WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma vertical velocity

  1. Vertical Rise Velocity of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles Estimated from Equatorial Atmosphere Radar Observations and High-Resolution Bubble Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, T.; Ajith, K. K.; Yamamoto, M.; Niranjan, K.

    2017-12-01

    Equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) is a well-known phenomenon in the equatorial ionospheric F region. As it causes severe scintillation in the amplitude and phase of radio signals, it is important to understand and forecast the occurrence of EPBs from a space weather point of view. The development of EPBs is presently believed as an evolution of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We have already developed a 3D high-resolution bubble (HIRB) model with a grid spacing of as small as 1 km and presented nonlinear growth of EPBs which shows very turbulent internal structures such as bifurcation and pinching. As EPBs have field-aligned structures, the latitude range that is affected by EPBs depends on the apex altitude of EPBs over the dip equator. However, it was not easy to observe the apex altitude and vertical rise velocity of EPBs. Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in Indonesia is capable of steering radar beams quickly so that the growth phase of EPBs can be captured clearly. The vertical rise velocities of the EPBs observed around the midnight hours are significantly smaller compared to those observed in postsunset hours. Further, the vertical growth of the EPBs around midnight hours ceases at relatively lower altitudes, whereas the majority of EPBs at postsunset hours found to have grown beyond the maximum detectable altitude of the EAR. The HIRB model with varying background conditions are employed to investigate the possible factors that control the vertical rise velocity and maximum attainable altitudes of EPBs. The estimated rise velocities from EAR observations at both postsunset and midnight hours are, in general, consistent with the nonlinear evolution of EPBs from the HIRB model.

  2. Climatology of tropospheric vertical velocity spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecklund, W. L.; Gage, K. S.; Balsley, B. B.; Carter, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Vertical velocity power spectra obtained from Poker Flat, Alaska; Platteville, Colorado; Rhone Delta, France; and Ponape, East Caroline Islands using 50-MHz clear-air radars with vertical beams are given. The spectra were obtained by analyzing the quietest periods from the one-minute-resolution time series for each site. The lengths of available vertical records ranged from as long as 6 months at Poker Flat to about 1 month at Platteville. The quiet-time vertical velocity spectra are shown. Spectral period ranging from 2 minutes to 4 hours is shown on the abscissa and power spectral density is given on the ordinate. The Brunt-Vaisala (B-V) periods (determined from nearby sounding balloons) are indicated. All spectra (except the one from Platteville) exhibit a peak at periods slightly longer than the B-V period, are flat at longer periods, and fall rapidly at periods less than the B-V period. This behavior is expected for a spectrum of internal waves and is very similar to what is observed in the ocean (Eriksen, 1978). The spectral amplitudes vary by only a factor of 2 or 3 about the mean, and show that under quiet conditions vertical velocity spectra from the troposphere are very similar at widely different locations.

  3. Predicting vertical jump height from bar velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s(-2)). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r(2) = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r(2) = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key pointsVertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer.The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s(-2) and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement.Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance.

  4. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newsom, R. K. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Sivaraman, C. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Shippert, T. R. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Riihimaki, L. D. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Accurate height-resolved measurements of higher-order statistical moments of vertical velocity fluctuations are crucial for improved understanding of turbulent mixing and diffusion, convective initiation, and cloud life cycles. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility operates coherent Doppler lidar systems at several sites around the globe. These instruments provide measurements of clear-air vertical velocity profiles in the lower troposphere with a nominal temporal resolution of 1 sec and height resolution of 30 m. The purpose of the Doppler lidar vertical velocity statistics (DLWSTATS) value-added product (VAP) is to produce height- and time-resolved estimates of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis from these raw measurements. The VAP also produces estimates of cloud properties, including cloud-base height (CBH), cloud frequency, cloud-base vertical velocity, and cloud-base updraft fraction.

  5. Shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of antihydrogen in GBAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufour, G.; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S. [CNRS, ENS, UPMC, Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Paris (France); Debu, P. [CEA-Saclay, Institut de Recherche sur les lois Fondamentales de l' Univers, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Nesvizhevsky, V.V. [Institut Max von Laue-Paul Langevin, Grenoble (France); Voronin, A.Yu. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-15

    GBAR is a project aiming at measuring the freefall acceleration of gravity for antimatter, namely antihydrogen atoms (H). The precision of this timing experiment depends crucially on the dispersion of initial vertical velocities of the atoms as well as on the reliable control of their distribution.We propose to use a new method for shaping the distribution of the vertical velocities of H, which improves these factors simultaneously. The method is based on quantum reflection of elastically and specularly bouncing H with small initial vertical velocity on a bottom mirror disk, and absorption of atoms with large initial vertical velocities on a top rough disk.We estimate statistical and systematic uncertainties, and we show that the accuracy for measuring the free fall acceleration g of H could be pushed below 10{sup -3} under realistic experimental conditions. (orig.)

  6. Shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of antihydrogen in GBAR

    CERN Document Server

    Dufour, G.; Lambrecht, A.; Nesvizhevsky, V.V.; Reynaud, S.; Voronin, A.Yu.

    2014-01-30

    GBAR is a project aiming at measuring the free fall acceleration of gravity for antimatter, namely antihydrogen atoms ($\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$). Precision of this timing experiment depends crucially on the dispersion of initial vertical velocities of the atoms as well as on the reliable control of their distribution. We propose to use a new method for shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$, which improves these factors simultaneously. The method is based on quantum reflection of elastically and specularly bouncing $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$ with small initial vertical velocity on a bottom mirror disk, and absorption of atoms with large initial vertical velocities on a top rough disk. We estimate statistical and systematic uncertainties, and show that the accuracy for measuring the free fall acceleration $\\overline{g}$ of $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$ could be pushed below $10^{-3}$ under realistic experimental conditions.

  7. Estimation of sand dune thickness using a vertical velocity profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shuhail, Abdullatif A.

    2004-01-01

    Previous field and mathematical studies have shown that sand dunes may have vertical velocity profiles (i.e. continuous increase of velocity with depth). Therefore, computing the dunes thickness using conventional seismic refraction methods that assume a vertically homogeneous layer will likely produce some errors. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of the vertical velocity profile in a sand dune on the process of thickness estimation using seismic refraction data. First, the time distance (T-X) data of the direct wave in the dune is calculated using a vertical velocity profile, V (z), derived from Hertz-Mindlin contact theory. Then the thickness is estimated from the calculated T-X data, intercept time and velocity of the refractor at the dune's base assuming a constant velocity in the dune. The error in the estimated thickness due to the constant-velocity assumption increases with increasing thickness and decreasing porosity of the dune. For sand dunes with porosities greater than 0.2 and thickness less than 200 meter, the error is less than 15%. (author)

  8. Critical ionisation velocity effects in astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1979-08-01

    Critical ionisation velocity effects are relevant to astrophysical situations where neutral gas moves through a magnetised plasma. The experimental significance of the critical velocity is well established and the physical basis is now becoming clear. The underlying mechanism depends on the combined effects of electron impact ionisation and electron energisation by collective plasma interactions. For low density plasmas a theory based on a circular process involving electron heating through a modified two stream instability has been developed. Several applications of critical velocity effects to astrophysical plasmas have been discussed in the literature. The importance of the effect in any particular case may be determined from a detailed consideration of energy and momentum balance, using appropriate atomic rate coefficients and taking full account of collective plasma processes. (Auth.)

  9. Algebraic motion of vertically displacing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2018-02-01

    The vertical motion of a tokamak plasma is analytically modelled during its non-linear phase by a free-moving current-carrying rod inductively coupled to a set of fixed conducting wires or a cylindrical conducting shell. The solutions capture the leading term in a Taylor expansion of the Green's function for the interaction between the plasma column and the surrounding vacuum vessel. The plasma shape and profiles are assumed not to vary during the vertical drifting phase such that the plasma column behaves as a rigid body. In the limit of perfectly conducting structures, the plasma is prevented to come in contact with the wall due to steep effective potential barriers created by the induced Eddy currents. Resistivity in the wall allows the equilibrium point to drift towards the vessel on the slow timescale of flux penetration. The initial exponential motion of the plasma, understood as a resistive vertical instability, is succeeded by a non-linear "sinking" behaviour shown to be algebraic and decelerating. The acceleration of the plasma column often observed in experiments is thus concluded to originate from an early sharing of toroidal current between the core, the halo plasma, and the wall or from the thermal quench dynamics precipitating loss of plasma current.

  10. Asymmetric SOL Current in Vertically Displaced Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, J. D.; Navratil, G. A.; Hanson, J. M.

    2017-10-01

    Experiments at the DIII-D tokamak demonstrate a non-monotonic relationship between measured scrape-off layer (SOL) currents and vertical displacement event (VDE) rates with SOL currents becoming largely n=1 dominant as plasma is displaced by the plasma control system (PCS) at faster rates. The DIII-D PCS is used to displace the magnetic axis 10x slower than the intrinsic growth time of similar instabilities in lower single-null plasmas. Low order (n VDE instabilities observed when vertical control is disabled. Previous inquiry shows VDE asymmetry characterized by SOL current fraction and geometric parameters of tokamak plasmas. We note that, of plasmas displaced by the PCS, short displacement time scales near the limit of the PCS temporal control appear to result in larger n=1/n=2 asymmetries. Work supported under USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-04ER54761.

