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Sample records for plasma virus rna

  1. Detection of Viral RNA in Tissues following Plasma Clearance from an Ebola Virus Infected Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordi, Licia; Castilletti, Concetta; Colavita, Francesca; Quartu, Serena; Nicastri, Emanuele; Lauria, Francesco Nicola; Petrosillo, Nicola; Lanini, Simone; Kobinger, Gary; Zumla, Alimuddin; Di Caro, Antonino; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Lalle, Eleonora

    2017-01-01

    An unprecedented Ebola virus (EBOV) epidemic occurred in 2013–2016 in West Africa. Over this time the epidemic exponentially grew and moved to Europe and North America, with several imported cases and many Health Care Workers (HCW) infected. Better understanding of EBOV infection patterns in different body compartments is mandatory to develop new countermeasures, as well as to fully comprehend the pathways of human-to-human transmission. We have longitudinally explored the persistence of EBOV-specific negative sense genomic RNA (neg-RNA) and the presence of positive sense RNA (pos-RNA), including both replication intermediate (antigenomic-RNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, in the upper and lower respiratory tract, as compared to plasma, in a HCW infected with EBOV in Sierra Leone, who was hospitalized in the high isolation facility of the National Institute for Infectious Diseases “Lazzaro Spallanzani” (INMI), Rome, Italy. We observed persistence of pos-RNA and neg-RNAs in longitudinally collected specimens of the lower respiratory tract, even after viral clearance from plasma, suggesting possible local replication. The purpose of the present study is to enhance the knowledge on the biological features of EBOV that can contribute to the human-to-human transmissibility and to develop effective intervention strategies. However, further investigation is needed in order to better understand the clinical meaning of viral replication and shedding in the respiratory tract. PMID:28056096

  2. On-chip purification and detection of hepatitis C virus RNA from human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghi, V; Potrich, C; Pasquardini, L; Lunelli, L; Vanzetti, L; Ebranati, E; Lai, A; Zehender, G; Mombello, D; Cocuzza, M; Pirri, C F; Pederzolli, C

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the main causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. The diagnosis and monitoring of HCV infection is a crucial need in the clinical management. The conventional diagnostic technologies are challenged when trying to address molecular diagnostics, especially because they require a complex and time-consuming sample preparation phase. Here, a new concept based on surface functionalization was applied to viral RNA purification: first of all polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) flat surfaces were modified to hold RNA adsorption. After a careful chemical and morphological analysis of the modified surfaces, the functionalization protocols giving the best RNA adsorbing surfaces were applied to PDMS microdevices. The functionalized microdevices were then used for RNA purification from HCV infected human plasma samples. RNA purification and RT were successfully performed in the same microdevice chamber, saving time of analysis, reagents, and labor. The PCR protocol for HCV cDNA amplification was also implemented in the microdevice, demonstrating that the entire process of HCV analysis, from plasma to molecular readout, could be performed on-chip. Not only HCV but also other microdevice-based viral RNA detection could therefore result in a successful Point-of-Care (POC) diagnostics for resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of plasma viral RNA levels during acute dengue virus infection using quantitative competitor reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudiro, T M; Zivny, J; Ishiko, H; Green, S; Vaughn, D W; Kalayanarooj, S; Nisalak, A; Norman, J E; Ennis, F A; Rothman, A L

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the potential importance of viral burden in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). There is little data available, however, describing the kinetics of viral replication in humans with natural dengue virus (DV) infection. Standard procedures for measuring titers of infectious virus in clinical specimens are either laborious or insensitive. We developed a method for measurement of DV RNA in plasma samples based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using a mutant RNA target as a competitor. This technique was reproducible and accurate for samples containing any of the four DV serotypes, and could be applied to samples containing as few as 250 copies of RNA per reaction. We examined plasma viral RNA levels in 80 children with acute DV infection; sequential plasma samples were tested in 34 of these children. Plasma viral RNA levels ranged as high as 10(9) RNA copies/ml, and correlated with titers of infectious virus measured in mosquitoes (r= 0.69). Plasma viral RNA levels fell rapidly during the last several days of the febrile period. We did not find a significant difference in maximal plasma viral RNA levels between children with DHF and children with dengue fever, but peak viral RNA levels were identified in only 16 subjects. We conclude that this quantitative RT-PCR method will be valuable for further studies of natural DV infections.

  4. Sensing of RNA viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2012-01-01

    pathogen-associated molecular patterns have emerged in great detail. This review presents an overview of our current knowledge regarding the receptors used to detect RNA virus invasion, the molecular structures these receptors sense, and the involved downstream signaling pathways.......Our knowledge regarding the contribution of the innate immune system in recognizing and subsequently initiating a host response to an invasion of RNA virus has been rapidly growing over the last decade. Descriptions of the receptors involved and the molecular mechanisms they employ to sense viral...

  5. Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus RNA present in commercial spray-dried porcine plasma is not infectious to naive pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Opriessnig

    Full Text Available Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus emerged in North America in April 2013 and has since been identified in 30 U.S. States, Canada and Mexico. The rapid spread of PEDV has raised concerns about the role of feed and particularly pork-by-product components such as spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP in PEDV transmission. The aim of this study was to determine the infectivity of PEDV RNA present in commercial SDPP. Specifically, 40 3-week-old PEDV naïve pigs were randomly assigned to one of five treatment groups. At day post inoculation (dpi 0, NEG-CONTROL pigs were sham-inoculated, PEDV-CONTROL pigs received cell culture propagated PEDV, and SDPP-CONTROL pigs were switched to a diet with 5% SDPP containing 5.1±0.1 log10 PEDV RNA copies/g. To evaluate a potential positive effect of anti-PEDV antibodies in SDPP on PEDV challenge, four days prior to PEDV challenge the pigs in the SDPP-PEDV group were switched to and remained on a 5% SDPP diet through dpi 28. Another group, EGG-PEDV, was orally administered a commercial egg-derived liquid PEDV globulin product from dpi -4 through 6. All PEDV-CONTROL pigs began shedding PEDV in feces by dpi 3 and seroconverted between dpi 7 and 14, whereas pigs in NEG-CONTROL and SDPP-CONTROL groups remained PEDV RNA negative and did not seroconvert to PEDV for the study duration. This indicates no evidence of infectivity of the PEDV RNA in the SDPP lot utilized. Furthermore, under the study conditions SDPP or egg-derived liquid PEDV globulin addition did not significantly alter PEDV-shedding or overall disease course after experimental challenge.

  6. RNA chaperones encoded by RNA viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Yang; Hongjie Xia; Qi Qian; Xi Zhou

    2015-01-01

    RNAs are functionally diverse macromolecules whose proper functions rely strictly upon their correct tertiary structures. However, because of their high structural flexibility, correct folding of RNAs is challenging and slow. Therefore, cells and viruses encode a variety of RNA remodeling proteins, including helicases and RNA chaperones. In RNA viruses, these proteins are believed to play pivotal roles in all the processes involving viral RNAs during the life cycle. RNA helicases have been studied extensively for decades, whereas RNA chaperones, particularly virus-encoded RNA chaperones, are often overlooked. This review describes the activities of RNA chaperones encoded by RNA viruses, particularly the ones identified and characterized in recent years, and the functions of these proteins in different steps of viral life cycles, and presents an overview of this unique group of proteins.

  7. Plant RNA binding proteins for control of RNA virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Sung Un; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Plant RNA viruses have effective strategies to infect host plants through either direct or indirect interactions with various host proteins, thus suppressing the host immune system. When plant RNA viruses enter host cells exposed RNAs of viruses are recognized by the host immune system through processes such as siRNA-dependent silencing. Interestingly, some host RNA binding proteins have been involved in the inhibition of RNA virus replication, movement, and translation through RNA-specific b...

  8. Evaluation of the VACUTAINER PPT Plasma Preparation Tube for use with the Bayer VERSANT assay for quantification of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbeik, Tarek; Nassos, Patricia; Kipnis, Patricia; Haller, Barbara; Ng, Valerie L

    2005-08-01

    Separation and storage of plasma within 2 h of phlebotomy is required for the VACUTAINER PPT Plasma Preparation Tube (PPT) versus 4 h for the predecessor VACUTAINER EDTA tube for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral load (HIVL) testing by the VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 3.0 assay (branched DNA). The 2-h limit for PPT imposes time constraints for handling and transporting to the testing laboratory. This study compares HIVL reproducibility from matched blood in EDTA tubes and PPTs and between PPT pairs following processing within 4 h of phlebotomy, stability of plasma HIV-1 RNA at 24- and 72-h room temperature storage in the tube, and comparative labor and supply requirements. Blood from 159 patients was collected in paired tubes (EDTA/PPT or PPT/PPT): 86 paired EDTA tubes and PPTs were processed 4 h following phlebotomy and their HIVLs were compared, 42 paired PPT/PPT pairs were analyzed for intertube HIVL reproducibility, and 31 PPT/PPT pairs were analyzed for HIV-1 RNA stability by HIVL. Labor and supply requirements were compared between PPT and EDTA tubes. PPTs produce results equivalent to standard EDTA tube results when processed 4 h after phlebotomy. PPT intertube analyte results are reproducible. An average decrease of 13% and 37% in HIVL was observed in PPT plasma after 24 and 72 h of room temperature storage, respectively; thus, plasma can be stored at room temperature up to 24 h in the original tube. PPTs offer labor and supply savings over EDTA tubes.

  9. RNA recombination in animal and plant viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    An increasing number of animal and plant viruses have been shown to undergo RNA-RNA recombination, which is defined as the exchange of genetic information between nonsegmented RNAs. Only some of these viruses have been shown to undergo recombination in experimental infection of tissue culture, animals, and plants. However, a survey of viral RNA structure and sequences suggests that many RNA viruses were derived form homologous or nonhomologous recombination between viruses or between viruses ...

  10. The effect of tenidap on cytokines, acute-phase proteins, and virus load in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients: correlation between plasma HIV-1 RNA and proinflammatory cytokine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezube, B J; Lederman, M M; Chapman, B; Georges, D L; Dogon, A L; Mudido, P; Reis-Lishing, J; Cheng, S L; Silberman, S L; Crumpacker, C S

    1997-09-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines may be important in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease. Tenidap decreases interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells and decreases IL-6 plasma levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients. In this randomized double-blind study, 43 HIV-1-infected patients received tenidap (120 mg) or placebo daily for 6 weeks and then crossed over to the alternative therapy for an additional 6 weeks. Mean entry CD4 cell count was 140/microL. Analyses were performed on cytokines, acute-phase proteins, virus load, and CD4 cell counts. With the exception of small differences in plasma TNF levels, tenidap had no significant effect on these indices. Significant correlations of plasma IL-6 and TNF levels with HIV-1 RNA were noted. Six patients discontinued tenidap due to rash. The effects of tenidap in HIV-1 infection contrast to results in arthritis patients, in whom tenidap decreased plasma levels of IL-6 and acute-phase proteins.

  11. Comparative study of the plasma globulin level, CD21(-) B-cell counts and FOXP3 mRNA expression level in CD4(+) T-cells for different clinical stages of feline immunodeficiency virus infected cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tomomi; Hosoya, Shinobu; Shibao, Akari; Nagasaki, Bunpei; Yoshioka, Hisao; Satoh, Ryoichi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2012-02-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection leads to hypergammaglobulinemia through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. We investigated changes in plasma globulin level, B cells, and T cells with progression of the clinical stage of FIV-infected cats. We classified FIV-infected cats into the stage of Asymptomatic carrier (AC) and AIDS-related complex (ARC) based on the clinical symptoms, and measured the plasma globulin level, the CD4(+) T-cell counts, and analyzed surface markers of B cells. We investigated the relationship between the plasma globulin level and regulatory T cells (Tregs) using the Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) mRNA expression level. In FIV-infected cats, the plasma globulin level and the surface immunoglobulin (sIg)(+) CD21(-) B-cell counts were increased, whereas the CD4(+) T-cell counts were decreased compared with specific-pathogen free (SPF) cats. The mRNA expression of Blimp-1 (master gene of plasma cells) was increased in peripheral blood, and the FOXP3 mRNA expression level was decreased in CD4(+) T-cells. These immunological changes were marked in the ARC stage. These data indicate that the decrease of Tregs and the increase of plasma cells lead to hypergammaglobulinemia.

  12. [Physicochemical properties of Teschen disease virus RNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsybanov, S Zh; Sergeev, V A; Balysheva, V I

    1982-01-01

    The specific infectivity of virion RNA of teschen disease virus in a sensitive PP cell culture was 4-5 lg TCD50/ml per 1 microgram RNA. When virion RNA was inoculated into cell cultures insusceptible to the native virus, the virus replicated to a titre of 2.0-3.5 lg TCD50/ml. The molecular weight of virion RNA determined by two independent methods was 2.7 x 10(6) daltons. Tm calculated from the curve of virion RNA melting temperature was 57 degrees C. The double-stranded replicative form of RNA recovered from virus-infected PP cells was shown to have sucrose gradient sedimentation coefficient of 20 S. The specific infectivity was 2-3 lg TCD50/ml per 1 microgram of RNA.

  13. Strategies underlying RNA silencing suppression by negative strand RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focused on the strategies of negative strand RNA viruses to counteract antiviral RNA silencing. In plants and insects, RNA silencing has been shown to act as a sequence specific antiviral defence mechanism that is characterised by the processing of double strand

  14. Strategies underlying RNA silencing suppression by negative strand RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focused on the strategies of negative strand RNA viruses to counteract antiviral RNA silencing. In plants and insects, RNA silencing has been shown to act as a sequence specific antiviral defence mechanism that is characterised by the processing of double strand

  15. Functional RNA during Zika virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göertz, Giel P.; Abbo, Sandra R.; Fros, Jelke J.; Pijlman, Gorben P.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV; family Flaviviridae; genus Flavivirus) is a pathogenic mosquito-borne RNA virus that currently threatens human health in the Americas, large parts of Asia and occasionally elsewhere in the world. ZIKV infection is often asymptomatic but can cause severe symptoms including

  16. Cell Transformation by RNA Viruses: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Fan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies of oncogenic viruses have made seminal contributions to the molecular biology of cancer. Key discoveries include the identification of viral oncogenes and cellular proto-oncogenes, elucidation of signal transduction pathways, and identification of tumor suppressor genes. The origins of cancer virology began almost exactly one hundred years ago with the discovery of avian sarcoma and acute leukemia viruses—RNA-containing viruses of the retrovirus family. The study of animal cancer viruses accelerated beginning in the late 1960s and early 1970s, with the discovery of DNA viruses that could transform cells in culture, and the development of quantitative assays for transformation by DNA and RNA-containing tumor viruses. The discovery of reverse transcriptase in retroviruses in 1970 also greatly accelerated research on these viruses. Indeed RNA and DNA tumor viruses led the way in cancer molecular biology during this era before molecular cloning. It was possible to physically purify virus particles and generate specific hybridization probes for viral DNA and RNA at a time when it was not possible to analyze cellular genes in the same manner. [...

  17. RNA topology remoulds electrostatic stabilization of viruses

    CERN Document Server

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; van der Schoot, Paul; Podgornik, Rudolf; Zandi, Roya

    2013-01-01

    Simple RNA viruses efficiently encapsulate their genome into a nano-sized protein shell-the capsid. Spontaneous co-assembly of the genome and the capsid proteins is driven predominantly by electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged RNA and the positively charged inner capsid wall. Using field theoretic formulation we show that the inherently branched RNA secondary structure allows viruses to {\\sl maximize} the amount of encapsulated genome and make assembly more efficient, allowing viral RNAs to out-compete cellular RNAs during replication in infected host cells.

  18. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortín, Juan, E-mail: jortin@cnb.csic.es [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC) and CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (ISCIII), Madrid (Spain); Martín-Benito, Jaime, E-mail: jmartinb@cnb.csic.es [Department of Macromolecular Structures, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes.

  19. The Effect of Oseltamivir on the Disease Progression of Lethal Influenza A Virus Infection: Plasma Cytokine and miRNA Responses in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok K. Chockalingam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lethal influenza A virus infection leads to acute lung injury and possibly lethal complications. There has been a continuous effort to identify the possible predictors of disease severity. Unlike earlier studies, where biomarkers were analyzed on certain time points or days after infection, in this study biomarkers were evaluated over the entire course of infection. Circulating proinflammatory cytokines and/or miRNAs that track with the onset and progression of lethal A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8 influenza A virus infection and their response to oseltamivir treatment were investigated up to 10 days after infection. Changes in plasma cytokines (IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-6, KC, TNF-α, and IFN-γ and several candidate miRNAs were profiled. Among the cytokines analyzed, IL-6 and KC/GRO cytokines appeared to correlate with peak viral titer. Over the selected 48 miRNAs profiled, certain miRNAs were up- or downregulated in a manner that was dependent on the oseltamivir treatment and disease severity. Our findings suggest that IL-6 and KC/GRO cytokines can be a potential disease severity biomarker and/or marker for the progression/remission of infection. Further studies to explore other cytokines, miRNAs, and lung injury proteins in serum with different subtypes of influenza A viruses with varying disease severity may provide new insight into other unique biomarkers.

  20. RNA families in Epstein–Barr virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Walter N; Lee, Nara; Pimienta, Genaro; Steitz, Joan A

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a tumorigenic human γ-herpesvirus, which produces several known structured RNAs with functional importance: two are implicated in latency maintenance and tumorigenic phenotypes, EBER1 and EBER2; a viral small nucleolar RNA (v-snoRNA1) that may generate a small regulatory RNA; and an internal ribosomal entry site in the EBNA1 mRNA. A recent bioinformatics and RNA-Seq study of EBV identified two novel EBV non-coding (nc)RNAs with evolutionary conservation in lymphocryptoviruses and likely functional importance. Both RNAs are transcribed from a repetitive region of the EBV genome (the W repeats) during a highly oncogenic type of viral latency. One novel ncRNA can form a massive (586 nt) hairpin, while the other RNA is generated from a short (81 nt) intron and is found in high abundance in EBV-infected cells. PMID:24441309

  1. RNA families in Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Walter N; Lee, Nara; Pimienta, Genaro; Steitz, Joan A

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a tumorigenic human γ-herpesvirus, which produces several known structured RNAs with functional importance: two are implicated in latency maintenance and tumorigenic phenotypes, EBER1 and EBER2; a viral small nucleolar RNA (v-snoRNA1) that may generate a small regulatory RNA; and an internal ribosomal entry site in the EBNA1 mRNA. A recent bioinformatics and RNA-Seq study of EBV identified two novel EBV non-coding (nc)RNAs with evolutionary conservation in lymphocryptoviruses and likely functional importance. Both RNAs are transcribed from a repetitive region of the EBV genome (the W repeats) during a highly oncogenic type of viral latency. One novel ncRNA can form a massive (586 nt) hairpin, while the other RNA is generated from a short (81 nt) intron and is found in high abundance in EBV-infected cells.

  2. RNA polymerase activity of Ustilago maydis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yie, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    Ustilago maydis virus has an RNA polymerase enzyme which is associated with virion capsids. In the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ ion and ribonucleotide triphosphate, the enzyme catalyzes the in vitro synthesis of mRNA by using dsRNA as a template. The products of the UmV RNA polymerase were both ssRNA and dsRNA. The dsRNA was determined by characteristic mobilities in gel electrophoresis, lack of sensitivity to RNase, and specific hybridization tests. The ssRNAs were identified by elution from a CF-11 column and by their RNase sensitivity. On the basis of the size of ssRNAs, it was concluded that partial transcripts were produced from H dsRNA segments, and full length transcripts were produced from M and L dsRNA segments. The following observations indicates that transcription occurs by strand displacement; (1) Only the positive strand of M2 dsRNA was labeled by the in vitro reaction. (2) The M2 dsRNA which had been labeled with /sup 32/''P-UTP in vitro could be chased from dsRNA with unlabeled UTP. The transcription products of three UmV strains were compared, and the overall pattern of transcription was very similar among them.

  3. Multicenter comparison of Roche COBAS AMPLICOR MONITOR version 1.5, Organon Teknika NucliSens QT with Extractor, and Bayer Quantiplex version 3.0 for quantification of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D G; Côté, L; Fauvel, M; René, P; Vincelette, J

    2000-11-01

    The performance and characteristics of Roche COBAS AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR version 1.5 (CA MONITOR 1.5) UltraSensitive (usCA MONITOR 1. 5) and Standard (stCA MONITOR 1.5) procedures, Organon Teknika NucliSens HIV-1 RNA QT with Extractor (NucliSens), and Bayer Quantiplex HIV RNA version 3.0 (bDNA 3.0) were compared in a multicenter trial. Samples used in this study included 460 plasma specimens from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1)-infected persons, 100 plasma specimens from HIV antibody (anti-HIV)-negative persons, and culture supernatants of HIV-1 subtype A to E isolates diluted in anti-HIV-negative plasma. Overall, bDNA 3.0 showed the least variation in RNA measures upon repeat testing. For the Roche assays, usCA MONITOR 1.5 displayed less variation in RNA measures than stCA MONITOR 1.5. NucliSens, at an input volume of 2 ml, showed the best sensitivity. Deming regression analysis indicated that the results of all three assays were significantly correlated (P < 0.0001). However, the mean difference in values between CA MONITOR 1.5 and bDNA 3.0 (0.274 log(10) RNA copies/ml; 95% confidence interval, 0.192 to 0.356) was significantly different from 0, indicating that CA MONITOR 1.5 values were regularly higher than bDNA 3.0 values. Upon testing of 100 anti-HIV-negative plasma specimens, usCA MONITOR 1.5 and NucliSens displayed 100% specificity, while bDNA 3.0 showed 98% specificity. NucliSens quantified 2 of 10 non-subtype B viral isolates at 1 log(10) lower than both CA MONITOR 1.5 and bDNA 3.0. For NucliSens, testing of specimens with greater than 1,000 RNA copies/ml at input volumes of 0.1, 0.2, and 2.0 ml did not affect the quality of results. Additional factors differing between assays included specimen throughput and volume requirements, limit of detection, ease of execution, instrument work space, and costs of disposal. These characteristics, along with assay performance, should be considered when one is selecting a viral load assay.

  4. Comparison of the artus HIV-1 QS-RGQ and VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 1.0 assays for quantitative detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, Roee; Canducci, Filippo; Racca, Sara; Rolla, Serena; Stucchi, Sonia; Clementi, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    Several integrated diagnostic platforms to quantify human immunodeficiency virus type-1 viremia have been developed in recent years. We evaluated the performances of the Artus HIV-1 QS-RGQ assay, using the complete QIAsymphony RGQ workflow. 192 clinical plasma specimens and external control panel samples were analyzed, using the Artus assay and the routine Siemens VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 1.0 assay. Three samples were excluded due to amplification inhibition. Among the remaining 189 specimens, 130 samples were detected as positive (above the limit of detection by both assays; median log10 difference: 0.01) and 18 samples were detected as negative. Eight samples (4.2%), all slightly above the limit of detection of the Versant assay, were negative with the Artus assay. The remaining 33 samples (beside 3 negative by Artus assay) were positive by both assays, but below the limit of detection at least in one of them. Results from the external panel samples showed a mean Log10 variation of -0.18 and -0.45 for the Versant and the Artus assays, respectively. As both assays showed highly correlated results, the QIAsymphony RGQ system, using the Artus HIV-1 QS-RGQ assay, could be considered a potential platform for HIV-1 RNA quantification in plasma.

  5. Mutation rates among RNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, John W.; Holland, John J.

    1999-01-01

    The rate of spontaneous mutation is a key parameter in modeling the genetic structure and evolution of populations. The impact of the accumulated load of mutations and the consequences of increasing the mutation rate are important in assessing the genetic health of populations. Mutation frequencies are among the more directly measurable population parameters, although the information needed to convert them into mutation rates is often lacking. A previous analysis of mutation rates in RNA viru...

  6. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, Richard E., E-mail: rlloyd@bcm.edu

    2015-05-15

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication.

  7. ER stress, autophagy, and RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Rong eJheng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is a general term for representing the pathway by which various stimuli affect ER functions. ER stress induces the evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways, called the unfolded protein response (UPR, which compromises the stimulus and then determines whether the cell survives or dies. In recent years, ongoing research has suggested that these pathways may be linked to the autophagic response, which plays a key role in the cell’s response to various stressors. Autophagy performs a self-digestion function, and its activation protects cells against certain pathogens. However, the link between the UPR and autophagy may be more complicated. These two systems may act dependently, or the induction of one system may interfere with the other. Experimental studies have found that different viruses modulate these mechanisms to allow them to escape the host immune response or, worse, to exploit the host’s defense to their advantage; thus, this topic is a critical area in antiviral research. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about how RNA viruses, including influenza virus, poliovirus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus 71, Japanese encephalitis virus, hepatitis C virus, and dengue virus, regulate these processes. We also discuss recent discoveries and how these will produce novel strategies for antiviral treatment.

  8. Mutual Interference between Genomic RNA Replication and Subgenomic mRNA Transcription in Brome Mosaic Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.; Garcia-Ruiz, Hernan; Watanabe, Tokiko; Ahlquist, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Replication by many positive-strand RNA viruses includes genomic RNA amplification and subgenomic mRNA (sgRNA) transcription. For brome mosaic virus (BMV), both processes occur in virus-induced, membrane-associated compartments, require BMV replication factors 1a and 2a, and use negative-strand RNA3 as a template for genomic RNA3 and sgRNA syntheses. To begin elucidating their relations, we examined the interaction of RNA3 replication and sgRNA transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae expres...

  9. Hepatitis G Viral RNA Co-infection in Plasma and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Patients with Hepatitis C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shuli; ZENG Linglan; LUO Duande; LIU Wei; GUO Jingsong; YANG Xiaoming

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of the co-infection of hepatitis G virus (HGV) and hepatitis C virus(HCV) and its clinical implication was investigated and the difference in the positive rate of HGV RNA and HCV RNA between plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) observed. By using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay, HCV-RNA and HGV-RNA in plasma and PBMCs of 72 patients with hepatitis C was detected. It was showed that HGV RNA was positive in plasma of 11 patients, in PBMCs of 15 patients, and simultaneously in both of plasma and PBMCs of 10 patients with the co-infection rate being 22.2 %. Nine patients were both HGV RNA and HCV RNA positive in plasma, 11 patients were both HGV RNA and HCV RNA positive in PBMC, and 6 patients were both HGV RNA and HCV RNA positive in both plasma and PBMC with the positive rate being 12.4 %, 15.3 % and 8.3 % respectively. The positive rate of both HGV RNA and HCV RNA in PBMCs was higher than in plasma. It was concluded that the HGV co-infection rate in the patients with hepatitis C was 22. 2 %. Simultaneous examination of plasma and PBMC can improve clinically detectable rate.

  10. RNA conformational changes in the life cycles of RNA viruses, viroids, and virus-associated RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Anne E; Gehrke, Lee

    2009-01-01

    The rugged nature of the RNA structural free energy landscape allows cellular RNAs to respond to environmental conditions or fluctuating levels of effector molecules by undergoing dynamic conformational changes that switch on or off activities such as catalysis, transcription or translation. Infectious RNAs must also temporally control incompatible activities and rapidly complete their life cycle before being targeted by cellular defenses. Viral genomic RNAs must switch between translation and replication, and untranslated subviral RNAs must control other activities such as RNA editing or self-cleavage. Unlike well characterized riboswitches in cellular RNAs, the control of infectious RNA activities by altering the configuration of functional RNA domains has only recently been recognized. In this review, we will present some of these molecular rearrangements found in RNA viruses, viroids and virus-associated RNAs, relating how these dynamic regions were discovered, the activities that might be regulated, and what factors or conditions might cause a switch between conformations.

  11. Comparison of levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in plasma as measured by the NucliSens nucleic acid sequence-based amplification and Quantiplex branched-DNA assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginocchio, C C; Tetali, S; Washburn, D; Zhang, F; Kaplan, M H

    1999-04-01

    This study compared levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in plasma as measured by the Quantiplex branched-DNA and NucliSens nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assays. RNA was detectable in 118 of 184 samples (64.13%) by the Quantiplex assay and in 171 of 184 samples (92.94%) by the NucliSens assay. Regression analysis indicated that a linear relationship existed between the two sets of values (P < 0.0001), although the Quantiplex and NucliSens values were significantly different (P < 0.001), with the NucliSens values being approximately 0.323 log higher. Spearman correlation analysis indicated that the overall changes in patient viral load patterns were highly correlative between the two assays: r = 0.912, P < 0.0001. The lower limits of sensitivity were determined to be approximately 100 copies/ml and 1,200 to 1,400 copies/ml for the NucliSens and Quantiplex assays, respectively.

  12. In vitro transcription of Sonchus yellow net virus RNA by a virus-associated RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flore, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the investigation presented in this thesis was to elucidate the nature of the RNA- dependent RNA polymerase, thought to be associated with Sonchus yellow net virus (SYNV), a rhabdovirus infecting plants. This research was initiated to shed light on the transcription activity in rhabdoviru

  13. Rapid molecular detection of Lujo virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Barry; Chamberlain, John; Dowall, Stuart D; Cook, Nicola; Bruce, Christine; Hewson, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Lujo virus is an emerging arenavirus circulating in Southern Africa. Although to date there has only been a single outbreak of the novel haemorrhagic disease resulting from human infection with this virus, the case-fatality rate of exposed individuals, including nosocomial transmission, was 80%. The ability to identify viral haemorrhagic fevers accurately, especially those capable of nosocomial transmission, is of critical importance. Timely identification of these diseases allow medical professionals to isolate patients and implement barrier nursing techniques in order to prevent onward transmission of the virus. While rapid diagnostic methods are published for most viral haemorrhagic fevers, at present there are no such virus specific protocols for Lujo haemorrhagic fever. This report details the first set of diagnostic molecular assays designed to identify Lujo viral RNA rapidly, and demonstrates the potential functionality of these assays for use in the clinical setting. Although these assays have been designed and validated against a solitary isolate of Lujo virus, this represents the entirety of strains detected to date, and offer quick, cheap and easy methods for use in diagnostic laboratories.

  14. RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from cowpea mosaic virus-infected cowpea leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorssers, L.C.J.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this thesis was the purification and identification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase engaged in replicating viral RNA in cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV)- infected cowpea leaves.Previously, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase produced upon infection of Vigna unguiculata

  15. RNA Replicons - A New Approach for Influenza Virus Immunoprophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Zimmer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA replicons are derived from either positive- or negative-strand RNA viruses. They represent disabled virus vectors that are not only avirulent, but also unable to revert to virulence. Due to autonomous RNA replication, RNA replicons are able to drive high level, cytosolic expression of recombinant antigens stimulating both the humoral and the cellular branch of the immune system. This review provides an update on the available literature covering influenza virus vaccines based on RNA replicons. The pros and cons of these vaccine strategies will be discussed and future perspectives disclosed.

  16. A Broad RNA Virus Survey Reveals Both miRNA Dependence and Functional Sequestration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels K H; Luna, Joseph M; Liniger, Matthias;

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs have emerged as key modulators of viral infection. However, with the exception of hepatitis C virus, which requires the liver-specific microRNA (miRNA)-122, the interactions of RNA viruses with host miRNAs remain poorly characterized. Here, we used crosslinking immunoprecipi...

  17. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis.

  18. Intrathecal Humoral Immunity to Encephalitic RNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia C. Bergmann

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system is the target for acute encephalitic viral infections, as well as a reservoir for persisting viruses. Intrathecal antibody (Ab synthesis is well documented in humans afflicted by infections associated with neurological complications, as well as the demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis. This review focuses on the origin, recruitment, maintenance, and biological relevance of Ab-secreting cells (ASC found in the central nervous system (CNS following experimental neurotropic RNA virus infections. We will summarize evidence for a highly dynamic, evolving humoral response characterized by temporal alterations in B cell subsets, proliferation, and differentiation. Overall local Ab plays a beneficial role via complement-independent control of virus replication, although cross or self-reactive Ab to CNS antigens may contribute to immune-mediated pathogenesis during some infections. Importantly, protective Ab exert anti-viral activity not only by direct neutralization, but also by binding to cell surface-expressed viral glycoproteins. Ab engagement of viral glycoproteins blocks budding and mediates intracellular signaling leading to restored homeostatic and innate functions. The sustained Ab production by local ASC, as well as chemokines and cytokines associated with ASC recruitment and retention, are highlighted as critical components of immune control.

  19. The dsRNA Virus Papaya Meleira Virus and an ssRNA Virus Are Associated with Papaya Sticky Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tathiana Ferreira Sá Antunes

    Full Text Available Papaya sticky disease, or "meleira", is one of the major diseases of papaya in Brazil and Mexico, capable of causing complete crop loss. The causal agent of sticky disease was identified as an isometric virus with a double stranded RNA (dsRNA genome, named papaya meleira virus (PMeV. In the present study, PMeV dsRNA and a second RNA band of approximately 4.5 kb, both isolated from latex of papaya plants with severe symptoms of sticky disease, were deep-sequenced. The nearly complete sequence obtained for PMeV dsRNA is 8,814 nucleotides long and contains two putative ORFs; the predicted ORF1 and ORF2 display similarity to capsid proteins and RdRp's, respectively, from mycoviruses tentatively classified in the family Totiviridae. The sequence obtained for the second RNA is 4,515 nucleotides long and contains two putative ORFs. The predicted ORFs 1 and 2 display 48% and 73% sequence identity, respectively, with the corresponding proteins of papaya virus Q, an umbravirus recently described infecting papaya in Ecuador. Viral purification in a sucrose gradient allowed separation of particles containing each RNA. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated that both PMeV and the second RNA virus (named papaya meleira virus 2, PMeV2 were encapsidated in particles formed by the protein encoded by PMeV ORF1. The presence of both PMeV and PMeV2 was confirmed in field plants showing typical symptoms of sticky disease. Interestingly, PMeV was detected alone in asymptomatic plants. Together, our results indicate that sticky disease is associated with double infection by PMeV and PMeV2.

  20. Phomopsis longicolla RNA virus 1 - Novel virus at the edge of myco- and plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabáková, Lenka; Koloniuk, Igor; Petrzik, Karel

    2017-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a new RNA mycovirus in the KY isolate of Phomopsis longicolla Hobbs 1985 and its protoplasts subcultures p5, p9, and ME711 was discovered. The virus, provisionally named Phomopsis longicolla RNA virus 1 (PlRV1), was localized in mitochondria and was determined to have a genome 2822 nucleotides long. A single open reading frame could be translated in silico by both standard and mitochondrial genetic codes into a product featuring conservative domains for an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The RdRp of PlRV1 has no counterpart among mycoviruses, but it is about 30% identical with the RdRp of plant ourmiaviruses. Recently, new mycoviruses related to plant ourmiaviruses and forming one clade with PlRV1 have been discovered. This separate clade could represent the crucial link between plant and fungal viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Influenza A virus targets a cGAS-independent STING pathway that controls enveloped RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Christian K; Rahbek, Stine H; Gad, Hans Henrik; Bak, Rasmus O; Jakobsen, Martin R; Jiang, Zhaozaho; Hansen, Anne Louise; Jensen, Simon K; Sun, Chenglong; Thomsen, Martin K; Laustsen, Anders; Nielsen, Camilla G; Severinsen, Kasper; Xiong, Yingluo; Burdette, Dara L; Hornung, Veit; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Duch, Mogens; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Bahrami, Shervin; Mikkelsen, Jakob Giehm; Hartmann, Rune; Paludan, Søren R

    2016-02-19

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) is known be involved in control of DNA viruses but has an unexplored role in control of RNA viruses. During infection with DNA viruses STING is activated downstream of cGAMP synthase (cGAS) to induce type I interferon. Here we identify a STING-dependent, cGAS-independent pathway important for full interferon production and antiviral control of enveloped RNA viruses, including influenza A virus (IAV). Further, IAV interacts with STING through its conserved hemagglutinin fusion peptide (FP). Interestingly, FP antagonizes interferon production induced by membrane fusion or IAV but not by cGAMP or DNA. Similar to the enveloped RNA viruses, membrane fusion stimulates interferon production in a STING-dependent but cGAS-independent manner. Abolishment of this pathway led to reduced interferon production and impaired control of enveloped RNA viruses. Thus, enveloped RNA viruses stimulate a cGAS-independent STING pathway, which is targeted by IAV.

  2. Role of RNA secondary structure in emergence of compartment specific hepatitis B virus immune escape variants

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Chakravarty, Runu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of subgenotype specific RNA secondary structure in the compartment specific selection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) immune escape mutations. METHODS This study was based on the analysis of the specific observation of HBV subgenotype A1 in the serum/plasma, while subgenotype A2 with G145R mutation in the peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). Genetic variability found among the two subgenotypes was used for prediction and comparison of the full length pregenomic RNA (pgRN...

  3. Nucleotide sequence of papaya mosaic virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, T L; Abouhaidar, M G; Holy, S

    1989-09-01

    The RNA genome of papaya mosaic virus is 6656 nucleotides long [excluding the poly(A) tail] with six open reading frames (ORFs) more than 200 nucleotides long. The four nearest the 5' end each overlap with adjacent ORFs and could code for proteins with Mr 176307, 26248, 11949 and 7224 (ORFs 1 to 4). The fifth ORF produces the capsid protein of Mr 23043 and the sixth ORF, located completely within ORF1, could code for a protein with Mr 14113. The translation products of ORFs 1 to 3 show strong similarity with those of other potexviruses but the ORF 4 protein has only limited similarity with the other potexvirus ORF 4 proteins of 7K to 11K.

  4. Viral counterdefense on RNA silencing : analysis of RNA silencing suppressors from arthropod-borne negative strand RNA plant viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnettler, E.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes that RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins encoded by negative-stranded RNA plant viruses are able to interfere with different RNA silencing pathways in a variety of organisms by interacting with double stranded (ds)RNA molecules. These RSS proteins are able to counteract the

  5. Viral counterdefense on RNA silencing : analysis of RNA silencing suppressors from arthropod-borne negative strand RNA plant viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnettler, E.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes that RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins encoded by negative-stranded RNA plant viruses are able to interfere with different RNA silencing pathways in a variety of organisms by interacting with double stranded (ds)RNA molecules. These RSS proteins are able to counteract the

  6. Prevalence of hepatitis G virus RNA in a monocentric population of French haemophiliacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerolami, V; Halfon, P; Chambost, H; Sicardi, F; Thuret, I; Planells, R; Halimi, G; Fossat, C; Michel, G; Cartouzou, G

    1997-10-01

    Hepatitis G virus (HGV) and hepatitis GB virus (GBV-C) have been reported as possible causes of non-A-E transfusional hepatitis. To assess the prevalence of hepatitis G virus infection in haemophiliacs we retrospectively investigated the presence of viral RNA in 92 patients with and without HCV infection. HGV/GBV-C RNA was reverse transcribed and amplified with primers from the 5' non-coding region of the genome. RNA was detected in 16/92 patients (17.4%). Restriction enzyme analysis revealed that the 16 patients belonged to the HGV-like genotype. Serology with E2-specific antibodies demonstrated that HGV viraemia underestimates previous infection by HGV. 33 patients were positive for HGV; all but two have cleared HGV RNA. 47/92 patients had a marker of prior infection by HGV. No difference between HGV RNA positive and negative patients was observed concerning age, diagnosis, HIV and HCV status. Previous HBV infection correlated with the frequency of HGV infection. There was no difference in alanine aminotransferase levels between HGV positive and negative patients. All 18 patients exposed to only virally inactivated plasma-derived concentrates were negative for both HGV RNA and anti E2 antibodies. Prior exposure to untreated concentrates correlated with HGV viraemia (P=0.03), HGV seropositivity (P=0.0002), and markers of HGV infection (Pinfection and suggests that hepatitis G virus infection in multi-transfused patients has a better outcome than infection with other blood-borne viruses.

  7. A phylogenetic survey of recombination frequency in plant RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chare, E R; Holmes, E C

    2006-05-01

    The severe economic consequences of emerging plant viruses highlights the importance of studies of plant virus evolution. One question of particular relevance is the extent to which the genomes of plant viruses are shaped by recombination. To this end we conducted a phylogenetic survey of recombination frequency in a wide range of positive-sense RNA plant viruses, utilizing 975 capsid gene sequences and 157 complete genome sequences. In total, 12 of the 36 RNA virus species analyzed showed evidence for recombination, comprising 17% of the capsid gene sequence alignments and 44% of the genome sequence alignments. Given the conservative nature of our analysis, we propose that recombination is a relatively common process in some plant RNA viruses, most notably the potyviruses.

  8. The relative prognostic value of plasma HIV RNA levels and CD4 lymphocyte counts in advanced HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, A; Katzenstein, T L; Ullum, H

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that the plasma HIV RNA level is a better predictor of AIDS and death than the CD4 lymphocyte count. We assessed whether the prognostic value of plasma virus levels was different according to the CD4 count. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study of HIV-infected patients...

  9. IVA: accurate de novo assembly of RNA virus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Martin; Gall, Astrid; Ong, Swee Hoe; Brener, Jacqui; Ferns, Bridget; Goulder, Philip; Nastouli, Eleni; Keane, Jacqueline A; Kellam, Paul; Otto, Thomas D

    2015-07-15

    An accurate genome assembly from short read sequencing data is critical for downstream analysis, for example allowing investigation of variants within a sequenced population. However, assembling sequencing data from virus samples, especially RNA viruses, into a genome sequence is challenging due to the combination of viral population diversity and extremely uneven read depth caused by amplification bias in the inevitable reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction amplification process of current methods. We developed a new de novo assembler called IVA (Iterative Virus Assembler) designed specifically for read pairs sequenced at highly variable depth from RNA virus samples. We tested IVA on datasets from 140 sequenced samples from human immunodeficiency virus-1 or influenza-virus-infected people and demonstrated that IVA outperforms all other virus de novo assemblers. The software runs under Linux, has the GPLv3 licence and is freely available from http://sanger-pathogens.github.io/iva © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. RNA of tobacco etch virus contains poly(A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hari, V.; Siegel, A.; Rozek, C.; Timberlake, W.E.

    1979-01-30

    The RNA of tobacco etch virus was extracted and found to have a molecular weight of 3.2 x 10/sup 6/ based on an extrapolation from polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis mobility. The RNA from the virus could be separated into two classes, one containing and one lacking polyadenylate isostichs of sufficient length to bind to polyuridylic-acid-agarose. The two classes were present in variable amounts depending on the batch of virus used for isolation of RNA and both classes were infectious.

  11. Comparative interactomics for virus-human protein-protein interactions: DNA viruses versus RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmuş, Saliha; Ülgen, Kutlu Ö

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are obligatory intracellular pathogens and completely depend on their hosts for survival and reproduction. The strategies adopted by viruses to exploit host cell processes and to evade host immune systems during infections may differ largely with the type of the viral genetic material. An improved understanding of these viral infection mechanisms is only possible through a better understanding of the pathogen-host interactions (PHIs) that enable viruses to enter into the host cells and manipulate the cellular mechanisms to their own advantage. Experimentally-verified protein-protein interaction (PPI) data of pathogen-host systems only became available at large scale within the last decade. In this study, we comparatively analyzed the current PHI networks belonging to DNA and RNA viruses and their human host, to get insights into the infection strategies used by these viral groups. We investigated the functional properties of human proteins in the PHI networks, to observe and compare the attack strategies of DNA and RNA viruses. We observed that DNA viruses are able to attack both human cellular and metabolic processes simultaneously during infections. On the other hand, RNA viruses preferentially interact with human proteins functioning in specific cellular processes as well as in intracellular transport and localization within the cell. Observing virus-targeted human proteins, we propose heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins and transporter proteins as potential antiviral therapeutic targets. The observed common and specific infection mechanisms in terms of viral strategies to attack human proteins may provide crucial information for further design of broad and specific next-generation antiviral therapeutics.

  12. Evolution of mutational robustness in an RNA virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Montville

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutational (genetic robustness is phenotypic constancy in the face of mutational changes to the genome. Robustness is critical to the understanding of evolution because phenotypically expressed genetic variation is the fuel of natural selection. Nonetheless, the evidence for adaptive evolution of mutational robustness in biological populations is controversial. Robustness should be selectively favored when mutation rates are high, a common feature of RNA viruses. However, selection for robustness may be relaxed under virus co-infection because complementation between virus genotypes can buffer mutational effects. We therefore hypothesized that selection for genetic robustness in viruses will be weakened with increasing frequency of co-infection. To test this idea, we used populations of RNA phage phi6 that were experimentally evolved at low and high levels of co-infection and subjected lineages of these viruses to mutation accumulation through population bottlenecking. The data demonstrate that viruses evolved under high co-infection show relatively greater mean magnitude and variance in the fitness changes generated by addition of random mutations, confirming our hypothesis that they experience weakened selection for robustness. Our study further suggests that co-infection of host cells may be advantageous to RNA viruses only in the short term. In addition, we observed higher mutation frequencies in the more robust viruses, indicating that evolution of robustness might foster less-accurate genome replication in RNA viruses.

  13. Modulation of the Host Lipid Landscape to Promote RNA Virus Replication : The Picornavirus Encephalomyocarditis Virus Converges on the Pathway Used by Hepatitis C Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorobantu, Cristina M; Albulescu, Lucian; Harak, Christian; Feng, Qian; van Kampen, Mirjam; Strating, Jeroen R P M; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Lohmann, Volker; van der Schaar, Hilde M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2015-01-01

    Cardioviruses, including encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and the human Saffold virus, are small non-enveloped viruses belonging to the Picornaviridae, a large family of positive-sense RNA [(+)RNA] viruses. All (+)RNA viruses remodel intracellular membranes into unique structures for viral genome

  14. RNA Viruses and RNAi: Quasispecies Implications for Viral Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Presloid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to high mutation rates, populations of RNA viruses exist as a collection of closely related mutants known as a quasispecies. A consequence of error-prone replication is the potential for rapid adaptation of RNA viruses when a selective pressure is applied, including host immune systems and antiviral drugs. RNA interference (RNAi acts to inhibit protein synthesis by targeting specific mRNAs for degradation and this process has been developed to target RNA viruses, exhibiting their potential as a therapeutic against infections. However, viruses containing mutations conferring resistance to RNAi were isolated in nearly all cases, underlining the problems of rapid viral evolution. Thus, while promising, the use of RNAi in treating or preventing viral diseases remains fraught with the typical complications that result from high specificity of the target, as seen in other antiviral regimens.

  15. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of nucleocapsid proteins of enveloped RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu eWulan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Most viruses with non-segmented single stranded RNA genomes complete their life cycle in the cytoplasm of infected cells. However, despite undergoing replication in the cytoplasm, the structural proteins of some of these RNA viruses localize to the nucleus at specific times in the virus life cycle, primarily early in infection. Limited evidence suggests that this enhances successful viral replication by interfering with or inhibiting the host antiviral response. Nucleocapsid proteins of RNA viruses have a well-established, essential cytoplasmic role in virus replication and assembly. Intriguingly, nucleocapsid proteins of some RNA viruses also localize to the nucleus/nucleolus of infected cells. Their nuclear function is less well understood although significant advances have been made in recent years. This review will focus on the nucleocapsid protein of cytoplasmic enveloped RNA viruses, including their localization to the nucleus/nucleolus and function therein. A greater understanding of the nuclear localization of nucleocapsid proteins has the potential to enhance therapeutic strategies as it can be a target for the development of live-attenuated vaccines or antiviral drugs.

  16. Screening and identification of virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjee, Sumona; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Mukherjee, Sunil K

    2008-01-01

    RNA silencing, including RNA interference, is a novel method of gene regulation and one of the potent host-defense mechanisms against the viruses. In the course of evolution, the viruses have encoded proteins with the potential to suppress the host RNA silencing mechanism as a counterdefense strategy. The virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs) can serve as important biological tools to dissect the detailed RNA silencing pathways and also to evolve the antiviral strategies. Screening and identification of the RSSs are indeed of utmost significance in the field of plant biotechnology. We describe two Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) reporter-based plant assay systems that rely on two different principles, namely reversal of silencing and enhancement of rolling circle replication (RCR) of geminiviral replicon. These proof-of-concept examples and assay systems could be used to screen various plant, animal, and insect viral ORFs for identification of the RSS activities.

  17. Using Small RNA Deep Sequencing Data to Detect Human Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Sun, Yu; Ruan, Jishou; Chen, Rui; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chengjie; Kreuze, Jan F; Fei, ZhangJun; Zhu, Xiao; Gao, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA sequencing (sRNA-seq) can be used to detect viruses in infected hosts without the necessity to have any prior knowledge or specialized sample preparation. The sRNA-seq method was initially used for viral detection and identification in plants and then in invertebrates and fungi. However, it is still controversial to use sRNA-seq in the detection of mammalian or human viruses. In this study, we used 931 sRNA-seq runs of data from the NCBI SRA database to detect and identify viruses in human cells or tissues, particularly from some clinical samples. Six viruses including HPV-18, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, SMRV, and EBV were detected from 36 runs of data. Four viruses were consistent with the annotations from the previous studies. HIV-1 was found in clinical samples without the HIV-positive reports, and SMRV was found in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma cells for the first time. In conclusion, these results suggest the sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in mammals and humans.

  18. Using Small RNA Deep Sequencing Data to Detect Human Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small RNA sequencing (sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in infected hosts without the necessity to have any prior knowledge or specialized sample preparation. The sRNA-seq method was initially used for viral detection and identification in plants and then in invertebrates and fungi. However, it is still controversial to use sRNA-seq in the detection of mammalian or human viruses. In this study, we used 931 sRNA-seq runs of data from the NCBI SRA database to detect and identify viruses in human cells or tissues, particularly from some clinical samples. Six viruses including HPV-18, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, SMRV, and EBV were detected from 36 runs of data. Four viruses were consistent with the annotations from the previous studies. HIV-1 was found in clinical samples without the HIV-positive reports, and SMRV was found in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma cells for the first time. In conclusion, these results suggest the sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in mammals and humans.

  19. Negative-strand RNA viruses: The plant-infecting counterparts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kormelink, R.J.M.; Garcia, M.L.; Goodin, M.; Sasaya, T.; Haenni, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    While a large number of negative-strand (-)RNA viruses infect animals and humans, a relative small number have plants as their primary host. Some of these have been classified within families together with animal/human infecting viruses due to similarities in particle morphology and genome organizat

  20. Multiple functions of capsid proteins in (+) stranded RNA viruses during plant-virus interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Philipp H; Bujarski, Jozef J

    2015-01-22

    In addition to providing a protective shell for genomic RNA(s), the coat (capsid) proteins (CPs) of plus-stranded RNA viruses play a variety of other functions that condition the plant-virus relationship. In this review we outline the extensive research progress that has been made within the last decade on those CP characteristics that relate to virus infectivity, pathogenicity, symptom expression, interactions with host factors, virus movement, vector transmission, host range, as well as those used to study virus evolution. By discussing the examples among a variety of plant RNA viruses we show that in addition to general features and pathways, the involvement of CPs may assume very distinct tasks that depend on the particular virus life style. Research perspectives and potential applications are discussed at the end.

  1. Analysis of RNA binding by the dengue virus NS5 RNA capping enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittney R Henderson

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are small, capped positive sense RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Dengue virus and other related flaviviruses have evolved RNA capping enzymes to form the viral RNA cap structure that protects the viral genome and directs efficient viral polyprotein translation. The N-terminal domain of NS5 possesses the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase activities necessary for forming mature RNA cap structures. The mechanism for flavivirus guanylyltransferase activity is currently unknown, and how the capping enzyme binds its diphosphorylated RNA substrate is important for deciphering how the flavivirus guanylyltransferase functions. In this report we examine how flavivirus NS5 N-terminal capping enzymes bind to the 5' end of the viral RNA using a fluorescence polarization-based RNA binding assay. We observed that the K(D for RNA binding is approximately 200 nM Dengue, Yellow Fever, and West Nile virus capping enzymes. Removal of one or both of the 5' phosphates reduces binding affinity, indicating that the terminal phosphates contribute significantly to binding. RNA binding affinity is negatively affected by the presence of GTP or ATP and positively affected by S-adensyl methoninine (SAM. Structural superpositioning of the dengue virus capping enzyme with the Vaccinia virus VP39 protein bound to RNA suggests how the flavivirus capping enzyme may bind RNA, and mutagenesis analysis of residues in the putative RNA binding site demonstrate that several basic residues are critical for RNA binding. Several mutants show differential binding to 5' di-, mono-, and un-phosphorylated RNAs. The mode of RNA binding appears similar to that found with other methyltransferase enzymes, and a discussion of diphosphorylated RNA binding is presented.

  2. Pathogenesis of Noroviruses, Emerging RNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M. Karst

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Human noroviruses in the family Caliciviridae are a major cause of epidemic gastroenteritis. They are responsible for at least 95% of viral outbreaks and over 50% of all outbreaks worldwide. Transmission of these highly infectious plus-stranded RNA viruses occurs primarily through contaminated food or water, but also through person-to-person contact and exposure to fomites. Norovirus infections are typically acute and self-limited. However, disease can be much more severe and prolonged in infants, elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Norovirus outbreaks frequently occur in semi-closed communities such as nursing homes, military settings, schools, hospitals, cruise ships, and disaster relief situations. Noroviruses are classified as Category B biodefense agents because they are highly contagious, extremely stable in the environment, resistant to common disinfectants, and associated with debilitating illness. The number of reported norovirus outbreaks has risen sharply since 2002 suggesting the emergence of more infectious strains. There has also been increased recognition that noroviruses are important causes of childhood hospitalization. Moreover, noroviruses have recently been associated with multiple clinical outcomes other than gastroenteritis. It is unclear whether these new observations are due to improved norovirus diagnostics or to the emergence of more virulent norovirus strains. Regardless, it is clear that human noroviruses cause considerable morbidity worldwide, have significant economic impact, and are clinically important emerging pathogens. Despite the impact of human norovirus-induced disease and the potential for emergence of highly virulent strains, the pathogenic features of infection are not well understood due to the lack of a cell culture system and previous lack of animal models. This review summarizes the current understanding of norovirus pathogenesis from the histological to the molecular level, including

  3. Hepatitis C virus RNA functionally sequesters miR-122

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luna, Joseph M; Scheel, Troels K H; Danino, Tal

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) uniquely requires the liver-specific microRNA-122 for replication, yet global effects on endogenous miRNA targets during infection are unexplored. Here, high-throughput sequencing and crosslinking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP) experiments of human Argonaute (AGO) during...

  4. Construct Hairpin RNA to Fight Against Rice Dwarf Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAZhong-Liang; YANGHuai-Yi; WANGRong; TIENPo

    2004-01-01

    Hairpin RNA (hpRNA) can induce post-transcriptional gene silencing, and was constructed with128-754 bp of segment 8 of rice dwarf virus then placed under the control of the CaMV35S promoter andused to transform rice cultivar "Zhonghua 11" via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. A total of 12 independentlines containing hpRNA were obtained as demonstrated by Southern blotting analysis. Challenge inocula-tion with rice dwarf virus (RDV) viruliferous leafhoppers (Nephotettix cincticeps) showed that T1 plantscontaining the hpRNA transgene displayed high resistance or delayed and attenuated viral symptoms. Incontrast, transgenic lines expressing sense RNA showed severe symptoms similar to control plants trans-formed with the vector alone. These results suggest that hpRNA confers high resistance to RDV intransgenic rice.

  5. Reassortment in segmented RNA viruses: mechanisms and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sarah M; Nelson, Martha I; Turner, Paul E; Patton, John T

    2016-07-01

    Segmented RNA viruses are widespread in nature and include important human, animal and plant pathogens, such as influenza viruses and rotaviruses. Although the origin of RNA virus genome segmentation remains elusive, a major consequence of this genome structure is the capacity for reassortment to occur during co-infection, whereby segments are exchanged among different viral strains. Therefore, reassortment can create viral progeny that contain genes that are derived from more than one parent, potentially conferring important fitness advantages or disadvantages to the progeny virus. However, for segmented RNA viruses that package their multiple genome segments into a single virion particle, reassortment also requires genetic compatibility between parental strains, which occurs in the form of conserved packaging signals, and the maintenance of RNA and protein interactions. In this Review, we discuss recent studies that examined the mechanisms and outcomes of reassortment for three well-studied viral families - Cystoviridae, Orthomyxoviridae and Reoviridae - and discuss how these findings provide new perspectives on the replication and evolution of segmented RNA viruses.

  6. Mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 RNA packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Na; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Dilley, Kari A;

    2011-01-01

    that specifically recognize stem-loop motifs in the viral genomes, an assay termed single virion analysis. These studies revealed that >90% of the HIV-2 particles contained viral RNAs and that RNAs derived from different viruses were copackaged frequently. Furthermore, the frequencies of heterozygous particles...... two monomeric RNAs. Additionally, single virion analyses demonstrated a similar RNA distribution in viral particles regardless of whether both viruses had a functional gag or one of the viruses had a nonfunctional gag, providing further support for the trans-packaging hypothesis. Together......Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) has been reported to have a distinct RNA packaging mechanism, referred to as cis packaging, in which Gag proteins package the RNA from which they were translated. We examined the progeny generated from dually infected cell lines that contain two HIV-2...

  7. Metagenomic analysis of RNA viruses in a fresh water lake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appolinaire Djikeng

    Full Text Available Freshwater lakes and ponds present an ecological interface between humans and a variety of host organisms. They are a habitat for the larval stage of many insects and may serve as a medium for intraspecies and interspecies transmission of viruses such as avian influenza A virus. Furthermore, freshwater bodies are already known repositories for disease-causing viruses such as Norwalk Virus, Coxsackievirus, Echovirus, and Adenovirus. While RNA virus populations have been studied in marine environments, to this date there has been very limited analysis of the viral community in freshwater. Here we present a survey of RNA viruses in Lake Needwood, a freshwater lake in Maryland, USA. Our results indicate that just as in studies of other aquatic environments, the majority of nucleic acid sequences recovered did not show any significant similarity to known sequences. The remaining sequences are mainly from viral types with significant similarity to approximately 30 viral families. We speculate that these novel viruses may infect a variety of hosts including plants, insects, fish, domestic animals and humans. Among these viruses we have discovered a previously unknown dsRNA virus closely related to Banna Virus which is responsible for a febrile illness and is endemic to Southeast Asia. Moreover we found multiple viral sequences distantly related to Israeli Acute Paralysis virus which has been implicated in honeybee colony collapse disorder. Our data suggests that due to their direct contact with humans, domestic and wild animals, freshwater ecosystems might serve as repositories of a wide range of viruses (both pathogenic and non-pathogenic and possibly be involved in the spread of emerging and pandemic diseases.

  8. Metagenomic analysis of RNA viruses in a fresh water lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djikeng, Appolinaire; Kuzmickas, Ryan; Anderson, Norman G; Spiro, David J

    2009-09-29

    Freshwater lakes and ponds present an ecological interface between humans and a variety of host organisms. They are a habitat for the larval stage of many insects and may serve as a medium for intraspecies and interspecies transmission of viruses such as avian influenza A virus. Furthermore, freshwater bodies are already known repositories for disease-causing viruses such as Norwalk Virus, Coxsackievirus, Echovirus, and Adenovirus. While RNA virus populations have been studied in marine environments, to this date there has been very limited analysis of the viral community in freshwater. Here we present a survey of RNA viruses in Lake Needwood, a freshwater lake in Maryland, USA. Our results indicate that just as in studies of other aquatic environments, the majority of nucleic acid sequences recovered did not show any significant similarity to known sequences. The remaining sequences are mainly from viral types with significant similarity to approximately 30 viral families. We speculate that these novel viruses may infect a variety of hosts including plants, insects, fish, domestic animals and humans. Among these viruses we have discovered a previously unknown dsRNA virus closely related to Banna Virus which is responsible for a febrile illness and is endemic to Southeast Asia. Moreover we found multiple viral sequences distantly related to Israeli Acute Paralysis virus which has been implicated in honeybee colony collapse disorder. Our data suggests that due to their direct contact with humans, domestic and wild animals, freshwater ecosystems might serve as repositories of a wide range of viruses (both pathogenic and non-pathogenic) and possibly be involved in the spread of emerging and pandemic diseases.

  9. Superiority of West Nile Virus RNA Detection in Whole Blood for Diagnosis of Acute Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, Yaniv; Mannasse, Batya; Koren, Ravit; Katz-Likvornik, Shiri; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal; Dovrat, Sara; Sofer, Danit; Mendelson, Ella

    2016-09-01

    The current diagnosis of West Nile virus (WNV) infection is primarily based on serology, since molecular identification of WNV RNA is unreliable due to the short viremia and absence of detectable virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recent studies have shown that WNV RNA can be detected in urine for a longer period and at higher concentrations than in plasma. In this study, we examined the presence of WNV RNA in serum, plasma, whole-blood, CSF, and urine samples obtained from patients diagnosed with acute WNV infection during an outbreak which occurred in Israel in 2015. Our results demonstrate that 33 of 38 WNV patients had detectable WNV RNA in whole blood at the time of diagnosis, a higher rate than in any of the other sample types tested. Overall, whole blood was superior to all other samples, with 86.8% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 83.9% negative predictive value. Interestingly, WNV viral load in urine was higher than in whole blood, CSF, serum, and plasma despite the lower sensitivity than that of whole blood. This study establishes the utility of whole blood in the routine diagnosis of acute WNV infection and suggests that it may provide the highest sensitivity for WNV RNA detection in suspected cases.

  10. Mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 RNA packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Na; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Dilley, Kari A;

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) has been reported to have a distinct RNA packaging mechanism, referred to as cis packaging, in which Gag proteins package the RNA from which they were translated. We examined the progeny generated from dually infected cell lines that contain two HIV-2...... proviruses, one with a wild-type gag/gag-pol and the other with a mutant gag that cannot express functional Gag/Gag-Pol. Viral titers and RNA analyses revealed that mutant viral RNAs can be packaged at efficiencies comparable to that of viral RNA from which wild-type Gag/Gag-Pol is translated. These results...... do not support the cis-packaging hypothesis but instead indicate that trans packaging is the major mechanism of HIV-2 RNA packaging. To further characterize the mechanisms of HIV-2 RNA packaging, we visualized HIV-2 RNA in individual particles by using fluorescent protein-tagged RNA-binding proteins...

  11. Use of Existing Diagnostic Reverse-Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays for Detection of Ebola Virus RNA in Semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, James; Higgs, Elizabeth S; Adams, Rick D; Jahrling, Peter B; Hensley, Lisa E

    2016-04-15

    Sexual transmission of Ebola virus in Liberia has now been documented and associated with new clusters in regions previously declared Ebola free. Assays that have Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) and are routinely used to detect Ebola virus RNA in whole blood and plasma specimens at the Liberian Institute for Biomedical Research were tested for their suitability in detecting the presence of Ebola virus RNA in semen. Qiagen AVL extraction protocols, as well as the Ebola Zaire Target 1 and major groove binder quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assays, were demonstrably suitable for this purpose and should facilitate epidemiologic investigations, including those involving long-term survivors of Ebola.

