WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma x-ray emission

  1. Exotic x-ray emission from dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmej, F. B.; Dachicourt, R.; Deschaud, B.; Khaghani, D.; Dozières, M.; Šmíd, M.; Renner, O.

    2015-11-01

    Exotic x-ray emission from dense matter is identified as the complex high intensity satellite emission from autoionizing states of highly charged ions. Among a vast amount of possible transitions, double K-hole hollow ion (HI) x-ray emission K0L X → K1L X-1 + hν hollow is of exceptional interest due to its advanced diagnostic potential for matter under extreme conditions where opacity and radiation fields play important roles. Transient ab initio simulations identify intense short pulse radiation fields (e.g., those emitted by x-ray free electron lasers) as possible driving mechanisms of HI x-ray emission via two distinct channels: first, successive photoionization of K-shell electrons, second, photoionization followed by resonant photoexciation among various ionic charge states that are simultaneously present in high density matter. We demonstrated that charge exchange of intermixing inhomogenous plasmas as well as collisions driven by suprathermal electrons are possible mechanisms to populate HIs to observable levels in dense plasmas, particularly in high current Z-pinch plasmas and high intensity field-ionized laser produced plasmas. Although the HI x-ray transitions were repeatedly identified in many other cases of dense optical laser produced plasmas on the basis of atomic structure calculations, their origin is far from being understood and remains one of the last holy grails of high intensity laser-matter interaction.

  2. X-ray emission of exotic ions in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmej, F. B.; Khaghani, D.; Dozières, M.; Dachicourt, R.; Šmíd, M.; Renner, O.

    2017-03-01

    Hollow ion X-ray emission has been observed in experiments studying interaction of heavy ion beams with solids and their occurrence has been ascribed to charge exchange processes occurring when highly charged ions interact with a metal surface. In high temperature high-density plasmas, like, e.g., high intensity laser produced plasmas or high current Z-pinches, numerous researchers have reported about "exotic" X-ray transitions of hollow ions: K0LX →K1LX-1+hνhollow. Although atomic structure calculations seem to confirm that measured line positions correspond to transitions in hollow ions, line identification is difficult and the observed high intensity remains a mystery (by orders of magnitude) up to present days.

  3. Plasma Emission Profile Recreation using Soft X-Ray Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, J. W.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    With sufficient views from multiple diode arrays, soft X-ray tomography is an invaluable plasma diagnostic because it is a non-perturbing method to reconstruct the emission within the interior of the plasma. In preparation for the installation of new SXR arrays in HBT-EP, we compute high-resolution tomographic reconstructions of discharges having kink-like structures that rotate nearly rigidly. By assuming a uniform angular mapping from the kink mode rotation, Δϕ ~ ωΔ t, a temporal sequence from a single 16-diode fan array represents as many as 16 x 100 independent views. We follow the procedure described by Wang and Granetz and use Bessel basis functions to take the inverse Radon transform. This transform is fit to our data using a least-squares method to estimate the internal SXR emissivity as a sum of polar functions. By varying different parameters of the transformation, we optimize the quality of our recreation of the emission profile and quantify how the reconstruction changes with the azimuthal order of the transform. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  4. X-ray emission from a small 2 kJ plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, F. N.; Ross, I.; Dangor, A. E.

    1997-05-01

    We report on a study of a 2 kJ, 200 kA plasma focus device as an x-ray source. The x-ray yield from a number of pure gases, deuterium, nitrogen, neon, argon, and xenon, was measured as a function of pressure. X-ray emission is mainly due to line radiation. Maximum x-ray yield of 12.5 J obtained for neon. At lower pressures, electron beams are generated which play an important role.

  5. Mapping the X-Ray Emission Region in a Laser-Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corde, S.; Thaury, C.; Phuoc, K. Ta; Lifschitz, A.; Lambert, G.; Faure, J.; Lundh, O.; Benveniste, E.; Ben-Ismail, A.; Arantchuk, L.; Marciniak, A.; Stordeur, A.; Brijesh, P.; Rousse, A.; Specka, A.; Malka, V.

    2011-11-01

    The x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators can be a powerful tool to understand the physics of relativistic laser-plasma interaction. It is shown here that the mapping of betatron x-ray radiation can be obtained from the x-ray beam profile when an aperture mask is positioned just beyond the end of the emission region. The influence of the plasma density on the position and the longitudinal profile of the x-ray emission is investigated and compared to particle-in-cell simulations. The measurement of the x-ray emission position and length provides insight on the dynamics of the interaction, including the electron self-injection region, possible multiple injection, and the role of the electron beam driven wakefield.

  6. Comparative study of X-ray emission from plasma focus relative to different preionization schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Qayyum, A.; Hassan, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2017-07-01

    A 2.7-kJ Mather-type plasma focus has been investigated for X-ray emission with preionization produced by an α-source, a β-source, and a shunt resistor. Time-resolved and time integrated measurements are carried out using a PIN-diode-based X-ray spectrometer and pinhole camera. The β-source (28Ni63) assisted preionization enhances the X-ray emission up to 25%, while preionization induced by depleted uranium (92U238) increases both Cu-Kα and total X-ray yield of about 100%. The preionization caused by the optimum shunt resistor enhances the Cu-Kα and total X-ray yield of about 53%. It is found that preionization also broadens the working pressure range for the high X-ray yield and improves the shot-to-shot reproducibility of the system. Pinhole images reveal that the X-ray emission from the anode tip is dominant owing to impact of electron bombardment, while the X-ray emission from hot spots is also visible.

  7. Volume effect of laser produced plasma on X-ray emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Senecha; Y B S R Prasad; M P Kamath; A S Joshi; G S Solanki; A P Kulkarni; S Gupta; R Pareek; H C Pant

    2000-11-01

    An investigation of x-ray emission from Cu plasma produced by 1.054 m Nd:glass laser pulses of 5 ns duration, at 2 × 1012-2 × 1013 W cm-2 is reported. The x-ray emission has been studied as a function of target position with respect to the laser beam focus position. It has been observed that x-ray emissions from ns duration plasma show a volume effect similar to subnanosecond plasmas. Due to this effect the x-ray yield increases when target is moved away relative to the best focal plane of the laser beam. This result supports the theoretical model of Tallents and has also been testified independently using suitably modified theoretical model for our experimental conditions. While above result is in good agreement with similar experimental results obtained for sub-nanosecond laser produced plasmas, it differs from result claiming filamentation rather than pure geometrical effect leading to x-ray enhancement for ns plasmas.

  8. Catalytic action of β source on x-ray emission from plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Sadiq, Mehboob; Hussain, S.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.; Waheed, A.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of preionization around the insulator sleeve by a mesh-type β source (Ni6328) for the x-ray emission from a (2.3-3.9 kJ) plasma focus device is investigated. Quantrad Si p-i-n diodes along with suitable filters are employed as time-resolved x-ray detectors and a multipinhole camera with absorption filters is used for time-integrated analysis. X-ray emission in 4π geometry is measured as a function of argon and hydrogen gas filling pressures with and without β source at different charging voltages. It is found that the pressure range for the x-ray emission is broadened, x-ray emission is enhanced, and shot to shot reproducibility is improved with the β source. With argon, the CuKα emission is estimated to be 27.14 J with an efficiency of 0.7% for β source and 21.5 J with an efficiency of 0.55% without β source. The maximum x-ray yield in 4π geometry is found to be about 68.90 J with an efficiency of 1.8% for β source and 54.58 J with an efficiency of 1.4% without β source. With hydrogen, CuKα emission is 11.82 J with an efficiency of 0.32% for β source and 10.07 J with an efficiency of 0.27% without β source. The maximum x-ray yield in 4π geometry is found to be 30.20 J with an efficiency of 0.77% for β source and 25.58 J with an efficiency of 0.6% without β source. The x-ray emission with Pb insert at the anode tip without β source is also investigated and found to be reproducible and significantly high. The maximum x-ray yield is estimated to be 46.6 J in 4π geometry with an efficiency of 1.4% at 23 kV charging voltage. However, degradation of x-ray yield is observed when charging voltage exceeds 23 kV for Pb insert. From pinhole images it is observed that the x-ray emission due to the bombardment of electrons at the anode tip is dominant in both with and without β source.

  9. Plasma code for astrophysical charge exchange emission at X-ray wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Liyi; Raassen, A J J

    2016-01-01

    Charge exchange X-ray emission provides unique insights into the interactions between cold and hot astrophysical plasmas. Besides its own profound science, this emission is also technically crucial to all observations in the X-ray band, since charge exchange with the solar wind often contributes a significant foreground component that contaminates the signal of interest. By approximating the cross sections resolved to $n$ and $l$ atomic subshells, and carrying out complete radiative cascade calculation, we create a new spectral code to evaluate the charge exchange emission in the X-ray band. Comparing to collisional thermal emission, charge exchange radiation exhibits enhanced lines from large-$n$ shells to the ground, as well as large forbidden-to-resonance ratios of triplet transitions. Our new model successfully reproduces an observed high-quality spectrum of comet C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), which emits purely by charge exchange between solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. It demonstrates that a proper charge ...

  10. Scaling of X-ray emission and ion velocity in laser produced Cu plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Y. B. S. R.; Senecha, V. K.; Pant, H. C.; Kamath, M. P.; Solanki, G. S.; Tripathi, P. K.; Kulkarni, A. P.; Gupta, S.; Pareek, R.; Joshi, A. S.; Sreedhar, N.; Nigam, Sameer; Navathe, C. P.

    2000-11-01

    The x-ray emission from slab targets of copper irradiated by Nd:glass laser (1.054 m m, 5 and 15 ns) at intensities between 1012 and 1014 W/cm2 has been studied. The x-ray emissions were monitored with the help of high quantum efficiency x-ray silicon photo diodes and vacuum photo diodes, all covered with aluminium filters of different thickness. The x-ray intensity vs the laser intensity has a scaling factor of (1.2--1.92). The relative x-ray conversion efficiency follows an empirical relationship which is in close agreement with the one reported by Babonneau et al. The ion velocities were monitored using Langmuir probes placed at different angles and radial distances from the target position. The variation of the ion velocity with the laser intensity follows a scaling of the form Fb where b ~ 0.22 which is in good agreement with the reported scaling factor values. The results on the x-ray emission from Cu plasma are reported.

  11. Scaling of x-ray emission and ion velocity in laser produced Cu plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y B S R Prasad; V K Senecha; H C Pant; M P Kamath; G S Solanki; P K Tripathi; A P Kulkarni; S Gupta; R Pareek; A S Joshi; N Sreedhar; Sameer Nigam; C P Navathe

    2000-11-01

    The x-ray emission from slab targets of copper irradiated by Nd:glass laser (1.054 m, 5 and 15 ns) at intensities between 1012 and 1014W/cm2 has been studied. The x-ray emissions were monitored with the help of high quantum efficiency x-ray silicon photo diodes and vacuum photo diodes, all covered with aluminium filters of different thickness. The x-ray intensity vs the laser intensity has a scaling factor of (1.2–1.92). The relative x-ray conversion efficiency follows an empirical relationship which is in close agreement with the one reported by Babonneau et al. The ion velocities were monitored using Langmuir probes placed at different angles and radial distances from the target position. The variation of the ion velocity with the laser intensity follows a scaling of the form where ∼ 0.22 which is in good agreement with the reported scaling factor values. The results on the x-ray emission from Cu plasma are reported.

  12. Plasma code for astrophysical charge exchange emission at X-ray wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liyi; Kaastra, Jelle; Raassen, A. J. J.

    2016-04-01

    Charge exchange X-ray emission provides unique insight into the interactions between cold and hot astrophysical plasmas. Besides its own profound science, this emission is also technically crucial to all observations in the X-ray band, since charge exchange with the solar wind often contributes a significant foreground component that contaminates the signal of interest. By approximating the cross sections resolved to n and l atomic subshells and carrying out complete radiative cascade calculation, we have created a new spectral code to evaluate the charge exchange emission in the X-ray band. Compared to collisional thermal emission, charge exchange radiation exhibits enhanced lines from large-n shells to the ground, as well as large forbidden-to-resonance ratios of triplet transitions. Our new model successfully reproduces an observed high-quality spectrum of comet C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), which emits purely by charge exchange between solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. It demonstrates that a proper charge exchange model will allow us to probe the ion properties remotely, including charge state, dynamics, and composition, at the interface between the cold and hot plasmas.

  13. Interpretation of perturbed temperature based on X-ray emissivity in fusion plasma experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, C.; Cote, A.; Dichaud, D.

    1995-05-01

    The relationship between the dynamical response to perturbations of the soft X-ray emissivity (δE), the electron temperature (δTe), the electron density (δne) and the impurity concentration (δni) for a Maxwellian plasma is analysed in detail. In particular, the so-called 'impurity function' F(Zeff) is also strongly dependent on Te via the direct radiative recombination (DRR) contribution to the X-ray emission, which significantly affects the relation between the perturbed quantities as derived from the popular expression E propto F(Zeff)ne2Tealpha even if the impurity content (or Zeff) remains constant. In order to overcome this difficulty, a simple analytical approximation is derived for F(Zeff,Te) that can be used as a formula to relate the perturbed quantities δE, δTe, δne and δF with ease and accuracy. This simple approximation is illustrated by studying saw-toothing discharges on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) with Te, ne and E measured by the Thomson scattering, the FIR interferometer and the X-ray camera diagnostics, and its accuracy is tested against the predictions of a full X-ray modelling code

  14. Measurements of fast electron beams and soft X-ray emission from plasma-focus experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports results of the recent experimental studies of pulsed electron beams and soft X-rays in plasma-focus (PF experiments carried out within a modified PF-360U facility at the NCBJ, Poland. Particular attention was focused on time-resolved measurements of the fast electron beams by means of two different magnetic analyzers, which could record electrons of energy ranging from about 41 keV to about 715 keV in several (6 or 8 measuring channels. For discharges performed with the pure deuterium filling, many strong electron signals were recorded in all the measuring channels. Those signals were well correlated with the first hard X-ray pulse detected by an external scintillation neutron-counter. In some of the analyzer channels, electron spikes (lasting about dozens of nanoseconds and appearing in different instants after the current peculiarity (so-called current dip were also recorded. For several discharges, fast ion beams, which were emitted along the z-axis and recorded with nuclear track detectors, were also investigated. Those measurements confirmed a multibeam character of the ion emission. The time-integrated soft X-ray images, which were taken side-on by means of a pinhole camera and sensitive X-ray films, showed the appearance of some filamentary structures and so-called hot spots. The application of small amounts of admixtures of different heavy noble gases, i.e. of argon (4.8% volumetric, krypton (1.6% volumetric, or xenon (0.8% volumetric, decreased intensity of the recorded electron beams, but increased intensity of the soft X-ray emission and showed more distinct and numerous hot spots. The recorded electron spikes have been explained as signals produced by quasi-mono-energetic microbeams emitted from tiny sources (probably plasma diodes, which can be formed near the observed hot spots.

  15. Study of x-ray emission from a table top plasma focus and its application as an x-ray backlighter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, F. N.; Ross, I.; Lorenz, A.; Worley, J. F.; Dangor, A. E.; Haines, M. G.

    2000-09-01

    A study of a 2 kJ, 200 kA, table top plasma focus device as an intense x-ray source is reported. The x-ray yield from a number of gases, (deuterium, nitrogen, neon, argon, and xenon) is measured as a function of filling pressure and in neon as a function of anode length. In gases with Zplasma implodes to form a uniform cylindrical column, whereas for Z⩾18, the plasma consists of a number of hot spots. A maximum x-ray yield of 16.6 J and pulse length of 10-15 ns was obtained in neon. The x-ray emission was established to be due to H- and He-like line radiation. The temperature estimated from spectroscopic observations was about 300-400 eV at an electron density of (3-5)×1020cm-3 in neon. At low pressures in neon, hard x-ray radiation, presumably due to electron beams was dominant. Mesh images of different wire materials were recorded at the optimum pressure in neon as a proof of principle for x-ray backlighting.

  16. Development of X-ray Emission Computed Tomography for Laser-Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao'En, Jiang; Zhongli, Liu; Nan, Li; Zhijian, Zheng; Dao'Yuan, Tang; Yongkun, Ding; Xin, Hu

    1996-11-01

    A computed tomography (CT) technique has been developed to diagnose laser produced plasma using X-ray emission. The three dimensional X-ray distribution was reconstructed by using a multiplicate algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) from five pinhole camera images obtained along different sight directions. A three dimensional reconstruction program (CT3D) has been worked out, the accuracy of which reaches 92% and 86%, without and with noise (S/N-10), respectively. The experimental data, obtained from the ICF on the ``Xinguang-II'' facilities (λ = 0.35 μm, EL = 100J, τ = 700ps), are processed by using the CT3D program and good reconstruction results have been obtained.

  17. MCNP Simulation to Hard X-Ray Emission of KSU Dense Plasma Focus Machine

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamed, Amgad E

    2015-01-01

    The MCNP program used to simulate the hard x-ray emission from KSU dense plasma focus device, an electron beam spectrum of maximum energy 100 keV was used to hit anode target. The bremsstrahlung radiation was measured using the F2 tally functions on the chamber walls and on a virtual sphere surrounding the machine, the radiation spectrum was recorded for various anode materials like tungsten, stainless steel and molybdenum. It was found that tungsten gives the best and the most intense radiation for the same electron beam. An aluminum filter of thickness 2mm and 4mm was used to cutoff the lower energy band from the x-ray spectrum. It was found that the filters achieved the mission and there is no distinct difference in between.

  18. Conversion Efficiency of Kilovolt X- Ray Line Emission in Laser-heated NaF Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔令华; 淳于书泰; 何绍堂; 陈涵德; 杨向东; 李孝昌; 王永国

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the theoretical and experimental work on converting focused Nd-glass laser radiation of LI-11 facility into kilovolt X-ray line emission in laser-heated NaF plasma.This conversion efficiency ε turns out to he in the range from 0.2% to 1% for the laser (λ=1.06μm) power density changing from 10×1013 to 3.5×1013 W/cm2 The relationship between ε and λ has also been discussed.Simultaneously,theoretical results are compared with the experimental.

  19. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5–7.5 × 1013 cm−3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d–4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20–40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  20. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Hayato; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sasaki, Akira; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tamura, Naoki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; LHD Experiment Group

    2017-08-01

    The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA) emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5-7.5) × 1013 cm-3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d-4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20-40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  1. Photon Temperatures of Hard X-Ray Emission of LHCD Plasmas in HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jawad YOUNIS; WAN Baonian; CHEN Zhongyong; LIN Shiyao; SHI Yuejiang; SHAN Jiafang; LIU Fukun

    2008-01-01

    A detailed study of photon temperatures (Tph) of hard X-ray emission in lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) plasmas is presented.The photon temperature increases with the increase in plasma current and decreases with the increase in plasma density.In lower hybrid power and phase scanning experiments;there is no appreciable change in the photon temperature.The numerical results based on ray-tracing calculation and Fokker-Planck solver gives reasonable explanation for the experimental observation.Both experimental and numerical results reveal that the photon temperature depends mainly on global effects of the fast electron population,synergy between the fast electron and the loop voltage and the Coulomb slowing down.

  2. Probing electron acceleration and X-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Brijesh, P; Lambert, G; Mangles, S P D; Bloom, M S; Kneip, S; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam is focused in the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  3. Optimization of X-Ray-Emission from a Laser-Produced Plasma in a Narrow Wavelength Band

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dorssen, G. E.; E. Louis,; F. Bijkerk,

    1992-01-01

    The X-ray emission from laser-produced plasmas at an X-ray wavelength of approximately 10.4 nm was measured for Al and Gd target materials. The laser power density on the target surface was varied between 1.5 x 10(10) and 3 x 10(12) W/cm2 to obtain different electron temperatures. The output from th

  4. Characteristic x-ray emission from undermines plasmas irradiated by ultra-intense lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Christoph [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-05-05

    Between FY09 and FY11 we have conducted more than a dozen three-week experimental campaigns at high-power laser facilities around the world to investigate laser-channeling through x-ray and optical imaging and the conversion from laser-energy to xrays. We have performed simultaneous two-wavelength x-ray imaging (K-alpha and He-alpha) to distinguish the hot-plasma region (hot-spot) from the laser-produced electrons (K-alpha). In addition, we have initiated a new collaboration with SNL and have performed first shots on the 100 TW beamlet chamber to commission a fast x-ray streak camera to be used to investigate the temporal evolution of our K-alpha sources. We also collaborated on campaigns at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) and the LANL Trident laser to employ laser produced x-ray sources for Thomson scattering off dense matter.

  5. Soft X-ray Emission Optimization Studies with Krypton and Xenon Gases in Plasma Focus Using Lee Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akel, Mohamad

    2013-10-01

    The X-ray emission properties of krypton and xenon plasmas are numerically investigated using corona plasma equilibrium model. Numerical experiments have been investigated on various low energy plasma focus devices with Kr and Xe filling gases using Lee model. The Lee model was applied to characterize and to find the optimum combination of soft X-ray yields (Ysxr) for krypton (~4 Å) and xenon (~3 Å) plasma focus. These combinations give Ysxr = 0.018 J for krypton, and Ysxr = 0.5 J for xenon. Scaling laws on Kr and Xe soft X-ray yields, in terms of storage energies E0, peak discharge current Ipeak and focus pinch current Ipinch were found over the range from 2.8 to 900 kJ. Soft X-ray yields scaling laws in terms of storage energies were found to be as and for Kr and Xe, respectively, (E0 in kJ and Ysxr in J) with the scaling showing gradual deterioration as E0 rises over the range. The maximum soft X-ray yields are found to be about 0.5 and 27 J from krypton and xenon, respectively, for storage energy of 900 kJ. The optimum efficiencies for soft X-ray yields (0.0002 % for Kr) and (0.0047 % for Xe) are with capacitor bank energies of 67.5 and 225 kJ, respectively.

  6. The effect of pre-ionization by a shunt resistor on the reproducibility of plasma focus x-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Sadiq, Mehboob [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Shafiq, M [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Waheed, A [PINSTECH, PO Box 2151, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Lee, P [Natural Sciences Academics Group, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, 637616 (Singapore); Zakaullah, M [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2006-08-15

    The effect of pre-ionization by means of a shunt resistor on the x-ray emission of a low energy (1.8 kJ) plasma focus device powered by a 9 {mu}F capacitor bank, charged at 20 kV and giving a peak discharge current of about 175 kA is investigated. Quantrad Si pin-diodes along with a suitable filter are employed as time-resolved x-ray detectors, whereas a multipinhole camera with absorption filters is used for time-integrated analysis. X-ray flux in 4{pi}-geometry is measured as a function of argon filling pressure with and without pre-ionization. It is found that appropriate selection of the shunt resistor increases shot-to-shot reproducibility of the x-ray emission as well as the stability of the pinch filament and broadens the x-ray pulse width. The x-ray emission is also enhanced by (45 {+-} 5)% at the optimum pressure.

  7. Study of soft X-ray emission during wire array implosion under plasma focus conditions at the PF-3 facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan’ko, S. A. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Mitrofanov, K. N., E-mail: mitrofan@triniti.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Krauz, V. I.; Myalton, V. V.; Zhuzhunashvili, A. I.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Kharrasov, A. M.; Anan’ev, S. S.; Vinogradova, Yu. V.; Kalinin, Yu. G. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Results of measurements of soft X-ray emission with photon energies of <1 keV under conditions of a plasma focus (PF) experiment are presented. The experiments were carried out at the world’s largest PF device—the PF-3 Filippov-type facility (I ⩽ 3 MA, T/4 ≈ 15–20 µs, W{sub 0} ⩽ 3 MJ). X-ray emission from both a discharge in pure neon and with a tungsten wire array placed on the axis of the discharge chamber was detected. The wire array imploded under the action of the electric current intercepted from the plasma current sheath of the PF discharge in neon. The measured soft X-ray powers from a conventional PF discharge in gas and a PF discharge in the presence of a wire array were compared for the first time.

  8. Compression between ion and hard x-ray emissions from nitrogen and argon in Mather type plasma focus device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Paghe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, some characteristics of a Mather type Plasma Focus (PF device such as a discharge current, pinch time, ion flux and hard x-ray intensity has been investigated simultaneously in argon and nitrogen gases separately for various operating gas pressures and charging voltages of capacitor bank. It was observed that pinch phenomena was energy and pressure dependent in current sheath as well as ion and hard x-ray emission intensity. Optimum pressure with maximum ion flux and the most intense hard x-ray showed a nearly linear dependence on the charging voltage of the device. Maximum ion flux was estimated in the order of 1018 ions per steradian in both gases. Hard x-ray emission was registered a little after discharge current and Faraday cup (FC signals. Also, optimum pressure for maximum ion flux was not the same as the pressure for intense hard x-rays. Hard x-ray intensity reached its peak at higher pressures

  9. Charge transfer reactions at interfaces between neutral gas and plasma: Dynamical effects and X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provornikova, E.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Lallement, R.

    2012-04-01

    Charge-transfer is the main process linking neutrals and charged particles in the interaction regions of neutral (or partly ionized) gas with a plasma. In this paper we illustrate the importance of charge-transfer with respect to the dynamics and the structure of neutral gas-plasma interfaces. We consider the following phenomena: (1) the heliospheric interface - region where the solar wind plasma interacts with the partly-ionized local interstellar medium (LISM) and (2) neutral interstellar clouds embedded in a hot, tenuous plasma such as the million degree gas that fills the so-called ``Local Bubble". In (1), we discuss several effects in the outer heliosphere caused by charge exchange of interstellar neutral atoms and plasma protons. In (2) we describe the role of charge exchange in the formation of a transition region between the cloud and the surrounding plasma based on a two-component model of the cloud-plasma interaction. In the model the cloud consists of relatively cold and dense atomic hydrogen gas, surrounded by hot, low density, fully ionized plasma. We discuss the structure of the cloud-plasma interface and the effect of charge exchange on the lifetime of interstellar clouds. Charge transfer between neutral atoms and minor ions in the plasma produces X-ray emission. Assuming standard abundances of minor ions in the hot gas surrounding the cold interstellar cloud, we estimate the X-ray emissivity consecutive to the charge transfer reactions. Our model shows that the charge-transfer X-ray emission from the neutral cloud-plasma interface may be comparable to the diffuse thermal X-ray emission from the million degree gas cavity itself.

  10. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajmal Jain; Malini Aggarwal; Raghunandan Sharma

    2008-03-01

    Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors capable of observing the full disk Sun in X-ray energy range of 4–56 keV. The X-ray spectra of solar flares obtained by the Si detector in the 4–25 keV range show evidence of Fe and Fe/Ni line emission and multi-thermal plasma. The evolution of the break energy point that separates the thermal and non-thermal processes reveals increase with increasing flare plasma temperature. Small scale flare activities observed by both the detectors are found to be suitable to heat the active region corona; however their location appears to be in the transition region.

  11. Joint Experiments on X-ray/Particle Emission from Plasmas Produced by Laser Irradiating Nano Structured Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, H.; Allam, S. H.; Chaurasia, S.; Dhareshwar, L.; El-Sherbini, Th. M.; Kunze, H.-J.; Mank, G.; McDaniel, D. H.; Rosinski, M.; Ryc, L.; Stewart, B.; Wolowski, J.; Abd El-Ghany, H.; Abd El-Latif, G.; Abd El-Rahim, F. M.; Bedrane, Z.; Diab, F.; Farrag, A.; Hedwig, R.; Helal, A.; Pardede, M.; Refaie, A.; Sharkawy, H.; El-khatim, A., Sir

    2008-04-01

    The 1st Joint (Host Laboratory) Experiment on laser plasma involving more than twenty scientists from eight countries has been carried out at the Laser and New Materials Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Egypt. It was co-ordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and supported through the IAEA and the ICTP (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste). The main experimental programme was aimed at characterising the possible enhancement of x-ray and particle emission from plasmas produced by laser incidence on nano-structured targets. Laser beams at 1.064 μm of 250 mJ and 532 nm of 165 mJ focused at the target surface using a nanosecond laser type Quantel were used in the present study. In the present experiments nano-copper structures evaporated onto copper bulk disks and nano-gold structures evaporated onto gold ones were used. The thickness of the nano-materials on their bulk material was 1 μm. An ion collector and x-ray semiconductor diode were used to study the ion and x-ray emission, respectively. Both were positioned at the same port at 90° with respect to the target surface and at 90 cm from the surface in the case of the ion collector and 55 cm in the case of the x-ray detector. These experiments were performed at vacuum pressures of (5—8)×10-6 mbar. Comparison of both studies in the case of nano structured targets and bulk targets were performed at different laser fluencies (1×109-1×1012 W/cm2) on the target. A 20% increase of the X-ray emission for nano gold with respect to bulk gold was observed, however, the x-ray emission in the of nano copper and copper was the same.

  12. Fast plasma discharge capillary design as a high power throughput soft x-ray emission source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyndham, E S; Favre, M; Valdivia, M P; Valenzuela, J C; Chuaqui, H; Bhuyan, H

    2010-09-01

    We present the experimental details and results from a low energy but high repetition rate compact plasma capillary source for extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray research and applications. Two lengths of capillary are mounted in two versions of a closely related design. The discharge operates in 1.6 and 3.2 mm inner diameter alumina capillaries of lengths 21 and 36 mm. The use of water both as dielectric and as coolant simplifies the compact low inductance design with nanosecond discharge periods. The stored electrical energy of the discharge is approximately 0.5 J and is provided by directly charging the capacitor plates from an inexpensive insulated-gate bipolar transistor in 1 μs or less. We present characteristic argon spectra from plasma between 30 and 300 Å as well as temporally resolved x-ray energy fluence in discrete bands on axis. The spectra also allow the level of ablated wall material to be gauged and associated with useful capillary lifetime according to the chosen configuration and energy storage. The connection between the electron beams associated with the transient hollow cathode mechanism, soft x-ray output, capillary geometry, and capillary lifetime is reported. The role of these e-beams and the plasma as measured on-axis is discussed. The relation of the electron temperature and the ionization stages observed is discussed in the context of some model results of ionization in a non-Maxwellian plasma.

  13. Research on pinches driven by Speed-2 generator: Hard X-ray and neutron emission in plasma focus configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, L.; Moreno, J.; Silva, P.; Sylvester, G.; Zambra, M.; Pavez, C. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile); Pavez, C. [Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); Raspa, V. [Buenos Aires Univ., PLADEMA, CONICET and INFIP (Argentina); Castillo, F. [Insitituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM (Mexico); Kies, W. [Heinrich-Heine-Univ., Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Speed-2 is a generator based on Marx technology and was designed in the University of Dusseldorf. Speed-2 consists on 40 +/- Marx modules connected in parallel (4.1 {mu}F equivalent Marx generator capacity, 300 kV, 4 MA in short circuit, 187 kJ, 400 ns rise time, dI/dt {approx} 10{sup 13} A/s). Currently Speed-2 is operating at CCHEN (Chilean nuclear energy commission), being the most powerful and energetic device for dense transient plasma in the Southern Hemisphere. Most of the previous works developed in Speed-2 at Dusseldorf were done in a plasma focus configuration for soft X-ray emission and the neutron emission from Speed-2 was not completely studied. The research program at CCHEN considers experiments in different pinch configurations (plasma focus, gas puffed plasma focus, gas embedded Z-pinch, wire arrays) at current of hundred of kilo- to mega-amperes, using the Speed-2 generator. The Chilean operation has begun implementing and developing diagnostics in a conventional plasma focus configuration operating in deuterium in order to characterize the neutron emission and the hard X-ray production. Silver activation counters, plastics CR39 and scintillator-photomultiplier detectors are used to characterize the neutron emission. Images of metallic plates with different thickness are obtained on commercial radiographic film, Agfa Curix ST-G2, in order to characterize an effective energy of the hard X-ray outside of the discharge. (authors)

  14. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M. [and others

    1996-03-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E{sub c}, below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E{sub c}. These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production.

  15. Detailed analysis of hollow ions spectra from dense matter pumped by X-ray emission of relativistic laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, S. B., E-mail: sbhanse@sandia.gov, E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Colgan, J.; Abdallah, J. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Faenov, A. Ya., E-mail: sbhanse@sandia.gov, E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Wagenaars, E.; Culfa, O.; Dance, R. J.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Woolsey, N. C. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Booth, N.; Lancaster, K. L. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Evans, R. G. [Department of Physics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 ONG (United Kingdom); Kaempfer, T.; Schulze, K. S. [Helmholtzinstitut Jena, Jena D-07743 (Germany); Uschmann, I. [Helmholtzinstitut Jena, Jena D-07743 (Germany); Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronic, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien Platz 1, Jena, D-07743 (Germany); and others

    2014-03-15

    X-ray emission from hollow ions offers new diagnostic opportunities for dense, strongly coupled plasma. We present extended modeling of the x-ray emission spectrum reported by Colgan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 125001 (2013)] based on two collisional-radiative codes: the hybrid-structure Spectroscopic Collisional-Radiative Atomic Model (SCRAM) and the mixed-unresolved transition arrays (MUTA) ATOMIC model. We show that both accuracy and completeness in the modeled energy level structure are critical for reliable diagnostics, investigate how emission changes with different treatments of ionization potential depression, and discuss two approaches to handling the extensive structure required for hollow-ion models with many multiply excited configurations.

  16. The effect of anode shape on neon soft x-ray emissions and current sheath configuration in plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, M A; Sobhanian, S [Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Wong, C S [Plasma Research Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Lee, S; Lee, P; Rawat, R S, E-mail: rajdeep.rawat@nie.edu.s [Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2009-02-21

    The effect of three different anode shapes, flat, tapered and hemispherical, on the x-ray emission characteristics of a neon filled UNU-ICTP plasma focus device is investigated. The current sheath dynamics, in the radial collapse phase, has been simultaneously interrogated using the laser shadowgraphy method to understand the variation in x-ray emission characteristics for anodes of different shapes used in the experiments. The maximum neon soft x-ray (SXR) yield for the flat anode is about 7.5 {+-} 0.4 J at 4 mbar, whereas for hemispherical and tapered anodes the neon SXR is almost halved with the optimum pressure shifting to a lower value of 3 mbar. The laser shadowgraphic images confirm that the reduction in the overall neon SXR yield is due to the reduced focused plasma column length for these anodes. The relative HXR yield was the highest for the hemispherical anode followed by the tapered and the flat anodes in that order. The shadowgraphic images and the voltage probe signals confirmed that for the hemispherical anode the multiple-pinch phenomenon was most commonly observed, which could be responsible for multiple HXR bursts for this anode with maximum HXR yields.

  17. Attenuation correction for X-ray emission computed tomography of laser-produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yen-Wei; Nakao, Zensho [Ryukyus Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Tamura, Shinichi

    1996-08-01

    An attenuation correction method was proposed for laser-produced plasma emission computed tomography (ECT), which is based on a relation of the attenuation coefficient and the emission coefficient in plasma. Simulation results show that the reconstructed images are dramatically improved in comparison to the reconstructions without attenuation correction. (J.P.N.)

  18. X-ray emission processes in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola

    2010-01-01

    A decade of X-ray stellar observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton has led to significant advances in our understanding of the physical processes at work in hot (magnetized) plasmas in stars and their immediate environment, providing new perspectives and challenges, and in turn the need for improved models. The wealth of high-quality stellar spectra has allowed us to investigate, in detail, the characteristics of the X-ray emission across the HR diagram. Progress has been made in addressing issues ranging from classical stellar activity in stars with solar-like dynamos (such as flares, activity cycles, spatial and thermal structuring of the X-ray emitting plasma, evolution of X-ray activity with age), to X-ray generating processes (e.g. accretion, jets, magnetically confined winds) that were poorly understood in the pre-Chandra/XMM-Newton era. I discuss the progress made in the study of high energy stellar physics and its impact in a wider astrophysical context, focusing on the role of spectral diagnostics no...

  19. Optimization of soft x-ray line emission from laser-produced carbon plasma with laser intensity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Chowdhury; R A Joshi; G P Gupta; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2003-12-01

    Absolute measurement for He- resonance (1s2 10-1s2p 11, at 40.2 Å) line emission from a laser-produced carbon plasma has been studied as a function of laser intensity. The optimum laser intensity is found to be ≈ 1.3 × 1012 W/cm2 for the maximum emission of 3.2 × 1013 photons sr-1 pulse-1. Since this line lies in the water window spectral region, it has potential application in x-ray microscopic imaging of biological sample in wet condition. Theoretical calculation using corona model for the emission of this line is also carried out with appropriate ionization and radiative recombination rate coefficients.

  20. Research on pinches driven by SPPED 2 generator hard X-ray and neutron emission in plasma focus configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Soto, L L; Silva, P; Sylvester, G S; Zambra, M; Pavez, C; Raspa, V; Castillo, F; Kies, W; Soto, Leopoldo; Moreno, Jose; Silva, Patricio; Sylvester, Gustavo; Zambra, Marcelo; Pavez, Cristian; Raspa, Veronica; Castillo, Fermin; Kies, Walter

    2004-01-01

    SPEED2 is a generator based on Marx technology and was designed in the University of Dusseldorf. SPEED2 consists on 40 +/- Marx modules connected in parallel (4.1 mF equivalent Marx generator capacity, 300 kV, 4 MA in short circuit, 187 kJ, 400 ns rise time, dI/dt~1013 A/s). Currently the SPEED2 is operating at the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, CCHEN, Chile, being the most powerful and energetic device for dense transient plasma in the Southern Hemisphere. Most of the previous works developed in SPEED2 at Dusseldorf were done in a plasma focus configuration for soft X-ray emission and the neutron emission from SPEED2 was not completely studied. The research program at CCHEN considers experiments in different pinch configurations (plasma focus, gas puffed plasma focus, gas embedded Z-pinch, wire arrays) at current of hundred of kiloamperes to mega-amperes, using the SPEED2 generator. The Chilean operation has begun implementing and developing diagnostics in a conventional plasma focus configuration oper...

  1. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  2. Theoretical and experimental study of inertial gases admixtures influence on the hard x-ray emission of plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulatov, A. K.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Mikhailov, Yu V.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the influence of inertial gases admixtures (Ar, Kr, Xe) to deuterium in plasma focus (PF) chambers. Experiments were realized in PF chambers with discharge currents of 350, 650 and 1000 kA. The measurements of the hard x-ray (HXR) emission were carried out by the scintillation detector SSDI38 with time resolution of 2.5 ns. Experiments show the existence of optimum amount of inertial gases, which corresponds with the atomic number of added gas. At the optimum amount of inertial gas and deuterium in PF chamber, the HXR yield rises up to 10 times in comparison with HXR yield only for deuterium filling. This work shows the dependence of HXR emission on PF device stored energy. The mechanism of inertial gases admixtures influence that leads to rise of HXR yield has been discussed. The mechanism concerns with different behavior of deuterium ions and ions of inertial gases during the pinch decay phase when the discharge current compression force has reduced. Inertial gas ions locate near the axis of the pinch and deuterium ions go to the near plasma area. Local positive charge in plasma forms on this axis because of multiply charged ions of inertial gases. Then electrons gather to the axis area and electron density increases. This electrons form high current electron beam under the influence of the induced electromotive force during the pinch decay phase. HXR emission is generated after the electron beam interaction with the anode target in PF chamber.

  3. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, F. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption process. Section II discusses 1s X-ray absorption, i.e., the K edges, and section III deals with 2p X-ray absorption, the L edges. X-ray emission is discussed in, respectively, the L edges. X-ray emis...

  4. Determination of plasma trace elements in tumor-bearing animals by proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogle, M; Daly, B; Evans, M; Justiniano, E L; Kovacs, C J; Shinpaugh, J L; Toburen, L H

    2001-11-01

    Although altered levels of circulating essential trace elements are known to accompany malignant disease, the lack of sensitivity of conventional detection methods has generally limited their study to clinical conditions involving extensive disease (i.e., significant tumor burden). As such, the application of altered trace element levels as potential prognostic guides or as response indicators subsequent to treatment has been of limited use. During this study, proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy was evaluated as a tool to determine trace element imbalances in a murine tumor model. Using plasma from C57B1/6 mice bearing the syngeneic Lewis lung carcinoma (LLCa), levels of Fe, Cu, and Zn, as well as changes in the Cu /Zn ratio, were measured in animals carrying an increasing primary tumor burden. The plasma levels of Fe, Cu, and Zn were found to decrease significantly 7 d following implants of LLCa cells with no significant change observed in the Cu/Zn ratio. By d 21, however, an increase in the Cu/Zn ratio was found to accompany increased growth of the LLCa tumor; the plasma levels of Cu had returned to normal levels, whereas both the Fe and Zn plasma levels remained lowered. Collectively, the results suggest that although a net change in individual plasma trace element concentrations might not be accurately associated with tumor growth, a clear relationship was established between the Cu/Zn ratio and tumor size.

  5. X-ray emission from comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, T E

    2002-05-10

    The discovery of x-ray emission from comet Hyakutake was surprising given that comets are known to be cold. Observations by x-ray satellites such as the Röntgen Satellite (ROSAT) indicate that x-rays are produced by almost all comets. Theoretical and observational work has demonstrated that charge-exchange collisions of highly charged solar wind ions with cometary neutral species can explain this emission. X-ray observations of comets and other solar system objects may be used to determine the structure and dynamics of the solar wind.

  6. Single and double core-hole ion emission spectroscopy of transient neon plasmas produced by ultraintense x-ray laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Cheng; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    Single core-hole (SCH) and double core-hole (DCH) spectroscopy is investigated systematically for neon gas in the interaction with ultraintense x-ray pulses with photon energy from 937 eV to 2000 eV. A time-dependent rate equation, implemented in the detailed level accounting approximation, is utilized to study the dynamical evolution of the level population and emission properties of the laser-produced highly transient plasmas. The plasma density effects on level populations are demonstrated with an x-ray photon energy of 2000 eV. For laser photon energy in the range of 937 - 1360 eV, resonant absorptions (RA) of 1s-np (n> = 2) transitions play important roles in time evolution of the population and DCH emission spectroscopy. For x-ray photon energy larger than 1360 eV, no RA exist and transient plasmas show different features in the DCH spectroscopy.

  7. Imploding process and x-ray emission of shotgun z-pinch plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, Ryusuke [Nihon University, College of Science and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Takasugi, Keiichi; Miyamoto, Tetsu [Nihon University, Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability was observed on the surface of a contracting z-pinch plasma. Wavelength of the instability was analyzed from the envelope of the profile, and it increased with implosion. Analysis with finite Larmor radius effect shows that there is some acceleration of ions during the contraction process. A suggestion to obtain macroscopically uniform plasma is to increase plasma current without heating the plasma. (author)

  8. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma produced by ultrashort high-intensity laser pulse irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Arora; U Chakravarty; Manoranjan P Singh; J A Chakera; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2014-02-01

    Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma, produced by laser pulses of 45 fs duration, focussed up to an intensity of ∼1018 W cm-2, is carried out. The plasma conditions prevalent during the emission of X-ray spectrum were identified by comparing the experimental spectra with the synthetic spectra generated using the spectroscopic code Prism-SPECT. It is observed that He-like resonance line emission occurs from the plasma region having sub-critical density, whereas K- emission arises from the bulk solid heated to a temperature of 10 eV by the impact of hot electrons. K- line from Be-like ions was used to estimate the hot electron temperature. A power law fit to the electron temperature showed a scaling of 0.47 with laser intensity.

  9. X-ray emission from single Wolf-Rayet stars

    CERN Document Server

    Oskinova, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    This review briefly summarizes our knowledge of the X-ray emission from single WN, WC, and WO stars. These stars have relatively modest X-ray luminosities, typically not exceeding L_sun. The analysis of X-ray spectra usually reveals thermal plasma with temperatures reaching a few 10 MK. X-ray variability is detected in some WN stars. At present we don't fully understand how X-ray radiation in produced in WR stars, albeit there are some promising research avenues, such as the presence of CIRs in the winds of some stars. To fully understand WR stars we need to unravel mechanisms of X-ray production in their winds.

  10. Fast transient transport phenomena measured by soft X-ray emission in TCV tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furno, I. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-08-01

    Energy and particle transport during sawtooth activity in TCV plasmas has been studied in this thesis with high temporal resolution many chord diagnostics. We indicated the influence of sawteeth on plasma profiles in ohmic conditions and in the presence of auxiliary electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive. A 2-dimensional model for heat transport, including localised heat source and a magnetic island, has been used to interpret the experimental observations. These results provided a new interpretation of a coupled heat and transport phenomenon which is potentially important for plasma confinement. The observations validate the applicability and show the possibility of improvement of a 2-dimensional theoretic a1 model for the study of heat transport in the presence of localised heat source and a magnetic island. Furthermore, the TCV results showed a new possibility for the interpretation of a coupled heat and particle transport phenomenon previously understood only in stellarators. (author)

  11. X-ray scattering from dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McSherry, D.J

    2000-09-01

    Dense plasmas were studied by probing them with kilovolt x-rays and measuring those scattered at various angles. The Laser-Produced x-ray source emitted Ti He alpha 4.75 keV x-rays. Two different plasma types were explored. The first was created by laser driven shocks on either side of a sample foil consisting of 2 micron Al layer, sandwiched between two 1 micron CH layers. We have observed a peak in the x-ray scattering cross section, indicating diffraction from the plasma. However, the experimentally inferred plasma density, broadly speaking, did not always agree with the hydrodynamic simulation MEDX (A modified version of MEDUSA). The second plasma type that we studied was created by soft x-ray heating on either side of a sample foil, this time consisting of 1 micron layer of Al, sandwiched between two 0.2 micron CH layers. Two foil targets, each consisting of a 0.1 micron thick Au foil mounted on 1 micron of CH, where placed 4 mm from the sample foil. The soft x-rays where produced by laser irradiating these two foil targets. We found that, 0.5 ns after the peak of the laser heating pulses, the measured cross sections more closely matched those simulated using the Thomas Fermi model than the Inferno model. Later in time, at 2 ns, the plasma is approaching a weakly coupled state. This is the first time x-ray scattering cross sections have been measured from dense plasmas generated by radiatively heating both sides of the sample. Moreover, these are absolute values typically within a factor of two of expectation for early x-ray probe times. (author)

  12. X-ray scattering from dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSherry, Declan Joseph

    Dense plasmas were studied by probing them with kilovolt x-rays and measuring those scattered at various angles. The laser produced x-ray source emitted Ti He alpha 4.75 keV x-rays. Two different plasma types were explored. The first was created by laser driven shocks on either side of a sample foil consisting of 2 micron thickness of Al, sandwiched between two 1 micron CH layers. We have observed a peak in the x-ray scattering cross section, indicating diffraction from the plasma. However, the experimentally inferred plasma density, did not always agree broadly with the hydrodynamic simulation MEDX (A modified version of MEDUSA). The second plasma type that we studied was created by soft x-ray heating on either side of a sample foil, this time consisting of 1 micron thickness of Al, sandwiched between two 0.2 micron CH layers. Two foil targets, each consisting of a 0.1 micron thick Au foil mounted on 1 micron of CH, were placed 4 mm from the sample foil. The soft x-rays were produced by laser irradiating these two foil targets. We found that, 0.5 ns after the peak of the laser heating pulses, that the measured cross sections more closely matched those simulated using the Thomas Fermi model than the Inferno model. Later in time, at 2 ns, the plasma is approaching a weakly coupled state. This is the first time x-ray scattering cross sections have been measured from dense plasmas generated by radiatively heating both sides of the sample. Moreover, these are absolute values typically within a factor of two of expectation for early x-ray probe times.

  13. Enhanced X-ray emission from laser-produced gold plasma by double pulses irradiation of nano-porous targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, R.

    2017-02-01

    Enhancement of the soft X-ray emission including free-free, free-bound and bound-bound emissions from Au nano-porous targets irradiated by single and double laser pulses is studied through numerical simulations. Laser pulses of duration 2 ns are used in calculations considering different prepulse intensities and a fixed intensity of 1013 Wcm-2 for the main pulse. The effects of prepulse intensity and time separation between laser pulses are studied for targets of different porosities. Results show that the X-ray yield can be enhanced significantly by a nano-porous target having optimum initial density. Such enhancement can be more improved when double laser pulses with appropriate delay time and intensities irradiate nano-porous targets. It is shown that the enhancement will be reduced when the prepulse intensity is greater than a specific value.

  14. X-ray Emission of Hollow Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhaoYongtao; XiaoGuoqing; ZhangXiaoan; YangZhihu; ChenXimeng; ZhangYanping

    2003-01-01

    We have systematically investigated the X-rays emission of hollow atoms (HA) which formed in the interaction of highly charged ions with a variety of solid surfaces at the atomic physics experimental setup of IMP. The X-ray spectra were measured by Si(Li) detectors with effective energy ranging from 1 keV to 60 keV. The results show that, the X-ray emission from the formed HA is closely correlated with the charge state of the projectile ions, and weakly correlated with the velocity of the projectile ions. For example, it was found that when Ar18+ ions interact with Be-target, the yield of K X-ray with character energy of 3.0 keV is 7.2×10-3 per ion, which is two times and 5 order of magnitude higher than those in the interactions of Ar17+ and Ar16+ ions respectively. When Ar15+ ions interact with the same targets, the Argon K X-ray would be too feeble to be detected. The X-ray yield with single ion in this experiment can be represented by the following equation,

  15. The effects of pre-ionization using a shunt resistor on reproducibility of the x-ray emission in a dense plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriaei, D.; Yousefi, H. R.; Mahabadi, T. D.; SalarElahi, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this research, the effects of pre-ionization using a shunt resistor on reproducibility of x-ray emission in a Mather type plasma focus device have been studied. This technique increased the intensities of the emitted x-rays from argon as the filling gas of the device and made the x-ray yields with similar intensities reproducible. A Mirnov coil was also used to record the variations of the plasma's magnetic field, and the wavelet spectrums of these recorded signals showed the reduced instabilities due to the application of the pre-ionization technique. Moreover, it was demonstrated that this technique was capable of reducing the number of initial runaway electrons that could increase the impurities and instabilities inside the plasma. In addition to the above-mentioned features, this technique could improve the uniform formation of the current sheath during the breakdown phase that might later lead to a high quality pinch and high intensity emitted x-rays.

  16. A comparative study of the ionic keV X-ray line emission from plasma produced by the femtosecond, picosecond and nanosecond duration laser pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Arora; P A Naik; B S Rao; P D Gupta

    2012-02-01

    We report here an experimental study of the ionic keV X-ray line emission from magnesium plasma produced by laser pulses of three widely different pulse durations (FWHM) of 45 fs, 25 ps and 3 ns, at a constant laser fluence of ∼ 1.5 × 104 J cm-2. It is observed that the X-ray yield of the resonance lines from the higher ionization states such as H- and He-like ions decreases on decreasing the laser pulse duration, even though the peak laser intensities of 3.5 × 1017 W cm-2 for the 45 fs pulses and 6.2 × 1014 W cm-2 for the 25 ps pulses are much higher than 5 × 1012 W cm-2 for the 3 ns laser pulse. The results were explained in terms of the ionization equilibrium time for different ionization states in the heated plasma. The study can be useful to make optimum choice of the laser pulse duration to produce short pulse intense X-ray line emission from the plasma and to get the knowledge of the degree of ionization in the plasma.

  17. The optical/UV excess of X-ray dim isolated neutron star:bremsstrahlung emission from a strange star plasma atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Weiyang; Tong, Hao; Ge, Mingyu; Li, Zhaosheng; Men, Yunpeng; Xu, Renxin

    2016-01-01

    X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINSs) are characterized by Planckian spectra in X-ray bands, but show optical/ultraviolet(UV) excesses which are the measured photometry exceeding that extrapolated from X-ray spectra. To solve this problem, a radiative model of bremsstrahlung emission from a plasma atmosphere is constructed in the regime of strange (quark-cluster) star. The plasma atmosphere is supposed to be of two-temperature, formed and maintained by the ISM-accreted matter which is bound on a star's surface because of the so-called strangeness barrier. All the seven XDINS spectra could be well fitted by the radiative model, from optical/UV to X-ray bands. The fitted radiation radii of XDINSs are from 7 to 13 km, while the modelled electron temperatures are between 50 and 250 eV, except RX J0806.4$-$4123 with a radiation radius $\\sim 3$ km, indicating that this source could be a low-mass strange star candidate.

  18. Comparison of simulation to absolute X-ray emission of CH plasma created with the Nike laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquet, M.; Weaver, J. L.; Colombant, D. G.; Mostovych, A. N.; Feldman, U.; Klapisch, M.; Seely, J. F.; Holland, G.

    2006-06-01

    The Nike laser group at the Naval Research Laboratory has an ongoing effort to improve and benchmark the radiation hydrodynamic simulations used to develop pellet designs for inertial confinement fusion. A new postprocessor, Virtual Spectro, has been added to the FAST code suite for detailed simulation of non-LTE spectra, including radiation transport effects and Stark line profile. This new combination enhances our ability to predict the absolute emission of soft x-rays. An absolutely calibrated transmission grating spectrometer and a high resolution grazing incidence spectrometer have been used to collect time integrated and time resolved spectra emitted by CH targets irradiated at laser intensities of ˜10 TW/cm^2. Comparison between these observations and simulations using Virtual Spectro demonstrates excellent agreement (within factor of ˜1.5) for the absolute emission.

  19. Comparison of simulation to absolute X-ray emission of CH plasma created with the Nike laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busquet, M.; Feldman, U.; Klapisch, M. [ARTEP, Inc., Ellicott City, Maryland (contractor to NRL) (United States); Weaver, J.L.; Colombant, D.G.; Mostovych, A.N. [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Washington, DC (United States); Seely, J.F. [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Washington, DC (United States); Holland, G. [SFA, Inc., Landover, Maryland (contractor to NRL) (United States)

    2006-06-15

    The Nike laser group at the Naval Research Laboratory has an ongoing effort to improve and benchmark the radiation hydrodynamic simulations used to develop pellet designs for inertial confinement fusion. A new post-processor, Virtual Spectro, has been added to the FAST code suite for detailed simulation of non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (non-LTE) spectra, including radiation transport effects and Stark line profile. This new combination enhances our ability to predict the absolute emission of soft X-rays. An absolutely calibrated transmission grating spectrometer and a high resolution grazing incidence spectrometer have been used to collect time integrated and time resolved spectra emitted by CH targets irradiated at laser intensities of about 10 TW/cm{sup 2}. Comparison between these observations and simulations using Virtual Spectro demonstrates excellent agreement (within factor of about 1.5) for the absolute emission. (authors)

  20. X-ray emission from red quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, J. N.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.; Kinney, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    A dozen red quasars were observed with the Einstein Observatory in order to determine their X-ray properties. The observations show that for all these sources, the infrared-optical continuum is so steep that when extrapolated to higher frequencies, it passes orders of magnitude below the measured X-ray flux. The X-ray emission is better correlated with the radio than with the infrared flux, suggesting a connection between the two. By applying the synchrotron-self-Compton model to the data, it is found that the infrared-optical region has a size of 0.01 pc or more and a magnetic field more than 0.1 G, values considerably different than are found in the radio region. Unlike other quasars, the ionizing continuum is dominated by the X-ray emission. The peculiar line ratios seen in these objects can be understood with a photoionization model, provided that the photon to gas density ratio (ionization parameter) is an order of magnitude less than in typical quasars.

  1. Continuous emission of keV x-rays from low-pressure, low-field, low-power-RF plasma columns and significance to mirror confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandovitz, P.; Swanson, C.; Glasser, A.; Cohen, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    We report on observations of a continuous stream of 0.8-6.0 keV x-rays emitted from cool (bulk Te 4 eV), tenuous (ne 1010 cm-3), 4-cm-diameter hydrogen or argon plasma columns generated in an axisymmetric, high-mirror-ratio, tandem mirror machine heated in one end cell by an external RF (27 MHz) antenna operating at low power, 20-600 W. The continuous emission of x-rays is evidence of the steady production of energetic electrons. The source appears to be ion-induced secondary electron emission from a floating carbon cup in the vacuum system about 2 cm from the RF antenna. The cup is charged to a high negative potential, perhaps by other secondary electrons emitted from the self-biased Pyrex vessel under the antenna. X-ray emission in the central cell increases as the mirror ratio increases, an effect we attribute to increased trapping of passing particles due to non-adiabatic scattering at the midplane of the central cell. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  2. X-ray Studies of Flaring Plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. Sylwester; J. Sylwester; K. J. H. Phillips

    2008-03-01

    We present some methods of X-ray data analysis employed in our laboratory for deducing the physical parameters of flaring plasma. For example, we have used a flare well observed with Polish instrument RESIK aboard Russian CORONAS-F satellite. Based on a careful instrument calibration, the absolute fluxes in a number of individual spectral lines have been obtained. The analysis of these lines allows us to follow the evolution of important thermodynamic parameters characterizing the emitting plasma throughout this flare evolution.

  3. The x-ray emission spectra of multicharged xenon ions in a gas puff laser-produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skobelev, I.Yu.; Dyakin, V.M.; Faenov, A.Ya. [Multicharged Ion Spectra Data Center, VNIIFTRI, Mendeleevo (Russian Federation); Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Biemont, E. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire Experimentale, Universite de Liege, Liege (Belgium); Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Mons-Hainaut, Mons (Belgium); Quinet, P. [Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Mons-Hainaut, Mons (Belgium); Nilsen, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Behar, E.; Doron, R.; Mandelbaum, P.; Schwob, J.L. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem (Israel)

    1999-01-14

    Emission spectra of multicharged xenon ions produced by a laser gas puff are observed with high spectral resolution in the 8.5-9.5 and 17-19 A wavelength ranges. Three different theoretical methods are employed to obtain 3l-n'l'(n' = 4 to 10) wavelengths and Einstein coefficients for Ni-like Xe{sup 26+}. For the 3d-4p transitions, very good agreement is found between the experimental wavelengths and the various theoretical wavelengths. These accurate energy level measurements can be useful for studying the Ni-like xenon x-ray laser scheme. On the other hand, several intense spectral lines could not be identified as 3l-n'l' lines of Ni-like xenon, despite the very good agreement between the wavelengths and Einstein coefficients calculated for these transitions using the three different methods. (author)

  4. Modeling X-ray Emission Around Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Extended X-ray emission can be studied either spatially (through its surface brightness profile) or spectrally (by analyzing the spectrum at various locations in the field). Both techniques have advantages and disadvantages, and when the emission becomes particularly faint and/or extended, the two methods can disagree. We argue that an ideal approach would be to model the events file directly, and therefore to use both the spectral and spatial information which are simultaneously available for each event. In this work we propose a first step in this direction, introducing a method for spatial analysis which can be extended to leverage spectral information simultaneously. We construct a model for the entire X-ray image in a given energy band, and generate a likelihood function to compare the model to the data. A critical goal of this modeling is disentangling vignetted and unvignetted backgrounds through their different spatial distributions. Employing either maximum likelihood or Markov Chain Monte Carlo, we ...