  11. Algebraic motion of vertically displacing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Pfefferle, David; Hirvijoki, Eero

    2017-10-01

    The vertical displacement of tokamak plasmas is modelled during the non-linear phase by a free-moving current-carrying rod coupled to a set of fixed conducting wires and a cylindrical conducting shell. The models capture the leading term in a Taylor expansion of the Green's function for the interaction between the plasma column and the vacuum vessel. The plasma is assumed not to vary during the VDE such that it behaves as a rigid body. In the limit of perfectly conducting structures, the plasma is prevented from coming in contact with the wall due to steep effective potential barriers by the eddy currents, and will hence oscillate at Alfvénic frequencies about a given force-free position. In addition to damping oscillations, resistivity allows for the column to drift towards the vessel on slow flux penetration timescales. The initial exponential motion of the plasma, i.e. the resistive vertical instability, is succeeded by a non-linear sinking behaviour, that is shown analytically to be algebraic and decelerative. The acceleration of the plasma column often observed in experiments is thus conjectured to originate from an early sharing of toroidal current between the core, the halo plasma and the wall or from the thermal quench dynamics precipitating loss of plasma current

  12. Revisiting the radiative vertical velocity paradigm in the TTL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolot, Maximilien; Moyer, Elisabeth

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate that uplift rates in the TTL (tropical tropopause layer) may be commonly overestimated. The mass balance of any tracer in the TTL depends on the vertical speed of large-scale uplift and the rate of convective detrainment from overshoots. Generally, uplift velocity is retrieved from the conservation of energy, assuming that the only significant factor is radiative heating.1,2 The detrainment rate is then computed from the convergence of the uplift flux, with the assumption that detrainment dominates over entrainment in the TTL. We show that this commonly calculated 'radiative vertical velocity' and the associated rate of detrainment are necessarily flawed for either of two mutually exclusive reasons. If radiative heating is the sole diabatic term in the energy budget, then significant convective entrainment must occur at TTL levels. If detrainment dominates over entrainment, then the heat budget must include the cooling rate from the export of sensible heat deficit in overshooting convection. We illustrate the calculations using tropical values of radiative heating rates and large-scale divergence fluxes from ERA-Interim reanalysis. For undilute convection, the export of heat deficit in detrained overshoots would substantially offset radiative heating, lowering the resulting assumed vertical velocity at 16 km by a factor of three. The computed detrainment rate at this altitude also increases significantly, by a factor of five. Because these changes would alter interpretation of tracer profiles, it is important to include all terms in the heat budget in tracer studies. Conversely, tracer transport properties can be used to help constrain the impact of convection on the TTL heat budget.3 [1] Folkins, I. et al., J. Geophys. Res., 111, D23304, (2006). [2] Read, W. G. et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 6051-6067, (2008). [3] Kuang, Z. and Bretherton, C. S., J. Atmos. Sci., 61, 2919-2927, (2004)

  13. Periodic Variations in the Vertical Velocities of Galactic Masers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobylev V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We compiled published data on Galactic masers with VLBI-measured trigonometric parallaxes and determined the residual tangential, ∆Vcirc, and radial, ∆VR, velocities for 120 masers. We used these data to redetermine the parameters of the Galactic spiral density wave using the method of spectral analysis. The most interesting result of this study is the detection of wavelike oscillations of vertical spatial velocities (W versus distance R from the Galactic rotation axis. Spectral analysis allowed us to determine the perturbation wavelength and the amplitude of this wave, which we found to be equal to λW = 3.4 ± 0.7 kpc and fW = 4.9 ± 1.2 km s−1, respectively.

  14. Neoclassical rotation velocities in multispecies plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Hirshman, S.P.; Shaing, K.C.

    1996-01-01

    We examine the relationships between the poloidal, toroidal and parallel rotation velocities for typical plasma conditions in existing tokamak experiments. The radial force balance, neoclassical solution to the poloidal flow from the parallel force balance, and anomalous toroidal rotation axe included. A full multispecies formulation of the neoclassical transport theory is implemented in the NCLASS code (which includes arbitrary axisymmetric geometries and plasma collisionalities) to determine the poloidal rotation velocities. Comparisons are made with analytic relationships derived from a single impurity formulation of the problem. The roles of the radial electric field and species density and pressure gradients are evaluated. The determination of the radial electric field using the NCLASS solution for poloidal rotation and a local measurement of the toroidal rotation in conjunction with measured plasma profiles is discussed; it has been used in analysis of TFTR enhanced reverse shear plasmas. The ordering of banana orbit size small relative to local minor radius and gradients (as incorporated into initial versions of NCLASS) are examined for typical negative shear plasmas. We show the degree to which these constraints axe violated and demonstrate that finite orbit corrections axe required for better determination of the bootstrap current, particle fluxes and ion heat fluxes, i.e., the conditions r much-lt Δ b much-lt r n , r T , r E are significantly violated. Progress in relaxing these constraints is discussed

  15. Velocity measurement of model vertical axis wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.A.; McWilliam, M. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    An increasingly popular solution to future energy demand is wind energy. Wind turbine designs can be grouped according to their axis of rotation, either horizontal or vertical. Horizontal axis wind turbines have higher power output in a good wind regime than vertical axis turbines and are used in most commercial class designs. Vertical axis Savonius-based wind turbine designs are still widely used in some applications because of their simplistic design and low wind speed performance. There are many design variables that must be considered in order to optimize the power output in a given wind regime in a typical wind turbine design. Using particle image velocimetry, a study of the air flow around five different model vertical axis wind turbines was conducted in a closed loop wind tunnel. A standard Savonius design with two semi-circular blades overlapping, and two variations of this design, a deep blade and a shallow blade design were among the turbine models included in this study. It also evaluated alternate designs that attempt to increase the performance of the standard design by allowing compound blade curvature. Measurements were collected at a constant phase angle and also at random rotor orientations. It was found that evaluation of the flow patterns and measured velocities revealed consistent and stable flow patterns at any given phase angle. Large scale flow structures are evident in all designs such as vortices shed from blade surfaces. An important performance parameter was considered to be the ability of the flow to remain attached to the forward blade and redirect and reorient the flow to the following blade. 6 refs., 18 figs.

  16. Orographic precipitation and vertical velocity characteristics from drop size and fall velocity spectra observed by disdrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-In; Kim, Dong-Kyun; Kim, Ji-Hyeon; Kang, Yunhee; Kim, Hyeonjoon

    2017-04-01

    During a summer monsoon season each year, severe weather phenomena caused by front, mesoscale convective systems, or typhoons often occur in the southern Korean Peninsula where is mostly comprised of complex high mountains. These areas play an important role in controlling formation, amount, and distribution of rainfall. As precipitation systems move over the mountains, they can develop rapidly and produce localized heavy rainfall. Thus observational analysis in the mountainous areas is required for studying terrain effects on the rapid rainfall development and its microphysics. We performed intensive field observations using two s-band operational weather radars around Mt. Jiri (1950 m ASL) during summertime on June and July in 2015-2016. Observation data of DSD (Drop Size Distribution) from Parsivel disdrometer and (w component) vertical velocity data from ultrasonic anemometers were analyzed for Typhoon Chanhom on 12 July 2015 and the heavy rain event on 1 July 2016. During the heavy rain event, a dual-Doppler radar analysis using Jindo radar and Gunsan radar was also conducted to examine 3-D wind fields and vertical structure of reflectivity in these areas. For examining up-/downdrafts in the windward or leeward side of Mt. Jiri, we developed a new scheme technique to estimate vertical velocities (w) from drop size and fall velocity spectra of Parsivel disdrometers at different stations. Their comparison with the w values observed by the 3D anemometer showed quite good agreement each other. The Z histogram with regard to the estimated w was similar to that with regard to R, indicating that Parsivel-estimated w is quite reasonable for classifying strong and weak rain, corresponding to updraft and downdraft, respectively. Mostly, positive w values (upward) were estimated in heavy rainfall at the windward side (D1 and D2). Negative w values (downward) were dominant even during large rainfall at the leeward side (D4). For D1 and D2, the upward w percentages were

  17. Simulation of air velocity in a vertical perforated air distributor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngu, T. N. W.; Chu, C. M.; Janaun, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Perforated pipes are utilized to divide a fluid flow into several smaller streams. Uniform flow distribution requirement is of great concern in engineering applications because it has significant influence on the performance of fluidic devices. For industrial applications, it is crucial to provide a uniform velocity distribution through orifices. In this research, flow distribution patterns of a closed-end multiple outlet pipe standing vertically for air delivery in the horizontal direction was simulated. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), a tool of research for enhancing and understanding design was used as the simulator and the drawing software SolidWorks was used for geometry setup. The main purpose of this work is to establish the influence of size of orifices, intervals between outlets, and the length of tube in order to attain uniformity of exit flows through a multi outlet perforated tube. However, due to the gravitational effect, the compactness of paddy increases gradually from top to bottom of dryer, uniform flow pattern was aimed for top orifices and larger flow for bottom orifices.

  18. Using Smartphone Pressure Sensors to Measure Vertical Velocities of Elevators, Stairways, and Drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Martín; Martí, Arturo C.

    2017-01-01

    We measure the vertical velocities of elevators, pedestrians climbing stairs, and drones (flying unmanned aerial vehicles), by means of smartphone pressure sensors. The barometric pressure obtained with the smartphone is related to the altitude of the device via the hydrostatic approximation. From the altitude values, vertical velocities are…

  19. A technique for plasma velocity-space cross-correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Sean; Skiff, Fred

    2018-05-01

    An advance in experimental plasma diagnostics is presented and used to make the first measurement of a plasma velocity-space cross-correlation matrix. The velocity space correlation function can detect collective fluctuations of plasmas through a localized measurement. An empirical decomposition, singular value decomposition, is applied to this Hermitian matrix in order to obtain the plasma fluctuation eigenmode structure on the ion distribution function. A basic theory is introduced and compared to the modes obtained by the experiment. A full characterization of these modes is left for future work, but an outline of this endeavor is provided. Finally, the requirements for this experimental technique in other plasma regimes are discussed.

  20. Poloidal rotation velocity measurement in toroidal plasmas via microwave reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlichenko, O.S.; Skibenko, A.I.; Fomin, I.P.; Pinos, I.B.; Ocheretenko, V.L.; Berezhniy, V.L.

    2001-01-01

    Results of experiment modeling backscattering of microwaves from rotating plasma layer perturbed by fluctuations are presented. It was shown that auto- and crosscorrelation of reflected power have a periodicity equal to rotation period. Such periodicity was observed by microwave reflectometry in experiments on RF plasma production on U-3M torsatron and was used for measurement of plasma poloidal rotation velocity. (author)

  1. Vertical velocity variances and Reynold stresses at Brookhaven

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Niels E.; Brown, R.M.; Frizzola, J.A.

    1970-01-01

    Results of wind tunnel tests of the Brookhaven annular bivane are presented. The energy transfer functions describing the instrument response and the numerical filter employed in the data reduction process have been used to obtain corrected values of the normalized variance of the vertical wind v...

  2. Magnetic and velocity fields MHD flow of a stretched vertical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analytical solutions for heat and mass transfer by laminar flow of Newtonian, viscous, electrically conducting and heat generation/absorbing fluid on a continuously moving vertical permeable surface with buoyancy in the presence of a magnetic field and a first order chemical reaction are reported. The solutions for magnetic ...

  3. Determination of vertical velocities in the equatorial part of the western Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bahulayan, N.; Varadachari, V.V.R.

    Using steady state two-dimensional turbulent diffusion equations of salt and heat some important characteristics of vertical circulation in the equatorial part of the Indian Ocean have been evaluated and discussed. Upwelling and sinking velocities...

  4. Estimates of vertical velocities and eddy coefficients in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.; Sastry, J.S.

    Vertical velocities and eddy coefficients in the intermediate depths of the Bay of Bengal are calculated from mean hydrographic data for 300 miles-squares. The linear current density (sigma- O) versus log-depth plots show steady balance between...

  5. Estimation of power in low velocity vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, S. S.; Shetty, Sawan; Chithirai Pon Selvan, M.

