soybean were studied with randomized complete block design. Results showed that the number of root nodules was increased significantly by rhizobium inoculation, but was inhibited under high lev⁃el of nitrogen. Significant improvement of plant biomass accumulation by inoculation rhizobium was found at R3 stage. Under inoculation conditions, the single root volume was increased with nitrogen treatment, but reduced without nitrogen. The interactive effects of yield components showed that the improvement of soybean yield was more significant with rhizobium inoculation than nitrogen treatment.

  18. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  19. Effects of tillage method and soil conditioner interaction on peanut yield and quality%耕作方式与土壤调理剂互作对花生产量和品质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司贤宗; 毛家伟; 张翔; 李亮; 李国平; 余辉

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tillage method and soil conditioner interaction on peanut yield and quality were studied by field experi-ment with split-plot randomized block design. The results indicated that the ridge planting method increased the peanut yields by 5. 7% ~12. 0%, compared with flat planting method. Obviously, soil conditioner application increased the peanut yield by 7. 4% ~18. 6% in flat planting method, and 5. 6% ~25. 6% in ridge planting method treatment, compared with control, respectively. According to the effect of improving the peanut yield, soil conditioner treatments was ranked as straw ash>biologi-cal carbon>humic acid. The study showed that the interaction of ridge tillage and soil conditioner application not only increased the peanut full pod number, 100-pod weight, kernel rate, plant height, lateral branch length, branch number, valid branch number, but also increased the peanut kernel nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium contents, protein and crude fat yield as com-pared to control. In particular, the interaction of ridge planting method with straw ash treatment had relatively high peanut pod, peanut kernel protein and crude fat yield in this study.%采用大田裂区随机区组设计试验,研究了耕作方式(垄作、平作)与土壤调理剂互作对花生产量及品质的影响。结果表明,垄作方式比平作方式花生增产5.7%~12.0%;无论是平作或垄作方式下,与对照相比,施用不同土壤调理剂均能使花生增产,增产幅度分别为7.4%~18.6%、5.6%~25.6%,不同土壤调理剂对花生增产的大小顺序为秸秆灰分>生物炭>腐植酸。垄作和土壤调理剂互作能显著增加花生的饱果数、百果重、出仁率、花生株高、侧枝长、分枝数和结果枝数,提高花生籽粒中的氮、磷和钾含量,增加花生蛋白质和粗脂肪的产量。本试验条件下,采用起垄与增施秸秆灰分互作的处理的花生产量、蛋白质产量和粗脂肪产量均最高。

  20. Effects of tillage method and soil conditioner interaction on peanut yield and quality%耕作方式与土壤调理剂互作对花生产量和品质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司贤宗; 毛家伟; 张翔; 李亮; 李国平; 余辉

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tillage method and soil conditioner interaction on peanut yield and quality were studied by field experi-ment with split-plot randomized block design. The results indicated that the ridge planting method increased the peanut yields by 5. 7% ~12. 0%, compared with flat planting method. Obviously, soil conditioner application increased the peanut yield by 7. 4% ~18. 6% in flat planting method, and 5. 6% ~25. 6% in ridge planting method treatment, compared with control, respectively. According to the effect of improving the peanut yield, soil conditioner treatments was ranked as straw ash>biologi-cal carbon>humic acid. The study showed that the interaction of ridge tillage and soil conditioner application not only increased the peanut full pod number, 100-pod weight, kernel rate, plant height, lateral branch length, branch number, valid branch number, but also increased the peanut kernel nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium contents, protein and crude fat yield as com-pared to control. In particular, the interaction of ridge planting method with straw ash treatment had relatively high peanut pod, peanut kernel protein and crude fat yield in this study.%采用大田裂区随机区组设计试验,研究了耕作方式(垄作、平作)与土壤调理剂互作对花生产量及品质的影响。结果表明,垄作方式比平作方式花生增产5.7%~12.0%;无论是平作或垄作方式下,与对照相比,施用不同土壤调理剂均能使花生增产,增产幅度分别为7.4%~18.6%、5.6%~25.6%,不同土壤调理剂对花生增产的大小顺序为秸秆灰分>生物炭>腐植酸。垄作和土壤调理剂互作能显著增加花生的饱果数、百果重、出仁率、花生株高、侧枝长、分枝数和结果枝数,提高花生籽粒中的氮、磷和钾含量,增加花生蛋白质和粗脂肪的产量。本试验条件下,采用起垄与增施秸秆灰分互作的处理的花生产量、蛋白质产量和粗脂肪产量均最高。

  1. GGE叠图法—分析品种×环境互作模式的理想方法%GGE Biplot-An Ideal Tool for Studying Genotype by Environment Interaction of Regional Yield Trial Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严威凯; 胡跃高; 等

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces a GGE biplot as a graphic method foranalyzing the yield data of crop regional trials. First, the average yield at each environment is subtracted from the original yield data so that the derived data contains only genotype main effect G and genotype by environment interaction GE, which are collectively called GGE. The GGE data is then subjected to singular value decomposition and is approximated by the first two principal components. Plotting the first principal component against the second for all genotypes and environments results in a GGE biplot. In light of supplement lines, the following questions can be visually addressed: 1) what is the best cultivar for a given environment; 2) what is the most favorable environment for a given cultivar; 3) how do a pair of cultivars compare at different environments; 4) what is the general pattern of genotype by environment interaction; 5) which are the cultivars that are both high-yielding and stable; and 6) what are the environments that facilitates identification of such cultivars.%本文介绍一种分析作物区域试验结果的方法—GGE叠图法。首先,将原始产量数据减去各地点的平均产量,由此形成的数据集只含品种主效应G和品种-环境互作效应GE,合称为GGE。对GGE作单值分解,并以第一和第二主成分近似之。按照第一和第二主成分值将各品种和各地点放到一个平面图上即形成GGE叠图。借助于辅助线,可以直观回答以下问题:(1)什么是某一特定环境下最好的品种;(2)什么是某一特定品种最适合的环境;(3)任意两品种在各环境下的表现如何;(4)试验中品种×环境互作的总体模式是怎样的;(5)什么是高产、稳产品种;(6)什么是有利于筛选高产、稳产品种的环境。

  2. Interactive effects of molybdenum and phosphorus fertilizers on grain yield and quality of Brassica napus%钼磷配合施用对甘蓝型油菜产量和子粒品质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红恩; 胡承孝; 聂兆君; 孙学成; 谭启玲

    2012-01-01

    Two years' (2006-2007 and 2007-2008 ) pot experiments with yellow-brown soil were conducted to investigate the interactive effects of molybdenum(Mo) and phosphorus(P) fertilizers on grain yield and oil content, oil yield, protein content, eucic acid and sulfuric glucoside contents and fatty acid composition of oil of Brassica napus seed. Both Mo and P fertilizers were applied at three levels ( Mo 0, O. 15,0. 30 mg/kg and P:O5 0, 0. 20, 0. 40 g/kg) and nine treatments were formed. The results indicate that the grain yield and biomass, oil content, oil yield, oleic and linoleic acid contents of grains of Brassica napus seed are increased significantly under the application of Mo fertilizer, while the contents of stearic acid, sulfuric glucoside and stearic acid are decreased remarkably. The grain and oil yields, biomass and linoleic acid contents are significantly increased under the application of P, while the stearic acid, sulfuric glucoside and eicosenoic acid contents are markedly decreased. The Mo fertilizer and P fertilizer applications have remarkable synergistic effects on the improvement of grain yield, oil yield and oleic acid content, and the reduction of eucic acid content of rapeseeds. These results obtained in this study suggest that both Mo fertilizer and P fertilizer are conducive for the improvement of grain yield and quality of Brassica napus seeds, and co-application of Mo and P fertilizers has a better effect.%利用酸性黄棕壤进行连续2年的盆栽试验,研究了钼肥和磷肥配合施用对甘蓝型油菜产量和子粒含油量、油产量、蛋白质含量、硫甙和芥酸含量以及脂肪酸组分等品质指标的影响。钼肥和磷肥各设置3个水平,分别为Mo0、0.15、0.30 mg/kg土和P2O50、0.20、0.40 g/kg土,共9个处理。结果表明,施钼能够显著(P〈0.05)提高油菜子粒产量和生物学产量,显著增加油菜子粒含油量、油产量及油酸、亚油酸含量,降低子粒硫

  3. 小黑麦基因型与环境互作效应及产量稳定性分析%ANALYSIS ON GENOTYPE × ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS AND YIELD STABILITY OF TRITICALE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴守玺; 常磊; 杨蕊菊; 杨德龙; 程宏波

    2011-01-01

    Genotype × environment interactions ( G × E) and grain yield stability of 26 spring triticale eultivars (lines)were analyzed using GGE biplot (genotype main effects plus genotype × environment interaction) model under different water supply conditions and locations in the alpine farming-pastoral ecotone of Northwest China. Results showed that average grain yield of triticale under natural drought conditions was 1805.5 kg/hm2, increased by 64.5% compared with common wheat control cultivar , and the average yield under irrigation condition was 7196. 1 kg/hm2, increased by 67.2% compared with control. Extremely significant differences were observed among genotypes, environments and G × E. The effects of environments and the G × E on the yield were larger than that of the genotypes, which were up to 25.9 times and 2. 1 times compared to the effect of genotype, respectively. The yield stability, water sensitivity and ecological adaptability of different genotypes showed considerable great difference. The genotypes with strong drought resistance accounted for 7.7% of total tested genotypes of triticale, the genotypes with high yield, good stability and wide adaptability were 15.4% of total tested genotypes. However, some genotypes had specific adaptability to the limited environments, and seven genotypes adapted to drought condition and the nine genotypes adapted to sufficient irrigation condition were selected or suggested.%选用26个小黑麦品种(系),在西北高寒农牧交错区的不同试点和供水条件下,利用GGE双标图法研究了小黑麦基因型与环境互作效应以及稳产性.结果表明:在自然干旱条件下,小黑麦平均籽粒产量为1805.5 ks/hm2,较普通小麦对照增产54.6%;在灌水条件下,小黑麦平均产量为7196.1 kg/hm2,较对照增产67.2%.基因型间、环境间及G×E存在着极显著的差异,环境和G×E对产量的影响远大于基因型,分别为基因型效应的25.9倍和2.1倍.不同小黑麦

  4. Measurement of the yields of positively charged particles at an angle of 35 Degree-Sign in proton interactions with nuclear targets at an energy of 50 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammosov, V. V.; Antonov, N. N. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation); Baldin, A. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Viktorov, V. A.; Gapienko, V. A.; Gapienko, G. S.; Golovin, A. A.; Gres, V. N.; Ivanilov, A. A.; Koreshev, V. I.; Korotkov, V. A.; Mysnik, A. I.; Prudkoglyad, A. F.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Semak, A. A., E-mail: Artem.Semak@ihep.ru; Terekhov, V. I.; Uglekov, V. Ya.; Ukhanov, M. N.; Chujko, B. V. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation); Shimanskii, S. S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15

    Momentum spectra of cumulative particles in the region of high transverse momenta (P{sub T}) in pA {yields} h{sup +} + X reactions were obtained for the first time. The experiment in which this was done was performed at the SPIN setup (Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino) in a beam of 50-GeV protons interacting with C, Al, Cu, and W nuclei. Positively charged particles were detected at a laboratory angle of 35 Degree-Sign and in the transverse-momentum range between 0.6 and 3.7 GeV/c. A strong dependence of the particle-production cross section on the atomic number was observed. A comparison with the results of calculations based on the HIJING and UrQMD models was performed in the subcumulative region.

  5. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  6. A Generalized Yield Criterion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shijian YUAN; Dazhi XIAO; Zhubin HE

    2004-01-01

    A generalized yield criterion is proposed based on the metal plastic deformation mechanics and the fundamental formula in theory of plasticity. Using the generalized yield criterion, the reason is explained that Mises yield criterion and Tresca yield criterion do not completely match with experimental data. It has been shown that the yield criteria of ductile metals depend not only on the quadratic invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor J2, but also on the cubic invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor J3 and the ratio of the yield stress in pure shear to the yield stress in uniaxial tension k/σs. The reason that Mises yield criterion and Tresca yield criterion are not in good agreement with the experimental data is that the effect of J3 and k/σs is neglected.

  7. Analysis of the differential cross sections for the reaction pp{yields}ppK{sup +}K{sup -} in view of the K{sup +}K{sup -} interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silarski, M.

    2008-07-15

    Measurements of the pp{yields}ppK{sup +}K{sup -} reaction, performed with the experiment COSY-11 at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY, show a significant difference between the obtained excitation function and theoretical expectations including pp-FSI. The discrepancy may be assigned to the influence of K{sup +}K{sup -} or K{sup -}p interaction. This interaction should manifest itself in the distributions of the differential cross section. This thesis presents an analysis of event distributions as a function of the invariant masses of two particle subsystems. In particular in the analysis two generalizations of the Dalitz plot proposed by Goldhaber and Nyborg are used. The present Investigations are based on the experimental data determined by the COSY-11 collaboration from two measurements at excess energies of Q=10 MeV and 28 MeV. The experimental distributions are compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations generated with various parameters of the K{sup +}K{sup -} and K{sup -}p interaction. The values of the K{sup +}K{sup -} scattering length, extracted from two data sets for Q=10 MeV and 28 MeV amount to: a{sub K{sup +}}{sub K{sup -}}=(11{+-}8)+i(0{+-}6) fm for Q=10 MeV, and a{sub K{sup +}}{sub K{sup -}}=(0.2{+-}0.2)+i(0.0{+-}0.5) fm for Q=28 MeV. Due to the low statistics, the extracted values have large uncertainties and are consistent with very low values of the real and imaginary part of the scattering length. (orig.)

  8. Yield stress fluids slowly yield to analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonn, D.; Denn, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    We are surrounded in everyday life by yield stress fluids: materials that behave as solids under small stresses but flow like liquids beyond a critical stress. For example, paint must flow under the brush, but remain fixed in a vertical film despite the force of gravity. Food products (such as mayon

  9. Yield Improvement in Steel Casting (Yield II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard A. Hardin; Christoph Beckermann; Tim Hays

    2002-02-18

    This report presents work conducted on the following main projects tasks undertaken in the Yield Improvement in Steel Casting research program: Improvement of Conventional Feeding and Risering Methods, Use of Unconventional Yield Improvement Techniques, and Case Studies in Yield Improvement. Casting trials were conducted and then simulated using the precise casting conditions as recorded by the participating SFSA foundries. These results present a statistically meaningful set of experimental data on soundness versus feeding length. Comparisons between these casting trials and casting trials performed more than forty years ago by Pellini and the SFSA are quite good and appear reasonable. Comparisons between the current SFSA feeding rules and feeding rules based on the minimum Niyama criterion reveal that the Niyama-based rules are generally less conservative. The niyama-based rules also agree better with both the trials presented here, and the casting trails performed by Pellini an d the SFSA years ago. Furthermore, the use of the Niyama criterion to predict centerline shrinkage for horizontally fed plate sections has a theoretical basis according to the casting literature reviewed here. These results strongly support the use of improved feeding rules for horizontal plate sections based on the Niyama criterion, which can be tailored to the casting conditions for a given alloy and to a desired level of soundness. The reliability and repeatability of ASTM shrinkage x-ray ratings was investigated in a statistical study performed on 128 x-rays, each of which were rated seven different times. A manual ''Feeding and Risering Guidelines for Steel Castings' is given in this final report. Results of casting trials performed to test unconventional techniques for improving casting yield are presented. These use a stacked arrangement of castings and riser pressurization to increase the casting yield. Riser pressurization was demonstrated to feed a casting up to

  10. Genotype and environment interaction on soybean yield in Mato Grosso State, Brazil Interação de genótipos com ambientes e produtividade da soja no Estado do Mato Grosso, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Ferraz de Toledo

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to investigate the genotype-environment interaction in Mato Grosso State, MT. The relative importance of locations, years, sowing dates and cultivars and their interactions was analyzed from data collected in regional yield trials performed in a randomized complete block design with four replications, from 1994-1995 through 1999-2000, in nine locations and two sowing dates. Individual and pooled analyses of variance over years and locations were performed. Complementary analyses of variances partitioned MT State in two main and five smaller regions, respectively: North and South of Cuiabá; and MT-South-A (Pedra Preta area, MT-South-B (Rondonópolis and Itiquira, MT-East (Primavera do Leste and Campo Verde, MT-Central (Nova Mutum, Lucas do Rio Verde and Sorriso and MT-Parecis (Campo Novo dos Parecis and Sapezal. Locations are relatively more important than years for yield testing soybeans in the MT State, therefore, investment should be made in increasing locations rather than years to improve experimental precision. Partitioning the MT State into regions has little impact on soybean yield testing results and, consequently, on the efficiency of the soybean breeding program in the State. Breeding genotypes with broad adaptation for the MT State is an efficient strategy for cultivar development.O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar a interação de genótipos com ambientes no Estado do Mato Grosso, MT. Locais, anos, épocas de semeadura, cultivares e respectivas interações foram analisados em relação a dados de produtividade de grãos de ensaios regionais realizados em delineamento de blocos completos casualizados, conduzidos de 1994-1995 a 1999-2000, em nove locais e duas épocas de semeadura. Análises de variâncias individuais e conjuntas de anos e locais foram efetuadas. Análises complementares foram realizadas, dividindo o Estado em duas regiões principais e cinco regiões menores, respectivamente

  11. YIELD OF AMARANTH

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    department of Agricultural Engineering, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. (Received 28 ... properties, growth and shoot yield of large-green leafy amaranth (Amaranth sp.). Soil moisture ... microorganisms which stimulate the physical processes ... to plants and, consequently, crop establishment ... sustainable soil structure.

  12. 6 Grain Yield

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    evaluate new interspecific genotypes for intensified double cropping of irrigated rice. The experimental ... the performance of the new irrigated .... nursing at a spacing of 20 cm between plants ..... if new technologies, comprising high yielding.

  13. Ecosystem Viable Yields

    CERN Document Server

    De Lara, Michel; Oliveros-Ramos, Ricardo; Tam, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg, 2002) encouraged the application of the ecosystem approach by 2010. However, at the same Summit, the signatory States undertook to restore and exploit their stocks at maximum sustainable yield (MSY), a concept and practice without ecosystemic dimension, since MSY is computed species by species, on the basis of a monospecific model. Acknowledging this gap, we propose a definition of "ecosystem viable yields" (EVY) as yields compatible i) with biological viability levels for all time and ii) with an ecosystem dynamics. To the difference of MSY, this notion is not based on equilibrium, but on viability theory, which offers advantages for robustness. For a generic class of multispecies models with harvesting, we provide explicit expressions for the EVY. We apply our approach to the anchovy--hake couple in the Peruvian upwelling ecosystem between the years 1971 and 1981.

  14. Crop yields in intercropping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract

    Intercropping, the cultivation of two or more crop species simultaneously in the same field, has been widely practiced by smallholder farmers in developing countries and is gaining increasing interest in developed countries. Intercropping can increase the yield per

  15. Crop yields in intercropping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract

    Intercropping, the cultivation of two or more crop species simultaneously in the same field, has been widely practiced by smallholder farmers in developing countries and is gaining increasing interest in developed countries. Intercropping can increase the yield per

  16. Estimating Corporate Yield Curves

    OpenAIRE

    Antionio Diaz; Frank Skinner

    2001-01-01

    This paper represents the first study of retail deposit spreads of UK financial institutions using stochastic interest rate modelling and the market comparable approach. By replicating quoted fixed deposit rates using the Black Derman and Toy (1990) stochastic interest rate model, we find that the spread between fixed and variable rates of interest can be modeled (and priced) using an interest rate swap analogy. We also find that we can estimate an individual bank deposit yield curve as a spr...

  17. Effects of planting density and nitrogen fertilizer interaction on yield and nitrogen use efficiency of cotton%种植密度氮肥互作对棉花产量及氮素利用效率的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鹏程; 董合林; 刘爱忠; 刘敬然; 孙淼; 王国平; 刘绍东; 赵新华; 李亚兵

    2015-01-01

    种植密度和氮肥投入是棉花生产中重要的管理措施,为提高棉花产量与氮素利用效率,于2013-2014年以转Bt+CpTI品种中棉所79为材料,在河南省安阳市中棉所试验农场设置了3个种植密度(分别为3.00,5.25,7.50株/m2),4个氮肥用量(分别为0,112.5、225.0、337.5 kg/hm2,以N计),探讨种植密度与氮肥对棉花产量及氮素利用效率的影响,结果表明:棉花的叶面积指数、生物量与氮吸收量随种植密度和氮肥用量的增加而增加,而收获指数随种植密度和氮肥用量的增加而下降,中密中氮处理(种植密度5.25株/m2、施氮量225.0 kg/hm2)单位面积成铃数较多,籽棉和皮棉产量、氮肥回收利用率优于其他处理,高密低氮处理(种植密度7.50株/m2、施氮量112.5 kg/hm2)氮肥农学利用效率、氮肥偏生产力、氮生理利用率高于其他处理,而籽棉、皮棉产量与中密中氮处理较接近,研究表明增密减氮可实现棉花的高产高效。%Planting density and nitrogen (N) fertilizer investment are 2 important practices for cotton production, and suitable planting density and N fertilizer application rate can improve both cotton yield and N use efficiency (NUE). Using transgenic Bt+CpTI cotton cultivar CCRI 79, a field experiment with split block design was conducted in the farm of Institute of Cotton Research of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences in Anyang City, Henan Province from 2013 to 2014, in order to understand the interaction of planting density and N level on seed yield and NUE of cotton. And there were 3 treatments with different planting density in main plot which were 3.00, 5.25, 7.50 plant/m2 respectively, and 4 dosages of N fertilizer were set as split block treatments which were 0, 112.5, 225.0, 337.5 kg/hm2 respectively. The results showed that LAI (leaf area index) of cotton at budding stage, flowering stage and boll-setting stage under the

  18. Poor farmers - poor yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, A.C.; Baijukya, F.; Kantengwa, S.; Reckling, M.; Vanlauwe, B.; Giller, K.E.

    2016-01-01

    Climbing bean is the key staple legume crop in the highlands of East and Central Africa. We assessed the impact of interactions between soil fertility characteristics, crop management and socio-economic factors, such as household resource endowment and gender of the farmer, on climbing bean

  19. Poor farmers - poor yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, A.C.; Baijukya, F.; Kantengwa, S.; Reckling, M.; Vanlauwe, B.; Giller, K.E.

    2016-01-01

    Climbing bean is the key staple legume crop in the highlands of East and Central Africa. We assessed the impact of interactions between soil fertility characteristics, crop management and socio-economic factors, such as household resource endowment and gender of the farmer, on climbing bean producti

  20. Correlation Analysis of some Growth, Yield, Yield Components and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Correlation, Wheat; growth, yield, yield components, grain quality. INTRODUCTION. Wheat ... macaroni, biscuits, cookies, cakes, pasta, noodles and couscous; beer, many .... and 6 WAS which ensured weed free plots. Fertilizer was ...

  1. Yield enhancement with DFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Seung Weon; Kang, Jae Hyun; Ha, Naya; Kim, Byung-Moo; Jang, Dae-Hyun; Jeon, Junsu; Kim, DaeWook; Chung, Kun Young; Yu, Sung-eun; Park, Joo Hyun; Bae, SangMin; Song, DongSup; Noh, WooYoung; Kim, YoungDuck; Song, HyunSeok; Choi, HungBok; Kim, Kee Sup; Choi, Kyu-Myung; Choi, Woonhyuk; Jeon, JoongWon; Lee, JinWoo; Kim, Ki-Su; Park, SeongHo; Chung, No-Young; Lee, KangDuck; Hong, YoungKi; Kim, BongSeok

    2012-03-01

    A set of design for manufacturing (DFM) techniques have been developed and applied to 45nm, 32nm and 28nm logic process technologies. A noble technology combined a number of potential confliction of DFM techniques into a comprehensive solution. These techniques work in three phases for design optimization and one phase for silicon diagnostics. In the DFM prevention phase, foundation IP such as standard cells, IO, and memory and P&R tech file are optimized. In the DFM solution phase, which happens during ECO step, auto fixing of process weak patterns and advanced RC extraction are performed. In the DFM polishing phase, post-layout tuning is done to improve manufacturability. DFM analysis enables prioritization of random and systematic failures. The DFM technique presented in this paper has been silicon-proven with three successful tape-outs in Samsung 32nm processes; about 5% improvement in yield was achieved without any notable side effects. Visual inspection of silicon also confirmed the positive effect of the DFM techniques.

  2. Interactive Effect of GA3, N and P Ameliorate Growth, Seed and Fibre Yield by Enhancing Photosynthetic Capacity and Carbonic Anhydrase Activity of Linseed:A Dual Purpose Crop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad N Khan; Firoz Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an important dual-purpose, industrial crop. Its seeds are used for the extraction of oil and stem for fibres. However, the production of linseed is not going parallel with the increasing demand of its products. The present work was carried out with an aim to find out whether exogenous application of gibberellic acid (GA3) with or without graded levels of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) could improve the performance of three linseed genotypes Parvati, Shekhar and Shubhra together with minimizing the costly fertilizer input and losses. Four combinations of N and P, viz., 0 mg N+0 mg P kg-1 soil (N0P0), N13.4P4.46, N26.8P8.94 and N40.2P13.4 were constituted. Half dose of each combination was applied basally at the time of sowing and remaining half dose was given at 40 d after sowing (DAS) as foliar spray along with 10-6 mol L-1 GA3. Prior to sowing, the seeds of each linseed genotype were grouped in to two, one group of seeds was soaked in 0 mol L-1 GA3 (control) and the other group was soaked in 10-6 M GA3 solution, each for 8 hours. Treatments were comprised of (i) 0 mol L-1 GA3+N0P0 (T0, control), (ii) 10-6 mol L-1 GA3+N13.4P4.46 (T1), (iii) 10-6 mol L-1 GA3+N26.8P8.94 (T2) and (iv) 10-6 mol L-1 GA3+N40.2P13.4 (T3). The crop performance was assessed in terms of growth, physiological and biochemical parameters at 60 and 75 DAS and yield attributes at harvest (175 DAS). The results showed a parallel increase in most of the parameters with increasing levels of N and P. However, application of 10-6 mol L-1 GA3 in association with N26.8P8.94 proved best, it enhanced seed yield, oil yield and fibre yield by 83.3, 97.3 and 78.7%, respectively accompanied with increase in net photosynthetic rate, carbonic anhydrase activity and dry matter accumulation. Among the genotypes tested, Shubhra performed best, while Parvati the least for most of the parameters studied. Thus, combined application of 10-6 mol L-1 GA3 plus N26.8P8.94 proved best

  3. Maximizing ROI with yield management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neil Snyder

    2001-01-01

    .... the technology is based on the concept of yield management, which aims to sell the right product to the right customer at the right price and the right time therefore maximizing revenue, or yield...

  4. Shortcomings in wheat yield predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Mikhail A.; Mitchell, Rowan A. C.; Whitmore, Andrew P.; Hawkesford, Malcolm J.; Parry, Martin A. J.; Shewry, Peter R.

    2012-06-01

    Predictions of a 40-140% increase in wheat yield by 2050, reported in the UK Climate Change Risk Assessment, are based on a simplistic approach that ignores key factors affecting yields and hence are seriously misleading.

  5. Central Bank Communication and the Yield Curve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leombroni, Matteo; Vedolin, Andrea; Venter, Gyuri

    We extract novel measures of ECB target rate announcement and communications shocks using high frequency data on money market rates and study their impact on yields of Eurozone countries. We find that (i) target rate shocks have little effect on changes in bond yields of Eurozone countries, while...... communication shocks have a significant impact, with intermediate maturities being affected the most; (ii) positive (negative) communication shocks significantly lower (raise) the yield spread between the peripheral and core countries; (iii) this cross-sectional difference arises after the 2008 financial crises......; (iv) higher credit risk amplifies the effect of communication shocks, and more so for core countries. We rationalize these findings in a parsimonious international term structure model in which interest rates are determined by the interaction between risk-averse arbitrageurs and reaching...

  6. Tart Cherry Yield and Economic Response to Alternative Planting Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Me-Nsope, Nathalie Mongue

    2009-01-01

    The study investigates the economic response of tart cherry yields to planting density using an unbalanced longitudinal yield data from tart cherry orchards in Northwest Michigan. The relationship between tart cherry yield and tree age is specified as a linear spline function and planting density interacts with tree age. A random effect method, treating block as random, is used to estimate the spline function. Stochastic simulation was used to estimate the mean and variance of the product of ...

  7. Influence of Inter and Intra-rows Spacing on Yield and Yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abyssinia

    many factors including genetic, agronomic and environmental factors (Ara et al., .... The interaction effect of cultivar, inter and intra-row spacing for canopy width was ... reported the highest total fruit yield of potato cultivars was obtained at closer spacing .... To Evaluate Physiological Traits In Genotypes of Horticulture Crops.

  8. Effect of Nitrogen and Boron in Seed Yield and Yield Attributing Characters of Broccoli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khanal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant nutrient is one of the limiting factors affecting crop production. Nitrogen and boron are major nutrients in case of broccoli. So, an experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of nitrogen and boron in seed yield and yield attributing characters of broccoli in Rampur, Chitwan during winter season. The experiment was laid out in factorial RCBD design with four levels of nitrogen and two levels of boron. Each plot consists of 25 plants which were separated by 60 * 60 cm spacing. There are altogether eight treatments replicates thrice. Local variety Calabrese was used. Significant effect of different dose of nitrogen and boron on yield attributing characters was found. Also interactive effect of nitrogen and boron in number of pods, pod length, seed yield and number of seeds per pod was found significantly different.

  9. Interação genótipo x ambiente no desempenho produtivo da soja no Paraná Genotype x environment interaction on soybean yielding performance in Paraná State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Guilherme Portela de Carvalho

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste trabalho foram conhecer o grau de representatividade dos locais no Estado do Paraná, onde são conduzidos os ensaios de avaliação final de produtividade de linhagens de soja no período 1990/2000 e realizar estudo de adaptabilidade e estabilidade das linhagens no ano agrícola 1999/2000. As linhagens testadas pertencem aos grupos de maturação precoce, semiprecoce e médio. Verificaram-se padrões de similaridade de resposta das linhagens dos três grupos de maturação, em alguns locais, em todos ou na maioria dos anos testados. Esses padrões dependeram do grupo de maturação. Contudo, as avaliações em Londrina/Cambé, Campo Mourão, Guarapuava/Mariópolis e Sertaneja foram sempre indicadas. O local Ponta Grossa - 1 foi útil na discriminação de linhagens do grupo precoce, e Ponta Grossa - 2, dos grupos semiprecoce e médio. O estudo de adaptabilidade e estabilidade revelou que as linhagens precoces BR95-7613, BRS 137, OC95-3006 e CD96-518 tiveram bom desempenho produtivo, adaptabilidade geral e previsibilidade. A linhagem semiprecoce BR96-25619 mostrou a maior produtividade, tanto em ambientes favoráveis como nos desfavoráveis, e pode ser indicada como tendo adaptabilidade geral. Outras linhagens semiprecoces de bom desempenho, como BR96-18710 e BRS 154, são indicadas para ambientes favoráveis e geral (ambientes favoráveis e desfavoráveis, respectivamente. As linhagens OC95-3194, BR96-12086 e BR96-16185, do grupo de maturação médio, destacam-se nos ambientes favoráveis e desfavoráveis.The objectives of this work were to study the representability of selected locations in the Paraná State, Brazil, used to carry out the final yield trials on soybean lines in the period 1990/2000 and to perform a stability and adaptability study on the soybean lines evaluated in 1999/2000. In the trials, the breeding lines are classified as early maturity group, semi-early maturity group and medium maturity group. Similar

  10. Genetic relationship between yield and yield components of maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastasić Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the objectives of this paper was to determine relationship between grain yield and yield components, in S1 and HS progenies of one early synthetic maize population. Grain yield was in high significant, medium strong and strong association with all studied yield components, in both populations. The strongest correlation was recorded between grain yield and 1000-kernel weight (S1 progenies rg = 0.684; HS progenies rg = 0.633. Between other studied traits, the highest values of genotypic coefficient of correlations were found between 1000-kernel weight and kernel depth in S1 population, and 1000-kernel weight and ear length in HS population. Also, objective of this research was founding the direct and indirect effects of yield components on grain yield. Desirable, high significant influence on grain yield, in path coefficient analysis, was found for 1000-kernel weight and kernel row number, and in S1 and HS progenies, and for ear length in population of S1 progenies. Kernel depth has undesirable direct effect on grain yield, in both populations.

  11. Effect of density and planting pattern on yield and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    alireza yadavi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate competition ability of Grain maize (Zea mays L. against redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L. a field experiment was conducted at Esfahan on 2003. In this research the effect of corn spatial arrangement on yield and yield components of corn (647 Three Way Cross hybrids under different levels of redroot pigweed infestation was investigated. Treatments were arranged in a factorial split experiment based on RCBD with three replications. Factorial arrangement of corn densities (74000 and 111000 plant ha-1 and planting patterns (single row, rectangular twin row and zigzag twin row formed the main plots. Split-plots referred to pigweed densities (0, 4, 8 and 12 plant m-1. Results showed that both grain and biological yield of corn increased as corn density rates increased but rows number per cob, number of grains per row of cob and 1000 grains weight decreased. The effects of planting arrangement on yield and yield components despite rows grain in cob, 1000 seeds weight and harvest index were statistically significant. Corn grain yield and yield components decreased significantly by increasing pigweed density. The effect of redroot pigweed density on corn grain and biological yield loss was predicted using Cousence hyperbolic yield equation. It showed that maximum grain yield loss and biological yield loss happened in single row arrangement and low corn density. Rows number per cob and grain numbers per row in higher corn density treatment showed lower reduction slopes under pigweed competition. In addition, grain rows numbers per cob and corn harvest index in twin arrangement treatments decreased lower than single row treatment under pigweed competition. The results of this research indicated that corn competition ability against redroot pigweed could be increased using dense population (1/5 fold of general density and zigzag twin row arrangement.

  12. Systematics in delayed neutron yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohsawa, Takaaki [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.

    1998-03-01

    An attempt was made to reproduce the systematic trend observed in the delayed neutron yields for actinides on the basis of the five-Gaussian representation of the fission yield together with available data sets for delayed neutron emission probability. It was found that systematic decrease in DNY for heavier actinides is mainly due to decrease of fission yields of precursors in the lighter side of the light fragment region. (author)

  13. Combining abilities of silage maize grain yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Tomislav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the following parameters of maize grain yield: variability of inbred lines and their diallel hybrids superior-parent heterosis and general and special combining abilities. According to obtained results of the two-year study, it can be concluded that variability of this trait is significantly affected by a genotype, year and their interaction. As expected, hybrids had higher average grain yields than inbreds due to the depression of this trait that occurs in inbreds during inbreeding. The highest average value of heterosis for gain yield was detected in the hybrid ZPLB405 x ZPLB406 (123.0% and 178.1% in 1997 and 1998, respectively. The estimation of combining abilities was done on the basis of diallel hybrids after the method established by Griffing, 1956 (method II, mathematical model I. The analysis of variance of combining ability for grain yield indicated highly significant values of GCA and SCA for the observed trait in both study years. Grain yield inheritance was more affected by non-additive genes (dominance and epistasis as indicated by the GCA to SCA ratio that was smaller than unity. The inbreds ZPLB401 and ZPLB406 had high GCA effects, while the hybrid combinations ZPLB40Î x ZPLB402, ZPLB401 x ZPLB403, ZPLB401 x ZPLB405, ZPLB402 x ZPLB406, ZPLB403 x ZPLB406, ZPLB404 x ZPLB406, ZPLB405 x ZPLB406 had high SCA effects in both study years. These hybrid combinations include one parent with high GCA effects and other with low GCA effects. Furthermore, there are combinations ZPLB402 x ZPLB405, ZPLB403 x ZPLB405 and ZPLB404 x ZPLB405 with significant SCA effects that include parents with low GCA effects. This is probably the result of the additive type (additive x additive of interaction between parents.

  14. Interdependence of yield and yield components of confectionary sunflower hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hladni Nada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The two most important criteria for introducing new confectionary hybrids into production are high seed and protein yield. That is why it is important to find the traits that are measurable, and that at the same time show a strong correlation with seed and protein yield, so that they can be used as a criteria for confectionary hybrid breeding. Results achieved during 2008 at the locations Rimski Šančevi (Region of Vojvodina and Kula (Central Serbia show that the new confectionary hybrids are expressing higher seed yields in comparison to standards (Vranac and Cepko though with a lower seed oil content. A very strong positive correlation was determined between seed yield and seed protein content, kernel content and mass of 1000 seeds. A very strong positive correlation was determined between seed protein content, seed yield and mass of 1000 seeds, with protein yield. This indicates that seed yield, seed protein content and mass of 1000 seeds have a high influence on protein yield. The degree of interdependence between different traits is a sign of direction which is supposed to facilitate better planning of sunflower breeding program.

  15. Effects of Planting Dates on Yield and Yield Components of Four Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L. Landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Soheyli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to investigate the effect of fall and winter planting dates on phenological and morphological traits, yield and yield components of four cumin (Cuminum cyminum L. landraces, an experiment was conducted at the Research Farm of Agricultural College of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad as a split plot based on randomized complete block design with three replications in 2005-06 growing season. Four planting dates (11th Nov., 11th Dec., 20th Feb. and 17th Mar. were allocated to main plots and four landraces (Ghayen, Torbat-e-heidariyeh, Sabzevar and Khaf were assigned to sub plots. The results indicated that the effects of planting date, landrace and interaction effect of these two factors on plant height, percent of plant survival after winter, yield components, seed yield, biological yield and harvest index were significant. With respect to plant height, there was no difference between fall (11th Nov. and 11th Dec. and winter (20th Feb. planting dates, while plant height in the fourth planting date (17th Mar. decreased severely. The lowest percent of plant survival was observed in the fall sowing dates, while the third and fourth plantings had no plant mortality, for not exposing to cold conditions. The maximum percent of plant survival belonged to Ghayen and Khaf landraces with 85% and 84% respectively, and Torbat-e-heidariyeh had the lowest percent of plant survival with 59%. The greatest number of umbels per plant, number of seeds per umbel, 1000 seeds weight and seeds weight per plant were achieved in the first planting date. Despite priority of the first planting date in yield components over other planting dates, the greatest seed yield and biological yield observed in the third planting date (20th Feb.. With regard to seed yield and biological yield, Ghayen in the third planting and Torbat-e-heidariyeh in the first planting had the greatest and the lowest yields, respectively. Since the fall and winter planting dates led to

  16. Specific yield: compilation of specific yields for various materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A.I.

    1967-01-01

    Specific yield is defined as the ratio of (1) the volume of water that a saturated rock or soil will yield by gravity to (2) the total volume of the rock or soft. Specific yield is usually expressed as a percentage. The value is not definitive, because the quantity of water that will drain by gravity depends on variables such as duration of drainage, temperature, mineral composition of the water, and various physical characteristics of the rock or soil under consideration. Values of specific yields nevertheless offer a convenient means by which hydrologists can estimate the water-yielding capacities of earth materials and, as such, are very useful in hydrologic studies. The present report consists mostly of direct or modified quotations from many selected reports that present and evaluate methods for determining specific yield, limitations of those methods, and results of the determinations made on a wide variety of rock and soil materials. Although no particular values are recommended in this report, a table summarizes values of specific yield, and their averages, determined for 10 rock textures. The following is an abstract of the table. [Table

  17. Incorporating phenology into yield models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, J. M.; Friedl, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Because the yields of many crops are sensitive to meteorological forcing during specific growth stages, phenological information has potential utility in yield mapping and forecasting exercises. However, most attempts to explain the spatiotemporal variability in crop yields with weather data have relied on growth stage definitions that do not change from year-to-year, even though planting, maturity, and harvesting dates show significant interannual variability. We tested the hypothesis that quantifying temperature exposures over dynamically determined growth stages would better explain observed spatiotemporal variability in crop yields than statically defined time periods. Specifically, we used National Agricultural and Statistics Service (NASS) crop progress data to identify the timing of the start of the maize reproductive growth stage ("silking"), and examined the correlation between county-scale yield anomalies and temperature exposures during either the annual or long-term average silking period. Consistent with our hypothesis and physical understanding, yield anomalies were more correlated with temperature exposures during the actual, rather than the long-term average, silking period. Nevertheless, temperature exposures alone explained a relatively low proportion of the yield variability, indicating that other factors and/or time periods are also important. We next investigated the potential of using remotely sensed land surface phenology instead of NASS progress data to retrieve crop growth stages, but encountered challenges related to crop type mapping and subpixel crop heterogeneity. Here, we discuss the potential of overcoming these challenges and the general utility of remotely sensed land surface phenology in crop yield mapping.

  18. Coiling of yield stress fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Rahmani; M. Habibi; A. Javadi; D. Bonn

    2011-01-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the coiling of a filament of a yield stress fluid falling on a solid surface. We use two kinds of yield stress fluids, shaving foam and hair gel, and show that the coiling of the foam is similar to the coiling of an elastic rope. Two regimes of coiling (el

  19. Yield gaps in oil palm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woittiez, Lotte S.; Wijk, van Mark T.; Slingerland, Maja; Noordwijk, van Meine; Giller, Ken E.

    2017-01-01

    Oil palm, currently the world's main vegetable oil crop, is characterised by a large productivity and a long life span (≥25 years). Peak oil yields of 12 t ha−1 yr−1 have been achieved in small plantations, and maximum theoretical yields as calculated with simulation models are 18.5 t oil ha−1 yr−1,

  20. Interaction Effects between Nitrogen Application and Soybean Rhizobium on Yield and Quality of Soybean in the Maize/Soybean Intercropping Pattern%玉米/大豆间作条件下根瘤菌与氮肥互作对大豆产量和品质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢运河; 李小红; 王同华; 王利群; 杨汉民; 王业建

    2011-01-01

    通过大豆与玉米间作,研究根瘤菌与氮肥互作对大豆产量和品质的影响.研究结果表明,合理运筹氮肥和大豆种子拌根瘤菌均可提高间作大豆产量、品质和效益;大豆种子拌根瘤菌还可增强玉米/大豆间作系统的互补促进效应,减少施氮量,增加复合系统总效益;大豆高产、优质、高效等不同指标对应的最大需氮量不同,在确定大豆最佳施氮量时应考虑施氮量与根瘤菌互作效应的影响.%Interaction effects between nitrogen application rate and soybean rhizobium on yield and quality of soybean under maize/soybean intercropping pattern were studied. The results showed that the yield, quality and benefits of intercropping soybean could be enhanced by using soybean rhizobium and rational nitrogen fertilizer management. The compensatory positive effect of the maize/soybean intercropping pattern was enhanced by using soybean rhizobium. The nitrogen application rate was decreased and the nitrogen use efficiency was increased. The maximum nitrogen requirements among the target of high yield, high quality and high benefit were different. It also needed to be considered of the interaction effects between soybean rhizobium and nitrogen application rate when the maximum nitrogen application rate of soybean was determined.