  5. Soft X-ray emission in flaring coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, R F; Brun, A S

    2014-01-01

    Solar flares are associated with intense soft X-ray emission generated by the hot flaring plasma in coronal magnetic loops. Kink unstable twisted flux-ropes provide a source of magnetic energy which can be released impulsively and account for the heating of the plasma in flares. We investigate the temporal, spectral and spatial evolution of the properties of the thermal X-ray emission produced in such kink-unstable magnetic flux-ropes using a series of MHD simulations. We deduce emission diagnostics and their temporal evolution and discuss the results of the simulations with respect to observations. The numerical setup used consists of a highly twisted loop embedded in a region of uniform and untwisted background coronal magnetic field. We let the kink instability develop, compute the evolution of the plasma properties in the loop (density, temperature) and deduce the X-ray emission properties of the plasma during the whole flaring episode. During the initial phase of the instability plasma heating is mostly ...

  6. Is Coronal X-ray Emission Energized By Electric Currents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Kazunori; Metcalf, T.; Lites, B.

    2007-05-01

    We examine the spatial correlation between coronal X-ray emission observed with the Hinode X-Ray Telescope and electric currents observed with the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope Spectro-polarimeter. We determine to what extent the X-ray brightness is correlated with electric current density and hence to what extent the hot corona is energized by electric currents which flow through the photosphere. We will also consider whether the currents reach the corona to heat the coronal plasma or whether they predominantly close below the corona. Hinode is an international project supported by JAXA, NASA, PPARC and ESA. We are grateful to the Hinode team for all their efforts in the design, development and operation of the mission.

  7. Investigation of biodistribution behavior of platinum particles in mice: Correlation between inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy and X-ray scanning analytical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Shigeaki, E-mail: sabe@den.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Koyama, Chika; Mutoh, Mami [Faculty of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Akasaka, Tsukasa [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Uo, Motohiro [Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Watari, Fumio [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the biodistribution of platinum microparticles in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biodistribution behavior was observed using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP) and scanning X-ray analytical microscopy (XSAM). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The administered particles quickly reached in spleen, liver and lung with constant ration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We also estimated the correlation ship between XSAM and ICP measurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relative ratio of XSAM intensity showed highly correlation with the relative ratio of Pt concentration in organs. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the biodistribution of platinum (Pt) microparticles in mice. The particles were administered through the tail vein, and then the biodistribution behavior was observed using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP) and scanning X-ray analytical microscopy (XSAM). The administered particles quickly reached the spleen, liver, and lung at a constant ratio, and the ratio remained constant for four weeks. We also estimated the correlation between XSAM and ICP measurement. The relative ratio of XSAM intensity showed strong correlation with the relative ratio of Pt concentration in organs.

  8. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  9. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  10. Hard X-ray emission from neutron star X-ray binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Salvo, T.; Santangelo, A.; Segreto, A

    2004-06-01

    In this paper we review our current knowledge of the hard X-ray emission properties of accreting X-ray Binary Pulsars and old accreting neutron stars in Low Mass X-ray Binaries in light of 7 years of BeppoSAX and RXTE observations. The paper is divided in two parts. In the first part we review the more recent findings on the phase-dependent broad band continua and cyclotron resonance scattering features observed in many systems of the X-ray Binary Pulsar class. In the second part we review the hard X-ray emission of LMXRB focussing on the hard X-ray components extending up to energies of a few hundred keV that have been clearly detected in sources of both the atoll and Z classes. The presence and characteristics of these hard emission components are then discussed in relation to source properties and spectral state. We, also, briefly mention models that have been proposed for the hard X-ray emission of neutron star X-ray binaries.

  11. X-ray emission from Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Ness, J U; Wolk, S J; Dennerl, K; Burwitz, V

    2004-01-01

    We report the first unambiguous detection of X-ray emission originating from Saturn with a Chandra observation, duration 65.5 ksec with ACIS-S3. Beyond the pure detection we analyze the spatial distribution of X-rays on the planetary surface, the light curve, and some spectral properties. The detection is based on 162 cts extracted from the ACIS-S3 chip within the optical disk of Saturn. We found no evidence for smaller or larger angular extent. The expected background level is 56 cts, i.e., the count rate is (1.6 +- 0.2) 10^-3 cts/s. The extracted photons are rather concentrated towards the equator of the apparent disk, while both polar caps have a relative photon deficit. The inclination angle of Saturn during the observation was -27 degrees, so that the northern hemisphere was not visible during the complete observation. In addition, it was occulted by the ring system. We found a small but significant photon excess at one edge of the ring system. The light curve shows a small dip twice at identical phases,...

  12. X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-27

    A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  13. Energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry evaluated for multielement analysis in complex biological matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, R D; Schenk, E A; Giauque, R D

    1976-12-01

    Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry were evaluated as methods for routine multielement analysis of biological material. Standard samples included Standard Reference Materials (National Bureau of Standards), compounded mixtures, and supplements that provided a wide range of elemental concentrations for analysis. Elements included in this study were Zn, Pb, Ni, Mn, Fe, Mg, Cu, Ca, As, Se, Br, Rb, and Sr. Standards were analyzed as unknowns by participating laboratories. The two methods were evaluated for sensitivity, precision, and accuracy, and the results compared to those obtained for atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of identical standard unknowns. Both methods compared favorably and both were determined to be highly reliable for such an application. Advantages and disadvantages of each method are compared and discussed.

  14. Particle-induced X-ray emission analysis of elements in plasma from wild and captive sea turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata, Chelonia mydas, and Caretta caretta) in Okinawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Noda, Jun; Yanagisawa, Makio; Kawazu, Isao; Sera, Kouichiro; Fukui, Daisuke; Asakawa, Mitsuhiko; Yokota, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of direct determination of trace and major element concentrations in plasma samples from wild (six hawksbill, nine green, and nine loggerhead) and captive sea turtles (25 howksbill, five green, and three loggerhead) in Okinawa, Japan. The particle induced X-ray emission method allowed detection of 23 trace and major elements (Al, As, Br, Ca, Cl, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, S, Se, Si, Sr, Ti, Y, and Zn). The wild sea turtles were found to have high concentrations of As and Pb in plasma compared with captive, but there were no significant changes in the Al and Hg concentrations. Loggerhead sea turtles were found to have significantly higher accumulation of As and Pb in plasma in comparison to other species. These findings may be useful when adjusting environmental and species-related factors in severely polluted marine ecosystems. Our results indicate that measuring the plasma As and Pb concentrations in wild sea turtles might be of help to assess the level of pollution in marine ecosystems, keeping in mind that loggerhead sea turtles had been shown to have higher levels of As and Pb in plasma.

  15. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascali, David, E-mail: davidmascali@lns.infn.it; Castro, Giuseppe; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Gammino, Santo [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József [Institute for Nuclear Research (Atomki), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Bem tér 18/c, H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Caliri, Claudia [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dip.to di Fisica e Astronomia, via Santa Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Romano, Francesco Paolo [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); CNR, Istituto per i Beni Archeologici e Monumentali, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Torrisi, Giuseppe [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, DIIES, Via Graziella, I-89100 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed “on-line” during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  16. X-ray lasers: Multicolour emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao; Deng, Haixiao

    2016-11-01

    The X-ray free-electron laser at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the US can now generate multicolour X-ray pulses with unprecedented brightness using the fresh-slice technique. The development opens the way to new forms of spectroscopy.

  17. Soft X-ray measurements in magnetic fusion plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrugno, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Mazon, D.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.

    2010-11-01

    Soft X-ray diagnostic systems and their successful application in the field of magnetic fusion plasma physics are discussed. Radiation with wavelength in the region of Soft X-Ray (1-30 keV) is largely produced by high temperature plasmas, carrying important information on many processes during a plasma discharge. Soft X-ray diagnostics are largely used in various fusion devices all over the world. These diagnostic systems are able to obtain information on electron temperature, electron density, impurity transport, Magneto Hydro Dynamic instabilities. We will discuss the SXR diagnostic installed on FTU in Frascati (Italy) and on Tore Supra in Cadarache (France), with special emphasis on diagnostic performances. Moreover, we will discuss the two different inversion methods for tomographic reconstruction used in Frascati and in Cadarache, the first one is relied on a guessed topology of iso-emissivity surfaces, the second one on regularization techniques, like minimum Fisher or maximum entropy. Finally, a new and very fast 2D imaging system with energy discrimination and high time resolution will be summarized as an alternative approach of SXR detection system.

  18. Low-luminosity X-ray sources and the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Warwick, R S

    2014-01-01

    Using the XMM-Newton Slew Survey, we construct a hard-band selected sample of low-luminosity Galactic X-ray sources. Two source populations are represented, namely coronally-active stars and binaries (ASBs) and cataclysmic variables (CVs), with X-ray luminosities collectively spanning the range 10^(28-34) erg/s (2-10 keV). We derive the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and volume emissivity of each population. Scaled to the local stellar mass density, the latter is found to be 1.08 +/- 0.16 x 10^28 erg/s/M and 2.5 +/- 0.6 x 10^27 erg/s/M, for the ASBs and CVs respectively, which in total is a factor 2 higher than previous estimates. We employ the new XLFs to predict the X-ray source counts on the Galactic plane at l = 28.5 deg and show that the result is consistent with current observational constraints. The X-ray emission of faint, unresolved ASBs and CVs can account for a substantial fraction of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We discuss a model in which roughly 80 per cent of the 6-10 keV...

  19. Behavior of the x-ray spectrum of multiply charged ions during forced plasma expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhidkov, A.G.; Marchenko, V.S.

    1982-07-01

    The behavior of the x-ray emission spectrum of a dense plasma during forced expansion is studied. The optical transparency of the plasma varies during the expansion. The plasma emission spectrum integrated over the expansion time is calculated from the analytic solutions of the equations. The intensity of the line emission is calculated in the average-ion approximation.

  20. X-Ray Emission from Compact Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cominsky, L

    2004-03-23

    This paper presents a review of the physical parameters of neutron stars and black holes that have been derived from X-ray observations. I then explain how these physical parameters can be used to learn about the extreme conditions occurring in regions of strong gravity, and present some recent evidence for relativistic effects seen in these systems. A glossary of commonly used terms and a short tutorial on the names of X-ray sources are also included.

  1. Eclipse and Collapse of the Colliding Wind X-ray Emission from Eta Carinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray emission from the massive stellar binary system, Eta Carinae, drops strongly around periastron passage; the event is called the X-ray minimum. We launched a focused observing campaign in early 2009 to understand the mechanism of causing the X-ray minimum. During the campaign, hard X-ray emission (<10 keV) from Eta Carinae declined as in the previous minimum, though it recovered a month earlier. Extremely hard X-ray emission between 15-25 keV, closely monitored for the first time with the Suzaku HXD/PIN, decreased similarly to the hard X-rays, but it reached minimum only after hard X-ray emission from the star had already began to recover. This indicates that the X-ray minimum is produced by two composite mechanisms: the thick primary wind first obscured the hard, 2-10 keV thermal X-ray emission from the wind-wind collision (WWC) plasma; the WWC activity then decays as the two stars reach periastron.

  2. Current Problems in X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Williams, David B.; Lyman, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Various problems that limit X-ray analysis in the analytical electron microscope are reviewed. Major emphasis is given to the trade-off between minimum mass fraction and spatial resolution. New developments such as high-brightness electron guns, new X-ray spectrometers and clean high-vacuum analysis conditions will lead to major improvements in the accuracy and detectability limits of X-ray emission spectroscopy.

  3. Temporal and Spectral Resolved Measurement of Soft X-ray From Ultrashort Pulse Laser Produced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.Theobald; L.Veisz; H.Schwoerer; R.Sauerbrey; X.Z.Tang

    2001-01-01

    Ultrashort laser pulse produced plasmas are powerful sources of incoherent XUV/soft X-ray radiation and have important applications range from microscopy to lithography. Adding a prepulse is one possible way to enhance soft X-ray emission. The experiment is performed on the Jena 10 TW laser system in IOQ, Germany. The main purpose is to measure the time-resolved soft X-ray spectrum, and study how a prepulse play an important role and enhance the X-ray emission as well as and pulse duration. We clarified the temporal behavior of X-ray emission from quartz plasma produced by intensive femtosecond 800 nm laser pulse, and obtained a quantitative pictures of the

  4. x-ray irradiation analysis based on wavelet transform in tokamak plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, K; Ghoranneviss, M; Elahi, A Salar; Saviz, S

    2014-01-01

    Hard x-ray emission from the Runaway electrons is an important issue in tokamaks. Suggesting methods to reduce the Runaway electrons and therefore the emitted hard x-ray is important for tokamak plasma operation. In this manuscript, we have investigated the effects of external fields on hard x-ray intensity and Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) activity. In other words, we have presented the effects of positive biased limiter and Resonant Helical Field (RHF) on the MHD fluctuations and hard x-ray emission from the Runaway electrons. MHD activity and hard x-ray intensity were analyzed using Wavelet transform in the presence of external fields and without them. The results show that the MHD activity and therefore the hard x-ray intensity can be controlled by the external electric and magnetic fields.

  5. X-Ray Probes of Jupiter's Auroral Zones, Galilean Moons, and the Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Swartz, D. A.; Rehak, P.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Cooper, J. F.; Johnson, R. E.

    2005-01-01

    Remote observations from the Earth orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown the the Jovian system is a rich and complex source of x-ray emission. The planet's auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission, though with different origins. Chandra observations discovered x-ray emission from the Io plasma torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from the moons is due to bombardment of their surfaces by highly energetic magnetospheric protons, and oxygen and sulfur ions, producing fluorescent x-ray emission lines from the elements in their surfaces against an intense background continuum. Although very faint when observed from Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around the icy Galilean moons would provide a detail mapping of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Here we review the results of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the Jovian system and describe the characteristics of X-MIME, an imaging x-ray spectrometer undergoing study for possible application to future missions to Jupiter such as JIMO. X-MIME has the ultimate goal of providing detailed high-resolution maps of the elemental abundances of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as detailed study of the x-ray mission from the Io plasma torus, Jupiter's auroral zones, and the planetary disk.

  6. The Hard X-ray Emission of Cen A

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, V; Lubinski, P; Soldi, S; Terrier, R

    2011-01-01

    The radio galaxy Cen A has been detected all the way up to the TeV energy range. This raises the question about the dominant emission mechanisms in the high-energy domain. Spectral analysis allows us to put constraints on the possible emission processes. Here we study the hard X-ray emission as measured by INTEGRAL in the 3-1000 keV energy range, in order to distinguish between a thermal and non-thermal inverse Compton process. The hard X-ray spectrum of Cen A shows a significant cut-off at energies Ec = 434 (+106 -73) keV with an underlying power law of photon index 1.73 +- 0.02. A more physical model of thermal Comptonisation (compPS) gives a plasma temperature of kT = 206+-62 keV within the optically thin corona with Compton parameter y = 0.42 (+0.09 -0.06). The reflection component is significant at the 1.9 sigma level with R = 0.12 (+0.09 -0.10), and a reflection strength R>0.3 can be excluded on a 3 sigma level. Time resolved spectral studies show that the flux, absorption, and spectral slope varied in ...

  7. X-ray Emission from the Guitar Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Romani, R W; Yadigaroglu, I A; Romani, Roger W.; Cordes, James M.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected weak soft X-ray emission from the Pulsar Wind Nebula trailing the high velocity star PSR 2224+65 (the `Guitar Nebula'). This X-ray flux gives evidence of \\gamma~10^7 eV particles in the pulsar wind and constrains the properties of the post-shock flow. The X-ray emission is most easily understood if the shocked pulsar wind is partly confined in the nebula and if magnetic fields in this zone can grow to near equipartition values.

  8. Experimental study of conversion from atomic high-order harmonics to x-ray emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骐; 陈建新; 夏元钦; 陈德应

    2003-01-01

    There are two physical phenomena in a strong laser intensity. One is the high-order harmonic emission; the other is x-ray emission from optical-field ionized plasmas. The experiment of conversion from high-order harmonics to x-ray emissions was given with a 105fs Ti:sapphire laser by adjusting laser intensities. The ingredient in plasma was investigated by the numerical simulations. Our experimental results suggested that the free electrons have detrimental effects on harmonic generation but are favourable for x-ray emission from optical-field ionized plasmas. If we want to obtain more intense harmonic signals as a coherent light source in the soft x-ray region, we must avoid the production of free electrons in plasmas. At the same time, if we want to observe x-rays for the development of high-repetition-rate table-top soft x-ray lasers, we should strip all atoms in the plasmas to a necessary ionized stage by the optical-fieldionization in the field of a high-intensity laser pulse.

  9. A Pilot Deep Survey for X-Ray Emission from fuvAGB Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, R.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Stute, M.

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of a pilot survey for X-ray emission from a newly discovered class of AGB stars with far-ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars) using XMM-Newton and Chandra. We detected X-ray emission in three of six fuvAGB stars observed—the X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long timescales, and simultaneous UV observations using the Optical Monitor on XMM for these sources show similar variations in the UV flux. These data, together with previous studies, show that X-ray emission is found only in fuvAGB stars. From modeling the spectra, we find that the observed X-ray luminosities are ˜(0.002-0.2) L⊙ and the X-ray-emitting plasma temperatures are ˜(35-160) × 106 K. The high X-ray temperatures argue against the emission arising in stellar coronae, or directly in an accretion shock, unless it occurs on a WD companion. However, none of the detected objects is a known WD-symbiotic star, suggesting that if WD companions are present, they are relatively cool (<20,000 K). In addition, the high X-ray luminosities specifically argue against emission originating in the coronae of main-sequence companions. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  10. Uranium M x-ray emission spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keski-Rahkonen, O.; Krause, M.O.

    1977-03-01

    The uranium M x-ray spectrum from a thick metallic target excited by 12-keV electrons was measured by the PAX (photoelectron spectrometry for the analysis of x rays) technique. Energies of the strongest lines were obtained with an accuracy of 0.1 eV using Ag L..beta../sub 1/ and Ag L..cap alpha../sub 1/ as standards. Widths of the uranium lines were obtained by deconvoluting the measured Voigt profiles, and the experimental values were found to agree satisfactorily with McGuire's Hartree-Slater predictions. Natural widths of 4.0(3) and 3.8(3) eV were derived for the M/sub 4/ and M/sub 5/ levels, respectively, and the energies of the M/sub 4/, M/sub 5/, N/sub 2/, and N/sub 3/ levels in uranium metal were determined. Relative intensities of the M lines were measured, and branching ratios were found to be in fair agreement with relativistic Hartree-Slater predictions. The satellite structures of the M..cap alpha../sub 1/ and M..beta.. lines were interpreted in terms of the pertinent multiple-hole configurations. Finally, an approximate analytic expression for the Voigt half-width and its graphical representation are given.

  11. On the X-ray Emission from Massive Star Clusters and their Evolving Superbubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Silich, S; Zeferino, G A A; Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Zeferino, Gabriel Alejandro Anorve

    2005-01-01

    The X-ray emission properties from the hot thermalized plasma that results from the collisions of individual stellar winds and supernovae ejecta within rich and compact star clusters are discussed. We propose a simple analytical way of estimating the X-ray emission generated by super star clusters and derive an expression that indicates how this X-ray emission depends on the main cluster parameters. Our model predicts that the X-ray luminosity from the star cluster region is highly dependent on the star cluster wind terminal speed, a quantity related to the temperature of the thermalized ejecta.We have also compared the X-ray luminosity from the SSC plasma with the luminosity of the interstellar bubbles generated from the mechanical interaction of the high velocity star cluster winds with the ISM.We found that the hard (2.0 keV - 8.0 keV) X-ray emission is usually dominated by the hotter SSC plasma whereas the soft (0.3 keV - 2.0 keV) component is dominated by the bubble plasma. This implies that compact and ...

  12. Comparison of a portable micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the ancient ceramics analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou, D.N. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Zachariadis, G.A. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Anthemidis, A.N. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Tsirliganis, N.C. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, Tsimiski 58, GR-67100, Xanthi (Greece); Stratis, J.A. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece)]. E-mail: jstratis@chem.auth.gr

    2004-12-01

    Two multielement instrumental methods of analysis, micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were applied for the analysis of 7th and 5th century B.C. ancient ceramic sherds in order to evaluate the above two methods and to assess the potential to use the current compact and portable micro-XRF instrument for the in situ analysis of ancient ceramics. The distinguishing factor of interest is that micro-XRF spectrometry offers the possibility of a nondestructive analysis, an aspect of primary importance in the compositional analysis of cultural objects. Micro-XRF measurements were performed firstly directly on the ceramic sherds with no special pretreatment apart from surface cleaning (micro-XRF on sherds) and secondly on pressed pellet disks which were prepared for each ceramic sherd (micro-XRF on pellet). For the ICP-AES determination of elements, test solutions were prepared by the application of a microwave-assisted decomposition procedure in closed high-pressure PFA vessels. Also, the standard reference material SARM 69 was used for the efficiency calibration of the micro-XRF instrument and was analysed by both methods. In order to verify the calibration, the standard reference materials NCS DC 73332 and SRM620 as well as the reference materials AWI-1 and PRI-1 were analysed by micro-XRF. Elemental concentrations determined by the three analytical procedures (ICP-AES, micro-XRF on sherds and micro-XRF on pellets) were statistically treated by correlation analysis and Student's t-test (at the 95% confidence level)

  13. Low Energy Plasma Focus as an Intense X-ray Source for Radiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Hussain; M. Zakaullah; Shujaat Ali; A. Waheed

    2004-01-01

    Study on X-ray emission from a low energy (1.8 k J) plasma focus device powered by a 9 μF capacitor bank, charged at 20 kV and giving peak discharge current of about 175 kA by using a lead-inserted copper-tapered anode is reported. The X-ray yield in different energy windows is measured as a function of hydrogen filling pressure. The maximum yield in 4π-geometry is found to be (27.3±1.1) J and corresponding wall plug efficiency for X-ray generation is 1.52 ±0.06%. X-ray emission, presumably due to bombarding activity of electrons in current sheath at the anode tip was dominant, which is confirmed by the pinhole images. The feasibility of the device as an intense X-ray source for radiography is demonstrated.

  14. Stimulated scintillation emission depletion X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekhin, M S; Patton, G; Dujardin, C; Douissard, P-A; Lebugle, M; Novotny, L; Stampanoni, M

    2017-01-23

    X-ray microtomography is a widely applied tool for noninvasive structure investigations. The related detectors are usually based on a scintillator screen for the fast in situ conversion of an X-ray image into an optical image. Spatial resolution of the latter is fundamentally diffraction limited. In this work, we introduce stimulated scintillation emission depletion (SSED) X-ray imaging where, similar to stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, a depletion beam is applied to the scintillator screen to overcome the diffraction limit. The requirements for the X-ray source, the X-ray flux, the scintillator screen, and the STED beam were evaluated. Fundamental spatial resolution limits due to the spread of absorbed X-ray energy were estimated with Monte Carlo simulations. The SSED proof-of-concept experiments demonstrated 1) depletion of X-ray excited scintillation, 2) partial confinement of scintillating regions to sub-diffraction sized volumes, and 3) improvement of the imaging contrast by applying SSED.

  15. The effect of bound states on X-ray Thomson scattering for partially ionized plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsen, J.; Johnson, W.R.; Cheng, K. T.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray Thomson scattering is being developed as a method to measure the temperature, electron density, and ionization state of high energy density plasmas such as those used in inertial confinement fusion. X-ray laser sources have always been of interest because of the need to have a bright monochromatic x-ray source to overcome plasma emission and eliminate other lines in the background that complicate the analysis. With the advent of the xray free electron laser (X-FEL) at the SLAC Linac Coh...

  16. Electronic Structure of Dense Plasmas by X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Pollaine, S M; Froula, D H; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R; Landen, O L

    2003-10-07

    We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

  17. Modeling X-ray emission from stellar coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, S G; Argiroffi, C; Donati, J -F

    2008-01-01

    By extrapolating from observationally derived surface magnetograms of low-mass stars we construct models of their coronal magnetic fields and compare the 3D field geometry with axial multipoles. AB Dor, which has a radiative core, has a very complex field, whereas V374 Peg, which is completely convective, has a simple dipolar field. We calculate global X-ray emission measures assuming that the plasma trapped along the coronal loops is in hydrostatic equilibrium and compare the differences between assuming isothermal coronae, or by considering a loop temperature profiles. Our preliminary results suggest that the non-isothermal model works well for the complex field of AB Dor, but not for the simple field of V374 Peg.

  18. X-ray line emission in Hercules X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez-Garate, M A; Den Herder, J W A; Zane, S; Ramsay, G

    2002-01-01

    We find line emission from the hydrogen- and/or helium-like ions of Ne, O, N and C in the low and short-on states of Her X-1, using the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer. The emission line velocity broadening is 200 < sigma < 500 km/s. Plasma diagnostics with the Ne IX, O VII and N VI He-alpha lines and the radiative recombination continua of O VII and N VII, indicate the gas is heated by photoionization. We use spectral models to measure the element abundance ratios N/O, C/O, and Ne/O, which quantify CNO processing in HZ Her. Photoexcitation and high-density effects are not differentiated by the measured He-alpha lines. We set limits on the location, temperature and density of the line emission region. The narrow emission lines can be attributed to reprocessing in either an accretion disk atmosphere and corona or on the X-ray illuminated face of HZ Her. In the main-on state, the bright continuum only allows the detection of interstellar absorption, plus O VII He-alpha emission lines with sigma...

  19. A Pilot Deep Survey for X-Ray Emission from fuvAGB Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, R; Contreras, C Sanchez; Stute, M

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a pilot survey for X-ray emission from a newly discovered class of AGB stars with far-ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars) using XMM-Newton and Chandra. We detected X-ray emission in 3 of 6 fuvAGB stars observed -- the X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long times-scales, and simultaneous UV observations using the Optical Monitor on XMM for these sources show similar variations in the UV flux. These data, together with previous studies, show that X-ray emission is found only in fuvAGB stars. From modeling the spectra, we find that the observed X-ray luminosities are ~(0.002-0.2 ) Lsun, and the X-ray emitting plasma temperatures are ~(35-160) x 10^6 K. The high X-ray temperatures argue against the emission arising in stellar coronae, or directly in an accretion shock, unless it occurs on a WD companion. However, none of the detected objects is a known WD-symbiotic star, suggesting that if WD companions are present, they are relatively...

  20. X-ray and radio emission from colliding stellar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Pittard, J M; Coker, R F; Corcoran, M F

    2004-01-01

    The collision of the hypersonic winds in early-type binaries produces shock heated gas, which radiates thermal X-ray emission, and relativistic electrons, which emit nonthermal radio emission. We review our current understanding of the emission in these spectral regions and discuss models which have been developed for the interpretation of this emission. Physical processes which affect the resulting emission are reviewed and ideas for the future are noted.

  1. X-Ray Emission from Rotation-Powered Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Gui-Fang; ZHANG Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ We study the properties of pulsed component of hard (2-10keV) x-ray emission from pulsars based on the new version of outer gap model we proposed previously [Astrophys.J.604 (2004) 317].On the frame of this outer gap model, we derive an expression of non-thermal pulsed x-ray luminosity of rotation-powered pulsars, and then apply it to the pulsars whose pulsed x-rays are detected by ASCA.Using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test,we determine the model parameter.The present results indicate LX ∝ L1.15sd for these x-ray pulsars, which is consistent with the observed data.

  2. Extended X-ray emission from radio galaxy cocoons

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Biman B

    2010-01-01

    We study the emission of X-rays from lobes of FR-II radio galaxies by inverse Compton scattering of microwave background photons. Using a simple model that takes into account injection of relativistic electrons, their energy losses through adiabatic expansion, synchrotron and inverse Compton emission, and also the stopping of the jet after a certain time, we study the evolution of the total X-ray power, the surface brightness, angular size of the X-ray bright region and the X-ray photon index, as functions of time and cocoon size, and compare the predictions with observations. We find that the radio power drops rapidly after the stopping of the jet, with a shorter time-scale than the X-ray power. The X-ray spectrum initially hardens until the jet stops because the steepening of electron spectrum is mitigated by the injection of fresh particles, for electrons with $\\gamma \\ge 10^3$. This happens because of the concurrence of two times scales, that of the typical jet lifetimes and cooling due to inverse Compton...

  3. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change

  4. Warm, Dense Plasma Characterization by X-ray Thomson Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Cauble, R C; Lee, R W; Edwards, J E; Degroot, J S

    2000-07-18

    We describe how the powerful technique of spectrally resolved Thomson scattering can be extended to the x-ray regime, for direct measurements of the ionization state, density, temperature, and the microscopic behavior of dense cool plasmas. Such a direct measurement of microscopic parameters of solid density plasmas could eventually be used to properly interpret laboratory measurements of material properties such as thermal and electrical conductivity, EUS and opacity. In addition, x-ray Thomson scattering will provide new information on the characteristics of rarely and hitherto difficult to diagnose Fermi degenerate and strongly coupled plasmas.

  5. Silicon Drift Detector for Soft x-ray Spectrometer in Fusion Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Mei; JU Hong-jun

    2008-01-01

    Silicon drift detector(SDD) is used in the soft x-ray pulse height analyzer(PHA) to measure soft x-ray emissions in fusion plasmas. SDD has the virtues of high count rates and high energy resolution, and the good performances at work temperature of about -10 ℃ achieved by single stage peltier element. The performance and first experimental results from SDD system are presented.

  6. Understanding X-ray reflection emissivity profiles in AGN: Locating the X-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkins, D R

    2012-01-01

    The illumination pattern (or emissivity profile) of the accretion disc due to the reflection of X-rays in AGN can be understood in terms of relativistic effects on the rays propagating from a source in a corona surrounding the central black hole, both on their trajectories and on the accretion disc itself. Theoretical emissivity profiles due to isotropic point sources as well as simple extended geometries are computed in general relativistic ray tracing simulations performed on graphics processing units (GPUs). Such simulations assuming only general relativity naturally explain the accretion disc emissivity profiles determined from relativistically broadened emission lines which fall off steeply (with power law indices of between 6 and 8) over the inner regions of the disc, then flattening off to almost a constant before tending to a constant power law of index 3 over the outer disc. Simulations for a variety of source locations, extents and geometries show how the emissivity profiles depend on these properti...

  7. Soft X-ray emission in kink-unstable coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, R. F.; Vilmer, N.; Brun, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Solar flares are associated with intense soft X-ray emission generated by the hot flaring plasma in coronal magnetic loops. Kink-unstable twisted flux-ropes provide a source of magnetic energy that can be released impulsively and may account for the heating of the plasma in flares. Aims: We investigate the temporal, spectral, and spatial evolution of the properties of the thermal continuum X-ray emission produced in such kink-unstable magnetic flux-ropes and discuss the results of the simulations with respect to solar flare observations. Methods: We computed the temporal evolution of the thermal X-ray emission in kink-unstable coronal loops based on a series of magnetohydrodynamical numerical simulations. The numerical setup consisted of a highly twisted loop embedded in a region of uniform and untwisted background coronal magnetic field. We let the kink instability develop, computed the evolution of the plasma properties in the loop (density, temperature) without accounting for mass exchange with the chromosphere. We then deduced the X-ray emission properties of the plasma during the whole flaring episode. Results: During the initial (linear) phase of the instability, plasma heating is mostly adiabatic (as a result of compression). Ohmic diffusion takes over as the instability saturates, leading to strong and impulsive heating (up to more than 20 MK), to a quick enhancement of X-ray emission, and to the hardening of the thermal X-ray spectrum. The temperature distribution of the plasma becomes broad, with the emission measure depending strongly on temperature. Significant emission measures arise for plasma at temperatures higher than 9 MK. The magnetic flux-rope then relaxes progressively towards a lower energy state as it reconnects with the background flux. The loop plasma suffers smaller sporadic heating events, but cools down globally by thermal conduction. The total thermal X-ray emission slowly fades away during this phase, and the high

  8. X-ray optical diagnostic of laser produced plasmas for nuclear fusion and X-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butzbach, R.

    2001-07-01

    In the present work, the conception, design and appliance of toroidally bent crystals for the X-ray optical diagnostics of laser produced plasmas is discussed. The first part of this work deals with the development, design and characterization of an X-Ray microscope for the observation of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, which act against the confinement and ignition of the fuel in the inertial confinement fusion process. The aim of the second part of the present work was the diagnostic of the lasing medium for amplified spontaneous emission close to the water window. For this purpose, an one-dimensionally (1-D) imaging X-ray spectrometer based on toroidally bent quartz crystals was developed for the observation of the Ni-like 4f-3d transition of Yb, Hf, Ta, and W ions, which should be related to the amplified 4d-4p emission, since the 4f niveau is very close to the 4d niveau. Thus, the 4f-3d transition can serve as an indicator for the population of the 4d niveau. (orig.)

  9. L X-ray emission induced by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajek, M. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Banaś, D., E-mail: d.banas@ujk.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Semaniak, J. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Fijał-Kirejczyk, I. [The Institute of Atomic Energy, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Jaskóła, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Korman, A. [The National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Kretschmer, W. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Mukoyama, T. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Trautmann, D. [Institut für Physik, Universität Basel, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique is usually applied using typically 1 MeV to 3 MeV protons or helium ions, for which the ion-atom interaction is dominated by the single ionization process. For heavier ions the multiple ionization plays an increasingly important role and this process can influence substantially both the X-ray spectra and atomic decay rates. Additionally, the subshell coupling effects are important for the L- and M-shells ionized by heavy ions. Here we discuss the main features of the X-ray emission induced by heavy ions which are important for PIXE applications, namely, the effects of X-ray line shifts and broadening, vacancy rearrangement and change of the fluorescence and Coster–Kronig yields in multiple ionized atoms. These effects are illustrated here by the results of the measurements of L X-ray emission from heavy atoms bombarded by 6 MeV to 36 MeV Si ions, which were reported earlier. The strong L-subshell coupling effects are observed, in particular L{sub 2}-subshell, which can be accounted for within the coupling subshell model (CSM) developed within the semiclassical approximation. Finally, the prospects to use heavy ions in PIXE analysis are discussed.

  10. L X-ray emission induced by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajek, M.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Semaniak, J.; Fijał-Kirejczyk, I.; Jaskóła, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Korman, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Mukoyama, T.; Trautmann, D.

    2015-11-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique is usually applied using typically 1 MeV to 3 MeV protons or helium ions, for which the ion-atom interaction is dominated by the single ionization process. For heavier ions the multiple ionization plays an increasingly important role and this process can influence substantially both the X-ray spectra and atomic decay rates. Additionally, the subshell coupling effects are important for the L- and M-shells ionized by heavy ions. Here we discuss the main features of the X-ray emission induced by heavy ions which are important for PIXE applications, namely, the effects of X-ray line shifts and broadening, vacancy rearrangement and change of the fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields in multiple ionized atoms. These effects are illustrated here by the results of the measurements of L X-ray emission from heavy atoms bombarded by 6 MeV to 36 MeV Si ions, which were reported earlier. The strong L-subshell coupling effects are observed, in particular L2-subshell, which can be accounted for within the coupling subshell model (CSM) developed within the semiclassical approximation. Finally, the prospects to use heavy ions in PIXE analysis are discussed.

  11. Picosecond resolution soft x-ray laser plasma interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S; Nilsen, J; Ng, A; Shlyaptsev, V; Dunn, J; Hunter, J; Keenan, R; Marconi, M; Filevich, J; Rocca, J; Smith, R

    2003-12-01

    We describe a soft x-ray laser interferometry technique that allows two-dimensional diagnosis of plasma electron density with picosecond time resolution. It consists of the combination of a robust high throughput amplitude division interferometer and a 14.7 nm transient inversion soft x-ray laser that produces {approx} 5 ps pulses. Due to its picosecond resolution and short wavelength scalability, this technique has potential for extending the high inherent precision of soft x-ray laser interferometry to the study of very dense plasmas of significant fundamental and practical interest, such as those investigated for inertial confined fusion. Results of its use in the diagnostics of dense large scale laser-created plasmas are presented.

  12. K alpha line emission during solar X-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Neupert, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The expected flux of K alpha line emission from sulfur, argon, calcium, and iron is calculated during both thermal and nonthermal solar X-ray events. Such emission is shown to be weak during the course of most of the nonthermal hard X-ray bursts that Kane and Anderson (1970) have observed. If Compton backscattering is significant at high energies, the flux is reduced still further for disk flares, but it is noted that the strong, near-limb burst of June 26 would have produced about 100 photons /sq cm/sec of sulfur and iron K alpha emission. The impulsive hard X-ray bursts may in general be too short-lived for much K alpha emission. It may be noted that sulfur K alpha emission in particular depends sensitively on the lower-energy limit of the nonthermal electron spectrum, assuming such a sharply defined boundary exists. During soft X-ray bursts, when temperatures of a few 10 to the 7th power K are obtained, K alpha emission from certain iron ions, specifically Fe XVIII-XXIII, may be important.

  13. X-Ray Emission in Non-AGN Galaxies at z &8771 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Suchetana; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Jeltema, Tesla; Myers, Adam D.; Aird, James; Bundy, Kevin; Conselice, Christopher; Cooper, Michael; Laird, Elise; Nandra, Kirpal; Willmer, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Using data from the DEEP2 galaxy redshift survey and the All Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey we obtain stacked X-ray maps of galaxies at 0.7≤slant z≤slant 1.0 as a function of stellar mass. We compute the total X-ray counts of these galaxies and show that in the soft band (0.5-2 kev) there exists a significant correlation between galaxy X-ray counts and stellar mass at these redshifts. The best-fit relation between X-ray counts and stellar mass can be characterized by a power law with a slope of 0.58 ± 0.1. We do not find any correlation between stellar mass and X-ray luminosities in the hard (2-7 kev) and ultra-hard (4-7 kev) bands. The derived hardness ratios of our galaxies suggest that the X-ray emission is degenerate between two spectral models, namely point-like power-law emission and extended plasma emission in the interstellar medium. This is similar to what has been observed in low redshift galaxies. Using a simple spectral model where half of the emission comes from power-law sources and the other half from the extended hot halo we derive the X-ray luminosities of our galaxies. The soft X-ray luminosities of our galaxies lie in the range 1039-8× {{10}40} erg s-1. Dividing our galaxy sample by the criteria U-B\\gt 1, we find no evidence that our results for X-ray scaling relations depend on optical color.

  14. Soft x-ray scattering using FEL radiation for probing near-solid density plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toleikis, S; Faustlin, R R; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Truong, N X; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

    2009-03-03

    We report on soft x-ray scattering experiments on cryogenic hydrogen and simple metal targets. As a source of intense and ultrashort soft x-ray pulses we have used free-electron laser radiation at 92 eV photon energy from FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. X-ray pulses with energies up to 100 {micro}J and durations below 50 fs provide interaction with the target leading simultaneously to plasma formation and scattering. Experiments exploiting both of these interactions have been carried out, using the same experimental setup. Firstly, recording of soft x-ray inelastic scattering from near-solid density hydrogen plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures confirms the feasibility of this diagnostics technique. Secondly, the soft x-ray excitation of few electronvolt solid-density plasmas in simple metals could be studied by recording soft x-ray line and continuum emission integrated over emission times from fs to ns.

  15. X-ray absorption spectra of plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG; Yonglun彭永伦; HAN; Xiaoying韩小英; LI; Jiaming李家明; DING; Yaonan丁耀南; YANG; Jiamin杨家敏; ZHENG; Zhijian郑志坚

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical method to calculate the absorption spectra of hot dense plasmas. Based on our fully relativistic treatment incorporated with the quantum defect theory to handle the huge number of transition arrays from many configurations with high principal quantum number, we can calculate the absorption spectra for any element or multi-element plasmas with little computational efforts. We calculate the absorption spectra of C10H1605 plasmas, which are in good agreement with the experimental spectra. We can then provide diagnostic analysis for plasmas in relevant inertial confinement fusion (lCF) experiments; namely not only to determine plasmas' temperatures and densities, but also to provide the population densities of various ionic stages. Our theoretical method verified by "benchmark experiments" will be a basic tool to provide "precise" opacity data for the ICF research.``

  16. X-RAY EMISSION FROM MAGNETIC MASSIVE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazé, Yaël [GAPHE, Département AGO, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, Bat. B5C, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Petit, Véronique [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Rinbrand, Melanie; Owocki, Stan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Bartol Research Institute, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Cohen, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA 19081 (United States); Ud-Doula, Asif [Penn State Worthington Scranton, Dunmore, PA 18512 (United States); Wade, Gregg A., E-mail: naze@astro.ulg.ac.be [Department of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, PO Box 17000, Station Forces, Kingston, ON K7K 4B4 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Magnetically confined winds of early-type stars are expected to be sources of bright and hard X-rays. To clarify the systematics of the observed X-ray properties, we have analyzed a large series of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, corresponding to all available exposures of known massive magnetic stars (over 100 exposures covering ∼60% of stars compiled in the catalog of Petit et al.). We show that the X-ray luminosity is strongly correlated with the stellar wind mass-loss rate, with a power-law form that is slightly steeper than linear for the majority of the less luminous, lower- M-dot B stars and flattens for the more luminous, higher- M-dot O stars. As the winds are radiatively driven, these scalings can be equivalently written as relations with the bolometric luminosity. The observed X-ray luminosities, and their trend with mass-loss rates, are well reproduced by new MHD models, although a few overluminous stars (mostly rapidly rotating objects) exist. No relation is found between other X-ray properties (plasma temperature, absorption) and stellar or magnetic parameters, contrary to expectations (e.g., higher temperature for stronger mass-loss rate). This suggests that the main driver for the plasma properties is different from the main determinant of the X-ray luminosity. Finally, variations of the X-ray hardnesses and luminosities, in phase with the stellar rotation period, are detected for some objects and they suggest that some temperature stratification exists in massive stars' magnetospheres.

  17. Catheterized plasma X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derzon, Mark S.; Robinson, Alex; Galambos, Paul C.

    2017-06-20

    A radiation generator useful for medical applications, among others, is provided. The radiation generator includes a catheter; a plasma discharge chamber situated within a terminal portion of the catheter, a cathode and an anode positioned within the plasma discharge chamber and separated by a gap, and a high-voltage transmission line extensive through the interior of the catheter and terminating on the cathode and anode so as to deliver, in operation, one or more voltage pulses across the gap.

  18. Diffuse X-Ray Emission in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the diffuse X-ray emission from the Milky Way has evolved. extensively with time from when it was first observed in the 1960's, and its origin is still the subject of debate as much now as ever. This presentation will provide an overview of that evolution, the various emission components, emission mechanisms, an assessment of the current state of the field, and implications for eROSITA.

  19. Solar wind charge exchange X-ray emission from Mars Model and data comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Chanteur, Gerard; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Kharchenko, Vasili; Lallement, Rosine

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We study the soft X-ray emission induced by charge exchange (CX) collisions between solar-wind, highly charged ions and neutral atoms of the Martian exosphere. Methods. A 3D multi species hybrid simulation model with improved spatial resolution (130 km) is used to describe the interaction between the solar wind and the Martian neutrals. We calculated velocity and density distributions of the solar wind plasma in the Martian environment with realistic planetary ions description, using spherically symmetric exospheric H and O profiles. Following that, a 3D test-particle model was developed to compute the X-ray emission produced by CX collisions between neutrals and solar wind minor ions. The model results are compared to XMM-Newton observations of Mars. Results. We calculate projected X-ray emission maps for the XMM-Newton observing conditions and demonstrate how the X-ray emission reflects the Martian electromagnetic structure in accordance with the observed X-ray images. Our maps confirm that X-ray imag...

  20. Origin of Thermal and Non-Thermal Hard X-ray Emission from the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Dogiel, Vladimir; Yuasa, Takayuki; Prokhorov, Dmitrii; Cheng, Kwong-Sang; Bamba, Aya; Inoue, Hajime; Ko, Chung-Ming; Kokubun, Motohide; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Noriko Y

    2009-01-01

    We analyse new results of Chandra and Suzaku which found a flux of hard X-ray emission from the compact region around Sgr A$^\\ast$ (r ~ 100 pc). We suppose that this emission is generated by accretion processes onto the central supermassive blackhole when an unbounded part of captured stars obtains an additional momentum. As a result a flux of subrelativistic protons is generated near the Galactic center which heats the background plasma up to temperatures about 6-10 keV and produces by inverse bremsstrahlung a flux of non-thermal X-ray emission in the energy range above 10 keV.

  1. Element abundances in X-ray emitting plasmas in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Studies of element abundances in stars are of fundamental interest for their impact in a wide astrophysical context, from our understanding of galactic chemistry and its evolution, to their effect on models of stellar interiors, to the influence of the composition of material in young stellar environments on the planet formation process. We review recent results of studies of abundance properties of X-ray emitting plasmas in stars, ranging from the corona of the Sun and other solar-like stars, to pre-main sequence low-mass stars, and to early-type stars. We discuss the status of our understanding of abundance patterns in stellar X-ray plasmas, and recent advances made possible by accurate diagnostics now accessible thanks to the high resolution X-ray spectroscopy with Chandra and XMM-Newton.

  2. Plasma debris sputter resistant x-ray mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Sho; Inoue, Tomoaki; Harada, Tetsuo

    2013-06-01

    A diamond-like carbon (DLC) mirror, used as a grazing incident mirror in a plasma x-ray source, exhibits a high resistance to plasma debris sputtering. Good mirror reflectivity at a wavelength of 13.5 nm was confirmed using synchrotron radiation at the NewSUBARU facility. The erosion rate due to plasma debris sputtered at the incident debris angle of 20° was measured using a laser-produced Xe plasma source developed by the authors. The results indicate that the DLC film has a 5- and 15-fold higher sputtering resistance compared to films made of the traditional mirror materials Ru and Au, respectively. Because the DLC mirror retains a high sputtering resistance to Sn ions, it may be effective in Sn plasma source applications. We conclude that a grazing incident x-ray mirror coated with DLC can be of use as a plasma debris sputtering resistant mirror.

  3. New X-ray emission spectrometer at the Rossendorf Beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Molecular Structures

    2016-07-01

    A preliminary Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer has recently been installed and tested at the Rossendorf Beamline (ROBL). The spectrometer consists of a single spherically bent crystal analyzer and an avalanche photodiode detector positioned on the vertical Rowland cycle with 1 m diameter. The instrument has been tested at the Zr-K edge.

  4. Low-photon-energy plasma flash x-ray generator (LPFXG-2002)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Makoto; Sato, Eiichi; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Usuki, Tatsumi; Sato, Koetsu; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2003-07-01

    In this study, we have made a low photon energy flash x-ray generator with a titanium target and have measured the radiographic characteristics. The flash x-ray generator consists of a high-voltage power supply, a high-voltage condenser, a turbo molecular pump and a flash x-ray tube. The condenser is charged up to about 30 kV, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the tube after triggering the cathode. The linear plasma x-ray source forms from the target evaporation, and then the flash x-rays are generated from the plasma in the axial direction. K-series emission of titanium has been confirmed in experiments qualitatively and characteristics of the generator have been measured. K-series x-ray of titanium had a high resolution and enable us to take radiographs of a thin rabbit's ear clearly using the CR (Computed Radiography) system. The effect of titanium on the target of the soft flash x-ray tube has been indicated accordingly.

  5. Screening in resonant X-ray emission of molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågren, Hans; Luo, Yi; Gelmukhanov, Faris

    1996-01-01

    We explore the effects of screening in resonant X-ray emission from molecules by means of unconstrained multi-configurational self-consistent field optimizations of each state involved in the resonant and nonresonant X-ray processes. It is found that, although screening can produce shifts...... in transition energies of a few eV, its effect on the transition intensities is relatively minor. Using results from the investigated molecules, we find that the screening is quite dependent on the type of molecule - saturated versus unsaturated - and on the core site, but depends little on the particular core...

  6. Typing Supernova Remnants Using X-ray Line Emission Morphologies

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Laura A; Badenes, Carles; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Jeltema, Tesla E; Pooley, David A

    2009-01-01

    We present a new observational method to type the explosions of young supernova remnants (SNRs). By measuring the morphology of the Chandra X-ray line emission in seventeen Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs with a multipole expansion analysis (using power ratios), we find that the core-collapse SNRs are statistically more asymmetric than the Type Ia SNRs. We show that the two classes of supernovae can be separated naturally using this technique because X-ray line morphologies reflect the distinct explosion mechanisms and structure of the circumstellar material. These findings are consistent with recent spectropolarimetry results showing that core-collapse SNe are intrinsically more asymmetric.

  7. X-ray pinhole camera setups used in the Atomki ECR Laboratory for plasma diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, R.; Biri, S.; Pálinkás, J.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Caliri, C.; Romano, F. P.; Gammino, S.

    2016-02-01

    Imaging of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas by using CCD camera in combination with a pinhole is a non-destructive diagnostics method to record the strongly inhomogeneous spatial density distribution of the X-ray emitted by the plasma and by the chamber walls. This method can provide information on the location of the collisions between warm electrons and multiple charged ions/atoms, opening the possibility to investigate the direct effect of the ion source tuning parameters to the plasma structure. The first successful experiment with a pinhole X-ray camera was carried out in the Atomki ECR Laboratory more than 10 years ago. The goal of that experiment was to make the first ECR X-ray photos and to carry out simple studies on the effect of some setting parameters (magnetic field, extraction, disc voltage, gas mixing, etc.). Recently, intensive efforts were taken to investigate now the effect of different RF resonant modes to the plasma structure. Comparing to the 2002 experiment, this campaign used wider instrumental stock: CCD camera with a lead pinhole was placed at the injection side allowing X-ray imaging and beam extraction simultaneously. Additionally, Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) and High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors were installed to characterize the volumetric X-ray emission rate caused by the warm and hot electron domains. In this paper, detailed comparison study on the two X-ray camera and detector setups and also on the technical and scientific goals of the experiments is presented.

  8. X-ray pinhole camera setups used in the Atomki ECR Laboratory for plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rácz, R., E-mail: rracz@atomki.hu; Biri, S.; Pálinkás, J. [Institute for Nuclear Research (Atomki), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Bem tér 18/C, H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Caliri, C.; Gammino, S. [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Romano, F. P. [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CNR, Istituto per i Beni Archeologici e Monumentali, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    Imaging of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas by using CCD camera in combination with a pinhole is a non-destructive diagnostics method to record the strongly inhomogeneous spatial density distribution of the X-ray emitted by the plasma and by the chamber walls. This method can provide information on the location of the collisions between warm electrons and multiple charged ions/atoms, opening the possibility to investigate the direct effect of the ion source tuning parameters to the plasma structure. The first successful experiment with a pinhole X-ray camera was carried out in the Atomki ECR Laboratory more than 10 years ago. The goal of that experiment was to make the first ECR X-ray photos and to carry out simple studies on the effect of some setting parameters (magnetic field, extraction, disc voltage, gas mixing, etc.). Recently, intensive efforts were taken to investigate now the effect of different RF resonant modes to the plasma structure. Comparing to the 2002 experiment, this campaign used wider instrumental stock: CCD camera with a lead pinhole was placed at the injection side allowing X-ray imaging and beam extraction simultaneously. Additionally, Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) and High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors were installed to characterize the volumetric X-ray emission rate caused by the warm and hot electron domains. In this paper, detailed comparison study on the two X-ray camera and detector setups and also on the technical and scientific goals of the experiments is presented.

  9. X-ray pinhole camera setups used in the Atomki ECR Laboratory for plasma diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, R; Biri, S; Pálinkás, J; Mascali, D; Castro, G; Caliri, C; Romano, F P; Gammino, S

    2016-02-01

    Imaging of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas by using CCD camera in combination with a pinhole is a non-destructive diagnostics method to record the strongly inhomogeneous spatial density distribution of the X-ray emitted by the plasma and by the chamber walls. This method can provide information on the location of the collisions between warm electrons and multiple charged ions/atoms, opening the possibility to investigate the direct effect of the ion source tuning parameters to the plasma structure. The first successful experiment with a pinhole X-ray camera was carried out in the Atomki ECR Laboratory more than 10 years ago. The goal of that experiment was to make the first ECR X-ray photos and to carry out simple studies on the effect of some setting parameters (magnetic field, extraction, disc voltage, gas mixing, etc.). Recently, intensive efforts were taken to investigate now the effect of different RF resonant modes to the plasma structure. Comparing to the 2002 experiment, this campaign used wider instrumental stock: CCD camera with a lead pinhole was placed at the injection side allowing X-ray imaging and beam extraction simultaneously. Additionally, Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) and High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors were installed to characterize the volumetric X-ray emission rate caused by the warm and hot electron domains. In this paper, detailed comparison study on the two X-ray camera and detector setups and also on the technical and scientific goals of the experiments is presented.

  10. X-ray emission from hot subdwarfs with compact companions

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, Sandro; Esposito, Paolo; Tiengo, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    We review the X-ray observations of hot subdwarf stars. While no X-ray emission has been detected yet from binaries containing B-type subdwarfs, interesting results have been obtained in the case of the two luminous O-type subdwarfs HD 49798 and BD +37 442. Both of them are members of binary systems in which the X-ray luminosity is powered by accretion onto a compact object: a rapidly spinning (13.2 s) and massive (1.28 M_sun) white dwarf in the case of HD 49798 and most likely a neutron star, spinning at 19.2 s, in the case of BD +37 442. Their study can shed light on the poorly known processes taking place during common envelope evolutionary phases and on the properties of wind mass loss from hot subdwarfs.

  11. Neon soft x-ray emission studies from the UNU-ICTP plasma focus operated with longer than optimal anode length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, M A [Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Verma, R [Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Sobhanian, S [Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Wong, C S [Plasma Research Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Lee, S [Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Springham, S V [Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Tan, T L [Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Lee, P [Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Rawat, R S [Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2007-11-15

    The UNU-ICTP plasma focus with a significantly longer than conventional anode can still be a reasonably good neon soft x-ray (SXR) source. The highest average neon SXR yield of 3.3 J was achieved at 3 mbar. The time difference between the two first peaks of the voltage probe signal at the radial collapse phase was found to be inversely related to the SXR yield, i.e. the smaller the time difference, the higher the yield and vice versa. The estimation of average current sheath speeds using the shadowgraphic method coupled with laser and focus peak timing signals showed that the average axial rundown speed is similar to the one obtained for the optimal anode length but the average radial compression speed is decreased significantly. The range of pressure for a good neon SXR yield, however, has become much narrower, making efficient plasma focus operation a very sensitive function of the filling gas pressure for longer than the optimal anode length.

  12. Evaluation of a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer for highly charged ion plasma emission in soft x-ray spectral region from 1 to 10 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Thanh Hung; Kondo, Yoshiki; Tamura, Toshiki; Ono, Yuichi; Hara, Hiroyuki; Oikawa, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Yoichi; Ishino, Masahiko; Nishikino, Masaharu; Makimura, Tetsuya; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitano, Ken; Ejima, Takeo; Tadashi, Hatano; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    A flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer operating on the spectral region from 1 to 10 nm was built for research on physics of high temperature and high energy density plasmas. It consists of a flat-field grating with 2400 lines/mm as a dispersing element and an x-ray charged coupled device (CCD) camera as the detector. The diffraction efficiency of the grating and the sensitivity of the CCD camera were directly measured by use of synchrotron radiation at the BL-11D beamline of the Photon Factory (PF). The influence of contamination to the spectrometer also was characterized. This result enables us to evaluate the absolute number of photons in a wide range wavelength between 1 and 10 nm within an acquisition. We obtained absolutely calibrated spectra from highly charged ion plasmas of Gd, from which a maximum energy conversion efficiency of 0.26% was observed at a Nd:YAG laser intensity of 3 × 1012 W/cm2.

  13. Spontaneous emission effects in optically pumped x-ray FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smetanin, I.V.; Grigor`ev, S.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    An effect of spontaneous emission in both quantum and classical regimes of the optically pumped X-ray free electron laser (FEL) in investigated. The quantum properties of an FEL are determined by the ratio of the separation {h_bar} between the absorption and emission lines (i.e. the quanta emitted) and their effective width {Delta}{epsilon} {eta}={h_bar}/{Delta}{epsilon}. In the conventional classical regime {eta} {much_lt} 1 an electron emits and absorbes a great number of shortwavelength photons over the interaction region, the gain in FEL being the result of these competitive processes. In the quantum limit {eta} {much_gt} 1 the emission and absorption lines are completely separated and thus the FEL becomes a two-level quantum oscillator with a completely inverted active medium. Spontaneous emission causes the electron to leave the range of energies where resonant interaction with the laser field occurs, thus effectively reducing the number of particles that take part in generating the induced X-ray signal. This effect is found to be crucial for lasing in optically pumped X-ray FEL. The characteristic relaxation times are calculated for both classical and quantum FEL regimes. It is shown that spontaneous emission results in FEL electron beam threshold current, which is of rather high value. An optimal range of pumping laser intensities is determined.

  14. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Faint Discrete X-ray Point Sources Constituting the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Morihana, Kumiko; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic Plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (~80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations, thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out Near-Infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l,b)=(0.1{\\arcdeg}, -1.4{\\arcdeg}) and (28.5{\\arcdeg}, 0.0{\\arcdeg}) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as HI(Br{\\gamma}), HeI, and HeII (2 objects), (B)...

  15. X-ray Emission Properties of Intermediate-Mass, Pre-Main-Sequence Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Binder, Breanna; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.

    2017-08-01

    Intermediate-mass (2-8 M⊙) main-sequence stars with A to mid-B spectral types occupy an X-ray "desert" of weak intrinsic emission between low- and high-mass stars. Lacking the wind-shock driven emission of massive, O and early B stars or the convectively-driven magnetic reconnection flaring activity of later-type stars, X-ray detections of (non-peculiar) main-sequence AB stars are typically ascribed to the presence of unresolved, lower-mass binary companions. There is mounting evidence, however, that intermediate-mass, pre-main sequence stars (IMPS) with GK spectral types produce intrinsic X-ray emission that rapidly decays with time following the development of a radiative zone as IMPS approach the ZAMS as AB stars. This suggests that X-ray emission from IMPS may be a more luminous analog of the well-studied coronal X-ray emission from lower-mass, T Tauri stars. Statistical studies of young IMPS have been hampered by their scarcety in nearby, unobscured star-forming regions. We present the first results from a spectral-fitting study to measure absorption-corrected X-ray luminosities and plasma temperatures for hundreds of candidate X-ray emitting IMPS found in the MYStIX and MAGiX surveys of massive Galactic star forming regions. Candidate IMPS are placed on the HR diagram via a novel infrared spectral energy distribution modeling technique designed for highly-obscured, young massive star-forming regions. The rapid decay of X-ray emission from these objects has the potential to provide an independent chronometer to constrain star formation rates, and may produce an age-dependent bias in the relationship between the stellar X-ray luminosity function and mass function in distant (>2 kpc) regions observed with relatively shallow X-ray observations.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant CAREER-1454334 and by NASA through Chandra Award 18200040.

  16. Generation of intense soft X-rays from capillary discharge plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y B S R Prasad; S Nigam; K Aneesh; S Barnwal; P K Tripathi; P A Naik; C P Navathe; P D Gupta

    2011-06-01

    X-ray lasing through high voltage, high current discharges in gas filled capillaries has been demonstrated in several laboratories. This method gives highest number of X-ray photons per pulse. The fast varying current and the j x B magnetic force compress the plasma towards the axis forming a hot, dense, line plasma, wherein under appropriate discharge conditions lasing occurs. At Laser Plasma Division, RRCAT, a program on high voltage capillary discharge had been started. The system consists of a 400 kV Marx bank, water line capacitor, spark gap and capillary chamber. The initial results of the emission of intense short soft X-ray pulses (5–10 ns) from the capillary discharge are reported.