    2015-06-01

    The present work involves in the construction of a vertical axis wind turbine and the determination of power. Various different types of turbine blades are considered and the optimum blade is selected. Mechanical components of the entire setup are built to obtain maximum rotation per minute. The mechanical energy is converted into the electrical energy by coupling coaxially between the shaft and the generator. This setup produces sufficient power for consumption of household purposes which is economic and easily available.

  6. Velocities of gas and plasmas from real time holographic interferograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deason, V.A.; Reynolds, L.D.; McIlwain, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    A truly noninvasive measurement technique for plasma velocity has not been demonstrated. Plasma velocities have been inferred using laser Doppler anemometry or photographic analysis of the position of smoke or small particles. This paper describes an alternate method based on the refractive index change created in a plasma by a gaseous probe material injected into the plasma. This disturbance of the refractive index can be monitored using interferometry. A multipass real time holographic interferometry system was used to follow the changes of the interferometric pattern, and the data was recorded using high speed cinematography. A transparent model of an industrial plasma torch was employed in these studies, and a number of different types of trace gas materials were used to track the plasma flow. Using a combination of multipass interferometry and a laser line absorbing gas, sufficient interferometric sensitivity was obtained to determine plasma velocities in the 100 m/s range. Based on these results, a working plasma torch was constructed. Further studies are planned using this torch and actual plasmas

  7. Particle fluxes in the deep Eastern Mediterranean basins: the role of ocean vertical velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Patara

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the relationship between deep sedimentary fluxes and ocean current vertical velocities in an offshore area of the Ionian Sea, the deepest basin of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Sediment trap data are collected at 500 m and 2800 m depth in two successive moorings covering the period September 1999–May 2001. A tight coupling is observed between the upper and deep traps and the estimated particle sinking rates are more than 200 m day−1. The current vertical velocity field is computed from a 1/16°×1/16° Ocean General Circulation Model simulation and from the wind stress curl. Current vertical velocities are larger and more variable than Ekman vertical velocities, yet the general patterns are alike. Current vertical velocities are generally smaller than 1 m day−1: we therefore exclude a direct effect of downward velocities in determining high sedimentation rates. However we find that upward velocities in the subsurface layers of the water column are positively correlated with deep particle fluxes. We thus hypothesize that upwelling would produce an increase in upper ocean nutrient levels – thus stimulating primary production and grazing – a few weeks before an enhanced vertical flux is found in the sediment traps. High particle sedimentation rates may be attained by means of rapidly sinking fecal pellets produced by gelatinous macro-zooplankton. Other sedimentation mechanisms, such as dust deposition, are also considered in explaining large pulses of deep particle fluxes. The fast sinking rates estimated in this study might be an evidence of the efficiency of the biological pump in sequestering organic carbon from the surface layers of the deep Eastern Mediterranean basins.

  8. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n plu , which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v gas is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n plu ∝ log(v gas ). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity

  9. Remote operation of the vertical plasma stabilization @ the GOLEM tokamak for the plasma physics education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, V., E-mail: svoboda@fjfi.cvut.cz [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Kocman, J.; Grover, O. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Krbec, J.; Stöckel, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, CZ-182 21 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: * Understandable remote operation of a vertical plasma position control system in the tokamak GOLEM for educational purposes.* Two combinable modes of real-time plasma position control: position based feedback and a pre-defined waveform.* More than 20% plasma life prolongation with plasma position control in feedback mode. - Highlights: • Understandable remote operation of a vertical plasma position control system in the tokamak GOLEM for educational purposes. • Two combinable modes of real-time plasma position control: position based feedback and a pre-defined waveform. • More than 20% plasma life prolongation with plasma position control in feedback mode. - Abstract: The GOLEM tokamak at the Czech Technical University has been established as an educational tokamak device for domestic and foreign students. Remote participation in the scope of several laboratory practices, plasma physics schools and workshops has been successfully performed from abroad. A new enhancement allowing understandable remote control of vertical plasma position in two modes (i) predefined and (ii) feedback control is presented. It allows to drive the current in the stabilization coils in any time-dependent scenario, which can include as a parameter the actual plasma position measured by magnetic diagnostics. Arbitrary movement of the plasma column in a vertical direction, stabilization of the plasma column in the center of the tokamak vessel as well as prolongation/shortening of plasma life according to the remotely defined request are demonstrated.

  10. Numerical simulation of plasma vertical position stabilization in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astapkovich, A.M.; Sadakov, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    The paper deals with numerical simulation of plasma vertical position stabilization in ITER. The calculations are performed using EDDY C-2 code by the method of direct numerical simulation of transient electromagnetic processes taking into account the evolution of plasma position, cross-section shape and full plasma current. When simulating free vertical plasma drift in ITER with twin passive stabilization loops, it was shown that account of the effects of cross-section deformation and plasma current alternations results in almost two fold degradation of passive stabilization parameters as compared to the calculations for 'rigid displacement' model. In terms of methodology, the account of the effects of cross section deformation and plasma current alternations requires clarification of the definitions for reverse increment of vertical instability and for stability margin coefficient. The simulation of plasma pinch return to equilibrium position after the closure of control coils allows to assess the required parameters of active control system and demonstrate the effect of screen current reverse in twin loops. The obtained results were used to develop the ITER conceptual design and affected the choice of the concept of twin passive loops and new positron of control coils as the basis approaches. 11 refs.; 12 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Numerical calculation of velocity distribution near a vertical flat plate immersed in bubble flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Akihiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Horihata, Hideyuki; Hiraoka, Setsuro; Aragaki, Tsutomu; Yamada, Ikuho; Isoda, Shinji.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid and gas velocity distributions for bubble flow near a vertical flat plate were calculated numerically by using the SIMPLER method, where the flow was assumed to be laminar, two-dimensional, and at steady state. The two-fluid flow model was used in the numerical analysis. To calculate the drag force on a small bubble, Stokes' law for a rigid sphere is applicable. The dimensionless velocity distributions which were arranged with characteristic boundary layer thickness and maximum liquid velocity were adjusted with a single line and their forms were similar to that for single-phase wall-jet flow. The average wall shear stress derived from the velocity gradient at the plate wall was strongly affected by bubble diameter but not by inlet liquid velocity. The present dimensionless velocity distributions obtained numerically agreed well with previous experimental results, and the proposed numerical algorithm was validated. (author)

  12. A Unified Geodetic Vertical Velocity Field (UGVVF), Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalzle, G.; Wdowinski, S.

    2014-12-01

    Tectonic motion, volcanic inflation or deflation, as well as oil, gas and water pumping can induce vertical motion. In southern California these signals are inter-mingled. In tectonics, properly identifying regions that are contaminated by other signals can be important when estimating fault slip rates. Until recently vertical deformation rates determined by high precision Global Positioning Systems (GPS) had large uncertainties compared to horizontal components and were rarely used to constrain tectonic models of fault motion. However, many continuously occupied GPS stations have been operating for ten or more years, often delivering uncertainties of ~1 mm/yr or less, providing better constraints for tectonic modeling. Various processing centers produced GPS time series and estimated vertical velocity fields, each with their own set of processing techniques and assumptions. We compare vertical velocity solutions estimated by seven data processing groups as well as two combined solutions (Figure 1). These groups include: Central Washington University (CWU) and New Mexico Institute of Technology (NMT), and their combined solution provided by the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) through the UNAVCO website. Also compared are the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Scripps Orbit and Permanent Array Center (SOPAC) and their combined solution provided as part of the NASA MEaSUREs project. Smaller velocity fields included are from Amos et al., 2014, processed at the Nevada Geodetic Laboratory, Shen et al., 2011, processed by UCLA and called the Crustal Motion Map 4.0 (CMM4) dataset, and a new velocity field provided by the University of Miami (UM). Our analysis includes estimating and correcting for systematic vertical velocity and uncertainty differences between groups. Our final product is a unified velocity field that contains the median values of the adjusted velocity fields and their uncertainties. This product will be periodically updated when new velocity fields

  13. Gas and particle velocity measurements in an induction plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesinski, J.; Gagne, R.; Boulos, M.I.

    1981-08-01

    Laser doppler anemometry was used for the measurements of the plasma and particle velocity profiles in the coil region of an inductively coupled plasma. Results are reported for a 50 mm ID induction torch operated at atmospheric pressure with argon as the plasma gas. The oscillator frequency was 3 MHz and the power in the coil was varied between 4.6 and 10.5 kW. The gas velocity measurements were made using a fine carbon powder as a tracer (dp approx. = 1 μm). Measurements were also made with larger silicon particles (dp = 33 μm and sigma = 13 μm) centrally injected in the plasma under different operating conditions

  14. On plasma coupling and turbulence effects in low velocity stopping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurilenkov, Yu K [Unified Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/19 Izhorskaya Str., 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Maynard, G [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, UMR-8578, Bat. 210, Universite Paris XI, F-91405 Orsay (France); Barriga-Carrasco, M D [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, UMR-8578, Bat. 210, Universite Paris XI, F-91405 Orsay (France); Valuev, A A [Unified Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/19 Izhorskaya Str., 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-04-28

    The problem of stopping power (SP) for projectile ions is analysed in terms of the dielectric function and effective collision frequency for moderately dense and strongly coupled plasmas (SCP). We consider several issues regarding the calculation of stopping power for correlated ensembles of particles and oscillators. In particular, effects of group (few particle) modes, transition from positive to negative dispersion and excitation of collective modes up to suprathermal level at plasma targets are addressed. Linear SP of dense suprathermal (nonlinear) plasma targets at different levels of target plasma turbulence is estimated. The force of suprathermal plasma oscillations on the projectile ions is mostly in the nature of increased frictional drag. The results obtained show the possibility of increasing low velocity stopping (up to 'turbulent' values) in comparison with losses in equilibrium dense plasma targets. Experimental conditions to create specific turbulent targets as well as some connection between stopping phenomena and SCP transport properties are discussed briefly.