  1. Breeding for Grass Seed Yield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelt, Birte; Studer, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Seed yield is a trait of major interest for many fodder and amenity grass species and has received increasing attention since seed multiplication is economically relevant for novel grass cultivars to compete in the commercial market. Although seed yield is a complex trait and affected...... by agricultural practices as well as environmental factors, traits related to seed production reveal considerable genetic variation, prerequisite for improvement by direct or indirect selection. This chapter first reports on the biological and physiological basics of the grass reproduction system, then highlights...... important aspects and components affecting the seed yield potential and the agronomic and environmental aspects affecting the utilization and realization of the seed yield potential. Finally, it discusses the potential of plant breeding to sustainably improve total seed yield in fodder and amenity grasses....

  2. YIELD AND YIELD COMPONENTS OF INVESTIGATED RAPESEED HYBRIDS AND CULTIVARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Pospišil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate new winter rapeseed hybrids and cultivars, investigations were conducted at the experimental field of the Faculty of Agriculture, University of Zagreb, in the period 2009/10 - 2011/12. The trial involved 11 hybrids and 5 cultivars rapeseed of 5 seed producers selling seed in Croatia. The studied rapeseed hybrids and cultivars differed significantly in seed and oil yields, oil content and yield components (seed number per silique and 1000 seed weight. However, a number of hybrids rendered identical results, since the differences in the investigated properties were within statistically allowable deviation. Hybrids Traviata and CWH 119 can be singled out based on the achieved seed and oil yields, and the cultivar Ricco and hybrids CWH 119 and PR46W15 for their high oil content in seed. Hybrids with a larger silique number per plant also achieved a higher seed yield.

  3. Groundwater subsidies and penalties to corn yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipper, S. C.; Booth, E.; Loheide, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    Proper water management is critical to closing yield gaps (observed yield below potential yield) as global populations continue to expand. However, the impacts of shallow groundwater on crop production and surface processes are poorly understood. The presence of groundwater within or just below the root zone has the potential to cause (via oxygen stress in poorly drained soils) or eliminate (via water supply in dry regions) yield gaps. The additional water use by a plant in the presence of shallow groundwater, compared to free drainage conditions, is called the groundwater subsidy; the depth at which the groundwater subsidy is greatest is the optimal depth to groundwater (DTGW). In wet years or under very shallow water table conditions, the groundwater subsidy is likely to be negative due to increased oxygen stress, and can be thought of as a groundwater penalty. Understanding the spatial dynamics of groundwater subsidies/penalties and how they interact with weather is critical to making sustainable agricultural and land-use decisions under a range of potential climates. Here, we examine patterns of groundwater subsidies and penalties in two commercial cornfields in the Yahara River Watershed, an urbanizing agricultural watershed in south-central Wisconsin. Water table levels are generally rising in the region due to a long-term trend of increasing precipitation over the last several decades. Biophysical indicators tracked throughout both the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons show a strong response to variable groundwater levels on a field scale. Sections of the field with optimal DTGW exhibit consistently higher stomatal conductance rates, taller canopies and higher leaf area index, higher ET rates, and higher pollination success rates. Patterns in these biophysical lines of evidence allow us to pinpoint specific periods within the growing season that plants were experiencing either oxygen or water stress. Most importantly, groundwater subsidies and penalties are

  4. Efeito da interação reprodutor x rebanho sobre as produções de leite e de gordura na raça Pardo-Suíça Effects of sire x herd interaction on milk and fat yields in Brown-Swiss herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Leme Franco Geraldini Sirol

    2005-10-01

    interaction on milk and fat yields and to verify the effect of this interaction on sire genetic evaluation, using the models that differed in the presence or not of the interaction term. The milk and fat yields were adjusted for two milkings, 305 days of lactation and age cow. Likelihood ratio test was used to verify the effectiveness of including a sire x herd interaction effect in the model. Averages for milk and fat yields were 6085.79 ± 1629.73 kg and 225.61 ± 60.44 kg, respectively. The proportion of the phenotypic variance due to sire x herd interaction was 0.4% for milk yield and 1% for fat yield. The heritability estimate was 0.38 to milk yield, using both models, and decreased from 0.40 to 0.39 for fat yield, when the model with interaction effect was considered. The likelihood function increased significantly with the inclusion of interaction in the model. The Spearman correlation was close to one for both traits, when all sires were considered. There was reduction of 1% in the estimate of accuracy of the breeding values for both traits, however the Pearson correlation estimated among the accuracy obtained for each model was close to one. No effects of sire x herd interaction on estimates of genetic and residual variance components, breeding values magnitude and sire order classification, for both traits, were observed.

  5. Interdependence of yield and yield components of confectionary sunflower hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Hladni Nada; Jocić Siniša; Miklič Vladimir; Saftić-Panković Dejana; Kraljević-Balalić Marija

    2011-01-01

    The two most important criteria for introducing new confectionary hybrids into production are high seed and protein yield. That is why it is important to find the traits that are measurable, and that at the same time show a strong correlation with seed and protein yield, so that they can be used as a criteria for confectionary hybrid breeding. Results achieved during 2008 at the locations Rimski Sancevi (Region of Vojvodina) and Kula (Central Serbia) show t...

  6. Willow yield is highly dependent on clone and site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugilt Larsen, Søren; Jørgensen, Uffe; Lærke, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    Use of high-yielding genotypes is one of the means to achieve high yield and profitability in willow (Salix spp.) short rotation coppice. This study investigated the performance of eight willow clones (Inger, Klara, Linnea, Resolution, Stina, Terra Nova, Tora, Tordis) on five Danish sites......, differing considerably in soil type, climatic conditions and management. Compared to the best clone, the yield was up to 36 % lower for other clones across sites and up to 51 % lower within sites. Tordis was superior to other clones with dry matter yields between 5.2 and 10.2 Mg ha−1 year−1 during the first...... 3-year harvest rotation, and it consistently ranked as the highest yielding clone on four of the five sites and not significantly lower than the highest yielding clone on the fifth site. The ranking of the other clones was more dependent on site with significant interaction between clone and site...

  7. Interação zinco e fósforo em solução nutritiva influenciando o crescimento e a produtividade da alface Zinc and phosphorus interaction in nutrient solution affecting lettuce growth and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marialva Alvarenga Moreira

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de Zn e P, em solução nutritiva, na absorção desses elementos pela alface (Lactuca sativa L. e na produtividade dessa hortaliça. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos casualizados, com os tratamentos dispostos num esquema fatorial 3 x 3, com três repetições. Os tratamentos foram constituídos de três níveis de Zn: baixo, normal e alto, correspondentes a 0,0, 1,5 e 6,0 miM L-1, e de três níveis de P: baixo, normal e alto, correspondentes a 0,01, 1,5 e 6,0 mM L-1, utilizando-se como fontes o ZnSO4.7H2O e o KH2PO4, respectivamente. Aos 26 dias após o transplante (DAT, a área foliar e a produção de matéria seca da parte aérea não foram influenciadas pelos tratamentos. Aos 52 DAT, a área foliar, o número de folhas e a matéria seca da parte aérea não foram influenciadas pela adição de Zn à solução quando o nível de P foi baixo. Porém, quando os níveis de P foram normal e alto, os níveis normal e alto de Zn propiciaram maiores valores de área foliar, de número de folhas, e de produção de matéria seca da parte aérea. Os teores de P nas folhas comerciais, em cada nível de Zn, foram semelhantes quando houve adição das doses normal e alta de P à solução. O maior teor de P foi o do caule, seguido do das raízes, e, por último, do das folhas comerciais. Os teores de Zn na matéria seca das folhas comerciais, nos caules e nas raízes, aumentaram com adição de Zn à solução, em todos os níveis de fósforo.The experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of Zn and P levels in nutrient solution on Zn and P absorption and lettuce yield (Lactuca sativa L.. A randomized block experimental design in 3 x 3 factorial arrangement with three replications was used. The treatments were three Zn levels: low, normal and high, corresponding to 0.0, 1.5 and 6.0 muM L-1 and three P levels: low, normal and high, corresponding to 0.01, 1.5 and 6.0 mM L-1 as Zn

  8. Grapevine canopy reflectance and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minden, K. A.; Philipson, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    Field spectroradiometric and airborne multispectral scanner data were applied in a study of Concord grapevines. Spectroradiometric measurements of 18 experimental vines were collected on three dates during one growing season. Spectral reflectance, determined at 30 intervals from 0.4 to 1.1 microns, was correlated with vine yield, pruning weight, clusters/vine, and nitrogen input. One date of airborne multispectral scanner data (11 channels) was collected over commercial vineyards, and the average radiance values for eight vineyard sections were correlated with the corresponding average yields. Although some correlations were significant, they were inadequate for developing a reliable yield prediction model.

  9. Comprehensive Study of Plasma-Wall Sheath Transport Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    temperature is always well below that expected for significant thermionic emission from LaB6, and the heat flux from the plasma is also low given the order...measurements from HET materials is their low electrical conductivity. In a typical electron emission study, a primary electron beam is focused onto to...Transition Controlled by Secondary Electron Emission at Low Gas Pressure,” 67th Annual Gaseous Electronics Conference, Raleigh, NC, November 2-7, 2014

  10. Multiaxial yield behaviour of polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterize the yield behavior of polypropylene as a function of pressure and to verify the applicability of the Drucker-Prager yield function, various tests were conducted to cover a wide range of stress states from uniaxial tension and compression to multiaxial tension and confined compression. Tests were performed below and above the glass transition temperature, to study the combined effect of pressure and temperature. The pressure sensitivity coefficient as an intrinsic material parameter was determined as a function of temperature. Increasing pressure sensitivity values were found with increasing temperature, which can be related to the change in the free volume and thus, to the enhanced molecular mobility. A best-fit Drucker-Prager yield function was applied to the experimental yield stresses and an average error between the predictions and the measurements of 7 % was obtained.

  11. Effect of biofertilizers on yield and yield components of cucumber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faranak Moshabaki Isfahani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofertilizer is defined as a substance which contains living organisms which, when applied to seed, plant surface, or soil, colonize the rhizosphere or interior of the plant and promote growth by increasing the supply or availability of primary nutrients to the host plant. Biofertilizers are well recognized as an important component of integrated plant nutrient management for sustainable agriculture and hold a great promise improve crop yield. The present study for the sake of evaluating the use of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria produced by Pseudomonas sp. and phosphate bio fertilizers produced by Pseudomonas putida strain P13 and Pantoea agglomerans strain P5 and chemical fertilizers in the separate treatments on yield and yield components of cucumber by using a factorial experiment in completely randomized block design with three repetition were performed in the field. The symbol of P represents chemical fertilizer by amount of respectively (0, 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%, B1 shows plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR and B2 indicates bio fertilizer-2. The results showed that P1B0 has the most yield, and control treatments has the least yield. P100B1 has the most length of plant and P100B0 has the least length of plant, P25B1 has the most amount of chlorophyll and P75B2 has the least chlorophyll. P75B2 has the most shoots dry weight and P100B0 has the least shoots dry weight. B1P50 has the most shoots fresh weight and P25B2 has the least shoots fresh weight. B1P50 has the most roots dry weight and P100B0 has the least roots dry weight. B1P50 has the most roots fresh weight and P25B2 has the least roots fresh weight. So the results indicate that use of biological fertilizers have caused increase yield and components yield of cucumber.

  12. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lantz M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f and Th(p,f have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  13. Effects of Interaction between Nitrogen Fertilizer and Planting Density on Leaf Type,Photosynthetic Characteristics and Yield of Mechanical-transplanting Super Hybrid Rice%氮肥和密度互作对机插超级杂交稻叶型、光合特性及产量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈乾; 刘科; 何爱斌; 龙继锐; 卢碧林; 田小海; 张运波

    2015-01-01

    The effects of different nitrogen fertilizer application amount and transplanting density on the leaf type,photosynthetic characteristic and yield of mechanical-transplanting super rice were studied with Quanliangyou 681 as material. The results showed that the interaction between the planting density and ni-trogen fertilizer significantly influenced the rate of effective leaf area,net photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance,and did not significantly influenced the intercellular CO2 concentration. The lower planting density and nitrogen fertilizer application amount were beneficial for the increase of effective leaf area rate,lower planting density and higher fertilizer application amount were beneficial for the increase of net photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance. The interaction between the planting density and nitrogen fertilizer significantly influenced the yield of super hybrid rice,the yield increased with the increase of the planting density and nitrogen fertilizer application amount,the treatment with high fertilizer application amount(250 kg / ha)and high density(2. 38 × 105 plants/ ha) obtained the highest yiled of 9. 26 t/ ha, which significantly higher than the other treatments. The interaction between the planting density and ni-trogen fertilizer mainly influenced the panicles number per plant and setting percentage,and panicles number per plant was crucial for high yield of mechanical-transplanting super hybrid rice,the proper in-crease of transplanting density was the approach to receive high yield under the suitable nitrogen fertilizer application amount in Jianghan Plain.%以超级杂交稻全两优681为材料,探讨不同氮肥用量和密度对江汉平原地区机插超级杂交稻叶型、光合特性及产量的影响。结果表明,氮肥和密度互作对高效叶面积率、净光合速率和气孔导度影响显著,对胞间 CO2浓度影响不显著。低氮、低密度有利于高效叶面积率的提高,高氮、低密度

  14. Genetic Effects and Heterosis of Yield and Yield Component Traits Based on Gossypium Barbadense Chromosome Segment Substitution Lines in Two Gossypium Hirsutum Backgrounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botao Li

    Full Text Available We hybridized 10 chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs each from two CSSL populations and produced 50 F1 hybrids according to North Carolina Design II. We analyzed the genetic effects and heterosis of yield and yield components in the F1 hybrids and parents in four environments via the additive-dominance genetic model. Yield and yield components of the CSSLs were controlled by combined additive and dominance effects, and lint percentage was mainly controlled by additive effects, but boll weight, boll number, seedcotton yield and lint yield were mainly controlled by dominance effects. We detected significant interaction effects between genetics and the environment for all yields traits. Similar interactions were detected between two CSSL populations (Pop CCRI 36 and Pop CCRI 45. Significant positive mid-parent heterosis was detected for all yield traits in both populations, and significant positive better-parent heterosis was also detected for all yield traits except lint percentage. The differences among parents were relatively small, but significant heterosis was detected for yield and yield components. Therefore, the relationship between heterosis and genetic distance for yield traits is complicated and requires further study. These CSSLs represent useful tools for improving yield and yield components in cotton.

  15. Efeito da interação reprodutor x rebanho sobre os valores genéticos de reprodutores para produção de leite e gordura na raça Pardo-Suíça Effect of sire x herd interaction on genetic values for milk and fat yields of Brown Swiss breed sires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Santos Bueno

    2005-08-01

    study the effects of sire x herd and sire x herd-year interactions on genetic values of Brown Swiss breed sires. The (covariance components were estimated by the restricted maximum likelihood method, by using three models with multitrait. In these models, the genetic group, season of calving and herd-year class were considered as fixed effects, while the animal effects, the permanent environment, the interaction of either sire x herd or sire x herd-year were considered as random ones, when the interaction was considered in the model, and the error as well. The likelihood ratio test was used to verify the effectiveness in including the interaction effects into models. The estimates of components of the genetic addictive and residual (covariances did not change when the models were adjusted for the interaction effects. Therefore, the heritability coefficients approximated to each others. The heritability estimate were of 0.40 for both characteristics, and the genetic correlation among the characteristics of 0.94, except when the model considered the effect of the interaction sire x herd. The heritability of fat yield was of 0.39, and the genetic correlation among the characteristics of 0.95. The proportion of the total variance explained by the sire x herd and the sire x herd -year interactions was low, but almost null for milk yield, and about 1% for fat yield. The natural logarithm of likelihood function increased, when the interaction effects were included in the models. Pearson and Spearman correlations among the genetic values obtained by these models were superior than 0.99 for both milk and fat yields, and above 0.897 among the studied characteristics.

  16. Yield statistics of interpolated superoscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzav, Eytan; Perlsman, Ehud; Schwartz, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    Yield optimized interpolated superoscillations have been recently introduced as a means for possibly making the use of the phenomenon of superoscillation practical. In this paper we study how good is a superoscillation that is not optimal. Namely, by how much is the yield decreased when the signal departs from the optimal one. We consider two situations. One is the case where the signal strictly obeys the interpolation requirement and the other is when that requirement is relaxed. In the latter case the yield can be increased at the expense of deterioration of signal quality. An important conclusion is that optimizing superoscillations may be challenging in terms of the precision needed, however, storing and using them is not at all that sensitive. This is of great importance in any physical system where noise and error are inevitable.

  17. Cacao yield in different planting densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Spaggiari Souza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of six planting densities on cacao yield of a commercial hybrid mixture as well as the interaction of planting densities with the years were investigated. Crop data collected over a 14-year period (1977-1990 showed that it was possible to optimise the regional cacao yields by implementing high planting densities (2500 and 1736 trees ha-1. This was however only true for the first half of the crop period. In the second half, low planting density (1059 trees ha-1 attained the best yields. This change in the ranking of planting densities over the years confirmed the presence of density-year interaction. Alternatives to achieve high productivity in high planting density systems were presented and discussed.O efeito de seis densidades de plantio sobre a produção de um híbrido comercial de cacau, bem como a interação das densidades com os anos, foi investigado. Dados coletados do cultivo por 14 anos (1977-1990 mostraram que é possível otimizar a produção de cacau da região implementando uma alta densidade populacional (2500 e 1736 plantas ha-1. Todavia, isto se verificou apenas para a primeira metade do período de cultivo. Na segunda metade, a baixa densidade (1059 plantas ha-1 foi superior em produção. Esta mudança na densidade com o passar dos anos foi confirmada pela presença da interação densidades por anos. Alternativas para alcançar elevadas produtividades nos sistemas com altas densidades foram apresentadas e discutidas.

  18. Climatological and genetic effects on milk composition and yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A K; Rodriguez, L A; Mekonnen, G; Wilcox, C J; Bachman, K C; Collier, R J

    1983-01-01

    Results confirm most other research on milk composition and yield. All responses were affected by climate, some considerably more than others, if percent of error variance is the criterion. Jersey yields were less sensitive to climate than were Holstein, but Jersey milk composition appeared more sensitive. Somatic cell count (REF), a measure of mastitis, was affected by climate but less than all other variables except protein/fat and LM%. Needed are estimates of interactions between climatic effects and response surface models to quantify possible improvement in performance following environmental modification. Genetic correlations between milk yield and REF and chloride % suggest that single trait selection for milk yield might increase incidence of mastitis although phenotypic correlations indicate that high yields and absence of mastitis are correlated.

  19. Compression Enhanced Shear Yield Stress of Electrorheological Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Min-Liang; TIAN Yu; JIANG Ji-Le; ZHU Xu-Li; MENG Yong-Gang; WEN Shi-Zhu

    2009-01-01

    @@ Shear tests of an electrorheological fluid with pre-applied electric field and compression along the field direction are carried out. The results show that pre-compressions can increase the shear yield stress up to ten times. Under the same external electric field strength, a higher compressive strain corresponds to a larger shear yield stress enhancement but with slight current density decrease, which shows that the particle interaction potentials are not increased by compressions but the compression-induced chain aggregation dominates the shear yield stress improvement. This pre-compression technique might be useful [or developing high performance flexible ER or magnetorheological couplings.

  20. Specific yield, High Plains aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents specific-yield ranges in the High Plains aquifer of the United States. The High Plains aquifer underlies 112.6 million acres (176,000...

  1. Assessing potential sustainable wood yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert F. Powers

    2001-01-01

    Society is making unprecedented demands on world forests to produce and sustain many values. Chief among them is wood supply, and concerns are rising globally about the ability of forests to meet increasing needs. Assessing this is not easy. It requires a basic understanding of the principles governing forest productivity: how wood yield varies with tree and stand...

  2. Effects of Nitrogen Rates and Application Method on Grain Yield and Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Babazadeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Proper application of N fertilizer and its optimization for increasing the economic yield of rice is definitely important. In order to determine the best N application method and amount according to growth stages of hybrid rice, an experiment was carried out at experimental farm of RRII in a factorial experiment based on a randomized complete block design with 3 replications. The treatments included 6 application methods as follow: total nitrogen at transplanting stage ,50% at transplanting stage +50% at early tillering , 50% at transplanting stage +50% at panicle initiation , 50% at transplanting stage +25% at maximum tillering +25% at booting ,34% at transplanting stage + 33% at early tillering + 33% at booting and 70% at transplanting + 30% at panicle initiation. 3 levels of nitrogen (90,120 and 150 kg/ha from urea source were also used. Recorded traits were grain yield and yield component. Results showed the significant interactions between split methods and N rates on yield, flag leaf area, filled and unfilled grain number per panicle and percentage fertility (p

  3. AMMI Analysis of Yields and Oil Content in Some Linseed (Linum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    interaction (GEI) among the varieties for yield and oil content. The experiment ... specific GEI terms, and for its ability to extract genotype and environment main effects. ...... interactions analysis of yield performance in bread wheat varieties across environments. ... MSc thesis, Alemaya University, Alemaya, Ethiopia. Taye G.

  4. Examining growth, yield and bean quality of Ethiopian coffee trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bote, Adugna

    2016-01-01

    Coffee (Coffeaarabica L.)bean production and quality are determined by a diversity of interacting factors (e.g. shade, nitrogen, crop traits). Bean yield increases with increase in radiation, but adequate fertilizer suppliesare needed to sustain the productivity. This thesis analysed coffee tree gro

  5. Corn Response to Competition: Growth Alteration vs. Yield Limiting Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding competition mechanisms among adjacent plants can improve site-specific management recommendations. This 2-yr study compared two hypotheses, yield limiting factors vs. behavior modification, to explain plant interactions. Corn was grown under different levels of stress by varying light ...

  6. Examining growth, yield and bean quality of Ethiopian coffee trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bote, Adugna

    2016-01-01

    Coffee (Coffeaarabica L.)bean production and quality are determined by a diversity of interacting factors (e.g. shade, nitrogen, crop traits). Bean yield increases with increase in radiation, but adequate fertilizer suppliesare needed to sustain the productivity. This thesis analysed coffee tree

  7. Fruit Yield Responses of Eggplant ( Solanum melongena ) to Single ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out in the experimental farm of the Department of Crop ... the effect of different rates of poultry manure and NPK 15.15:15 fertilizer and their ... 15 interaction was not statistically significant in the plant yield attributes studied, ...

  8. Stability Analysis for Seed Yield over Environments in Coriander

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Yadav

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Thirty five genotypes of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L. were tested in four artificially created environments to judge their stability in performance of seed yield. The differences among genotypes and environments were significant for seed yield. Stability parameters varied considerably among the tested genotypes in all the methods used. The variation in result in different methods was due to non-fulfillment of assumption of different models. However, AMMI analysis provides the information on main effects as well as interaction effects and depiction of PCA score gives better understanding of the pattern of genotype – environment interaction. The sum of squares due to PCAs was also used for the computation of AMMI stability values for better understanding of the adaptability behavior of genotypes hence, additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI model was most appropriate for the analysis of G x E interactions for seed yield in coriander. Genotypes RVC 15, RVC 19, RVC 22, RVC 25 and Panipat local showed wider adaptability while, Simpo S 33 exhibited specific adaptability to favourable conditions of high fertility. These genotypes could be utilized in breeding programmers to transfer the adaptability genes into high yielding genetic back ground of coriander.

  9. Variation in Fruit Yield and Correlations between Seed Quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for their environmental seed quality response and relationship among fruit yield and seed quality .... genotype x environment interaction variance (6. 2ge) and genotypic variance (6. 2g). Broad ..... Thesis,. Mississippi. State. Univ.,. Mississippi State, USA. Anonymous 1991. Annual ... Coefficient analysis in Potato,. Solanum ...

  10. Closing yield gaps in China by empowering smallholder farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weifeng; Cao, Guoxin; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Hongyan; Wang, Chong; Liu, Quanqing; Chen, Xinping; Cui, Zhenling; Shen, Jianbo; Jiang, Rongfeng; Mi, Guohua; Miao, Yuxin; Zhang, Fusuo; Dou, Zhengxia

    2016-09-01

    Sustainably feeding the world’s growing population is a challenge, and closing yield gaps (that is, differences between farmers’ yields and what are attainable for a given region) is a vital strategy to address this challenge. The magnitude of yield gaps is particularly large in developing countries where smallholder farming dominates the agricultural landscape. Many factors and constraints interact to limit yields, and progress in problem-solving to bring about changes at the ground level is rare. Here we present an innovative approach for enabling smallholders to achieve yield and economic gains sustainably via the Science and Technology Backyard (STB) platform. STB involves agricultural scientists living in villages among farmers, advancing participatory innovation and technology transfer, and garnering public and private support. We identified multifaceted yield-limiting factors involving agronomic, infrastructural, and socioeconomic conditions. When these limitations and farmers’ concerns were addressed, the farmers adopted recommended management practices, thereby improving production outcomes. In one region in China, the five-year average yield increased from 67.9% of the attainable level to 97.0% among 71 leading farmers, and from 62.8% to 79.6% countywide (93,074 households); this was accompanied by resource and economic benefits.

  11. Influence of micronutrients on dry matter yield and interaction with other nutrients in annual crops Influência de micronutrientes na produção de matéria seca e interação com outros nutrientes em culturas anuais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nand Kumar Fageria

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the influence of Zn, Mn and Cu on shoot dry matter yield and uptake of macro and micronutrients in upland rice, common bean and corn. Six greenhouse experiments were conducted using a Dark Red Latosol (Typic Haplusthox. Treatments consisted of application of Zn at 0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 and 120 mg kg-1, of Mn at 0, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160, 320 and 640 mg kg-1 and of Cu application at 0, 2, 4, 8, 32, 64 and 96 mg kg-1. Zinc increased yield of rice, Mn increased yields of corn and bean and Cu improved yields of rice and bean. Uptake of N, Ca, and Cu in rice was decreased by zinc treatment. In common bean, uptake of N, Mg, and Cu was increased by zinc application, whereas, uptake of P was decreased. Manganese increased uptake of Mg, Zn and Fe and decreased uptake of Ca, in corn. Uptake of K, Zn and Mn was increased and uptake of P and Cu was decreased by Mn application, in bean. Copper had positive and negative interactions in the uptake of macro and micronutrients, depending on crop species and nutrients involved.O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a influência do Zn, Mn e Cu na produção de matéria seca e na absorção de nutrientes pelo arroz de terras altas, feijoeiro e milho. Foram conduzidos seis experimentos em casa de vegetação, num Latossolo Vermelho-Escuro. Os tratamentos constituíram-se de 0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 e 120 mg kg-1 de Zn, 0, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160, 320 e 640 mg kg-1 de Mn e 0, 2, 4, 8, 32, 64 e 96 mg kg-1 de cobre. O Zn aumentou a produção de arroz, o Mn aumentou a produção de milho e feijão, e o Cu aumentou a produção de arroz e feijão. O Zn diminuiu a absorção de N, Ca e Cu pelo arroz. No feijoeiro, o Zn aumentou a absorção de N, Mg e Cu e diminuiu a absorção de fósforo. No milho, o Mn aumentou a absorção de Mg, Zn e Fe e diminuiu a absorção de cálcio. A absorção de K, Zn e Mn aumentou no feijoeiro com a aplicação de Mn, porém, a absorção de P e Cu

  12. Pod yield stability analysis of runner peanut lines using AMMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Jorge de Oliveira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between genotypes and environment (GxE can influence the selection process andrecommendation of peanut cultivars. The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate the influence of GxE interaction ofpeanut pod yield using AMMI. The yield of 18 peanut lines and the cultivars IAC Caiapo and Runner IAC 886 was assessedin 10 field trials in the state of São Paulo. Significant effects of genotypes, environments and GxE interactions were detected inthe analysis. The first AMMI principal component (IPCA1 explained 42.3% of the sum of squares of the GxE interaction.Sixteen of the twenty lines/cultivars under evaluation presented medium to high stability. Genotypes L127, L118, L123 line andRunner IAC 886 accounted for the greatest part of GxE interaction. Lines L132, L149 and L1-50P presented the higheststability and pod yields, above the overall mean, reflecting outstanding potential for cultivar recommendation.

  13. Effect of planting dates and nitrogen rates on yield and yield components of black cumin (Nigella Sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hamed javadi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effect of planting dates and nitrogen rates on yield and yield components of black cumin (Nigella sativa L. a field experiment was conducted in spring 2006 in the Azad University of Birjand. The experiment was done as split plot based on compeletely randomized block design with 3 replications. Four planting dates (21 March, 4, 21 April, 5 May were used as main plot and 3 levels of nitrogen (40, 80 and 120 kg/ha were as sub plot. The results showed that the planting dates effect was significant on traits such as plant height, number of main branches, number of follicles per plant, biological yield and grain yield. As, maximum plant height, number of follicles per plant and biological yield were observed in first planting date and maximum number of main branches and grain yield were observed in first and second planting dates. Planting dates had no significant effects on number of follicles in main branches, number of seed per follicles, weight of 1000 seeds and harvest index. Nitrogen rates and interaction between planting dates and nitrogen rates had no significant effect on the traits. According to the results of this experiment 40 kg/ha nitrogen is enough for black cumin. Also, planting dates in 21 March and 4 April were recognised better because of high yield production.

  14. Interaction of Winter Legume Manure Covering(Astragalus sinicus L.) and Atraw Retention on Yield and Soil Properties in A Double Rice Cropping System%冬种紫云英与稻草还田对双季水稻产量和土壤性状的互作效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄山; 汤军; 廖萍; 曾勇军; 石庆华; 潘晓华

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the interactive effect of winter legume manure cover⁃ing (Astragalus sinicus L.) and straw retention on yield and soil properties in a double rice cropping system.The results showed that winter legume manure covering and straw retention did not significantly affect both ear⁃ly and late rice yield in 2013,and no significant interaction was found.Straw retention had no significant effect on both early and late rice yield in 2014.There was marginally significant effect of winter legume manure cover⁃ing and straw retention on early rice yield in 2014 (P=0.090).Winter legume manure covering significantly increased the yield and biomass in early rice in 2014,but had no significant effect in late rice. Winter legume manure covering significantly increased the number of panicles and the number of spikelets per panicle in early rice in 2014,with marginally significant effect on the number of panicles in late rice (P=0.055).Winter leg⁃ume manure covering significantly reduced soil bulk density and increased the total porosity after the 2⁃year ex⁃periment.Straw retention significantly increased soil pH,whereas winter legume manure covering reduced the effect of straw retention.Winter legume manure covering and straw retention did not significantly affect the con⁃centration of soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and available nitrogen. Straw retention significantly increased the concentration of available phosphorous and potassium,and promoted the activity of soil celluloses,inverta⁃ses,proteinases,and acid phosphatases,whereas winter legume manure covering had no significant effect.Win⁃ter legume manure covering and straw retention synergistically increased the concentration of soil available phosphorous and the activity of celluloses.%通过2年田间试验,旨在明确冬种紫云英和稻草还田对双季水稻产量和土壤性状的互作效应。结果表明:稻草还田和冬种紫云英对2013年早

  15. Plant genetics: increasing crop yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, P R

    1977-09-30

    Cell cultures of crop plants provide new opportunities to recover induced mutations likely to increase crop yield. Approaches include regulating respiration to conserve carbon fixed by photosynthesis, and increasing the nutritive value of seed protein. They depend on devising selecting conditions which only desired mutant cells can survive. Protoplast fusion offers some promise of tapping sources of genetic variation now unavailable because of sterility barriers between species and genera. Difficulties in regenerating cell lines from protoplasts, and plants from cells, still hamper progress but are becoming less severe. Recombinant DNA techniques may allow detection and selection of bacterial cell lines carrying specific DNA sequences. Isolation and amplification of crop plant genes could then lead to ways of transforming plants that will be useful to breeders.

  16. PHENOTYPIC GRAIN YIELD STABILITY OF SEVERAL SOYBEAN OSCULTIVARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Sudarić

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective of this study was to evaluate the level and stability of grain yield as well as adaptability level of several domestic soybean cultivars. The trials were conducted on three locations in the region of the eastern Croatia (Osijek, Brijest, Donji Miholjac in the period from 1998-2002 and involved 14 soybean cultivars. Tested cultivars were created in soybean breeding programme at the Agricultural Institute Osijek. They belong to maturity groups 0, 0-I and I according to vegetation period length. Two parameters are used in the analysis of yield stability and cultivar adaptability: portion of variance of genotype x environment interaction of each genotype to total variance of genotype x environment interaction (S2 GxE and regression coefficient (bi. Obtained results indicated significant differences in level and stability of grain yield as well as level of cultivar adaptability. Six of the 14 tested cultivars: Ika, Podravka 95, Smiljana, Kuna, Anica and Tisa had high and stable grain yield and wide-general adaptability. Other tested cultivars had unstable grain yield and narrow (specific adaptability.

  17. Interactive Effects of Nitrogen and Sulfur on Flag Leaf Senescence,Yield and Nitrogen Use Efifciency of Winter Wheat%氮硫互作对冬小麦旗叶衰老、产量和氮素利用效率的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽; 王东; 周杰; 韩坤

    2016-01-01

    试验采用裂裂区设计,小麦品种(烟农19和汶农6号)为主区,施氮(N)量为裂区,设0(N0)、120(N120)、240(N240)kg hm-2三个施N水平,施硫(S)量为裂裂区,设0(S0)、20(S20)、40(S40)、60(S60)kg hm-2四个施S水平。结果表明,汶农6号开花后旗叶超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)活性、旗叶净光合速率、产量和氮素利用效率均高于烟农19。在一定施氮水平下适量施硫显著提高烟农19和汶农6号小麦开花后旗叶SOD活性和可溶性蛋白质含量,提高旗叶净光合速率和开花后干物质积累量,增加植株地上部氮素积累量和籽粒产量;当施氮水平为120 kg hm-2施硫量超过40 kg hm-2和施氮240 kg hm-2施硫量超过20 kg hm-2时,汶农6号植株地上部氮素积累量仍继续增加,但旗叶抗氧化能力和光合同化能力均无明显提高,籽粒产量不再增加,烟农19号旗叶SOD活性、可溶性蛋白质含量和光合速率均降低,植株地上部氮素积累量和籽粒产量均减少。在同一施氮水平下,两小麦品种氮素利用效率总体表现为随施硫量增加而降低的趋势。在土壤有效硫为38.9~42.1 mg kg-1的条件下,适量施用氮肥和硫肥有利于延缓小麦花后旗叶衰老,提高光合同化能力,增加籽粒产量,但不同品种小麦对氮肥和硫肥施用量的响应不同,氮素利用效率较高的品种在较高的氮硫供给水平下仍有较好的光合同化和产量表现,而氮素利用效率相对低的品种对高氮高硫的适应性较差,后期易早衰,影响产量和氮素利用效率。%Abstract[Objective]Nitrogen(N)and sulfur(S)are nutrient elements essential to winter wheat in growth and development. The purpose of this article was to determine the effects of nitrogen and sulfur and their interaction on flag leaf senescence,photosynthetic rate after anthesis,accumulation and distribution of dry matter

  18. Evaluation of Yield and Yield Components of Black Cumin (Nigella sativa L. under different Plant Density and Limited Irrigation Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Rezvan Beidokhti

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on crop response to deficit irrigation is important to reduce agriculture water use in areas where water is limited resource. Using drought resistant landraces with irrigation scheduling based on phenological stages in semi-arid and arid regions may provide an opportunity to optimize irrigation efficiency and water savings in these regions. In order to evaluate of yield and yield components of black cumin under different plant density and limited irrigation condition an experiment was conducted in Research Farm of Islamic Azad University of Damghan during growing season of 2007-2008. The experimental treatments were arranged in split plots based on a complete randomized block design with three replications. The limited irrigation (based on phenological stages treatments were included: cutting irrigation at blooming (folded flowers, cutting irrigation at flowering stage, cutting irrigation at seed formation and normal weekly irrigation (control were allocated to the main plots and different plant density: 100, 150, 200 and 250 plant per square meter (m2 were allocated to sub plots. The results showed that the effect of limited irrigation, plant density and their interaction on plant height, number of follicle, follicle weight, number of seed, 1000 seed weight, seed yield, biological yield and harvest index Black Cumin. The highest yield and yield components was obtained in normal irrigation (control and 200 plant density and the lowest yield were obtained when irrigation cut at the blooming stage and 250 plant density. There was a significant correlation between seed yield and number (r=0.90, 1000 seed weight (r=0.95 and biological yield (r=0.97. Optimum plant density of black cumin was decreased under limited irrigation treatments. Under normal (control and limited irrigation, optimum plant density was 200 and 150 plant per (m2 respectively.

  19. EDITORIAL: Plasma Surface Interactions for Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    Because plasma-boundary physics encompasses some of the most important unresolved issues for both the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and future fusion power reactors, there is a strong interest in the fusion community for better understanding and characterization of plasma wall interactions. Chemical and physical sputtering cause the erosion of the limiters/divertor plates and vacuum vessel walls (made of C, Be and W, for example) and degrade fusion performance by diluting the fusion fuel and excessively cooling the core, while carbon redeposition could produce long-term in-vessel tritium retention, degrading the superior thermo-mechanical properties of the carbon materials. Mixed plasma-facing materials are proposed, requiring optimization for different power and particle flux characteristics. Knowledge of material properties as well as characteristics of the plasma material interaction are prerequisites for such optimizations. Computational power will soon reach hundreds of teraflops, so that theoretical and plasma science expertise can be matched with new experimental capabilities in order to mount a strong response to these challenges. To begin to address such questions, a Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma Surface Interactions for Fusion (PSIF) was held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 21 to 23 March, 2005. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together researchers in fusion related plasma wall interactions in order to address these topics and to identify the most needed and promising directions for study, to exchange opinions on the present depth of knowledge of surface properties for the main fusion-related materials, e.g., C, Be and W, especially for sputtering, reflection, and deuterium (tritium) retention properties. The goal was to suggest the most important next steps needed for such basic computational and experimental work to be facilitated

  20. Interação entre sistemas de manejo e de controle de plantas daninhas em pós-emergência afetando o desenvolvimento e a produtividade da soja Interaction between burndown systems and post-emergence weed control affecting soybean development and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Oliveira Jr.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar a interação entre sistemas de manejo e de controle de plantas daninhas em pós-emergência na cultura da soja, cv. BRS 154, em plantio direto em áreas com expressiva cobertura vegetal. Foram avaliados 13 tratamentos, compostos por um esquema fatorial (3x4+1. Os fatores eram constituídos por três sistemas de manejo (dessecação imediatamente antes da semeadura, dessecação 10 dias antes da semeadura e dessecação antecipada, sendo esta composta por duas aplicações de manejo, a primeira 24 dias antes da semeadura e a segunda na data da semeadura, quatro formas de controle das plantas daninhas após a emergência da cultura (nenhum controle, capina manual das parcelas, aplicação única e aplicação seqüencial de herbicidas e um tratamento adicional, constituído por uma testemunha absoluta (sem manejo e sem controle em pós-emergência. Embora a dessecação nos diferentes sistemas de manejo tenha sido eficiente, a antecipação da dessecação no manejo antecipado favoreceu a emergência e o desenvolvimento inicial da soja, proporcionando maiores ganhos de produtividade, nas condições de infestação apresentadas. O sistema de manejo afetou também o fluxo de emergência das plantas daninhas após a emergência da soja, com menos reinfestações no sistema de manejo antecipado, em função do controle dos fluxos iniciais proporcionado pela segunda aplicação deste sistema de manejo. O manejo realizado na data da semeadura e dez dias antes prejudicou o desenvolvimento da soja, resultando em menor produtividade. O manejo antecipado, quando comparado aos demais sistemas, proporcionou maior produtividade da soja.This work aimed to evaluate the interaction between burndown methods and systems of post-emergence weed control in soybeans, cv. BRS 154, under no-tillage, in areas with expressive soil green cover. Thirteen treatments in a factorial scheme (3x4 +1, were evaluated. Main factors were

  1. Influence of Bark Pyrolysis Technology on Yield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yong; YAN Zhen; LIU Yurong; WANG Shu

    2006-01-01

    With the self-made pyrolysis equipment in miniature,we experimented in different pyrolysis conditions to get different pyrolyzate yields (carbon,vinegar and gas).It proved that with the rise of temperature,the average yield of carbon descends gradually while the yields of vinegar and gas rise gradually.As the temperature rises,the yield of gas increases much more than that of vinegar.When speeding up the rising temperature,yield of carbon goes down while yields of vinegar and gas go up.

  2. 129Xe20+入射Au表面X射线产额与离子动能的相关性%The relativity of X-ray yield with kinetic energies by the interaction of 129Xe20+ ions with solid Au surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李耀宗; 徐戈; 李锦玉; 肖国青; 张小安; 梁昌慧; 赵永涛; 程锐; 周贤明; 王兴; 雷瑜; 孙渊博

    2011-01-01

    报道了在兰州重离子加速器国家实验室320kV高电荷态离子综合研究平台上,用2.4~6.0 MeV动能的高电荷态离子129 Xe20+轰击Au表面,探测X射线谱的实验结果.当离子动能较大时,相互作用不仅激发出了Au的M-X射线,还激发出了Xe的L-X射线,且X射线产额随入射离子动能的增加总体呈增加趋势.对碰撞导致X射线产生的微观机制进行了初步分析.%The experimental results of the X-ray spectrum by the interaction of I29Xe20+ ions of 2. 4~6. OMeV kinetic energies with solid Au surface has been detected, to do the experiment with the 320 kV research platform for highly charged ions of the national laboratory of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou. The experimental results showed that, as ion's kinetic energies are larger the incident ions not only excited Au M X-ray but also excited Xe L X-ray. The X-ray yield show increasing trend with the ion's kinetic energies. The micro-mechanism of X-ray excitation by the collision has been preliminary analyzed.

  3. Yield and yield gaps in central U.S. corn production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The magnitude of yield gaps (YG) (potential yield – farmer yield) provides some indication of the prospects for increasing crop yield. Quantile regression analysis was applied to county maize (Zea mays L.) yields (1972 – 2011) from Kentucky, Iowa and Nebraska (irrigated) (total of 115 counties) to e...

  4. Effects of Nitrogen and Phosphorous Biofertilizers on Yield and Yield Components of Corn AS71 in Dareh-shahr, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fathi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofertilizers are inputs that naturally supplement replace chemical fertilizers and they are recommended in sustainable agriculture. To study the effects of biological fertilizers on yield and yield components of corn, a factorial experiment in randomized complete block design with three replications were conducted at Dareh-shahr, Iran in 2010. Biological factors were 4 levels of nitrogen biofertilizers (nitroxin, nitrokara, supernitroplus and control and 4 levels of phosphorus biofertilizers (biophosphore, phosphate fertilized 2, MC1 and control. Results showed that biological nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers had significant effects on all traits under study. Interaction of nitrogen biological fertilizer × phosphate biological fertilizer was significant on 100 seed weight (P

  5. Phenomenology of muon-induced neutron yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgin, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    The cosmogenic neutron yield Yn characterizes the ability of matter to produce neutrons under the effect of cosmic ray muons with spectrum and average energy corresponding to an observation depth. The yield is the basic characteristic of cosmogenic neutrons. The neutron production rate and neutron flux both are derivatives of the yield. The constancy of the exponents α and β in the known dependencies of the yield on energy Yn∝Eμα and the atomic weight Yn∝Aβ allows one to combine these dependencies in a single formula and to connect the yield with muon energy loss in matter. As a result, the phenomenological formulas for the yields of muon-induced charged pions and neutrons can be obtained. These expressions both are associated with nuclear loss of the ultrarelativistic muons, which provides the main contribution to the total neutron yield. The total yield can be described by a universal formula, which is the best fit of the experimental data.