  17. X-Ray Emission from a prominent dust lane lenticular galaxy NGC 5866

    CERN Document Server

    Vagshette, N D; Pandey, S K; Patil, M K

    2015-01-01

    We report the multiband imagery with an emphasis on the X-ray emission properties of a prominent dust lane lenticular galaxy NGC 5866. X-ray emission from this galaxy is due to a diffuse component and a substantial contribution from the population of discrete X-ray binary sources. A total of 22 discrete sources have been detected within the optical D25 extent of the galaxy, few of which exhibit spatial association with the globular clusters hosted by this system. Composite spectrum of the diffuse emission from this galaxy was well constrained by a thermal plasma model plus a power law component to represent the emission from unresolved sources, while that of the discrete sources was well fitted by an absorbed power law component of photon index 1.82$\\pm$0.14. X-ray color-color plot for the resolved source was used to classify the detected sources. The cumulative X-ray luminosity function of the XRBs is well represented by a power law function of index of {\\Gamma} ~ 0.82$\\pm$0.12. Optical imagery of NGC 5866 r...

  18. Two distinct phases of hard x-ray emissions in a solar eruptive flare

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Cho, K -S; Bong, S -C; Moon, Y -J; Lee, Jeongwoo; Somov, B V; Manoharan, P K; Kim, Y -H

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the evolution of an M7.6 flare that occurred near the south-east limb on October 24, 2003 utilizing a multi-wavelength data set. Preflare images at TRACE 195 A show that the bright and complex system of coronal loops already existed at the flaring site. The X-ray light curves clearly reveal two phases of flare evolution. The emission during the first phase is seen in GOES and RHESSI measurements at energies below 25 keV, while the second phase is evident in all the X-ray energies as high as 300 keV. The first phase is gradual whereas the second phase shows impulsive emission with several individual hard X-ray bursts. The first phase starts with the appearance of an X-ray loop-top (LT) source in RHESSI images below 25 keV. About 5 minute later, the TRACE 195 A images show an intense emission that is cospatial with RHESSI LT source. This hot and diffuse TRACE emission is attributed to the existence of 15-20 MK plasma, heated directly from the primary energy source. Both X-ray a...

  19. Formation and X-ray Emission from Hot Bubbles in Planetary Nebulae. II. Hot bubble X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Toalá, J A

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the X-ray emission from numerical simulations of hot bubbles in planetary nebulae (PNe). High-resolution, two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of the formation and evolution of hot bubbles in PNe, with and without thermal conduction, are used to calculate the X-ray emission and study its time-dependence and relationship to the changing stellar parameters. Instabilities in the wind-wind interaction zone produce clumps and filaments in the swept-up shell of nebular material. Turbulent mixing and thermal conduction at the corrugated interface can produce quantities of intermediate temperature and density gas between the hot, shocked wind bubble and the swept-up photoionized nebular material, which can emit in soft, diffuse X-rays. We use the CHIANTI software to compute synthetic spectra for the models and calculate their luminosities. We find that models both with conduction and those without can produce the X-ray temperatures and luminosities that are in the ranges reporte...

  20. Hard X-ray emission spectroscopy with pink beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Rossberg, Andre; Exner, Joerg; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures

    2017-06-01

    Valence-band X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) with a ''pink beam'', i.e. a beam with large energy bandwidth produced by a double-multilayer monochromator, is introduced here to overcome the weak count rate of monochromatic beams produced by conventional double-crystal monochromators. Our results demonstrate that - in spite of the large bandwidth in the order of 100 eV - the high spectral resolution of the Johann-type spectrometer is maintained, while the two orders of magnitude higher flux greatly reduces the required counting time. The short working distance Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer and multilayer monochromator is available at ROBL.

  1. Nonthermal Hard X-Ray Emission from the Galactic Ridge

    OpenAIRE

    Dogiel, V. A.; Schoenfelder, V.; Strong, A.W.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the origin of the nonthermal X-ray emission from the Galactic ridge in the range 10-200 keV. We consider bremsstrahlung of subrelativistic cosmic ray protons and electrons as production processes. From the solution of the kinetic equations describing the processes of particle in-situ acceleration and spatial propagation we derive parameters of the spectra for protons and electrons. For in-situ acceleration the flux of accelerated particles consists mainly of protons since the r...

  2. X-ray Emission from the Born-Again Planetary Nebula Abell 30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, M. A.

    2013-05-01

    The planetary nebula (PN) Abell 30 underwent a very late thermal pulse that resulted in the ejection of knots of hydrogen-poor material. ROSAT detected soft X-ray emission from these knots. We present deep Chandra and XMM-Newton observations that show this X-ray emission to consist of two components: a point-source at the central star and diffuse emission associated with the hydrogen-poor knots and the cloverleaf structure inside the nebular shell. The spatial distribution and spectral properties of the diffuse X-ray emission suggest that it is generated by the shock-heated plasma produced by the interaction of the present stellar wind with the hydrogen-poor ejecta of the born-again event. Charge-exchange reactions between the ions of the stellar winds and the born-again ejecta may also contribute to this emission. The origin of the X-ray emission from the central star of A 30 is puzzling: shocks in the present fast stellar wind and photospheric emission can be ruled out, while the development of a new, compact hot bubble confining the fast stellar wind seems implausible.

  3. X-Ray Emission from the Wolf-Rayet Bubble S 308

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toala, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Arthur, S. J.; Smith, R. C.; Snowden, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble S 308 around the WR star HD 50896 is one of the only two WR bubbles known to possess X-ray emission. We present XMM-Newton observations of three fields of this WR bubble that, in conjunction with an existing observation of its Northwest quadrant (Chu et al. 2003), map most of the nebula. The X-ray emission from S 308 displays a limb-brightened morphology, with a 22' in size central cavity and a shell thickness of approx. 8'. This X-ray shell is confined by the optical shell of ionized material. The spectrum is dominated by the He-like triplets of N VI at approx.0.43 keV and O VII at approx.0.5 keV, and declines towards high energies, with a faint tail up to 1 keV. This spectrum can be described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma emission model (T1 approx.1.1 x 10(exp 6) K, T2 approx.13 x 10(exp 6) K), with a total X-ray luminosity approx.3 x 10(exp 33) erg/s at the assumed distance of 1.8 kpc. Qualitative comparison of the X-ray morphology of S 308 with the results of numerical simulations of wind-blown WR bubbles suggests a progenitor mass of 40 Stellar mass and an age in the WR phase approx.20,000 yrs. The X-ray luminosity predicted by simulatioms including the effects of heat conduction is in agreement with the observations, however, the simulated X-ray spectrum indicates generally hotter gas than is derived from the observations. We suggest that non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) may provide an explanation for this discrepancy.

  4. Chemical Speciation via X-ray Emission Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankudinov, A. L.; Rehr, J. J.; Elam, W. T.; Sieber, J. R.

    2002-03-01

    We have extended our calculations of lineshapes in x-ray emission and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy to investigate the dependence on formal oxidation state. We used the self-consistent x-ray spectroscopy code FEFF8.1 [1], which is based on a real-space Green's function formalism, to calculate the phosphorus K-M_2,3 line and the Cr K and L emission lines for a range of simple oxides. These lines exhibit changes depending on oxidation state. Convolution with an algorithm describing the response function of the spectrometer is necessary to compare to experimental measurements. The calculated spectra are compared to measured spectra and to other relevant calculations, e.g., Fujikawa and Kawai [2]. The comparisons thus far indicate that calculations and measurements together can yield a quantitative analysis of compounds. [1] A. L. Ankudinov and J. J. Rehr, Phys. Rev. B 62, 2437 (2000). [2] T. Fujikawa and J. Kawai, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 68, 4032 (1999).

  5. Hard X-ray emission of Sco X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Revnivtsev, Mikhail G; Churazov, Eugene M; Krivonos, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    We study hard X-ray emission of the brightest accreting neutron star Sco X-1 with INTEGRAL observatory. Up to now INTEGRAL have collected ~4 Msec of deadtime corrected exposure on this source. We show that hard X-ray tail in time average spectrum of Sco X-1 has a power law shape without cutoff up to energies ~200-300 keV. An absence of the high energy cutoff does not agree with the predictions of a model, in which the tail is formed as a result of Comptonization of soft seed photons on bulk motion of matter near the compact object. The amplitude of the tail varies with time with factor more than ten with the faintest tail at the top of the so-called flaring branch of its color-color diagram. We show that the minimal amplitude of the power law tail is recorded when the component, corresponding to the innermost part of optically thick accretion disk, disappears from the emission spectrum. Therefore we show that the presence of the hard X-ray tail may be related with the existence of the inner part of the optica...

  6. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and mo...

  7. Ion and X-ray techniques used for study of laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolowski, J.; Parys, P.; Rosinski, M.; Ryć, L.; Woryna, E.

    2015-04-01

    This review article describes apparatus for ion and X-ray diagnostics, which were used in experimental studies of laser-produced plasmas performed by the IPPLM's team in collaboration with other researchers at IPPLM and PALS Research Centre in Prague (the Czech Republic). The investigations of expanding laser-produced plasma properties in dependence on laser beam parameters were done by means of ion diagnostics devices: ion collectors (ICs), cylindrical ion energy analyzer (IEA) and the mass spectrograph of the Thomson type. At IPPLM, different types of detectors have been developed for measurement of X-ray emission. Properties of laser-produced beams of ions and X-ray radiation were analysed in the cooperative experiments performed with the use of a high-energy iodine laser PALS at the PALS Research Centre ASCR in the Czech Republic and the low-energy repetitive laser at IPPLM.

  8. Soft X-ray emission of nearby galaxy M81

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏旸; 毕红光; 李启斌

    1997-01-01

    The pointed observations of NGC3077 are analyzed by position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) on board the ROSAT satellite on 1991-04-18, 1991, finding out that the X-ray emission range of M81 galaxy has, in the softer and more sensitive ROSAT PSPC band (0. 2-2. 4 keV), extended by 40% larger than ever observed by image proportional counter (IPC) on board the Einstein satellite, which shows that M81 galaxy has a larger X-ray corona. And by the aid of the timing analysis, it is concluded that M81 nucleus has no variabilities on time scale of a few minutes; hence the possibility of M81 nucleus having the marginal variability over time scale of about 2 min that Fabbiano (1988) found from the Einstein IPC observation is ruled out.

  9. X-ray Probes of Magnetospheric Interactions with Jupiter's Auroral zones, the Galilean Satellites, and the Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Rehak, P.; Johnson, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Remote observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown that the Jovian system is a source of x-rays with a rich and complicated structure. The planet's polar auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission. Chandra observations revealed x-ray emission from the Io Plasma Torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from these moons is certainly due to bombardment of their surfaces of highly energetic protons, oxygen and sulfur ions from the region near the Torus exciting atoms in their surfaces and leading to fluorescent x-ray emission lines. Although the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons is faint when observed fiom Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around these moons, operating at 200 eV and above with 150 eV energy resolution, would provide a detailed mapping (down to 40 m spatial resolution) of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Here we describe the physical processes leading to x-ray emission fiom the surfaces of Jupiter's moons and the instrumental properties, as well as energetic ion flux models or measurements, required to map the elemental composition of their surfaces. We discuss the proposed scenarios leading to possible surface compositions. For Europa, the two most extreme are (1) a patina produced by exogenic processes such as meteoroid bombardment and ion implantation, and (2) upwelling of material fiom the subsurface ocean. We also describe the characteristics of X - m , an imaging x-ray spectrometer under going a feasibility study for the JIM0 mission, with the ultimate goal of providing unprecedented x-ray studies of the elemental composition of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as of Jupiter's auroral x-ray emission.

  10. Diffuse X-ray emission from the superbubbles N70 and N185 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Iturbide, J.; Rodríguez-González, A.; Velázquez, P. F. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70–543, D.F. México (Mexico); Rosado, M.; Sánchez-Cruces, M. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70–264, C.P. 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Ambrocio-Cruz, P. [Instituto de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Ciudad Universitaria, Km 4.5 Carretera Pachuca-Tulancingo, Col. Carboneras, C.P. 42184, Mineral de la Reforma, Hgo. (Mexico)

    2014-11-01

    We present a study of the diffuse X-ray emission from superbubbles (SBs) N70 (DEM L301) and N185 (DEM L25) located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, based on data from the XMM-Newton Satellite. We obtained spectra and images of these objects in the soft X-ray energy band. These X-ray spectra were fitted by a thermal plasma model, with temperatures of 2.6×10{sup 6} K and 2.3×10{sup 6} K, for N70 and N185, respectively. For N70, images show that X-ray emission comes from the inner regions of the SB when we compare the distribution of the X-ray and the optical emission, while for N185, the X-ray emission is partially confined by the optical shell. We suggest that the observed X-ray emission is caused by shock-heated gas, inside of the optical shells. We also obtained X-ray luminosities which exceed the values predicted by the standard analytical model. This fact shows that, in addition to the winds of the interior stars, it is necessary to consider another ingredient in the description, such as a supernova explosion, as has been proposed in previous numerical models.

  11. Diffuse X-ray emission from the superbubbles N 70 and N 185 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Iturbide., Jorge; Rodríguez-González., Ary; Velázquez., Pablo F; Sánchez-Cruces, Mónica; Ambrocio-Cruz, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the diffuse X-ray emission from superbubbles N 70 (DEM L301) and N 185 (DEM L25) located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, based on data from the XMM-Newton Satellite. We obtained spectra and images of these objects in the soft X-ray energy band. These X-ray spectra were fitted by a thermal plasma model, with temperatures of $2.6 \\times 10^{6}$ K and $2.3 \\times 10^{6}$ K, for N 70 and N 185, respectively. For N 70, images show that X-ray emission comes from the inner regions of the superbubble, when we compare the distribution of the X-ray and the optical emission; while for N 185, the X-ray emission is partially confined by the optical shell. We suggest that the observed X-ray emission is caused by shock-heated gas, inside of the optical shells. We also obtained X-ray luminosities which exceed the values predicted by the standard analytical model. This fact shows that, in addition to the winds of the interior stars, it is necessary to consider another ingredient in the description, such a...

  12. Observation of asymmetrically imploded core plasmas with a two-dimensional sampling image x-ray streak camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Lee, Myongdok; Mahigashi, Norimitsu; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    A shell target with a cone for guiding the heating beam has been proposed for the fast ignition scheme. Implosion of such target is no longer symmetric because of the cone. A fast two-dimensional x-ray imaging technique, two-dimensional (2D) sampling image x-ray streak camera was applied for the first time to observation of the dynamics of implosion and core plasma. X-ray emission image of the plasma was sampled with two-dimensionally distributed image sampling points, streaked with the tube, and the recorded signals were reconstructed as sequential 2D frame images. Shape and movement of the core plasma were clearly observed.

  13. Spatially Varying X-ray Synchrotron Emission in SN 1006

    CERN Document Server

    Dyer, K K; Borkowski, K; Petre, R; Dyer, Kristy; Reynolds, Stephen P; Borkowski, Kazik; Petre, Rob

    2001-01-01

    A growing number of both galactic and extragalactic supernova remnants show non-thermal (non-plerionic) emission in the X-ray band. New synchrotron models, realized as SRESC and SRCUT in XSPEC 11, which use the radio spectral index and flux as inputs and include the full single-particle emissivity, have demonstrated that synchrotron emission is capable of producing the spectra of dominantly non-thermal supernova remnants with interesting consequences for residual thermal abundances and acceleration of particles. In addition, these models deliver a much better-constrained separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, whereas combining an unconstrained powerlaw with modern thermal models can produce a range of acceptable fits. While synchrotron emission can be approximated by a powerlaw over small ranges of energy, the synchrotron spectrum is in fact steepening over the X-ray band. Having demonstrated that the integrated spectrum of SN 1006, a remnant dominated by non-thermal emission, is well desc...

  14. Progress in the applicability of plasma X-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehl, T., E-mail: T.Kuehl@gsi.de; Aurand, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Ecker, B.; Eisenbarth, U. [GSI (Germany); Guilbaud, O. [Universite Paris Sud (France); Fils, J.; Goette, S. [GSI (Germany); Habib, J. [Universite Paris Sud (France); Hochhaus, D.; Javorkova, D. [GSI (Germany); Neumayer, P. [Extreme Matter Institute, EMMI (Germany); Kazamias, S.; Pittman, M.; Ros, D. [Universite Paris Sud (France); Seres, J.; Spielmann, Ch. [Friedrich Schiller-University (Germany); Zielbauer, B.; Zimmer, D. [GSI (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Proposed as satellite-based weapons during the 1980s, X-ray lasing was for a long time only achieved with enormous amounts of pump energy in either nuclear explosions or at kilojoule-class laser installations. During the last few years a tremendous development was achieved, most visible in the realisation of the FEL lasers at DESY and SLAC. As important for a wider applicability is the enormous reduction in pump energy for laser pumped plasma X-ray lasers, which now brings such devices into the range of applications for diagnostics and spectroscopy even in smaller laboratories. Main developments were the transient excitation scheme and the optimized pumping concepts. This paper concentrates on developments at the GSI Helmholtzcenter at Darmstadt aiming towards reliable X-ray laser sources in the range from 50 to several 100 eV. The main driving forces for the laser development at GSI are the possible application for the spectroscopy of Li-like ions in the storage ring ESR and the future storage ring NESR at FAIR, and the interest in novel plasma diagnostics.

  15. Low-Energy Plasma Focus as a Tailored X-Ray Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaullah, M.; Alamgir, K.; Shafiq, M.; Sharif, M.; Waheed, A.; Murtaza, G.

    2000-06-01

    A low-energy (2.3 kJ) plasma focus energized by a single 32-μF capacitor charged at 12 kV with filling gases hydrogen, neon, and argon is investigated as an X-ray source. Experiments are conducted with a copper and an aluminum anode. Specifically, attention is given to tailoring the radiation in different windows, e.g., 1.2-1.3 keV, 1.3-1.5 keV, 2.5-5 keV, and Cu-Kα line radiation. The highest X-ray emission is observed with neon filling and the copper anode in the 1.2-1.3 keV window, which we speculate to be generated due to recombination of hydrogenlike neon ions with a few eV to a few 10s of eV electrons. The wall-plug efficiency of the device is found to be 4%. The other significant emission occurs with hydrogen filling, which exhibits wall-plug efficiency of 1.7% for overall X-ray emission and 0.35% for Cu-Kα line radiation. The emission is dominated by the interaction of electrons in the current sheath with the anode tip. The emission with the aluminum anode and hydrogen filling is up to 10 J, which corresponds to wall-plug efficiency of 0.4%. The X-ray emission with argon filling is less significant.

  16. X-ray calibration facility for plasma diagnostics of the MégaJoule laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Laser MégaJoule (LMJ located at CEA-CESTA will be equipped with x-ray plasma diagnostics using different kinds of x-ray components such as filters, mirrors, crystals, detectors and cameras. To guarantee LMJ measurements, detectors such as x-ray cameras need to be regularly calibrated. An x-ray laboratory is devoted to this task and performs absolute x-ray calibrations for similar x-ray cameras running on Laser Integration Line (LIL. This paper presents the x-ray calibration bench with its x-ray tube based High Energy x-ray Source (HEXS and some calibration results. By mean of an ingenious transposition system under vacuum absolute x-ray calibration of x-ray cameras, like streak and stripline ones, can be carried out. Coupled to a new collimation system with micrometric accuracy on aperture sensitivity quantum efficiency measurements can be achieved with reduced uncertainties.

  17. Strong higher-order resonant contributions to x-ray line polarization in hot plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Chintan; Steinbrügge, Rene; Beilmann, Christian; Bernitt, Sven; Fritzsche, Stephan; Surzhykov, Andrey; López-Urrutia, José R Crespo; Tashenov, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    We studied angular distributions of x rays emitted in resonant recombination of highly charged iron and krypton ions, resolving dielectronic, trielectronic, and quadruelectronic channels. A tunable electron beam drove these processes, inducing x rays registered by two detectors mounted along and perpendicular to the beam axis. The measured emission asymmetries comprehensively benchmarked full-order atomic calculations. We conclude that accurate polarization diagnostics of hot plasmas can only be obtained under the premise of inclusion of higher-order processes that were neglected in earlier work.

  18. X-ray Emission from Nitrogen-Type Wolf-Rayet Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, S L; Guedel, M; Schmutz, W; Sokal, K R

    2009-01-01

    We summarize new X-ray detections of four nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars obtained in a limited survey aimed at establishing the X-ray properties of WN stars across their full range of spectral subtypes. None of the detected stars is so far known to be a close binary. We report Chandra detections of WR 2 (WN2), WR 18 (WN4), and WR 134 (WN6), and an XMM-Newton detection of WR79a (WN9ha). These observations clearly demonstrate that both WNE and WNL stars are X-ray sources. We also discuss Chandra archive detections of the WN6h stars WR 20b, WR 24, and WR 136 and ROSAT non-detections of WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). The X-ray spectra of all WN detections show prominent emission lines and an admixture of cool (kT 2 keV) plasma. The hotter plasma is not predicted by radiative wind shock models and other as yet unidentified mechanisms are at work. Most stars show X-ray absorption in excess of that expected from visual extinction (Av), likely due to their strong winds or cold circumstellar gas. Existing data s...

  19. Laboratory Setup for Scanning-Free Grazing Emission X-ray Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, J; Herzog, C; Spanier, M; Grötzsch, D; Lühl, L; Witte, K; Jonas, A; Günther, S; Förste, F; Hartmann, R; Huth, M; Kalok, D; Steigenhöfer, D; Krämer, M; Holz, T; Dietsch, R; Strüder, L; Kanngießer, B; Mantouvalou, I

    2017-02-07

    Grazing incidence and grazing emission X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (GI/GE-XRF) are techniques that enable nondestructive, quantitative analysis of elemental depth profiles with a resolution in the nanometer regime. A laboratory setup for soft X-ray GEXRF measurements is presented. Reasonable measurement times could be achieved by combining a highly brilliant laser produced plasma (LPP) source with a scanning-free GEXRF setup, providing a large solid angle of detection. The detector, a pnCCD, was operated in a single photon counting mode in order to utilize its energy dispersive properties. GEXRF profiles of the Ni-Lα,β line of a nickel-carbon multilayer sample, which displays a lateral (bi)layer thickness gradient, were recorded at several positions. Simulations of theoretical profiles predicted a prominent intensity minimum at grazing emission angles between 5° and 12°, depending strongly on the bilayer thickness of the sample. This information was used to retrieve the bilayer thickness gradient. The results are in good agreement with values obtained by X-ray reflectometry, conventional X-ray fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy measurements and serve as proof-of-principle for the realized GEXRF setup. The presented work demonstrates the potential of nanometer resolved elemental depth profiling in the soft X-ray range with a laboratory source, opening, for example, the possibility of in-line or even in situ process control in semiconductor industry.

  20. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, Luis; O'Neil, Galen C.; Joe, Young I.; Alpert, Bradley K.; Damrauer, Niels H.; Doriese, William B.; Fatur, Steven M.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Jimenez, Ralph; Reintsema, Carl D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Silverman, Kevin L.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Tatsuno, Hideyuki; Ullom, Joel N.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond) time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3 keV ) spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe (2 ,2'-bipyridine)3]2 + and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  1. X-ray Emission Characteristics of Flares Associated with CMEs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malini Aggarwal; Rajmal Jain; A. P. Mishra; P. G. Kulkarni; Chintan Vyas; R. Sharma; Meera Gupta

    2008-03-01

    We present the study of 20 solar flares observed by ``Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)” mission during November 2003 to December 2006 and found associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) seen by LASCO/SOHO mission. In this investigation, X-ray emission characteristics of solar flares and their relationship with the dynamics of CMEs have been presented.We found that the fast moving CMEs, i.e., positive acceleration are better associated with short rise time (< 150 s) flares. However, the velocity of CMEs increases as a function of duration of the flares in both 4.1–10 and 10–20 keV bands. This indicates that the possibility of association of CMEs with larger speeds exists with long duration flare events. We observed that CMEs decelerate with increasing rise time, decay time and duration of the associated X-ray flares. A total 10 out of 20 CMEs under current investigation showed positive acceleration, and 5 of them whose speed did not exceed 589 km/s were associated with short rise time (< 150 s) and short duration (< 1300 s) flares. The other 5 CMEs were associated with long duration or large rise time flare events. The unusual feature of all these positive accelerating CMEs was their low linear speed ranging between 176 and 775 km/s. We do not find any significant correlation between X-ray peak intensity of the flares with linear speed as well as acceleration of the associated CMEs. Based on the onset time of flares and associated CMEs within the observing cadence of CMEs by LASCO, we found that in 16 cases CME preceded the flare by 23 to 1786 s, while in 4 cases flare occurred before the CME by 47 to 685 s. We argue that both events are closely associated with each other and are integral parts of one energy release system.

  2. Hard X-ray sources from miniature plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raspa, V. [Buenos Aires Univ., PLADEMA, CONICET and INFIP (Argentina); Silva, P.; Moreno, J.; Zambra, M.; Soto, L. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile)

    2004-07-01

    As first stage of a program to design a repetitive pulsed radiation generator for industrial applications, two miniature plasma foci have been designed and constructed at the Chilean commission of nuclear energy. The devices operate at an energy level of the order of tens of joules (PF-50 J, 160 nF capacitor bank, 20-35 kV, 32-100 J, {approx} 150 ns time to peak current) and hundred of joules (PF-400 J, 880 nF, 20-35 kV, 176-539 J, {approx} 300 ns time to peak current). Hard X-rays are being studied in these devices operating with hydrogen. Images of metallic plates with different thickness were obtained on commercial radiographic film, Agfa Curix ST-G2, in order to characterize the energy of the hard X-ray outside of the discharge chamber of PF-400 J. An effective energy of the order of 90 keV was measured under those conditions. X ray images of different metallic objects also have been obtained. (authors)

  3. Study of X-ray emission in aluminium z-pinches; Etude de l'emission X dans les plasmas d'aluminium de type Z-pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosch, R. [CEA/DAM-Ile de France, Dept. de Conception et Realisation des Experimentations (DCRE), 91 - Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)]|[Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-07-01

    Previous experiments, at 0.1. TX level, have shown that stability and x-ray emission of fast Z-pinches, could be strongly increased by imploding an aluminium vapor jet onto a very thin coaxial wire. We present here first results of an aluminium Z-pinch, using a similar liner, but at mega-ampere level. The pinch is driven by AMBIORIX high-power facility, a 2 TW,0.5 {omega}, 2 MA, 50 ns pulse-line generator. We study the effect of an aluminium wire and its diameter (20-50 {mu}m) on the implosion dynamics, on x-ray yield on MHD stability of the column at stagnation. Analysis of A1 jet on A1 wire shots demonstrates that x-ray yield due to emission processes in the H- and He- like ionization stages (i.e. the K-shell) is significantly enhanced, relative to that of A1 jet only ones. The wire also leads to better symmetry of the implosion, and to better reproducibility of shots. X-ray signals exhibit two similar pulses, 10 ns in width, 15 ns spaced. To discern spectral origin of both pulses, experiments are realized with stainless steel wire (25 {mu}m in diameter). Results show that liner and wire radial simultaneously and contribute to both pulses. Analysis of a typical A1 jet on A1 wire shot, using detailed collisional-radiative equilibrium (CRE) model is also given in this thesis. View o the pinch at stagnation as a cola-dense core surrounded by a hot-low density corona reproduces all features of the X-ray data. (author)

  4. X-raying hot plasma in solar active regions with the SphinX spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Miceli, M; Gburek, S; Terzo, S; Barbera, M; Collura, A; Sylwester, J; Kowalinski, M; Podgorski, P; Gryciuk, M

    2012-01-01

    The detection of very hot plasma in the quiescent corona is important for diagnosing heating mechanisms. The presence and the amount of such hot plasma is currently debated. The SphinX instrument on-board CORONAS-PHOTON mission is sensitive to X-ray emission well above 1 keV and provides the opportunity to detect the hot plasma component. We analyzed the X-ray spectra of the solar corona collected by the SphinX spectrometer in May 2009 (when two active regions were present). We modelled the spectrum extracted from the whole Sun over a time window of 17 days in the 1.34-7 keV energy band by adopting the latest release of the APED database. The SphinX broadband spectrum cannot be modelled by a single isothermal component of optically thin plasma and two components are necessary. In particular, the high statistics and the accurate calibration of the spectrometer allowed us to detect a very hot component at ~7 million K with an emission measure of ~2.7 x 10^44 cm^-3. The X-ray emission from the hot plasma dominat...

  5. Characterizing X-ray and Radio emission in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary V404 Cygni during Quiescence

    CERN Document Server

    Rana, Vikram; Corbel, Stephane; Tomsick, John A; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Walton, Dominic J; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William; Fuerst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Grefenstette, Brian W; Hailey, Charles; Harrison, Fiona A; Madsen, Kristin K; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Zhang, William W

    2015-01-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg in quiescence. Our coverage with NuSTAR provides the very first opportunity to study the X-ray spectrum of V404 Cyg at energies above 10 keV. The unabsorbed broad-band (0.3-30 keV) quiescent luminosity of the source is 8.9$\\times$10$^{32}$ erg s$^{-1}$ for a distance of 2.4 kpc. The source shows clear variability on short time scales in radio, soft X-ray and hard X-ray bands in the form of multiple flares. The broad-band X-ray spectra obtained from XMM-Newton and NuSTAR can be characterized with a power-law model having photon index {\\Gamma}=2.13$\\pm$0.07 (90% confidence errors); however, residuals at high energies indicate spectral curvature significant at a 3{\\sigma} confidence level with e-folding energy of the cutoff to be 19$^{+19}_{-7}$ keV. Such curvature can be explained using synchrotron emission from the base of a jet outflow. Radio observations using the JVLA reveal that the sp...

  6. Hard X-ray Emission From A Flare-related Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Hazel; Fletcher, L.

    2009-05-01

    Solar X-ray jets were first observed by Yohkoh (Shibata 1992, Strong 1992). During these events, collimated flows of plasma are accelerated in the corona. Previous observations have detected jet-related electrons directly in space as well as via radio signatures (type III bursts). However the major diagnostic of fast electrons is bremsstrahlung X-ray emission, but until now we have never seen any evidence of hard X-ray emission directly from the jet in the corona. This could be because it is rare to find a coronal jet dense enough to provide a bremsstrahlung target for the electrons, or hot enough to generate high energy thermal emission. We report what we believe to be the first observation of hard X-ray emission formed in a coronal jet. The event occurred on the 22nd of August 2002 and its evolution was observed by a number of instruments. In particular we study the pre-impulsive and impulsive phase of the flare using data from RHESSI, TRACE and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph. During this period RHESSI observed significant hard X-ray emission to energies as high as 50 keV in the jet. Radio observations from the Nobeyama Radioheliograph show a positive spectral index for the ejected material, which may be explained by optically-thick gyrosynchrotron emission from non-thermal electrons in the jet. HMB gratefully acknowledges the support of an SPD and STFC studentship. LF gratefully acknowledges the support of an STFC Rolling Grant, and financial support by the European Commission through the SOLAIRE Network (MTRN-CT_2006-035484)

  7. Extranuclear X-ray Emission in the Edge-on Seyfert Galaxy NGC 2992

    CERN Document Server

    Colbert, E J M; Veilleux, S; Weaver, K A; Colbert, Edward J. M.; Strickland, David K.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Weaver, Kimberly A.

    2005-01-01

    We found several extranuclear (r >~ 3") X-ray nebulae within 40" (6.3 kpc at 32.5 Mpc) of the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 2992. The net X-ray luminosity from the extranuclear sources is ~2-3 E39 erg/s (0.3-8.0 keV). The X-ray core itself (r <~ 1") is positioned at 9:45:41.95 -14:19:34.8 (J2000) and has a remarkably simple power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma=1.86 and Nh=7E21 /cm2. The near-nuclear (3" <~ r <~ 18") Chandra spectrum is best modelled by three components: (1) a direct AGN component with Gamma fixed at 1.86, (2) cold Compton reflection of the AGN component, and (3) a 0.5 keV low-abundance (Z < 0.03 Zsolar) "thermal plasma," with ~10% of the flux of either of the first two components. The X-ray luminosity of the 3rd component (the "soft excess") is ~1.4E40 erg/s, or ~5X that of all of the detected extranuclear X-ray sources. We suggest that most (~75-80%) of the soft excess emission originates from 1" < r < 3", which is not imaged in our observation due to severe CCD p...

  8. Quasi Periodic Oscillations and Strongly Comptonized X-ray emission from Holmberg IX X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Dewangan, G C; Rao, A R

    2006-01-01

    We report the discovery of a 200mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the X-ray emission from a bright ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) Holmberg IX X-1 using a long XMM-Newton observation. The QPO has a centroid at 202.5_{-3.8}^{+4.9}mHz, a coherence Q ~9.3 and an amplitude (rms) of 6% in the 0.2-10keV band. This is only the second detection of a QPO from an ULX, after M82 X-1, and provides strong evidence against beaming. The power spectrum is well fitted by a power law with an index of ~0.7. The total integrated power (rms) is ~9.4% in the 0.001-1Hz range. The X-ray spectrum shows clear evidence for a soft X-ray excess component that is well described by a multicolor disk blackbody (kT_in ~ 0.3keV) and a high energy curvature that can be modeled either by a cut-off power law (Gamma ~ 1; E_cutoff ~9keV) or as a strongly Comptonized continuum in an optically thick (tau ~7.3) and cool (kT_e ~3keV) plasma. Both the presence of the QPO and the shape of the X-ray spectrum strongly suggest that the ULX is not i...

  9. Chandra X-ray Grating Spectrometry of Eta Carinae near X-ray Minimum: I. Variability of the Sulfur and Silicon Emission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, D. B.; Corcoran, M. F.; Pittard, J. M.; Stevens, I. R.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T. R.

    2008-01-01

    We report on variations in important X-ray emission lines in a series of Chandra grating spectra of the supermassive colliding wind binary star eta Car, including key phases around the X-ray minimum/periastron passage in 2003.5. The X-rays arise from the collision of the slow, dense wind of eta Car with the fast, low-density wind of an otherwise hidden companion star. The X-ray emission lines provide the only direct measure of the flow dynamics of the companion's wind along the wind-wind collision zone. We concentrate here on the silicon and sulfur lines, which are the strongest and best resolved lines in the X-ray spectra. Most of the line profiles can be adequately fit with symmetric Gaussians with little significant skewness. Both the silicon and sulfur lines show significant velocity shifts and correlated increases in line widths through the observations. The R = forbidden-to-intercombination ratio from the Si XIII and S XV triplets is near or above the low-density limit in all observations, suggesting that the line-forming region is > 1.6 stellar radii from the companion star, and that the emitting plasma may be in a non-equilibrium state. We show that simple geometrical models cannot simultaneously fit both the observed centroid variations and changes in line width as a function of phase. We show that the observed profiles can be fitted with synthetic profiles with a reasonable model of the emissivity along the wind-wind collision boundary. We use this analysis to help constrain the line formation region as a function of orbital phase, and the orbital geometry. Subject headings: X-rays: stars -stars: early-type-stars: individual (q Car)

  10. Strongly absorbed quiescent X-ray emission from the X-ray transient XTE J0421+56

    CERN Document Server

    Boirin, L; Lumb, D H; Orlandini, M; Schartel, N

    2002-01-01

    We have observed the soft X-ray transient XTE J0421+56 in quiescence with XMM-Newton. The observed spectrum is highly unusual being dominated by a broad feature at 6.5 keV and can be modeled by a strongly absorbed continuum. The spectra of X-ray transients observed so far are normally modeled using Advection Dominated Accretion Flow models, black-bodies, power-laws, or by the thermal emission from a neutron star surface. The strongly absorbed X-ray emission of XTE J0421+56 could result from the compact object being embedded within the dense circumstellar wind emitted from the supergiant B[e] companion star.

  11. Transient X-ray Emission from Normal Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, A Y L; Cheng, K S

    2007-01-01

    X-ray transients appeared in optically non-active galactic nuclei have been observed in recent years. The most popular model explaining this kind of phenomena is the conventional tidal disruption model. In this model, when a star moves within the tidal radius of a black hole, part of the star materials will fall into the black hole through an accretion disk, which gives rise to the luminous flare. We propose that the X-ray emission may not necessarily come from radiation of the accretion disk. Instead, it may be related to a jet. As the jet travels in the interstellar medium, a shock is produced and synchrotron radiation is expected. We compared the model light curve and the synchrotron radiation spectrum with the observed data, and find that our model explains the observed light curve and late-time spectrum well. Our model predicts that these transient active galactic nuclei could be sources of the future gamma-ray satellites, e.g. GLAST and the emission region will be expanding with time.

  12. A comparison of X-ray and radio emission from the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A

    CERN Document Server

    Keohane, J W; Anderson, M C; Keohane, Jonathan W; Rudnick, Lawrence; Anderson, Martha C

    1996-01-01

    We compare the radio and soft X-ray brightness as a function of position within the young supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. A moderately strong correlation (r = 0.7) was found between the X-ray emission (corrected for interstellar absorption) and radio emission, showing that the thermal and relativistic plasmas occupy the same volumes and are regulated by common underlying parameters. The logarithmic slope of the relationship, ln(Sx-ray) = 1.2 x Sradio + ln(k) implies that the variations in brightness are primarily due to path length differences. The X-ray and radio emissivities are both high in the same general locations, but their more detailed relationship is poorly constrained and probably shows significant scatter. The strongest radio and X-ray absorption is found at the western boundary of Cas A. Based on the properties of Cas A and the absorbing molecular cloud, we argue that they are physically interacting. We also compare ASCA derived column densities with 21 cm H I and 18 cm OH optical depths in the d...

  13. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE WOLF-RAYET BUBBLE S 308

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toala, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Arthur, S. J. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Morelia, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Smith, R. C. [NOAO/CTIO, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Snowden, S. L., E-mail: toala@iaa.es [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    The Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble S 308 around the WR star HD 50896 is one of the only two WR bubbles known to possess X-ray emission. We present XMM-Newton observations of three fields of this WR bubble that, in conjunction with an existing observation of its northwest quadrant, map most of the nebula. The X-ray emission from S 308 displays a limb-brightened morphology, with a central cavity {approx}22' in size and a shell thickness of {approx}8'. This X-ray shell is confined by the optical shell of ionized material. The spectrum is dominated by the He-like triplets of N VI at 0.43 keV and O VII at 0.57 keV, and declines toward high energies, with a faint tail up to 1 keV. This spectrum can be described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma emission model (T{sub 1} {approx} 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K, T{sub 2} {approx} 13 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K), with a total X-ray luminosity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} at the assumed distance of 1.5 kpc.

  14. G346.6-0.2: The Mixed-Morphology Supernova Remnant with Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Ng, Stephen C.-Y.; Wong, B. T. T.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) provides us with a unique window into studying particle acceleration at the shock-front. All of the 14 or so SNRs in which non-thermal X-ray synchrotron emission has been detected are shell-like in nature, and show no evidence of interaction with large nearby molecular clouds. Here we present a new X-ray study of the molecular cloud interacting mixed-morphology (MM) SNR G346.6-0.2 using XMM-Newton. We found that the X-ray emission arises from a cool recombining plasma with subsolar abundances, confirming previous Suzaku results. In addition, we identified an additional power-law component in the spectrum, with a photon index of ˜2. We investigated its possible origin and conclude that it most likely arises from synchrotron emission produced by particles accelerated at the shock. This makes G346.6-0.2 an important new object in the class of synchrotron emitting SNRs, as unlike shell type X-ray synchrotron SNRs, MM SNRs are usually thought to have shock velocities that are effectively too slow to accelerate electrons. The dense environment and nature of the remnant, provide conditions unseen in shell type X-ray synchrotron SNRs, providing a unique opportunity to study the effect that these properties have on the production of X-ray synchrotron emission.

  15. Weak Hard X-ray Emission from Broad Absorption Line Quasars: Evidence for Intrinsic X-ray Weakness

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, B; Alexander, D M; Stern, D; Teng, S H; Arévalo, P; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Farrah, D; Gandhi, P; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Koss, M; Ogle, P; Puccetti, S; Saez, C; Scott, A E; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z=0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

  16. Development of single frame X-ray framing camera for pulsed plasma experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Upadhyay; J A Chakera; C P Navathe; P A Naik; A S Joshi; P D Gupta

    2006-10-01

    A single-frame X-ray framing camera has been set up for fast imaging of X-ray emissions from pulsed plasma sources. It consists of two parts, viz. an X-ray pin-hole camera using an open-ended microchannel plate (MCP) detector coupled to a CCD camera, and a high voltage short duration gate pulse for the MCP. The camera uses a 10-m pin-hole aperture for imaging on the MCP detector with a magnification of 6X. The high voltage pulser circuit generates a pulse of variable duration from 5 to 30 ns (at 70% of peak amplitude) with variable amplitude from 800 V to 1·25 kV, and is triggered through a laser pulse synchronized with the event to be recorded. The performance of the system has been checked by recording X-ray emission from a laser-produced copper plasma. A reduction factor of ∼6·5 is seen in the dark current contribution as the MCP gate pulse is decreased from 250s to 5 ns duration.

  17. Weak hard X-ray emission from broad absorption line quasars: evidence for intrinsic X-ray weakness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Scott, A. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Alexander, D. M.; Gandhi, P. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Teng, S. H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Comastri, A. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Harrison, F. A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Koss, M. [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Ogle, P. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Puccetti, S. [ASDC—ASI, Via del Politecnico, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Saez, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); and others

    2014-10-10

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z < 1.3. However, their rest-frame ≈2 keV luminosities are 14 to >330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three are not detected. The hard X-ray (8-24 keV) weakness observed by NuSTAR requires Compton-thick absorption if these objects have nominal underlying X-ray emission. However, a soft stacked effective photon index (Γ{sub eff} ≈ 1.8) for this sample disfavors Compton-thick absorption in general. The uniform hard X-ray weakness observed by NuSTAR for this and the pilot samples selected with <10 keV weakness also suggests that the X-ray weakness is intrinsic in at least some of the targets. We conclude that the NuSTAR observations have likely discovered a significant population (≳ 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

  18. X-ray Emission from Hot Bubbles in nebulae around Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toalá Sánz, Jesús Alberto

    This thesis presents an observational and numerical study on the X-ray emission related to the formation and evolution from hot bubbles in nebulae around evolved stars. The observational part of this study consists mainly in observations obtained from the X-ray satellites X-ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton) and Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO). We have made use of optical, infrared, and ultraviolet observations that have complemented our results and analysis. These observations have allowed us to study the Wolf-Rayet (WR) nebulae S 308 and NGC 6888 and that around the WR star WR 16. We have also studied the planetary nebulae (PNe) NGC 6543 and Abell 78 (A 78). The X-ray telescopes, XMM-Newton and CXO, have allowed us to study the distribution and physical characteristics of the hot and diffuse gas in the WR nebulae S 308 and NGC 6888 with exquisite detail. Even though the CXO observations do not map entirely NGC 6888, we are able to estimate global parameters of the X-ray emission making use of ROSAT observations. Previous observations performed with were hampered by Suzaku, ROSAT, and ASCA were hampered by a large number of point sources in the line of sight of the nebulae. S 308 was observed with XMM-Newton with four pointings. We have made use of the most up-to-date tools for the analysis of soft and diffuse X-ray emission (the ESAS tasks). We found that in both nebulae the hot gas has a plasma temperature of 1-1.5×10^6 K and it is delineated by the [O III] emission and not the Hα as stated in previous studies. A notable difference between these two WR nebulae is that S 308 has a limb-brightened morphology in the distribution of its hot gas, while NGC 6888 displays three maxima. We have studied the WR nebula around WR 16 with archived XMM-Newton observations. Even though it was expected that diffuse X-ray emission should be detected from a spherical, non-disrupted WR nebula, by comparison with S 308 and NGC 6888, we are not able to detect such emission

  19. Conduction-Zone Measurements Using X-Ray Self-Emission Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. K.; Michel, D. T.; Epstein, R.; Hu, S. X.; Knauer, J. P.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-10-01

    Time-gated soft x-ray self-emission images of directly driven implosions were used to measure the hydrodynamic conditions between the critical-density surface and the ablation front of a CH target (conduction zone) at the beginning of a laser pulse. These images were calibrated using the time-resolved broadband soft x-ray spectrometer Dante, azimuthally averaged to reduce the noise, and Abel-inverted to determine the emissivity at each point in the plasma. The electron temperature was determined using co-timed images taken with three different filters to obtain a coarse measurement of the emission spectrum at each point. With the temperature determined, the density profile in the corona was determined from the emissivity profile. This measurement is critical for inertial confinement fusion since it governs the length of time that the plasma is too small to provide substantial beam smoothing through thermal conduction, determining the laser imprint efficiency. This region has previously proven challenging to probe because the density is too high for optical diagnostics and the temperature is too high for x-ray radiography. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  20. X-ray Emission Spectroscopy of Biomimetic Mn Coordination Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Scott C; Davis, Katherine M; Sullivan, Brendan; Hartzler, Daniel A; Seidler, Gerald T; Casa, Diego M; Kasman, Elina; Colmer, Hannah E; Massie, Allyssa A; Jackson, Timothy A; Pushkar, Yulia

    2017-06-15

    Understanding the function of Mn ions in biological and chemical redox catalysis requires precise knowledge of their electronic structure. X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is an emerging technique with a growing application to biological and biomimetic systems. Here, we report an improved, cost-effective spectrometer used to analyze two biomimetic coordination compounds, [Mn(IV)(OH)2(Me2EBC)](2+) and [Mn(IV)(O)(OH)(Me2EBC)](+), the second of which contains a key Mn(IV)═O structural fragment. Despite having the same formal oxidation state (Mn(IV)) and tetradentate ligands, XES spectra from these two compounds demonstrate different electronic structures. Experimental measurements and DFT calculations yield different localized spin densities for the two complexes resulting from Mn(IV)-OH conversion to Mn(IV)═O. The relevance of the observed spectroscopic changes is discussed for applications in analyzing complex biological systems such as photosystem II. A model of the S3 intermediate state of photosystem II containing a Mn(IV)═O fragment is compared to recent time-resolved X-ray diffraction data of the same state.

  1. Superorbital modulation of X-ray emission from gamma-ray binary LSI +61 303

    CERN Document Server

    Chernyakova, M; Molkov, S; Malyshev, D; Lutovinov, A; Pooley, G; 10.1088/2041-8205/747/2/L29

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of a systematic constant time lag between the X-ray and radio flares of the gamma-ray binary LSI +61 303, persistent over long, multi-year, time scale. Using the data of monitoring of the system by RXTE we show that the orbital phase of X-ray flares from the source varies from $\\phi_X\\simeq 0.35$ to $\\phi_X\\simeq 0.75$ on the superorbital 4.6 yr time scale. Simultaneous radio observations show that periodic radio flares always lag the X-ray flare by $\\Delta\\phi_{X-R}\\simeq 0.2$. We propose that the constant phase lag corresponds to the time of flight of the high-energy particle filled plasma blobs from inside the binary to the radio emission region at the distance ~10 times the binary separation distance. We put forward a hypothesis that the X-ray bursts correspond to the moments of formation of plasma blobs inside the binary system.

  2. X-ray emission as a diagnostic from pseudospark-sourced electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowes, D., E-mail: david.bowes@strath.ac.uk [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Yin, H.; He, W.; Zhang, L.; Cross, A.W.; Ronald, K.; Phelps, A.D.R. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Chen, D.; Zhang, P. [Computed Tomography Lab, School of Mathematical Sciences, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Chen, X.; Li, D. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    X-ray emission has been achieved using an electron beam generated by a pseudospark low-pressure discharge and utilised as a diagnostic for beam detection. A 300 A, 34 kV PS-sourced electron beam pulse of 3 mm diameter impacting on a 0.1 mm-thick molybdenum target generated X-rays which were detected via the use of a small, portable X-ray detector. Clear X-ray images of a micro-sized object were captured using an X-ray photodetector. This demonstrates the inducement of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) not only as an indicator of beam presence but also as a future X-ray source for small-spot X-ray imaging of materials.

  3. X-ray emission simulation from hollow atoms produced by high intensity laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Zhidkov, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan); Suto, Keiko [Nara Women' s Univ., Graduate School of Human Culture, Nara (Japan); Kagawa, Takashi [Nara Women' s Univ., Department of Physics, Nara (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    We theoretically study the x-ray emission from hollow atoms produced by collisions of multiply charged ions accelerated by a short pulse laser with a solid or foil. By using the multistep-capture-and-loss (MSCL) model a high conversion efficiency to x-rays in an ultrafast atomic process is obtained. It is also proposed to apply this x-ray emission process to the x-ray source. For a few keV x-rays this x-ray source has a clear advantage. The number of x-ray photons increases as the laser energy becomes larger. For a laser energy of 10 J, the number of x-ray photons of 3x10{sup 11} is estimated. (author)

  4. Soft X-ray emission studies of biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurmaev, E.Z. E-mail: kurmaev@ifmlrs.uran.ru; Werner, J.P.; Moewes, A.; Chiuzbaian, S.; Bach, M.; Ching, W.-Y.; Motozaki, W.; Otsuka, T.; Matsuya, S.; Endo, K.; Neumann, M

    2004-07-01

    Soft X-ray fluorescence measurements are used to characterize three groups of biomaterials: Vitamin B{sub 12} and derivatives, antioxidants (aspirin and paracetamol), and human teeth. We show that the chemical bonding in Vitamin B{sub 12} is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and the relatively weak Co-N bond. The Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is found to be stronger than that of methylcobalamin leading to their different biological activity. The chemical bonding of paracetamol and aspirin is characterized by the formation of oxygen lone-pair {pi}-orbitals, which can neutralize free radicals and therefore be related to antioxidant activity of these compounds. Carbon K{alpha} emission spectra of a caries lesion suggest that the CaCO{sub 3} like phase exists in sound enamel and that a selective loss of carbonate occurs during the early stages of a caries attack.

  5. Radiography using a dense plasma focus device as a source of pulsed X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Julio; Castillo, Fermín; Gamboa, Isabel; Rangel, José

    2007-11-01

    Soft and hard X-ray emissions have been studied in the FN-II, which is a small dense plasma focus machine (5 kJ), operating at the Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, using aluminum filtered pin-hole cameras. Their angular distribution has been measured using TLD-200 dosimeters [1]. Their temporal evolution has been observed by means of a PIN diode, and scinltillators coupled to photomultipliers outside the discharge chamber. The X rays source can be concentrated by placing a needle on the end of the electrode. X-rays crossing across a 300 micron aluminum window, through the axis of the machine, can be used to obtain high contrast radiographs, with an average dose of 0.4 mGy per shot. In contrast, the average dose with a hollow cathode is 0.2 mGy per shot. This work is partially supported by grant IN105705 de la DGAPA-UNAM. [1] F. Castillo, J.J.E. Herrera, J. Rangel, I. Gamboa, G. Espinosa y J.I. Golzarri ``Angular Distribution of fusion products and X-rays emitted by a small dense plasma focus machine'' Journal of Applied Physics 101 013303-1-7 (2007).

  6. Suzaku Observation of Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Petre, Robert; Matsumoti, Hironori; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Holt, Stephan S.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Hideki; Tsuboi, Yohko; Soong, Yang; Kitamoto, Shunji; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Kokubun, Motohide

    2007-01-01

    We studied extended X-ray emission from the Carina Nebula taken with the Suzaku CCD camera XIS on 2005 Aug. 29. The X-ray morphology, plasma temperature and absorption to the plasma are consistent with the earlier Einstein results. The Suzaku spectra newly revealed emission lines from various spices including oxygen, but not from nitrogen. This result restricts the N/O ratio significantly low, compared with evolved massive stellar winds, suggesting that the diffuse emission is originated in an old supernova remnant or a super shell produced by multiple supernova remnants. The X-ray spectra from the north and south of eta Car showed distinct differences between 0.3-2 keV. The south spectrum shows strong L-shell lines of iron ions and K-shell lines of silicon ions, while the north spectrum shows them weak in intensity. This means that silicon and iron abundances are a factor of 2-4 higher in the south region than in the north region. The abundance variation may be produced by an SNR ejecta, or relate to the dust formation around the star forming core.

  7. Suzaku Observation of Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, K; Matsumoto, H; Tsujimoto, M; Holt, S S; Ezoe, Y; Ozawa, H; Tsuboi, Y; Soong, Y; Kitamoto, S; Sekiguchi, A; Kokubun, M; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Petre, Robert; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Holt, Stephan S.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Hideki; Tsuboi, Yohko; Soong, Yang; Kitamoto, Shunji; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Kokubun, Motohide

    2006-01-01

    We studied extended X-ray emission from the Carina Nebula taken with the Suzaku CCD camera XIS on 2005 Aug. 29. The X-ray morphology, plasma temperature and absorption to the plasma are consistent with the earlier Einstein results. The Suzaku spectra newly revealed emission lines from various species including oxygen, but not from nitrogen. This result restricts the N/O ratio significantly low, compared with evolved massive stellar winds, suggesting that the diffuse emission is originated in an old supernova remnant or a super shell produced by multiple supernova remnants. The X-ray spectra from the north and south of Eta Carinae showed distinct differences between 0.3-2 keV. The south spectrum shows strong L-shell lines of iron ions and K-shell lines of silicon ions, while the north spectrum shows them weak in intensity. This means that silicon and iron abundances are a factor of 2-4 higher in the south region than in the north region. The abundance variation may be produced by an SNR ejecta, or relate to th...

  8. Some Like it Hot: The X-Ray Emission of The Giant Star YY Mensae

    CERN Document Server

    Audard, M; Güdel, M; Skinner, S L; Pallavicini, R; Mitra-Kraev, U; Audard, Marc; Telleschi, Alessandra; Guedel, Manuel; Skinner, Stephen L.; Pallavicini, Roberto; Mitra-Kraev, Urmila

    2004-01-01

    (Abridged abstract) We present an analysis of the X-ray emission of the rapidly rotating giant star YY Mensae observed by Chandra HETGS and XMM-Newton. Although no obvious flare was detected, the X-ray luminosity changed by a factor of two between the XMM-Newton and Chandra observations taken 4 months apart. The coronal abundances and the emission measure distribution have been derived from three different methods using optically thin collisional ionization equilibrium models. The abundances show an inverse first ionization potential (FIP) effect. We further find a high N abundance which we interpret as a signature of material processed in the CNO cycle. The corona is dominated by a very high temperature (20-40 MK) plasma, which places YY Men among the magnetically active stars with the hottest coronae. Lower temperature plasma also coexists, albeit with much lower emission measure. Line broadening is reported, which we interpret as Doppler thermal broadening, although rotational broadening due to X-ray emitt...

  9. Extended X-ray Monitoring of Gravitational Lenses with Chandra and Joint Constraints on X-ray Emission Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Guerras, Eduardo; Steele, Shaun; Liu, Ang; Kochanek, Christopher S; Chartas, George; Morgan, Christopher W; Chen, Bin

    2016-01-01

    We present an X-ray photometric analysis of six gravitationally lensed quasars spanning from 5 to 14 years, measuring the total (0.83-21.8 keV restframe), soft (0.83-3.6 keV), and hard (3.6-21.8 keV) band image flux ratios for each epoch. Using the ratios of the model-predicted macro-magnifications as baselines, we build differential microlensing curves and obtain joint likelihood functions for the average X-ray emission region sizes. Our analysis yields a Probability Distribution Function for the average half-light radius of the X-Ray emission region in the sample that peaks slightly above 1 gravitational radius, and yields nearly indistinguishable 68 % confidence (one-sided) upper limits of 17.8 (18.9) gravitational radii for the soft (hard) X-ray emitting region, assuming a mean stellar mass of 0.3 solar masses. We see hints of energy dependent microlensing between the soft and hard bands in two of the objects. In a separate analysis on the root-mean-square (RMS) of the microlensing variability, we find si...

  10. X-ray Spectroscopic Characterization of Shock-Ignition-Relevant plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Šmíd

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments with multilayer plastic/Cu targets performed at a PALS laser system aimed at the study of matter at conditions relevant to a shock ignition ICF scheme, and, in particular, at the investigation of hot electrons generation. Plasma temperature and density were obtained using high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy. 2D-spatially resolved quasi–monochromatic imaging was observing the hot electrons via fluorescence K emission in the copper tracer layer. Found values of plasma temperature 690 ± 10 eV, electron density 3 × 1022 cm-3 and the effective energy of hot electrons 45 ± 20 keV demonstrate the potential of X-ray methods in the characterization of the shock ignition environmental conditions.

  11. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Main; Misra, Ranjeev; Pawar, Pramod K

    2016-01-01

    We study X-ray and UV emission from the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy II~Zw~177 using a $137\\ks$ long and another $13\\ks$ short \\xmm{} observation performed in 2012 and 2001, respectively. Both observations show soft X-ray excess emission contributing $76.9\\pm4.9\\%$ in 2012 and $58.8\\pm10.2\\%$ in 2001 in the $0.3-2\\kev$ band. We find that both blurred reflection from an ionized disc and Comptonized disc emission describe the observed soft excess well. Time-resolved spectroscopy on scales of $\\sim20\\ks$ reveals strong correlation between the soft excess and the powerlaw components. The fractional variability amplitude $F_{var}$ derived from EPIC-pn lightcurves at different energy bands is nearly constant ($F_{var} \\sim20\\%$). This is in contrast to other AGNs where the lack of short term variation in soft X-ray excess emission has been attributed to intense light bending in the framework of the "lamppost" model. Thus, the variations in powerlaw emission are most likely intrinsic to corona rather than just due t...

  12. High-intensity X-rays interaction with matter processes in plasmas, clusters, molecules and solids

    CERN Document Server

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P

    2012-01-01

    Filling the need for a book bridging the effect of matter on X-ray radiation and the interaction of x-rays with plasmas, this monograph provides comprehensive coverage of the topic. As such, it presents and explains such powerful new X-ray sources as X-ray free-electron lasers, as well as short pulse interactions with solids, clusters, molecules, and plasmas, and X-ray matter interactions as a diagnostic tool. Equally useful for researchers and practitioners working in the field.

  13. Enhancement of x-ray yields from heteronuclear cluster plasmas irradiated by intense laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, J; Mathur, D; Krishnamurthy, M [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2005-09-28

    We report a new method to enhance the x-ray emission from nano-cluster plasmas formed upon irradiation by intense femtosecond-duration laser pulses. Our experiments demonstrate that when Ar clusters are doped with H{sub 2}O the time-integrated yield of Ar K x-ray emission is enhanced by approximately 12-fold in comparison to that obtained from pure Ar clusters under otherwise identical experimental conditions. A significant alteration in the time-dependent electron density is achieved by the presence of an H{sub 2}O dopant, and this could be the possible reason for the enhancement that is observed. (letter to the editor)

  14. X-RAY EMISSION FROM STELLAR JETS BY COLLISION AGAINST HIGH-DENSITY MOLECULAR CLOUDS: AN APPLICATION TO HH 248

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Santiago, J.; Ustamujic, S.; Castro, A. I. Gómez de [S. D. Astronomía y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Bonito, R.; Orlando, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Orellana, M. [Sede Andina de la Universidad Nacional de Río Negro (Argentina); Miceli, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Sede Atlántica de la Universidad Nacional de Río Negro, Don Bosco y Leloir s/n, 8500 Viedma RN (Argentina); Castro, E. de [Dpto. de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Facultad de Física, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-06-10

    We investigate the plausibility of detecting X-ray emission from a stellar jet that impacts a dense molecular cloud, a scenario that may be typical for classical T Tauri stars with jets in dense star-forming complexes. We first model the impact of a jet against a dense cloud using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations, exploring different configurations of the ambient environment. Then, we compare our results with XMM-Newton observations of the Herbig–Haro object HH 248, where extended X-ray emission aligned with the optical knots is detected at the edge of the nearby IC 434 cloud. Our simulations show that a jet can produce plasma with temperatures up to 10{sup 7} K, consistent with production of X-ray emission, after impacting a dense cloud. We find that jets denser than the ambient medium but less dense than the cloud produce detectable X-ray emission only at impact with the cloud. From an exploration of the model parameter space, we constrain the physical conditions (jet density and velocity and cloud density) that reproduce the intrinsic luminosity and emission measure of the X-ray source possibly associated with HH 248 well. Thus, we suggest that the extended X-ray source close to HH 248 corresponds to a jet impacting a dense cloud.