  15. On plasma coupling and turbulence effects in low velocity stopping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurilenkov, Yu K; Maynard, G; Barriga-Carrasco, M D; Valuev, A A

    2006-01-01

    The problem of stopping power (SP) for projectile ions is analysed in terms of the dielectric function and effective collision frequency for moderately dense and strongly coupled plasmas (SCP). We consider several issues regarding the calculation of stopping power for correlated ensembles of particles and oscillators. In particular, effects of group (few particle) modes, transition from positive to negative dispersion and excitation of collective modes up to suprathermal level at plasma targets are addressed. Linear SP of dense suprathermal (nonlinear) plasma targets at different levels of target plasma turbulence is estimated. The force of suprathermal plasma oscillations on the projectile ions is mostly in the nature of increased frictional drag. The results obtained show the possibility of increasing low velocity stopping (up to 'turbulent' values) in comparison with losses in equilibrium dense plasma targets. Experimental conditions to create specific turbulent targets as well as some connection between stopping phenomena and SCP transport properties are discussed briefly

  16. Equatorial 150 km echoes and daytime F region vertical plasma drifts in the Brazilian longitude sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Rodrigues

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed that conventional coherent backscatter radar measurements of the Doppler velocity of the so-called 150 km echoes can provide an alternative way of estimating ionospheric vertical plasma drifts during daytime hours (Kudeki and Fawcett, 1993; Chau and Woodman, 2004. Using observations made by a small, low-power 30 MHz coherent backscatter radar located in the equatorial site of São Luís (2.59° S, 44.21° W; −2.35° dip lat, we were able to detect and monitor the occurrence of 150 km echoes in the Brazilian sector. Using these measurements we estimated the local time variation of daytime vertical ionospheric drifts in the eastern American sector. Here, we present a few interesting cases of 150 km-echoes observations made by the São Luís radar and estimates of the diurnal variation of vertical drifts. These cases exemplify the variability of the vertical drifts in the Brazilian sector. Using same-day 150 km-echoes measurements made at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory in Peru, we also demonstrate the variability of the equatorial vertical drifts across the American sector. In addition to first estimates of the absolute vertical plasma drifts in the eastern American (Brazilian sector, we also present observations of abnormal drifts detected by the São Luís radar associated with the 2009 major sudden stratospheric warming event.

  17. Inferring regional vertical crustal velocities from averaged relative sea level trends: A proof of concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bâki Iz H.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates that relative sea level trends calculated from long-term tide gauge records can be used to estimate relative vertical crustal velocities in a region with high accuracy. A comparison of the weighted averages of the relative sea level trends estimated at six tide gauge stations in two clusters along the Eastern coast of United States, in Florida and in Maryland, reveals a statistically significant regional vertical crustal motion of Maryland with respect to Florida with a subsidence rate of −1.15±0.15 mm/yr identified predominantly due to the ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment process. The estimate is a consilience value to validate vertical crustal velocities calculated from GPS time series as well as towards constraining predictive GIA models in these regions.

  18. Continuous, saturation, and discontinuous tokamak plasma vertical position control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrishkin, Yuri V., E-mail: y_mitrishkin@hotmail.com [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Pavlova, Evgeniia A., E-mail: janerigoler@mail.ru [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Evgenii A., E-mail: ea.kuznetsov@mail.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Gaydamaka, Kirill I., E-mail: k.gaydamaka@gmail.com [V. A. Trapeznikov Institute of Control Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Robust new linear state feedback control system for tokamak plasma vertical position. • Plasma vertical position relay control system with voltage inverter in sliding mode. • Design of full models of multiphase rectifier and voltage inverter. • First-order unit approximation of full multiphase rectifier model with high accuracy. • Wider range of unstable plant parameters of stable control system with multiphase rectifier. - Abstract: This paper is devoted to the design and comparison of unstable plasma vertical position control systems in the T-15 tokamak with the application of two types of actuators: a multiphase thyristor rectifier and a transistor voltage inverter. An unstable dynamic element obtained by the identification of plasma-physical DINA code was used as the plasma model. The simplest static feedback state space control law was synthesized as a linear combination of signals accessible to physical measurements, namely the plasma vertical displacement, the current, and the voltage in a horizontal field coil, to solve the pole placement problem for a closed-loop system. Only one system distinctive parameter was used to optimize the performance of the feedback system, viz., a multiple real pole. A first-order inertial unit was used as the rectifier model in the feedback. A system with a complete rectifier model was investigated as well. A system with the voltage inverter model and static linear controller was brought into a sliding mode. As this takes place, real time delays were taken into account in the discontinuous voltage inverter model. The comparison of the linear and sliding mode systems showed that the linear system enjoyed an essentially wider range of the plant model parameters where the feedback system was stable.

  19. Continuous, saturation, and discontinuous tokamak plasma vertical position control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrishkin, Yuri V.; Pavlova, Evgeniia A.; Kuznetsov, Evgenii A.; Gaydamaka, Kirill I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Robust new linear state feedback control system for tokamak plasma vertical position. • Plasma vertical position relay control system with voltage inverter in sliding mode. • Design of full models of multiphase rectifier and voltage inverter. • First-order unit approximation of full multiphase rectifier model with high accuracy. • Wider range of unstable plant parameters of stable control system with multiphase rectifier. - Abstract: This paper is devoted to the design and comparison of unstable plasma vertical position control systems in the T-15 tokamak with the application of two types of actuators: a multiphase thyristor rectifier and a transistor voltage inverter. An unstable dynamic element obtained by the identification of plasma-physical DINA code was used as the plasma model. The simplest static feedback state space control law was synthesized as a linear combination of signals accessible to physical measurements, namely the plasma vertical displacement, the current, and the voltage in a horizontal field coil, to solve the pole placement problem for a closed-loop system. Only one system distinctive parameter was used to optimize the performance of the feedback system, viz., a multiple real pole. A first-order inertial unit was used as the rectifier model in the feedback. A system with a complete rectifier model was investigated as well. A system with the voltage inverter model and static linear controller was brought into a sliding mode. As this takes place, real time delays were taken into account in the discontinuous voltage inverter model. The comparison of the linear and sliding mode systems showed that the linear system enjoyed an essentially wider range of the plant model parameters where the feedback system was stable.

  20. Velocity limitations in coaxial plasma gun experiments with gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axnaes, I.

    1976-04-01

    The velocity limitations found in many crossed field plasma experiments with neutral gas present are studied for binary mixtures of H 2 , He, N 2 O 2 , Ne and Ar. The apparatus used is a coaxial plasma gun with an azimuthal magnetic bias field. The discharge parameters are chosen so that the plasma is weakly ionized. In some of the mixtures it is found that one of the components tends to dominate in the sense that only a small amount (regarding volume) of that component is needed for the discharge to adopt a limiting velocity close to that for the pure component. Thus in a mixture between a heavy and a light component having nearly equal ionization potentials the heavy component dominates. Also if there is a considerable difference in ionization potential between the components, the component with the lowest ionization potential tends to dominate. (author)

  1. Post-midnight equatorial irregularity distributions and vertical drift velocity variations during solstices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, S.-Y.; Liu, C. H.; Chao, C.-K.

    2018-04-01

    Longitudinal distributions of post-midnight equatorial ionospheric irregularity occurrences observed by ROCSAT-1 (1st satellite of the Republic of China) during moderate to high solar activity years in two solstices are studied with respect to the vertical drift velocity and density variations. The post-midnight irregularity distributions are found to be similar to the well-documented pre-midnight ones, but are different from some published distributions taken during solar minimum years. Even though the post-midnight ionosphere is sinking in general, longitudes of frequent positive vertical drift and high density seems to coincide with the longitudes of high irregularity occurrences. Large scatters found in the vertical drift velocity and density around the dip equator in different ROCSAT-1 orbits indicate the existence of large and frequent variations in the vertical drift velocity and density that seem to be able to provide sufficient perturbations for the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability to cause the irregularity occurrences. The need of seeding agents such as gravity waves from atmospheric convective clouds to initiate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability may not be necessary.

  2. Velocity space ring-plasma instability, magnetized, Part I: Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.K.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of magnetized monoenergetic ions (a ring in velocity space) with a homogeneous Maxwellian target plasma is studied numerically using linear Vlasov theory. The ring may be produced when an energetic beam is injected perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field. In addition to yielding the previously known results, the present study classifies this flute-like instability into three distinct regimes based on the beam density relative to the plasma density, where many features such as physical mechanisms, dispersion diagrams, and maximum growth rates are quite different. The effects of electron dynamics, plasma or ring thermal spread, the ratio of ω/sub p//ω/sub c/ for plasma ions, and electromagnetic modifications are also considered

  3. Plasma vertical instability in a tokamak with rail limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belashob, V.I.; Brevnov, N.N.; Gribov, Yu.V.; Putvinskij, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    An effect of currents between rail limiters on plasma equilibrium in the tokamak is studied theoretically and experimentally. Limiter currents can emerge at fast changes of plasma position along rail limiters for example when compression along major radius takes place and result in additional electrodynamic loadings on to the chamber and limiters. It is shown that at high currents between the limiters, the behaviour of discharge depends on limiter voltage polarity. When the plasma - limiter contact points are asymmetrically located respective to an equatorial plane a radial component of the limiter current emerges. The interaction of the component with the toroidal magnetic field can result in a vertical plasma filament instability. 9 refs.; 10 figs

  4. Modification of Turbulent Pipe Flow Equations to Estimate the Vertical Velocity Profiles Under Woody Debris Jams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervania, A.; Knack, I. M. W.

    2017-12-01

    The presence of woody debris (WD) jams in rivers and streams increases the risk of backwater flooding and reduces the navigability of a channel, but adds fish and macroinvertebrate habitat to the stream. When designing river engineering projects engineers use hydraulic models to predict flow behavior around these obstructions. However, the complexities of flow through and beneath WD jams are still poorly understood. By increasing the ability to predict flow behavior around WD jams, landowners and engineers are empowered to develop sustainable practices regarding the removal or placement of WD in rivers and flood plains to balance the desirable and undesirable effects to society and the environment. The objective of this study is to address some of this knowledge gap by developing a method to estimate the vertical velocity profile of flow under WD jams. When flow passes under WD jams, it becomes affected by roughness elements on all sides, similar to turbulent flows in pipe systems. Therefore, the method was developed using equations that define the velocity profiles of turbulent pipe flows: the law of the wall, the logarithmic law, and the velocity defect law. Flume simulations of WD jams were conducted and the vertical velocity profiles were measured along the centerline. A calculated velocity profile was fit to the measured profile through the calibration of eight parameters. An optimal value or range of values have been determined for several of these parameters using cross-validation techniques. The results indicate there may be some promise to using this method in hydraulic models.

  5. The ion velocity distribution of tokamak plasmas: Rutherford scattering at TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tammen, H.F.

    1995-01-10

    One of the most promising ways to gererate electricity in the next century on a large scale is nuclear fusion. In this process two light nuclei fuse and create a new nucleus with a smaller mass than the total mass of the original nuclei, the mass deficit is released in the form of kinetic energy. Research into this field has already been carried out for some decades now, and will have to continue for several more decades before a commercially viable fusion reactor can be build. In order to obtain fusion, fuels of extremely high temperatures are needed to overcome the repulsive force of the nuclei involved. Under these circumstances the fuel is fully ionized: it consists of ions and electrons and is in the plasma state. The problem of confining such a hot substance is solved by using strong magnetic fields. One specific magnetic configuration, in common use, is called the tokamak. The plasma in this machine has a toroidal, i.e. doughnut shaped, configuration. For understanding the physical processes which take place in the plasma, a good temporally and spatially resolved knowledge of both the ion and electron velocity distribution is required. The situation concerning the electrons is favourable, but this is not the case for the ions. To improve the existing knowledge of the ion velocity distribution in tokamak plasmas, a Rutherford scattering diagnostic (RUSC), designed and built by the FOM-Institute for Plasmaphysics `Rijnhuizen`, was installed at the TEXTOR tokamak in Juelich (D). The principle of the diagnostic is as follows. A beam of monoenergetic particles (30 keV, He) is injected vertically into the plasma. A small part of these particles collides elastically with the moving plasma ions. By determining the energy of a scattered beam particle under a certain angle (7 ), the initial velocity of the plasma ion in one direction can be computed. (orig./WL).