  6. Definitions of radioisotope thick target yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otuka, Naohiko [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wien (Austria). Nuclear Data Section; Takacs, Sandor [Hungarian Academy of Science, Debrecen (Hungary). Inst. of Nuclear Research

    2015-05-01

    Definitions of thick target yields are reviewed in relation to their documentation for the experimental nuclear reaction data library (database). Researchers reporting experimental thick target yields are urged to define their yields clearly with an appropriate unit in order to compile them in the experimental data library (EXFOR) in a consistent manner, and also to properly utilise them for comparison with other experimental and evaluated yields.

  7. GDP growth and the yield curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Stig Vinther

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the forecastability of GDP growth using information from the term structure of yields. In contrast to previous studies, the paper shows that the curvature of the yield curve contributes with much more forecasting power than the slope of yield curve. The yield curvature also...... predicts bond returns, implying a common element to time-variation in expected bond returns and expected GDP growth....

  8. Analysis of yield advantage in mixed cropping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranganathan, R.

    1993-01-01

    It has long been recognized that mixed cropping can give yield advantages over sole cropping, but methods that can identify such yield benefits are still being developed. This thesis presents a method that combines physiological and economic principles in the evaluation of yield advantage.

  9. Nodal yield in selective neck dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norling, Rikke; Therkildsen, Marianne H; Bradley, Patrick J

    2013-01-01

    The total lymph node yield in neck dissection is highly variable and depends on anatomical, surgical and pathological parameters. A minimum yield of six lymph nodes for a selective neck dissection (SND) as recommended in guidelines lies in the lower range of the reported clinical nodal yields...

  10. PREDICTION OF YIELD FUNCTIONS ON BCC POLYCRYSTALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Mojia; Fu Mingfu; Zheng Chaomei

    2006-01-01

    By the nonlinear optimization theory, we predict the yield function of single BCC crystals in Hill's criterion form. Then we give a formula on the macroscopic yield function of a BCC polycrystal Ω under Sachs' model, where the volume average of the yield functions of all BCC crystallites in Ω is taken as the macroscopic yield function of the BCC polycrystal. In constructing the formula, we try to find the relationship among the macroscopic yield function, the orientation distribution function (ODF), and the single BCC crystal's plasticity. An expression for the yield stress of a uniaxial tensile problem is derived under Taylor's model in order to compare the expression with that of the macroscopic yield function.

  11. Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Dependence Upon Texture Development in Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Loftus, Ryan J.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2016-01-01

    The atomic oxygen erosion yield (volume of a polymer that is lost due to oxidation per incident atom) of polymers is typically assumed to be reasonably constant with increasing fluence. However polymers containing ash or inorganic pigments, tend to have erosion yields that decrease with fluence due to an increasing presence of protective particles on the polymer surface. This paper investigates two additional possible causes for erosion yields of polymers that are dependent upon atomic oxygen. These are the development of surface texture which can cause the erosion yield to change with fluence due to changes in the aspect ratio of the surface texture that develops and polymer specific atomic oxygen interaction parameters. The surface texture development under directed hyperthermal attack produces higher aspect ratio surface texture than isotropic thermal energy atomic oxygen attack. The fluence dependence of erosion yields is documented for low Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) effective fluences for a variety of polymers under directed hyperthermal and isotropic thermal energy attack.

  12. Neutron and fission yields from high-energy deuterons in infinite /sup 238/U targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canfield, E.

    1965-06-28

    Early work on the interaction of high energy deuterons with large /sup 238/U targets is reexamined and current theoretical study is discussed. Results of fission and neutron yield calculations are compared with experiment. (SDF)

  13. Estimations of neutron yield from beryllium target irradiated by SPring-8 hard synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Gryaznykh, D A; Plokhoi, V V

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of creating a neutron source based on ''SPring-8'' synchrotron radiation interaction with beryllium targets is discussed. The possible neutron yield is estimated to be of order 10 sup 1 sup 2 s sup - sup 1 .

  14. Dependence of simulated positron emitter yields in ion beam cancer therapy on modeling nuclear fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin; Priegnitz, Marlen; Fiedler, Fine;

    2014-01-01

    In ion beam cancer therapy, range verification in patients using positron emission tomography (PET) requires the comparison of measured with simulated positron emitter yields. We found that (1) changes in modeling nuclear interactions strongly affected the positron emitter yields and that (2) Monte...

  15. Stability Analyse for Yield and Yield Components of Selected Peanut Breeding Lines (Arachis hypogaea L. in the North Province of Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngueguim, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Six advanced Cameroonian peanut breeding lines (Arachis hypogaea L., two introductions from Kano (Nigeria and one traditionally cultivated variety (control were grown at four locations during three seasons, giving a total of twelve locations x year combinations. The purpose was to evaluate yield stability and a number of yield components. Significant lines x environment interactions were detected for all traits. Results revealed that most Cameroonian breeding lines including 82Ds 479, 854, 1809 and 1632 had above-average results for pod and seed yields, good stability shown by their regression coefficients (b close to unity and low non-significant deviations from regression. Lines 82D22P-466 and 82D14S- 1809, with mean yields and yield components higher than average and b values lower or close to unity are expected to perform well for these traits in less favourable environments. The introduced line K2044- 80 was stable for seed yield but had below average yields. Such a line can be utilized in a breeding programme for transferring stability characters into high yielding cultivars. Significant positive correlations between pod and seed yields vs. 100-seed weight for some lines contributed to their yield increase in poor environments.

  16. Yield stress determination of a physical gel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Pluronic F127 solutions form gels in water with high elastic moduli. Pluronic gels can, however, only withstand small deformations and stresses. Different steady shear and oscillatory methods traditionally used to determine yield stress values are compared. The results show that the yield stresses...... values of these gels depend on test type and measurement time, and no absolute yield stress value can be determined for these physical gels....

  17. Forecasting Exchange Rates with Commodity Convenience Yields

    OpenAIRE

    Beutler, Toni

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates whether commodity convenience yields - the yields that accrue to the holders of physical commodities - can predict the exchange rate of commodity-exporters' currencies. Predictability is a consequence of the fact that i) convenience yields are useful predictors for commodity prices and ii) commodity currencies have a strong relationship with commodity prices. The empirical evidence indicates that there is a significant relationship between aggregate measures of conveni...

  18. Representing Extreme Temperature Events and Resolving Their Implications for Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybers, P. J.; Mueller, N. D.; Butler, E. E.; Tingley, M.; McKinnon, K. A.; Rhines, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    Although it is well recognized that extreme temperatures occurring at particular growth stages are destructive to yield, there appears substantial scope for improved empirical assessment and simulation of the relationship between temperature and yield. Several anecdotes are discussed. First, a statistical analysis of historical U.S. extreme temperatures is provided. It is demonstrated that both reanalysis and model simulations significantly differ from near-surface temperature observations in the frequency and magnitude of extremes. This finding supports empirical assessment using near-surface instrumental records and underscores present difficulties in simulating past and predicting future changes. Second, an analysis of the implications of extreme temperatures on U.S. maize yield is provided where the response is resolved regionally and according to growth stage. Sensitivity to extreme temperatures during silking is found to be uniformly high across the U.S., but the response during grain filling varies spatially, with higher sensitivity in the North. This regional and growth-stage dependent sensitivity implies the importance of representing cultivar, planting times, and development rates, and is also indicative of the potential for future changes according to the combined effects of climate and technology. Finally, interaction between extreme temperatures and agriculture is indicated by analysis showing that historical extreme temperatures in the U.S. Midwest have cooled in relation to changes in regional productivity, possibly because of greater potential for cooling through evapotranspiration. This interpretation is consistent with changes in crop physiology and management, though also noteworthy is that the moderating influence of increased evapotranspiration on extreme temperatures appears to be lost during severe drought. Together, these findings indicate that a more accurate assessment of the historical relationship between extreme temperatures and yield

  19. Yield Mapping in Salix; Skoerdekartering av salix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Christoffer; Gilbertsson, Mikael; Rogstrand, Gustav; Thylen, Lars

    2004-09-01

    The most common species for energy forest production is willow. Willow is able to produce a large amount of biomass in a short period of time. Growing willow has a potential to render a good financial result for the farmer if cultivated on fields with the right conditions and plenty of water. Under the right conditions growing willow can give the farmer a net income of 3,000 SEK (about 430 USD) per hectare and year, which is something that common cereal crops cannot compete with. However, this is not the common case since willow is often grown as a substitute crop on fields where cereal crop yield is low. The aim of this study was to reveal if it is possible to measure yield variability in willow, and if it is possible to describe the reasons for yield variation both within the field but also between different fields. Yield mapping has been used in conventional farming for about a decade. The principles for yield mapping are to continuously measure the yield while registering location by the use of GPS when harvesting the field. The collected data is then used to search for spatial variations within the field, and to try to understand the reasons for this variation. Since there is currently no commercial equipment for yield mapping in willow, a yield mapping system had to be developed within this project. The new system was installed on a Claas Jaguar harvester. The principle for yield mapping on the Claas Jaguar harvester is to measure the distance between the feeding rollers. This distance is correlated to the flow through the harvester. The speed and position of the machine was registered using GPS. Knowing the working width of the harvester this information was used to calculate the yield. All collected data was stored on a PDA computer. Soil samples were also collected from the yield mapped fields. This was to be able to test yield against both physical and chemical soil parameters. The result shows that it is possible to measure spatial variations of yield in

  20. Efficient prediction of (p,n) yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D C; McNaney, J M; Higginson, D P; Beg, F

    2009-09-09

    In the continuous deceleration approximation, charged particles decelerate without any spread in energy as they traverse matter. This approximation simplifies the calculation of the yield of nuclear reactions, for which the cross-section depends on the particle energy. We calculated (p,n) yields for a LiF target, using the Bethe-Bloch relation for proton deceleration, and predicted that the maximum yield would be around 0.25% neutrons per incident proton, for an initial proton energy of 70 MeV or higher. Yield-energy relations calculated in this way can readily be used to optimize source and (p,n) converter characteristics.

  1. Food for thought: pretty good multispecies yield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Anna; Dichmont, C. M.; Levin, P.S.

    2017-01-01

    that broader ecosystem, economic, and social objectives are addressed. We investigate how the principles of a “pretty good yield” range of fishing mortalities assumed to provide >95% of the average yield for a single stock can be expanded to a pretty good multispecies yield (PGMY) space and further to pretty...... good multidimensional yield to accommodate situations where the yield from a stock affects the ecosystem, economic and social benefits, or sustainability. We demonstrate in a European example that PGMY is a practical concept. As PGMY provides a safe operating space for management that adheres...

  2. Nucleosynthetic Yields from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rockefeller, Gabriel; Young, Patrick; Bennett, Michael; Diehl, Steven; Herwig, Falk; Hirschi, Raphael; Hungerford, Aimee; Pignatari, Marco; Magkotsios, Georgios; Timmes, Francis X

    2008-01-01

    The "collapsar" engine for gamma-ray bursts invokes as its energy source the failure of a normal supernova and the formation of a black hole. Here we present the results of the first three-dimensional simulation of the collapse of a massive star down to a black hole, including the subsequent accretion and explosion. The explosion differs significantly from the axisymmetric scenario obtained in two-dimensional simulations; this has important consequences for the nucleosynthetic yields. We compare the nucleosynthetic yields to those of hypernovae. Calculating yields from three-dimensional explosions requires new strategies in post-process nucleosynthesis; we discuss NuGrid's plan for three-dimensional yields.

  3. Quality and Yield of Cannabis Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastorp, Grith; Lindholst, Christian

    2011-01-01

    cultivation was examined in order to determine THC content and yield. The results are used by the Danish Police Attorney to estimate expected yields in cases with unripe cannabis plants. The results indicate that the THC content found in locally grown marihuana is slightly higher than in hashish. However...

  4. Central Bank Communication and the Yield Curve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leombroni, Matteo; Vedolin, Andrea; Venter, Gyuri

    We extract novel measures of ECB target rate announcement and communications shocks using high frequency data on money market rates and study their impact on yields of Eurozone countries. We find that (i) target rate shocks have little effect on changes in bond yields of Eurozone countries, while...

  5. Crop yield response to increasing biochar rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The benefit or detriment to crop yield from biochar application varies with biochar type/rate, soil, crop, or climate. The objective of this research was to identify yield response of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), corn (Zea mayes L.), and peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) to hardwood biochar applied at...

  6. Yield potential of pigeon pea cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yield potential of twelve vegetable pigeon pea (Cajanus cajun) cultivars was evaluated at two locations in eastern Kenya during 2012 and 2013 cropping years. Pigeon pea pod numbers, seeds per pod, seed mass, grain yield and shelling percentage were quantified in three replicated plots, arranged in a...

  7. FEM growth and yield data monocultures - Sycamore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburger, J.F.; Jansen, J.J.; Oosterbaan, A.; Mohren, G.M.J.; Ouden, den J.

    2016-01-01

    The current database is part of the FEM growth and yield database, a collection of growth and yield data from even-aged monocultures (douglas fir, common oak, poplar, Japanese Larch, Norway spruce, Scots pine, Corsican pine, Austrian pine, red oak and several other species, with only a few plots, ev

  8. Biogas and Methane Yield from Rye Grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Vítěz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogas production in the Czech Republic has expanded substantially, including marginal regions for maize cultivation. Therefore, there are increasingly sought materials that could partially replace maize silage, as a basic feedstock, while secure both biogas production and its quality.Two samples of rye grass (Lolium multiflorum var. westerwoldicum silage with different solids content 21% and 15% were measured for biogas and methane yield. Rye grass silage with solid content of 15% reached an average specific biogas yield 0.431 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter and an average specific methane yield 0.249 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter. Rye grass silage with solid content 21% reached an average specific biogas yield 0.654 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter and an average specific methane yield 0.399 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter.

  9. Wheat yield dynamics: a structural econometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Afsin; Akdi, Yilmaz; Arslan, Fahrettin

    2007-10-15

    In this study we initially have tried to explore the wheat situation in Turkey, which has a small-open economy and in the member countries of European Union (EU). We have observed that increasing the wheat yield is fundamental to obtain comparative advantage among countries by depressing domestic prices. Also the changing structure of supporting schemes in Turkey makes it necessary to increase its wheat yield level. For this purpose, we have used available data to determine the dynamics of wheat yield by Ordinary Least Square Regression methods. In order to find out whether there is a linear relationship among these series we have checked each series whether they are integrated at the same order or not. Consequently, we have pointed out that fertilizer usage and precipitation level are substantial inputs for producing high wheat yield. Furthermore, in respect for our model, fertilizer usage affects wheat yield more than precipitation level.

  10. Why well yield matters for managing agricultural drought risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Foster

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater-fed irrigation has supported growth in agricultural production around the world by allowing farmers to buffer production against the risks associated with variable and uncertain climatic conditions. However, uncontrolled exploitation has also led to rapid rates of groundwater depletion in many semi-arid and arid regions that threaten farmers' long-term capacity to adapt to future climate change and extreme events. Declining well yields, which control the potential rate and feasibility of groundwater abstraction, are likely to restrict adaptation to drought, but this interaction has largely been neglected in previous research. In this study, we present a set of numerical hydro-economic simulations that assess the joint biophysical and economic effects of climate variability and well yield on irrigated agriculture through a case study in the Texas High Plains region of the United States. Our results demonstrate that reductions in well yield will constrain farmers' ability to use irrigation as an adaptive tool, and may have large negative economic impacts on production. Significantly, economic impacts will be greatest during drought events that are projected to increase in frequency and intensity as a result of climate change. We suggest therefore that management of well yields should be a key consideration when evaluating agricultural drought risk adaptation.

  11. Study of nonproportionality in the light yield of inorganic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [School of Engineering and IT, B-purple-12, Faculty of EHSE, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory 0909 (Australia)

    2011-07-15

    Using a phenomenological approach, the light yield is derived for inorganic scintillators as a function of the rates of linear, bimolecular, and Auger processes occurring in the electron track initiated by an x ray or a {gamma}-ray photon. A relation between the track length and incident energy is also derived. It is found that the nonproportionality in the light yield can be eliminated if either nonlinear processes of interaction among the excited electrons, holes, and excitons can be eliminated from occurring or the high density situation can be relieved by diffusion of carriers from the track at a faster rate than the rate of activation of nonlinear processes. The influence of the track length and radius on the yield nonproportionality is discussed in view of the known experimental results. Inventing new inorganic scintillating materials with high carrier mobility can lead to a class of proportional inorganic scintillators. Results agree qualitatively with experimental results for the dependence of light yield on the incident energy.

  12. Dendrimer-surfactant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yiyun; Zhao, Libo; Li, Tianfu

    2014-04-28

    In this article, we reviewed the interactions between dendrimers and surfactants with particular focus on the interaction mechanisms and physicochemical properties of the yielding dendrimer-surfactant aggregates. In order to provide insight into the behavior of dendrimers in biological systems, the interactions of dendrimers with bio-surfactants such as phospholipids in bulk solutions, in solid-supported bilayers and at the interface of phases or solid-states were discussed. Applications of the dendrimer-surfactant aggregates as templates to guide the synthesis of nanoparticles and in drug or gene delivery were also mentioned.

  13. Effect of Mycorrhiza Symbiosis on Yield, Yield Components and Water Use Efficiency of Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. Affected by Different Irrigation Regimes in Mashhad Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Koocheki

    2016-02-01

    4000 m3 ha-1, inoculation with two species of mycorrhiza fungi (Glomus mosseae and G. intraradices and control allocated to the main and sub plots, respectively. Results and Discussion Results showed that the effect of irrigation regimes were significant (p≤0.05 on yield components except 1000-seed weight, biological yield, seed yield, harvest index (HI and WUE based on biological yield and seed yield. By increasing the irrigation level from 2000 to 4000 m3 ha-1 biological and seed yield enhanced up to 52% and 118%, respectively. Increasing the irrigation level from 2000 to 4000 m3 ha-1 also improved WUE based on seed yield up to 22%. Inoculation with mycorrhiza species had significant effect on yield components, biological yield, seed yield, HI and WUE based on biological yield and seed yield P ≤ 0.05. Inoculation with G. mosseae improved seed yield compared to G. intraradices and control with 7 and 12%, respectively. These improvement of WUE based on seed yield were 7% and 24%, respectively. In general, mycorrhiza inoculation enhanced WUE through root system development and nutrient availability as this effect for G. mosseae was higher than G. intraradices. Conclusions Yield and yield components of sesame were generally more responsive to irrigation level under mycorhiza inoculation. Sesame yield and its components were significantly affected by irrigation treatments. Increase the irrigation level enhanced biological and seed yield- and also improved WUE. The water was used more efficiently in the deficit irrigation treatments where WUE increased with lower amounts of water. Inoculation with G. mosseae improved seed yield compared to G. intraradices and control. Mycorrhiza inoculation enhanced WUE due to root system development and nutrient availability. These results highlight the importance of determining the interaction effects between water level and mycorrhiza inoculation on yield of sesame to formulate proper management practices for sustainable production.

  14. Precision calculations for {gamma}{gamma} {yields} 4 fermions and H {yields} WW/ZZ {yields} 4 fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredenstein, A.

    2006-05-08

    In this work we provide precision calculations for the processes {gamma}{gamma} {yields} 4 fermions and H {yields} WW/ZZ {yields} 4 fermions. At a {gamma}{gamma} collider precise theoretical predictions are needed for the {gamma}{gamma} {yields} WW {yields} 4f processes because of their large cross section. These processes allow a measurement of the gauge-boson couplings {gamma}WW and {gamma}{gamma}WW. Furthermore, the reaction {gamma}{gamma} {yields} H {yields} WW/ZZ {yields} 4f arises through loops of virtual charged, massive particles. Thus, the coupling {gamma}{gamma}H can be measured and Higgs bosons with a relatively large mass could be produced. For masses M{sub H} >or(sim) 135 GeV the Higgs boson predominantly decays into W- or Z-boson pairs and subsequently into four leptons. The kinematical reconstruction of these decays is influenced by quantum corrections, especially real photon radiation. Since off-shell effects of the gauge bosons have to be taken into account below M{sub H} {approx} 2M{sub W/Z}, the inclusion of the decays of the gauge bosons is important. In addition, the spin and the CP properties of the Higgs boson can be determined by considering angular and energy distributions of the decay fermions. For a comparison of theoretical predictions with experimental data Monte Carlo generators are useful tools. We construct such programs for the processes {gamma}{gamma} {yields} WW {yields} 4f and H {yields} WW/ZZ {yields} 4f. On the one hand, they provide the complete predictions at lowest order of perturbation theory. On the other hand, they contain quantum corrections, which ca be classified into real corrections, connected with photons bremsstrahlung, and virtual corrections. Whereas the virtual quantum corrections to {gamma}{gamma} {yields} WW {yields} 4f are calculated in the double-pole approximation, i.e. only doubly-resonant contributions are taken into account, we calculate the complete O({alpha}) corrections for the H {yields} WW

  15. Comparison of Fission Product Yields and Their Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Harrison

    2006-02-01

    This memorandum describes the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) Space Nuclear Power Program (SNPP) interest in determining the expected fission product yields from a Prometheus-type reactor and assessing the impact of these species on materials found in the fuel element and balance of plant. Theoretical yield calculations using ORIGEN-S and RACER computer models are included in graphical and tabular form in Attachment, with focus on the desired fast neutron spectrum data. The known fission product interaction concerns are the corrosive attack of iron- and nickel-based alloys by volatile fission products, such as cesium, tellurium, and iodine, and the radiological transmutation of krypton-85 in the coolant to rubidium-85, a potentially corrosive agent to the coolant system metal piping.

  16. Thresholds of geographic environmental elements in sediment yield of drainage basins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Hao; ZHOU; Jinxing; CAI; Qiangguo; LU; Zhongchen; LI

    2005-01-01

    Threshold of environmental elements in drainage basin sediment yield refers to, under effect of climate, underlying surface and human activity, a turning point of abrupt changes in drainage sediment yield related to environmental element characteristics. Previous studies on threshold of sediment yield of relevant drainage basins were mainly concentrated on impact of natural zones with a few researches on impact of other environmental elements. Particularly studies on compound environmental element threshold in drainage basin sediment yield remain blank today. Studies indicate that sediment yield in drainage basins is affected by compound interactions and complex actions. Based on single element analysis, the present paper gives quantitatively compound threshold of environmental elements affecting sediment yield of the drainage basin between Hekouzhen and Tongguan in the middle Yellow River by the method of multi-variant, polynomial formula regression analysis.

  17. Interação genótipo × ambiente para produção de leite de bovinos da raça Holandesa entre bacias leiteiras no estado do Paraná Genotype × environment interaction for milk yield of Holstein cows among dairy production units in the state of Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiby Carneiro de Paula

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisados 117.082 registros de lactações encerradas para a produção de leite corrigida para os 305 dias de lactação (PL305 de 49.676 vacas da raça Holandesa, provenientes de 308 rebanhos distribuídos em sete bacias leiteiras no estado do Paraná, com o objetivo de verificar a existência de interação genótipo × ambiente para a PL305 desses animais utilizando-se a inferência Bayesiana. Todos os animais foram controlados oficialmente entre janeiro de 1992 a dezembro de 2003 pelo Serviço de Controle Leiteiro Mensal da Associação Paranaense de Criadores de Bovinos da Raça Holandesa. Os componentes de co-variância e os parâmetros genéticos foram estimados por meio de análises uni e multicaracteres, de modo que, na análise multicaracter, a PL305 em cada uma das bacias foi tratada como uma característica diferente. A produção de leite corrigida para os 305 de lactação, em kg, nas bacias leiteiras de Castro, Carambeí, Witmarsum, Arapoti, Sul, Norte e Oeste foram de 8.414 ± 1.825, 8.481 ± 2.010, 7.636 ± 1.594, 7.850 ± 1.795, 8.617 ± 2.050, 7.401 ± 1.809 e 7.336 ± 2.456, respectivamente. A estimativa de herdabilidade mais alta (0,39 foi obtida para a bacia leiteira do Oeste e a mais baixa (0,23 para a de Carambeí. As correlações genéticas obtidas entre as bacias leiteiras foram baixas (0,09 a 0,57. As correlações de Pearson e de Spearman mais baixas foram obtidas para a bacia leiteira do Oeste do Paraná e variaram de 0,37 a 0,41 e de 0,37 a 0,49, respectivamente. Esses resultados comprovam a existência de interação genótipo × ambiente nas bacias leiteiras do estado do Paraná.It was analyzed 117,082 complete lactation records adjusted for 305 days in milk yield (MY305 of 49,676 Holsteins cows from 308 herds distributed among seven dairy production units in the state of Paraná, Brazil. The objective was to verify the genotype × environment interaction to MY305 of Holsteins cows between dairy

  18. Effect of Drought Stress onYield and Yield Components of Sesame cultivars under Kerman conditions (Sesamum indicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Farahbakhsh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To investigate effects of drought stress on yield and yield components of sesame in Kerman region a split-plot experiment based onn compelet randomised block design with three replications was carried out in 1388. Irrigation levels (Normal irrigation in all growth stages, witholding water after 50% flowering, witholding water after 50% pod setting and differen t sesame landraces (Jiroft, Shiraz, Ardestan, Dezful, Shahr babak, Gorgan, Sirjan, Markazi, Birjand and Orzueieh were considered as main plots and sub-plots respectively. Plant height, the biggest pod length, noumber of grain per pod, noumber of pod per plant, grain weight per plant, thousand grain weight and grain yield were the measured traits. Results showed all the measured traits were significantly affected by the irrigation treatments. The effects of different landraces on all traits except noumber of grain per plant were significant. Irrigation × landraces interaction affected all measured traits except the biggest pod length significantly. The highest grain yield was recorde for Markezi landrace (845.2 kg –ha under normal irrigation and the lowest one was obtained from Jiroft landrace (104.8 kg –ha with witholding irrigation after 50% flowering.

  19. Regression Models For Saffron Yields in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. H, Sanaeinejad; S. N, Hosseini

    Saffron is an important crop in social and economical aspects in Khorassan Province (Northeast of Iran). In this research wetried to evaluate trends of saffron yield in recent years and to study the relationship between saffron yield and the climate change. A regression analysis was used to predict saffron yield based on 20 years of yield data in Birjand, Ghaen and Ferdows cities.Climatologically data for the same periods was provided by database of Khorassan Climatology Center. Climatologically data includedtemperature, rainfall, relative humidity and sunshine hours for ModelI, and temperature and rainfall for Model II. The results showed the coefficients of determination for Birjand, Ferdows and Ghaen for Model I were 0.69, 0.50 and 0.81 respectively. Also coefficients of determination for the same cities for model II were 0.53, 0.50 and 0.72 respectively. Multiple regression analysisindicated that among weather variables, temperature was the key parameter for variation ofsaffron yield. It was concluded that increasing temperature at spring was the main cause of declined saffron yield during recent years across the province. Finally, yield trend was predicted for the last 5 years using time series analysis.

  20. Climate Change and Maize Yield in Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Twine, Tracy E; Girvetz, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Climate is changing across the world, including the major maize-growing state of Iowa in the USA. To maintain crop yields, farmers will need a suite of adaptation strategies, and choice of strategy will depend on how the local to regional climate is expected to change. Here we predict how maize yield might change through the 21st century as compared with late 20th century yields across Iowa, USA, a region representing ideal climate and soils for maize production that contributes substantially to the global maize economy. To account for climate model uncertainty, we drive a dynamic ecosystem model with output from six climate models and two future climate forcing scenarios. Despite a wide range in the predicted amount of warming and change to summer precipitation, all simulations predict a decrease in maize yields from late 20th century to middle and late 21st century ranging from 15% to 50%. Linear regression of all models predicts a 6% state-averaged yield decrease for every 1°C increase in warm season average air temperature. When the influence of moisture stress on crop growth is removed from the model, yield decreases either remain the same or are reduced, depending on predicted changes in warm season precipitation. Our results suggest that even if maize were to receive all the water it needed, under the strongest climate forcing scenario yields will decline by 10-20% by the end of the 21st century.

  1. Yields of rotating stars at solar metallicity

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschi, R; Maeder, A

    2004-01-01

    We present a new set of stellar yields obtained from rotating stellar models at solar metallicity covering the massive star range (12-60 solar masses). The stellar models were calculated with the latest version of the Geneva stellar evolution code described in Hirschi et al (2004). Evolution and nucleosynthesis are in general followed up to silicon burning. The yields of our non-rotating models are consistent with other calculations and differences can be understood in the light of the treatment of convection and the rate used for C12(a,g)O16. This verifies the accuracy of our calculations and gives a safe basis for studying the effects of rotation on the yields. The contributions from stellar winds and supernova explosions to the stellar yields are presented separately. We then add the two contributions to compute the total stellar yields. Below about 30 solar masses, rotation increases the total metal yields, Z, and in particular the yields of carbon and oxygen by a factor of 1.5-2.5. As a rule of thumb, th...

  2. Planting densities and Nitrogen level impact on yield and yield component of maize

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kashif Akhtar; Muhammad Zahir Afridi; Mansoor Akbar; Sajjad Zaheer; Shah Faisal

    2015-01-01

      An experiment was conducted to find out effect of planting densities and nitrogen levels on yield and yield components of maize at Toru Mardan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, during Kharif season 2014...

  3. Correlation of yield and yield components for afila and normal leave pea, Pissum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Radiša

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to research the correlation of yield and yield components of Afila and normal leaf Pea, we conducted a three years research (1993 - 1995. We have researched a correlative junction of yield and yield components (number of pods, number of grains per pod, number of grains per plant and the absolute grain weight of 8 Afila lines and 4 parent varieties. The results showed that the yield and yield components are highly related r - 0.82 - 0.95, while the absolute weight is not related to the yield r - 0, 19 and due to that it does not represent the yield component. The determined correlative values for all researched genotypes and parents were the same as previously researched by other authors, which leads us to the conclusion that the absence of leaves does not directly impact the change of correlative values.

  4. Optimizing rice yields while minimizing yield-scaled global warming potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittelkow, Cameron M; Adviento-Borbe, Maria A; van Kessel, Chris; Hill, James E; Linquist, Bruce A

    2014-05-01

    To meet growing global food demand with limited land and reduced environmental impact, agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are increasingly evaluated with respect to crop productivity, i.e., on a yield-scaled as opposed to area basis. Here, we compiled available field data on CH4 and N2 O emissions from rice production systems to test the hypothesis that in response to fertilizer nitrogen (N) addition, yield-scaled global warming potential (GWP) will be minimized at N rates that maximize yields. Within each study, yield N surplus was calculated to estimate deficit or excess N application rates with respect to the optimal N rate (defined as the N rate at which maximum yield was achieved). Relationships between yield N surplus and GHG emissions were assessed using linear and nonlinear mixed-effects models. Results indicate that yields increased in response to increasing N surplus when moving from deficit to optimal N rates. At N rates contributing to a yield N surplus, N2 O and yield-scaled N2 O emissions increased exponentially. In contrast, CH4 emissions were not impacted by N inputs. Accordingly, yield-scaled CH4 emissions decreased with N addition. Overall, yield-scaled GWP was minimized at optimal N rates, decreasing by 21% compared to treatments without N addition. These results are unique compared to aerobic cropping systems in which N2 O emissions are the primary contributor to GWP, meaning yield-scaled GWP may not necessarily decrease for aerobic crops when yields are optimized by N fertilizer addition. Balancing gains in agricultural productivity with climate change concerns, this work supports the concept that high rice yields can be achieved with minimal yield-scaled GWP through optimal N application rates. Moreover, additional improvements in N use efficiency may further reduce yield-scaled GWP, thereby strengthening the economic and environmental sustainability of rice systems.

  5. Maximizing oil yields may not optimize economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has used the ASPEN computer code to calculate the economics of different hydroretorting conditions. When the oil yield was maximized and a oil shale plant designed around this process, the costs turned out much higher than expected. However, calculations based on runs of less than maximum yields showed lower cost estimates. It is recommended that future efforts should be concentrated on minimizing production costs rather than maximizing yields. An oil shale plant has been designed around minimum production cost, but has not been able to be tested experimentally.

  6. Distinguishing Ordinal and Disordinal Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widaman, Keith F.; Helm, Jonathan L.; Castro-Schilo, Laura; Pluess, Michael; Stallings, Michael C.; Belsky, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Re-parameterized regression models may enable tests of crucial theoretical predictions involving interactive effects of predictors that cannot be tested directly using standard approaches. First, we present a re-parameterized regression model for the Linear x Linear interaction of 2 quantitative predictors that yields point and interval estimates…

  7. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Irrigation Levels of Drip Irrigation (Tape on Yield and Yield Components of Corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad karimi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the serious problems in the further development of maize cultivation is increasing irrigation efficiency. Using conventional irrigation causes a shortage of water resources to increase the acreage of the crop. With regard to the development of maize cultivation, agronomic and executable methods must be studied to reduce water consumption. Using drip irrigation system is most suitable for row crops. Hamedi et al. (2005 compared drip (tape and surface irrigation systems on yield of maize in different levels of water requirement and indicated that drip irrigation increases the amount of yield to 2015 kg/ha and water use efficiency to 3 time. Kohi et al. (2005 investigated the effects of deficit irrigation use of drip (tape irrigation on water use efficiency on maize in planting of one and two rows. The results showed that maximum water use efficiency related to crop density, water requirement and planting pattern 85000, 125% and two rows, respectively with 1.46 kg/m3. Jafari and Ashrafi (2011 studied the effects of irrigation levels, plant density and planting pattern in drip irrigation (tape on corn. The results showed that the amount of irrigation water and crop density on the level of 1% and their interactions and method of planting were significant at the 5 and 10% on water use efficiency, respectively. The yield was measured under different levels of irrigation, crop density and method of planting and the difference was significant on the level of 1%. Lamm et al. (1995 studied water requirement of maize in field with silt loam texture under sub drip irrigation and reported that water use reduced to 75%; but yield of maize remained at maximum amount of 12.5 t/ha. The objective of this study was to evaluate the drip (tape irrigation method for corn production practices in the Qazvin province in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this study, yield and yield components of corn (SC 704 were investigated under different levels of

  8. Rice yields and yield gaps in Southeast Asia: Past trends and future outlook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laborte, A.G.; Bie, de C.A.J.M.; Smaling, E.M.A.; Moya, P.F.; Boling, A.A.; Ittersum, van M.K.

    2012-01-01

    Rice production must increase to meet future food requirements amid strong competition for limited resources. Yield gap analysis is a useful method to examine how large the ranges are between potential, desirable rice yields and those actually realized in farmers’ fields. We analyzed farmers’ yields

  9. Separating heat stress from moisture stress: analyzing yield response to high temperature in irrigated maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Elizabeth K.; Melkonian, Jeff; Riha, Susan J.; Shaw, Stephen B.

    2016-09-01

    Several recent studies have indicated that high air temperatures are limiting maize (Zea mays L.) yields in the US Corn Belt and project significant yield losses with expected increases in growing season temperatures. Further work has suggested that high air temperatures are indicative of high evaporative demand, and that decreases in maize yields which correlate to high temperatures and vapor pressure deficits (VPD) likely reflect underlying soil moisture limitations. It remains unclear whether direct high temperature impacts on yields, independent of moisture stress, can be observed under current temperature regimes. Given that projected high temperature and moisture may not co-vary the same way as they have historically, quantitative analyzes of direct temperature impacts are critical for accurate yield projections and targeted mitigation strategies under shifting temperature regimes. To evaluate yield response to above optimum temperatures independent of soil moisture stress, we analyzed climate impacts on irrigated maize yields obtained from the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) corn yield contests for Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri. In irrigated maize, we found no evidence of a direct negative impact on yield by daytime air temperature, calculated canopy temperature, or VPD when analyzed seasonally. Solar radiation was the primary yield-limiting climate variable. Our analyses suggested that elevated night temperature impacted yield by increasing rates of phenological development. High temperatures during grain-fill significantly interacted with yields, but this effect was often beneficial and included evidence of acquired thermo-tolerance. Furthermore, genetics and management—information uniquely available in the NCGA contest data—explained more yield variability than climate, and significantly modified crop response to climate. Thermo-acclimation, improved genetics and changes to management practices have the potential to partially or completely

  10. The Effect of Mycorrhizal Fungi and Humic Acid on Yield and Yield Components of Sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh Veysi

    2017-03-01

    was performed using LSD method (at 5% level. The figures were prepared by Microsoft Excel. Results and discussion Mean comparisons showed that highest seed number per head belonged to plants under G. mosseae, without chemical fertilizer applying and without the use of humic acid (Fig. 5. The highest thousand seed weight obtained from using 8 and 16 kg.ha-1 humic acid without chemical fertilizer and applying 0 and 8 kg.ha-1 humic acid and using 50 and 100% chemical fertilizer. It seems that humic acid has antagonistic effects with chemical fertilizer in high levels. Interaction of humic acid and mycorrhiza species also showed that the highest thousand seed weight belonged to 8 kg.ha-1 humic acid and G. intraradices. Samarbakhash et al. (2009 in maize showed that Inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi significantly increased the average seed weight. The highest seed yield obtained from applying 50% chemical fertilizer and 8 kg.ha-1 humic acid. Mean comparison of interaction effect of humic acid levels and mycorrhiza strains also showed that the highest seed yield belonged to 8 kg.ha-1 humic acid and G. intraradices. This increase may be attributed to the extensive root development and hyphae that reduce the distance fordiffusion of essential elements thus enhancing the nutrient absorption. Mean comparison of interaction effect of chemical fertilizer levels and mycorrhiza strains indicated that chemical fertilizer levels had no considerable effect on G. mosseae efficiency from viewpoint of seed oil content but applying 50 and 100% chemical fertilizer along with using G. intraradices significantly increased seed oil content. Mirzakhani et al. (2008 in sprig safflower showed that mycorrhiza can solubilize phosphorus in soil and enhance absorb elements by plant. Conclusion In general, among applied humic acid levels, using 8 kg.ha-1 had positive effects on the studied traits of sunflower than its other levels. Furthermore, inoculation of seeds with mycorrhiza and using

  11. Suspended sediment yield in Texas watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coonrod, Julia Ellen Allred

    The Texas Water Development Board collected suspended sediment samples across the state of Texas for approximately 60 years. Until this research, no comprehensive analysis of the data had been conducted. This study compiles the suspended sediment data along with corresponding streamflow and rainfall. GIS programs are developed which characterize watersheds corresponding to the sediment gauging stations. The watersheds are characterized according to topography, climate, soils, and land use. All of the data is combined to form several SAS data sets which can subsequently be analyzed using regression. Annual data for all of the stations across the state are classified temporally and spatially to determine trends in the sediment yield. In general, the suspended sediment load increases with increasing runoff but no correlation exists with rainfall. However, the annual average rainfall can be used to classify the watersheds according to climate, which improves the correlation between sediment load and runoff. The watersheds with no dams have higher sediment loads than watersheds with dams. Dams in the drier parts of Texas reduce the sediment load more than dams in the wetter part of the state. Sediment rating curves are developed separately for each basin in Texas. All but one of the curves fall into a band which varies by about two orders of magnitude. The study analyzes daily time series data for the Lavaca River near Edna station. USGS data are used to improve the sediment rating curve by the addition of physically related variables and interaction terms. The model can explain an additional 41% of the variability in sediment concentration compared to a simple bivariate regression of sediment load and flow. The TWDB daily data for the Lavaca River near Edna station are used to quantify temporal trends. There is a high correlation between sediment load and flowrate for the Lavaca River. The correlation can be improved by considering a flow-squared term and by

  12. Modeling temporal and spatial variability of crop yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, S.; Manoli, G.; Scudiero, E.; Morari, F.; Putti, M.; Teatini, P.

    2014-12-01

    In a world of increasing food insecurity the development of modeling tools capable of supporting on-farm decision making processes is highly needed to formulate sustainable irrigation practices in order to preserve water resources while maintaining adequate crop yield. The design of these practices starts from the accurate modeling of soil-plant-atmosphere interaction. We present an innovative 3D Soil-Plant model that couples 3D hydrological soil dynamics with a mechanistic description of plant transpiration and photosynthesis, including a crop growth module. Because of its intrinsically three dimensional nature, the model is able to capture spatial and temporal patterns of crop yield over large scales and under various climate and environmental factors. The model is applied to a 25 ha corn field in the Venice coastland, Italy, that has been continuously monitored over the years 2010 and 2012 in terms of both hydrological dynamics and yield mapping. The model results satisfactorily reproduce the large variability observed in maize yield (from 2 to 15 ton/ha). This variability is shown to be connected to the spatial heterogeneities of the farmland, which is characterized by several sandy paleo-channels crossing organic-rich silty soils. Salt contamination of soils and groundwater in a large portion of the area strongly affects the crop yield, especially outside the paleo-channels, where measured salt concentrations are lower than the surroundings. The developed model includes a simplified description of the effects of salt concentration in soil water on transpiration. The results seem to capture accurately the effects of salt concentration and the variability of the climatic conditions occurred during the three years of measurements. This innovative modeling framework paves the way to future large scale simulations of farmland dynamics.

  13. Different universality classes at the yielding transition of amorphous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagla, E. A.

    2017-08-01

    We study the yielding transition of a two-dimensional amorphous system under shear by using a mesoscopic elasto-plastic model. The model combines a full (tensorial) description of the elastic interactions in the system and the possibility of structural reaccommodations that are responsible for the plastic behavior. The possible structural reaccommodations are encoded in the form of a "plastic disorder" potential, which is chosen independently at each position of the sample to account for local heterogeneities. We observe that the stress must exceed a critical value σc in order for the system to yield. In addition, when the system yields a flow curve (relating stress σ and strain rate γ ˙) of the form γ ˙˜(σ-σc) β is obtained. Remarkably, we observe the value of β to depend on some details of the plastic disorder potential. For smooth potentials a value of β ≃2.0 is obtained, whereas for potentials obtained as a concatenation of smooth pieces a value β ≃1.5 is observed in the simulations. This indicates a dependence of critical behavior on details of the plastic behavior. In addition, by integrating out nonessential, harmonic degrees of freedom, we derive a simplified scalar version of the model that represents a collection of interacting Prandtl-Tomlinson particles. A mean-field treatment of this interaction reproduces the difference of β exponents for the two classes of plastic disorder potentials and provides values of β that compare favorably with those found in the full simulations.

  14. Soybean Yield Determinants and Response to Rhizobial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    parameters (shoot, root, nodule number and shoot and nodule fresh weight) measured. ... the BNF and grain yield of the improved variety were significantly higher than the ..... On the whole, field ... nutrient loss especially N through leaching.

  15. N-acetylcysteine increased rice yield

    OpenAIRE

    NOZULAIDI, MOHD; JAHAN, MD SARWAR; KHAIRI, MOHD; Khandaker, Mohammad Moneruzzaman; Mat NASHRIYAH; KHANIF, YUSOP MOHD

    2015-01-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) biosynthesized reduced glutathione (GSH), which maintains redox homeostasis in plants under normal and stressful conditions. To justify the effects of NAC on rice production, we measured yield parameters, chlorophyll (Chl) content, minimum Chl fluorescence (Fo), maximum Chl fluorescence (Fm), quantum yield (Fv/Fm), net photosynthesis rate (Pn), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and relative water content (RWC). Four treatments, N1G0 (nitrogen (N) with no NAC), ...