  12. Comparison of methods for miRNA extraction from plasma and quantitative recovery of RNA from plasma and cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A McAlexander

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Interest in extracellular RNA has intensified as evidence accumulates that these molecules may be useful as indicators of a wide variety of biological conditions. To establish specific extracellular RNA molecules as clinically relevant biomarkers, reproducible recovery from biological samples and reliable measurements of the isolated RNA are paramount. Towards these ends, careful and rigorous comparisons of technical procedures are needed at all steps from sample handling to RNA isolation to RNA measurement protocols. In the investigations described in this methods paper, RT-qPCR was used to examine the apparent recovery of specific endogenous miRNAs and a spiked-in synthetic RNA from blood plasma samples. RNA was isolated using several widely used RNA isolation kits, with or without the addition of glycogen as a carrier. Kits examined included total RNA isolation systems that have been commercially available for several years and commonly adapted for extraction of biofluid RNA, as well as more recently introduced biofluids-specific RNA methods. Our conclusions include the following: some RNA isolation methods appear to be superior to others for the recovery of RNA from biological fluids; addition of a carrier molecule seems to be beneficial for some but not all isolation methods; and partially or fully quantitative recovery of RNA is observed from increasing volumes of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid.

  13. Phosphatidic acid produced by phospholipase D promotes RNA replication of a plant RNA virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwamu Hyodo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic positive-strand RNA [(+RNA] viruses are intracellular obligate parasites replicate using the membrane-bound replicase complexes that contain multiple viral and host components. To replicate, (+RNA viruses exploit host resources and modify host metabolism and membrane organization. Phospholipase D (PLD is a phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylethanolamine-hydrolyzing enzyme that catalyzes the production of phosphatidic acid (PA, a lipid second messenger that modulates diverse intracellular signaling in various organisms. PA is normally present in small amounts (less than 1% of total phospholipids, but rapidly and transiently accumulates in lipid bilayers in response to different environmental cues such as biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. However, the precise functions of PLD and PA remain unknown. Here, we report the roles of PLD and PA in genomic RNA replication of a plant (+RNA virus, Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV. We found that RCNMV RNA replication complexes formed in Nicotiana benthamiana contained PLDα and PLDβ. Gene-silencing and pharmacological inhibition approaches showed that PLDs and PLDs-derived PA are required for viral RNA replication. Consistent with this, exogenous application of PA enhanced viral RNA replication in plant cells and plant-derived cell-free extracts. We also found that a viral auxiliary replication protein bound to PA in vitro, and that the amount of PA increased in RCNMV-infected plant leaves. Together, our findings suggest that RCNMV hijacks host PA-producing enzymes to replicate.

  14. Effects of RNA branching on the electrostatic stabilization of viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Wagner, Jef; van der Schoot, Paul; Podgornik, Rudolf; Zandi, Roya

    2016-08-01

    Many single-stranded (ss) ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses self-assemble from capsid protein subunits and the nucleic acid to form an infectious virion. It is believed that the electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged RNA and the positively charged viral capsid proteins drive the encapsidation, although there is growing evidence that the sequence of the viral RNA also plays a role in packaging. In particular, the sequence will determine the possible secondary structures that the ssRNA will take in solution. In this work, we use a mean-field theory to investigate how the secondary structure of the RNA combined with electrostatic interactions affects the efficiency of assembly and stability of the assembled virions. We show that the secondary structure of RNA may result in negative osmotic pressures while a linear polymer causes positive osmotic pressures for the same conditions. This may suggest that the branched structure makes the RNA more effectively packaged and the virion more stable.

  15. Influenza virus RNA polymerase: insights into the mechanisms of viral RNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Velthuis, Aartjan J.W.; Fodor, Ervin

    2016-01-01

    The genome of influenza viruses consists of multiple segments of single stranded negative-sense RNA. Each of these segments is bound by the heterotrimeric viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and multiple copies of nucleoprotein, forming viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complexes. It is in the context of these vRNPs that the viral RNA polymerase carries out transcription of viral genes and replication of the viral RNA genome. In this Review, we discuss our current knowledge of the structure of the influenza virus RNA polymerase, how it carries out transcription and replication, and how its activities are modulated by viral and host factors. Furthermore, we discuss how advances in our understanding of polymerase function could help identifying new antiviral targets. PMID:27396566

  16. DDX3 DEAD-Box RNA Helicase Is Required for Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication▿

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    DDX3, a DEAD-box RNA helicase, binds to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. However, the role(s) of DDX3 in HCV replication is still not understood. Here we demonstrate that the accumulation of both genome-length HCV RNA (HCV-O, genotype 1b) and its replicon RNA were significantly suppressed in HuH-7-derived cells expressing short hairpin RNA targeted to DDX3 by lentivirus vector transduction. As well, RNA replication of JFH1 (genotype 2a) and release of the core into the culture supern...

  17. RNA interference of influenza A virus replication by microRNA-adapted lentiviral loop short hairpin RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang; Liu, Guanqun; Liu, Qiang; Zhou, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Limitations of the current vaccines and antivirals against influenza A virus (IAV) pandemic underscore the urgent need for developing novel anti-influenza strategies. RNA interference (RNAi) induced by small interfering RNA (siRNA) has become a powerful new means to inhibit viral infection in a gene-specific manner. However, the efficacy of the siRNA delivery platform and the relatively high cost of administration have hindered widespread application of siRNA. In this study, we developed a microRNA (miRNA)-30-based lentivirus delivery system by embedding a synthetic short hairpin RNA (shRNA) stem into the context of endogenous precursor of miRNA-30 (shRNAmir) to express a silencer of the influenza gene. We showed that the miRNA-based lentivirus vector was able to express and process a single nucleoprotein (NP)-targeting shRNAmir, which could potently inhibit IAV replication. We further showed that miRNA-based lentivirus vector carrying tandemly linked NP and polymerase PB1 shRNAmirs could express and process double shRNAmirs. Despite the relatively low levels of NP and PB1 miRNAs produced in the stably transduced cells, the combination of two miRNAs exerted a great degree of inhibition on influenza infection. Given the advantage of combinatorial RNAi in preventing emergence of mutant virus, miRNA-based lentiviral vectors are valuable tools for anitiviral activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that a miRNA-based RNAi strategy can be applied for better control of influenza virus infection.

  18. Efficient Interaction between Arenavirus Nucleoprotein (NP) and RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase (L) Is Mediated by the Virus Nucleocapsid (NP-RNA) Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Masaharu; Ngo, Nhi; Cubitt, Beatrice; de la Torre, Juan C

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we document that efficient interaction between arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L protein), the two trans-acting viral factors required for both virus RNA replication and gene transcription, requires the presence of virus-specific RNA sequences located within the untranslated 5' and 3' termini of the viral genome.

  19. Phosphorylation of the viral coat protein regulates RNA virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoover HS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Haley S Hoover, C Cheng Kao Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA Abstract: Coat proteins (CPs are the most abundant protein produced during a viral infection. CPs have been shown to regulate the infection processes of RNA viruses, including RNA replication and gene expression. The numerous activities of the CP in infection are likely to require regulation, possibly through posttranslational modifications. Protein posttranslational modifications are involved in signal transduction, expanding and regulating protein function, and responding to changes in the environment. Accumulating evidence suggests that phosphorylation of viral CPs is involved in the regulation of the viral infection process from enabling virion disassembly to regulation of viral protein synthesis and replication. CP phosphorylation also affects viral trafficking and virion assembly. This review focuses on the regulatory roles that phosphorylation of CPs has in the life cycle of viruses with RNA genomes. Keywords: viral capsid protein, posttranslational modification, phosphorylation, protein–RNA interaction

  20. Identification of hepatotropic viruses from plasma using deep sequencing: a next generation diagnostic tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Law

    Full Text Available We conducted an unbiased metagenomics survey using plasma from patients with chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis C, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, and patients without liver disease (control. RNA and DNA libraries were sequenced from plasma filtrates enriched in viral particles to catalog virus populations. Hepatitis viruses were readily detected at high coverage in patients with chronic viral hepatitis B and C, but only a limited number of sequences resembling other viruses were found. The exception was a library from a patient diagnosed with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection that contained multiple sequences matching GB virus C (GBV-C. Abundant GBV-C reads were also found in plasma from patients with AIH, whereas Torque teno virus (TTV was found at high frequency in samples from patients with AIH and NASH. After taxonomic classification of sequences by BLASTn, a substantial fraction in each library, ranging from 35% to 76%, remained unclassified. These unknown sequences were assembled into scaffolds along with virus, phage and endogenous retrovirus sequences and then analyzed by BLASTx against the non-redundant protein database. Nearly the full genome of a heretofore-unknown circovirus was assembled and many scaffolds that encoded proteins with similarity to plant, insect and mammalian viruses. The presence of this novel circovirus was confirmed by PCR. BLASTx also identified many polypeptides resembling nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV proteins. We re-evaluated these alignments with a profile hidden Markov method, HHblits, and observed inconsistencies in the target proteins reported by the different algorithms. This suggests that sequence alignments are insufficient to identify NCLDV proteins, especially when these alignments are only to small portions of the target protein. Nevertheless, we have now established a reliable protocol for the identification of viruses in plasma that can also be

  1. Fujinami sarcoma virus: An avian RNA tumor virus with a unique transforming gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Hwa; Bister, Klaus; Pawson, Anthony; Robins, Terry; Moscovici, Carlo; Duesberg, Peter H.

    1980-01-01

    The oncogenic properties and RNA of the Fujinami avian sarcoma virus (FSV) and the protein it encodes were investigated and compared to those of other avian tumor viruses with sarcomagenic properties such as Rous sarcoma virus and the acute leukemia viruses MC29 and erythroblastosis virus. Cloned stocks of FSV caused sarcomas in all chickens inoculated and were found to contain a 4.5-kilobase (kb) and an 8.5-kb RNA species. The 4.5-kb RNA was identified as the genome of defective FSV because it was absent from nondefective FSV-associated helper virus and because the titer of focus-forming units increased with the ratio of 4.5-kb to 8.5-kb RNA in virus preparations. This is, then, the smallest known tumor virus RNA with a transforming function. Comparisons with other viral RNAs, based on oligonucleotide mapping and molecular hybridization, indicated that 4.5-kb FSV RNA contains a 5′ gag gene-related sequence of 1 kb, an internal specific sequence of about 3 kb that is unrelated to Rous sarcoma virus, MC29, and erythroblastosis virus, and a 3′-terminal sequence of about 0.5 kb related to the conserved C region of avian tumor viruses. The lack of some or all nucleotide sequences of the essential virion genes, gag, pol, and env, and the isolation of FSV-transformed nonproducer cell clones indicated that FSV is replication defective. A 140,000-dalton, gag-related non-structural protein was found in FSV-transformed producer and nonproducer cells and was translated in vitro from full-length FSV RNA. This protein is expected to have a transforming function both because its intracellular concentration showed a positive correlation with the percentage of transformed cells in a culture and because FSV is unlikely to code for major additional proteins since the genetic complexities of FSV RNA and the FSV protein are almost the same. It is concluded that the transforming onc gene of FSV is distinct from that of Rous sarcoma virus and other avian tumor viruses with

  2. Metagenomic analysis of the turkey gut RNA virus community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffler Brian E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral enteric disease is an ongoing economic burden to poultry producers worldwide, and despite considerable research, no single virus has emerged as a likely causative agent and target for prevention and control efforts. Historically, electron microscopy has been used to identify suspect viruses, with many small, round viruses eluding classification based solely on morphology. National and regional surveys using molecular diagnostics have revealed that suspect viruses continuously circulate in United States poultry, with many viruses appearing concomitantly and in healthy birds. High-throughput nucleic acid pyrosequencing is a powerful diagnostic technology capable of determining the full genomic repertoire present in a complex environmental sample. We utilized the Roche/454 Life Sciences GS-FLX platform to compile an RNA virus metagenome from turkey flocks experiencing enteric disease. This approach yielded numerous sequences homologous to viruses in the BLAST nr protein database, many of which have not been described in turkeys. Our analysis of this turkey gut RNA metagenome focuses in particular on the turkey-origin members of the Picornavirales, the Caliciviridae, and the turkey Picobirnaviruses.

  3. Beet yellows virus replicase and replicative compartments: parallels with other RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Gushchin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic virus systems, infection leads to induction of membranous compartments in which replication occurs. Virus-encoded subunits of the replication complex mediate its interaction with membranes. As replication platforms, RNA viruses use the cytoplasmic surfaces of different membrane compartments, e.g., endoplasmic reticulum (ER, Golgi, endo/lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts and peroxisomes. Closterovirus infections are accompanied by formation of multivesicular complexes from cell membranes of ER or mitochondrial origin. So far the mechanisms for vesicles formation have been obscure. In the replication-associated 1a polyprotein of Beet yellows virus (BYV and other closteroviruses, the region between the methyltransferase (MTR and helicase (HEL domains (1a central region, 1a CR is marginally conserved. Computer-assisted analysis predicts several putative membrane-binding domains in the BYV 1a CR. Transient expression of a hydrophobic segment (referred to here as CR-2 of the BYV 1a in Nicotiana benthamiana led to reorganization of the ER and formation of ~1-m mobile globules. We propose that the CR-2 may be involved in the formation of multivesicular complexes in BYV-infected cells. This provides analogy with membrane-associated proteins mediating the build-up of virus factories in cells infected with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses (alpha-like viruses, picorna-like viruses, flaviviruses, and nidoviruses and negative-strand RNA viruses (bunyaviruses.

  4. Beet yellows virus replicase and replicative compartments: parallels with other RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushchin, Vladimir A; Solovyev, Andrey G; Erokhina, Tatyana N; Morozov, Sergey Y; Agranovsky, Alexey A

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic virus systems, infection leads to induction of membranous compartments in which replication occurs. Virus-encoded subunits of the replication complex mediate its interaction with membranes. As replication platforms, RNA viruses use the cytoplasmic surfaces of different membrane compartments, e.g., endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, endo/lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts, and peroxisomes. Closterovirus infections are accompanied by formation of multivesicular complexes from cell membranes of ER or mitochondrial origin. So far the mechanisms for vesicles formation have been obscure. In the replication-associated 1a polyprotein of Beet yellows virus (BYV) and other closteroviruses, the region between the methyltransferase and helicase domains (1a central region (CR), 1a CR) is marginally conserved. Computer-assisted analysis predicts several putative membrane-binding domains in the BYV 1a CR. Transient expression of a hydrophobic segment (referred to here as CR-2) of the BYV 1a in Nicotiana benthamiana led to reorganization of the ER and formation of ~1-μm mobile globules. We propose that the CR-2 may be involved in the formation of multivesicular complexes in BYV-infected cells. This provides analogy with membrane-associated proteins mediating the build-up of "virus factories" in cells infected with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses (alpha-like viruses, picorna-like viruses, flaviviruses, and nidoviruses) and negative-strand RNA viruses (bunyaviruses).

  5. Dinucleotide composition in animal RNA viruses is shaped more by virus family than host species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Schlub, Timothy E; Shi, Mang; Holmes, Edward C

    2017-02-01

    Viruses use the cellular machinery of their hosts for replication. It has therefore been proposed that the nucleotide and dinucleotide composition of viruses should match that of their host species. If upheld, it may then be possible to use dinucleotide composition to predict the true host species of viruses sampled in metagenomic surveys. However, it is also clear that different taxonomic groups of viruses tend to have distinctive patterns of dinucleotide composition that may be independent of host species. To determine the relative strength of the effect of host versus virus family in shaping dinucleotide composition we performed a comparative analysis of 20 RNA virus families from 15 host groupings, spanning two animal phyla and more than 900 virus species. In particular, we determined the odds ratios for the 16 possible dinucleotides and performed a discriminant analysis to evaluate the capability of virus dinucleotide composition to predict the correct virus family or host taxon from which it was isolated. Notably, while 81% of the data analyzed here were predicted to the correct virus family, only 62% of these data were predicted to their correct subphylum/class host, and a mere 32% to their correct mammalian order. Similarly, dinucleotide composition has a weak predictive power for different hosts within individual virus families. We therefore conclude that dinucleotide composition is generally uniform within a virus family but less well reflects that of its host species. This has obvious implications for attempts to accurately predict host species from virus genome sequences alone.

  6. Detection of hepatitis C virus core antigen for early diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infection in plasma donor in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-Qiu Zhang; Shao-Bo Li; Guo-Hua Wang; Kun Chen; Xiao-Guo Song; Xiao-Yan Feng

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of a new hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen assay developed in China.METHODS: After the determination of HCV infection, 49 serial samples were selected from 11 regular plasma donors in 5 different plasma stations. To compare the performance of HCV core antigen detection and HCV PCR, these samples were genotyped, and each specimen was analyzed by ELISA for the detection of HCV core antigen and by qualitative HCV PCR.RESULTS: Among all of the sequential samples, the original 13 specimens were HCV RNA-negative, and 36 samples were HCV RNA-positive. Twenty-seven samples (75%) were HCV core antigen-positive from these HCV RNA-positive specimens. Conversely, 27 samples (93.1%) were found HCV RNA-positive in HCV core antigen-positive samples. Intervals between HCV RNA and HCV core antigen-positive, as well as between HCV core antigen-positive and HCV antibody-positive were 36.0 and 32.8 d, respectively.CONCLUSION: This HCV core antigen assay, developed in China, is able to detect much of anti-HCV-negative, HCV RNA-positive preseroconversion window period (PWP) plasma donations.

  7. Noncoding subgenomic flavivirus RNA: multiple functions in West Nile virus pathogenesis and modulation of host responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roby, J.A.; Pijlman, G.P.; Wilusz, J.; Khromykh, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Flaviviruses are a large group of positive strand RNA viruses transmitted by arthropods that include many human pathogens such as West Nile virus (WNV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus. All members in this genus tested so far are

  8. Noncoding subgenomic flavivirus RNA: multiple functions in West Nile virus pathogenesis and modulation of host responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roby, J.A.; Pijlman, G.P.; Wilusz, J.; Khromykh, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Flaviviruses are a large group of positive strand RNA viruses transmitted by arthropods that include many human pathogens such as West Nile virus (WNV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus. All members in this genus tested so far are

  9. Inhibition of Monkeypox virus replication by RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahrling Peter B

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Orthopoxvirus genus of Poxviridae family is comprised of several human pathogens, including cowpox (CPXV, Vaccinia (VACV, monkeypox (MPV and Variola (VARV viruses. Species of this virus genus cause human diseases with various severities and outcome ranging from mild conditions to death in fulminating cases. Currently, vaccination is the only protective measure against infection with these viruses and no licensed antiviral drug therapy is available. In this study, we investigated the potential of RNA interference pathway (RNAi as a therapeutic approach for orthopox virus infections using MPV as a model. Based on genome-wide expression studies and bioinformatic analysis, we selected 12 viral genes and targeted them by small interference RNA (siRNA. Forty-eight siRNA constructs were developed and evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit viral replication. Two genes, each targeted with four different siRNA constructs in one pool, were limiting to viral replication. Seven siRNA constructs from these two pools, targeting either an essential gene for viral replication (A6R or an important gene in viral entry (E8L, inhibited viral replication in cell culture by 65-95% with no apparent cytotoxicity. Further analysis with wild-type and recombinant MPV expressing green fluorescence protein demonstrated that one of these constructs, siA6-a, was the most potent and inhibited viral replication for up to 7 days at a concentration of 10 nM. These results emphasis the essential role of A6R gene in viral replication, and demonstrate the potential of RNAi as a therapeutic approach for developing oligonucleotide-based drug therapy for MPV and other orthopox viruses.

  10. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra ePesko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wildtype gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense nonsegmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales have specific genome architecture: 3′ UTR – core protein genes – envelope protein genes – RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase gene – 5′ UTR. To test how genome architecture affects RNA virus evolution, we examined vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV variants with the nucleocapsid (N gene moved sequentially downstream in the genome. Because RNA polymerase stuttering in VSV replication causes greater mRNA production in upstream genes, N-gene translocation towards the 5’ end leads to stepwise decreases in N transcription, viral replication and progeny production, and also impacts the activation of type 1 interferon mediated antiviral responses. We evolved VSV gene-order variants in two prostate cancer cell lines: LNCap cells deficient in innate immune response to viral infection, and PC3 cells that mount an IFN stimulated anti-viral response to infection. We observed that gene order affects phenotypic adaptability (reproductive growth; viral suppression of immune function, especially on PC3 cells that strongly select against virus infection. Overall, populations derived from the least-fit ancestor (most-altered N position architecture adapted fastest, consistent with theory predicting populations with low initial fitness should improve faster in evolutionary time. Also, we observed correlated responses to selection, where viruses improved across both hosts, rather than suffer fitness trade-offs on unselected hosts. Whole genomics revealed multiple mutations in evolved variants, some of which were conserved across selective

  11. dsRNA interference on expression of a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene of Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhong-Hua; Gao, Kun; Hou, Cheng-Xiang; Wu, Ping; Qin, Guang-Xing; Geng, Tao; Guo, Xi-Jie

    2015-07-01

    Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) is one of the major viral pathogens in silkworm. Its infection often results in significant losses to sericulture. Studies have demonstrated that RNAi is one of the important anti-viral mechanisms in organisms. In this study, three dsRNAs targeting the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP) gene of BmCPV were designed and synthesized with 2'-F modification to explore their interference effects on BmCPV replication in silkworm larvae. The results showed that injecting dsRNA in the dosage of 4-6 ng per mg body weight into the 5th instar larvae can interfere with the BmCPV-RDRP expression by 93% after virus infection and by 99.9% before virus infection. In addition, the expression of two viral structural protein genes (genome RNA segments 1 and 5) was also decreased with the decrease of RDRP expression, suggesting that RNAi interference of BmCPV-RDRP expression could affect viral replication. The study provides an effective method for investigating virus replication as well as the virus-host interactions in the silkworm larvae using dsRNA.

  12. High rate of hepatitis C virus (HCV) recurrence in HIV-infected individuals with spontaneous HCV RNA clearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, L; Mocroft, A; Soriano, V

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Following resolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, recurrence has been shown to occur in some persons with repeated exposure to HCV. We aimed to investigate the rate and factors associated with HCV RNA recurrence among HIV-1-infected patients with prior spontaneous HCV RNA...... clearance in the EuroSIDA cohort. METHODS: All HIV-infected patients with documented prior spontaneous HCV clearance, and at least one subsequently collected plasma sample, were examined. The last sample was tested for HCV RNA and those with HCV RNA ≥ 615 IU/mL were defined as having HCV recurrence...

  13. Detection of Hepatitis A Virus RNA in Saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Mackiewicz, Vincent; Dussaix, Elisabeth; Le Petitcorps, Marie-France; Roque-Afonso, Anne Marie

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is shed in feces but also in saliva. HAV RNA was detected in saliva in five out of six acutely infected patients with HAV viremia. Serum and saliva sequences were identical. The simplicity of obtaining material allows the recommendation of the use of saliva for investigation of outbreaks.

  14. An improved purification procedure for Leishmania RNA virus (LRV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Marcos Michel; Manzine, Livia Regina; da Silva, Marcos Vinicius G.; Bettini, Jefferson; Portugal, Rodrigo Vilares; Cruz, Angela Kaysel; Arruda, Eurico; Thiemann, Otavio Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania RNA Virus (LRV, Totiviridae) infect Leishmania cells and subvert mice immune response, probably promoting parasite persistence, suggesting significant roles for LRV in host-parasite interaction. Here we describe a new LRV1-4 purification protocol, enabling capsid visualization by negatively stained electron microscopy representing a significant contribution to future LRV investigations. PMID:25242960

  15. Comparing the MicroRNA spectrum between serum and plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate various biological processes, primarily through interaction with messenger RNAs. The levels of specific, circulating miRNAs in blood have been shown to associate with various pathological conditions including cancers. These miRNAs have great potential as biomarkers for various pathophysiological conditions. In this study we focused on different sample types' effects on the spectrum of circulating miRNA in blood. Using serum and corresponding plasma samples from the same individuals, we observed higher miRNA concentrations in serum samples compared to the corresponding plasma samples. The difference between serum and plasma miRNA concentration showed some associations with miRNA from platelets, which may indicate that the coagulation process may affect the spectrum of extracellular miRNA in blood. Several miRNAs also showed platform dependent variations in measurements. Our results suggest that there are a number of factors that might affect the measurement of circulating miRNA concentration. Caution must be taken when comparing miRNA data generated from different sample types or measurement platforms.

  16. Interleukin-21 mRNA expression during virus infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Christian; Nyvold, Charlotte Guldborg; Paludan, Søren Riis

    2006-01-01

    and activational effects of IL-21 on different leukocytes come into play in vivo in an immune response has so far not been fully investigated. We show here for the first time in vivo, that IL-21 mRNA is produced in the spleen when mice are challenged with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) or lymphocytic...... choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). We show in HSV-2 challenged mice that this production takes place in CD4+ T cell fractions and is absent in CD4+ T cell-depleted fractions. We also show that the peak of IL-21 mRNA production in both the HSV-2 and LCMV-challenged mice coincides with the onset of the adaptive immune...... response. Thus, our data suggest a role for IL-21 in the early stages of adaptive immune response against virus infections....

  17. Interleukin-21 mRNA expression during virus infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Christian; Nyvold, C.G.; Paludan, Søren Riis

    2006-01-01

    and activational effects of IL-21 on different leukocytes come into play in vivo in an immune response has so far not been fully investigated. We show here for the first time in vivo, that IL-21 mRNA is produced in the spleen when mice are challenged with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) or lymphocytic...... choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). We show in HSV-2 challenged mice that this production takes place in CD4+ T cell fractions and is absent in CD4+ T cell-depleted fractions. We also show that the peak of IL-21 mRNA production in both the HSV-2 and LCMV-challenged mice coincides with the onset of the adaptive immune...... response. Thus, our data suggest a role for IL-21 in the early stages of adaptive immune response against virus infections....

  18. Interferon Induction by RNA Viruses and Antagonism by Viral Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchen Nan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interferons are a group of small proteins that play key roles in host antiviral innate immunity. Their induction mainly relies on host pattern recognition receptors (PRR. Host PRR for RNA viruses include Toll-like receptors (TLR and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I like receptors (RLR. Activation of both TLR and RLR pathways can eventually lead to the secretion of type I IFNs, which can modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses against viral pathogens. Because of the important roles of interferons, viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade host TLR and RLR mediated signaling. This review focuses on the mechanisms of interferon induction and antagonism of the antiviral strategy by RNA viruses.

  19. Distribution of Mayaro virus RNA in polysomes during heat shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, S L; Herculano, S; Carvalho, M da G

    1997-05-01

    Mayaro virus (alphavirus) infection of Aedes albopictus cells results in inhibition of cell protein synthesis and viral proteins are preferably synthesized. When infected cells are heat shocked, however, there is also an inhibition of viral protein synthesis, and there is preferential synthesis of heat shock proteins. Based on these observations, the distribution of Mayaro viral RNA in polysomes and the association of p34 (capsid protein) with ribosomal fractions of the cells under such conditions have been analyzed. During infection, the viral RNA is mainly observed in light polysomes (60% of total viral RNA in the cell) and also in heavy polysomes (13%). However, when infected cells are heat-shocked, the viral RNA is strongly mobilized from heavy polysomes to the light polysomes fraction and an enrichment in the unbound fraction can be noticed. The amount of p34 associated with the ribosomal fraction was also shown to be decreased in the heat shocked cells. These data lead to the suggestion that two mechanisms could be involved in the inhibition of Mayaro virus protein synthesis in response to heat shock: (1) mobilization of Mayaro virus RNA from heavy to light polysomes; (2) a decrease in the amount of the p34 within the ribosomal fraction.

  20. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus protein expression by RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Adrish; Steele, Robert; Ghosh, Asish K; Basu, Arnab; Ray, Ranjit; Ray, Ratna B

    2003-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a serious human pathogen and an estimated 170 million people are infected worldwide. Current therapeutic regimens have shown limited efficacy against selected genotypes of the virus. The phenomenon of RNA interference can be used to selectively block homologous genes post-transcriptionally, and has revolutionized approaches to study gene function. In this report, we have demonstrated that small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeted against NS5A of HCV genotype 1a specifically inhibit NS5A RNA and protein expression in a human hepatoma (HepG2) cell line. Expression of endogenous alpha-actin and the ds-RNA activated serine/threonine kinase-PKR were unaltered, demonstrating that the inhibitory effect observed from siRNA was specific to the HCV NS5A protein. We next examined whether siRNA directed against NS5A could inhibit core protein expression, the first gene product synthesized in virus infected cells due to its localization at the 5' end of the HCV polyprotein. For this purpose, a full-length cDNA clone from HCV (H77, genotype 1a) was used, and results indicated that the introduction of NS5A targeted siRNA resulted in an inhibition of NS5A and core protein expression. Moreover, we observed that this siRNA effectively inhibited NS5A mediated activation of the IL-8 promoter. Taken together, our results demonstrated that siRNA was effective in inhibiting HCV protein expression, and may have therapeutic potential to limit HCV replication in chronically infected patients.

  1. Library preparation for highly accurate population sequencing of RNA viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Ashley; Andino, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Circular resequencing (CirSeq) is a novel technique for efficient and highly accurate next-generation sequencing (NGS) of RNA virus populations. The foundation of this approach is the circularization of fragmented viral RNAs, which are then redundantly encoded into tandem repeats by ‘rolling-circle’ reverse transcription. When sequenced, the redundant copies within each read are aligned to derive a consensus sequence of their initial RNA template. This process yields sequencing data with error rates far below the variant frequencies observed for RNA viruses, facilitating ultra-rare variant detection and accurate measurement of low-frequency variants. Although library preparation takes ~5 d, the high-quality data generated by CirSeq simplifies downstream data analysis, making this approach substantially more tractable for experimentalists. PMID:24967624

  2. Assessing an improved protocol for plasma microRNA extraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Moret

    Full Text Available The first step in biomarkers discovery is to identify the best protocols for their purification and analysis. This issue is critical when considering peripheral blood samples (plasma and serum that are clinically interesting but meet several methodological problems, mainly complexity and low biomarker concentration. Analysis of small molecules, such as circulating microRNAs, should overcome these disadvantages. The present study describes an optimal RNA extraction method of microRNAs from human plasma samples. Different reagents and commercially available kits have been analyzed, identifying also the best pre-analytical conditions for plasma isolation. Between all of them, the column-based approaches were shown to be the most effective. In this context, miRNeasy Serum/Plasma Kit (from Qiagen rendered more concentrated RNA, that was better suited for microarrays studies and did not require extra purification steps for sample concentration and purification than phenol based extraction methods. We also present evidences that the addition of low doses of an RNA carrier before starting the extraction process improves microRNA purification while an already published carrier dose can result in significant bias over microRNA profiles. Quality controls for best protocol selection were developed by spectrophotometry measurement of contaminants and microfluidics electrophoresis (Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer for RNA integrity. Selected donor and patient plasma samples and matched biopsies were tested by Affymetrix microarray technology to compare differentially expressed microRNAs. In summary, this study defines an optimized protocol for microRNA purification from human blood samples, increasing the performance of assays and shedding light over the best way to discover and use these biomarkers in clinical practice.

  3. Assessing an improved protocol for plasma microRNA extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, Inés; Sánchez-Izquierdo, Dolors; Iborra, Marisa; Tortosa, Luis; Navarro-Puche, Ana; Nos, Pilar; Cervera, José; Beltrán, Belén

    2013-01-01

    The first step in biomarkers discovery is to identify the best protocols for their purification and analysis. This issue is critical when considering peripheral blood samples (plasma and serum) that are clinically interesting but meet several methodological problems, mainly complexity and low biomarker concentration. Analysis of small molecules, such as circulating microRNAs, should overcome these disadvantages. The present study describes an optimal RNA extraction method of microRNAs from human plasma samples. Different reagents and commercially available kits have been analyzed, identifying also the best pre-analytical conditions for plasma isolation. Between all of them, the column-based approaches were shown to be the most effective. In this context, miRNeasy Serum/Plasma Kit (from Qiagen) rendered more concentrated RNA, that was better suited for microarrays studies and did not require extra purification steps for sample concentration and purification than phenol based extraction methods. We also present evidences that the addition of low doses of an RNA carrier before starting the extraction process improves microRNA purification while an already published carrier dose can result in significant bias over microRNA profiles. Quality controls for best protocol selection were developed by spectrophotometry measurement of contaminants and microfluidics electrophoresis (Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer) for RNA integrity. Selected donor and patient plasma samples and matched biopsies were tested by Affymetrix microarray technology to compare differentially expressed microRNAs. In summary, this study defines an optimized protocol for microRNA purification from human blood samples, increasing the performance of assays and shedding light over the best way to discover and use these biomarkers in clinical practice.

  4. Plasma virus load evaluation in relation to disease progression in HIV-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetali, S; Bakshi, S; Than, S; Pahwa, S; Abrams, E; Romano, J; Pahwa, S G

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of plasma HIV RNA load with survival and disease progression in HIV-infected children and to determine its correlation with cellular HIV DNA. Virus load (VL, HIV RNA copies/ml) was determined retrospectively by nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay in 144 stored plasma samples between birth and 48 months in 50 children of whom 40 are alive (age range, 2-13 years). On the basis of clinical and immunologic status children were classified as rapid progressors (RPs), or nonrapid progressors (NRPs). Proviral HIV DNA quantitated by QC-PCR (quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction) in 24 children was compared with plasma HIV RNA. At age 2 years (p or =750,000 copies/ml. Increasing mortality was observed with increasing plasma HIV RNA levels at ages 3-24 months and baseline VL of infants who died before age 24 months was significantly higher (p = 0.004) than baseline VL of those who survived beyond 24 months. Although baseline VL in infants classified as RPs was higher than that of NRPs, the difference was not statistically significant. Among surviving children 2-13 years of age, the baseline VL obtained at 80%. We conclude that high plasma HIV RNA in infancy is associated with increased mortality.

  5. Initiation of RNA Polymerization and Polymerase Encapsidation by a Small dsRNA Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M Collier

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available During the replication cycle of double-stranded (ds RNA viruses, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP replicates and transcribes the viral genome from within the viral capsid. How the RdRP molecules are packaged within the virion and how they function within the confines of an intact capsid are intriguing questions with answers that most likely vary across the different dsRNA virus families. In this study, we have determined a 2.4 Å resolution structure of an RdRP from the human picobirnavirus (hPBV. In addition to the conserved polymerase fold, the hPBV RdRP possesses a highly flexible 24 amino acid loop structure located near the C-terminus of the protein that is inserted into its active site. In vitro RNA polymerization assays and site-directed mutagenesis showed that: (1 the hPBV RdRP is fully active using both ssRNA and dsRNA templates; (2 the insertion loop likely functions as an assembly platform for the priming nucleotide to allow de novo initiation; (3 RNA transcription by the hPBV RdRP proceeds in a semi-conservative manner; and (4 the preference of virus-specific RNA during transcription is dictated by the lower melting temperature associated with the terminal sequences. Co-expression of the hPBV RdRP and the capsid protein (CP indicated that, under the conditions used, the RdRP could not be incorporated into the recombinant capsids in the absence of the viral genome. Additionally, the hPBV RdRP exhibited higher affinity towards the conserved 5'-terminal sequence of the viral RNA, suggesting that the RdRP molecules may be encapsidated through their specific binding to the viral RNAs during assembly.

  6. DDX3 DEAD-box RNA helicase is required for hepatitis C virus RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariumi, Yasuo; Kuroki, Misao; Abe, Ken-ichi; Dansako, Hiromichi; Ikeda, Masanori; Wakita, Takaji; Kato, Nobuyuki

    2007-12-01

    DDX3, a DEAD-box RNA helicase, binds to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. However, the role(s) of DDX3 in HCV replication is still not understood. Here we demonstrate that the accumulation of both genome-length HCV RNA (HCV-O, genotype 1b) and its replicon RNA were significantly suppressed in HuH-7-derived cells expressing short hairpin RNA targeted to DDX3 by lentivirus vector transduction. As well, RNA replication of JFH1 (genotype 2a) and release of the core into the culture supernatants were suppressed in DDX3 knockdown cells after inoculation of the cell culture-generated HCVcc. Thus, DDX3 is required for HCV RNA replication.

  7. Hepatitis G virus genomic RNA is pathogenic to Macaca mulatta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Ren; Fen-Lu Zhu; Ming-Mei Cao; Xin-Yu Wen; Ping Zhao; Zhong-Tian Qi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the pathogenicity and infectivity of hepatitis G virus (HGV) by observing replication and expression of the virus, as well as the serological and histological changes of Macaca mulatta infected with HGV genomic RNA or HGV RNA-positive serum.METHODS: Full-length HGV cDNA clone (HGVqz) was constructed and proved to be infectious, from which HGV genomic RNA was transcribed in vitro. Macaca mulatta BY1 was intra-hepatically inoculated with HGV genomic RNA, HGV RNA-positive serum from BY1 was intravenously inoculated into Macaca mulatta BM1, and then BB1 was infected with serum from BM1. Serum and liver tissue were taken regularly, and checked with RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and other immunological, serological,histological assays.RESULTS: Serum HGV RNA was detectable in all the 3Macaca mulattas, serological and histological examinations showed the experimental animals had slightly elevated alanine transaminase (ALT) and developed HGV viremia during the infectious period. The histology, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization in liver tissues of the inoculated animals demonstrated a very mild hepatitis with HGV antigen expression in cytoplasm of hepatocytes.RT-PCR and quantitative PCR results showed that HGV could replicate in liver.CONCLUSION: The genomic RNA from full-length HGV cDNA is infectious to the Macaca mulatta and can cause mild hepatitis. HGV RNA-positive serum, from HGV RNA inoculated Macaca mulatta, is infectious to other Macaca mulattas. Macaca mulatta is susceptible to the inoculated HGV, and therefore can be used as an experimental animal model for the studies of HGV infection and pathogenesis.

  8. RNA virus evolution via a fitness-space model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsimring, L.S.; Levine, H. [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0402 (United States); Kessler, D.A. [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    1996-06-01

    We present a mean-field theory for the evolution of RNA virus populations. The theory operates with a distribution of the population in a one-dimensional fitness space, and is valid for sufficiently smooth fitness landscapes. Our approach explains naturally the recent experimental observation [I. S. Novella {ital et} {ital al}., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. {bold 92}, 5841{endash}5844 (1995)] of two distinct stages in the growth of virus fitness. {copyright} {ital 1995 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Undetectable hepatitis C virus RNA during syphilis infection in two HIV/HCV-co-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten; Knudsen, Andreas; Krarup, Henrik Bygum;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, elicits a vigorous immune response in the infected host. This study sought to describe the impact of syphilis infection on hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels in patients with HIV and chronic HCV infection. METHODS: Patients...... with chronic HIV/HCV and syphilis co-infection were identified by their treating physicians from 1 October 2010 to 31 December 2013. Stored plasma samples obtained before, during, and after syphilis infection were analysed for interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF......-α), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), and IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 kDa (IP-10). RESULTS: Undetectable HCV RNA at the time of early latent syphilis infection was observed in 2 patients with HIV and chronic HCV infection. After treatment of the syphilis infection, HCV RNA levels increased again in patient 1, whereas...

  10. Influenza virus mRNA trafficking through host nuclear speckles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Amir; White, Alexander; Zhang, Ke; Thompson, Matthew; Esparza, Matthew; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Koide, Kazunori; Lynch, Kristen W; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2016-05-27

    Influenza A virus is a human pathogen with a genome composed of eight viral RNA segments that replicate in the nucleus. Two viral mRNAs are alternatively spliced. The unspliced M1 mRNA is translated into the matrix M1 protein, while the ion channel M2 protein is generated after alternative splicing. These proteins are critical mediators of viral trafficking and budding. We show that the influenza virus uses nuclear speckles to promote post-transcriptional splicing of its M1 mRNA. We assign previously unknown roles for the viral NS1 protein and cellular factors to an intranuclear trafficking pathway that targets the viral M1 mRNA to nuclear speckles, mediates splicing at these nuclear bodies and exports the spliced M2 mRNA from the nucleus. Given that nuclear speckles are storage sites for splicing factors, which leave these sites to splice cellular pre-mRNAs at transcribing genes, we reveal a functional subversion of nuclear speckles to promote viral gene expression.

  11. Nucleotide Sequence of the Hantaan Virus S RNA Segment and Expression of Encoded Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-03

    stomatitis virus and influenza virus) has been shown to be important in generating cytotoxic T cells in response to viral infection (Townsend et al...termination-polyadenylation signal common to other negative-strand RNA viruses (Sendai virus: 5’-TAAGAAAA and vesicular stomatitis virus: TATGAAAA...codon also occurs in the two retroviruses, murine leukemia virus and feline leukemia virus, to produce a precursor polyprotein larger than normal 191

  12. Crystal structure of Zika virus NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Andre S.; Lima, Gustavo M. A.; Oliveira, Ketllyn I. Z.; Torres, Naiara U.; Maluf, Fernando V.; Guido, Rafael V. C.; Oliva, Glaucius

    2017-01-01

    The current Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak became a global health threat of complex epidemiology and devastating neurological impacts, therefore requiring urgent efforts towards the development of novel efficacious and safe antiviral drugs. Due to its central role in RNA viral replication, the non-structural protein 5 (NS5) RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) is a prime target for drug discovery. Here we describe the crystal structure of the recombinant ZIKV NS5 RdRp domain at 1.9 Å resolution as a platform for structure-based drug design strategy. The overall structure is similar to other flaviviral homologues. However, the priming loop target site, which is suitable for non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitor design, shows significant differences in comparison with the dengue virus structures, including a tighter pocket and a modified local charge distribution. PMID:28345596

  13. Interleukin-21 mRNA expression during virus infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Christian; Nyvold, C.G.; Paludan, Søren Riis;

    2006-01-01

    and activational effects of IL-21 on different leukocytes come into play in vivo in an immune response has so far not been fully investigated. We show here for the first time in vivo, that IL-21 mRNA is produced in the spleen when mice are challenged with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) or lymphocytic...... choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). We show in HSV-2 challenged mice that this production takes place in CD4+ T cell fractions and is absent in CD4+ T cell-depleted fractions. We also show that the peak of IL-21 mRNA production in both the HSV-2 and LCMV-challenged mice coincides with the onset of the adaptive immune...

  14. RNA interference-mediated inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Ni; ZHANG Bingqiang; YAN Ge; PU Dan; GAO Xiaolin; Tong-Chuan He; HUANG Ailong

    2004-01-01

    Persistent and recurrent infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) represents one of the most common and severe viral infections of humans, and has caused a formidable health problem in the affected countries. Currently used antiviral drugs have a very limited success on controlling HBV replication and infection. RNA interference (RNAi), a process by which double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) directs sequence-specific degradation of target mRNA in mammalian and plant cells, has recently been used to knockdown gene expression in various species. In this study, we sought to determine whether RNAi-mediated silencing of HBV viral gene expression could lead to the effective inhibition of HBV replication. We first developed RNAi vectors that expressed small interfering RNA (siRNA) and targeted the HBV core or surface gene sequence. Our results demonstrated that these specific siRNAs efficiently reduced the levels of corresponding viral RNAs and proteins, and thus suppressed viral replication. Treatment with siRNA gave the greatest reduction in the levels of HBsAg (92%) and in HBeAg (85%) respectively in the cultured cell medium. Our findings further demonstrated that the RNAi-mediated antiviral effect was sequence-specific and dose-dependent. Therefore, our findings strongly suggest that RNAi-mediated silencing of HBV viral genes could effectively inhibit the replication of HBV, hence RNAi-based strategy should be further explored as a more efficacious antiviral therapy of HBV infection.

  15. Detecting RNA viruses in living mammalian cells by fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, Divya; Biswas, Payal; Cella, Lakshmi N; Yates, Marylynn V; Chen, Wilfred

    2011-07-01

    Traditional methods that rely on viral isolation and culture techniques continue to be the gold standards used for detection of infectious viral particles. However, new techniques that rely on visualization of live cells can shed light on understanding virus-host interaction for early stage detection and potential drug discovery. Live-cell imaging techniques that incorporate fluorescent probes into viral components provide opportunities for understanding mRNA expression, interaction, and virus movement and localization. Other viral replication events inside a host cell can be exploited for non-invasive detection, such as single-virus tracking, which does not inhibit viral infectivity or cellular function. This review highlights some of the recent advances made using these novel approaches for visualization of viral entry and replication in live cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inhibition of RNA recruitment and replication of an RNA virus by acridine derivatives with known anti-prion activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Sasvari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small molecule inhibitors of RNA virus replication are potent antiviral drugs and useful to dissect selected steps in the replication process. To identify antiviral compounds against Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV, a model positive stranded RNA virus, we tested acridine derivatives, such as chlorpromazine (CPZ and quinacrine (QC, which are active against prion-based diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report that CPZ and QC compounds inhibited TBSV RNA accumulation in plants and in protoplasts. In vitro assays revealed that the inhibitory effects of these compounds were manifested at different steps of TBSV replication. QC was shown to have an effect on multiple steps, including: (i inhibition of the selective binding of the p33 replication protein to the viral RNA template, which is required for recruitment of viral RNA for replication; (ii reduction of minus-strand synthesis by the tombusvirus replicase; and (iii inhibition of translation of the uncapped TBSV genomic RNA. In contrast, CPZ was shown to inhibit the in vitro assembly of the TBSV replicase, likely due to binding of CPZ to intracellular membranes, which are important for RNA virus replication. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Since we found that CPZ was also an effective inhibitor of other plant viruses, including Tobacco mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus, it seems likely that CPZ has a broad range of antiviral activity. Thus, these inhibitors constitute effective tools to study similarities in replication strategies of various RNA viruses.

  17. Noncoding subgenomic flavivirus RNA is processed by the mosquito RNA interference machinery and determines West Nile virus transmission by Culex pipiens mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göertz, G.P.; Fros, J.J.; Miesen, P.; Vogels, C.B.F.; Bent, van der M.L.; Geertsema, C.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Rij, van R.P.; Oers, van M.M.; Pijlman, G.P.

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses, such as Zika virus, yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus (WNV), are a serious concern for human health. Flaviviruses produce an abundant noncoding subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) in infected cells. sfRNA results from stalling of the host 5=-3= exoribonuclease XRN1

  18. Noncoding Subgenomic Flavivirus RNA Is Processed by the Mosquito RNA Interference Machinery and Determines West Nile Virus Transmission by Culex pipiens Mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goertz, G.P.; Fros, J.J.; Miesen, P.; Vogels, C.B.F.; Bent, M.L. van der; Geertsema, C.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Rij, R.P. van; Oers, M.M. van; Pijlman, G.P.

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses, such as Zika virus, yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus (WNV), are a serious concern for human health. Flaviviruses produce an abundant noncoding subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) in infected cells. sfRNA results from stalling of the host 5'-3' exoribonuclease XRN1/Pa

  19. Noncoding subgenomic flavivirus RNA is processed by the mosquito RNA interference machinery and determines West Nile virus transmission by Culex pipiens mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göertz, G.P.; Fros, J.J.; Miesen, P.; Vogels, C.B.F.; Bent, van der M.L.; Geertsema, C.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Rij, van R.P.; Oers, van M.M.; Pijlman, G.P.

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses, such as Zika virus, yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus (WNV), are a serious concern for human health. Flaviviruses produce an abundant noncoding subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) in infected cells. sfRNA results from stalling of the host 5=-3= exoribonuclease XRN1

  20. Noncoding Subgenomic Flavivirus RNA Is Processed by the Mosquito RNA Interference Machinery and Determines West Nile Virus Transmission by Culex pipiens Mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goertz, G.P.; Fros, J.J.; Miesen, P.; Vogels, C.B.F.; Bent, M.L. van der; Geertsema, C.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Rij, R.P. van; Oers, M.M. van; Pijlman, G.P.

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses, such as Zika virus, yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus (WNV), are a serious concern for human health. Flaviviruses produce an abundant noncoding subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) in infected cells. sfRNA results from stalling of the host 5'-3' exoribonuclease

  1. Noncoding subgenomic flavivirus RNA is processed by the mosquito RNA interference machinery and determines West Nile virus transmission by Culex pipiens mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göertz, G.P.; Fros, J.J.; Miesen, P.; Vogels, C.B.F.; Bent, van der M.L.; Geertsema, C.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Rij, van R.P.; Oers, van M.M.; Pijlman, G.P.

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses, such as Zika virus, yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus (WNV), are a serious concern for human health. Flaviviruses produce an abundant noncoding subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) in infected cells. sfRNA results from stalling of the host 5=-3= exoribonuclease

  2. A dsRNA-binding protein of a complex invertebrate DNA virus suppresses the Drosophila RNAi response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkhorst, A.W.; Cleef, K.W.R. van; Venselaar, H.; Rij, R.P. van

    2014-01-01

    Invertebrate RNA viruses are targets of the host RNA interference (RNAi) pathway, which limits virus infection by degrading viral RNA substrates. Several insect RNA viruses encode suppressor proteins to counteract this antiviral response. We recently demonstrated that the dsDNA virus Invertebrate ir

  3. A dsRNA-binding protein of a complex invertebrate DNA virus suppresses the Drosophila RNAi response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkhorst, A.W.; Cleef, K.W.R. van; Venselaar, H.; Rij, R.P. van

    2014-01-01

    Invertebrate RNA viruses are targets of the host RNA interference (RNAi) pathway, which limits virus infection by degrading viral RNA substrates. Several insect RNA viruses encode suppressor proteins to counteract this antiviral response. We recently demonstrated that the dsDNA virus Invertebrate ir

  4. Probing the MicroRNA and Small Interfering RNA Pathways with Virus-Encoded Suppressors of RNA SilencingW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunoyer, Patrice; Lecellier, Charles-Henri; Parizotto, Eneida Abreu; Himber, Christophe; Voinnet, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    In plants, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are effectors of RNA silencing, a process involved in defense through RNA interference (RNAi) and in development. Plant viruses are natural targets of RNA silencing, and as a counterdefensive strategy, they have evolved highly diverse silencing suppressor proteins. Although viral suppressors are usually thought to act at distinct steps of the silencing machinery, there had been no consensus system so far that allowed a strict side-by-side analysis of those factors. We have set up such a system in Arabidopsis thaliana and used it to compare the effects of five unrelated viral silencing suppressors on the siRNA and miRNA pathways. Although all the suppressors inhibited RNAi, only three of them induced developmental defects, indicating that the two pathways are only partially overlapping. These developmental defects were remarkably similar, and their penetrance correlated with inhibition of miRNA-guided cleavage of endogenous transcripts and not with altered miRNA accumulation per se. Among the suppressors investigated, the tombusviral P19 protein coimmunoprecipitated with siRNA duplexes and miRNA duplexes corresponding to the primary cleavage products of miRNA precursors. Thus, it is likely that P19 prevents RNA silencing by sequestering both classes of small RNAs. Moreover, the finding here that P19 binds siRNAs and suppresses RNAi in Hela cells also suggests that this factor may be useful to dissect the RNA silencing pathways in animals. Finally, the differential effects of the silencing suppressors tested here upon other types of Arabidopsis silencing-related small RNAs revealed a surprising variety of biosynthetic and, presumably, functional pathways for those molecules. Therefore, silencing suppressors are valuable probes of the complexity of RNA silencing. PMID:15084715

  5. Adenovirus vectors lacking virus-associated RNA expression enhance shRNA activity to suppress hepatitis C virus replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zheng; Shi, Guoli; Kondo, Saki; Ito, Masahiko; Maekawa, Aya; Suzuki, Mariko; Saito, Izumu; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Kanegae, Yumi

    2013-12-01

    First-generation adenovirus vectors (FG AdVs) expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) effectively downregulate the expressions of target genes. However, this vector, in fact, expresses not only the transgene product, but also virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs) that disturb cellular RNAi machinery. We have established a production method for VA-deleted AdVs lacking expression of VA RNAs. Here, we showed that the highest shRNA activity was obtained when the shRNA was inserted not at the popularly used E1 site, but at the E4 site. We then compared the activities of shRNAs against hepatitis C virus (HCV) expressed from VA-deleted AdVs or conventional AdVs. The VA-deleted AdVs inhibited HCV production much more efficiently. Therefore, VA-deleted AdVs were more effective than the currently used AdVs for shRNA downregulation, probably because of the lack of competition between VA RNAs and the shRNAs. These VA-deleted AdVs might enable more effective gene therapies for chronic hepatitis C.

  6. MicroRNA transcriptome profiling of mice brains infected with Japanese encephalitis virus by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Feng; Cao, Rui-Bing; Luo, Jun; Fan, Jian-Ming; Wang, Jing-Man; Zhang, Yuan-Peng; Gu, Jin-Yan; Feng, Xiu-Li; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a mosquito borne viral disease, caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection producing severe neuroinflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) with the associated disruption of the blood brain barrier. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of 21-24 nt small non-coding RNAs that play important post-transcriptional regulatory roles in gene expression and have critical roles in virus pathogenesis. We examined the potential roles of miRNAs in JEV-infected suckling mice brains and found that JEV infection changed miRNA expression profiles when the suckling mice began showing nervous symptoms. A total of 1062 known and 71 novel miRNAs were detected in JEV-infected group, accompanied with 1088 known and 75 novel miRNAs in mock controls. Among these miRNAs, one novel and 25 known miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed, including 18 up-regulated and 8 down-regulated miRNAs which were further confirmed by real-time PCR. Gene ontology (GO) and signaling pathway analysis of the predicted target mRNAs of the modulated miRNAs showed that they are correlated with the regulation of apoptosis, neuron differentiation, antiviral immunity and infiltration of mouse brain, and the validated targets of 12 differentially expressed miRNAs were enriched for the regulation of cell programmed death, proliferation, transcription, muscle organ development, erythrocyte differentiation, gene expression, plasma membrane and protein domain specific binding. KEGG analysis further reveals that the validated target genes were involved in the Pathways in cancer, Neurotrophin signaling pathway, Toll like receptor signaling pathway, Endometrial cancer and Jak-STAT signaling pathway. We constructed the interaction networks of miRNAs and their target genes according to GO terms and KEGG pathways and the expression levels of several target genes were examined. Our data provides a valuable basis for further studies on the regulatory roles of miRNAs in JE

  7. Virus-derived transgenes expressing hairpin RNA give immunity to Tobacco mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An effective method for obtaining resistant transgenic plants is to induce RNA silencing by expressing virus-derived dsRNA in plants and this method has been successfully implemented for the generation of different plant lines resistant to many plant viruses. Results Inverted repeats of the partial Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV movement protein (MP gene and the partial Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV replication protein (Rep gene were introduced into the plant expression vector and the recombinant plasmids were transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was carried out and three transgenic tobacco lines (MP16-17-3, MP16-17-29 and MP16-17-58 immune to TMV infection and three transgenic tobacco lines (Rep15-1-1, Rep15-1-7 and Rep15-1-32 immune to CMV infection were obtained. Virus inoculation assays showed that the resistance of these transgenic plants could inherit and keep stable in T4 progeny. The low temperature (15℃ did not influence the resistance of transgenic plants. There was no significant correlation between the resistance and the copy number of the transgene. CMV infection could not break the resistance to TMV in the transgenic tobacco plants expressing TMV hairpin MP RNA. Conclusions We have demonstrated that transgenic tobacco plants expressed partial TMV movement gene and partial CMV replicase gene in the form of an intermolecular intron-hairpin RNA exhibited complete resistance to TMV or CMV infection.

  8. Global organization of a positive-strand RNA virus genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baodong Wu

    Full Text Available The genomes of plus-strand RNA viruses contain many regulatory sequences and structures that direct different viral processes. The traditional view of these RNA elements are as local structures present in non-coding regions. However, this view is changing due to the discovery of regulatory elements in coding regions and functional long-range intra-genomic base pairing interactions. The ∼4.8 kb long RNA genome of the tombusvirus tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV contains these types of structural features, including six different functional long-distance interactions. We hypothesized that to achieve these multiple interactions this viral genome must utilize a large-scale organizational strategy and, accordingly, we sought to assess the global conformation of the entire TBSV genome. Atomic force micrographs of the genome indicated a mostly condensed structure composed of interconnected protrusions extending from a central hub. This configuration was consistent with the genomic secondary structure model generated using high-throughput selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analysed by primer extension (i.e. SHAPE, which predicted different sized RNA domains originating from a central region. Known RNA elements were identified in both domain and inter-domain regions, and novel structural features were predicted and functionally confirmed. Interestingly, only two of the six long-range interactions known to form were present in the structural model. However, for those interactions that did not form, complementary partner sequences were positioned relatively close to each other in the structure, suggesting that the secondary structure level of viral genome structure could provide a basic scaffold for the formation of different long-range interactions. The higher-order structural model for the TBSV RNA genome provides a snapshot of the complex framework that allows multiple functional components to operate in concert within a confined context.

  9. Convergent evolution of argonaute-2 slicer antagonism in two distinct insect RNA viruses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierlo, J.T. van; Bronkhorst, A.W.; Overheul, G.J.; Sadanandan, S.A.; Ekstrom, J.O.; Heestermans, M.; Hultmark, D.; Antoniewski, C.; Rij, R.P. van

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a major antiviral pathway that shapes evolution of RNA viruses. We show here that Nora virus, a natural Drosophila pathogen, is both a target and suppressor of RNAi. We detected viral small RNAs with a signature of Dicer-2 dependent small interfering RNAs in Nora virus inf

  10. Convergent evolution of argonaute-2 slicer antagonism in two distinct insect RNA viruses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierlo, J.T. van; Bronkhorst, A.W.; Overheul, G.J.; Sadanandan, S.A.; Ekstrom, J.O.; Heestermans, M.; Hultmark, D.; Antoniewski, C.; Rij, R.P. van

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a major antiviral pathway that shapes evolution of RNA viruses. We show here that Nora virus, a natural Drosophila pathogen, is both a target and suppressor of RNAi. We detected viral small RNAs with a signature of Dicer-2 dependent small interfering RNAs in Nora virus

  11. The efficiency of RNA interference for conferring stable resistance to Plum Pox Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plum transformed with an intron hairpin RNA CP (ihRNA-CP) were resistant to PPV infection through the specific process of RNA silencing involving both small interfering -RNA interfering (siRNA) and a methylated virus transgene. This recognition process specifically targeted the triggered PPV genome...

  12. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus RNA replication by short hairpin RNA synthesized by T7 RNA polymerase in hepatitis C virus subgenomic replicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ujino, Saneyuki; Miyano-Kurosaki, Naoko; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2006-05-12

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a cellular process that induces gene silencing by which small duplexes of RNA specifically target a homologous sequence for cleavage by cellular ribonucleases. Here, to test the RNAi method for blocking hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA replication, we created four short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting the HCV internal ribosome entry site/Core gene transcript using T7 RNA polymerase. shRNA suppressed the replication of HCV RNA in the HCV replicon. On the other hand, short interfering RNAs synthesized using the T7 RNA polymerase system trigger a potent induction of interferon-alpha and -beta in a variety of cells. We examined whether the shRNAs synthesized using the T7 RNA polymerase system activated double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase, 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase, or interferon-regulatory factor-3. Our results demonstrated that the T7-transcribed shRNA did not activate these proteins in Huh-7 cells and the HCV replicon. These shRNAs are a promising new strategy for anti-HCV gene therapeutics.

  13. Analysis of the Tomato spotted wilt virus ambisense S RNA-encoded hairpin structure in translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts-Dimitriadou, C.; Lu, Y.Y.; Geertsema, C.; Goldbach, R.W.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The intergenic region (IR) of ambisense RNA segments from animal- and plant-infecting (-)RNA viruses functions as a bidirectional transcription terminator. The IR sequence of the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) ambisense S RNA contains stretches that are highly rich in A-residues and U-residues and

  14. Oligonucleotide Antiviral Therapeutics: Antisense and RNA Interference for Highly Pathogenic RNA Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    www.cdc.gov/flu/keyfacts), and poses the contin- ing threat of a global pandemic that could kill millions (Johnson nd Mueller, 2002). Dengue virus is...A single dose of E-specific shRNA- xpressing neurotropic lentivirus was able to provide complete rotection (100% of mice survive) against lethal JEV...449 (7163), 745–747.ohnson, N.P., Mueller, J., 2002. Updating the accounts: global mortality of the 1918-1920 “Spanish” influenza pandemic. Bull. Hist

  15. Isolation and Identification of Virus dsRNA from Strawberry Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI He; DAI Hong-yan; ZHANG Zhi-hong; GAO Xiu-yan; DU Guo-dong; ZHANG Xin-yu

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of virus genome is based on nucleic acid isolation. The aims of this study were to develop a method for isolation and identification of virus double-stranded ribonucleic acid (dsRNA) and to elucidate the nucleotide sequences of strawberry virus. Using the modified method, virus dsRNA was extracted from strawberry virus indicator plants and cultivated strawberry plants and detected using agarose gel electrophoresis with ethidium bromide staining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The quantity of virus dsRNA varied among strawberry cultivars. The quantity of dsRNA from in vitro plantlets was higher than that from the young leaves of field plants. For the field-grown plants, there was more dsRNA in the young leaves. Virus dsRNA extracted from strawberry plants was resistant to deoxyribonuclease Ⅰ (DNase Ⅰ ), but evidently, it became resistant to ribonuclease A (RNase A) only in the presence of 0.5 M NaCl. Its bands in agarose gel could be readily recycled using an agarose gel DNA purification kit. With RT-PCR, the segments of both strawberry mottle virus and Strawberry mild yellow edge virus genomes were amplified by using the virus dsRNA recycled from gel or treated with DNase Ⅰ /RNase A as templates. The system developed for dsRNA isolation and identification in strawberry plants laid a sound foundation for the work on genome analysis of strawberry virus isolates in China.

  16. Ebola Virus RNA in Semen from an HIV-Positive Survivor of Ebola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Emerson; Baller, April; White, Stephen; Soka, Moses; Choi, Mary J.; Mahmoud, Nuha; Wasunna, Christine; Massaquoi, Moses; Kollie, Jomah; Dweh, Straker; Bemah, Philip; Ladele, Victor; Kpaka, Jonathan; Jawara, Mary; Mugisha, Margaret; Subah, Onyekachi; Faikai, Mylene; Bailey, Jeff A.; Rollin, Pierre; Marston, Barbara; Nyenswah, Tolbert; Gasasira, Alex; Knust, Barbara; Nichol, Stuart; Williams, Desmond

    2017-01-01

    Ebola virus is known to persist in semen of male survivors of Ebola virus disease (EVD). However, maximum duration of, or risk factors for, virus persistence are unknown. We report an EVD survivor with preexisting HIV infection, whose semen was positive for Ebola virus RNA 565 days after recovery from EVD. PMID:28287374

  17. Episodic adaptive diversification of classical swine fever virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yang, Zexiao

    2015-12-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the pathogen that causes a highly infectious disease of pigs and has led to disastrous losses to pig farms and related industries. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) NS5B is a central component of the replicase complex (RC) in some single-stranded RNA viruses, including CSFV. On the basis of genetic variation, the CSFV RdRps could be clearly divided into 2 major groups and a minor group, which is consistent with the phylogenetic relationships and virulence diversification of the CSFV isolates. However, the adaptive signature underlying such an evolutionary profile of the polymerase and the virus is still an interesting open question. We analyzed the evolutionary trajectory of the CSFV RdRps over different timescales to evaluate the potential adaptation. We found that adaptive selection has driven the diversification of the RdRps between, but not within, CSFV major groups. Further, the major adaptive divergence-related sites are located in the surfaces relevant to the interaction with other component(s) of RC and the entrance and exit of the template-binding channel. These results might shed some light on the nature of the RdRp in virulence diversification of CSFV groups.