  6. The ion velocity distribution of tokamak plasmas: Rutherford scattering at TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tammen, H.F.

    1995-01-01

    One of the most promising ways to gererate electricity in the next century on a large scale is nuclear fusion. In this process two light nuclei fuse and create a new nucleus with a smaller mass than the total mass of the original nuclei, the mass deficit is released in the form of kinetic energy. Research into this field has already been carried out for some decades now, and will have to continue for several more decades before a commercially viable fusion reactor can be build. In order to obtain fusion, fuels of extremely high temperatures are needed to overcome the repulsive force of the nuclei involved. Under these circumstances the fuel is fully ionized: it consists of ions and electrons and is in the plasma state. The problem of confining such a hot substance is solved by using strong magnetic fields. One specific magnetic configuration, in common use, is called the tokamak. The plasma in this machine has a toroidal, i.e. doughnut shaped, configuration. For understanding the physical processes which take place in the plasma, a good temporally and spatially resolved knowledge of both the ion and electron velocity distribution is required. The situation concerning the electrons is favourable, but this is not the case for the ions. To improve the existing knowledge of the ion velocity distribution in tokamak plasmas, a Rutherford scattering diagnostic (RUSC), designed and built by the FOM-Institute for Plasmaphysics 'Rijnhuizen', was installed at the TEXTOR tokamak in Juelich (D). The principle of the diagnostic is as follows. A beam of monoenergetic particles (30 keV, He) is injected vertically into the plasma. A small part of these particles collides elastically with the moving plasma ions. By determining the energy of a scattered beam particle under a certain angle (7 ), the initial velocity of the plasma ion in one direction can be computed. (orig./WL)

  7. Fatigue influences lower extremity angular velocities during a single-leg drop vertical jump

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura, Akihiro; Akasaka, Kiyokazu; Otsudo, Takahiro; Shiozawa, Junya; Toda, Yuka; Yamada, Kaori

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Fatigue alters lower extremity landing strategies and decreases the ability to attenuate impact during landing. The purpose of this study was to reveal the influence of fatigue on dynamic alignment and joint angular velocities in the lower extremities during a single leg landing. [Subjects and Methods] The 34 female college students were randomly assigned to either the fatigue or control group. The fatigue group performed single-leg drop vertical jumps before, and after, the fatigue...

  8. Inference and Biogeochemical Response of Vertical Velocities inside a Mode Water Eddy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceló-Llull, B.; Pallas Sanz, E.; Sangrà, P.

    2016-02-01

    With the aim to study the modulation of the biogeochemical fluxes by the ageostrophic secondary circulation in anticyclonic mesoscale eddies, a typical eddy of the Canary Eddy Corridor was interdisciplinary surveyed on September 2014 in the framework of the PUMP project. The eddy was elliptical shaped, 4 month old, 110 km diameter and 400 m depth. It was an intrathermocline type often also referred as mode water eddy type. We inferred the mesoscale vertical velocity field resolving a generalized omega equation from the 3D density and ADCP velocity fields of a five-day sampled CTD-SeaSoar regular grid centred on the eddy. The grid transects where 10 nautical miles apart. Although complex, in average, the inferred omega velocity field (hereafter w) shows a dipolar structure with downwelling velocities upstream of the propagation path (west) and upwelling velocities downstream. The w at the eddy center was zero and maximum values were located at the periphery attaining ca. 6 m day-1. Coinciding with the occurrence of the vertical velocities cells a noticeable enhancement of phytoplankton biomass was observed at the eddy periphery respect to the far field. A corresponding upward diapycnal flux of nutrients was also observed at the periphery. As minimum velocities where reached at the eddy center, lineal Ekman pumping mechanism was discarded. Minimum values of phytoplankton biomass where also observed at the eddy center. The possible mechanisms for such dipolar w cell are still being investigated, but an analysis of the generalized omega equation forcing terms suggest that it may be a combination of horizontal deformation and advection of vorticity by the ageostrophic current (related to nonlinear Ekman pumping). As expected for Trades, the wind was rather constant and uniform with a speed of ca. 5 m s-1. Diagnosed nonlinear Ekman pumping leaded also to a dipolar cell that mirrors the omega w dipolar cell.

  9. Velocity shear generated Alfven waves in electron-positron plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogava, A.D.; Berezhiani, V.I.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    Linear MHD modes in cold, nonrelativistic electron-positron plasma shear flow are considered. The general set of differential equations, describing the evolution of perturbations in the framework of the nonmodal approach is derived. It is found, that under certain circumstances, the compressional and shear Alfven perturbations may exhibit large transient growth fuelled by the mean kinetic energy of the shear flow. The velocity shear also induces mode coupling allowing the exchange of energy as well as the possibility of a strong mutual transformation of these modes into each other. The compressional Alfven mode may extract the energy of the mean flow and transfer it to the shear Alfven mode via this coupling. The relevance of these new physical effects to provide a better understanding of the laboratory e + e - plasma is emphasized. It is speculated that the shear-induced effects in the electron-positron plasmas could also help solve some astrophysical puzzles (e.g., the generation of pulsar radio emission). Since most astrophysical plasma are relativistic, it is shown that the major results of the study remain valid for weakly sheared relativistic plasmas. (author). 21 refs, 4 figs

  10. Velocity of large bubble in liquid-solid mixture in a vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, H.; Sakaguchi, T.

    1995-01-01

    The upward movement of a large bubble in a stationary mixture of liquid and solid is one of the most fundamental phenomena of gas-liquid-solid three phase slug flow in a vertical tube. The purpose of this study is to make clear the characteristic of the rising velocity of this fundamental flow experimentally. The rising velocity of a large bubble V in a liquid-solid mixture was measured and compared with the velocity V o in a liquid (without solid). The experimental results were correlated using a non-dimensional velocity V * (=V/V o ), and the following results were obtained. It was found that the characteristic of the rising velocity differs according to the tube diameter and the liquid viscosity, or the Galileo number in the non-dimensional expression. It can be classified into two regimes. (i) When the liquid viscosity is large (or the tube diameter is small), V * decreases linearly against the volumetric solid fraction ε of the mixture. (ii) When the viscosity is small, on the other hand, the relation between V * and ε is not linear. This classification can be explained by the results in the previous papers by the authors dealing with a large bubble in a liquid

  11. Velocity of large bubble in liquid-solid mixture in a vertical tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamaguchi, H.; Sakaguchi, T. [Kobe Univ., Kobe (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    The upward movement of a large bubble in a stationary mixture of liquid and solid is one of the most fundamental phenomena of gas-liquid-solid three phase slug flow in a vertical tube. The purpose of this study is to make clear the characteristic of the rising velocity of this fundamental flow experimentally. The rising velocity of a large bubble V in a liquid-solid mixture was measured and compared with the velocity V{sub o} in a liquid (without solid). The experimental results were correlated using a non-dimensional velocity V{sup *}(=V/V{sub o}), and the following results were obtained. It was found that the characteristic of the rising velocity differs according to the tube diameter and the liquid viscosity, or the Galileo number in the non-dimensional expression. It can be classified into two regimes. (i) When the liquid viscosity is large (or the tube diameter is small), V{sup *} decreases linearly against the volumetric solid fraction {epsilon} of the mixture. (ii) When the viscosity is small, on the other hand, the relation between V{sup *} and {epsilon} is not linear. This classification can be explained by the results in the previous papers by the authors dealing with a large bubble in a liquid.

  12. High plasma rotation velocity and density transitions by biased electrodes in RF produced, magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Shoichiro; Shinohara, Shunjiro

    2001-01-01

    A large density profile modification was successfully obtained by voltage biasing to electrodes inserted in a RF (radio frequency) produced, magnetized plasma, and formation of strong shear of azimuthal plasma rotation velocity in a supersonic regime was found. For the case of biasing to an electrode near the central plasma region, two types of density transitions were observed in the outer plasma region: one was an oscillatory transition between two states, and the other was a transition from high to low density states with a large reduction of density fluctuations. (author)

  13. High plasma rotation velocity and density transitions by biased electrodes in RF produced, magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, Shoichiro; Shinohara, Shunjiro [Kyushu Univ., Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A large density profile modification was successfully obtained by voltage biasing to electrodes inserted in a RF (radio frequency) produced, magnetized plasma, and formation of strong shear of azimuthal plasma rotation velocity in a supersonic regime was found. For the case of biasing to an electrode near the central plasma region, two types of density transitions were observed in the outer plasma region: one was an oscillatory transition between two states, and the other was a transition from high to low density states with a large reduction of density fluctuations. (author)

  14. Velocity and texture of a plasma jet created in a plasma torch with fixed minimal arc length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilotijevic, M; Dacic, B; Bozic, D

    2009-01-01

    A new plasma jet (PJ-100) plasma spraying torch with a fixed minimal arc length was tested and the basic working parameters were measured and evaluated. The velocity of the plasma exiting both the cylindrical and the conical anode nozzles was assessed by measuring the thrust generated by the plasma jet and by photographing the translation of plasma clouds (parts with different brightnesses) in the last third of the length of the plasma plume. The basic characteristics of the argon/hydrogen plasma jets (enthalpy, mean temperature, mean plasma velocity and effective exhaust thrust velocity) were determined for different working regimes, for both the cylindrical and the conical nozzles. The thermal efficiency of the new plasma torch is between 70% and 74% for the plasma generation power up to 90 kW. The plasma plume generated in the cylindrical nozzle has a homogeneous radial temperature (and velocity) distribution with a full laminar flow.

  15. A local-velocity meter for hypersonic plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyazev, A.A.; Lerner, N.B.; Svinolupov, K.I.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a system for a resonant laser Doppler meter for the local velocity in a hypersonic plasma flow. Preliminary test results on the prototype are reported for a jet of air containing sodium at 1100 degrees K, air pressure in the working region 20-200 Pa, and jet speed 6-8 km/sec. Measured speeds agree with theoretical predictions. The prototype and the method do not impose constraints on the working conditions but can be extended to wide ranges in temperature and pressure, such as ones in which the line width does not exceed the Doppler shift

  16. The boundary condition for vertical velocity and its interdependence with surface gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Andrew S.