  15. The cosmic X-ray background-IRAS galaxy correlation and the local X-ray volume emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Lahav, Ofer; Jahoda, Keith; Boldt, Elihu

    1994-01-01

    We have cross-correlated the galaxies from the IRAS 2 Jy redshift survey sample and the 0.7 Jy projected sample with the all-sky cosmic X-ray background (CXB) map obtained from the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) 1 A-2 experiment. We have detected a significant correlation signal between surface density of IRAS galaxies and the X-ray background intensity, with W(sub xg) = (mean value of ((delta I)(delta N)))/(mean value of I)(mean value of N)) of several times 10(exp -3). While this correlation signal has a significant implication for the contribution of the local universe to the hard (E greater than 2 keV) X-ray background, its interpretation is model-dependent. We have developed a formulation to model the cross-correlation between CXB surface brightness and galaxy counts. This includes the effects of source clustering and the X-ray-far-infrared luminosity correlation. Using an X-ray flux-limited sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), which has IRAS 60 micrometer measurements, we have estimated the contribution of the AGN component to the observed CXB-IRAS galaxy count correlations in order to see whether there is an excess component, i.e., contribution from low X-ray luminosity sources. We have applied both the analytical approach and Monte Carlo simulations for the estimations. Our estimate of the local X-ray volume emissivity in the 2-10 keV band is rho(sub x) approximately = (4.3 +/- 1.2) x 10(exp 38) h(sub 50) ergs/s/cu Mpc, consistent with the value expected from the luminosity function of AGNs alone. This sets a limit to the local volume emissivity from lower luminosity sources (e.g., star-forming galaxies, low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs)) to rho(sub x) less than or approximately = 2 x 10(exp 38) h(sub 50) ergs/s/cu Mpc.

  16. Highly enhanced hard x-ray emission from oriented metal nanorod arrays excited by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sudipta; Chakraborty, Indrani; Ahmad, Saima; Carvalho, Daniel; Singh, Prashant; Lad, Amit D.; Narayanan, V.; Ayyub, Pushan; Kumar, G. Ravindra; Zheng, J.; Sheng, Z. M.

    2011-01-01

    We report a 43-fold enhancement in the hard x-ray emission (in the 150-300 keV range) from copper nanorod arrays (compared to a polished Cu surface) when excited by 30-fs, 800-nm laser pulses with an intensity of 1016 W/cm2. The temperature of the hot electrons that emit the x rays is 11 times higher. Significantly, the x-ray yield enhancement is found to depend on both the aspect ratio as well as the cluster size of the nanorods. We show that the higher yield arises from enhanced laser absorption owing to the extremely high local electric fields around the nanorod tips. Particle-in-cell plasma simulations reproduce these observations and provide pointers to further optimization of the x-ray emission.

  17. Non-thermal x-ray emission from wire array z-pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ampleford, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hansen, Stephanie B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jennings, Christopher Ashley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Webb, Timothy Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper-Slaboszewicz, V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Loisel, Guillaume Pascal [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flanagan, Timothy McGuire [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bell, Kate Suzanne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Brent M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McPherson, Leroy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rochau, Gregory A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chittenden, Jeremy P. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Sherlock, Mark [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Appelbe, Brian [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Giuliani, John [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States); Ouart, Nicholas [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States); Seely, John [Artep Inc., Ellicott City, MD (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We report on experiments demonstrating the transition from thermally-dominated K-shell line emission to non-thermal, hot-electron-driven inner-shell emission for z pinch plasmas on the Z machine. While x-ray yields from thermal K-shell emission decrease rapidly with increasing atomic number Z, we find that non-thermal emission persists with favorable Z scaling, dominating over thermal emission for Z=42 and higher (hn ≥ 17keV). Initial experiments with Mo (Z=42) and Ag (Z=47) have produced kJ-level emission in the 17-keV and 22-keV Kα lines respectively. We will discuss the electron beam properties that could excite these non - thermal lines. We also report on experiments that have attempted to control non - thermal K - shell line emission by modifying the wire array or load hardware setup.

  18. Do some AGN lack X-ray emission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, C.; Bauer, F. E.; Thuan, T. X.; Izotov, Y. I.; Stern, D.; Harrison, F. A.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) are thought to be the seeds of early supermassive black holes (SMBHs). While ≳100 IMBH and small SMBH candidates have been identified in recent years, few have been robustly confirmed to date, leaving their number density in considerable doubt. Placing firmer constraints both on the methods used to identify and confirm IMBHs/SMBHs, as well as characterizing the range of host environments that IMBHs/SMBHs likely inhabit is therefore of considerable interest and importance. Additionally, finding significant numbers of IMBHs in metal-poor systems would be particularly intriguing, since such systems may represent local analogs of primordial galaxies, and therefore could provide clues of early accretion processes. Aims: Here we study in detail several candidate active galactic nuclei (AGN) found in metal-poor hosts. Methods: We utilize new X-ray and optical observations to characterize these metal-poor AGN candidates and compare them against known AGN luminosity relations and well-characterized IMBH/SMBH samples. Results: Despite having clear broad optical emission lines that are long-lived (≳10-13 yr), these candidate AGN appear to lack associated strong X-ray and hard UV emission, lying at least 1-2 dex off the known AGN correlations. If they are IMBHs/SMBHs, our constraints imply that they either are not actively accreting, their accretion disks are fully obscured along our line-of-sight, or their accretion disks are not producing characteristic high energy emission. Alternatively, if they are not AGN, then their luminous broad emission lines imply production by extreme stellar processes. The latter would have profound implications on the applicability of broad lines for mass estimates of massive black holes. The reduced spectra (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A64

  19. Performance Optimization of a High-Repetition-Rate KrF Laser Plasma X-Ray Source for Microlithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukerk, F; Louis, E; Turcu, E C; Tallents, G J; Batani, D

    1992-01-01

    In order to develop a high-intensity laser plasma x-ray source appropriate for industrial application of x-ray lithography, experiments have been carried out using a high-repetition-rate (up to 40 Hz) excimer laser (249 nm, 300 mJ) with a power density of 2 × 1013 W/ cm2 in the laser focus. In this study emphasis is given to remedying specific problems inherent in operating the laser plasma x-ray source at high repetition rates and in its prolonged operation. Two different methods of minimizing the production of target debris are investigated. First, the use of helium as a quenching gas results in a reduction of the amount of atomic debris particles by more than two orders of magnitude with negligible x-ray absorption. Second, a tape target as opposed to a solid target reduces the production of larger debris particles by a further factor of 100. Remaining debris is stopped by an aluminized plastic or beryllium filter used to avoid exposure of the resist by plasma ultraviolet radiation. The x-ray source has been used to image x-ray transmission mask structures down to 0.3 μm onto general purpose x-ray photo-resist. Results have been analyzed with SEM. The x-ray emission spectrum of the repetitive laser plasmas created from an iron target has been recorded and the conversion efficiency of the laser light into x-rays that contribute to exposure of the resist was measured to be 0.3% over 2π sr.

  20. Prompt and afterglow X-ray emission from the X-Ray Flash of 2002 April 27

    CERN Document Server

    Amati, L; in 't Zand, J J M; Capalbi, M; Landi, R; Soffitta, P; Vetere, L; Antonelli, L A; Costa, E; Del Sordo, S; Feroci, M; Guidorzi, C; Heise, J; Masetti, N; Montanari, E; Nicastro, L; Palazzi, E; Piro, L

    2004-01-01

    We report on the X-ray observations of the X-ray flash (XRF) which occurred on 2002 April 27, three days before BeppoSAX was switched off. The event was detected with the BeppoSAX Wide Field Cameras but not with the Gamma ray Burst Monitor. A follow-up observation with the BeppoSAX Narrow Field Instruments was soon performed and a candidate afterglow source was discovered. We present the results obtained. We also include the results obtained from the observations of the XRF field with the Chandra X-ray satellite. The spectral analysis of the prompt emission shows that the peak energy of the EF(E) spectrum is lower than 5.5 keV, with negligible spectral evolution. The X-ray afterglow spectrum is consistent with a power law model with photon index of about 2, while the 2-10 keV flux fades as a power law with a decay index -1.33. Both these indices are typical of GRBs. A very marginal excess around 4.5-5 keV is found in the afterglow spectrum measured by BeppoSAX . As for many GRBs, the extrapolation of the 2-10...

  1. Resonant K-alpha spectroscopy of a hot dense plasma created by the LCLS x-ray free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byoung-Ick; Engelhorn, K.; Falcone, R. W.; Heimann, P. A.; Vinko, S. M.; Ciricosta, O.; Higginbotham, A.; Murphy, C.; Wark, J. S.; Chung, H.-K.; Brown, C. R. D.; Burian, T.; Vysin, L.; Juha, L.; Lee, H. J.; Messersmidt, M.; Schlotter, W.; Turner, J.; Nagler, B.; Ping, Y.; Lee, R. W.; Toleikis, S.; Zastrau, U.

    2011-10-01

    We present one of the first experimental studies of the interaction of high intensity x-ray free electron laser radiation with solid density matter. In the experiment performed at the LCLS, an intense 80 fs x-ray pulse at 1017 Wcm-2 with photon energies of 1480 ~ 1560 eV is focused on a thin Al foil and K-alpha emission spectra are observed. Although x-ray photon energy is lower than the absorption edge, because of its high intensity the sample is surprisingly heated up to 100 ~200 eV in the pulse duration and a hot dense plasma is created. Observed x-ray spectra indicate this dense plasma resonantly interacts with the x-ray photons. The emission spectra are also simulated using the collisional-radiative code, SCFLY which provides information about the electron temperature and density, the charge state distribution and opacity. The comparison of experiment and simulation provides a detailed description of a dense plasma resonantly interacting with an intense x-ray pulse.

  2. Superhot-X-ray and -electron transport in high-intensity CO2-laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, G. D.; Burnett, N. H.

    1985-12-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the high-energy (70-400-keV) X-ray emission from CO2 laser-produced plasmas at intensities up to 3 x 10 to the 14th W/sq cm has revealed the presence of a 'superhot' component. The intensity of this component scales very strongly with incident laser intensity. It is expected that for intensities greater than about 5 x 10 to the 15th W/sq cm energy balance in CO2-laser-produced plasmas would be dominated by the energetic electrons responsible for this high-energy X-ray emission.

  3. Study of fast capillary discharge plasma columns for soft x-ray amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Jorge J. G.; Cortazar, O. D.; Szapiro, Benito T.; Tomasel, Fernando G.; Hartshorn, D.

    1994-02-01

    The efficient generation, by a fast discharge, of capillary plasma channels containing Ne-like and Ni-like ions for collisionally excited soft-x-ray lasers is reported. Rapid pulse excitation of capillary channels 1.5 mm in diameter with currents of less than 70 kA produced Ca and Ti plasmas in which atoms are ionized up to the F-like state. Line emission at the wavelengths corresponding to the 3p - 3s and 3d - 3p transitions of Ne-like Ca has been observed.

  4. Low-Energy X-ray Emission from Young Isolated Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ruderman, M

    2003-01-01

    A young neutron star with large spin-down power is expected to be closely surrounded by an e+/- pair plasma maintained by the conversion of gamma-rays associated with the star's polar-cap and/or outer-gap accelerators. Cyclotron-resonance scattering by the e- and e+ within several radii of such neutron stars prevents direct observations of thermal X-rays from the stellar surface. Estimates are presented for the parameters of the Planck-like X-radiation which ultimately diffuses out through this region. Comparisons with observations, especially of apparent blackbody emission areas as a function of neutron star age, support the proposition that we are learning about a neutron star's magnetosphere rather than about its surface from observations of young neutron star thermal X-rays.

  5. High resolution X-ray spherically bent crystal spectrometer for laser-produced plasma diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shali Xiao; Hongjian Wang; Jun Shi; Changhuan Tang; Shenye Liu

    2009-01-01

    A new high spectral resolution crystal spectrometer is designed to measure very low emissive X-ray spectra of laser-produced plasma in 0.5 - 0.9 nm range. A large open aperture (30 x 20 (mm)) mica (002) spherically bent crystal with curvature radius R = 380 mm is used as dispersive and focusing element. The imaging plate is employed to obtain high spectral resolution with effective area of 30 x 80 (mm). The long designed path of the X-ray spectrometer beam is 980 mm from the source to the detector via the crystal. Experiment is carried out at a 20-J laser facility. X-ray spectra in an absolute intensity scale is obtained from Al laser produced plasmas created by laser energy of 6.78 J. Samples of spectra obtained with spectral resolution of up to E/鈻矱 ~ 1500 are presented. The results clearly show that the device is good to diagnose laser high-density plasmas.

  6. Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula Observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    A number of giant HII regions are associated with soft diffuse X-ray emission. Among these, the Carina nebula possesses the brightest soft diffuse emission. The required plasma temperature and thermal energy can be produced by collisions or termination of fast winds from main-sequence or embedded young O stars, but the extended emission is often observed from regions apart from massive stellar clusters. The origin of the X-ray emission is unknown. The XIS CCD camera onboard Suzaku has the best spectral resolution for extended soft sources so far, and is therefore capable of measuring key emission lines in the soft band. Suzaku observed the core and the eastern side of the Carina nebula (Car-D1) in 2005 Aug and 2006 June, respectively. Spectra of the south part of the core and Car-D1 similarly showed strong L-shell lines of iron ions and K-shell lines of silicon ions, while in the north of the core these lines were much weaker. Fitting the spectra with an absorbed thin-thermal plasma model showed kT~0.2, 0.6 k...

  7. Origin of power-law X-ray emission in the steep power-law state of X-ray binaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Hong Yan; Jian-Cheng Wang

    2011-01-01

    We present a new explanation for the origin of the steep power-law (SPL) state of X-ray binaries.The power-law component of X-ray emission is the synchrotron radiation of relativistic electrons in highly magnetized compact spots orbiting near the inner stable circular orbit of a black hole.It has a hard spectrum that extends to above MeV energies, which is determined by the electron acceleration rate.These photons are then down-scattered by the surrounding plasma to form an observed steep spectrum.We discuss the relevance of the model to high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and the extremely high luminosity of the SPL state.

  8. X-ray emission of SNRs in nonuniform medium: properties of thermal and nonthermal spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruk, O.

    2006-05-01

    In this report we consider two effects in the thermal and nonthermal spectra of supernova remnants (SNRs) which could be caused by the nonuniform ISM: i) the mimicry of the thermal X-ray spectrum of SNRs under the nonthermal one and ii) artificial broadening of the high-energy end of the nonthermal X-ray spectrum of SNRs. 1.There is possibility that the nonthermal features in the X-ray spectrum of some supernova remnants may be in fact of the thermal origin. Observed spectrum from SNRs is a superposition of ``individual'' spectra from different small volumes along the line of sight. The plasma is under different conditions in different places in SNR. The thermal X-ray spectrum of emission from a volume with high enough gradients of density and temperature may mimic under nonthermal one. This effect is studied with special attention to the case of supernova remnant evolution in the nonuniform interstellar medium like near molecular cloud. The mimicry-effect may be responsible for the nonthermal properties of X-ray spectra in those SNRs where nonthermal flux in photons with energy nonuniform interstellar medium. Time dependence of the maximum energy of electrons accelerated by the shock is also not able to make the observed spectrum considerably broader. The only possibility to produce broadening in the spectrum is the variation of the maximum energy of electrons over the surface of SNR. In such a case, the obliquity dependence of injection efficiency and/or magnetic field strength make also effect on the shape of the spectrum but their role is of the second order.

  9. K-alpha conversion efficiency measurments for x-ray scattering in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Urry, M K; Robey, H; Niemann, C; Landen, O L; Morse, E; Glenzer, S H

    2006-11-21

    The conversion efficiency of ultra short-pulse laser radiation to K-{alpha} x-rays has been measured for various chlorine-containing targets to be used as x-ray scattering probes of dense plasmas. The spectral and temporal properties of these sources will allow spectrally-resolved x-ray scattering probing with picosecond temporal resolution required for measuring the plasma conditions in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Simulations of x-ray scattering spectra from these plasmas show that fuel capsule density, capsule ablator density, and shock timing information may be inferred.

  10. kHz femtosecond laser-plasma hard X-ray and fast ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoss, A.; Korn, G.; Richardson, M. C.; Faubel, M.; Stiel, H.; Voigt, U.; Siders, C. W.; Elsaesser, T.

    2002-04-01

    We describe the first demonstration of a new stable, kHz femtosecond laser-plasma source of hard x-ray continuum and Kα emission using a thin liquid metallic jet target. kHz femtosecond x-ray sources will find many applications in time-resolved x-ray diffraction and microscopy studies. As high intensity lasers become more compact and operate at increasingly high repetition-rates, they require a target configuration that is both repeatable from shot-to-shot and is debris-free. We have solved this requirement with the use of a fine (10-30 μm diameter) liquid metal jet target that provides a pristine, unperturbed filament surface at rates >100 kHz. A number of liquid metal targets are considered. We will show hard x-ray spectra recorded from liquid Ga targets that show the generation of the 9.3 keV and 10.3 keV, Kα and Kβ lines superimposed on a multi-keV Bremsstrahlung continuum. This source was generated by a 50fs duration, 1 kHz, 2W, high intensity Ti:Sapphire laser. We will discuss the extension of this source to higher powers and higher repetition rates, providing harder x-ray emission, with the incorporation of pulse-shaping and other techniques to enhance the x-ray conversion efficiency. Using the same liquid target technology, we have also demonstrated the generation of forward-going sub-MeV protons from a 10 μm liquid water target at 1 kHz repetition rates. kHz sources of high energy ions will find many applications in time-resolved particle interaction studies, as well as lead to the efficient generation of short-lived isotopes for use in nuclear medicine and other applications. The protons were detected with CR-39 track detectors both in the forward and backward directions up to energies of ~500 keV. As the intensity of compact high repetition-rate lasers sources increase, we can expect improvements in the energy, conversion efficiency and directionality to occur. The impact of these developments on a number of fields will be discussed. As compact

  11. X-ray calculations for a NLTE Ar plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ze-qing; PANG Jin-qiao; HAN Guo-xing

    2004-01-01

    A model is developed to calculate emission spectrum of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium(NLTE) plasmas. The Collisional-Radiative model is adopted for non-LTE population calculations. Configuration-averaged rate coefficients that needed in the rate equations are obtained based on the first order perturbation theory. The Hatree-Fock-Slater self-consistent-field method is used to calculate electron wave functions. The present model is applied to the calculation of emissivity from a Ar plasma. The features of the spectra are in good agreement with those calculated by other theoretical models, but the data of the integrated emissivity differ by a factor 2~8.

  12. Characterizing Hohlraum Plasma Conditions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Using X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Maria Alejandra

    2015-11-01

    Improved hohlraums will have a significant impact on increasing the likelihood of indirect drive ignition at the NIF. In indirect-drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), a high-Z hohlraum converts laser power into a tailored x-ray flux that drives the implosion of a spherical capsule filled with D-T fuel. The x-radiation drive to capsule coupling sets the velocity, adiabat, and symmetry of the implosion. Previous experiments in gas-filled hohlraums determined that the laser-hohlraum energy coupling is 20-25% less than modeled, therefore identifying energy loss mechanisms that reduce the efficacy of the hohlraum drive is central to improving implosion performance. Characterizing the plasma conditions, particularly the plasma electron temperature (Te) , is critical to understanding mechanism that affect the energy coupling such as the laser plasma interactions (LPI), hohlraum x-ray conversion efficiency, and dynamic drive symmetry. The first Te measurements inside a NIF hohlraum, presented here, were achieved using K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of an Mn-Co tracer dot. The dot is deposited on a thin-walled CH capsule, centered on the hohlraum symmetry axis below the laser entrance hole (LEH) of a bottom-truncated hohlraum. The hohlraum x-ray drive ablates the dot and causes it to flow upward, towards the LEH, entering the hot laser deposition region. An absolutely calibrated streaked spectrometer with a line of sight into the LEH records the temporal history of the Mn and Co X-ray emission. The measured (interstage) Lyα/ Heα line ratios for Co and Mn and the Mn-Heα/Co-Heα isoelectronic line ratio are used to infer the local plasma Te from the atomic physics code SCRAM. Time resovled x-ray images perpendicular to the hohlraum axis record the dot expansion and trajectory into the LEH region. The temporal evolution of the measured Te and dot trajectory are compared with simulations from radiation-hydrodynamic codes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U

  13. Evidence of Bulk Acceleration of the GRB X-Ray Flare Emission Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing

    2016-06-01

    Applying our recently developed generalized version of the high-latitude emission theory to the observations of X-ray flares in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), here we present clear observational evidence that the X-ray flare emission region is undergoing rapid bulk acceleration as the photons are emitted. We show that both the observed X-ray flare light curves and the photon index evolution curves can be simultaneously reproduced within a simple physical model invoking synchrotron radiation in an accelerating emission region far from the GRB central engine. Such an acceleration process demands an additional energy dissipation source other than kinetic energy, which points toward a significant Poynting flux in the emission region of X-ray flares. As the X-ray flares are believed to share a similar physical mechanism as the GRB prompt emission, our finding here hints that the GRB prompt emission jets may also carry a significant Poynting flux in their emitting region.

  14. PAHs in protoplanetary disks: emission and X-ray destruction

    CERN Document Server

    Siebenmorgen, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    We study the PAH emission from protoplanetary disks. First, we discuss the dependence of the PAH band ratios on the hardness of the absorbed photons and the temperature of the stars. We show that the photon energy together with a varying degree of the PAH hydrogenation accounts for most of the observed PAH band ratios without the need to change the ionization degree of the molecules. We present an accurate treatment of stochastic heated grains in a vectorized three dimensional Monte Carlo dust radiative transfer code. The program is verified against results using ray tracing techniques. Disk models are presented for T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars. Particular attention is given to the photo-dissociation of the molecules. We consider beside PAH destruction also the survival of the molecules by vertical mixing within the disk. By applying typical X-ray luminosities the model accounts for the low PAH detection probability observed in T Tauri and the high PAH detection statistics found in Herbig Ae disks. Spherical h...

  15. Determination of 198Au X-rays emission probabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, D S; Koskinas, M F; Dias, M S; Yamazaki, I M

    2010-01-01

    This work describes the measurements of the K X-ray and gamma-ray emission probabilities per decay of (198)Au performed at the Nuclear Metrology Laboratory (LMN) at the IPEN, São Paulo. The radioactive sample was obtained by means of (197)Au(n, gamma)(198)Au reaction irradiating an Au foil in a thermal neutron flux near the core of the IPEN 3.5 MW research reactor. The activity of samples was determined in a 4pibeta-gamma coincidence system, setting the gamma window at the 411.80 keV total energy absorption peak. The same samples were measured in two different spectrometers: a HPGe planar spectrometer with Be window, suitable for measurements in the low energy range and a coaxial REGe spectrometer. Both spectrometers were previously calibrated in a well defined geometry by means of standard sources calibrated in a 4pibeta-gamma coincidence system. MCNP4C Monte Carlo code was used for simulating the REGe spectrometer calibration curve, and a new version of code ESQUEMA was adopted for simulating the detection processes in the coincidence system, in order to predict the efficiency extrapolation curve.

  16. The Origin of T Tauri X-ray Emission: New Insights from the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project

    CERN Document Server

    Preibisch, T; Favata, F; Feigelson, E D; Flaccomio, E; Getman, K; Micela, G; Sciortino, S; Stassun, K G; Stelzer, B; Zinnecker, H; Preibisch, Thomas; Kim, Yong -Cheol; Favata, Fabio; Feigelson, Eric D.; Flaccomio, Ettore; Getman, Konstantin; Micela, Giusi; Sciortino, Salvatore; Stassun, Keivan; Stelzer, Beate; Zinnecker, Hans

    2005-01-01

    We use the data of the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) to study the nearly 600 X-ray sources that can be reliably identified with optically well characterized T Tauri stars (TTS) in the Orion Nebula Cluster. We detect X-ray emission from more than 97% of the optically visible late-type (spectral types F to M) cluster stars. This proofs that there is no ``X-ray quiet'' population of late-type stars with suppressed magnetic activity. All TTS with known rotation periods lie in the saturated or super-saturated regime of the relation between activity and Rossby numbers seen for main-sequence (MS) stars, but the TTS show a much larger scatter in X-ray activity than seen for the MS stars. Strong near-linear relations between X-ray luminosities, bolometric luminosities and mass are present. We also find that the fractional X-ray luminosity rises slowly with mass over the 0.1 - 2 M_sun range. The plasma temperatures determined from the X-ray spectra of the TTS are much hotter than in MS stars, but seem to follo...

  17. X-ray emission from charge exchange of highly-charged ions in atoms and molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge exchange followed by radiative stabilization are the main processes responsible for the recent observations of X-ray emission from comets in their approach to the Sun. A new apparatus was constructed to measure, in collisions of HCIs with atoms and molecules, (a) absolute cross sections for single and multiple charge exchange, and (b) normalized X-ray emission cross sections.

  18. Discovery of extended X-ray emission around the highly magnetic RRAT J1819-1458

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rea, N.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Gaensler, B.M.; Slane, P.O.; Stella, L.; Reynolds, S.P.; Burgay, M.; Israel, G.L.; Possenti, A.; Chatterjee, S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the discovery of extended X-ray emission around the high magnetic field rotating radio transient J1819-1458. Using a 30 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation, we found significant evidence for extended X-ray emission with a peculiar shape: a compact region out to similar to 5.'' 5, and more dif

  19. Is optical Fe II emission related to the soft X-ray properties of quasars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Elvis, Martin; Mchardy, Ian

    1987-01-01

    Radio-quiet quasars generally show broad, blended multiplets of Fe II emission in their optical and UV spectra. Radio-loud quasars also show UV Fe II emission, but their optical Fe II emission is generally weaker. No satisfactory theory connecting the generation of Fe II and radio emission has been found to explain this effect. A second, well-established distinction between the two clases of quasar is in their X-ray properties: radio-loud quasars are more X-ray luminous, and recent results have shown that they also have systematically flatter soft X-ray slopes. Here it is proposed that the second effect causes the first; i.e., that the primary factor controlling the optical Fe II emission is the soft X-ray spectrum. This proposition is supported by X-ray and optical data for nine quasars, which shows a correlation between the soft X-ray slope and the strength of the optical Fe II emission. One of these quasars (1803+676) is radio-quiet, and yet its optical spectrum shows no evidence for Fe II emission. This quasar is also unusual in that it has a flat X-ray spectrum. This further supports the proposal that the X-ray spectrum is important in determining the relative strengths of UV and optical Fe II emission.

  20. X-ray Magnetosheath Emission from Solar Wind Charge Exchange During Two CME Events in 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembay, S.; Whittaker, I. C.; Read, A.; Carter, J. A.; Milan, S. E.; Palmroth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Using a combination of the GUMICS-4 MHD model and observed solar wind heavy ion abundances from ACE, we produce case studies looking at X-ray emission from charge exchange in the Earth's magnetosheath. We specifically look in the 0.5-0.7 keV range, which is dominated by highly ionised oxygen emission. Previous studies looking at solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission have verified our modelling process via comparison to the XMM-Newton X-ray observatory, and we use the same simulation process here. This study investigates the emission magnitude changes that occur during two coronal mass ejection (CME) events (31 March 2001 and 21 October 2001). As part of this work we also provide a novel masking technique to exclude the plasma of terrestrial origin in the MHD model. As expected the two CME cases examined provide an increased dynamic pressure which pushes the magnetopause closer to the Earth, with a high temporal variation. We show how these changes cause an increase in the peak SWCX emission signature by over an order of magnitude from the quiescent solar wind case. Imaging of this SWCX emission allows a global view of the magnetopause shape and position, a technique planned for future missions such as SMILE (Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer).

  1. THE CHANDRA PLANETARY NEBULA SURVEY (ChanPlaNS). III. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE CENTRAL STARS OF PLANETARY NEBULAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montez, R. Jr. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37212 (United States); Kastner, J. H.; Freeman, M. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); and others

    2015-02-10

    We present X-ray spectral analysis of 20 point-like X-ray sources detected in Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey observations of 59 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood. Most of these 20 detections are associated with luminous central stars within relatively young, compact nebulae. The vast majority of these point-like X-ray-emitting sources at PN cores display relatively ''hard'' (≥0.5 keV) X-ray emission components that are unlikely to be due to photospheric emission from the hot central stars (CSPN). Instead, we demonstrate that these sources are well modeled by optically thin thermal plasmas. From the plasma properties, we identify two classes of CSPN X-ray emission: (1) high-temperature plasmas with X-ray luminosities, L {sub X}, that appear uncorrelated with the CSPN bolometric luminosity, L {sub bol} and (2) lower-temperature plasmas with L {sub X}/L {sub bol} ∼ 10{sup –7}. We suggest these two classes correspond to the physical processes of magnetically active binary companions and self-shocking stellar winds, respectively. In many cases this conclusion is supported by corroborative multiwavelength evidence for the wind and binary properties of the PN central stars. By thus honing in on the origins of X-ray emission from PN central stars, we enhance the ability of CSPN X-ray sources to constrain models of PN shaping that invoke wind interactions and binarity.

  2. High energy X-ray emission from recurrent novae in quiescence: T CrB

    CERN Document Server

    Luna, Gerardo J M; Mukai, Koji

    2007-01-01

    We present Suzaku X-ray observations of the recurrent nova T CrB in quiescence. T CrB is the first recurrent nova to be detected in the hard-X-ray band (E ~ 40.0 keV) during quiescence. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with cooling-flow emission emanating from an optically thin region in the boundary layer of an accretion disk around the white dwarf. The detection of strong stochastic flux variations in the light curve supports the interpretation of the hard X-ray emission as emanating from a boundary layer.

  3. On the X-Ray emission of Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, Alvaro

    2007-01-01

    Recent data gathered and triggered by the SWIFT satellite have greatly improved our knowledge of long-duration gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs). This is particularly the case for the X-ray data at all times. We show that the entire X-ray observations are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the `cannonball' model of GRBs and XRFs, which are based on simple physics and were published long before the launch of SWIFT. Two mechanisms underlie these predictions: inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron radiation, generally dominant at early and late times, respectively. The former mechanism provides a unified description of the gamma-ray peaks, X-ray flares and even the optical `humps' seen in some favourable cases; i.e. their very different durations, fluxes and peak-times are related precisely as predicted. The observed smooth or bumpy fast decay of the X-ray light curve is correctly described case-by-case, in minute detail. The `canonical' X-ray plateau, as well as the subsequent gra...

  4. Opacity effects in a solid-density aluminium plasma created by photo-excitation with an X-ray laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackstraw, D. S.; Vinko, S. M.; Ciricosta, O.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Chung, H.-K.; Brown, C. R. D.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Falcone, R. W.; Graves, C.; Hájková, V.; Higginbotham, A.; Juha, L.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, H. J.; Messerschmidt, M.; Murphy, C.; Ping, Y.; Scherz, A.; Schlotter, W.; Toleikis, S.; Turner, J. J.; Vysin, L.; Wang, T.; Wu, B.; Zastrau, U.; Zhu, D.; Nagler, B.; Lee, R. W.; Heimann, P. A.; Wark, J. S.

    2014-06-01

    The intensities within the focal spots of the output of recently developed X-ray sources based on free-electron-laser (FEL) technology are so great that atoms within the focal region can potentially absorb several photons during the few tens of femtosecond X-ray pulse. Furthermore, the duration of the FEL X-ray pulse is comparable to the Auger decay times of inner-shell holes created by the X-rays themselves. We report here how such a scenario can lead to opacity broadening of the fluorescence radiation emitted by the hot, dense plasma, which is created as a result of the X-radiation focussed onto a solid target, and in particular present calculations of the broadening of the Kα emission in a solid-density aluminium target, produced when the FEL photon energy is tuned below the Al K-edge, but is resonant with the Kα transition.

  5. Diagnosing Pulsed Power Produced Plasmas with X-ray Thomson Scattering at the Nevada Terawatt Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, J. C.; Krauland, C.; Mariscal, D.; Krasheninnikov, I.; Beg, F. N.; Wiewior, P.; Covington, A.; Presura, R.; Ma, T.; Niemann, C.; Mabey, P.; Gregori, G.

    2015-11-01

    We present experimental results on X-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) to study current driven plasmas. Using the Leopard laser, ~ 30 J and pulse width of 0.8 ns, we generated He- α emission (4.75 keV) from a thin Ti foil. Initial parameter scans showed that the optimum intensity is ~ 1015W/cm2 with a foil thickness of 2 μm for forward X-ray production. Bandwidth measurements of the source, using a HAPG crystal in the Von Hamos configuration, were found to be ΔE/E ~ 0.01. Giving the scattering angle of our experimental setup of 129 degrees and X-ray probing energy, the non-collective regime was accessed. The ZEBRA load was a 3 mm wide, 500 μm thick, and 10 mm long graphite foil, placed at one of the six current return posts. Estimates of the plasma temperature, density and ionization state were made by fitting the scattering spectra with dynamic structure factor calculations based on the random phase approximation for the treatment of charged particle coupling. The work was partially funded by the Department of Energy grant number DE-NA0001995.

  6. A Novel Spectrometer for Measuring Laser-Produced Plasma X-Ray in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Gang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the experimental investigations of inertial confinement fusion, the laser-produced high-temperature plasma contains very abundant information, such as the electron temperature and density, ionization. In order to diagnose laser-plasma distribution in space and evolution in time, an elliptical curved crystal spectrometer has been developed and applied to diagnose X-ray of laser-produced plasma in 0.2~2.46 nm region. According to the theory of Bragg diffraction, four kinds of crystal including LiF, PET, MiCa, and KAP were chosen as dispersive elements. The distance of crystal lattice varies from 0.4 to 2.6 nm. Bragg angle is in the range of 30°~67.5°, and the spectral detection angle is in 55.4°~134°. The curved crystal spectrometer mainly consists of elliptical curved crystal analyzer, vacuum configuration, aligning device, spectral detectors and three-dimensional microadjustment devices. The spectrographic experiment was carried out on the XG-2 laser facility. Emission spectrum of Al plasmas, Ti plasma, and Au plasmas have been successfully recorded by using X-ray CCD camera. It is demonstrated experimentally that the measured wavelength is accorded with the theoretical value.

  7. Detection of X-ray Emission from the Eastern Radio Lobe of PICTOR A

    CERN Document Server

    Grandi, P; Maraschi, L; Morganti, R; Fusco-Femiano, R; Fiocchi, M; Ballo, L; Tavecchio, F; Grandi, Paola; Guainazzi, Matteo; Maraschi, Laura; Morganti, Raffaella; Fusco-Femiano, Roberto; Fiocchi, Mariateresa; Ballo, Lucia; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2003-01-01

    The XMM-Newton satellite has revealed extended X-ray emission from the eastern radio lobe of the Fanaroff-Riley II Radio Galaxy Pictor A. The X-ray spectrum, accumulated on a region covering about half the entire radio lobe, is well described by both a thermal model and a power law. The X-ray emission could be thermal and produced by circum-galactic gas shocked by the expanding radio lobe or, alternatively, by Inverse Compton (IC) of cosmic microwave background photons by relativistic electrons in the lobe. The latter possibility seems to be supported by the good agreement between the lobe-average synchrotron radio index and the X-ray energy slope. However, if this is the case, the magnetic field, as deduced from the comparison of the IC X-ray and radio fluxes, is more than a factor 2 below the equipartition value estimated in the same X-ray region.

  8. X-ray Diagnostics of Thermal Conditions of the Hot Plasmas in the Centaurus Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, I; Makishima, K; Matsushita, K; Fukazawa, Y; Ikebe, Y; Kitaguchi, T; Kokubun, M; Nakazawa, K; Okuyama, S; Ota, N; Tamura, T

    2009-01-01

    X-ray data of the Centaurus cluster, obtained with {\\it XMM-Newton} for 45 ksec, were analyzed. Deprojected EPIC spectra from concentric thin shell regions were reproduced equally well by a single-phase plasma emission model, or by a two-phase model developed by {\\it ASCA}, both incorporating cool (1.7--2.0 keV) and hot ($\\sim 4$ keV) plasma temperatures. However, EPIC spectra with higher statistics, accumulated over 3-dimentional thick shell regions, were reproduced better by the two-phase model than by the singe-phase one. Therefore, hot and cool plasma phases are inferred to co-exist in the cluster core region within $\\sim 70$ kpc. The iron and silicon abundances of the plasma were reconfirmed to increase significantly towards the center, while that of oxygen was consistent with being radially constant. The implied non-solar abundance ratios explains away the previously reported excess X-ray absorption from the central region. Although an additional cool ($\\sim 0.7$ keV) emission was detected within $\\sim ...

  9. Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Broad Absorption Line Quasars: Evidence for Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z 330 times weaker than...... expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL...... quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three...

  10. A Suzaku Search for Dark Matter Emission Lines in the X-ray Brightest Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Urban, O; Allen, S W; Simionescu, A; Kaastra, J S; Strigari, L E

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a search for unidentified emission lines in deep Suzaku X-ray spectra for the central regions of the four X-ray brightest galaxy clusters: Perseus, Coma, Virgo and Ophiuchus. We employ an optimized energy range for our analysis (3.2-5.3 keV) that is relatively free of instrumental features, and a baseline plasma emission model that incorporates the abundances of elements with the strongest expected emission lines at these energies (S, Ar, Ca) as free parameters. For the Perseus Cluster core, employing this baseline model, we find evidence for an additional emission feature at an energy $3.51^{+0.02}_{-0.01}$ keV with a flux of ~$2.87\\times10^{-7}$ ph/s/cm^2/arcmin^2. At slightly larger radii, we detect an emission line at 3.59+/-0.02 keV with a flux of ~$4.8\\times10^{-8}$ ph/s/cm^2/arcmin^2. The energies and fluxes of these features are broadly consistent with previous claims, although the radial variation of the line strength appears in tension with standard dark matter (DM) model p...

  11. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng, Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5×10)...

  12. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoul, Matthieu

    2010-09-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are a powerful tool to investigate atomic motions triggered by femtosecond pump pulses. This thesis is dedicated to the production of such pulses and their use in optical pump - X-ray probe measurement. This thesis describes the laser-plasma-based sources available at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Part of it consists of the description of the design, built-up and characterization of a new ''modular'' X-ray source dedicated to optimize the X-ray flux onto the sample under investigation. The acoustic wave generation in femtosecond optically excited semiconductor (gallium arsenide) and metal (gold) was performed using the sources of the University of Duisburg-Essen. The physical answer of the material was modeled by a simple strain model for the semiconductor, pressure model for the metal, in order to gain information on the interplay of the electronic and thermal pressures rising after excitation. Whereas no reliable information could be obtain in gallium arsenide (principally due to the use of a bulk), the model for gold achieved very good agreement, providing useful information. The relaxation time of the electron to lattice energy was found to be (5.0{+-}0.3) ps, and the ratio of the Grueneisen parameters was found to be {gamma}{sub e} / {gamma}{sub i} = (0.5{+-}0.1). This thesis also describes the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) which existed at the (formally) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, an accelerator-based X-ray source, and two measurements performed with it. The first one is the detailed investigation of the phonon softening of the A{sub 1g} mode launch in bismuth upon fluence excitation. Detailed information concerning the new equilibrium position and phonon frequency were obtained over extended laser pump fluences. The second measurement concerned the study of the liquid phase dynamics in a newly formed liquid phase following ultrafast melting in indium antimonide. The formation of the liquid phase

  13. X-ray emission on hybird stars: ROSAT observations of alpha Trianguli Australis and iota Aurigae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, V.; Rosner, R.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.

    1994-01-01

    We report on deep ROSAT observations of two Hybrid atmosphere stars, alpha TrA and iota Aur, and our analysis of these observations. We detect high-energy transient phenomena on alpha TrA and consider the implications of this discovery to the atmospheres of Hybrid stars. We detect iota Aur in the high-energy passband of ROSAT, implying the existence of multimillion degree plasma on the star. Our major results include the following: discovery of two large flare events, detected during pointed observations of alpha TrA; the demonstration that the flare emission most likely comes from the giant itself, rather than from a previously unseen low-mass companion star; the demonstration that the plasma characteristics associated with the flares and with the 'quiescent' component are essentially indistinguishable; and that the geometric dimensions of the emitting plasma are considerably smaller than the critical dimension characterizing stable 'hot' coronal loop structures. Our results suggest that alpha TrA does not have any steady X-ray emission consistent with theoretical expectations, and support the argument that Hybrid stars constitute a transitional type of object in which large-scale magnetic dynamo activity ceases, and the dominant spatial scales characterizing coronal structure rapidly decline as such stars evolve across the X-ray 'Dividing Line' in the H-R diagram.

  14. Echo Emission From Dust Scattering and X-Ray Afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, L; Mirabal, N

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the effect of X-ray echo emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We find that the echo emission can provide an alternative way of understanding X-ray shallow decays and jet breaks. In particular, a shallow decay followed by a "normal" decay and a further rapid decay of X-ray afterglows can be together explained as being due to the echo from prompt X-ray emission scattered by dust grains in a massive wind bubble around a GRB progenitor. We also introduce an extra temporal break in the X-ray echo emission. By fitting the afterglow light curves, we can measure the locations of the massive wind bubbles, which will bring us closer to finding the mass loss rate, wind velocity, and the age of the progenitors prior to the GRB explosions.

  15. X-Ray Emission from the Halo of M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); DiStefano, Rosanne

    2004-01-01

    Our goal was to use short (10 ksec) observations of selected fields in the halo of M31, to determine the size and characteristics of its X-ray population and to study the connection between globular clusters and X-ray sources. The program of observations has yet to be successfully completed. We received acceptable data from just 2 of the 5 approved fields. Nevertheless, the results were intriguing and we have submitted a paper based on this data to Nature. We find that the X-ray source density is significantly enhanced in the vicinity of one GC, providing the first observational evidence supporting the ejection hypothesis. We also find additional X-ray sources, including some which are very soft, in large enough numbers to suggest that not all could have been formed in GCs. That is, some must be descended from the same primordial halo population that produced any compact stars comprising part of the halo's dark matter. Extrapolating fiom the X-ray source population, we estimate that stellar remnants and dim old stars in the halo could comprise as much as 25% of the estimated mass (approx. 10(exp 12) Solar Mass) of the halo. These results suggest that the other approved fields should be observed soon and also provide strong motivation for the future XMM-Newton programs.

  16. Multi-energy x-ray detector calibration for Te and impurity density (nZ) measurements of MCF plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Efthimion, P.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rissi, M.; Donath, T.; Luethi, B.; Stratton, B.

    2016-11-01

    Soft x-ray detection with the new "multi-energy" PILATUS3 detector systems holds promise as a magnetically confined fusion (MCF) plasma diagnostic for ITER and beyond. The measured x-ray brightness can be used to determine impurity concentrations, electron temperatures, ne 2 Z eff products, and to probe the electron energy distribution. However, in order to be effective, these detectors which are really large arrays of detectors with photon energy gating capabilities must be precisely calibrated for each pixel. The energy-dependence of the detector response of the multi-energy PILATUS3 system with 100 K pixels has been measured at Dectris Laboratory. X-rays emitted from a tube under high voltage bombard various elements such that they emit x-ray lines from Zr-Lα to Ag-Kα between 1.8 and 22.16 keV. Each pixel on the PILATUS3 can be set to a minimum energy threshold in the range from 1.6 to 25 keV. This feature allows a single detector to be sensitive to a variety of x-ray energies, so that it is possible to sample the energy distribution of the x-ray continuum and line-emission. PILATUS3 can be configured for 1D or 2D imaging of MCF plasmas with typical spatial energy and temporal resolution of 1 cm, 0.6 keV, and 5 ms, respectively.

  17. Observation of iron spin-states using tabletop x-ray emission spectroscopy and microcalorimeter sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Y. I.; O'Neil, G. C.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Fowler, J. W.; Jimenez, R.; Silverman, K. L.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful probe of the electronic and chemical state of elemental species embedded within complex compounds. X-ray sensors that combine high resolving power and high collecting efficiency are desirable for photon-starved XES experiments such as measurements of dilute, gaseous, and radiation-sensitive samples, time-resolved measurements, and in-laboratory XES. To assess whether arrays of cryogenic microcalorimeters will be useful in photon-starved XES scenarios, we demonstrate that these emerging energy-dispersive sensors can detect the spin-state of 3d electrons of iron in two different compounds, Fe2O3 and FeS2. The measurements were conducted with a picosecond pulsed laser-driven plasma as the exciting x-ray source. The use of this tabletop source suggests that time-resolved in-laboratory XES will be possible in the future. We also present simulations of {{K}}α and {{K}}β spectra that reveal the spin-state sensitivity of different combinations of sensor resolution and accumulated counts. These simulations predict that our current experimental apparatus can perform time-resolved XES measurements on some samples with a measurement time of a few 10 s of hours per time delay.

  18. The 300 Kpc Long X-Ray Jet in PKS 1127-145, Z=1.18 Quasar: Constraining X-Ray Emission Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Stawarz, Lukasz; /Heidelberg Observ. /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Cheung, C.C.; /KIPAC,; Harris, D.E.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Sikora, Marek; /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Bechtold,; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.

    2006-11-20

    We present a {approx} 100 ksec Chandra X-ray observation and new VLA radio data of the large scale, 300 kpc long X-ray jet in PKS 1127-145, a radio loud quasar at redshift z=1.18. With this deep X-ray observation we now clearly discern the complex X-ray jet morphology and see substructure within the knots. The X-ray and radio jet intensity profiles are seen to be strikingly different with the radio emission peaking strongly at the two outer knots while the X-ray emission is strongest in the inner jet region. The jet X-ray surface brightness gradually decreases by an order of magnitude going out from the core. The new X-ray data contain sufficient counts to do spectral analysis of the key jet features. The X-ray energy index of the inner jet is relatively flat with {alpha}{sub x} = 0.66 {+-} 0.15 and steep in the outer jet with {alpha}{sub x} = 1.0 {+-} 0.2. We discuss the constraints implied by the new data on the X-ray emission models and conclude that ''one-zone'' models fail and at least a two component model is needed to explain the jet's broad-band emission. We propose that the X-ray emission originates in the jet proper while the bulk of the radio emission comes from a surrounding jet sheath. We also consider intermittent jet activity as a possible cause of the observed jet morphology.

  19. Discovery of X-ray emission from young suns in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Oskinova, L M; Evans, C J; Hénault-Brunet, V; Chu, Y -H; Gallagher, J S; Guerrero, M A; Gruendl, R A; Güdel, M; Silich, S; Chen, Y; Nazé, Y; Hainich, R; Reyes-Iturbide, J

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of extended X-ray emission within the young star cluster NGC 602 in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) based on observations obtained with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. X-ray emission is detected from the cluster core area with the highest stellar density and from a dusty ridge surrounding the HII region. We use a census of massive stars in the cluster to demonstrate that a cluster wind or wind-blown bubble is unlikely to provide a significant contribution to the X-ray emission detected from the central area of the cluster. We therefore suggest that X-ray emission at the cluster core originates from an ensemble of low- and solar-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars, each of which would be too weak in X-rays to be detected individually. We attribute the X-ray emission from the dusty ridge to the embedded tight cluster of the new-born stars known in this area from infrared studies. Assuming that the levels of X-ray activity in young stars in the low-metallicity environment of NG...

  20. EVIDENCE OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM HH 80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Santiago, J. [Instituto de Matemática Interdisciplinar, S. D. Astronomía y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Miceli, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monseñor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Río Negro (Argentina); De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-20

    Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s{sup –1}, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to non-thermal processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock.

  1. Simulation of Soft X-ray Emission Lines from the Missing Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, T; Sanders, W T; Houck, J; Davé, R; Katz, N; Weinberg, D H; Hernquist, L

    2003-01-01

    We study the soft X-ray emission (0.1 - 1 keV) from the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) in a hydrodynamic simulation of a Cold Dark Matter universe. Our main goal is to investigate how such emission can be explored with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy, and to motivate future X-ray missions. We first present high resolution images of the X-ray emission in several energy bands, in which emission from different ion species dominates. We pick three different areas to study the high resolution spectra of X-rays from the warm-hot IGM: (a) a galaxy group; (b) a filament and (c) an underluminous region. By taking into account the background X-ray emission from AGNs and foreground emission from the Galaxy, we compute composite X-ray spectra of the selected regions. We briefly investigate angular clustering of the soft-X-ray emission, finding a strong signal. Most interestingly, the combination of high spectral resolution and angular information allows us to map the emission from the WHIM in 3 dimensions...

  2. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G32.8-0.1 WITH SUZAKU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamba, Aya; Sawada, Makoto [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University 5-10-1 Fuchinobe Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Terada, Yukikatsu [Department of Physics, Science, Saitama University, Sakura, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Hewitt, John; Petre, Robert; Angelini, Lorella [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Safi-Harb, Samar [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Zhou, Ping [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Bocchino, Fabrizio [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134, Palermo (Italy)

    2016-02-10

    We present the first dedicated X-ray study of the supernova remnant (SNR) G32.8−0.1 (Kes 78) with Suzaku. X-ray emission from the whole SNR shell has been detected for the first time. The X-ray morphology is well correlated with the emission from the radio shell, while anti-correlated with the molecular cloud found in the SNR field. The X-ray spectrum shows not only conventional low-temperature (kT ∼ 0.6 keV) thermal emission in a non-equilibrium ionization state, but also a very high-temperature (kT ∼ 3.4 keV) component with a very low ionization timescale (∼2.7 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −3} s), or a hard nonthermal component with a photon index Γ ∼ 2.3. The average density of the low-temperature plasma is rather low, of the order of 10{sup −3}–10{sup −2} cm{sup −3}, implying that this SNR is expanding into a low-density cavity. We discuss the X-ray emission of the SNR, also detected in TeV with H.E.S.S., together with multi-wavelength studies of the remnant and other gamma-ray emitting SNRs, such as W28 and RCW 86. Analysis of a time-variable source, 2XMM J185114.3−000004, found in the northern part of the SNR, is also reported for the first time. Rapid time variability and a heavily absorbed hard-X-ray spectrum suggest that this source could be a new supergiant fast X-ray transient.

  3. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM YOUNG SUNS IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Hainich, R. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Sun, W.; Chen, Y. [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 Jiangsu (China); Evans, C. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Henault-Brunet, V. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Gallagher, J. S. III [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 5534 Sterling, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Guedel, M. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Silich, S. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica, AP 51, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Naze, Y. [GAPHE, Departement AGO, Universite de Liege, Allee du 6 Aout 17, Bat. B5C, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Reyes-Iturbide, J. [LATO-DCET/Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Rodovia Jorge Amado, km 16, 45662-000 Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of extended X-ray emission within the young star cluster NGC 602a in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) based on observations obtained with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. X-ray emission is detected from the cluster core area with the highest stellar density and from a dusty ridge surrounding the H II region. We use a census of massive stars in the cluster to demonstrate that a cluster wind or wind-blown bubble is unlikely to provide a significant contribution to the X-ray emission detected from the central area of the cluster. We therefore suggest that X-ray emission at the cluster core originates from an ensemble of low- and solar-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars, each of which would be too weak in X-rays to be detected individually. We attribute the X-ray emission from the dusty ridge to the embedded tight cluster of the newborn stars known in this area from infrared studies. Assuming that the levels of X-ray activity in young stars in the low-metallicity environment of NGC 602a are comparable to their Galactic counterparts, then the detected spatial distribution, spectral properties, and level of X-ray emission are largely consistent with those expected from low- and solar-mass PMS stars and young stellar objects (YSOs). This is the first discovery of X-ray emission attributable to PMS stars and YSOs in the SMC, which suggests that the accretion and dynamo processes in young, low-mass objects in the SMC resemble those in the Galaxy.

  4. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Hai-En; Shaw, Joseph; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V; Shvets, G; Downer, M C

    2014-01-01

    We present results of the first tunable Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the easily aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The LPA is driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses, and produces high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit efficiently retro-reflects the LPA driving pulse with relativistic intensity into oncoming electrons to produce $2\\times10^{7}$ CBS x-ray photons per shot with 10-20 mrad angular divergence and 50 % (FWHM) energy spread without detectable bremsstrahlung background. The x-ray central energy is tuned from 75 KeV to 200 KeV by tuning the LPA e-beam central energy. Particle-in-cell simulations of the LPA, the drive pulse/PM interaction and CBS agree well with measurements.

  5. Hard X-ray and Infrared Emission from Apparently Single White Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Y H; Guerrero, M A; Su, K Y L

    2007-01-01

    The photospheric emission of a white dwarf (WD) is not expected to be detectable in hard X-rays or the mid-IR. Hard X-ray (~1 keV) emission associated with a WD is usually attributed to a binary companion; however, emission at 1 keV has been detected from three WDs without companions: KPD 0005+5106, PG 1159, and WD 2226-210. The origin of their hard X-ray emission is unknown, although it has been suggested that WD 2226-210 has a late-type companion whose coronal activity is responsible for the hard X-rays. Recent Spitzer observations of WD 2226-210 revealed mid-IR excess emission indicative of the existence of a dust disk. It now becomes much less clear whether WD 2226-210's hard X-ray emission originates from the corona of a late-type companion or from the accretion of the disk material. High-quality X-ray observations and mid-IR observations of KPD 0005+5106 and PG 1159 are needed to help us understand the origin of their hard X-ray emission.

  6. X-Ray Emission from the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Galeazzi, E U M

    2006-01-01

    The number of detected baryons in the Universe at z<0.5 is much smaller than predicted by standard big bang nucleosynthesis and by the detailed observation of the Lyman alpha forest at red-shift z=2. Hydrodynamical simulations indicate that a large fraction of the baryons today is expected to be in a ``warm-hot'' (10^5-10^7K) filamentary gas, distributed in the intergalactic medium. This gas, if it exists, should be observable only in the soft X-ray and UV bands. Using the predictions of a particular hydrodynamic model, we simulated the expected X-ray flux as a function of energy in the 0.1-2 keV band due to the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM), and compared it with the flux from local and high red-shift diffuse components. Our results show that as much as 20% of the total diffuse X-ray background (DXB) in the energy range 0.37-0.925keV could be due to X-ray flux from the WHIM, 70% of which comes from filaments at redshift z between 0.1 and 0.6. Simulations done using a FOV of 3', comparable with that ...

  7. X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    During the last two decades, remarkable and often spectacular progress has been made in the methodological and instrumental aspects of x–ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. This progress includes considerable technological improvements in the design and production of detectors especially with the development and expansion of large-scale synchrotron reactors All this has resulted in improved analytical performance and new applications, as well as in the perspective of a dramatic enhancement in the potential of x–ray based analysis techniques for the near future. This comprehensive two-volume treatise features articles that explain the phenomena and describe examples of X–ray absorption and emission applications in several fields, including chemistry, biochemistry, catalysis, amorphous and liquid systems, synchrotron radiation, and surface phenomena. Contributors explain the underlying theory, how to set up X–ray absorption experiments, and how to analyze the details of the resulting spectra. X-R...

  8. THE CLOSE T TAURI BINARY SYSTEM V4046 Sgr: ROTATIONALLY MODULATED X-RAY EMISSION FROM ACCRETION SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argiroffi, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Maggio, A.; Damiani, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Montmerle, T. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis bd Arago, FR-75014 Paris (France); Huenemoerder, D. P. [MIT, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Alecian, E. [Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, 5, place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France); Audard, M. [ISDC Data Center for Astrophysics, University of Geneva, Ch. d' Ecogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Bouvier, J. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, F-38041, Grenoble (France); Donati, J.-F. [IRAP-UMR 5277, CNRS and Universite de Toulouse, 14 Av. E. Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Gregory, S. G. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guedel, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Vienna, Trkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Hussain, G. A. J. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Kastner, J. H.; Sacco, G. G., E-mail: argi@astropa.unipa.it [Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    We report initial results from a quasi-simultaneous X-ray/optical observing campaign targeting V4046 Sgr, a close, synchronous-rotating classical T Tauri star (CTTS) binary in which both components are actively accreting. V4046 Sgr is a strong X-ray source, with the X-rays mainly arising from high-density (n{sub e}{approx} 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}) plasma at temperatures of 3-4 MK. Our multi-wavelength campaign aims to simultaneously constrain the properties of this X-ray-emitting plasma, the large-scale magnetic field, and the accretion geometry. In this paper, we present key results obtained via time-resolved X-ray-grating spectra, gathered in a 360 ks XMM-Newton observation that covered 2.2 system rotations. We find that the emission lines produced by this high-density plasma display periodic flux variations with a measured period, 1.22 {+-} 0.01 d, that is precisely half that of the binary star system (2.42 d). The observed rotational modulation can be explained assuming that the high-density plasma occupies small portions of the stellar surfaces, corotating with the stars, and that the high-density plasma is not azimuthally symmetrically distributed with respect to the rotational axis of each star. These results strongly support models in which high-density, X-ray-emitting CTTS plasma is material heated in accretion shocks, located at the base of accretion flows tied to the system by magnetic field lines.

  9. STELLAR WIND INDUCED SOFT X-RAY EMISSION FROM CLOSE-IN EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kislyakova, K. G.; Lammer, H. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz (Austria); Fossati, L. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie der Universität Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Johnstone, C. P. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Holmström, M. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden); Zaitsev, V. V., E-mail: kristina.kislyakova@oeaw.ac.at [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-30

    In this Letter, we estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX), which produces soft X-ray emission, is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are emitted as a result of the charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. In the solar system, comets produce X-rays mostly through the SWCX mechanism, but it has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus, and the Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not very effective for the solar system giants. Here we present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar giant planets due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈10{sup 22} erg s{sup –1}, which is 10{sup 6} times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss also the possibility of observing the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  10. Stelllar wind induced soft X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislyakova, Kristina; Fossati, Luca; Johnstone, Colin P.; Holmström, Mats; Zaitsev, Valery V.; Lammer, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    We estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX) which produces soft X-ray radiation is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are produces by charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. This mechanism is know to generate X-ray emission of comets in the Solar system. It has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus and Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not effective for the Solar system giants. We present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar Hot Jupiters due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈ 1022 erg s-1, which is 106 times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss the possibility to observe the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  11. Laser-Plasma Sources for Soft-X-Ray Projection Lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Bijkerk,; Shmaenok, L.; Vanhonk, A.; Bastiaensen, R.; Platonov, Y. Y.; Shevelko, A. P.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Voss, F.; Desor, R.; Frowein, H.; Nikolaus, B.