  18. Variation in RNA virus mutation rates across host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Combe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that RNA viruses exhibit higher rates of spontaneous mutation than DNA viruses and microorganisms. However, their mutation rates vary amply, from 10(-6 to 10(-4 substitutions per nucleotide per round of copying (s/n/r and the causes of this variability remain poorly understood. In addition to differences in intrinsic fidelity or error correction capability, viral mutation rates may be dependent on host factors. Here, we assessed the effect of the cellular environment on the rate of spontaneous mutation of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, which has a broad host range and cell tropism. Luria-Delbrück fluctuation tests and sequencing showed that VSV mutated similarly in baby hamster kidney, murine embryonic fibroblasts, colon cancer, and neuroblastoma cells (approx. 10(-5 s/n/r. Cell immortalization through p53 inactivation and oxygen levels (1-21% did not have a significant impact on viral replication fidelity. This shows that previously published mutation rates can be considered reliable despite being based on a narrow and artificial set of laboratory conditions. Interestingly, we also found that VSV mutated approximately four times more slowly in various insect cells compared with mammalian cells. This may contribute to explaining the relatively slow evolution of VSV and other arthropod-borne viruses in nature.

  19. Identification of a novel RNA virus lethal to tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyngor, Marina; Zamostiano, Rachel; Kembou Tsofack, Japhette Esther; Berkowitz, Asaf; Bercovier, Hillel; Tinman, Simon; Lev, Menachem; Hurvitz, Avshalom; Galeotti, Marco; Bacharach, Eran; Eldar, Avi

    2014-12-01

    Tilapines are important for the sustainability of ecological systems and serve as the second most important group of farmed fish worldwide. Significant mortality of wild and cultured tilapia has been observed recently in Israel. The etiological agent of this disease, a novel RNA virus, is described here, and procedures allowing its isolation and detection are revealed. The virus, denominated tilapia lake virus (TiLV), was propagated in primary tilapia brain cells or in an E-11 cell line, and it induced a cytopathic effect at 5 to 10 days postinfection. Electron microscopy revealed enveloped icosahedral particles of 55 to 75 nm. Low-passage TiLV, injected intraperitoneally in tilapia, induced a disease resembling the natural disease, which typically presents with lethargy, ocular alterations, and skin erosions, with >80% mortality. Histological changes included congestion of the internal organs (kidneys and brain) with foci of gliosis and perivascular cuffing of lymphocytes in the brain cortex; ocular inflammation included endophthalmitis and cataractous changes of the lens. The cohabitation of healthy and diseased fish demonstrated that the disease is contagious and that mortalities (80 to 100%) occur within a few days. Fish surviving the initial mortality were immune to further TiLV infections, suggesting the mounting of a protective immune response. Screening cDNA libraries identified a TiLV-specific sequence, allowing the design of a PCR-based diagnostic test. This test enables the specific identification of TiLV in tilapines and should help control the spread of this virus worldwide.

  20. Convergent evolution of argonaute-2 slicer antagonism in two distinct insect RNA viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël T van Mierlo

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a major antiviral pathway that shapes evolution of RNA viruses. We show here that Nora virus, a natural Drosophila pathogen, is both a target and suppressor of RNAi. We detected viral small RNAs with a signature of Dicer-2 dependent small interfering RNAs in Nora virus infected Drosophila. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Nora virus VP1 protein contains RNAi suppressive activity in vitro and in vivo that enhances pathogenicity of recombinant Sindbis virus in an RNAi dependent manner. Nora virus VP1 and the viral suppressor of RNAi of Cricket paralysis virus (1A antagonized Argonaute-2 (AGO2 Slicer activity of RNA induced silencing complexes pre-loaded with a methylated single-stranded guide strand. The convergent evolution of AGO2 suppression in two unrelated insect RNA viruses highlights the importance of AGO2 in antiviral defense.

  1. Membranous Replication Factories Induced by Plus-Strand RNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Romero-Brey

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the membranous replication factories of members of plus-strand (+ RNA viruses. We discuss primarily the architecture of these complex membrane rearrangements, because this topic emerged in the last few years as electron tomography has become more widely available. A general denominator is that two “morphotypes” of membrane alterations can be found that are exemplified by flaviviruses and hepaciviruses: membrane invaginations towards the lumen of the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER and double membrane vesicles, representing extrusions also originating from the ER, respectively. We hypothesize that either morphotype might reflect common pathways and principles that are used by these viruses to form their membranous replication compartments.

  2. Costs and benefits of mutational robustness in RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Adi; Bianco, Simone; Yeh, Ming Te; Wright, Caroline; Butcher, Kristin; Tang, Chao; Nielsen, Rasmus; Andino, Raul

    2014-08-21

    The accumulation of mutations in RNA viruses is thought to facilitate rapid adaptation to changes in the environment. However, most mutations have deleterious effects on fitness, especially for viruses. Thus, tolerance to mutations should determine the nature and extent of genetic diversity that can be maintained in the population. Here, we combine population genetics theory, computer simulation, and experimental evolution to examine the advantages and disadvantages of tolerance to mutations, also known as mutational robustness. We find that mutational robustness increases neutral diversity and, as expected, can facilitate adaptation to a new environment. Surprisingly, under certain conditions, robustness may also be an impediment for viral adaptation, if a highly diverse population contains a large proportion of previously neutral mutations that are deleterious in the new environment. These findings may inform therapeutic strategies that cause extinction of otherwise robust viral populations.

  3. Costs and Benefits of Mutational Robustness in RNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Stern

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of mutations in RNA viruses is thought to facilitate rapid adaptation to changes in the environment. However, most mutations have deleterious effects on fitness, especially for viruses. Thus, tolerance to mutations should determine the nature and extent of genetic diversity that can be maintained in the population. Here, we combine population genetics theory, computer simulation, and experimental evolution to examine the advantages and disadvantages of tolerance to mutations, also known as mutational robustness. We find that mutational robustness increases neutral diversity and, as expected, can facilitate adaptation to a new environment. Surprisingly, under certain conditions, robustness may also be an impediment for viral adaptation, if a highly diverse population contains a large proportion of previously neutral mutations that are deleterious in the new environment. These findings may inform therapeutic strategies that cause extinction of otherwise robust viral populations.

  4. [Indications for fresh frozen plasma: evaluation of virus inactivating preparations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindur, G; Kiesewetter, H; Seyfert, U T; Wenzel, E

    1993-01-01

    When no specific factor concentrate is available fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) is indicated in the treatment of clinically relevant hemorrhagic diathesis. These disorders include congenital factor V and XI deficiencies, multiple factor defects, as disseminated intravascular coagulation and severe liver disease, and patients receiving massive transfusions, when bleeding occurs and severe abnormalities on coagulation testing are evident. FFP is beneficial when used with plasma exchange in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and related disorders. Various virucidal treatments including solvent-detergent (SD), photoactivated dyes (methylene blue) or pasteurization have been evolved to improve virus safety of human plasma. More extensive studies to demonstrate efficient virus inactivation in plasma have been performed with SD compared to other methods. On the other hand, the use of single-donor FFP in methylene blue treatment is possibly superior to pooled plasma which is processed according to the SD procedure. Pasteurization enables the inactivation not only of lipid-enveloped but also of non-lipid-enveloped viruses. Virucidal treatment of plasma may cause alterations in clotting factors, fibrinolysis and protease inhibitors; however, the currently achieved recovery of procoagulant activities is approximately comparable with that found in untreated FFP. The toxicity of virucidal additives is reported to be negligible since manufacturing includes a removal procedure (SD) or comparably low amounts (methylene blue) are used in inactivation treatment.

  5. Cold oxygen plasma technology efficiency against different airborne respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, O; Essere, B; Yver, M; Barthélémy, M; Bouscambert-Duchamp, M; Kurtz, P; VanMechelen, D; Morfin, F; Billaud, G; Ferraris, O; Lina, B; Rosa-Calatrava, M; Moules, V

    2009-06-01

    Respiratory infections caused by viruses are major causes of upper and lower respiratory tract infections. They account for an important mortality and morbidity worldwide. Amongst these viruses, influenza viruses and paramyxoviruses are major pathogens. Their transmission is mainly airborne, by direct transmission through droplets from infected cases. In the context of an influenza pandemic, as well as for the reduction of nosocomial infections, systems that can reduce or control virus transmission will reduce the burden of this disease. It may also be part of the strategy for pandemic mitigation. A new system based on physical decontamination of surface and air has been developed. This process generates cold oxygen plasma (COP) by subjecting air to high-energy deep-UV light. To test its efficiency, we have developed an experimental device to assess for the decontamination of nebulized respiratory viruses. High titer suspensions of influenza virus type A, human parainfluenza virus type 3 and RSV have been tested. Different experimental conditions have been evaluated against these viruses. The use of COP with an internal device allowed the best results against all viruses tested. We recorded a reduction of 6.5, 3.8 and 4 log(10) TCID50/mL of the titre of the hPIV-3, RSV and influenza virus A (H5N2) suspensions. The COP technology is an efficient and innovative strategy to control airborne virus dissemination. It could successfully control nosocomial diffusion of respiratory viruses in hospital setting, and could be useful for the reduction of influenza transmission in the various consultation settings implemented for the management of cases during a pandemic.

  6. MicroRNA panels as disease biomarkers distinguishing hepatitis B virus infection caused hepatitis and liver cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bo-Xun Jin; Yong-Hong Zhang; Wen-Jing Jin; Xiang-Ying Sun; Gui-Fang Qiao; Ying-Ying Wei; Li-Bo Sun; Wei-Hong Zhang; Ning Li

    2015-01-01

    An important unresolved clinical issue is to distinguish hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection caused chronic hepatitis and their corresponding liver cirrhosis (LC). Recent research suggests that circulating microRNAs are useful biomarkers for a wide array of diseases. We analyzed microRNA profiles in the plasmas of a total of 495 chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients, LC patients and healthy donors and identified 10 miRNAs that were differentially expressed between CHB and LC patients. Our logistic...

  7. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chan-Mi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV NS5 is a viral nonstructural protein that carries both methyltransferase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp domains. It is a key component of the viral RNA replicase complex that presumably includes other viral nonstructural and cellular proteins. The biochemical properties of JEV NS5 have not been characterized due to the lack of a robust in vitro RdRp assay system, and the molecular mechanisms for the initiation of RNA synthesis by JEV NS5 remain to be elucidated. Results To characterize the biochemical properties of JEV RdRp, we expressed in Escherichia coli and purified an enzymatically active full-length recombinant JEV NS5 protein with a hexahistidine tag at the N-terminus. The purified NS5 protein, but not the mutant NS5 protein with an Ala substitution at the first Asp of the RdRp-conserved GDD motif, exhibited template- and primer-dependent RNA synthesis activity using a poly(A RNA template. The NS5 protein was able to use both plus- and minus-strand 3'-untranslated regions of the JEV genome as templates in the absence of a primer, with the latter RNA being a better template. Analysis of the RNA synthesis initiation site using the 3'-end 83 nucleotides of the JEV genome as a minimal RNA template revealed that the NS5 protein specifically initiates RNA synthesis from an internal site, U81, at the two nucleotides upstream of the 3'-end of the template. Conclusion As a first step toward the understanding of the molecular mechanisms for JEV RNA replication and ultimately for the in vitro reconstitution of viral RNA replicase complex, we for the first time established an in vitro JEV RdRp assay system with a functional full-length recombinant JEV NS5 protein and characterized the mechanisms of RNA synthesis from nonviral and viral RNA templates. The full-length recombinant JEV NS5 will be useful for the elucidation of the structure-function relationship of this enzyme and for the

  8. Suppression of RNA interference increases alphavirus replication and virus-associated mortality in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Geiss Brian J; Phillips Aaron T; Scott Jaclyn C; Cirimotich Chris M; Olson Ken E

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) can persistently infect and cause limited damage to mosquito vectors. RNA interference (RNAi) is a mosquito antiviral response important in restricting RNA virus replication and has been shown to be active against some arboviruses. The goal of this study was to use a recombinant Sindbis virus (SINV; family Togaviridae; genus Alphavirus) that expresses B2 protein of Flock House virus (FHV; family Nodaviridae; genus Alphanodavirus), a pr...

  9. Influenza A virus preferentially snatches noncoding RNA caps

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) lacks the enzyme for adding 5′ caps to its RNAs and snatches the 5′ ends of host capped RNAs to prime transcription. Neither the preference of the host RNA sequences snatched nor the effect of cap-snatching on host processes is completely defined. Previous studies of influenza cap-snatching used poly(A)-selected RNAs from infected cells or relied on annotated host genes to define the snatched host RNAs, and thus lack details on many noncoding host RNAs including snRNAs...

  10. The lipidomes of vesicular stomatitis virus, semliki forest virus, and the host plasma membrane analyzed by quantitative shotgun mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvodova, Lucie; Sampaio, Julio L; Cordo, Sandra;

    2009-01-01

    kidney cells can be infected by two different viruses, namely, vesicular stomatitis virus and Semliki Forest virus, from the Rhabdoviridae and Togaviridae families, respectively. We purified the host plasma membrane and the two different viruses after exit from the host cells and analyzed the lipid...

  11. Pea enation mosaic virus genoma RNA contains no polyadenylate sequences and cannot be aminoacylated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, T L; De Zoeten, G A; Hall, T C

    1978-01-01

    An active synthetase enzyme preparation from peas (Pisum sativum L.) did not catalyze the aminoacylation of pea enation mosaic virus RNA. The viral RNA was shown not to contain polyadenylic acid sequences.

  12. Detection of influenza A virus RNA in birds by optimized Real-Time PCR system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ilinykh Ph A; Shestopalova EM; Khripko Yu I; Durimanov AG; Sharshov KA; Shestopalov AM

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of Real-Time PCR system based on specific amplification of matrix protein gene fragment for influenza A virus RNA detection in cloacal swabs from wild birds. Methods:Sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility of analysis results were identified. Study of cloacal swabs from wild birds for influenza A virus presence was performed. Results:Reproducibility of low concentrations of virus detection in samples by Real-Time PCR was significantly higher than that of detection based on cytopathic effect of viruses grown on MDCK cell culture. Conclusions: Real-Time PCR system for influenza A virus RNA detection is developed and applied for virus surveillance study.

  13. [Therapeutic use of fresh plasma and "virus-safe" plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfert, U T; Lorenz, C; Espig, J; Heinrich, H; Grund, S; Rupp, K H; Wenzel, E

    1991-01-01

    The use of plasma and factor concentrates for the treatment of coagulation disorders is well established, but many questions remain. The indications for fresh frozen plasma are still not clearly established and excessive use is rampant. The safety of all blood products has not yet been firmly established. Peer review of transfusion practice in a hospital can be achieved by a Hospital Transfusion Committee. The review and analysis of the statistical reports of the transfusion service and strategies for enhancing quality of patient care will be presented.

  14. [Presence of autocomplementary RNA with viral specificity in cells infected with herpes virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béchet, J M; Montagnier, L; Latarjet, R

    1975-01-13

    RNA from cells infected with Herpes simplex virus contain a higher percentage of double-stranded RNA than non-infected cells. This percentage increases three-fold upon self-annealing. The complementary RNA sequences were shown to be virus-specific by the following criteria: (1) high melting temperature than double-stranded RNA from non infected cells; (2) higher density in caesium sulphate; (3) specific hybridization with viral DNA.

  15. Gene Knockdown of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus E2 Glycoprotein Using DNA-Directed RNA Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    e _s~u~m mary - Introduction: Alphaviruses are a large family of RNA viruses that can cause acute infection resulting in arthritis and encephalitis...One of the important alphaviruses is the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. This virus has been linked to a number of outbreaks in both North and... replication of VEE virus in vitro. Bhogal, H.S., McLaws, L.J., and Jager, S.J. 2006. Gene Knockdown of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus E2

  16. Structural comparisons of the nucleoprotein from three negative strand RNA virus families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsao Jun

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Structures of the nucleoprotein of three negative strand RNA virus families, borna disease virus, rhabdovirus and influenza A virus, are now available. Structural comparisons showed that the topology of the RNA binding region from the three proteins is very similar. The RNA was shown to fit into a cavity formed by the two distinct domains of the RNA binding region in the rhabdovirus nucleoprotein. Two helices connecting the two domains characterize the center of the cavity. The nucleoproteins contain at least 5 conserved helices in the N-terminal domain and 3 conserved helices in the C-terminal domain. Since all negative strand RNA viruses are required to have the ribonucleoprotein complex as their active genomic templates, it is perceivable that the (5H+3H structure is a common motif in the nucleoprotein of negative strand RNA viruses.

  17. Robustness promotes evolvability of thermotolerance in an RNA virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Paul E

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability for an evolving population to adapt to a novel environment is achieved through a balance of robustness and evolvability. Robustness is the invariance of phenotype in the face of perturbation and evolvability is the capacity to adapt in response to selection. Genetic robustness has been posited, depending on the underlying mechanism, to either decrease the efficacy of selection, or increase the possibility of future adaptation. However, the true effect of genetic robustness on evolvability in biological systems remains uncertain. Results Here we demonstrate that genetic robustness increases evolvability of thermotolerance in laboratory populations of the RNA virus φ6. We observed that populations founded by robust clones evolved greater resistance to heat shock, relative to populations founded by brittle (less-robust clones. Thus, we provide empirical evidence for the idea that robustness can promote evolvability in this environment, and further suggest that evolvability can arise indirectly via selection for robustness, rather than through direct selective action. Conclusion Our data imply that greater tolerance of mutational change is associated with virus adaptability in a new niche, a finding generally relevant to evolutionary biology, and informative for elucidating how viruses might evolve to emerge in new habitats and/or overcome novel therapies.

  18. Genetic recombination in plant-infecting messenger-sense RNA viruses: overview and research perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Julian Bujarski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA recombination is one of the driving forces of genetic variability in (+-strand RNA viruses. Various types of RNA-RNA crossovers were described including crosses between the same or different viral RNAs or between viral and cellular RNAs. Likewise, a variety of molecular mechanisms are known to support RNA recombination, such as replicative events (based on internal or end-to-end replicase switchings along with nonreplicative joining among RNA fragments of viral and/or cellular origin. Such mechanisms as RNA decay or RNA interference are responsible for RNA fragmentation and trans-esterification reactions which are likely accountable for ligation of RNA fragments. Numerous host factors were found to affect the profiles of viral RNA recombinants and significant differences in recombination frequency were observed among various RNA viruses. Comparative analyses of viral sequences allowed for the development of evolutionary models in order to explain adaptive phenotypic changes and co-evolving sites. Many questions remain to be answered by forthcoming RNA recombination research. (i How various factors modulate the ability of viral replicase to switch templates, (ii What is the intracellular location of RNA-RNA template switchings, (iii Mechanisms and factors responsible for non-replicative RNA recombination, (iv Mechanisms of integration of RNA viral sequences with cellular genomic DNA, and (v What is the role of RNA splicing and ribozyme activity. From an evolutionary stand point, it is not known how RNA viruses parasitize new host species via recombination, nor is it obvious what the contribution of RNA recombination is among other RNA modification pathways. We do not understand why the frequency of RNA recombination varies so much among RNA viruses and the status of RNA recombination as a form of sex is not well documented.

  19. Nicotiana small RNA sequences support a host genome origin of cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Kiran; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Smith, Neil A; Schumann, Ulrike; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Zhang, Ren; Guo, Hui-Shan; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Satellite RNAs (satRNAs) are small noncoding subviral RNA pathogens in plants that depend on helper viruses for replication and spread. Despite many decades of research, the origin of satRNAs remains unknown. In this study we show that a β-glucuronidase (GUS) transgene fused with a Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) Y satellite RNA (Y-Sat) sequence (35S-GUS:Sat) was transcriptionally repressed in N. tabacum in comparison to a 35S-GUS transgene that did not contain the Y-Sat sequence. This repression was not due to DNA methylation at the 35S promoter, but was associated with specific DNA methylation at the Y-Sat sequence. Both northern blot hybridization and small RNA deep sequencing detected 24-nt siRNAs in wild-type Nicotiana plants with sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that the N. tabacum genome contains Y-Sat-like sequences that give rise to 24-nt sRNAs capable of guiding RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) to the Y-Sat sequence in the 35S-GUS:Sat transgene. Consistent with this, Southern blot hybridization detected multiple DNA bands in Nicotiana plants that had sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that Y-Sat-like sequences exist in the Nicotiana genome as repetitive DNA, a DNA feature associated with 24-nt sRNAs. Our results point to a host genome origin for CMV satRNAs, and suggest novel approach of using small RNA sequences for finding the origin of other satRNAs.

  20. Nicotiana small RNA sequences support a host genome origin of cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Zahid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite RNAs (satRNAs are small noncoding subviral RNA pathogens in plants that depend on helper viruses for replication and spread. Despite many decades of research, the origin of satRNAs remains unknown. In this study we show that a β-glucuronidase (GUS transgene fused with a Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV Y satellite RNA (Y-Sat sequence (35S-GUS:Sat was transcriptionally repressed in N. tabacum in comparison to a 35S-GUS transgene that did not contain the Y-Sat sequence. This repression was not due to DNA methylation at the 35S promoter, but was associated with specific DNA methylation at the Y-Sat sequence. Both northern blot hybridization and small RNA deep sequencing detected 24-nt siRNAs in wild-type Nicotiana plants with sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that the N. tabacum genome contains Y-Sat-like sequences that give rise to 24-nt sRNAs capable of guiding RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM to the Y-Sat sequence in the 35S-GUS:Sat transgene. Consistent with this, Southern blot hybridization detected multiple DNA bands in Nicotiana plants that had sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that Y-Sat-like sequences exist in the Nicotiana genome as repetitive DNA, a DNA feature associated with 24-nt sRNAs. Our results point to a host genome origin for CMV satRNAs, and suggest novel approach of using small RNA sequences for finding the origin of other satRNAs.

  1. Leishmania RNA virus: when the host pays the toll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Anne eHartley

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of an RNA virus in a South American subgenus of the Leishmania parasite, L. (Viannia, was detected several decades ago but its role in leishmanial virulence and metastasis was only recently described. In Leishmania guyanensis, the nucleic acid of Leishmania RNA virus (LRV1 acts as a potent innate immunogen, eliciting a hyper-inflammatory immune response through Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3. The resultant inflammatory cascade has been shown to increase disease severity, parasite persistence and perhaps even resistance to anti-leishmanial drugs. Curiously, LRVs were found mostly in clinical isolates prone to infectious metastasis in both their human source and experimental animal model, suggesting an association between the viral hyperpathogen and metastatic complications such as mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (MCL. MCL presents as chronic secondary lesions in the mucosa of the mouth and nose, debilitatingly inflamed and notoriously refractory to treatment. Immunologically, this outcome has many of the same hallmarks associated with the reaction to LRV: production of type 1 interferons, bias toward a chronic Th1 inflammatory state and an impaired ability of host cells to eliminate parasites through oxidative stress. More intriguing, is that the risk of developing MCL is found almost exclusively in infections of the L. (Viannia subtype, further indication that leishmanial metastasis is caused, at least in part, by a parasitic component. LRV present in this subgenus may contribute to the destructive inflammation of metastatic disease either by acting in concert with other intrinsic ‘metastatic factors’ or by independently preying on host TLR3 hypersensitivity. Because LRV amplifies parasite virulence, its presence may provide a unique target for diagnostic and clinical intervention of metastatic leishmaniasis. Taking examples from other members of the Totiviridae virus family, this paper reviews the benefits and costs of endosymbiosis

  2. Transfection of RNA from organ samples of infected animals represents a highly sensitive method for virus detection and recovery of classical swine fever virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Meyer

    Full Text Available Translation and replication of positive stranded RNA viruses are directly initiated in the cellular cytoplasm after uncoating of the viral genome. Accordingly, infectious virus can be generated by transfection of RNA genomes into susceptible cells. In the present study, efficiency of conventional virus isolation after inoculation of cells with infectious sample material was compared to virus recovery after transfection of total RNA derived from organ samples of pigs infected with Classical swine fever virus (CSFV. Compared to the conventional method of virus isolation applied in three different porcine cell lines used in routine diagnosis of CSF, RNA transfection showed a similar efficiency for virus rescue. For two samples, recovery of infectious virus was only possible by RNA transfection, but not by the classical approach of virus isolation. Therefore, RNA transfection represents a valuable alternative to conventional virus isolation in particular when virus isolation is not possible, sample material is not suitable for virus isolation or when infectious material is not available. To estimate the potential risk of RNA prepared from sample material for infection of pigs, five domestic pigs were oronasally inoculated with RNA that was tested positive for virus rescue after RNA transfection. This exposure did not result in viral infection or clinical disease of the animals. In consequence, shipment of CSFV RNA can be regarded as a safe alternative to transportation of infectious virus and thereby facilitates the exchange of virus isolates among authorized laboratories with appropriate containment facilities.

  3. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus-encoded ovarian tumor protease activity is dispensable for virus RNA polymerase function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Eric; Albariño, César G; Khristova, Marina L; Nichol, Stuart T

    2010-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne virus (genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae) associated with high case fatality disease outbreaks in regions of Africa, Europe, and Asia. The CCHFV genome consists of three negative-strand RNA segments, S, M, and L. The unusually large virus L polymerase protein and the need for biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment conditions for work with infectious virus have hampered the study of CCHFV replication. The L protein has an ovarian tumor (OTU) protease domain located in the N terminus, which has led to speculation that the protein may be autoproteolytically cleaved to generate the active virus L polymerase and additional functions. We report the successful development of efficient CCHFV helper virus-independent S, M, and L segment minigenome systems for analysis of virus RNA and protein features involved in replication. The virus RNA segment S, M, and L untranslated regions were found to be similar in support of replication of the respective minigenomes. In addition, the OTU domain located in the N terminus of the expressed virus L protein was shown to be a functional protease. However, no evidence of L protein autoproteolytic processing was found, and the OTU protease activity was dispensable for virus RNA replication. Finally, physiologically relevant doses of ribavirin inhibited CCHFV minigenome replication. These results demonstrated the utility of the minigenome system for use in BSL-2 laboratory settings to analyze CCHFV biology and in antiviral drug discovery programs for this important public health and bioterrorism threat.

  4. Analysis of correlation between cerebrospinal fluid and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels in patients with neurological opportunistic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Pereira Christo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The question of whether HIV-1 RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is derived from viral replication in the central nervous system or simply reflects the transit of infected lymphocytes from the blood compartment has long been a matter of debate. Some studies found no correlation between CSF and plasma viral load, whereas others did. The lack of a correlation between the two compartments suggests that the presence of HIV-1 RNA is not simply due to the passive passage of the virus from blood to CSF but rather due to intrathecal replication. To evaluate the correlation between plasma and CSF HIV-1 RNA levels and to identify situations in which there is no correlation between the two compartments, seventy patients were prospectively studied. The association between CSF and plasma viral load was evaluated in the total population and in subgroups of patients with similar characteristics. A correlation between the CSF and plasma compartments was observed for patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, those with a CD4 T lymphocyte count lower than 200 cells/mm³, and those with increased CSF protein content. On the other hand, no correlation was observed for patients without adequate virological control, who had a CD4 count higher than 200 cells/mm³ and who did not use HAART. The correlation between the two compartments observed in some patients suggests that CSF HIV-1 RNA levels may reflect plasma levels in these subjects. In contrast, the lack of a correlation between the two compartments in patients who were not on HAART and who had normal CSF proteins and a poor virological control possibly indicates compartmentalization of the virus in CSF and, consequently, plasma-independent intrathecal viral replication.

  5. [Determination of genomic and replicative RNA of hepatitis C virus in patients treated with interferon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilicoff, R; Ameigeiras, B; Ojeda, E; Isla Rodríguez, R; Grünbaum, S; Genero, M; Cappelletti, C; Tielli, G; Roatta, R; Koch, O

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the presence of genomic and replicative RNA strands of hepatitis C virus in liver and serum. Eleven patients with proven chronic hepatitis C, received Interferon a2a 4,5 MU, three times a week during six months. RT-PCR was used with sense primer to detect the replicative strand and an antisense primer to identify genomic strand. Before treatment, genomic strands were present in liver and serum of all patients. Replicative strands were present in liver and serum in five and six cases, respectively. Seven out of eleven responded to treatment. In responders, genomic strands were absent in liver of 3 cases (43%) and replicative strands in liver of 4 (57%). In plasma genomic and replicative strands were absent in 5 (71%) and 7 (100%), respectively. In all non responders, genomic strands in liver and plasma remained present. Replicative strands in liver and plasma were present in 100% and 25%, respectively. Knodell score improved in 5 out of 7 responders and remained unchanged in 3 out of 4 non responders. In 2 out of 4 responders with genomic and replicative strands in liver, Knodell score remained unchanged or worse. In all non responders, genomic and replicative strands in liver were present and Knodell score remained unchanged or worse. Genomic and replicative strands in plasma tended to be negative after treatment in responders. Genomic strands in plasma remained present in non responders. Conversely, genomic and replicative strands in liver were present in all non responders. It seems to exist a relationship between genomic and replicative strands in liver and the same or worse Knodell score. After a follow up, it will be possible to determined whether responders who still present viral RNA in liver would be prone to a relapse.

  6. Birds shed RNA-viruses according to the pareto principle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Jankowski

    Full Text Available A major challenge in disease ecology is to understand the role of individual variation of infection load on disease transmission dynamics and how this influences the evolution of resistance or tolerance mechanisms. Such information will improve our capacity to understand, predict, and mitigate pathogen-associated disease in all organisms. In many host-pathogen systems, particularly macroparasites and sexually transmitted diseases, it has been found that approximately 20% of the population is responsible for approximately 80% of the transmission events. Although host contact rates can account for some of this pattern, pathogen transmission dynamics also depend upon host infectiousness, an area that has received relatively little attention. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of pathogen shedding rates of 24 host (avian - pathogen (RNA-virus studies, including 17 bird species and five important zoonotic viruses. We determined that viral count data followed the Weibull distribution, the mean Gini coefficient (an index of inequality was 0.687 (0.036 SEM, and that 22.0% (0.90 SEM of the birds shed 80% of the virus across all studies, suggesting an adherence of viral shedding counts to the Pareto Principle. The relative position of a bird in a distribution of viral counts was affected by factors extrinsic to the host, such as exposure to corticosterone and to a lesser extent reduced food availability, but not to intrinsic host factors including age, sex, and migratory status. These data provide a quantitative view of heterogeneous virus shedding in birds that may be used to better parameterize epidemiological models and understand transmission dynamics.

  7. Birds shed RNA-viruses according to the pareto principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Mark D; Williams, Christopher J; Fair, Jeanne M; Owen, Jennifer C

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in disease ecology is to understand the role of individual variation of infection load on disease transmission dynamics and how this influences the evolution of resistance or tolerance mechanisms. Such information will improve our capacity to understand, predict, and mitigate pathogen-associated disease in all organisms. In many host-pathogen systems, particularly macroparasites and sexually transmitted diseases, it has been found that approximately 20% of the population is responsible for approximately 80% of the transmission events. Although host contact rates can account for some of this pattern, pathogen transmission dynamics also depend upon host infectiousness, an area that has received relatively little attention. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of pathogen shedding rates of 24 host (avian) - pathogen (RNA-virus) studies, including 17 bird species and five important zoonotic viruses. We determined that viral count data followed the Weibull distribution, the mean Gini coefficient (an index of inequality) was 0.687 (0.036 SEM), and that 22.0% (0.90 SEM) of the birds shed 80% of the virus across all studies, suggesting an adherence of viral shedding counts to the Pareto Principle. The relative position of a bird in a distribution of viral counts was affected by factors extrinsic to the host, such as exposure to corticosterone and to a lesser extent reduced food availability, but not to intrinsic host factors including age, sex, and migratory status. These data provide a quantitative view of heterogeneous virus shedding in birds that may be used to better parameterize epidemiological models and understand transmission dynamics.

  8. Dynamics of 103K/N and 184M/V HIV-1 drug resistant populations: relative comparison in plasma virus RNA versus CD45RO+T cell proviral DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Martin Roelsgaard; Tolstrup, M; Bertelsen, L

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Viral populations defined by 103K/N and 184M/V as linked or single mutations in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase gene were investigated in plasma samples and compared with previous findings in the CD45RO(+)T cell compartment. OBJECTIVE: To develop an ARMS assay for plasma virions and t...... an unequal distribution of linked-mutation populations in plasma and CD45RO(+)T cells. Furthermore, the linked 103N-184V mutation may be more fit than the single 184V mutation and this linked population emerges rapidly under inadequate drug pressure. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Jul...

  9. Noncoding Subgenomic Flavivirus RNA: Multiple Functions in West Nile Virus Pathogenesis and Modulation of Host Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin A. Roby

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are a large group of positive strand RNA viruses transmitted by arthropods that include many human pathogens such as West Nile virus (WNV, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV, yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus. All members in this genus tested so far are shown to produce a unique subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA derived from the 3' untranslated region (UTR. sfRNA is a product of incomplete degradation of genomic RNA by the cell 5'–3' exoribonuclease XRN1 which stalls at highly ordered secondary RNA structures at the beginning of the 3'UTR. Generation of sfRNA results in inhibition of XRN1 activity leading to an increase in stability of many cellular mRNAs. Mutant WNV deficient in sfRNA generation was highly attenuated displaying a marked decrease in cytopathicity in cells and pathogenicity in mice. sfRNA has also been shown to inhibit the antiviral activity of IFN-α/β by yet unknown mechanism and of the RNAi pathway by likely serving as a decoy substrate for Dicer. Thus, sfRNA is involved in modulating multiple cellular pathways to facilitate viral pathogenicity; however the overlying mechanism linking all these multiple functions of sfRNA remains to be elucidated.

  10. Virus and dsRNA-triggered transcriptional responses reveal key components of honey bee antiviral defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutscher, Laura M; Daughenbaugh, Katie F; Flenniken, Michelle L

    2017-07-25

    Recent high annual losses of honey bee colonies are associated with many factors, including RNA virus infections. Honey bee antiviral responses include RNA interference and immune pathway activation, but their relative roles in antiviral defense are not well understood. To better characterize the mechanism(s) of honey bee antiviral defense, bees were infected with a model virus in the presence or absence of dsRNA, a virus associated molecular pattern. Regardless of sequence specificity, dsRNA reduced virus abundance. We utilized next generation sequencing to examine transcriptional responses triggered by virus and dsRNA at three time-points post-infection. Hundreds of genes exhibited differential expression in response to co-treatment of dsRNA and virus. Virus-infected bees had greater expression of genes involved in RNAi, Toll, Imd, and JAK-STAT pathways, but the majority of differentially expressed genes are not well characterized. To confirm the virus limiting role of two genes, including the well-characterized gene, dicer, and a probable uncharacterized cyclin dependent kinase in honey bees, we utilized RNAi to reduce their expression in vivo and determined that virus abundance increased, supporting their involvement in antiviral defense. Together, these results further our understanding of honey bee antiviral defense, particularly the role of a non-sequence specific dsRNA-mediated antiviral pathway.

  11. Novel microRNA-like viral small regulatory RNAs arising during human hepatitis A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiandong; Sun, Jing; Wang, Bin; Wu, Meini; Zhang, Jing; Duan, Zhiqing; Wang, Haixuan; Hu, Ningzhu; Hu, Yunzhang

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), including host miRNAs and viral miRNAs, play vital roles in regulating host-virus interactions. DNA viruses encode miRNAs that regulate the viral life cycle. However, it is generally believed that cytoplasmic RNA viruses do not encode miRNAs, owing to inaccessible cellular miRNA processing machinery. Here, we provide a comprehensive genome-wide analysis and identification of miRNAs that were derived from hepatitis A virus (HAV; Hu/China/H2/1982), which is a typical cytoplasmic RNA virus. Using deep-sequencing and in silico approaches, we identified 2 novel virally encoded miRNAs, named hav-miR-1-5p and hav-miR-2-5p. Both of the novel virally encoded miRNAs were clearly detected in infected cells. Analysis of Dicer enzyme silencing demonstrated that HAV-derived miRNA biogenesis is Dicer dependent. Furthermore, we confirmed that HAV mature miRNAs were generated from viral miRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs) in host cells. Notably, naturally derived HAV miRNAs were biologically and functionally active and induced post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Genomic location analysis revealed novel miRNAs located in the coding region of the viral genome. Overall, our results show that HAV naturally generates functional miRNA-like small regulatory RNAs during infection. This is the first report of miRNAs derived from the coding region of genomic RNA of a cytoplasmic RNA virus. These observations demonstrate that a cytoplasmic RNA virus can naturally generate functional miRNAs, as DNA viruses do. These findings also contribute to improved understanding of host-RNA virus interactions mediated by RNA virus-derived miRNAs.

  12. Multiple functions of the 32K and 60K proteins in cowpea mosaic virus RNA replication.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) is the type member of the comoviridae , a group of 14 different plant viruses that have a divided genome consisting of two plus-strand RNAs. These RNAs, designated B-RNA and M-RNA, have a small protein, VPg, attached to the 5'-end and a poly(A) tail at the 3'-end and are s

  13. Attenuation of Sindbis virus neurovirulence by using defined mutations in nontranslated regions of the genome RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, R J; Griffin, D E; Zhang, H; Niesters, Hubert G. M.; Strauss, J H

    1992-01-01

    We examined a panel of Sindbis virus mutants containing defined mutations in the 5' nontranslated region of the genome RNA, in the 3' nontranslated region, or in both for their growth in cultured cells and virulence in newborn mice. In cultured cells, these viruses all had defects in RNA synthesis a

  14. The spray-drying process is sufficient to inactivate infectious porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Priscilla F; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Jianqiang; Halbur, Patrick G; Opriessnig, Tanja

    2014-11-07

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is considered an emergent pathogen associated with high economic losses in many pig rearing areas. Recently it has been suggested that PEDV could be transmitted to naïve pig populations through inclusion of spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP) into the nursery diet which led to a ban of SDPP in several areas in North America and Europe. To determine the effect of spray-drying on PEDV infectivity, 3-week-old pigs were intragastrically inoculated with (1) raw porcine plasma spiked with PEDV (RAW-PEDV-CONTROL), (2) porcine plasma spiked with PEDV and then spray dried (SD-PEDV-CONTROL), (3) raw plasma from PEDV infected pigs (RAW-SICK), (4) spray-dried plasma from PEDV infected pigs (SD-SICK), or (5) spray-dried plasma from PEDV negative pigs (SD-NEG-CONTROL). For the spray-drying process, a tabletop spray-dryer with industry-like settings for inlet and outlet temperatures was used. In the RAW-PEDV-CONTROL group, PEDV RNA was present in feces at day post infection (dpi) 3 and the pigs seroconverted by dpi 14. In contrast, PEDV RNA in feces was not detected in any of the pigs in the other groups including the SD-PEDV-CONTROL group and none of the pigs had seroconverted by termination of the project at dpi 28. This work provides direct evidence that the experimental spray-drying process used in this study was effective in inactivating infectious PEDV in the plasma. Additionally, plasma collected from PEDV infected pigs at peak disease did not contain infectious PEDV. These findings suggest that the risk for PEDV transmission through commercially produced SDPP is minimal.

  15. Prognostic value of single measurements of beta-2-microglobulin, immunoglobulin A in HIV disease after controlling for CD4 lymphocyte counts and plasma HIV RNA levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, H; Lepri, A Cozzi; Katzenstein, T L

    2000-01-01

    The interrelationships between the CD4 lymphocyte count, plasma viral load [human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA], beta-2-microglobulin (beta2-M) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) and the mortality risk was explored in 234 HIV-infected individuals (median CD4 count 230 cells/mm3, range 1-1,247). Produ...

  16. Presence and Persistence of Zika Virus RNA in Semen, United Kingdom, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Barry; Thorburn, Fiona; Petridou, Christina; Bailey, Daniel; Hewson, Roger; Simpson, Andrew J.H.; Brooks, Timothy J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus RNA has been detected in semen collected several months after onset of symptoms of infection. Given the potential for sexual transmission of Zika virus and for serious fetal abnormalities resulting from infection during pregnancy, information regarding the persistence of Zika virus in semen is critical for advancing our understanding of potential risks. We tested serial semen samples from symptomatic male patients in the United Kingdom who had a diagnosis of imported Zika virus infection. Among the initial semen samples from 23 patients, Zika virus RNA was detected at high levels in 13 (56.5%) and was not detected in 9 (39.1%); detection was indeterminate in 1 sample (4.4%). After symptomatic infection, a substantial proportion of men have detectable Zika virus RNA at high copy numbers in semen during early convalescence, suggesting high risk for sexual transmission. Viral RNA clearance times are not consistent and can be prolonged. PMID:27997333

  17. Nonreplicative RNA Recombination of an Animal Plus-Strand RNA Virus in the Absence of Efficient Translation of Viral Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine Büning, Maximiliane; Meyer, Denise; Austermann-Busch, Sophia; Roman-Sosa, Gleyder; Rümenapf, Tillmann

    2017-01-01

    RNA recombination is a major driving force for the evolution of RNA viruses and is significantly implicated in the adaptation of viruses to new hosts, changes of virulence, as well as in the emergence of new viruses including drug-resistant and escape mutants. However, the molecular details of recombination in animal RNA viruses are only poorly understood. In order to determine whether viral RNA recombination depends on translation of viral proteins, a nonreplicative recombination system was established which is based on cotransfection of cells with synthetic bovine viral diarrhea virus (family Flaviviridae) RNA genome fragments either lacking the internal ribosome entry site required for cap-independent translation or lacking almost the complete polyprotein coding region. The emergence of a number of recombinant viruses demonstrated that IRES-mediated translation of viral proteins is dispensable for efficient recombination and suggests that RNA recombination can occur in the absence of viral proteins. Analyses of 58 independently emerged viruses led to the detection of recombinant genomes with duplications, deletions and insertions in the 5′ terminal region of the open reading frame, leading to enlarged core fusion proteins detectable by Western blot analysis. This demonstrates a remarkable flexibility of the pestivirus core protein. Further experiments with capped and uncapped genome fragments containing a luciferase gene for monitoring the level of protein translation revealed that even a ∼1,000-fold enhancement of translation of viral proteins did not increase the frequency of RNA recombination. Taken together, this study highlights that nonreplicative RNA recombination does not require translation of viral proteins. PMID:28338950

  18. Transiently Expressed Short Hairpin RNA Targeting 126 kDa Protein of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Interferes with Virus Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Min ZHAO; De-Rong AN; Jian ZHAO; Guang-Hua HUANG; Zu-Hua HE; Jiang-Ye CHEN

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) silences gene expression by guiding mRNA degradation in asequence-specific fashion. Small interfering RNA (siRNA), an intermediate of the RNAi pathway, has been shown to be very effective in inhibiting virus infection in mammalian cells and cultured plant cells. Here, we report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) could inhibit tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA accumulation by targeting the gene encoding the replication-associated 126 kDa protein in intact plant tissue. Our results indicate that transiently expressed shRNA efficiently interfered with TMV infection. The interference observed is sequence-specific, and time- and site-dependent.Transiently expressed shRNA corresponding to the TMV 126 kDa protein gene did not inhibit cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), an unrelated tobamovirus. In order to interfere with TMV accumulation in tobacco leaves, it is essential for the shRNA constructs to be infiltrated into the same leaves as TMV inoculation. Our results support the view that RNAi opens the door for novel therapeutic procedures against virus diseases.We propose that a combination of the RNAi technique and Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression could be employed as a potent antiviral treatment in plants.

  19. From Cells to Virus Particles: Quantitative Methods to Monitor RNA Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Ferrer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In cells, positive strand RNA viruses, such as Retroviridae, must selectively recognize their full-length RNA genome among abundant cellular RNAs to assemble and release particles. How viruses coordinate the intracellular trafficking of both RNA and protein components to the assembly sites of infectious particles at the cell surface remains a long-standing question. The mechanisms ensuring packaging of genomic RNA are essential for viral infectivity. Since RNA packaging impacts on several essential functions of retroviral replication such as RNA dimerization, translation and recombination events, there are many studies that require the determination of RNA packaging efficiency and/or RNA packaging ability. Studies of RNA encapsidation rely upon techniques for the identification and quantification of RNA species packaged by the virus. This review focuses on the different approaches available to monitor RNA packaging: Northern blot analysis, ribonuclease protection assay and quantitative reverse transcriptase-coupled polymerase chain reaction as well as the most recent RNA imaging and sequencing technologies. Advantages, disadvantages and limitations of these approaches will be discussed in order to help the investigator to choose the most appropriate technique. Although the review was written with the prototypic simple murine leukemia virus (MLV and complex human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 in mind, the techniques were described in order to benefit to a larger community.

  20. Inhibition of avian tumor viruses by vector-based RNA interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been shown to reduce the replication of certain animal viruses both in cell culture and in live animals. We developed RNAi-based anti-viral strategies against two important chicken pathogens: avian leukosis virus (ALV) and Marek’s Disease virus MDV). Entry plasmids conta...

  1. Infection dynamics in a traveller with persistent shedding of Zika virus RNA in semen for six months after returning from Haiti to Italy, January 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzon, Luisa; Pacenti, Monia; Franchin, Elisa; Lavezzo, Enrico; Trevisan, Marta; Sgarabotto, Dino; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    We describe the dynamics of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in a man in his early 40s who developed fever and rash after returning from Haiti to Italy, in January 2016. Follow-up laboratory testing demonstrated detectable ZIKV RNA in plasma up to day 9 after symptom onset and in urine and saliva up to days 15 and 47, respectively. Notably, persistent shedding of ZIKV RNA was demonstrated in semen, still detectable at 181 days after onset. PMID:27542178

  2. Examination for double-stranded RNA viruses in Trichomonas gallinae and identification of a novel sequence of a Trichomonas vaginalis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, Richard W; Allison, Andrew B; Sellers, Holly; Linnemann, Erich; Chang, T-H; Alderete, John F

    2009-09-01

    To determine if double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses exist and are potential virulence factors in Trichomonas gallinae, virus purification via ultracentrifugation was attempted for 12 T. gallinae isolates recovered from wild birds. Following purification, virus-like particles were not observed by transmission electron microscopy, nor were dsRNA segments visualized in agarose gels after electrophoresis of extracted RNA from any of the 12 T. gallinae isolates. However, virus particles and dsRNA segments were detected from a previously determined virus-infected T. vaginalis isolate as a control using identical purification procedures. Subsequent reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the dsRNA of the virus in this isolate revealed a novel sequence of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene of T. vaginalis viruses.

  3. Viral RNA silencing suppressors (RSS): novel strategy of viruses to ablate the host RNA interference (RNAi) defense system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivalkar-Mehla, Shalmali; Vakharia, Janaki; Mehla, Rajeev; Abreha, Measho; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh; Tikoo, Akshay; Chauhan, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic viruses have developed a molecular defense arsenal for their survival by counteracting the host anti-viral system known as RNA interference (RNAi). Cellular RNAi, in addition to regulating gene expression through microRNAs, also serves as a barrier against invasive foreign nucleic acids. RNAi is conserved across the biological species, including plants, animals and invertebrates. Viruses in turn, have evolved mechanisms that can counteract this anti-viral defense of the host. Recent studies of mammalian viruses exhibiting RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) activity have further advanced our understanding of RNAi in terms of host-virus interactions. Viral proteins and non-coding viral RNAs can inhibit the RNAi (miRNA/siRNA) pathway through different mechanisms. Mammalian viruses having dsRNA-binding regions and GW/WG motifs appear to have a high chance of conferring RSS activity. Although, RSSs of plant and invertebrate viruses have been well characterized, mammalian viral RSSs still need in-depth investigations to present the concrete evidences supporting their RNAi ablation characteristics. The information presented in this review together with any perspective research should help to predict and identify the RSS activity-endowed new viral proteins that could be the potential targets for designing novel anti-viral therapeutics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genome-wide analyses of Epstein-Barr virus reveal conserved RNA structures and a novel stable intronic sequence RNA

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus implicated in cancer and autoimmune disorders. Little is known concerning the roles of RNA structure in this important human pathogen. This study provides the first comprehensive genome-wide survey of RNA and RNA structure in EBV. Results Novel EBV RNAs and RNA structures were identified by computational modeling and RNA-Seq analyses of EBV. Scans of the genomic sequences of four EBV strains (EBV-1, EBV-2, GD1, and GD2) and of the clo...

  5. Dengue virus type 2 infections of Aedes aegypti are modulated by the mosquito's RNA interference pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Sánchez-Vargas

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have shown that both innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms greatly influence the course of human dengue virus (DENV infections, but little is known about the innate immune response of the mosquito vector Aedes aegypti to arbovirus infection. We present evidence here that a major component of the mosquito innate immune response, RNA interference (RNAi, is an important modulator of mosquito infections. The RNAi response is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA, which occurs in the cytoplasm as a result of positive-sense RNA virus infection, leading to production of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs. These siRNAs are instrumental in degradation of viral mRNA with sequence homology to the dsRNA trigger and thereby inhibition of virus replication. We show that although dengue virus type 2 (DENV2 infection of Ae. aegypti cultured cells and oral infection of adult mosquitoes generated dsRNA and production of DENV2-specific siRNAs, virus replication and release of infectious virus persisted, suggesting viral circumvention of RNAi. We also show that DENV2 does not completely evade RNAi, since impairing the pathway by silencing expression of dcr2, r2d2, or ago2, genes encoding important sensor and effector proteins in the RNAi pathway, increased virus replication in the vector and decreased the extrinsic incubation period required for virus transmission. Our findings indicate a major role for RNAi as a determinant of DENV transmission by Ae. aegypti.

  6. [Genome virology: the novel interaction of RNA viruses and host genomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomonaga, Keizo

    2012-06-01

    The origin of virus-like organisms probably dates back to the earliest forms of cellular life. Such a long coexistence between viruses and ourselves suggests that viruses may have crucially influenced the evolution of our species and vice versa. Sequences derived from retroviruses and retrotransposons have been shown to make up a substantial part of the human genome, suggesting a direct role of virus infection as a source of new genetic information and genomic innovation of the host species. Until very recently, retroviruses were the only viruses known to generate such endogenous copies in vertebrate genomes. However, we and others have reported recently that non-retroviral RNA viruses, including bornaviruses and filoviruses, have been endogenized repeatedly during mammalian evolution. These endogenous elements of RNA viruses not only provide evidence of ancient viral infections in each animal species but also offer novel paradigms for the interaction between RNA viruses and their hosts. Based on the presentation of the plenary lecture at the XV International Congress of Virology 2011, I will review here our recent findings regarding the generation and functions of endogenous bornavirus-like N elements in mammalian genomes, in order to reveal the unknown dynamics of RNA viruses in eukaryotic cells, and also discuss the evolutionary interaction between RNA viruses and hosts.

  7. Cellular RNA binding proteins NS1-BP and hnRNP K regulate influenza A virus RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Ling; Chiou, Ni-Ting; Kuss, Sharon; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Lynch, Kristen W; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a major human pathogen with a genome comprised of eight single-strand, negative-sense, RNA segments. Two viral RNA segments, NS1 and M, undergo alternative splicing and yield several proteins including NS1, NS2, M1 and M2 proteins. However, the mechanisms or players involved in splicing of these viral RNA segments have not been fully studied. Here, by investigating the interacting partners and function of the cellular protein NS1-binding protein (NS1-BP), we revealed novel players in the splicing of the M1 segment. Using a proteomics approach, we identified a complex of RNA binding proteins containing NS1-BP and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), among which are hnRNPs involved in host pre-mRNA splicing. We found that low levels of NS1-BP specifically impaired proper alternative splicing of the viral M1 mRNA segment to yield the M2 mRNA without affecting splicing of mRNA3, M4, or the NS mRNA segments. Further biochemical analysis by formaldehyde and UV cross-linking demonstrated that NS1-BP did not interact directly with viral M1 mRNA but its interacting partners, hnRNPs A1, K, L, and M, directly bound M1 mRNA. Among these hnRNPs, we identified hnRNP K as a major mediator of M1 mRNA splicing. The M1 mRNA segment generates the matrix protein M1 and the M2 ion channel, which are essential proteins involved in viral trafficking, release into the cytoplasm, and budding. Thus, reduction of NS1-BP and/or hnRNP K levels altered M2/M1 mRNA and protein ratios, decreasing M2 levels and inhibiting virus replication. Thus, NS1-BP-hnRNPK complex is a key mediator of influenza A virus gene expression.

  8. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangquan Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21–24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA. By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species.

  9. 5'-Phospho-RNA Acceptor Specificity of GDP Polyribonucleotidyltransferase of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in mRNA Capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Minako; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2017-03-15

    The GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) domain of the multifunctional L protein of rhabdoviruses, such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and rabies virus, catalyzes the transfer of 5'-phospho-RNA (pRNA) from 5'-triphospho-RNA (pppRNA) to GDP via a covalent enzyme-pRNA intermediate to generate a 5'-cap structure (GpppA). Here, using an improved oligo-RNA capping assay with the VSV L protein, we showed that the Michaelis constants for GDP and pppAACAG (VSV mRNA-start sequence) are 0.03 and 0.4 μM, respectively. A competition assay between GDP and GDP analogues in the GpppA formation and pRNA transfer assay using GDP analogues as pRNA acceptors indicated that the PRNTase domain recognizes the C-2-amino group, but not the C-6-oxo group, N-1-hydrogen, or N-7-nitrogen, of GDP for the cap formation. 2,6-Diaminopurine-riboside (DAP), 7-deazaguanosine (7-deaza-G), and 7-methylguanosine (m(7)G) diphosphates efficiently accepted pRNA, resulting in the formation of DAPpppA, 7-deaza-GpppA, and m(7)GpppA (cap 0), respectively. Furthermore, either the 2'- or 3'-hydroxyl group of GDP was found to be required for efficient pRNA transfer. A 5'-diphosphate form of antiviral ribavirin weakly inhibited the GpppA formation but did not act as a pRNA acceptor. These results indicate that the PRNTase domain has a unique guanosine-binding mode different from that of eukaryotic mRNA capping enzyme, guanylyltransferase. IMPORTANCE mRNAs of nonsegmented negative-strand (NNS) RNA viruses, such as VSV, possess a fully methylated cap structure, which is required for mRNA stability, efficient translation, and evasion of antiviral innate immunity in host cells. GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) is an unconventional mRNA capping enzyme of NNS RNA viruses that is distinct from the eukaryotic mRNA capping enzyme, guanylyltransferase. In this study, we studied the pRNA acceptor specificity of VSV PRNTase using various GDP analogues and identified chemical groups of GDP as

  10. 5′-Phospho-RNA Acceptor Specificity of GDP Polyribonucleotidyltransferase of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in mRNA Capping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Minako

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) domain of the multifunctional L protein of rhabdoviruses, such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and rabies virus, catalyzes the transfer of 5′-phospho-RNA (pRNA) from 5′-triphospho-RNA (pppRNA) to GDP via a covalent enzyme-pRNA intermediate to generate a 5′-cap structure (GpppA). Here, using an improved oligo-RNA capping assay with the VSV L protein, we showed that the Michaelis constants for GDP and pppAACAG (VSV mRNA-start sequence) are 0.03 and 0.4 μM, respectively. A competition assay between GDP and GDP analogues in the GpppA formation and pRNA transfer assay using GDP analogues as pRNA acceptors indicated that the PRNTase domain recognizes the C-2-amino group, but not the C-6-oxo group, N-1-hydrogen, or N-7-nitrogen, of GDP for the cap formation. 2,6-Diaminopurine-riboside (DAP), 7-deazaguanosine (7-deaza-G), and 7-methylguanosine (m7G) diphosphates efficiently accepted pRNA, resulting in the formation of DAPpppA, 7-deaza-GpppA, and m7GpppA (cap 0), respectively. Furthermore, either the 2′- or 3′-hydroxyl group of GDP was found to be required for efficient pRNA transfer. A 5′-diphosphate form of antiviral ribavirin weakly inhibited the GpppA formation but did not act as a pRNA acceptor. These results indicate that the PRNTase domain has a unique guanosine-binding mode different from that of eukaryotic mRNA capping enzyme, guanylyltransferase. IMPORTANCE mRNAs of nonsegmented negative-strand (NNS) RNA viruses, such as VSV, possess a fully methylated cap structure, which is required for mRNA stability, efficient translation, and evasion of antiviral innate immunity in host cells. GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) is an unconventional mRNA capping enzyme of NNS RNA viruses that is distinct from the eukaryotic mRNA capping enzyme, guanylyltransferase. In this study, we studied the pRNA acceptor specificity of VSV PRNTase using various GDP analogues and identified chemical groups

  11. Detection of Leishmania RNA virus in Leishmania parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroun Zangger

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL caused by New World Leishmania (Viannia species are at high risk of developing mucosal (ML or disseminated cutaneous leishmaniasis (DCL. After the formation of a primary skin lesion at the site of the bite by a Leishmania-infected sand fly, the infection can disseminate to form secondary lesions. This metastatic phenotype causes significant morbidity and is often associated with a hyper-inflammatory immune response leading to the destruction of nasopharyngeal tissues in ML, and appearance of nodules or numerous ulcerated skin lesions in DCL. Recently, we connected this aggressive phenotype to the presence of Leishmania RNA virus (LRV in strains of L. guyanensis, showing that LRV is responsible for elevated parasitaemia, destructive hyper-inflammation and an overall exacerbation of the disease. Further studies of this relationship and the distribution of LRVs in other Leishmania strains and species would benefit from improved methods of viral detection and quantitation, especially ones not dependent on prior knowledge of the viral sequence as LRVs show significant evolutionary divergence.This study reports various techniques, among which, the use of an anti-dsRNA monoclonal antibody (J2 stands out for its specific and quantitative recognition of dsRNA in a sequence-independent fashion. Applications of J2 include immunofluorescence, ELISA and dot blot: techniques complementing an arsenal of other detection tools, such as nucleic acid purification and quantitative real-time-PCR. We evaluate each method as well as demonstrate a successful LRV detection by the J2 antibody in several parasite strains, a freshly isolated patient sample and lesion biopsies of infected mice.We propose that refinements of these methods could be transferred to the field for use as a diagnostic tool in detecting the presence of LRV, and potentially assessing the LRV-related risk of complications in cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  12. Detection of Leishmania RNA Virus in Leishmania Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desponds, Chantal; Kuhlmann, F. Matthew; Robinson, John; Hartley, Mary-Anne; Prevel, Florence; Castiglioni, Patrik; Pratlong, Francine; Bastien, Patrick; Müller, Norbert; Parmentier, Laurent; Saravia, Nancy Gore; Beverley, Stephen M.; Fasel, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) caused by New World Leishmania (Viannia) species are at high risk of developing mucosal (ML) or disseminated cutaneous leishmaniasis (DCL). After the formation of a primary skin lesion at the site of the bite by a Leishmania-infected sand fly, the infection can disseminate to form secondary lesions. This metastatic phenotype causes significant morbidity and is often associated with a hyper-inflammatory immune response leading to the destruction of nasopharyngeal tissues in ML, and appearance of nodules or numerous ulcerated skin lesions in DCL. Recently, we connected this aggressive phenotype to the presence of Leishmania RNA virus (LRV) in strains of L. guyanensis, showing that LRV is responsible for elevated parasitaemia, destructive hyper-inflammation and an overall exacerbation of the disease. Further studies of this relationship and the distribution of LRVs in other Leishmania strains and species would benefit from improved methods of viral detection and quantitation, especially ones not dependent on prior knowledge of the viral sequence as LRVs show significant evolutionary divergence. Methodology/Principal Findings This study reports various techniques, among which, the use of an anti-dsRNA monoclonal antibody (J2) stands out for its specific and quantitative recognition of dsRNA in a sequence-independent fashion. Applications of J2 include immunofluorescence, ELISA and dot blot: techniques complementing an arsenal of other detection tools, such as nucleic acid purification and quantitative real-time-PCR. We evaluate each method as well as demonstrate a successful LRV detection by the J2 antibody in several parasite strains, a freshly isolated patient sample and lesion biopsies of infected mice. Conclusions/Significance We propose that refinements of these methods could be transferred to the field for use as a diagnostic tool in detecting the presence of LRV, and potentially assessing the LRV

  13. Ebola Virus RNA Stability in Human Blood and Urine in West Africa's Environmental Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, Frédéric; Delaune, Deborah; Poyot, Thomas; Valade, Eric; Mérens, Audrey; Rollin, Pierre E; Foissaud, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    We evaluated RNA stability of Ebola virus in EDTA blood and urine samples collected from infected patients and stored in West Africa's environmental conditions. In blood, RNA was stable for at least 18 days when initial cycle threshold values were <30, but in urine, RNA degradation occurred more quickly.

  14. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Adrian; Busnadiego, Idoia; Maliogka, Varvara; Ferrero, Diego; Castón, José R; Rodríguez, José Francisco; García, Juan Antonio

    2012-01-01

    RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  15. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Valli

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  16. Hsp90 interacts specifically with viral RNA and differentially regulates replication initiation of Bamboo mosaic virus and associated satellite RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wen Huang

    Full Text Available Host factors play crucial roles in the replication of plus-strand RNA viruses. In this report, a heat shock protein 90 homologue of Nicotiana benthamiana, NbHsp90, was identified in association with partially purified replicase complexes from BaMV-infected tissue, and shown to specifically interact with the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR of BaMV genomic RNA, but not with the 3' UTR of BaMV-associated satellite RNA (satBaMV RNA or that of genomic RNA of other viruses, such as Potato virus X (PVX or Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV. Mutational analyses revealed that the interaction occurs between the middle domain of NbHsp90 and domain E of the BaMV 3' UTR. The knockdown or inhibition of NbHsp90 suppressed BaMV infectivity, but not that of satBaMV RNA, PVX, or CMV in N. benthamiana. Time-course analysis further revealed that the inhibitory effect of 17-AAG is significant only during the immediate early stages of BaMV replication. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down assays demonstrated the existence of an interaction between NbHsp90 and the BaMV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. These results reveal a novel role for NbHsp90 in the selective enhancement of BaMV replication, most likely through direct interaction with the 3' UTR of BaMV RNA during the initiation of BaMV RNA replication.