  16. Stability analysis of oil yield in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) progenies in different environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, M Y; Jalani, B S; Rajanaidu, N; Kushairi, A; Puteh, A; Latif, M A

    2012-10-04

    We evaluated 38 dura x pisifera (DP) oil palm progenies in four locations in Malaysia for genotype by environment interaction and genotypic stability studies. The DP progenies derived from crosses between pisifera palms of AVROS, Serdang S27B, Serdang 29/36, and Lever Cameroon were chosen to be the males' parent and Deli dura palms designated as females' parent. All the locations differed in terms of soil physical and chemical properties, and the soil types ranged from coastal clay to inland soils. The genotype by environment interaction and stability of the individual genotypes were analyzed for oil yield trait using several stability techniques. A genotype by environment interaction was detected for oil yield and it had a larger variance component than genotypic variance (σ(2)(gl)/σ(2)(g) = 139.7%). Genotype by environment interaction of oil yield was largely explained by a non-linear relationship between genotypic and environmental values. Overall assessment of individual genotypic stability showed that seven genotypes were highly stable and had consistent performance over the environments for the oil yield trait [total individual genotype stability scored more than 10 and mean oil yielded above the average of the environment (genotype means are more than 34.37 kg·palm(-1)·year(-1))]. These genotypes will be useful for oil palm breeding and tissue culture programs for developing high oil yielding planting materials with stable performance.

  17. Yield criteria for quasibrittle and frictional materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bigoni, Davide

    2010-01-01

    A new yield/damage function is proposed for modelling the inelastic behaviour of a broad class of pressure-sensitive, frictional, ductile and brittle-cohesive materials. The yield function allows the possibility of describing a transition between the shape of a yield surface typical of a class of materials to that typical of another class of materals. This is a fundamental key to model the behaviour of materials which become cohesive during hardening (so that the shape of the yield surface evolves from that typical of a granular material to that typical of a dense material), or which decrease cohesion due to damage accumulation. The proposed yield function is shown to agree with a variety of experimental data relative to soil, concrete, rock, metallic and composite powders, metallic foams, porous metals, and polymers. The yield function represents a single, convex and smooth surface in stress space approaching as limit situations well-known criteria and the extreme limits of convexity in the deviatoric plane....

  18. Modulus and yield stress of drawn LDPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarungkul, Nandh

    Modulus and yield stress were investigated in drawn low density polyethylene (LDPE) film. Uniaxially drawn polymeric films usually show high values of modulus and yield stress, however, studies have normally only been conducted to identify the structural features that determine modulus. In this study small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), thermal shrinkage, birefringence, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) were used to examine, directly and indirectly, the structural features that determine both modulus and yield stress, which are often closely related in undrawn materials. Shish-kebab structures are proposed to account for the mechanical properties in drawn LDPE. The validity of this molecular/morphological model was tested using relationships between static mechanical data and structural and physical parameters. In addition, dynamic mechanical results are also in line with static data in supporting the model. In the machine direction (MD), "shish" and taut tie molecules (TTM) anchored in the crystalline phase account for E; whereas crystal lamellae with contributions from "shish" and TTM determine yield stress. In the transverse direction (TD), the crystalline phase plays an important roll in both modulus and yield stress. Modulus is determined by crystal lamellae functioning as platelet reinforcing elements in the amorphous matrix with an additional contributions from TTM and yield stress is determined by the crystal lamellae's resistance to deformation.

  19. Water limits to closing yield gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kyle Frankel; Rulli, Maria Cristina; Garrassino, Francesco; Chiarelli, Davide; Seveso, Antonio; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Agricultural intensification is often seen as a suitable approach to meet the growing demand for agricultural products and improve food security. It typically entails the use of fertilizers, new cultivars, irrigation, and other modern technology. In regions of the world affected by seasonal or chronic water scarcity, yield gap closure is strongly dependent on irrigation (blue water). Global yield gap assessments have often ignored whether the water required to close the yield gap is locally available. Here we perform a gridded global analysis (10 km resolution) of the blue water consumption that is needed annually to close the yield gap worldwide and evaluate the associated pressure on renewable freshwater resources. We find that, to close the yield gap, human appropriation of freshwater resources for irrigation would have to increase at least by 146%. Most study countries would experience at least a doubling in blue water requirement, with 71% of the additional blue water being required by only four crops - maize, rice, soybeans, and wheat. Further, in some countries (e.g., Algeria, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, and Yemen) the total volume of blue water required for yield gap closure would exceed sustainable levels of freshwater consumption (i.e., 40% of total renewable surface and groundwater resources).

  20. Addressing the yield by density interaction is a prerequisite to bridge the yield gap of rain‐fed wheat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tokatlidis, I.S

    2014-01-01

    ...‐dependent cultivars, relying on high populations, usually vary in optimum population. The optimum population is primarily affected by the water regime, while sowing date, heat, terminal drought, frost and type of soil are also indicators...

  1. Soliton interactions of integrable models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan Hangyu E-mail: hyruan@mail.nbip.net; Chen Yixin

    2003-08-01

    The solution of integrable (n+1)-dimensional KdV system in bilinear form yields a dromion solution that is localized in all directions. The interactions between two dromions are studied both in analytical and in numerical for three (n+1)-dimensional KdV-type equations (n=1, 2, 3). The same interactive properties between two dromions (solitons) are revealed for these models. The interactions between two dromions (solitons) may be elastic or inelastic for different form of solutions.

  2. Soliton interactions of integrable models

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan Hang Yu

    2003-01-01

    The solution of integrable (n+1)-dimensional KdV system in bilinear form yields a dromion solution that is localized in all directions. The interactions between two dromions are studied both in analytical and in numerical for three (n+1)-dimensional KdV-type equations (n=1, 2, 3). The same interactive properties between two dromions (solitons) are revealed for these models. The interactions between two dromions (solitons) may be elastic or inelastic for different form of solutions.

  3. Genetic Dissection of QTL Associated with Grain Yield in Diverse Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junli Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. breeding programs strive to increase grain yield; however, the progress is hampered due to its quantitative inheritance, low heritability, and confounding environmental effects. In the present study, a winter wheat population of 159 recombinant inbred lines (RILs was evaluated in six trials under rainfed, terminal drought, and fully-irrigated conditions, over four years. Quantitative trait locus/loci (QTL mapping was conducted for grain yield main effect (GY and the genotype × environment interaction (GEI effect. A total of 17 QTL were associated with GY and 13 QTL associated with GEI, and nine QTL were mapped in the flanking chromosomal regions for both GY and GEI. One major QTL Q.Gy.ui-1B.2, explaining up to 22% of grain yield, was identified in all six trials. Besides the additive effect of QTL associated with GY, interactions among QTL (QTL × QTL interaction, QTL × environment, and QTL × QTL × environment were also observed. When combining the interaction effects, QTL Q.Gy.ui-1B.2 along with other QTL explained up to 52% of the variation in grain yield over the six trials. This study suggests that QTL mapping of complex traits such as grain yield should include interaction effects of QTL and environments in marker-assisted selection.

  4. Soil Texture and Cultivar Effects on Rice (Oryza sativa, L.) Grain Yield, Yield Components and Water Productivity in Three Water Regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Fugen; Soriano, Junel; Tabien, Rodante E; Chen, Kun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of water regime/soil condition (continuous flooding, saturated, and aerobic), cultivar ('Cocodrie' and 'Rondo'), and soil texture (clay and sandy loam) on rice grain yield, yield components and water productivity using a greenhouse trial. Rice grain yield was significantly affected by soil texture and the interaction between water regime and cultivar. Significantly higher yield was obtained in continuous flooding than in aerobic and saturated soil conditions but the latter treatments were comparable to each other. For Rondo, its grain yield has decreased with soil water regimes in the order of continuous flooding, saturated and aerobic treatments. The rice grain yield in clay soil was 46% higher than in sandy loam soil averaged across cultivar and water regime. Compared to aerobic condition, saturated and continuous flooding treatments had greater panicle numbers. In addition, panicle number in clay soil was 25% higher than in sandy loam soil. The spikelet number of Cocodrie was 29% greater than that of Rondo, indicating that rice cultivar had greater effect on spikelet number than soil type and water management. Water productivity was significantly affected by the interaction of water regime and cultivar. Compared to sandy loam soil, clay soil was 25% higher in water productivity. Our results indicated that cultivar selection and soil texture are important factors in deciding what water management option to practice.

  5. Soil Texture and Cultivar Effects on Rice (Oryza sativa, L. Grain Yield, Yield Components and Water Productivity in Three Water Regimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fugen Dou

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effects of water regime/soil condition (continuous flooding, saturated, and aerobic, cultivar ('Cocodrie' and 'Rondo', and soil texture (clay and sandy loam on rice grain yield, yield components and water productivity using a greenhouse trial. Rice grain yield was significantly affected by soil texture and the interaction between water regime and cultivar. Significantly higher yield was obtained in continuous flooding than in aerobic and saturated soil conditions but the latter treatments were comparable to each other. For Rondo, its grain yield has decreased with soil water regimes in the order of continuous flooding, saturated and aerobic treatments. The rice grain yield in clay soil was 46% higher than in sandy loam soil averaged across cultivar and water regime. Compared to aerobic condition, saturated and continuous flooding treatments had greater panicle numbers. In addition, panicle number in clay soil was 25% higher than in sandy loam soil. The spikelet number of Cocodrie was 29% greater than that of Rondo, indicating that rice cultivar had greater effect on spikelet number than soil type and water management. Water productivity was significantly affected by the interaction of water regime and cultivar. Compared to sandy loam soil, clay soil was 25% higher in water productivity. Our results indicated that cultivar selection and soil texture are important factors in deciding what water management option to practice.

  6. Genotype W environment interaction effects on some physiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genotype W environment interaction effects on some physiological yield ... Ghana Journal of Agricultural Science ... study the yield basis and environmental effects on 31cowpea genotypes of early, medium and late maturities. ... Article Metrics.

  7. Correlation and path coefficient analysis of yield and yield component in some of broad bean (Vicia faba l. genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifi Peyman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Faba bean is a grain legume and grown for its high protein content in the seed. It is also serves as a rotational crop which play great role in controlling disease epidemics in areas were cereal mono-cropping is abundant. Yield in faba bean, similar to the other crops, is a complex trait and constitute by many of morphological and physiological traits. This study was carried out during 2011-12 and 2012-13 in two region of Iran including Guilan and Lorestan provinces. Field experiments were conducted in a randomized complete block design with three replications and ten genotypes. The results of combined analysis of variance indicated that the studied genotypes differed significantly for all of the studied traits. The results indicated also environment effect and environment × genotype interaction effects were significant or highly significant for all of the traits. The highest seed yield were determined for genotype 1 (3159.9 and 4016.9 kg ha-1 at 2012 and 2013, respectively in Guilan and genotype 5 (495.44 kg ha-1 in Lorestan. The results of correlation analysis indicated that there were positive significant correlation coefficients between seed yield and seed length (LS, seed width (WS, pod length (PL and hundred seed weight (HSW in Guilan province at two cropping season. Path coefficient analysis indicated that traits containing number of pod per plant, number of steam per plant, pod length, seed length/width ratio and hundred seed weight had the highest positive direct effects on dry seed yield in studied faba bean genotypes. Attention should be paid to some of characters such as pod length, hundred seed weight, number of pods per plant and number of stems per plant for augmentation of seed yield and these traits could be used as selection criteria in faba bean breeding programs. These findings indicate that selection for each or full of the above traits would be accompanied by high yielding ability under such conditions. It could be

  8. Role of Yield Stress in Magma Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, A.; Di Giuseppe, E.; Davaille, A.; Kurita, K.

    2012-04-01

    Magmas are essentially multiphase material composed of solid crystals, gaseous bubbles and silicate liquids. They exhibit various types of drastic change in rheology with variation of mutual volumetric fractions of the components. The nature of this variable rheology is a key factor in controlling dynamics of flowing magma through a conduit. Particularly the existence of yield stress in flowing magma is expected to control the wall friction and formation of density waves. As the volumetric fraction of solid phase increases yield stress emerges above the critical fraction. Several previous studies have been conducted to clarify this critical value of magmatic fluid both in numerical simulations and laboratory experiments ([Lejeune and Pascal, 1995], [Saar and Manga 2001], [Ishibashi and Sato 2010]). The obtained values range from 13.3 to 40 vol%, which display wide variation and associated change in rheology has not been clarified well. In this presentation we report physical mechanism of emergence of yield stress in suspension as well as the associated change in the rheology based on laboratory experiments using analog material. We utilized thermogel aqueous suspension as an analog material of multiphase magma. Thermogel, which is a commercial name for poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAM) undergoes volumetric phase change at the temperature around 35C:below this temperature the gel phase absorbs water and swells while below this it expels water and its volume shrinks. Because of this the volumetric fraction of gel phase systematically changes with temperature and the concentration of gel powder. The viscosity measured at lower stress drastically decreases across this phase change with increasing temperature while the viscosity at higher stress does not exhibit large change across the transition. We have performed a series of rheological measurements focusing on the emergence of yield stress on this aqueous suspension. Since the definition of yield stress is not

  9. Engineered semiconductor nanocrystals with enhanced carrier multiplication yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Victor

    2014-03-01

    Carrier multiplication (CM) is a process whereby absorption of a single photon results in multiple electron-hole pairs (excitons). This process could benefit a number of solar-energy conversion technologies, most notably photocatalysis and photovoltaics. This presentation overviews recent progress in understanding the CM process in semiconductor nanocrystals, motivated by an outstanding challenge in this field - the lack of capability to predict the CM performance of nanocrystals based on their known photophysical properties or documented parameters of parental bulk solids. Here, we present a possible solution to this problem by showing that, using biexciton Auger lifetimes and intraband relaxation rates inferred from ultrafast spectroscopic studies, we can rationalize relative changes in CM yields as a function of nanocrystal composition, size and shape. Further, guided by this model, we demonstrate a two-fold enhancement in multiexciton yields in PbSe nanorods vs. quantum dots attributed to enhanced Coulomb interactions. We also explore the control of competing intra-band cooling for increasing multiexciton production. Specifically, we design a new type of hetero-structured PbSe/CdSe quantum dots with reduced rates of intra-band relaxation and demonstrate a four-fold boost in the multiexciton yield. These studies provide useful guidelines for future efforts to achieve the ultimate, energy-conservation-defined CM efficiencies.

  10. Laser heating challenges of high yield MagLIF targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutz, Stephen; Sefkow, Adam; Vesey, Roger

    2014-10-01

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept is predicted by numerical simulation to produce fusion yields of about 100 kJ, when driven by 25 MA from the existing Z accelerator [S. A. Slutz et al. Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] and much higher yields with future accelerators delivering higher currents [Slutz and Vesey PRL 108, 025003 (2012)]. The fuel must be heated before compression to obtain significant fusion yields due to the relatively slow implosion velocities (~ 100 km/s) of magnetically driven liners. Lasers provide a convenient means to accomplish this pre-compressional heating of the fusion fuel, but there are challenges. The laser must penetrate a foil covering the laser entrance hole and deposit 20-30 kJ within the ~1 cm length of the liner in fuel at 6-12 mg/cc. Such high densities could result in beam scattering due to refraction and laser plasma interactions. Numerical simulations of the laser heating process are presented, which indicate that energies as high as 30 kJ could be deposited in the fuel by using two laser pulses of different wavelengths. Simulations of this process will be presented as well of results for a MagLIF design for a potential new machine delivering 50 MA of current. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Year-to-Year and Maturity Variation in Rainfed Soybean Yield by Planting Dates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jin-zhong; Mark Alley; Jon Roygard

    2004-01-01

    The interactions on rainfed soybean yield among planting date,maturity,and year-to-year climate change were studied using CROPGRO-soybeanmodel.Simulations were based on 19 planting dates,maturity groupsⅢ,Ⅳ and V,30 years recorded weather data from Corbin,Suffolk,West Point in Virginia,USA.Yield was similar on early plantings and went down with late plantings.Both grand and year-to-year variation of soybean yield declined linearly with planting date.Year-to-year climate variation was dominant yield variation source in rainfed soybean production.Interaction occurred between planting date and maturity.Optimal planting dates for different sites lied within 130th-170th day of a year.Irrigation is recommended for profitable crops,especially in Corbin and West Point.

  12. Defect reduction methodologies: pellicle yield improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Susan V.

    1993-03-01

    The pelliclization process at Intel during the first half of 1991 was not in control. Weekly process yield was trending downward, and the range of the weekly yield during that time frame was greater than 40%. A focused effort in process yield improvement, that started in the second half of 1991 and continued through 1992, brought process yield up an average of 20%, and reduced the range of the process yield to 20 - 25%. This paper discusses the continuous process improvement guidelines that are being followed to reduce variations/defects in the pelliclization process. Teamwork tools, such as Pareto charts, fishbone diagrams, and simple experiments, prioritize efforts and help find the root cause of the defects. Best known methods (BKM), monitors, PMs, and excursion control aid in the elimination and prevention of defects. Monitoring progress and repeating the whole procedure are the final two guidelines. The benefits from the use of the continuous process improvement guidelines and tools can be seen in examples of the actions, impacts, and results for the last half of 1991 and the first half of 1992.

  13. Soybean growth and yield under cover crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila de Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of cover crops in no-tillage systems can provide better conditions for the development of soybean plants with positive effects on grain yield and growth analysis techniques allow researchers to characterize and understand the behavior of soybean plants under different straw covers. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize, using growth analysis, yield components and agronomic performance of soybean under common bean, Brachiaria brizantha and pearl millet straws. The experiment was performed on a soil under cerrado in the municipality of Santo Antônio de Goiás, GO. The experiment was arranged in a randomized complete block design with three treatments (cover crops and five replications. Soybean grain yield was lower in the B. brizantha straw treatment (3,708 kg ha-1 than both in the pearl millet (4.772 kg ha-1 and common bean straw treatments (5,200 kg ha-1. The soybean growth analysis in B. brizantha, pearl millet and common bean allowed characterizing the variation in the production of dry matter of leaves, stems, pods and total and leaf area index that provided different grain yields. The cover crop directly affects the soybean grain yield.

  14. Particle debonding using different yield criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Kuroda, Mitsutoshi

    2004-01-01

    is subjected to a fixed biaxial stress state. Four phenomenological anisotropic yield criteria are considered, namely Hill [Hill, R., 1948. Proc. Roy. Soc. London Ser. A 193, 281-297], Barlat and Lian [Barlat, F., Lian, J., 1989. Int. J. Plasticity 5, 51-66], Barlat et al. [Barlat, F., Lege, D.J., Brem, J.......C., 1991. Int. J. Plasticity 7, 693-712; Barlat, F., et al., 2003. Int. J. Plasticity 19, 1297-1319], or the von Mises isotropic yield surface. Also a non-normality flow rule is adopted in some of the studies. Significant effects of plastic anisotropy are seen on the plane stress cell, due to the initial...... extent and shape of the particular yield function considered. The required overall straining of the cell for debonding initiation is related to the extent of the yield surfaces, since a high yield stress promotes debonding. Additionally, the maximum overall stress level for the cell is lower for the Hill...

  15. STABILITY AND ADAPTABILITY OF SEVERAL SOYBEAN OS-CULTIVARS IN THE GRAIN YIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Sudarić

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to evaluate the level and stability of grain yield and adaptability of several domestic soybean cultivars. Trials were conducted on the experimental field of the Agricultural Institute Osijek during five years (1996-2000 and involved 14 soybean cultivars: Kaja, Una, Iva, Ilova, Lika, Drina, Tisa, Vuka, Nada, Podravka 95, Kuna, Ika, Anica, Kruna. All tested cultivars were created in soybean breeding programme at the Agricultural Institute Osijek. Data for grain yield were subjected to analysis of variance followed by LSD test. Stability of grain yield for each cultivar was estimated by three parameters: regression coefficient (bi, ecovalence (Wi and portion of genotype x environment variance due to the contribution of each genotype to total variance of genotype x environment interaction (S2GxY. Correlations between grain yield and stability parameters as well as among stability parameters were calculated. The summarised results indicate significant variation in level and stability of grain yield and adaptability of cultivars. Among 14 tested cultivars, six cultivars: Ika, Podravka 95, Anica, Kuna, Tisa and Drina had high and stable grain yield and wide-general adaptability. Correlation between grain yield and stability parameters has indicated that simultaneous selection on high and stable grain yield is possible. Very high significant positive correlation between parameters Wi and S2GxYindicate using of smaller number of parameters for stability estimation of grain yield without reduction of the estimation accuracy.

  16. Event-Based Modeling of Driver Yielding Behavior at Unsignalized Crosswalks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Bastian J; Rouphail, Nagui M

    2011-07-01

    This research explores factors associated with driver yielding behavior at unsignalized pedestrian crossings and develops predictive models for yielding using logistic regression. It considers the effect of variables describing driver attributes, pedestrian characteristics and concurrent conditions at the crosswalk on the yield response. Special consideration is given to 'vehicle dynamics constraints' that form a threshold for the potential to yield. Similarities are identified to driver reaction in response to the 'amber' indication at a signalized intersection. The logit models were developed from data collected at two unsignalized mid-block crosswalks in North Carolina. The data include 'before' and 'after' observations of two pedestrian safety treatments, an in-street pedestrian crossing sign and pedestrian-actuated in-roadway warning lights.The analysis suggests that drivers are more likely to yield to assertive pedestrians who walk briskly in their approach to the crosswalk. In turn, the yield probability is reduced with higher speeds, deceleration rates and if vehicles are traveling in platoons. The treatment effects proved to be significant and increased the propensity of drivers to yield, but their effectiveness may be dependent on whether the pedestrian activates the treatment.The results of this research provide new insights on the complex interaction of pedestrians and vehicles at unsignalized intersections and have implications for future work towards predictive models for driver yielding behavior. The developed logit models can provide the basis for representing driver yielding behavior in a microsimulation modeling environment.

  17. Yield and Solidification of Yield-Stress Materials in Rigid Networks and Porous Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sochi, Taha

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we address the issue of threshold yield pressure of yield-stress materials in rigid networks of interconnected conduits and porous structures subject to a pressure gradient. We compare the results as obtained dynamically from solving the pressure field to those obtained statically from tracing the path of the minimum sum of threshold yield pressures of the individual conduits by using the threshold path algorithms. We refute criticisms directed recently to our previous findings that the pressure field solution generally produces a higher threshold yield pressure than the one obtained by the threshold path algorithms. Issues related to the solidification of yield stress materials in their transition from fluid phase to solid state have also been investigated and assessed as part of the investigation of the yield point.

  18. Climate risks on potato yield in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xun; Lall, Upmanu

    2016-04-01

    The yield of potatoes is affected by water and temperature during the growing season. We study the impact of a suite of climate variables on potato yield at country level. More than ten climate variables related to the growth of potato are considered, including the seasonal rainfall and temperature, but also extreme conditions at different averaging periods from daily to monthly. A Bayesian hierarchical model is developed to jointly consider the risk of heat stress, cold stress, wet and drought. Future climate risks are investigated through the projection of future climate data. This study contributes to assess the risks of present and future climate risks on potatoes yield, especially the risks of extreme events, which could be used to guide better sourcing strategy and ensure food security in the future.

  19. Principal component regression for crop yield estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Suryanarayana, T M V

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the estimation of crop yield in Central Gujarat, especially with regard to the development of Multiple Regression Models and Principal Component Regression (PCR) models using climatological parameters as independent variables and crop yield as a dependent variable. It subsequently compares the multiple linear regression (MLR) and PCR results, and discusses the significance of PCR for crop yield estimation. In this context, the book also covers Principal Component Analysis (PCA), a statistical procedure used to reduce a number of correlated variables into a smaller number of uncorrelated variables called principal components (PC). This book will be helpful to the students and researchers, starting their works on climate and agriculture, mainly focussing on estimation models. The flow of chapters takes the readers in a smooth path, in understanding climate and weather and impact of climate change, and gradually proceeds towards downscaling techniques and then finally towards development of ...

  20. Fission yield studies at the IGISOL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penttilae, H.; Elomaa, V.V.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I.D.; Rahaman, S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Weber, C.; Aeystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Rubchenya, V. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-04-15

    Low-energy-particle-induced fission is a cost-effective way to produce neutron-rich nuclei for spectroscopic studies. Fission has been utilized at the IGISOL to produce isotopes for decay and nuclear structure studies, collinear laser spectroscopy and precision mass measurements. The ion guide technique is also very suitable for the fission yield measurements, which can be performed very efficiently by using the Penning trap for fission fragment identification and counting. The proton- and neutron-induced fission yield measurements at the IGISOL are reviewed, and the independent isotopic yields of Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Cd and In in 25MeV deuterium-induced fission are presented for the first time. Moving to a new location next to the high intensity MCC30/15 light-ion cyclotron will allow also the use of the neutron-induced fission to produce the neutron rich nuclei at the IGISOL in the future. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of trends in wheat yield models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Trend terms in models for wheat yield in the U.S. Great Plains for the years 1932 to 1976 are evaluated. The subset of meteorological variables yielding the largest adjusted R(2) is selected using the method of leaps and bounds. Latent root regression is used to eliminate multicollinearities, and generalized ridge regression is used to introduce bias to provide stability in the data matrix. The regression model used provides for two trends in each of two models: a dependent model in which the trend line is piece-wise continuous, and an independent model in which the trend line is discontinuous at the year of the slope change. It was found that the trend lines best describing the wheat yields consisted of combinations of increasing, decreasing, and constant trend: four combinations for the dependent model and seven for the independent model.

  2. Predicting spring barley yield from variety-specific yield potential, disease resistance and straw length, and from environment-specific disease loads and weed pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergård, Hanne; Kristensen, Kristian; Pinnschmidt, Hans O.;

    2008-01-01

    For low-input crop production, well-characterised varieties increase the possibilities of managing diseases and weeds. This analysis aims at developing a framework for analyzing grain yield using external varietal information about disease resistance, weed competitiveness and yield potential...... and quantifying the impact of susceptibility grouping and straw length scores (as a measure for weed competitiveness) for predicting spring barley grain yield under variable biotic stress levels. The study comprised 52 spring barley varieties and 17 environments, i.e., combinations of location, growing system...... and year. Individual varieties and their interactions with environments were analysed by factorial regression of grain yield on external variety information combined with observed environmental disease loads and weed pressure. The external information was based on the official Danish VCU testing. The most...

  3. Spin-dependent np {yields}pn amplitude estimated from dp{yields}ppn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glagolev, V.V.; Khvastunov, M.S.; Ladygina, N.B.; Piskunov, N.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Hlavacova, J. [Technical University, Park Komenskeho 2, SK-04200, Kosice (Slovakia); Martinska, G.; Urban, J. [University of P.J. Safarik, Jesenna 5, SK-04154 Kosice (Slovakia); Musinsky, J. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); University of P.J. Safarik, Jesenna 5, SK-04154 Kosice (Slovakia); Pastircak, B. [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, SK-04353, Kosice (Slovakia); Siemiarczuk, T. [Institute of Nuclear Studies,ul. Hoza 69, Warsaw, PL-00 681 (Poland)

    2002-12-01

    An estimation of the spin-dependent part of the np{yields}pn charge exchange amplitude was made on the basis of dp{yields}(pp)n data, taken at 1.67 GeV/c per nucleon in a full solid-angle arrangement. The np{yields}pn amplitude turned out to be entirely spin-dependent. This result shows new possibilities for experiments using polarized deuteron beams and polarized proton targets. (orig.)

  4. yield and yield componemts of extra early maize (zea mays l.)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SHARIFAI

    yielded the control but at par with 4 and 6 t ha-1 in most of the yield attributes. The optimum yield .... basal fertilizer application of 19.97 kg K ha-1 (45 kg. K2O) and 37.35 kg P ... of urea (46%N) was applied in two split doses as per treatment at 3 and 5 WAS ..... holding capacity of soil and are source of slow-release nutrient.

  5. Combining Costs and Benefits of Animal Activities to Assess Net Yield Outcomes in Apple Orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Manu E; Luck, Gary W

    2016-01-01

    Diverse animal communities influence ecosystem function in agroecosystems through positive and negative plant-animal interactions. Yet, past research has largely failed to examine multiple interactions that can have opposing impacts on agricultural production in a given context. We collected data on arthropod communities and yield quality and quantity parameters (fruit set, yield loss and net outcomes) in three major apple-growing regions in south-eastern Australia. We quantified the net yield outcome (accounting for positive and negative interactions) of multiple animal activities (pollination, fruit damage, biological control) across the entire growing season on netted branches, which excluded vertebrate predators of arthropods, and open branches. Net outcome was calculated as the number of undamaged fruit at harvest as a proportion of the number of blossoms (i.e., potential fruit yield). Vertebrate exclusion resulted in lower levels of fruit set and higher levels of arthropod damage to apples, but did not affect net outcomes. Yield quality and quantity parameters (fruit set, yield loss, net outcomes) were not directly associated with arthropod functional groups. Model variance and significant differences between the ratio of pest to beneficial arthropods between regions indicated that complex relationships between environmental factors and multiple animal interactions have a combined effect on yield. Our results show that focusing on a single crop stage, species group or ecosystem function/service can overlook important complexity in ecological processes within the system. Accounting for this complexity and quantifying the net outcome of ecological interactions within the system, is more informative for research and management of biodiversity and ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes.

  6. Combining Costs and Benefits of Animal Activities to Assess Net Yield Outcomes in Apple Orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    Diverse animal communities influence ecosystem function in agroecosystems through positive and negative plant-animal interactions. Yet, past research has largely failed to examine multiple interactions that can have opposing impacts on agricultural production in a given context. We collected data on arthropod communities and yield quality and quantity parameters (fruit set, yield loss and net outcomes) in three major apple-growing regions in south-eastern Australia. We quantified the net yield outcome (accounting for positive and negative interactions) of multiple animal activities (pollination, fruit damage, biological control) across the entire growing season on netted branches, which excluded vertebrate predators of arthropods, and open branches. Net outcome was calculated as the number of undamaged fruit at harvest as a proportion of the number of blossoms (i.e., potential fruit yield). Vertebrate exclusion resulted in lower levels of fruit set and higher levels of arthropod damage to apples, but did not affect net outcomes. Yield quality and quantity parameters (fruit set, yield loss, net outcomes) were not directly associated with arthropod functional groups. Model variance and significant differences between the ratio of pest to beneficial arthropods between regions indicated that complex relationships between environmental factors and multiple animal interactions have a combined effect on yield. Our results show that focusing on a single crop stage, species group or ecosystem function/service can overlook important complexity in ecological processes within the system. Accounting for this complexity and quantifying the net outcome of ecological interactions within the system, is more informative for research and management of biodiversity and ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes. PMID:27391022

  7. Quality and Yield of Cannabis Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastorp, Grith; Lindholst, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. 180 seizures containing 667 different samples of cannabis products from 5 police districts in Jutland were examined from 2008 to the present. The samples were divided into the groups: hashish, marihuana (leaves and buds) and whole plants (indoors and outdoors). Cannabis seized from indoor...... cultivation was examined in order to determine THC content and yield. The results are used by the Danish Police Attorney to estimate expected yields in cases with unripe cannabis plants. The results indicate that the THC content found in locally grown marihuana is slightly higher than in hashish. However...

  8. Amplitude Models for Discrimination and Yield Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, William Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This seminar presentation describes amplitude models and yield estimations that look at the data in order to inform legislation. The following points were brought forth in the summary: global models that will predict three-component amplitudes (R-T-Z) were produced; Q models match regional geology; corrected source spectra can be used for discrimination and yield estimation; three-component data increase coverage and reduce scatter in source spectral estimates; three-component efforts must include distance-dependent effects; a community effort on instrument calibration is needed.

  9. Experimental assessment of bacterial storage yield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karahan-Gül, Ö.; Artan, N.; Orhon, D.;

    2002-01-01

    An experimental procedure was developed for the respirometric determination of bacterial storage yield as defined in the Activated Sludge Model No. 3. The proposed approach is based on the oxygen utilization rate (OUR) profile obtained from a batch test and correlates the area under the OUR curve...... to the amount of oxygen associated with substrate storage. Model simulation was used to evaluate the procedure for different initial experimental conditions. The procedure was tested on acetate. The same storage yield value of 0.76 gCOD/gCOD was calculated for two experiments, starting with different F/M ratios...

  10. PREOVULATORY FOLLICLE DEVELOPMENT IN HIGH YIELDING COWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Tomášek

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the development of preovulatory follicles in pregnant and non-pregnant high yielding cows. The treatment by supergestran and oestrophan was used to synchronize the estrous cycle. Ovaries were monitored by transrectal ultrasonography. The linear increase of preovulatory follicles was observed in pregnant (P < 0,001 and non-pregnant (P < 0,001 cows during 8 days before ovulation. In conclusion, preovulatory follicles in pregnant and non-pregnant high yielding cows developed similarly.

  11. Comparison of statistical models to estimate daily milk yield in single milking testing schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Klopcˇic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Different statistical models were compared to estimate daily milk yield from morning or evening milking test results. The experiment was conducted on 14 family farms with 325 recorded cows. The amount of explained variance was higher for models including the effects of partial milk yield, the interval between successive milking, the interaction between partial milk yield and the milking interval and the farm (R2 = 0.976 for AM, R2 = 0.956 for PM than for models including partial milk yield effect only (R2 = 0.957 for AM, R2 = 0.937 for PM. Estimates of daily milk yield from linear models were more accurate than those obtained by doubling single milking weights. The results show that more complex model gives the best fit to the data. Differences between models according to determination and correlation coefficient were minor. Further investigations on larger sets of data are needed to draw more general conclusion.

  12. Analysis of hadron yield data within hadron resonance gas model with multi-component eigenvolume corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Vovchenko, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the sensitivity of thermal fits to heavy-ion hadron yield data of ALICE and NA49 collaborations to the systematic uncertainties in the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model related to the modeling of the eigenvolume interactions. We find a surprisingly large sensitivity in extraction of chemical freeze-out parameters to the assumptions regarding eigenvolumes of different hadrons. We additionally study the effect of including yields of light nuclei into the thermal fits to LHC data and find even larger sensitivity to the modeling of their eigenvolumes. The inclusion of light nuclei yields, thus, may lead to further destabilization of thermal fits. Our results show that modeling of eigenvolume interactions plays a crucial role in thermodynamics of HRG and that conclusions based on a non-interacting HRG are not unique.

  13. Yielding and post-yield behaviour of closed-cell cellular materials under multiaxial dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesenjak, Matej; Ren, Zoran

    2016-05-01

    The paper focuses on characterisation of yielding and post-yield behaviour of metals with closed-cell cellular structure when subjected to multiaxial dynamic loading, considering the influence of the relative density, base material, strain rate and pore gas pressure. Research was conducted by extensive parametric fully-coupled computational simulations using the finite element code LS-DYNA. Results have shown that the macroscopic yield stress of cellular material rises with increase of the relative density, while its dependence on the hydrostatic stress decreases. The yield limit also rises with increase of the strain rate, while the hydrostatic stress influence remains more or less the same at different strain-rates. The macroscopic yield limit of the cellular material is also strongly influenced by the choice of base material since the base materials with higher yield limit contribute also to higher macroscopic yield limit of the cellular material. By increasing the pore gas filler pressure the dependence on hydrostatic stress increases while at the same time the yield surface shifts along the hydrostatic axis in the negative direction. This means that yielding at compression is delayed due to influence of the initial pore pressure and occurs at higher compressive loading, while the opposite is true for tensile loading.

  14. Zero tillage: A potential technology to improve cotton yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Hafiz Ghazanfar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zero tillage technology revealed with no use of any soil inverting technique to grow crops. The crop plant seed is planted in the soil directly after irrigation to make the soil soft without any replenishing in soil layers. A study was conducted to evaluate cotton genotypes FH-114 and FH-142 for the consecutive three years of growing seasons from 2013-15. The seed of both genotypes was sown with two date of sowing, 1 March and 1 May of each three years of sowing under three tillage treatments (zero tillage, minimum tillage and conventional tillage in triplicate completely randomized split-split plot design. It was found from results that significant differences were recorded for tillage treatments, date of sowing, genotypes and their interactions. Multivariate analysis was performed to evaluate the yield and it attributed traits for potential of FH-114 and FH-142 cotton genotypes. The genotype FH-142 was found with higher and batter performance as compared to FH-114 under zero tillage, minimum tillage and conventional tillage techniques. The traits bolls per plant, boll weight, fibre fineness, fibre strength, plant height, cotton yield per plant and sympodial branches per plant were found as most contributing traits towards cotton yield and production. It was also found that FH-142 gives higher output in terms of economic gain under zero tillage with 54% increase as compared to conventional tillage technique. It was suggested that zero tillage technology should be adopted to improve cotton yield and quality. It was also recommended that further study to evaluate zero tillage as potential technology should be performed with different regions, climate and timing throughout the world.

  15. The Impacts of Mycorrhiza and Phsphorus Along with the Use of Salicylic Acid on Maize Seed Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedra Taheri Oshtrinani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of biological and chemical fertilizers, along with the use of salicylic acid, on the agronomic characteristics of corn in a factorial experiment based on randomized complete block design with three replications were evaluated at the Agricultural Research Station of Boroujerd in 2011. Factors were three levels of phosphorus fertilizer (0, 100 and 150 kg ha, two levels of biological fertilizers (mycorrhizal fungi (inoculation and non- inoculation of seeds and two levels of salicylic acid (0.5 and 1 mM, respectively. The results showed that phosphorus fertilizer and mycorrhizal inoculation of seeds affected number of seed rows, seed weight, seed yield and biological yield significantly. Seed yield of plants inoculated with mycorrhiza was 8412 kg.ha-1 which is 24% higher than non-inoculated ones. The effect of salicylic acid on plant height, stem diameter, ear length, ear diameter, number of seed rows, seed weight, seed yield and biological yield and harvest index was also significant. The yield of plants with 1 mM salicylic acid treatment amounted to be 8316 kg.ha-1 which is 24% higher than none treated ones. Phosphorus and mycorrhizal interaction on the number of rows of seeds, seed weight, seed yield and biological yield were significant. Salicylic acid and phosphorus interactions and three way treatment effects were only significant on grain yield. This study showed that salicylic acid and mycorrhizal inoculation of seeds can increase seed yield by improving yield components.

  16. Grain yield, net blotch and scald of barley in Finnish official variety trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. ROBINSON

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Data on grain yield, and terminal severity of net blotch (Pyrenophora teres f. teres and scald (Rhynchosporium secalis from Finnish official barley (Hordeum vulgare variety trials were analysed to indicate the pattern of disease incidence over six years and five sites for nineteen barley genotypes, and the effect of the diseases on yield and the genotype by environment interaction for yield. The effect of climatic factors on net blotch severity were also investigated. The genotype by site interaction for net blotch severity was not statistically significant, but that for yield was. Net blotch severity differed between years, but was similar across sites and there were statistically significant first order interactions between year, site and genotype. 'Saana' and 'Thule' had relatively low mean terminal net blotch scores and their reaction to the disease was less sensitive to the environment than was that of 'Tyra' for example. Analysis of yield data adjusted for net blotch severity indicated that the magnitude of the genotype by environment interaction terms were not accounted for to any significant degree by differences in relative net blotch resistances among the barley genotypes. Overall, mean scores for scald severity were lower than those for net blotch. Terminal net blotch severity was correlated with May rainfall and growing degree days.;

  17. AMMI analysis of the adaptability and yield stability of yellow passion fruit varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Jorge de Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available High yield stability and adaptability of yellow passion fruit varieties (Passiflora edulis Sims. f. flavicarpa Deg. are highly desirable attributes when exploring different environments. This study aimed to evaluate the adaptability and yield stability of yellow passion fruit varieties using AMMI (additive main effects and multiplicative interaction and other ancillary statistics. Twelve varieties were evaluated in eight environments. Analysis of variance showed effects attributable to the varieties (G, environment (E and their interaction (G × E. The first two multiplicative components of the interaction accounted for 69% of the sum of squares. The scores of the principal interaction components showed high variability for the environments relative to the variety effects. High varietal phenotypic stability was observed in three environments; which can be used in yellow passion fruit breeding programs for initial selection trials. A biplot-AMMI analysis and yield stability index incorporating the AMMI stability value and yield capacity in a single non-parametric index were useful for discriminating genotypes with superior and stable fruit yield. AMMI analysis also allowed for the identification of more productive varieties in specific environments, leading to significant increase in passion fruit productivity.

  18. Evaluation of Yield Maps Using Fuzzy Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents a new methodology for the evaluation of yield maps using fuzzy indicators, which takes into account atypical phenomena and expert opinions regarding the maps. This methodology could allow for improved methods for deciding boundary locations for precision application of production...

  19. Expectations, Bond Yields and Monetary Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chun, Albert Lee

    2011-01-01

    expectations about inflation, output growth, and the anticipated path of monetary policy actions contain important information for explaining movements in bond yields. Estimates from a forward-looking monetary policy rule suggest that the central bank exhibits a preemptive response to inflationary expectations...

  20. 6-Benzyladenine enhancements of cotton yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of applied plant growth regulators (PGR) on growth, development and yield in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. and Gossypium barbadense L.) has been studied for over half a century. A recent study suggested that cytokinin treatment of young cotton seedlings may enhance overall performanc...

  1. MITE INCIDENCE AND CROP YIELD IN ZIMBABWE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    control, as well as damage and yield of tomatoes were investigated in two important tomato production areas of ... Mutoko, while the pruned and trellised plots had 4.6 and 17.3 mites per leaf. ..... therefore, insecticide deposit on the leaves was.

  2. Effects of water management on crop yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hack-ten Broeke, M.J.D.; Bartholomeus, R.; Kroes, J.G.; Dam, van J.C.; Bakel, van J.

    2015-01-01

    A new instrument for the quantification of agricultural crop yield reduction due to too wet, too dry or too salty conditions: what kind of instrument should that be? And could such an instrument be usable for the calculation of effects of climate scenarios? WaterVision Agriculture should be the answ

  3. Electricity yield simulation of complex BIPV systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprenger, W.

    2013-01-01

    Building-integrated photovoltaic systems (BIPV) are able to improve the energy balance of buildings. However, this improvement can be analyzed quantitatively only if the electricity yield generated by the BIPV system is calculated. This PhD thesis presents a simulation program that calculates the

  4. Yielding elastic tethers stabilize robust cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt J Whitfield

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds.

  5. Improved light yield of lead tungstate scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Annenkov, A N; Hofstäetter, A; Korzhik, M V; Ligun, V; Lecoq, P; Missevitch, O V; Novotny, R; Peigneux, J P

    2000-01-01

    The application at medium and low energies of lead tungstate scintillators, so far optimized for the ECAL calorimeter of CMS for the future LHC, is strongly limited by their poor light yield. Suitable dopants like molybdenum and terbium can help to overcome this problem. Concepts, results, advantages and drawbacks of this approach are discussed. (11 refs).

  6. Comparison of oilseed yields: a preliminary review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duke, J.A. (Economic Botany Lab., Beltsville, MD); Bagby, M.O.