    2017-07-01

    The law of conservation of linear momentum is applied to surface gas exchanges, employing scale analysis to diagnose the vertical velocity (w) in the boundary layer. Net upward momentum in the surface layer is forced by evaporation (E) and defines non-zero vertical motion, with a magnitude defined by the ratio of E to the air density, as w = E/ρ. This is true even right down at the surface where the boundary condition is w|0 = E/ρ|0 (where w|0 and ρ|0 represent the vertical velocity and density of air at the surface). This Stefan flow velocity implies upward transport of a non-diffusive nature that is a general feature of the troposphere but is of particular importance at the surface, where it assists molecular diffusion with upward gas migration (of H2O, for example) but opposes that of downward-diffusing species like CO2 during daytime. The definition of flux-gradient relationships (eddy diffusivities) requires rectification to exclude non-diffusive transport, which does not depend on scalar gradients. At the microscopic scale, the role of non-diffusive transport in the process of evaporation from inside a narrow tube - with vapour transport into an overlying, horizontal airstream - was described long ago in classical mechanics and is routinely accounted for by chemical engineers, but has been neglected by scientists studying stomatal conductance. Correctly accounting for non-diffusive transport through stomata, which can appreciably reduce net CO2 transport and marginally boost that of water vapour, should improve characterisations of ecosystem and plant functioning.

  17. The boundary condition for vertical velocity and its interdependence with surface gas exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kowalski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The law of conservation of linear momentum is applied to surface gas exchanges, employing scale analysis to diagnose the vertical velocity (w in the boundary layer. Net upward momentum in the surface layer is forced by evaporation (E and defines non-zero vertical motion, with a magnitude defined by the ratio of E to the air density, as w = E/ρ. This is true even right down at the surface where the boundary condition is w|0 = E/ρ|0 (where w|0 and ρ|0 represent the vertical velocity and density of air at the surface. This Stefan flow velocity implies upward transport of a non-diffusive nature that is a general feature of the troposphere but is of particular importance at the surface, where it assists molecular diffusion with upward gas migration (of H2O, for example but opposes that of downward-diffusing species like CO2 during daytime. The definition of flux–gradient relationships (eddy diffusivities requires rectification to exclude non-diffusive transport, which does not depend on scalar gradients. At the microscopic scale, the role of non-diffusive transport in the process of evaporation from inside a narrow tube – with vapour transport into an overlying, horizontal airstream – was described long ago in classical mechanics and is routinely accounted for by chemical engineers, but has been neglected by scientists studying stomatal conductance. Correctly accounting for non-diffusive transport through stomata, which can appreciably reduce net CO2 transport and marginally boost that of water vapour, should improve characterisations of ecosystem and plant functioning.

  18. Characteristics of low-mass-velocity vertical gas-liquid two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiromichi; Abe, Yutaka; Kimura, Ko-ji

    1995-01-01

    In the present paper, characteristics of low mass velocity two-phase flow was analyzed based on a concept that pressure energy of two-phase flow is converted into acceleration work, gravitational work and frictional work, and the pressure energy consumption rate should be minimum at the stable two-phase flow condition. Experimental data for vertical upward air-water two-phase flow at atmospheric pressure was used to verify this concept and the turbulent model used in this method is optimized with the data. (author)

  19. Velocity and phase distribution measurements in vertical air-water annular flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassallo, P.

    1997-07-01

    Annular flow topology for three air-water conditions in a vertical duct is investigated through the use of a traversing double-sensor hot-film anemometry probe and differential pressure measurements. Near wall measurements of mean and fluctuating velocities, as well as local void fraction, are taken in the liquid film, with the highest turbulent fluctuations occurring for the flow condition with the largest pressure drop. A modified law-of-the-wall formulation for wall shear is presented which, using near wall values of mean velocity and kinetic energy, agrees reasonably well with the average stress obtained from direct pressure drop measurements. The linear profile using wall coordinates in the logarithmic layer is preserved in annular flow; however, the slope and intercept of the profile differ from the single-phase values for the annular flow condition which has a thicker, more turbulent, liquid film

  20. Vertical wind velocity measurements using a five-hole probe with remotely piloted aircraft to study aerosol-cloud interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmer, Radiance; Roberts, Gregory C.; Preissler, Jana; Sanchez, Kevin J.; Derrien, Solène; O'Dowd, Colin

    2018-05-01

    The importance of vertical wind velocities (in particular positive vertical wind velocities or updrafts) in atmospheric science has motivated the need to deploy multi-hole probes developed for manned aircraft in small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA). In atmospheric research, lightweight RPAs ( power spectral density (PSD) functions and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) derived from the five-hole probe are compared with sonic anemometers on a meteorological mast. During a BACCHUS field campaign at Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station (Ireland), a fleet of RPAs was deployed to profile the atmosphere and complement ground-based and satellite observations of physical and chemical properties of aerosols, clouds, and meteorological state parameters. The five-hole probe was flown on straight-and-level legs to measure vertical wind velocities within clouds. The vertical velocity measurements from the RPA are validated with vertical velocities derived from a ground-based cloud radar by showing that both measurements yield model-simulated cloud droplet number concentrations within 10 %. The updraft velocity distributions illustrate distinct relationships between vertical cloud fields in different meteorological conditions.

  1. An analytical model for displacement velocity of liquid film on a hot vertical surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Shu

    1975-01-01

    The downward progress of the advancing front of a liquid film streaming down a heated vertical surface, as it would occur in emergency core cooling, is much slower than in the case of ordinary streaming down along a heated surface already wetted with the liquid. A two-dimensional heat conduction model is developed for evaluating this velocity of the liquid front, which takes account of the heat removal by ordinary flow boiling mechanism. In the analysis, the maximum heat flux and the calefaction temperature are taken up as parameters in addition to the initial dry heated wall temperature, the flow rate and the velocity of downward progress of the liquid front. The temperature profile is calculated for various combinations of these parameters. Two criteria are proposed for choosing the most suitable combination of the parameters. One is to reject solutions that represent an oscillating wall temperature distribution, and the second criterion requires that the length of the zone of violent boiling immediately following the liquid front should not be longer than about 1 mm, this value being determined from comparisons made between experiment and calculation. Application of the above two criteria resulted in reasonable values obtained for the calefaction temperature and the maximum heat flux, and the velocity of the liquid front derived therefrom showed good agreement with experiment. (auth.)

  2. Vertical wind velocity measurements using a five-hole probe with remotely piloted aircraft to study aerosol–cloud interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Calmer

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of vertical wind velocities (in particular positive vertical wind velocities or updrafts in atmospheric science has motivated the need to deploy multi-hole probes developed for manned aircraft in small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA. In atmospheric research, lightweight RPAs ( <  2.5 kg are now able to accurately measure atmospheric wind vectors, even in a cloud, which provides essential observing tools for understanding aerosol–cloud interactions. The European project BACCHUS (impact of Biogenic versus Anthropogenic emissions on Clouds and Climate: towards a Holistic UnderStanding focuses on these specific interactions. In particular, vertical wind velocity at cloud base is a key parameter for studying aerosol–cloud interactions. To measure the three components of wind, a RPA is equipped with a five-hole probe, pressure sensors, and an inertial navigation system (INS. The five-hole probe is calibrated on a multi-axis platform, and the probe–INS system is validated in a wind tunnel. Once mounted on a RPA, power spectral density (PSD functions and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE derived from the five-hole probe are compared with sonic anemometers on a meteorological mast. During a BACCHUS field campaign at Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station (Ireland, a fleet of RPAs was deployed to profile the atmosphere and complement ground-based and satellite observations of physical and chemical properties of aerosols, clouds, and meteorological state parameters. The five-hole probe was flown on straight-and-level legs to measure vertical wind velocities within clouds. The vertical velocity measurements from the RPA are validated with vertical velocities derived from a ground-based cloud radar by showing that both measurements yield model-simulated cloud droplet number concentrations within 10 %. The updraft velocity distributions illustrate distinct relationships between vertical cloud fields in different meteorological

  3. Horizontal and Vertical Velocities Derived from the IDS Contribution to ITRF2014, and Comparisons with Geophysical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreaux, G.; Lemoine, F. G.; Argus, D. F.; Santamaria-Gomez, A.; Willis, P.; Soudarin, L.; Gravelle, M.; Ferrage, P.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the 2014 realization of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF2014), the International DORIS Service (IDS) has delivered to the IERS a set of 1140 weekly SINEX files including station coordinates and Earth orientation parameters, covering the time period from 1993.0 to 2015.0. From this set of weekly SINEX files, the IDS Combination Center estimated a cumulative DORIS position and velocity solution to obtain mean horizontal and vertical motion of 160 stations at 71 DORIS sites. The main objective of this study is to validate the velocities of the DORIS sites by comparison with external models or time series. Horizontal velocities are compared with two recent global plate models (GEODVEL 2010 and NNR-MORVEL56). Prior to the comparisons, DORIS horizontal velocities were corrected for Global Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) from the ICE-6G (VM5a) model. For more than half of the sites, the DORIS horizontal velocities differ from the global plate models by less than 2-3 mm/yr. For five of the sites (Arequipa, Dionysos/Gavdos, Manila, Santiago) with horizontal velocity differences wrt these models larger than 10 mm/yr, comparisons with GNSS estimates show the veracity of the DORIS motions. Vertical motions from the DORIS cumulative solution are compared with the vertical velocities derived from the latest GPS cumulative solution over the time span 1995.0-2014.0 from the University of La Rochelle (ULR6) solution at 31 co-located DORIS-GPS sites. These two sets of vertical velocities show a correlation coefficient of 0.83. Vertical differences are larger than 2 mm/yr at 23 percent of the sites. At Thule the disagreement is explained by fine-tuned DORIS discontinuities in line with the mass variations of outlet glaciers. Furthermore, the time evolution of the vertical time series from the DORIS station in Thule show similar trends to the GRACE equivalent water height.

  4. Relative ion expansion velocity in laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, S.; Moreno, J.C.; Griem, H.R.; Cohen, L.; Richardson, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    The spectra of highly ionized titanium, TiXIII through TiXXI, and CVI Lyman lines were excited in laser-produced plasmas. The plasma was produced by uniformly irradiating spherical glass microballoons coated with thin layers of titanium and parylene. The 24-beam Omega laser system produced short, 0.6 ns, and high intensity, 4 x 10 14 W/cm, 2 laser pulses at a wavelength of 351 nm. The measured wavelength for the 2p-3s TiXIII resonance lines had an average shift of +0.023 A relative to the CVI and TiXX spectral lines. No shift was found between the CVI, TiXIX, and TiXX lines. The shift is attributed to a Doppler effect, resulting from a difference of (2.6 +- 0.2) x 10 7 cm/s in the expansion velocities of TiXIX and TiXX ions compared to TiXIII ions

  5. Oscillation of the current sheet velocity in plasma focus discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melzacki, K.; Nardi, V.