    1994-01-01

    Results are reported concerning high-repetition-rate excimer lasers with average powers up to 415 W and their usage for generating laser-plasma soft X-ray sources. A conversion efficiency of laser light into monochromatized soft X-ray radiation of 0.7% at 13.5 nm (2% bandwidth) was achieved using an

  12. Laser-Plasma Sources for Soft-X-Ray Projection Lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Bijkerk,; Shmaenok, L.; Vanhonk, A.; Bastiaensen, R.; Platonov, Y. Y.; Shevelko, A. P.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Voss, F.; Desor, R.; Frowein, H.; Nikolaus, B.

    1994-01-01

    Results are reported concerning high-repetition-rate excimer lasers with average powers up to 415 W and their usage for generating laser-plasma soft X-ray sources. A conversion efficiency of laser light into monochromatized soft X-ray radiation of 0.7% at 13.5 nm (2% bandwidth) was achieved using an

  13. BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey II: X-ray Emission and High Ionization Optical Emission Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Berney, Simon; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Ricci, Claudio; Lamperti, Isabella; Schawinski, Kevin; Balokovic, Mislav; Crenshaw, D Michael; Fischer, Travis; Gehrels, Neil; Harrison, Fiona; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ichikawa, Kohei; Mushotzky, Richard; Oh, Kyuseok; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between X-ray and optical line emission in 340 nearby AGN selected above 10 keV using Swift BAT. We find a weak correlation between the extinction corrected [O III] and hard X-ray luminosity (14-195 keV) with a [OIII] large scatter (R_Pear = 0.64, sigma = 0.62 dex) and a similarly large scatter with the intrinsic 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosities (RPear=0.63, sigma = 0.63 dex). Correlations of the hard X-ray fluxes with the fluxes of high-ionization narrow lines ([O III], He II, [Ne III] and [Ne V]) are not significantly better than with the low ionization lines (Halpha, [SII]). Factors like obscuration or physical slit size are not found to be a significant part of the large scatter. In contrast, the optical emission lines show much better correlations with each other (sigma = 0.3 dex) than with the X-ray flux. The inherent large scatter questions the common usage of narrow emission lines as AGN bolometric luminosity indicators and suggests that other issues such as geometrical...

  14. Development of low-energy x-ray fluorescence micro-distribution analysis using a laser plasma x-ray source and multilayer optics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuik, R.; Shmaenok, L. A.; Fledderus, H.; Andreev, S. S.; Shamov, E. A.; Zuev, S. Y.; Salashchenko, N. N.; F. Bijkerk,

    1999-01-01

    A new technique is presented for low-energy X-ray fluorescence micro-distribution analysis of low-Z elements at micrometer spatial resolutions. The technique is based on the use of a laser plasma X-ray source and spherically curved multilayer optics. A large collimator is used to focus the light fro

  15. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adjei, Daniel, E-mail: nana.adjeidan@gmail.com [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2, Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Radiation Protection Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2, Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Vyšín, Luděk [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Engineering Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 152, Radzikowskiego Str., 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Pina, Ladislav [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Engineering Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Davídková, Marie [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Řež (Czech Republic); Juha, Libor [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray “water window” spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280–540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 10{sup 3} photons/μm{sup 2}/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms’ sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the “water window”, where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET – Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  16. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  17. Suzaku Detection of Diffuse Hard X-Ray Emission outside Vela X

    CERN Document Server

    Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Bamba, Aya; Miceli, Marco; Hewitt, John W; Temim, Tea; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Yoshii, Rie

    2011-01-01

    Vela X is a large, 3x2 degrees, radio-emitting pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by the Vela pulsar in the Vela supernova remnant. Using four Suzaku/XIS observations pointed just outside Vela X, we find hard X-ray emission extending throughout the fields of view. The hard X-ray spectra are well represented by a power-law. The photon index is measured to be constant at Gamma~2.4, similar to that of the southern outer part of Vela X. The power-law flux decreases with increasing distance from the pulsar. These properties lead us to propose that the hard X-ray emission is associated with the Vela PWN. The larger X-ray extension found in this work strongly suggests that distinct populations relativistic electrons form the X-ray PWN and Vela X, as was recently inferred from multiwavelength spectral modeling of Vela X.

  18. Suzaku Detection of Diffuse Hard X-Ray Emission Outside Vela X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Mori, Koji; Petre, Robert; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Bamba, Aya; Miceli, Marco; Hewitt, John W.; Temim, Tea; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Yoshii, Rie

    2011-01-01

    Vela X is a large, 3 deg x 2 deg, radio-emitting pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by the Vela pulsar in the Vela supernova remnant. Using four Suzaku/XIS observations pointed just outside Vela X, we find hard X-ray emission extending throughout the fields of view. The hard X-ray spectra are well represented by a power-law. The photon index is measured to be constant at Gamma approximates 2.4, similar to that of the southern outer part of Vela X. The power-law flux decreases with increasing distance from the pulsar. These properties lead us to propose that the hard X-ray emission is associated with the Vela PWN. The larger X-ray extension found in this work strongly suggests that distinct populations relativistic electrons form the X-ray PWN and Vela X, as was recently inferred from multiwavelength spectral modeling of Vela X.

  19. X-ray emission from spiral galaxies with normal and low-activity nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuricin, G. (Trieste Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Astronomia); Bertotti, G. (Centre for Advanced Research in Space Optics, Trieste (Italy)); Mardirossian, F.; Mezzetti, M. (Trieste Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Astronomia Centro Interuniversitario Regionale per l' Astrofisica e la Cosmologia (CIRAC), Trieste (Italy))

    1991-05-15

    A statistical analysis of the soft X-ray emission from spiral galaxies with normal and low-luminosity active nuclei (LINERs and Seyfert 2) - derived from published observations obtained with the Einstein Observatory - has revealed a number of previously unrecognised characteristics of the X-ray emission. Seyfert 2 galaxies (the least powerful X-ray sources of the Seyfert class) turn out to be, on average, stronger X-ray emitters (per unit light) than non-Seyfert galaxies, whereas galaxies with LINER nuclei and H II-region-like nuclei exhibit X-ray emissions of comparable strength. We have verified that the X-ray luminosity (per unit light) is linked to the total H {alpha} emission-line strength. Remarkably, more enhanced X-ray emission (per unit light) has been found in Arp atlas galaxies, in galaxies included in the Atlas and Catalogue of Interacting Galaxies of Vorontsov-Vel'yaminov, and in interacting galaxies compared to normal galaxies. (Author).

  20. A Comprehensive Archival Chandra Search for X-ray Emission from Ultracompact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pandya, Viraj; Greene, Jenny E

    2016-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive archival study of the X-ray properties of ultracompact dwarf (UCD) galaxies, with the goal of identifying weakly-accreting central black holes in UCDs. Our study spans 578 UCDs distributed across thirteen different host systems, including clusters, groups, fossil groups, and isolated galaxies. Of the 336 spectroscopically-confirmed UCDs with usable archival Chandra imaging observations, 21 are X-ray-detected. Imposing a completeness limit of $L_X>2\\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$, the global X-ray detection fraction for the UCD population is $\\sim3\\%$. Of the 21 X-ray-detected UCDs, seven show evidence of long-term X-ray time variability on the order of months to years. X-ray-detected UCDs tend to be more compact than non-X-ray-detected UCDs, and we find tentative evidence that the X-ray detection fraction increases with surface luminosity density and global stellar velocity dispersion. The X-ray emission of UCDs is fully consistent with arising from a population of low-mass X-ra...

  1. NuSTAR Hard X-ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region I: Hard X-ray Morphology and Spectroscopy of the Diffuse Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Kaya; Krivonos, Roman; Hong, Jaesub; Ponti, Gabriele; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Tomsick, John A; Alexander, David M; Baganoff, Frederick K; Barret, Didier; Barriere, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E; Canipe, Alicia M; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Harrison, Fiona A; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E; Luu, Vy; Madsen, Kristen K; Mao, Peter H; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Stern, Daniel; Westergaard, Niels J; Zhang, William W; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456-2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with $\\Gamma\\sim1.3$-$2.3$ up to ~50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe K$\\alpha$ fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broad-band X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density ($\\sim10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws wi...

  2. Characterizing X-Ray and Radio Emission in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary V404 Cygni During Quiescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rana, Vikram; Loh, Alan; Corbel, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg in quiescence. Our coverage with NuSTAR provides the very first opportunity to study the X-ray spectrum of V404 Cyg at energies above 10 keV. The unabsorbed broadband (0.3–30...

  3. Characterizing X-Ray and Radio Emission in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary V404 Cygni During Quiescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rana, Vikram; Loh, Alan; Corbel, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg in quiescence. Our coverage with NuSTAR provides the very first opportunity to study the X-ray spectrum of V404 Cyg at energies above 10 keV. The unabsorbed broadband (0...

  4. AGN X-Ray emission and black holes (Kelly+, 2008)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, B. C.; Bechtold, J.; Trump, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    In this analysis we combine 169 RQQs from Kelly et al. (2007ApJ...665.1489K) with 149 RQQs from the main SDSS sample of Strateva et al. (2005, Cat. J/AJ/130/387) to create a sample of 318 RQQs. Out of these 318 sources, 276 (86.8%) are detected in the X-ray. (1 data file)....

  5. Emission Angles for Soft X-Ray Coherent Transition Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    School is used to study radiation effects and damage, radiation characteristics and nuclear structure. The LINAC is capable of operating from...Private communication.) 43 ........ 11. "PCD Linear Image Sensors (S3201 Series)," HAMAMATSU Technical Data Sheet, July 1985. 12. "Application of Reticon ...Photodiode Arrays as Electron and X-Ray Detectors," EG&G Reticon Application Notes No. 101, 1975. 13. Chu, A.N., M.A. Piestrup and R.H. Pantell

  6. Dense plasma focus PACO as a hard X-ray emitter: a study on the radiation source

    OpenAIRE

    Supán, L.; Guichón, S.; Milanese, Maria Magdalena; Niedbalski, Jorge Julio; Moroso, Roberto Luis; Acuña, H.; Malamud, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    The radiation in the X-ray range detected outside the vacuum chamber of the dense plasma focus (DPF) PACO, are produced on the anode zone. The zone of emission is studied in a shot-to-shot analysis, using pure deuterium as filling gas. We present a diagnostic method to determine the place and size of the hard X-ray source by image analysis of high density radiography plates. Fil: Supán, L.. Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas. Insti...

  7. The evolution of X-ray emission in young stars

    CERN Document Server

    Preibisch, T; Preibisch, Thomas; Feigelson, Eric D.

    2005-01-01

    We study the relation between age and magnetic activity in late-type pre-main sequence (PMS) stars, for the first time using mass-stratified subsamples. The effort is based on the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) which provides very sensitive and homogenous X-ray data on a uniquely large sample of 481 optically well-characterized low-extinction low-mass members of the Orion Nebula Cluster, for which individual stellar masses and ages could be determined. More than 98 percent of the stars in this sample are detected as X-ray sources. Within the PMS phase for stellar ages in the range $\\sim 0.1-10$ Myr, we establish a mild decay in activity with stellar age $\\tau$ roughly as $L_{\\rm X} \\propto \\tau^{-1/3}$. On longer timescales, when the Orion stars are compared to main sequence stars, the X-ray luminosity decay law for stars in the $0.5 < M < 1.2$ M$_\\odot$ mass range is more rapid with $L_{\\rm X} \\propto \\tau^{-0.75}$ over the wide range of ages $5 < \\log \\tau < 9.5$ yr. The magnetic activit...

  8. Kilohertz sources of hard x rays and fast ions with femtosecond laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoss, A.; Richardson, M.; Korn, G.; Faubel, M.; Stiel, H.; Vogt, U.; Elsaesser, T.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a new, stable, kilohertz femtosecond laser plasma source of hard-x-ray continuum and Kα emission that uses a microscopic liquid jet target that is continuous and debris free. Plasmas produced by ultrashort (50-fs) intense laser pulses from a fine (10-30-μm diameter) liquid Ga jet emit bright 9.3- and 10.3-keV Kα and Kβ lines superimposed on a multikilovolt bremmstrahlung continuum. Kilohertz femtosecond x-ray sources will find many applications in time-resolved x-ray diffraction and microscopy studies. As high-intensity lasers become more compact and operate at increasingly high repetition-rates, they require a target configuration that is both repeatable from shot to shot and debris free. Our target provides a pristine, unperturbed filament surface at rates >100 kHz. A number of liquid metal targets are considered. We show the hard-x-ray spectrum described above. The source was generated by a 50-fs-duration, 1-kHz, 2-W, high-intensity Ti:sapphire laser. Using the same technology, we also generate forward-going sub-mega-electron-volt (sub-MeV) protons from a 10-μm liquid water target at 1-kHz repetition rates. Kilohertz sources of high-energy ions will find many applications in time-resolved particle interaction studies and will lead to efficient generation of short-lived isotopes for use in nuclear medicine and other applications. The protons were detected with CR-39 track detectors in both the forward and the backward directions up to energies of ~500 keV. As the intensity of compact high-repetition-rate lasers sources increases, we can expect improvements in the energy, conversion efficiency, and directionality to occur. The effect of these developments is discussed. As compact, high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser technology reaches focused intensities of ~1019 W/cm2, many new applications of high-repetition-rate hard-x-ray and MeV ion sources will become practical.

  9. Inflow Generated X-ray Corona Around Supermassive Black Holes and Unified Model for X-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lile

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, covering the spatial domain from hundreds of Schwarzschild radii to $2\\ \\mathrm{pc}$ around the central supermassive black hole of mass $10^8 M_\\odot$, with detailed radiative cooling processes, are performed. Generically found is the existence of a significant amount of shock heated, high temperature ($\\geq 10^8\\ \\mathrm{K}$) coronal gas in the inner ($\\leq 10^4 r_\\mathrm{sch}$) region. It is shown that the composite bremsstrahlung emission spectrum due to coronal gas of various temperatures are in reasonable agreement with the overall ensemble spectrum of AGNs and hard X-ray background. Taking into account inverse Compton processes, in the context of the simulation-produced coronal gas, our model can readily account for the wide variety of AGN spectral shape, which can now be understood physically. The distinguishing feature of our model is that X-ray coronal gas is, for the first time, an integral part of the inflow gas and its observable characteristics are phys...

  10. Benchmarking and Optimizing Techniques for Inverting Images of DIII-D Soft X-Ray Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, E.; Unterberg, E. A.; Shafer, M. W.; Wingen, A.

    2012-10-01

    A tangential 2-D soft x-ray (SXR) imaging system is installed on DIII-D to directly measure the 3-D magnetic topology at the plasma edge. This diagnostic allows the study of the plasma SXR emissivity at time resolutions >=,0 ms and spatial resolutions ˜1 cm. Extracting 3-D structure from the 2-D image requires the inversion of large ill-posed matrices - a ubiquitous problem in mathematics. The goal of this work is to reduce the memory usage and computational time of the inversion to a point where image inversions can be processed between shots. We implement the Phillips-Tikohnov and Maximum Entropy regularization techniques on a parallel GPU processor. To optimize the memory demands of computing these matrixes, effects of reducing the inversion grid size and binning images are analyzed and benchmarked. Further benchmarking includes a characterization of the final image quality (with respect to numerical and instrumentation noise).

  11. X-ray emission from protostellar jet HH 154: the first evidence of a diamond shock?

    CERN Document Server

    Bonito, R; Miceli, M; Peres, G; Micela, G; Favata, F

    2011-01-01

    X-ray emission from about ten protostellar jets has been discovered and it appears as a feature common to the most energetic jets. Although X-ray emission seems to originate from shocks internal to jets, the mechanism forming these shocks remains controversial. One of the best studied X-ray jet is HH 154 that has been observed by Chandra over a time base of about 10 years. We analyze the Chandra observations of HH 154 by investigating the evolution of its X-ray source. We show that the X-ray emission consists of a bright stationary component and a faint elongated component. We interpret the observations by developing a hydrodynamic model describing a protostellar jet originating from a nozzle and compare the X-ray emission synthesized from the model with the X-ray observations. The model takes into account the thermal conduction and radiative losses and shows that the jet/nozzle leads to the formation of a diamond shock at the nozzle exit. The shock is stationary over the period covered by our simulations and...

  12. Laboratory simulation of charge exchange-produced X-ray emission from comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; May, M; Olson, R E; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Tillotson, W A

    2003-06-06

    In laboratory experiments using the engineering spare microcalorimeter detector from the ASTRO-E satellite mission, we recorded the x-ray emission of highly charged ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which simulates charge exchange reactions between heavy ions in the solar wind and neutral gases in cometary comae. The spectra are complex and do not readily match predictions. We developed a charge exchange emission model that successfully reproduces the soft x-ray spectrum of comet Linear C/1999 S4, observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  13. CHANDRA DETECTION OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM ULTRACOMPACT DWARF GALAXIES AND EXTENDED STAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Meicun; Li, Zhiyuan, E-mail: lizy@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2016-03-10

    We have conducted a systematic study of X-ray emission from ultracompact dwarf (UCD) galaxies and extended star clusters (ESCs), based on archival Chandra observations. Among a sample of 511 UCDs and ESCs complied from the literature, 17 X-ray counterparts with 0.5–8 keV luminosities above ∼5 × 10{sup 36} erg s{sup −1} are identified, which are distributed in eight early-type host galaxies. To facilitate comparison, we also identify X-ray counterparts of 360 globular clusters (GCs) distributed in four of the eight galaxies. The X-ray properties of the UCDs and ESCs are found to be broadly similar to those of the GCs. The incidence rate of X-ray-detected UCDs and ESCs, 3.3% ± 0.8%, while lower than that of the X-ray-detected GCs (7.0% ± 0.4%), is substantially higher than expected from the field populations of external galaxies. A stacking analysis of the individually undetected UCDs/ESCs further reveals significant X-ray signals, which corresponds to an equivalent 0.5–8 keV luminosity of ∼4 × 10{sup 35} erg s{sup −1} per source. Taken together, these provide strong evidence that the X-ray emission from UCDs and ESCs is dominated by low-mass X-ray binaries having formed from stellar dynamical interactions, consistent with the stellar populations in these dense systems being predominantly old. For the most massive UCDs, there remains the possibility that a putative central massive black hole gives rise to the observed X-ray emission.

  14. Non-thermal X-ray Emission An Alternative to Cluster Cooling Flows?

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, I G; Welch, G A; Carthy, Ian G. Mc; West, Michael J.; Welch, Gary A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the results of experiments aimed at reducing the major problem with cooling flow models of rich cluster X-ray sources: the fact that most of the cooled gas or its products have not been found. Here we show that much of the X-ray emission usually attributed to cooling flows can, in fact, be modeled by a power-law component which is indicative of a source(s) other than thermal bremsstrahlung from the intracluster medium. We find that adequate simultaneous fits to ROSAT PSPCB and ASCA GIS/SIS spectra of the central regions of ten clusters are obtained for two-component models that include a thermal plasma component that is attributable to hot intracluster gas and a power-law component that is likely generated by compact sources and/or extended non-thermal emission. For five of the clusters that purportedly have massive cooling flows, the best-fit models have power-law components that contribute $\\sim$ 30 % of the total flux (0.14 - 10.0 keV) within the central 3 arcminutes. Because cooling flow mass de...

  15. All the X-ray binaries in the Universe: X-ray Emission from Normal and Starburst Galaxies Near and Far

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornschemeier, Ann; Basu-Zych, Antara; Lehmer, Bret

    2015-08-01

    There has recently been quite a bit of excitement on the role of X-ray emission from galaxies in early heating of the IGM, demonstrating that understanding of X-ray emission from normal and starburst galaxies may have significant impact on structure formation in the Universe. The X-ray output from X-ray binaries and hot gas are both important and may rival the ionizing output of AGN at z>5, particularly for Hydrogen reionization. Here we present our research on constraining the X-ray SED of galaxies across cosmic time via several complementary approaches. In the very local universe (d optical/UV surveys that may be studied with Chandra. We will finish with a discussion of starburst galaxies emitting X-rays at z>4, which thanks to the extremely deep Chandra Deep Field-South 7 Ms survey, are better constrained than ever before. We discuss survey strategy and how the various pieces of the puzzle fit together regarding the X-ray output of galaxies and their X-ray binary populations over cosmic time. We discuss implications for next-generation missions and instruments, including those with wide-field survey capabilities and high throughput, especially the Athena mission.

  16. Composition variations in Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} thin films analyzed by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, particle induced X-ray emission, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Dahyun [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Opanasyuk, A.S.; Koval, P.V.; Ponomarev, A.G. [Department of Electronics and Computer Technology, Sumy State University, Sumy UA-40007 (Ukraine); Jeong, Ah Reum; Kim, Gee Yeong; Jo, William [Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Hyeonsik, E-mail: hcheong@sogang.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Compositional and structural studies of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) thin films were carried out by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy. CZTSe thin films with different compositions were deposited on sodalime glass by co-evaporation. The composition of the films measured by two different methods, EDS and PIXE, showed significant differences. Generally, the Zn/Sn ratio measured by EDS is larger than that measured by PIXE. Both the micro-PIXE and the micro-Raman imaging results indicated the compositional and structural inhomogeneity of the sample. - Highlights: • Particle induced X-ray emission was used to analyze the composition of CZTSe films. • Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy tends to underestimate the Sn composition. • Local Raman intensity is related with the composition rather than the crystallinity.

  17. Design calculations for a xenon plasma x-ray shield to protect the NIF optical Thomson scattering diagnostic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, G F; Ross, J S; Datte, P; Moody, J; Divol, L; Jones, O; Landen, O

    2016-11-01

    An Optical Thomson Scattering (OTS) diagnostic is currently being developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This diagnostic is designed to make measurements of the hohlraum plasma parameters, such as the electron temperature and the density, during inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. NIF ICF experiments present a very challenging environment for optical measurements; by their very nature, hohlraums produce intense soft x-ray emission, which can cause "blanking" (radiation induced opacity) of the radiation facing optical components. The soft x-ray fluence at the surface of the OTS blast shield, 60 cm from the hohlraum, is estimated to be ∼8 J cm(-2). This is significantly above the expected threshold for the onset of "blanking" effects. A novel xenon plasma x-ray shield is proposed to protect the blast shield from x-rays and mitigate "blanking." Estimates suggest that an areal density of 10(19) cm(-2) Xe atoms will be sufficient to absorb 99.5% of the soft x-ray flux. Two potential designs for this shield are presented.

  18. Design calculations for a xenon plasma x-ray shield to protect the NIF optical Thomson scattering diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, G. F.; Ross, J. S.; Datte, P.; Moody, J.; Divol, L.; Jones, O.; Landen, O.

    2016-11-01

    An Optical Thomson Scattering (OTS) diagnostic is currently being developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This diagnostic is designed to make measurements of the hohlraum plasma parameters, such as the electron temperature and the density, during inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. NIF ICF experiments present a very challenging environment for optical measurements; by their very nature, hohlraums produce intense soft x-ray emission, which can cause "blanking" (radiation induced opacity) of the radiation facing optical components. The soft x-ray fluence at the surface of the OTS blast shield, 60 cm from the hohlraum, is estimated to be ˜8 J cm-2. This is significantly above the expected threshold for the onset of "blanking" effects. A novel xenon plasma x-ray shield is proposed to protect the blast shield from x-rays and mitigate "blanking." Estimates suggest that an areal density of 1019 cm-2 Xe atoms will be sufficient to absorb 99.5% of the soft x-ray flux. Two potential designs for this shield are presented.

  19. Design calculations for a xenon plasma x-ray shield to protect the NIF optical Thomson scattering diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swadling, G. F.; Ross, J. S.; Datte, P.; Moody, J.; Divol, L.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    An Optical Thomson Scattering (OTS) diagnostic is currently being developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This diagnostic is designed to make measurements of the hohlraum plasma parameters, such as the electron temperature and the density, during inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. NIF ICF experiments present a very challenging environment for optical measurements; by their very nature, hohlraums produce intense soft x-ray emission, which can cause “blanking” (radiation induced opacity) of the radiation facing optical components. The soft x-ray fluence at the surface of the OTS blast shield, 60 cm from the hohlraum, is estimated to be ∼8 J cm{sup −2}. This is significantly above the expected threshold for the onset of “blanking” effects. A novel xenon plasma x-ray shield is proposed to protect the blast shield from x-rays and mitigate “blanking.” Estimates suggest that an areal density of 10{sup 19} cm{sup −2} Xe atoms will be sufficient to absorb 99.5% of the soft x-ray flux. Two potential designs for this shield are presented.

  20. Radio emission from the high-mass X-ray binary BP Cru: first detection

    CERN Document Server

    Pestalozzi, M; Hobbs, G; Lopez-Sanchez, A R

    2009-01-01

    BP Cru is a well known high-mass X-ray binary composed of a late B hypergiant (Wray 977) and a neutron star, also observed as the X-ray pulsar GX 301-2. No information about emission from BP Cru in other bands than X-rays and optical has been reported to date in the literature, though massive X-ray binaries containing black holes can have radio emission from a jet. In order to assess the presence of a radio jet, we searched for radio emission towards BP Cru using the Australia Compact Array Telescope during a survey for radio emission from Be/X-ray transients. We probed the 41.5d orbit of BP Cru with the Australia Telescope Compact Array not only close to periastron but also close to apastron. BP Cru was clearly detected in our data on 4, possibly 6, of 12 occasions at 4.8 and 8.6 GHz. Our data suggest that the spectral index of the radio emission is modulated either by the X-ray flux or the orbital phase of the system. We propose that the radio emission of BP Cru probably arises from two components: a persis...

  1. Discovery of Oxygen Kalpha X-ray Emission from the Rings of Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, A; Waite, J H; Gladstone, G R; Cravens, T E; Ford, P G; Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ronald F.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Ford, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    Using the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) observed the Saturnian system for one rotation of the planet (~37 ks) on 20 January, 2004, and again on 26-27 January, 2004. In this letter we report the detection of X-ray emission from the rings of Saturn. The X-ray spectrum from the rings is dominated by emission in a narrow (~130 eV wide) energy band centered on the atomic oxygen K-alpha fluorescence line at 0.53 keV. The X-ray power emitted from the rings in the 0.49-0.62 keV band is 84 MW, which is about one-third of that emitted from Saturn disk in the photon energy range 0.24-2.0 keV. Our analysis also finds a clear detection of X-ray emission from the rings in the 0.49-0.62 keV band in an earlier (14-15 April, 2003) Chandra ACIS observation of Saturn. Fluorescent scattering of solar X-rays from oxygen atoms in the H2O icy ring material is the likely source mechanism for ring X-rays, consistent with the scenario of solar photo-production of a tenuous ring oxygen at...

  2. Hard X-ray and ultraviolet emission during the 2011 June 7 solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Inglis, Andrew R

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between X-ray and UV emission during flares, particularly in the context of quasi-periodic pulsations, remains unclear. To address this, we study the X-ray and UV emission during the eruptive flare of 2011 June 7 utilising X-ray imaging from RHESSI and UV 1700A imaging from SDO/AIA. This event is associated with synchronous quasi-periodic pulsations in both the X-ray and UV emission, as well as substantial motion of the hard X-ray footpoints. The motion of the footpoint associated with the left-hand flare ribbon is shown to reverse direction along the flare ribbons on at least two occasions. Over the same time interval, the footpoints also gradually move apart at v ~ 12 km/s. This is consistent with the measured plane-of-sky thermal X-ray source outward velocity of ~ 14 km/s, and matches the gradual outward expansion of the UV ribbons. However, there is no associated short-timescale motion of the UV bright regions. We find that the locations of the brightest X-ray and UV regions are different...

  3. Research in space science and technology. [including X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Progress in various space flight research programs is reported. Emphasis is placed on X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics. Topics covered include: infrared astronomy, long base line interferometry, geological spectroscopy, space life science experiments, atmospheric physics, and space based materials and structures research. Analysis of galactic and extra-galactic X-ray data from the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-3) and HEAO-A and interplanetary plasma data for Mariner 10, Explorers 47 and 50, and Solrad is discussed.

  4. High-energy neutrino emission from X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Christiansen, H R; Romero, G E; Christiansen, Hugo R.; Orellana, Mariana; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2006-01-01

    We show that high-energy neutrinos can be efficiently produced in X-ray binaries with relativistic jets and high-mass primary stars. We consider a system where the star presents a dense equatorial wind and the jet has a small content of relativistic protons. In this scenario, neutrinos and correlated gamma-rays result from pp interactions and the subsequent pion decays. As a particular example we consider the microquasar LSI +61 303. Above 1 TeV, we obtain a mean-orbital $\

  5. X-ray emission from stellar jets by collision against high-density molecular clouds: an application to HH 248

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Santiago, Javier; Orellana, Mariana; Miceli, Marco; Orlando, Salvatore; Ustamujic, Sabina; Albacete-Colombo, Juan Facundo; de Castro, Elisa; de Castro, Ana Ines Gomez

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the plausibility of detecting X-ray emission from a stellar jet that impacts against a dense molecular cloud. This scenario may be usual for classical T Tauri stars with jets in dense star-forming complexes. We first model the impact of a jet against a dense cloud by 2D axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations, exploring different configurations of the ambient environment. Then, we compare our results with XMM-Newton observations of the Herbig-Haro object HH 248, where extended X-ray emission aligned with the optical knots is detected at the edge of the nearby IC 434 cloud. Our simulations show that a jet can produce plasma with temperatures up to 10 MK, consistent with production of X-ray emission, after impacting a dense cloud. We find that jets denser than the ambient medium but less dense than the cloud produce detectable X-ray emission only at the impact onto the cloud. From the exploration of the model parameter space, we constrain the physical conditions (jet density and velocity, cloud den...

  6. A Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer at the Rossendorf beamline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvashnina, Kristina O; Scheinost, Andreas C

    2016-05-01

    This paper gives a detailed description, including equations, of the Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer which has been recently installed and tested at the Rossendorf beamline (ROBL) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The spectrometer consists of a single spherically bent crystal analyzer and an avalanche photodiode detector positioned on the vertical Rowland cycle of 1 m diameter. The hard X-ray emission spectrometer (∼3.5-25 keV) operates at atmospheric pressure and covers the Bragg angles of 65°-89°. The instrument has been tested at high and intermediate incident energies, i.e. at the Zr K-edge and at the Au L3-edge, in the second experimental hutch of ROBL. The spectrometer is dedicated for studying actinides in materials and environmental samples by high-energy-resolution X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopies.

  7. Waiting in the Wings: Reflected X-ray Emission from the Homunculus Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Corcoran, M F; Gull, T R; Davidson, K; Petre, R; Hillier, D J; Smith, N; Damineli, A; Morse, J A; Walborn, N R; Verner, E; Collins, N; White, S; Pittard, J M; Weis, K; Bomans, D; Butt, Y

    2004-01-01

    We report the first detection of X-ray emission associated with the Homunculus Nebula which surrounds the supermassive star Eta Carinae. The emission is characterized by a temperature in excess of 100 MK, and is consistent with scattering of the time-delayed X-ray flux associated with the star. The nebular emission is bright in the northwestern lobe and near the central regions of the Homunculus, and fainter in the southeastern lobe. We also report the detection of an unusually broad Fe K fluorescent line, which may indicate fluorescent scattering off the wind of a companion star or some other high velocity outflow. The X-ray Homunculus is the nearest member of the small class of Galactic X-ray reflection nebulae, and the only one in which both the emitting and reflecting sources are distinguishable.

  8. NuSTAR Hard X-ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. I. Hard X-ray Morphology and Spectroscopy of the Diffuse Emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Krivonos, Roman

    2015-01-01

    pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe K alpha fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broadband X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model......We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456-2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). Nu......STAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with Gamma similar to 1.3-2.3 up to similar to 50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young...

  9. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Struminsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV {\\gamma}-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these {\\gamma}-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and {\\pi}0-decay {\\gamma}-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X-ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard {\\gamma}-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated du...

  10. Characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Moorti; A Raghuramaiah; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2004-11-01

    Temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode are presented. Electrons from a laser-produced aluminium plasma were accelerated towards a conical point tip titanium anode to generate K-shell x-ray radiation. Approximately 1010 photons/pulse were generated in x-ray pulses of ∼ 18 to ∼ 28 ns duration from a source of ∼ 300 m diameter, at ℎ = 4.51 keV ( emission of titanium), with a brightness of ∼ 1020 photons/cm2 /s/sr. This was sufficient to record single-shot x-ray radiographs of physical objects on a DEF-5 x-ray film kept at a distance of up to ∼ 10 cm.

  11. Investigation of the Electronic Structure of Solid Density Plasmas by X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Forest, F J; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R; Faussurier, G; Blancard, C; Renaudin, P; Landen, O L

    2003-05-19

    We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

  12. Electronic Structure Measurement of Solid Density Plasmas using X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Landen, O L; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R

    2003-08-23

    We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

  13. A Search For X-ray Emission From Colliding Magnetospheres In Young Eccentric Stellar Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Getman, Konstantin V; Kospal, Agnes; Salter, Demerese M; Garmire, Gordon P

    2016-01-01

    Among young binary stars whose magnetospheres are expected to collide, only two systems have been observed near periastron in the X-ray band: the low-mass DQ Tau and the older and more massive HD 152404. Both exhibit elevated levels of X-ray emission at periastron. Our goal is to determine whether colliding magnetospheres in young high-eccentricity binaries commonly produce elevated average levels of X-ray activity. This work is based on Chandra snapshots of multiple periastron and non-periastron passages in four nearby young eccentric binaries (Parenago 523, RX J1622.7-2325 Nw, UZ Tau E, and HD 152404). We find that for the merged sample of all 4 binaries the current X-ray data show an increasing average X-ray flux near periastron (at about 2.5-sigma level). Further comparison of these data with the X-ray properties of hundreds of young stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster, produced by the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP), indicates that the X-ray emission from the merged sample of our binaries can not be...

  14. The X-ray emission from the knots in 3C 120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    3C 120 is a Seyfert galaxy with a well detected X-ray jet.We investigate the X-ray emission of its five jet knots and fit their spectral energy distributions(SEDs) from the radio to the X-ray bands with a single-zone lepton model.We find that the SEDs of knots k7,s2,and s3 can be explained by synchrotron radiation,and the X-rays are the simple extension of the radio-optical emission component,but that of the inner knot k4 requires the IC/CMB model,in which the X-rays are due to the inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background photons by relativistic electrons in the jet with a beaming factor δ-14.The outer knot k25 is resolved into a three-part sub-structure.It is shown that the fitting of the X-rays from this knot with the IC/CMB model needs an extraordinary beaming factor δ-15-25 for a jet at the kpc scale.If the X-rays of knot k25 are produced by synchrotron radiation similar to k7,s2,and s3,they may be contributed by a relativistic electron population whose radiations in other wavelengths are not detected.

  15. Surface roughness-aided hard X-ray emission from carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suman Bagchi; P Prem Kiran; M K Bhuyan; M Krishnamurthy; K Yang; A M Rao; G Ravindra Kumar

    2010-12-01

    Efficient low debris hard X-ray source based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) irradiated by intense, femtosecond laser over an intensity range of 1015 –1017 W cm−2 2 is reported. The MWNT targets yield two orders of magnitude higher X-rays (indicating significant enhancement of laser coupling) and three orders of magnitude lower debris compared to conventional metallic targets under identical experimental conditions. The simple analytical model explains the basic experimental observations and also serves as a guide to design efficient targets to achieve low-debris laser plasma-based hard X-ray sources at low laser intensities suitable for multi-kHz operation.

  16. Relation between X-Ray and -Ray Emissions for Fermi Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bijun Li; Xiong Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Using -ray band data detected by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and X-ray band data for 78 blazars, we find a medium correlation between X-ray and -ray fluxes in the average state. A medium anticorrelation is also found between X-ray (1 KeV) mean spectral index and -ray mean spectral index for blazars. Our results suggest that the most likely radiation mechanism for the high energy -ray would be SSC. And that the -ray emission mechanism may be somewhat different for BL Lacs and FSRQs.

  17. Ultra fast atomic process in X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Tajima, T.

    1998-03-01

    An ultra-fast atomic process together with X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization using high intensity (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse (20fs) X-ray is studied. A new class of experiment is proposed and a useful pumping source is suggested. In this method, it is found that the gain value of X-ray laser amounts to larger than 1000(1/cm) with use of the density of 10{sup 22}/cm{sup 3} of carbon atom. Electron impact ionization effect and initial density effect as well as intensity of pumping source effect are also discussed. (author)

  18. X-ray emission from the double-binary OB-star system QZ Car (HD 93206)

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, E R; Townsley, L K; Pittard, J M; Moffat, A F J; Naze, Y; Rauw, G; Oskinova, L M

    2011-01-01

    X-ray observations of the double-binary OB-star system QZ Car (HD 93206) obtained with the Chandra X-ray Observatory over a period of roughly 2 years are presented. The orbit of systems A (O9.7 I+b2 v, PA = 21 d) and B (O8 III+o9 v, PB = 6 d) are reasonably well sampled by the observations, allowing the origin of the X-ray emission to be examined in detail. The X-ray spectra can be well fitted by an attenuated three temperature thermal plasma model, characterised by cool, moderate, and hot plasma components at kT ~ 0.2, 0.7, and 2 keV, respectively, and a circumstellar absorption of ~ 0.2 x 10^22 cm-2. Although the hot plasma component could be indicating the presence of wind-wind collision shocks in the system, the model fluxes calculated from spectral fits, with an average value of ~ 7 x 10^-13 erg s-1 cm-2, do not show a clear correlation with the orbits of the two constituent binaries. A semi-analytical model of QZ Car reveals that a stable momentum balance may not be established in either system A or B. ...

  19. X-ray emission from the base of a current sheet in the wake of a CME

    CERN Document Server

    Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Lin, Robert P

    2011-01-01

    Following a CME which started on 2002 November 26, RHESSI, the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, observed for 12 hours an X-ray source above the solar limb, at altitudes between 0.1 and 0.3 RS above the photosphere. The GOES baseline was remarkably high throughout this event. The X-ray source's temperature peaked around 10-11 MK, and its emission measure increased throughout this time interval. Higher up, at 0.7 RS, hot (initially >8 MK) plasma has been observed by UVCS on SoHO for 2.3 days. This hot plasma was interpreted as the signature of a current sheet trailing the CME (Bemporad et al. 2006). The thermal energy content of the X-ray source is more than an order of magnitude larger than in the current sheet. Hence, it could be the source of the hot plasma in the current sheet, although current sheet heating by magnetic reconnection within it cannot be discounted. To better characterize the X-ray spectrum, we have used novel techniques (back-projection based and visibility-based) for long inte...

  20. Stellar wind induced soft X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Kislyakova, K G; Johnstone, C P; Holmström, M; Zaitsev, V V; Lammer, H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX) which produces soft X-ray emission is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are emitted as a result of the charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. In the Solar System, comets produce X-rays mostly through the SWCX mechanism, but it has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus and Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not very effective for the Solar system giants. Here we present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar giant planets due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD~209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of $\\approx 10...

  1. Advances in understanding the anomalous dispersion of plasmas in the X-ray regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J; Cheng, K T; Johnson, W R

    2008-09-24

    Over the last several years we have predicted and observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one in the soft X-ray regime. These plasmas are usually a few times ionized and have ranged from low-Z carbon plasmas to mid-Z tin plasmas. Our main computational tool has been the average atom code AVATOMKG that enables us to calculate the index of refraction for any plasma at any wavelength. In the last year we have improved this code to take into account many-atomic collisions. This allows the code to converge better at low frequencies. In this paper we present our search for plasmas with strong anomalous dispersion that could be used in X-ray laser interferometer experiments to help understand this phenomena. We discuss the calculations of anomalous dispersion in Na vapor and Ne plasmas near 47 nm where we predict large effects. We also discuss higher Z plasmas such as Ce and Yb plasmas that look very interesting near 47 nm. With the advent of the FLASH X-ray free electron laser in Germany and the LCLS X-FEL coming online at Stanford in another year we use the average atom code to explore plasmas at higher X-ray energy to identify potential experiments for the future. In particular we look near the K shell lines of near solid carbon plasmas and predict strong effects. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  2. Spectral Modeling of the Charge-Exchange X-ray Emission from M82

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shuinai; Ji, Li; Smith, Randall K; Foster, Adam R; Zhou, Xin

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that the charge exchange (CX) process at the interface between hot and cool interstellar gases could contribute significantly to the observed soft X-ray emission in star forming galaxies. We analyze the XMM-Newton/RGS spectrum of M82, using a newly developed CX model combined with a single-temperature thermal plasma to characterize the volume-filling hot gas. The CX process is largely responsible for not only the strongly enhanced forbidden lines of the K$\\alpha$ triplets of various He-like ions, but also good fractions of the Ly$\\alpha$ transitions of C VI (~87%), O VIII and N VII ($\\gtrsim$50%) as well. In total about a quarter of the X-ray flux in the RGS 6-30 \\AA\\ band originates in the CX. We infer an ion incident rate of $3\\times10^{51}\\,\\rm{s^{-1}}$ undergoing CX at the hot and cool gas interface, and an effective area of the interface as $\\sim2\\times10^{45}\\,{\\rm cm^2}$ that is one order of magnitude larger than the cross section of the global biconic outflow. With the CX contribu...

  3. Feasibility tests of transmission x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy of wet samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Gilbert, B.; Nelson, T.; Hansen, R.; Wallace, J.; Mercanti, D.; Capozi, M.; Baudat, P. A.; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.; Tonner, B. P.

    2000-01-01

    We performed feasibility tests of photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy of wet samples in the water window (285-532 eV) soft x-ray spectral region. Water was successfully confined in an ultrahigh vacuum compatible compartment with x-ray transparent sides. This water cell was placed in the MEPHISTO spectromicroscope in a transmission geometry, and complete x-ray absorption spectra of the water window region were acquired. We also show micrographs of test samples, mounted outside of the compartment, and imaged through the water. This technique can be used to study liquid chemistry and, at least to the micron level, the microstructure of wet samples. Possibilities include cells in water or buffer, proteins in solution, oils of tribological interest, liquid crystals, and other samples not presently accessible to the powerful x-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy technique.

  4. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng, Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-05-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5×10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy/min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result.

  5. Do Some AGN Lack X-ray Emission?

    CERN Document Server

    Simmonds, Charlotte; Thuan, Trinh X; Izotov, Yuri I; Stern, Daniel; Harrison, Fiona A

    2016-01-01

    $Context:$ Intermediate-Mass Black Holes (IMBHs) are thought to be the seeds of early Supermassive Black Holes (SMBHs). While $\\gtrsim$100 IMBH and small SMBH candidates have been identified in recent years, few have been robustly confirmed to date, leaving their number density in considerable doubt. Placing firmer constraints both on the methods used to identify and confirm IMBHs/SMBHs, as well as characterizing the range of host environments that IMBHs/SMBHs likely inhabit is therefore of considerable interest and importance. Additionally, finding significant numbers of IMBHs in metal-poor systems would be particularly intriguing, since such systems may represent local analogs of primordial galaxies, and therefore could provide clues of early accretion processes. $Aims:$ Here we study in detail several candidate Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) found in metal-poor hosts. $Methods:$ We utilize new X-ray and optical observations to characterize these metal-poor AGN candidates and compare them against known AGN lu...

  6. X-ray emission from hot accretion flows

    CERN Document Server

    Niedzwiecki, Andrzej; Stepnik, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Radiatively inefficient, hot accretion flows are widely considered as a relevant accretion mode in low-luminosity AGNs. We study spectral formation in such flows using a refined model with a fully general relativistic description of both the radiative (leptonic and hadronic) and hydrodynamic processes, as well as with an exact treatment of global Comptonization. We find that the X-ray spectral index--Eddington ratio anticorrelation as well as the cut-off energy measured in the best-studied objects favor accretion flows with rather strong magnetic field and with a weak direct heating of electrons. Furthermore, they require a much stronger source of seed photons than considered in previous studies. The nonthermal synchrotron radiation of relativistic electrons seems to be the most likely process capable of providing a sufficient flux of seed photons. Hadronic processes, which should occur due to basic properties of hot flows, provide an attractive explanation for the origin of such electrons.

  7. X-ray emission from hot accretion flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedźwiecki, Andrzej; Xie, Fu-Guo; Stȩpnik, Agnieszka

    2014-07-01

    Radiatively inefficient, hot accretion flows are widely considered as a relevant accretion mode in low-luminosity AGNs. We study spectral formation in such flows using a refined model with a fully general relativistic description of both the radiative (leptonic and hadronic) and hydrodynamic processes, as well as with an exact treatment of global Comptonization. We find that the X-ray spectral index-Eddington ratio anticorrelation as well as the cut-off energy measured in the best-studied objects favor accretion flows with rather strong magnetic field and with a weak direct heating of electrons. Furthermore, they require a much stronger source of seed photons than considered in previous studies. The nonthermal synchrotron radiation of relativistic electrons seems to be the most likely process capable of providing a sufficient flux of seed photons. Hadronic processes, which should occur due to basic properties of hot flows, provide an attractive explanation for the origin of such electrons.

  8. Global structure of isothermal X-ray emission along the Fermi bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Kataoka, J; Totani, T; Sofue, Y; Inoue, Y; Nakashima, S; Cheung, C C

    2015-01-01

    In our previous works (Kataoka et al. 2013, Tahara et al. 2015), we found absorbed thermal X-ray plasma with kT ~ 0.3 keV observed ubiquitously near the edges of the Fermi bubbles and interpreted this emission as weakly shock-heated Galactic halo (GH) gas. Here we present a systematic and uniform analysis of archival Suzaku (29 pointings; 6 newly presented) and Swift (68 pointings; 49 newly presented) data within Galactic longitudes |l| 0 deg) favors (ii), whereas that of the south (b < 0 deg) is rather close to (i), but weak excess signature is clearly detected also in the south like NPS (South Polar Spur; SPS). Such an asymmetry, if due to the bubbles, cannot be fully understood only by the inclination of bubbles' axis against the Galactic disk normal, thus suggesting asymmetric outflow due to different environmental/initial condition.

  9. X-ray emission from classical T Tauri stars: Accretion shocks and coronae?

    CERN Document Server

    Guenther, H M; Robrade, J; Liefke, C

    2007-01-01

    Classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) are surrounded by actively accreting disks. According to current models material falls along the magnetic field lines from the disk with more or less free-fall velocity onto the star, where the plasma heats up and generates X-rays. We want to quantitatively explain the observed high energy emission and measure the infall parameters from the data. Absolute flux measurements allow to calculate the filling factor and the mass accretion rate.We use a numerical model of the hot accretion spot and solve the conservation equations. A comparison to data from XMM-Newton and Chandra shows that our model reproduces the main features very well. It yields for TW Hya a filling factor of 0.3% and a mass accretion rate 2e-10 M_sun/yr.

  10. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bosch-Ramon, V., E-mail: vzabalza@am.ub.es [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  11. X-Ray Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei with Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, G. C.; Mathur, S.; Griffiths, R. E.; Rao, A. R.

    2008-12-01

    We present a systematic X-ray study of eight active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with intermediate-mass black holes (MBH ~ 8-95 × 104 M⊙) based on 12 XMM-Newton observations. The sample includes the two prototype AGNs in this class—NGC 4395 and POX 52 and six other AGNs discovered with the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey. These AGNs show some of the strongest X-ray variability, with the normalized excess variances being the largest and the power density break timescales being the shortest observed among radio-quiet AGNs. The excess-variance-luminosity correlation appears to depend on both the BH mass and the Eddington luminosity ratio. The break timescale-black hole mass relations for AGN with IMBHs are consistent with that observed for massive AGNs. We find that the FWHM of the Hβ/Hα line is uncorrelated with the BH mass, but shows strong anticorrelation with the Eddington luminosity ratio. Four AGNs show clear evidence for soft X-ray excess emission (kTin ~ 150-200 eV). X-ray spectra of three other AGNs are consistent with the presence of the soft excess emission. NGC 4395 with lowest L/LEdd lacks the soft excess emission. Evidently small black mass is not the primary driver of strong soft X-ray excess emission from AGNs. The X-ray spectral properties and optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions of these AGNs are similar to those of Seyfert 1 galaxies. The observed X-ray/UV properties of AGNs with IMBHs are consistent with these AGNs being low-mass extensions of more massive AGNs, those with high Eddington luminosity ratio looking more like narrow-line Seyfert 1 s and those with low L/LEdd looking more like broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  12. Electron optics simulation for designing carbon nanotube based field emission x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shabana

    In this dissertation, electron optics simulation for designing carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source for medical imaging applications will be presented. However, for design optimization of x-ray tubes accurate electron beam optics simulation is essential. To facilitate design of CNT x-ray sources a commercial 3D finite element software has been chosen for extensive simulation. The results show that a simplified model of uniform electron field emission from the cathode surface is not sufficient when compared to experimental measurements. This necessitated the development of a refined model to describe a macroscopic field emission CNT cathode for electron beam optics simulations. The model emulates the random distribution of CNTs and the associated variation of local field enhancement factor. The main parameter of the model has been derived empirically from the experimentally measured I-V characteristics of the CNT cathode. Simulation results based on this model agree well with experiments which include measurements of the transmission rate and focus spot size. The model provides a consistent simulation platform for optimization of electron beam optics in CNT x-ray source design. A systematic study of electron beam optics in CNT x-ray tubes led to the development of a new generation of compact x-ray source with multiple pixels. A micro focus field emission x-ray source with a variable focal spot size has been fully characterized and evaluated. It has been built and successfully integrated into micro-CT scanners which are capable of dynamic cardiac imaging of free-breathing small animals with high spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition a spatially distributed high power multi-beam x-ray source has also been designed and integrated into a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) configuration. This system has the potential to reduce the total scan time to 4 seconds and yield superior image quality in breast imaging.

  13. The Morphology of the X-ray Emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's Aurorae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Galand, M.; Grodent, D.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Cravens, T.; Ford, P.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery in XMM-Newton X-ray data of X-ray emission above 2 keY from Jupiter's aurorae has led us to reexamine the Chandra ACIS-S observations taken in Feb 2003. Chandra's superior spatial resolution has revealed that the auroral X-rays with E > 2 keV are emitted from the periphery of the region emitting those with E morphology to that of the FUV emission from the main auroral oval and the polar cap. The low energy emission has previously been established as due to charge exchange between energetic precipitating ions of oxygen and either sulfur or carbon. It seems likely to us that the higher energy emission is due to precipitation of energetic electrons, possibly the same population of electrons responsible for the FUV emission. We discuss our analysis and interpretation.

  14. Thermal X-ray emission from shocked ejecta in Type Ia Supernova Remnants. Prospects for explosion mechanism identification

    CERN Document Server

    Badenes, C; Borkowski, K J; Dominguez, I; Badenes, Carles; Bravo, Eduardo; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Dominguez, Inmaculada

    2003-01-01

    The explosion mechanism behind Type Ia supernovae is a matter of continuing debate. The diverse attempts to identify or at least constrain the physical processes involved in the explosion have been only partially successful so far. In this paper we propose to use the thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants originated in Type Ia events to extract relevant information concerning the explosions themselves. We have produced a grid of thermonuclear supernova models representative of the paradigms currently under debate: pure deflagrations, delayed detonations, pulsating delayed detonations and sub-Chandrasekhar explosions, using their density and chemical composition profiles to simulate the interaction with the surrounding ambient medium and the ensuing plasma heating, non-equilibrium ionization and thermal X-ray emission of the ejecta. Key observational parameters such as electron temperatures, emission measures and ionization time scales are presented and discussed. We find that not only is it poss...

  15. Plasma-based X-ray laser speckle and its application on ferroelectric material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAI Ren-Zhong; NAMIKAWA Kazumichi

    2005-01-01

    A new type of soft X-ray source, i.e. a plasma-based X-ray laser, is found to be promising to conduct transient measurement. By means of picosecond X-ray laser speckles, the dynamic microscopic polarization clusters within cubic (paraelectric) BaTiO3 was directly observed and characterized in a microscopic scale for the first time.This opens a way to study this type of clusters, which usually manifest large external-field response for ferroelectric materials.

  16. A novel X-ray spectrometer for plasma hot spot diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Guo, Yongchao; Xiao, Shali; Yang, Zuhua; Qian, Feng; Cao, LeiFeng; Gu, Yuqiu

    2017-09-01

    A novel X-ray spectrometer is designed to diagnose the different conditions in plasmas. It can provide both X-ray spectroscopy and plasma image information simultaneously. Two pairs of elliptical crystal analyzers are used to measure the X-ray spectroscopy in the range of 2-20 keV. The pinhole imaging system coupled with gated micro-channel plate(MCP) detectors are developed, which allows 20 images to be collected in a single individual experiment. The experiments of measuring spectra were conducted at ;Shenguang-II upgraded laser; in China Academy of Engineering Physics to demonstrate the utility of the spectrometer. The X-ray spectroscopy information was obtained by the image plate(IP). The hot spot imaging experiments were carried out at ;Shenguang-III prototype facility;. We have obtained the hot sport images with the spectrometer, and the signal to noise ratio of 30 ∼ 40 is observed.

  17. The Chandra Planetary Nebulae Survey (ChanPlaNS): III. X-ray Emission from the Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Montez, R; Balick, B; Behar, E; Blackman, E; Bujarrabal, V; Chu, Y -H; Corradi, R L M; De Marco, O; Frank, A; Freeman, M; Frew, D J; Guerrero, M A; Jones, D; Lopez, J A; Miszalski, B; Nordhaus, J; Parker, Q A; Sahai, R; Sandin, C; Schonberner, D; Soker, N; Sokoloski, J L; Steffen, M; Toalá, J A; Ueta, T; Villaver, E; Zijlstra, A

    2014-01-01

    We present X-ray spectral analysis of 20 point-like X-ray sources detected in Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS) observations of 59 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood. Most of these 20 detections are associated with luminous central stars within relatively young, compact nebulae. The vast majority of these point-like X-ray-emitting sources at PN cores display relatively "hard" ($\\geq0.5$~keV) X-ray emission components that are unlikely to be due to photospheric emission from the hot central stars (CSPN). Instead, we demonstrate that these sources are well modeled by optically-thin thermal plasmas. From the plasma properties, we identify two classes of CSPN X-ray emission: (1) high-temperature plasmas with X-ray luminosities, $L_{\\rm X}$, that appear uncorrelated with the CSPN bolometric luminosity, $L_{\\rm bol}$; and (2) lower-temperature plasmas with $L_{\\rm X}/L_{\\rm bol}\\sim10^{-7}$. We suggest these two classes correspond to the physical processes of magnetically active binary comp...

  18. X-Ray Emission from the Pre-Planetary Nebula Henize 3-1475

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, R; Frank, A; Morris, M; Blackman, E G; Sahai, Raghvendra; Kastner, Joel H.; Frank, Adam; Morris, Mark; Blackman, Eric G.

    2003-01-01

    We report the first detection of X-ray emission in a pre-planetary nebula, Hen 3-1475. Pre-planetary nebulae are rare objects in the short transition stage between the Asymptotic Giant Branch and planetary nebula evolutionary phases, and Hen 3-1475, characterised by a remarkable S-shaped chain of optical knots, is one of the most noteworthy members of this class. Observations with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) onboard the Chandra X-Ray observatory show the presence of compact emission coincident with the brightest optical knot in this bipolar object, which is displaced from the central star by 2.7 arcsec along the polar axis. Model fits to the X-ray spectrum indicate an X-ray temperature and luminosity, respectively, of (4.3-5.7) 10^6 K and (4+/-1.4) 10^{31} (D/5 kpc)^2 erg s^{-1}, respectively. Our 3-sigma upper limit on the luminosity of compact X-ray emission from the central star in Hen 3-1475 is ~5 10^{31} (D/5 kpc)^2 erg s^{-1}. The detection of X-rays in Hen 3-1475 is consistent with mod...

  19. Temporal behavior of unresolved transition array emission in water window soft x-ray spectral region from multiply charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, Thanh-Hung, E-mail: dinh@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Higashiguchi, Takeshi, E-mail: higashi@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Li, Bowen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Dunne, Padraig; O' Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Fujioka, Shinsuke [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Nishikino, Masaharu [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2015-09-21

    We have characterized the spectral structure and the temporal history of the laser-produced high-Z multi-charged ion plasmas for the efficient water window soft x-ray sources. Strong unresolved transition array emission was observed due to 4d–4f and 4f–5g transitions from Au, Pb, and Bi plasmas in the 280–700 eV photon energy region. The temporal behavior of the emission was essentially similar of that of the laser pulse with a slight delay between different transitions. These results provide feedback for accurate modeling of the atomic processes with the radiative hydrodynamic simulations.

  20. The Young Binary DQ Tau: A Hunt For X-ray Emission From Colliding Magnetospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Getman, Konstantin V; Salter, Demerese M; Garmire, Gordon P; Hogerheijde, Michiel R

    2011-01-01

    The young high-eccentricity binary DQ Tau exhibits powerful recurring millimeter-band (mm) flaring attributed to collisions between the two stellar magnetospheres near periastron, when the stars are separated by only ~8Rstar. These magnetospheric interactions are expected to have scales and magnetic field strengths comparable to those of large X-ray flares from single pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars observed in the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP). To search for X-rays arising from processes associated with colliding magnetospheres, we performed simultaneous X-ray and mm observations of DQ Tau near periastron phase. We report here several results. 1) As anticipated, DQ Tau was caught in a flare state in both mm and X-rays. A single long X-ray flare spanned the entire 16.5 hour Chandra exposure. 2) The inferred morphology, duration, and plasma temperature of the X-ray flare are typical of those of large flares from COUP stars. 3) However, our study provides three lines of evidence that this X-ray flare lik...

  1. 3D Hydrodynamic & Radiative Transfer Models of X-ray Emission from Colliding Wind Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Christopher M P; Owocki, Stanley P; Corcoran, Michael F; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Sugawara, Yasuharu

    2014-01-01

    Colliding wind binaries (CWBs) are unique laboratories for X-ray astrophysics. The massive stars in these systems possess powerful stellar winds with speeds up to $\\sim$3000 km s$^{-1}$, and their collision leads to hot plasma (up to $\\sim10^8$K) that emit thermal X-rays (up to $\\sim$10 keV). Many X-ray telescopes have observed CWBs, including Suzaku, and our work aims to model these X-ray observations. We use 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to model the wind-wind interaction, and then perform 3D radiative transfer to compute the emergent X-ray flux, which is folded through X-ray telescopes' response functions to compare directly with observations. In these proceedings, we present our models of Suzaku observations of the multi-year-period, highly eccentric systems $\\eta$ Carinae and WR 140. The models reproduce the observations well away from periastron passage, but only $\\eta$ Carinae's X-ray spectrum is reproduced at periastron; the WR 140 model produces too much flux during this more complicated p...

  2. Empirical studies of solar flares: Comparison of X-ray and H alpha filtergrams and analysis of the energy balance of the X-ray plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The physics of solar flares was investigated through a combined analysis of X-ray filtergrams of the high temperature coronal component of flares and H alpha filtergrams of the low temperature chromospheric component. The data were used to study the magnetic field configuration and its changes in solar flares, and to examine the chromospheric location and structure of X-ray bright points (XPB) and XPB flares. Each topic and the germane data are discussed. The energy balance of the thermal X-ray plasma in flares, while not studied, is addressed.