    1982-01-01

    It was assumed that for most oilseed crops, 90% of the oil yield might be considered as profit. To compare oil seeds, pertinent portions of the yield and energy paragraphs from a summary published by Dr. Duke for DOE Grant No. 59-2246-1-6-054-0 with Dr. Bagby as ADODR were reproduced. The seed yields ranged from 200 to 14,000 kg/ha, the low one too low to consider and the high one suspiciously high. The yield of 14,000 kg oil per hectare is equivalent to more than 30 barrels of oil per hectare. The energy species included ambrette, tung-oil tree, cashew, wood-oil tree, mu-oil tree, peanut, mustard greens; rape, colza; black mustard, turnip, safflower, colocynth, coconut, crambe, African oil palm, soybean, cotton, sunflower, Eastern black walnut, Engligh walnut, meadow foam, flax, macadamia nuts, opium poppy, perilla, almond, castorbean, Chinese tallow tree, sesame, jojoba, yellow mustard, stokes' aster, and Zanzibar oilvine. 1 table. (DP)

  7. [Frameless stereotactic biopsy: diagnostic yield and complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Maria; Nájera, Edinson; Samprón, Nicolas; Bollar, Alicia; Urreta, Iratxe; Urculo, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the variables that could modify the diagnostic yield of frameless stereotactic biopsy, as well as its complications. This was a retrospective study of frameless stereotactic biopsies carried out between July 2008 and December 2011 at Donostia University Hospital. The variables studied were size, distance to the cortex, contrast uptake and location. A total of 70 patients were included (75 biopsies); 39 males and 31 females with an age range between 39 and 83 years. The total diagnostic yield in our series was 97.1%. For lesions >19mm, the technique offered a sensitivity of 95.2% (95% CI: 86.9-98.4) and specificity of 57.1% (95% CI: 25.0-84.2). The yield was lower for lesions within 17mm of the cortex: sensitivity of 74.6% (95% CI: 62.1-84.7) and specificity of 71.4% (95% CI: 29.0-96.3). Seven (10%) patients developed complications after the first biopsy and none after the second. The diagnostic yield was lower for lesions less than 2cm in size and located superficially. In this series we did not observe an increased rate of complications after a second biopsy. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. 7 CFR 1437.102 - Yield determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... farming practices in the administrative county such as irrigated, non-irrigated, and organic practices... missing crop years actual yield. (h) If producers add land in the farming operation and do not have... been actively engaged in farming for a share of the production of the eligible crop in...

  9. Simulation of oil palm growth and yield.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraalingen, van D.W.G.; Breure, C.J.; Spitters, C.J.T.

    1989-01-01

    A dynamic model is presented to simulate growth and yield formation of oil palm (Elaeis quineensis Jacq.) in dependence of weather data and plant characteristics. From incoming amounts of light, light interception of the foliage and photosynthetic characteristics of individual leaflets, daily rates

  10. Simulation of oil palm growth and yield.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraalingen, van D.W.G.; Breure, C.J.; Spitters, C.J.T.

    1989-01-01

    A dynamic model is presented to simulate growth and yield formation of oil palm (Elaeis quineensis Jacq.) in dependence of weather data and plant characteristics. From incoming amounts of light, light interception of the foliage and photosynthetic characteristics of individual leaflets, daily rates

  11. Effects of geoengineering on crop yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongratz, J.; Lobell, D. B.; Cao, L.; Caldeira, K.

    2011-12-01

    The potential of "solar radiation management" (SRM) to reduce future climate change and associated risks has been receiving significant attention in scientific and policy circles. SRM schemes aim to reduce global warming despite increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations by diminishing the amount of solar insolation absorbed by the Earth, for example, by injecting scattering aerosols into the atmosphere. Climate models predict that SRM could fully compensate warming at the global mean in a high-CO2 world. While reduction of global warming may offset a part of the predicted negative effects of future climate change on crop yields, SRM schemes are expected to alter regional climate and to have substantial effects on climate variables other than temperature, such as precipitation. It has therefore been warned that, overall, SRM may pose a risk to food security. Assessments of benefits and risks of geoengineering are imperative, yet such assessments are only beginning to emerge; in particular, effects on global food security have not previously been assessed. Here, for the first time, we combine climate model simulations with models of crop yield responses to climate to assess large-scale changes in yields and food production under SRM. In most crop-growing regions, we find that yield losses caused by climate changes are substantially reduced under SRM as compared with a non-geoengineered doubling of atmospheric CO2. Substantial yield losses with SRM are only found for rice in high latitudes, where the limits of low temperatures are no longer alleviated. At the same time, the beneficial effect of CO2-fertilization on plant productivity remains active. Overall therefore, SRM in our models causes global crop yields to increase. We estimate the direct effects of climate and CO2 changes on crop production, and do not quantify effects of market dynamics and management changes. We note, however, that an SRM deployment would be unlikely to maintain the economic status quo, as

  12. Low potato yields in Kenya: do conventional input innovations account for the yields disparity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. van Dijk (Meine Pieter); J.G. Wang’ombe

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Background: Potato yields in Kenya are less than half the amount obtained by some developed countries. Despite more acreage being dedicated to the crop, annual production has not improved. Kenya’s low yields have been blamed on a failure to use clean seeds, fertilizers,

  13. Analysis on Wheat Yield in China Based on the Prediction of Yield Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The maximum yield growth range of wheat yield per unit in China is analyzed from three aspects including photosynthesis production potential of wheat,the changing trend of per unit wheat in the previous years and potential of distribution area agricultural crops.In the paper,the potential of using light,the external potential of historical yield evolution tend and AEZ (agricultural ecological zone) are applied to calculate the per unit yield potential of Chinese wheat.The results assume that the maximum growth range of per unit yield in different stages was different:before 1991,the growth range was 10%;before 1996,the growth range was 9%;before 2000,the growth range was 8%.Any variety of wheat and planting technology higher than the above growth range can only be promoted in restricted area and has the statistical error.The results are of reference significance to Chinese wheat production.

  14. Effect of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR on Phenological Traits, Grain Yield and Yield Components of Three Maize (Zea mays L. Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Soleimani Fard

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of bio-fertilize on yield and its components in maize cultivars, an split plot experiment based on randomized complete bock design with three replications in was conducted in Payam-noor University of Ilam, Iran, in 2009-2010. Treatments were cultivar (SC604, SC704 and SC807 assigned to main plots and bio-fertilizer (non- inoculation, inoculation with Azetobacter, Azospirillum and dual inoculation ofAzotobacterand Azospirillum to subplots. The effect of cultivar on days to maturity, plant height, dry matter, ear length, stem diameter, number of grain per ear row, 1000-grain weight, grain yield, biological yield and protein content was significant cultivar. SC 704 had the highest dry matter (259.5 g.m-2, plant height (201.1 cm, number of grain per ear row (42.8 grain, grain yield (10850 kg.m-2, and biological yield (22040 kg.m-2. The effect of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria on all traits expect harvest index was significant. Dual inoculation ofAzotobacterand Azospirillum had the longest days to ear initiation (71.2 days, days to maturity (115.4 day, number of leaves above ear (5.6 ear, dry matter (240.4 g.m-2, ear length (24.3 cm, plant height (212.4 cm, seed number of rows per ear (14.5 row, number of grains per row (44.2 grain, grain yield (10190 kg.m-2, biological yield (21320 kg.m-2 and protein content (10.7%. Interaction effect of cultivar× plant growth promoting rhizobacteria on grain yield was significant. The highest and lowest grain yield was obtained from SC 704 and application of dual inoculation ofAzotobacterand Azospirillum (12320 kg.ha-1 and lowest from SC 604 when inoculation treatments were not used 7570 kg.ha-1 respectively.

  15. Statistical modelling and deconvolution of yield meter data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøgersen, Frede Aakmann; Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of mapping spatial variation of yield in a field using data from a yield monitoring system on a combine harvester. The unobserved yield is assumed to be a Gaussian random field and the yield monitoring system data is modelled as a convolution of the yield and an i...

  16. Three metonyms for Critical Practice: Jig, Foam and Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha Bradfield

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This tripartite account reflects on the patainstiutional approach of Critical Practice Research Cluster (London, UK, which is comprised of artists, designers, curators, researchers and others hosted by Chelsea College of Arts. We consider the cluster’s self-organisation by way of three metonyms, exploring the significance of jig, foam and yield. We reflect on this as longstanding members of Critical Practice (CP and three of many co-convenors of #TransActing: A Market of Values (July 2015. This bustling flea market-like event comprised ‘stalls’ that featured artists, designers, theorists, philosophers, civil-society groups, ecologists, enthusiasts, experts, activists and others. Together with a milling crowd, stallholders creatively explored existing structures of evaluation and actively produced new ones. The jigs arose through the intersection of various vectors, principally the need to make ‘stalls’ to host the market, they evolved into the physical protocols which produced assemblies from disparate individuals, materials and coordinated their interactions into collaborative communities. Jigs are relational machines. ‘Foam’ is a rereading of Peter Sloterdijk’s ‘thought image’ which calls for an attention when describing contemporary social space. If jigs produce specific temporary institutions, how are these institutions composed? CP’s form of organisation encourages decisions, processes and production to be accessible and transparent, yet, a ‘foamy’ approach recognises that every act of inclusion, even within open institutions, necessitates exclusion elsewhere. The final section of this account explores the Critical Practice market’s value against the rampant corporatization of life as we know it. ‘Yield’ features here as metonymic of the give-and-take distinguishing CP’s mixed economy. It is through giving way (yielding to the demands and possibilities of co-authorship that the bounty of this way of working

  17. Weed Diversity Affects Soybean and Maize Yield in a Long Term Experiment in Michigan, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Rosana; Lima, Mauricio; Davis, Adam S; Gonzalez-Andujar, Jose L

    2017-01-01

    Managing production environments in ways that promote weed community diversity may enhance both crop production and the development of a more sustainable agriculture. This study analyzed data of productivity of maize (corn) and soybean in plots in the Main Cropping System Experiment (MCSE) at the W. K. Kellogg Biological Station Long-Term Ecological Research (KBS-LTER) in Michigan, USA, from 1996 to 2011. We used models derived from population ecology to explore how weed diversity, temperature, and precipitation interact with crop yields. Using three types of models that considered internal and external (climate and weeds) factors, with additive or non-linear variants, we found that changes in weed diversity were associated with changes in rates of crop yield increase over time for both maize and soybeans. The intrinsic capacity for soybean yield increase in response to the environment was greater under more diverse weed communities. Soybean production risks were greatest in the least weed diverse systems, in which each weed species lost was associated with progressively greater crop yield losses. Managing for weed community diversity, while suppressing dominant, highly competitive weeds, may be a helpful strategy for supporting long term increases in soybean productivity. In maize, there was a negative and non-additive response of yields to the interaction between weed diversity and minimum air temperatures. When cold temperatures constrained potential maize productivity through limited resources, negative interactions with weed diversity became more pronounced. We suggest that: (1) maize was less competitive in cold years allowing higher weed diversity and the dominance of some weed species; or (2) that cold years resulted in increased weed richness and prevalence of competitive weeds, thus reducing crop yields. Therefore, we propose to control dominant weed species especially in the years of low yield and extreme minimum temperatures to improve maize yields

  18. Weed Diversity Affects Soybean and Maize Yield in a Long Term Experiment in Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Rosana; Lima, Mauricio; Davis, Adam S.; Gonzalez-Andujar, Jose L.

    2017-01-01

    Managing production environments in ways that promote weed community diversity may enhance both crop production and the development of a more sustainable agriculture. This study analyzed data of productivity of maize (corn) and soybean in plots in the Main Cropping System Experiment (MCSE) at the W. K. Kellogg Biological Station Long-Term Ecological Research (KBS-LTER) in Michigan, USA, from 1996 to 2011. We used models derived from population ecology to explore how weed diversity, temperature, and precipitation interact with crop yields. Using three types of models that considered internal and external (climate and weeds) factors, with additive or non-linear variants, we found that changes in weed diversity were associated with changes in rates of crop yield increase over time for both maize and soybeans. The intrinsic capacity for soybean yield increase in response to the environment was greater under more diverse weed communities. Soybean production risks were greatest in the least weed diverse systems, in which each weed species lost was associated with progressively greater crop yield losses. Managing for weed community diversity, while suppressing dominant, highly competitive weeds, may be a helpful strategy for supporting long term increases in soybean productivity. In maize, there was a negative and non-additive response of yields to the interaction between weed diversity and minimum air temperatures. When cold temperatures constrained potential maize productivity through limited resources, negative interactions with weed diversity became more pronounced. We suggest that: (1) maize was less competitive in cold years allowing higher weed diversity and the dominance of some weed species; or (2) that cold years resulted in increased weed richness and prevalence of competitive weeds, thus reducing crop yields. Therefore, we propose to control dominant weed species especially in the years of low yield and extreme minimum temperatures to improve maize yields

  19. Effect of Application of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Organic Fertilizers on Yield and Yield Components of Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. in Lahijan, Northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mansour Ghanaei Pashaki

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effect of application of nitrogen, phosphorus and biologic fertilizers on yield and yield components of native bean, an experiment was conducted as factorial in randomized complete block design with three replications in Lahijan, northern Iran in 2013. Treatments consisted of chemical nitrogen fertilizer (0, 60 and 120 kg ha-1 urea, chemical phosphorus fertilizer (0, 40 and 80 kg ha-1 P2O5 and mixture of rhizobium, bacillus and pseudomonas biofertilizers (application and on application. The maximum and minimum seed yields (1556 kg ha-1and 451 kg ha-1 were obtained at the presence of 120 kg ha-1 urea with 80 kg ha-1 P2O5 and control (no fertilizers, respectively. The results showed that seed yield was significantly affected by interactions of nitrogen and phosphorus, and phosphorus with bio-fertilizers. The triple interaction effect of nitrogen, phosphorus and biofertilizers was significant on pod number per plant, seed number per pod, seed number per plant and 100 seed weight. The maximum pod number per plant, seed number per pod and 100 seed weight were found in interaction of 120 kg ha-1 urea and 40 kg ha-1 P2O5 with biological fertilizers. Overall, it seems that application of biological phosphorus with both N and P chemical fertilizers is more beneficial to bean; however, the present one-year study needs to be continued in years ahead to ascertain our results.

  20. Study of pp{yields}pp{eta} reaction at threshold; Etude de la reaction pp{yields}pp{eta} au seuil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleb, A.

    1994-11-01

    The {eta} production has been studied through the pp {yields} pp{eta} reaction at threshold. Data were taken at the Synchrotron of the ``Laboratoire National Saturne``. The detection in coincidence of the two protons scattered near 0 deg and analysed with the magnetic spectrometer SPES3 allows the reconstruction of missing mass spectra for the {eta} signature. A simulation program which takes into account all the experimental set up characteristics has been realized and tested through the pp {yields} d{pi}{sup +} reaction detected simultaneously with pp {yields} pp{eta}. The generated proton momentum spectra for pp {yields} pp{eta} show a pronounced {eta} mass dependence. This characteristic, connected to the kinematical properties of pp {yields} pp{eta} at threshold, is used to extract the mass of the meson {eta}. The obtained value, m{sub {eta}} = 547.65 {+-} 0.18 MeV, is in good agreement with measurement done recently through the pd {yields} {sup H}e{eta} reaction. The total cross section {sigma}{sub t} of pp {yields} pp{eta} measured at 1260, 1265 and 1300 MeV presents a strong energy dependence. This cross section increases less with energy than the phase-space. The influence of p-p and {eta}-p final state interactions in our measurements is studied. Our results are compared with theoretical predictions and assess the dominant character of the baryonic resonance N{sup *}(1535) in the {eta} mechanism production at threshold. These experimental results give an energy dependence which is not well reproduced by the theoretical predictions. This discrepancy could be an incorrect description of the {eta}-p interaction in the models. (author). 48 refs., 60 figs., 15 tabs.

  1. Low Odor, High Yield Kraft Pulping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.T. McKean

    2000-12-15

    In laboratory cooks pure oxygen was profiled into the circulation line of a batch digester during two periods of the cooking cycle: The first injection occurred during the heating steps for the purpose of in-situ generation of polysulfide. This chip treatment was studied to explore stabilization against alkaline induced carbohydrate peeling and to increase pulp yield. Under optimum conditions small amounts of polysulfide were produced with yield increase of about 0.5% These increases fell below earlier reports suggesting that unknown differences in liquor composition may influence the relative amounts of polysulfide and thiosulfate generated during the oxidation. Consequently, further studies are required to understand the factors that influence the ratios of those two sulfur species.

  2. A Yield-Driven Gridless Router

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Zhou; Yi-Ci Cai; Duo Li; Xian-Long Hong

    2007-01-01

    A new gridless router to improve the yield of IC layout is presented. The improvement of yield is achieved by reducing the critical areas where the circuit failures are likely to happen. This gridless area router benefits from a novel cost function to compute critical areas during routing process, and heuristically lays the patterns on the chip area where it is less possible to induce critical area. The router also takes other objectives into consideration, such as routing completion rate and nets length. It takes advantage of gridless routing to gain more flexibility and a higher completion rate. The experimental results show that critical areas are effectively decreased by 21% on average while maintaining the routing completion rate over 99%.

  3. Stock vs. Bond Yields, and Demographic Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gozluklu, Arie; Morin, Annaïg

    that the slow-evolving time-series covariation due to changing population age structure accounts for the equilibrium relation between stock and bond markets. As a result, by exploiting the demographic information into distant future, the forecasting performance of evaluation models improves. Finally, using...... a cross-country panel, we document the cross-sectional variation of the demographic effect and explain the cross-country differences in comovement between stock and bond markets.......This paper analyzes the strong comovement between real stock and nominal bond yields at generational (low) frequencies. Life-cycle patterns in savings behavior in an overlapping generations model with cash-in-advance constraints explain this persistent comovement between financial yields. We argue...

  4. Grain yield stability of early maize genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Bahadur Kunwar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate grain yield stability of early maize genotypes. Five early maize genotypes namely Pool-17, Arun1EV, Arun-4, Arun-2 and Farmer’s variety were evaluated using Randomized Complete Block Design along with three replications at four different locations namely Rampur, Rajahar, Pakhribas and Kabre districts of Nepal during summer seasons of three consecutive years from 2010 to 2012 under farmer’s fields. Genotype and genotype × environment (GGE biplot was used to identify superior genotype for grain yield and stability pattern. The genotypes Arun-1 EV and Arun-4 were better adapted for Kabre and Pakhribas where as pool-17 for Rajahar environments. The overall findings showed that Arun-1EV was more stable followed by Arun-2 therefore these two varieties can be recommended to farmers for cultivation in both environments.

  5. Stock vs. Bond Yields, and Demographic Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gozluklu, Arie; Morin, Annaïg

    that the slow-evolving time-series covariation due to changing population age structure accounts for the equilibrium relation between stock and bond markets. As a result, by exploiting the demographic information into distant future, the forecasting performance of evaluation models improves. Finally, using...... a cross-country panel, we document the cross-sectional variation of the demographic effect and explain the cross-country differences in comovement between stock and bond markets.......This paper analyzes the strong comovement between real stock and nominal bond yields at generational (low) frequencies. Life-cycle patterns in savings behavior in an overlapping generations model with cash-in-advance constraints explain this persistent comovement between financial yields. We argue...

  6. Effects of nitrogen application method and weed control on corn yield and yield components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepahvand, Pariya; Sajedi, Nurali; Mousavi, Seyed Karim; Ghiasvand, Mohsen

    2014-04-01

    The effects of nitrogen fertilizer application and different methods for weed control on yield and yield components of corn was evaluated in Khorramabad in 2011. The experiment was conducted as a split plot based on randomized complete block design in 3 replications. Nitrogen application was as main plot in 4 levels (no nitrogen, broadcasting nitrogen, banding nitrogen and sprayed nitrogen) and methods of weed control were in 4 levels (non-control weeds, application Equip herbicide, once hand control of weeds and application Equip herbicide+once time weeding) was as subplots. Result illustrated that effects of nitrogen fertilizer application were significant on grain and forage yield, 100 seeds weight, harvest index, grain number per row and cob weight per plant. Grain yield increased by 91.4 and 3.9% in application banding and broadcasting for nitrogen fertilizer, respectively, compared to the no fertilizer treatment. The results show improved efficiency of nitrogen utilization by banding application. Grain yield, harvest index, seed rows per cob, seeds per row and cob weight were increased by weed control. In the application of Equip herbicide+ hand weeding treatment corn grain yield was increased 126% in comparison to weedy control. It represents of the intense affects of weed competition with corn. The highest corn grain yield (6758 kg h(-1)) was related to the application banding of nitrogen fertilizer and Equip herbicide+once hand weeding.

  7. Methods for high yield production of terpenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutchan, Toni; Higashi, Yasuhiro; Feng, Xiaohong

    2017-01-03

    Provided are enhanced high yield production systems for producing terpenes in plants via the expression of fusion proteins comprising various combinations of geranyl diphosphate synthase large and small subunits and limonene synthases. Also provided are engineered oilseed plants that accumulate monoterpene and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons in their seeds, as well as methods for producing such plants, providing a system for rapidly engineering oilseed crop production platforms for terpene-based biofuels.

  8. Predicting Pallet Part Yields From Hardwood Cants

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Hal Lee

    1999-01-01

    Pallet cant quality directly impacts pallet part processing and material costs. By knowing the quality of the cants being processed, pallet manufacturers can predict costs to attain better value from their raw materials and more accurately price their pallets. The study objectives were 1) to develop a procedure for accurately predicting hardwood pallet part yield as a function of raw material geometry and grade, processing equipment, and pallet part geometry, 2) to develop a model for accur...

  9. Riparian vegetation and water yield: A synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemi, Luiz Felippe; Groppo, Juliano Daniel; Trevisan, Rodrigo; Marcos de Moraes, Jorge; de Paula Lima, Walter; Martinelli, Luiz Antonio

    2012-08-01

    SummaryForested riparian zones perform numerous ecosystem functions, including the following: storing and fixing carbon; serving as wildlife habitats and ecological corridors; stabilizing streambanks; providing shade, organic matter, and food for streams and their biota; retaining sediments and filtering chemicals applied on cultivated/agricultural sites on upslope regions of the catchments. In this paper, we report a synthesis of a different feature of this type of vegetation, which is its effect on water yield. By synthesizing results from studies that used (i) the nested catchment and (ii) the paired catchment approaches, we show that riparian forests decrease water yield on a daily to annual basis. In terms of the treated area increases on average were 1.32 ± 0.85 mm day-1 and 483 ± 309 mm yr-1, respectively; n = 9. Similarly, riparian forest plantation or regeneration promoted reduced water yield (on average 1.25 ± 0.34 mm day-1 and 456 ± 125 mm yr-1 on daily and annual basis, respectively, when prorated to the catchment area subjected to treatment; n = 5). Although there are substantially fewer paired catchment studies assessing the effect of this vegetation type compared to classical paired catchment studies that manipulate the entire vegetation of small catchments, our results indicate the same trend. Despite the occurrence of many current restoration programs, measurements of the effect on water yield under natural forest restoration conditions are still lacking. We hope that presenting these gaps will encourage the scientific community to enhance the number of observations in these situations as well as produce more data from tropical regions.

  10. Almond advertising yields net benefits to growers

    OpenAIRE

    Crespi, John M.; Sexton, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluates the economic impacts of advertising and promotion expenditures funded under the almond marketing order. Over the crop years 1962/63 through 1997/98, the correlation of industry promotion and demand was positive and statistically significant. Almond advertising has yielded marginal benefits between $3 and $10 per dollar spent. The 1994/95 through 1996/97 suspension of the promotion program reduced grower profits in the range of $88 million to $231 million during the suspen...

  11. Methods for high yield production of terpenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutchan, Toni; Higashi, Yasuhiro; Feng, Xiaohong

    2017-01-03

    Provided are enhanced high yield production systems for producing terpenes in plants via the expression of fusion proteins comprising various combinations of geranyl diphosphate synthase large and small subunits and limonene synthases. Also provided are engineered oilseed plants that accumulate monoterpene and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons in their seeds, as well as methods for producing such plants, providing a system for rapidly engineering oilseed crop production platforms for terpene-based biofuels.

  12. Search for hadronic b yields u decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, H.; Glaeser, R.; Harder, G.; Krueger, A.; Nilsson, A.W.; Nippe, A.; Oest, T.; Reidenbach, M.; Schaefer, M.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Schroeder, H.; Schulz, H.D.; Sefkow, F.; Wurth, R. (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany, F.R.)); Appuhn, R.D.; Drescher, A.; Hast, C.; Herrera, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Scheck, H.; Schweda, G.; Spaan, B.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D. (Dortmund Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physik); Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Volland, U.; Wegener, H. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Physikalisches Inst.); Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik); Ball, S.; Gabriel, J.C.; Geyer, C.; Hoelscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Holzer, B.; Khan, S.; Spengler, J. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.)); Charlesworth, C.E.K.; Krieger, P.; Kutschke, R.; Orr, R.S.; Parsons, J.A.; Prentice, J.D.; Seidel, S.C.; Swain, J.D.; Yoon, T.S. (; ARGUS Collaboration

    1990-05-10

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e{sup +}e{sup -} storgage ring DORIS II at DESY, we searched for b{yields}u transitions in exclusive hadronic B meson decays. A systematic analysis of B decays into pions has been performed for decay modes with 2-7 pions in the final state. In none of the decays a positive signal was observed. The upper limits obtained on various branching ratios are consistent with the current model predictions. (orig.).

  13. Combined Nucleosynthetic Yields of Multiple First Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Conrad

    2016-01-01

    Modern numerical simulations of the formation of the first stars predict that the first stars formed in multiples. In those cases, the chemical yields of multiple supernova explosions may have contributed to the formation of a next generation star. We match the chemical abundances of the oldest observed stars in the universe to a database of theoretical supernova models, to show that it is likely that the first stars formed from the ashes of two or more progenitors.

  14. Path Analysis of Grain Yield and Yield Components and Some Agronomic Traits in Bread Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Janmohammadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of new bread wheat cultivars needs efficient tools to monitor trait association in a breeding program. This investigation was aimed to characterize grain yield components and some agronomic traits related to bread wheat grain yield. The efficiency of a breeding program depends mainly on the direction of the correlation between different traits and the relative importance of each component involved in contributing to grain yield. Correlation and path analysis were carried out in 56 bread wheat genotypes grown under field conditions of Maragheh, Iran. Observations were recorded on 18 wheat traits and correlation coefficient analysis revealed grain yield was positively correlated with stem diameter, spike length, floret number, spikelet number, grain diameter, grain length and 1000 seed weight traits. According to the variance inflation factor (VIF and tolerance as multicollinearity statistics, there are inconsistent relationships among the variables and all traits could be considered as first-order variables (Model I with grain yield as the response variable due to low multicollinearity of all measured traits. In the path coefficient analysis, grain yield represented the dependent variable and the spikelet number and 1000 seed weight traits were the independent ones. Our results indicated that the number of spikelets per spikes and leaf width and 1000 seed weight traits followed by the grain length, grain diameter and grain number per spike were the traits related to higher grain yield. The above mentioned traits along with their indirect causal factors should be considered simultaneously as an effective selection criteria evolving high yielding genotype because of their direct positive contribution to grain yield.

  15. Combining ability of highland tropic adapted potato for tuber yield and yield components under drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirut, Betaw; Shimelis, Hussein; Fentahun, Mengistu; Bonierbale, Merideth; Gastelo, Manuel; Asfaw, Asrat

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent drought and late blight disease are the major factors limiting potato productivity in the northwest Ethiopian highlands. Incorporating drought tolerance and late blight resistance in the same genotypes will enable the development of cultivars with high and stable yield potential under erratic rainfall conditions. The objectives of this study were to assess combining ability effects and gene action for tuber yield and traits related to drought tolerance in the International Potato Centre's (CIP's) advanced clones from the late blight resistant breeding population B group 'B3C2' and to identify promising parents and families for cultivar development. Sixteen advanced clones from the late blight resistant breeding population were crossed in two sets using the North Carolina Design II. The resulting 32 families were evaluated together with five checks and 12 parental clones in a 7 x 7 lattice design with two water regimes and two replications. The experiment was carried out at Adet, in northwest Ethiopia under well-watered and water stressed conditions with terminal drought imposed from the tuber bulking stage. The results showed highly significant differences between families, checks, and parents for growth, physiological, and tuber yield related traits. Traits including marketable tuber yield, marketable tuber number, average tuber weight and groundcover were positively correlated with total tuber yield under both drought stressed and well-watered conditions. Plant height was correlated with yield only under drought stressed condition. GCA was more important than SCA for total tuber yield, marketable tuber yield, average tuber weight, plant height, groundcover, and chlorophyll content under stress. This study identified the parents with best GCA and the combinations with best SCA effects, for both tuber yield and drought tolerance related traits. The new population is shown to be a valuable genetic resource for variety selection and improvement of potato

  16. Effects of rates of nitrogen on yield and yield components of winter triticale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalević Dragana N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the high genetic potential for yield and favourable nutritional value, triticale is a promising plant species. For achieving high and stable yields, it is necessary to have favorable agroclimatic conditions of the locality, variety and advanced agricultural techniques, with special emphasis on fertilizing. This study examines the effect of increasing rates of nitrogen on yield and yield components of five cultivars of winter triticale: Odisej, Kg-20, Triumph, Rtanj and Tango. The three-year trial (2009-2012, which was set up in a randomized block system with three replications, included control and three different doses of nitrogen fertilization (0, 60, 90 and 120 kg ha-1. In all variants of fertilization, 80 kg ha-1 P2O5 and K2O were added beside nitrogen. The obtained results showed that the use of nitrogen had a positive effect on yield and yield components in all variants and in all cultivars. The variety Tango had the highest average grain yield, while the variety Kg-20 had the lowest. Also, Tango had the highest value of the 1000 grain mass and the number of grains per spike, while Triumph had the highest value of hectoliter weight. The application of fertilizers led to a very large and significant increase of yield compared with the control. Accordingly, all studied cultivars had the highest yield with the highest quantities of nitrogen (120 kg ha-1. Considering that triticale is intended mainly for feeding livestock, the results of these studies would be valuable in terms of its growing as a forage crop as well as in terms of its breeding for grain quality and productivity.

  17. Element Yields of Intermediate-Mass Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, R B C

    2003-01-01

    Intermediate mass stars occupy the mass range between 0.8-8 solar masses. In this review, evolutionary models of these stars from numerous sources are compared in terms of their input physics and predicted yields. In particular, the results of Renzini & Voli, van den Hoek & Groenewegen, and Marigo are discussed. Generally speaking, it is shown that yields of He-4, C-12, and N-14 decrease with increasing metallicity, reduced mass loss rate, and increased rotation rate. Integrated yields and recently published chemical evolution model studies are used to assess the relative importance of intermediate mass and massive stars in terms of their contributions to universal element buildup. Intermediate mass stars appear to play a major role in the chemical evolution of N-14, a modest role in the case of C-12, and a small role for He-4. Furthermore, the time delay in their release of nuclear products appears to play an important part in explaining the apparent bimodality in the distribution of damped Lyman alp...

  18. EVIDENCE FOR K+ YIELDS P+ VV-.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KETTELL,S.

    1998-12-18

    The first observation of the decay K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{ovr {nu}} has been reported. The E787 experiment presented evidence for the K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{ovr {nu}} decay, based on the observation of a single clean event from data collected during the 1995 run of the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory). The branching ratio indicated by this observation, B(K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{ovr {nu}}) = 4.2{sub -3.5}{sup +9.7} x 10{sup -10}, is consistent with the Standard Model expectation although the central experimental value is four times larger. The final E7878 data sample, from the 1995-98 runs, should reach a sensitivity of about five times that of the 1995 run alone. A new experiment, E949, has been given scientific approval and should start data collected in 2001. It is expected to achieve a sensitivity of more than an order of magnitude below the prediction of the Standard Model.

  19. Whey cheese: membrane technology to increase yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Francisco; González, Pablo; Muro, Claudia

    2016-02-01

    Sweet cheese whey has been used to obtain whey cheese without the addition of milk. Pre-treated whey was concentrated by nanofiltration (NF) at different concentration ratios (2, 2.5 and 2.8) or by reverse osmosis (RO) (2-3 times). After the concentration, whey was acidified with lactic acid until a final pH of 4.6-4.8, and heated to temperatures between 85 and 90 °C. The coagulated fraction (supernatant) was collected and freely drained over 4 h. The cheese-whey yield and protein, fat, lactose and ash recoveries in the final product were calculated. The membrane pre-concentration step caused an increase in the whey-cheese yield. The final composition of products was compared with traditional cheese-whey manufacture products (without membrane concentration). Final cheese yields found were to be between 5 and 19.6%, which are higher than those achieved using the traditional 'Requesón' process.

  20. Analysis of Yield Spreads on Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities

    OpenAIRE

    Brian A. Maris; William Segal

    2002-01-01

    Yield spreads on commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS) are defined as the difference between the yield on CMBS and the yield on comparable-maturity Treasuries. CMBS yield spreads declined dramatically from 1992 until 1997, then increased in 1998 and 1999. The relationship between CMBS yield spreads and other variables is estimated in an effort to explain recent trends. Results identify several variables that are related to yield spreads on both fixed-rate and variable-rate CMBS. Howeve...

  1. Yield Potential of Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) Cultivars in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, Lise Christina; Flengmark, Poul Kristiansen

    2005-01-01

    In order to determine the yield potential of fibre hemp in Denmark, defined as seed yield, biomass, stem and fibre production, five cultivars were evaluated in field trials at two sites during 1998-2000. The total dry matter yield, stem yield, fibre yield, fibre percent, plant height, and seed...... was approximately 500 kg ha-1. In general, fibre yields increased when seed rates of 16 kg ha-1 or more were used. At 32 kg seed ha-1 Futura gave higher fibre yields than at all other seed rates, and higher yields at 24 cm row distance than at 48 cm. Fasamo differed from the other cultivars by having a lower dry...

  2. Neutrino interactions with nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Leitner, T; Mosel, U; Alvarez-Ruso, L

    2008-01-01

    Current long baseline experiments aim at measuring neutrino oscillation parameters with a high precision. A critical quantity is the neutrino energy which can not be measured directly but has to be reconstructed from the observed hadrons. A good knowledge of neutrino-nucleus interactions is thus necessary to minimize the systematic uncertainties in neutrino fluxes, backgrounds and detector responses. In particular final-state interactions inside the target nucleus modify considerably the particle yields through rescattering, charge-exchange and absorption. Nuclear effects can be described with our coupled channel GiBUU transport model where the neutrino first interacts with a bound nucleon producing secondary particles which are then transported out of the nucleus. In this contribution, we give some examples for the application of our model focusing in particular on the MiniBooNE and K2K experiments.

  3. Heterosis expression in crosses between maize populations: ear yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Ricardo Machado da

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of heterosis has been exploited extensively in maize (Zea mays L. breeding. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic potential of ten maize populations for ear yield following the diallel mating scheme. Six parental populations were obtained through phenotypic selection of open-pollinated ears in Rio Verde, GO, Brazil, (GO populations and four parental populations were synthesized in Piracicaba, SP, Brazil (GN populations: GO-D (DENTADO, GO- F (FLINT, GO-A (AMARELO, GO-B (BRANCO, GO-L (LONGO, GO-G (GROSSO, GN-01, GN-02, GN-03 and GN-04. Experiments were carried out in three environments: Anhembi (SP and Rio Verde (GO in 1998/99 (normal season crop and Piracicaba (SP in 1999 (off-season crop. All experiments were in completely randomized blocks with six replications. Analysis of variance grouped over environments showed high significance for heterosis and its components, although mid-parent heterosis and average heterosis were of low expression. The interaction treatments x environments was not significant. Total mid-parent heterosis effects ranged from de -4.3% to 17.3% with an average heterosis of 3.37%. Population with the highest yield (7.4 t ha-1 and with the highest effect of population (v i = 0.746 was GN-03, while the highest yielding cross was GO-B x GN-03 with 7,567 t ha-1. The highest specific heterosis effect (s ii' = 0.547 was observed in the cross GO-B x GN-03.

  4. Climate Change Modelling and Its Roles to Chinese Crops Yield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Hui; LIN Er-da; Tim Wheeler; Andrew Challinor; JIANG Shuai

    2013-01-01

    Climate has been changing in the last fifty years in China and will continue to change regardless any efforts for mitigation. Agriculture is a climate-dependent activity and highly sensitive to climate changes and climate variability. Understanding the interactions between climate change and agricultural production is essential for society stable development of China. The first mission is to fully understand how to predict future climate and link it with agriculture production system. In this paper, recent studies both domestic and international are reviewed in order to provide an overall image of the progress in climate change researches. The methods for climate change scenarios construction are introduced. The pivotal techniques linking crop model and climate models are systematically assessed and climate change impacts on Chinese crops yield among model results are summarized. The study found that simulated productions of grain crop inherit uncertainty from using different climate models, emission scenarios and the crops simulation models. Moreover, studies have different spatial resolutions, and methods for general circulation model (GCM) downscaling which increase the uncertainty for regional impacts assessment. However, the magnitude of change in crop production due to climate change (at 700 ppm CO2 eq correct) appears within ±10%for China in these assessments. In most literatures, the three cereal crop yields showed decline under climate change scenarios and only wheat in some region showed increase. Finally, the paper points out several gaps in current researches which need more studies to shorten the distance for objective recognizing the impacts of climate change on crops. The uncertainty for crop yield projection is associated with climate change scenarios, CO2 fertilization effects and adaptation options. Therefore, more studies on the fields such as free air CO2 enrichment experiment and practical adaptations implemented need to be carried out.

  5. Effects of municipal sewage sludge doses on the yield, some yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-03

    Sep 3, 2008 ... seed number per plant in municipal sewage sludge treatments had increasing effects on grain yield. ... lime, low in organic matter and available phosphorus, iron ..... amendment for calcareous bauxite mine spoils reclamation.

  6. Heterosis for yield and yield component traits in rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishna B and Satyanarayana P V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Heterosis in rice was studied for yield and its component traits in 20 F1s involving 9 parents comprises of 4 lines and 5 testers. The high magnitude of heterosis for grain yield per plant is evident by significant superiority of crosses over mid parent and better parents in several crosses. The crosses viz. Sudu Hondarawala × PLA 1100, Sudu Hondarawala × IR 64 and Sudu Hondarawala × MTU 7029 showed high relative heterosis and heterobeltiosis for grain yield per plant. The crosses exhibiting good heterotic expression in F1 may be further studied to isolate superior transgressive segregants in later generations. The development of pure lines from segregating population is very important for evolving high yielding varieties.

  7. Growth and yield of maize in purple nutsedge interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Valadão Silva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed evaluates the influence of purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus on the agronomic performance of maize. We conducted a field experiment at Viçosa, MG, in completely randomized design experimental with three replications. The treatments consisted of the interaction of maize with nine nutsedge densities (0, 10, 30, 50, 90, 110, 130, 160 and 260 plants m-2. In the flowering culture was made the measurement of plant height, the insertion of the corn ears and the total dry matter of corn plants. At harvest were determined ear weight, grain yield and 100-grain weight adjusted to 13% moisture. Higher density of nutsedge increased plant height and the insertion of the first corn ear. We also observed a reduction in total dry matter accumulation, ear weight, 100-grain weight and grain yield in all densities evaluate. Nutsedge control, even at low densities is necessary because the presence of this plant promotes negative effect on growth and development of corn with a direct consequences on crop productivity.

  8. Uncertainty in Simulating Wheat Yields Under Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Rosenzweig, C.; Jones, J.W.; Hatfield, Jerry; Ruane, Alex; Boote, K. J.; Thorburn, Peter; Rotter, R.P.; Cammarano, D.; Brisson, N.; Basso, B.; Martre, P.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Angulo, C.; Bertuzzi, P.; Biernath, C.; Challinor, AJ; Doltra, J.; Gayler, S.; Goldberg, R.; Grant, Robert; Heng, L.; Hooker, J.; Hunt, L.A.; Ingwersen, J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kersebaum, K.C.; Mueller, C.; Naresh Kumar, S.; Nendel, C.; O' Leary, G.O.; Olesen, JE; Osborne, T.; Palosuo, T.; Priesack, E.; Ripoche, D.; Semenov, M.A.; Shcherbak, I.; Steduto, P.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Stratonovitch, P.; Streck, T.; Supit, I.; Tao, F.; Travasso, M.; Waha, K.; Wallach, D.; White, J.W.; Williams, J.R.; Wolf, J.

    2013-09-01

    Anticipating the impacts of climate change on crop yields is critical for assessing future food security. Process-based crop simulation models are the most commonly used tools in such assessments1,2. Analysis of uncertainties in future greenhouse gas emissions and their impacts on future climate change has been increasingly described in the literature3,4 while assessments of the uncertainty in crop responses to climate change are very rare. Systematic and objective comparisons across impact studies is difficult, and thus has not been fully realized5. Here we present the largest coordinated and standardized crop model intercomparison for climate change impacts on wheat production to date. We found that several individual crop models are able to reproduce measured grain yields under current diverse environments, particularly if sufficient details are provided to execute them. However, simulated climate change impacts can vary across models due to differences in model structures and algorithms. The crop-model component of uncertainty in climate change impact assessments was considerably larger than the climate-model component from Global Climate Models (GCMs). Model responses to high temperatures and temperature-by-CO2 interactions are identified as major sources of simulated impact uncertainties. Significant reductions in impact uncertainties through model improvements in these areas and improved quantification of uncertainty through multi-model ensembles are urgently needed for a more reliable translation of climate change scenarios into agricultural impacts in order to develop adaptation strategies and aid policymaking.

  9. Endophytic bacteria from Ocimum sanctum and their yield enhancing capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Rashmi; Kalra, Alok; Darokar, M P; Chandra, Mahesh; Aggarwal, Nitin; Singh, A K; Khanuja, S P S

    2010-03-01

    Endophytes are beneficial microbes that reside intercellularly inside the plants. Interaction of endophytes with the host plants and their function within their host are important to address ecological relevance of endophyte. Four endophytic bacteria OS-9, OS-10, OS-11, and OS-12 were isolated from healthy leaves of Ocimum sanctum. These isolated microbes were screened in dual culture against various phytopathogenic fungi viz. Rhizoctonia solani, Sclerotium rolfsii, Fusarium solani, Alternaria solani, and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. Of these, strain OS-9 was found to be antagonistic to R. solani, A. solani, F. solani, and C. lindemuthianum while OS-11 was found antagonistic against A. solani only. The growth-promoting benefits of the endophytes were initially evaluated in the glasshouse by inoculated seeds of O. sanctum. Treatment with endophytes OS-10 and OS-11 resulted in significant enhancement of growth as revealed by increase in fresh as well as dry weight. Further, field trials involving two genotypes OS Purple and CIM-Angana were conducted with strains OS-10 and OS-11. The growth-promoting effect was visible on both the genotypes tested as the endophytes significantly enhanced fresh herbage yield (t/ha). Interestingly, these endophytes increased the content of essential oil particularly in cultivar OS Purple and thereby increasing the total oil yields. Molecular characterization of strain OS-11 indicated the strain to be highly related to the type strain of Bacillus subtilis.