    1994-01-01

    The oscillation of the propagation speed of the plasma focus current sheet has been recorded with schlieren photography. The sheet stuttering in the propagation during the implosion phase has a frequency of about 60 MHz. The effect could be recorded due to application of long exposure time (60 ns) technique. It is not detectable in the subnanosecond pictures. The pictures are taken in black schlieren. The probing range of the electron density gradient, with integration along the path of the 1 J, Q-switched ruby laser beam, has been selected by the size of the stop and aperture within 3 x 10 18 cm -3 and 3 x 10 20 cm -3 . Raising the sensitivity threshold to 2 x 10 19 cm -3 (refraction angle of 4 mrad) has helped to clear the pictures by limiting their image to high gradients of density only. With this technique (and other diagnostic methods) the dynamics of 6 kJ, 16 kV plasma focus discharges in deuterium at 5 torr, with a 10% decrease of the magnetic insulation at the breech has been investigated. The average implosion velocity of the current sheath obtained with this effect, 5 x 10 6 cm/s, is consistent with those measured by the smear effect, and the electric probe. The electron density gradient has been determined at several instants; at the pinch time it is (3 ± 1.5) x 10 20 cm -4 . The data are discussed on the basis of several pictures

  6. Suppression of vertical instability in elongated current-carrying plasmas by applying stellarator rotational transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ArchMiller, M. C.; Cianciosa, M. R.; Ennis, D. A.; Hanson, J. D.; Hartwell, G. J.; Hebert, J. D.; Herfindal, J. L.; Knowlton, S. F.; Ma, X.; Maurer, D. A.; Pandya, M. D.; Traverso, P.

    2014-01-01

    The passive stability of vertically elongated current-carrying toroidal plasmas has been investigated in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid, a stellarator/tokamak hybrid device. In this experiment, the fractional transform f, defined as the ratio of the imposed external rotational transform from stellarator coils to the total rotational transform, was varied from 0.04 to 0.50, and the elongation κ was varied from 1.4 to 2.2. Plasmas that were vertically unstable were evidenced by motion of the plasma in the vertical direction. Vertical drifts are measured with a set of poloidal field pickup coils. A three chord horizontally viewing interferometer and a soft X-ray diode array confirmed the drifts. Plasmas with low fractional transform and high elongation are the most susceptible to vertical instability, consistent with analytic predictions that the vertical mode in elongated plasmas can be stabilized by the poloidal field of a relatively weak stellarator equilibrium

  7. TSC plasma halo simulation of a DIII-D vertical displacement episode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayer, R.O.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Jardin, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    A benchmark of the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) plasma halo model has been achieved by calibration against a DIII-D vertical displacement episode (VDE) consisting of vertical drift, thermal quench and current quench. With a suitable halo surrounding the main plasma, the TSC predictions are in good agreement with experimental results for the plasma current decay, plasma trajectory, toroidal and poloidal vessel currents, and for the magnetic probe and flux loop values for the entire VDE. Simulations with no plasma halo yield much faster vertical motion and significantly worse agreement with the magnetics and flux loop data than do halo simulations. (author). 12 refs, 13 figs

  8. Clogging of granular material in vertical pipes discharged at constant velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Rodríguez Diego

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an experimental study on the flow of spherical particles through a vertical pipe discharged at constant velocity by means of a conveyor belt placed at the bottom. For a pipe diameter 3.67 times the diameter of the particles, we observe the development of hanging arches that stop the flow as they are able to support the weight of the particles above them. We find that the distribution of times that it takes until a stable clog develops, decays exponentially. This is compatible with a clogging probability that remains constant during the discharge. We also observe that the probability of clogging along the pipe decreases with the height, i.e. most of the clogs are developed near the bottom. This spatial dependence may be attributed to different pressure values within the pipe which might also be related to a spontaneous development of an helical structure of the grains inside the pipe.

  9. Dependence of energy characteristics of ascending swirling air flow on velocity of vertical blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, R. E.; Obukhov, A. G.; Kutrunov, V. N.

    2018-05-01

    In the model of a compressible continuous medium, for the complete Navier-Stokes system of equations, an initial boundary problem is proposed that corresponds to the conducted and planned experiments and describes complex three-dimensional flows of a viscous compressible heat-conducting gas in ascending swirling flows that are initiated by a vertical cold blowing. Using parallelization methods, three-dimensional nonstationary flows of a polytropic viscous compressible heat-conducting gas are constructed numerically in different scaled ascending swirling flows under the condition when gravity and Coriolis forces act. With the help of explicit difference schemes and the proposed initial boundary conditions, approximate solutions of the complete system of Navier-Stokes equations are constructed as well as the velocity and energy characteristics of three-dimensional nonstationary gas flows in ascending swirling flows are determined.

  10. Alignment of stress, mean wind, and vertical gradient of the velocity vector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Mann, Jakob; Patton, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    In many applications in the atmospheric surface layer the turbulent-viscosity hypothesis is applied, i.e. the stress vector can be described through the vertical gradient of velocity. In the atmospheric surface layer, where the Coriolis force and baroclinic effects are considered negligible......, this is supposedly a good approximation. High resolution large-eddy simulation (LES) data show that it is indeed the case. Through analysis of WindCube lidar measurements accompanied by sonic measurements we show that this is, on the other hand, rarely the case in the real atmosphere. This might indicate that large...... of atmospheric boundary layer modeling. The measurements are from the Danish wind turbine test sites at Høvsøre. With theWindCube lidar we are able to reach heights of 250 meters and hence capture the entire atmospheric surface layer both in terms of wind speed and the direction of the mean stress vector....

  11. Characteristics of vertical velocity in marine stratocumulus: comparison of large eddy simulations with observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Huan; Liu Yangang; Daum, Peter H; Senum, Gunnar I; Tao, W-K

    2008-01-01

    We simulated a marine stratus deck sampled during the Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) with a three-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) model at different model resolutions. Various characteristics of the vertical velocity from the model simulations were evaluated against those derived from the corresponding aircraft in situ observations, focusing on standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, probability density function (PDF), power spectrum, and structure function. Our results show that although the LES model captures reasonably well the lower-order moments (e.g., horizontal averages and standard deviations), it fails to simulate many aspects of the higher-order moments, such as kurtosis, especially near cloud base and cloud top. Further investigations of the PDFs, power spectra, and structure functions reveal that compared to the observations, the model generally underestimates relatively strong variations on small scales. The results also suggest that increasing the model resolutions improves the agreements between the model results and the observations in virtually all of the properties that we examined. Furthermore, the results indicate that a vertical grid size <10 m is necessary for accurately simulating even the standard-deviation profile, posing new challenges to computer resources.

  12. Electronic oscillations in a hot plasma due the non-Maxwellian velocity distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, L.A.V.; Nakamura, Y.

    1977-01-01

    In a completely ionized hot plasma, with a non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution, it is shown that, depending on the electron temperature, oscillations may occur at the elctron plasma and gyro frequencies. For three different electron velocity distributions, it is shown the oscillations dependency on the temperature. This situation occurs in the ionospheric plasma when artificially heated by HF radio waves. If the distribution is Maxwellian, the oscillation only occur near the electron plasma frequency [pt

  13. Far-Field and Middle-Field Vertical Velocities Associated with Megathrust Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleitout, L.; Trubienko, O.; Klein, E.; Vigny, C.; Garaud, J.; Shestakov, N.; Satirapod, C.; Simons, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    The recent megathrust earthquakes (Sumatra, Chili and Japan) have induced far-field postseismic subsidence with velocities from a few mm/yr to more than 1cm/yr at distances from 500 to 1500km from the earthquake epicentre, for several years following the earthquake. This subsidence is observed in Argentina, China, Korea, far-East Russia and in Malaysia and Thailand as reported by Satirapod et al. ( ASR, 2013). In the middle-field a very pronounced uplift is localized on the flank of the volcanic arc facing the trench. This is observed both over Honshu, in Chile and on the South-West coast of Sumatra. In Japan, the deformations prior to Tohoku earthquake are well measured by the GSI GPS network: While the East coast was slightly subsiding, the West coast was raising. A 3D finite element code (Zebulon-Zset) is used to understand the deformations through the seismic cycle in the areas surrounding the last three large subduction earthquakes. The meshes designed for each region feature a broad spherical shell portion with a viscoelastic asthenosphere. They are refined close to the subduction zones. Using these finite element models, we find that the pattern of the predicted far-field vertical postseismic displacements depends upon the thicknesses of the elastic plate and of the low viscosity asthenosphere. A low viscosity asthenosphere at shallow depth, just below the lithosphere is required to explain the subsidence at distances from 500 to 1500km. A thick (for example 600km) asthenosphere with a uniform viscosity predicts subsidence too far away from the trench. Slip on the subduction interface is unable tot induce the observed far-field subsidence. However, a combination of relaxation in a low viscosity wedge and slip or relaxation on the bottom part of the subduction interface is necessary to explain the observed postseismic uplift in the middle-field (volcanic arc area). The creep laws of the various zones used to explain the postseismic data can be injected in

  14. High-resolution vertical velocities and their power spectrum observed with the MAARSY radar - Part 1: frequency spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Rapp, Markus; Stober, Gunter; Latteck, Ralph

    2018-04-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) installed at the island of Andøya has been run for continuous probing of atmospheric winds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) region. In the current study, we present high-resolution wind measurements during the period between 2010 and 2013 with MAARSY. The spectral analysis applying the Lomb-Scargle periodogram method has been carried out to determine the frequency spectra of vertical wind velocity. From a total of 522 days of observations, the statistics of the spectral slope have been derived and show a dependence on the background wind conditions. It is a general feature that the observed spectra of vertical velocity during active periods (with wind velocity > 10 m s-1) are much steeper than during quiet periods (with wind velocity wind conditions considered together the general spectra are obtained and their slopes are compared with the background horizontal winds. The comparisons show that the observed spectra become steeper with increasing wind velocities under quiet conditions, approach a spectral slope of -5/3 at a wind velocity of 10 m s-1 and then roughly maintain this slope (-5/3) for even stronger winds. Our findings show an overall agreement with previous studies; furthermore, they provide a more complete climatology of frequency spectra of vertical wind velocities under different wind conditions.

  15. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Caccia

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhône-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhône-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (Mesoscale Alpine Program in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transports d'Emission in summer 2001. Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhône valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of "flow around" and "flow over" mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events. In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking, which is coherent with non-convective situations. In summer, due to the ground heating and to the interactions with thermal circulation, the

  16. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccia, J.; Guénard, V.; Benech, B.; Campistron, B.; Drobinski, P.