  17. Identification of novel positive-strand RNA viruses by metagenomic analysis of archaea-dominated Yellowstone hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Benjamin; Shaughnessy, Daniel P; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V; Roberto, Francisco F; Young, Mark

    2012-05-01

    There are no known RNA viruses that infect Archaea. Filling this gap in our knowledge of viruses will enhance our understanding of the relationships between RNA viruses from the three domains of cellular life and, in particular, could shed light on the origin of the enormous diversity of RNA viruses infecting eukaryotes. We describe here the identification of novel RNA viral genome segments from high-temperature acidic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park in the United States. These hot springs harbor low-complexity cellular communities dominated by several species of hyperthermophilic Archaea. A viral metagenomics approach was taken to assemble segments of these RNA virus genomes from viral populations isolated directly from hot spring samples. Analysis of these RNA metagenomes demonstrated unique gene content that is not generally related to known RNA viruses of Bacteria and Eukarya. However, genes for RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), a hallmark of positive-strand RNA viruses, were identified in two contigs. One of these contigs is approximately 5,600 nucleotides in length and encodes a polyprotein that also contains a region homologous to the capsid protein of nodaviruses, tetraviruses, and birnaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses of the RdRps encoded in these contigs indicate that the putative archaeal viruses form a unique group that is distinct from the RdRps of RNA viruses of Eukarya and Bacteria. Collectively, our findings suggest the existence of novel positive-strand RNA viruses that probably replicate in hyperthermophilic archaeal hosts and are highly divergent from RNA viruses that infect eukaryotes and even more distant from known bacterial RNA viruses. These positive-strand RNA viruses might be direct ancestors of RNA viruses of eukaryotes.

  18. Application of sequence-independent amplification (SIA) for the identification of RNA viruses in bioenergy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agindotan, Bright O; Ahonsi, Monday O; Domier, Leslie L; Gray, Michael E; Bradley, Carl A

    2010-10-01

    Miscanthus x giganteus, energycane, and Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) are three potential biomass crops being evaluated for commercial cellulosic ethanol production. Viral diseases are potentially significant threats to these crops. Therefore, identification of viruses infecting these bioenergy crops is important for quarantine purposes, virus resistance breeding, and production of virus-free planting materials. The application is described of sequence-independent amplification, for the identification of RNA viruses in bioenergy crops. The method involves virus partial purification from a small amount of infected leaf tissue (miniprep), extraction of viral RNA, amplification of randomly primed cDNAs, cloning, sequencing, and BLAST searches for sequence homology in the GenBank. This method has distinct advantage over other virus characterization techniques in that it does not require reagent specific to target viruses. Using this method, a possible new species was identified in the genus Marafivirus in switchgrass related to Maize rayado fino virus, its closest relative currently in GenBank. Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), genus Potyvirus, was identified in M.xgiganteus, energycane, corn (Zea mays), and switchgrass. Other viruses identified were: Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), genus Potyvirus, in johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense); Soil borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV), genus Furovirus, in wheat (Triticum aestivum); and Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV), genus Comovirus, in soybean (Glycine max). The method was as sensitive as conventional RT-PCR. This is the first report of a Marafivirus infecting switchgrass, and SCMV infecting both energycane and M. x giganteus. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibition of RNA Helicases of ssRNA+ Virus Belonging to Flaviviridae, Coronaviridae and Picornaviridae Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Briguglio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many viral pathogens encode the motor proteins named RNA helicases which display various functions in genome replication. General strategies to design specific and selective drugs targeting helicase for the treatment of viral infections could act via one or more of the following mechanisms: inhibition of the NTPase activity, by interferences with ATP binding and therefore by limiting the energy required for the unwinding and translocation, or by allosteric mechanism and therefore by stabilizing the conformation of the enzyme in low helicase activity state; inhibition of nucleic acids binding to the helicase; inhibition of coupling of ATP hydrolysis to unwinding; inhibition of unwinding by sterically blocking helicase translocation. Recently, by in vitro screening studies, it has been reported that several benzotriazole, imidazole, imidazodiazepine, phenothiazine, quinoline, anthracycline, triphenylmethane, tropolone, pyrrole, acridone, small peptide, and Bananin derivatives are endowed with helicase inhibition of pathogen viruses belonging to Flaviviridae, Coronaviridae, and Picornaviridae families.

  20. Rapid screening of RNA silencing suppressors by using a recombinant virus derived from beet necrotic yellow vein virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilley, H; Bortolamiol, D; Jonard, G; Bouzoubaa, S; Ziegler-Graff, V

    2009-10-01

    To counteract plant defence mechanisms, plant viruses have evolved to encode RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins. These proteins can be identified by a range of silencing suppressor assays. Here, we describe a simple method using beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) that allows a rapid screening of RSS activity. The viral inoculum consisted of BNYVV RNA1, which encodes proteins involved in viral replication, and two BNYVV-derived replicons: rep3-P30, which expresses the movement protein P30 of tobacco mosaic virus, and rep5-X, which allows the expression of a putative RSS (X). This approach has been validated through the use of several known RSSs. Two potential candidates have been tested and we show that, in our system, the P13 protein of burdock mottle virus displays RSS activity while the P0 protein of cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV does not.

  1. Plasma EBV-DNA monitoring in Epstein-Barr virus-positive Hodgkin lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spacek, Martin; Hubacek, Petr; Markova, Jana; Zajac, Miroslav; Vernerova, Zdenka; Kamaradova, Katerina; Stuchly, Jan; Kozak, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with approximately one-third of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) cases. EBV-DNA is often present in the plasma and whole blood of EBV-associated HL patients. However, the significance of EBV-DNA monitoring is debated. In a cohort of 165 adult HL patients, EBV-DNA viral load was prospectively monitored both in the plasma and whole blood. Diagnostic tissue samples of all patients were histologically reviewed; in 72% nodular sclerosis was detected, 24% presented with mixed cellularity (MC), and 5% had other type of HL. Tissues from 150 patients were also analyzed for the presence of latent EBV infection using in situ hybridization for EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) and immunohistochemistry for latent membrane protein (LMP1). Using these methods, 29 (19%) patients were classified as EBV positive. Using real-time quantitative PCR, 22 (76%) of EBV-positive HL patients had detectable EBV-DNA in the plasma and 19 (66%) patients in whole blood prior to therapy. In the group of EBV-negative HL cases, three (2%) patients had detectable plasma EBV-DNA and 30 (25%) patients whole blood EBV-DNA before treatment. EBV-positive HL was significantly associated with EBV-DNA positivity both in the plasma and whole blood in pretreatment samples, increasing age and MC subtype. Serial analysis of plasma EBV-DNA showed that response to therapy was associated with decline in viral load. Moreover, significantly increased plasma EBV-DNA level recurred before disease relapse in one patient. Our results further suggest that the assessment of plasma EBV-DNA viral load might be of value for estimation of prognosis and follow-up of patients with EBV-positive HL.

  2. In situ structures of the segmented genome and RNA polymerase complex inside a dsRNA virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Ding, Ke; Yu, Xuekui; Chang, Winston; Sun, Jingchen; Hong Zhou, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Viruses in the Reoviridae, like the triple-shelled human rotavirus and the single-shelled insect cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (CPV), all package a genome of segmented double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) inside the viral capsid and carry out endogenous messenger RNA synthesis through a transcriptional enzyme complex (TEC). By direct electron-counting cryoelectron microscopy and asymmetric reconstruction, we have determined the organization of the dsRNA genome inside quiescent CPV (q-CPV) and the in situ atomic structures of TEC within CPV in both quiescent and transcribing (t-CPV) states. We show that the ten segmented dsRNAs in CPV are organized with ten TECs in a specific, non-symmetric manner, with each dsRNA segment attached directly to a TEC. The TEC consists of two extensively interacting subunits: an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) and an NTPase VP4. We find that the bracelet domain of RdRP undergoes marked conformational change when q-CPV is converted to t-CPV, leading to formation of the RNA template entry channel and access to the polymerase active site. An amino-terminal helix from each of two subunits of the capsid shell protein (CSP) interacts with VP4 and RdRP. These findings establish the link between sensing of environmental cues by the external proteins and activation of endogenous RNA transcription by the TEC inside the virus.

  3. Influenza A virus preferentially snatches noncoding RNA caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Weifeng; Gallagher, Glen R; Dai, Weiwei; Liu, Ping; Li, Ruidong; Trombly, Melanie I; Gammon, Don B; Mello, Craig C; Wang, Jennifer P; Finberg, Robert W

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) lacks the enzyme for adding 5' caps to its RNAs and snatches the 5' ends of host capped RNAs to prime transcription. Neither the preference of the host RNA sequences snatched nor the effect of cap-snatching on host processes is completely defined. Previous studies of influenza cap-snatching used poly(A)-selected RNAs from infected cells or relied on annotated host genes to define the snatched host RNAs, and thus lack details on many noncoding host RNAs including snRNAs, snoRNAs, and promoter-associated capped small (cs)RNAs, which are made by "paused" Pol II during transcription initiation. In this study, we used a nonbiased technique, CapSeq, to identify host and viral-capped RNAs including nonpolyadenylated RNAs in the same samples, and investigated the substrate-product correlation between the host RNAs and the viral RNAs. We demonstrated that noncoding host RNAs, particularly U1 and U2, are the preferred cap-snatching source over mRNAs or pre-mRNAs. We also found that csRNAs are highly snatched by IAV. Because the functions of csRNAs remain mostly unknown, especially in somatic cells, our finding reveals that csRNAs at least play roles in the process of IAV infection. Our findings support a model where nascent RNAs including csRNAs are the preferred targets for cap-snatching by IAV and raise questions about how IAV might use snatching preferences to modulate host-mRNA splicing and transcription.

  4. The miRNA Plasma Signature in Response to Acute Aerobic Exercise and Endurance Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren; Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Rinnov, Anders

    2014-01-01

    the miRNA signature in human plasma in response to acute exercise and chronic endurance training by utilizing a novel methodological approach. RNA was isolated from human plasma collected from young healthy men before and after an acute endurance exercise bout and following 12 weeks of endurance training...

  5. HTLV-1 viral RNA is detected rarely in plasma of HTLV-1 infected subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demontis, Maria Antonietta; Sadiq, Maaz Tahir; Golz, Simon; Taylor, Graham P

    2015-12-01

    Plasma of patients infected with HTLV-1 is considered non-infectious but detection of HTLV-1 genomic RNA in plasma has been recently reported. The aim of this project was to detect and quantify HTLV-1 RNA in plasma and assess its potential value in diagnosis and prognosis. RNA from 1 ml of plasma from 65 subjects infected with HTLV-1 (27 asymptomatic carriers [AC]), 17 patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (HAM/TSP), 14 with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), two co-infected with HIV, and five with other HTLV-1-associated disease, was extracted and reverse transcribed. HTLV-1 specific nested PCR was performed using primers to amplify the conserved Tax region. All samples were run in quadruplicate, nested PCR products were detected by gel electrophoresis. HTLV-1 RNA was detected in plasma from 18 (28%) patients, always at a very low copy number (3-13 copies viral cDNA per milliliter of plasma). Mean values of HTLV-1 proviral load did not differ between patients in whom HTLV-1 RNA was detected and patients in whom it was not possible to detect HTLV-1 RNA in plasma. HTLV-1 genomic RNA can be detected in the plasma of a minority of patients but not at a level or frequency to be useful clinically or diagnostically. Lack of transmission of HTLV-1 by plasma is due to the rare presence of HTLV-1 virions, regardless of any other factor.

  6. MRPrimerV: a database of PCR primers for RNA virus detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyerin; Kang, NaNa; An, KyuHyeon; Kim, Doyun; Koo, JaeHyung; Kim, Min-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Many infectious diseases are caused by viral infections, and in particular by RNA viruses such as MERS, Ebola and Zika. To understand viral disease, detection and identification of these viruses are essential. Although PCR is widely used for rapid virus identification due to its low cost and high sensitivity and specificity, very few online database resources have compiled PCR primers for RNA viruses. To effectively detect viruses, the MRPrimerV database (http://MRPrimerV.com) contains 152 380 247 PCR primer pairs for detection of 1818 viruses, covering 7144 coding sequences (CDSs), representing 100% of the RNA viruses in the most up-to-date NCBI RefSeq database. Due to rigorous similarity testing against all human and viral sequences, every primer in MRPrimerV is highly target-specific. Because MRPrimerV ranks CDSs by the penalty scores of their best primer, users need only use the first primer pair for a single-phase PCR or the first two primer pairs for two-phase PCR. Moreover, MRPrimerV provides the list of genome neighbors that can be detected using each primer pair, covering 22 192 variants of 532 RefSeq RNA viruses. We believe that the public availability of MRPrimerV will facilitate viral metagenomics studies aimed at evaluating the variability of viruses, as well as other scientific tasks. PMID:27899620

  7. A novel virus genome discovered in an extreme environment suggests recombination between unrelated groups of RNA and DNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diemer Geoffrey S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses are known to be the most abundant organisms on earth, yet little is known about their collective origin and evolutionary history. With exceptionally high rates of genetic mutation and mosaicism, it is not currently possible to resolve deep evolutionary histories of the known major virus groups. Metagenomics offers a potential means of establishing a more comprehensive view of viral evolution as vast amounts of new sequence data becomes available for comparative analysis. Results Bioinformatic analysis of viral metagenomic sequences derived from a hot, acidic lake revealed a circular, putatively single-stranded DNA virus encoding a major capsid protein similar to those found only in single-stranded RNA viruses. The presence and circular configuration of the complete virus genome was confirmed by inverse PCR amplification from native DNA extracted from lake sediment. The virus genome appears to be the result of a RNA-DNA recombination event between two ostensibly unrelated virus groups. Environmental sequence databases were examined for homologous genes arranged in similar configurations and three similar putative virus genomes from marine environments were identified. This result indicates the existence of a widespread but previously undetected group of viruses. Conclusions This unique viral genome carries implications for theories of virus emergence and evolution, as no mechanism for interviral RNA-DNA recombination has yet been identified, and only scant evidence exists that genetic exchange occurs between such distinct virus lineages. Reviewers This article was reviewed by EK, MK (nominated by PF and AM. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  8. The influence of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 on potato virus Y infection and on other antiviral response genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshandehroo, Farshad; Takeshita, Minoru; Squires, Julie; Palukaitis, Peter

    2009-10-01

    The gene encoding RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 (RDR1) is involved in basal resistance to several viruses. Expression of the RDR1 gene also is induced in resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) mediated by the N gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun NN) in an incompatible hypersensitive response, as well as in a compatible response against Potato virus Y (PVY). Reducing the accumulation of NtRDR1 transcripts by RNA inhibition mediated by transgenic expression of a double-stranded RNA hairpin corresponding to part of the RDR1 gene resulted in little or no induction of accumulation of RDR1 transcripts after infection by PVY. Plants with lower accumulation of RDR1 transcripts showed much higher accumulation levels of PVY. Reduced accumulation of NtRDR1 transcripts also resulted in lower or no induced expression of three other antiviral, defense-related genes after infection by PVY. These genes encoded a mitochondrial alternative oxidase, an inhibitor of virus replication (IVR), and a transcription factor, ERF5, all involved in resistance to infection by TMV, as well as RDR6, involved in RNA silencing. The extent of the effect on the induced NtIVR and NtERF5 genes correlated with the extent of suppression of the NtRDR1 gene.

  9. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Amr [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Present address: Genomics Facility, Agricultural Genetic Engineering Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619 (Egypt); Hutchens, Heather M. [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Howard Berg, R. [Integrated Microscopy Facility, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, Saint Louis, MO 63132 (United States); Sue Loesch-Fries, L., E-mail: loeschfr@purdue.edu [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2012-11-25

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast.

  10. Rapid mapping of functional cis-acting RNA elements by recovery of virus from a degenerate RNA population: application to genome segment 10 of bluetongue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, M; McCrae, M A

    2015-10-01

    The regulatory elements which control the processes of virus replication and gene expression in the Orbivirus genus are uncharacterized in terms of both their locations within genome segments and their specific functions. The reverse genetics system for the type species, Bluetongue virus, has been used in combination with RNA secondary structure prediction to identify and map the positions of cis-acting regions within genome segment 10. Through the simultaneous introduction of variability at multiple nucleotide positions in the rescue RNA population, the functional contribution of these positions was used to map regions containing cis-acting elements essential for virus viability. Nucleotides that were individually lethal when varied mapped within a region of predicted secondary structure involving base pairing between the 5' and 3' ends of the transcript. An extended region of predicted perfect base pairing located within the 3' untranslated region of the genome segment was also found to be required for virus viability. In contrast to the identification of individually lethal mutations, gross alteration of the composition of this predicted stem region was possible, providing the base-pairing potential between the two strands was maintained, identifying a structural feature predicted to be conserved throughout the Orbivirus genus. The approach of identifying cis-acting sequences through sequencing the recovered virus following the rescue of a degenerate RNA population is broadly applicable to viruses where reverse genetics is available.

  11. Platelets confound the measurement of extracellular miRNA in archived plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Adam J.; Gray, Warren D; Hayek, Salim S.; Yi-An Ko; Sheena Thomas; Kim Rooney; Mosaab Awad; John D. Roback; Arshed Quyyumi; Searles, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular miRNAs are detectable in biofluids and represent a novel class of disease biomarker. Although many studies have utilized archived plasma for miRNA biomarker discovery, the effects of processing and storage have not been rigorously studied. Previous reports have suggested plasma samples are commonly contaminated by platelets, significantly confounding the measurement of extracellular miRNA, which was thought to be easily addressed by additional post-thaw plasma processing. In a c...

  12. Efficient Hepatitis Delta Virus RNA Replication in Avian Cells Requires a Permissive Factor(s) from Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Brazas, Rob; Ganem, Don

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a highly pathogenic human RNA virus whose genome is structurally related to those of plant viroids. Although its spread from cell to cell requires helper functions supplied by hepatitis B virus (HBV), intracellular HDV RNA replication can proceed in the absence of HBV proteins. As HDV encodes no RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the identity of the (presumably cellular) enzyme responsible for this reaction remains unknown. Here we show that, in contrast to mammalian...

  13. Use of convalescent plasma in Ebola virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraud, Olivier

    2017-02-01

    The recent Ebola virus epidemics which threatened three West African countries (Dec.2014-Apr.2016) has urged global collaborative health organizations and countries to set up measures to stop the infection and to treat patients, near half of them being at risk of death. Convalescent plasma-recovered from rescued West Africans-was considered a feasible therapeutic option. Efficacy was difficult to evaluate because of numerous unknowns (especially evolution of neutralizing antibodies), prior to the cessation of active transmission. This raises a large body of questions spanning epidemiological, virological, immunological but also ethical, sociological and anthropological aspects, alongside with public health concerns, in order to be better prepared to the next outbreak. This essay summarizes efforts made by a large number of groups worldwide, and attempts to address still unanswered questions on the benefit of specific versus non-specific plasma on altered-leaking-vascular endothelia in Ebola infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cell-free plasma microRNA in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and disease controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Anting Liu; Joergensen, Maiken Thyregod; Knudsen, Steen;

    2013-01-01

    There are no tumor-specific biochemical markers for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Tissue-specific gene expression including microRNA (miRNA) profiling, however, identifies specific PDAC signatures. This study evaluates associations between circulating, cell-free plasma-miRNA profiles...

  15. Looking for inhibitors of the dengue virus NS5 RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase using a molecular docking approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiano, Vicente; Garcia-Valtanen, Pablo; Micol, Vicente; Encinar, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) contains both an N-terminal methyltransferase domain and a C-terminal RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domain. Polymerase activity is responsible for viral RNA synthesis by a de novo initiation mechanism and represents an attractive target for antiviral therapy. The incidence of DENV has grown rapidly and it is now estimated that half of the human population is at risk of becoming infected with this virus. Despite this, there are no effective drugs to treat DENV infections. The present in silico study aimed at finding new inhibitors of the NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of the four serotypes of DENV. We used a chemical library comprising 372,792 nonnucleotide compounds (around 325,319 natural compounds) to perform molecular docking experiments against a binding site of the RNA template tunnel of the virus polymerase. Compounds with high negative free energy variation (ΔG <−10.5 kcal/mol) were selected as putative inhibitors. Additional filters for favorable druggability and good absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity were applied. Finally, after the screening process was completed, we identified 39 compounds as lead DENV polymerase inhibitor candidates. Potentially, these compounds could act as efficient DENV polymerase inhibitors in vitro and in vivo.

  16. P19 of Tomato Bushy Stunt Virus Suppresses RNA Silencing Induced by Short Hairpin RNA in Mammal Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-xian CHEN; Juan CHEN; Zhen-zhen ZHANG; Ai-long HUANG

    2007-01-01

    To counteract the immune system in parasitic hosts, some viruses encode proteins to suppress the RNA interference (RNAi) effect. In this report, we established two RNAi systems to be easily observed with strong and obvious effect. The function of the P19 of tomato bushy stunt virus, which suppresses RNAi in mammal cells, was then studied using these two systems. Short hairpin RNAs targeting green fluorescence protein (pshRNA-GFP) and firefly luciferase (pshRNA-luc) were designed and inserted into a eukaryotic transcriptional vector pTZU6+1, respectively. The shRNA expressing vectors were co-transfected with plasmids containing the target gene with or without P19. The GFP expression level was assayed by fluorescence microscopy, Western blotting and RT-PCR. The luciferase expression level was analyzed by the dual-luciferase assay system. pshRNA designed in this study down-regulated the target gene specifically and efficiently, with a decrease of expression of both genes of about 70%, respectively. When P19 was introduced into the RNAi systems, the expression of both GFP and the luciferase were mostly recovered compared with the control groups. The RNAi systems of GFP and luciferase were constructed successfully, demonstrating that P19 of tomato bushy stunt virus has the ability to counteract the RNAi effect induced by shRNA in mammal cells.

  17. Construction Strategy and Affecting Factors of Positive-Strand RNA Virus Infectious Clone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Shichuan; YUE Kuizhong

    2008-01-01

    Construction of infectious clones by full-length eDNA is basic and key for recovering RNA virus and is core of reverse genetics. In this article, basic consideration and key technology were viewed and factors affecting infectivity of clones were also summarized. Some research advances were briefly introduced about positive-strand RNA viruses infectious clones. Finally, this article also reviewed the application of infectious clones.

  18. Characterization of murine hepatitis virus (JHM) RNA from rats with experimental encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D P; Percy, D H; Morris, V L

    1984-09-01

    When Wistar Furth rats are inoculated intracerebrally with the murine hepatitis virus JHM they often develop a demyelinating disease with resulting hind leg paralysis. Using an RNA transfer procedure and hybridization kinetic analysis, the virus-specific RNA in these rats was characterized. The pattern of JHM-specific RNA varied with individual infections of Wistar Furth rats. However, two species of JHM-specific RNA, the nucleocapsid and a 2.1-2.4 X 10(6)-Da RNA species were generally present. A general decrease in JHM-specific RNA in brains and spinal cord samples taken later than 20 days postinoculation was observed; however, JHM-specific RNA persisted in the spinal cord longer than in the brain of these rats.

  19. Ins and Outs of Multipartite Positive-Strand RNA Plant Viruses: Packaging versus Systemic Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall’Ara, Mattia; Ratti, Claudio; Bouzoubaa, Salah E.; Gilmer, David

    2016-01-01

    Viruses possessing a non-segmented genome require a specific recognition of their nucleic acid to ensure its protection in a capsid. A similar feature exists for viruses having a segmented genome, usually consisting of viral genomic segments joined together into one viral entity. While this appears as a rule for animal viruses, the majority of segmented plant viruses package their genomic segments individually. To ensure a productive infection, all viral particles and thereby all segments have to be present in the same cell. Progression of the virus within the plant requires as well a concerted genome preservation to avoid loss of function. In this review, we will discuss the “life aspects” of chosen phytoviruses and argue for the existence of RNA-RNA interactions that drive the preservation of viral genome integrity while the virus progresses in the plant. PMID:27548199

  20. Ins and Outs of Multipartite Positive-Strand RNA Plant Viruses: Packaging versus Systemic Spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Ara, Mattia; Ratti, Claudio; Bouzoubaa, Salah E; Gilmer, David

    2016-08-18

    Viruses possessing a non-segmented genome require a specific recognition of their nucleic acid to ensure its protection in a capsid. A similar feature exists for viruses having a segmented genome, usually consisting of viral genomic segments joined together into one viral entity. While this appears as a rule for animal viruses, the majority of segmented plant viruses package their genomic segments individually. To ensure a productive infection, all viral particles and thereby all segments have to be present in the same cell. Progression of the virus within the plant requires as well a concerted genome preservation to avoid loss of function. In this review, we will discuss the "life aspects" of chosen phytoviruses and argue for the existence of RNA-RNA interactions that drive the preservation of viral genome integrity while the virus progresses in the plant.

  1. A Novel Mechanism Underlying the Innate Immune Response Induction upon Viral-Dependent Replication of Host Cell mRNA: A Mistake of +sRNA Viruses' Replicases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgui, Laura R.; Colombo, María I.

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are lifeless particles designed for setting virus-host interactome assuring a new generation of virions for dissemination. This interactome generates a pressure on host organisms evolving mechanisms to neutralize viral infection, which places the pressure back onto virus, a process known as virus-host cell co-evolution. Positive-single stranded RNA (+sRNA) viruses are an important group of viral agents illustrating this interesting phenomenon. During replication, their genomic +sRNA is employed as template for translation of viral proteins; among them the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is responsible of viral genome replication originating double-strand RNA molecules (dsRNA) as intermediates, which accumulate representing a potent threat for cellular dsRNA receptors to initiate an antiviral response. A common feature shared by these viruses is their ability to rearrange cellular membranes to serve as platforms for genome replication and assembly of new virions, supporting replication efficiency increase by concentrating critical factors and protecting the viral genome from host anti-viral systems. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding cellular dsRNA receptors and describes prototype viruses developing replication niches inside rearranged membranes. However, for several viral agents it's been observed both, a complex rearrangement of cellular membranes and a strong innate immune antiviral response induction. So, we have included recent data explaining the mechanism by, even though viruses have evolved elegant hideouts, host cells are still able to develop dsRNA receptors-dependent antiviral response. PMID:28164038

  2. Development of a simplified RT-PCR without RNA isolation for rapid detection of RNA viruses in a single small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiufang; Liu, Haoqiu; Yuan, Pingping; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Qingqing; Jiang, Xuanli; Zhou, Yijun

    2017-05-03

    The small brown planthopper (SBPH) is an important pest of cereal crops and acts as a transmission vector for multiple RNA viruses. Rapid diagnosis of virus in the vector is crucial for efficient forecast and control of viral disease. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for virus detection. The traditional RT-PCR contains a RNA isolation step and is widely used for virus detection in insect. However, using the traditional RT-PCR for detecting RNA virus in individual SBPHs becomes challenging because of the expensive reagents and laborious procedure associated with RNA isolation when processing a large number of samples. We established a simplified RT-PCR method without RNA isolation for RNA virus detection in a single SBPH. This method is achieved by grinding a single SBPH in sterile water and using the crude extract directly as the template for RT-PCR. The crude extract containing the virus RNA can be prepared in approximately two minutes. Rice stripe virus (RSV), rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) and Himetobi P virus (HiPV) were successfully detected using this simplified method. The detection results were validated by sequencing and dot immunobinding assay, indicating that this simplified method is reliable for detecting different viruses in insects. The evaluation of the sensitivity of this method showed that both RSV and HiPV can be detected when the cDNA from the crude extract was diluted up to 10(3) fold. Compared to the traditional RT-PCR with RNA isolation, the simplified RT-PCR method greatly reduces the sample processing time, decreases the detection cost, and improves the efficiency by avoiding RNA isolation. A simplified RT-PCR method is developed for rapid detection of RNA virus in a single SBPH without the laborious RNA isolation step. It offers a convenient alternative to the traditional RT-PCR method.

  3. Viral hemorrhagic fevers of animals caused by positive-stranded RNA viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we outline serious diseases of wildlife, food and fiber animals, and non-human primates that cause damaging economic effects on producers all over the world. While some zoonotic viruses that occasionally cause serious disease and death in humans are mentioned, the positive sense RNA viruses ge...

  4. Foot-and-mouth disease virus-induced RNA polymerase is associated with Golgi apparatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Polatnick, J; Wool, S H

    1985-01-01

    Electrophoretic analysis of the Golgi apparatus isolated by differential centrifugation from radiolabeled cells infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus showed about 10 protein bands. The virus-induced RNA polymerase was identified by immunoprecipitation and electron microscope staining procedures. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that the polymerase passed through the Golgi apparatus in less than 1 h.

  5. Emaravirus: A Novel Genus of Multipartite, Negative Strand RNA Plant Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter Mühlbach

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ringspot symptoms in European mountain ash (Sorbus aucuparia L., fig mosaic, rose rosette, raspberry leaf blotch, pigeonpea sterility mosaic (Cajanus cajan and High Plains disease of maize and wheat were found to be associated with viruses that share several characteristics. They all have single-stranded multipartite RNA genomes of negative orientation. In some cases, double membrane-bound virus-like particles of 80 to 200 nm in diameter were found in infected tissue. Furthermore, at least five of these viruses were shown to be vectored by eriophyid mites. Sequences of European mountain ash ringspot-associated virus (EMARaV, Fig mosaic virus (FMV, rose rosette virus (RRV, raspberry leaf blotch virus (RLBV, pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus and High Plains virus strongly support their potential phylogenetic relationship. Therefore, after characterization of EMARaV, the novel genus Emaravirus was established, and FMV was the second virus species assigned to this genus. The recently sequenced RRV and RLBV are supposed to be additional members of this new group of plant RNA viruses.

  6. HumanViCe: Host ceRNA network in virus infected cells in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman eGhosal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Host-virus interaction via host cellular components has been an important field of research in recent times. RNA interference mediated by short interfering RNAs and microRNAs (miRNA, is a widespread anti-viral defence strategy. Importantly, viruses also encode their own miRNAs. In recent times miRNAs were identified as key players in host-virus interaction. Furthermore, viruses were shown to exploit the host miRNA networks to suite their own need. The complex cross-talk between host and viral miRNAs and their cellular and viral targets forms the environment for viral pathogenesis. Apart from protein-coding mRNAs, non-coding RNAs may also be targeted by host or viral miRNAs in virus infected cells, and viruses can exploit the host miRNA mediated gene regulatory network via the competing endogenous RNA effect. A recent report showed that viral U-rich non-coding RNAs called HSUR, expressed in primate virus herpesvirus saimiri (HVS infected T cells, were able to bind to three host miRNAs, causing significant alteration in cellular level for one of the miRNAs. We have predicted protein coding and non protein-coding targets for viral and human miRNAs in virus infected cells. We identified viral miRNA targets within host non-coding RNA loci from AGO interacting regions in three different virus infected cells. Gene ontology (GO and pathway enrichment analysis of the genes comprising the ceRNA networks in the virus infected cells revealed enrichment of key cellular signalling pathways related to cell fate decisions and gene transcription, like Notch and Wnt signalling pathways, as well as pathways related to viral entry, replication and virulence. We identified a vast number of non-coding transcripts playing as potential ceRNAs to the immune response associated genes; e.g. APOBEC family genes, in some virus infected cells. All these information are compiled in HumanViCe, a comprehensive database that provides the potential ceRNA networks in virus

  7. Identification of novel RNA viruses in alfalfa (Medicago sativa): an Alphapartitivirus, a Deltapartitivirus and a Marafivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyein; Park, Dongbin; Hahn, Yoonsoo

    2017-09-30

    Genomic RNA molecules of plant RNA viruses are often co-isolated with the host RNAs, and their sequences can be detected in plant transcriptome datasets. Here, an alfalfa (Medicago sativa) transcriptome dataset was analyzed and three new RNA viruses were identified, which were named Medicago sativa alphapartitivirus 1 (MsAPV1), Medicago sativa deltapartitivirus 1 (MsDPV1), and Medicago sativa marafivirus 1 (MsMV1). The RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of MsAPV1, MsDPV1, and MsMV1 showed about 68%, 58%, and 46% amino acid sequence identity, respectively, with their closest virus species. Sequence similarity and phylogenetic analyses indicated that MsAPV1, MsDPV1, and MsMV1 were novel RNA virus species that belong to the genus Alphapartitivirus of the family Partitiviridae, the genus Deltapartitivirus of the family Partitiviridae, and the genus Marafivirus of the family Tymoviridae, respectively. The bioinformatics procedure applied in this study may facilitate the identification of novel RNA viruses from plant transcriptome data. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Expression of RNA virus proteins by RNA polymerase II dependent expression plasmids is hindered at multiple steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Überla Klaus

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins of human and animal viruses are frequently expressed from RNA polymerase II dependent expression cassettes to study protein function and to develop gene-based vaccines. Initial attempts to express the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV by eukaryotic promoters revealed restrictions at several steps of gene expression. Results Insertion of an intron flanked by exonic sequences 5'-terminal to the open reading frames (ORF of VSV-G and RSV-F led to detectable cytoplasmic mRNA levels of both genes. While the exonic sequences were sufficient to stabilise the VSV-G mRNA, cytoplasmic mRNA levels of RSV-F were dependent on the presence of a functional intron. Cytoplasmic VSV-G mRNA levels led to readily detectable levels of VSV-G protein, whereas RSV-F protein expression remained undetectable. However, RSV-F expression was observed after mutating two of four consensus sites for polyadenylation present in the RSV-F ORF. Expression levels could be further enhanced by codon optimisation. Conclusion Insufficient cytoplasmic mRNA levels and premature polyadenylation prevent expression of RSV-F by RNA polymerase II dependent expression plasmids. Since RSV replicates in the cytoplasm, the presence of premature polyadenylation sites and elements leading to nuclear instability should not interfere with RSV-F expression during virus replication. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the destabilisation of the RSV-F and VSV-G mRNAs and the different requirements for their rescue by insertion of an intron remain to be defined.

  9. Maternal Plasma DNA and RNA Sequencing for Prenatal Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminga, Saskia; van Maarle, Merel; Henneman, Lidewij; Oudejans, Cees B M; Cornel, Martina C; Sistermans, Erik A

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing has recently become indispensable in diagnostic testing and screening. In the prenatal setting, this type of testing is often called noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT). With a number of techniques, using either next-generation sequencing or single nucleotide polymorphism-based approaches, fetal cfDNA in maternal plasma can be analyzed to screen for rhesus D genotype, common chromosomal aneuploidies, and increasingly for testing other conditions, including monogenic disorders. With regard to screening for common aneuploidies, challenges arise when implementing NIPT in current prenatal settings. Depending on the method used (targeted or nontargeted), chromosomal anomalies other than trisomy 21, 18, or 13 can be detected, either of fetal or maternal origin, also referred to as unsolicited or incidental findings. For various biological reasons, there is a small chance of having either a false-positive or false-negative NIPT result, or no result, also referred to as a "no-call." Both pre- and posttest counseling for NIPT should include discussing potential discrepancies. Since NIPT remains a screening test, a positive NIPT result should be confirmed by invasive diagnostic testing (either by chorionic villus biopsy or by amniocentesis). As the scope of NIPT is widening, professional guidelines need to discuss the ethics of what to offer and how to offer. In this review, we discuss the current biochemical, clinical, and ethical challenges of cfDNA testing in the prenatal setting and its future perspectives including novel applications that target RNA instead of DNA.

  10. Viral suppressors of RNA interference impair RNA silencing induced by a Semliki Forest virus replicon in tick cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, S.; Billecocq, A.; Crance, J.M.; Prins, M.W.; Garin, D.; Bouloy, M.

    2006-01-01

    It was recently shown that infection of ISE6 tick cells by a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) expressing a heterologous gene induced small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and silencing of the gene. To gain information on RNA interference (RNAi) in ticks, three known viral inhibitors that act in diff

  11. Viral suppressors of RNA interference impair RNA silencing induced by a Semliki Forest virus replicon in tick cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, S.; Billecocq, A.; Crance, J.M.; Prins, M.W.; Garin, D.; Bouloy, M.

    2006-01-01

    It was recently shown that infection of ISE6 tick cells by a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) expressing a heterologous gene induced small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and silencing of the gene. To gain information on RNA interference (RNAi) in ticks, three known viral inhibitors that act in diff

  12. Hepatitis E virus and the safety of plasma products: investigations into the reduction capacity of manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farcet, Maria R; Lackner, Cornelia; Antoine, Gerhard; Rabel, Philip O; Wieser, Andreas; Flicker, Andreas; Unger, Ulrike; Modrof, Jens; Kreil, Thomas R

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) has been transmitted by transfusion of labile blood products and the occasional detection of HEV RNA in plasma pools indicates that HEV viremic donations might enter the manufacturing process of plasma products. To verify the safety margins of plasma products with respect to HEV, virus reduction steps commonly used in their manufacturing processes were investigated for their effectiveness to reduce HEV. Detection methods for HEV removal (by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction) and inactivation (using an infectivity assay) were established. Immunoaffinity chromatography and 20-nm virus filtration for Factor (F)VIII, cold ethanol fractionation, and low-pH treatment for immunoglobulin, heat treatment for human albumin, and 35-nm nanofiltration for FVIII inhibitor-bypassing activity (FEIBA) were investigated for their capacity to reduce HEV or the physicochemically similar viruses feline calicivirus (FCV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV). For FVIII, HEV reduction of 3.9 and more than 3.9 log was demonstrated for immunoaffinity chromatography and 20-nm nanofiltration, respectively, and the cold ethanol fractionation for immunoglobulin removed more than 3.5 log of HEV, to below the limit of detection (LOD). Heat treatment of human albumin inactivated more than 3.1 log of HEV to below the LOD and 35-nm nanofiltration removed 4.0 log of HEV from the FEIBA intermediate. The results indicated HAV rather than FCV as the more relevant model virus for HEV. Substantial HEV reduction during processes commonly used in the manufacturing of plasma products was demonstrated, similar to that previously demonstrated for HAV. © 2015 AABB.

  13. Definition of the minimal viral components required for the initiation of unprimed RNA synthesis by influenza virus RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M T Michael; Bishop, Konrad; Medcalf, Liz; Elton, Debra; Digard, Paul; Tiley, Laurence

    2002-01-15

    The first 11 nt at the 5' end of influenza virus genomic RNA were shown to be both necessary and sufficient for specific binding by the influenza virus polymerase. A novel in vitro transcription assay, in which the polymerase was bound to paramagnetic beads via a biotinylated 5'-vRNA oligonucleotide, was used to study the activities of different forms of the polymerase. Complexes composed of co-expressed PB1/PB2/PA proteins and a sub-complex composed of PB1/PA bound to the 5'-vRNA oligonucleotide, whereas PB1 expressed alone did not. The enriched 5'-vRNA/PB1/PB2/PA complex was highly active for ApG and globin mRNA primed transcription on a model 3'-vRNA template. RNA synthesis in the absence of added primers produced products with 5'-terminal tri- or diphosphate groups, indicating that genuine unprimed initiation of transcription also occurred. No transcriptase activity was detected for the PB1/PA complex. These results demonstrate a role for PA in the enhancement of 5' end binding activity of PB1, a role for PB2 in the assembly of a polymerase complex able to perform both cap-dependent and -independent synthesis and that NP is not required for the initiation of replicative transcription.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Diaphorina citri-associated C virus, a Novel Putative RNA Virus of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Shahideh; Salem, Nidà; Falk, Bryce W

    2016-07-21

    We present here the complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of a novel putative RNA virus identified in field populations of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, through sequencing of the transcriptome followed by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). We tentatively named this virus Diaphorina citri-associated C virus (DcACV). DcACV is an unclassified positive-sense RNA virus.

  15. Computational identification of hepatitis C virus associated microRNA-mRNA regulatory modules in human livers

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    Aicher Lauri D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a major cause of chronic liver disease by infecting over 170 million people worldwide. Recent studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs, a class of small non-coding regulatory RNAs, are involved in the regulation of HCV infection, but their functions have not been systematically studied. We propose an integrative strategy for identifying the miRNA-mRNA regulatory modules that are associated with HCV infection. This strategy combines paired expression profiles of miRNAs and mRNAs and computational target predictions. A miRNA-mRNA regulatory module consists of a set of miRNAs and their targets, in which the miRNAs are predicted to coordinately regulate the level of the target mRNA. Results We simultaneously profiled the expression of cellular miRNAs and mRNAs across 30 HCV positive or negative human liver biopsy samples using microarray technology. We constructed a miRNA-mRNA regulatory network, and using a graph theoretical approach, identified 38 miRNA-mRNA regulatory modules in the network that were associated with HCV infection. We evaluated the direct miRNA regulation of the mRNA levels of targets in regulatory modules using previously published miRNA transfection data. We analyzed the functional roles of individual modules at the systems level by integrating a large-scale protein interaction network. We found that various biological processes, including some HCV infection related canonical pathways, were regulated at the miRNA level during HCV infection. Conclusion Our regulatory modules provide a framework for future experimental analyses. This report demonstrates the utility of our approach to obtain new insights into post-transcriptional gene regulation at the miRNA level in complex human diseases.

  16. Error baseline rates of five sample preparation methods used to characterize RNA virus populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugelman, Jeffrey R.; Wiley, Michael R.; Nagle, Elyse R.; Reyes, Daniel; Pfeffer, Brad P.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Palacios, Gustavo F.

    2017-01-01

    Individual RNA viruses typically occur as populations of genomes that differ slightly from each other due to mutations introduced by the error-prone viral polymerase. Understanding the variability of RNA virus genome populations is critical for understanding virus evolution because individual mutant genomes may gain evolutionary selective advantages and give rise to dominant subpopulations, possibly even leading to the emergence of viruses resistant to medical countermeasures. Reverse transcription of virus genome populations followed by next-generation sequencing is the only available method to characterize variation for RNA viruses. However, both steps may lead to the introduction of artificial mutations, thereby skewing the data. To better understand how such errors are introduced during sample preparation, we determined and compared error baseline rates of five different sample preparation methods by analyzing in vitro transcribed Ebola virus RNA from an artificial plasmid-based system. These methods included: shotgun sequencing from plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed RNA as a basic “no amplification” method, amplicon sequencing from the plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed RNA as a “targeted” amplification method, sequence-independent single-primer amplification (SISPA) as a “random” amplification method, rolling circle reverse transcription sequencing (CirSeq) as an advanced “no amplification” method, and Illumina TruSeq RNA Access as a “targeted” enrichment method. The measured error frequencies indicate that RNA Access offers the best tradeoff between sensitivity and sample preparation error (1.4−5) of all compared methods. PMID:28182717

  17. Construction and characterization of recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus carrying brainspecific miRNA target sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-yuan CAO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct the recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus ( JEV carrying brain-specific miRNA targeting sequences. Methods The target sequences of brain-specific miR-124 and miR-125 were introduced into the infectious cDNA clone of JEV to generate recombinant plasmids based on reverse genetics technology. The recombinant plasmids were linearized with Xho Ⅰ and served as templates of transcription with SP6 RNA polymerase to generate infectious viral RNA. The RNA transcripts were then transfected into BHK-21 cells, and the supernatant was obtained after incubated at 37℃, 5% CO2 for 3 days. The cytopathic changes of BHK-21 cells inoculated with the supernatant were observed after one passage. The rescued viruses carrying miRNA target sequences were validated by RT-PCR, standard plaque forming test on BHK-21 cells and growth curves analysis. Results Two recombinant viruses carrying miR-124 or miR-125 target sequence were rescued, respectively. The insertion of miRNA target sequences was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The rescued viruses yielded similar plaque morphology and replication efficiency compared with wild type JEV. Conclusion The recombinant JEV containing brain-specific miRNA target sequences can be obtained by reverse genetics technique, which could be used in further studies of miRNA-mediated tissue-specific attenuation mechanism of JEV. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.06.01

  18. Synthesis of double-stranded RNA in a virus-enriched fraction from Agaricus bisporus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sriskantha, A.; Wach, P.; Schlagnhaufer, B.; Romaine, C.P.

    1986-03-01

    Partially purified virus preparations from sporophores of Agaricus bisporus affected with LaFrance disease had up to a 15-fold-higher RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity than did comparable preparations from health sporophores. Enzyme activity was dependent upon the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ and the four nucleoside triphosphates and was insensitive to actinomycin D, ..cap alpha..-amanitin, and rifampin. The /sup 3/H-labeled enzyme reaction products were double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as indicated by CF-11 cellulose column chromatography and by their ionic-strength-dependent sensitivity to hydrolysis by RNase A. The principal dsRNA products had estimated molecular weights of 4.3 /times/ 10/sup 6/ and 1.4 /times/ 10/sup 6/. Cs/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ equilibrium centrifugation of the virus preparation resolved a single peak of RNA polymerase activity that banded with a 35-nm spherical virus particle containing dsRNAs with molecular weights of 4.3 /times/ 10/sup 6/ and 1.4 /times/ 10/sup 6/. The data suggest that the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase associated with the 35-nm spherical virus is a replicase which catalyzes the synthesis of the genomic dsRNAs.

  19. Therapeutic silencing of microRNA-122 in primates with chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanford, Robert E; Hildebrandt-Eriksen, Elisabeth S; Petri, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The liver-expressed microRNA-122 (miR-122) is essential for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA accumulation in cultured liver cells, but its potential as a target for antiviral intervention has not been assessed. We found that treatment of chronically infected chimpanzees with a locked nucleic acid (LNA...

  20. Cytoskeletal Requirements for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) RNA Synthesis in the HCV Replicon Cell Culture System

    OpenAIRE

    Bost, Anne G.; Venable, Daryl; Liu, Lifei; Heinz, Beverly A.

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces microtubule aggregates in infected hepatocytes. To determine if cytoskeletal elements are important for HCV RNA synthesis, we examined the effect of cytoskeleton inhibitors on HCV replicon transcription in Huh7 cells. The data demonstrate that HCV replication complex-mediated RNA synthesis requires microtubule and actin polymerization.

  1. Cytoskeletal requirements for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA synthesis in the HCV replicon cell culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, Anne G; Venable, Daryl; Liu, Lifei; Heinz, Beverly A

    2003-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces microtubule aggregates in infected hepatocytes. To determine if cytoskeletal elements are important for HCV RNA synthesis, we examined the effect of cytoskeleton inhibitors on HCV replicon transcription in Huh7 cells. The data demonstrate that HCV replication complex-mediated RNA synthesis requires microtubule and actin polymerization.

  2. A one step real time PCR method for the quantification of hepatitis delta virus RNA using an external armored RNA standard and intrinsic internal control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataylı, Ersin; Altunoğlu, Yasemin Çelik; Karataylı, Senem Ceren; Alagöz, S Gökçe K; Cınar, Kubilay; Yalçın, Kendal; Idilman, Ramazan; Yurdaydın, Cihan; Bozdayı, A Mithat

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA viral load measurement is critical in diagnosis and monitoring the response to antiviral treatment. Our aim is to design a real time PCR method for accurate quantitation of HDV RNA in clinical specimens using an armored RNA as external standard, and an intrinsic internal control. A plasmid bearing delta antigen region of genotype I HDV genome was used to develop an armored RNA. Serial dilutions of the armored HDV RNA standard with 10(12)copy/mL were used as standards for quantitation. A primer-probe set derived from HDAg region was used in one step EZ RT PCR kit chemistry which uses rTth enzyme allowing reverse transcription and polymerization in the same tube. The kit also uses the advantage of uracil-N-glycosylase (UNG) enzyme treatment to prevent PCR contamination. The established assay has a dynamic range of 10(2)-10(11)copy/mL with a PCR efficiency of 96.9%. Detection limit was 858±32copy/mL with 95% confidence interval. Intra- and inter-assay variabilities were low for high, medium and low levels of viremia. Incorporation of freely circulating GAPDH in serum into the assay as an intrinsic internal control prevented false negative results and failures in PCR amplifications due to inhibitors, inefficient extraction procedures or enzymatic reactions. In conclusion, this study defines a novel assay for sensitive and reliable quantification of HDV RNA using an armored HDV RNA as a standard and GAPDH in plasma or serum as an intrinsic internal control in a single tube. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The first phlebo-like virus infecting plants: a case study on the adaptation of negative-stranded RNA viruses to new hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Beatriz; Minutolo, Maria; De Stradis, Angelo; Palmisano, Francesco; Alioto, Daniela; Di Serio, Francesco

    2017-07-28

    A novel negative-stranded (ns) RNA virus associated with a severe citrus disease reported more than 80 years ago has been identified. Transmission electron microscopy showed that this novel virus, tentatively named citrus concave gum-associated virus, is flexuous and non-enveloped. Notwithstanding, its two genomic RNAs share structural features with members of the genus Phlebovirus, which are enveloped arthropod-transmitted viruses infecting mammals, and with a group of still unclassified phlebo-like viruses mainly infecting arthropods. CCGaV genomic RNAs code for an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, a nucleocapsid protein and a putative movement protein showing structural and phylogenetic relationships with phlebo-like viruses, phleboviruses and the unrelated ophioviruses, respectively, thus providing intriguing evidence of a modular genome evolution. Phylogenetic reconstructions identified an invertebrate-restricted virus as the most likely ancestor of this virus, revealing that its adaptation to plants was independent from and possibly predated that of the other nsRNA plant viruses. These data are consistent with an evolutionary scenario in which trans-kingdom adaptation occurred several times during the history of nsRNA viruses and followed different evolutionary pathways, in which genomic RNA segments were gained or lost. The need to create a new genus for this bipartite nsRNA virus and the impact of the rapid and specific detection methods developed here on citrus sanitation and certification are also discussed. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  4. Intersection of the multivesicular body pathway and lipid homeostasis in RNA replication by a positive-strand RNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Diaz, Arturo; Hao, Linhui; Gancarz, Brandi; den Boon, Johan A; Ahlquist, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Like many positive-strand RNA viruses, brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA replication occurs in membrane-invaginated vesicular compartments. BMV RNA replication compartments show parallels with membrane-enveloped, budding retrovirus virions, whose release depends on the cellular multivesicular body (MVB) sorting pathway. BMV RNA replication compartments are not released from their parent membranes, but might depend on MVB functions for membrane invagination. Prior results show that BMV RNA replication is severely inhibited by deletion of the crucial MVB gene DOA4 or BRO1. We report here that involvement of DOA4 and BRO1 in BMV RNA replication is not dependent on the MVB pathway's membrane-shaping functions but rather is due to their roles in recycling ubiquitin from MVB cargos. We show that deleting DOA4 or BRO1 inhibits the ubiquitination- and proteasome-dependent activation of homologous transcription factors Mga2p and Spt23p, which regulate many lipid metabolism genes, including the fatty acid desaturase gene OLE1, which is essential for BMV RNA replication. However, Mga2p processing and BMV RNA replication are restored by supplementing free ubiquitin, which is depleted in doa4Δ and bro1Δ cells. The results identify Mga2p and Spt23p processing and lipid regulation as sensitive targets of ubiquitin depletion and correctly predict multiple effects of modulating additional host genes RFU1, UBP6, and UFD3. Our results also show that BMV RNA replication depends on additional Mga2p-regulated genes likely involved in lipid metabolism beyond OLE1. Among other points, these findings show the potential for blocking viral RNA replication by modulating lipid synthesis at multiple levels.

  5. Differential sensitivity of bat cells to infection by enveloped RNA viruses: coronaviruses, paramyxoviruses, filoviruses, and influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Bats (Chiroptera host major human pathogenic viruses including corona-, paramyxo, rhabdo- and filoviruses. We analyzed six different cell lines from either Yinpterochiroptera (including African flying foxes and a rhinolophid bat or Yangochiroptera (genera Carollia and Tadarida for susceptibility to infection by different enveloped RNA viruses. None of the cells were sensitive to infection by transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV, a porcine coronavirus, or to infection mediated by the Spike (S protein of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV incorporated into pseudotypes based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. The resistance to infection was overcome if cells were transfected to express the respective cellular receptor, porcine aminopeptidase N for TGEV or angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 for SARS-CoV. VSV pseudotypes containing the S proteins of two bat SARS-related CoV (Bg08 and Rp3 were unable to infect any of the six tested bat cell lines. By contrast, viral pseudotypes containing the surface protein GP of Marburg virus from the family Filoviridae infected all six cell lines though at different efficiency. Notably, all cells were sensitive to infection by two paramyxoviruses (Sendai virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus and three influenza viruses from different subtypes. These results indicate that bat cells are more resistant to infection by coronaviruses than to infection by paramyxoviruses, filoviruses and influenza viruses. Furthermore, these results show a receptor-dependent restriction of the infection of bat cells by CoV. The implications for the isolation of coronaviruses from bats are discussed.

  6. The Ebola virus VP35 protein is a suppressor of RNA silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haasnoot, Joost; de Vries, Walter; Geutjes, Ernst-Jan; Prins, Marcel; de Haan, Peter; Berkhout, Ben

    2007-06-01

    RNA silencing or interference (RNAi) is a gene regulation mechanism in eukaryotes that controls cell differentiation and developmental processes via expression of microRNAs. RNAi also serves as an innate antiviral defence response in plants, nematodes, and insects. This antiviral response is triggered by virus-specific double-stranded RNA molecules (dsRNAs) that are produced during infection. To overcome antiviral RNAi responses, many plant and insect viruses encode RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs) that enable them to replicate at higher titers. Recently, several human viruses were shown to encode RSSs, suggesting that RNAi also serves as an innate defence response in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that the Ebola virus VP35 protein is a suppressor of RNAi in mammalian cells and that its RSS activity is functionally equivalent to that of the HIV-1 Tat protein. We show that VP35 can replace HIV-1 Tat and thereby support the replication of a Tat-minus HIV-1 variant. The VP35 dsRNA-binding domain is required for this RSS activity. Vaccinia virus E3L protein and influenza A virus NS1 protein are also capable of replacing the HIV-1 Tat RSS function. These findings support the hypothesis that RNAi is part of the innate antiviral response in mammalian cells. Moreover, the results indicate that RSSs play a critical role in mammalian virus replication.

  7. The Ebola virus VP35 protein is a suppressor of RNA silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost Haasnoot

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing or interference (RNAi is a gene regulation mechanism in eukaryotes that controls cell differentiation and developmental processes via expression of microRNAs. RNAi also serves as an innate antiviral defence response in plants, nematodes, and insects. This antiviral response is triggered by virus-specific double-stranded RNA molecules (dsRNAs that are produced during infection. To overcome antiviral RNAi responses, many plant and insect viruses encode RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs that enable them to replicate at higher titers. Recently, several human viruses were shown to encode RSSs, suggesting that RNAi also serves as an innate defence response in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that the Ebola virus VP35 protein is a suppressor of RNAi in mammalian cells and that its RSS activity is functionally equivalent to that of the HIV-1 Tat protein. We show that VP35 can replace HIV-1 Tat and thereby support the replication of a Tat-minus HIV-1 variant. The VP35 dsRNA-binding domain is required for this RSS activity. Vaccinia virus E3L protein and influenza A virus NS1 protein are also capable of replacing the HIV-1 Tat RSS function. These findings support the hypothesis that RNAi is part of the innate antiviral response in mammalian cells. Moreover, the results indicate that RSSs play a critical role in mammalian virus replication.

  8. Short hairpin RNA targeting NP mRNA inhibiting Newcastle disease virus production and other viral structural mRNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Hua; Deng, Shu; Yang, Fa-Long; Li, Ding-Fei; Fu, An-Jing; Yang, Fan; Tang, Cheng

    2009-02-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), formally recognized as avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1), is the etiological agent of Newcastle disease (ND), an affliction which can cause severe losses in the poultry industry. Better understanding of the molecular basis of viral structural genes involved with production should contribute significantly toward the development of improved prophylactic and therapeutic reagents to control the infection. Here we show that a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) eukaryotic expression vector targeting nucleocapsid (NP) gene of NDV can potently inhibit NDV production in both primary cells and embryonated chicken eggs. Moreover, shRNA specific for NP abolished the accumulation of not only the corresponding mRNA but also P, HN, F, M gene mRNA. The findings reveal that newly synthesized NP mRNA is essential for NDV transcription and replication, and provide a basis for the development of shRNAs as a prophylaxis and therapy for NDV infection in poultry.

  9. Multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses using an oligonucleotide microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D Grubaugh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arthropod-borne viruses are important emerging pathogens world-wide. Viruses transmitted by mosquitoes, such as dengue, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, infect hundreds of millions of people and animals each year. Global surveillance of these viruses in mosquito vectors using molecular based assays is critical for prevention and control of the associated diseases. Here, we report an oligonucleotide DNA microarray design, termed ArboChip5.1, for multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses from the genera Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae, Alphavirus (Togaviridae, Orthobunyavirus (Bunyaviridae, and Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The assay utilizes targeted PCR amplification of three genes from each virus genus for electrochemical detection on a portable, field-tested microarray platform. Fifty-two viruses propagated in cell-culture were used to evaluate the specificity of the PCR primer sets and the ArboChip5.1 microarray capture probes. The microarray detected all of the tested viruses and differentiated between many closely related viruses such as members of the dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and Semliki Forest virus clades. Laboratory infected mosquitoes were used to simulate field samples and to determine the limits of detection. Additionally, we identified dengue virus type 3, Japanese encephalitis virus, Tembusu virus, Culex flavivirus, and a Quang Binh-like virus from mosquitoes collected in Thailand in 2011 and 2012. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated that the described assay can be utilized in a comprehensive field surveillance program by the broad-range amplification and specific identification of arboviruses from infected mosquitoes. Furthermore, the microarray platform can be deployed in the field and viral RNA extraction to data analysis can occur in as little as 12 h. The information derived from the ArboChip5.1 microarray can help to establish

  10. Sustained Small Interfering RNA-Mediated Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Inhibition in Primary Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can induce potent gene silencing by degradation of cognate mRNA. However, in dividing cells, the silencing lasts only 3 to 7 days, presumably because of siRNA dilution with cell division. Here, we investigated if sustained siRNA-mediated silencing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is possible in terminally differentiated macrophages, which constitute an important reservoir of HIV in vivo. CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor...

  11. Importance of Basic Residues in Binding of Rous Sarcoma Virus Nucleocapsid to the RNA Packaging Signal

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eun-Gyung; Alidina, Annie; May, Cynthia; Linial, Maxine L.

    2003-01-01

    In the context of the Rous sarcoma virus Gag polyprotein, only the nucleocapsid (NC) domain is required to mediate the specificity of genomic RNA packaging. We have previously showed that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae three-hybrid system provides a rapid genetic assay to analyze the RNA and protein components of the avian retroviral RNA-Gag interactions necessary for specific encapsidation. In this study, using both site-directed mutagenesis and in vivo random screening in the yeast three-hybr...

  12. Tobacco calmodulin-like protein provides secondary defense by binding to and directing degradation of virus RNA silencing suppressors

    OpenAIRE

    Nakahara, Kenji S; Masuta, Chikara; Yamada, Syouta; Shimura, Hanako; KASHIHARA, Yukiko; Wada, Tomoko S.; Meguro, Ayano; Goto, Kazunori; Tadamura, Kazuki; Sueda, Kae; Sekiguchi, Toru; Shao, Jun; Itchoda, Noriko; Matsumura, Takeshi; Igarashi, Manabu

    2012-01-01

    RNA silencing (RNAi) induced by virus-derived double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which is in a sense regarded as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) of viruses, is a general plant defense mechanism. To counteract this defense, plant viruses express RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs), many of which bind to dsRNA and attenuate RNAi. We showed that the tobacco calmodulin-like protein, rgs-CaM, counterattacked viral RSSs by binding to their dsRNA-binding domains and sequestering them from inhi...

  13. [Synthesis of messenger-like RNA in plasma cels producing different clases of immunoglobulins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, A V; Babichev, V A

    1976-01-01

    Electrophoretic analysis of the nuclear poly A RNA cells of the MOPC 21, MOPC 406 and MOPC 41 plasmocytomas demonstrated a similarity in their distribution by the mol wt. Kinetics of the label accumulation in the nuclear poly A RNA of different plasma cells was unitypical. Individual peculiarities of the distribution of the cytoplasmic poly A RNA were expressed for each individual line of the myeloma cells. The majority of the molecules of the heterogenous RNA in the plasma cells were subjected to posttranscription polyadenylation.

  14. Relationship of SARS-CoV to other pathogenic RNA viruses explored by tetranucleotide usage profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danchin Antoine

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The exact origin of the cause of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS is still an open question. The genomic sequence relationship of SARS-CoV with 30 different single-stranded RNA (ssRNA viruses of various families was studied using two non-standard approaches. Both approaches began with the vectorial profiling of the tetra-nucleotide usage pattern V for each virus. In approach one, a distance measure of a vector V, based on correlation coefficient was devised to construct a relationship tree by the neighbor-joining algorithm. In approach two, a multivariate factor analysis was performed to derive the embedded tetra-nucleotide usage patterns. These patterns were subsequently used to classify the selected viruses. Results Both approaches yielded relationship outcomes that are consistent with the known virus classification. They also indicated that the genome of RNA viruses from the same family conform to a specific pattern of word usage. Based on the correlation of the overall tetra-nucleotide usage patterns, the Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus (TGV and the Feline CoronaVirus (FCoV are closest to SARS-CoV. Surprisingly also, the RNA viruses that do not go through a DNA stage displayed a remarkable discrimination against the CpG and UpA di-nucleotide (z = -77.31, -52.48 respectively and selection for UpG and CpA (z = 65.79,49.99 respectively. Potential factors influencing these biases are discussed. Conclusion The study of genomic word usage is a powerful method to classify RNA viruses. The congruence of the relationship outcomes with the known classification indicates that there exist phylogenetic signals in the tetra-nucleotide usage patterns, that is most prominent in the replicase open reading frames.

  15. Cell Type-Dependent RNA Recombination Frequency in the Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wei Chiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is one of approximately 70 flaviviruses, frequently causing symptoms involving the central nervous system. Mutations of its genomic RNA frequently occur during viral replication, which is believed to be a force contributing to viral evolution. Nevertheless, accumulating evidences show that some JEV strains may have actually arisen from RNA recombination between genetically different populations of the virus. We have demonstrated that RNA recombination in JEV occurs unequally in different cell types. In the present study, viral RNA fragments transfected into as well as viral RNAs synthesized in mosquito cells were shown not to be stable, especially in the early phase of infection possibly via cleavage by exoribonuclease. Such cleaved small RNA fragments may be further degraded through an RNA interference pathway triggered by viral double-stranded RNA during replication in mosquito cells, resulting in a lower frequency of RNA recombination in mosquito cells compared to that which occurs in mammalian cells. In fact, adjustment of viral RNA to an appropriately lower level in mosquito cells prevents overgrowth of the virus and is beneficial for cells to survive the infection. Our findings may also account for the slower evolution of arboviruses as reported previously.

  16. Cell type-dependent RNA recombination frequency in the Japanese encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wei-Wei; Chuang, Ching-Kai; Chao, Mei; Chen, Wei-June

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is one of approximately 70 flaviviruses, frequently causing symptoms involving the central nervous system. Mutations of its genomic RNA frequently occur during viral replication, which is believed to be a force contributing to viral evolution. Nevertheless, accumulating evidences show that some JEV strains may have actually arisen from RNA recombination between genetically different populations of the virus. We have demonstrated that RNA recombination in JEV occurs unequally in different cell types. In the present study, viral RNA fragments transfected into as well as viral RNAs synthesized in mosquito cells were shown not to be stable, especially in the early phase of infection possibly via cleavage by exoribonuclease. Such cleaved small RNA fragments may be further degraded through an RNA interference pathway triggered by viral double-stranded RNA during replication in mosquito cells, resulting in a lower frequency of RNA recombination in mosquito cells compared to that which occurs in mammalian cells. In fact, adjustment of viral RNA to an appropriately lower level in mosquito cells prevents overgrowth of the virus and is beneficial for cells to survive the infection. Our findings may also account for the slower evolution of arboviruses as reported previously.