  3. NuSTAR HARD X-RAY SURVEY OF THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION. I. HARD X-RAY MORPHOLOGY AND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE DIFFUSE EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Canipe, Alicia M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Krivonos, Roman; Tomsick, John A.; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hong, Jaesub [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ponti, Gabriele [Max-Planck-Institut f. extraterrestrische Physik, HEG, Garching (Germany); Bauer, Franz [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Alexander, David M. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Baganoff, Frederick K. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusets Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Barret, Didier [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space—National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Forster, Karl [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Giommi, Paolo, E-mail: kaya@astro.columbia.edu [ASI Science Data Center, Via del Politecnico snc I-00133, Roma (Italy); and others

    2015-12-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456–2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with Γ ∼ 1.3–2.3 up to ∼50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe Kα fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broadband X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density (∼10{sup 23} cm{sup −2}), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws with Γ ∼ 2) and set a lower limit of the X-ray luminosity of Sgr A* flare illuminating the Sgr A clouds to L{sub X} ≳ 10{sup 38} erg s{sup −1}. Above ∼20 keV, hard X-ray emission in the central 10 pc region around Sgr A* consists of the candidate PWN G359.95–0.04 and the CHXE, possibly resulting from an unresolved population of massive CVs with white dwarf masses M{sub WD} ∼ 0.9 M{sub ⊙}. Spectral energy distribution analysis suggests that G359.95–0.04 is likely the hard X-ray counterpart of the ultra-high gamma-ray source HESS J1745–290, strongly favoring a leptonic origin of the GC TeV emission.

  4. Infrared Line Emission from Molecular Gas Heated by X-Rays and Energetic Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Philip R.

    1997-01-01

    "I propose to carry out a detailed study using infrared observations (and in some cases, optical and ultraviolet observations) of dense interstellar gas exposed to intense fluxes of X-rays and/or energetic electrons. This is undoubtedly the dominant source of line emission for clouds exposed to X-rays from active galactic nuclei, supernova shocks, or embedded X-ray sources (e.g., X-ray binaries), or to high-temperature or relativistic electrons in galaxy clusters, near powerful radio sources, or supernova remnants. Detailed physical and chemical models of such clouds will be used to analyze infrared observations of the Great Annihilator X-ray source in the Galactic Center, cD galaxies in massive cooling flows, and the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies which will be obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), UV and optical observations of the Crab Nebula obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, and ground-based near-infrared observations of Seyfert nuclei. Results from this work will also be of great relevance to observations obtained with the Submillimeter Wave Astronomical Satellite (SWAS). In the first year of funding of this proposal, my chief collaborators (D.J. Hollenbach and A.G.G.M. Tielens, both of NASA Ames Research Center) and I concentrated on completing our models of the physical conditions in, and the resulting line emission from, dense gas irradiated by X-rays. As noted in the original proposal, some important physical processes were not yet thoroughly incorporated into our models at the time of submission. We completed our modeling of the physical conditions and line emission for essentially the entire range of parameter space (five orders of magnitude in X-ray flux to gas density ratio) occupied by typical dense interstellar clouds in which the gas is mostly neutral and X-rays are important for the ionization, chemistry, and thermal balance.

  5. Origin of X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Emission from the Galactic Central Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshov, D. O.; Cheng, K.-S.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C. M.

    2017-02-01

    We study a possible connection between different non-thermal emissions from the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy. We analyze the origin of the gamma-ray source 2FGL J1745.6‑2858 (or 3FGL J1745.6‑2859c) in the Galactic Center (GC) and the diffuse hard X-ray component recently found by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, as well as the radio emission and processes of hydrogen ionization from this area. We assume that a source in the GC injected energetic particles with power-law spectrum into the surrounding medium in the past or continues to inject until now. The energetic particles may be protons, electrons, or a combination of both. These particles diffuse to the surrounding medium and interact with gas, magnetic field, and background photons to produce non-thermal emissions. We study the spectral and spatial features of the hard X-ray emission and gamma-ray emission by the particles from the central source. Our goal is to examine whether the hard X-ray and gamma-ray emissions have a common origin. Our estimations show that, in the case of pure hadronic models, the expected flux of hard X-ray emission is too low. Despite the fact that protons can produce a non-zero contribution in gamma-ray emission, it is unlikely that they and their secondary electrons can make a significant contribution in hard X-ray flux. In the case of pure leptonic models, it is possible to reproduce both X-ray and gamma-ray emissions for both transient and continuous supply models. However, in the case of the continuous supply model, the ionization rate of molecular hydrogen may significantly exceed the observed value.

  6. Reverse and Forward Shock X-Ray Emission in an Evolutionary Model of Supernova Remnants Undergoing Efficient Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Ellison, Donald C.; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Slane, Patrick O.

    2014-08-01

    We present new models for the forward and reverse shock thermal X-ray emission from core-collapse and Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) that include the efficient production of cosmic rays (CR) via nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Our CR-hydro-NEI code takes into account non-equilibrium ionization, hydrodynamic effects of efficient CR production on the SNR evolution, and collisional temperature equilibration among heavy ions and electrons in both the shocked supernova (SN) ejecta and the shocked circumstellar material. While X-ray emission is emphasized here, our code self-consistently determines both thermal and non-thermal broadband emission from radio to TeV energies. We include Doppler broadening of the spectral lines by thermal motions of the ions and by the remnant expansion. We study, in general terms, the roles that the ambient environment, progenitor models, temperature equilibration, and processes related to DSA have on the thermal and non-thermal spectra. The study of X-ray line emission from young SNRs is a powerful tool for determining specific SN elemental contributions and for providing critical information that helps to understand the type and energetics of the explosion, the composition of the ambient medium in which the SN exploded, and the ionization and dynamics of the hot plasma in the shocked SN ejecta and interstellar medium. With the approaching launch of the next-generation X-ray satellite Astro-H, observations of spectral lines with unprecedented high resolution will become a reality. Our self-consistent calculations of the X-ray spectra from various progenitors will help interpret future observations of SNRs.

  7. Reverse and forward shock X-ray emission in an evolutionary model of supernova remnants undergoing efficient diffusive shock acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Patnaude, Daniel J.; Slane, Patrick O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ellison, Donald C. [Physics Department, North Carolina State University, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Nagataki, Shigehiro, E-mail: slee@astro.isas.jaxa.jp, E-mail: shiu-hang.lee@riken.jp, E-mail: shigehiro.nagataki@riken.jp, E-mail: slane@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: dpatnaude@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: don_ellison@ncsu.edu [RIKEN, Astrophysical Big Bang Laboratory, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-08-20

    We present new models for the forward and reverse shock thermal X-ray emission from core-collapse and Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) that include the efficient production of cosmic rays (CR) via nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Our CR-hydro-NEI code takes into account non-equilibrium ionization, hydrodynamic effects of efficient CR production on the SNR evolution, and collisional temperature equilibration among heavy ions and electrons in both the shocked supernova (SN) ejecta and the shocked circumstellar material. While X-ray emission is emphasized here, our code self-consistently determines both thermal and non-thermal broadband emission from radio to TeV energies. We include Doppler broadening of the spectral lines by thermal motions of the ions and by the remnant expansion. We study, in general terms, the roles that the ambient environment, progenitor models, temperature equilibration, and processes related to DSA have on the thermal and non-thermal spectra. The study of X-ray line emission from young SNRs is a powerful tool for determining specific SN elemental contributions and for providing critical information that helps to understand the type and energetics of the explosion, the composition of the ambient medium in which the SN exploded, and the ionization and dynamics of the hot plasma in the shocked SN ejecta and interstellar medium. With the approaching launch of the next-generation X-ray satellite Astro-H, observations of spectral lines with unprecedented high resolution will become a reality. Our self-consistent calculations of the X-ray spectra from various progenitors will help interpret future observations of SNRs.

  8. X-ray Emission and Corona of the Young Intermediate Mass Binary $\\theta^1$ Ori E

    CERN Document Server

    Huenemoerder, David P; Testa, Paola; Kesich, Anthony; Canizares, Claude R

    2009-01-01

    Theta 1 Ori E is a young, moderate mass binary system, a rarely observed case of spectral-type G-giants of about 3 Solar masses, which are still collapsing towards the main sequence. We have obtained high resolution X-ray spectra with Chandra and find that the system is very active and similar to coronal sources, having emission typical of magnetically confined plasma: a broad temperature distribution with a hot component and significant high energy continuum; narrow emission lines from H- and He-like ions, as well as a range of Fe ions, and relative luminosity, L_x/L_bol = 0.001. Density, while poorly constrained, is consistent with the low density limits as determined from Mg XI and Ne IX emission lines. Coronal elemental abundances are sub-Solar, with Ne being the highest at about 0.4 times Solar. We find a possible trend in Trapezium hot plasmas towards low relative abundances of Fe, O, and Ne, which is hard to explain in terms of the dust depletion scenarios of low-mass young stars. Variability was unusu...

  9. [Experimental investigation of laser plasma soft X-ray source with gas target].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qi-liang; Gong, Yan; Lin, Jing-quan; Chen, Bo; Cao, Jian-lin

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a debris-free laser plasma soft X-ray source with a gas target, which has high operating frequency and can produce strong soft X-ray radiation. The valve of this light source is drived by a piezoelectrical ceramic whose operating frequency is up to 400 Hz. In comparison with laser plasma soft X-ray sources using metal target, the light source is debris-free. And it has higher operating frequency than gas target soft X-ray sources whose nozzle is controlled by a solenoid valve. A channel electron multiplier (CEM) operating in analog mode is used to detect the soft X-ray generated by the laser plasma source, and the CEM's output is fed to to a charge-sensitive preamplifier for further amplification purpose. Output charges from the CEM are proportional to the amplitude of the preamplifier's output voltage. Spectra of CO2, Xe and Kr at 8-14 nm wavelength which can be used for soft X-ray projection lithography are measured. The spectrum for CO2 consists of separate spectral lines originate mainly from the transitions in Li-like and Be-like ions. The Xe spectrum originating mainly from 4d-5f, 4d-4f, 4d-6p and 4d-5p transitions in multiply charged xenon ions. The spectrum for Kr consists of separate spectral lines and continuous broad spectra originating mainly from the transitions in Cu-, Ni-, Co- and Fe-like ions.

  10. Weak Hard X-ray Emission from Two Broad Absorption Line Quasars Observed with NuSTAR: Compton-thick Absorption or Intrinsic X-ray Weakness?

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, B; Alexander, D M; Harrison, F A; Stern, D; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Fabian, A C; Farrah, D; Fiore, F; Fuerst, F; Grefenstette, B W; Hailey, C J; Hickox, R; Madsen, K K; Matt, G; Ogle, P; Risaliti, G; Saez, C; Teng, S H; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2013-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain ~400-600 hard X-ray (>10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed (NH<1E24 cm^{-2}). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be NH~7E24 cm^{-2} if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We d...

  11. 3D models of radiatively driven colliding winds in massive O+O star binaries - III. Thermal X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Pittard, J M

    2009-01-01

    The X-ray emission from the wind-wind collision in short-period massive O+O-star binaries is investigated. The emission is calculated from three-dimensional hydrodynamical models which incorporate gravity, the driving of the winds, orbital motion of the stars, and radiative cooling of the shocked plasma. Changes in the amount of stellar occultation and circumstellar attenuation introduce phase-dependent X-ray variability in systems with circular orbits, while strong variations in the intrinsic emission also occur in systems with eccentric orbits. The X-ray emission in eccentric systems can display strong hysteresis, with the emission softer after periastron than at corresponding orbital phases prior to periastron, reflecting the physical state of the shocked plasma at these times. Furthermore, the rise of the luminosity to maximum does not necessarily follow a 1/D law. Our models further demonstrate that the effective circumstellar column can be highly energy dependent. We simulate Chandra and Suzaku observat...

  12. Rebirth of X-ray Emission from the Born-Again Planetary Nebula A 30

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, M A; Hamann, W -R; Chu, Y -H; Todt, H; Schoenberner, D; Oskinova, L; Gruendl, R A; Steffen, M; Blair, W P; Toala, J A

    2012-01-01

    The planetary nebula (PN) A 30 is believed to have undergone a very late thermal pulse resulting in the ejection of knots of hydrogen-poor material. Using multi-epoch HST images we have detected the angular expansion of these knots and derived an age of 850+280-150 yr. To investigate the spectral and spatial properties of the soft X-ray emission detected by ROSAT, we have obtained Chandra and XMM-Newton deep observations of A 30. The X-ray emission from A 30 can be separated into two components: a point-source at the central star and diffuse X-ray emission associated with the hydrogen-poor knots and the cloverleaf structure inside the nebular shell. To help us assess the role of the current stellar wind in powering this X-ray emission, we have determined the stellar parameters and wind properties of the central star of A 30 using a non-LTE model fit to its optical and UV spectrum. The spatial distribution and spectral properties of the diffuse X-ray emission is highly suggestive that it is generated by the po...

  13. Development of a soft x-ray plasma camera with a Fresnel zone plate to image laser produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kado, M.; Mori, M.; Nishiuchi, M.; Ishino, M.; Kawachi, T.

    2009-09-01

    A soft x-ray plasma camera operated at 3.35nm in the water window x-ray region is developed and demonstrated imaging gas jet plasmas of several spices produced with a 10TW Ti: sapphire laser. The plasma camera consists of a 300nm thick Ag/Ti/Si3N4 x-ray band pass filter with bandwidth of 1.43nm to cut visible light and also to reduce colour aberration of the Fresnel zone plate, a Fresnel zone plate with diameter of 1mm and outermost zone width of 300nm, and a soft x-ray CCD camera. The magnification of the plasma camera is 10. The soft x-ray plasma camera powered by a Fresnel zone plate is a very powerful tool to observe laser produced plasmas since it is 1000 times brighter and has 5 times higher spatial resolution comparing ordinary x-ray pinhole camera. The soft x-ray images of helium, nitrogen, argon, krypton, and xenon gas jet plasmas are obtained changing gas pressure from 0.01MPa to 1MPa.

  14. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons could not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.

  15. Searching for plasmas with anomalous dispersion in the soft X-ray regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Cheng, K T

    2007-08-24

    Over the last decade the electron density of plasmas has been measured using X-ray laser interferometers in the 14 to 47 nm wavelength regime. With the same formula used in decades of experiments with optical interferometers, the data analysis assumes the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index less than one. Over the last several years, interferometer experiments in C, Al, Ag, and Sn plasmas have observed plasmas with index of refraction greater than one at 14 or 47 nm and demonstrated unequivocally that the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction is not always valid as the contribution from bound electrons can dominate the free electrons in certain cases. In this paper we search for other materials with strong anomalous dispersion that could be used in X-ray laser interferometer experiments to help understand this phenomena. An average atom code is used to calculate the plasma properties. This paper discusses the calculations of anomalous dispersion in Ne and Na plasmas near 47 nm and Xe plasmas near 14 nm. With the advent of the FLASH X-ray free electron laser in Germany and the LCLS X-FEL coming online at Stanford in 2 years the average atom code will be an invaluable tool to explore plasmas at higher X-ray energy to identify potential experiments for the future. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be used to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  16. High-brightness laser plasma soft X-ray source using a double-stream gas puff target irradiated with the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Juha, L.; Jungwirth, K.; Kralikova, B.; Krasa, J.; Kubat, P.; Pfeifer, M.; Pina, L.; Prchal, P.; Rohlena, K.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Horvath, M.; Wawer, J

    2004-01-14

    High brightness laser plasma soft X-ray source based on a recently developed double-stream gas puff target irradiated with 0.5 ns laser pulses with energies up to 700 J from the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) is presented. The gas puff target was created by pulsed injection of xenon into a hollow stream of helium using an electromagnetic valve system with the double-nozzle setup. Soft X-ray emission was measured using the transmission grating spectrograph coupled to a CCD camera and the calibrated silicon photodiodes. The absolute soft X-ray production was determined to be 160 J for 540 J of laser energy, giving the soft X-ray conversion efficiency of about 30%. The source has been used in initial experiments on soft X-ray ablation of organic polymers and elemental solids.

  17. A glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube based on carbon nanotube emitter for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Seung Jun; Jeong, Jaeik; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Park, Hunkuk; Kwak, Junghwan; Noh, Eunkyong; Paik, Sanghyun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Ryu, Jehwang

    2016-04-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a carbon nanotube based a glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube without vacuum pump. The x-ray tube consists of four electrodes with anode, focuser, gate, and cathode electrode. The shape of cathode is rectangular for isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The obtained x-ray images show clearly micrometer scale.

  18. Effect of the Metallicity on the X-ray Emission from the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ursino, Eugenio; Roncarelli, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations predict that a significant fraction of the gas in the current Universe is in the form of high temperature, highly ionized plasma emitting and absorbing primarily in the soft X-ray and UV bands, dubbed the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). Its signature should be observable in red-shifted emission and absorption lines from highly ionized elements. To determine the expected WHIM emission in the soft X-ray band we used the output of a large scale hydrodynamic SPH simulation to generate images and spectra with angular resolution of 14'' and energy resolution of 1 eV. The current biggest limit of any hydrodynamic simulation in predicting the X-ray emission comes from metal diffusion. In our investigation, by using four different models for the WHIM metallicity we have found a strong dependence of the emission on the model used, with differences up to almost an order of magnitude. For each model we have investigated the redshift distribution and angular scale of the emission, confirming...

  19. Study of X-ray photoionized Fe plasma and comparisons with astrophysical modeling codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foord, M E; Heeter, R F; Chung, H; vanHoof, P M; Bailey, J E; Cuneo, M E; Liedahl, D A; Fournier, K B; Jonauskas, V; Kisielius, R; Ramsbottom, C; Springer, P T; Keenan, K P; Rose, S J; Goldstein, W H

    2005-04-29

    The charge state distributions of Fe, Na and F are determined in a photoionized laboratory plasma using high resolution x-ray spectroscopy. Independent measurements of the density and radiation flux indicate the ionization parameter {zeta} in the plasma reaches values {zeta} = 20-25 erg cm s{sup -1} under near steady-state conditions. A curve-of-growth analysis, which includes the effects of velocity gradients in a one-dimensional expanding plasma, fits the observed line opacities. Absorption lines are tabulated in the wavelength region 8-17 {angstrom}. Initial comparisons with a number of astrophysical x-ray photoionization models show reasonable agreement.

  20. Investigation of laser produced x-ray plasma created from high pressure gas-puff target using Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki [School of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Daido, Hiroyuki; Choi, I.W. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering] (and others)

    2000-03-01

    We characterize a laser produced gas puff plasma for soft x-ray generation. Strong emission in 11.4 nm wavelength region was observed, using krypton and xenon gas puff targets irradiated by a Nd:YAG laser with an energy of 0.7 J/8 ns. Space resolved x-ray spectral measurement indicated that the source size on the Rayleigh length and the gas density profile. (author)

  1. Quiescent X-ray emission from Cen X-4: a variable thermal component

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Cackett; E.F. Brown; J.M. Miller; R. Wijnands

    2010-01-01

    The nearby neutron star low-mass X-ray binary, Cen X-4, has been in a quiescent state since its last outburst in 1979. Typically, quiescent emission from these objects consists of thermal emission (presumably from the neutron star surface) with an additional hard power-law tail of unknown nature. Va

  2. The Chandra planetary nebula survey (CHANPLANS). II. X-ray emission from compact planetary nebulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, M.; Kastner, J. H. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Montez, R. Jr. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Macquarie Research Centre for Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Jones, D. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Atacama, Copayapu 485, Copiapó (Chile); Miszalski, B. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory, 7935 (South Africa); Sahai, R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Blackman, E.; Frank, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Chu, Y.-H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, Granada, E-18008 (Spain); Lopez, J. A. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Ensenada, Apdo. Postal 22860, Ensenada, B. C. (Mexico); Zijlstra, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bujarrabal, V. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Corradi, R. L. M. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nordhaus, J. [NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellow, Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); and others

    2014-10-20

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ∼1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. CHANPLANS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. CHANPLANS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ∼1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall CHANPLANS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ∼27% and the point source detection rate to ∼36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (≲ 5 × 10{sup 3} yr), and likewise compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (n{sub e} ≳ 1000 cm{sup –3}), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H{sub 2} emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  3. Calibration Of A KrF Laser-Plasma Source For X-Ray Microscopy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, I. C. E.; O'Neill, F.; Zammit, U.; Al-Hadithi, Y.; Eason, R. W.; Rogayski, A. M.; Hills, C. P. B.; Michette, A. G.

    1988-02-01

    Plasma X-ray sources for biological microscopy in the water-window have been produced by focusing tige 200 3, 50 ns Sprit q KrF laser onto carbon targets at irradiance between 2.2 x 10" W/cm4 and 3.7 x 10i3W/cm. Absolute measurements of X-ray production have been made using a calibrated, vacuum X-ray diode detector. A peak conversion efficiency . 10% is measured from KrF laseri)Tight tcto wate-window X-rays at 280 eV < hv < 530 eV for a target irradiance . 1 x x 10 W/cm'. Some measurements with gold and tungsten targets give conversion efficiencies 2$25% at a similar laser irradiance.

  4. Hard X-Ray Burst Detected From Caltech Plasma Jet Experiment Magnetic Reconnection Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Ryan S.; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-10-01

    In the Caltech plasma jet experiment a 100 kA MHD driven jet becomes kink unstable leading to a Rayleigh-Taylor instability that quickly causes a magnetic reconnection event. Movies show that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is simultaneous with voltage spikes across the electrodes that provide the current that drives the jet. Hard x-rays between 4 keV and 9 keV have now been observed using an x-ray scintillator detector mounted just outside of a kapton window on the vacuum chamber. Preliminary results indicate that the timing of the x-ray burst coincides with a voltage spike on the electrodes occurring in association with the Rayleigh-Taylor event. The x-ray signal accompanies the voltage spike and Rayleigh-Taylor event in approximately 50% of the shots. A possible explanation for why the x-ray signal is sometimes missing is that the magnetic reconnection event may be localized to a specific region of the plasma outside the line of sight of the scintillator. The x-ray signal has also been seen accompanying the voltage spike when no Rayleigh-Taylor is observed. This may be due to the interframe timing on the camera being longer than the very short duration of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  5. Giant coronal loops dominate the quiescent X-ray emission in rapidly rotating M stars

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, O; Garraffo, C; Saar, S H; Wolk, S J; Kashyap, V L; Drake, J J; Pillitteri, I

    2016-01-01

    Observations indicate that magnetic fields in rapidly rotating stars are very strong, on both small and large scales. What is the nature of the resulting corona? Here we seek to shed some light on this question. We use the results of an anelastic dynamo simulation of a rapidly rotating fully-convective M-star to drive a physics-based model for the stellar corona. We find that due to the several kilo Gauss large-scale magnetic fields at high latitudes, the corona and its X-ray emission are dominated by star-size large hot loops, while the smaller, underlying colder loops are not visible much in the X-ray. Based on this result we propose that, in rapidly rotating stars, emission from such coronal structures dominates the quiescent, cooler but saturated X-ray emission.

  6. X-RAY EMISSION AND ABSORPTION FEATURES DURING AN ENERGETIC THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURST FROM IGR J17062-6143

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D. [Astronomical Institute ' ' Anton Pannekoek' ' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fabian, A. C., E-mail: degenaar@umich.edu [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OHA (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-20

    Type-I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions occurring in the surface layers of accreting neutron stars. These events are powerful probes of the physics of neutron stars and their surrounding accretion flow. We analyze a very energetic type-I X-ray burst from the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary IGR J17062-6143 that was detected with Swift on 2012 June 25. The light curve of the {approx_equal}18 minute long X-ray burst tail shows an episode of {approx_equal}10 minutes during which the intensity is strongly fluctuating by a factor of {approx_equal}3 above and below the underlying decay trend on a timescale of seconds. The X-ray spectrum reveals a highly significant emission line around {approx_equal}1 keV, which can be interpreted as an Fe-L shell line caused by the irradiation of cold gas. We also detect significant absorption lines and edges in the Fe-K band, which are strongly suggestive of the presence of hot, highly ionized gas along the line of sight. None of these features are present in the persistent X-ray spectrum of the source. The timescale of the strong intensity variations, the velocity width of the Fe-L emission line (assuming Keplerian motion), and photoionization modeling of the Fe-K absorption features each independently point to gas at a radius of {approx_equal} 10{sup 3} km as the source of these features. The unusual X-ray light curve and spectral properties could have plausibly been caused by a disruption of the accretion disk due to the super-Eddington fluxes reached during the X-ray burst.

  7. Ultrafast atomic process in X-ray emission by using inner-shell ionization method for sodium and carbon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-07-01

    An ultrafast inner-shell ionization process with X-ray emission stimulated by high-intensity short-pulse X-ray is studied. Carbon and sodium atoms are treated as target matter. It is shown that atomic processes of the target determine the necessary X-ray intensity for X-ray laser emission as well as the features of X-ray laser such as wavelength and duration time. The intensity also depends on the density of initial atoms. Furthermore, we show that as the intensity of X-ray source becomes high, the multi-inner-shell ionization predominates, leading to the formation of hollow atoms. As the density of hollow atoms is increased by the pumping X-ray power, the emission of X-rays is not only of significance for high brightness X-ray measurement but also is good for X-ray lasing. New classes of experiments of pump X-ray probe and X-ray laser are suggested. (author)

  8. Line Emission and X-ray Line Polarization of Multiply Ionized Mo Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, E. E.; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Stafford, A.; Safronova, U. I.; Shrestha, I. K.; Schultz, K. A.; Childers, R.; Cooper, M. C.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Hell, N.; Brown, G. V.

    2016-10-01

    We present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the line emission from multiply ionized Mo ions produced by two different sets of experiments: at LLNL EBIT and the pulsed power generator Zebra at UNR. Mo line emission and polarization measurements were accomplished at EBIT for the first time. In particular, benchmarking experiments at the LLNL EBIT with Mo ions produced at electron beam energies from 2.75 keV up to 15 keV allowed us to break down these very complicated spectra into spectra with only few ionization stages and to select processes that influence them as well as to measure line polarization. The EBIT data were recorded using the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer and a crystal spectrometer with a Ge crystal. X-ray Mo spectra and pinhole images were collected from Z-pinch plasmas produced from various wire loads. Non-LTE modeling, high-precision relativistic atomic and polarization data were used to analyze L-shell Mo spectra. The influence of different plasma processes including electron beams on Mo line radiation is summarized. This work was supported by NNSA under DOE Grant DE-NA0002954. Experiments at the NTF/UNR were funded in part by DE-NA0002075. Work at LLNL was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. XMM-Newton confirmation of Soft X-ray excess emission in clusters of galaxies - the discovery of O VII emission from an extended warm baryonic component

    CERN Document Server

    Kaastra, J S; Tamura, T; Paerels, F B S; Den Herder, J W A

    2003-01-01

    We investigate a sample of 14 clusters of galaxies observed with XMM-Newton in a search for soft X-ray excess emission. In five of these clusters a significant soft excess is evident. This soft X-ray excess is compared with the thermal emission from both the hot intracluster gas and any cooling (flow) gas that may be present. A warm (kT=0.2 keV), extended (several Mpc), plasma component is particularly clear in the outer parts of the cluster, where the normal cluster X-ray emission is weak. This warm component causes both a thermal soft X-ray excess at low energies (below 0.4-0.5 keV), as well as O VII line emission with a redshift consistent with a cluster origin, and not easily interpreted as Galactic foreground emission. The intensity of this component is commensurate with what has been measured before with the ROSAT PSPC in the 1/4 keV band. We attribute this component to emission from intercluster filaments of the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium in the vicinity of these clusters. For the central regions of...

  10. Characteristics of ultrafast K line hard x-ray source from femtosecond terawatt laser-produced plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈敏; 陈建文; 高鸿奕; 陆培祥; 徐至展

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical studies and analytical scalings were carried out to find the optimized laser parameters and target conditions so that ultrashort hard x-ray pulses and high x-ray power could be achieved. The dependence of laser intensity and wavelength on the yield of K-shell x-ray emission was studied. We propose an optimal design for a foil target for producing high-yield hard x-ray pulses of customizing duration.

  11. Single crystal silicon carbide detector of emitted ions and soft x rays from power laser-generated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Foti, G.; Giuffrida, L.; Puglisi, D.; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Rosinski, M.; Margarone, D.; Krasa, J.; Velyhan, A.; Ullschmied, U.

    2009-06-01

    A single-crystal silicon carbide (SiC) detector was used for measurements of soft x rays, electrons, and ion emission from laser-generated plasma obtained with the use of the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) at intensities of the order of 1016 W/cm2 and pulse duration of 300 ps. Measurements were performed by varying the laser intensity and the nature of the irradiated target. The spectra obtained by using the SiC detector show not only the photopeak due to UV and soft x-ray detection, but also various peaks due to the detection of energetic charged particles. Time-of-flight technique was employed to determine the ion kinetic energy of particles emitted from the plasma and to perform a comparison between SiC and traditional ion collectors. The detector was also employed by inserting absorber films of different thickness in front of the SiC surface in order to determine, as a first approximation, the mean energy of the soft x-ray emission from the plasma.

  12. X-ray emission from Planetary Nebulae. I. Spherically symmetric numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Stute, M; Stute, Matthias; Sahai, Raghvendra

    2006-01-01

    (abridged) The interaction of a fast wind with a spherical Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) wind is thought to be the basic mechanism for shaping Pre-Planetary Nebulae (PPN) and later Planetary Nebulae (PN). Due to the large speed of the fast wind, one expects extended X-ray emission from these objects, but X-ray emission has only been detected in a small fraction of PNs and only in one PPN. Using numerical simulations we investigate the constraints that can be set on the physical properties of the fast wind (speed, mass-flux, opening angle) in order to produce the observed X-ray emission properties of PPNs and PNs. We combine numerical hydrodynamical simulations including radiative cooling using the code FLASH with calculations of the X-ray properties of the resulting expanding hot bubble using the atomic database ATOMDB. In this first study, we compute X-ray fluxes and spectra using one-dimensional models. Comparing our results with analytical solutions, we find some agreements and many disagreements. In parti...

  13. Search of X-ray emission from roAp stars: The case of gamma Equulei

    CERN Document Server

    Stelzer, B; Schöller, M; Hubrig, S; Cowley, C

    2011-01-01

    The detection of X-ray emission from Ap stars can be an indicator for the presence of magnetic activity and dynamo action, provided different origins for the emission, such as wind shocks and close late-type companions, can be excluded. Here we report on results for gamma Equu, the only roAp star for which an X-ray detection is reported in ROSAT catalogs. We use high resolution imaging in X-rays with Chandra and in the near-infrared with NACO/VLT that allow us to spatially resolve companions down to ~1" and ~0.06" separations, respectively. The bulk of the X-ray emission is associated with a companion of gamma Equu identified in our NACO image. Assuming coevality with the primary roAp star (~900 Myr), the available photometry for the companion points at a K-type star with ~0.6 M_sun. Its X-ray properties are in agreement with the predictions for its age and mass. An excess of photons with respect to the expected background and contribution from the nearby companion is observed near the optical position of gam...

  14. X-Ray Emission by A Shocked Fast Wind from the Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Akashi, M; Behar, E; Akashi, Muhammad; Soker, Noam; Behar, Ehud

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the X-ray emission from the shocked fast wind blown by the central stars of planetary nebulae (PNs) and compare with observations. Using spherically symmetric self similar solutions with radiative cooling, we calculate the flow structure and X-ray temperature for a fast wind slamming into a previously ejected slow wind. We find that the observed X-ray emission of six PNs can be accounted for by shocked wind segments that were expelled during the early PN phase, if the fast wind speed is moderate, ~400-600 km/sec, and the mass loss rate is a few times 10^{-7} Mo/year. We find, as proposed previously, that the morphology of the X-ray emission is in the form of a narrow ring inner to the optical bright part of the nebula. The bipolar X-ray morphology of several observed PNs, which indicates an important role of jets rather than a spherical fast wind, cannot be explained by the flow studied here.

  15. [C II] emission from galactic nuclei in the presence of X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Langer, William D

    2015-01-01

    The luminosity of [C II] is used to probe the star formation rate in galaxies, but the correlation breaks down in some active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Models of the [C II] emission from galactic nuclei do not include the influence of X-rays on the carbon ionization balance, which may be a factor in reducing the [C II] luminosity. We calculate the [C II] luminosity in galactic nuclei under the influence of bright sources of X-rays. We solve the balance equation of the ionization states of carbon as a function of X-ray flux, electron, atomic hydrogen, and molecular hydrogen density. These are input to models of [CII] emission from the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic nuclei. We also solve the distribution of the ionization states of oxygen and nitrogen in highly ionized regions. We find that the dense warm ionized medium (WIM) and dense photon dominated regions (PDRs) dominate the [C II] emission when no X-rays are present. The X-rays in galactic nuclei can affect strongly the C$^+$ abundance in the WIM con...

  16. X-ray Emission from Eta Carinae near Periastron in 2009 I: A Two State Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Russell, Christopher; Pollock, Andrew M T; Gull, Theodore R; Teodoro, Mairan; Madura, Thomas I; Damineli, Augusto; Pittard, Julian M

    2014-01-01

    X-ray emission from the supermassive binary system Eta Carinae declines sharply around periastron. This X-ray minimum has two distinct phases - the lowest flux phase in the first ~3 weeks and a brighter phase thereafter. In 2009, the Chandra X-ray Observatory monitored the first phase five times and found the lowest observed flux at ~1.9e-12 ergs cm-2 s-1 (3-8 keV). The spectral shape changed such that the hard band above ~4 keV dropped quickly at the beginning and the soft band flux gradually decreased to its lowest observed value in ~2 weeks. The hard band spectrum had begun to recover by that time. This spectral variation suggests that the shocked gas producing the hottest X-ray gas near the apex of the wind-wind collision (WWC) is blocked behind the dense inner wind of the primary star, which later occults slightly cooler gas downstream. Shocked gas previously produced by the system at earlier orbital phases is suggested to produce the faint residual X-ray emission seen when the emission near the apex is ...

  17. Radio emission of the Galactic X-rays binaries with relativistic jets

    CERN Document Server

    Trushkin, S A

    2000-01-01

    Variable non-thermal radio emission from Galactic X-ray binaries is a trace of relativistic jets, created near accretion disks. The spectral characteristics of a lot of radio flares in the X-ray binaries with jets (RJXB) is discussed in this report. We carried out several long daily monitoring programs with the RATAN-600 radio telescope of the sources: SS433, Cyg X-3, LSI+61o303, GRS 1915+10 and some others. We also reviewed some data from the GBI monitoring program at two frequencies and hard X-ray BATSE (20-100 keV) and soft X-ray RTXE (2-12 keV) ASM data. We confirmed that flaring radio emission of Cyg X-3 correlated with hard and anti-correlated with soft X-ray emission during the strong flare (>$ Jy) in May 1997. During two orbital periods we investigated radio light curves of the remarkable X-binary LSI+61o303. Two flaring events near a phase 0.6 of the 26.5-day orbital period have been detected for first time at four frequencies simultaneously. Powerful flaring events of SS433 were detected at six freq...

  18. MODELING THE THERMAL DIFFUSE SOFT AND HARD X-RAY EMISSION IN M17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez, P. F.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Esquivel, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-543, 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Rosado, M. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-248, 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Reyes-Iturbide, J., E-mail: pablo@nucleares.unam.mx, E-mail: ary@nucleares.unam.mx, E-mail: esquivel@nucleares.unam.mx, E-mail: margarit@astro.unam.mx [LATO-DCET/Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Rodovia Jorge Amado, km 16, 45662-000 Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2013-04-10

    We present numerical models of very young wind driven superbubbles. The parameters chosen for the simulations correspond to the particular case of the M17 nebula, but are appropriate for any young superbubble in which the wind sources have not completely dispersed their parental cloud. From the simulations, we computed the diffuse emission in the soft ([0.5-1.5] keV) and hard ([1.5-5] keV) X-ray bands. The total luminosity in our simulations agrees with the observations of Hyodo et al., about two orders of magnitude below the prediction of the standard model of Weaver et al.. The difference with respect to the standard (adiabatic) model is the inclusion of radiative cooling, which is still important in such young bubbles. We show that for this type of object the diffuse hard X-ray luminosity is significant compared to that of soft X-rays, contributing as much as 10% of the total luminosity, in contrast with more evolved bubbles where the hard X-ray emission is indeed negligible, being at least four orders of magnitude lower than the soft X-ray emission.

  19. Evidence for Elevated X-ray Emission in Local Lyman Break Galaxy Analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Basu-Zych, Antara R; Hornschemeier, Ann E; Goncalves, Thiago S; Fragos, Tassos; Heckman, Tim; Overzier, Roderik A; Ptak, Andrew F; Schiminovich, David

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the relationship between the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity (L_X), assumed to originate from X-ray binaries (XRBs), and star formation rate (SFR) in UV-selected z2). We show that these LBAs are unlikely to harbor AGN, based on their optical and X-ray spectra and the spatial distribution of the X-rays in three spatially extended cases. We expect that high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) dominate the X-ray emission in these galaxies, based on their high specific SFRs (sSFRs=SFR/M* > 10^{-9}/yr), which suggest the prevalence of young stellar populations. Since both LBAs and LBGs have lower dust attenuations and metallicities compared to similar samples of more typical local galaxies, we investigate the effects of dust extinction and metallicity on the L_X/SFR for the broader population of galaxies with high sSFRs (>10^{-10}/yr). The estimated dust extinctions (corresponding to column densities of N_H2 LBGs may yield higher total HMXB luminosity than found in typical galaxies in the local Universe.

  20. Revising the Local Bubble Model due to Solar Wind Charge Exchange X-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Shelton, Robin L

    2008-01-01

    The hot Local Bubble surrounding the solar neighborhood has been primarily studied through observations of its soft X-ray emission. The measurements were obtained by attributing all of the observed local soft X-rays to the bubble. However, mounting evidence shows that the heliosphere also produces diffuse X-rays. The source is solar wind ions that have received an electron from another atom. The presence of this alternate explanation for locally produced diffuse X-rays calls into question the existence and character of the Local Bubble. This article addresses these questions. It reviews the literature on solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray production, finding that SWCX accounts for roughly half of the observed local 1/4 keV X-rays found at low latitudes. This article also makes predictions for the heliospheric O VI column density and intensity, finding them to be smaller than the observational error bars. Evidence for the continued belief that the Local Bubble contains hot gas includes the remaining local...

  1. Final Report LDRD 02-ERD-013 Dense Plasma Characterization by X-ray Thomson Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G; Pollaine, S M; Hammer, J H; Rogers, F; Meezan, N B; Chung, H; Lee, R W

    2005-02-11

    We have successfully demonstrated spectrally-resolved x-ray scattering in a variety of dense plasmas as a powerful new technique for providing microscopic dense plasma parameters unattainable by other means. The results have also been used to distinguish between ionization balance models. This has led to 10 published or to be published papers, 8 invited talks and significant interest from both internal and external experimental plasma physicists and the international statistical plasma physics theory community.

  2. Suzaku Detection of Thermal X-Ray Emission Associated with the Western Radio Lobe of Fornax A

    CERN Document Server

    Seta, Hiromi; Inoue, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of X-ray mapping observations of the western radio lobe of the Fornax A galaxy, using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) onboard the Suzaku satellite with a total exposure time of 327 ks. The purpose of this study is to investigate the nature and spatial extent of the diffuse thermal emission around the lobe by exploiting the low and stable background of the XIS. The diffuse thermal emission had been consistently reported in all previous studies of this region, but its physical nature and relation to the radio lobe had not been examined in detail. Using the data set covering the entire western lobe and the central galaxy NGC 1316, as well as comparison sets in the vicinity, we find convincingly the presence of thermal plasma emission with a temperature of ~1 keV in excess of conceivable background and contaminating emission (cosmic X-ray background, Galactic halo, intra-cluster gas of Fornax, interstellar gas of NGC 1316, and the ensemble of point-like sources). Its surface brightness...

  3. A Model of Polarized X-ray Emission from Twinkling Synchrotron Supernova Shells

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, A M; Bloemen, J B G M; Herder, J W den; Kaastra, J S

    2009-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray emission components were recently detected in many young supernova remnants (SNRs). There is even an emerging class - SN1006, RXJ1713.72-3946, Vela Jr, and others - that is dominated by non-thermal emission in X-rays, also probably of synchrotron origin. Such emission results from electrons/positrons accelerated well above TeV energies in the spectral cut-off regime. In the case of diffusive shock acceleration, which is the most promising acceleration mechanism in SNRs, very strong magnetic fluctuations with amplitudes well above the mean magnetic field must be present. Starting from such a fluctuating field, we have simulated images of polarized X-ray emission of SNR shells and show that these are highly clumpy with high polarizations up to 50%. Another distinct characteristic of this emission is the strong intermittency, resulting from the fluctuating field amplifications. The details of this "twinkling" polarized X-ray emission of SNRs depend strongly on the magnetic-field fluctuation spe...

  4. Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Two Broad Absorption Line Quasars Observed with NuStar: Compton-Thick Absorption or Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Harrison, F. A.; Stern, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W..; Fabian, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Fiore, F.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R.; Madsen, K. K.; Matt, G.; Ogle, P.; Risaliti, G.; Saez, C.; Teng, S. H.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain approx. or equal to 400-600 hard X-ray (is greater than or equal to 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed N(sub H) is less than or equal to 10(exp24) cm(exp-2). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N(sub H) 7 × 10(exp 24) cm(exp-2) if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe Ka line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  5. Anisotropy of BN and Be x-ray-emission bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansour, A.; Schnatterly, S.E.

    1987-12-15

    We present measurements of the K emission spectra of hexagonal Be and BN (h-Be and h-BN). The anisotropy of the emission allows us to separate the bands into their sigma and ..pi.. components, enabling us to demonstrate the unambiguous ..pi.. character of the B core exciton. We find that the exciton presents a double-peaked structure which we attribute to phonon ringing. For the first time we are able to separate into ..pi.. and sigma components the doubly ionized K emission bands of B and N in h-BN and of Be in h-Be, revealing the effect of the spectator core hole on the shape of the density of states. Such an effect is in qualitative agreement with the final-state rule, although the local p density of states is distorted more than has previously been reported.

  6. Emission statistics of X-ray induced photoelectrons and its comparison with electron- and ion-induced electron emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohya, K. [Institute of Technology and Science, University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan)], E-mail: ohya@ee.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Inai, K. [Graduate School of Advanced Technology and Science, University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan); Nisawa, A. [RIKEN Harima Institute, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Itoh, A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    The emission statistics of secondary electrons from a gold metal surface induced by monochromatic X-rays is studied by Monte Carlo simulations. The number distributions of emitted electrons n and their mean values {gamma} are calculated systematically for incident photon energies from 1 to 100 keV. The results are compared with recent experimental results measured at the SPring-8 X-ray beam facility (BL15XU). We found that both theoretical and experimental results of the statistical number distributions of secondary electrons can be reproduced fairly well by Polya-type functions, showing small probabilities for one-electron emission (n = 1) and broad distributions for high-n emission. In contrast, these features can never be reproduced by Poisson statistics. Furthermore, calculated emission yields {gamma} are found to depend rather weakly on the incident X-ray energy. These results indicate clearly that fast photoelectrons produced by high-energy X-rays are responsible for high-n emission although the photoionization cross sections are considerably smaller at higher X-ray energies. Simulations are also extended to electron and ion bombardments, and a comprehensive comparison between X-rays and charged particle impacts is given for the emission statistics of electrons from a metal surface.

  7. Chandra Observation of an X-ray Flare at Saturn: Evidence for Direct Solar Control on Saturn's Disk X-ray Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, A; Elsner, R F; Ford, P G; Gladstone, G R; Bhardwaj, Anil; Cravens, Thomas E.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Ford, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    Saturn was observed by Chandra ACIS-S on 20 and 26-27 January 2004 for one full Saturn rotation (10.7 hr) at each epoch. We report here the first observation of an X-ray flare from Saturn's non-auroral (low-latitude) disk, which is seen in direct response to an M6-class flare emanating from a sunspot that was clearly visible from both Saturn and Earth. Saturn's disk X-ray emissions are found to be variable on time scales of hours to weeks to months, and correlated with solar F10.7 cm flux. Unlike Jupiter, X-rays from Saturn's polar (auroral) region have characteristics similar to those from its disk. This report, combined with earlier studies, establishes that disk X-ray emissions of the giant planets Saturn and Jupiter are directly regulated by processes happening on the Sun. We suggest that these emissions could be monitored to study X-ray flaring from solar active regions when they are on the far side and not visible to Near-Earth space weather satellites.

  8. X-ray emission and absorption features during an energetic thermonuclear X-ray burst from IGR J17062-6143

    CERN Document Server

    Degenaar, N; Wijnands, R; Altamirano, D; Fabian, A C

    2012-01-01

    Type-I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions occurring in the surface layers of accreting neutron stars. These events are powerful probes of the physics of neutron stars and their surrounding accretion flow. We analyze a very energetic type-I X-ray burst from the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary IGR J17062-6143 that was detected with Swift on 2012 June 25. The light curve of the ~18 min long X-ray burst tail shows an episode of ~10 min during which the intensity is strongly fluctuating by a factor of ~3 above and below the underlying decay trend, on a time scale of seconds. The X-ray spectrum reveals a highly significant emission line around ~1 keV, which can be interpreted as a Fe-L shell line caused by irradiation of cold gas. We also detect significant absorption lines and edges in the Fe-K band, which are strongly suggestive of the presence of hot, highly ionized gas along the line of sight. None of these features are present in the persistent X-ray spectrum of the source. The time scale of the stro...

  9. K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of laser produced aluminum plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Channprit; Chaurasia, S.; Poswal, A. K.; Munda, D. S.; Rossall, A. K.; Deo, M. N.; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2017-01-01

    Optimization of a laser produced plasma (LPP) X-ray source has been performed by analyzing K-shell emission spectra of Al plasma at a laser intensity of 1013-1014 W/cm2. The effect of varying the laser intensity on the emissivity of the K-shell resonance lines is studied and found to follow a power law, Ix =(IL) α with α=2.2, 2.3, 2.4 for Heβ, Heγ, Heδ respectively. The emission of these resonance lines has been found to be heavily anisotropic. A Python language based code has been developed to generate an intensity profile of K-shell spectral lines from the raw data. In theoretical calculations, the temperature is estimated by taking the ratio of the Li-like satellite (1s22p-1s2p3p) and the Heβ (1s2-1s3p) resonance line and the ratio of the He-like satellite (1s2p-2p2) and the Lyα (1s-2p) resonance line. To determine the plasma density, stark broadening of the Lyβ spectral line is used. Simulation was carried out using the FLYCHK code to generate a synthetic emission spectrum. The results obtained by FLYCHK are Te=160 eV, Th=1 keV, f=0.008, ne=5×1020 cm-3 and the analytical model resulted Te=260-419 eV and ne=3x1020 cm-3.

  10. Probing the X-ray emission of old nulling pulsars with high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posselt, Bettina

    2013-10-01

    We propose XMM-Newton observations of two nulling radio pulsars with magnetic fields B>10^(13)G. These long-period pulsars have spin-down properties, including characteristic ages, similar to those of the Magnificent Seven which are bright thermal X-ray emitters. Nulling pulsars have been suggested as evolutionary stage where the magnetospheric emission of a pulsar ceases. In contrast, no magnetospheric emission was detected at all at X-ray or radio wavelengths for the Magnificent Seven. The proposed XMM-Newton observations will probe the magneto-thermal NS evolution model as a potential link between the radio pulsar population and the Magnificent Seven. They will also provide for the first time an X-ray characterization of nulling pulsars with large magnetic fields.

  11. Water maser emission from X-ray-heated circumnuclear gas in active galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, David A.; Maloney, Philip R.; Conger, Sarah

    1994-01-01

    We have modeled the physical and chemical conditions present within dense circumnuclear gas that is irradiated by X-rays from an active galactic nucleus. Over a wide range of X-ray fluxes and gas pressures, the effects of X-ray heating give rise to a molecular layer at temperatures of 400-1000 K within which the water abundance is large. The physical conditions within this molecular layer naturally give rise to collisionally pumped maser emission in the 6(sub 16) - 5(sub 23) 22 GHz transition of ortho-water, with predicted maser luminosities of 10(exp 2 +/- 0.5) solar luminosity per sq. pc of illuminated area. Given plausible assumptions about the geometry of the source and about the degree to which the maser emission is anisotropic, such surface luminosities are sufficient to explain the large apparent luminosities observed in water maser sources that are associated with active galactic nuclei.

  12. The X-ray synchrotron emission of RCW 86 and the implications for its age

    CERN Document Server

    Vink, J; Van der Heyden, K J; Bykov, A; Bamba, A; Yamazaki, R; Vink, Jacco; Bleeker, Johan; Heyden, Kurt van der; Bykov, Andrei; Bamba, Aya; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2006-01-01

    We report here X-ray imaging spectroscopy observations of the northeastern shell of the supernova remnant RCW 86 with Chandra and XMM-Newton. Along this part of the shell the dominant X-ray radiation mechanism changes from thermal to synchrotron emission. We argue that both the presence of X-ray synchrotron radiation and the width of the synchrotron emitting region suggest a locally higher shock velocity of V_s = 2700 km/s and a magnetic field of B = 24+/-5 microGauss. Moreover, we also show that a simple power law cosmic ray electron spectrum with an exponential cut-off cannot explain the broad band synchrotron emission. Instead a concave electron spectrum is needed, as predicted by non-linear shock acceleration models. Finally, we show that the derived shock velocity strengthens the case that RCW 86 is the remnant of SN 185.

  13. Water maser emission from X-ray-heated circumnuclear gas in active galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, David A.; Maloney, Philip R.; Conger, Sarah

    1994-12-01

    We have modeled the physical and chemical conditions present within dense circumnuclear gas that is irradiated by X-rays from an active galactic nucleus. Over a wide range of X-ray fluxes and gas pressures, the effects of X-ray heating give rise to a molecular layer at temperatures of 400-1000 K within which the water abundance is large. The physical conditions within this molecular layer naturally give rise to collisionally pumped maser emission in the 616 - 523 22 GHz transition of ortho-water, with predicted maser luminosities of 102 +/- 0.5 solar luminosity per sq. pc of illuminated area. Given plausible assumptions about the geometry of the source and about the degree to which the maser emission is anisotropic, such surface luminosities are sufficient to explain the large apparent luminosities observed in water maser sources that are associated with active galactic nuclei.

  14. Charge-Transfer induced EUV and Soft X-ray emissions in the Heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Koutroumpa, D; Kharchenko, V; Dalgarno, A; Pepino, R; Izmodenov, V; Quemerais, E

    2006-01-01

    We study the EUV/soft X-ray emission generated by charge transfer between solar wind heavy ions and interstellar H and He neutral atoms in the inner Heliosphere. We present heliospheric maps and spectra for stationary solar wind, depending on solar cycle phase, solar wind anisotropies and composition, line of sight direction and observer position. A time-dependant simulation of the X-ray intensity variations due to temporary solar wind enhancement is compared to XMM Newton recorded data of the Hubble Deep Field North observation (Snowden et al. 2004). Results show that the heliospheric component can explain a large fraction of the line intensity below 1.3 keV, strongly attenuating the need for soft X-ray emission from the Local Interstellar Bubble.

  15. X-ray emission and dynamics from large diameter superbubbles: The case of N 70 superbubble

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-González, Ary; Rosado, Margarita; Esquivel, Alejandro; Reyes-Iturbide, Jorge; Toledo-Roy, J Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The morphology, dynamics and thermal X-ray emission of the superbubble N70 is studied by means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations, carried out with the {\\sc{yguaz\\'u-a}} code. We have considered different scenarios: the superbubble being the product of a single supernova remnant, of the stellar winds from an OB association, or the result of the joint action of stellar winds and a supernova event. Our results show that, in spite that all scenarios produce bubbles with the observed physical size, only those where the bubble is driven by stellar winds and a SN event are successful to explain the general morphology, dynamics and the X-ray luminosity of N70. Our models predict temperatures in excess of $10^8 \\mathrm{K}$ at the interior of the superbubble, however the density is too low and the emission in thermal X-ray above $2 \\mathrm{keV}$ is too faint to be detected.

  16. Multireference X-Ray Emission and Absorption Spectroscopy calculations from Monte Carlo Configuration Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, J P

    2015-01-01

    We adapt the method of Monte Carlo configuration interaction to calculate core-hole states and use this for the computation of X-ray emission and absorption values. We consider CO, CH$_{4}$, NH$_{3}$, H$_{2}$O, HF, HCN, CH$_{3}$OH, CH$_{3}$F, HCl and NO using a 6-311G** basis. We also look at carbon monoxide with a stretched geometry and discuss the dependence of its results on the cutoff used. The Monte Carlo configuration interaction results are compared with EOM-CCSD values for X-ray emission and with experiment for X-ray absorption. Oscillator strengths are also computed and we quantify the multireference nature of the wavefunctions to suggest when approaches based on a single reference would be expected to be successful.

  17. Obtaining attosecond x-ray pulses using a self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Zholents

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a technique for the generation of a solitary attosecond x-ray pulse in a free-electron laser (FEL, via a process of self-amplified spontaneous emission. In this method, electrons experience an energy modulation upon interacting with laser pulses having a duration of a few cycles within single-period wiggler magnets. Two consecutive modulation sections, followed by compression in a dispersive section, are used to obtain a single, subfemtosecond spike in the electron peak current. This region of the electron beam experiences an enhanced growth rate for FEL amplification. After propagation through a long undulator, this current spike emits a ∼250   attosecond x-ray pulse whose intensity dominates the x-ray emission from the rest of the electron bunch.

  18. MASS AND ENERGY OF ERUPTING SOLAR PLASMA OBSERVED WITH THE X-RAY TELESCOPE ON HINODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin-Yi; Moon, Yong-Jae; Kim, Kap-Sung [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Raymond, John C.; Reeves, Katharine K., E-mail: jlee@khu.ac.kr [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    We investigate seven eruptive plasma observations by Hinode/XRT. Their corresponding EUV and/or white light coronal mass ejection features are visible in some events. Five events are observed in several passbands in X-rays, which allows for the determination of the eruptive plasma temperature using a filter ratio method. We find that the isothermal temperatures vary from 1.6 to 10 MK. These temperatures are an average weighted toward higher temperature plasma. We determine the mass constraints of eruptive plasmas by assuming simplified geometrical structures of the plasma with isothermal plasma temperatures. This method provides an upper limit to the masses of the observed eruptive plasmas in X-ray passbands since any clumping causes the overestimation of the mass. For the other two events, we assume the temperatures are at the maximum temperature of the X-ray Telescope (XRT) temperature response function, which gives a lower limit of the masses. We find that the masses in XRT, ∼3 × 10{sup 13}-5 × 10{sup 14} g, are smaller in their upper limit than the total masses obtained by LASCO, ∼1 × 10{sup 15} g. In addition, we estimate the radiative loss, thermal conduction, thermal, and kinetic energies of the eruptive plasma in X-rays. For four events, we find that the thermal conduction timescales are much shorter than the duration of eruption. This result implies that additional heating during the eruption may be required to explain the plasma observations in X-rays for the four events.

  19. Instantaneous x-ray radiation energy from laser produced polystyrene plasmas for shock ignition conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Wanli; Wei, Huiyue; Li, Zhichao; Yi, Rongqing; Zhu, Tuo; Song, Tianmin; Huang, Chengwu; Yang, Jiamin [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Laser target energy coupling mechanism is crucial in the shock ignition (SI) scheme, and x-ray radiation energy is a non-negligible portion of the laser produced plasma energy. To evaluate the x-ray radiation energy amount at conditions relevant to SI scheme, instantaneous x-ray radiation energy is investigated experimentally with continuum phase plates smoothed lasers irradiating layer polystyrene targets. Comparative laser pulses without and with shock spike are employed. With the measured x-ray angular distribution, full space x-ray radiation energy and conversion efficiency are observed. Instantaneous scaling law of x-ray conversion efficiency is obtained as a function of laser intensity and time. It should be pointed out that the scaling law is available for any laser pulse shape and intensity, with which irradiates polystyrene planar target with intensity from 2 × 10{sup 14} to 1.8 × 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Numerical analysis of the laser energy transformation is performed, and the simulation results agree with the experimental data.

  20. Role of local absorption on the X-ray emission from MHD accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accretion processes onto classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs are believed to generate shocks at the stellar surface due to the impact of supersonic downflowing plasma. Although current models of accretion streams provide a plausible global picture of this process, several aspects are still unclear. For example, the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is, in general, well below the predicted value. A possible explanation discussed in the literature is in terms of significant absorption of the emission due to the thick surrounding medium. Here we consider a 2D MHD model describing an accretion stream propagating through the atmosphere of a CTTS and impacting onto its chromosphere. The model includes all the relevant physics, namely the gravity, the thermal conduction, and the radiative cooling, and a realistic description of the unperturbed stellar atmosphere (from the chromosphere to the corona. From the model results, we synthesize the X-ray emission emerging from the hot slab produced by the accretion shock, exploring different configurations and strengths of the stellar magnetic field. The synthesis includes the local absorption by the thick surrounding medium and the Doppler shift of lines due to the component of plasma velocity along the line-of-sight. We explore the effects of absorption on the emerging X-ray spectrum, considering different inclinations of the accretion stream with respect to the observer. Finally we compare our results with the observations.

  1. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, S R; Hilsabeck, T J; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Ayers, M J; Piston, K; Felker, B; Kilkenny, J D; Chung, T; Sammuli, B; Hares, J D; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A K L

    2014-11-01

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2-17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10(17). We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  2. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, S. R., E-mail: nagel7@llnl.gov; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  3. Extended hard-X-ray emission in the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Kerstin; Hailey, Charles J.; Bauer, Franz E.

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic Centre hosts a puzzling stellar population in its inner few parsecs, with a high abundance of surprisingly young, relatively massive stars bound within the deep potential well of the central supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (ref. 1). Previous studies suggest that the populatio...... outflows interacting with the surrounding radiation field, dense molecular material or magnetic fields. However, all these interpretations pose significant challenges to our understanding of stellar evolution, binary formation, and cosmic-ray production in the Galactic Centre....... of objects emitting soft X-rays (less than 10 kiloelectronvolts) within the surrounding hundreds of parsecs, as well as the population responsible for unresolved X-ray emission extending along the Galactic plane, is dominated by accreting white dwarf systems. Observations of diffuse hard-X-ray (more than 10...... range. This emission is more sharply peaked towards the Galactic Centre than is the surface brightness of the soft-X-ray population. This could indicate a significantly more massive population of accreting white dwarfs, large populations of low-mass X-ray binaries or millisecond pulsars, or particle...

  4. The Sun's X-ray Emission During the Recent Solar Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Mirek; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Kuzin, Sergey; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.