  10. Effect of irrigation regime on yield and yield components of soya bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kresović Branka J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the effects of different irrigation regimes on seed yield and yield components of sprinkler-irrigated soya bean [(Glycine max (L. Merr.] under field conditions in 2006, 2007 and 2008 in Zemun Polje (Srem, Srbija. Four irrigation regimes: 80-85% (T1, 70-75% (T2, 60-65% (T3 of field capacity, and non-irrigated regime (T0 were evaluated each experimental year. The experimental design was a randomised complete block with four replications on a Calcaric Chernozem. Water stress (drought during growing season in the non-irrigated treatment (T0 decreased plant physiological activity, vegetative growth, and productivity of soya bean. Irrigation treatments significantly (P < 0.01 influenced soya bean seed yield and yield components. The treatment T2 produced higher seed yield than T1 and T3. Irrigation regimes had statistically significant different effects on yield components such as the plant height at harvest, number of pods per plant, number of seeds per plant, mass of pod with seeds per plant, 1,000 seed mass and hectoliter mass of soya bean seeds. Yield reduction was mainly due to a lower number of pods and seeds per plant and lower seed mass. The T1 treatment had the highest plant height of soya bean in all three growing years. The results have shown that under water scarcity, the treatment T3 is an acceptable irrigation strategy to stabilize and increase soya bean yield in Srem and neighboring countries in the region, provided that this practice is not prevented by economic constraints. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III-43009: Nove tehnologije za monitoring i zaštitu životnog okruženja od štetnih hemijskih supstanci i radijacionog opterećenja i br. TR-31037: Integralni sistemi gajenja ratarskih useva: očuvanje biodiverziteta i plodnosti zemljišta

  11. Yield And Yield Characters of Differrent Confectionery Sunflower Varieties in Conditions of Tekirdag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ergen

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This research which was performed for the purpose of determining the yield and yield characters of six different kinds confectionery sunflowers in the conditions of Tekirdağ was established in the simulation field at Field Plants Department of Thrace University Tekirdağ Agriculture Faculty. In the research were used, T.T.A.E. 1, T.T.A.E. 2 was hybrid varieties, Kıbrıs, İnegöl Alası, and Tekirdağ was local varieties The field experiments was layout at the randomized complete blocks with four replication.In the experiment, some of the characters related to yield such as the plant height, the head diameter, the weight of 1000 seed, the seed yield, seed lenght, the ratio of hull, ratio of oil and protein were examined. The highest seed yield (364.55 kg/da and the lowest hull ratio (%42.77 were determined at T.T.A.E. 2. The highest protein percentage (%17.18 was found İnegöl Alası and the tallest seed lengths (1.61cm was determined Kıbrıs sort. Through the dual relationship between the characters which were examined, a positive and important correlation was found between yield of seed and the seed lenght (0.624**, important but negative correlation was found between the yield of seed and hull ratio (-0.488*. Important and positive correlation was determined between the protein ratio and the plant height (0.575** and important but negative relation was determined between the weight of the 1000 seed (-0.508* and the hull ratio (-0.488*. As a results of Path Analysis, it was determined that the direct influences of the seed and plant height is especially important for the yield of seed and the protein ratio confectionery sunflowers

  12. The Effects of Limitation of Source and Sink on Yield and Yield Components of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kafi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to study the effect of limitation of source and sink on yield and yield components of cumin, an experiment was conducted in complete randomized block design in Research Field of Agriculture Faculty of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad during the years 2006-2007. The treatments were control, defoliation of 100% of leaves, defoliation of 50% of leaves and removing of 50% of umbrellas. The result indicated that in first sampling (10 days after treatments, dry matter and green area of plant significantly influenced by removing of leaves and umbrellas, in a way that increasing in defoliation cause reduction of dry matter accumulation and total green area of plant. In second sampling (24 days after treatments defoliation of leaves and umbrellas imposed a significant effect on dry matter and total green area of plant. Leaf weight, stem weight and reproductive organs weight influenced by defoliation and umbrellas removing and in each three component the highest amount was observed in control treatment. In maturity stage, only the number of umbrellas per plant influenced by defoliation and umbrellas treatments. In control and defoliation of 50% of umbrellas, there was no significant difference between grain yield and biological yield. The highest grain weight and harvest index obtained at control and removing 50% of umbrellas. The lowest grain yield observed in 50% of umbrellas removing, whereas, the lowest biological yield observed in 100% defoliation. Moreover, the results indicated that when plant exposed with complete defoliation, accumulates more dry matter in reproductive organs and when exposed with half of umbrellas removing, dry matter partitioning pattern shift to vegetative organs. Keywords: Defoliation, Cuminum cyminum, Yield, Yield components, Source limitation, Sink limitation

  13. Estimates of Sputter Yields of Solar-Wind Heavy Ions of Lunar Regolith Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, Abdulmasser F.; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    At energies of approximately 1 keV/amu, solar-wind protons and heavy ions interact with the lunar surface materials via a number of microscopic interactions that include sputtering. Solar-wind induced sputtering is a main mechanism by which the composition of the topmost layers of the lunar surface can change, dynamically and preferentially. This work concentrates on sputtering induced by solar-wind heavy ions. Sputtering associated with slow (speeds the electrons speed in its first Bohr orbit) and highly charged ions are known to include both kinetic and potential sputtering. Potential sputtering enjoys some unique characteristics that makes it of special interest to lunar science and exploration. Unlike the yield from kinetic sputtering where simulation and approximation schemes exist, the yield from potential sputtering is not as easy to estimate. This work will present a preliminary numerical scheme designed to estimate potential sputtering yields from reactions relevant to this aspect of solar-wind lunar-surface coupling.

  14. The effect of different methods of seed bed preparation on greenhouse cucumber yield and yield components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Momeni

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of different methods of seed bed preparation on yield of greenhouse cucumber, a two-year long experiment was conducted as a randomized complete block design with four replications in Jiroft from 2004. Different methods of seed bed preparation were as follows: 1 ridge with 20 cm height and 50 cm width and 2 plant rows with 40 cm distance, 2 furrow with 20 cm depth and 50 cm width and 2 plant rows inside, with 40 cm distance, and 3 planting on flat area with 40 cm distance. The results showed that the effect of planting bed on yield of greenhouse cucumber was significant. Furrow and flat area increased yield significantly, compared to the ridge treatment. Analysis of yield components such as plant height, number of pickling fruits, number of leaves, photosynthetic area and number of flowers showed that they are all correlated with fruit yield. The number of pickling fruits was significantly more in furrow and flat area than in ridge treatment. The height of cucumber plants on flat bed was significantly higher than that of the other treatments. The number of leaves and photosynthetic area of plants on flat bed were significantly greater than those in the other treatments. The least dead plants due to fungi disease were observed in ridge treatment. In view of yield and its components under the condition of this experiment, it can be concluded that flat area and furrow treatments are better than ridge treatment.

  15. Limitations in the Statistical Analysis of Normalised Cigarette Smoke Analyte Yield per Milligram of Nicotine Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahours X

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Yields of selected mainstream smoke analytes expressed per milligram of nicotine yield (nicotine ratio and ceilings on these ratios have been proposed by WHO as part of future cigarette product regulation. This paper describes the different approaches required for precision assessment, depending on whether yields or nicotine ratios are being studied. The widely used approach of assessment of yield precision is to perform a collaborative study using a standardised method. However, for assessment of ratio precision the measurement of smoke analyte and smoke nicotine yields are often not carried out on the same set of cigarettes (unpaired due to analytical constraints and therefore the statistical approach described in ISO 5725 is inappropriate due to the various replicate combinations. In this paper, the precision of ratios was computed with unpaired measurements for NNN and nicotine yield data for the CM6 monitor test piece and the Kentucky Reference 1R5F cigarette carried out during a collaborative study in 2011 (1. A sampling technique, based on the draw of the most representative ratios, has been used to evaluate the range of both estimated repeatability and reproducibility under the ISO smoking regime that might be expected when comparing data between different laboratories. This statistical evaluation highlighted that a robust estimate of repeatability and reproducibility could not be determined for ratios obtained with unpaired measurements, using the method defined by ISO5725-2.

  16. Salinity effects on yield, yield components and nutrient ions in rapeseed genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameeh Valiollah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is a major restriction to crop production in many areas of the world. Seven spring types of rapeseed genotypes were evaluated in four salinity levels of irrigation water including 0, 4, 8 and 12 dsm-1. A factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with 3 replications was considered for evaluation of 28 treatments at green house condition. Significant mean square of salinity levels was observed for plant height, pods per plant, 1000-seed weight, seed yield, calcium (Ca, potassium (K and sodium (Na, indicating significant differences of salinity levels for these traits. The genotypes had significant differences for all the studied traits except Ca. Significant positive correlations were detected among plant height and seed yield and other yield associated traits including number of pods per plant, 1000-seed weight and K, therefore the genotypes with high plant height in saline environment will have high seed yield and yield associated traits. The genotype L18 with high mean values of 1000-seed weight and seed yield was more tolerant to salinity than the other genotypes.

  17. Identification of QTL-s for drought tolerance in maize, II: Yield and yield components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Ana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Grain yield is the primary trait of interest in maize breeding programs. Worldwide, drought is the most pervasive limitation to the achievement of yield potential in maize. Drought tolerance of maize has been considerably improved through conventional breeding. Traditional breeding methods have numerous limitations, so development of new molecular genetics techniques could help in elucidation of genetic basis of drought tolerance .In order to map QTLs underlying yield and yield components under drought 116 F3 families of DTP79xB73 cross were evaluated in the field trials. Phenotypic correlations calculated using Pearson’s coefficients were high and significant. QTL detection was performed using composite interval mapping option in WinQTL Cartographer v 2.5. Over all nine traits 45 QTLs were detected: five for grain yield per plant and 40 for eight yield components. These QTLs were distributed on all chromosomes except on chromosome 9. Percent of phenotypic variability determined for the identified QTLs for all the traits was in the range from 27.46 to 95.85%. Different types of gene action were found for the QTLs identified for analyzed traits. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31068

  18. Growth and yield of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) as affected by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    Supplementary irrigation × site interaction had significant effect only on ... of those of the respective non-stressed environments (Cantero-Martínez et al., ..... managements and genotypes response (Boyer, 1982). .... Doctoral Scientiarum Thesis. ... term tillage, crop rotation, and nitrogen fertilizer effects on wheat yield under.

  19. Regional effects of vegetation restoration on water yield across the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    X. M. Feng; G. Sun; B. J. Fu; C. H. Su; Y. Liu; H. Lamparski

    2012-01-01

    The general relationships between vegetation and water yield under different climatic regimes are well established at a small watershed scale in the past century. However, applications of these basic theories to evaluate the regional effects of land cover change on water resources remain challenging due to the complex interactions of vegetation and climatic variability...

  20. Radiatively corrected lepton energy distributions in top quark decays t {yields} bW{sup +} {yields} b(l{sup +}{nu}{sub l}) and t {yields} bH{sup +} {yields} b({tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) and single charged prong energy distributions from subsequent {tau}{sup +} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kuraev, Eduard A.; Bystritskiy, Yury M. [JINR-BLTP, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-15

    We calculate the QED and QCD radiative corrections to the charged lepton energy distributions in the dominant semileptonic decays of the top quark t{yields}bW{sup +}{yields}b(l{sup +}{nu}{sub l}) (l=e,{mu},{tau}) in the standard model (SM), and for the decay t{yields}bH{sup +}{yields}b({tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) in an extension of the SM having a charged Higgs boson H{sup {+-}} with m{sub H}{sup {+-}}{sup <}m{sub t}-m{sub b}. The QCD corrections are calculated in the leading and next-to-leading logarithmic approximations, but the QED corrections are considered in the leading logarithmic approximation only. These corrections are numerically important for precisely testing the universality of the charged current weak interactions in t-quark decays. As the {tau}{sup +} leptons arising from the decays W{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} and H{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} are predominantly left- and right-polarised, respectively, influencing the energy distributions of the decay products in the subsequent decays of the {tau}{sup +}, we work out the effect of the radiative corrections on such distributions in the dominant (one-charged prong) decay channels {tau}{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +} anti {nu}{sub {tau}},{rho}{sup +} anti {nu}{sub {tau}},a{sub 1}{sup +} anti {nu}{sub {tau}} and l{sup +}{nu}{sub l} anti {nu}{sub {tau}}. The inclusive {pi}{sup +} energy spectra in the decay chains t{yields}b(W{sup +},H{sup +}){yields}b({tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}){yields}b({pi}{sup +} anti {nu}{sub {tau}}{nu}{sub {tau}}+X) are calculated, which can help in searching for the induced H{sup {+-}} effects at the Tevatron and the LHC. (orig.)

  1. Iodine carry over in dairy cows: effects of levels of diet fortification and milk yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Masoero

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty multiparous lactating cows were divided in three groups based on milk yield: high (H, average (A and low (L. Within each group, cows were randomly allotted to two levels of iodine inclusions into the diet and respectively: level 1 (1: base diet containing 1.55 mg/kg dry matter, level 2 (2: base diet plus 47.2 mg/d. Potassium iodide was used. Feeds, orts, drinking water and individual milk samples were collected and analysed for the iodine content. The iodine concentration and total excretion in milk were affected by the level of iodine supplementation (P<0.05. No effect on milk iodine concentration could be addressed either to the level of milk yield or to the milk yield x treatment interaction. The total amount of iodine excretion and carry over were affected (P<0.05 by the level of milk yield.

  2. The uncertainty of crop yield projections is reduced by improved temperature response functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Enli; Martre, Pierre; Zhao, Zhigan

    2017-01-01

    Increasing the accuracy of crop productivity estimates is a key element in planning adaptation strategies to ensure global food security under climate change. Process-based crop models are effective means to project climate impact on crop yield, but have large uncertainty in yield simulations. Here...... response functions that when substituted in four wheat models reduced the error in grain yield simulations across seven global sites with different temperature regimes by 19% to 50% (42% average). We anticipate the improved temperature responses to be a key step to improve modelling of crops under rising...... temperature and climate change, leading to higher skill of crop yield projections. Process-based modelling of crop growth is an effective way of representing how crop genotype, environment and management interactions affect crop production to aid tactical and strategic decision making1. Process-based crop...

  3. Milk yield of some Croatian sheep breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Kristijan Pandek; Boro Mioč; Zdravko Barać; Vesna Pavić; Neven Antunac; Zvonimir Prpić

    2005-01-01

    Among the most important breeds of sheep, used for the milk production in Croatia, are the sheep from Pag, Brač, Cres, Istrian and Travnik΄s sheep, different crossbreeds and, recently, East Friesian sheep. The aim of the research was to determine the genotype effect on lactation period, milk yield and protein and fat content, which are important in cheese making. The longest lactation period (213 days) had East Friesian sheep, while the highest total milk production (294 kg) and the highest p...

  4. Flexagons yield a curious Catalan number identity

    CERN Document Server

    Callan, David

    2010-01-01

    Hexaflexagons were popularized by the late Martin Gardner in his first Scientific American column in 1956. Oakley and Wisner showed that they can be represented abstractly by certain recursively defined permutations called pats, and deduced that they are counted by the Catalan numbers. Counting pats by number of descents yields the curious identity Sum[1/(2n-2k+1)binom{2n-2k+1}{k}binom{2k}{n-k},k=0..n] = C(n), where only the middle third of the summands are nonzero.

  5. Upgrade and yields of the IGISOL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karvonen, P. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), University of Jyvaeskylae, FI-40014 (Finland)], E-mail: Pasi.Karvonen@phys.jyu.fi; Penttilae, H.; Aystoe, J. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), University of Jyvaeskylae, FI-40014 (Finland); Billowes, J.; Campbell, P. [Schuster Laboratory, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Elomaa, V-V. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), University of Jyvaeskylae, FI-40014 (Finland); Hager, U. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), University of Jyvaeskylae, FI-40014 (Finland); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kessler, T.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I.D. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), University of Jyvaeskylae, FI-40014 (Finland); Peraejaervi, K. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), University of Jyvaeskylae, FI-40014 (Finland); STUK, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. Box 14, FI-00881 (Finland); Rahaman, S. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), University of Jyvaeskylae, FI-40014 (Finland); Rinta-Antila, S. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), University of Jyvaeskylae, FI-40014 (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Rissanen, J.; Ronkainen, J.; Saastamoinen, A. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), University of Jyvaeskylae, FI-40014 (Finland); Sonoda, T. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), University of Jyvaeskylae, FI-40014 (Finland); K. U. Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Tordoff, B. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), University of Jyvaeskylae, FI-40014 (Finland); Schuster Laboratory, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    2008-10-15

    The front end of the Jyvaeskylae IGISOL facility was upgraded in 2003 by increasing its pumping capacity and by improving the radiation shielding. In late 2005, the skimmer electrode of the mass separator was replaced by a sextupole ion guide, which improved the mass separator efficiency up to an order of magnitude. The current design of the facility is described. The updated yield data, achieved with and without the additional JYFLTRAP purification, using both fusion evaporation reactions and particle induced fission is presented to give an overview of the capability of the facility. These data have been determined either by radioactivity measurements or by direct ion counting after the Penning trap system.

  6. Quantitative Genetic Analysis for Yield and Yield Components in Boro Rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyo CHAKRABORTY

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-nine genotypes of boro rice (Oryza sativa L. were grown in a randomized block design with three replications in plots of 4m x 1m with a crop geometry of 20 cm x 20 cm between November-April, in Regional Agricultural Research Station, Nagaon, India. Quantitative data were collected on five randomly selected plants of each genotype per replication for yield/plant, and six other yield components, namely plant height, panicles/plant, panicle length, effective grains/panicle, 100 grain weight and harvest index. Mean values of the characters for each genotype were used for analysis of variance and covariance to obtain information on genotypic and phenotypic correlation along with coheritability between two characters. Path analyses were carried out to estimate the direct and indirect effects of boro rice�s yield components. The objective of the study was to identify the characters that mostly influence the yield for increasing boro rice productivity through breeding program. Correlation analysis revealed significant positive genotypic correlation of yield/plant with plant height (0.21, panicles/plant (0.53, panicle length (0.53, effective grains/panicle (0.57 and harvest index (0.86. Path analysis based on genotypic correlation coefficients elucidated high positive direct effect of harvest index (0.8631, panicle length (0.2560 and 100 grain weight (0.1632 on yield/plant with a residual effect of 0.33. Plant height and panicles/plant recorded high positive indirect effect on yield/plant via harvest index whereas effective grains/panicle on yield/plant via harvest index and panicle length. Results of the present study suggested that five component characters, namely harvest index, effective grains/plant, panicle length, panicles/plant and plant height influenced the yield of boro rice. A genotype with higher magnitude of these component characters could be either selected from the existing genotypes or evolved by breeding program for genetic

  7. ENSO and PDO-related climate variability impacts on Midwestern United States crop yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Chasity; Market, Patrick; Lupo, Anthony; Guinan, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    An analysis of crop yields for the state of Missouri was completed to determine if an interannual or multidecadal variability existed as a result of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Corn and soybean yields were recorded in kilograms per hectare for each of the six climate regions of Missouri. An analysis using the Mokhov "method of cycles" demonstrated interannual, interdecadal, and multidecadal variations in crop yields. Cross-spectral analysis was used to determine which region was most impacted by ENSO and PDO influenced seasonal (April-September) temperature and precipitation. Interannual (multidecadal) variations found in the spectral analysis represent a relationship to ENSO (PDO) phase, while interdecadal variations represent a possible interaction between ENSO and PDO. Average crop yields were then calculated for each combination of ENSO and PDO phase, displaying a pronounced increase in corn and soybean yields when ENSO is warm and PDO is positive. Climate regions 1, 2, 4, and 6 displayed significant differences (p value of 0.10 or less) in yields between El Niño and La Niña years, representing 55-70 % of Missouri soybean and corn productivity, respectively. Final results give the opportunity to produce seasonal predictions of corn and soybean yields, specific to each climate region in Missouri, based on the combination of ENSO and PDO phases.

  8. Genetic variation for seed phosphorus and yield traits in Indian sorghum landraces and varieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ashok Badigannavar; G. Girish; T.R. Ganapathi

    2015-01-01

    Phytic acid is the major storage form of phosphorus in cereals. It binds with nutritionally important metals and affects mineral bioavailability. The present study analyzed phytic acid, inorganic phosphorus (IP) content, seed weight, and grain yield in 98 sorghum landraces and varieties grown in two environments to evaluate genotypic and environmental effects and to determine trait stability. Genotypic effects and genotype × interaction were significant for phytic acid concentration and yield components. A promising landrace, Malkhed-1, had the lowest phytic acid (0.015 mg g−1) concentration, with a higher yield (70.02 g plant−1), than the check variety M-35-1 in both environments. Similarly, among the varieties, Phule Maulee showed the lowest phytic acid (0.07 mg g−1) and a higher grain yield of 53.15 g plant−1 in both environments. Phytic acid and IP were negatively correlated (r=−0.34), whereas grain yield and seed weight were positively correlated (r=0.20). Cluster analysis based on seed phosphorus traits and yield components identified five and six clusters, respectively. Genotypes containing low phytic acid with high yield identified in this study would be helpful for increasing the bioavailability of mineral nutrients.

  9. Genetic variation for seed phosphorus and yield traits in Indian sorghum landraces and varieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ashok; Badigannavar; G.Girish; T.R.Ganapathi

    2015-01-01

    Phytic acid is the major storage form of phosphorus in cereals. It binds with nutritionally important metals and affects mineral bioavailability. The present study analyzed phytic acid, inorganic phosphorus(IP) content, seed weight, and grain yield in 98 sorghum landraces and varieties grown in two environments to evaluate genotypic and environmental effects and to determine trait stability. Genotypic effects and genotype × interaction were significant for phytic acid concentration and yield components. A promising landrace, Malkhed-1, had the lowest phytic acid(0.015 mg g-1)concentration, with a higher yield(70.02 g plant-1), than the check variety M-35-1 in both environments. Similarly, among the varieties, Phule Maulee showed the lowest phytic acid(0.07 mg g-1) and a higher grain yield of 53.15 g plant-1in both environments. Phytic acid and IP were negatively correlated(r =- 0.34), whereas grain yield and seed weight were positively correlated(r = 0.20). Cluster analysis based on seed phosphorus traits and yield components identified five and six clusters, respectively. Genotypes containing low phytic acid with high yield identified in this study would be helpful for increasing the bioavailability of mineral nutrients.

  10. Response of Yield and Yield Components of Tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter] to Tillage, Nutrient, and Weed Management Practices in Dura Area, Northern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfahunegn, Gebreyesus Brhane

    2014-01-01

    The low average grain yield (0.7 ton ha(-1)) of tef in Ethiopia is mainly attributed to low soil fertility, and inappropriate tillage and weeds control practices. Despite this, limited scientific information has been documented so far on their interaction effects on tef crop productivity in northern Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to assess the separate and interaction effects of tillage, fertilizer, and weed control practices on tef yield and yield components in the conditions of northern Ethiopia. A two-year study (2008-2009) was conducted using split-split-plot design with three replications. In the main plot, three tillage treatments: conventional tillage (6 times tillage passes) (T1), four times tillage passes (T2), and reduced tillage (single tillage pass at sowing) (T3) were applied. The fertilizer treatments in the subplots were: no fertilizer (F1); 23 kg N ha(-1) (F2); 23 kg N ha(-1) and 10 kg P ha(-1) (F3); 23 kg N ha(-1) and 2.5 ton manure ha(-1) (F4); and 2.5 ton manure ha(-1) (F5). The sub-subplot weed control treatments included farmer weed control practice or hand weeding (W1); 2,4 D at 0.75 kg ha(-1) at five-leaf stage; 2,4 D at 0.75 kg ha(-1) at six-leaf stage; 2,4 D at 1.5 kg ha(-1) at five-leaf stage; and 2,4 D at 1.5 kg ha(-1) at six-leaf stage. This study showed that the separate and interaction effects of tillage, fertilizer, and weed control practices significantly affected tef crop yield and yield components in both crop seasons. T2 increased tef yield by >42% over the other tillage and F3 increased yield by >21% over the other fertilizer treatments. Grain yield increased by >23% due to W1. This study thus suggested that promising treatments such as T2, F3, and W1 should be demonstrated at on-farm fields in order to evaluate their performance at farmers' conditions.

  11. Effects of Mineral N and P Fertilizers on Yield and Yield Components of Flooded Lowland Rice on Vertisols of Fogera Plain, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heluf Gebrekidan

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite its very recent history of cultivation in Ethiopia, rice is one of the potential grain crops that could contribute to the efforts for the realization of food security in the country. However, the scientific information available with regards to the response of flooded rice to N and P fertilizers for its optimum production on Vertisols of Fogera Plain is very limited. Therefore, a field experiment was conducted on Vertisols of Fogera plain, northern Ethiopia to study the yield and yield components response of rice and to establish the optimum N and P fertilizer levels required for improved grain yield of flooded rice. Six levels of N (0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 kg ha−1 and five levels of P (0, 13.2, 26.4, 39.6 and 52.8 kg ha−1 laid down in a randomized complete block design with four replications were used as treatments. Nitrogen was applied in two equal splits (50% basal and 50% at maximum tillering as urea and the entire dose of P was applied basal as triple super phosphate at sowing. The main effects of N and P fertilizer levels showed significant differences (P ≤ 0.01 for all yield and yield components studied. The effects of N by P interaction were significant only for grain yield (P ≤ 0.05, number of panicles per m2 (P ≤ 0.01, number of spikelets per panicle (P ≤ 0.05 and plant height (P ≤ 0.01 among the different yield and yield components studied. Application of N and P significantly (P ≤ 0.01 increased grain yield of rice up to the levels of 60 kg N and 13.2 kg P ha−1. However, maximum grain yield (4282 kg ha−1 was obtained with the combined application of 60 kg N and 13.2 kg P ha−1, and the yield advantage over the control was 38.49% (1190 kg ha−1. Moreover, application of both N and P fertilizers have increased the magnitudes of the important yield attributes including number of panicles per m2, number of spikelets per panicle, panicle length, dry matter accumulation, straw yield and plant height

  12. Effects of Plant Density on Sweet and Baby Corn (Hybrid KSC 403 Yield and Yield Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Bavi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Sweet corn is the one of the most important types of corn. There is a high amount of sugar in the endosperm of sweet corn than dent corn. Baby corn is the ear of corn that is being harvested in the silking stage before the end of pollination. This crop has an interesting using methods as salad, conserve production and vegetative consumption. Both two sweet and baby corn is obtained from one plant in different growth stages and could be harvested from one corn hybrid. Best yield and quality of baby corn is obtained from sweet corn hybrids, because of high amounts of sugar in the grains and ears. Sweet corn and baby corn could be harvested at early dough stage (with about 30 % of humidity and early silking stage before the pollination is completed, respectively. Plant density is the most important factor in growing corn, especially in sweet and baby corn. Khuzestan province is one of the main regions of corn production in Iran. In Khuzestan, forage and silage corn have the most production among the summer crops. Corn is planted in two planting date in Khuzestan: early spring and early summer. Spring corn planting produces little grain yield due to Simultaneity of silking stage with hot early summer days. Because of little production and little research about sweet and baby corn, this study was performed and designed. Materials and Methods In order to investigate the effects of plant density and harvesting method on sweet corn and baby corn yield, an experiment was performed during 2012-13, in research farm of Ramin Agriculture and Natural Resources University of Khuzestan, located in southwest of Iran. In this experiment, four plant densities (7, 9, 11 and 13 plants.m-2 and two harvesting methods (baby corn and sweet corn were investigated in an RCB statistical design with four replications. The KSC 403 hybrid was used and investigated in the experiment, as a sweet corn hybrid. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS 9.1 through

  13. Effect of Zeolite, Selenium and Silicon on Yield, Yield Components and Some Physiological Traits of Canola under Salt Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bybordi

    2016-07-01

    chlorophyll, relative water content, catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity, as well as malondialdehyde, sodium and potassium content in the leaves. The samples were immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen and kept in -80° C freezer. At the end of the growing season, agronomic traits such as silique number, seed number on silique, 1000- grain weight, grain yield, biological yield and harvest index were recorded. Total oil percentage and fatty acids (oleic, linolenic and linoleic percentage were measured. Results and Discussion The combined analysis of variance indicated that the effect of year was significant on all studied traits, except for silique number, grain number in silique, linoleic acid, chlorophyll content and peroxidase activity. In addition, the results showed that the main effect of zeolite, selenium and silicon were significant on all canola studied traits. However, relative water content and peroxidase activity were not affected by silicon application. Comparison of means indicated that triple interaction was significant at 1000- grain weight, grain yield, biological yield, chlorophyll content, photosynthesis rate, relative water content and antioxidant enzyme activity. Some traits such as 1000- grain weight, grain yield, biological yield, harvest index, oil percentage, linolenic percentage and superoxide dismutase activity as well as sodium content in leaves were found to be higher in the second year compared with the first year. Zeolite significantly increased silique number and grain number in silique. Furthermore, harvest index increased with the increase of zeolite level. According to the results, selenium increased silique number, grain number in silique and harvest index in canola plants. Silicon foliar application also significantly increased silique number, grain number in silique and harvest index. The highest chlorophyll contents, photosynthesis rate and relative water content were registered when zeolite was applied at 10% w: w and

  14. Yield and yield components of minituber potato under direct cultivation and transplanting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ghorbani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This research was performed to study the effect of direct planting and transplanting of potato minituber on its yield and yield components. The experiment was designed as a randomized complete blocks with nine treatments and three replications. Treatments were one direct and eight indirect planting. In order to prepare the nursery, two types of pots (peat and nylon and four types of substrates including sand + peat moss (1:1, sand + Kimiya organic fertilizer (1:1, sand + vermicompost (1:1 and sand + farm soil (1:1 were used. Results showed that there was significant difference in regard to mean yield per plant, mean wet weight of tuber, number of tubers smaller and greater than 80 g, percent dry weight of tuber, biologic yield, starch percentage and nitrate content of tubers. The highest mean tuber yield per plant, number of tubers greater than 80 gr and biologic yield belonged to plants in nylon pots with substrate of sand + Kimiya organic fertilizer. The highest percentage of starch and tuber dry matter belonged to plants in peat pots with substrate of sand + soil. The highest mean wet weight of tubers belonged to nylon pots with substrate of sand + peat moss. The highest number of tubers lower than 80 g and the highest nitrate content was obtained by direct planting. The sand+ Kimiya organic fertilizer, which provides the necessary elements for plant growth, with more yield and number of marketable tubers, could be the best substrate as compared to other substrates used in this experiment.

  15. Effect of different tillage intensity on yields and yield-forming factors in winter wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Houšť

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of a study on application of minimum tillage technologies when growing winter wheat. Experiments were performed in the sugar-beet-growing region with loamy chernozem within the period of 2005–2009. Aanalysed and evaluated were effects of different methods of soil processing on yield-forming factors in stands of winter wheat grown after three different preceding crops (i.e. alfalfa, maize for silage and pea. Evaluated were the following four variants of tillage: (1 conventional ploughing to the depth of 0.22 m (Variant 1; (2 ploughing to the depth of 0.15 m (Variant 2; (3 direct sowing into the untilled soil (Variant 3, and (4 shallow tillage to the depth of 0.10 m (Variant 4.The effect of different tillage intensity on winter wheat yields was statistically non-significant after all forecrops. After alfalfa, the highest and the lowest average yields were recorded in Variant 2 (i.e. with ploughing to the depth of 0.15 m and Variant 3 (direct sowing into the untilled soil, respectively. After maize grown for silage, higher yields were obtained in Variant 2 and Variant 1 (conventional ploughing while in Variants 4 and 3 the obtained yields were lower. When growing winter wheat after pea as a preceding crop, the highest and the lowest average yields were recorded after direct sowing (Variant 3 and in Variant 1 (i.e. ploughing to the depth of 0.22 m, respectively. Results of studies on effect of different tillage technologies on yields of winter wheat crops indicate that under the given pedological and climatic conditions it is possible to apply methods of reduced tillage intensity. However, the choice of the corresponding technology must be performed with regard to the type of preceding crop.

  16. Yield and Yield Components of Winter Canola (Brassica napus L. Affected by

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M AghaAlikhani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the critical period of weed control and investigation the effect of periodical control and interference of weeds natural population on yield and yield components of winter canola (Brassica napus L. cv. Okapi in west region of Tehran an experiment was carried out at research field of Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran, Iran on 2004-5 growing season. Fourteen experimental treatments which divided into two sets were arranged in randomized complete blocks design with three replications. In the first set, the crop was kept weedfree from canola emergence time to two-leaf stage (V2, four-leaf stage (V4, six-leaf stage (V6, eight-leaf stage (V8, initiation of flowering (If, %50 of pod set (%50Ps and final harvest (H. In the second set of treatments, weeds were permitted to grow with the crop until above mentioned stages and then related plots kept weed free till end of season. Furthermore two additional treatments known as whole season control and whole season weed infested were established. At mentioned phonological stages in interference treatments weeds were removed, separated to species and measured for dry weight. Also during canola growth season trend of plant height and dry matter distribution were studied. At the end of season canola grain yield and yield components were determined. Results showed that extending interference duration and limiting weed control duration significantly decreased all canola yield components except 1000 grain weight .Furthermore extended weed interference duration up to canola 4-leaf stage decreased %20-70 of grain yield in compare to whole season control. Delayed weed control up to early rosette stage creates decreasing trend in canola grain yield. According to Gompertz and Logistic equations, critical period of weed control in canola was estimated between 25-70 days after emergence of canola.

  17. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Tomasz [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Juszczak, Cezary [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  18. Statistical circuit design for yield improvement in CMOS circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, H. J.; Purviance, J. E.; Whitaker, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses the statistical design of CMOS integrated circuits for improved parametric yield. The work uses the Monte Carlo technique of circuit simulation to obtain an unbiased estimation of the yield. A simple graphical analysis tool, the yield factor histogram, is presented. The yield factor histograms are generated by a new computer program called SPICENTER. Using the yield factor histograms, the most sensitive circuit parameters are noted, and their nominal values are changed to improve the yield. Two basic CMOS example circuits, one analog and one digital, are chosen and their designs are 'centered' to illustrate the use of the yield factor histograms for statistical circuit design.

  19. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C. [and others

    2001-01-10

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT [deuterium-tritium] fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D [Research and Development] avenues for their resolution are presented.

  20. Yield stability and relationships among stability parameters in faba bean(Vicia faba L.) genotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tamene; Temesgen; Gemechu; Keneni; Tadese; Sefera; Mussa; Jarso

    2015-01-01

    Sixteen faba bean genotypes were evaluated in 13 environments in Ethiopia during the main cropping season for three years(2009–2011). The objectives of the study were to evaluate the yield stability of the genotypes and the relative importance of different stability parameters for improving selection in faba bean. The study was conducted using a randomized complete block design with four replications. G × E interaction and yield stability were estimated using 17 different stability parameters. Pooled analysis of variance for grain yield showed that the main effects of both genotypes and environments, and the interaction effect, were highly significant(P ≤ 0.001) and(P ≤ 0.01), respectively. The environment main effect accounted for 89.27% of the total yield variation, whereas genotype and G × E interaction effects accounted for 2.12% and 3.31%, respectively.Genotypic superiority index(Pi) and FT3 were found to be very informative for selecting both high-yielding and stable faba bean genotypes. Twelve of the 17 stability parameters,including CVi, RS, α, λ, S2 di, bi, S(2)i, Wi, σ2i, EV, P59, and ASV, were influenced simultaneously by both yield and stability. They should accordingly be used as complementary criteria to select genotypes with high yield and stability. Although none of the varieties showed consistently superior performance across all environments, the genotype EK 01024-1-2ranked in the top third of the test entries in 61.5% of the test environments and was identified as the most stable genotype, with type I stability. EK 01024-1-2 also showed a17.0% seed size advantage over the standard varieties and was released as a new variety in2013 for wide production and named "Gora". Different stability parameters explained genotypic performance differently, irrespective of yield performance. It was accordingly concluded that assessment of G × E interaction and yield stability should not be based on a single or a few stability parameters but rather

  1. Yield stability and relationships among stability parameters in faba bean (Vicia faba L. genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamene Temesgen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sixteen faba bean genotypes were evaluated in 13 environments in Ethiopia during the main cropping season for three years (2009–2011. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the yield stability of the genotypes and the relative importance of different stability parameters for improving selection in faba bean. The study was conducted using a randomized complete block design with four replications. G × E interaction and yield stability were estimated using 17 different stability parameters. Pooled analysis of variance for grain yield showed that the main effects of both genotypes and environments, and the interaction effect, were highly significant (P ≤ 0.001 and (P ≤ 0.01, respectively. The environment main effect accounted for 89.27% of the total yield variation, whereas genotype and G × E interaction effects accounted for 2.12% and 3.31%, respectively. Genotypic superiority index (Pi and FT3 were found to be very informative for selecting both high-yielding and stable faba bean genotypes. Twelve of the 17 stability parameters, including CVi, RS, α, λ, S2di, bi, Si(2, Wi, σi2, EV, P59, and ASV, were influenced simultaneously by both yield and stability. They should accordingly be used as complementary criteria to select genotypes with high yield and stability. Although none of the varieties showed consistently superior performance across all environments, the genotype EK 01024-1-2 ranked in the top third of the test entries in 61.5% of the test environments and was identified as the most stable genotype, with type I stability. EK 01024-1-2 also showed a 17.0% seed size advantage over the standard varieties and was released as a new variety in 2013 for wide production and named “Gora”. Different stability parameters explained genotypic performance differently, irrespective of yield performance. It was accordingly concluded that assessment of G × E interaction and yield stability should not be based on a single or a few

  2. Yield stability and relationships among stability parameters in faba bean (Vicia faba L.) genotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tamene Temesgen; Gemechu Keneni; Tadese Sefera; Mussa Jarso

    2015-01-01

    Sixteen faba bean genotypes were evaluated in 13 environments in Ethiopia during the main cropping season for three years (2009–2011). The objectives of the study were to evaluate the yield stability of the genotypes and the relative importance of different stability parameters for improving selection in faba bean. The study was conducted using a randomized complete block design with four replications. G × E interaction and yield stability were estimated using 17 different stability parameters. Pooled analysis of variance for grain yield showed that the main effects of both genotypes and environments, and the interaction effect, were highly significant (P≤0.001) and (P≤0.01), respectively. The environment main effect accounted for 89.27% of the total yield variation, whereas genotype and G × E interaction effects accounted for 2.12% and 3.31%, respectively. Genotypic superiority index (Pi) and FT3 were found to be very informative for selecting both high-yielding and stable faba bean genotypes. Twelve of the 17 stability parameters, including CVi, RS,α,λ, S2di, bi, Si(2), Wi,σi2, EV, P59, and ASV, were influenced simultaneously by both yield and stability. They should accordingly be used as complementary criteria to select genotypes with high yield and stability. Although none of the varieties showed consistently superior performance across all environments, the genotype EK 01024-1-2 ranked in the top third of the test entries in 61.5% of the test environments and was identified as the most stable genotype, with type I stability. EK 01024-1-2 also showed a 17.0%seed size advantage over the standard varieties and was released as a new variety in 2013 for wide production and named “Gora”. Different stability parameters explained genotypic performance differently, irrespective of yield performance. It was accordingly concluded that assessment of G × E interaction and yield stability should not be based on a single or a few stability parameters but

  3. Statistical modelling and deconvolution of yield meter data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøgersen, Frede Aakmann; Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge

    previously harvested along the swath. The unobserved yield is assumed to be a Gaussian random field and the yield monitoring system data is modelled as a convolution of the yield and an impulse response function. This results in an unusual spatial covariance structure (depending on the driving pattern......Data for yield maps can be obtained from modern combine harvesters equipped with a differential global positioning system and a yield monitoring system. Due to delay and smoothing effects in the combine harvester the recorded yield data for a location represents a shifted weighted average of yield...... of the combine harvester) for the yield monitoring system data. Parameters of the impulse response function and the spatial covariance function of the yield are estimated using maximum likelihood. The fitted model is assessed using certain empirical directional covariograms and the yield is finally predicted...

  4. FORAGE AND GRAIN YIELD PERFORMANCES OF SOYBEAN LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur BILGILI

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the yield and yield components of twelve soybean genotypes as a forage and a grain crop in Marmara Region of Turkey in 2003-2004 growing seasons. Forage and dry matter yield and yield components at one vegetative stage (V5 and two reproductive stages (R2, and R4 and seed yield was determined in all soybean genotypes. The experiments showed that the harvest stages had signifi cant effects on forage and dry matter yield, and R4 reproductive stage had the highest forage and dry matter yield. Dry matter partitioning of soybean plant parts was greatly affected by harvest stages, while the genotypes had little effect on dry matter partitioning of soybean plant parts. There were statistically signifi cant differences between soybean genotypes in seed yield, but the differences were small. The correlations between forage and dry matter yield and seed yield were not statistically signifi cant.

  5. Overdominant quantitative trait loci for yield and fitness in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semel, Yaniv; Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Menda, Naama; Zinder, Michael; Krieger, Uri; Issman, Noa; Pleban, Tzili; Lippman, Zachary; Gur, Amit; Zamir, Dani

    2006-08-29

    Heterosis, or hybrid vigor, is a major genetic force that contributes to world food production. The genetic basis of heterosis is not clear, and the importance of loci with overdominant (ODO) effects is debated. One problem has been the use of whole-genome segregating populations, where interactions often mask the effects of individual loci. To assess the contribution of ODO to heterosis in the absence of epistasis, we carried out quantitative genetic and phenotypic analyses on a population of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) introgression lines (ILs), which carry single marker-defined chromosome segments from the distantly related wild species Solanum pennellii. The ILs revealed 841 quantitative trait loci (QTL) for 35 diverse traits measured in the field on homozygous and heterozygous plants. ILs showing greater reproductive fitness were characterized by the prevalence of ODO QTL, which were virtually absent for the nonreproductive traits. ODO can result from true ODO due to allelic interactions of a single gene or from pseudoODO that involves linked loci with dominant alleles in repulsion. The fact that we detected dominant and recessive QTL for all phenotypic categories but ODO only for the reproductive traits indicates that pseudoODO due to random linkage is unlikely to explain heterosis in the ILs. Thus, we favor the true ODO model involving a single functional Mendelian locus. We propose that the alliance of ODO QTL with higher reproductive fitness was selected for in evolution and was domesticated by man to improve yields of crop plants.

  6. Ethiopian Wheat Yield and Yield Gap Estimation: A Spatial Small Area Integrated Data Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, M.; Warner, J.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the collection of routine annual agricultural surveys and significant advances in GIS and remote sensing products, little econometric research has been undertaken in predicting developing nation's agricultural yields. In this paper, we explore the determinants of wheat output per hectare in Ethiopia during the 2011-2013 Meher crop seasons aggregated to the woreda administrative area. Using a panel data approach, combining national agricultural field surveys with relevant GIS and remote sensing products, the model explains nearly 40% of the total variation in wheat output per hectare across the country. The model also identifies specific contributors to wheat yields that include farm management techniques (eg. area planted, improved seed, fertilizer, irrigation), weather (eg. rainfall), water availability (vegetation and moisture deficit indexes) and policy intervention. Our findings suggest that woredas produce between 9.8 and 86.5% of their potential wheat output per hectare given their altitude, weather conditions, terrain, and plant health. At the median, Amhara, Oromiya, SNNP, and Tigray produce 48.6, 51.5, 49.7, and 61.3% of their local attainable yields, respectively. This research has a broad range of applications, especially from a public policy perspective: identifying causes of yield fluctuations, remotely evaluating larger agricultural intervention packages, and analyzing relative yield potential. Overall, the combination of field surveys with spatial data can be used to identify management priorities for improving production at a variety of administrative levels.