  17. Hepatitis C virus genomic RNA dimerization is mediated via a kissing complex intermediate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Sumangala; Kim, Seungtaek; Shimakami, Tetsuro; Lemon, Stanley M.; Mihailescu, Mihaela-Rita

    2010-01-01

    With over 200 million people infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide, there is a need for more effective and better-tolerated therapeutic strategies. The HCV genome is a positive-sense; single-stranded RNA encoding a large polyprotein cleaved at multiple sites to produce at least ten proteins, among them an error-prone RNA polymerase that confers a high mutation rate. Despite considerable overall sequence diversity, in the 3′-untranslated region of the HCV genomic RNA there is a 98-nucleotide (nt) sequence named X RNA, the first 55 nt of which (X55 RNA) are 100% conserved among all HCV strains. The X55 region has been suggested to be responsible for in vitro dimerization of the genomic RNA in the presence of the viral core protein, although the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. In this study, we analyzed the X55 region and characterized the mechanism by which it mediates HCV genomic RNA dimerization. Similar to a mechanism proposed previously for the human immunodeficiency 1 virus (HIV-1) genome, we show that dimerization of the HCV genome involves formation of a kissing complex intermediate, which is converted to a more stable extended duplex conformation in the presence of the core protein. Mutations in the dimer linkage sequence loop sequence that prevent RNA dimerization in vitro significantly reduced but did not completely ablate the ability of HCV RNA to replicate or produce infectious virus in transfected cells. PMID:20360391

  18. Adipose tissue interleukin-18 mRNA and plasma interleukin-18: effect of obesity and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leick, Lotte; Lindegaard, Birgitte; Stensvold, Dorthe

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Obesity and a physically inactive lifestyle are associated with increased risk of developing insulin resistance. The hypothesis that obesity is associated with increased adipose tissue (AT) interleukin (IL)-18 mRNA expression and that AT IL-18 mRNA expression is related to insulin......: AT IL-18 mRNA content and plasma IL-18 concentration were higher (p insulin resistance. While acute exercise did not affect IL-18 mRNA expression...... at the studied time-points, exercise training reduced AT IL-18 mRNA content by 20% in both sexes. DISCUSSION: Because obesity and insulin resistance were associated with elevated AT IL-18 mRNA and plasma IL-18 levels, the training-induced lowering of AT IL-18 mRNA content may contribute to the beneficial effects...

  19. Platelets confound the measurement of extracellular miRNA in archived plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Adam J; Gray, Warren D; Hayek, Salim S; Ko, Yi-An; Thomas, Sheena; Rooney, Kim; Awad, Mosaab; Roback, John D; Quyyumi, Arshed; Searles, Charles D

    2016-09-13

    Extracellular miRNAs are detectable in biofluids and represent a novel class of disease biomarker. Although many studies have utilized archived plasma for miRNA biomarker discovery, the effects of processing and storage have not been rigorously studied. Previous reports have suggested plasma samples are commonly contaminated by platelets, significantly confounding the measurement of extracellular miRNA, which was thought to be easily addressed by additional post-thaw plasma processing. In a case-control study of archived plasma, we noted a significant correlation between miRNA levels and platelet counts despite post-thaw processing. We thus examined the effects of a single freeze/thaw cycle on microparticles (MPs) and miRNA levels, and show that a single freeze/thaw cycle of plasma dramatically increases the number of platelet-derived MPs, contaminates the extracellular miRNA pool, and profoundly affects the levels of miRNAs detected. The measurement of extracellular miRNAs in archived samples is critically dependent on the removal of residual platelets prior to freezing plasma samples. Many previous clinical studies of extracellular miRNA in archived plasma should be interpreted with caution and future studies should avoid the effects of platelet contamination.

  20. THE INHIBITORY EFFECT OF ASTRAGALUS MEMBRANACEUS ON COXSACKIE B-3 VIRUS RNA REPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭天庆; 杨英珍; HelgaRiesemann; ReinhardKandolf

    1995-01-01

    Using mice infected with coxsackie B-3 virus (CVB3) as a viral myocarditis model,we observed the inhibitory effect of Astragalus membranaceus (AM) on CVB3-RNA replication in myocardial tissue of mice by RNA-RNA in situ hybridization with negative-strand RNA probes labelled with 35S and quantitative imaging analysis of positive signals.The mechanism of its effect on CVB3-RNA replication has been inves-tigated by detection of beta-interferon (β-IFN) as well.Results showed that the copy numbers of CVB3-RNA as well as the histologic scores (necrosis) in myocardial tissues of infected-AM treated mice were sig-nificantly lower than those in infected and normal saline treated mice,suggesting that AM could inhibit the replication of CVB3-RNA,but its effect on CVB3-RNA replication had no correlation with induction of β-IFN.

  1. Modulation of the Host Lipid Landscape to Promote RNA Virus Replication: The Picornavirus Encephalomyocarditis Virus Converges on the Pathway Used by Hepatitis C Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M Dorobantu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardioviruses, including encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV and the human Saffold virus, are small non-enveloped viruses belonging to the Picornaviridae, a large family of positive-sense RNA [(+RNA] viruses. All (+RNA viruses remodel intracellular membranes into unique structures for viral genome replication. Accumulating evidence suggests that picornaviruses from different genera use different strategies to generate viral replication organelles (ROs. For instance, enteroviruses (e.g. poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus rely on the Golgi-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III beta (PI4KB, while cardioviruses replicate independently of the kinase. By which mechanisms cardioviruses develop their ROs is currently unknown. Here we show that cardioviruses manipulate another PI4K, namely the ER-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III alpha (PI4KA, to generate PI4P-enriched ROs. By siRNA-mediated knockdown and pharmacological inhibition, we demonstrate that PI4KA is an essential host factor for EMCV genome replication. We reveal that the EMCV nonstructural protein 3A interacts with and is responsible for PI4KA recruitment to viral ROs. The ensuing phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P proved important for the recruitment of oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP, which delivers cholesterol to EMCV ROs in a PI4P-dependent manner. PI4P lipids and cholesterol are shown to be required for the global organization of the ROs and for viral genome replication. Consistently, inhibition of OSBP expression or function efficiently blocked EMCV RNA replication. In conclusion, we describe for the first time a cellular pathway involved in the biogenesis of cardiovirus ROs. Remarkably, the same pathway was reported to promote formation of the replication sites of hepatitis C virus, a member of the Flaviviridae family, but not other picornaviruses or flaviviruses. Thus, our results highlight the convergent recruitment by distantly related (+RNA viruses of a host

  2. Modulation of the Host Lipid Landscape to Promote RNA Virus Replication: The Picornavirus Encephalomyocarditis Virus Converges on the Pathway Used by Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorobantu, Cristina M; Albulescu, Lucian; Harak, Christian; Feng, Qian; van Kampen, Mirjam; Strating, Jeroen R P M; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Lohmann, Volker; van der Schaar, Hilde M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2015-09-01

    Cardioviruses, including encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and the human Saffold virus, are small non-enveloped viruses belonging to the Picornaviridae, a large family of positive-sense RNA [(+)RNA] viruses. All (+)RNA viruses remodel intracellular membranes into unique structures for viral genome replication. Accumulating evidence suggests that picornaviruses from different genera use different strategies to generate viral replication organelles (ROs). For instance, enteroviruses (e.g. poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus) rely on the Golgi-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III beta (PI4KB), while cardioviruses replicate independently of the kinase. By which mechanisms cardioviruses develop their ROs is currently unknown. Here we show that cardioviruses manipulate another PI4K, namely the ER-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III alpha (PI4KA), to generate PI4P-enriched ROs. By siRNA-mediated knockdown and pharmacological inhibition, we demonstrate that PI4KA is an essential host factor for EMCV genome replication. We reveal that the EMCV nonstructural protein 3A interacts with and is responsible for PI4KA recruitment to viral ROs. The ensuing phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) proved important for the recruitment of oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), which delivers cholesterol to EMCV ROs in a PI4P-dependent manner. PI4P lipids and cholesterol are shown to be required for the global organization of the ROs and for viral genome replication. Consistently, inhibition of OSBP expression or function efficiently blocked EMCV RNA replication. In conclusion, we describe for the first time a cellular pathway involved in the biogenesis of cardiovirus ROs. Remarkably, the same pathway was reported to promote formation of the replication sites of hepatitis C virus, a member of the Flaviviridae family, but not other picornaviruses or flaviviruses. Thus, our results highlight the convergent recruitment by distantly related (+)RNA viruses of a host lipid

  3. Sendai virus, an RNA virus with no risk of genomic integration, delivers CRISPR/Cas9 for efficient gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Arnold; Hong, Patrick; Won, Sohui T; Thibault, Patricia A; Vigant, Frederic; Oguntuyo, Kasopefoluwa Y; Taft, Justin D; Lee, Benhur

    2016-01-01

    The advent of RNA-guided endonuclease (RGEN)-mediated gene editing, specifically via CRISPR/Cas9, has spurred intensive efforts to improve the efficiency of both RGEN delivery and targeted mutagenesis. The major viral vectors in use for delivery of Cas9 and its associated guide RNA, lentiviral and adeno-associated viral systems, have the potential for undesired random integration into the host genome. Here, we repurpose Sendai virus, an RNA virus with no viral DNA phase and that replicates solely in the cytoplasm, as a delivery system for efficient Cas9-mediated gene editing. The high efficiency of Sendai virus infection resulted in high rates of on-target mutagenesis in cell lines (75-98% at various endogenous and transgenic loci) and primary human monocytes (88% at the ccr5 locus) in the absence of any selection. In conjunction with extensive former work on Sendai virus as a promising gene therapy vector that can infect a wide range of cell types including hematopoietic stem cells, this proof-of-concept study opens the door to using Sendai virus as well as other related paramyxoviruses as versatile and efficient tools for gene editing.

  4. Role of LncRNA-activated by transforming growth factor beta in the progression of hepatitis C virus-related liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Na; Niu, Xuemin; Wang, Yang; Du, Huijuan; Wang, Baoyu; Du, Jinghua; Li, Ya; Wang, Rongqi; Zhang, Yuguo; Zhao, Suxian; Sun, Dianxing; Qiao, Liang; Nan, Yuemin

    2016-08-01

    Long non-coding RNA (LncRNA)-activated by transforming growth factor-beta (LncRNA-ATB) is a key regulator of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway, and is positively correlated with the development of liver cirrhosis and vascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the role of LncRNA-ATB in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver fibrosis remains largely unknown. In the present study, we confirmed a high expression level of LncRNA-ATB in the liver tissues and plasma samples of patients with HCV-related hepatic fibrosis, and the plasma level of LncRNA-ATB was significantly correlated with liver fibrosis stages. Furthermore, increased expression level of LncRNA-ATB was also present in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), and knockdown of LncRNA-ATB inhibited the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and alpha-1 type I collagen (Col1A1). LncRNA-ATB was found to share the common miRNA responsive element of miR-425-5p with TGF-β type II receptor (TGF-βRII) and SMAD2. Ectopic expression of LncRNA-ATB in HSCs could upregulate the protein expression of TGF-βRII and SMAD2 by inhibiting the endogenous miR-425-5p. Moreover, overexpression of miR-425-5p could partly abrogate the expression of TGF-βRII and SMAD2 induced by LncRNA-ATB. Hence, we conclude that LncRNA-ATB promotes HCV-induced liver fibrogenesis by activating HSCs and increasing collagen I production through competitively binding to miR-425-5p. LncRNA-ATB may be a novel diagnostic biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for HCV-related hepatic fibrosis.

  5. Heterologous RNA-silencing suppressors from both plant- and animal-infecting viruses support plum pox virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliogka, Varvara I; Calvo, María; Carbonell, Alberto; García, Juan Antonio; Valli, Adrian

    2012-07-01

    HCPro, the RNA-silencing suppressor (RSS) of viruses belonging to the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae, is a multifunctional protein presumably involved in all essential steps of the viral infection cycle. Recent studies have shown that plum pox potyvirus (PPV) HCPro can be replaced successfully by cucumber vein yellowing ipomovirus P1b, a sequence-unrelated RSS from a virus of the same family. In order to gain insight into the requirement of a particular RSS to establish a successful potyviral infection, we tested the ability of different heterologous RSSs from both plant- and animal-infecting viruses to substitute for HCPro. Making use of engineered PPV chimeras, we show that PPV HCPro can be replaced functionally by some, but not all, unrelated RSSs, including the NS1 protein of the mammal-infecting influenza A virus. Interestingly, the capacity of a particular RSS to replace HCPro does not correlate strictly with its RNA silencing-suppression strength. Altogether, our results suggest that not all suppression strategies are equally suitable for efficient escape of PPV from the RNA-silencing machinery. The approach followed here, based on using PPV chimeras in which an under-consideration RSS substitutes for HCPro, could further help to study the function of diverse RSSs in a 'highly sensitive' RNA-silencing context, such as that taking place in plant cells during the process of a viral infection.

  6. Single-stranded RNA viruses infecting the invasive Argentine ant, Linepithema humile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Monica A M; Cooling, Meghan; Baty, James W; Buckley, Kevin; Friedlander, Anna; Quinn, Oliver; Russell, Jessica F E J; Sébastien, Alexandra; Lester, Philip J

    2017-06-12

    Social insects host a diversity of viruses. We examined New Zealand populations of the globally widely distributed invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) for RNA viruses. We used metatranscriptomic analysis, which identified six potential novel viruses in the Dicistroviridae family. Of these, three contigs were confirmed by Sanger sequencing as Linepithema humile virus-1 (LHUV-1), a novel strain of Kashmir bee virus (KBV) and Black queen cell virus (BQCV), while the others were chimeric or misassembled sequences. We extended the known sequence of LHUV-1 to confirm its placement in the Dicistroviridae and categorised its relationship to closest relatives, which were all viruses infecting Hymenoptera. We examined further for known viruses by mapping our metatranscriptomic sequences to all viral genomes, and confirmed KBV, BQCV, LHUV-1 and Deformed wing virus (DWV) presence using qRT-PCR. Viral replication was confirmed for DWV, KBV and LHUV-1. Viral titers in ants were higher in the presence of honey bee hives. Argentine ants appear to host a range of' honey bee' pathogens in addition to a virus currently described only from this invasive ant. The role of these viruses in the population dynamics of the ant remain to be determined, but offer potential targets for biocontrol approaches.

  7. A Diverse Range of Novel RNA Viruses in Geographically Distinct Honey Bee Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remnant, Emily J; Shi, Mang; Buchmann, Gabriele; Blacquière, Tjeerd; Holmes, Edward C; Beekman, Madeleine; Ashe, Alyson

    2017-08-15

    Understanding the diversity and consequences of viruses present in honey bees is critical for maintaining pollinator health and managing the spread of disease. The viral landscape of honey bees (Apis mellifera) has changed dramatically since the emergence of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor, which increased the spread of virulent variants of viruses such as deformed wing virus. Previous genomic studies have focused on colonies suffering from infections by Varroa and virulent viruses, which could mask other viral species present in honey bees, resulting in a distorted view of viral diversity. To capture the viral diversity within colonies that are exposed to mites but do not suffer the ultimate consequences of the infestation, we examined populations of honey bees that have evolved naturally or have been selected for resistance to Varroa This analysis revealed seven novel viruses isolated from honey bees sampled globally, including the first identification of negative-sense RNA viruses in honey bees. Notably, two rhabdoviruses were present in three geographically diverse locations and were also present in Varroa mites parasitizing the bees. To characterize the antiviral response, we performed deep sequencing of small RNA populations in honey bees and mites. This provided evidence of a Dicer-mediated immune response in honey bees, while the viral small RNA profile in Varroa mites was novel and distinct from the response observed in bees. Overall, we show that viral diversity in honey bee colonies is greater than previously thought, which encourages additional studies of the bee virome on a global scale and which may ultimately improve disease management.IMPORTANCE Honey bee populations have become increasingly susceptible to colony losses due to pathogenic viruses spread by parasitic Varroa mites. To date, 24 viruses have been described in honey bees, with most belonging to the order Picornavirales Collapsing Varroa-infected colonies are often overwhelmed with

  8. Exosomes and Their Role in the Life Cycle and Pathogenesis of RNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harendra Singh Chahar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are membrane-enclosed vesicles actively released into the extracellular space, whose content reflect the physiological/pathological state of the cells they originate from. These vesicles participate in cell-to-cell communication and transfer of biologically active proteins, lipids, and RNAs. Their role in viral infections is just beginning to be appreciated. RNA viruses are an important class of pathogens and affect millions of people worldwide. Recent studies on Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, Hepatitis C Virus (HCV, human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV, and Dengue Virus (DENV have demonstrated that exosomes released from infected cells harbor and deliver many regulatory factors including viral RNA and proteins, viral and cellular miRNA, and other host functional genetic elements to neighboring cells, helping to establish productive infections and modulating cellular responses. Exosomes can either spread or limit an infection depending on the type of pathogen and target cells, and can be exploited as candidates for development of antiviral or vaccine treatments. This review summarizes recent progress made in understanding the role of exosomes in RNA virus infections with an emphasis on their potential contribution to pathogenesis.

  9. Ecological connectivity shapes quasispecies structure of RNA viruses in an Antarctic lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bueno, A; Rastrojo, A; Peiró, R; Arenas, M; Alcamí, A

    2015-10-01

    RNA viruses exist as complex mixtures of genotypes, known as quasispecies, where the evolution potential resides in the whole community of related genotypes. Quasispecies structure and dynamics have been studied in detail for virus infecting animals and plants but remain unexplored for those infecting micro-organisms in environmental samples. We report the first metagenomic study of RNA viruses in an Antarctic lake (Lake Limnopolar, Livingston Island). Similar to low-latitude aquatic environments, this lake harbours an RNA virome dominated by positive single-strand RNA viruses from the order Picornavirales probably infecting micro-organisms. Antarctic picorna-like virus 1 (APLV1), one of the most abundant viruses in the lake, does not incorporate any mutation in the consensus sequence from 2006 to 2010 and shows stable quasispecies with low-complexity indexes. By contrast, APLV2-APLV3 are detected in the lake water exclusively in summer samples and are major constituents of surrounding cyanobacterial mats. Their quasispecies exhibit low complexity in cyanobacterial mat, but their run-off-mediated transfer to the lake results in a remarkable increase of complexity that may reflect the convergence of different viral quasispecies from the catchment area or replication in a more diverse host community. This is the first example of viral quasispecies from natural aquatic ecosystems and points to ecological connectivity as a modulating factor of quasispecies complexity.

  10. Exosomes and Their Role in the Life Cycle and Pathogenesis of RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahar, Harendra Singh; Bao, Xiaoyong; Casola, Antonella

    2015-06-19

    Exosomes are membrane-enclosed vesicles actively released into the extracellular space, whose content reflect the physiological/pathological state of the cells they originate from. These vesicles participate in cell-to-cell communication and transfer of biologically active proteins, lipids, and RNAs. Their role in viral infections is just beginning to be appreciated. RNA viruses are an important class of pathogens and affect millions of people worldwide. Recent studies on Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV), and Dengue Virus (DENV) have demonstrated that exosomes released from infected cells harbor and deliver many regulatory factors including viral RNA and proteins, viral and cellular miRNA, and other host functional genetic elements to neighboring cells, helping to establish productive infections and modulating cellular responses. Exosomes can either spread or limit an infection depending on the type of pathogen and target cells, and can be exploited as candidates for development of antiviral or vaccine treatments. This review summarizes recent progress made in understanding the role of exosomes in RNA virus infections with an emphasis on their potential contribution to pathogenesis.

  11. Suppressor of RNA silencing encoded by Rice gall dwarf virus genome segment 11

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU FuXiu; ZHAO Qin; RUAN XiaoLei; HE YunWei; LI HuaPing

    2008-01-01

    Rice gall dwarf virus (RGDV) is an important rice pathogen in China and Southeast Asia. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of RGDV interactions with plant cells. Here, we have identi-fied an RGDV protein, Pns11, which acts as a suppressor of RNA silencing in coinfiltration assays with the reporter, green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transgenic Nicotiana bentharniana line 16c carrying GFP. Pns11 suppressed local and systemic silencing induced by sense RNA. The spread of mobile FINA si-lencing signals was blocked or inactivated by Pns11. Expression of Pns11 also enhanced Potato virus X pathogenicity in N. benthamiana. This suppressor could reduce, but not eliminate, siRNA in the local and systemic RNA silencing suppression assays, suggesting that Pns11 functions by interfering with initial stages of RNA silencing.

  12. Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein enhances the spread of RNA silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Vogler

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells restrain the activity of foreign genetic elements, including viruses, through RNA silencing. Although viruses encode suppressors of silencing to support their propagation, viruses may also exploit silencing to regulate host gene expression or to control the level of their accumulation and thus to reduce damage to the host. RNA silencing in plants propagates from cell to cell and systemically via a sequence-specific signal. Since the signal spreads between cells through plasmodesmata like the viruses themselves, virus-encoded plasmodesmata-manipulating movement proteins (MP may have a central role in compatible virus:host interactions by suppressing or enhancing the spread of the signal. Here, we have addressed the propagation of GFP silencing in the presence and absence of MP and MP mutants. We show that the protein enhances the spread of silencing. Small RNA analysis indicates that MP does not enhance the silencing pathway but rather enhances the transport of the signal through plasmodesmata. The ability to enhance the spread of silencing is maintained by certain MP mutants that can move between cells but which have defects in subcellular localization and do not support the spread of viral RNA. Using MP expressing and non-expressing virus mutants with a disabled silencing suppressing function, we provide evidence indicating that viral MP contributes to anti-viral silencing during infection. Our results suggest a role of MP in controlling virus propagation in the infected host by supporting the spread of silencing signal. This activity of MP involves only a subset of its properties implicated in the spread of viral RNA.

  13. Are there any subgenomic forms of hepatitis C virus RNA in the liver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, R; Negro, F

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus has a single stranded positive RNA genoma. Although believed to replicate via semi-conservative transcription of a negative-stranded, genomic-length RNA intermediate, detailed steps of its replicative cycle are unknown. To quantify some of intrahepatic hepatitis C virus RNA forms, as inferred from comparison with replication of other members of the Flaviviridae family. Genomic and negative-stranded hepatitis C virus RNA were semi-quantitated by strand-specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction at both their 5' and 3' ends in liver of 10 patients with recurrent hepatitis C after liver transplantation. Our data are consistent with the existence of hitherto unrecognized, very large amounts (up to approximately 10,000 fold the amount of the replication intermediate proper) of subgenomic hepatitis C virus RNAs of genomic polarity, starting in the 5' untranslated region, of unknown length. Similarly, subgenomic RNAs of negative polarity, starting in the 3' untranslated region, may also be produced, albeit to a less extent. We found no correlation between the amount of these forms and any clinical, histological or virological feature. However, the number of subgenomic RNA molecules of negative polarity tended to be inversely correlated with viraemia (r = 0.7, p = 0.058), suggesting their possible role in controlling rate of virion production. Hepatitis C virus replication results in transcription of huge amounts of subgenomic RNAs both of genomic and negative polarity, which may either regulate translation of excess structural antigens of hepatitis C virus, or play the role of defective RNAs interfering with viral replication. A revised model of hepatitis C virus RNA replication is proposed.

  14. Cloning the Horse RNA Polymerase I Promoter and Its Application to Studying Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gang; He, Dong; Wang, Zengchao; Ou, Shudan; Yuan, Rong; Li, Shoujun

    2016-05-31

    An influenza virus polymerase reconstitution assay based on the human, dog, or chicken RNA polymerase I (PolI) promoter has been developed and widely used to study the polymerase activity of the influenza virus in corresponding cell types. Although it is an important member of the influenza virus family and has been known for sixty years, no studies have been performed to clone the horse PolI promoter or to study the polymerase activity of equine influenza virus (EIV) in horse cells. In our study, the horse RNA PolI promoter was cloned from fetal equine lung cells. Using the luciferase assay, it was found that a 500 bp horse RNA PolI promoter sequence was required for efficient transcription. Then, using the developed polymerase reconstitution assay based on the horse RNA PolI promoter, the polymerase activity of two EIV strains was compared, and equine myxovirus resistance A protein was identified as having the inhibiting EIV polymerase activity function in horse cells. Our study enriches our knowledge of the RNA PolI promoter of eukaryotic species and provides a useful tool for the study of influenza virus polymerase activity in horse cells.

  15. Structure of Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase in Complex with Primer-Template RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosley, Ralph T.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Murakami, Eisuke; Lam, Angela M.; Grice, Rena L.; Du, Jinfa; Sofia, Michael J.; Furman, Philip A.; Otto, Michael J. (Pharmasset); (Emerald)

    2012-08-01

    The replication of the hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome is accomplished by the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), for which mechanistic understanding and structure-guided drug design efforts have been hampered by its propensity to crystallize in a closed, polymerization-incompetent state. The removal of an autoinhibitory {beta}-hairpin loop from genotype 2a HCV NS5B increases de novo RNA synthesis by >100-fold, promotes RNA binding, and facilitated the determination of the first crystallographic structures of HCV polymerase in complex with RNA primer-template pairs. These crystal structures demonstrate the structural realignment required for primer-template recognition and elongation, provide new insights into HCV RNA synthesis at the molecular level, and may prove useful in the structure-based design of novel antiviral compounds. Additionally, our approach for obtaining the RNA primer-template-bound structure of HCV polymerase may be generally applicable to solving RNA-bound complexes for other viral RdRps that contain similar regulatory {beta}-hairpin loops, including bovine viral diarrhea virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus.

  16. Noncoding Subgenomic Flavivirus RNA Is Processed by the Mosquito RNA Interference Machinery and Determines West Nile Virus Transmission by Culex pipiens Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göertz, G P; Fros, J J; Miesen, P; Vogels, C B F; van der Bent, M L; Geertsema, C; Koenraadt, C J M; van Rij, R P; van Oers, M M; Pijlman, G P

    2016-11-15

    Flaviviruses, such as Zika virus, yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus (WNV), are a serious concern for human health. Flaviviruses produce an abundant noncoding subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) in infected cells. sfRNA results from stalling of the host 5'-3' exoribonuclease XRN1/Pacman on conserved RNA structures in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the viral genomic RNA. sfRNA production is conserved in insect-specific, mosquito-borne, and tick-borne flaviviruses and flaviviruses with no known vector, suggesting a pivotal role for sfRNA in the flavivirus life cycle. Here, we investigated the function of sfRNA during WNV infection of Culex pipiens mosquitoes and evaluated its role in determining vector competence. An sfRNA1-deficient WNV was generated that displayed growth kinetics similar to those of wild-type WNV in both RNA interference (RNAi)-competent and -compromised mosquito cell lines. Small-RNA deep sequencing of WNV-infected mosquitoes indicated an active small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based antiviral response for both the wild-type and sfRNA1-deficient viruses. Additionally, we provide the first evidence that sfRNA is an RNAi substrate in vivo Two reproducible small-RNA hot spots within the 3' UTR/sfRNA of the wild-type virus mapped to RNA stem-loops SL-III and 3' SL, which stick out of the three-dimensional (3D) sfRNA structure model. Importantly, we demonstrate that sfRNA-deficient WNV displays significantly decreased infection and transmission rates in vivo when administered via the blood meal. Finally, we show that transmission and infection rates are not affected by sfRNA after intrathoracic injection, thereby identifying sfRNA as a key driver to overcome the mosquito midgut infection barrier. This is the first report to describe a key biological function of sfRNA for flavivirus infection of the arthropod vector, providing an explanation for the strict conservation of sfRNA production. Understanding the flavivirus transmission

  17. Replication and encapsidation of the viroid-like satellite RNA of lucerne transient streak virus are supported in divergent hosts by cocksfoot mottle virus and turnip rosette virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, O P; Sinha, R C; Gellatly, D L; Ivanov, I; AbouHaidar, M G

    1993-04-01

    Cocksfoot mottle sobemovirus supports replication and encapsidation of the viroid-like satellite RNA (sat-RNA) of lucerne transient streak virus (LTSV) in two monocotyledonous species, Triticum aestivum and Dactylis glomerata. Additionally, LTSV sat-RNA replicates effectively in the presence of turnip rosette sobemovirus in Brassica rapa, Raphanus raphanistrum and Sinapsis arvensis, but not in Thlaspi arvense or Nicotiana bigelovii, indicating that host species markedly influence this interaction. Previous reports of the association between LTSV sat-RNA and helper sobemoviruses were limited to dicotyledonous hosts. Our results demonstrate that the biological interaction between these two entities spans divergent dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous species.

  18. Effects of ultraviolet radiation on structural components of enveloped RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Mauro R.; Couceiro, Jose N.S.S.; Brito, Sieberth N.; Cabral, Maulori C. [Universidade Federal, Rio de janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Microbiologia

    1995-01-01

    The interaction of ultraviolet radiation and virus particles of Western Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus (WEE) and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) which have respectively RNA of positive (RNA+) and negative (RNA-) polarity as genomes, was studied using purified particles. The purified virus preparations were irradiated at a range of 1,000 to 6,000 joules per m{sup 2} with posterior analysis of their propagation in primary cells cultures of chicken embryos. It could be observed that a radiation dose of 4,500 joules per m{sup 2} could induce 10{sup 9} TCID50 per ml as minimal loss of titer for WEE virus and NDV. The hemagglutination assay was used as a tool for evaluate the alterations caused by UV radiation on the molecular arrangement of virus proteins. Alterations of the virus hemagglutinating activity were only observed when radiation levels higher than 6,000 joules per m{sup 2} were used. The results from hemolysis assays showed the importance of the loss of the envelope integrity and the damages to nucleoprotein structures during the inactivation process, when we use radiation doses higher than 6,000 joules per m{sup 2}. This model of study can increase our comprehension of the radiation effects on the cell physiology and biological components of the cell membranes. (author). 34 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Virus-like particles in Eimeria nieschulzi are associated with multiple RNA segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roditi, I; Wyler, T; Smith, N; Braun, R

    1994-02-01

    RNA preparations from sporulated oocysts of Eimeria nieschulzi were found to contain 2 double-stranded RNA segments of 5.0 kb and 5.7 kb that were not present in other species of Eimeria. Treatment of crude lysates with RNase A revealed that in addition to these two segments, 3 other segments of 0.57 kb, 0.72 kb and 11.5 kb were protected from digestion, suggesting that they were enclosed within particles. Virus-like particles with a diameter of approximately 39 nm were purified by caesium chloride buoyant density centrifugation. Four of the five RNA segments copurified with these particles. In keeping with the nomenclature generally adopted for protozoan viruses, we have named this new isolate ENV 1. The largest RNA segment does not cosediment with ENV 1 particles and may be derived from another RNA-protein complex that is unstable under the conditions used. The particle size and genome structure of ENV 1 both differ from that of the Eimeria stiedae virus (ESV), which is the only other virus to have been isolated from Eimeria to date. Short cDNA clones derived from ENV 1 show significant homology to a region of the Leishmania virus (LRV 1) genome that encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The polymerase sequences from ENV 1 and LRV 1 are more closely related to each other than to any other protein sequences in the GenEMBL Database. This raises intriguing questions about the origins of the two viruses, since Eimeria and Leishmania normally infect different hosts and also show different cell tropisms within these hosts.

  20. Combined DECS Analysis and Next-Generation Sequencing Enable Efficient Detection of Novel Plant RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Hironobu; Tomita, Reiko; Katsu, Koji; Uehara, Takuya; Atsumi, Go; Tateda, Chika; Kobayashi, Kappei; Sekine, Ken-Taro

    2016-03-07

    The presence of high molecular weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) within plant cells is an indicator of infection with RNA viruses as these possess genomic or replicative dsRNA. DECS (dsRNA isolation, exhaustive amplification, cloning, and sequencing) analysis has been shown to be capable of detecting unknown viruses. We postulated that a combination of DECS analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS) would improve detection efficiency and usability of the technique. Here, we describe a model case in which we efficiently detected the presumed genome sequence of Blueberry shoestring virus (BSSV), a member of the genus Sobemovirus, which has not so far been reported. dsRNAs were isolated from BSSV-infected blueberry plants using the dsRNA-binding protein, reverse-transcribed, amplified, and sequenced using NGS. A contig of 4,020 nucleotides (nt) that shared similarities with sequences from other Sobemovirus species was obtained as a candidate of the BSSV genomic sequence. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR primer sets based on sequences from this contig enabled the detection of BSSV in all BSSV-infected plants tested but not in healthy controls. A recombinant protein encoded by the putative coat protein gene was bound by the BSSV-antibody, indicating that the candidate sequence was that of BSSV itself. Our results suggest that a combination of DECS analysis and NGS, designated here as "DECS-C," is a powerful method for detecting novel plant viruses.

  1. A Viral Protein Suppresses siRNA-directed Interference in Tobacco Mosaic Virus Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Min ZHAO; De-Rong AN; Guang-Hua HUANG; Zu-Hua HE; Jiang-Ye CHEN

    2005-01-01

    Plant viruses encode suppressors of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), an adaptive defense response that limits virus replication and its spread in plants. The helper component proteinase (HCPro) of the potato virus A (PVA, genus Potyvirus) suppresses PTGS of silenced transgenes. Here, the effect of HC-Pro on siRNA-directed interference in the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was examined by using a transient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-based delivery system in intact tissues. It was shown that the interference effect was completely blocked by co-infiltration with HC-Pro plus siRNA constructs in both systemic and hypersensitive hosts. In the system host, all plants agro-infiltrated with HC-Pro plus siRNA constructs displayed the same symptoms as the negative control. Meanwhile, TMV RNA accumulation was found to be abundant in the upper leaves using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and Northern blot assays. On the contrary, plants agro-infiltrated with the siRNA construct alone were free of symptoms. Therefore, our study suggests that the transient expression of HC-Pro inhibited the siRNA-directed host defenses against TMV infection.

  2. Evaluation of convenient pretreatment protocols for RNA virus metagenomics in serum and tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosseel, Toon; Ozhelvaci, Orkun; Freimanis, Graham; Van Borm, Steven

    2015-09-15

    Viral metagenomic approaches are increasingly being used for viral discovery. Various strategies are applied to enrich viral sequences, but there is often a lack of knowledge about their effective influence on the viral discovery sensitivity. We evaluate some convenient and widely used approaches for RNA virus discovery in clinical samples in order to reveal their sensitivity and potential bias introduced by the enrichment or amplifications steps. An RNA virus was artificially spiked at a fixed titer in serum and lung tissue, respectively, low and high nucleic acid content matrices. For serum, a simple DNase treatment on the RNA extract gave the maximum gain in proportion of viral sequences (83×), and a subsequent ribosomal RNA removal nearly doubled once more the proportion of viral sequences. For lung tissue, a ribosomal RNA depletion step on the RNA extract had the biggest gain in proportion of viral sequences (32×). We show also that direct sequencing of cDNA is recommended above an extra random PCR amplification step, and a that the virion enrichment strategy (filtration and nuclease treatment) has a beneficial effect for sequencing-based virus discovery. Our findings provide sample-dependent guidelines for targeted virus discovery strategies.

  3. Two virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressors, P14 of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus and S6 of Rice black streak dwarf virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lingdi; WANG Zhaohui; WANG Xianbing; LI Dawei; HAN Chenggui; ZHAI Yafeng; YU Jialin

    2005-01-01

    Functional analysis for gene silencing suppressor of P14 gene of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus and S6 gene of Rice black streak dwarf virus was carried out by agro- infiltration with recombinant vectors of Potato virus X. The phenotype observation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression and Northern blot showed that the gene silencing of gfp transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana induced by homologous sequence was strongly suppressed by the immixture infiltration of either the P14 or the S6. In the suppressed plants, the gfp mRNA accumulation was higher than that in the non-suppressed controls and the symptoms caused by PVX infection became more severe, especially the gfp DNA methylation of plant genome was significantly inhabited when co-infiltrated with RBSDV S6 gene. These results suggested that these two virus genes were potentially to encode for proteins as RNA silencing suppressors.

  4. Small noncoding RNA modulates japanese encephalitis virus replication and translation in trans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yi-Hsin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence and structural elements in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV are known to regulate translation and replication. We previously reported an abundant accumulation of small subgenomic flaviviral RNA (sfRNA which is collinear with the highly conserved regions of the 3'-UTR in JEV-infected cells. However, function of the sfRNA in JEV life cycle remains unknown. Results Northern blot and real-time RT-PCR analyses indicated that the sfRNA becomes apparent at the time point at which minus-strand RNA (antigenome reaches a plateau suggesting a role for sfRNA in the regulation of antigenome synthesis. Transfection of minus-sense sfRNA into JEV-infected cells, in order to counter the effects of plus-sense sfRNA, resulted in higher levels of antigenome suggesting that the presence of the sfRNA inhibits antigenome synthesis. Trans-acting effect of sfRNA on JEV translation was studied using a reporter mRNA containing the luciferase gene fused to partial coding regions of JEV and flanked by the respective JEV UTRs. In vivo and in vitro translation revealed that sfRNA inhibited JEV translation. Conclusions Our results indicate that sfRNA modulates viral translation and replication in trans.

  5. Functional specialization of the small interfering RNA pathway in response to virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Trindade Marques

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, post-transcriptional gene silencing occurs when exogenous or endogenous double stranded RNA (dsRNA is processed into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs by Dicer-2 (Dcr-2 in association with a dsRNA-binding protein (dsRBP cofactor called Loquacious (Loqs-PD. siRNAs are then loaded onto Argonaute-2 (Ago2 by the action of Dcr-2 with another dsRBP cofactor called R2D2. Loaded Ago2 executes the destruction of target RNAs that have sequence complementarity to siRNAs. Although Dcr-2, R2D2, and Ago2 are essential for innate antiviral defense, the mechanism of virus-derived siRNA (vsiRNA biogenesis and viral target inhibition remains unclear. Here, we characterize the response mechanism mediated by siRNAs against two different RNA viruses that infect Drosophila. In both cases, we show that vsiRNAs are generated by Dcr-2 processing of dsRNA formed during viral genome replication and, to a lesser extent, viral transcription. These vsiRNAs seem to preferentially target viral polyadenylated RNA to inhibit viral replication. Loqs-PD is completely dispensable for silencing of the viruses, in contrast to its role in silencing endogenous targets. Biogenesis of vsiRNAs is independent of both Loqs-PD and R2D2. R2D2, however, is required for sorting and loading of vsiRNAs onto Ago2 and inhibition of viral RNA expression. Direct injection of viral RNA into Drosophila results in replication that is also independent of Loqs-PD. This suggests that triggering of the antiviral pathway is not related to viral mode of entry but recognition of intrinsic features of virus RNA. Our results indicate the existence of a vsiRNA pathway that is separate from the endogenous siRNA pathway and is specifically triggered by virus RNA. We speculate that this unique framework might be necessary for a prompt and efficient antiviral response.

  6. Effects of RNA sequence specificity in the electrostatic stabilization of viruses

    CERN Document Server

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; van der Schoot, Paul; Podgornik, Rudolf; Zandi, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Many single-stranded (ss) RNA viruses self assemble from capsid protein subunits and the nucleic acid to form an infectious virion. It is believed that the electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged RNA and the positively charged viral capsid proteins drive the encapsidation, although there is growing evidence that the sequence of the viral RNA also plays a role in packaging. In particular the sequence will determine the possible secondary structures that the ssRNA will take in solution. In this work, we use a mean field theory to investigate how the secondary structure of the RNA combined with electrostatic interactions affects the efficiency of assembly and stability of the assembled virions. We show that the secondary structure of RNA may result in negative osmotic pressures while a linear polymer causes positive osmotic pressures for the same conditions. This may suggest that the branched structure makes the RNA more effectively packaged and the virion more stable.

  7. Identification of a novel human tRNA(Ser(CGA)) functional in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Schmitz, A; Pedersen, F S

    2000-01-01

    (CGA)) was detected in cell lines of human, monkey and mouse origin. The UCG codon is the most rarely used codon in human genes. The cloned human tRNA(Ser(CGA)) gene encodes an 85 nucleotide, intron-less tRNA, contains a consensus split intragenic promoter and is located at region p21.3-22.2 on chromosome 6......We have identified a human tRNA(Ser) isoacceptor matching the UCG codon. The tRNA was discovered via its ability to act in reverse transcription of a murine leukemia virus vector containing a complementary tRNA primer binding site (Lund et al., Nucleic Acids Res., 28 (2000) 791-799). The tRNA(Ser....... The integrity and functionality of the cloned tRNA(Ser(CGA)) gene was verified by in vitro transcription analysis in HeLa nuclear extracts....

  8. Creation of Functional Viruses from Non-Functional cDNA Clones Obtained from an RNA Virus Population by the Use of Ancestral Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Dräger, Carolin

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses have the highest known mutation rates. Consequently it is likely that a high proportion of individual RNA virus genomes, isolated from an infected host, will contain lethal mutations and be non-functional. This is problematic if the aim is to clone and investigate high-fitness, functi...

  9. Acylated simian virus 40-specific proteins in the plasma membrane of HeLa cells infected with adenovirus 2-simian virus 40 hybrid virus Ad2+ND2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klockmann, U.; Deppert, W.

    1983-04-30

    HeLa cells infected with the adenovirus 2-simian virus 40 (Ad2+SV40) hybrid virus Ad2+ND2 were labeled with either (/sup 35/S)methionine or (/sup 3/H)palmitate and fractionated into cytoplasmic, nuclear, and plasma membrane fractions. Analysis of these fractions by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the SV40-specific proteins in the plasma membrane fraction were specificially acylated.

  10. Estimating the impact of plasma HIV-1 RNA reductions on heterosexual HIV-1 transmission risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairam R Lingappa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of sexual transmission of HIV-1 is strongly associated with the level of HIV-1 RNA in plasma making reduction in HIV-1 plasma levels an important target for HIV-1 prevention interventions. A quantitative understanding of the relationship of plasma HIV-1 RNA and HIV-1 transmission risk could help predict the impact of candidate HIV-1 prevention interventions that operate by reducing plasma HIV-1 levels, such as antiretroviral therapy (ART, therapeutic vaccines, and other non-ART interventions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use prospective data collected from 2004 to 2008 in East and Southern African HIV-1 serodiscordant couples to model the relationship of plasma HIV-1 RNA levels and heterosexual transmission risk with confirmation of HIV-1 transmission events by HIV-1 sequencing. The model is based on follow-up of 3381 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples over 5017 person-years encompassing 108 genetically-linked HIV-1 transmission events. HIV-1 transmission risk was 2.27 per 100 person-years with a log-linear relationship to log(10 plasma HIV-1 RNA. The model predicts that a decrease in average plasma HIV-1 RNA of 0.74 log(10 copies/mL (95% CI 0.60 to 0.97 reduces heterosexual transmission risk by 50%, regardless of the average starting plasma HIV-1 level in the population and independent of other HIV-1-related population characteristics. In a simulated population with a similar plasma HIV-1 RNA distribution the model estimates that 90% of overall HIV-1 infections averted by a 0.74 copies/mL reduction in plasma HIV-1 RNA could be achieved by targeting this reduction to the 58% of the cohort with plasma HIV-1 levels ≥4 log(10 copies/mL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This log-linear model of plasma HIV-1 levels and risk of sexual HIV-1 transmission may help estimate the impact on HIV-1 transmission and infections averted from candidate interventions that reduce plasma HIV-1 RNA levels.

  11. Novel positive-sense, single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA virus with di-cistronic genome from intestinal content of freshwater carp (Cyprinus carpio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ákos Boros

    Full Text Available A novel positive-sense, single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA virus (Halastavi árva RNA virus, HalV; JN000306 with di-cistronic genome organization was serendipitously identified in intestinal contents of freshwater carps (Cyprinus carpio fished by line-fishing from fishpond "Lőrinte halastó" located in Veszprém County, Hungary. The complete nucleotide (nt sequence of the genomic RNA is 9565 nt in length and contains two long--non-in-frame--open reading frames (ORFs, which are separated by an intergenic region. The ORF1 (replicase is preceded by an untranslated sequence of 827 nt, while an untranslated region of 139 nt follows the ORF2 (capsid proteins. The deduced amino acid (aa sequences of the ORFs showed only low (less than 32% and partial similarity to the non-structural (2C-like helicase, 3C-like cystein protease and 3D-like RNA dependent RNA polymerase and structural proteins (VP2/VP4/VP3 of virus families in Picornavirales especially to members of the viruses with dicistronic genome. Halastavi árva RNA virus is present in intestinal contents of omnivorous freshwater carps but the origin and the host species of this virus remains unknown. The unique viral sequence and the actual position indicate that Halastavi árva RNA virus seems to be the first member of a new di-cistronic ssRNA virus. Further studies are required to investigate the specific host species (and spectrum, ecology and role of Halastavi árva RNA virus in the nature.

  12. Eilat virus, a unique alphavirus with host range restricted to insects by RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasar, Farooq; Palacios, Gustavo; Gorchakov, Rodion V; Guzman, Hilda; Da Rosa, Amelia P Travassos; Savji, Nazir; Popov, Vsevolod L; Sherman, Michael B; Lipkin, W Ian; Tesh, Robert B; Weaver, Scott C

    2012-09-04

    Most alphaviruses and many other arboviruses are mosquito-borne and exhibit a broad host range, infecting many different vertebrates including birds, rodents, equids, humans, and nonhuman primates. Consequently, they can be propagated in most vertebrate and insect cell cultures. This ability of arboviruses to infect arthropods and vertebrates is usually essential for their maintenance in nature. However, several flaviviruses have recently been described that infect mosquitoes but not vertebrates, although the mechanism of their host restriction has not been determined. Here we describe a unique alphavirus, Eilat virus (EILV), isolated from a pool of Anopheles coustani mosquitoes from the Negev desert of Israel. Phylogenetic analyses placed EILV as a sister to the Western equine encephalitis antigenic complex within the main clade of mosquito-borne alphaviruses. Electron microscopy revealed that, like other alphaviruses, EILV virions were spherical, 70 nm in diameter, and budded from the plasma membrane of mosquito cells in culture. EILV readily infected a variety of insect cells with little overt cytopathic effect. However, in contrast to typical mosquito-borne alphaviruses, EILV could not infect mammalian or avian cell lines, and viral as well as RNA replication could not be detected at 37 °C or 28 °C. Evolutionarily, these findings suggest that EILV lost its ability to infect vertebrate cells. Thus, EILV seems to be mosquito-specific and represents a previously undescribed complex within the genus Alphavirus. Reverse genetic studies of EILV may facilitate the discovery of determinants of alphavirus host range that mediate disease emergence.

  13. Stimulation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in vitro RNA Synthesis by Microtubule-Associated Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Virginia M.; Harmon, Shirley A.; Summers, Donald F.

    1986-08-01

    Microtubule-associated proteins purified from bovine brains stimulated the in vitro transcription and replication reactions of vesicular stomatitis virus. The products of these reactions were intact messenger or genome-sized RNA species. A preparation from HeLa cells containing tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins also stimulated vesicular stomatitis virus transcription in vitro. This observation is in accord with previous studies, which suggested that a host cell factor was involved with the function of the vesicular stomatitis virus RNA polymerase, and others that indicated that several animal viruses displayed an association with host cell cytoskeletal elements during their replication cycles. We show evidence in this report of a host cell protein that seems to have a functional role in interacting with the virion polymerase.

  14. Infection dynamics in a traveller with persistent shedding of Zika virus RNA in semen for six months after returning from Haiti to Italy, January 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzon, Luisa; Pacenti, Monia; Franchin, Elisa; Lavezzo, Enrico; Trevisan, Marta; Sgarabotto, Dino; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-08-11

    We describe the dynamics of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in a man in his early 40s who developed fever and rash after returning from Haiti to Italy, in January 2016. Follow-up laboratory testing demonstrated detectable ZIKV RNA in plasma up to day 9 after symptom onset and in urine and saliva up to days 15 and 47, respectively. Notably, persistent shedding of ZIKV RNA was demonstrated in semen, still detectable at 181 days after onset. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  15. Production of cucumber mosaic virus RNA5 and its role in recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wispelaere, Melissanne; Rao, A L N

    2009-02-05

    Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) is a plant infecting tripartite positive-strand RNA virus. In addition to three genomic and two known subgenomic RNAs, CMV strains of subgroup II (e.g. Q-CMV), but not subgroup I (e.g. Fny-CMV), produce and package a redundant RNA5 encompassing the 3' 304-307 nucleotides of RNAs 2 and 3. The mechanism regulating RNA5 production and its role in CMV life cycle is unknown. In this study, transient expression of Q2 or Q3 by agroinfiltration into Nicotiana benthamiana plants resulted in efficient accumulation of RNA5 suggesting that its production is independent of CMV replication. Deletion and point mutations engineered into a highly conserved region (Box1) adjacent to the 5' end of RNA5 identified sequences required for its efficient production. An experimental system, involving a chimera of Q3 (Q3B3) characterized by having a 3' tRNA-like structure (3'TLS) from Brome mosaic virus (BMV) and RNA5 defective variants of Q1 (Q1Delta), Q2 (Q2Delta) and Q3B3 (Q3DeltaB3), was used to evaluate in vivo the contribution of RNA5 in promoting RNA recombination. Generation of precise homologous recombinants was strictly dependent on sequence identity. When both parental RNAs carried the Box1, recombination occurred preferentially within the Box1. In contrast, generation of non-homologous recombinants occurred only when Q1 and Q2 were competent to produce RNA5. A mechanistic model explaining the functional role played by the RNA5 in generating CMV recombinants was presented.

  16. A Cytoplasmic RNA Virus Alters the Function of the Cell Splicing Protein SRSF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Serrano, Efraín E; Fritch, Ethan J; Scholl, Elizabeth H; Sherry, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    To replicate efficiently, viruses must create favorable cell conditions and overcome cell antiviral responses. We previously reported that the reovirus protein μ2 from strain T1L, but not strain T3D, represses one antiviral response: alpha/beta interferon signaling. We report here that T1L, but not T3D, μ2 localizes to nuclear speckles, where it forms a complex with the mRNA splicing factor SRSF2 and alters its subnuclear localization. Reovirus replicates in cytoplasmic viral factories, and there is no evidence that reovirus genomic or messenger RNAs are spliced, suggesting that T1L μ2 might target splicing of cell RNAs. Indeed, RNA sequencing revealed that reovirus T1L, but not T3D, infection alters the splicing of transcripts for host genes involved in mRNA posttranscriptional modifications. Moreover, depletion of SRSF2 enhanced reovirus replication and cytopathic effect, suggesting that T1L μ2 modulation of splicing benefits the virus. This provides the first report of viral antagonism of the splicing factor SRSF2 and identifies the viral protein that determines strain-specific differences in cell RNA splicing.IMPORTANCE Efficient viral replication requires that the virus create favorable cell conditions. Many viruses accomplish this by repressing specific antiviral responses. We demonstrate here that some mammalian reoviruses, RNA viruses that replicate strictly in the cytoplasm, express a protein variant that localizes to nuclear speckles, where it targets a cell mRNA splicing factor. Infection with a reovirus strain that targets this splicing factor alters splicing of cell mRNAs involved in the maturation of many other cell mRNAs. Depletion of this cell splicing factor enhances reovirus replication and cytopathic effect. Our results provide the first evidence of viral antagonism of this splicing factor and suggest that downstream consequences to the cell are global and benefit the virus. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Capture of dengue viruses using antibody-integrated graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads produced using gas plasma technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAKUDO, AKIKAZU; VISWAN, ANCHU; CHOU, HAN; SASAKI, TADAHIRO; IKUTA, KAZUYOSHI; NAGATSU, MASAAKI

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant advances in medicine, global health is threatened by emerging infectious diseases caused by a number of viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne virus, which can be transmitted to humans via mosquito vectors. Previously, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan reported the country's first domestically acquired case of dengue fever for almost 70 years. To address this issue, it is important to develop novel technologies for the sensitive detection of DENV. The present study reported on the development of plasma-functionalized, graphite-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles (GrMNPs) conjugated with anti-DENV antibody for DENV capture. Radiofrequency wave-excited inductively-coupled Ar and ammonia gas plasmas were used to introduce amino groups onto the surface of the GrMNPs. The GrMNPs were then conjugated with an antibody against DENV, and the antibody-integrated magnetic beads were assessed for their ability to capture DENV. Beads incubated in a cell culture medium of DENV-infected mosquito cells were separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field and were then washed. The adsorption of DENV serotypes 1–4 onto the beads was confirmed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, which detected the presence of DENV genomic RNA on the GrMNPs. The methodology described in the present study, which employed the plasma-functionalization of GrMNPs to enable antibody-integration, represents a significant improvement in the detection of DENV. PMID:27221214

  18. Capture of dengue viruses using antibody-integrated graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads produced using gas plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Viswan, Anchu; Chou, Han; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-07-01

    Despite significant advances in medicine, global health is threatened by emerging infectious diseases caused by a number of viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito‑borne virus, which can be transmitted to humans via mosquito vectors. Previously, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan reported the country's first domestically acquired case of dengue fever for almost 70 years. To address this issue, it is important to develop novel technologies for the sensitive detection of DENV. The present study reported on the development of plasma-functionalized, graphite-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles (GrMNPs) conjugated with anti-DENV antibody for DENV capture. Radiofrequency wave‑excited inductively‑coupled Ar and ammonia gas plasmas were used to introduce amino groups onto the surface of the GrMNPs. The GrMNPs were then conjugated with an antibody against DENV, and the antibody‑integrated magnetic beads were assessed for their ability to capture DENV. Beads incubated in a cell culture medium of DENV‑infected mosquito cells were separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field and were then washed. The adsorption of DENV serotypes 1‑4 onto the beads was confirmed using reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction, which detected the presence of DENV genomic RNA on the GrMNPs. The methodology described in the present study, which employed the plasma-functionalization of GrMNPs to enable antibody‑integration, represents a significant improvement in the detection of DENV.

  19. Virus-Like Particles That Can Deliver Proteins and RNA | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present invention describes novel virus-like particles (VLPs) that are capable of binding to and replicating within a target mammalian cell, including human cells. The claimed VLPs are safer than viral delivery because they are incapable of re-infecting target cells. The National Cancer Institute's Protein Expression Laboratory seeks parties interested in licensing the novel delivery of RNA to mammalian cells using virus-like particles.

  20. Prevalence and Distribution of Leishmania RNA Virus 1 in Leishmania Parasites from French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginouvès, Marine; Simon, Stéphane; Bourreau, Eliane; Lacoste, Vincent; Ronet, Catherine; Couppié, Pierre; Nacher, Mathieu; Demar, Magalie; Prévot, Ghislaine

    2016-01-01

    In South America, the presence of the Leishmania RNA virus type 1 (LRV1) was described in Leishmania guyanensis and Leishmania braziliensis strains. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence distribution of LRV1 in Leishmania isolates in French Guiana given that, in this French overseas department, most Leishmania infections are due to these parasite species. The presence of the virus was observed in 74% of Leishmania spp. isolates, with a highest presence in the internal areas of the country.

  1. Aedes aegypti uses RNA interference in defense against Sindbis virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilusz Jeffrey

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi is an important anti-viral defense mechanism. The Aedes aegypti genome encodes RNAi component orthologs, however, most populations of this mosquito are readily infected by, and subsequently transmit flaviviruses and alphaviruses. The goal of this study was to use Ae. aegypti as a model system to determine how the mosquito's anti-viral RNAi pathway interacts with recombinant Sindbis virus (SINV; family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus. Results SINV (TR339-eGFP (+ strand RNA, infectious virus titers and infection rates transiently increased in mosquitoes following dsRNA injection to cognate Ago2, Dcr2, or TSN mRNAs. Detection of SINV RNA-derived small RNAs at 2 and 7 days post-infection in non-silenced mosquitoes provided important confirmation of RNAi pathway activity. Two different recombinant SINV viruses (MRE16-eGFP and TR339-eGFP with significant differences in infection kinetics were used to delineate vector/virus interactions in the midgut. We show virus-dependent effects on RNAi component transcript and protein levels during infection. Monitoring midgut Ago2, Dcr2, and TSN transcript levels during infection revealed that only TSN transcripts were significantly increased in midguts over blood-fed controls. Ago2 protein levels were depleted immediately following a non-infectious bloodmeal and varied during SINV infection in a virus-dependent manner. Conclusion We show that silencing RNAi components in Ae. aegypti results in transient increases in SINV replication. Furthermore, Ae. aegypti RNAi is active during SINV infection as indicated by production of virus-specific siRNAs. Lastly, the RNAi response varies in a virus-dependent manner. These data define important features of RNAi anti-viral defense in Ae. aegypti.

  2. Rescue of a Plant Negative-Strand RNA Virus from Cloned cDNA: Insights into Enveloped Plant Virus Movement and Morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Wang; Xiaonan Ma; ShaSha Qian; Xin Zhou; Kai Sun; Xiaolan Chen; Xueping Zhou; Jackson, Andrew O.; Zhenghe Li

    2015-01-01

    Reverse genetics systems have been established for all major groups of plant DNA and positive-strand RNA viruses, and our understanding of their infection cycles and pathogenesis has benefitted enormously from use of these approaches. However, technical difficulties have heretofore hampered applications of reverse genetics to plant negative-strand RNA (NSR) viruses. Here, we report recovery of infectious virus from cloned cDNAs of a model plant NSR, Sonchus yellow net rhabdovirus (SYNV). The ...

  3. SiRNA Inhibits Replication of Langat Virus, a Member of the Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Complex in Organotypic Rat Brain Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffioli, Carola; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L.; Engler, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus is the causative agent of tick-borne encephalitis, a potentially fatal neurological infection. Tick-borne encephalitis virus belongs to the family of flaviviruses and is transmitted by infected ticks. Despite the availability of vaccines, approximately 2000–3000 cases of tick-borne encephalitis occur annually in Europe for which no curative therapy is available. The antiviral effects of RNA mediated interference by small interfering RNA (siRNA) was evaluated in cell culture and organotypic hippocampal cultures. Langat virus, a flavivirus highly related to Tick-borne encephalitis virus exhibits low pathogenicity for humans but retains neurovirulence for rodents. Langat virus was used for the establishment of an in vitro model of tick-borne encephalitis. We analyzed the efficacy of 19 siRNA sequences targeting different regions of the Langat genome to inhibit virus replication in the two in vitro systems. The most efficient suppression of virus replication was achieved by siRNA sequences targeting structural genes and the 3′ untranslated region. When siRNA was administered to HeLa cells before the infection with Langat virus, a 96.5% reduction of viral RNA and more than 98% reduction of infectious virus particles was observed on day 6 post infection, while treatment after infection decreased the viral replication by more than 98%. In organotypic hippocampal cultures the replication of Langat virus was reduced by 99.7% by siRNA sequence D3. Organotypic hippocampal cultures represent a suitable in vitro model to investigate neuronal infection mechanisms and treatment strategies in a preserved three-dimensional tissue architecture. Our results demonstrate that siRNA is an efficient approach to limit Langat virus replication in vitro. PMID:22984545

  4. Expression of Bovine Leukemia Virus Genome is Blocked by a Nonimmunoglobulin Protein in Plasma from Infected Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, P.; Ferrer, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma of cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus contains a soluble factor that blocks the expression of the viral genome in cultured lymphocytes. The blocking factor is not present in plasma of bovine leukemia virus-free cattle or of cattle infected with common bovine viruses. Blocking of bovine leukemia virus expression by the plasma factor is reversible, and seems to be mediated by a nonimmunoglobulin protein molecule.

  5. Zn(2+ inhibits coronavirus and arterivirus RNA polymerase activity in vitro and zinc ionophores block the replication of these viruses in cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aartjan J W te Velthuis

    Full Text Available Increasing the intracellular Zn(2+ concentration with zinc-ionophores like pyrithione (PT can efficiently impair the replication of a variety of RNA viruses, including poliovirus and influenza virus. For some viruses this effect has been attributed to interference with viral polyprotein processing. In this study we demonstrate that the combination of Zn(2+ and PT at low concentrations (2 µM Zn(2+ and 2 µM PT inhibits the replication of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV and equine arteritis virus (EAV in cell culture. The RNA synthesis of these two distantly related nidoviruses is catalyzed by an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, which is the core enzyme of their multiprotein replication and transcription complex (RTC. Using an activity assay for RTCs isolated from cells infected with SARS-CoV or EAV--thus eliminating the need for PT to transport Zn(2+ across the plasma membrane--we show that Zn(2+ efficiently inhibits the RNA-synthesizing activity of the RTCs of both viruses. Enzymatic studies using recombinant RdRps (SARS-CoV nsp12 and EAV nsp9 purified from E. coli subsequently revealed that Zn(2+ directly inhibited the in vitro activity of both nidovirus polymerases. More specifically, Zn(2+ was found to block the initiation step of EAV RNA synthesis, whereas in the case of the SARS-CoV RdRp elongation was inhibited and template binding reduced. By chelating Zn(2+ with MgEDTA, the inhibitory effect of the divalent cation could be reversed, which provides a novel experimental tool for in vitro studies of the molecular details of nidovirus replication and transcription.

  6. Ultrastructure of the replication sites of positive-strand RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harak, Christian; Lohmann, Volker, E-mail: volker_lohmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de

    2015-05-15

    Positive strand RNA viruses replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells and induce intracellular membranous compartments harboring the sites of viral RNA synthesis. These replication factories are supposed to concentrate the components of the replicase and to shield replication intermediates from the host cell innate immune defense. Virus induced membrane alterations are often generated in coordination with host factors and can be grouped into different morphotypes. Recent advances in conventional and electron microscopy have contributed greatly to our understanding of their biogenesis, but still many questions remain how viral proteins capture membranes and subvert host factors for their need. In this review, we will discuss different representatives of positive strand RNA viruses and their ways of hijacking cellular membranes to establish replication complexes. We will further focus on host cell factors that are critically involved in formation of these membranes and how they contribute to viral replication. - Highlights: • Positive strand RNA viruses induce massive membrane alterations. • Despite the great diversity, replication complexes share many similarities. • Host factors play a pivotal role in replication complex biogenesis. • Use of the same host factors by several viruses hints to similar functions.

  7. The Ebola Virus VP30-NP Interaction Is a Regulator of Viral RNA Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Moyer, Crystal L.; Abelson, Dafna M.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann (Scripps)

    2016-10-18

    Filoviruses are capable of causing deadly hemorrhagic fevers. All nonsegmented negative-sense RNA-virus nucleocapsids are composed of a nucleoprotein (NP), a phosphoprotein (VP35) and a polymerase (L). However, the VP30 RNA-synthesis co-factor is unique to the filoviruses. The assembly, structure, and function of the filovirus RNA replication complex remain unclear. Here, we have characterized the interactions of Ebola, Sudan and Marburg virus VP30 with NP using in vitro biochemistry, structural biology and cell-based mini-replicon assays. We have found that the VP30 C-terminal domain interacts with a short peptide in the C-terminal region of NP. Further, we have solved crystal structures of the VP30-NP complex for both Ebola and Marburg viruses. These structures reveal that a conserved, proline-rich NP peptide binds a shallow hydrophobic cleft on the VP30 C-terminal domain. Structure-guided Ebola virus VP30 mutants have altered affinities for the NP peptide. Correlation of these VP30-NP affinities with the activity for each of these mutants in a cell-based mini-replicon assay suggests that the VP30-NP interaction plays both essential and inhibitory roles in Ebola virus RNA synthesis.