    2010-02-01

    The Sun recently underwent a period of a remarkable lack of major activity such as large flares and sunspots, without equal since the advent of the space age a half century ago. A widely used measure of solar activity is the amount of solar soft X-ray emission, but until recently this has been below the threshold of the X-ray-monitoring Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). There is thus an urgent need for more sensitive instrumentation to record solar X-ray emission in this range. Anticipating this need, a highly sensitive spectrophotometer called Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was included in the solar telescope/spectrometer TESIS instrument package on the third spacecraft in Russia's Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun (CORONAS-PHOTON) program, launched 30 January 2009 into a near-polar orbit. SphinX measures X-rays in a band similar to the GOES longer-wavelength channel.

  5. Development of an X-ray tube for irradiation experiments using a field emission electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hidetoshi, E-mail: katou-h@aist.go.jp [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation (RIMA), National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology - AIST, Tsukuba-Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); O' Rourke, Brian E.; Suzuki, Ryoichi [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation (RIMA), National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology - AIST, Tsukuba-Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Wang, Jiayu; Ooi, Takashi; Nakajima, Hidetoshi [Pureron Japan Co., Ltd., 1-37 Yoshima Industrial Park, Iwaki, Fukushima, 970-1144 (Japan)

    2016-01-21

    A new X-ray tube using a ring-shaped emitter as a field emission electron source has been developed. By using a ring shaped cathode, X-rays can be extracted along the axial direction through the central hole. This cylindrically symmetrical design allows for the tube to be arranged in the axial direction with the high voltage target at one end and the X-ray beam at the other. The newly developed X-ray tube can operate at a tube voltage of more than 100 kV and at a tube current of more than 4 mA, and can be used for irradiation experiments with an irradiation dose range from mGy up to kGy. The X-ray tube can be used immediately after turning on (i.e. there is no stand-by time). In the experimental model, we demonstrated stable electron emission at a tube voltage of 100 kV and at a tube current of 4 mA during a 560 h continuous test.

  6. Detection of a Cool, Accretion Shock-Generated X-ray Plasma in EX Lupi During the 2008 Optical Eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Teets, William K; Kastner, Joel H; Grosso, Nicolas; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Richmond, Michael

    2012-01-01

    EX Lupi is the prototype for a class of young, pre-main sequence stars which are observed to undergo irregular, presumably accretion-generated, optical outbursts that result in a several magnitude rise of the optical flux. EX Lupi was observed to optically erupt in 2008 January, triggering Chandra ACIS ToO observations shortly thereafter. We find very strong evidence that most of the X-ray emission in the first few months after the optical outburst is generated by accretion of circumstellar material onto the stellar photosphere. Specifically, we find a strong correlation between the decreasing optical and X-ray fluxes following the peak of the outburst in the optical, which suggests that these observed declines in both the optical and X-ray fluxes are the result of declining accretion rate. In addition, in our models of the X-ray spectrum, we find strong evidence for a ~0.4 keV plasma component, as expected for accretion shocks on low-mass, pre-main sequence stars. From 2008 March through October, this cool p...

  7. Impacts of fragmented accretion streams onto Classical T Tauri Stars: UV and X-ray emission lines

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, Salvatore; Peres, Giovanni; Argiroffi, Costanza; Reale, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Context. The accretion process in Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs) can be studied through the analysis of some UV and X-ray emission lines which trace hot gas flows and act as diagnostics of the post-shock downfalling plasma. In the UV band, where higher spectral resolution is available, these lines are characterized by rather complex profiles whose origin is still not clear. Aims. We investigate the origin of UV and X-ray emission at impact regions of density structured (fragmented) accretion streams.We study if and how the stream fragmentation and the resulting structure of the post-shock region determine the observed profiles of UV and X-ray emission lines. Methods. We model the impact of an accretion stream consisting of a series of dense blobs onto the chromosphere of a CTTS through 2D MHD simulations. We explore different levels of stream fragmentation and accretion rates. From the model results, we synthesize C IV (1550 {\\AA}) and OVIII (18.97 {\\AA}) line profiles. Results. The impacts of accreting blob...

  8. Chandra X-ray Grating Spectrometry of Eta Carinae near X-ray Minimum: I. Variability of the Sulfur and Silicon Emission Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, D B; Pittard, J M; Stevens, I R; Hamaguchi, K; Gull, T R

    2008-01-01

    We report on variations in important X-ray emission lines in a series of Chandra grating spectra of the supermassive colliding wind binary star Eta Carinae, including key phases around the X-ray minimum/periastron passage in 2003.5. The X-rays arise from the collision of the slow, dense wind of Eta Car with the fast, low-density wind of an otherwise hidden companion star. The X-ray emission lines provide the only direct measure of the flow dynamics of the companion's wind along the wind-wind collision zone. We concentrate here on the silicon and sulfur lines, which are the strongest and best resolved lines in the X-ray spectra. Most of the line profiles can be adequately fit with symmetric Gaussians with little significant skewness. Both the silicon and sulfur lines show significant velocity shifts and correlated increases in line widths through the observations. The R = forbidden-to-intercombination ratio from the Si XIII and S XV triplets is near or above the low-density limit in all observations, suggestin...

  9. The chemical sensitivity of X-ray spectroscopy: high energy resolution XANES versus X-ray emission spectroscopy of substituted ferrocenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Andrew J; Bauer, Matthias; Jacob, Christoph R

    2013-06-07

    X-ray spectroscopy at the metal K-edge is an important tool for understanding catalytic processes and provides insight into the geometric and electronic structures of transition metal complexes. In particular, X-ray emission-based methods such as high-energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (V2C-XES) hold the promise of providing increased chemical sensitivity compared to conventional X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Here, we explore the ability of HERFD-XANES and V2C-XES spectroscopy to distinguish substitutions beyond the directly coordinated atoms for the example of ferrocene and selected ferrocene derivatives. The experimental spectra are assigned and interpreted through the use of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that while the pre-edge peaks in the HERFD-XANES spectra are affected by substituents at the cyclopentadienyl ring containing π-bonds [A. J. Atkins, Ch. R. Jacob and M. Bauer, Chem.-Eur. J., 2012, 18, 7021], the V2C-XES spectra are virtually unchanged. The pre-edge in HERFD-XANES probes the weak transition to unoccupied metal d-orbitals, while the V2C-XES spectra are determined by dipole-allowed transitions from occupied ligand orbitals to the 1s core hole. The latter turn out to be less sensitive to changes beyond the first coordination shell.

  10. Evidence for Intermediate Polars as the Origin of the Galactic Center Hard X-ray Emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Perez, Kerstin;

    2016-01-01

    Recently, unresolved hard (20-40 keV) X-ray emission has been discovered within the central 10 pc of the Galaxy, possibly indicating a large population of intermediate polars (IPs). Chandra and XMM-Newton measurements in the surrounding ∼50 pc imply a much lighter population of IPs with 〈MWD〉≈0.5...

  11. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube yarn for micro-resolution X-ray tube cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Won; Mo, Chan Bin; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Seongwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has excellent electrical and thermal conductivity and high aspect ratio for X-ray tube cathode. However, CNT field emission cathode has been shown unstable field emission and short life time due to field evaporation by high current density and detachment by electrostatic force. An alternative approach in this direction is the introduction of CNT yarn, which is a one dimensional assembly of individual carbon nanotubes bonded by the Van der Waals force. Because CNT yarn is composed with many CNTs, CNT yarns are expected to increase current density and life time for X-ray tube applications. In this research, CNT yarn was fabricated by spinning of a super-aligned CNT forest and was characterized for application to an X-ray tube cathode. CNT yarn showed a high field emission current density and a long lifetime of over 450 hours. Applying the CNT yarn field emitter to the X-ray tube cathode, it was possible to obtain micro-scale resolution images. The relationship between the field emission properties and the microstructure evolution was investigated and the unraveling effect of the CNT yarn was discussed.

  12. Evidence for Intermediate Polars as the Origin of the Galactic Center Hard X-ray Emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Perez, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Recently, unresolved hard (20-40 keV) X-ray emission has been discovered within the central 10 pc of the Galaxy, possibly indicating a large population of intermediate polars (IPs). Chandra and XMM-Newton measurements in the surrounding ∼50 pc imply a much lighter population of IPs with 〈MWD〉≈0.5...

  13. X-ray Emission from the Radio Jet in 3C 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, D. E.; Hjorth, J.; Sadun, A. C.;

    1999-01-01

    We report the discovery of X-ray emission from a radio knot at a projected distance of 25" from the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy, 3C 120. The data were obtained with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI). Optical upper limits for the knot preclude a simple power law extension of the radio spect...

  14. 2p3d Resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy of cobalt compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooneveld, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript demonstrates that 2p3d resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) yields unique information on the chemically relevant valence electrons of transition metal atoms or ions. Experimental data on cobalt compounds and several theories were used hand-in-hand. In chapter 1 2p3d RXES was s

  15. Forensic analysis of tempered sheet glass by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jisonna, L.J. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); DeYoung, P.A., E-mail: deyoung@hope.ed [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Ferens, J.; Hall, C.; Lunderberg, J.M.; Mears, P. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Padilla, D. [Department of Physics, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1233 (United States); Peaslee, G.F. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Sampson, R. [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: {yields} PIXE was found to give the same results for trace elements in glass as ICP. {yields} PIXE can non-destructively determine trace element concentrations in auto glass. {yields} Measured Ca, Fe, Ti, Mn, and Sr in auto glass with PIXE. -- Abstract: The elemental concentrations of five trace elements in tempered sheet glass fragments were determined using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectrometry. The trace element concentrations for calcium, iron, manganese, strontium, and titanium are compared to those obtained by inductively-coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) following complete digestion by hydrofluoric acid. For these five elements, the absolute concentrations obtained by both methods are shown to agree well over a wide range of concentrations. The limits of detection for trace elements are typically lower for the ICP-AES method. However, we show that the concentrations of these five elements can be accurately measured by the PIXE method. Since PIXE is an entirely non-destructive method, there exists a niche for this technique to be used as a complement to the more sensitive ICP-AES technique in the forensic analysis of sheet glass.

  16. Suzaku Detection of Diffuse Hard X-Ray Emission outside Vela X

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuda, Satoru; Mori, Koji; Petre, Robert; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Bamba, Aya; Miceli, Marco; Hewitt, John W.; Temim, Tea; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Yoshii, Rie

    2011-01-01

    Vela X is a large, 3x2 degrees, radio-emitting pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by the Vela pulsar in the Vela supernova remnant. Using four Suzaku/XIS observations pointed just outside Vela X, we find hard X-ray emission extending throughout the fields of view. The hard X-ray spectra are well represented by a power-law. The photon index is measured to be constant at Gamma~2.4, similar to that of the southern outer part of Vela X. The power-law flux decreases with increasing distance from the...

  17. Extended Hard-X-Ray Emission in the Inner Few Parsecs of the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Kerstin; Hailey, Charles J.; Bauer, Franz E.; Krivonos, Roman A.; Mori, Kaya; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barriere, Nicholas M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Jaesub; Madsen, Kristin K.; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A.; Wik, Daniel R.; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic Centre hosts a puzzling stellar population in its inner few parsecs, with a high abundance of surprisingly young, relatively massive stars bound within the deep potential well of the central supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (ref. 1). Previous studies suggest that the population of objects emitting soft X-rays (less than 10 kiloelectronvolts) within the surrounding hundreds of parsecs, as well as the population responsible for unresolved X-ray emission extending along the Galactic plane, is dominated by accreting white dwarf systems2, 3, 4, 5.

  18. Suzaku Monitoring of Hard X-ray Emission from Eta Carinae over a Single Binary Orbital Cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Yuasa, Takayuki; Ishida, Manabu; Gull, Theodore R; Pittard, Julian M; Russell, Christopher M P; Madura, Thomas I

    2014-01-01

    The Suzaku X-ray observatory monitored the supermassive binary system Eta Carinae 10 times during the whole 5.5 year orbital cycle between 2005-2011. This series of observations presents the first long-term monitoring of this enigmatic system in the extremely hard X-ray band between 15-40 keV. During most of the orbit, the 15-25 keV emission varied similarly to the 2-10 keV emission, indicating an origin in the hard energy tail of the kT ~4 keV wind-wind collision (WWC) plasma. However, the 15-25 keV emission declined only by a factor of 3 around periastron when the 2-10 keV emission dropped by two orders of magnitude due probably to an eclipse of the WWC plasma. The observed minimum in the 15-25 keV emission occurred after the 2-10 keV flux had already recovered by a factor of ~3. This may mean that the WWC activity was strong, but hidden behind the thick primary stellar wind during the eclipse. The 25-40 keV flux was rather constant through the orbital cycle, at the level measured with INTEGRAL in 2004. Thi...

  19. X-ray emission from the giant molecular clouds in the Galactic Center region and the discovery of new X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoli, L; Treves, A; Parmar, A N; Turolla, R; Favata, F

    2001-01-01

    We report the results of X-ray (2-10 keV) observations of the giant molecular clouds SgrB, SgrC and SgrD in the Galactic Center region, together with the discovery of the point-like source SAXJ1748.2-2808. The data have been obtained with the MECS instrument on the BeppoSAX satellite. The core of SgrB2 has an X-ray luminosity of 6x10^34 erg/s and its spectrum is characterized by a strong Fe emission line at 6.5 keV with an equivalent width of 2 keV. Faint diffuse X-ray emission is detected from SgrC and from the SNR G1.05-0.15 (SgrD). A new, unresolved source with a strong Fe line has been discovered in the SgrD region. This source, SAXJ1748.2-2808, is probably associated with a SiO and OH maser source at the Galactic Center distance. If so, its luminosity is 10^34 erg/s. We propose that the X-ray emission from SAX J1748.2-2808 is produced either by protostars or by a giant molecular cloud core. Emission from sources similar to SAX J1748.2-2808 could have an impact on the expected contribution on the observed...

  20. X-ray Emission from Supernovae in Dense Circumstellar Matter Environments: a Search for Collisionless Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, E. O.; Fox, D.; Cenko, Stephen B.; Sullivan, M; Gnat, O.; Frail, D. A.; Horesh, A.; Corsi, A.; Quimby, R. M.; Gehrels, N.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P. E.; Yaron, O.; Fillippenko, A. V; Kasliwal, M. M.; Bildsten, L.; Bloom, J. S.; Poznanski, D.; Arcavi, I.; Laher, R. R.; Levitan, D.; Sesar, B.; Surace, J..

    2013-01-01

    The optical light curve of some supernovae (SNe) may be powered by the outward diffusion of the energy deposited by the explosion shock (the so-called shock breakout) in optically thick (Tau approx > 30) circumstellar matter (CSM). Recently, it was shown that the radiation-mediated and radiation-dominated shock in an optically thick wind must transform into a collisionless shock and can produce hard X-rays. The X-rays are expected to peak at late times, relative to maximum visible light. Here we report on a search, using Swift/XRT and Chandra, for X-ray emission from 28 SNe that belong to classes whose progenitors are suspected to be embedded in dense CSM. Our sample includes 19 Type IIn SNe, one Type Ibn SN, and eight hydrogen-poor superluminous SNe (SLSN-I such as SN 2005ap). Two SNe (SN 2006jc and SN 2010jl) have X-ray properties that are roughly consistent with the expectation for X-rays from a collisionless shock in optically thick CSM. However, the X-ray emission from SN 2006jc can also be explained as originating in an optically thin region. Thus, we propose that the optical light curve of SN 2010jl is powered by shock breakout in CSM. We suggest that two other events (SN 2010al and SN 2011ht) were too X-ray bright during the SN maximum optical light to be explained by the shock-breakout model.We conclude that the light curves of some, but not all, SNe IIn/Ibn are powered by shock breakout in CSM. For the rest of the SNe in our sample, including all of the SLSN-I events, our X-ray limits are not deep enough and were typically obtained too early (i.e., near the SN maximum light) for definitive conclusions about their nature. Late-time X-ray observations are required in order to further test whether these SNe are indeed embedded in dense CSM. We review the conditions required for a shock breakout in a wind profile. We argue that the timescale, relative to maximum light, for the SN to peak in X-rays is a probe of the column density and the density profile above

  1. Observations of X-rays and Thermal Dust Emission from the Supernova Remnant Kes 75

    CERN Document Server

    Morton, T D; Borkowski, K J; Reynolds, S P; Helfand, D J; Gaensler, B M; Hughes, J P

    2007-01-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the composite Galactic supernova remnant Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). We use the detected flux at 24 microns and hot gas parameters from fitting spectra from new, deep X-ray observations to constrain models of dust emission, obtaining a dust-to-gas mass ratio M_dust/M_gas ~0.001. We find that a two-component thermal model, nominally representing shocked swept-up interstellar or circumstellar material and reverse-shocked ejecta, adequately fits the X-ray spectrum, albeit with somewhat high implied densities for both components. We surmise that this model implies a Wolf-Rayet progenitor for the remnant. We also present infrared flux upper limits for the central pulsar wind nebula.

  2. Thermal X-ray emission from massive, fast rotating, highly magnetized white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Caceres, D L; Coelho, J G; de Lima, R C R; Rueda, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    There is solid observational evidence on the existence of massive, $M\\sim 1~M_\\odot$, highly magnetized white dwarfs (WDs) with surface magnetic fields up to $B\\sim 10^9$ G. We show that, if in addition to these features, the star is fast rotating, it can become a rotation-powered pulsar-like WD and emit detectable high-energy radiation. We infer the values of the structure parameters (mass, radius, moment of inertia), magnetic field, rotation period and spin-down rates of a WD pulsar death-line. We show that WDs above the death-line emit blackbody radiation in the soft X-ray band via the magnetic polar cap heating by back flowing pair-created particle bombardment and discuss as an example the X-ray emission of soft gamma-repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars within the WD model.

  3. Modeling of laser produced plasma and z-pinch x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J; Frati, M; Gonzales, J J; Kalashnikov, M P; Marconi, M C; Moreno, C H; Nickels, P V; Osterheld, A L; Rocca, J J; Sandner, W; Shlyaptsev, V N

    1999-02-07

    In this work we describe our theoretical activities in two directions of interest. First, we discuss progress in modeling laser produced plasmas mostly related to transient collisional excitation scheme experiments with Ne- and recently with Ni-like ions. Calculations related to the delay between laser pulses, transient gain duration and hybrid laser/capillary approach are described in more detail. Second, the capillary discharge plasma research, extended to wider range of currents and rise-times has been outlined. We have systematically evaluated the major plasma and atomic kinetic properties by comparing near- and far-field X-ray laser output with that for the capillary Argon X-ray laser operating under typical current values. Consistent with the experiment insight was obtained for the 469{angstrom} X-ray laser shadowgraphy experiments with very small kiloamp currents. At higher currents, as much as {approximately}200 kA we evaluated plasma temperature, density and compared x-ray source size and emitted spectra.

  4. CORRELATION OF HARD X-RAY AND WHITE LIGHT EMISSION IN SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Bahnhofstrasse 6, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martinez; Hudson, Hugh S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 Å summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbons with an integration time of 45 s around the peak hard-X ray time. We find a good correlation between hard X-ray fluxes and excess white light fluxes, with a highest correlation coefficient of 0.68 for photons with energy of 30 keV. Assuming the thick target model, a similar correlation is found between the deposited power by flare-accelerated electrons and the white light fluxes. The correlation coefficient is found to be largest for energy deposition by electrons above ∼50 keV. At higher electron energies the correlation decreases gradually while a rapid decrease is seen if the energy provided by low-energy electrons is added. This suggests that flare-accelerated electrons of energy ∼50 keV are the main source for white light production.

  5. Molecular Hydrogen Emission from Protoplanetary Disks II. Effects of X-ray Irradiation and Dust Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nomura, H; Tsujimoto, M; Nakagawa, Y; Millar, T J

    2007-01-01

    Detailed models for the density and temperature profiles of gas and dust in protoplanetary disks are constructed by taking into account X-ray and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation from a central T Tauri star, as well as dust size growth and settling toward the disk midplane. The spatial and size distributions of dust grains in the disks are numerically computed by solving the coagulation equation for settling dust particles. The level populations and line emission of molecular hydrogen are calculated using the derived physical structure of the disks. X-ray irradiation is the dominant heating source of the gas in the inner disk region and in the surface layer, while the far UV heating dominates otherwise. If the central star has strong X-ray and weak UV radiation, the H2 level populations are controlled by X-ray pumping, and the X-ray induced transition lines could be observable. If the UV irradiation is strong, the level populations are controlled by thermal collisions or UV pumping, depending on the properties of...

  6. Correlation of hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhar, Matej; Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martínez; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego; Hudson, Hugh S

    2015-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from RHESSI (Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) and HMI (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager). We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 \\r{A} summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbons with an integration time of 45 seconds around the peak hard-X ray time. We find a good correlation between hard X-ray fluxes and excess white light fluxes, with a highest correlation coefficient of 0.68 for photons with energy of 30 keV. Assuming the thick target model, a similar correlation is found between the deposited power by flare-accelerated electrons and the white light fluxes. The correlation coefficient is found to be largest for energy deposition by electrons above ~50 keV. At higher electron energies the co...

  7. The origin of the puzzling hard X-ray emission of $\\gamma$ Cassiopeiae

    CERN Document Server

    Motch, Christian; Smith, Myron A

    2015-01-01

    Massive B and Be stars produce X-rays from shocks in high velocity winds with temperatures of a few million degrees and maximum X-ray luminosities of $\\approx$ 10$^{31}$ erg/s. Surprisingly, a sub-group of early Be stars exhibits > 20 times hotter X-ray temperatures and > 10 times higher X-ray luminosities than normal. This group of Be stars, dubbed Gamma-Cas analogs, contains about 10 known objects. The origin of this bizarre behavior has been extensively debated in the past decades. Two mechanisms have been put forward, accretion of circumstellar disk matter onto an orbiting white dwarf, or magnetic field interaction between the star and the circumstellar disk (Smith & Robinson 1999). We show here that the X-ray and optical emissions of the prototype of the class, Gamma-Cas, are very well correlated on year time scales with no significant time delay. Since the expected migration time from internal disk regions that emit most of the optical flux to the orbit of the companion star is of several years, the...

  8. Supernova Remnants in the Sedov Expansion Phase Thermal X-Ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, K J; Reynolds, S P

    2001-01-01

    Improved calculations of X-ray spectra for supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Sedov-Taylor phase are reported, which for the first time include reliable atomic data for Fe L-shell lines. This new set of Sedov models also allows for a partial collisionless heating of electrons at the blast wave and for energy transfer from ions to electrons through Coulomb collisions. X-ray emission calculations are based on the updated Hamilton-Sarazin spectral model. The calculated X-ray spectra are succesfully interpreted in terms of three distribution functions: the electron temperature and ionization timescale distributions, and the ionization timescale averaged electron temperature distribution. The comparison of Sedov models with a frequently used single nonequilibrium ionization (NEI) timescale model reveals that this simple model is generally not an appropriate approximation to X-ray spectra of SNRs. We find instead that plane-parallel shocks provide a useful approximation to X-ray spectra of SNRs, particularly for youn...

  9. Population Inversion and Gain Measurements for Soft X-Ray Laser Development in a Magnetically Confined Plasma Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    INVERSION AND GAIN MEASUREMENTS FOR ’I SOFT X-RAY LASER DEVELOPMENT IN A MAGNET ICALLY CONFINED PLASMA COLUMN" For the Period: Nov. 1, 1983 t hr u Sept...proposal to AFOSR entitled "Population Inversion and Gain Measurements for X-Ray Laser Development in Magnetically Confined Plasma Column," Princeton, March...I* INTRODUCTION Extensive research on x-ray laser development has provided a number of interesting results for different schemes, e.g. recombination

  10. Modeling of the EUV and X-Ray Emission Spectra Induced by the Solar Winds Ions in the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, Vasili

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out investigation of the EUV and X-ray emission spectra induced in interaction between the Solar Wind (SW) and interstellar neutral gas. The spectra of most important SW ions have been computed for the charge-exchange mechanism of X-ray emission using new accurate spectroscopic data from recent laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. Total spectra have been constructed as a sum of spectra induced in the charge-exchange collisions by individual O(exp q+), C(exp q+), N(exp q+), Ne(exp q+), Mg (exp q+) and Fe(exp q+) ions. Calculations have been performed for X-ray emission from the heliospheric hydrogen and helium gas. X-ray maps of the heliosphere have been computed. The power density of X-ray sources in the heliospheric ecliptic plane is shown for the H gas and for the He gas. Distances from the Sun (0,0) are given in AU. The helium cone is clear seen in the X-ray map of the charge-exchange emission induced by the solar wind. X-ray emission spectra detected by the Chandra X-ray telescope from the "dark" side of Moon has been identified as a X-ray background emission induced by the solar wind from the geocorona. Spectra and intensities of this charge-exchange X-rays have been compared with the heliospheric component of the X-ray background. Observations and modeling of the SW spectra induced from the geocorona indicate a strong presence of emission lines of highly charged oxygen ions. Anisotropy in distribution of heliospheric X-rays has been predicted and calculated for the regions of the fast and slow solar winds.

  11. Characterization of metallic nanoparticles by high-resolution X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Timna-Josua

    2012-03-15

    In almost all areas of technology, metallic nanoparticles are of interest due to their special thermal, electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Their special properties are mainly due to their small size which implies the relevance of quantum effects as well as the significance of the surface: For 2 nm nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio is already 1:1. However, the identification of surface-to-volume interactions - that are responsible for the new properties - is a difficult task due to the small size that inhibits a lot of 'standard' techniques to be applicable. Here X-ray absorption/emission spectroscopy (XAS/XES) is a favorable tool for the characterization of nanoparticles, independent on size, degree of crystallinity and shape/condition of the surface. Using XAS, a tempered nanosized Co{sub 3}Pt/C catalyst have been investigated. Its outstanding oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) properties in a fuel cell could be related to a lowered Pt 5d-band center connected to a tightened Pt-Pt bonding distance, leading to a weakening of the oxygen adsorption strength so that the ORR may proceed faster. One drawback remains, however, as the properties found by (standard) XAS are summed up for different chemical environments of the chosen element. Thus, no distinction can be made between, e.g., the pure metal in a nanoparticles' interior and the ligated metal in the outer shells or surface. Here, high-resolution fluorescence-detected XAS (HRFD-XAS) provides additional opportunities as, due to its chemical sensitivity, it leads to site-selective XAS. For a system of 6 nm sized Co nanoparticles, build up of a metallic core surrounded by a protecting shell, that resulted from the 'smooth oxidation' process, this technique of site-selective XAS was proven to be applicable. For the first time, the interior and outer shell of a metallic nanoparticle could be characterized separately. In particular, the Co-hcp phase could be determined for the

  12. Evidence of non-thermal X-ray emission from radio lobes of Cygnus A

    CERN Document Server

    Yaji, Y; Isobe, N; Kino, M; Asada, K; Nagai, H; Koyama, S; Kusunose, M

    2010-01-01

    Using deep Chandra ACIS observation data for Cygnus A, we report evidence of non-thermal X-ray emission from radio lobes surrounded by a rich intra-cluster medium (ICM). The diffuse X-ray emission, which are associated with the eastern and western radio lobes, were observed in a 0.7--7 keV Chandra$ ACIS image. The lobe spectra are reproduced with not only a single-temperature Mekal model, such as that of the surrounding ICM component, but also an additional power-law (PL) model. The X-ray flux densities of PL components for the eastern and western lobes at 1 keV are derived as 77.7^{+28.9}_{-31.9} nJy and 52.4^{+42.9}_{-42.4} nJy, respectively, and the photon indices are 1.69^{+0.07}_{-0.13} and 1.84^{+2.90}_{-0.12}, respectively. The non-thermal component is considered to be produced via the inverse Compton (IC) process, as is often seen in the X-ray emission from radio lobes. From a re-analysis of radio observation data, the multiwavelength spectra strongly suggest that the seed photon source of the IC X-ra...

  13. Thermal X-ray emission from a baryonic jet: a self-consistent multicolour spectral model

    CERN Document Server

    Khabibullin, Ildar; Sazonov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    We present a publicly-available spectral model for thermal X-ray emission from a baryonic jet in an X-ray binary system, inspired by the microquasar SS 433. The jet is assumed to be strongly collimated (half-opening angle $\\Theta\\sim 1\\deg$) and mildly relativistic (bulk velocity $\\beta=V_{b}/c\\sim 0.03-0.3$). Its X-ray spectrum is found by integrating over thin slices of constant temperature, radiating in optically thin coronal regime. The temperature profile along the jet and corresponding differential emission measure distribution are calculated with full account for gas cooling due to expansion and radiative losses. Since the model predicts both the spectral shape and luminosity of the jet's emission, its normalisation is not a free parameter if the source distance is known. We also explore the possibility of using simple X-ray observables (such as flux ratios in different energy bands) to constrain physical parameters of the jet (e.g. gas temperature and density at its base) without broad-band fitting of...

  14. X-ray emission from the local hot bubble and solar wind charge exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprety, Youaraj

    DXL (Diffuse X-rays from the Local galaxy) is a sounding rocket mission to quantify the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX) X-ray emission in the interplanetary medium, and separate its contribution from the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) emission. The first launch of DXL took place in December 2012. This thesis will describe the DXL instrumentation and calibrations, and discuss the results obtained. The mission uses two large area proportional counters to scan through the Helium Focusing Cone (HFC), a high helium density region in the solar system emitting excess X-rays due to SWCX. Using well determined models of the interplanetary neutral distribution and comparing the DXL results with data from the same region obtained by the ROSAT satellite away from the cone, we calculated that SWCX contributes at most 36% to the ¼ keV ROSAT band and 13% to the ¾ keV ROSAT band, in the galactic plane. This provides a firm proof for existence of a LHB which dominates the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXB) at ¼ keV, while raising new questions on the origin of the ¾ keV emission.

  15. Origin of X-ray Emission from Transient Black Hole Candidates in Quiescence

    CERN Document Server

    Pszota, Gabor; Yuan, Feng; Cui, Wei

    2008-01-01

    We report results from a systematic study of X-ray emission from black hole transients in quiescence. In this state mass accretion is thought to follow the geometry of an outer optically thick, geometrically thin disc and an inner optically thin, geometrically thick radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF). The inner flow is likely also coupled to the jets near the black hole that are often seen in such systems. The goal of the study is to see whether the X-ray emission in the quiescent state is mainly powered by the accretion flow or the jets. Using data from deep XMM-Newton observations of selected black hole transients, we have found that the quiescent X-ray spectra are, to a high precision, of power-law shape in the cases of GRO J1655-40 and V404 Cyg. Such spectra deviate significantly from the expected X-ray spectrum of the RIAF at very low accretion rates. On the other hand, they can naturally be explained by emission from the jets, if the emitting electrons follow a power-law spectral distribution...

  16. The optical emission lines of type 1 X-ray bright Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    La Mura, G; Ciroi, S; Cracco, V; Di Mille, F; Rafanelli, P

    2013-01-01

    A strong X-ray emission is one of the defining signatures of nuclear activity in galaxies. According to the Unified Model for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), both the X-ray radiation and the prominent broad emission lines, characterizing the optical and UV spectra of Type 1 AGNs, are originated in the innermost regions of the sources, close to the Super Massive Black Holes (SMBH), which power the central engine. Since the emission is concentrated in a very compact region (with typical size $r 2000 km/s) and narrow line (1000 km/s < FWHMH$_{\\rm H\\beta}\\, \\leq$ 2000 km/s) emitting objects, it has been observed that the kinematic and ionization properties of matter close to the SMBHs are related together, and, in particular, that ionization is higher in narrow line sources. Here we report on the study of the optical and X-ray spectra of a sample of Type 1 AGNs, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database, within an upper redshift limit of z = 0.35, and detected at X-ray energies. We present anal...

  17. Accretion states in X-ray binaries and their connection to GeV emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerding, Elmar

    Accretion onto compact objects is intrinsically a multi-wavelength phenomenon: it shows emis-sion components visible from the radio to GeV bands. In X-ray binaries one can well observe the evolution of a single source under changes of the accretion rate and thus study the interplay between the different emission components.I will introduce the phenomenology of X-ray bina-ries and their accretion states and present our current understanding of the interplay between the optically thin and optically thick part of the accretion flow and the jet.The recent detection of the Fermi Large Area Telescope of a variable high-energy source coinciding with the position of the x-ray binary Cygnus X-3 will be presented. Its identification with Cygnus X-3 has been secured by the detection of its orbital period in gamma rays, as well as the correlation of the LAT flux with radio emission from the relativistic jets of Cygnus X-3. This will be interpreted in the context of the accretion states of the X-ray binary.

  18. Specific features of X-ray generation by plasma focus chambers with deuterium and deuterium-tritium fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulatov, A. K.; Krapiva, P. S.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Moskalenko, I. N.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The process of hard X-ray (HXR) generation in plasma focus (PF) chambers was studied experimentally. The radiation was recorded using scintillation detectors with a high time resolution and thermoluminescent detectors in combination with the method of absorbing filters. Time-resolved analysis of the processes of neutron and X-ray generation in PFs is performed. The spectra of HXR emission from PF chambers with deuterium and deuterium-tritium fillings are determined. In experiments with PF chambers filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture, in addition to the HXR pulse with photon energies of up to 200-300 keV, a γ-ray pulse with photon energies of up to 2.5-3.0 MeV is recorded, and a mechanism of its generation is proposed.

  19. Numerical Experiments on Oxygen Plasma Focus: Scaling Laws of Soft X-Ray Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akel, M.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical experiments have been investigated on UNU/ICTP PFF low energy plasma focus device with oxygen filling gas. In these numerical experiments, the temperature window of 119-260 eV has been used as a suitable temperature range for generating oxygen soft X-rays. The Lee model was applied to characterize the UNU/ICTP PFF plasma focus. The optimum soft X-ray yield (Ysxr) was found to be 0.75 J, with the corresponding efficiency of about 0.03 % at pressure of 2.36 Torr and the end axial speed was va = 5 cm/μs. The practical optimum combination of p0, z0 and `a' for oxygen Ysxr was found to be 0.69 Torr, 4.8 cm and 2.366 cm respectively, with the outer radius b = 3.2 cm. This combination gives Ysxr ~ 5 J, with the corresponding efficiency of about 0.16 %. Thus we expect to increase the oxygen Ysxr of UNU/ICTP PFF, without changing the capacitor bank, merely by changing the electrode configuration and operating pressure. Scaling laws on oxygen soft X-ray yield, in terms of storage energies E0, peak discharge current Ipeak and focus pinch current Ipinch were found over the range from 1 kJ to 1 MJ. It was found that the oxygen soft X-ray yields scale well with and for the low inductance (L0 = 30 nH) (where yields are in J and currents in kA). While the soft X-ray yield scaling laws in terms of storage energies were found to be as (E0 in kJ and Ysxr in J) with the scaling showing gradual deterioration as E0 rises over the range. The oxygen soft X-ray yield emitted from plasma focus is found to be about 8.7 kJ for storage energy of 1 MJ. The optimum efficiency for soft X-ray yield (1.1 %) is with capacitor bank energy of 120 kJ. This indicates that oxygen plasma focus is a good soft X-ray source when properly designed.

  20. Observations of non-collective x-ray scattering in warm dense carbon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihua, Bao; Jiyan, Zhang; Xiaoding, Zhang; Yang, Zhao; Yongkun, Ding

    2012-12-01

    An experiment for observing the spectrally resolved non-collective x-ray scattering in warm dense carbon plasma is presented in this paper. The experiment used Ta M-band x-rays to heat a foamed carbon cylinder sample isochorically and measured the scattering spectrum with a HOPG crystal spectrometer. The spectrum was compared with the calculation results using a Born-Mermin-approximation model. The best fitting was found at an electron temperature of Te=34 eV and an electron density of ne=1.6×1023cm-3.

  1. Electronic emission of radio-sensitizing gold nanoparticles under X-ray irradiation : experiment and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Casta, R; Sence, M; Moretto-Capelle, P; Cafarelli, P; Amsellem, A; Sicard-Roselli, C

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present new results on electronic emission of Gold Nanoparticles (GNPs) using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and compare them to the gold bulk electron emission. This subject has undergone new interest within the perspective of using GNPs as a radiotherapy enhancer. The experimental results were simulated using various models (Livermore and PENELOPE) of the Geant 4 simulation toolkit dedicated to the calculation of the transportation of particles through the matter. Our results show that the GNPs coating is a key parameter to correctly construe the experimental GNPs electronic emission after X-ray irradiation and point out some limitations of the PENELOPE model. Using XPS spectra and Geant4 Livermore simulations,we propose a method to determine precisely the coating surface density of the GNPs. We also show that the expected intrinsic nano-scale electronic emission enhancement effect - suspected to contribute to the GNPs radio-sensitizing properties - participates at most for a few pe...

  2. Propagation and scattering of high-intensity X-ray pulses in dense atomic gases and plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weninger, Clemens

    2015-10-15

    Nonlinear spectroscopy in the X-ray domain is a promising technique to explore the dynamics of elementary excitations in matter. X-rays provide an element specificity that allows them to target individual chemical elements, making them a great tool to study complex molecules. The recent advancement of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) allows to investigate non-linear processes in the X-ray domain for the first time. XFELs provide short femtosecond X-ray pulses with peak powers that exceed previous generation synchrotron X-ray sources by more than nine orders of magnitude. This thesis focuses on the theoretical description of stimulated emission processes in the X-ray regime in atomic gases. These processes form the basis for more complex schemes in molecules and provide a proof of principle for nonlinear X-ray spectroscopy. The thesis also includes results from two experimental campaigns at the Linac Coherent Light Source and presents the first experimental demonstration of stimulated X-ray Raman scattering. Focusing an X-ray free electron laser beam into an elongated neon gas target generates an intense stimulated X-ray emission beam in forward direction. If the incoming X-rays have a photon energy above the neon K edge, they can efficiently photo-ionize 1s electrons and generate short-lived core excited states. The core-excited states decay mostly via Auger decay but have a small probability to emit a spontaneous X-ray photon. The spontaneous emission emitted in forward direction can stimulate X-ray emission along the medium and generate a highly directional and intense X-ray laser pulse. If the photon energy of the incoming X-rays however is below the ionization edge in the region of the pre-edge resonance the incoming X-rays can be inelastically scattered. This spontaneous X-ray Raman scattering process has a very low probability, but the spontaneously scattered photons in the beginning of the medium can stimulate Raman scattering along the medium. The

  3. X-ray attenuation around -edge of Zr, Nb, Mo and Pd: A comparative study using proton-induced X-ray emission and 241Am gamma rays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Abdullah; K Karunakaran Nair; N Ramachandran; K M Varier; B R S Babu; Antony Joseph; Rajive Thomas; P Magudapathy; K G M Nair

    2010-09-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients (/ρ) for Zr, Nb, Mo and Pd elements around their -edges are measured at 14 energies in the range 15.744–28.564 keV using secondary excitation from thin Zr, Nb, Mo, Rh, Pd, Cd and Sn foils. The measurements were carried out at the and energy values of the target elements by two techniques: (1) Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and (2) 241Am (300 mCi) source. In PIXE, 2 MeV proton-excited X-rays were detected by a Si(Li) detector. In the second case, X-rays excited by 59.54 keV photons from the targets were counted by an HPGe detector under a narrow beam good geometry set-up with sufficient shielding. The results are consistent with theoretical values derived from the XCOM package and indicate that the PIXE data have better statistical accuracy.

  4. Making use of x-ray optical effects in photoelectron-, Auger electron-, and x-ray emission spectroscopies: Total reflection, standing-wave excitation, and resonant effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.-H. [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Gray, A. X. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science, Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kaiser, A. M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Peter Grunberg Institute, PGI-6, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Mun, B. S. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Hanyang University, Ansan, Gyeonggi 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Sell, B. C. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Physics, Otterbein College, Westerville, Ohio 43081 (United States); Kortright, J. B. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Fadley, C. S. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2013-02-21

    We present a general theoretical methodology and related open-access computer program for carrying out the calculation of photoelectron, Auger electron, and x-ray emission intensities in the presence of several x-ray optical effects, including total reflection at grazing incidence, excitation with standing-waves produced by reflection from synthetic multilayers and at core-level resonance conditions, and the use of variable polarization to produce magnetic circular dichroism. Calculations illustrating all of these effects are presented, including in some cases comparisons to experimental results. Sample types include both semi-infinite flat surfaces and arbitrary multilayer configurations, with interdiffusion/roughness at their interfaces. These x-ray optical effects can significantly alter observed photoelectron, Auger, and x-ray intensities, and in fact lead to several generally useful techniques for enhancing surface and buried-layer sensitivity, including layer-resolved densities of states and depth profiles of element-specific magnetization. The computer program used in this study should thus be useful for a broad range of studies in which x-ray optical effects are involved or are to be exploited in next-generation surface and interface studies of nanoscale systems.

  5. Potential application of X-ray communication through a plasma sheath encountered during spacecraft reentry into earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Hang, Shuang; Liu, Yunpeng; Chen, Da

    2017-03-01

    Rapid progress in exploiting X-ray science has fueled its potential application in communication networks as a carrier wave for transmitting information through a plasma sheath during spacecraft reentry into earth's atmosphere. In this study, we addressed the physical transmission process of X-rays in the reentry plasma sheath and near-earth space theoretically. The interactions between the X-rays and reentry plasma sheath were investigated through the theoretical Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method, and the Monte Carlo simulation was employed to explore the transmission properties of X-rays in the near-earth space. The simulation results indicated that X-ray transmission was not influenced by the reentry plasma sheath compared with regular RF signals, and adopting various X-ray energies according to different spacecraft reentry altitudes is imperative when using X-ray uplink communication especially in the near-earth space. Additionally, the performance of the X-ray communication system was evaluated by applying the additive white Gaussian noise, Rayleigh fading channel, and plasma sheath channel. The Doppler shift, as a result of spacecraft velocity changes, was also calculated through the Matlab Simulink simulation, and various plasma sheath environments have no significant influence on X-ray communication owing to its exceedingly high carrier frequency.

  6. Electronic emission of radio-sensitizing gold nanoparticles under X-ray irradiation : experiment and simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Casta, R.; Champeaux, J. -P.; Sence, M.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Cafarelli, P.; Amsellem, A.; Sicard-Roselli, C.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present new results on electronic emission of Gold Nanoparticles (GNPs) using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and compare them to the gold bulk electron emission. This subject has undergone new interest within the perspective of using GNPs as a radiotherapy enhancer. The experimental results were simulated using various models (Livermore and PENELOPE) of the Geant 4 simulation toolkit dedicated to the calculation of the transportation of particles through the matter. O...

  7. INTRAGROUP AND GALAXY-LINKED DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Hornschemeier, Ann E. [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mulchaey, John S. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Johnson, Kelsey E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3813, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Zabludoff, Ann I., E-mail: tdesjar@uwo.ca [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 95721 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L{sub X} -T relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L{sub X} -{sigma} relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L{sub X} increases with decreasing group H I to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on H I morphology whereby systems with intragroup H I indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L{sub X} of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  8. Intragroup and Galaxy-linked Diffuse X-ray Emission In Hickson Compact Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Mulchaey, John S.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Cardiff, Ann; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis, S.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L(sub X-Tau) relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L(sub X-sigma) relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L(sub X) increases with decreasing group Hi to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on Hi morphology whereby systems with intragroup Hi indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L(sub X) of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  9. X-ray High-resolution Spectroscopy for Laser-produced Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbato, F.; Scarpellini, D.; Malizia, A.; Gaudio, P.; Richetta, M.; Antonelli, L.

    The study of the emission spectrum gives information about the material generating the spectrum itself and the condition in which this is generated. The wavelength spectra lines are linked to the specific element and plasma conditions (electron temperature, density), while their shape is influenced by several physical effects like Stark and Doppler ones. In this work we study the X-ray emission spectra of a copper laser-produced plasma by using a spherical bent crystal spectrometer to measure the electron temperature. The facility used is the laser TVLPS, at the Tor Vergata University in Rome. It consists of a Nd:Glass source (in first harmonic - 1064 nm) whose pulse parameters are: 8 J in energy, time duration of 15 ns and a focal spot diameter of 200 μm. The adopted spectrometer is based on a spherical bent crystal of muscovite. The device combines the focusing property of a spherical mirror with the Bragg's law. This allows to obtain a great power resolution but a limited range of analysis. In our case the resolution is on average 80 eV. As it is well-known, the position of the detector on the Rowland's circle is linked to the specific spectral range which has been studied. To select the area to be investigated, we acquired spectra by means of a flat spectrometer. The selected area is centered on 8.88 Å. To calibrate the spectrum we wrote a ray-tracing MATLAB code, which calculates the detector alignment parameters and calibration curve. We used the method of line ratio to measure the electron temperature. This is possible because we assumed the plasma to be in LTE condition. The temperature value was obtained comparing the experimental one, given by the line ratio, with the theoretical one, preceded by FLYCHK simulations.

  10. Elliptically-bent crystal spectrograph for X-ray diagnosis of laser-produced plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiancai Xiong(熊先才); Xianxin Zhong(钟先信); Shali Xiao(肖沙里); Guohong Yang(杨国洪); Jie Gao(高洁)

    2004-01-01

    In order to measure spatially and temporarily resolved laser-produced plasma X-ray spectra in 0.2 - 2nm region, a novel two-channel elliptically-bent crystal spectrograph has been developed. Dispersive elements are LiF, PET, Mica, and KAP crystals, which cover Bragg angles in the range of 30 - 67.5degrees. Eccentricity and focal distance of twin ellipses are 0.9586 and 1350 mm, respectively. Spatially resolved spectrum is photographically recorded with an X-ray film or X-CCD camera in one channel, and temporarily resolved one is photographically recorded with an X-ray streak camera in another channel,thus spatially and temporarily resolved spectra can be simultaneously obtained. Spectral images were acquired with X-CCD and PET in SHENGUANG-Ⅱ laser facility, and experimental results show that the spectral resolution of the spectrograph is about 0.002 nm.

  11. Target optimization for desired X-ray spectra produced by laser plasma accelerated electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobok, Maxim; Brantov, Andrey; Bychenkov, Valery

    2016-10-01

    Different regimes of electron acceleration from low-density targets are investigated using three-dimensional numerical simulations. Multiple spatial target density profiles were examined, including laser pre-pulse modified targets. The size of the plasma corona is shown to be one of the main parameters characterizing the temperature and number of hot electrons, which determine the yield of X-ray radiation and its hardness. The generation of X-ray radiation by laser accelerated electrons, which impact the converter target located behind the laser target, was studied. The X-ray spectra were computed using Monte-Carlo simulations. This work was partially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research 16-02-00088-a.

  12. Multiframe, Single Line-of-Sight X-Ray Imager for Burning Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Kevin L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-28

    The purpose of this LDRD project was to demonstrate high spatial and temporal resolution x-ray imaging using optical detectors, and in particular the VISAR and OHRV diagnostics on the OMEGA laser. The x-ray source being imaged was a backlighter capsule being imploded by 39 beams of the OMEGA laser. In particular this approach utilized a semiconductor with the side facing the backlighter capsule coated with a thin aluminum layer to allow x rays to pass through the metal layer and then get absorbed in the semiconductor. The other side of the semiconductor was AR coated to allow the VISAR or OHRV probe beam to sample the phase change of the semiconductor as the x rays were absorbed in the semiconductor. This technique is capable of acquiring sub-picosecond 2-D or 1-D x-ray images, detector spatial resolution of better than 10 um and the ability to operate in a high neutron flux environment expected on ignition shots with burning plasmas. In addition to demonstrating this technique on the OMEGA laser, several designs were made to improve the phase sensitivity, temporal resolution and number of frames over the existing diagnostics currently implemented on the OMEGA laser. These designs included both 2-d imaging diagnostics as well as improved 1-D imaging diagnostics which were streaked in time.

  13. Soft X-Ray Excess from Shocked Accreting Plasma in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Fukumura, Keigo; Clark, Peter; Tombesi, Francesco; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel theoretical model to describe a physical identity of the soft X-ray excess, ubiquitously detected in many Seyfert galaxies, by considering a steady-state, axisymmetric plasma accretion within the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) around a black hole (BH) accretion disk. We extend our earlier theoretical investigations on general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) accretion which has implied that the accreting plasma can develop into a standing shock for suitable physical conditions causing the downstream flow to be sufficiently hot due to shock compression. We numerically calculate to examine, for sets of fiducial plasma parameters, a physical nature of fast MHD shocks under strong gravity for different BH spins. We show that thermal seed photons from the standard accretion disk can be effectively Compton up-scattered by the energized sub-relativistic electrons in the hot downstream plasma to produce the soft excess feature in X-rays. As a case study, we construct a three-paramet...

  14. The Project PLASMONX for Plasma Acceleration Experiments and a Thomson X-Ray Source at SPARC

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, Luca; Alessandria, Franco; Bacci, Alberto; Baldeschi, Walter; Barbini, Alessandro; Bellaveglia, Marco; Bertolucci, Sergio; Biagini, Maria; Boni, Roberto; Bonifacio, Rodolfo; Boscolo, Ilario; Boscolo, Manuela; Bottigli, Ubaldo; Broggi, Francesco; Castellano, Michele; Cecchetti, Carlo A; Cialdi, Simone; Clozza, Alberto; De Martinis, Carlo; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Drago, Alessandro; Esposito, Adolfo; Ferrario, Massimo; Ficcadenti, L; Filippetto, Daniele; Fusco, Valeria; Galimberti, Marco; Gallo, Alessandro; Gatti, Giancarlo; Ghigo, Andrea; Giove, Dario; Giulietti, Antonio; Giulietti, Danilo; Gizzi, Leonida A; Golosio, Bruno; Guiducci, Susanna; Incurvati, Maurizio; Köster, Petra; Labate, Luca; Ligi, Carlo; Marcellini, Fabio; Maroli, Cesare; Mauri, Marco; Migliorati, Mauro; Mostacci, Andrea; Oliva, Pier N; Palumbo, Luigi; Pellegrino, Luigi; Petrillo, Vittoria; Piovella, Nicola; Poggiu, Angela; Pozzoli, Roberto; Preger, Miro; Ricci, Ruggero; Rome, Massimiliano; Rossi, Antonella; Sanelli, Claudio; Serio, Mario; Sgamma, Francesco; Spataro, Bruno; Stecchi, Alessandro; Stella, Angelo; Stumbo, Simone; Tazzioli, Franco; Tommasini, Paolo; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Vescovi, Mario; Vicario, Carlo

    2005-01-01

    We present the status of the activity on the project PLASMONX, which foresees the installation of a multi-TW Ti:Sa laser system at the CNR-ILIL laboratory to conduct plasma acceleration experiments and the construction of an additional beam line at SPARC to develop a Thomson X-ray source at INFN-LNF. After pursuing self-injection experiments at ILIL, when the electron beam at SPARC will be available the SPARC laser system will be upgraded to TW power level in order to conduct either external injection plasma acceleration experiments and ultra-bright X-ray pulse generation with the Thomson source. Results of numerical simulations modeling the interaction of the SPARC electron beam and the counter-propagating laser beam are presented with detailed discussion of the monochromatic X-ray beam spectra generated by Compton backscattering: X-ray energies are tunable in the range 20 to 1000 keV, with pulse duration from 30 fs to 20 ps. Preliminary simulations of plasma acceleration with self-injection are illustrated,...

  15. Probing near-solid density plasmas using soft x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toleikis, S; Duesterer, S; Faeustlin, R R; Laarmann, T; Redlin, H [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bornath, T; Goede, S; Irsig, R; Meiwes-Broer, K-H; Przystawik, A [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, Universitaetsplatz 3, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Doeppner, T; Glenzer, S H [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Av., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Foerster, E [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Fortmann, C [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gregori, G; Mithen, J [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Lee, H J; Nagler, B [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Li, B [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Radcliffe, P, E-mail: sven.toleikis@desy.d [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22671 Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-10-14

    X-ray scattering using highly brilliant x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) radiation provides new access to probe free-electron density, temperature and ionization in near-solid density plasmas. First experiments at the soft x-ray FEL FLASH at DESY, Hamburg, show the capabilities of this technique. The ultrashort FEL pulses in particular can probe equilibration phenomena occurring after excitation of the plasma using ultrashort optical laser pumping. We have investigated liquid hydrogen and find that the interaction of very intense soft x-ray FEL radiation alone heats the sample volume. As the plasma establishes, photons from the same pulse undergo scattering, thus probing the transient, warm dense matter state. We find a free-electron density of (2.6 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} and an electron temperature of 14 {+-} 3.5 eV. In pump-probe experiments, using intense optical laser pulses to generate more extreme states of matter, this interaction of the probe pulse has to be considered in the interpretation of scattering data. In this paper, we present details of the experimental setup at FLASH and the diagnostic methods used to quantitatively analyse the data.

  16. Gain dynamics measurement in injection-seeded soft x-ray laser plasma amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Wang, S.; Li, L.; Oliva, E.; Thuy Le, T. T.; Ros, D.; Berrill, M.; Dunn, J.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Yin, L.; Luther, B.; Rocca, J. J.

    2013-10-01

    Herein we report the first measurement of the gain dynamics in a soft x-ray plasma amplifier seeded by high harmonic pulses. A sequence of two time-delayed spatially-overlapping high harmonic pulses was injected into a λ = 18.9 nm Ni-like Mo plasma amplifier to measure the regeneration of the population inversion that follows the gain depletion caused by the amplification of the first seed pulse. Collisional excitation is observed to re-establish population inversion depleted during the amplification of the seed pulse in about ~1.75 ps. The measured gain-recovery time is compared to model simulations to gain insight on the population inversion mechanisms that create the transient gain in these amplifiers. This result supports the concept of a soft x-ray laser amplification scheme based on the continuous extraction of energy from a soft x-ray plasma-based amplifier by an stretched seed pulse has the potential to generate ultra-intense fully phase-coherent soft x-ray laser pulses. Work supported by AMOS program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the US DoE, and the NSF ERC Program with equipment developed under NSF Award MRI-ARRA 09-561, and by LASERLAB3-INREX European project and SHYLAX plus CIBORG RTRA `Triangle de la Physique.'

  17. A streaked X-ray spectroscopy platform for rapidly heated, near-solid density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, C. R.; Nilson, P. M.; Ivancic, S. T.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Junquist, R. K.; Nelson, D. J.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    A picosecond, time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy platform was developed to study the thermal line emission from rapidly heated solid targets containing buried aluminum or iron layers. The targets were driven by high-contrast 1ω or 2ω laser pulses at focused intensities up to 1 × 1019 W/cm2. The experimental platform combines time-integrating and time-resolved x-ray spectrometers. Picosecond time resolution was achieved with a pair of ultrafast x-ray streak cameras coupled to high-throughput Hall spectrometers. Time-integrated spectra were collected on each shot to correct the streaked data for variations in x-ray photocathode spectral sensitivity. The time-integrated spectrometer uses three elliptical crystals to disperse x rays with energies between 800 and 2100 eV with moderate (E/ΔE ˜ 450) resolving power. The streaked spectrometers accept four interchangeable conical crystals with higher resolving power (E/ΔE ˜ 650) to measure the brightest thermal lines in the 1300 to 1700 eV spectral range.

  18. Gamma-ray emitting radio galaxies at hard X-rays: Seyfert core or jet emission?

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, V; Mattana, F; Saez, D; Soldi, S

    2013-01-01

    A number of radio galaxies has been detected by Fermi/LAT in the gamma-ray domain. In some cases, like Cen A and M 87, these objects have been seen even in the TeV range by Cherenkov telescopes. Whereas the gamma-ray emission is likely to be connected with the non-thermal jet emission, dominating also the radio band, the situation is less clear at hard X-rays. While the smoothly curved continuum emission and the overall spectral energy distribution indicate a non-thermal emission, other features such as the iron line emission and the low variability appear to be rather of Seyfert type, i.e. created in the accretion disk and corona around the central black hole. We investigate several prominent cases using combined X-ray and gamma-ray data in order to constrain the possible contributions of the jet and the accretion disk to the overall spectral energy distribution in radio galaxies. Among the three sources we study, three different origins of the hard X-ray flux can be identified. The emission can be purely no...

  19. EVIDENCE FOR ELEVATED X-RAY EMISSION IN LOCAL LYMAN BREAK GALAXY ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu-Zych, Antara R.; Lehmer, Bret D.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Ptak, Andrew F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Goncalves, Thiago S. [Observatorio do Valongo, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ladeira Pedro Antonio 43, Saude, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, CEP 22240-060 (Brazil); Fragos, Tassos [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Overzier, Roderik A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Schiminovich, David, E-mail: antara.r.basu-zych@nasa.gov [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    Our knowledge of how X-ray emission scales with star formation at the earliest times in the universe relies on studies of very distant Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). In this paper, we study the relationship between the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity (L{sub X}), assumed to originate from X-ray binaries (XRBs), and star formation rate (SFR) in ultraviolet (UV) selected z < 0.1 Lyman break analogs (LBAs). We present Chandra observations for four new Galaxy Evolution Explorer selected LBAs. Including previously studied LBAs, Haro 11 and VV 114, we find that LBAs demonstrate L{sub X}/SFR ratios that are elevated by {approx}1.5{sigma} compared to local galaxies, similar to the ratios found for stacked LBGs in the early universe (z > 2). Unlike some of the composite LBAs studied previously, we show that these LBAs are unlikely to harbor active galactic nuclei, based on their optical and X-ray spectra and the spatial distribution of the X-rays in three spatially extended cases. Instead, we expect that high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) dominate the X-ray emission in these galaxies, based on their high specific SFRs (sSFRs {identical_to} SFR/M{sub *} {>=} 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1}), which suggest the prevalence of young stellar populations. Since both UV-selected populations (LBGs and LBAs) have lower dust attenuations and metallicities compared to similar samples of more typical local galaxies, we investigate the effects of dust extinction and metallicity on the L{sub X}/SFR for the broader population of galaxies with high sSFRs (>10{sup -10} yr{sup -1}). The estimated dust extinctions (corresponding to column densities of N{sub H} < 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) are expected to have insignificant effects on observed L{sub X}/SFR ratio for the majority of galaxy samples. We find that the observed relationship between L{sub X}/SFR and metallicity appears consistent with theoretical expectations from XRB population synthesis models. Therefore, we conclude that lower metallicities, related to

  20. Non-thermal electron populations in microwave heated plasmas investigated with X-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belapure, Jaydeep Sanjay

    2013-04-15

    An investigation of the generation and dynamics of superthermal electrons in fusion plasma is carried out. A SDD+CsI(Tl) based X-ray diagnostic is constructed, characterized and installed at ASDEX Upgrade. In various plasma heating power and densities, the fraction and the energy distribution of the superthermal electrons is obtained by a bi-Maxwellian model and compared with Fokker-Planck simulations.

  1. X-ray and radio emission from Type In supernova SN 2010jl

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Poonam; Chugai, Nikolai; Fransson, Claes; Soderberg, Alicia M

    2015-01-01

    We present all X-ray and radio observations of the Type IIn supernova SN 2010jl. The X-ray observations cover a period up to day 1500 with Chandra, XMM-Newton, NuSTAR and Swift-XRT. The Chandra observations after 2012 June, the XMM-Newton observation in 2013 November, and most of the Swift-XRT observations until 2014 December are presented for the first time. All the spectra can be fitted by an absorbed hot thermal model except for \\chandra spectra on 2011 October and 2012 June when an additional component is needed. Although the origin of this component is uncertain, it is spatially coincident with the supernova and occurs when there are changes to the supernova spectrum in the energy range close to that of the extra component, indicating that the emission is related to the supernova. The X-ray light curve shows an initial plateau followed by a steep drop starting at day $\\sim 300$. We attribute the drop to a decrease in the circumstellar density. The column density to the X-ray emission drops rapidly with t...