  7. Combining ability studies for yield and yield components trait in hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.V. Padmavathi, P.V. Satyanarayana , Lal Ahamed M.,Y. Ashoka Rani and V. Srinivasa Rao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fifty two hybrids were generated from crossing four CMS lines and thirteen restorer lines in line x tester design. Crosses along with parents were evaluated for yield and yield component traits during rabi, 2011 at RARS, Jagtial, Andhra Pradesh. Predominance of non additive gene action was recorded for all the characters. Among CMS lines APMS 9A andAPMS 10A and in testers viz., MTU II-110-9-1-1-1-1, MTU II -187-6-1-1, MTU II-143-26-2, MTU II-290-42-1 and MTU II-283-7-1-1 were found to be good general combiners for grain yield and yield component traits. The crosses APMS 10A x MTU II-290-42-1, APMS 6A x MTU II -187-6-1-1 and PMS 6A x MTU II-110-9-1-1-1-1 were identified as most promising hybrids for grain yield plant-1. These hybrids can be tested over locations before their commercial cultivation.

  8. Genomic Distribution of Quantitative Trait Loci for Yield and Yield-related Traits in Common Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Yi Zhang; Dong-Cheng Liu; Xiao-Li Guo; Wen-Long Yang; Jia-Zhu Sun; Dao-Wen Wang; Aimin Zhang

    2010-01-01

    A major objective of quantitative trait locus(QTL)studies is to find genes/markers that can be used in breeding programs via marker assisted selection(MAS).We surveyed the QTLs for yield and yield related traits and their genomic distributions in common wheat(Triticum aestivum L.)in the available published reports.We then carried out a meta-QTL(MQTL)analysis to identify the major and consistent QTLs for these traits.In total,55 MQTLs were identified,of which 12 significant MQTLs were located on wheat chromosomes 1A,1B,2A,2D,3B,4A,4B,4D and 5A.Our study showed that the genetic control of yield and its components in common wheat involved the important genes such as Rht and Vrn.Furthermore,several significant MQTLs were found in the chromosomal regions corresponding to several rice genomic locations containing important QTLs for yield related traits.Our results demonstrate that meta-QTL analysis is a powerful tool for confirming the major and stable QTLs and refining their chromosomal positions in common wheat,which may be useful for improving the MAS efficiency of yield related traits.

  9. Effect of Black and Clear Polyethylene Mulch on Yield and Yield Components of Melon in Salinity Stress Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Jafari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The term of Mulch, is the German word (Molsh means the soft, however, not soft, and made of plant debris or synthetic substances. Many positive effects attributed to the use of plastic mulch such as adjusting the temperature in the root environment, conserve moisture, reduce weeds, increase root growth, reduce soil erosion, and soil condensation and improve germination and early plant establishment. The use of mulch can reduce the harmful effects of salt in plants. Materials and Methods: To evaluate the effects of black and clear polyethylene mulch on yield and yield components of melon in salinity stress condition, a study was conducted in 2011 using split plot randomized based on complete block design with three replications in Varamin region. Three salinity levels of irrigation water of 2, 5 and 8 dS-1 as main factor and three plastic mulch treatments (no mulch, clear mulch and black mulch were considered as sub-plots. At harvest and after determining the yield and number of fruits harvested from each plot, the average number of fruits per plant was measured and fruit pulp thickness was recorded with calipers. Results Discussion The results showed interactive effects of salinity and mulch on fruit yield, number of fruits per plant, average fruit weight, fruit length, days to first harvest and fruit soluble solids percentage were statistically significant. In salinity levels of 2, 5 and 8 dS m-1, fruit yield increased, respectively, 19.6, 59, and 45.4 %in clear mulch compared to control. Similarly these increases for the black mulch were equal to 15.7, 41.9, and 21.4 percent, respectively. With 2, 5 and 8 dS m-1 salinity levels, fruit yield in the first harvest were 7.44, 7.72, and 6.98 t ha -1, respectively, which was significantly higher than without mulch and black mulch. Mulch can reduce evaporation and increase the level of moisture in the soil and thereby dilute the salt and reduce the harmful effects of salinity. Some

  10. Responsiveness of cold tolerant chickpea characteristics in fall and spring planting: II. yield and yield components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ahmad nezami

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research in Mashhad collection chickpeas (MCC has shown that there are some cold tolerant genotypes for fall planting in the highlands. To obtain more detailed information about the reaction of these genotypes to fall and spring planting, the yield and yield component responses of 33 chickpea genotypes (32 cold tolerant genotypes and one susceptible genotypes to four planting dates (28 Sep., 16 Oct., 2 Nov., and 7 Mar. were evaluated in 2000-2001 growing season. The experiment was conducted at the experimental field of college of agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad as a split plot design with two replications. The planting dates were imposed as main plot and chickpea genotypes as subplot. Effects of planting date and genotype on percent of plant survival (PPS after winter, number. of pod per plant, 100 seed weight, yield and Harvest Index (HI were significant (p

  11. Influence of organic polymer on yield components and seed yield of soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Faligowska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the years 2004-2005 a two-factorial experiment was conducted at the Research-Didactic Station in Gorzyń belong to Poznań University of Life Sciences. The factors were: soybean cultivars (‘Aldana’, ‘Nawiko’, ‘Jaselda’, ‘Pripyat’, line ‘SN 2394’ and organic polymer in dose 30 g·m-2 by control. The yield components (number of pods and seeds per plant, weight of seeds per plant, yield and weight of 1000 seeds depended mostly on the weather conditions. The highest number of pods and seeds per plant, weight of seeds per plant was recorded in cultivar ‘Nawiko’. The polymer application increased only the number of pods per plant in ‘SN 2394’ line but did not influence the seed yield.

  12. Higgs production in vector boson fusion in the H{yields} {tau}{tau} {yields} ll + 4{nu} final state with ATLAS. A sensitivity study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Martin

    2011-05-15

    A study of the expected sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment to discover the Standard Model Higgs boson produced via vector boson fusion (VBF) and its decay to H{yields} {tau}{tau} {yields} ll + 4{nu} is presented. The study is based on simulated proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. For the rst time the discovery potential is evaluated in the presence of additional proton-proton interactions (pile-up) to the process of interest in a complete and consistent way. Special emphasis is placed on the development of background estimation techniques to extract the main background processes Z{yields} {tau}{tau} and t anti t production using data. The t anti t background is estimated using a control sample selected with the VBF analysis cuts and the inverted b-jet veto. The dominant background process Z {yields} {tau}{tau} is estimated using Z{yields} {mu}{mu} events. Replacing the muons of the Z{yields} {mu}{mu} event with simulated {tau}-leptons, Z {yields} {tau}{tau} events are modelled to high precision. For the replacement of the Z boson decay products a dedicated method based on tracks and calorimeter cells is developed. Without pile-up a discovery potential of 3{sigma} to 3.4{sigma} in the mass range 115 GeV

  13. Estimation of rice yield affected by drought and relation between rice yield and TVDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, C.; Tamura, E.; Sigit, G.

    2016-12-01

    Impact of climate change is not only seen on food production but also on food security and sustainable development of society. Adaptation to climate change is a pressing issue throughout the world to reduce the risks along with the plans and strategies for food security and sustainable development. As a key adaptation to the climate change, agricultural insurance is expected to play an important role in stabilizing agricultural production through compensating the losses caused by the climate change. As the adaptation, the Government of Indonesia has launched agricultural insurance program for damage of rice by drought, flood and pest and disease. The Government started a pilot project in 2013 and this year the pilot project has been extended to 22 provinces. Having the above as background, we conducted research on development of new damage assessment method for rice using remote sensing data which could be used for evaluation of damage ratio caused by drought in West Java, Indonesia. For assessment of the damage ratio, estimation of rice yield is a key. As the result of our study, rice yield affected by drought in dry season could be estimated at level of 1 % significance using SPOT 7 data taken in 2015, and the validation result was 0.8t/ha. Then, the decrease ratio in rice yield about each individual paddy field was calculated using data of the estimated result and the average yield of the past 10 years. In addition, TVDI (Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index) which was calculated from Landsat8 data in heading season indicated the dryness in low yield area. The result suggests that rice yield was affected by irrigation water shortage around heading season as a result of the decreased precipitation by El Nino. Through our study, it becomes clear that the utilization of remote sensing data can be promising for assessment of the damage ratio of rice production precisely, quickly and quantitatively, and also it can be incorporated into the insurance procedures.

  14. ZNJPrice/Earnings Ratio Model through Dividend Yield and Required Yield Above Expected Inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Mihalina

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Price/earnings ratio is the most popular and most widespread evaluation model used to assess relative capital asset value on financial markets. In functional terms, company earnings in the very long term can be described with high significance. Empirically, it is visible from long-term statistics that the demanded (required yield on capital markets has certain regularity. Thus, investors first require a yield above the stable inflation rate and then a dividend yield and a capital increase caused by the growth of earnings that influence the price, with the assumption that the P/E ratio is stable. By combining the Gordon model for current dividend value, the model of market capitalization of earnings (price/earnings ratio and bearing in mind the influence of the general price levels on company earnings, it is possible to adjust the price/earnings ratio by deriving a function of the required yield on capital markets measured by a market index through dividend yield and inflation rate above the stable inflation rate increased by profit growth. The S&P 500 index for example, has in the last 100 years grown by exactly the inflation rate above the stable inflation rate increased by profit growth. The comparison of two series of price/earnings ratios, a modelled one and an average 7-year ratio, shows a notable correlation in the movement of two series of variables, with a three year deviation. Therefore, it could be hypothesized that three years of the expected inflation level, dividend yield and profit growth rate of the market index are discounted in the current market prices. The conclusion is that, at the present time, the relationship between the adjusted average price/earnings ratio and its effect on the market index on one hand and the modelled price/earnings ratio on the other can clearly show the expected dynamics and course in the following period.

  15. Optimal green tax reforms yielding double dividend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Esther; Perez, Rafaela [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); ICAE (Spain); Ruiz, Jesus, E-mail: jruizand@ccee.ucm.es [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); ICAE (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    In an stylized endogenous growth economy with a negative externality created by CO2 emissions and in which abatement activities are made by private firms, we find a wide range of dynamically feasible green tax reforms yielding the double dividend without any need to assume a complex production structure or tax system, or a variety of externalities in production. As a remarkable finding, we obtain certain scenarios in which increasing the emissions tax up to the Pigouvian level and removing completely the income tax is dynamically feasible and, also, it is the second-best reform. Hence, as a difference to previous literature, in these scenarios the first-best tax mix is implementable, allowing for the elimination of both environmental and non-environmental inefficiencies. Our result arises because of the consideration of public debt issuing and the management of the government budget balance with an intertemporal perspective. The result is obtained for an intermediate range of environmental bearing in preferences, the valid range being contingent on the pre-existing income tax rate. The type of tax reform that we propose could also be implemented for different energy taxes. - Highlights: > We use an endogenous growth model with a negative externality from CO2 emissions. > Abatement activities are made by private firms to reduce payment of emissions taxes. > We find dynamically feasible green tax reforms yielding the double dividend result. > Our result arises thanks to the inclusion of public debt issuing as a financing device. > The type of tax reform proposed can be implemented for other energy taxes.

  16. Setting maximum sustainable yield targets when yield of one species affects that of other species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Anna; Reid, David; Mackinson, Steve;

    2012-01-01

    species. But how should we prioritize and identify most appropriate targets? Do we prefer to maximize by focusing on total yield in biomass across species, or are other measures targeting maximization of profits or preserving high living qualities more relevant? And how do we ensure that targets remain......, industry, managers, and NGO representatives. The workshop was designed to identify variants of maximum sustainable yield (MSY) which account for the necessary trade‐offs and estimate the preferences of the workshop participants for each of these variants across five regional groups: the Baltic Sea...

  17. Setting maximum sustainable yield targets when yield of one species affects that of other species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Anna; Reid, David; Mackinson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    species. But how should we prioritize and identify most appropriate targets? Do we prefer to maximize by focusing on total yield in biomass across species, or are other measures targeting maximization of profits or preserving high living qualities more relevant? And how do we ensure that targets remain......, industry, managers, and NGO representatives. The workshop was designed to identify variants of maximum sustainable yield (MSY) which account for the necessary trade‐offs and estimate the preferences of the workshop participants for each of these variants across five regional groups: the Baltic Sea...

  18. Genetical and environmental analyses of yield in six biparental soybean crosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOLEDO JOSÉ FRANCISCO FERRAZ DE

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The yearly genetic progress obtained by breeding for increased soybean yield has been considered acceptable worldwide. It is common sense, however, that this progress can be improved further if refined breeding techniques, developed from the knowledge of the genetic mechanisms controlling soybean yield, are used. In this paper, data from four cultivars and/or lines and their derived sets of F2, F3, F7, F8, F9 and F10 generations assayed in 17 environments were analyzed to allow an insight of the genetic control of soybean yield under different environmental conditions. The general picture was of a complex polygene system controlling yield in soybeans. Additive genetic effects predominated although dominance was often found to be significant. Complications such as epistasis, linkage and macro and micro genotype x environment (G x E interactions were also commonly detected. The overall heritability was 0.29. The relative magnitude of the additive effects and the complicating factors allowed the inference that the latter are not a serious problem to the breeder. The low heritability values and the considerable magnitude of G x E interactions for yield, however, indicated that careful evaluation through experiments designed to allow for the presence of these effects is necessary for successful selection.

  19. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per

    2006-01-01

    as an interpretation of palpability, comprising usability as well as patient empowerment and socially performative issues. We present a prototype environment for video recording during physiotherapeutical consultation which illustrates our current thoughts on explicit interaction and serves as material for further......We report an ongoing study of palpable computing to support surgical rehabilitation, in the general field of interaction design for ubiquitous computing. Through explorative design, fieldwork and participatory design techniques, we explore the design principle of explicit interaction...

  20. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin;

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  1. Influence of Bradyrhizobium Strains on Peanut Advanced Breeding Lines (Arachis hypogaea L. Yield in North Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngueguim, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Peanut yields may be reduced due to early season nitrogen deficiency. A study was conducted in 1994 and 1995 at two locations (Guiring and Guetale, the peanut belt of Cameroon, to investigate the use of Bradyrhizobium strains to improve the nitrogen use by selected peanut advanced breeding lines. Thirty treatments were arranged in a 5 x 6 factorial and grown in a randomized complete block with four replications in 1994 and three in 1995. The treatments were a factorial set of five peanuts lines tested with four introduced inoculants, one local strain and the nitrogen treatment. Results over locations and years showed significant differences among strains for plant stand and seed weight, and among peanut lines for all traits except days to flowering. Genotypes CGS- 269 (1.225 t/ha and CGS-1272 (1.032 t/ha had the best average yields for the locations tested. The strain x host interaction was significant for plant stand, pod length and pod yield. The environment x strain x host interaction was also significant for haulm yield. Strain NC92 (- (45.2 plants/7 m2 produced higher plant stands than nitrogen treatment (40.3 plants/7 m2 or indigenous strain (41 plants/7 m2, but was not significantly superior to other strains. Strain NC92 (+ performed poorly for seed weight. The combination of peanut line CGS-1272/NC-120 and CGS-383/NC92(+ produced the highest means for pod length (58.2 cm. Genotype CGS-269 with strain NC-120 produced the highest pod yield (1.483 t/ha. Although the strain x host interaction was not significant for haulm yield, there was a good performance of line CGS-1272 with 3G4B20 and NC92 (+ which outyielded the indigenous/CGS-1272 combination by 20.3% and 17.8%, respectively.

  2. Playful Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The video Playful Interaction describes a future architectural office, and envisions ideas and concepts for playful interactions between people, materials and appliances in a pervasive and augmented working environment. The video both describes existing developments, technologies and designs...... as well as ideas not yet implemented such as playful modes of interaction with an augmented ball. Playful Interaction has been used as a hybrid of a vision video and a video prototype (1). Externally the video has been used to visualising our new ideas, and internally the video has also worked to inspire...

  3. Crop Yield Forecasted Model Based on Time Series Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hong-ying; Hou Yan-lin; Zhou Yong-juan; Zhao Hui-ming

    2012-01-01

    Traditional studies on potential yield mainly referred to attainable yield: the maximum yield which could be reached by a crop in a given environment. The new concept of crop yield under average climate conditions was defined in this paper, which was affected by advancement of science and technology. Based on the new concept of crop yield, the time series techniques relying on past yield data was employed to set up a forecasting model. The model was tested by using average grain yields of Liaoning Province in China from 1949 to 2005. The testing combined dynamic n-choosing and micro tendency rectification, and an average forecasting error was 1.24%. In the trend line of yield change, and then a yield turning point might occur, in which case the inflexion model was used to solve the problem of yield turn point.

  4. Sweet corn (Zea mays L.: Fresh ear yield in dependance of genotype and the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srdić Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet corn is used as food in the milky stage of endosperm, when its kernel is tender, succulent and sweet. It is consumed in form of fresh ears, or it is industrially processed. Breeding of sweet corn has several equally important aims that are directed by the market demands and different modes of consumption. The ear yield, in sweet corn is the most important but not the only main goal of breeding. In the two year study (2013, 2014 we observed the effect of the genotype, year and their interactions on the yields of 8 sweet corn hybrids. Two of the hybrids were commercial and six were experimental hybrids. The field experiment was arranged according to the RCBD with four replications. Hybrids were harvested 23 days after pollination, i.e. silking. Average yield in 2013 was significantly higher (12.19 t ha-1 than in 2014 (11.49 t ha- 1. In 2013 it ranged from 10.21 t ha-1 for the experimental hybrid ZP 489/1su, up to 13.52 t ha-1 for the commercial hybrid ZP 355su. In 2014 the lowest yielding hybrid was ZP 485/1su (10.14 t ha-1 while the highest yielding was ZP 486/1su (13.41 t ha-1. On average those two were also the highest (13.19 t ha-1 and the lowest yielding (10.66 t ha-1 hybrids. Statistical analysis showed that the effect of genotype and the year, as well as their interactions had significant impact on the yield performances of sweet corn hybrids.

  5. Effect of different fertilizer resources on yield and yield components of grain maize (Zea mays L. affected by tillage managements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghasemi

    2016-03-01

    maturity, 10 plants were randomly selected and the plant height, the number of kernels per row, the number of rows per ear, the seed weight, the harvest index, and the ear length were measured, separately. Results and discussion The results showed that in comparison with the first year, in the second year a significant increase was observed in plant height, ear length, number of kernel per row, weight of 100 seed weight, harvest index, and seed yield. The highest grain yield was obtained from the conventional tillage systems (mixing the fertilizer with the soil with the mean of 4494.85 kg.ha-1. Other characteristics, except the number of row per ear, increased more in the conventional tillage than in the no tillage. Fertilizer sources were significant for plant height, ear length, number of kernel per row, weight of 100 kernels, harvest index, and seed yield. The highest grain yield was obtained from the sixth treatment (mix of animal, chemical and green manures with the mean of 7018.5 kg.ha-1. The interaction of year, tillage and fertilizer sources indicated that the highest grain yield and 100 seed weight were obtained from the conventional tillage systems and from the 6th treatment (mix of animal, chemical and green manures with the means of 9400.33 kg.ha-1 and 246 g, respectively. In the conventional tillage, microbial decomposition occurs faster than in the no tillage. Nutrients are released in vicinity of the plant roots and it can be placed conveniently at the disposal plant. In this way, the sixth treatment will achieve higher yield and better quality, because it can create diverse sources of essential nutrients for the plant; moreover, it can increase absorption capacity in corn. Conclusion In conventional tillage systems, where the sources of fertilizer are mixed with soil, the plant is placed in direct contact with the soil degrading bacteria, accelerating the fertilizers’ mineralization, and ultimately, improving the plant growth. Due to high soil density

  6. Dependence of simulated positron emitter yields in ion beam cancer therapy on modeling nuclear fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühr, Armin; Priegnitz, Marlen; Fiedler, Fine; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Bassler, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In ion beam cancer therapy, range verification in patients using positron emission tomography (PET) requires the comparison of measured with simulated positron emitter yields. We found that (1) changes in modeling nuclear interactions strongly affected the positron emitter yields and that (2) Monte Carlo simulations with SHIELD-HIT10Areasonably matched the most abundant PET isotopes (11)C and (15)O. We observed an ion-energy (i.e., depth) dependence of the agreement between SHIELD-HIT10Aand measurement. Improved modeling requires more accurate measurements of cross-section values.

  7. A decade of precision agriculture impacts on grain yield and yield variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targeting management practices and inputs with precision agriculture has high potential to meet some of the grand challenges of sustainability in the coming century, including simultaneously improving crop yields and reducing environmental impacts. Although the potential is high, few studies have do...

  8. The effects of the regulated deficit irrigation on yield and some yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-05-16

    May 16, 2011 ... phases: (1) Vegetative stage (V); from seed germination to the beginning of flowering and (2) .... recorded maximum and the minimum temperatures were 32.7 and. 11.7°C in ..... Quality and yield response of soybean (Glycine.

  9. Introduction to production yield analysis : a new tool for improvement of raw material yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somsen, D.; Capelle, A.

    2002-01-01

    Mass losses during processing will result in a decrease of production yield. Losses can be separated in wanted and unwanted losses. Wanted losses are necessary to transform raw material into desired final product(s). Unwanted losses will result in additional raw material usage and generate

  10. Comparing predicted yield and yield stability of willow and Miscanthus across Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren; Jaiswal, Deepak; Bentsen, Niclas Scott;

    2016-01-01

    . The semi-mechanistic crop model BioCro was used to simulate the production of both short rotation coppice (SRC) willow and Miscanthus across Denmark. Predictions were made from high spatial resolution soil data and weather records across this area for 1990-2010. The potential average, rain-fed mean yield...

  11. SIMULATIONS OF SEDIMENT YIELD AND PHOSPHORUS YIELD FROM A WATERSHED IN TAIWAN, CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Daw HSIEH; Wan-Fa YANG; Wen C.WANG

    2006-01-01

    Long term sediment yield and phosphorus yield from a watershed are important information for watershed management planning. Since sediment and water quality data for the streams draining a watershed are most often observed only periodically, a method is needed to extend the knowledge gained from the observed data to the rest of the observation period. In this study, it is proposed that suspended sediment load be established as a power function of stream discharge, and total phosphorus load as a power function of suspended sediment load. The propositions are applied to a watershed in Taiwan. Using suspended sediment load and total phosphorus load data, parameters for the functions are calibrated. The functions are used to simulate daily suspended sediment load and daily total phosphorus load based on observed daily stream discharges for the gauging station near the watershed outlet. Annual sediment yield and total phosphorus yield are then calculated from the simulated daily load. It is shown in this study that the intercepts of the power functions are related to watershed land use activities and can be calibrated using those data. The relations may be used to develop watershed management strategies for controlling sediment and phosphorus exports.

  12. Short communication. Inheritance of yield, yield components and resistance to major diseases in Sesamum indicum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bramaway, M. A. S.; Shaban, W. I.

    2008-07-01

    Field experiments were conducted over 2005 and 2006 to study the gene action associated with yield and ten yield components, as well as resistance Fusarium wilt, charcoal rot and Alternaria leaf spot, in 6x6 half-diallel sesame progenies (F1). Highly significant differences among the 15 F1s and their six parents were detected with respect to all the investigated traits. A preponderance of non-additive genetic variance was seen for all the studied traits, except for days to maturity and resistance to Alternaria leaf spot. Ten traits showed over dominance. Recessive alleles were predominantly involved in fruiting branches plant-1, capsules plant-1 and single plant yield. The distribution of genes with positive and negative effects were symmetrical or nearly symmetrical with respect to 1000-seed weight, charcoal rot disease resistance, fruiting branches plant-1, capsules plant-1, single plant yield, and oil content. The parents possessed mostly negative genes in dominant form with respect to capsules plant-1, 1000-seed weight, oil content, and resistance to charcoal rot and Alternaria leaf spot; positive genes in recessive form were observed for the rest of the studied traits. Given the gene action observed, bi parental mating or diallel selective mating and heterosis breeding is suggested for the improvement of sesame. (Author) 24 refs.

  13. Comparing predicted yield and yield stability of willow and Miscanthus across Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren; Jaiswal, Deepak; Bentsen, Niclas Scott

    2016-01-01

    . The semi-mechanistic crop model BioCro was used to simulate the production of both short rotation coppice (SRC) willow and Miscanthus across Denmark. Predictions were made from high spatial resolution soil data and weather records across this area for 1990-2010. The potential average, rain-fed mean yield...

  14. Ligand-Receptor Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bongrand, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The formation and dissociation of specific noncovalent interactions between a variety of macromolecules play a crucial role in the function of biological systems. During the last few years, three main lines of research led to a dramatic improvement of our understanding of these important phenomena. First, combination of genetic engineering and X ray cristallography made available a simultaneous knowledg of the precise structure and affinity of series or related ligand-receptor systems differing by a few well-defined atoms. Second, improvement of computer power and simulation techniques allowed extended exploration of the interaction of realistic macromolecules. Third, simultaneous development of a variety of techniques based on atomic force microscopy, hydrodynamic flow, biomembrane probes, optical tweezers, magnetic fields or flexible transducers yielded direct experimental information of the behavior of single ligand receptor bonds. At the same time, investigation of well defined cellular models raised the ...

  15. Effect of stripe rust on the yield response of wheat to nitrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rakhesh; Devadas; Steven; Simpfendorfer; David; Backhouse; David; W.Lamb

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen(N) is the most important fertiliser element determining the productivity of wheat.N nutrition is known to affect the level of stripe rust infection, with higher N associated with increased disease severity. Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is a major yield-limiting disease of wheat in Australia. This paper describes experiments designed to investigate the agronomic response to the interaction of various levels of N application and stripe rust severity in wheat varieties differing in response. Experimental plots were established in crop seasons 2006 and 2007 on the Liverpool Plains of northern NSW, Australia.Yield, biomass, grain protein content(GPC) and harvest index(HI) data were recorded.Increased rates of N increased the severity of stripe rust during grain filling. N application also increased yield and GPC in all varieties in both years. Stripe rust reduced the yield of the rust-susceptible wheat varieties, and GPC and proportion of added N recovered in the grain were also reduced in one year but not the other. It was evident from our experiment that stripe rust caused yield loss accompanied by either no change or reduction in GPC, indicating that the total amount of N entering the grain was reduced by stripe rust. The effects of stripe rust on N yield are most likely associated with reduced uptake of N during grain filling.

  16. Yield Stability of Maize Hybrids Evaluated in Maize Regional Trials in Southwestern China Using Nonparametric Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong-jian; DUAN Chuan; TIAN Meng-liang; HU Er-liang; HUANG Yu-bi

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of multi-environment trials (METs) of crops for the evaluation and recommendation of varieties is an important issue in plant breeding research. Evaluating on the both stability of performance and high yield is essential in MET analyses. The objective of the present investigation was to compare 11 nonparametric stability statistics and apply nonparametric tests for genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI) to 14 maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes grown at 25 locations in southwestern China during 2005. Results of nonparametric tests of GEI and a combined ANOVA across locations showed that both crossover and noncrossover GEI, and genotypes varied highly significantly for yield. The results of principal component analysis, correlation analysis of nonparametric statistics, and yield indicated the nonparametric statistics grouped as four distinct classes that corresponded to different agronomic and biological concepts of stability.Furthermore, high values of TOP and low values of rank-sum were associated with high mean yield, but the other nonparametric statistics were not positively correlated with mean yield. Therefore, only rank-sum and TOP methods would be useful for simultaneously selection for high yield and stability. These two statistics recommended JY686 and HX 168 as desirable and ND 108, CM 12, CN36, and NK6661 as undesirable genotypes.

  17. Yield stability of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. in the North West Frontier Province, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Rasul Tahir

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Ten promising wheat genotypes were evaluated for grain yield stability under varied environments at nine locations in the North West Frontier Province, Pakistan. The interaction between genotypes and environments (G x E was found significant in this study. None of the regression coefficients (bi was significantly different from variety; therefore, stable performance of the genotypes could not be predicted on ‘bi’ alone. In this study, deviations from regression (S2d and average grain yields were used to identify the superior genotypes. Above average grain yields were observed in genotypes, CT-99022, SAW-98063, CT- 99155 and Saleem-2000. Although cultivar Saleem-2000 produced high yield, on the basis of high S2d value seemed to be sensitive upon environmental changes. Based on grain yield performance, low deviation from regression and bi values the genotype CT-99022 is more suitable for favourable and CT-99155 for unfavourable environments. Stable performance was expressed by SAW-98063 because of higher grain yield, regression coefficient (bi = .983 and low deviation from regression (S2d = 0.065.

  18. Effect of increasing temperature on yield of some winter crops in northwest India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalra, N.; Chakraborty, D.; Sharma, A.; Rai, H.K.; Jolly, M.; Chander, S.; Kumar, P.R.; Bhadraray, S.; Barman, D.; Mittal, R.B.; Lal, M.; Sehgal, M. [Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi (India)

    2008-01-10

    Seasonal temperature is an important climatic factor which can have profound effects on the yield of crops. Climate change is a concern today, and researchers are engaged in understanding its impact on growth and yield of crops, and also identifying suitable management options to sustain the crops' productivity under the climate change scenarios. The effect of increase in temperature on grain yield of some winter crops (wheat, mustard, barley and chickpea) in northwest India was evaluated on the basis of historic records and through a dynamic crop growth model, WTGROWS. The optimal date of sowing was also evaluated in view of the increase in seasonal temperature. The yield of these crops, especially wheat, already showing signs of stagnation in most places of northwest India, is most likely to be affected by temperature changes. The solar radiation-temperature interactions study in wheat reveals some interesting trends and is seen to vary from one location to another. Keeping in view the trends in global climate change, a shift in sowing time, as an adaptation strategy is recommended. The simple and empirical relations between yield and seasonal temperature change can be well used for a crude estimate of yield dependence of temperature rise of these winter crops.

  19. Influences on venom yield in Australian tigersnakes (Notechis scutatus) and brownsnakes (Pseudonaja textilis: Elapidae, Serpentes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtschin, P J; Shine, R; Nias, T J; Dunstan, N L; Hough, B J; Mirtschin, M

    2002-11-01

    The rates at which venomous animals produce venoms are of obvious biological and medical importance, but factors influencing those rates remain poorly understood. We gathered data on venom yield (wet mass of venom) and percentage solids (dry mass of the venom divided by wet mass) for 53 eastern brownsnakes (Pseudonaja textilis) and 36 mainland tigersnakes (Notechis scutatus) over a 4-year period at Venom Supplies Pty. Ltd, a commercial venom production facility in South Australia. Tigersnakes yielded about threefold more venom (by wet mass) than brownsnakes, but with slightly lower percentage solids. Both species showed significant geographic variation in percentage solids. Venom yields varied as a function of the snake's sex and geographic origin, but these effects were secondary consequences of geographic and sex-based differences in body size. Relative head size affected venom yield in brownsnakes but not tigersnakes. Overall, the amount of venom that a snake produced during milking was affected by its species, its geographic origin, its body size and relative head size, and by the time of year that it was milked, as well as by interactions among these factors. Body size was the most important effect on venom yield, with yields increasing more rapidly with size in brownsnakes than in tigersnakes. Research at the intersection of snake ecology and venom characteristics has great potential, but will require a genuinely interdisciplinary approach.

  20. Drought impacts on cereal yields in Iberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Célia; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Russo, Ana; Montero, Irene

    2014-05-01

    In the present context of climate change, land degradation and desertification it becomes crucial to assess the impact of droughts to determine the environmental consequences of a potential change of climate. Large drought episodes in Iberian Peninsula have widespread ecological and environmental impacts, namely in vegetation dynamics, resulting in significant crop yield losses. During the hydrological years of 2004/2005 and 2011/2012 Iberia was affected by two extreme drought episodes (Garcia-Herrera et al., 2007; Trigo et al., 2013). This work aims to analyze the spatial and temporal behavior of climatic droughts at different time scales using spatially distributed time series of drought indicators, such as the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) (Vicente-Serrano et al., 2010). This climatic drought index is based on the simultaneous use of precipitation and temperature. We have used CRU TS3 dataset to compute SPEI and the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI). Results will be analyzed in terms of the mechanisms that are responsible by these drought events and will also be used to assess the impact of droughts in crops. Accordingly an analysis is performed to evaluate the large-scale conditions required for a particular extreme anomaly of long-range transport of water vapor from the subtropics. We have used the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA Interim reanalyses, namely, the geopotential height fields, temperature, wind, divergence data and the specific humidity at all pressure levels and mean sea level pressure (MSLP) and total column water vapor (TCWV) for the Euro-Atlantic sector (100°W to 50°E, 0°N-70°N) at full temporal (six hourly) and spatial (T255; interpolated to 0.75° regular horizontal grid) resolutions available to analyse the large-scale conditions associated with the drought onset. Our analysis revealed severe impacts on cereals crop productions and yield (namely wheat) for Portugal and

  1. Identification and mapping of yield and yield related QTLs from an Indian accession of Oryza rufipogon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Sarla

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L. is endowed with a rich genetic variability. In spite of such a great diversity, the modern rice cultivars have narrow genetic base for most of the agronomically important traits. To sustain the demand of an ever increasing population, new avenues have to be explored to increase the yield of rice. Wild progenitor species present potential donor sources for complex traits such as yield and would help to realize the dream of sustained food security. Results Advanced backcross method was used to introgress and map new quantitative trait loci (QTLs relating to yield and its components from an Indian accession of Oryza rufipogon. An interspecific BC2 testcross progeny (IR58025A/O. rufipogon//IR580325B///IR58025B////KMR3 was evaluated for 13 agronomic traits pertaining to yield and its components. Transgressive segregants were obtained for all the traits. Thirty nine QTLs were identified using interval mapping and composite interval mapping. In spite of it's inferiority for most of the traits studied, O. rufipogon alleles contributed positively to 74% of the QTLs. Thirty QTLs had corresponding occurrences with the QTLs reported earlier, indicating that these QTLs are stable across genetic backgrounds. Nine QTLs are novel and reported for the first time. Conclusion The study confirms that the progenitor species constitute a prominent source of still unfolded variability for traits of complex inheritance like yield. With the availability of the complete genome sequence of rice and the developments in the field of genomics, it is now possible to identify the genes underlying the QTLs. The identification of the genes constituting QTLs would help us to understand the molecular mechanisms behind the action of QTLs.

  2. Nonstop Selection for High and Stable Crop Yield by Two Prognostic Equations to Reduce Yield Losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionysia A. Fasoula

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Yield losses occurring at the field level, whether due to plant diseases or abiotic stresses, reveal reduced stability of the crop yield potential. The paper argues that the stability of crop yield potential is a trait with a clear genetic component, which can be successfully selected for at the single-plant level and incorporated into high-yielding cultivars. Two novel selection equations with prognostic power are presented, capable to objectively phenotype and evaluate individual plants in real field conditions in the absence of the masking effects of interplant competition and soil heterogeneity. The equations predict performance at the crop stand through the key concept of coefficient of homeostasis and are equally useful for early generation selection and for nonstop selection within finished cultivars in order to continuously incorporate the adaptive (genetic or epigenetic responses of plants. Exploitation of adaptive responses acquires particular importance in view of the climate change effects on crop productivity and the changing biotic or abiotic micro-environments. Cotton is used as a case study to highlight the potential of nonstop selection for increasing crop yield and for the gradual build-up of disease resistance. In addition, the paper envisions and proposes the formation of international networks of researchers focusing on specific diseases as, for example, the cereal root-rot or the cotton Verticillium wilt that will concurrently use the proposed strategy in their respective environments to select for resistant genotypes, while gaining a deeper understanding of the nature of the genetic or epigenetic changes at the phenotypic and genomic levels.

  3. Heterosis for seed yield and yield components over environments in castor (Ricinus communis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.N. Chaudhari, R.F. Chaudhary, D.K. Patel, Ashish Kanwal, H.N. Patel, H.C. Pathak and B.H. Prajapari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigation with 10 diverse inbreds, their 45 hybrids (generated by diallel mating design excluding reciprocals along with two standard checks viz; GCH-4 and GCH-5 was taken up over four environments (two fertility levels and two sowing dates to determine the extent of heterosis of seed yield and eight component traits. The heterobeltiosis and standard heterosis over GCH-4 and GCH-5 for seed yield/plant across the environments ranged from -13.71% to 47.89%, -25.08% to 22.77% and -31.62% to 12.04% respectively. SKI-280 x SH-41, SKI-280 x SKI-288, SH-41 x SKI-285, SKI-280 x SKI-215, SKI-288 x SH-41, SKI-288 x SKI-232, SKI-218 x SKI-232, SKI-215 x SH-41, SKI-288 x SKI-285, SKI-215 x SKI-285, SKI-232 x DCS-9 and SKI-215 x SKI-232 had significantly out yielded their better parent while SKI-232 x DCS-9 was significantly superior over GCH-4. Across the locations, the cross SKI-232 x DCS-9 produced the highest 182.28g of seed/plant and registered 30.49%, 22.77% and 12.04% superiority over better parent, GCH-4 and GCH-5 respectively. Magnitudes of heterosis vary from character to character and cross to cross. In general, for seed yield/plant across the locations magnitude of desirable heterosis was high over batter parent but low over standard checks. For developing high yielding and earlier maturing genotypes, selection of crosses on the basis of per se performance with considerable per cent heterobeltiosis and standard heterosis would be more desirable.

  4. Low Diagnostic Yield of Elective Coronary Angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R.; Peterson, Eric D.; Dai, David; Brennan, J. Matthew; Redberg, Rita F.; Anderson, H. Vernon; Brindis, Ralph G.; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Guidelines for triaging patients for cardiac catheterization recommend a risk assessment and noninvasive testing. We determined patterns of noninvasive testing and the diagnostic yield of catheterization among patients with suspected coronary artery disease in a contemporary national sample. Methods From January 2004 through April 2008, at 663 hospitals in the American College of Cardiology National Cardiovascular Data Registry, we identified patients without known coronary artery disease who were undergoing elective catheterization. The patients’ demographic characteristics, risk factors, and symptoms and the results of noninvasive testing were correlated with the presence of obstructive coronary artery disease, which was defined as stenosis of 50% or more of the diameter of the left main coronary artery or stenosis of 70% or more of the diameter of a major epicardial vessel. Results A total of 398,978 patients were included in the study. The median age was 61 years; 52.7% of the patients were men, 26.0% had diabetes, and 69.6% had hypertension. Noninvasive testing was performed in 83.9% of the patients. At catheterization, 149,739 patients (37.6%) had obstructive coronary artery disease. No coronary artery disease (defined as <20% stenosis in all vessels) was reported in 39.2% of the patients. Independent predictors of obstructive coronary artery disease included male sex (odds ratio, 2.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.64 to 2.76), older age (odds ratio per 5-year increment, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.28 to 1.30), presence of insulin-dependent diabetes (odds ratio, 2.14; 95% CI, 2.07 to 2.21), and presence of dyslipidemia (odds ratio, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.57 to 1.67). Patients with a positive result on a noninvasive test were moderately more likely to have obstructive coronary artery disease than those who did not undergo any testing (41.0% vs. 35.0%; P<0.001; adjusted odds ratio, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.37). Conclusions In this study, slightly more than one

  5. Milk yield prediction at late lactation in reproductive rabbit does

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Arnau-Bonachera

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Separating kits and mother to determine milk yield at 4th wk of lactation (MY4 could have negative consequences on the training and development of young rabbits. In this work, a total of 313 lactation curves (28 d long, taken from 2 different trials, were used to fit regression models to estimate MY4. In both trials, females were subjected to a semi-intensive reproductive rhythm [insemination at 11 d post-partum (dpp and weaning at 28 dpp], but diets, genetic types, parity order and day of controls were slightly different. The models included variables which, according to the bibliography, are related to milk yield and are often recorded in joint management (without separation of litters  rom mothers, such as litter size at weaning (LSW; both linear and quadratic, joint energy intake of doe plus litter at 4th wk of lactation (JEI; both linear and quadratic, perirenal fat thickness change (ΔPFTd and milk yield at 3rd wk (MY3. The overlapping degree (OL between current lactation and next pregnancy was included as a dummy variable, as well as their interactions with quantitative traits. To fit these models, 3  procedures were proposed to obtain accurate equations with biological meaning: Eq1, multiple linear regression (MLR of data; Eq2, MLR with previous smoothing of sample distribution; and Eq3, MLR with previous smoothing and avoiding redundant samples and collinearities among variables. MY3 had a positive and relevant linear effect on MY4 for the 3 equations obtained (responsible for 39 to 50% of MY4 prediction. JEI had also a relevant role in MY4 prediction (28 to 61%, its positive effect being linear on Eq1, quadratic on Eq2 and both linear and quadratic on Eq3. ΔPFTd and LSW related traits were only included in Eq3, with a low relative weight, and OL inclusion did not improve prediction in any equation. Predicting MY4 was possible with the variables used, although certain precautions must be taken. Traditional MLR seems to predict

  6. Electromagnetic thin-wall model for simulations of plasma wall-touching kink and vertical modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Atanasiu, Calin V.; Lackner, Karl; Hoelzl, Matthias; Strumberger, Erika

    2015-12-01

    > The understanding of plasma disruptions in tokamaks and predictions of their effects require realistic simulations of electric current excitation in three-dimensional vessel structures by the plasma touching the walls. As discovered at JET in 1996 (Litunovski JET Internal Report contract no. JQ5/11961, 1995; Noll et al., Proceedings of the 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology, Lisbon (ed. C. Varandas & F. Serra), vol. 1, 1996, p. 751. Elsevier) the wall-touching kink modes are frequently excited during vertical displacement events and cause large sideways forces on the vacuum vessel which are difficult to withstand in large tokamaks. In disruptions, the sharing of electric current between the plasma and the wall plays an important role in plasma dynamics and determines the amplitude and localization of the sideways force (Riccardo et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 40, 2000, p. 1805; Riccardo & Walker, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, vol. 42, 2000, p. 29; Zakharov, Phys. Plasmas, vol. 15, 2008, 062507; Riccardo et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 49, 2009, 055012; Bachmann et al., Fusion Engng Des., vol. 86, 2011, pp. 1915-1919). This paper describes a flat triangle representation of the electric circuits of a thin conducting wall of arbitrary three-dimensional geometry. Implemented into the shell simulation code (SHL) and the source sink current code (SSC), this model is suitable for modelling the electric currents excited in the wall inductively and through current sharing with the plasma.