  8. Persistence of dengue virus RNA in dried Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) exposed to natural tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangs, Michael J; Pudiantari, Ratna; Gionar, Yoyo R

    2007-01-01

    Aedes aegypti (L.) is the primary vector of dengue viruses, a group of four serotypic single-stranded RNA viruses. Dengue virus RNA can be readily detected in fresh or dried infected mosquitoes by using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The current study examined the persistence and limit of dengue virus RNA detection in infected Ae. aegypti killed and exposed to natural ambient tropical conditions of temperature and humidity. Under relatively harsh conditions, dengue RNA retained sufficient integrity to be detected in dried mosquitoes up to 13 wk after exposure to relatively high ambient temperatures (26.3-31.7 degrees C) and relative humidity (49.4-69.9%). These findings confirm that the necessity for testing either fresh or frozen mosquitoes is not a prerequisite when using RT-PCR as the viral detection method, and under particular epidemiological circumstances it allows for a more convenient means of conducting vector-virus surveillance activities where collection methods and logistics may preclude immediate testing or access to a cold chain.

  9. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus replication by single-stranded RNA structural mimics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert; Smolic; Martina; Smolic; John; H; Andorfer; Catherine; H; Wu; Robert; M; Smith; George; Y; Wu

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of hepatitis C virus (HCV) structural mimics of regulatory regions of the genome on HCV replication.METHODS: HCV RNA structural mimics were constructed and tested in a HCV genotype 1b aBB7 replicon,and a Japanese fulminant hepatitis-1 (JFH-1) HCV genotype 2a infection model.All sequences were computer-predicted to adopt stem-loop structures identical to the corresponding elements in full-length viral RNA.Huh7.5 cells bearing the BB7 replicon or infected with JFH-1 virus were trans...

  10. Suppression of RNA interference increases alphavirus replication and virus-associated mortality in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geiss Brian J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses can persistently infect and cause limited damage to mosquito vectors. RNA interference (RNAi is a mosquito antiviral response important in restricting RNA virus replication and has been shown to be active against some arboviruses. The goal of this study was to use a recombinant Sindbis virus (SINV; family Togaviridae; genus Alphavirus that expresses B2 protein of Flock House virus (FHV; family Nodaviridae; genus Alphanodavirus, a protein that inhibits RNAi, to determine the effects of linking arbovirus infection with RNAi inhibition. Results B2 protein expression from SINV (TE/3'2J inhibited the accumulation of non-specific small RNAs in Aedes aegypti mosquito cell culture and virus-specific small RNAs both in infected cell culture and Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. More viral genomic and subgenomic RNA accumulated in cells and mosquitoes infected with TE/3'2J virus expressing B2 (TE/3'2J/B2 compared to TE/3'2J and TE/3'2J virus expressing GFP. TE/3'2J/B2 exhibited increased infection rates, dissemination rates, and infectious virus titers in mosquitoes following oral bloodmeal. Following infectious oral bloodmeal, significantly more mosquitoes died when TE/3'2J/B2 was ingested. The virus was 100% lethal following intrathoracic inoculation of multiple mosquito species and lethality was dose-dependent in Ae. aegypti. Conclusion We show that RNAi is active in Ae. aegypti cell culture and that B2 protein inhibits RNAi in mosquito cells when expressed by a recombinant SINV. Also, SINV more efficiently replicates in mosquito cells when RNAi is inhibited. Finally, TE/3'2J/B2 kills mosquitoes in a dose-dependent manner independent of infection route and mosquito species.

  11. Influenza virus targets the mRNA export machinery and the nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterly, Neal; Tsai, Pei-Ling; van Deursen, Jan; Nussenzveig, Daniel R; Wang, Yaming; Faria, Paula A; Levay, Agata; Levy, David E; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2007-02-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza A virus is a major virulence factor that is essential for pathogenesis. NS1 functions to impair innate and adaptive immunity by inhibiting host signal transduction and gene expression, but its mechanisms of action remain to be fully elucidated. We show here that NS1 forms an inhibitory complex with NXF1/TAP, p15/NXT, Rae1/mrnp41, and E1B-AP5, which are key constituents of the mRNA export machinery that interact with both mRNAs and nucleoporins to direct mRNAs through the nuclear pore complex. Increased levels of NXF1, p15, or Rae1 revert the mRNA export blockage induced by NS1. Furthermore, influenza virus down-regulates Nup98, a nucleoporin that is a docking site for mRNA export factors. Reduced expression of these mRNA export factors renders cells highly permissive to influenza virus replication, demonstrating that proper levels of key constituents of the mRNA export machinery protect against influenza virus replication. Because Nup98 and Rae1 are induced by interferons, down-regulation of this pathway is likely a viral strategy to promote viral replication. These findings demonstrate previously undescribed influenza-mediated viral-host interactions and provide insights into potential molecular therapies that may interfere with influenza infection.

  12. High content image-based screening of a protease inhibitor library reveals compounds broadly active against Rift Valley fever virus and other highly pathogenic RNA viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini Mudhasani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High content image-based screening was developed as an approach to test a protease inhibitor small molecule library for antiviral activity against Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV and to determine their mechanism of action. RVFV is the causative agent of severe disease of humans and animals throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Of the 849 compounds screened, 34 compounds exhibited ≥ 50% inhibition against RVFV. All of the hit compounds could be classified into 4 distinct groups based on their unique chemical backbone. Some of the compounds also showed broad antiviral activity against several highly pathogenic RNA viruses including Ebola, Marburg, Venezuela equine encephalitis, and Lassa viruses. Four hit compounds (C795-0925, D011-2120, F694-1532 and G202-0362, which were most active against RVFV and showed broad-spectrum antiviral activity, were selected for further evaluation for their cytotoxicity, dose response profile, and mode of action using classical virological methods and high-content imaging analysis. Time-of-addition assays in RVFV infections suggested that D011-2120 and G202-0362 targeted virus egress, while C795-0925 and F694-1532 inhibited virus replication. We showed that D011-2120 exhibited its antiviral effects by blocking microtubule polymerization, thereby disrupting the Golgi complex and inhibiting viral trafficking to the plasma membrane during virus egress. While G202-0362 also affected virus egress, it appears to do so by a different mechanism, namely by blocking virus budding from the trans Golgi. F694-1532 inhibited viral replication, but also appeared to inhibit overall cellular gene expression. However, G202-0362 and C795-0925 did not alter any of the morphological features that we examined and thus may prove to be good candidates for antiviral drug development. Overall this work demonstrates that high-content image analysis can be used to screen chemical libraries for new antivirals and to determine their

  13. Space constrained homology modelling: the paradigm of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of dengue (type II) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kontopoulos, Dimitrios Georgios; Kossida, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure is more conserved than sequence in nature. In this direction we developed a novel methodology that significantly improves conventional homology modelling when sequence identity is low, by taking into consideration 3D structural features of the template, such as size and shape. Herein, our new homology modelling approach was applied to the homology modelling of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of dengue (type II) virus. The RdRp of dengue was chosen due to the low sequence similarity shared between the dengue virus polymerase and the available templates, while purposely avoiding to use the actual X-ray structure that is available for the dengue RdRp. The novel approach takes advantage of 3D space corresponding to protein shape and size by creating a 3D scaffold of the template structure. The dengue polymerase model built by the novel approach exhibited all features of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and was almost identical to the X-ray structure of the dengue RdRp, as opposed to the model built by conventional homology modelling. Therefore, we propose that the space-aided homology modelling approach can be of a more general use to homology modelling of enzymes sharing low sequence similarity with the template structures.

  14. Variability and host-dependency of RNA virus mutation rates

    OpenAIRE

    Combe, Marine

    2015-01-01

    Los virus de ARN pueden infectar todo tipo de organismos, desde los procariotas a los eucariotas superiores, y estos agentes infecciosos parecen particularmente propensos a causar enfermedades emergentes tanto en humanos, animales, como en plantas. Su habilidad para escapar del sistema inmunitario, evadir estrategias antivirales o infectar a nuevas especies son aspecto más de su rápida evolución. Por lo tanto, comprender los procesos básicos del la evolución de los virus de ARN podría ayudar ...

  15. RNA interference with special reference to combating viruses of crustacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fauce, Kathy; Owens, Leigh

    2012-09-01

    RNA interference has evolved from being a nuisance biological phenomenon to a valuable research tool to determine gene function and as a therapeutic agent. Since pioneering observations regarding RNA interference were first reported in the 1990s from the nematode worm, plants and Drosophila, the RNAi phenomenon has since been reported in all eukaryotic organisms investigated from protozoans, plants, arthropods, fish and mammals. The design of RNAi therapeutics has progressed rapidly to designing dsRNA that can specifically and effectively silence disease related genes. Such technology has demonstrated the effective use of short interfering as therapeutics. In the absence of a B cell lineage in arthropods, and hence no long term vaccination strategy being available, the introduction of using RNA interference in crustacea may serve as an effective control and preventative measure for viral diseases for application in aquaculture.

  16. Systematic identification of spontaneous preterm birth-associated RNA transcripts in maternal plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen S C Chim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spontaneous preterm birth (SPB, before 37 gestational weeks is a major cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity, but its pathogenesis remains unclear. Studies on SPB have been hampered by the limited availability of markers for SPB in predelivery clinical samples that can be easily compared with gestational age-matched normal controls. We hypothesize that SPB involves aberrant placental RNA expression, and that such RNA transcripts can be detected in predelivery maternal plasma samples, which can be compared with gestational age-matched controls. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using gene expression microarray to profile essentially all human genes, we observed that 426 probe signals were changed by >2.9-fold in the SPB placentas, compared with the spontaneous term birth (STB placentas. Among the genes represented by those probes, we observed an over-representation of functions in RNA stabilization, extracellular matrix binding, and acute inflammatory response. Using RT-quantitative PCR, we observed differences in the RNA concentrations of certain genes only between the SPB and STB placentas, but not between the STB and term elective cesarean delivery placentas. Notably, 36 RNA transcripts were observed at placental microarray signals higher than a threshold, which indicated the possibility of their detection in maternal plasma. Among them, the IL1RL1 mRNA was tested in plasma samples taken from 37 women. It was detected in 6 of 10 (60% plasma samples collected during the presentation of preterm labor (≤32.9 weeks in women eventually giving SPB, but was detected in only 1 of 27 (4% samples collected during matched gestational weeks from women with no preterm labor (Fisher exact test, p = 0.00056. CONCLUSION: We have identified 36 SPB-associated RNA transcripts, which are possibly detectable in maternal plasma. We have illustrated that the IL1RL1 mRNA was more frequently detected in predelivery maternal plasma samples collected from women

  17. Looking for inhibitors of the dengue virus NS5 RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase using a molecular docking approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galiano V

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vicente Galiano,1 Pablo Garcia-Valtanen,2 Vicente Micol,3,4 José Antonio Encinar3 1Physics and Computer Architecture Department, Miguel Hernández University (UMH, Elche, Spain; 2Experimental Therapeutics Laboratory, Hanson and Sansom Institute for Health Research, School of Pharmacy and Medical Science, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; 3Molecular and Cell Biology Institute, Miguel Hernández University (UMH, Elche, Spain; 4CIBER: CB12/03/30038, Physiopathology of the Obesity and Nutrition, CIBERobn, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Palma de Mallorca, Spain Abstract: The dengue virus (DENV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5 contains both an N-terminal methyltransferase domain and a C-terminal RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domain. Polymerase activity is responsible for viral RNA synthesis by a de novo initiation mechanism and represents an attractive target for antiviral therapy. The incidence of DENV has grown rapidly and it is now estimated that half of the human population is at risk of becoming infected with this virus. Despite this, there are no effective drugs to treat DENV infections. The present in silico study aimed at finding new inhibitors of the NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of the four serotypes of DENV. We used a chemical library comprising 372,792 nonnucleotide compounds (around 325,319 natural compounds to perform molecular docking experiments against a binding site of the RNA template tunnel of the virus polymerase. Compounds with high negative free energy variation (ΔG <-10.5 kcal/mol were selected as putative inhibitors. Additional filters for favorable druggability and good absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity were applied. Finally, after the screening process was completed, we identified 39 compounds as lead DENV polymerase inhibitor candidates. Potentially, these compounds could act as efficient DENV polymerase inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. Keywords: virtual screening, molecular

  18. Cigarette smoking substantially alters plasma microRNA profiles in healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kei; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Tatsumi, Naoyuki; Fukami, Tatsuki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Miki, E-mail: nmiki@p.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2013-10-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are receiving attention as potential biomarkers of various diseases, including cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular disease. However, it is unknown whether the levels of circulating miRNAs in a healthy subject might vary with external factors in daily life. In this study, we investigated whether cigarette smoking, a habit that has spread throughout the world and is a risk factor for various diseases, affects plasma miRNA profiles. We determined the profiles of 11 smokers and 7 non-smokers by TaqMan MicroRNA array analysis. A larger number of miRNAs were detected in smokers than in non-smokers, and the plasma levels of two-thirds of the detected miRNAs (43 miRNAs) were significantly higher in smokers than in non-smokers. A principal component analysis of the plasma miRNA profiles clearly separated smokers and non-smokers. Twenty-four of the miRNAs were previously reported to be potential biomarkers of disease, suggesting the possibility that smoking status might interfere with the diagnosis of disease. Interestingly, we found that quitting smoking altered the plasma miRNA profiles to resemble those of non-smokers. These results suggested that the differences in the plasma miRNA profiles between smokers and non-smokers could be attributed to cigarette smoking. In addition, we found that an acute exposure of ex-smokers to cigarette smoke (smoking one cigarette) did not cause a dramatic change in the plasma miRNA profile. In conclusion, we found that repeated cigarette smoking substantially alters the plasma miRNA profile, interfering with the diagnosis of disease or signaling potential smoking-related diseases. - Highlights: • Plasma miRNA profiles were unambiguously different between smokers and non-smokers. • Smoking status might interfere with the diagnosis of disease using plasma miRNAs. • Changes of plasma miRNA profiles may be a signal of smoking-related diseases.

  19. RNA Interference with Special Reference to Combating Viruses of Crustacea

    OpenAIRE

    La Fauce, Kathy; Owens, Leigh

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference has evolved from being a nuisance biological phenomenon to a valuable research tool to determine gene function and as a therapeutic agent. Since pioneering observations regarding RNA interference were first reported in the 1990s from the nematode worm, plants and Drosophila, the RNAi phenomenon has since been reported in all eukaryotic organisms investigated from protozoans, plants, arthropods, fish and mammals. The design of RNAi therapeutics has progressed rapidly to design...

  20. Dynamics of small RNA profiles of virus and host origin in wheat cultivars synergistically infected by Wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus: virus infection caused a drastic shift in the endogenous small RNA profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M; Graybosch, Robert A; French, Roy; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Co-infection of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, a Tritimovirus) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, a Poacevirus) of the family Potyviridae causes synergistic interaction. In this study, the effects of the synergistic interaction between WSMV and TriMV on endogenous and virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) were examined in susceptible ('Arapahoe') and temperature-sensitive resistant ('Mace') wheat cultivars at 18°C and 27°C. Single and double infections in wheat caused a shift in the profile of endogenous small RNAs from 24 nt being the most predominant in healthy plants to 21 nt in infected wheat. Massive amounts of 21 and 22 nt vsiRNAs accumulated in singly and doubly infected Arapahoe at both temperatures and in Mace at 27°C but not 18°C. The plus- and minus-sense vsiRNAs were distributed throughout the genomic RNAs in Arapahoe at both temperature regimens and in Mace at 27°C, although some regions served as hot-spots, spawning an excessive number of vsiRNAs. The vsiRNA peaks were conserved among cultivars, suggesting that the Dicer-like enzymes in susceptible and resistant cultivars similarly accessed the genomic RNAs of WSMV or TriMV. Accumulation of large amounts of vsiRNAs in doubly infected plants suggests that the silencing suppressor proteins encoded by TriMV and WSMV do not prevent the formation of vsiRNAs; thus, the synergistic effect observed is independent from RNA-silencing mediated vsiRNA biogenesis. The high-resolution map of endogenous and vsiRNAs from WSMV- and/or TriMV-infected wheat cultivars may form a foundation for understanding the virus-host interactions, the effect of synergistic interactions on host defense, and virus resistance mechanisms in wheat.

  1. Statoviruses, A novel taxon of RNA viruses present in the gastrointestinal tracts of diverse mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowski, Andrew B; Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Lim, Efrem S; Zhao, Guoyan; Brenchley, Jason M; Barouch, Dan H; Thakwalakwa, Chrissie; Manary, Mark J; Holtz, Lori R; Wang, David

    2017-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing has expanded our understanding of the viral populations that constitute the mammalian virome. We describe a novel taxon of viruses named Statoviruses, for Stool associated Tombus-like viruses, present in multiple metagenomic datasets. These viruses define a novel clade that is phylogenetically related to the RNA virus families Tombusviridae and Flaviviridae. Five distinct statovirus types were identified in human, macaque, mouse, and cow gastrointestinal tract samples. The prototype genome, statovirus A, was frequently identified in macaque stool samples from multiple geographically distinct cohorts. Another genome, statovirus C1, was discovered in a stool sample from a human child with fever, cough, and rash. Further experimental data will clarify whether these viruses are infectious to mammals or if they originate from another source present in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract.

  2. Deletion analysis of the 5' untranslated leader sequence of tobacco mosaic virus RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Takamatsu, N; Watanabe, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Shiba, T.; Meshi, T; Okada, Y.

    1991-01-01

    To determine the sequences essential for viral multiplication in the 5' untranslated leader sequence of tobacco mosaic virus RNA, mutant TMV-L (a tomato strain) RNAs which carry several deletions in this 71-nucleotide sequence were constructed by an in vitro transcription system and their multiplication was analyzed by introducing mutant RNA into tobacco protoplasts by electroporation. Large deletions of the sequence from nucleotides 9 to 47 or 25 to 71 abolished viral multiplication; when ab...

  3. Expanding our Understanding of the Seaweed Holobiont: RNA Viruses of the Red Alga Delisea pulchra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachnit, Tim; Thomas, Torsten; Steinberg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Marine seaweeds are holobionts comprised of the macroalgal hosts and their associated microbiota. While the composition of the bacterial component of seaweed microbiomes is increasingly studied, almost nothing is known about the presence, diversity and composition of viruses in macroalgae in situ. In this study, we characterize for the first time the viruses associated with a red macroalga, Delisea pulchra. Using transmission electron microscopy we identified diverse morphotypes of virus-like particles in D. pulchra ranging from icosahedral to bacilliform to coiled pleomorphic as well as bacteriophages. Virome sequencing revealed the presence of a diverse group of dsRNA viruses affiliated to the genus Totivirus, known to infect plant pathogenic fungi. We further identified a ssRNA virus belonging to the order Picornavirales with a close phylogenetic relationship to a pathogenic virus infecting marine diatoms. The results of this study shed light on a so far neglected part of the seaweed holobiont, and suggest that some of the identified viruses may be possible pathogens for a host that is already known to be significantly impacted by bacterial infections.

  4. Differential expression of miRNA-423-5p in serum from cattle challenged with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an RNA virus that causes respiratory disease in cattle. MicroRNAs have been proposed as indicators of exposure to respiratory pathogens. However, microRNA profiles in cattle exposed to BVDV are currently nonexistent and few studies have been reported; therefore,...

  5. The H4 subunit of vaccinia virus RNA polymerase is not required for transcription initiation at a viral late promoter.

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, C F; Coroneos, A M

    1995-01-01

    Chromatography of RNA polymerase purified from vaccinia virions and from vaccinia virus-infected HeLa cells resulted in the separation of populations active for early and late transcription. An RNA polymerase population immunodepleted for the vaccinia virus H4 gene peptide could support late transcription.

  6. Annexin A2 binds RNA and reduces the frameshifting efficiency of infectious bronchitis virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyun Kwak

    Full Text Available Annexin A2 (ANXA2 is a protein implicated in diverse cellular functions, including exocytosis, DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. It was recently proposed to be involved in RNA metabolism because it was shown to associate with some cellular mRNA. Here, we identified ANXA2 as a RNA binding protein (RBP that binds IBV (Infectious Bronchitis Virus pseudoknot RNA. We first confirmed the binding of ANXA2 to IBV pseudoknot RNA by ultraviolet crosslinking and showed its binding to RNA pseudoknot with ANXA2 protein in vitro and in the cells. Since the RNA pseudoknot located in the frameshifting region of IBV was used as bait for cellular RBPs, we tested whether ANXA2 could regulate the frameshfting of IBV pseudoknot RNA by dual luciferase assay. Overexpression of ANXA2 significantly reduced the frameshifting efficiency from IBV pseudoknot RNA and knockdown of the protein strikingly increased the frameshifting efficiency. The results suggest that ANXA2 is a cellular RBP that can modulate the frameshifting efficiency of viral RNA, enabling it to act as an anti-viral cellular protein, and hinting at roles in RNA metabolism for other cellular mRNAs.

  7. The structure of a rigorously conserved RNA element within the SARS virus genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Robertson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have solved the three-dimensional crystal structure of the stem-loop II motif (s2m RNA element of the SARS virus genome to 2.7-A resolution. SARS and related coronaviruses and astroviruses all possess a motif at the 3' end of their RNA genomes, called the s2m, whose pathogenic importance is inferred from its rigorous sequence conservation in an otherwise rapidly mutable RNA genome. We find that this extreme conservation is clearly explained by the requirement to form a highly structured RNA whose unique tertiary structure includes a sharp 90 degrees kink of the helix axis and several novel longer-range tertiary interactions. The tertiary base interactions create a tunnel that runs perpendicular to the main helical axis whose interior is negatively charged and binds two magnesium ions. These unusual features likely form interaction surfaces with conserved host cell components or other reactive sites required for virus function. Based on its conservation in viral pathogen genomes and its absence in the human genome, we suggest that these unusual structural features in the s2m RNA element are attractive targets for the design of anti-viral therapeutic agents. Structural genomics has sought to deduce protein function based on three-dimensional homology. Here we have extended this approach to RNA by proposing potential functions for a rigorously conserved set of RNA tertiary structural interactions that occur within the SARS RNA genome itself. Based on tertiary structural comparisons, we propose the s2m RNA binds one or more proteins possessing an oligomer-binding-like fold, and we suggest a possible mechanism for SARS viral RNA hijacking of host protein synthesis, both based upon observed s2m RNA macromolecular mimicry of a relevant ribosomal RNA fold.

  8. Clinical performance of the new Roche COBAS (R) TaqMan HCV test and high pure system for extraction, detection and quantitation of HCV RNA in plasma and serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.C. Gelderblom; S. Menting; M.G. Beld

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the Roche COBAS (R) TaqMan HCV Test For Use With The High Pure System (TaqMan HPS; Roche Diagnostics), for the extraction, detection and quantitation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in serum or plasma of HCV-infected individuals. The TaqMan HPS is a real-time PCR assay with a reported li

  9. Inhibition of dengue virus entry and multiplication into monocytes using RNA interference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdelfatah Alhoot

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue infection ranks as one of the most significant viral diseases of the globe. Currently, there is no specific vaccine or antiviral therapy for prevention or treatment. Monocytes/macrophages are the principal target cells for dengue virus and are responsible for disseminating the virus after its transmission. Dengue virus enters target cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis after the viral envelope protein E attaches to the cell surface receptor. This study aimed to investigate the effect of silencing the CD-14 associated molecule and clathrin-mediated endocytosis using siRNA on dengue virus entry into monocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene expression analysis showed a significant down-regulation of the target genes (82.7%, 84.9 and 76.3% for CD-14 associated molecule, CLTC and DNM2 respectively in transfected monocytes. The effect of silencing of target genes on dengue virus entry into monocytes was investigated by infecting silenced and non-silenced monocytes with DENV-2. Results showed a significant reduction of infected cells (85.2%, intracellular viral RNA load (73.0%, and extracellular viral RNA load (63.0% in silenced monocytes as compared to non-silenced monocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Silencing the cell surface receptor and clathrin mediated endocytosis using RNA interference resulted in inhibition of the dengue virus entry and subsequently multiplication of the virus in the monocytes. This might serve as a novel promising therapeutic target to attenuate dengue infection and thus reduce transmission as well as progression to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  10. The p122 subunit of Tobacco Mosaic Virus replicase is a potent silencing suppressor and compromises both small interfering RNA- and microRNA-mediated pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Tibor; Bovi, Aurelie; Dalmay, Tamás; Burgyán, József

    2007-11-01

    One of the functions of RNA silencing in plants is to defend against molecular parasites, such as viruses, retrotransposons, and transgenes. Plant viruses are inducers, as well as targets, of RNA silencing-based antiviral defense. Replication intermediates or folded viral RNAs activate RNA silencing, generating small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which are the key players in the antiviral response. Viruses are able to counteract RNA silencing by expressing silencing-suppressor proteins. It has been shown that many of the identified silencing-suppressor proteins bind long double-stranded RNA or siRNAs and thereby prevent assembly of the silencing effector complexes. In this study, we show that the 122-kDa replicase subunit (p122) of crucifer-infecting Tobacco mosaic virus (cr-TMV) is a potent silencing-suppressor protein. We found that the p122 protein preferentially binds to double-stranded 21-nucleotide (nt) siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) intermediates with 2-nt 3' overhangs inhibiting the incorporation of siRNA and miRNA into silencing-related complexes (e.g., RNA-induced silencing complex [RISC]) both in vitro and in planta but cannot interfere with previously programmed RISCs. In addition, our results also suggest that the virus infection and/or sequestration of the siRNA and miRNA molecules by p122 enhances miRNA accumulation despite preventing its methylation. However, the p122 silencing suppressor does not prevent the methylation of certain miRNAs in hst-15 mutants, in which the nuclear export of miRNAs is compromised.

  11. Extracellular tumor-related mRNA in plasma of lymphoma patients and survival implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Garcia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We studied anomalous extracellular mRNAs in plasma from patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL and their survival implications. mRNAs studied have been reported in the literature as markers of poor (BCL2, CCND2, MYC and favorable outcome (LMO2, BCL6, FN1 in tumors. These markers were also analyzed in lymphoma tissues to test possible associations with their presence in plasma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: mRNA from 42 plasma samples and 12 tumors from patients with DLBCL was analyzed by real-time PCR. Samples post-treatment were studied. The immunohistochemistry of BCL2 and BCL6 was defined. Presence of circulating tumor cells was determined by analyzing the clonality of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes by PCR. In DLBCL, MYC mRNA was associated with short overall survival. mRNA targets with unfavorable outcome in tumors were associated with characteristics indicative of poor prognosis, with partial treatment response and with short progression-free survival in patients with complete response. In patients with low IPI score, unfavorable mRNA targets were related to shorter overall survival, partial response, high LDH levels and death. mRNA disappeared in post-treatment samples of patients with complete response, and persisted in those with partial response or death. No associations were found between circulating tumor cells and plasma mRNA. Absence of BCL6 protein in tumors was associated with presence of unfavorable plasma mRNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Through a non-invasive procedure, tumor-derived mRNAs can be obtained in plasma. mRNA detected in plasma did not proceed from circulating tumor cells. In our study, unfavorable targets in plasma were associated with poor prognosis in B-cell lymphomas, mainly MYC mRNA. Moreover, the unfavorable targets in plasma could help us to classify patients with poor outcome within the good prognosis group according to IPI.

  12. Expression of IMP1 enhances production of murine leukemia virus vector by facilitating viral genomic RNA packaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Mai

    Full Text Available Murine leukemia virus (MLV-based retroviral vector is widely used for gene transfer. Efficient packaging of the genomic RNA is critical for production of high-titer virus. Here, we report that expression of the insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 1 (IMP1 enhanced the production of infectious MLV vector. Overexpression of IMP1 increased the stability of viral genomic RNA in virus producer cells and packaging of the RNA into progeny virus in a dose-dependent manner. Downregulation of IMP1 in virus producer cells resulted in reduced production of the retroviral vector. These results indicate that IMP1 plays a role in regulating the packaging of MLV genomic RNA and can be used for improving production of retroviral vectors.

  13. Expression of IMP1 enhances production of murine leukemia virus vector by facilitating viral genomic RNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Yun; Gao, Guangxia

    2010-12-29

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based retroviral vector is widely used for gene transfer. Efficient packaging of the genomic RNA is critical for production of high-titer virus. Here, we report that expression of the insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 1 (IMP1) enhanced the production of infectious MLV vector. Overexpression of IMP1 increased the stability of viral genomic RNA in virus producer cells and packaging of the RNA into progeny virus in a dose-dependent manner. Downregulation of IMP1 in virus producer cells resulted in reduced production of the retroviral vector. These results indicate that IMP1 plays a role in regulating the packaging of MLV genomic RNA and can be used for improving production of retroviral vectors.

  14. Varroa destructor Macula-like virus, Lake Sinai virus and other new RNA viruses in wild bumblebee hosts (Bombus pascuorum, Bombus lapidarius and Bombus pratorum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Laurian; Smagghe, Guy; de Graaf, Dirk C; Meeus, Ivan

    2016-02-01

    Pollinators such as bumblebees (Bombus spp.) are in decline worldwide which poses a threat not only for ecosystem biodiversity but also to human crop production services. One main cause of pollinator decline may be the infection and transmission of diseases including RNA viruses. Recently, new viruses have been discovered in honeybees, but information on the presence of these in wild bumblebees is largely not available. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of new RNA viruses in Bombus species, and can report for the first time Varroa destructor Macula-like virus (VdMLV) and Lake Sinai virus (LSV) infection in multiple wild bumblebee hosts of Bombus pascuorum, Bombus lapidarius and Bombus pratorum. We sampled in 4 locations in Flanders, Belgium. Besides, we confirmed Slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV) in wild bumblebees, but no positive samples were obtained for Big Sioux river virus (BSRV). Secondly, we screened for the influence of apiaries on the prevalence of these viruses. Our results indicated a location effect for the prevalence of VdMLV in Bombus species, with a higher prevalence in the proximity of honeybee apiaries mainly observed in one location. For LSV, the prevalence was not different in the proximity or at a 1.5 km-distance of apiaries, but we reported a different isolate with similarities to LSV-2 and "LSV-clade A" as described by Ravoet et al. (2015), which was detected both in Apis mellifera and Bombus species. In general, our results indicate the existence of a disease pool of new viruses that seems to be associated to a broad range of Apoidae hosts, including multiple Bombus species.

  15. Detection of Ebola Virus RNA through Aerosol Sampling of Animal Biosafety Level 4 Rooms Housing Challenged Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-02

    301- 619-4768(f). 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Title: Detection of Ebola Virus RNA through Aerosol Sampling of Animal Biosafety Level 9 4...embedded in the texts. This is the first report demonstrating detection of Ebola virus 17 RNA from animal rooms housing infected nonhuman primates and...on Ebola virus disease and NHP animal models 34 of filovirus infections 35 • Dr. Robert Hawley, Private Consultant, bobhawley226@gmail.com, Former

  16. Sequences locating the 5' ends of the major simian virus 40 late mRNA forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, M; Ghosh, P K; Norkin, L C; Weissman, S M

    1983-01-01

    The 5' sequences of late mRNA specified by several constructed or naturally occurring deletion or duplication mutants of simian virus 40 were examined. The mutants included viruses with various small deletions centered about 25 nucleotides upstream from the major transcription initiation site, as well as viruses containing tandem duplications of a sequence of 50 nucleotides or less embedding the major transcription initiation site. The results show that the sequences 25 to 30 nucleotides upstream from the major initiation site in the position of the TATA box of other polymerase II promoters are not essential for the precise localization of the initiation site of late mRNA. Rather, we deduce that the major late mRNA start site is determined primarily by sequences located very close to the initiation site, and that the relative abundance of the 5' ends with this initiation site is modulated by nearby downstream sequences. Modification of six nucleotides adjacent upstream to the initiation site almost completely prevents the utilization of this site. Various deletions and substitutions of sequences 21 nucleotides or more downstream from the major initiation site causes upstream shifts in the localization of the most abundantly utilized 5' ends. The sequences immediately downstream from the major simian virus 40 initiation sites contain inverted symmetries that could give rise to secondary structures in either single-stranded DNA or RNA; the possibility that these inverted symmetries function in transcription initiation at the level of DNA structure rather than in RNA stabilization is discussed. Finally, we present additional evidence that precursor species with certain 5' termini are selectively spliced to form 19S RNA, whereas other 5' termini are preferred for forming the 16S RNA splice. We discuss the possibility that this is a consequence of the influence of leader structure on downstream splicing events. Images PMID:6194314

  17. Molecular modeling of epsilon RNA from hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huai Ren Pan; Hai Jun Zhu; Zhong Rong Song; Xu Dong Zhang; Huai Cao

    2009-01-01

    An initial model of the HBV epsilon RNA was built by the Biopolymer module of Insight Ⅱ. While its three-dimensional structure was obtained through structure optimization based on molecular dynamics simulation, the two active sites were found. A comparison with the experimental result indicated that the active sites may be the binding sites of the epsilon RNA in the RT-epsilon interaction. The result will be helpful to further discussion about the mechanism of RT-epsilon interaction and the study of HBV genome replication.

  18. Total Extracellular Small RNA Profiles from Plasma, Saliva, and Urine of Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeri, Ashish; Courtright, Amanda; Reiman, Rebecca; Carlson, Elizabeth; Beecroft, Taylor; Janss, Alex; Siniard, Ashley; Richholt, Ryan; Balak, Chris; Rozowsky, Joel; Kitchen, Robert; Hutchins, Elizabeth; Winarta, Joseph; McCoy, Roger; Anastasi, Matthew; Kim, Seungchan; Huentelman, Matthew; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Interest in circulating RNAs for monitoring and diagnosing human health has grown significantly. There are few datasets describing baseline expression levels for total cell-free circulating RNA from healthy control subjects. In this study, total extracellular RNA (exRNA) was isolated and sequenced from 183 plasma samples, 204 urine samples and 46 saliva samples from 55 male college athletes ages 18–25 years. Many participants provided more than one sample, allowing us to investigate variability in an individual’s exRNA expression levels over time. Here we provide a systematic analysis of small exRNAs present in each biofluid, as well as an analysis of exogenous RNAs. The small RNA profile of each biofluid is distinct. We find that a large number of RNA fragments in plasma (63%) and urine (54%) have sequences that are assigned to YRNA and tRNA fragments respectively. Surprisingly, while many miRNAs can be detected, there are few miRNAs that are consistently detected in all samples from a single biofluid, and profiles of miRNA are different for each biofluid. Not unexpectedly, saliva samples have high levels of exogenous sequence that can be traced to bacteria. These data significantly contribute to the current number of sequenced exRNA samples from normal healthy individuals. PMID:28303895

  19. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA–RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase

    OpenAIRE

    Lohman, Gregory J. S.; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M.; Cantor, Eric J.; Evans, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10−3 s−1 and KM < 1 nM at 25°C under conditions where T4 DNA ligase produced only 5′-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a KM ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of M...

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of a Double-Stranded RNA Virus from Avocado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Francisco; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Valverde, Rodrigo A.

    2012-01-01

    A number of avocado (Persea americana) cultivars are known to contain high-molecular-weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules for which a viral nature has been suggested, although sequence data are not available. Here we report the cloning and complete sequencing of a 13.5-kbp dsRNA virus isolated from avocado and show that it corresponds to the genome of a new species of the genus Endornavirus (family Endornaviridae), tentatively named Persea americana endornavirus (PaEV). PMID:22205720

  1. Detection of double-stranded RNA molecules and virus-like particles in different Mucor species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vágvölgyi, C; Magyar, K; Papp, T; Vastag, M; Ferenczy, L; Hornok, L; Fekete, C

    1998-02-01

    The presence of double-stranded RNA elements was examined in 123 strains representing 18 Mucor species. These genetic elements were found to be present in 6 strains: 1 M. aligarensis, 1 M. hiemalis, 2 M. corticolus, 1 M. mucedo and 1 M. ramannianus. Electrophoretic separation of the nucleic acids revealed 4 different RNA patterns, with 1 to 5 discrete dsRNA bands. The molecular weights corresponding to these bands were 1.42-4.15 x 10(6) D. Using electronmicroscopy, for the first time the presence of virus like particles in Mucor species has been revealed.

  2. Differences in HIV type 1 RNA plasma load profile of closely related cocirculating Ethiopian subtype C strains: C and C'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayele, Workenesh; Mekonnen, Yared; Messele, Tsehaynesh; Mengistu, Yohannes; Tsegaye, Aster; Bakker, Margreet; Berkhout, Ben; Dorigo-Zetsma, Wendelien; Wolday, Dawit; Goudsmit, Jaap; Coutinho, Roel; de Baar, Michel; Paxton, William A; Pollakis, Georgios

    2010-07-01

    Two HIV-1 subtype C subclusters have been identified in Ethiopia (C and C') with little knowledge regarding their biological or clinical differences. We longitudinally monitored HIV-1 viral loads and CD4(+) T cell counts for 130 subtype C-infected individuals from Ethiopia over 5 years. The genetic subclusters C and C' were determined and comparisons were made between the groups. None of the study individuals received antiretroviral therapy. Subcluster C' was found to be the more prevalent (72.3%) genotype circulating. Individuals infected with subcluster C' harbored higher viral loads in comparison to subcluster C-infected individuals when the CD4(+) T cell counts were high (500-900 cells/mm(3)), whereas at low CD4(+) T cell counts (0-150 cells/mm(3)) individuals infected with subcluster C viruses showed higher viral loads. We identified a greater number of deaths among individuals infected with subcluster C viruses in comparison to C'. Our results indicate that infection with subcluster C viruses leads to a more rapid onset of disease, despite the initial lower HIV-1 RNA plasma loads. Additionally, the higher viral loads seen for HIV-1 subcluster C' infections at higher CD4(+) T cell counts can help explain the higher prevalence of this subtype in Ethiopia.

  3. An RNA conformational shift in recent H5N1 influenza A viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gultyaev, A.P.; Heus, H.A.; Olsthoorn, R.C.

    2007-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of avian influenza are being caused by unusually virulent H5N1 strains. It is unknown what makes these recent H5N1 strains more aggressive than previously circulating strains. Here, we have compared more than 3000 RNA sequences of segment 8 of type A influenza viruses and found a un

  4. MiRNA expression signatures induced by Marek disease virus infection in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    MMicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Emerging evidence suggests that differential miRNA expression is associated with viral infection and cancer. Marek's disease virus infection induces lymphoma in chickens. However, the host...

  5. Virus-Like Particles of mRNA with Artificial Minimal Coat Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jekhmane, Shehrazade; Haas, De Rob; Paulino Da Silva Filho, Omar; Asbeck, van Alexander H.; Favretto, Marco Emanuele; Hernandez Garcia, Armando; Brock, Roland; Vries, De Renko

    2017-01-01

    RNA has enormous potential as a therapeutic, yet, the successful application depends on efficient delivery strategies. In this study, we demonstrate that a designed artificial viral coat protein, which self-assembles with DNA to form rod-shaped virus-like particles (VLPs), also encapsulates and

  6. Differential RNA silencing suppression activity of NS1 proteins from different influenza A virus strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. de Vries; J. Haasnoot; R. Fouchier; P. de Haan; B. Berkhout

    2009-01-01

    The NS1 gene of influenza A virus encodes a multi-functional protein that plays an important role in counteracting cellular antiviral mechanisms such as the interferon (IFN), protein kinase R and retinoic acid-inducible gene product I pathways. In addition, NS1 has recently been shown to have RNA in

  7. West Nile Virus RNA in Tissues from Donor Associated with Transmission to Organ Transplant Recipients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-11-19

    William Hale reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases’ dispatch, West Nile Virus RNA in Tissues from Donor Associated with Transmission to Organ Transplant Recipients.  Created: 11/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/21/2013.

  8. The NS3 protein of rice hoja blanca virus suppresses RNA silencing in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnettler, E.; Hemmes, J.C.; Goldbach, R.W.; Prins, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    The NS3 protein of the tenuivirus rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV) has previously been shown to represent the viral RNA interference (RNAi) suppressor and is active in both plant and insect cells by binding short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in vitro. Using a firefly luciferase-based silencing assay it is

  9. Engineering Cowpea Mosaic Virus RNA-2 into a vector to express heterologous proteins in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kodetham Gopinath,; Wellink, J.; Porta, C.; Taylor, K.M.; Lomonossoff, G.P.; Kammen, van A.

    2000-01-01

    series of new cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) RNA-2-based expression vectors were designed. The jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) was introduced between the movement protein (MP) and the large (L) coat protein or downstream of the small (S) coat protein. Release of the GFP inserted between the MP

  10. RNA structural constraints in the evolution of the influenza A virus genome NP segment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Gultyaev (Alexander); A. Tsyganov-Bodounov (Anton); M.I. Spronken (Monique); S. Van Der Kooij (Sander); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); R.C.L. Olsthoorn (René)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractConserved RNA secondary structures were predicted in the nucleoprotein (NP) segment of the influenza A virus genome using comparative sequence and structure analysis. A number of structural elements exhibiting nucleotide covariations were identified over the whole segment length, includi

  11. RNA sequence and transcriptional properties of the 3' end of the Newcastle disease virus genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurilla, M.G.; Stone, H.O.; Keene, J.D.

    1985-09-01

    The 3' end of the genomic RNA of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been sequenced and the leader RNA defined. Using hybridization to a 3'-end-labeled genome, leader RNA species from in vitro transcription reactions and from infected cell extracts were found to be 47 and 53 nucleotides long. In addition, the start site of the 3'-proximal mRNA was determined by sequence analysis of in vitro (beta-32P)GTP-labeled transcription products. The genomic sequence extending beyond the leader region demonstrated an open reading frame for at least 42 amino acids and probably represents the amino terminus of the nucleocapsid protein (NP). The terminal 8 nucleotides of the NDV genome were identical to those of measles virus and Sendai virus while the sequence of the distal half of the leader region was more similar to that of vesicular stomatitis virus. These data argue for strong evolutionary relatedness between the paramyxovirus and rhabdovirus groups.

  12. Metagenomic Analysis of Cucumber RNA from East Timor Reveals an Aphid lethal paralysis virus Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Solomon; Edwards, Owain R.; de Almeida, Luis; Ximenes, Abel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present here the first complete genomic Aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV) sequence isolated from cucumber plant RNA from East Timor. We compare it with two complete ALPV genome sequences from China, and one each from Israel, South Africa, and the United States. It most closely resembled the Chinese isolate LGH genome. PMID:28082492

  13. Original Antigenic Sin Response to RNA Viruses and Antiviral Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mee Sook; Kim, Jin Il; Park, Sehee; Lee, Ilseob

    2016-01-01

    The human immune system has evolved to fight against foreign pathogens. It plays a central role in the body's defense mechanism. However, the immune memory geared to fight off a previously recognized pathogen, tends to remember an original form of the pathogen when a variant form subsequently invades. This has been termed 'original antigenic sin'. This adverse immunological effect can alter vaccine effectiveness and sometimes cause enhanced pathogenicity or additional inflammatory responses, according to the type of pathogen and the circumstances of infection. Here we aim to give a simplified conceptual understanding of virus infection and original antigenic sin by comparing and contrasting the two examples of recurring infections such as influenza and dengue viruses in humans. PMID:27799871

  14. RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in human cells reveals requirements for de novo initiation and protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba-Reddy, Chennareddy V; Tragesser, Brady; Xu, Zhili; Stein, Barry; Ranjith-Kumar, C T; Kao, C Cheng

    2012-04-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a model positive-strand RNA virus whose replication has been studied in a number of surrogate hosts. In transiently transfected human cells, the BMV polymerase 2a activated signaling by the innate immune receptor RIG-I, which recognizes de novo-initiated non-self-RNAs. Active-site mutations in 2a abolished RIG-I activation, and coexpression of the BMV 1a protein stimulated 2a activity. Mutations previously shown to abolish 1a and 2a interaction prevented the 1a-dependent enhancement of 2a activity. New insights into 1a-2a interaction include the findings that helicase active site of 1a is required to enhance 2a polymerase activity and that negatively charged amino acid residues between positions 110 and 120 of 2a contribute to interaction with the 1a helicase-like domain but not to the intrinsic polymerase activity. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that the BMV 1a and 2a colocalized to perinuclear region in human cells. However, no perinuclear spherule-like structures were detected in human cells by immunoelectron microscopy. Sequencing of the RNAs coimmunoprecipitated with RIG-I revealed that the 2a-synthesized short RNAs are derived from the message used to translate 2a. That is, 2a exhibits a strong cis preference for BMV RNA2. Strikingly, the 2a RNA products had initiation sequences (5'-GUAAA-3') identical to those from the 5' sequence of the BMV genomic RNA2 and RNA3. These results show that the BMV 2a polymerase does not require other BMV proteins to initiate RNA synthesis but that the 1a helicase domain, and likely helicase activity, can affect RNA synthesis by 2a.

  15. Ultrasensitive Detection of RNA and DNA Viruses Simultaneously Using Duplex UNDP-PCR Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zengguo; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Du, Qian; Chang, Lingling; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Mixed infection of multiple viruses is common in modern intensive pig rearing. However, there are no methods available to detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system in preclinical level. In this study, we aimed to develop a duplex ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (duplex UNDP-PCR) that was able to simultaneously detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system. PCV2 and TGEV are selected as representatives of the two different types of viruses. PCV2 DNA and TGEV RNA were simultaneously released from the serum sample by boiling with lysis buffer, then magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles coated with single and/or duplex specific probes for TGEV and PCV2 were added to form a sandwich-like complex with nucleic acids released from viruses. After magnetic separation, DNA barcodes specific for PCV2 and TGEV were eluted using DTT and characterized by specific PCR assay for specific DNA barcodes subsequently. The duplex UNDP-PCR showed similar sensitivity as that of single UNDP-PCR and was able to detect 20 copies each of PCV2 and TGEV in the serum, showing approximately 250-fold more sensitivity than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR assays. No cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The positive detection rate of single MMPs- and duplex MMPs-based duplex UNDP-PCR was identical, with 29.6% for PCV2, 9.3% for TGEV and 3.7% for PCV2 and TGEV mixed infection. This duplex UNDP-PCR assay could detect TGEV (RNA virus) and PCV2 (DNA virus) from large-scale serum samples simultaneously without the need for DNA/RNA extraction, purification and reverse transcription of RNA, and showed a significantly increased positive detection rate for PCV2 (29%) and TGEV (11.7%) preclinical infection than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR. Therefore, the established duplex UNDP-PCR is a rapid and economical detection method, exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility. PMID:26544710

  16. Ultrasensitive Detection of RNA and DNA Viruses Simultaneously Using Duplex UNDP-PCR Assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Huang

    Full Text Available Mixed infection of multiple viruses is common in modern intensive pig rearing. However, there are no methods available to detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system in preclinical level. In this study, we aimed to develop a duplex ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (duplex UNDP-PCR that was able to simultaneously detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system. PCV2 and TGEV are selected as representatives of the two different types of viruses. PCV2 DNA and TGEV RNA were simultaneously released from the serum sample by boiling with lysis buffer, then magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles coated with single and/or duplex specific probes for TGEV and PCV2 were added to form a sandwich-like complex with nucleic acids released from viruses. After magnetic separation, DNA barcodes specific for PCV2 and TGEV were eluted using DTT and characterized by specific PCR assay for specific DNA barcodes subsequently. The duplex UNDP-PCR showed similar sensitivity as that of single UNDP-PCR and was able to detect 20 copies each of PCV2 and TGEV in the serum, showing approximately 250-fold more sensitivity than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR assays. No cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The positive detection rate of single MMPs- and duplex MMPs-based duplex UNDP-PCR was identical, with 29.6% for PCV2, 9.3% for TGEV and 3.7% for PCV2 and TGEV mixed infection. This duplex UNDP-PCR assay could detect TGEV (RNA virus and PCV2 (DNA virus from large-scale serum samples simultaneously without the need for DNA/RNA extraction, purification and reverse transcription of RNA, and showed a significantly increased positive detection rate for PCV2 (29% and TGEV (11.7% preclinical infection than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR. Therefore, the established duplex UNDP-PCR is a rapid and economical detection method, exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility.

  17. Co-infection Weakens Selection Against Epistatic Mutations in RNA Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froissart, Rémy; Wilke, Claus O.; Montville, Rebecca; Remold, Susanna K.; Chao, Lin; Turner, Paul E.

    2004-01-01

    Co-infection may be beneficial in large populations of viruses because it permits sexual exchange between viruses that is useful in combating the mutational load. This advantage of sex should be especially substantial when mutations interact through negative epistasis. In contrast, co-infection may be detrimental because it allows virus complementation, where inferior genotypes profit from superior virus products available within the cell. The RNA bacteriophage φ6 features a genome divided into three segments. Co-infection by multiple φ6 genotypes produces hybrids containing reassorted mixtures of the parental segments. We imposed a mutational load on φ6 populations by mixing the wild-type virus with three single mutants, each harboring a deleterious mutation on a different one of the three virus segments. We then contrasted the speed at which these epistatic mutations were removed from virus populations in the presence and absence of co-infection. If sex is a stronger force, we predicted that the load should be purged faster in the presence of co-infection. In contrast, if complementation is more important we hypothesized that mutations would be eliminated faster in the absence of co-infection. We found that the load was purged faster in the absence of co-infection, which suggests that the disadvantages of complementation can outweigh the benefits of sex, even in the presence of negative epistasis. We discuss our results in light of virus disease management and the evolutionary advantage of haploidy in biological populations. PMID:15454523

  18. Seminal Plasma HIV-1 RNA Concentration Is Strongly Associated with Altered Levels of Seminal Plasma Interferon-γ, Interleukin-17, and Interleukin-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jennifer C.; Anton, Peter A.; Baldwin, Gayle Cocita; Elliott, Julie; Anisman-Posner, Deborah; Tanner, Karen; Grogan, Tristan; Elashoff, David; Sugar, Catherine; Yang, Otto O.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Seminal plasma HIV-1 RNA level is an important determinant of the risk of HIV-1 sexual transmission. We investigated potential associations between seminal plasma cytokine levels and viral concentration in the seminal plasma of HIV-1-infected men. This was a prospective, observational study of paired blood and semen samples from 18 HIV-1 chronically infected men off antiretroviral therapy. HIV-1 RNA levels and cytokine levels in seminal plasma and blood plasma were measured and analyzed using simple linear regressions to screen for associations between cytokines and seminal plasma HIV-1 levels. Forward stepwise regression was performed to construct the final multivariate model. The median HIV-1 RNA concentrations were 4.42 log10 copies/ml (IQR 2.98, 4.70) and 2.96 log10 copies/ml (IQR 2, 4.18) in blood and seminal plasma, respectively. In stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis, blood HIV-1 RNA level (pplasma HIV-1 RNA level. After controlling for blood HIV-1 RNA level, seminal plasma HIV-1 RNA level was positively associated with interferon (IFN)-γ (p=0.03) and interleukin (IL)-17 (p=0.03) and negatively associated with IL-5 (p=0.0007) in seminal plasma. In addition to blood HIV-1 RNA level, cytokine profiles in the male genital tract are associated with HIV-1 RNA levels in semen. The Th1 and Th17 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-17 are associated with increased seminal plasma HIV-1 RNA, while the Th2 cytokine IL-5 is associated with decreased seminal plasma HIV-1 RNA. These results support the importance of genital tract immunomodulation in HIV-1 transmission. PMID:25209674

  19. Frequent Zika Virus Sexual Transmission and Prolonged Viral RNA Shedding in an Immunodeficient Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha K. Duggal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Circulation of Zika virus (ZIKV was first identified in the Western hemisphere in late 2014. Primarily transmitted through mosquito bite, ZIKV can also be transmitted through sex and from mother to fetus, and maternal ZIKV infection has been associated with fetal malformations. We assessed immunodeficient AG129 mice for their capacity to shed ZIKV in semen and to infect female mice via sexual transmission. Infectious virus was detected in semen between 7 and 21 days post-inoculation, and ZIKV RNA was detected in semen through 58 days post-inoculation. During mating, 73% of infected males transmitted ZIKV to uninfected females, and 50% of females became infected, with evidence of fetal infection in resulting pregnancies. Semen from vasectomized mice contained significantly lower levels of infectious virus, though sexual transmission still occurred. This model provides a platform for studying the kinetics of ZIKV sexual transmission and prolonged RNA shedding also observed in human semen.

  20. RNA aptamers inhibit the growth of the fish pathogen viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punnarak, Porntep; Santos, Mudjekeewis D; Hwang, Seong Don; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Kikuchi, Yo; Aoki, Takashi

    2012-12-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a serious disease impacting wild and cultured fish worldwide. Hence, an effective therapeutic method against VHSV infection needs to be developed. Aptamer technology is a new and promising method for diagnostics and therapeutics. It revolves around the use of an aptamer molecule, an artificial ligand (nucleic acid or protein), which has the capacity to recognize target molecules with high affinity and specificity. Here, we aimed at selecting RNA aptamers that can specifically bind to and inhibit the growth of a strain of fish VHSV both in vitro and in vivo. Three VHSV-specific RNA aptamers (F1, F2, and C6) were selected from a pool of artificially and randomly produced oligonucleotides using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. The three RNA aptamers showed obvious binding to VHSV in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay but not to other tested viruses. The RNA aptamers were tested for their ability to inhibit VHSV in vitro using hirame natural embryo (HINAE) cells. Cytopathic effect and plaque assays showed that all aptamers inhibited the growth of VHSV in HINAE cells. In vivo tests using RNA aptamers produced by Rhodovulum sulfidophilum showed that extracellular RNA aptamers inhibited VHSV infection in Japanese flounder. These results suggest that the RNA aptamers are a useful tool for protection against VHSV infection in Japanese flounder.

  1. Physicochemical properties of double-stranded RNA used to discover a reo-like virus from blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Holly A; Messick, Gretchen A; Hanif, Ammar; Jagus, Rosemary; Carrion, Lee; Zmora, Oded; Schott, Eric J

    2010-12-07

    Mortality among blue crab Callinectes sapidus in soft shell production facilities is typically 25% or greater. The harvest, handling, and husbandry practices of soft shell crab production have the potential to spread or exacerbate infectious crab diseases. To investigate the possible role of viruses in soft shell crab mortalities, we took advantage of the physicochemical properties of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to isolate a putative virus genome. Further characterization confirmed the presence of a reo-like virus that possesses 12 dsRNA genome segments. The virus was present in >50% of dead or dying soft shell crabs, but fewer than 5% of healthy hard crabs. Injection of the virus caused mortality and resulted in the appearance of viral RNA and virus inclusions in hemocytes. The genome of the virus was partially sequenced and the information used to develop a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay that is able to detect the virus genome in as little as 7.5 pg of total RNA. The molecular tools developed during this study will allow us to quantify prevalence of the blue crab reo-like virus in captive (soft shell facilities, aquaculture operations) and wild populations and facilitate understanding of the role this virus has in blue crab life history.

  2. Base Pairing between Hepatitis C Virus RNA and MicroRNA 122 3′ of Its Seed Sequence Is Essential for Genome Stabilization and Production of Infectious Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakami, Tetsuro; Yamane, Daisuke; Welsch, Christoph; Hensley, Lucinda; Jangra, Rohit K.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA 122 (miR-122) facilitates hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication by recruiting an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-like complex containing argonaute 2 (Ago2) to the 5′ end of the HCV genome, thereby stabilizing the viral RNA. This requires base pairing between the miR-122 “seed sequence” (nucleotides [nt] 2 to 8) and two sequences near the 5′ end of the HCV RNA: S1 (nt 22 to 28) and S2 (nt 38 to 43). However, recent reports suggest that additional base pair interactions occur between HCV RNA and miR-122. We searched 606 sequences from a public database (genotypes 1 to 6) and identified two conserved, putatively single-stranded RNA segments, upstream of S1 (nt 2 and 3) and S2 (nt 30 to 34), with potential for base pairing to miR-122 (nt 15 and 16 and nt 13 to 16, respectively). Mutagenesis and genetic complementation experiments confirmed that HCV nt 2 and 3 pair with nt 15 and 16 of miR-122 bound to S1, while HCV nt 30 to 33 pair with nt 13 to 16 of miR-122 at S2. In genotype 1 and 6 HCV, nt 4 also base pairs with nt 14 of miR-122. These 3′ supplementary base pair interactions of miR-122 are functionally important and are required for Ago2 recruitment to HCV RNA by miR-122, miR-122-mediated stabilization of HCV RNA, and production of infectious virus. However, while complementary mutations at HCV nt 30 and 31 efficiently rescued the activity of a 15C,16C miR-122 mutant targeting S2, similar mutations at nt 2 and 3 failed to rescue Ago2 recruitment at S1. These data add to the current understanding of miR-122 interactions with HCV RNA but indicate that base pairing between miR-122 and the 5′ 43 nt of the HCV genome is more complex than suggested by existing models. PMID:22532678

  3. Expanding our understanding of the seaweed holobiont: RNA viruses of the red alga Delisea pulchra.

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    Tim eLachnit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine seaweeds are holobionts comprised of the macroalgal hosts and their associated microbiota. While the composition of the bacterial component of seaweed microbiomes is increasingly studied, almost nothing is known about the presence, diversity and composition of viruses in macroalgae in situ. In this study, we characterise for the first time the viruses associated with a red macroalga, Delisea pulchra. Using transmission electron microscopy we identified diverse morphotypes of virus-like particles in D. pulchra ranging from icosahedral to bacilliform to coiled pleomorphic as well as bacteriophages. Virome sequencing revealed the presence of a diverse group of dsRNA viruses affiliated to the genus Totivirus, known to infect plant pathogenic fungi. We further identified a ssRNA virus belonging to the order Picornavirales with a close phylogenetic relationship to a pathogenic virus infecting marine diatoms. The results of this study shed light on a so far neglected part of the seaweed holobiont, and suggest that some of these may be possible pathogens for a host that is already known to be significantly impacted by bacterial infections.

  4. Differential plasma microRNA profiles in HBeAg positive and HBeAg negative children with chronic hepatitis B.

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    Thilde Nordmann Winther

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Children chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV are at high risk of progressive liver disease. However, no treatment is available that is consistently effective in curing chronic hepatitis B (CHB in children. Improved understanding of the natural course of disease is warranted. Identification of specific microRNA (miRNA profiles in children chronically infected with HBV may provide insight into the pathogenesis of CHB and lead to advances in the management of children with CHB. PATIENTS AND METHODS: MiRNA PCR panels were employed to screen plasma levels of 739 miRNAs in pooled samples from HBeAg positive, HBeAg negative, and healthy children. The three groups' plasma miRNA profiles were compared, and aberrantly expressed miRNAs were identified. The identified miRNAs were then validated. Individual RT-qPCRs were performed on plasma from 34 HBeAg positive, 26 HBeAg negative, and 60 healthy children. RESULTS: A panel of 16 plasma miRNAs were identified as aberrantly expressed in HBeAg positive and HBeAg negative children (p<0.001. Levels of all of the miRNAs were upregulated in HBeAg positive children compared with in HBeAg negative children. A positive correlation was furthermore found between plasma levels of the identified miRNAs and HBV DNA (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: We are the first to investigate the plasma miRNA profile of children chronically infected with HBV. Our data indicates the existence of a relationship between abundance of circulating miRNAs and immunological stages in the natural course of disease. Certain miRNAs may contribute to the establishment and maintenance of CHB in children. Further studies are warranted to advance understanding of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of CHB, hopefully leading to the identification of future therapeutic targets.

  5. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaozhen; Collins, Christopher M; Mendel, Justin B; Iwakoshi, Neal N; Speck, Samuel H

    2009-11-01

    Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency) account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners) that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus reactivation by

  6. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Liang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus

  7. Characterization of Botrytis cinerea negative-stranded RNA virus 1, a new mycovirus related to plant viruses, and a reconstruction of host pattern evolution in negative-sense ssRNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaire, Livia; Pagán, Israel; Ayllón, María A

    2016-12-01

    The molecular characterization of a novel negative single-stranded RNA virus infecting the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea is reported here. Comparison of the sequence of Botrytis cinerea negative-stranded RNA virus 1 (BcNSRV-1) showed a strong identity with RNA dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) of plant pathogenic emaraviruses and tospoviruses. We have also found all the molecular signatures present in the RdRp of the genus Emaravirus and in other genera of family Bunyaviridae: the conserved TPD triplet and RY dinucleotide, the three basic residues in premotif A and the conserved motifs A, B, C, D, and E. Our results showed that BcNSRV-1 is phylogenetically close to members of the genus Emaravirus and of the family Bunyaviridae, and an ancestral state reconstruction using the conserved RdRp motifs of type members of each family of (-)ssRNA viruses indicated that BcNSRV-1 could possibly derive from an invertebrate and vertebrate-infecting virus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterisation of several heterogeneous species of defective RNAs derived from RNA 3 of cucumber mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, C; Aramburu, J; Galipienso, L; Nuez, F

    2007-01-01

    Preparations of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) extracted from Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi plants infected with a subgroup IB isolate of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) were found to contain a heterogeneous population of defective RNAs (D-RNAs) derived from RNA 3. Characterised D-RNAs ranged in size from 1.5 to 1.9 kb and were derived either by a single in-frame deletion within the 3a or 3b genes or by means of double in-frame deletions within both genes. Also, northern blot hybridisation showed two other types of RNA derived from RNA 3: (a) RNA species of ca. 0.7 kb containing the 3'-terminus but lacking the 5'-terminus, which could be 3'-coterminal subgenomic of D-RNAs derived from the 3b gene and (b) RNA species of unknown origin of ca. 0.8 kb containing the 5'-terminus but lacking the 3'-terminus.

  9. A whole-genome RNA interference screen for human cell factors affecting myxoma virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teferi, Wondimagegnehu M; Dodd, Kristopher; Maranchuk, Rob; Favis, Nicole; Evans, David H

    2013-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) provides an important model for investigating host-pathogen interactions. Recent studies have also highlighted how mutations in transformed human cells can expand the host range of this rabbit virus. Although virus growth depends upon interactions between virus and host proteins, the nature of these interactions is poorly understood. To address this matter, we performed small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens for genes affecting MYXV growth in human MDA-MB-231 cells. By using siRNAs targeting the whole human genome (21,585 genes), a subset of human phosphatases and kinases (986 genes), and also a custom siRNA library targeting selected statistically significant genes ("hits") and nonsignificant genes ("nonhits") of the whole human genome screens (88 genes), we identified 711 siRNA pools that promoted MYXV growth and 333 that were inhibitory. Another 32 siRNA pools (mostly targeting the proteasome) were toxic. The overall overlap in the results was about 25% for the hits and 75% for the nonhits. These pro- and antiviral genes can be clustered into pathways and related groups, including well-established inflammatory and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, as well as clusters relating to β-catenin and the Wnt signaling cascade, the cell cycle, and cellular metabolism. The validity of a subset of these hits was independently confirmed. For example, treating cells with siRNAs that might stabilize cells in G(1), or inhibit passage into S phase, stimulated MYXV growth, and these effects were reproduced by trapping cells at the G(1)/S boundary with an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6. By using 2-deoxy-D-glucose and plasmids carrying the gene for phosphofructokinase, we also confirmed that infection is favored by aerobic glycolytic metabolism. These studies provide insights into how the growth state and structure of cells affect MYXV growth and how these factors might be manipulated to advantage in oncolytic virus therapy.