  2. Transition-Edge Sensors for Particle Induced X-ray Emission Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Palosaari, M R J; Julin, J; Laitinen, M; Napari, M; Sajavaara, T; Doriese, W B; Fowler, J; Reintsema, C; Swetz, D; Schmidt, D; Ullom, J; Maasilta, I J

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new measurement setup, where a transitionedge sensor detector array is used to detect X-rays in particle induced X-ray emission measurements with a 2 MeV proton beam. Transition-edge sensors offer orders of magnitude improvement in energy resolution compared to conventional silicon or germanium detectors, making it possible to recognize spectral lines in materials analysis that have previously been impossible to resolve, and to get chemical information from the elements. Our sensors are cooled to the operation temperature (65 mK) with a cryogen-free adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, which houses a specially designed X-ray snout that has a vacuum tight window to couple in the radiation. For the best pixel, the measured instrumental energy resolution was 3.06 eV full width at half maximum at 5.9 keV.We discuss the current status of the project, benefits of transition-edge sensors when used in particle induced X-ray emission spectroscopy, and the results from the first measuremen...

  3. The XMM-Newton X-ray emission of the SNR N120 in the LMC

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Iturbide, Jorge; Velazquez, Pablo F

    2009-01-01

    We present new XMM-Newton observations of the supernova remnant N120 in the LMC, and numerical simulations on the evolution of this supernova remnant which we compare with the X-ray observations. The supernova remnant N120, together with several HII regions, forms a large nebular complex5D (also called N120) whose shape resembles a semicircular ring. From the XMM-Newton data we generate images and spectra of this remnant in the energy band between 0.2 to 2.0 keV. The images show that the X-ray emission is brighter towards the east (i.e., towards the rim of the large nebular complex). The EPIC/MOS1 and MOS2 data reveal a thermal spectrum in soft X-rays. 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations with the Yguaz\\'u-a code were carried out assuming that the remnant is expanding into an inhomogeneous ISM with an exponential density gradient and showing that thermal conduction effects are negligible. Simulated X-ray emission maps were obtained from the numerical simulations in order to compare them with the observations...

  4. Comparison of Millimeter-wave and X-Ray Emission in Seyfert Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Monje, R R; Phillips, T G; 10.1088/0067-0049/195/2/23

    2011-01-01

    We compare the emission at multiple wavelengths of an extended Seyfert galaxy sample, including both types of Seyfert nuclei. We use the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory to observe the CO J = 2-1 transition line in a sample of 45 Seyfert galaxies and detect 35 of them. The galaxies are selected by their joint soft X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) and far-infrared ({\\lambda} = 60-100 {\\mu}m) emission from the ROSAT/IRAS sample. Since the CO line widths (W CO) reflect the orbital motion in the gravitational potential of the host galaxy, we study how the kinematics are affected by the central massive black hole (BH), using the X-ray luminosity. A significant correlation is found between the CO line width and hard (0.3-8 keV from Chandra and XMM-Newton) X-ray luminosity for both types of Seyfert nuclei. Assuming an Eddington accretion to estimate the BH mass (M BH) from the X-ray luminosity, the W CO-L X relation establishes a direct connection between the kinematics of the molecular gas of the host galaxy and the nuclear ac...

  5. RT Cru: a look into the X-ray emission of a peculiar symbiotic star

    CERN Document Server

    Ducci, L; Suleimanov, V; Nikolajuk, M; Santangelo, A; Ferrigno, C

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic stars are a heterogeneous class of interacting binaries. Among them, RT Cru has been classified as prototype of a subclass that is characterised by hard X-ray spectra extending past ~20 keV. We analyse ~8.6 Ms of archival INTEGRAL data collected in the period 2003-2014, ~140 ks of Swift/XRT data, and a Suzaku observation of 39 ks, to study the spectral X-ray emission and investigate the nature of the compact object. Based on the 2MASS photometry, we estimate the distance to the source of 1.2-2.4 kpc. The X-ray spectrum obtained with Swift/XRT, JEM-X, IBIS/ISGRI, and Suzaku data is well fitted by a cooling flow model modified by an absorber that fully covers the source and two partial covering absorbers. Assuming that the hard X-ray emission of RT Cru originates from an optically thin boundary layer around a non-magnetic white dwarf, we estimated a mass of the WD of about 1.2 M_Sun. The mass accretion rate obtained for this source might be too high for the optically thin boundary layer scenario. Ther...

  6. Quantitative Analysis of X-ray Self Emission in ICF Implosions Using Orthogonal Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Laura Robin; Nagel, S. R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Kyrala, G. A.; Patel, P.; Bradley, D. K.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven experiments can create implosion cores that are hot and dense enough for inertially-confined fusion. This implosion method is inherently three-dimensional, where loss of symmetry often indicates reduced performance. However, the symmetry of the core at stagnation is typically only diagnosed by images of x-ray self emission along two orthogonal lines of sight. We report on a method to use x-ray self-emission images along multiple lines of sight to infer quantitative properties of the implosion. Specifically we find that we can use absolute x-ray yields to quantify variations in the compressed fuel and shell that surrounds the core. In addition, we can use the spatial variations in x-ray brightness to estimate volumes of very asymmetric hotspots that are otherwise not well described by spherical or ellipsoidal approximations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL-ABS-697774.

  7. BeppoSAX Observations of Synchrotron X-ray Emission from Radio Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, P; Ghisellini, G; Giommi, P; Perlman, E

    2002-01-01

    We present new BeppoSAX LECS, MECS, and PDS observations of four flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQ) having effective spectral indices alpha_ro and alpha_ox typical of high-energy peaked BL Lacs. Our sources have X-ray-to-radio flux ratios on average ~ 70 times larger than ``classical'' FSRQ and lie at the extreme end of the FSRQ X-ray-to-radio flux ratio distribution. The collected data cover the energy range 0.1 - 10 keV (observer's frame), reaching ~ 100 keV for one object. The BeppoSAX band in one of our sources, RGB J1629+4008, is dominated by synchrotron emission peaking at ~ 2 x 10^16 Hz, as also shown by its steep (energy index alpha_x ~ 1.5) spectrum. This makes this object the FIRST known FSRQ whose X-ray emission is not due to inverse Compton radiation. Two other sources display a flat BeppoSAX spectrum (alpha_x ~ 0.7), with weak indications of steepening at low X-ray energies. The combination of BeppoSAX and ROSAT observations, (non-simultaneous) multifrequency data, and a synchrotron inverse Compt...

  8. A common stochastic process rules gamma-ray burst prompt emission and X-ray flares

    CERN Document Server

    Guidorzi, C; Frontera, F; Margutti, R; Baldeschi, A; Amati, L

    2015-01-01

    Prompt gamma-ray and early X-ray afterglow emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are characterized by a bursty behavior and are often interspersed with long quiescent times. There is compelling evidence that X-ray flares are linked to prompt gamma-rays. However, the physical mechanism that leads to the complex temporal distribution of gamma-ray pulses and X-ray flares is not understood. Here we show that the waiting time distribution (WTD) of pulses and flares exhibits a power-law tail extending over 4 decades with index ~2 and can be the manifestation of a common time-dependent Poisson process. This result is robust and is obtained on different catalogs. Surprisingly, GRBs with many (>=8) gamma-ray pulses are very unlikely to be accompanied by X-ray flares after the end of the prompt emission (3.1 sigma Gaussian confidence). These results are consistent with a simple interpretation: an hyperaccreting disk breaks up into one or a few groups of fragments, each of which is independently accreted with the same pro...

  9. Deka-keV X-ray emission associated with the onset of radio noise storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crosby, N.; Vilmer, N.; Lund, Niels

    1996-01-01

    Radio noise storms show that suprathermal electrons (a few tens of keV) are present in the vicinity of active regions during several hours or even a few days. Where and how these electrons are energized is not yet well known. A flare-like sudden energy release in the active region is in general...... observed at the onset of noise storms, either as a fully developed flare or, more often, as a soft X-ray brightening without conspicuous Her signature. In order to investigate to what extent electrons energized in the active region contribute to the noise-storm emission in the overlying coronal structures...... from an isothermal fit to the GOES fluxes. Although the electron population producing the deka-keV X-ray emission would be energetic enough to power the simultaneous radio noise storm, the much longer duration of the radio emission requires time-extended particle acceleration. The acceleration probably...

  10. X-Ray Emission from Star-Forming Galaxies - Signatures of Cosmic Rays and Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Klessen, Ralf S

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of magnetic fields in galaxies is still an open problem in astrophysics. In nearby galaxies the far-infrared-radio correlation indicates the coupling between magnetic fields and star formation. The correlation arises from the synchrotron emission of cosmic ray electrons traveling through the interstellar magnetic fields. However, with an increase of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF), inverse Compton scattering becomes the dominant energy loss mechanism of cosmic ray electrons with a typical emission frequency in the X-ray regime. The ISRF depends on the one hand on the star formation rate and becomes stronger in starburst galaxies, and on the other hand increases with redshift due to the evolution of the cosmic microwave background. With a model for the star formation rate of galaxies, the ISRF, and the cosmic ray spectrum, we can calculate the expected X-ray luminosity resulting from the inverse Compton emission. Except for galaxies with an active galactic nucleus the main additional cont...

  11. Resonant Compton Upscattering Models of Magnetar Hard X-ray Emission and Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Gonthier, Peter L.; Kust Harding, Alice

    2017-08-01

    Non-thermal quiescent X-ray emission extending between 10 keV and around 150 keV has been seen in about 10 magnetars by RXTE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku and Fermi-GBM. For inner magnetospheric models of such hard X-ray signals, resonant Compton upscattering is anticipated to be the most efficient process for generating the continuum radiation. This is because the scattering becomes resonant at the cyclotron frequency, and the effective cross section exceeds the classical Thomson value by over two orders of magnitude. We present angle-dependent hard X-ray upscattering model spectra for uncooled monoenergetic relativistic electrons injected in inner regions of pulsar magnetospheres. These spectra are integrated over closed field lines and obtained for different observing perspectives. The spectral cut-off energies are critically dependent on the observer viewing angles and electron Lorentz factor. We find that electrons with energies less than around 15 MeV will emit most of their radiation below 250 keV, consistent with the observed turnovers in magnetar hard X-ray tails. Moreover, electrons of higher energy still emit most of the radiation below around 1 MeV, except for quasi-equatorial emission locales for select pulses phases. In such cases, attenuation mechanisms such as pair creation will be prolific, thereby making it difficult to observe signals extending into the Fermi-LAT band. Our spectral computations use new state-of-the-art, spin-dependent formalism for the QED Compton scattering cross section in strong magnetic fields. The emission exhibits strong polarization above around 30 keV that is anticipated to be dependent on pulse phase, thereby defining science agendas for future hard X-ray polarimeters.

  12. X-ray Emission from Young Stars in the TW Hya Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alexander; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Ayres, Thomas R.; France, Kevin; Brown, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    The 9 Myr old TW Hya Association (TWA) is the nearest group (typical distances of ˜50 pc) of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars with ages less than 10 Myr and contains stars with both actively accreting disks and debris disks. We have studied the coronal X-ray emission from a group of low mass TWA common proper motion binaries using the Chandra and Swift satellites. Our aim is to understand better their coronal properties and how high energy photons affect the conditions around young stars and their role in photo-exciting atoms, molecules and dust grains in circumstellar disks and lower density circumstellar gas. Once planet formation is underway, this emission influences protoplanetary evolution and the atmospheric conditions of the newly-formed planets. The X-ray properties for 7 individual stars (TWA 13A, TWA 13B, TWA 9A, TWA 9B, TWA 8A, TWA 8B, and TWA 7) and 2 combined binary systems (TWA 3AB and TWA 2AB) have been measured. All the stars with sufficient signal require two-component fits to their CCD-resolution X-ray spectra, typically with a dominant hot (~2 kev (25 MK)) component and a cooler component at ~0.4 keV (4 MK). The brighter sources all show significant X-ray variability (at a level of 50-100% of quiescence) over the course of 5-15 ksec observations due to flares. We present the X-ray properties for each of the stars and find that the coronal emission is in the super-saturated rotational domain.

  13. Using Poisson statistics to analyze supernova remnant emission in the low counts X-ray regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Quentin Jeffrey

    We utilize a Poisson likelihood in a maximum likelihood statistical analysis to analyze X-ray spectragraphic data. Specifically, we examine four extragalactic supernova remnants (SNR). IKT 5 (SNR 0047-73.5), IKT 25 (SNR 0104-72.3), and DEM S 128 (SNR 0103-72.4) which are designated as Type Ia in the literature due to their spectra and morphology. This is troublesome because of their asymmetry, a trait not usually associated with young Type Ia remnants. We present Chandra X-ray Observatory data on these three remnants, and perform a maximum likelihood analysis on their spectra. We find that the X-ray emission is dominated by interactions with the interstellar medium. In spite of this, we find a significant Fe overabundance in all three remnants. Through examination of radio, optical, and infrared data, we conclude that these three remnants are likely not "classical" Type Ia SNR, but may be examples of so-called "prompt" Type Ia SNR. We detect potential point sources that may be members of the progenitor systems of both DEM S 128 and IKT 5, which could suggest a new subclass of prompt Type Ia SNR, Fe-rich CC remnants. In addition, we examine IKT 18. This remnant is positionally coincident with the X-ray point source HD 5980. Due to an outburst in 1994, in which its brightness changed by 3 magnitudes (corrsponding to an increase in luminosity by a factor of 16) HD 5980 was classified as a luminous blue variable star. We examine this point source and the remnant IKT 18 in the X-ray, and find that its non-thermal photon index has decreased from 2002 to 2013, corresponding to a larger proportion of more energetic X-rays, which is unexpected.

  14. A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlachetko, J; Nachtegaal, M; de Boni, E; Willimann, M; Safonova, O; Sa, J; Smolentsev, G; Szlachetko, M; van Bokhoven, J A; Dousse, J-Cl; Hoszowska, J; Kayser, Y; Jagodzinski, P; Bergamaschi, A; Schmitt, B; David, C; Lücke, A

    2012-10-01

    We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  15. On the Nature of the X-ray Emission from the Galactic Center Region

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Q D; Lang, C C

    2002-01-01

    The origin of the X-ray emission from the central region of the Galaxy has remained a mystery, despite extensive study over the past two decades. A fundamental question is the relative contribution of the point-source and diffuse components of this emission, which is critical to understanding the high-energy phenomena and processes unique to this Galactic nuclear environment. Here, we report on results from a large-scale imaging survey of the Galactic center with sufficient spatial resolution to allow a clean separation of the two components. The highly-ionized Fe emission, previously attributed to the diffuse emission, is found largely due to the discrete X-ray source population. The number and spectrum of such sources indicate the presence of numerous accreting white dwarfs, neutron stars, and/or black holes in the region. The diffuse X-ray emission dominates over the contribution from the faint discrete sources and is shown to be associated with distinct interstellar structures observed at radio and mid-in...

  16. X-ray/GeV emissions from Crab-like pulsars in LMC

    CERN Document Server

    Takata, J

    2016-01-01

    We discuss X-ray and gamma-ray emissions from Crab-like pulsars, PSRs~J0537-6910 and~J0540-6919, in Large Magellanic Cloud. Fermi-LAT observations have resolved the gamma-ray emissions from these two pulsars and found the pulsed emissions from PSR~J0540-6919. The total pulsed radiation in the X-ray/gamma-ray energy bands of PSR~J0540-6919 is observed with the efficiency $\\eta_{J0540}\\sim 0.06$ (in 4$\\pi$ sr), which is about a factor of ten larger than $\\eta_{Crab}\\sim 0.006$ of the Crab pulsar. Although PSR~J0537-6910 has the highest spin-down power among currently known pulsars, the efficiency of the observed X-ray emissions is about two orders of magnitude smaller than that of PSR~J0540-6919. This paper mainly discusses what causes the difference in the radiation efficiencies of these three energetic Crab-like pulsars. We discuss electron/positron acceleration and high-energy emission processes within the outer gap model. By solving the outer gap structure with the dipole magnetic field, we show that the ra...

  17. Resonant x-ray emission from gas-phase TiCl{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hague, C.F.; Tronc, M. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); De Groot, F. [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) has proved to be a powerful tool for studying the electronic structure of condensed matter. Over the past few years it has been used mainly for studying the valence bands of solids and condensed molecules. Very recently the advent of high brightness photon beams provided by third generation synchrotron radiation source undulators, associated with efficient x-ray emission spectrometers has made it possible to perform experiments on free diatomic molecular systems. RXE spectra of free molecules are of prime importance to gain insight into their electronic structure and bonding as they reflect the symmetry of orbitals engaged in the two-electron, two-step process with the l = 0, {+-}2 parity-conserving selection rule, and are free from solid state effects which can introduce difficulties in the interpretation. They provide information (more so than XAS) on the core excited states, and, when performed at fixed incident photon energy as a function of the emitted photon energy, on the electronic excitation (charge transfer, multiplet states). Moreover the anisotropy of the angular distribution of resonant x-ray emission affects the relative intensity of the emission peaks and provides information concerning the symmetries of final states. This is a preliminary report on what are the first RXE spectra of a 3d transition metal complex in the gas phase. The experiment concerns the Ti 3d {yields}2p emission spectrum of TiCl{sub 4} over the 450 to 470 eV region.

  18. A Deep X-Ray View of the Bare AGN Ark 120. I. Revealing the Soft X-Ray Line Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, J. N.; Porquet, D.; Braito, V.; Nardini, E.; Lobban, A.; Turner, T. J.

    2016-09-01

    The Seyfert 1 galaxy Ark 120 is a prototype example of the so-called class of bare nucleus active galactic nuclei (AGNs), whereby there is no known evidence for the presence of ionized gas along the direct line of sight. Here deep (>400 ks exposure), high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Ark 120 is presented from XMM-Newton observations that were carried out in 2014 March, together with simultaneous Chandra/High Energy Transmission Grating exposures. The high-resolution spectra confirmed the lack of intrinsic absorbing gas associated with Ark 120, with the only X-ray absorption present originating from the interstellar medium (ISM) of our own Galaxy, with a possible slight enhancement of the oxygen abundance required with respect to the expected ISM values in the solar neighborhood. However, the presence of several soft X-ray emission lines are revealed for the first time in the XMM-Newton RGS spectrum, associated with the AGN and arising from the He- and H-like ions of N, O, Ne, and Mg. The He-like line profiles of N, O, and Ne appear velocity broadened, with typical FWHMs of ˜5000 km s-1, whereas the H-like profiles are unresolved. From the clean measurement of the He-like triplets, we deduce that the broad lines arise from a gas of density n e ˜ 1011 cm-3, while the photoionization calculations infer that the emitting gas covers at least 10% of 4π steradian. Thus the broad soft X-ray profiles appear coincident with an X-ray component of the optical-UV broad-line region on sub-parsec scales, whereas the narrow profiles originate on larger parsec scales, perhaps coincident with the AGN narrow-line region. The observations show that Ark 120 is not intrinsically bare and substantial X-ray-emitting gas exists out of our direct line of sight toward this AGN.

  19. INTEGRAL spectral variability study of the atoll 4U 1820-30: first detection of hard X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Tarana, A; Ubertini, P; Zdziarski, A A; Tarana, Antonella; Bazzano, Angela; Ubertini, Pietro; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.

    2006-01-01

    We study the 4-200 keV spectral and temporal behaviour of the low mass X-ray binary 4U 1820-30 with INTEGRAL during 2003-2005. This source as been observed in both the soft (banana) and hard (island) spectral states. A high energy tail, above 50 keV, in the hard state has been observed for the first time. This places the source in the category of X-ray bursters showing high-energy emission. The tail can be modeled as a soft power law component, with the photon index of ~2.4, on top of thermal Comptonization emission from a plasma with the electron temperature of kT_e~6 keV and optical depth of \\tau~4. Alternatively, but at a lower goodness of the fit, the hard-state broad band spectrum can be accounted for by emission from a hybrid, thermal-nonthermal, plasma. During this monitoring the source spent most of the time in the soft state, usual for this source, and the >~4 keV spectra are represented by thermal Comptonization with kT_e~3 keV and \\tau~6-7.

  20. X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutt, T.E.

    1994-12-01

    When a solid target is irradiated by a laser beam, the material is locally heated to a high temperature and a plasma forms. The interaction of the laser with plasma can produce energetic electrons. By observing the behavior of these {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} electrons, we hope to obtain a better understanding of Laser/Plasma Interactions. In this work we employ a layered-fluorescer technique to study the transport, and therefore the energetics, of the electrons. The plasma forms on a thin foil of metallic Pd which is bonded to thin layer of metallic Sn. Electrons formed from the plasma penetrate first the Pd and then the Sn. In both layers the energetic electrons promote inner (K) shell ionization of the metallic atoms which leads to the emission of characteristic K{sub {alpha}} x-rays of the fluorescers. By recording the x-ray spectrum emitted by the two foils, we can estimate the energy-dependent range of the electrons and their numbers.

  1. Variation of the X-ray non-thermal emission in the Arches cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Clavel, Maïca; Terrier, R; Tatischeff, V; Maurin, G; Ponti, G; Goldwurm, A; Decourchelle, A

    2014-01-01

    The origin of the iron fluorescent line at 6.4 keV from an extended region surrounding the Arches cluster is debated and the non-variability of this emission up to 2009 has favored the low-energy cosmic-ray origin over a possible irradiation by hard X-rays. By probing the variability of the Arches cloud non-thermal emission in the most recent years, including a deep observation in 2012, we intend to discriminate between the two competing scenarios. We perform a spectral fit of XMM-Newton observations collected from 2000 to 2013 in order to build the Arches cloud lightcurve corresponding to both the neutral Fe Kalpha line and the X-ray continuum emissions. We reveal a 30% flux drop in 2012, detected with more than 4 sigma significance for both components. This implies that a large fraction of the studied non-thermal emission is due to the reflection of an X-ray transient source.

  2. Enhancement of Terrestrial Diffuse X-ray Emission Associated With Coronal Mass Ejection and Geomagnetic Storm

    CERN Document Server

    Ezoe, Yuichiro; Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Terada, Naoki; Oishi, Shihoko; Ohashi, Takaya

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of a Suzaku observation taken during the geomagnetic storm of 2005 August 23-24. We found time variation of diffuse soft X-ray emission when a coronal mass ejection hit Earth and caused a geomagnetic storm. The diffuse emission consists of fluorescent scattering of solar X-rays and exospheric solarwind charge exchange. The former is characterized by a neutral oxygen emission line due to strong heating of the upper atmosphere during the storm time, while the latter is dominated by a sum of C V, C VI, N VI, N VII, O VII, and O VIII emission lines due to the enhanced solar wind flux in the vicinity of the exosphere. Using the solar wind data taken with the ACE and WIND satellites,a time correlation between the solar wind and the strong O VII line flux were investigated. We estimated necessary column densities for the solar X-ray scattering and exospheric SWCX. From these results, we argue that a part of the solar wind ions enter inside the magnetosphere and cause the SWCX reaction.

  3. Soft X-ray and Ultraviolet Emission Relations in Optically Selected AGN Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Strateva, I; Schneider, D; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Vignali, C; Strateva, Iskra; Brandt, Niel; Schneider, Donald; Berk, Daniel Vanden; Vignali, Cristian

    2005-01-01

    Using a sample of 228 optically selected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) in the 0.01-6.3 redshift range with a high fraction of X-ray detections (81-86%), we study the relation between rest-frame UV and soft X-ray emission and its evolution with cosmic time. The majority of the AGNs in our sample (155 objects) have been selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in an unbiased way, rendering the sample results representative of all SDSS AGNs in particular, and highly complete optically selected AGN samples in general. The addition of two heterogeneous samples of 36 high-redshift and 37 low-redshift AGNs further supports and extends our conclusions. We confirm that the X-ray emission from AGNs is correlated with their UV emission, and that the ratio of the monochromatic luminosity emitted at 2keV compared to 2500A decreases with increasing luminosity (alpha_ox = -0.136l_uv+2.616, where l_uv is in log units), but does not change with cosmic time. These results apply to intrinsic AGN emission, as we correct...

  4. Impacts of fragmented accretion streams onto classical T Tauri stars: UV and X-ray emission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, S.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Argiroffi, C.; Reale, F.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The accretion process in classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) can be studied through the analysis of some UV and X-ray emission lines which trace hot gas flows and act as diagnostics of the post-shock downfalling plasma. In the UV-band, where higher spectral resolution is available, these lines are characterized by rather complex profiles whose origin is still not clear. Aims: We investigate the origin of UV and X-ray emission at impact regions of density structured (fragmented) accretion streams. We study if and how the stream fragmentation and the resulting structure of the post-shock region determine the observed profiles of UV and X-ray emission lines. Methods: We modeled the impact of an accretion stream consisting of a series of dense blobs onto the chromosphere of a CTTS through two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. We explored different levels of stream fragmentation and accretion rates. From the model results, we synthesize C IV (1550 Å) and O VIII (18.97 Å) line profiles. Results: The impacts of accreting blobs onto the stellar chromosphere produce reverse shocks propagating through the blobs and shocked upflows. These upflows, in turn, hit and shock the subsequent downfalling fragments. As a result, several plasma components differing for the downfalling velocity, density, and temperature are present altoghether. The profiles of C IV doublet are characterized by two main components: one narrow and redshifted to speed ≈ 50 km s-1 and the other broader and consisting of subcomponents with redshift to speed in the range 200-400 km s-1. The profiles of O VIII lines appear more symmetric than C IV and are redshifted to speed ≈ 150 km s-1. Conclusions: Our model predicts profiles of C IV line remarkably similar to those observed and explains their origin in a natural way as due to stream fragmentation. Movies are available at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Detection and Analysis of X Ray Emission from the Princeton-Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosh, Alexandra; Swanson, Charles; Jandovitz, Peter; Cohen, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    The PFRC is an odd-parity rotating-magnetic-field-driven field-reversed-configuration magnetic confinement experiment. Studying X rays produced via electron Bremsstrahlung with neutral particles is crucial to the further understanding of the energy and particle confinement of the PFRC. The data on the x rays are collected using a detector system comprised of two, spatially scannable Amptek XR-100 CR detectors and a Amptek XR-100 SDD detector that view the plasma column at two axial locations, one in the divertor and one near the axial midplane. These provide X-ray energy and arrival-time information. (Data analysis requires measurement of each detector's efficiency, a parameter that is modified by window transmission. Detector calibrations were performed with a custom-made X-ray tube that impinged 1-microamp 1-5 kV electron beams onto a carbon target.) From the analyzed data, the average electron energy, effective temperature, and electron density can be extracted. Spatial scans then allow the FRC's internal energy to be measured. We present recent measurements of the Bremsstrahlung spectrum from 0.8 to 6 keV and the inferred electron temperature in the PFRC device as functions of heating power, magnetic field and fill gas pressure. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. X-ray emission from the Wolf-Rayet bubble NGC 6888. II. XMM-Newton EPIC observations

    CERN Document Server

    Toalá, J A; Chu, Y -H; Arthur, S J; Tafoya, D; Gruendl, R A

    2015-01-01

    We present deep XMM-Newton EPIC observations of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble NGC6888 around the star WR136. The complete X-ray mapping of the nebula confirms the distribution of the hot gas in three maxima spatially associated with the caps and northwest blowout hinted at by previous Chandra observations. The global X-ray emission is well described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma model $T_1$=1.4$\\times$10$^{6}$ K, $T_{2}$=8.2$\\times$10$^{6}$ K) with a luminosity of $L_{\\mathrm{X}}$=7.8$\\times$10$^{33}$ erg s$^{-1}$ in the 0.3--1.5 keV energy range. The rms electron density of the X-ray-emitting gas is estimated to be $n_\\mathrm{e}$=0.4 cm$^{-3}$. The high-quality observations presented here reveal spectral variations within different regions in NGC6888, which allowed us for the first time to detect temperature and/or nitrogen abundance inhomogeneities in the hot gas inside a WR nebula. One possible explanation for such spectral variations is that the mixing of material from the outer nebula into the ...

  7. An example of the association of X-ray and UV emission with H-alpha surges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, B.; Mein, P.; Simnett, G. M.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1988-01-01

    From H-alpha UV, and X-ray data, the nature of a well-observed surge on November 12, 1980 has been studied to try to understand the relationships between the mechanical motions and the high-temperature emissions. The cool (H-alpha) and the hot (O v) parts of the surge plasma both show velocities in the range of 100-120 km/s. The kinetic and potential energies of the surge are two orders of magnitude higher than the radiative energy. The observations suggest that the surge occurs in open structures parallel to one leg of a large scale coronal magnetic loop. The energy is released principally in the open structure (surge) and only a small amount heats the coronal loop (X-ray signature). This energy division should probably not be treated as a general characteristic of surge events. Different events are expected to exhibit a different energy balance, and this can account for the lack of a consensus in the previous literature regarding surge/X-ray associations.

  8. G346.6-0.2: A Rare Mixed-Morphology Supernova Remnant with Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchettl, Katie Amanda; Wong, B. T. T.; Ng, Chi Yung; Slane, Patrick O.

    2016-04-01

    The detection of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) provides us with a unique window into studying particle acceleration at the shock-front of an SNR. All of the 14 or so SNRs in which non-thermal X-ray synchrotron emission has been detected are shell-like in nature, and show no evidence of interaction with large nearby molecular clouds. Here we present a new X-ray study of the molecular cloud interacting mixed-morphology SNR G346.6-0.2 using XMM-Newton. We found that the X-ray emission arises from a cool recombining plasma with subsolar abundance, confirming previous Suzaku results. In addition, we identified an additional power-law component in the spectrum, with a photon index of ~2. We investigated its possible origin and conclude that this is most likely synchrotron emission produced by particles accelerated at the shock. We also derive the age of the remnant to be 1.8-2.3 kyrs assuming a distance of 8.3 kpc, which is much younger than previously suggested, while based on its morphology, Galactic location and the density of its environment as derived from our X-ray analysis, the progenitor of G346.6-0.2 was most likely a massive star.

  9. Dynamics of laser-imploded core plasmas observed by ultrafast two-dimensional x-ray imaging with animation display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heya, Manabu; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Kyoko; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Takabe, Hideaki; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko; Mima, Kunioki [Osaka Univ., Inst. of Laser Engineering, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-05-01

    In order to observe time-resolved, two-dimensional (2D) spatial distribution of x rays emitted from core plasmas at the final stage of the implosion, we have developed a multi-imaging x-ray streak camera (MIXS) and a multi-channel MIXS (McMIXS) methods as new ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging techniques. The observed time-resolved 2D x-ray and electron-temperature images of core plasmas, which are sequentially changing with time, have been displayed by using an animation method. Temporal evolutions of nonuniform structures, including shape, size, and movement of core plasmas can be observed instinctively with the animated display. The ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging with the animation display is a new powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of laser-imploded core plasmas. (author)

  10. X-rays from solar system objects

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Gladstone, G Randall; Cravens, Thomas E; Lisse, Carey M; Dennerl, Konrad; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Wargelin, Bradford J; Waite, J Hunter; Robertson, Ina; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Snowden, Steven L; Kharchenko, Vasili; 10.1016/j.pss.2006.11.009

    2010-01-01

    During the last few years our knowledge about the X-ray emission from bodies within the solar system has significantly improved. Several new solar system objects are now known to shine in X-rays at energies below 2 keV. Apart from the Sun, the known X-ray emitters now include planets (Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn), planetary satellites (Moon, Io, Europa, and Ganymede), all active comets, the Io plasma torus (IPT), the rings of Saturn, the coronae (exospheres) of Earth and Mars, and the heliosphere. The advent of higher-resolution X-ray spectroscopy with the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories has been of great benefit in advancing the field of planetary X-ray astronomy. Progress in modeling X-ray emission, laboratory studies of X-ray production, and theoretical calculations of cross-sections, have all contributed to our understanding of processes that produce X-rays from the solar system bodies. At Jupiter and Earth, both auroral and non-auroral disk X-ray emissions have been observed. X-ray...

  11. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp2-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements.

  12. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp2-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements. PMID:28186190

  13. Hard X-Ray Emission from Partially Occulted Solar Flares: RHESSI Observations in Two Solar Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Frederic; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Oka, Mitsuo; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahé; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm

    2017-02-01

    Flares close to the solar limb, where the footpoints are occulted, can reveal the spectrum and structure of the coronal looptop source in X-rays. We aim at studying the properties of the corresponding energetic electrons near their acceleration site, without footpoint contamination. To this end, a statistical study of partially occulted flares observed with Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager is presented here, covering a large part of solar cycles 23 and 24. We perform detailed spectra, imaging, and light curve analyses for 116 flares and include contextual observations from SDO and STEREO when available, providing further insights into flare emission that were previously not accessible. We find that most spectra are fitted well with a thermal component plus a broken power-law, non-thermal component. A thin-target kappa distribution model gives satisfactory fits after the addition of a thermal component. X-ray imaging reveals small spatial separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, except for a few flares with a richer coronal source structure. A comprehensive light curve analysis shows a very good correlation between the derivative of the soft X-ray flux (from GOES) and the hard X-rays for a substantial number of flares, indicative of the Neupert effect. The results confirm that non-thermal particles are accelerated in the corona and estimated timescales support the validity of a thin-target scenario with similar magnitudes of thermal and non-thermal energy fluxes.

  14. Second launch of the Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan Sapkota, Dhaka

    2016-04-01

    The Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) is a sounding rocket mission to study the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX) and Local Hot Bubble (LHB) X-ray emission. After a successful launch of December 2012, DXL’s capabilities were expanded by using two additional proportional counters and three unique filters for the launch of December 2015. Employing Be-, B- and C-based plastic filters, DXL mission re-scanned the Helium Focusing Cone for better spectral and positional information (to address the IBEX controversy). In this paper, we will review the upgraded mission hardware and performance, while sharing some preliminary results from the latest observation.Submitted for the DXL Collaboration

  15. Models of Heliospheric solar wind charge exchange X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroumpa, Dimitra

    2016-04-01

    The first models of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray production in the heliosphere were developed shortly after the discovery of SWCX emission at the end of 1990s. Since then, continuous monitoring of the global solar wind evolution through the solar cycle has allowed better constraints on its interaction with the interstellar neutrals. We have a fairly accurate description of the interstellar neutral density distributions in interplanetary space. However, the solar wind heavy ion fluxes, and especially their short term variability and propagation through interplanetary space, have remained relatively elusive due to the sparseness or lack of in situ data, especially towards high ecliptic latitudes. In this talk, I will present a summary the heliospheric SWCX modeling efforts, and an overview of the global solar cycle variability of heliospheric SWCX emission, while commenting on the difficulties of modeling the real-time variability of the heliospheric X-ray signal.

  16. GAMMA-RAY AND X-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY-LOUD BLAZARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XIONG; ZHAO GANG; XIE GUANG-ZHONG; ZHENG GUANG-SHENG; ZHANG LI

    2001-01-01

    We present a strong correlation of the gamma-ray (above 100 MeV) mean spectral indices aγ and X-ray (1 keV)mean spectral indices cX for 34 gamma-ray-loud blazars (16 BL Lac objects and 18 flat spectrum radio quasars). Astrong correlation is also found between the gamma-ray flux densities F-γ and X-ray flux densities Fx in the low state for 47 blazars (17 BL Lac and 30 flat spectrum radio quasars). Possible correlation on the gamma-ray emission mechanism is discussed. We suggest that the main gamma-ray radiation mechanism is probably the synchrotron process. The gamma-ray emission may be somewhat different from that of BL Lac objects and flat spectrum radio quasars.

  17. Cyclotron lines in X-ray pulsars as a probe of relativistic plasmas in superstrong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Dal Fiume, D; Masetti, N; Orlandini, M; Palazzi, E; Del Sordo, S; Santangelo, A; Segreto, A; Oosterbroek, T; Parmar, A N; Frontera, Filippo; Masetti, Nicola; Orlandini, Mauro; Palazzi, Eliana; Sordo, Stefano Del; Santangelo, Andrea; Segreto, Alberto; Oosterbroek, Tim; Parmar, Arvind N.

    2000-01-01

    The systematic search for the presence of cyclotron lines in the spectra ofaccreting X-ray pulsars is being carried on with the BeppoSAX satellite sincethe beginning of the mission. These highly successful observations allowed thedetection of cyclotron lines in many of the accreting X-ray pulsars observed.Some correlations between the different measured parameters were found. Wepresent these correlations and discuss them in the framework of the currenttheoretical scenario for the X-ray emission from these sources.

  18. Kinetic and radiation-hydrodynamic modeling of x-ray heating in laboratory photoionized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    In experiments performed at the Z facility of Sandia National Laboratories a cm-scale cell filled with neon gas was driven by the burst of broadband x-rays emitted at the collapse of a wire-array z-pinch turning the gas into a photoionized plasma. Transmission spectroscopy of a narrowband portion of the x-ray flux was used to diagnose the plasma. The data show a highly-ionized neon plasma with a rich line absorption spectrum that permits the extraction of the ionization distribution among Be-, Li-, He- and H-like ions. Analysis of the spectra produced atomic ground and low excited state areal densities in these ions, and from the ratio of first-excited to ground state populations in Li-like neon a temperature of 19±4eV was extracted to characterize the x-ray heating of the plasma. To interpret this observation, we have performed data-constrained view-factor calculations of the spectral distribution of the x-ray drive, self-consistent modeling of electron and atomic kinetics, and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. For the conditions of the experiment, the electron distribution thermalizes quickly, has a negligible high-energy tail, and is very well approximated by a single Maxwellian distribution. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with either LTE or NLTE (i.e. non-equilibrium) atomic physics provide a more complete modeling of the experiment. We found that in order to compute electron temperatures consistent with observation inline non-equilibrium collisional-radiative neon atomic kinetics needs to be taken into account. We discuss the details of LTE and NLTE simulations, and the impact of atomic physics on the radiation heating and cooling rates that determine the plasma temperature. This work was sponsored in part by DOE Office of Science Grant DE-SC0014451, and the Z Facility Fundamental Science Program of SNL.

  19. Variable X-Ray and UV emission from AGB stars: Accretion activity associated with binarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Sanz-Forcada, Jorge; Sánchez Contreras, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    Almost all of our current understanding of the late evolutionary stages of (1 — 8) Mʘ stars is based on single-star models. However, binarity can drastically affect late stellar evolution, producing dramatic changes in the history and geometry of mass loss that occurs in stars as they evolve off the AGB to become planetary nebulae (PNe). A variety of binary models have been proposed, which can lead to the generation of accretion disks and magnetic fields, which in turn produce the highly collimated jets that have been proposed as the primary agents for the formation of bipolar and multipolar PNe. However, observational evidence of binarity in AGB stars is sorely lacking simply these stars are very luminous and variable, invalidating standard techniques for binary detection. Using an innovative technique of searching for UV emission from AGB stars with GALEX, we have identified a class of AGB stars with far- ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars), that are likely candidates for active accretion associated with a binary companion. We have carried out a pilot survey for X-ray emission from fuvAGB stars. The X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long times-scales, and simultaneous UV observations show similar variations in the UV fluxes. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a main-sequence companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  20. Laboratory Measurements of the X-ray Line Emission from Neon-like Fe XVII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G. V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Scofield, J. H.; Boyce, K. R.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Gu, M. F.; Kahn, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    We have conducted a systematic study of the dominant x-ray line emission from Fe XVII. These studies include relative line intensities in the optically thin limit, intensities in the presence of radiation from satellite lines from lower charge states of iron, and the absolute excitation cross sections of some of the strongest lines. These measurements were conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion trap facility using crystal spectrometers and a NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center microcalorimeter array.

  1. X-ray continuum emission spectroscopy from hot dense matter at Gbar pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, D., E-mail: dominik.kraus@berkeley.edu; Falcone, R. W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Döppner, T.; Kritcher, A. L.; Bachmann, B.; Collins, G. W.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; Le Pape, S.; Swift, D. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Chapman, D. A. [Plasma Physics Group, Radiation Physics Department, AWE plc, Reading RG7 4PR, United Kingdom and Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94309 (United States); Neumayer, P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    We have measured the time-resolved x-ray continuum emission spectrum of ∼30 times compressed polystyrene created at stagnation of spherically convergent shock waves within the Gbar fundamental science campaign at the National Ignition Facility. From an exponential emission slope between 7.7 keV and 8.1 keV photon energy and using an emission model which accounts for reabsorption, we infer an average electron temperature of 375 ± 21 eV, which is in good agreement with HYDRA-1D simulations.

  2. Measurements of laser generated soft X-ray emission from irradiated gold foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. S.; Frank, Y.; Raicher, E.; Fraenkel, M.; Keiter, P. A.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Shvarts, D.

    2016-11-01

    Soft x-ray emission from laser irradiated gold foils was measured at the Omega-60 laser system using the Dante photodiode array. The foils were heated with 2 kJ, 6 ns laser pulses and foil thicknesses were varied between 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μm. Initial Dante analysis indicates peak emission temperatures of roughly 100 eV and 80 eV for the 0.5 μm and 1.0 μm thick foils, respectively, with little measurable emission from the 2.0 μm foils.

  3. Comparing plasma and X-ray exposure and identifying vulnerable cell parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bill

    2012-10-01

    Here two issues in plasma medicine that are being addressed in a collaboration between the Centre of Plasma Physics and the School of Pharmacy at Queen's University Belfast and the Plasma Institute at York University UK will be discussed. Recent measurements of the interaction of plasmas created directly in DMEM cell medium and MDAMB-231, a human breast cancer cell line, showed evidence of reduced cell viability and of DNA damage. The same set of experiments were undertaken but with X-ray exposure. A correlation of the dependence on plasma exposure time and X-ray dose was observed which might point the way to dose definition in plasma medicine. We have also been working to identify the cell parts most vulnerable to plasma exposure. In this study a 10 kHz atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma jet, operating in He/0.5%O2 and characterized to determine the behavior of many of the plasma species, was incident onto the surface of media containing either bacterial strains, in their planktonic and biofilm forms, or isolated bacterial plasmid DNA. The results of measurements to look for changes in plasmid structural conformation, rates of single and double strand breaks, the catalytic activity of certain bacterial enzymes, the peroxidation of lipid content of the bacterial cells, the leakage of ATP and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images will be discussed.

  4. Depth-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy in nanostructures via standing-wave excited photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronast, F.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kaiser, A.; Wiemann, C.; Yang, S.-H.; Locatelli, A.; Burgler, D.E.; Schreiber, R.; Salmassi, F.; Fischer, P.; Durr, H.A.; Schneider, C.M.; Eberhardt, W.; Fadley, C.S.

    2008-11-24

    We present an extension of conventional laterally resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy. A depth resolution along the surface normal down to a few {angstrom} can be achieved by setting up standing x-ray wave fields in a multilayer substrate. The sample is an Ag/Co/Au trilayer, whose first layer has a wedge profile, grown on a Si/MoSi2 multilayer mirror. Tuning the incident x-ray to the mirror Bragg angle we set up standing x-ray wave fields. We demonstrate the resulting depth resolution by imaging the standing wave fields as they move through the trilayer wedge structure.

  5. Suzaku observations of X-ray excess emission in the cluster of galaxies A 3112

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, T.; Nevalainen, J.; Bonamente, M.; Ota, N.; Kaastra, J.

    2010-12-01

    Aims: We analysed the Suzaku XIS1 data of the A 3112 cluster of galaxies in order to examine the X-ray excess emission in this cluster reported earlier with the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites. Methods: We performed X-ray spectroscopy on the data of a single large region. We carried out simulations to estimate the systematic uncertainties affecting the X-ray excess signal. Results: The best-fit temperature of the intracluster gas depends strongly on the choice of the energy band used for the spectral analysis. This proves the existence of excess emission component in addition to the single-temperature MEKAL in A 3112. We showed that this effect is not an artifact due to uncertainties of the background modeling, instrument calibration or the amount of Galactic absorption. Neither does the PSF scatter of the emission from the cool core nor the projection of the cool gas in the cluster outskirts produce the effect. Finally we modeled the excess emission either by using an additional MEKAL or powerlaw component. Due to the small differencies between thermal and non-thermal model we can not rule out the non-thermal origin of the excess emission based on the goodness of the fit. Assuming that it has a thermal origin, we further examined the differential emission measure (DEM) models. We utilised two different DEM models, a Gaussian differential emission measure distribution (GDEM) and WDEM model, where the emission measure of a number of thermal components is distributed as a truncated power law. The best-fit XIS1 MEKAL temperature for the 0.4-7.0 keV band is 4.7 ± 0.1 keV, consistent with that obtained using GDEM and WDEM models.

  6. Modelling the Central Constant Emission X-ray component of eta Carinae

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Christopher M P; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Madura, Thomas I; Owocki, Stanley P; Hillier, D John

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray emission of $\\eta$ Carinae shows multiple features at various spatial and temporal scales. The central constant emission (CCE) component is centred on the binary and arises from spatial scales much smaller than the bipolar Homunculus nebula, but likely larger than the central wind--wind collision region between the stars as it does not vary over the $\\sim$2-3 month X-ray minimum when it can be observed. Using large-scale 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, we model both the colliding-wind region between the stars, and the region where the secondary wind collides with primary wind ejected from the previous periastron passage. The simulations extend out to one hundred semimajor axes and make two limiting assumptions (strong coupling and no coupling) about the influence of the primary radiation field on the secondary wind. We perform 3D radiative transfer calculations on the SPH output to synthesize the X-ray emission, with the aim of reproducing the CCE spectrum. For the preferred pr...

  7. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Krauss, A.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  8. Thermal X-Ray Emission and Cooling of Solid Quark Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, M

    2009-01-01

    We try to understand the thermal X-ray emission and reproduce the cooling behavior of isolated pulsars in a solid quark star regime. We focus on the population with common properties of manifesting considerable thermal emission, owning ordinary magnetic fields $\\sim10^{11-13}$ G, comparatively young ages $10^{3-6}$ yrs, and spins of a few tens of milliseconds to a few seconds. The sample thus includes 14 active cooling pulsar candidates, 6 central compact objects (CCOs) and the Magnificent Seven, or 7 X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINs); other 11 sources with identification of the upper limits on their thermal luminosity are also considered. The release rate of residual inner energy of solid quark stars, evaluated by Debye elastic medium theory, is found to be negligible comparing with the observational X-ray bolometric luminosity, and hence, for solid quark stars, the thermal emission could predominantly originate from stellar heating processes. For pulsars with magnetospheric activities, the heating co...

  9. Non-thermal emissions from accreting X-ray binary pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Jin, Hui; Dong, Ai-Jun

    2014-03-01

    We study non-thermal emissions from cascade processes in accreting X-ray binary pulsars. In the framework of the magnetospheric gap model, we consider three photon fields, which are respectively from the polar cap of a pulsar, its surrounding accretion disk and a massive companion star with a circumstellar disk, to shield the gap. The gap-accelerated ultra-relativistic electrons emit high-energy photons via curvature radiation and an inverse Compton scattering process, in which part of these high-energy photons absorbed by interactions with the surrounding photon fields can facilitate the following electromagnetic cascades. We first carry out numerical calculations of the cascade processes in order to obtain the predicted emission spectra. As an example, we subsequently apply this model to reproduce observations of LS I +61° 303. We find that the results can fit observations ranging from hard X-ray to γ-ray bands. In particular, they can explain the spectral cutoff feature at a few GeV. Finally, we suggest that the emissions detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope from X-ray binary pulsars originate in the magnetosphere region of the pulsar.

  10. Laser-driven x-ray and neutron source development for industrial applications of plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, C. M.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Rusby, D. R.; Armstrong, C.; Alejo, A.; Wilson, L. A.; Clarke, R.; Ahmed, H.; Butler, N. M. H.; Haddock, D.; Higginson, A.; McClymont, A.; Murphy, C.; Notley, M.; Oliver, P.; Allott, R.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Kar, S.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed beams of energetic x-rays and neutrons from intense laser interactions with solid foils are promising for applications where bright, small emission area sources, capable of multi-modal delivery are ideal. Possible end users of laser-driven multi-modal sources are those requiring advanced non-destructive inspection techniques in industry sectors of high value commerce such as aerospace, nuclear and advanced manufacturing. We report on experimental work that demonstrates multi-modal operation of high power laser-solid interactions for neutron and x-ray beam generation. Measurements and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations show that neutron yield is increased by a factor ~2 when a 1 mm copper foil is placed behind a 2 mm lithium foil, compared to using a 2 cm block of lithium only. We explore x-ray generation with a 10 picosecond drive pulse in order to tailor the spectral content for radiography with medium density alloy metals. The impact of using  >1 ps pulse duration on laser-accelerated electron beam generation and transport is discussed alongside the optimisation of subsequent bremsstrahlung emission in thin, high atomic number target foils. X-ray spectra are deconvolved from spectrometer measurements and simulation data generated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. We also demonstrate the unique capability of laser-driven x-rays in being able to deliver single pulse high spatial resolution projection imaging of thick metallic objects. Active detector radiographic imaging of industrially relevant sample objects with a 10 ps drive pulse is presented for the first time, demonstrating that features of 200 μm size are resolved when projected at high magnification.

  11. X-ray survey with microcalorimeters: from GRB in the far universe to diffuse emission in our galaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piro, L.; Colasanti, L. E-mail: colasant@iasf.rm.cnr.it; Gandolfi, G.; Pacciani, L.; De Rosa, A.; Hampai, D.; Costa, E.; Feroci, M.; Soffitta, P.; Gatti, F.; Pergolesi, D.; Vaccarone, R.; Orio, M.; Ferrari, A.; Trussoni, E.; McCammon, D.; Sanders, W.T.; Porter, F.S.; Kelley, R.L.; Stahle, C.K.; Figueroa, E.; Szymkowiak, A.; Galeazzi, M

    2004-03-11

    IMBOSS is an experiment based on X-ray microcalorimeters and aimed to perform a high spectral resolution all-sky survey. One of the primary scientific goals is the observation of the baryon 'missing' matter at z<2. This is expected to be in the form of a warm-hot medium emitting in soft X-rays. We aim to detect and study the WHIM via X-ray emission lines. Another key goal is the detection of X-ray features in the prompt emission of GRBs, ultimately leading to a measurement of z for those class of GRBs still embedded in the mystery. Finally, a high-resolution spectroscopy survey will clarify the origin of the many components thought to make up the diffuse galactic X-ray emission.

  12. Double core-hole spectroscopy of transient plasmas produced in the interaction of ultraintense x-ray pulses with neon

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Cheng; Yuan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Double core-hole (DCH) spectroscopy is investigated systematically for neon atomic system in the interaction with ultraintense x-ray pulses with photon energy from 937 eV to 2000 eV. A time-dependent rate equation, implemented in the detailed level accounting approximation, is utilized to study the dynamical evolution of the level population and emission properties of the highly transient plasmas. For x-ray pulses with photon energy in the range of 937-1030 eV, where $1s\\rightarrow 2p$ resonance absorption from single core-hole (SCH) states of neon charge states exist, inner-shell resonant absorption (IRA) effects play important roles in the time evolution of population and DCH spectroscopy. Such IRA physical effects are illustrated in detail by investigating the interaction of x-ray pulses at a photon energy of 944 eV, which corresponds to the $1s\\rightarrow 2p$ resonant absorption from the SCH states ($1s2s^22p^4$, $1s2s2p^5$ and $1s2p^6$) of Ne$^{3+}$. After averaging over the space and time distribution o...

  13. X-ray Computed Tomographic Investigation of the Porosity and Morphology of Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xun; Aliasghari, Sepideh; Němcová, Aneta; Burnett, Timothy L; Kuběna, Ivo; Šmíd, Miroslav; Thompson, George E; Skeldon, Peter; Withers, Philip J

    2016-04-06

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is of increasing interest for the formation of ceramic coatings on metals for applications that require diverse coating properties, such as wear and corrosion resistance, low thermal conductivity, and biocompatibility. Porosity in the coatings can have an important impact on the coating performance. However, the quantification of the porosity in coatings can be difficult due to the wide range of pore sizes and the complexity of the coating morphology. In this work, a PEO coating formed on titanium is examined using high resolution X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT). The observations are validated by comparisons of surface views and cross-sectional views of specific coating features obtained using X-ray CT and scanning electron microscopy. The X-ray CT technique is shown to be capable of resolving pores with volumes of at least 6 μm(3). Furthermore, the shapes of large pores are revealed and a correlation is demonstrated between the locations of the pores, nodules on the coating surface, and depressions in the titanium substrate. The locations and morphologies of the pores, which constitute 5.7% of the coating volume, indicate that they are generated by release of oxygen gas from the molten coating.

  14. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE FIRST Be/BLACK HOLE SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munar-Adrover, P.; Paredes, J. M.; Ribó, M. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, IEEC-UB, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Iwasawa, K. [ICREA, Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, IEEC-UB, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Zabalza, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Casares, J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-05-10

    MWC 656 (=HD 215227) was recently discovered to be the first binary system composed of a Be star and a black hole (BH). We observed it with XMM-Newton, and detected a faint X-ray source compatible with the position of the optical star, thus proving it to be the first Be/BH X-ray binary. The spectrum analysis requires a model fit with two components, a blackbody plus a power law, with k{sub B}T=0.07{sub −0.03}{sup +0.04} keV and a photon index Γ = 1.0 ± 0.8, respectively. The non-thermal component dominates above ≅0.8 keV. The obtained total flux is F(0.3-5.5 keV)=(4.6{sub −1.1}{sup +1.3})×10{sup −14} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}. At a distance of 2.6 ± 0.6 kpc the total flux translates into a luminosity L {sub X} = (3.7 ± 1.7) × 10{sup 31} erg s{sup –1}. Considering the estimated range of BH masses to be 3.8-6.9 M {sub ☉}, this luminosity represents (6.7 ± 4.4) × 10{sup –8} L {sub Edd}, which is typical of stellar-mass BHs in quiescence. We discuss the origin of the two spectral components: the thermal component is associated with the hot wind of the Be star, whereas the power-law component is associated with emission from the vicinity of the BH. We also find that the position of MWC 656 in the radio versus X-ray luminosity diagram may be consistent with the radio/X-ray correlation observed in BH low-mass X-ray binaries. This suggests that this correlation might also be valid for BH high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) with X-ray luminosities down to ∼10{sup –8} L {sub Edd}. MWC 656 will allow the accretion processes and the accretion/ejection coupling at very low luminosities for BH HMXBs to be studied.

  15. Discovery of X-Ray Emission from the First Be/Black Hole System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munar-Adrover, P.; Paredes, J. M.; Ribó, M.; Iwasawa, K.; Zabalza, V.; Casares, J.

    2014-05-01

    MWC 656 (=HD 215227) was recently discovered to be the first binary system composed of a Be star and a black hole (BH). We observed it with XMM-Newton, and detected a faint X-ray source compatible with the position of the optical star, thus proving it to be the first Be/BH X-ray binary. The spectrum analysis requires a model fit with two components, a blackbody plus a power law, with k_BT = 0.07^{+0.04}_{-0.03} keV and a photon index Γ = 1.0 ± 0.8, respectively. The non-thermal component dominates above sime0.8 keV. The obtained total flux is F(0.3-5.5\\, keV) = (4.6^{+1.3}_{-1.1})\\times 10^{-14} erg cm-2 s-1. At a distance of 2.6 ± 0.6 kpc the total flux translates into a luminosity L X = (3.7 ± 1.7) × 1031 erg s-1. Considering the estimated range of BH masses to be 3.8-6.9 M ⊙, this luminosity represents (6.7 ± 4.4) × 10-8 L Edd, which is typical of stellar-mass BHs in quiescence. We discuss the origin of the two spectral components: the thermal component is associated with the hot wind of the Be star, whereas the power-law component is associated with emission from the vicinity of the BH. We also find that the position of MWC 656 in the radio versus X-ray luminosity diagram may be consistent with the radio/X-ray correlation observed in BH low-mass X-ray binaries. This suggests that this correlation might also be valid for BH high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) with X-ray luminosities down to ~10-8 L Edd. MWC 656 will allow the accretion processes and the accretion/ejection coupling at very low luminosities for BH HMXBs to be studied.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling of the accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars: the role of local absorption on the X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Bonito, R; Argiroffi, C; Miceli, M; Peres, G; Matsakos, T; Stehle, C; Ibgui, L

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the properties of X-ray emission from accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs), generated where the infalling material impacts the stellar surface. Both observations and models of the accretion process reveal several aspects that are still unclear: the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is below the predicted value, and the density versus temperature structure of the shocked plasma, with increasing densities at higher temperature, deduced from the observations, is at odds with that proposed in the current picture of accretion shocks. To address these open issues we investigate whether a correct treatment of the local absorption by the surrounding medium is crucial to explain the observations. To this end, we describe the impact of an accretion stream on a CTTS by considering a magnetohydrodynamic model. From the model results we synthesize the X-ray emission from the accretion shock by producing maps and spectra. We perform density and temperature diagnostics on the synthe...

  17. Spectrograph complex for laser plasma X-ray radiation research in ISKRA-4, ISKRA-5 experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessarab, A.V.; Bel`kov, S.A.; Zhidkov, N.V.; Tokarev, V.A. [VNIIEF Russian Federal Nuclear Center, Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    A spectrograph complex, developed for the ISKRA-4 and ISKRA-5 facilities, is described. The complex was developed to study continuous and line spectra in the 0.06-3 keV range. It comprises diffraction-grating, multilayer-mirror, and grazing-incidence crystal spectrographs. Recorded laser plasma X-ray spectra are compared with the ones predicted by the gas-dynamical theory. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  18. X-ray emission from star-forming galaxies - signatures of cosmic rays and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, J.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Klessen, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of magnetic fields in galaxies is still an open problem in astrophysics. In nearby galaxies the far-infrared-radio correlation indicates the coupling between magnetic fields and star formation. The correlation arises from the synchrotron emission of cosmic ray electrons travelling through the interstellar magnetic fields. However, with an increase of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF), inverse Compton scattering becomes the dominant energy loss mechanism of cosmic ray electrons with a typical emission frequency in the X-ray regime. The ISRF depends on the one hand on the star formation rate and becomes stronger in starburst galaxies, and on the other hand increases with redshift due to the higher temperature of the cosmic microwave background. With a model for the star formation rate of galaxies, the ISRF, and the cosmic ray spectrum, we can calculate the expected X-ray luminosity resulting from the inverse Compton emission. Except for galaxies with an active galactic nucleus the main additional contribution to the X-ray luminosity comes from X-ray binaries. We estimate this contribution with an analytical model as well as with an observational relation, and compare it to the pure inverse Compton luminosity. Using data from the Chandra Deep Field Survey and far-infrared observations from Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array, we then determine upper limits for the cosmic ray energy. Assuming that the magnetic energy in a galaxy is in equipartition with the energy density of the cosmic rays, we obtain upper limits for the magnetic field strength. Our results suggest that the mean magnetic energy of young galaxies is similar to the one in local galaxies. This points towards an early generation of galactic magnetic fields, which is in agreement with current dynamo evolution models.

  19. Modelling the Central Constan