  7. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter;

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing interest in considering aesthetic aspects in the design of interactive systems. A set of approaches are emerging each representing different applications of the terminology as well as different inherent assumptions on the role of the user, designer and interaction ideals....... In this paper, we use the concept of Pragmatist Aesthetics to provide a framework for distinguishing between different approaches to aesthetics. Moreover, we use our own design cases to illustrate how pragmatist aesthetics is a promising path to follow in the context of designing interactive systems......, as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  8. PREDICTION OF LACTATION YIELD FROM LAST-RECORD DAY AND AVERAGE DAILY YIELD IN NILI-RAVI BUFFALOES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Khan, A. U. Hyder, I. R. Bajwa, M. S. Rehman and F. Hassan

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Different adjustment procedures were compared to determine if prediction of lactation milk yield using last record day information could be improved by using information on the average daily milk yield of the recorded lactation. Weekly milk yield records of 993 Nili-Ravi buffaloes for 2704 lactations were used for the study. Comparison of different procedures of lactation milk yield adjustment from partial/incomplete or complete lactations indicated that milk yield predicted from a linear regression equation, or from last test day information, was higher as compared to actual milk yield due to extrapolation to a higher base. Simple linear regression procedure overestimated the yield, especially in the later part of the lactation curve. Most precise adjustments were obtained when last test day and average daily milk yield information were included as predictors. The standard deviation of bias decreased and correlation between actual and predicted lactation milk yield improved with inclusion of average daily milk yield as a predictor along with the last test day milk yield. Last recorded milk yield information along with average daily yield of the recorded lactation period are suggested to be used for standardization of milk yield data in Nili-Ravi buffaloes.

  9. Effect of nitrogen and water deficit type on the yield gap between the potential and attainable wheat yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangang Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Water deficit and N fertilizer are the two primary limiting factors for wheat yield in the North China plain, the most important winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. production area in China. Analyzing the yield gap between the potential yield and the attainable yield can quantify the potential for increasing wheat production and exploring the limiting factors to yield gap in the high-yielding farming region of North China Plain. The Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT model was used to identify methods to increase the grain yield and decrease the gap. In order to explore the impact of N and cultivars on wheat yield in the different drought types, the climate conditions during 1981 to 2011 growing seasons was categorized into low, moderate, and severe water deficit classes according to the anomaly percentage of the water deficit rate during the entire wheat growing season. There are differences (P < 0.0001 in the variations of the potential yields among three cultivars over 30 yr. For all three water deficit types, the more recent cultivars Jimai22 and Shijiazhuang8 had higher yields compared to the older 'Jinan17'. As the N fertilizer rate increased, the yield gap decreased more substantially during the low water deficit years because of the significant increase in attainable yield. Overall, the yield gaps were smaller with less water stress. Replacement of cultivars and appropriate N fertilizer application based on the forecasted drought types can narrow the yield gap effectively.

  10. The photoneutron yield predictions by PICA and comparison with the measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Job, P.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gabriel, T.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The photoneutron yields at higher photon energies have become very important since the advent of high energy electron accelerators. Bremsstrahlung is produced when the particle beam interacts with the storage-ring components or residual-gas molecules in the storage-ring vacuum. Bremsstrahlung thus produced interacts with the high-Z materials in the beamline like the beam dumps and collimators to produce photoneutrons. There are three modes of neutron production by bremsstrahlung. At low energies ({>=}525 MeV), photons are absorbed by the dipole interaction and the compound nucleus thus formed decays emitting protons and neutrons and other heavier particles. At higher energies ({>=}25 MeV), photon interacts with the nucleus through absorption on a quasi-deuteron, which subsequently decays producing a neutron and proton pair which can interact with the rest of the nucleus. At still higher energies the photopion production becomes possible and competes with the quasi-deuteron process. In this paper we have calculated the photoneutron yield from a thick copper target using the photonuclear interaction code PICA. Using this as the neutron source, we have calculated the dose rates through heavy concrete and compared it with the measurements made at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Lab.

  11. Feature Selection for Wheat Yield Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruß, Georg; Kruse, Rudolf

    Carrying out effective and sustainable agriculture has become an important issue in recent years. Agricultural production has to keep up with an everincreasing population by taking advantage of a field’s heterogeneity. Nowadays, modern technology such as the global positioning system (GPS) and a multitude of developed sensors enable farmers to better measure their fields’ heterogeneities. For this small-scale, precise treatment the term precision agriculture has been coined. However, the large amounts of data that are (literally) harvested during the growing season have to be analysed. In particular, the farmer is interested in knowing whether a newly developed heterogeneity sensor is potentially advantageous or not. Since the sensor data are readily available, this issue should be seen from an artificial intelligence perspective. There it can be treated as a feature selection problem. The additional task of yield prediction can be treated as a multi-dimensional regression problem. This article aims to present an approach towards solving these two practically important problems using artificial intelligence and data mining ideas and methodologies.

  12. Ice sheets on plastically-yielding beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Ian

    2016-11-01

    Many fast flowing regions of ice sheets are underlain by a layer of water-saturated sediments, or till. The rheology of the till has been the subject of some controversy, with laboratory tests suggesting almost perfectly plastic behaviour (stress independent of strain rate), but many models adopting a pseudo-viscous description. In this work, we consider the behaviour of glaciers underlain by a plastic bed. The ice is treated as a viscous gravity current, on a bed that allows unconstrained slip above a critical yield stress. This simplified description allows rapid sliding, and aims to investigate 'worst-case' scenarios of possible ice-sheet disintegration. The plastic bed results in an approximate ice-sheet geometry that is primarily controlled by force balance, whilst ice velocity is determined from mass conservation (rather than the other way around, as standard models would hold). The stability of various states is considered, and particular attention is given to the pace at which transitions between unstable states can occur. Finally, we observe that the strength of basal tills depends strongly on pore pressure, and combine the model with a description of subglacial hydrology. Implications for the present-day ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica will be discussed. Funding: ERC Marie Curie FP7 Career Integration Grant.

  13. Carbon Coatings with Low Secondary Electron Yield

    CERN Document Server

    Taborelli, M; Costa Pinto, P; Calatroni, S; Chiggiato, P; Edwards, P; Letant-Delrieux, D; Lucas, S; Neupert, H; Vollenberg, W; Yin-Vallgren, C

    2013-01-01

    Carbon thin films for electron cloud mitigation and anti-multipacting applications have been prepared by dc magnetron sputtering in both neon and argon discharge gases and by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) using acetylene. The thin films have been characterized using Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) measurements, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). For more than 100 carbon thin films prepared by sputtering the average maximum SEY is 0.98+/-0.07 after air transfer. The density of the films is lower than the density of Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG), a fact which partially explains their lower SEY. XPS shows that magnetron sputtered samples exhibit mainly sp2 type bonds. The intensity on the high binding energy side of C1s is found to be related to the value of the SEY. Instead the initial surface concentration of oxygen has no influence on the resulting SEY, when it is below 16%. The thin films produced by P...

  14. Evaluation of Biofertilizers in Irrigated Rice: Effects on Grain Yield at Different Fertilizer Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo B. Badayos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Biofertilizers are becoming increasingly popular in many countries and for many crops, but very few studies on their effect on grain yield have been conducted in rice. Therefore, we evaluated three different biofertilizers (based on Azospirillum, Trichoderma, or unidentified rhizobacteria in the Philippines during four cropping seasons between 2009 and 2011, using four different fertilizer rates (100% of the recommended rate [RR], 50% RR, 25% RR, and no fertilizer as Control. The experiments were conducted under fully irrigated conditions in a typical lowland rice environment. Significant yield increases due to biofertilizer use were observed in all experimental seasons with the exception of the 2008/09 DS. However, the effect on rice grain yield varied between biofertilizers, seasons, and fertilizer treatments. In relative terms, the seasonal yield increase across fertilizer treatments was between 5% and 18% for the best biofertilizer (Azospirillum-based, but went up to 24% in individual treatments. Absolute grain yield increases due to biofertilizer were usually below 0.5 t·ha−1, corresponding to an estimated additional N uptake of less than 7.5 kg N ha−1. The biofertilizer effect on yield did not significantly interact with the inorganic fertilizer rate used but the best effects on grain yield were achieved at low to medium fertilizer rates. Nevertheless, positive effects of the biofertilizers even occurred at grain yields up to 5 t·ha−1. However, the trends in our results seem to indicate that biofertilizers might be most helpful in rainfed environments with limited inorganic fertilizer input. However, for use in these target environments, biofertilizers need to be evaluated under conditions with abiotic stresses typical of such systems such as drought, soil acidity, or low soil fertility.

  15. Water Yield and Sediment Yield Simulations for Teba Catchment in Spain Using SWRRB Model: Ⅱ.Simulation Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Simulated results of water yield, sediment yield, surface runoff, subsurface runoff, peak flow, evapotranspiration, etc., in the Teba catchment, Spain, using SWRRB (Simulator for Water Resources in Rural Basins) model are presented and the related problems are discussed. The results showed that water yield and sediment yield could be satisfactorily simulated using SWRRB model The accuracy of the annual water yield simulation in the Teba catchment was up to 83.68%, which implied that this method could be effectively used to predict the annual or inter-annual water yield and to realize the quantification of geographic elements and processes of a river basin.``

  16. GRAIN YIELD STABILITY OF WINTER OAT (AVENA SATIVA L. CULTIVARS IN THE CENTRAL ANATOLIAN REGION OF TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mevlut AKCURA

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were to assess genotype environment interaction and determine stable oat (Avena sativa L. cultivars for grain yield in Central Anatolian Region of Turkey. Stability analysis [9] were to performed on results for grain yield of 5 oat cultivars (Chekota, Yesilkoy-1779, Yesilkoy-330, Faikbey-2004, Seydisehir-2004 from 24 trials (6 irrigated, 18 rain fed was conducted over 6 years in the Central Anatolian Region, Turkey. There was considerable variation in grain yield within and across environments. Year by location and location variability were dominant sources of interactions. The cultivar, “Seydisehir-2004” with respective regression coefficient value of 1.03, the smallest deviations from regressions (S2di value and the highest grain yield could be considered the most widely adapted cultivar. The other test cultivars were sensitive to production-limiting factors, their wider adaptability, stability and general performance to the fluctuating growing conditions within and across environments being lowered.

  17. minimum variance estimation of yield parameters of rubber tree with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... STAMP, an OxMetric modular software system for time series analysis, was used to estimate the yield ... derlying regression techniques. .... Kalman Filter Minimum Variance Estimation of Rubber Tree Yield Parameters. 83.

  18. The Diversity and Associated Yield Components of Enset (Ensete ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Diversity and Associated Yield Components of Enset (Ensete ... granted corm, maturity period (years from planting till flowering), bulla and fibre yield. ... accounted for more than 50% of the variation expressed in this germplasm collection.

  19. Response of yield and yield components of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Tarom Hashemi in rice, duck and Azolla (Azolla sp. farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Gharavi Baigi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the yield and yield components of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Tarom Hashemi in integrated rice, duck and Azolla, an experiment was conducted at the Research Farm of Sari University of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources during 2012. Experiment was arranged in split plot based on a randomized complete block design with three replications. The number of ducks as main plots at four levels (0, 400, 800 and 1200 ducks.ha-1 and Nitrogen source as sub plots at four levels (without Azolla and nitrogen, Azolla, Azolla+nitrogen and nitrogen were the treatments. Analysis of variance showed highly significant differences for the number of ducks, Azolla+nitrogen and their interaction effects of plant height, number of tillers.plant-1, number of panicle.plant-1, number of grains.panicle-1, panicle weight, panicle dry weight and grain yield. The results revealed that the highest values of plant height (133 cm, number of tillers (38 tillers.plant-1, number of panicle (24 numbers.plant-1, number of grains (171 numbers.panicle-1, panicle weight (23 g, panicle dry weight (13 g and grain yield (4 t.ha-1 were recorded in 1200 duck pieces per hectare while treated with Azolla (500 g.m-2 and nitrogen (50 kg.ha-1. In conclusion, results of the current experiment showed that increasing of duck number from 400 to 1200 pieces.ha-1 along with Azolla and nitrogen could enhance the yield and yield components of rice (Tarom Hashemi cultivar.

  20. Effect of Biofertilizers and Irrigation Intervals on Yield Component and Yield of Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum- graecum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jaberi

    2016-02-01

    , Azad University, Birjand, Iran, during 2010-2011. Experimental treatments were irrigation intervals in three levels (every 6, 9 and 12 days and biofertilizer in five levels (nitroxin, biophosphorus, and micorhyza fungi G. mosseae, G. intraradices and control-no fertilizer. Fenugreek was planted through furrow in mid-April 2010. The distance between rows and between plants was 30 and 10 cm, respectively. Seeds were covered by Nitroxin (including: Azotobacterchroococcum, Azospirillum lipoferum and Azospirillum brasilense and biophosphrous (including: Pseudomonas fluorescens and then were cultured.They were used at a depth of 2cm below the seed from Glomusintraradiceand Glomus mosseae. Fenugreek was harvested in early July when the plants became yellow and at least 80% of the pods were reached. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using SAS 9.1 and MSTATC. Mean comparison were compared by the Duncan test at 1% and 5% level of probability. Results and Discussion: Results of statistical analysis showed that irrigation treatments and biofertilizers had significant effect on most indices. Interaction effect of irrigation and biofertilizer were significant on seed and leaf yield (p

  1. Quantum Yield Characterization and Excitation Scheme Optimization of Upconverting Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haichun; Xu, Can T.; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2014-01-01

    Upconverting nanoparticles suffer from low quantum yield in diffuse optical imaging, especially at low excitation intensities. Here, the power density dependent quantum yield is characterized, and the excitation scheme is optimized based on such characterization......Upconverting nanoparticles suffer from low quantum yield in diffuse optical imaging, especially at low excitation intensities. Here, the power density dependent quantum yield is characterized, and the excitation scheme is optimized based on such characterization...

  2. Revision of the JENDL FP Fission Yield Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katakura Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Some fission yields data of JENDL FP Fission Yields Data File 2011 (JENDL/FPY-2011 revealed inadequacies when applied to delayed neutron related subjects. The sensitivity analyses of decay heat summation calculations also showed some problems. From these results the fission yields of JENDL/FPY-2011 have been revised. The present report describes the revision of the yield data by emphasizing the sensitivity analyses.

  3. Quantum Yield Characterization and Excitation Scheme Optimization of Upconverting Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haichun; Xu, Can T.; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin;

    2014-01-01

    Upconverting nanoparticles suffer from low quantum yield in diffuse optical imaging, especially at low excitation intensities. Here, the power density dependent quantum yield is characterized, and the excitation scheme is optimized based on such characterization......Upconverting nanoparticles suffer from low quantum yield in diffuse optical imaging, especially at low excitation intensities. Here, the power density dependent quantum yield is characterized, and the excitation scheme is optimized based on such characterization...

  4. Internal stress and yield strength of copper films on substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jian-Min; Zhang Yan; Xu Ke-Wei

    2005-01-01

    Internal stress and yield strength of pure copper films on substrates were characterized by x-ray diffraction and thermal-cycle substrate curvature methods. The internal stress was of tension, and decreased with increasing workinggas (argon) pressure and increased with increasing film thickness. Tensile yield strength of copper films on steel substrate was reciprocal to the film thickness. Similarly, the compressive yield strength depended strongly on the film thickness:the thinner the film thickness, the larger the compressive yield strength.

  5. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  6. Effect of nitroxin and humic acid on yield and yield components of faba bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kholdi Abolfazl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality and quantity improvement of crops using organic matter and low-cost method in the field is very important. Bio-fertilizer nitroxin and humic acid can increase root and shoot biomass through improved intake of nutrition and they can lead to quality and quantity improvement of product. An experiment was carried out as a completely randomized block design with 4 treatments to study the effect of nitroxin and humic acid on faba bean (Vicia faba L. traits. Trial treatments included control, nitroxin, humic acid and nitroxin + humic acid. Analysis of variance showed that the effect of combination of nitroxin + humic acid was significant (p< 1% on some traits such as stem height and yield of faba bean. The highest yield (2,315 kg ha-1 was obtained under nitroxin + humic acid treatment.

  7. Statistical modelling and deconvolution of yield meter data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøgersen, Frede Aakmann; Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge

    Data for yield maps can be obtained from modern combine harvesters equipped with a differential global positioning system and a yield monitoring system. Due to delay and smoothing effects in the combine harvester the recorded yield data for a location represents a shifted weighted average of yiel...

  8. Yielding Torque-Tube System Reduces Crash Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcsmith, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    Yielding torque-tube system minimizes injuries by limiting load transferred to occupant in crash. When properly integrated into seat structure, torque tube yields in plastic deformation stage of material and maintains a relatively constant resistance to applied torque for many degrees of rotation. Yielding torque-tube system is expected to find application in aircraft and automobile industries.

  9. Yield performances and nutritional contents of three oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-06

    Oct 6, 2008 ... The total fresh mushroom yields obtained ... The yield of P. ostreatus was 17.9 g and the lowest yield was ... chemical composition analysis the fruiting bodies of mushrooms were ... Energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, dietary fibre, moisture, ash (g in 100 g ... In P. eryngii and P. sajor-caju the highest amount.

  10. An attempt to categorize yield stress fluid behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moller, P.; Fall, A.; Chikkadi, V.; Derks, D.; Bonn, D.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new view on yield stress materials. Dense suspensions and many other materials have a yield stress—they flow only if a large enough shear stress is exerted on them. There has been an ongoing debate in the literature on whether true yield stress fluids exist, and even whether the concept

  11. Simulating potential growth and yield of oil palm with PALMSIM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, M.P.; Vera, A.C.; Wijk, van M.T.; Giller, K.E.; Oberthur, R.; Donough, C.; Whitbread, A.M.; Fisher, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    The growing demand for palm oil can be met by reducing the gap between potential yield and actual yield. Simulation models can quantify potential yield, and therefore indicate the scope for intensification. A relatively simple physiological approach was used to develop PALMSIM, which is a model that

  12. Simulating potential growth and yield of oil palm with PALMSIM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, M.P.; Vera, A.C.; Wijk, van M.T.; Giller, K.E.; Oberthur, R.; Donough, C.; Whitbread, A.M.; Fisher, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    The growing demand for palm oil can be met by reducing the gap between potential yield and actual yield. Simulation models can quantify potential yield, and therefore indicate the scope for intensification. A relatively simple physiological approach was used to develop PALMSIM, which is a model that

  13. 19 CFR 151.71 - Laboratory testing for clean yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory testing for clean yield. 151.71 Section... Laboratory testing for clean yield. (a) Test and report by Customs laboratory. The clean yield of all general samples taken in accordance with § 151.70 shall be determined by test in a Customs laboratory, unless...

  14. Enhancement of central $\\Lambda$, $\\Xi$ and $\\Omega$ yields in Pb-Pb collisions at 158 A GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, E; Armenise, N; Bakke, H; Bán, J; Barberis, D; Beker, H; Beusch, Werner; Bloodworth, Ian J; Böhm, J; Caliandro, R; Campbell, M; Cantatore, E; Carrer, N; Catanesi, M G; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Dameri, M; Darbo, G; Diaczek, A; Di Bari, D; Di Liberto, S; Earl, B C; Elia, D; Evans, D; Fanebust, K; Fini, R A; Fontaine, J C; Ftácnik, J; Ghidini, B; Grella, G; Guida, M; Heijne, Erik H M; Helstrup, H; Holme, A K; Huss, D; Jacholkowski, A; Jones, G; Jovanovic, P; Jusko, A; Kachanov, V A; Kachelhoffer, T; Kinson, J B; Kirk, A; Klempt, W; Knudsen, H; Knudson, K P; Králik, I; Lassalle, J C; Lenti, V; Lietava, R; Loconsole, R A; Løvhøiden, G; Lupták, M; Mack, V; Manzari, V; Martinengo, P; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Michalon, A; Michalon-Mentzer, M E; Middelkamp, P; Morando, M; Muciaccia, M T; Nappi, E; Navach, F; Norman, P I; Osculati, B; Pastircák, B; Pellegrini, F; Píska, K; Posa, F; Quercigh, Emanuele; Ricci, R A; Romano, G; Rosa, G; Rossi, L; Rotscheidt, Herbert; Safarík, K; Saladino, S; Salvo, C; Sándor, L; Scognetti, T; Segato, G F; Sené, M; Sené, R; Simone, S; Singovsky, A V; Snoeys, W; Staroba, P; Szafran, S; Thompson, M; Thorsteinsen, T F; Tomasicchio, G; Torrieri, G D; Tveter, T S; Urbán, J; Vasileiadis, G; Venables, M; Villalobos Baillie, O; Virgili, T; Volte, A; Votruba, M F; Závada, P

    1998-01-01

    $\\Lambda$, $\\Xi$ and $\\Omega$ yields and transverse mass spectra have been measured at central rapidity in Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions at 158~A~GeV/$c$. The yields in Pb-Pb interactions are presente d as a function of the collision centrality and compared with those obtained from p-Pb collisions. Strangeness enhancement is observed which increases with centrality and with the strangeness co ntent of the hyperon.

  15. Foliar nickel application alleviates detrimental effects of glyphosate drift on yield and seed quality of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutman, Bahar Yildiz; Kutman, Umit Baris; Cakmak, Ismail

    2013-09-04

    Glyphosate drift to nontarget crops causes growth aberrations and yield losses. This herbicide can also interact with divalent nutrients and form poorly soluble complexes. The possibility of using nickel (Ni), an essential divalent metal, for alleviating glyphosate drift damage to wheat was investigated in this study. Effects of Ni applications on various growth parameters, seed yield, and quality of durum wheat ( Triticum durum ) treated with sublethal glyphosate at different developmental stages were investigated in greenhouse experiments. Nickel concentrations of various plant parts and glyphosate-induced shikimate accumulation were measured. Foliar but not soil Ni applications significantly reduced glyphosate injuries including yield losses, stunting, and excessive tillering. Both shoot and grain Ni concentrations were enhanced by foliar Ni treatment. Seed germination and seedling vigor were impaired by glyphosate and improved by foliar Ni application to parental plants. Foliar Ni application appears to have a great potential to ameliorate glyphosate drift injury to wheat.

  16. Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorophores in Lipid Bilayers Using a Plasmonic Nanocavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Falk; Ruhlandt, Daja; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg; Chizhik, Alexey I

    2017-03-20

    Precise knowledge of the quantum yield is important for many fluorescence-spectroscopic techniques, for example, for Förster resonance energy transfer. However, to measure it for emitters in a complex environment and at low concentrations is far from being trivial. Using a plasmonic nanocavity, we measure the absolute quantum yield value of lipid-conjugated dyes incorporated into a supported lipid bilayer. We show that for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules the quantum yield of dyes inside the lipid bilayer strongly differs from its value in aqueous solution. This finding is of particular importance for all fluorescence-spectroscopic studies involving lipid bilayers, such as protein-protein or protein-lipid interactions in membranes or direct fluorescence-spectroscopic measurements of membrane physical properties.

  17. Assessment the effects of different tillage methods on chickpea yield and some yield components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah KASAP

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the effects of different soil tillage methods on crop yield and some yield components in chickpea cultivation. For this reason, experimental trials were performed in Çayköy and Güzelpınar in Tokat-Kazova during 2008, 2009 and 2010. In this trials Gökçe cultivar of chickpea was used. Six different soil tillage methods were applied which were, mouldboard plough tillage in fall + cultivator in the spring + tooth harrow (Method A, mouldboard plough tillage in spring + cultivator + tooth harrow (Method B, rotary tiller in the spring (Method C, chisel in the spring + disc harrow and slider (Method D, strip tillage with router rotary hoe (Method E and direct seeding (Method F. Trials were set up in completely randomized block design with three replications. The results indicated that the highest average plant and seed yield per square meter was obtained with method A (470.74 g and 260.63 g and followed by method B (459.43 g and 254.18 g and method D (447.82 g and 247.23 g. In terms of factors evaluated; A, B and D methods were superior compared to the other methods.

  18. Effect of NS-nitragin application on soybean yield and yield components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural soils of Serbia are low in soybean symbiotic bacteria and application of bacteriological preparations has been introduced as a regular cultivation practice when growing soybean. A trial was set up on experimental field of Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops from Novi Sad on chernozem soil using a randomized block design with four replicates. Mineral nitrogen fertilizers were used in rates of 0, 30, 60, and 90 kg ha-1 in the experiment. Each of the nitrogen treatments had two variations, with and without inoculation. The effects of inoculation and different nitrogen fertilizer rates on yield and yield components were determined based on the pod number, seed number, 1000 seed mass and protein and oil content in seeds. Significantly higher pod number was observed in inoculated plants with the application of 30 kg N ha-1. Inoculation with NS-Nitragin increased seed number per plant. In treatment with no mineral nitrogen applied and with application of 30 kg N ha-1 and 60 kg N ha-1, 1000 seed mass was statistically higher in inoculated plants than in uninoculated ones. Inoculation produced statistically significant difference in soybean yield only in the treatment with no mineral nitrogen applied. Inoculation and applied mineral nitrogen rates had no significant effect on protein content in soybean grain.

  19. Effect of different intercropping patterns on yield and yield components of dill and fenugreek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Shokati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted based on randomized complete blocks design (RCBD in three replications during 2011 at the research farm of university of Tabriz, Iran. In this study two medicinal plants, dill (Anethum graveolens L. and fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum intercropped at different additive (1:20, 1:40 and 1:60 and different replacement (1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 series. Results showed that dill plant at additive treatment especially in 1:20 and 1:60 series had maximum plant fresh and dry weights, umbels per plant, 1000 seed weight, seeds per plant, biological yield and harvest index. However, fenugreek plant at replacement treatment especially in 1:3 and 1:2 series had maximum biological yield, pod in main stem, pod in branches, seeds per pod, seed weights and grain yield. Fenugreek as a medicinal, forage and legume crop promote dill grows characters and could be an effective plant in intercropping systems.

  20. Embarrassing Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Lucero, Andrés; Holopainen, Jussi;

    2015-01-01

    Wherever the rapid evolution of interactive technologies disrupts standing situational norms, creates new, often unclear situational audiences, or crosses cultural boundaries, embarrassment is likely. This makes embarrassment a fundamental adoption and engagement hurdle, but also a creative design...

  1. Interaction graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interaction graphs were introduced as a general, uniform, construction of dynamic models of linear logic, encompassing all Geometry of Interaction (GoI) constructions introduced so far. This series of work was inspired from Girard's hyperfinite GoI, and develops a quantitative approach that should...... be understood as a dynamic version of weighted relational models. Until now, the interaction graphs framework has been shown to deal with exponentials for the constrained system ELL (Elementary Linear Logic) while keeping its quantitative aspect. Adapting older constructions by Girard, one can clearly define...... "full" exponentials, but at the cost of these quantitative features. We show here that allowing interpretations of proofs to use continuous (yet finite in a measure-theoretic sense) sets of states, as opposed to earlier Interaction Graphs constructions were these sets of states were discrete (and finite...

  2. Neutrino Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    McFarland, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This manuscript summarizes a series of three lectures on interactions of neutrinos . The lectures begin with a pedagogical foundation and then explore topics of interest to current and future neutrino oscillation and cross-section experiments.

  3. The effect of sowing date and row spacing on yield and yield components on Hashem chickpea variety under rainfed condition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keyvan Shamsi

    2010-01-01

      In order to investigate the impacts of sowing date and row spacing on yield and yield components of Hashem chickpea variety, a field experiment was conducted in 2005 at farm of Dorood Faraman (Kermanshah-Iran...

  4. Interactive Workspaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Preben Holst

    augmented reality, interactive building elements, and mobile devices to support new ways of working in a diversity of application domains with work situations ranging from individual work, through local collaboration, to distributed collaboration. The work situations may take place in offices/project rooms...... or in the field. The types of tasks may range from adhoc to more planned forms of interaction. We involve users from specific application domains and use settings continuously in our research following a participatory design approach....

  5. Global Agriculture Yields and Conflict under Future Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, J.; Cane, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Aspects of climate have been shown to correlate significantly with conflict. We investigate a possible pathway for these effects through changes in agriculture yields, as predicted by field crop models (FAO's AquaCrop and DSSAT). Using satellite and station weather data, and surveyed data for soil and management, we simulate major crop yields across all countries between 1961 and 2008, and compare these to FAO and USDA reported yields. Correlations vary by country and by crop, from approximately .8 to -.5. Some of this range in crop model performance is explained by crop varieties, data quality, and other natural, economic, and political features. We also quantify the ability of AquaCrop and DSSAT to simulate yields under past cycles of ENSO as a proxy for their performance under changes in climate. We then describe two statistical models which relate crop yields to conflict events from the UCDP/PRIO Armed Conflict dataset. The first relates several preceding years of predicted yields of the major grain in each country to any conflict involving that country. The second uses the GREG ethnic group maps to identify differences in predicted yields between neighboring regions. By using variation in predicted yields to explain conflict, rather than actual yields, we can identify the exogenous effects of weather on conflict. Finally, we apply precipitation and temperature time-series under IPCC's A1B scenario to the statistical models. This allows us to estimate the scale of the impact of future yields on future conflict. Centroids of the major growing regions for each country's primary crop, based on USDA FAS consumption. Correlations between simulated yields and reported yields, for AquaCrop and DSSAT, under the assumption that no irrigation, fertilization, or pest control is used. Reported yields are the average of FAO yields and USDA FAS yields, where both are available.

  6. Antideuteron yield at the AGS and coalescence implications

    CERN Document Server

    Armstrong, T A; Batsouli, S; Bennett, S J; Bertaina, M; Chikanian, A; Coe, S D; Cormier, T M; Davies, R; Dover, C B; Fachini, P; Fadem, B S; Finch, L E; George, N K; Greene, S V; Haridas, P; Hill, J C; Hirsch, A S; Hoversten, R; Huang, H Z; Jaradat, H; Kumar, B S; Lainis, T; Lajoie, J G; Li, Q; Libby, B; Majka, R D; Miller, T E; Munhoz, M G; Nagle, J L; Pless, I A; Pope, J K; Porile, N T; Pruneau, C A; Rabin, M S Z; Reid, J D; Rimai, A; Rose, A; Rotondo, F S; Sandweiss, J; Scharenberg, R P; Slaughter, A J; Smith, G A; Tincknell, M L; Toothacker, W S; Van Buren, G; Wohn, F K; Xu, Z

    2000-01-01

    We present Experiment 864's measurement of invariant antideuteron yields in 11.5A GeV/c Au + Pt collisions. The analysis includes 250 million triggers representing 14 billion 10% central interactions sampled for events with high mass candidates. We find (1/2 pi pt) d^(2)N/dydpt = 3.5 +/- 1.5 (stat.) +0.9,-0.5 (sys.) x 10^(-8) GeV^(-2)c^(2) for 1.8=0.35 GeV/c (y(cm)=1.6) and 3.7 +/- 2.7 (stat.) +1.4,-1.5 (sys.) x 10^(-8) GeV^(-2)c^(2) for 1.4=0.26 GeV/c, and a coalescence parameter B2-bar of 4.1 +/- 2.9 (stat.) +2.3,-2.4 (sys.) x 10^(-3) GeV^(2)c^(-3). Implications for the coalescence model and antimatter annihilation are discussed.

  7. Cucumber Mosaic Virus and Chili Veinal Mottle Virus Infection on Growth and Yield Component of Chilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ENDANG NURHAYATI

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A research was undergone to study the effect of single and double infection of Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV and Chili Veinal Mottle Virus (ChiVMV on the growth and yield of five chilli cultivars, i.e. Prabu, Taro, Jatilaba, Laris, and Keriting Bogor. Mechanical inoculation was conducted to transmit the virus. Infection of the virus was then confirmed with DAS-ELISA. Severe symptom was observed on plant given double infection compared to those given single infection. The rate of plant growth and the amount and weight of fruits were reduced. The type of interaction between CMV and ChiVMV on most chilli cultivar can be considered as interference and additive. Synergism interaction was only observed on cultivar Laris. Based on symptom expression and reduction on yield, it can be concluded that all chilli cultivars used in this study could not hold up the virus infection.

  8. Effect of planting date and spacing on growth and yield of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) under irrigated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dalain, Saddam Aref; Abdel-Ghani, Adel H; Al-Dala'een, Jawad A; Thalaen, Haditha A

    2012-12-01

    Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) plant is a medicinal aromatic herb and belongs to Apiaceae family. It has a rich nutritional value and has many medicinal usages. Very limited information is available in the literature about fennel cultivation and production practices. Therefore, this study was carried out to evaluate the effect of planting date and plant spacing and their interactive effects on yield, yield components and growth of Fennel under irrigation. Three planting dates (Oct. 1st, Nov. 1st and Dec. 1st) and four plant spacings (10, 20, 30 and 40 cm with constant row width, 60 cm) were used. Fruit yield was significantly (p<0.05) influenced by plant spacing and planting date and their interaction. Early planting significantly increased the fruit yield combined with higher number of branches per plant, number of umbrella per plant, number of fruit per plant and plant height. The percentage of increases in Oct. 1st were 34.4 and 32.2% in fruit and biological yield respectively compared with Dec. 1st. Harvest index and thousand fruit weight was not significantly affected by planting date. Increase plant spacing to 30 cm led to more than 15% increase in fruit and biological yield. The early planting date with 30 cm plant spacing resulted in higher fruit (4136 kg ha(-1)) and biological yield (10,114 kg ha(-1)).

  9. How good is good enough? Data requirements for reliable crop yield simulations and yield-gap analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grassini, P.; Bussel, van L.G.J.; Wart, van J.; Wolf, J.; Claessens, L.; Yang, H.; Boogaard, H.L.; Groot, de H.L.E.; Ittersum, van M.K.; Cassman, K.G.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have been published during the past two decades that use simulation models to assesscrop yield gaps (quantified as the difference between potential and actual farm yields), impact of climatechange on future crop yields, and land-use change. However, there is a wide range in quality

  10. High yield stress associated with capillary attraction between alumina surfaces in the presence of low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, E-Jen; Leong, Yee-Kwong; Liu, Yinong; Craig, Vincent S J; Walsh, Rick B; Howard, Shaun C

    2010-03-02

    Adsorbed low molecular weight charged molecules are known to give rise to a range of surface forces that affect the rheological behavior of oxide dispersions. The behavior of dicarboxylic acid bolaform compounds in alumina slurry was investigated to determine the influence of the molecular structure on the nanoscale interactions between alumina surfaces and on the macroscopic properties of the slurry. The surface forces in dispersions and between a single particle and a flat surface were characterized by yield stress and atomic force microscopy (AFM) respectively. Absorbed muconic acid increased the yield stress of the alumina system, which indicates an additional attractive interaction between the particles. Adsorbed trans,trans (TT) muconic acid resulted in a much higher yield stress than cis,cis (CC) muconic acid. Force-distance data obtained via AFM displayed features indicating the presence of a capillary force attraction at low pH between the alumina surfaces when TT and CC muconic acids were adsorbed at high surface coverage. This force appeared to explain the high yield stress at low pH (pH 3.6), but the absence of a net attractive force at higher pH (pH 5) did not correlate with the yield stress results. At low pH, the muconic acids become less soluble in the confined space between the interacting surfaces resulting in the formation of an "oily" muconic acid phase located between the interacting surfaces. The nanosized "oil" phase is the source of the capillary force.

  11. Weather-based forecasts of California crop yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobell, D B; Cahill, K N; Field, C B

    2005-09-26

    Crop yield forecasts provide useful information to a range of users. Yields for several crops in California are currently forecast based on field surveys and farmer interviews, while for many crops official forecasts do not exist. As broad-scale crop yields are largely dependent on weather, measurements from existing meteorological stations have the potential to provide a reliable, timely, and cost-effective means to anticipate crop yields. We developed weather-based models of state-wide yields for 12 major California crops (wine grapes, lettuce, almonds, strawberries, table grapes, hay, oranges, cotton, tomatoes, walnuts, avocados, and pistachios), and tested their accuracy using cross-validation over the 1980-2003 period. Many crops were forecast with high accuracy, as judged by the percent of yield variation explained by the forecast, the number of yields with correctly predicted direction of yield change, or the number of yields with correctly predicted extreme yields. The most successfully modeled crop was almonds, with 81% of yield variance captured by the forecast. Predictions for most crops relied on weather measurements well before harvest time, allowing for lead times that were longer than existing procedures in many cases.

  12. Effect of electrolyte on the microstructure and yielding of aqueous dispersions of colloidal clay

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Samim; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2015-01-01

    Na-montmorillonite is a natural clay mineral and is available in abundance in nature. The aqueous dispersions of charged and anisotropic platelets of this mineral exhibit non-ergodic kinetically arrested states ranging from soft glassy phases dominated by interparticle repulsions to colloidal gels stabilized by salt induced attractive interactions. When the salt concentration in the dispersing medium is varied systematically, viscoelasticity and yield stress of the dispersion show non-monoton...

  13. Nonparametric long term prediction of stock returns with generated bond yields

    OpenAIRE

    M Scholz; Sperlich, S.; Nielsen, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Recent empirical approaches in forecasting equity returns or premiums found that dynamic interactions among the stock and bond are relevant for long term pension products. Automatic procedures to upgrade or downgrade risk exposure could potentially improve long term performance for such products. The risk and return of bonds is more easy to predict than the risk and return of stocks. This and the well known stock-bond correlation motivates the inclusion of the current bond yield in a model fo...

  14. EFFECT OF NITROGEN FERTILIZATION ON GRAIN YIELD AND QUALITY OF HULLED AND HULLESS SPRING OATS

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A field trial was set up in 2014 the growing season at the Bc Institute’s experimental field in Botinec aiming to investigate the effect of four levels of nitrogen fertilization on grain yield, test weight, thousand kernel weight and plant height of eight hulled and two hulless oat genotypes. Significant differences were found out among nitrogen fertilization levels as well as among the eight hulled genotypes for all traits. The interaction genotype × N fertilization was not significant. Sign...

  15. Effect of genotype on sugar beet yield and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenadić N.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a considerable number of both domestic and foreign sugar beet genotypes on root yield and quality was investigated. The data demonstrated the most favorable results of some genotypes for root yield and sugar content. Trials were conducted on rhizomania infested soil, thus tolerant genotypes were used. Susceptible cultivars represented the control. In the trial root yield was high and sugar content low. On average, in the genotypes tested, root yield varied from 73.98 to 93.30 t/ha and sugar content from 11.90 to 13.36%, depending on weather conditions. Root yield of the genotypes investigated varied from 30.61 to 112.64 t/ha and sugar content from 10.60 to 14.20%. The Swedish cultivar Dorotea (tolerant to both rhizomania and cercospora was the most yielding. The least yielding (susceptible to both rhizomania and cercospora was the domestic cultivar Dana.

  16. FACTORS INFLUENCING YIELD SPREADS OF THE MALAYSIAN BONDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norliza Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaysian bond market is developing rapidly but not much is understood in terms of macroeconomic factors that could influence the yield spread of the Ringgit Malaysian denominated bonds. Based on a multifactor model, this paper examines the impact of four macroeconomic factors namely: Kuala Lumpur Composite Index (KLCI, Industry Production Index (IPI, Consumer Price Index (CPI and interest rates (IR on bond yield spread of the Malaysian Government Securities (MGS and Corporate Bonds (CBs for a period from January 2001 to December 2008. The findings support the expected hypotheses that CPI and IR are the major drivers that influence the changes in MGS yield spreads. However IPI and KLCI have weak and no influence on MGS yield spreads respectively Whilst IR, CPI and IPI have significant influence on the yield spreads of CB1, CB2 and CB3, KLCI has significant influence only on the CB1 yield spread but not on CB2 and CB3 yield spreads.

  17. A measurement of R{sub b} = {Gamma}(Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b})/{Gamma}(Z{sup 0} {yields} hadrons) at SLD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SLD Collaboration

    1993-09-01

    A measurement of the ratio R{sub b} = {Gamma}(Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b})/{Gamma}(Z{sup 0} {yields} hadrons) is reported. This measurement is made using the CCD-based vertex detector of the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider. Efficient tagging of b{bar b} events is performed with an impact parameter technique that takes advantage of the small and stable interaction point of the SLC and all charged tracks in Z{sup 0} decays. In a sample of 27K Z{sup 0} events, a value R{sub b}=0.235{plus_minus}0.006{plus_minus}0.018 is obtained.

  18. High-yield entangled single photon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Daniel B. S.; Bisson, Scott E.

    2016-10-11

    The various technologies presented herein relate to utilizing photons at respective idler and signal frequencies to facilitate generation of photons at a pump frequency. A strong pump field can be applied at the .omega..sub.i and the .omega..sub.s frequencies, with the generated idler and signal pulses being utilized to generate a photon pair at the .omega..sub.p frequency. Further, the idler pump power can be increased relative to the signal pump power such that the pump power P.sub.i>pump power P.sub.s. Such reversed operation (e.g., .omega..sub.i+.omega..sub.s.fwdarw..omega..sub.p1+.omega..sub.p2) can minimize and/or negate Raman scattering effects. By complying with an energy conservation requirement, the .omega..sub.i and .omega..sub.s photons interacting with the material through the four-wave mixing process facilitates the entanglement of the .omega..sub.p1 and .omega..sub.p2 photons. The .omega..sub.i and .omega..sub.s photons can be respectively formed in different length waveguides with a delay utilized to facilitate common timing between the .omega..sub.i and .omega..sub.s photons.

  19. Synergistic interactions between silver decorated graphene and carbon nanotubes yield flexible composites to attenuate electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patangrao Pawar, Shital; Kumar, Sachin; Jain, Shubham; Gandi, Mounika; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2017-01-01

    The need of today’s highly integrated electronic devices, especially working in the GHz frequencies, is to protect them from unwanted interference from neighbouring devices. Hence, lightweight, flexible, easy to process microwave absorbers were designed here by dispersing conductive multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and silver nanoparticles decorated onto two-dimensional graphene sheets (rGO@Ag) in poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL). In this study, we have shown how dielectric losses can be tuned in the nanocomposites by rGO@Ag nano-hybrid; an essential criterion for energy dissipation within a material resulting in effective shielding of the incoming electromagnetic (EM) radiation. Herein, the conducting pathway for nomadic charge transfer in the PCL matrix was established by MWNTs and the attenuation was tuned by multiple scattering due to the large specific surface area of rGO@Ag. The latter was possible because of the fine dispersion state of the Ag nanoparticles which otherwise often agglomerate if mixed separately. The effect of individual nanoparticles on microwave attenuation was systematically assessed here. It was observed that this strategy resulted in strikingly enhanced microwave attenuation in PCL nanocomposites in contrast to addition of individual particles. For instance, PCL nanocomposites containing both MWNTs and rGO@Ag manifested in a SET of -37 dB and, interestingly, at arelatively smaller fraction. The SE shown by this particular composite makes it a potential candidate for many commercial applications as reflected by its exceptional absorption capability (91.3%).

  20. Pretreatment of Rice Straw by Hydrogen Peroxide for Enhanced Methane Yield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zi-lin; YAG Gai-he; FENG Yong-zhong; REN Guang-xin; HAN Xin-hui

    2013-01-01

    A pretreatment process for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was optimized to enhance the biodegradation performance of rice straw and increase biogas yield. A determination experiment was conducted under predicted optimal conditions. Optimization was implemented using response surface methodology. The effects of biodegradation and the interactive effects of pretreatment time (PT), H2O2 concentration (HC), and substrate to inoculum ratio (S/I) on methane yield were investigated. The lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose of rice straw were significantly degraded with increasing HC. The optimal conditions for the use of pretreated rice straw in anaerobic digestion were a 6.18-d PT, 2.68%HC (w/w total solid), and 1.08 S/I;these conditions result in a methane yield of 288 mL g-1 volatile solids (VS). A determination coefficient of 95.2%was obtained, indicating that the model used to predict the anabolic digestion process has a favorable fit with the experimental parameters. The determination experiment resulted in a methane yield of 290 mL g-1 VS, 88.0%higher than that of untreated rice straw. Thus, H2O2 pretreatment of rice straw can be used to improve methane yields during biogas production.