  10. Marburg virus infection in nonhuman primates: Therapeutic treatment by lipid-encapsulated siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi, Emily P; Mire, Chad E; Ursic-Bedoya, Raul; Geisbert, Joan B; Lee, Amy C H; Agans, Krystle N; Robbins, Marjorie; Deer, Daniel J; Fenton, Karla A; MacLachlan, Ian; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2014-08-20

    Marburg virus (MARV) and the closely related filovirus Ebola virus cause severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans and nonhuman primates with mortality rates up to 90%. There are no vaccines or drugs approved for human use, and no postexposure treatment has completely protected nonhuman primates against MARV-Angola, the strain associated with the highest rate of mortality in naturally occurring human outbreaks. Studies performed with other MARV strains assessed candidate treatments at times shortly after virus exposure, before signs of disease are detectable. We assessed the efficacy of lipid nanoparticle (LNP) delivery of anti-MARV nucleoprotein (NP)-targeting small interfering RNA (siRNA) at several time points after virus exposure, including after the onset of detectable disease in a uniformly lethal nonhuman primate model of MARV-Angola HF. Twenty-one rhesus monkeys were challenged with a lethal dose of MARV-Angola. Sixteen of these animals were treated with LNP containing anti-MARV NP siRNA beginning at 30 to 45 min, 1 day, 2 days, or 3 days after virus challenge. All 16 macaques that received LNP-encapsulated anti-MARV NP siRNA survived infection, whereas the untreated or mock-treated control subjects succumbed to disease between days 7 and 9 after infection. These results represent the successful demonstration of therapeutic anti-MARV-Angola efficacy in nonhuman primates and highlight the substantial impact of an LNP-delivered siRNA therapeutic as a countermeasure against this highly lethal human disease.

  11. Structure-function studies of the influenza virus RNA polymerase PA subunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark; BARTLAM

    2009-01-01

    The influenza virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is a heterotrimeric complex (PA, PB1 and PB2) with multiple enzymatic activities for catalyzing viral RNA transcription and replication. The roles of PB1 and PB2 have been clearly defined, but PA is less well understood. The critical role of the polymerase complex in the influenza virus life cycle and high sequence conservation suggest it should be a major target for therapeutic intervention. However, until very recently, functional studies and drug discovery targeting the influenza polymerase have been hampered by the lack of three-dimensional structural information. We will review the recent progress in the structure and function of the PA subunit of influenza polymerase, and discuss prospects for the development of anti-influenza therapeutics based on available structures.

  12. Structure-function studies of the influenza virus RNA polymerase PA subunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YingFang; LOU ZhiYong; Mark BARTLAM; RAO ZiHe

    2009-01-01

    The influenza virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is a heterotrimeric complex (PA, PB1 and PB2) with multiple enzymatic activities for catalyzing viral RNA transcription and replication. The roles of PB1 and PB2 have been clearly defined, but PA is less well understood. The critical role of the poly-merase complex in the influenza virus life cycle and high sequence conservation suggest it should be a major target for therapeutic intervention. However, until very recently, functional studies and drug discovery targeting the influenza polymerase have been hampered by the lack of three-dimensional structural information. We will review the recent progress in the structure and function of the PA sub-unit of influenza polymerase, and discuss prospects for the development of anti-influenza therapeutics based on available structures.

  13. Detection of eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus RNA in North American snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Andrea M; Graham, Sean P; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; White, Gregory S; Hassan, Hassan K; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2012-12-01

    The role of non-avian vertebrates in the ecology of eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus (EEEV) is unresolved, but mounting evidence supports a potential role for snakes in the EEEV transmission cycle, especially as over-wintering hosts. To determine rates of exposure and infection, we examined serum samples from wild snakes at a focus of EEEV in Alabama for viral RNA using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Two species of vipers, the copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and the cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus), were found to be positive for EEEV RNA using this assay. Prevalence of EEEV RNA was more frequent in seropositive snakes than seronegative snakes. Positivity for the quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in cottonmouths peaked in April and September. Body size and sex ratios were not significantly different between infected and uninfected snakes. These results support the hypothesis that snakes are involved in the ecology of EEEV in North America, possibly as over-wintering hosts for the virus.

  14. Small RNA populations for two unrelated viruses exhibit different biases in strand polarity and proximity to terminal sequences in the insect host Homalodisca vitripennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Next generation sequencing was used to analyze virus-derived small RNA (vsRNA) profiles for two taxonomically unrelated viruses infecting Homalodisca vitripennis, the glassy winged sharpshooter. Homalodisca coagulata virus-1 (HoCV-1), family Dicistroviridae, and Homalodisca vitripennis virus (HoVRV)...

  15. Small interfering RNA targeting the nonstructural gene 1 transcript inhibits influenza A virus replication in experimental mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Roopali; Khanna, Madhu; Kumar, Prashant; Kumar, Binod; Sharma, Sonal; Gupta, Neha; Saxena, Latika

    2012-12-01

    Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A viruses counteracts the host immune response against the influenza viruses by not only inhibiting the nuclear export and maturation of host cell messenger RNA (mRNA), but by also blocking the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-mediated inhibition of viral RNA translation. Reduction of NS1 gene product in the host cell may be a potent antiviral strategy to provide protection against the influenza virus infection. We used small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) synthesized against the viral mRNA to down regulate the NS1 gene and observed its effect on inhibition of virus replication. When NS1 gene-specific siRNA were transfected in Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells followed by influenza A virus infection, approximately 60% inhibition in intracellular levels of NS1 RNA was observed. When siRNA was administered in BALB/c mice, 92% reduction in the levels of NS1 gene expression in mice lungs was observed. A significant reduction in the lung virus titers and cytokine levels was also detected in the presence of siRNAs as compared with the untreated control. The study was validated by the use of selectively disabled mutants of each set of siRNA. Our findings suggest that siRNA targeted against NS1 gene of influenza A virus can provide considerable protection to the virus-infected host cells and may be used as potential candidates for nucleic acid-based antiviral therapy for prevention of influenza A virus infection.

  16. Stimulation of poliovirus RNA synthesis and virus maturation in a HeLa cell-free in vitro translation-RNA replication system by viral protein 3CDpro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimmer Eckard

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Poliovirus protein 3CDpro possesses both proteinase and RNA binding activities, which are located in the 3Cpro domain of the protein. The RNA polymerase (3Dpol domain of 3CDpro modulates these activities of the protein. We have recently shown that the level of 3CDpro in HeLa cell-free in vitro translation-RNA replication reactions is suboptimal for efficient virus production. However, the addition of either 3CDpro mRNA or of purified 3CDpro protein to in vitro reactions, programmed with viral RNA, results in a 100-fold increase in virus yield. Mutational analyses of 3CDpro indicated that RNA binding by the 3Cpro domain and the integrity of interface I in the 3Dpol domain of the protein are both required for function. The aim of these studies was to determine the exact step or steps at which 3CDpro enhances virus yield and to determine the mechanism by which this occurs. Our results suggest that the addition of extra 3CDpro to in vitro translation RNA-replication reactions results in a mild enhancement of both minus and plus strand RNA synthesis. By examining the viral particles formed in the in vitro reactions on sucrose gradients we determined that 3CDpro has only a slight stimulating effect on the synthesis of capsid precursors but it strikingly enhances the maturation of virus particles. Both the stimulation of RNA synthesis and the maturation of the virus particles are dependent on the presence of an intact RNA binding site within the 3Cpro domain of 3CDpro. In addition, the integrity of interface I in the 3Dpol domain of 3CDpro is required for efficient production of mature virus. Surprisingly, plus strand RNA synthesis and virus production in in vitro reactions, programmed with full-length transcript RNA, are not enhanced by the addition of extra 3CDpro. Our results indicate that the stimulation of RNA synthesis and virus maturation by 3CDpro in vitro is dependent on the presence of a VPg-linked RNA template.

  17. Infectious RNA transcripts from Ross River virus cDNA clones and the construction and characterization of defined chimeras with Sindbis virus.

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    Kuhn, R J; Niesters, H G; Hong, Z; Strauss, J H

    1991-06-01

    We have constructed a full-length cDNA clone of the virulent T48 strain of Ross River virus, a member of the alphavirus genus. Infectious RNA can be transcribed from this clone using SP6 or T7 RNA polymerase. The rescued virus has properties indistinguishable from those of the T48 strain of Ross River virus. We have used this clone, together with a full-length cDNA clone of Sindbis virus, to construct chimeric plasmids in which the 5' and the 3' nontranslated regions of the Sindbis and Ross River genomes were exchanged. The nontranslated regions of the two viral genomes differ in both size and sequence although they maintain specific conserved sequence elements. Virus was recovered from all four chimeras. Chimeras containing heterologous 3' nontranslated regions had replicative efficiencies equal to those of the parents. In contrast, the chimeras containing heterologous 5' nontranslated regions were defective in RNA synthesis and virus production, and the severity of the defect was dependent upon the host. Replication of a virus containing a heterologous 5' nontranslated region may be inefficient due to the formation of defective protein-RNA complexes, whereas, the presumptive complexes formed between host or virus proteins and the 3' nontranslated region to promote RNA synthesis appear to function normally in the chimeras.

  18. Brome mosaic virus Infection of Rice Results in Decreased Accumulation of RNA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Masahiko; Hoover, Haley; Middleton, Stefani; Kao, C Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) (the Russian strain) infects monocot plants and has been studied extensively in barley and wheat. Here, we report BMV can systemically infect rice (Oryza sativa var. japonica), including cultivars in which the genomes have been determined. The BMV capsid protein can be found throughout the inoculated plants. However, infection in rice exhibits delayed symptom expression or no symptoms when compared with wheat (Triticum aestivum). The sequences of BMV RNAs isolated from rice did not reveal any nucleotide changes in RNA1 or RNA2, while RNA3 had only one synonymous nucleotide change from the inoculum sequence. Preparations of purified BMV virions contained RNA1 at a significantly reduced level relative to the other two RNAs. Analysis of BMV RNA replication in rice revealed that minus-strand RNA1 was replicated at a reduced rate when compared with RNA2. Thus, rice appears to either inhibit RNA1 replication or lacks a sufficient amount of a factor needed to support efficient RNA1 replication.

  19. The structure and function of the rous sarcoma virus RNA stability element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Johanna B; Beemon, Karen L

    2011-11-01

    For simple retroviruses, such as the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), post-transcriptional control elements regulate viral RNA splicing, export, stability, and packaging into virions. These RNA sequences interact with cellular host proteins to regulate and facilitate productive viral infections. One such element, known as the RSV stability element (RSE), is required for maintaining stability of the full-length unspliced RNA. This viral RNA serves as the mRNA for the Gag and Pol proteins and also as the genome packaged in progeny virions. When the RSE is deleted from the viral RNA, the unspliced RNA becomes unstable and is degraded in a Upf1-dependent manner. Current evidence suggests that the RSE inhibits recognition of the viral gag termination codon by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway. We believe that the RSE acts as an insulator to NMD, thereby preventing at least one of the required functional steps that target an mRNA for degradation. Here, we discuss the history of the RSE and the current model of how the RSE is interacting with cellular NMD factors.

  20. Molecular characterization of a bipartite double-stranded RNA virus and its satellite-like RNA co-infecting the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

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    Lijiang eLiu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A variety of mycoviruses have been found in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. In this study, we report a novel mycovirus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum botybirnavirus 1 (SsBRV1 that was originally isolated from the hypovirulent strain SCH941 of S. sclerotiorum. SsBRV1 has rigid spherical virions that are ~38 nm in diameter, and three dsRNA segments (dsRNA1, 2 and 3 with lengths of 6.4, 6.0 and 1.7 kbp, respectively were packaged in the virions. dsRNA1 encodes a cap-pol fusion protein, and dsRNA2 encodes a polyprotein with unknown functions but contributes to the formation of virus particles. The dsRNA3 is dispensable and may be a satellite-like RNA (SatlRNA of SsBRV1. Although phylogenetic analysis of the RdRp domain demonstrated that SsBRV1 is related to Botrytis porri RNA virus 1 (BpRV1 and Ustilago maydis dsRNA virus-H1 (UmV-H1, the structure proteins of SsBRV1 do not have any significant sequence similarities with other known viral proteins with the exception of those of BpRV1. SsBRV1 carrying dsRNA3 seems to have no obvious effects on the colony morphology, but can significantly reduce the growth rate and virulence of S. sclerotiorum. Notably, a growth hormone receptor binding domain (GHBP, Pfam12772 is detected in ORF2-encoded protein of SsBRV1, which have not been reported in any other viruses. These findings provide new insights into the virus taxonomy, virus evolution and the interactions between SsBRV1 and the fungal hosts.

  1. The modeled structure of the RNA dependent RNA polymerase of GBV-C Virus suggests a role for motif E in Flaviviridae RNA polymerases

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    Dutartre Hélène

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Flaviviridae virus family includes major human and animal pathogens. The RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp plays a central role in the replication process, and thus is a validated target for antiviral drugs. Despite the increasing structural and enzymatic characterization of viral RdRps, detailed molecular replication mechanisms remain unclear. The hepatitis C virus (HCV is a major human pathogen difficult to study in cultured cells. The bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is often used as a surrogate model to screen antiviral drugs against HCV. The structure of BVDV RdRp has been recently published. It presents several differences relative to HCV RdRp. These differences raise questions about the relevance of BVDV as a surrogate model, and cast novel interest on the "GB" virus C (GBV-C. Indeed, GBV-C is genetically closer to HCV than BVDV, and can lead to productive infection of cultured cells. There is no structural data for the GBV-C RdRp yet. Results We show in this study that the GBV-C RdRp is closest to the HCV RdRp. We report a 3D model of the GBV-C RdRp, developed using sequence-to-structure threading and comparative modeling based on the atomic coordinates of the HCV RdRp structure. Analysis of the predicted structural features in the phylogenetic context of the RNA polymerase family allows rationalizing most of the experimental data available. Both available structures and our model are explored to examine the catalytic cleft, allosteric and substrate binding sites. Conclusion Computational methods were used to infer evolutionary relationships and to predict the structure of a viral RNA polymerase. Docking a GTP molecule into the structure allows defining a GTP binding pocket in the GBV-C RdRp, such as that of BVDV. The resulting model suggests a new proposition for the mechanism of RNA synthesis, and may prove useful to design new experiments to implement our knowledge on the initiation mechanism of RNA

  2. A cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) RNA 1 transgene mediates suppression of the homologous viral RNA 1 constitutively and prevents CMV entry into the phloem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, T; Palukaitis, P

    2001-10-01

    Resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in tobacco lines transformed with CMV RNA 1 is characterized by reduced virus accumulation in the inoculated leaf, with specific suppression of accumulation of the homologous viral RNA 1, and by the absence of systemic infection. We show that the suppression of viral RNA 1 occurs in protoplasts from resistant transgenic plants and therefore is not due to a host response activated by the cell-to-cell spread of virus. In contrast, suppression of Tobacco rattle virus vectors carrying CMV RNA 1 sequences did not occur in protoplasts from resistant plants. Furthermore, steady-state levels of transgene mRNA 1 were higher in resistant than in susceptible lines. Thus, the data indicate that sequence homology is not sufficient to induce suppression. Grafting experiments using transgenic resistant or susceptible rootstocks and scions demonstrated that the resistance mechanism exhibited an additional barrier to phloem entry, preventing CMV from moving a long distance in resistant plants. On the other hand, virus from susceptible rootstocks could systemically infect grafted resistant scions via the phloem. Analysis of viral RNA accumulation in the infected scions showed that the mechanism that suppresses the accumulation of viral RNA 1 at the single-cell level was overcome. The data indicate that this transgene-mediated systemic resistance probably is not based on a posttranscriptional gene-silencing mechanism.

  3. Persistent RNA virus infection of lepidopteran cell lines: Interactions with the RNAi machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swevers, Luc; Ioannidis, Konstantinos; Kolovou, Marianna; Zografidis, Aris; Labropoulou, Vassiliki; Santos, Dulce; Wynant, Niels; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Wang, Luoluo; Cappelle, Kaat; Smagghe, Guy

    RNAi is broadly used as a technique for specific gene silencing in insects but few studies have investigated the factors that can affect its efficiency. Viral infections have the potential to interfere with RNAi through their production of viral suppressors of RNAi (VSRs) and the production of viral small RNAs that can saturate and inactivate the RNAi machinery. In this study, the impact of persistent infection of the RNA viruses Flock house virus (FHV) and Macula-like virus (MLV) on RNAi efficiency was investigated in selected lepidopteran cell lines. Lepidopteran cell lines were found to be readily infected by both viruses without any apparent pathogenic effects, with the exception of Bombyx-derived Bm5 and BmN4 cells, which could not be infected by FHV. Because Sf21 cells were free from both FHV and MLV and Hi5-SF were free from FHV and only contained low levels of MLV, they were tested to evaluate the impact of the presence of the virus. Two types of RNAi reporter assays however did not detect a significant interference with gene silencing in infected Sf21 and Hi5-SF cells when compared to virus-free cells. In Hi5 cells, the presence of FHV could be easily cleared through the expression of an RNA hairpin that targets its VSR gene, confirming that the RNAi mechanism was not inhibited. Sequencing indicated that the B2 RNAi inhibitor gene of FHV and a putative VSR gene from MLV were intact in persistently infected cell lines, indicating that protection against RNAi remains essential for virus survival. It is proposed that infection levels of persistent viruses in the cell lines are too low to have an impact on RNAi efficiency in the lepidopteran cell lines and that encoded VSRs act locally at the sites of viral replication (mitochondrial membranes) without affecting the rest of the cytoplasm.

  4. Zika Virus RNA Replication and Persistence in Brain and Placental Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabeneck, Demi B.; Martines, Roosecelis B.; Reagan-Steiner, Sarah; Ermias, Yokabed; Estetter, Lindsey B.C.; Suzuki, Tadaki; Ritter, Jana; Keating, M. Kelly; Hale, Gillian; Gary, Joy; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Lambert, Amy; Lanciotti, Robert; Oduyebo, Titilope; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Bolaños, Fernando; Saad, Edgar Alberto Parra; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus is causally linked with congenital microcephaly and may be associated with pregnancy loss. However, the mechanisms of Zika virus intrauterine transmission and replication and its tropism and persistence in tissues are poorly understood. We tested tissues from 52 case-patients: 8 infants with microcephaly who died and 44 women suspected of being infected with Zika virus during pregnancy. By reverse transcription PCR, tissues from 32 (62%) case-patients (brains from 8 infants with microcephaly and placental/fetal tissues from 24 women) were positive for Zika virus. In situ hybridization localized replicative Zika virus RNA in brains of 7 infants and in placentas of 9 women who had pregnancy losses during the first or second trimester. These findings demonstrate that Zika virus replicates and persists in fetal brains and placentas, providing direct evidence of its association with microcephaly. Tissue-based reverse transcription PCR extends the time frame of Zika virus detection in congenital and pregnancy-associated infections. PMID:27959260

  5. Quantitative analysis of dengue-2 virus RNA during the extrinsic incubation period in individual Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jason; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Salazar, Ma Isabel; Black, William

    2006-01-01

    Dengue virus-2 (DENV-2) RNA was quantified from the midgut and legs of individual Aedes aegypti at each of 14 days postinfectious blood meal (dpi) in a DENV-2 susceptible strain from Chetumal, Mexico. A SYBR Green I based strand-specific, quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed. The lower detection and quantitation limits were 20 and 200 copies per reaction, respectively. Amounts of positive and negative strand viral RNA strands were correlated. Numbers of plaque-forming units (PFU) were correlated with DENV-2 RNA copy number in both C6/36 cell cultures and mosquitoes. PFU were consistently lower than RNA copy number by 2-3 log(10). Midgut levels of DENV-2 RNA peaked 8 dpi and fluctuated erratically between 6 and 9 dpi. Copies of DENV-2 RNA varied significantly among infected mosquitoes at each time point. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR is a convenient and reliable method that provides new insights into virus-vector interactions.

  6. Three-dimensional structure of a protozoal double-stranded RNA virus that infects the enteric pathogen Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Mandy E W; Takagi, Yuko; Parent, Kristin N; Cardone, Giovanni; Nibert, Max L; Baker, Timothy S

    2015-01-15

    Giardia lamblia virus (GLV) is a small, nonenveloped, nonsegmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus infecting Giardia lamblia, the most common protozoan pathogen of the human intestine and a major agent of waterborne diarrheal disease worldwide. GLV (genus Giardiavirus) is a member of family Totiviridae, along with several other groups of protozoal or fungal viruses, including Leishmania RNA viruses and Trichomonas vaginalis viruses. Interestingly, GLV is more closely related than other Totiviridae members to a group of recently discovered metazoan viruses that includes penaeid shrimp infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV). Moreover, GLV is the only known protozoal dsRNA virus that can transmit efficiently by extracellular means, also like IMNV. In this study, we used transmission electron cryomicroscopy and icosahedral image reconstruction to examine the GLV virion at an estimated resolution of 6.0 Å. Its outermost diameter is 485 Å, making it the largest totivirus capsid analyzed to date. Structural comparisons of GLV and other totiviruses highlighted a related "T=2" capsid organization and a conserved helix-rich fold in the capsid subunits. In agreement with its unique capacity as a protozoal dsRNA virus to survive and transmit through extracellular environments, GLV was found to be more thermoresistant than Trichomonas vaginalis virus 1, but no specific protein machinery to mediate cell entry, such as the fiber complexes in IMNV, could be localized. These and other structural and biochemical findings provide a basis for future work to dissect the cell entry mechanism of GLV into a "primitive" (early-branching) eukaryotic host and an important enteric pathogen of humans. Numerous pathogenic bacteria, including Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Salmonella enterica, and Vibrio cholerae, are infected with lysogenic bacteriophages that contribute significantly to bacterial virulence. In line with this phenomenon, several pathogenic protozoa, including Giardia lamblia

  7. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Induces Host RNA Stress Granules To Facilitate Viral Replication▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Michael E.; Lifland, Aaron W.; Utley, Thomas J.; Santangelo, Philip J.; Crowe, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian cell cytoplasmic RNA stress granules are induced during various conditions of stress and are strongly associated with regulation of host mRNA translation. Several viruses induce stress granules during the course of infection, but the exact function of these structures during virus replication is not well understood. In this study, we showed that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induced host stress granules in epithelial cells during the course of infection. We also showed that stress granules are distinct from cytoplasmic viral inclusion bodies and that the RNA binding protein HuR, normally found in stress granules, also localized to viral inclusion bodies during infection. Interestingly, we demonstrated that infected cells containing stress granules also contained more RSV protein than infected cells that did not form inclusion bodies. To address the role of stress granule formation in RSV infection, we generated a stable epithelial cell line with reduced expression of the Ras-GAP SH3 domain-binding protein (G3BP) that displayed an inhibited stress granule response. Surprisingly, RSV replication was impaired in these cells compared to its replication in cells with intact G3BP expression. In contrast, knockdown of HuR by RNA interference did not affect stress granule formation or RSV replication. Finally, using RNA probes specific for RSV genomic RNA, we found that viral RNA predominantly localized to viral inclusion bodies but a small percentage also interacted with stress granules during infection. These results suggest that RSV induces a host stress granule response and preferentially replicates in host cells that have committed to a stress response. PMID:20844027

  8. Full Genome Sequence and sfRNA Interferon Antagonist Activity of Zika Virus from Recife, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezelj, Veronica V.; Clark, Jordan J.; Cordeiro, Marli T.; Freitas de Oliveira França, Rafael; Pena, Lindomar J.; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Da Silva Filipe, Ana; Davis, Christopher; Hughes, Joseph; Varjak, Margus; Selinger, Martin; Zuvanov, Luíza; Owsianka, Ania M.; Patel, Arvind H.; McLauchlan, John; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Fall, Gamou; Sall, Amadou A.; Biek, Roman; Rehwinkel, Jan; Schnettler, Esther; Kohl, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Background The outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas has transformed a previously obscure mosquito-transmitted arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family into a major public health concern. Little is currently known about the evolution and biology of ZIKV and the factors that contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Determining genomic sequences of clinical viral isolates and characterization of elements within these are an important prerequisite to advance our understanding of viral replicative processes and virus-host interactions. Methodology/Principal findings We obtained a ZIKV isolate from a patient who presented with classical ZIKV-associated symptoms, and used high throughput sequencing and other molecular biology approaches to determine its full genome sequence, including non-coding regions. Genome regions were characterized and compared to the sequences of other isolates where available. Furthermore, we identified a subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) in ZIKV-infected cells that has antagonist activity against RIG-I induced type I interferon induction, with a lesser effect on MDA-5 mediated action. Conclusions/Significance The full-length genome sequence including non-coding regions of a South American ZIKV isolate from a patient with classical symptoms will support efforts to develop genetic tools for this virus. Detection of sfRNA that counteracts interferon responses is likely to be important for further understanding of pathogenesis and virus-host interactions. PMID:27706161

  9. Characterization of soluble RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from dengue virus serotype 2: The polyhistidine tag compromises the polymerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkaew, Maliwan; Chimnaronk, Sarin

    2015-08-01

    The viral RNA polymerase is an attractive target for inhibition in the treatment of viral infections. In the case of dengue virus (DENV), a member of the genus Flavivirus, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity resides in the C-terminal two-thirds of non-structural protein (NS) 5 responsible for the de novo synthesis of the viral RNA genome. Among four distinct, but closely related dengue serotypes, serotype 2 (DENV-2) produces more severe diseases than other serotypes. It has been reported that bacterial production of the recombinant DENV-2 RdRp was difficult due to its low expression and solubility levels. To facilitate functional and structural analyses, we here demonstrate complete protocols for overexpression and purification of soluble DENV-2 RdRp, increasing protein yields by a remarkable 10 times compared to earlier reports. Three different forms of DENV-2 RdRp as either N- or C-terminally His-tagged fusions, or without tag, were purified to homogeneity. We show here that the presence of both the N- and C-terminal His-tag had a deleterious effect on polymerase activity and, in contrast to earlier studies, our non-tagged RdRp did not require manganese ions to activate RNA polymerization. We also determined an apparent Kd value of 53nM for binding to the 5'-UTR RNA by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Our work provide a more suitable material for basic research of viral RdRp and for drug development.

  10. MS2 virus inactivation by atmospheric-pressure cold plasma using different gas carriers and power levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Liang, Yongdong; Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2015-02-01

    In this study, airborne MS2 bacteriophages were exposed for subsecond time intervals to atmospheric-pressure cold plasma (APCP) produced using different power levels (20, 24, and 28 W) and gas carriers (ambient air, Ar-O2 [2%, vol/vol], and He-O2 [2%, vol/vol]). In addition, waterborne MS2 viruses were directly subjected to the APCP treatment for up to 3 min. MS2 viruses with and without the APCP exposure were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Viral inactivation was shown to exhibit linear relationships with the APCP generation power and exposure time (R(2) > 0.95 for all energy levels tested) up to 95% inactivation (1.3-log reduction) after a subsecond airborne exposure at 28 W; about the same inactivation level was achieved for waterborne viruses with an exposure time of less than 1 min. A larger amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as atomic oxygen, in APCP was detected for a higher generation power with Ar-O2 and He-O2 gas carriers. SEM images, SDS-PAGE, and agarose gel analysis of exposed waterborne viruses showed various levels of damage to both surface proteins and their related RNA genes after the APCP exposure, thus leading to the loss of their viability and infectivity.

  11. Chikungunya virus RNA and antibody testing at a National Reference Laboratory since the emergence of Chikungunya virus in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Harry E; Seaton, Brent L; Matud, Jose L; Batterman, Hollis J

    2015-03-01

    Since first reported in the Americas in December 2013, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infections have been documented in travelers returning from the Caribbean, with many cases identified by CHIKV antibody and/or RNA testing at our laboratory. We used our large data set to characterize the relationship between antibody titers and RNA detection and to estimate IgM persistence. CHIKV RNA was measured by nucleic acid amplification and CHIKV IgG/IgM by indirect immunofluorescence. Of the 1,306 samples submitted for RNA testing in January through September 2014, 393 (30%) were positive; for 166 RNA-positive samples, CHIKV antibody testing was also ordered, and 84% were antibody negative. Of the 6,971 sera submitted for antibody testing in January through September 2014, 1,811 (26%) were IgM positive; 1,461 IgM positives (81%) were also IgG positive. The relationship between the CHIKV antibody titers and RNA detection was evaluated using 376 IgM-positive samples (138 with RNA testing ordered and 238 deidentified and tested for RNA). RNA detection showed no significant association with the IgM titer but was inversely related to the IgG titer; 63% of the IgG negative sera were RNA positive, compared to 36% of sera with low IgG titers (1:10 to 1:80) and 16% with IgG titers of ≥1:160. Using second-sample results from 62 seroconverters, we estimated that CHIKV IgM persists for 110 days (95% confidence interval, 78 to 150 days) after the initial antibody-negative sample. These findings indicate that (i) RNA detection is more sensitive than antibody detection early in CHIKV infection, (ii) in the absence of RNA results, the IgG titer of the IgM-positive samples may be a useful surrogate for viremia, and (iii) CHIKV IgM persists for approximately 4 months after symptom onset.

  12. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA profiles among chronic HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals in ESPRIT; spontaneous HCV RNA clearance observed in nine individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grint, D; Tedaldi, Ellen; Peters, L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Studies have shown that hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels remain stable over time in HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), while spontaneous clearance of HCV RNA during the persistent infection phase has been documented only rarely among tho...

  13. Sustained small interfering RNA-mediated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 inhibition in primary macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Erwei; Lee, Sang-Kyung; Dykxhoorn, Derek M; Novina, Carl; Zhang, Dong; Crawford, Keith; Cerny, Jan; Sharp, Phillip A; Lieberman, Judy; Manjunath, N; Shankar, Premlata

    2003-07-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can induce potent gene silencing by degradation of cognate mRNA. However, in dividing cells, the silencing lasts only 3 to 7 days, presumably because of siRNA dilution with cell division. Here, we investigated if sustained siRNA-mediated silencing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is possible in terminally differentiated macrophages, which constitute an important reservoir of HIV in vivo. CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor in macrophages, and the viral structural gene for p24 were targeted either singly or in combination. When transfected 2 days prior to infection, both CCR5 and p24 siRNAs effectively reduced HIV-1 infection for the entire 15-day period of observation, and combined targeting of both genes abolished infection. To investigate whether exogenously introduced siRNA is maintained stably in macrophages, we tested the kinetics of siRNA-mediated viral inhibition by initiating infections at various times (2 to 15 days) after transfection with CCR5 and p24 siRNAs. HIV suppression mediated by viral p24 siRNA progressively decreased and was lost by day 7 posttransfection. In contrast, viral inhibition by cellular CCR5 knockdown was sustained even when transfection preceded infection by 15 days, suggesting that the continued presence of target RNA may be needed for persistence of siRNA. The longer sustenance of CCR5 relative to p24 siRNA in uninfected macrophages was also confirmed by detection of internalized siRNA by modified Northern blot analysis. We also tested the potential of p24 siRNA to stably silence HIV in the setting of an established infection where the viral target gene is actively transcribed. Under these circumstances, long-term suppression of HIV replication could be achieved with p24 siRNA. Thus, siRNAs can induce potent and long-lasting HIV inhibition in nondividing cells such as macrophages.

  14. Messenger RNA vaccine based on recombinant MS2 virus-like particles against prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinming; Sun, Yanli; Jia, Tingting; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Kuo; Wang, Lunan

    2014-04-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most diagnosed cancer in the western male population with high mortality. Recently, alternative approaches based on immunotherapy including mRNA vaccines for PCa have shown therapeutic promise. However, for mRNA vaccine, several disadvantages such as the instability of mRNA, the high cost of gold particles, the limited production scale for mRNA-transfected dendritic cells in vitro, limit their development. Herein, recombinant bacteriophage MS2 virus-like particles (VLPs), which based on the interaction of a 19-nucleotide RNA aptamer and the coat protein of bacteriophage MS2, successfully addressed these questions, in which target mRNA was packaged by MS2 capsid. MS2 VLP-based mRNA vaccines were easily prepared by recombinant protein technology, nontoxic and RNase-resistant. We show the packaged mRNA was translated into protein as early as 12 hr after phagocytosed by macrophages. Moreover, MS2 VLP-based mRNA vaccines induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses, especially antigen-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) and balanced Th1/Th2 responses without upregulation of CD4(+) regulatory T cells, and protected C57BL/6 mice against PCa completely. As a therapeutic vaccine, MS2 VLP-based mRNA vaccines delayed tumor growth. Our results provide proof of concept on the efficacy and safety of MS2 VLP-based mRNA vaccine, which provides a new delivery approach for mRNA vaccine and implies important clinical value for the prevention and therapy of PCa.

  15. The capsid-coding region hairpin element (cHP) is a critical determinant of dengue virus and West Nile virus RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyde, Karen; Barrera, Julio; Harris, Eva

    2008-09-30

    Dengue virus (DENV) and West Nile virus (WNV) are members of the Flavivirus genus of positive-strand RNA viruses. RNA sequences and structures, primarily in the untranslated regions, have been shown to modulate flaviviral gene expression and genome replication. Previously, we demonstrated that a structure in the DENV coding region (cHP) enhances translation start codon selection and is required for viral replication. Here we further characterize the role of the cHP in the DENV life cycle. We demonstrate that the cHP is required for efficient viral RNA synthesis in a sequence-independent manner. Viruses with a disrupted cHP are rescued by a spontaneous compensatory mutation that restabilizes the structure. Furthermore, the cHP, which is predicted to be conserved among arthropod-borne flaviviruses, is required for WNV replication. We propose that the cHP is a multifunctional determinant of flavivirus replication, functioning in both translation and RNA synthesis.

  16. Comparative expression profile of miRNA and mRNA in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Gupta

    Full Text Available Host cells respond to exogenous infectious agents such as viruses, including HIV-1. Studies have evaluated the changes associated with virus infection at the transcriptional and translational levels of the cellular genes involved in specific pathways. While this approach is useful, in our view it provides only a partial view of genome-wide changes. Recently, technological advances in the expression profiling at the microRNA (miRNA and mRNA levels have made it possible to evaluate the changes in the components of multiple pathways. To understand the role of miRNA and its interplay with host cellular gene expression (mRNA during HIV-1 infection, we performed a comparative global miRNA and mRNA microarray using human PBMCs infected with HIV-1. The PBMCs were derived from multiple donors and were infected with virus generated from the molecular clone pNL4-3. The results showed that HIV-1 infection led to altered regulation of 21 miRNAs and 444 mRNA more than 2-fold, with a statistical significance of p<0.05. Furthermore, the differentially regulated miRNA and mRNA were shown to be associated with host cellular pathways involved in cell cycle/proliferation, apoptosis, T-cell signaling, and immune activation. We also observed a number of inverse correlations of miRNA and mRNA expression in infected PBMCs, further confirming the interrelationship between miRNA and mRNA regulation during HIV-1 infection. These results for the first time provide evidence that the miRNA profile could be an early indicator of host cellular dysfunction induced by HIV-1.

  17. Efficient escape from local optima in a highly rugged fitness landscape by evolving RNA virus populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Héctor; Lalić, Jasna; Elena, Santiago F

    2016-08-17

    Predicting viral evolution has proven to be a particularly difficult task, mainly owing to our incomplete knowledge of some of the fundamental principles that drive it. Recently, valuable information has been provided about mutation and recombination rates, the role of genetic drift and the distribution of mutational, epistatic and pleiotropic fitness effects. However, information about the topography of virus' adaptive landscapes is still scarce, and to our knowledge no data has been reported so far on how its ruggedness may condition virus' evolvability. Here, we show that populations of an RNA virus move efficiently on a rugged landscape and scape from the basin of attraction of a local optimum. We have evolved a set of Tobacco etch virus genotypes located at increasing distances from a local adaptive optimum in a highly rugged fitness landscape, and we observed that few evolved lineages remained trapped in the local optimum, while many others explored distant regions of the landscape. Most of the diversification in fitness among the evolved lineages was explained by adaptation, while historical contingency and chance events contribution was less important. Our results demonstrate that the ruggedness of adaptive landscapes is not an impediment for RNA viruses to efficiently explore remote parts of it. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: molecular cloning of genomic RNA and its diagnostic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, K.V.

    1987-01-01

    Molecular cloning of a field isolate of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain 72 RNA was done in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of cloned cDNA sequences in hybridization assays with various BVDV strains were determined. cDNA was synthesized from polyadenylated BVDV RNA templates with oligo-dT primers, reverse transcriptase, and DNA polymerase I. The newly synthesized double-stranded BVDV cDNA was C-tailed with terminal deoxytransferase and annealed into G-tailed, Pst-1-cut pUC9 plasmid. Escherichia coli was transformed with the recombinant plasmids and a library of approximately 200 BVDV specific cDNA clones varying in length from 0.5 to 2.6 kilobases were isolated. The sensitivity and specificity of hybridization between the labelled cDNA and BVDV target sequences were determined. Cloned BVDV sequences were isolated from pUC9 plasmid DNA and labelled with /sup 32/P by nick translation. The detection limit by dot blot hybridization assay was 20 pg of purified genomic BVDV RNA. cDNA hybridization probes were specific for all strains of BVDV tested, regardless of whether they were noncytopathic and cytopathic, but did not hybridize with heterologous bovine viruses tested. Probes did not hybridize with uninfected cell culture or cellular RNA. Hybridization probes were at least as sensitive as infectivity assays in detecting homologous virus.

  19. Integrated analysis of microRNA expression and mRNA transcriptome in lungs of avian influenza virus infected broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ying

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avian influenza virus (AIV outbreaks are worldwide threats to both poultry and humans. Our previous study suggested microRNAs (miRNAs play significant roles in the regulation of host response to AIV infection in layer chickens. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis if genetic background play essential role in the miRNA regulation of AIV infection in chickens and if miRNAs that were differentially expressed in layer with AIV infection would be modulated the same way in broiler chickens. Furthermore, by integrating with parallel mRNA expression profiling, potential molecular mechanisms of host response to AIV infection can be further exploited. Results Total RNA isolated from the lungs of non-infected and low pathogenic H5N3 infected broilers at four days post-infection were used for both miRNA deep sequencing and mRNA microarray analyses. A total of 2.6 M and 3.3 M filtered high quality reads were obtained from infected and non-infected chickens by Solexa GA-I Sequencer, respectively. A total of 271 miRNAs in miRBase 16.0 were identified and one potential novel miRNA was discovered. There were 121 miRNAs differentially expressed at the 5% false discovery rate by Fisher’s exact test. More miRNAs were highly expressed in infected lungs (108 than in non-infected lungs (13, which was opposite to the findings in layer chickens. This result suggested that a different regulatory mechanism of host response to AIV infection mediated by miRNAs might exist in broiler chickens. Analysis using the chicken 44 K Agilent microarray indicated that 508 mRNAs (347 down-regulated were differentially expressed following AIV infection. Conclusions A comprehensive analysis combining both miRNA and targeted mRNA gene expression suggests that gga-miR-34a, 122–1, 122–2, 146a, 155, 206, 1719, 1594, 1599 and 451, and MX1, IL-8, IRF-7, TNFRS19 are strong candidate miRNAs or genes involved in regulating the host response to AIV

  20. Stable hepatitis C virus RNA detection by RT-PCR during four days storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horsmans Yves

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suboptimal specimen processing and storage conditions of samples which contain hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA may result in a decline of HCV RNA concentration or false-negative results in the detection of HCV RNA in serum. We evaluated the stability of HCV RNA in serum and clotted blood samples stored at room temperature or at 4°C for 4 days with the aim of optimizing the standard procedures of processing and storage of samples. Methods Blood from five HCV RNA positive patients was collected in tubes with and without separator gel, centrifuged 1 or 6 hours after collection. Samples were then left 6, 24, 48, 72 or 96 h at room temperature (21.5 – 25.4°C or at 4°C before determining their HCV RNA level using the COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR Test, vs 2.0 (Roche Diagnostic Systems. Results The logarithm of the HCV RNA level measurements remained within a 0.3 value of the means for 4 days at both temperatures (room temperature or 4°C. Conclusions We conclude that blood samples may be collected and aliquoted within 6 h of collection and can be stored at 4°C for 72 hours as proposed by the manufacturer without significant differences in measured HCV RNA level. Our results indicate that lapses in this scheme may still yield reliable results.

  1. A Bioinformatics Method for the Design of Live Attenuated Virus Vaccine Utilizing Host MicroRNA Response Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichadakul, Duangdao

    2016-01-01

    The host microRNA machinery has been employed to control viral replication. To improve safety for live attenuated virus vaccines, the binding sites of the host microRNAs, so-called microRNA response elements (MREs), were incorporated into the virus sequences. These MREs were typically designed for a specific host microRNA and virus sequence with the effectiveness evaluated by experimental trials. Here, we describe a computational flow that can be used to simultaneously design and prioritize the effective MREs in large-scale.

  2. Theiler's virus RNA and protein synthesis in the central nervous system of demyelinating mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cash, E.; Chamorro, M.; Brahic, M.

    1985-07-15

    The authors studied Theiler's virus RNA and capsid protein synthesis in sections of mouse spinal cord using in situ hybridization coupled to immunoperoxidase. They found that the majority of infected cells contain 100 to 500 viral genomes and no detectable capsid antigens. Similarly, baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, which are permissive to Theiler's virus, do not synthesize capsid if they contain less than 1000 viral genomes. The results demonstrate that virus multiplication is restricted in vivo at the level of RNA replication. They suggest that RNA restriction is sufficient to explain the lack of capsid antigen synthesis.

  3. A raspberry bushy dwarf virus isolate from Ecuadorean Rubus glaucus contains an additional RNA that is a rearrangement of RNA-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quito-Avila, D F; Ibarra, M A; Alvarez, R; Peralta, E L; Martin, R R

    2014-09-01

    Sequencing of the complete genome of a raspberry bushy dwarf virus isolate from Rubus glaucus in Ecuador revealed that its RNA-1 and RNA-2 were 5449 and 2231 nucleotides (nt) long, respectively, and phylogenetically closest to isolates from Sweden and Slovenia. In dsRNA analysis of infected plants, an additional band of 3 kbp was observed. Sequencing of this band revealed that it was 3279 nt long. BLAST searches revealed that this band contained a modified version of RNA-2, which consisted of RNA-2 (2231 nt) plus an additional 1048-nt fragment that was concatenated in a reverse-complement fashion to its 5' terminus.

  4. Selection of functional tRNA primers and primer binding site sequences from a retroviral combinatorial library: identification of new functional tRNA primers in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Pedersen, F S

    2000-01-01

    . While most of the selected primer binding sites are complementary to the 3'-end of tRNA((Pro)), we also retrieved PBS sequences matching four other tRNA molecules and demonstrate that Akv murine leukemia virus vectors may efficiently replicate using tRNA(Arg(CCU)), tRNA(Phe(GAA))and a hitherto unknown......Retroviral reverse transcription is initiated from a cellular tRNA molecule and all known exogenous isolates of murine leukemia virus utilise a tRNA(Pro)molecule. While several studies suggest flexibility in murine leukemia virus primer utilisation, studies on human immunodeficiency virus and avian...... retro-viruses have revealed evidence of molecular adapt-ation towards the specific tRNA isoacceptor used as replication primer. In this study, murine leukemia virus tRNA utilisation is investigated by in vivo screening of a retroviral vector combinatorial library with randomised primer binding sites...

  5. Essential features of the assembly origin of tobacco mosaic virus RNA as studied by directed mutagenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    D. R. Turner; Butler, P J

    1986-01-01

    The assembly origin of tobacco mosaic virus RNA contains three stable hairpin loops. Coat protein disks bind first to loop 1 (the 3' most) during virus assembly, but the whole region is coated in a concerted fashion even in conditions of limiting protein. It is shown by in vitro packaging assays using mutant assembly origin transcripts that rapid and specific assembly initiation occurs in the absence of loops 2 and 3, but is abolished on removal of loop 1. Deletion or alteration of the unpair...

  6. High-Resolution Metatranscriptomics Reveals the Ecological Dynamics of Mosquito-Associated RNA Viruses in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Mang; Neville, Peter; Nicholson, Jay; Eden, John-Sebastian; Imrie, Allison; Holmes, Edward C

    2017-09-01

    Mosquitoes harbor a high diversity of RNA viruses, including many that impact human health. Despite a growing effort to describe the extent and nature of the mosquito virome, little is known about how these viruses persist, spread, and interact with both their hosts and other microbes. To address this issue we performed a metatranscriptomics analysis of 12 Western Australian mosquito populations structured by species and geographic location. Our results identified the complete genomes of 24 species of RNA viruses from a diverse range of viral families and orders, among which 19 are newly described. Comparisons of viromes revealed a striking difference between the two mosquito genera, with viromes of mosquitoes of the Aedes genus exhibiting substantially less diversity and lower abundances than those of mosquitoes of the Culex genus, within which the viral abundance reached 16.87% of the total non-rRNA. In addition, there was little overlap in viral diversity between the two genera, although the viromes were very similar among the three Culex species studied, suggesting that the host taxon plays a major role in structuring virus diversity. In contrast, we found no evidence that geographic location played a major role in shaping RNA virus diversity, and several viruses discovered here exhibited high similarity (95 to 98% nucleotide identity) to those from Indonesia and China. Finally, using abundance-level and phylogenetic relationships, we were able to distinguish potential mosquito viruses from those present in coinfecting bacteria, fungi, and protists. In sum, our metatranscriptomics approach provides important insights into the ecology of mosquito RNA viruses.IMPORTANCE Studies of virus ecology have generally focused on individual viral species. However, recent advances in bulk RNA sequencing make it possible to utilize metatranscriptomic approaches to reveal both complete virus diversity and the relative abundance of these viruses. We used such a

  7. Computational fitness landscape for all gene-order permutations of an RNA virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-il Lim

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available How does the growth of a virus depend on the linear arrangement of genes in its genome? Answering this question may enhance our basic understanding of virus evolution and advance applications of viruses as live attenuated vaccines, gene-therapy vectors, or anti-tumor therapeutics. We used a mathematical model for vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a prototype RNA virus that encodes five genes (N-P-M-G-L, to simulate the intracellular growth of all 120 possible gene-order variants. Simulated yields of virus infection varied by 6,000-fold and were found to be most sensitive to gene-order permutations that increased levels of the L gene transcript or reduced levels of the N gene transcript, the lowest and highest expressed genes of the wild-type virus, respectively. Effects of gene order on virus growth also depended upon the host-cell environment, reflecting different resources for protein synthesis and different cell susceptibilities to infection. Moreover, by computationally deleting intergenic attenuations, which define a key mechanism of transcriptional regulation in VSV, the variation in growth associated with the 120 gene-order variants was drastically narrowed from 6,000- to 20-fold, and many variants produced higher progeny yields than wild-type. These results suggest that regulation by intergenic attenuation preceded or co-evolved with the fixation of the wild type gene order in the evolution of VSV. In summary, our models have begun to reveal how gene functions, gene regulation, and genomic organization of viruses interact with their host environments to define processes of viral growth and evolution.

  8. The use of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase for the taxonomic assignment of Picorna-like viruses (order Picornavirales infecting Apis mellifera L. populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder Declan C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-stranded RNA viruses, infectious to the European honeybee, Apis mellifera L. are known to reside at low levels in colonies, with typically no apparent signs of infection observed in the honeybees. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR of regions of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp is often used to diagnose their presence in apiaries and also to classify the type of virus detected. Results Analysis of RdRp conserved domains was undertaken on members of the newly defined order, the Picornavirales; focusing in particular on the amino acid residues and motifs known to be conserved. Consensus sequences were compiled using partial and complete honeybee virus sequences published to date. Certain members within the iflaviruses, deformed wing virus (DWV, Kakugo virus (KV and Varroa destructor virus (VDV; and the dicistroviruses, acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV, Israeli paralysis virus (IAPV and Kashmir bee virus (KBV, shared greater than 98% and 92% homology across the RdRp conserved domains, respectively. Conclusion RdRp was validated as a suitable taxonomic marker for the assignment of members of the order Picornavirales, with the potential for use independent of other genetic or phenotypic markers. Despite the current use of the RdRp as a genetic marker for the detection of specific honeybee viruses, we provide overwhelming evidence that care should be taken with the primer set design. We demonstrated that DWV, VDV and KV, or ABPV, IAPV and KBV, respectively are all recent descendents or variants of each other, meaning caution should be applied when assigning presence or absence to any of these viruses when using current RdRp primer sets. Moreover, it is more likely that some primer sets (regardless of what gene is used are too specific and thus are underestimating the diversity of honeybee viruses.

  9. Tobacco calmodulin-like protein provides secondary defense by binding to and directing degradation of virus RNA silencing suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Kenji S; Masuta, Chikara; Yamada, Syouta; Shimura, Hanako; Kashihara, Yukiko; Wada, Tomoko S; Meguro, Ayano; Goto, Kazunori; Tadamura, Kazuki; Sueda, Kae; Sekiguchi, Toru; Shao, Jun; Itchoda, Noriko; Matsumura, Takeshi; Igarashi, Manabu; Ito, Kimihito; Carthew, Richard W; Uyeda, Ichiro

    2012-06-19

    RNA silencing (RNAi) induced by virus-derived double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which is in a sense regarded as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) of viruses, is a general plant defense mechanism. To counteract this defense, plant viruses express RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs), many of which bind to dsRNA and attenuate RNAi. We showed that the tobacco calmodulin-like protein, rgs-CaM, counterattacked viral RSSs by binding to their dsRNA-binding domains and sequestering them from inhibiting RNAi. Autophagy-like protein degradation seemed to operate to degrade RSSs with the sacrifice of rgs-CaM. These RSSs could thus be regarded as secondary viral PAMPs. This study uncovered a unique defense system in which an rgs-CaM-mediated countermeasure against viral RSSs enhanced host antiviral RNAi in tobacco.

  10. Intracranial administration of P gene siRNA protects mice from lethal Chandipura virus encephalitis.

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    Satyendra Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In parts of India, Chandipura Virus (CHPV has emerged as an encephalitis causing pathogen in both epidemic and sporadic forms. This pediatric disease follows rapid course leading to 55-75% mortality. In the absence of specific treatment, effectiveness of RNA interference (RNAi was evaluated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Efficacy of synthetic short interfering RNA (siRNA or short hairpin RNA (shRNA in protecting mice from CHPV infection was assessed. The target genes were P and M genes primarily because important role of the former in viral replication and lethal nature of the latter. Real time one step RT-PCR and plaque assay were used for the assessment of gene silencing. Using pAcGFP1N1-CHPV-P, we showed that P-2 siRNA was most efficient in reducing the expression of P gene in-vitro. Both quantitative assays documented 2 logs reduction in the virus titer when P-2, M-5 or M-6 siRNAs were transfected 2 hr post infection (PI. Use of these siRNAs in combination did not result in enhanced efficiency. P-2 siRNA was found to tolerate four mismatches in the center. As compared to five different shRNAs, P-2 siRNA was most effective in inhibiting CHPV replication. An extended survival was noted when mice infected intracranially with 100 LD50 CHPV were treated with cationic lipid complexed 5 microg P-2 siRNA simultaneously. Infection with 10LD50 and treatment with two doses of siRNA first, simultaneously and second 24 hr PI, resulted in 70% survival. Surviving mice showed 4 logs less CHPV titers in brain without histopathological changes or antibody response. Gene expression profiles of P-2 siRNA treated mice showed no interferon response. First dose of siRNA at 2 hr or 4 hr PI with second dose at 24hr resulted in 40% and 20% survival respectively suggesting potential application in therapy. CONCLUSIONS: The results highlight therapeutic potential of siRNA in treating rapid and fatal Chandipura encephalitis.

  11. EFEKTIVITAS SATELIT RNA YANG BERASOSIASI DENGAN CUCUMBER MOSAIC VIRUS (CARNA-5 UNTUK MENGENDALIKAN PENYAKIT VIRUS PADA TANAMAN TOMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasriadi Mat Akin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Two strains of CMV associated satellite RNA (CARNA 5.1 and CARNA 5.2 were evaluated to control severe strain of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV-G, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, and Potato virus Y (PVY on tomato plants.  Tomato plants were mechanically inoculated with CARNA 5.1 and CARNA 5.2 to protect the plants from super infection of CMV-G, TMV, and PVY.  The result revealed that inoculation of CARNA 5.1 and CARNA 5.2 to tomato plants effectively controlled the plants from CMV-G super infection. The effectiveness of  CARNA 5.1 and CARNA 5.2 to unrelated virus, TMV and PVY, was evaluated in this experiment.  The result showed that CARNA 5.1 and CARNA 5.2 inhibited TMV and PVY infection.  CMV-G super infection on protected tomato plants showed mild disease symptoms, significant redution of  plant growth, height, and yield; however, nonprotected plants showed severe disease  symptoms and significant inhibition of plant growth and tomato yield.

  12. Development of a multiplex AmpliDet RNA for the simultaneous detection of Potato leafroll virus and Potato virus Y in potato tubers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerks, M.M.; Leone, G.O.M.; Verbeek, M.; Heuvel, van den J.F.J.M.; Schoen, C.D.

    2001-01-01

    A novel isothermal multiplex AmpliDet RNA system is described for the simultaneous amplification and detection of Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) and Potato virus Y (PVY) in seed potatoes. The risk of contamination by carry-over during diagnostic screening is eliminated by performing the reaction in a

  13. Plasma microRNA profiles distinguish lethal injury in acetaminophen toxicity: A research study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeanine Ward; Shashi Bala; Jan Petrasek; Gyongyi Szabo

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate plasma microRNA (miRNA) profiles indicative of hepatotoxicity in the setting of lethal acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in mice.METHODS:Using plasma from APAP poisoned mice,either lethally (500 mg/kg) or sublethally (150 mg/kg) dosed,we screened commercially available murine microRNA libraries (SABiosciences,Qiagen Sciences,MD) to evaluate for unique miRNA profiles between these two dosing parameters.RESULTS:We distinguished numerous,unique plasma miRNAs both up- and downregulated in lethally compared to sublethally dosed mice.Of note,many of the greatest up- and downregulated miRNAs,namely 574-5p,466g,466f-3p,375,29c,and 148a,have been shown to be associated with asthma in prior studies.Interestingly,a relationship between APAP and asthma has been previously well described in the literature,with an as yet unknown mechanism of pathology.There was a statistically significant increase in alanine aminotransferase levels in the lethal compared to sublethal APAP dosing groups at the 12 h time point (P <0.001).There was 90% mortality in the lethally compared to sublethally dosed mice at the 48 h time point (P =0.011).CONCLUSION:We identified unique plasma miRNAs both up- and downregulated in APAP poisoning which are correlated to asthma development.

  14. Association between the miRNA Signatures in Plasma and Bronchoalveolar Fluid in Respiratory Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Molina-Pinelo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of new less invasive biomarkers is necessary to improve the detection and prognostic outcome of respiratory pathological processes. The measurement of miRNA expression through less invasive techniques such as plasma and serum have been suggested to analysis of several lung malignancies including lung cancer. These studies are assuming a common deregulated miRNA expression both in blood and lung tissue. The present study aimed to obtain miRNA representative signatures both in plasma and bronchoalveolar cell fraction that could serve as biomarker in respiratory diseases. Ten patients were evaluated to assess the expression levels of 381 miRNAs. We found that around 50% miRNAs were no detected in both plasma and bronchoalveolar cell fraction and only 20% of miRNAs showed similar expression in both samples. These results show a lack of association of miRNA signatures between plasma and bronchoalveolar cytology in the same patient. The profiles are not comparable; however, there is a similarity in the relative expression in a very small subset of miRNAs (miR-17, miR-19b, miR-195 and miR-20b between both biological samples in all patients. This finding supports that the miRNAs profiles obtained from different biological samples have to be carefully validated to link with respiratory diseases.

  15. Structural basis for the dsRNA specificity of the Lassa virus NP exonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Hastie

    Full Text Available Lassa virus causes hemorrhagic fever characterized by immunosuppression. The nucleoprotein of Lassa virus, termed NP, binds the viral genome. It also has an additional enzymatic activity as an exonuclease that specifically digests double-stranded RNA (dsRNA. dsRNA is a strong signal to the innate immune system of viral infection. Digestion of dsRNA by the NP exonuclease activity appears to cause suppression of innate immune signaling in the infected cell. Although the fold of the NP enzyme is conserved and the active site completely conserved with other exonucleases in its DEDDh family, NP is atypical among exonucleases in its preference for dsRNA and its strict specificity for one substrate. Here, we present the crystal structure of Lassa virus NP in complex with dsRNA. We find that unlike the exonuclease in Klenow fragment, the double-stranded nucleic acid in complex with Lassa NP remains base-paired instead of splitting, and that binding of the paired complementary strand is achieved by "relocation" of a basic loop motif from its typical exonuclease position. Further, we find that just one single glycine that contacts the substrate strand and one single tyrosine that stacks with a base of the complementary, non-substrate strand are responsible for the unique substrate specificity. This work thus provides templates for development of antiviral drugs that would be specific for viral, rather than host exonucleases of similar fold and active site, and illustrates how a very few amino acid changes confer alternate specificity and biological phenotype to an enzyme.

  16. Structural basis for the dsRNA specificity of the Lassa virus NP exonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Kathryn M; King, Liam B; Zandonatti, Michelle A; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus causes hemorrhagic fever characterized by immunosuppression. The nucleoprotein of Lassa virus, termed NP, binds the viral genome. It also has an additional enzymatic activity as an exonuclease that specifically digests double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). dsRNA is a strong signal to the innate immune system of viral infection. Digestion of dsRNA by the NP exonuclease activity appears to cause suppression of innate immune signaling in the infected cell. Although the fold of the NP enzyme is conserved and the active site completely conserved with other exonucleases in its DEDDh family, NP is atypical among exonucleases in its preference for dsRNA and its strict specificity for one substrate. Here, we present the crystal structure of Lassa virus NP in complex with dsRNA. We find that unlike the exonuclease in Klenow fragment, the double-stranded nucleic acid in complex with Lassa NP remains base-paired instead of splitting, and that binding of the paired complementary strand is achieved by "relocation" of a basic loop motif from its typical exonuclease position. Further, we find that just one single glycine that contacts the substrate strand and one single tyrosine that stacks with a base of the complementary, non-substrate strand are responsible for the unique substrate specificity. This work thus provides templates for development of antiviral drugs that would be specific for viral, rather than host exonucleases of similar fold and active site, and illustrates how a very few amino acid changes confer alternate specificity and biological phenotype to an enzyme.

  17. Effects of siRNA targeting HSV-2 LAT ORF on the virus latency and reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-hui SUN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the role of open reading frame (ORF of herpes virus 2 (HSV-2 latency associated transcript (LAT in reactivation of latent virus infection. Methods The neural cell model of HSV-2 latent infection and reactivation in SH-SY5Y cells was established. PCR was used to authenticate the latency and reactivation of HSV-2 and then sequenced. siRNAs targeting the mRNA of HSV LAT ORF were designed and transfected into SH-SY5Y cells through LipofectamineTM 2000 reagent. The expression of LAT ORF mRNA before and after transfection was assayed by RT-PCR. cDNA microarray was prepared to study the changes of gene expression profiles of HSV-2 after inhibition of LAT ORF mRNA. Results The neural cell model system of HSV-2 latent infection and reactivation was established successfully in SH-SY5Y cells. PCR results of LAT and gG genes proved the latency and reactivation of virus. The mRNA expression of LAT ORF in the cells treated by HSV LAT ORF-siRNA at 24, 36 and 48h were significantly reduced by 39%, 51% and 60%, respectively. After hybridization, a statistic analysis following microarray scanning showed that 28 genes differentially expressed in the LAT-siRNA transfected cells as contrast to untransfected cells. An increase of expression was found in 4 genes and a decrease in 24. Conclusion LAT ORF plays an important role in the reactivation of HSV-2 latent infection, and it provides a foundation for understanding the regulatory mechanism of LAT in latent infection and reactivation of HSV-2. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.02.06

  18. Structure of the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 nucleoprotein-RNA complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alayyoubi, Maher; Leser, George P.; Kors, Christopher A.; Lamb, Robert A. [NWU

    2015-05-20

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family of membrane-enveloped viruses with a negative-sense RNA genome that is packaged and protected by long filamentous nucleocapsid-helix structures (RNPs). These RNPs, consisting of ~2,600 protomers of nucleocapsid (N) protein, form the template for viral transcription and replication. We have determined the 3D X-ray crystal structure of the nucleoprotein (N)-RNA complex from PIV5 to 3.11-Å resolution. The structure reveals a 13-mer nucleocapsid ring whose diameter, cavity, and pitch/height dimensions agree with EM data from early studies on the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of native RNPs, indicating that it closely represents one-turn in the building block of the RNP helices. The PIV5-N nucleocapsid ring encapsidates a nuclease resistant 78-nt RNA strand in its positively charged groove formed between the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of its successive N protomers. Six nucleotides precisely are associated with each N protomer, with alternating three-base-in three-base-out conformation. The binding of six nucleotides per protomer is consistent with the "rule of six" that governs the genome packaging of the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of viruses. PIV5-N protomer subdomains are very similar in structure to the previously solved Nipah-N structure, but with a difference in the angle between NTD/CTD at the RNA hinge region. Based on the Nipah-N structure we modeled a PIV5-N open conformation in which the CTD rotates away from the RNA strand into the inner spacious nucleocapsid-ring cavity. This rotation would expose the RNA for the viral polymerase activity without major disruption of the nucleocapsid structure.

  19. Optimized Collection Protocol for Plasma MicroRNA Measurement in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Sheng Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Various microRNAs (miRNAs are used as markers of acute coronary syndrome, in which heparinization is considered mandatory therapy. Nevertheless, a standard method of handling plasma samples has not been proposed, and the effects of heparin treatment on miRNA detection are rarely discussed. Materials and Method. This study used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR analysis to investigate how storage temperature, standby time, hemolysis, and heparin treatment affect miRNA measurement in plasma samples from 25 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Results. For most miRNAs, the qPCR results remained consistent during the first 2 hours. The miRNA signals did not significantly differ between samples stored at 4°C before processing and samples stored at room temperature (RT before processing. miR-451a/miR-23a ratio < 60 indicated < 0.12% hemolysis with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Pretreatment with 0.25 U heparinase I recovered qPCR signals that were reduced by in vivo heparinization. Conclusions. For miRNA measurement, blood samples stored at RT should be processed into plasma within 2 hours after withdrawal and should be pretreated with 0.25 U heparinase I to overcome heparin-attenuated miRNA signals. The miR-451a/miR-23a ratio is a reliable indicator of significant hemolysis.

  20. Targeting microRNA-122 to Treat Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L. Jopling

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available An important host factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV is microRNA-122 (miR-122. miR-122 is a liver-specific member of a family of small, non-coding RNA molecules known as microRNAs that play major roles in the regulation of gene expression by direct interaction with RNA targets. miR-122 binds directly to two sites in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR of HCV RNA and positively regulates the viral life cycle. The mechanism by which this regulation occurs is still not fully understood. There has been a great deal of interest in potential therapeutics based on small RNAs, and targeting miR-122 to combat HCV is one of the furthest advanced. Chemical inhibitors of miR-122 can be introduced into mammals intravenously and result in potent and specific knockdown of the microRNA, with no detectable adverse effects on liver physiology. This strategy was recently applied to chimpanzees chronically infected with HCV and resulted in a sustained reduction in viral load in the animals. Inhibition of miR-122 therefore presents a very attractive novel approach to treating HCV, a virus for which improved therapeutics are urgently needed.

  1. Inhibition of the foot-and-mouth disease virus subgenomic replicon by RNA aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Sophie; Lear, Zoe; Herod, Morgan R; Ryan, Martin; Rowlands, David J; Stonehouse, Nicola J

    2014-12-01

    We have previously documented the inhibitory activity of RNA aptamers to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of foot-and-mouth disease virus (3D(pol)). Here we report their modification and use with a subgenomic replicon incorporating GFP (pGFP-PAC replicon), allowing replication to be monitored and quantified in real-time. GFP expression in transfected BHK-21 cells reached a maximum at approximately 8 h post-transfection, at which time change in morphology of the cells was consistent with a virus-induced cytopathic effect. However, transfection of replicon-bearing cells with a 3D(pol) aptamer RNA resulted in inhibition of GFP expression and maintenance of normal cell morphology, whereas a control aptamer RNA had little effect. The inhibition was correlated with a reduction in 3D(pol) (detected by immunoblotting) and shown to be dose dependent. The 3D(pol) aptamers appeared to be more effective than 2'-C-methylcytidine (2'CMC). Aptamers to components of the replication complex are therefore useful molecular tools for studying viral replication and also have potential as diagnostic molecules in the future.

  2. Cytoplasmic translocation of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein and its binding to viral RNA during Japanese encephalitis virus infection inhibits virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Bhullar

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV has a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome containing a single open reading frame flanked by the 5'- and 3'-non-coding regions (NCRs. The virus genome replicates via a negative-sense RNA intermediate. The NCRs and their complementary sequences in the negative-sense RNA are the sites for assembly of the RNA replicase complex thereby regulating the RNA synthesis and virus replication. In this study, we show that the 55-kDa polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB interacts in vitro with both the 5'-NCR of the positive-sense genomic RNA--5NCR(+, and its complementary sequence in the negative-sense replication intermediate RNA--3NCR(-. The interaction of viral RNA with PTB was validated in infected cells by JEV RNA co-immunoprecipitation and JEV RNA-PTB colocalization experiments. Interestingly, we observed phosphorylation-coupled translocation of nuclear PTB to cytoplasmic foci that co-localized with JEV RNA early during JEV infection. Our studies employing the PTB silencing and over-expression in cultured cells established an inhibitory role of PTB in JEV replication. Using RNA-protein binding assay we show that PTB competitively inhibits association of JEV 3NCR(- RNA with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5 protein, an event required for the synthesis of the plus-sense genomic RNA. cAMP is known to promote the Protein kinase A (PKA-mediated PTB phosphorylation. We show that cells treated with a cAMP analogue had an enhanced level of phosphorylated PTB in the cytoplasm and a significantly suppressed JEV replication. Data presented here show a novel, cAMP-induced, PTB-mediated, innate host response that could effectively suppress JEV replication in mammalian cells.

  3. Role of the C terminus of Lassa virus L protein in viral mRNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Maria; Pahlmann, Meike; Jérôme, Hanna; Busch, Carola; Lelke, Michaela; Günther, Stephan

    2014-08-01

    The N terminus of arenavirus L protein contains an endonuclease presumably involved in "cap snatching." Here, we employed the Lassa virus replicon system to map other L protein sites that might be involved in this mechanism. Residues Phe-1979, Arg-2018, Phe-2071, Asp-2106, Trp-2173, Tyr-2179, Arg-2200, and Arg-2204 were important for viral mRNA synthesis but dispensable for genome replication. Thus, the C terminus of L protein is involved in the mRNA synthesis process, potentially by mediating cap binding.

  4. Optimal design and validation of antiviral siRNA for targeting hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie FU; Zhong-ming TANG; Xin GAO; Fan ZHAO; Hui ZHONG; Mao-rong WEN; Xiao SUN; Hai-feng SONG; Xiao-hong QIAN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Optimal design of antiviral short-interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting highly divergent hepatitis B virus (HBV) was validated by quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis. Methods: The potency of 23 synthetic siRNAs targeting 23 sites throughout HBV pregenomic RNA were evaluated at 10 nmol/L by determining the inhibition on the expression of S/P/pregenomic mRNA and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) quantitatively in HepG2.2.15 cells. Genotype homology within HBV genomes was identified through plentiful computational analysis and the multiple linear regression analysis was made to validate the relationship between the functional siRNAs and primary characteristics. Based on the preliminary results, relationships between different determined endpoints [S/P mRNA, HBsAg, C/P mRNA, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and viral DNA load] and siRNA efficacy evaluation were investigated. Results: Genotype homology, open reading frame (ORF) S/E X and C had tight correlation with the ability of siRNAs on inhibiting the expression of S/P/Pregenomic mRNA and HBsAg (P<0.01), of which, ORF C was negatively correlated with the siRNA potency (P<0.05). Further study showed that siRNA potency evaluation was influenced by different determined endpoints. P-target siRNAs showed significant inhibition on the S mRNA and HBsAg expression. S-target siRNAs inhibited the expression of S mRNA and HBsAg strongly. X-target siRNAs played active roles in inhibiting all 5 determined endpoints. C-target siRNAs blocked the expression of C mRNA, HBeAg and viral DNA load significantly. Conclusion: The antiviral potency of siRNA was relevant to its primary characteristics and determined endpoints were important for siRNA efficacy evaluation for complex genome with overlapping ORF, which was helpful for siRNA optimal design.

  5. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) Inhibits RNA-Mediated Gene Silencing by Targeting Ago-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Shi, Xibao; Zhang, Xiaozhuan; Wang, Li; Luo, Jun; Xing, Guangxu; Deng, Ruiguang; Yang, Hong; Li, Jinting; Wang, Aiping; Zhang, Gaiping

    2015-10-23

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection strongly modulates the host's immune response. The RNA silencing pathway is an intracellular innate response to viral infections. However, it is unknown whether PRRSV interacts with cellular RNA silencing to facilitate the viral infection. Here, we report for the first time the interaction between PRRSV and RNA silencing in both the porcine macrophages and African green monkey kidney cell line (MARC-145) cell line, which were derived from African green monkey kidney cells and highly permissive for PRRSV infection. Our data demonstrated that PRRSV suppressed RNA silencing induced by short-hairpin (sh) RNA, double-strand (ds) RNA and microRNA (miRNA) and downregulated the expression of argonaute protein-2 (Ago-2), which is a key protein of the RNA silencing pathway in animal cells. Further, exogenous introduction of siRNA and shRNA downregulated Dicer or Ago-2 proteins of the cellular RNA silencing apparatus in MARC-145 cells and porcine macrophages, which, in turn, increased the viral replication and titers. The viral non-structure protein 1α (nsp-1α) and nsp11 of PRRSV were identified as the suppressors for cellular RNA silencing (RSSs) to downregulate the Ago-2 protein. Our results identify that PRRSV, through its nsp proteins, suppresses the cellular RNA silencing apparatus in favor of viral infection and supports a co-evolutionary process of the virus and the cellular RNA silencing process.

  6. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV Inhibits RNA-Mediated Gene Silencing by Targeting Ago-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infection strongly modulates the host’s immune response. The RNA silencing pathway is an intracellular innate response to viral infections. However, it is unknown whether PRRSV interacts with cellular RNA silencing to facilitate the viral infection. Here, we report for the first time the interaction between PRRSV and RNA silencing in both the porcine macrophages and African green monkey kidney cell line (MARC-145 cell line, which were derived from African green monkey kidney cells and highly permissive for PRRSV infection. Our data demonstrated that PRRSV suppressed RNA silencing induced by short-hairpin (sh RNA, double-strand (ds RNA and microRNA (miRNA and downregulated the expression of argonaute protein-2 (Ago-2, which is a key protein of the RNA silencing pathway in animal cells. Further, exogenous introduction of siRNA and shRNA downregulated Dicer or Ago-2 proteins of the cellular RNA silencing apparatus in MARC-145 cells and porcine macrophages, which, in turn, increased the viral replication and titers. The viral non-structure protein 1α (nsp-1α and nsp11 of PRRSV were identified as the suppressors for cellular RNA silencing (RSSs to downregulate the Ago-2 protein. Our results identify that PRRSV, through its nsp proteins, suppresses the cellular RNA silencing apparatus in favor of viral infection and supports a co-evolutionary process of the virus and the cellular RNA silencing process.

  7. Maternal And Neonatal Plasma MicroRNA Biomarkers For Fetal Alcohol Exposure In An Ovine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaraman, Sridevi; Lunde, E. Raine; Sawant, Onkar; Cudd, Timothy A.; Washburn, Shannon E.; Miranda, Rajesh C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasma or circulating miRNAs (cirmiRNAs) have potential diagnostic value as biomarkers for a range of diseases. Based on observations that ethanol altered intracellular miRNAs during development, we tested the hypothesis that plasma miRNAs were biomarkers for maternal alcohol exposure, and for past in utero exposure, in the neonate. Methods Pregnant sheep were exposed to a binge model of ethanol consumption resulting in an average peak blood alcohol content of 243 mg/dl, for a three-trimester equivalent period from gestational day (GD) 4 to GD 132. MiRNA profiles were assessed by quantitative PCR analysis in plasma, erythrocyte and leukocytes obtained from non-pregnant ewes, and plasma from pregnant ewes 24 hours following the last binge ethanol episode, and from newborn lambs, at birth on ~GD 147. Results Pregnant ewe and newborn lamb cirmiRNA profiles were similar to each other and different from non-pregnant female plasma, erythrocyte or leukocyte miRNAs. Significant changes in cirmiRNA profiles were observed in the ethanol-exposed ewe, and at birth, in the in utero, ethanol-exposed lamb. CirmiRNAs including miR-9, -15b, -19b and -20a were sensitive and specific measures of ethanol exposure in both pregnant ewe and newborn lamb. Additionally, ethanol exposure altered guide to passenger strand cirmiRNA ratios in the pregnant ewe, but not in the lamb. Conclusion Shared profiles between pregnant dam and neonate suggest possible maternal-fetal miRNA transfer. CirmiRNAs are biomarkers for alcohol exposure during pregnancy, in both mother and neonate, and may constitute an important shared endocrine biomarker that is vulnerable to the maternal environment. PMID:24588274

  8. Interplay between the cellular autophagy machinery and positive-stranded RNA viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junyan Shi; Honglin Luo

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process that acts as a key regulator in maintaining cellular homeostasis.Recent studies implicate an important role for autophagy in infection and immunity by removing invading pathogens and through modulating innate and adaptive immune responses.However,several pathogens,notably some positive-stranded RNA viruses,have subverted autophagy to their own ends.In this review,we summarize the current understanding of how viruses with a positive-stranded RNA genome interact with the host autophagy machinery to control their replication and spread.We review the mechanisms underlying the induction of autophagy and discuss the pro- and anti-viral functions of autophagy and the potential mechanisms involved.

  9. Polycistronic Expression of the Influenza A Virus RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase by Using the Thosea asigna Virus 2A-like Self-processing Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitaka eMomose

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp of influenza A virus consists of three subunits, PB2, PB1, and PA, and catalyses both viral RNA genome replication and transcription. Cotransfection of four monocistronic expression vectors for these subunits and nucleoprotein with an expression vector for viral RNA reconstitutes functional viral ribonucleoprotein complex (vRNP. However, the specific activity of reconstituted RdRp is usually very low since the expression level and the ratio of the three subunits by transfection are uncontrollable at single-cell levels. For efficient reconstitution of RdRp and vRNP, their levels need to be at least comparable. We constructed polycistronic expression vectors in which the coding sequences of the three subunits were joined with the 2A-like self-processing sequence of Thosea asigna virus (TaV2A in various orders. The level of PB1 protein, even when it was placed at the most downstream, was comparable with that expressed from the monocistronic PB1 vector. In contrast, the levels of PB2 and PA were very low, the latter of which was most likely due to proteasomal degradation caused by the TaV2A-derived sequences attached to the amino- and/or carboxyl-terminal ends in this expression system. Interestingly, two of the constructs, in which the PB1 coding sequence was placed at the most upstream, showed much higher reporter activity in a luciferase-based mini-genome assay than that observed by cotransfection of the monocistronic vectors. When the coding sequence of selective antibiotic marker was further placed at the most downstream of the PB1-PA-PB2 open reading frame, stable cells expressing RdRp were easily established, indicating that acquisition of antibiotic resistance assured the expression of upstream RdRp. The addition of an affinity tag to the carboxyl-terminal end of PB2 allowed us to isolate reconstituted vRNP. Taken together, the polycistronic expression system for influenza virus RdRp may be available

  10. CNOT4-Mediated Ubiquitination of Influenza A Virus Nucleoprotein Promotes Viral RNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV RNA segments are individually packaged with viral nucleoprotein (NP and RNA polymerases to form a viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP complex. We previously reported that NP is a monoubiquitinated protein which can be deubiquitinated by a cellular ubiquitin protease, USP11. In this study, we identified an E3 ubiquitin ligase, CNOT4 (Ccr4-Not transcription complex subunit 4, which can ubiquitinate NP. We found that the levels of viral RNA, protein, viral particles, and RNA polymerase activity in CNOT4 knockdown cells were lower than those in the control cells upon IAV infection. Conversely, overexpression of CNOT4 rescued viral RNP activity. In addition, CNOT4 interacted with the NP in the cell. An in vitro ubiquitination assay also showed that NP could be ubiquitinated by in vitro-translated CNOT4, but ubiquitination did not affect the protein stability of NP. Significantly, CNOT4 increased NP ubiquitination, whereas USP11 decreased it. Mass spectrometry analysis of ubiquitinated NP revealed multiple ubiquitination sites on the various lysine residues of NP. Three of these, K184, K227, and K273, are located on the RNA-binding groove of NP. Mutations of these sites to arginine reduced viral RNA replication. These results indicate that CNOT4 is a ubiquitin ligase of NP, and ubiquitination of NP plays a positive role in viral RNA replication.

  11. The pseudorabies virus vhs protein cleaves RNA containing an IRES sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-Fen; Tsai, Pei-Yun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Lin, Fong-Yuan; Hsu, Wei-Li

    2016-03-01

    The virion host shutoff protein (vhs), encoded by the gene UL41, has RNase activity and is the key regulator of the early host shutoff response induced by type 1 herpes simplex virus. Despite low amino acid similarity, the vhs protein of the swine herpesvirus, pseudorabies virus (PrV), also exhibits RNase activity. However, the mechanism underlying the action of vhs remains undefined. Here, we report that the RNA degradation profile of PrV vhs is similar, but not identical, to that of type 1 herpes simplex virus vhs. Notably, the presence of a cap structure enhances both the degradation rate and the preferential targeting of the vhs protein towards the 3'-end of the encephalomyocarditis virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Furthermore, type 1 herpes simplex virus vhs produces a simple degradation pattern, but PrV vhs gives rise to multiple intermediates. The results of northern blotting using probes recognizing various regions of the RNA substrate found that PrV vhs also cleaves downstream of the IRES region and this vhs protein overall shows 5' to 3' RNase activity. Moreover, addition of the translation initiation factors eIF4H and eIF4B significantly increased the RNase activity of recombinant PrV vhs against capped RNA. Nonetheless, these proteins did not fully reconstitute the IRES-directed targeting pattern observed for vhs translated in a rabbit reticular lysate system. The interaction between PrV vhs and eIF4H/eIF4B implies that the translation initiation machinery within the cell is able to stimulate the nuclease activity of PrV vhs. However, this process remains inefficient in terms of the IRES-targeting pattern.

  12. RNA Interference in Insect Vectors for Plant Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surapathrudu Kanakala

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Insects and other arthropods are the most important vectors of plant pathogens. The majority of plant pathogens are disseminated by arthropod vectors such as aphids, beetles, leafhoppers, planthoppers, thrips and whiteflies. Transmission of plant pathogens and the challenges in managing insect vectors due to insecticide resistance are factors that contribute to major food losses in agriculture. RNA interference (RNAi was recently suggested as a promising strategy for controlling insect pests, including those that serve as important vectors for plant pathogens. The last decade has witnessed a dramatic increase in the functional analysis of insect genes, especially those whose silencing results in mortality or interference with pathogen transmission. The identification of such candidates poses a major challenge for increasing the role of RNAi in pest control. Another challenge is to understand the RNAi machinery in insect cells and whether components that were identified in other organisms are also present in insect. This review will focus on summarizing success cases in which RNAi was used for silencing genes in insect vector for plant pathogens, and will be particularly helpful for vector biologists.

  13. RNA Interference in Insect Vectors for Plant Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakala, Surapathrudu; Ghanim, Murad

    2016-12-12

    Insects and other arthropods are the most important vectors of plant pathogens. The majority of plant pathogens are disseminated by arthropod vectors such as aphids, beetles, leafhoppers, planthoppers, thrips and whiteflies. Transmission of plant pathogens and the challenges in managing insect vectors due to insecticide resistance are factors that contribute to major food losses in agriculture. RNA interference (RNAi) was recently suggested as a promising strategy for controlling insect pests, including those that serve as important vectors for plant pathogens. The last decade has witnessed a dramatic increase in the functional analysis of insect genes, especially those whose silencing results in mortality or interference with pathogen transmission. The identification of such candidates poses a major challenge for increasing the role of RNAi in pest control. Another challenge is to understand the RNAi machinery in insect cells and whether components that were identified in other organisms are also present in insect. This review will focus on summarizing success cases in which RNAi was used for silencing genes in insect vector for plant pathogens, and will be particularly helpful for vector biologists.

  14. Acute leukemia viruses E26 and avian myeloblastosis virus have related transformation-specific RNA sequences but different genetic structures, gene products, and oncogenic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bister, Klaus; Nunn, Michael; Moscovici, Carlo; Perbal, Bernard; Baluda, Marcel A.; Duesberg, Peter H.

    1982-01-01

    Replication-defective acute leukemia viruses E26 and myeloblastosis virus (AMV) cause distinct leukemias although they belong to the same subgroup of oncogenic avian tumor viruses based on shared transformation-specific (onc) RNA sequences. E26 causes predominantly erythroblastosis in chicken and in quail, whereas AMV induces a myeloid leukemia. However, upon cultivation in vitro for >1 month, a majority of surviving hemopoietic cells of E26-infected animals bear myeloid markers similar to those of AMV-transformed cells. We have analyzed the genetic structure and gene products of E26 virus for a comparison with those of AMV. An E26/helper virus complex was found to contain two RNA species: a 5.7-kilobase (kb) RNA that hybridizes with cloned AMV-specific proviral DNA and hence is probably the E26 genome; and an 8.5-kb RNA that is unrelated to AMV and represents helper virus RNA. Thus, E26 RNA is smaller than 7.5-kb AMV RNA. Hybridization of size-selected poly(A)-terminating E26 RNA fragments with AMV-specific DNA indicated that the shared specific sequences are located in the 5′ half of the E26 genome as opposed to a 3′ location in AMV RNA. In nonproducer cells transformed in vitro by E26, a gag-related nonstructural 135,000-dalton protein (p135) was found. No gag(Pr76) or gag-pol (Pr180) precursors of essential virion proteins, which are present in AMV nonproducer cells, were observed. p135 was also found in cultured E26 virus producing cells of several leukemic chickens, and its intracellular concentration relative to that of the essential virion proteins encoded by the helper virus correlates with the ratio of E26 to helper RNA in virions released by these cells. p135 is phosphorylated but not glycosylated; antigenically it is not related to the pol or env gene products. It appears to be coded for by a partial gag gene and by E26-specific RNA sequences, presumably including those shared with AMV. Hence, AMV and E26 appear to use different strategies for the

  15. RNA Interference and Single Particle Tracking Analysis of Hepatitis C Virus Endocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly E Coller; Kristi L. Berger; Nicholas S. Heaton; Cooper, Jacob D.; Rosa Yoon; Glenn Randall

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters hepatocytes following a complex set of receptor interactions, culminating in internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. However, aside from receptors, little is known about the cellular molecular requirements for infectious HCV entry. Therefore, we analyzed a siRNA library that targets 140 cellular membrane trafficking genes to identify host genes required for infectious HCV production and HCV pseudoparticle entry. This approach identified 16 host cofact...

  16. Beneficial Effects of Population Bottlenecks in an RNA Virus Evolving at Increased Error Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Cases-González, Clara E.; Arribas, María; Domingo, Esteban; Lázaro, Ester

    2008-01-01

    RNA viruses replicate their genomes with a very high error rate and constitute highly heterogeneous mutant distributions similar to the molecular quasispecies introduced to explain the evolution of prebiotic replicators. The genetic information included in a quasispecies can only be faithfully transmitted below a critical error rate. When the error threshold is crossed, the population structure disorganizes, and it is substituted by a randomly distributed mutant spectrum. For viral quasispeci...

  17. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Defective interfering (DI viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8 was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1; it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral.

  18. Circadian transcription factor BMAL1 regulates innate immunity against select RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Tanmay; Dhar, Jayeeta; Patel, Sonal; Kondratov, Roman; Barik, Sailen

    2017-02-01

    BMAL1 (brain and muscle ARNT-like protein 1, also known as MOP3 or ARNT3) belongs to the family of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-PAS domain-containing transcription factors, and is a key component of the molecular oscillator that generates circadian rhythms. Here, we report that BMAL1-deficient cells are significantly more susceptible to infection by two major respiratory viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family, namely RSV and PIV3. Embryonic fibroblasts from Bmal1(-/-) mice produced nearly 10-fold more progeny virus than their wild type controls. These results were supported by animal studies whereby pulmonary infection of RSV produced a more severe disease and morbidity in Bmal1(-/-)mice. These results show that BMAL1 can regulate cellular innate immunity against specific RNA viruses.

  19. RNA editing of hepatitis B virus transcripts by activation-induced cytidine deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guoxin; Kitamura, Kouichi; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Guangyan; Chowdhury, Sajeda; Fu, Weixin; Koura, Miki; Wakae, Kousho; Honjo, Tasuku; Muramatsu, Masamichi

    2013-02-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for the somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of Ig genes. The mechanism by which AID triggers SHM and CSR has been explained by two distinct models. In the DNA deamination model, AID converts cytidine bases in DNA into uridine. The uridine is recognized by the DNA repair system, which produces DNA strand breakages and point mutations. In the alternative model, RNA edited by AID is responsible for triggering CSR and SHM. However, RNA deamination by AID has not been demonstrated. Here we found that C-to-T and G-to-A mutations accumulated in hepatitis B virus (HBV) nucleocapsid DNA when AID was expressed in HBV-replicating hepatic cell lines. AID expression caused C-to-T mutations in the nucleocapsid DNA of RNase H-defective HBV, which does not produce plus-strand viral DNA. Furthermore, the RT-PCR products of nucleocapsid viral RNA from AID-expressing cells exhibited significant C-to-T mutations, whereas viral RNAs outside the nucleocapsid did not accumulate C-to-U mutations. Moreover, AID was packaged within the nucleocapsid by forming a ribonucleoprotein complex with HBV RNA and the HBV polymerase protein. The encapsidation of the AID protein with viral RNA and DNA provides an efficient environment for evaluating AID's RNA and DNA deamination activities. A bona fide RNA-editing enzyme, apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide 1, induced a similar level of C-to-U mutations in nucleocapsid RNA as AID. Taken together, the results indicate that AID can deaminate the nucleocapsid RNA of HBV.

  20. Longitudinal follow-up of Zika virus RNA in semen of a traveller returning from Barbados to the Netherlands with Zika virus disease, march 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.E.M. Reusken (Chantal); S.D. Pas (Suzan); C.H. Geurts van Kessel (Corine); R. Mögling (Ramona); J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen); T. Langerak (Thomas); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A.A. Eijck (Annemiek); E.C.M. van Gorp (Eric)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe report the longitudinal follow-up of Zika virus (ZIKV) RNA in semen of a traveller who developed ZIKV disease after return to the Netherlands from Barbados, March 2016. Persistence of ZIKV RNA in blood, urine, saliva and semen was followed until the loads reached undetectable levels.

  1. Longitudinal follow-up of Zika virus RNA in semen of a traveller returning from Barbados to the Netherlands with Zika virus disease, March 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.E.M. Reusken (Chantal); S.D. Pas (Suzan); C.H. Geurts van Kessel (Corine); R. Mögling (Ramona); J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen); T. Langerak (Thomas); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A.A. Eijck (Annemiek); E.C.M. van Gorp (Eric)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe report the longitudinal follow-up of Zika virus (ZIKV) RNA in semen of a traveller who developed ZIKV disease after return to the Netherlands from Barbados, March 2016. Persistence of ZIKV RNA in blood, urine, saliva and semen was followed until the loads reached undetectable levels.

  2. Longitudinal follow-up of Zika virus RNA in semen of a traveller returning from Barbados to the Netherlands with Zika virus disease, March 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.E.M. Reusken (Chantal); S.D. Pas (Suzan); C.H. Geurts van Kessel (Corine); R. Mögling (Ramona); J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen); T. Langerak (Thomas); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A.A. Eijck (Annemiek); E.C.M. van Gorp (Eric)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe report the longitudinal follow-up of Zika virus (ZIKV) RNA in semen of a traveller who developed ZIKV disease after return to the Netherlands from Barbados, March 2016. Persistence of ZIKV RNA in blood, urine, saliva and semen was followed until the loads reached undetectable levels.

  3. Longitudinal follow-up of Zika virus RNA in semen of a traveller returning from Barbados to the Netherlands with Zika virus disease, march 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.E.M. Reusken (Chantal); S.D. Pas (Suzan); C.H. Geurts van Kessel (Corine); R. Mögling (Ramona); J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen); T. Langerak (Thomas); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A.A. Eijck (Annemiek); E.C.M. van Gorp (Eric)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe report the longitudinal follow-up of Zika virus (ZIKV) RNA in semen of a traveller who developed ZIKV disease after return to the Netherlands from Barbados, March 2016. Persistence of ZIKV RNA in blood, urine, saliva and semen was followed until the loads reached undetectable levels.

  4. A robust and cost-effective approach to sequence and analyze complete genomes of small RNA viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kiril M Dimitrov; Poonam Sharma; Jeremy D Volkening; Iryna V Goraichuk; Abdul Wajid; Shafqat Fatima Rehmani; Asma Basharat; Ismaila Shittu; Tony M Joannis; Patti J Miller; Claudio L Afonso

    2017-01-01

    ... of unsuspected variants and co-infecting agents. However, NGS is not widely used for small RNA viruses because of incorrectly perceived cost estimates and inefficient utilization of freely available bioinformatics tools...

  5. Schistosomiasis and HIV-1 infection in rural Zimbabwe: effect of treatment of schistosomiasis on CD4 cell count and plasma HIV-1 RNA load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup, Per; Zinyama, Rutendo; Gomo, Exnevia;

    2005-01-01

    To determine whether treatment of schistosomiasis has an effect on the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, individuals with schistosomiasis and with or without HIV-1 infection were randomized to receive praziquantel treatment at inclusion or after a delay of 3 months......; 287 participants were included in the study, and 227 (79%) were followed up. Among the 130 participants who were coinfected, those who received early treatment (n=64) had a significantly lower increase in plasma HIV-1 RNA load than did those who received delayed treatment (n=66) (P...

  6. Functional analysis of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) RNA4 in fungal transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Full-length RNA4 of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) and its mutants, including a frame-shift and deletions within the coding region, were inserted into a transcription plasmid. Transcripts derived from these plasmids and RNAs extracted from a BNYVV isolate containing only RNAs 1, 2 and 3 were coinoculated to Tetragona expansa. Then these recombinant isolates were inoculated to sugar beet plants grown in a sand culture system containing Polymyxa betae that had been freed of virus particles to test efficiency of BNYVV transmission. The result showed that the efficiency of BNYVV transmission among the plants by Polymyxa betae was highly decreased by different deletions in the coding region of RNA4, but not affected by the frame-shift mutant with four nucleotides insertion. The observations suggest that at least some of the RNA4 sequence encompassing the deleted region of 580 nucleotide acids (525-1105 nt) are necessary for high efficient transmission of the virus by the fungus.

  7. Viral Oncogenes, Noncoding RNAs, and RNA Splicing in Human Tumor Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ming Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral oncogenes are responsible for oncogenesis resulting from persistent virus infection. Although different human tumor viruses express different viral oncogenes and induce different tumors, their oncoproteins often target similar sets of cellular tumor suppressors or signal pathways to immortalize and/or transform infected cells. Expression of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes in papillomavirus, E1A and E1B oncogenes in adenovirus, large T and small t antigen in polyomavirus, and Tax oncogene in HTLV-1 are regulated by alternative RNA splicing. However, this regulation is only partially understood. DNA tumor viruses also encode noncoding RNAs, including viral microRNAs, that disturb normal cell functions. Among the determined viral microRNA precursors, EBV encodes 25 from two major clusters (BART and BHRF1, KSHV encodes 12 from a latent region, human polyomavirus MCV produce only one microRNA from the late region antisense to early transcripts, but HPVs appears to produce no viral microRNAs.

  8. Broad-Range Antiviral Activity of Hydrogen Sulfide Against Highly Pathogenic RNA Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhanov, Nikolay; Escaffre, Olivier; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an important endogenous mediator that has been the focus of intense investigation in the past few years, leading to the discovery of its role in vasoactive, cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory responses. Recently, we made a critical observation that H2S also has a protective role in paramyxovirus infection by modulating inflammatory responses and viral replication. In this study we tested the antiviral and anti-inflammatory activity of the H2S slow-releasing donor GYY4137 on enveloped RNA viruses from Ortho-, Filo-, Flavi- and Bunyavirus families, for which there is no FDA-approved vaccine or therapeutic available, with the exception of influenza. We found that GYY4137 significantly reduced replication of all tested viruses. In a model of influenza infection, GYY4137 treatment was associated with decreased expression of viral proteins and mRNA, suggesting inhibition of an early step of replication. The antiviral activity coincided with the decrease of viral-induced pro-inflammatory mediators and viral-induced nuclear translocation of transcription factors from Nuclear Factor (NF)-kB and Interferon Regulatory Factor families. In conclusion, increasing cellular H2S is associated with significant antiviral activity against a broad range of emerging enveloped RNA viruses, and should be further explored as potential therapeutic approach in relevant preclinical models of viral infections. PMID:28106111

  9. The untranslated regions of classic swine fever virus RNA trigger apoptosis.

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    Wei-Li Hsu

    Full Text Available Classical swine fever virus (CSFV causes a broad range of disease in pigs, from acute symptoms including high fever and hemorrhages, to chronic disease or unapparent infection, depending on the virus strain. CSFV belongs to the genus Pestivirus of the family Flaviviridae. It carries a single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome. An internal ribosomal entry site (IRES in the 5' untranslated region (UTR drives the translation of a single open reading frame encoding a 3898 amino acid long polypeptide chain. The open reading frame is followed by a 3' UTR comprising four highly structured stem-loops. In the present study, a synthetic RNA composed of the 5' and 3' UTRs of the CSFV genome devoid of any viral coding sequence and separated by a luciferase gene cassette (designated 5'UTR-Luc-3'UTR triggered apoptotic cell death as early as 4 h post-transfection. The apoptosis was measured by DNA laddering analysis, TUNEL assay, annexin-V binding determined by flow cytometry, and by analysis of caspase activation. Contrasting with this, only trace DNA laddering was observed in cells transfected with the individual 5' or 3' UTR RNA; even when the 5' UTR and 3' UTR were co-transfected as separate RNA molecules, DNA laddering did not reach the level induced by the chimeric 5'UTR-Luc-3'UTR RNA. Interestingly, RNA composed of the 5'UTR and of stem-loop I of the 3'UTR triggered much stronger apoptosis than the 5' or 3'UTR alone. These results indicate that the 5' and 3' UTRs act together in cis induce apoptosis. We furthered obtained evidence that the UTR-mediated apoptosis required double-stranded RNA and involved translation shutoff possibly through activation of PKR.

  10. Lipid nanoparticle siRNA treatment of Ebola-virus-Makona-infected nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi, Emily P; Mire, Chad E; Lee, Amy C H; Geisbert, Joan B; Zhou, Joy Z; Agans, Krystle N; Snead, Nicholas M; Deer, Daniel J; Barnard, Trisha R; Fenton, Karla A; MacLachlan, Ian; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2015-05-21

    The current outbreak of Ebola virus in West Africa is unprecedented, causing more cases and fatalities than all previous outbreaks combined, and has yet to be controlled. Several post-exposure interventions have been employed under compassionate use to treat patients repatriated to Europe and the United States. However, the in vivo efficacy of these interventions against the new outbreak strain of Ebola virus is unknown. Here we show that lipid-nanoparticle-encapsulated short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) rapidly adapted to target the Makona outbreak strain of Ebola virus are able to protect 100% of rhesus monkeys against lethal challenge when treatment was initiated at 3 days after exposure while animals were viraemic and clinically ill. Although all infected animals showed evidence of advanced disease including abnormal haematology, blood chemistry and coagulopathy, siRNA-treated animals had milder clinical features and fully recovered, while the untreated control animals succumbed to the disease. These results represent the first, to our knowledge, successful demonstration of therapeutic anti-Ebola virus efficacy against the new outbreak strain in nonhuman primates and highlight the rapid development of lipid-nanoparticle-delivered siRNA as a countermeasure against this highly lethal human disease.

  11. Replication protein of tobacco mosaic virus cotranslationally binds the 5′ untranslated region of genomic RNA to enable viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura-Nagaya, Kazue; Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Huang, Ying-Ping; Miyashita, Shuhei; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Genomic RNA of positive-strand RNA viruses replicate via complementary (i.e., negative-strand) RNA in membrane-bound replication complexes. Before replication complex formation, virus-encoded replication proteins specifically recognize genomic RNA molecules and recruit them to sites of replication. Moreover, in many of these viruses, selection of replication templates by the replication proteins occurs preferentially in cis. This property is advantageous to the viruses in several aspects of viral replication and evolution, but the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been characterized. Here, we used an in vitro translation system to show that a 126-kDa replication protein of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a positive-strand RNA virus, binds a 5′-terminal ∼70-nucleotide region of TMV RNA cotranslationally, but not posttranslationally. TMV mutants that carried nucleotide changes in the 5′-terminal region and showed a defect in the binding were unable to synthesize negative-strand RNA, indicating that this binding is essential for template selection. A C-terminally truncated 126-kDa protein, but not the full-length 126-kDa protein, was able to posttranslationally bind TMV RNA in vitro, suggesting that binding of the 126-kDa protein to the 70-nucleotide region occurs during translation and before synthesis of the C-terminal inhibitory domain. We also show that binding of the 126-kDa protein prevents further translation of the bound TMV RNA. These data provide a mechanistic explanation of how the 126-kDa protein selects replication templates in cis and how fatal collision between translating ribosomes and negative-strand RNA-synthesizing polymerases on the genomic RNA is avoided. PMID:24711385

  12. Three-dimensional analysis of a viral RNA replication complex reveals a virus-induced mini-organelle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin G Kopek

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses are the largest genetic class of viruses and include many serious human pathogens. All positive-strand RNA viruses replicate their genomes in association with intracellular membrane rearrangements such as single- or double-membrane vesicles. However, the exact sites of RNA synthesis and crucial topological relationships between relevant membranes, vesicle interiors, surrounding lumens, and cytoplasm generally are poorly defined. We applied electron microscope tomography and complementary approaches to flock house virus (FHV-infected Drosophila cells to provide the first 3-D analysis of such replication complexes. The sole FHV RNA replication factor, protein A, and FHV-specific 5-bromouridine 5'-triphosphate incorporation localized between inner and outer mitochondrial membranes inside approximately 50-nm vesicles (spherules, which thus are FHV-induced compartments for viral RNA synthesis. All such FHV spherules were outer mitochondrial membrane invaginations with interiors connected to the cytoplasm by a necked channel of approximately 10-nm diameter, which is sufficient for ribonucleotide import and product RNA export. Tomographic, biochemical, and other results imply that FHV spherules contain, on average, three RNA replication intermediates and an interior shell of approximately 100 membrane-spanning, self-interacting protein As. The results identify spherules as the site of protein A and nascent RNA accumulation and define spherule topology, dimensions, and stoichiometry to reveal the nature and many details of the organization and function of the FHV RNA replication complex. The resulting insights appear relevant to many other positive-strand RNA viruses and support recently proposed structural and likely evolutionary parallels with retrovirus and double-stranded RNA virus virions.

  13. Biochemical characterization of enzyme fidelity of influenza A virus RNA polymerase complex.

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    Shilpa Aggarwal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is widely accepted that the highly error prone replication process of influenza A virus (IAV, together with viral genome assortment, facilitates the efficient evolutionary capacity of IAV. Therefore, it has been logically assumed that the enzyme responsible for viral RNA replication process, influenza virus type A RNA polymerase (IAV Pol, is a highly error-prone polymerase which provides the genomic mutations necessary for viral evolution and host adaptation. Importantly, however, the actual enzyme fidelity of IAV RNA polymerase has never been characterized. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we established new biochemical assay conditions that enabled us to assess both polymerase activity with physiological NTP pools and enzyme fidelity of IAV Pol. We report that IAV Pol displays highly active RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity at unbiased physiological NTP substrate concentrations. With this robust enzyme activity, for the first time, we were able to compare the enzyme fidelity of IAV Pol complex with that of bacterial phage T7 RNA polymerase and the reverse transcriptases (RT of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus (MuLV, which are known to be low and high fidelity enzymes, respectively. We observed that IAV Pol displayed significantly higher fidelity than HIV-1 RT and T7 RNA polymerase and equivalent or higher fidelity than MuLV RT. In addition, the IAV Pol complex showed increased fidelity at lower temperatures. Moreover, upon replacement of Mg(++ with Mn(++, IAV Pol displayed increased polymerase activity, but with significantly reduced processivity, and misincorporation was slightly elevated in the presence of Mn(++. Finally, when the IAV nucleoprotein (NP was included in the reactions, the IAV Pol complex exhibited enhanced polymerase activity with increased fidelity. SIGNIFICANCE: Our study indicates that IAV Pol is a high fidelity enzyme. We envision that the high fidelity nature of IAV Pol may be

  14. Crude extracts of bacterially expressed dsRNA can be used to protect plants against virus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas Marisol

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA is a potent initiator of gene silencing in a diverse group of organisms that includes plants, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and mammals. We have previously shown and patented that mechanical inoculation of in vitro-transcribed dsRNA derived from viral sequences specifically prevents virus infection in plants. The approach required the in vitro synthesis of large amounts of RNA involving high cost and considerable labour. Results We have developed an in vivo expression system to produce large amounts of virus-derived dsRNAs in bacteria, with a view to providing a practical control of virus diseases in plants. Partially purified bacterial dsRNAs promoted specific interference with the infection in plants by two viruses belonging to the tobamovirus and potyvirus groups. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that easy to obtain, crude extracts of bacterially expressed dsRNAs are equally effective protecting plants against virus infections when sprayed onto plant surfaces by a simple procedure. Virus infectivity was significantly abolished when plants were sprayed with French Press lysates several days before virus inoculation. Conclusion Our approach provides an alternative to genetic transformation of plant species with dsRNA-expressing constructs capable to interfere with plant viruses. The main advantage of this mode of dsRNA production is its simplicity and its extremely low cost compared with the requirements for regenerating transgenic plants. This approach provides a reliable and potential tool, not only for plant protection against virus diseases, but also for the study of gene silencing mechanisms in plant virus infections.

  15. Plasma Epstein–Barr virus and Hepatitis B virus in non-Hodgkin lymphomas: Two lymphotropic, potentially oncogenic, latently occurring DNA viruses

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    Mahua Sinha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There is a need to study potential infective etiologies in lymphomas. Lymphocyte-transforming viruses can directly infect lymphocytes, disrupt normal cell functions, and promote cell division. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV is known to be associated with several lymphomas, especially Hodgkin lymphomas (HLs. And recently, the lymphocyte-transforming role of hepatitis B virus (HBV has been emphasized. Aims: The aim of this study was to elucidate the association of two potentially oncogenic, widely prevalent latent DNA viruses, EBV and HBV, in non-HL (NHL. Settings and Design: In this prospective study, we estimated plasma EBV and HBV DNA in NHL patients. Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from newly diagnosed, treatment na ïve, histologically confirmed NHL patients. Plasma EBV DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting Epstein–Barr Nucleic acid 1 while the plasma HBV DNA was detected using nested PCR targeting HBX gene. In a small subset of patients, follow-up plasma samples post-anticancer chemotherapy were available and retested for viral DNA. Results: Of the 110 NHL patients, ~79% were B-cell NHL and ~21% were T-cell NHL. Plasma EBV-DNA was detected in 10% NHLs with a higher EBV association in Burkitt lymphoma (33.3% than other subtypes. Pretherapy HBV DNA was detected in 21% NHLs; most of them being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Moreover, 42% of DLBCL patients had HBV DNA in plasma. Since all patients were HBV surface antigen seronegative at diagnosis, baseline plasma HBV-DNAemia before chemotherapy was indicative of occult hepatitis B infection. Conclusions: Our findings indicate a significant association of HBV with newly diagnosed DLBCL.

  16. A +RNA virus diptych : Chikungunya virus-host interactions and arteriviral programmed ribosomal frameshifting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treffers, Emma Elisabeth (Emmely)

    2015-01-01

    In part 1 of the thesis quantitative proteomics was used to determine changes in abundance and phosphorylation status of host proteins during infection with the human pathogen chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Several proteins were identified that may be specifically downregulated during CHIKV infection to

  17. A +RNA virus diptych : Chikungunya virus-host interactions and arteriviral programmed ribosomal frameshifting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treffers, Emma Elisabeth (Emmely)

    2015-01-01

    In part 1 of the thesis quantitative proteomics was used to determine changes in abundance and phosphorylation status of host proteins during infection with the human pathogen chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Several proteins were identified that may be specifically downregulated during CHIKV infection to

  18. NTPase and 5'-RNA triphosphatase activities of Chikungunya virus nsP2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpe, Yogesh A; Aher, Pankaj P; Lole, Kavita S

    2011-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an insect borne virus (genus: Alphavirus) which causes acute febrile illness in humans followed by a prolonged arthralgic disease that affects the joints of the extremities. Re-emergence of the virus in the form of outbreaks in last 6-7 years has posed a serious public health problem. CHIKV has a positive sense single stranded RNA genome of about 12,000 nt. Open reading frame 1 of the viral genome encodes a polyprotein precursor, nsP1234, which is processed further into different non structural proteins (nsP1, nsP2, nsP3 and nsP4). Sequence based analyses have shown helicase domain at the N-terminus and protease domain at C-terminus of nsP2. A detailed biochemical analysis of NTPase/RNA helicase and 5'-RNA phosphatase activities of recombinant CHIKV-nsP2T protein (containing conserved NTPase/helicase motifs in the N-terminus and partial papain like protease domain at the C-terminus) was carried out. The protein could hydrolyze all NTPs except dTTP and showed better efficiency for ATP, dATP, GTP and dGTP hydrolysis. ATP was the most preferred substrate by the enzyme. CHIKV-nsP2T also showed 5'-triphosphatase (RTPase) activity that specifically removes the γ-phosphate from the 5' end of RNA. Both NTPase and RTPase activities of the protein were completely dependent on Mg(2+) ions. RTPase activity was inhibited by ATP showing sharing of the binding motif by NTP and RNA. Both enzymatic activities were drastically reduced by mutations in the NTP binding motif (GKT) and co-factor, Mg(2+) ion binding motif (DEXX) suggesting that they have a common catalytic site.

  19. NTPase and 5'-RNA triphosphatase activities of Chikungunya virus nsP2 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh A Karpe

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an insect borne virus (genus: Alphavirus which causes acute febrile illness in humans followed by a prolonged arthralgic disease that affects the joints of the extremities. Re-emergence of the virus in the form of outbreaks in last 6-7 years has posed a serious public health problem. CHIKV has a positive sense single stranded RNA genome of about 12,000 nt. Open reading frame 1 of the viral genome encodes a polyprotein precursor, nsP1234, which is processed further into different non structural proteins (nsP1, nsP2, nsP3 and nsP4. Sequence based analyses have shown helicase domain at the N-terminus and protease domain at C-terminus of nsP2. A detailed biochemical analysis of NTPase/RNA helicase and 5'-RNA phosphatase activities of recombinant CHIKV-nsP2T protein (containing conserved NTPase/helicase motifs in the N-terminus and partial papain like protease domain at the C-terminus was carried out. The protein could hydrolyze all NTPs except dTTP and showed better efficiency for ATP, dATP, GTP and dGTP hydrolysis. ATP was the most preferred substrate by the enzyme. CHIKV-nsP2T also showed 5'-triphosphatase (RTPase activity that specifically removes the γ-phosphate from the 5' end of RNA. Both NTPase and RTPase activities of the protein were completely dependent on Mg(2+ ions. RTPase activity was inhibited by ATP showing sharing of the binding motif by NTP and RNA. Both enzymatic activities were drastically reduced by mutations in the NTP binding motif (GKT and co-factor, Mg(2+ ion binding motif (DEXX suggesting that they have a common catalytic site.

  20. Active RNA replication of hepatitis C virus downregulates CD81 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Po-Yuan; Chen, Steve S-L

    2013-01-01

    So far how hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication modulates subsequent virus growth and propagation still remains largely unknown. Here we determine the impact of HCV replication status on the consequential virus growth by comparing normal and high levels of HCV RNA expression. We first engineered a full-length, HCV genotype 2a JFH1 genome containing a blasticidin-resistant cassette inserted at amino acid residue of 420 in nonstructural (NS) protein 5A, which allowed selection of human hepatoma Huh7 cells stably-expressing HCV. Short-term establishment of HCV stable cells attained a highly-replicating status, judged by higher expressions of viral RNA and protein as well as higher titer of viral infectivity as opposed to cells harboring the same genome without selection. Interestingly, maintenance of highly-replicating HCV stable cells led to decreased susceptibility to HCV pseudotyped particle (HCVpp) infection and downregulated cell surface level of CD81, a critical HCV entry (co)receptor. The decreased CD81 cell surface expression occurred through reduced total expression and cytoplasmic retention of CD81 within an endoplasmic reticulum -associated compartment. Moreover, productive viral RNA replication in cells harboring a JFH1 subgenomic replicon containing a similar blasticidin resistance gene cassette in NS5A and in cells robustly replicating full-length infectious genome also reduced permissiveness to HCVpp infection through decreasing the surface expression of CD81. The downregulation of CD81 surface level in HCV RNA highly-replicating cells thus interfered with reinfection and led to attenuated viral amplification. These findings together indicate that the HCV RNA replication status plays a crucial determinant in HCV growth by modulating the expression and intracellular localization of CD81.

  1. Active RNA replication of hepatitis C virus downregulates CD81 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Yuan Ke

    Full Text Available So far how hepatitis C virus (HCV replication modulates subsequent virus growth and propagation still remains largely unknown. Here we determine the impact of HCV replication status on the consequential virus growth by comparing normal and high levels of HCV RNA expression. We first engineered a full-length, HCV genotype 2a JFH1 genome containing a blasticidin-resistant cassette inserted at amino acid residue of 420 in nonstructural (NS protein 5A, which allowed selection of human hepatoma Huh7 cells stably-expressing HCV. Short-term establishment of HCV stable cells attained a highly-replicating status, judged by higher expressions of viral RNA and protein as well as higher titer of viral infectivity as opposed to cells harboring the same genome without selection. Interestingly, maintenance of highly-replicating HCV stable cells led to decreased susceptibility to HCV pseudotyped particle (HCVpp infection and downregulated cell surface level of CD81, a critical HCV entry (coreceptor. The decreased CD81 cell surface expression occurred through reduced total expression and cytoplasmic retention of CD81 within an endoplasmic reticulum -associated compartment. Moreover, productive viral RNA replication in cells harboring a JFH1 subgenomic replicon containing a similar blasticidin resistance gene cassette in NS5A and in cells robustly replicating full-length infectious genome also reduced permissiveness to HCVpp infection through decreasing the surface expression of CD81. The downregulation of CD81 surface level in HCV RNA highly-replicating cells thus interfered with reinfection and led to attenuated viral amplification. These findings together indicate that the HCV RNA replication status plays a crucial determinant in HCV growth by modulating the expression and intracellular localization of CD81.

  2. Detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA in pharyngeal epithelium biopsy samples obtained from infected cattle: Investigation of possible sites of virus replication and persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenfeldt, Anna Carolina; Belsham, Graham

    2012-01-01

    was used to investigate the level of FMDV RNA present at this site at sequential time points during the infection. Results were compared to measurements of virus excretion in samples of oropharyngeal fluid collected at corresponding time points. Possible sites of virus persistence were investigated through...... measurements of the levels of FMDV RNA in the DSP as well as mandibular and retropharyngeal lymph nodes beyond 28 days after infection. Results indicated only low levels of FMDV RNA present in samples of pharyngeal epithelia during both early and persistent phases of infection with significantly higher levels...

  3. Longitudinal follow-up of Zika virus RNA in semen of a traveller returning from Barbados to the Netherlands with Zika virus disease, March 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusken, Chantal; Pas, Suzan; GeurtsvanKessel, Corine; Mögling, Ramona; van Kampen, Jeroen; Langerak, Thomas; Koopmans, Marion; van der Eijk, Annemiek; van Gorp, Eric

    2016-06-09

    We report the longitudinal follow-up of Zika virus (ZIKV) RNA in semen of a traveller who developed ZIKV disease after return to the Netherlands from Barbados, March 2016. Persistence of ZIKV RNA in blood, urine, saliva and semen was followed until the loads reached undetectable levels. RNA levels were higher in semen than in other sample types and declined to undetectable level at day 62 post onset of symptoms.

  4. Highly Sensitive Fluorescent-labeled Probes and Glass Slide Hybridization for the Detection of Plant RNA Viruses and a Viroid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyou DU; Bo JIN; Wenhong LIU; Liang CHEN; Jishuang CHEN

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a modified method of the conventional RNA dot-blot hybridization was established, by replacing 32P labels with CY5 labels and replacing nylon membranes with positive-charged glass slides, for detecting plant RNA viruses and a viroid. The modified RNA dot-blot hybridization method was named glass slide hybridization. The optimum efficiency of RNA binding onto the surfaces of activated glass slide was achieved using aminosilane-coated glass slide as a solid matrix and 5×saline sodium citrate (SSC) as a spotting solution. Using a CY5-labeled DNA probe prepared through PCR amplification, the optimized glass slide hybridization could detect as little as 1.71 pg of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA.The sensitivity of the modified method was four times that of dot-blot hybridization on nylon membrane with a 32P-labeled probe. The absence of false positive within the genus Potyvirus [potato virus A, potato virus Y (PVY) and zucchini yellow mosaic virus] showed that this method was highly specific. Furthermore,potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) was also detected specifically. A test of 40 field potato samples showed that this method was equivalent to the conventional dot-blot hybridization for detecting PVY and PSTVd. To our knowledge, this is the first report of using dot-blot hybridization on glass slides with fluorescent-labeled probes for detecting plant RNA viruses and a viroid.

  5. Transformation of Cowpea Vigna unguiculata with a Full-Length DNA Copy of Cowpea Mosaic Virus M-RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, Jacques; Goldbach, Rob

    1987-01-01

    A full-length DNA copy of the M-RNA of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), supplied with either the 35S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) or the nopaline synthase promoter from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, was introduced into the T-DNA region of a Ti-plasmid-derived gene vector and transferred to

  6. Data mining cDNAs reveals three new single stranded RNA viruses in Nasonia (Hymenopetera:Pteromalidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymenopteran viruses may provide insights into colony collapse disorder in honey bees and other insect species. Three novel small RNA viruses were discovered during the genomics effort for the beneficial parasitoid of flies in the genus Nasonia (Hymenoptera). Genomics provides a great deal of inform...

  7. Transformation of Cowpea Vigna unguiculata with a Full-Length DNA Copy of Cowpea Mosaic Virus M-RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, Jacques; Goldbach, Rob

    1987-01-01

    A full-length DNA copy of the M-RNA of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), supplied with either the 35S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) or the nopaline synthase promoter from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, was introduced into the T-DNA region of a Ti-plasmid-derived gene vector and transferred to

  8. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV RNA loads in peripheral blood correlates with disease severity in mice

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    Torres Juan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV infection is usually restricted to the respiratory epithelium. Few studies have documented the presence of RSV in the systemic circulation, however there is no consistent information whether virus detection in the blood correlates with disease severity. Methods Balb/c mice were inoculated with live RSV, heat-inactivated RSV or medium. A subset of RSV-infected mice was treated with anti-RSV antibody 72 h post-inoculation. RSV RNA loads were measured by PCR in peripheral blood from day 1-21 post-inoculation and were correlated with upper and lower respiratory tract viral loads, the systemic cytokine response, lung inflammation and pulmonary function. Immunohistochemical staining was used to define the localization of RSV antigens in the respiratory tract and peripheral blood. Results RSV RNA loads were detected in peripheral blood from day 1 to 14 post-inoculation, peaked on day 5 and significantly correlated with nasal and lung RSV loads, airway obstruction, and blood CCL2 and CXCL1 expression. Treatment with anti-RSV antibody reduced blood RSV RNA loads and improved airway obstruction. Immunostaining identified RSV antigens in alveolar macrophages and peripheral blood monocytes. Conclusions RSV RNA was detected in peripheral blood upon infection with live RSV, followed a time-course parallel to viral loads assessed in the respiratory tract and was significantly correlated with RSV-induced airway disease.

  9. Structure and Function of the Ribosomal Frameshifting Pseudoknot RNA from Beet Western Yellow Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egli, M.; Sarkhel, S.; Minasov, G.; Rich, A.

    2010-03-05

    Many viruses reprogram ribosomes to produce two different proteins from two different reading frames. So-called -1 frameshifting often involves pairwise alignment of two adjacent tRNAs at a 'slippery' sequence in the ribosomal A and P sites such that an overlapping codon is shifted upstream by one base relative to the zero frame. In the majority of cases, an RNA pseudoknot located downstream stimulates this type of frameshift. Crystal structures of the frameshifting RNA pseudoknot from Beet Western Yellow Virus (BWYV) have provided a detailed picture of the tertiary interactions stabilizing this folding motif, including a minor-groove triplex and quadruple-base interactions. The structure determined at atomic resolution revealed the locations of several magnesium ions and provided insights into the role of structured water stabilizing the RNA. Systematic in vitro and in vivo mutational analyses based on the structural results revealed specific tertiary interactions and regions in the pseudoknot that drastically change frameshifting efficiency. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of pseudoknot-mediated ribosomal frameshifting on the basis of the insights gained from structural and functional studies of the RNA pseudoknot from BWYV.

  10. Establishing conditions for the storage and elution of rabies virus RNA using FTA(®) cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Takeo; Ishii, Ayako; Segawa, Takao; Takagi, Yukihiko; Kobayashi, Yuki; Itou, Takuya

    2015-04-01

    The Flinders Technology Associates filter paper cards (FTA(®) cards) can be used to store nucleic acid from various samples and are easily portable. However, RNA is physicochemically unstable compared with DNA, and appropriate methods have not been established for storage and extraction of RNA from FTA(®) cards. The present study investigated the optimum conditions for storage and elution of viral RNA (vRNA) using rabies virus (RABV) applied to FTA(®) cards. When TE buffer was used, the elution rates of vRNA increased with the length of the elution time. When the cards were stored at -80 °C or -20 °C, vRNA was stable over 3 months. Degradation of vRNAs occurred following storage at 4 °C and room temperature, suggesting that RNA should be extracted from cards as soon as possible if no freezer is available. When we tried to amplify vRNA from RABV-infected animal brains applied to FTA(®) cards and stored at -80 °C for 6 months, we did not detect any amplified products with the primer set for 964 bp of RABV N gene. However, we were able to detect amplified products by increasing the elution time of vRNA from FTA(®) cards from 30 min to 24 hr or by changing the primer sets to amplify 290 bp of N gene. Thus, we recommend extending the elution time for damaged or low concentration samples in FTA(®) cards.

  11. A SELEX-screened aptamer of human hepatitis B virus RNA encapsidation signal suppresses viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Feng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The specific interaction between hepatitis B virus (HBV polymerase (P protein and the ε RNA stem-loop on pregenomic (pg RNA is crucial for viral replication. It triggers both pgRNA packaging and reverse transcription and thus represents an attractive antiviral target. RNA decoys mimicking ε in P protein binding but not supporting replication might represent novel HBV inhibitors. However, because generation of recombinant enzymatically active HBV polymerase is notoriously difficult, such decoys have as yet not been identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we used a SELEX approach, based on a new in vitro reconstitution system exploiting a recombinant truncated HBV P protein (miniP, to identify potential ε decoys in two large ε RNA pools with randomized upper stem. Selection of strongly P protein binding RNAs correlated with an unexpected strong enrichment of A residues. Two aptamers, S6 and S9, displayed particularly high affinity and specificity for miniP in vitro, yet did not support viral replication when part of a complete HBV genome. Introducing S9 RNA into transiently HBV producing HepG2 cells strongly suppressed pgRNA packaging and DNA synthesis, indicating the S9 RNA can indeed act as an ε decoy that competitively inhibits P protein binding to the authentic ε signal on pgRNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates the first successful identification of human HBV ε aptamers by an in vitro SELEX approach. Effective suppression of HBV replication by the S9 aptamer provides proof-of-principle for the ability of ε decoy RNAs to interfere with viral P-ε complex formation and suggests that S9-like RNAs may further be developed into useful therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B.

  12. Plasma microRNA profiles in rat models of hepatocellular injury, cholestasis, and steatosis.

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    Yu Yamaura

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small RNA molecules that function to modulate the expression of target genes, playing important roles in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. The miRNAs in body fluids have received considerable attention as potential biomarkers of various diseases. In this study, we compared the changes of the plasma miRNA expressions by acute liver injury (hepatocellular injury or cholestasis and chronic liver injury (steatosis, steatohepatitis and fibrosis using rat models made by the administration of chemicals or special diets. Using miRNA array analysis, we found that the levels of a large number of miRNAs (121-317 miRNAs were increased over 2-fold and the levels of a small number of miRNAs (6-35 miRNAs were decreased below 0.5-fold in all models except in a model of cholestasis caused by bile duct ligation. Interestingly, the expression profiles were different between the models, and the hierarchical clustering analysis discriminated between the acute and chronic liver injuries. In addition, miRNAs whose expressions were typically changed in each type of liver injury could be specified. It is notable that, in acute liver injury models, the plasma level of miR-122, the most abundant miRNA in the liver, was more quickly and dramatically increased than the plasma aminotransferase level, reflecting the extent of hepatocellular injury. This study demonstrated that the plasma miRNA profiles could reflect the types of liver injury (e.g. acute/chronic liver injury or hepatocellular injury/cholestasis/steatosis/steatohepatitis/fibrosis and identified the miRNAs that could be specific and sensitive biomarkers of liver injury.

  13. An RNA Element That Facilitates Programmed Ribosomal Readthrough in Turnip Crinkle Virus Adopts Multiple Conformations.

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    Kuhlmann, Micki M; Chattopadhyay, Maitreyi; Stupina, Vera A; Gao, Feng; Simon, Anne E

    2016-10-01

    Ribosome recoding is used by RNA viruses for translational readthrough or frameshifting past termination codons for the synthesis of extension products. Recoding sites, along with downstream recoding stimulatory elements (RSEs), have long been studied in reporter constructs, because these fragments alone mediate customary levels of recoding and are thus assumed to contain complete instructions for establishment of the proper ratio of termination to recoding. RSEs from the Tombusviridae and Luteoviridae are thought to be exceptions, since they contain a long-distance RNA-RNA connection with the 3' end. This interaction has been suggested to substitute for pseudoknots, thought to be missing in tombusvirid RSEs. We provide evidence that the phylogenetically conserved RSE of the carmovirus Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) adopts an alternative, smaller structure that extends an upstream conserved hairpin and that this alternative structure is the predominant form of the RSE within nascent viral RNA in plant cells and when RNA is synthesized in vitro The TCV RSE also contains an internal pseudoknot along with the long-distance interaction, and the pseudoknot is not compatible with the phylogenetically conserved structure. Conserved residues just past the recoding site are important for recoding, and these residues are also conserved in the RSEs of gammaretroviruses. Our data demonstrate the dynamic nature of the TCV RSE and suggest that studies using reporter constructs may not be effectively recapitulating RSE-mediated recoding within viral genomes. Ribosome recoding is used by RNA viruses to enable ribosomes to extend translation past termination codons for the synthesis of longer products. Recoding sites and a downstream recoding stimulatory element (RSE) mediate expected levels of recoding when excised and placed in reporter constructs and thus are assumed to contain complete instructions for the establishment of the proper ratio of termination to recoding. We provide

  14. MicroRNA-134 as a potential plasma biomarker for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism

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    Liu Yi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute pulmonary embolism (APE remains a diagnostic challenge due to a variable clinical presentation and the lack of a reliable screening tool. MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate gene expression in a wide range of pathophysiologic processes. Circulating miRNAs are emerging biomarkers in heart failure, type 2 diabetes and other disease states; however, using plasma miRNAs as biomarkers for the diagnosis of APE is still unknown. Methods Thirty-two APE patients, 32 healthy controls, and 22 non-APE patients (reported dyspnea, chest pain, or cough were enrolled in this study. The TaqMan miRNA microarray was used to identify dysregulated miRNAs in the plasma of APE patients. The TaqMan-based miRNA quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions were used to validate the dysregulated miRNAs. The receiver-operator characteristic (ROC curve analysis was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the miRNA identified as the candidate biomarker. Results Plasma miRNA-134 (miR-134 level was significantly higher in the APE patients than in the healthy controls or non-APE patients. The ROC curve showed that plasma miR-134 was a specific diagnostic predictor of APE with an area under the curve of 0.833 (95% confidence interval, 0.737 to 0.929; P Conclusions Our findings indicated that plasma miR-134 could be an important biomarker for the diagnosis of APE. Because of this finding, large-scale investigations are urgently needed to pave the way from basic research to clinical utilization.

  15. The role of virulence for in vivo superinfection fitness of a vertebrate RNA virus

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    Kell, Alison M.; Wargo, Andrew R.; Kurath, Gael

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a novel, in vivo superinfection