    2004-11-01

    The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhône-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhône-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (Mesoscale Alpine Program) in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transports d'Emission) in summer 2001. Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhône valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of "flow around" and "flow over" mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events. In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking), which is coherent with non-convective situations. In summer, due to the ground heating and to the interactions with thermal circulation, the vertical motions are

  17. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caccia, J.L.; Guenard, V. [LSEET, CNRS/Univ. de Toulon, La Garde (France); Benech, B.; Campistron, B. [CRA/LA, CNRS/Obs. Midi-Pyrenees, Campistrous (France); Drobinski, P. [IPSL/SA, CNRS/Univ. de Paris VI, Paris (France)

    2004-07-01

    The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhone-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhone-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (mesoscale alpine program) in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Experience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modeles de Pollution atmospheriques et de Transports d'Emission) in summer 2001. Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhone valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of ''flow around'' and ''flow over'' mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events. In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking), which is coherent with non-convective situations. In summer, due to the ground heating and to the interactions with

  18. Technologies for ITER divertor vertical target plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Merola, M.; Fouquet, S.; Bayetti, P.; Cordier, J.J.; Grosman, A.; Missirlian, M.; Tivey, R.; Roedig, M.

    2005-01-01

    The ITER divertor vertical target has to sustain heat fluxes up to 20 MW m -2 . The concept developed for this plasma facing component working at steady state is based on carbon fibre composite armour for the lower straight part and tungsten for the curved upper part. The main challenges involved in the use of such components include the removal of the high heat fluxes deposited and mechanically and thermally joining the armour to the metallic heat sink, despite the mismatch in the thermal expansions. Two solutions based on the use of a CuCrZr hardened copper alloy and an active metal casting (AMC (registered) ) process were investigated during the ITER EDA phase: the first one called 'flat tile geometry' was mainly developed for the Tore Supra pumped limiter, the second one called 'monoblock geometry' was developed by the EU Participating Team for the ITER project. This paper presents a review of these two solutions and analyses their assets and drawbacks: pressure drop, critical heat flux, surface temperature and expected behaviour during operation, risks during the manufacture, control of the armour defects during the manufacture and at the reception, and the possibility of repairing defective tiles

  19. Effect of flow velocity on the process of air-steam condensation in a vertical tube condenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlík, Jan; Dlouhý, Tomáš

    2018-06-01

    This article describes the influence of flow velocity on the condensation process in a vertical tube. For the case of condensation in a vertical tube condenser, both the pure steam condensation process and the air-steam mixture condensation process were theoretically and experimentally analyzed. The influence of steam flow velocity on the value of the heat transfer coefficient during the condensation process was evaluated. For the condensation of pure steam, the influence of flow velocity on the value of the heat transfer coefficient begins to be seen at higher speeds, conversely, this effect is negligible at low values of steam velocity. On the other hand, for the air-steam mixture condensation, the influence of flow velocity must always be taken into account. The flow velocity affects the water vapor diffusion process through non-condensing air. The presence of air significantly reduces the value of the heat transfer coefficient. This drop in the heat transfer coefficient is significant at low velocities; on the contrary, the decrease is relatively small at high values of the velocity.

  20. Temperature dynamics and velocity scaling laws for interchange driven, warm ion plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jeppe Miki Busk; Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2016-01-01

    The influence of electron and ion temperature dynamics on the radial convection of isolated structures in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated by means of numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that the maximum radial velocity of these plasma blobs roughly follows the inertial velocity...

  1. Plasma flow velocity measurements using a modulated Michelson interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of flow velocity reconstruction using passive spectroscopic techniques. We report some preliminary measurements of the toroidal flow velocity of hydrogen atoms in the RTP tokamak using a phase modulated Michelson interferometer. (orig.)

  2. Electromagnetic energy density and stress tensor in a warm plasma with finite flow velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Cheong R.; Lee, Nam C.

    2004-01-01

    The expressions of the average of energy density and the average stress tensor of the electromagnetic field in a warm collisionless plasma moving with a finite velocity are obtained by using a microscopic method that uses the fluid description of plasma. The result contains terms involved with derivatives of the dielectric tensor with respect to the velocity, which explicitly represent the effects of the finite velocity of the medium. In the zero-velocity limit, the results reduce to the well-known expressions for a plasma at rest with temporal and spatial dispersion

  3. Determination of plasma velocity from light fluctuations in a cutting torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Kelly, H.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of plasma velocities in a 30 A high energy density cutting torch are reported. The velocity diagnostic is based on the analysis of the light fluctuations emitted by the arc which are assumed to propagate with the flow velocity. These light fluctuations originate from plasma temperature and plasma density fluctuations mainly due to hydrodynamic instabilities. Fast photodiodes are employed as the light sensors. The arc core velocity was obtained from spectrally filtered light fluctuations measurements using a band-pass filter to detect light emission fluctuations emitted only from the arc axis. Maximum plasma jet velocities of 5000 m s -1 close to the nozzle exit and about 2000 m s -1 close to the anode were found. The obtained velocity values are in good agreement with those values predicted by a numerical code for a similar torch to that employed in this work.

  4. Method of measuring directed electron velocities in flowing plasma using the incoherent regions of laser scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, B.A.; York, T.M.

    1979-02-01

    With the presumption that a shifted Maxwellian velocity distribution adequately describes the electrons in a flowing plasma, the details of a method to measure their directed velocity are described. The system consists of a ruby laser source and two detectors set 180 0 from each other and both set at 90 0 with respect to the incident laser beam. The lowest velocity that can be determined by this method depends on the electron thermal velocity. The application of this diagnostic to the measurement of flow velocities in plasma being lost from the ends of theta-pinch devices is described

  5. The influence of the tangential velocity of inner rotating wall on axial velocity profile of flow through vertical annular pipe with rotating inner surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharf Abdusalam M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the oil and gas industries, understanding the behaviour of a flow through an annulus gap in a vertical position, whose outer wall is stationary whilst the inner wall rotates, is a significantly important issue in drilling wells. The main emphasis is placed on experimental (using an available rig and computational (employing CFD software investigations into the effects of the rotation speed of the inner pipe on the axial velocity profiles. The measured axial velocity profiles, in the cases of low axial flow, show that the axial velocity is influenced by the rotation speed of the inner pipe in the region of almost 33% of the annulus near the inner pipe, and influenced inversely in the rest of the annulus. The position of the maximum axial velocity is shifted from the centre to be nearer the inner pipe, by increasing the rotation speed. However, in the case of higher flow, as the rotation speed increases, the axial velocity is reduced and the position of the maximum axial velocity is skewed towards the centre of the annulus. There is a reduction of the swirl velocity corresponding to the rise of the volumetric flow rate.

  6. Comprehensive simulation of vertical plasma instability events and their serious damage to ITER plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Sizyuk, T.

    2008-01-01

    Safe and reliable operation is still one of the major challenges in the development of the new generation of ITER-like fusion reactors. The deposited plasma energy during major disruptions, edge-localized modes (ELMs) and vertical displacement events (VDEs) causes significant surface erosion, possible structural failure and frequent plasma contamination. While plasma disruptions and ELM will have no significant thermal effects on the structural materials or coolant channels because of their short deposition time, VDEs having longer-duration time could have a destructive impact on these components. Therefore, modelling the response of structural materials to VDE has to integrate detailed energy deposition processes, surface vaporization, phase change and melting, heat conduction to coolant channels and critical heat flux criteria at the coolant channels. The HEIGHTS 3D upgraded computer package considers all the above processes to specifically study VDE in detail. Results of benchmarking with several known laboratory experiments prove the validity of HEIGHTS implemented models. Beryllium and tungsten are both considered surface coating materials along with copper structure and coolant channels using both smooth tubes with swirl tape insert. The design requirements and implications of plasma facing components are discussed along with recommendations to mitigate and reduce the effects of plasma instabilities on reactor components.

  7. Improvement of vertical velocity statistics measured by a Doppler lidar through comparison with sonic anemometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Timothy A.; Newman, Jennifer F.; Klein, Petra M.; Chilson, Phillip B.; Wharton, Sonia

    2016-12-01

    Since turbulence measurements from Doppler lidars are being increasingly used within wind energy and boundary-layer meteorology, it is important to assess and improve the accuracy of these observations. While turbulent quantities are measured by Doppler lidars in several different ways, the simplest and most frequently used statistic is vertical velocity variance (w'2) from zenith stares. However, the competing effects of signal noise and resolution volume limitations, which respectively increase and decrease w'2, reduce the accuracy of these measurements. Herein, an established method that utilises the autocovariance of the signal to remove noise is evaluated and its skill in correcting for volume-averaging effects in the calculation of w'2 is also assessed. Additionally, this autocovariance technique is further refined by defining the amount of lag time to use for the most accurate estimates of w'2. Through comparison of observations from two Doppler lidars and sonic anemometers on a 300 m tower, the autocovariance technique is shown to generally improve estimates of w'2. After the autocovariance technique is applied, values of w'2 from the Doppler lidars are generally in close agreement (R2 ≈ 0.95 - 0.98) with those calculated from sonic anemometer measurements.

  8. Measurement of thermal plasma jet temperature and velocity by laser light lineshape analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S.C.; Reynolds, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    Two important parameters of thermal plasma jets are kinetic or gas temperatures and flow velocity. Gas temperatures have been traditionally measured using emission spectroscopy, but this method depends on either the generally unrealistic assumption of the existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) within the plasma, or the use of various non-LTE or partial LTE models to relate the intensity of the emission lines to the gas temperature. Plasma jet velocities have been measured using laser Doppler velocimetry on particles injected into the plasma. However, this method is intrusive and it is not known how well the particle velocities represent the gas velocity. Recently, plasma jet velocities have been measured from the Doppler shift of laser light scattered by the plasma. In this case, the Doppler shift was determined from the difference in the transmission profile of a high resolution monochromator between red shifted and blue shifted scattered light. A direct approach to measuring localized temperatures and velocities is afforded by high resolution scattered light lineshape measurements. The linewidth of laser light scattered by atoms and ions can be related to the kinetic temperature without LTE assumptions, while a shift in the peak position relative to the incident laser lineshape yields the gas velocity. We report in this paper work underway to measure gas temperatures and velocities in an argon thermal plasma jet using high resolution lineshape analysis of scattered laser light

  9. The velocity distribution caused by an airplane at the points of a vertical plane containing the span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Max M

    1925-01-01

    A formula for the computation of the vertical velocity component on all sides of an airplane is deduced and discussed. The formation is of value for the interpretation of such free flight tests where two airplanes fly alongside each other to facilitate observation.

  10. Air-water flow in a vertical pipe with sudden changes of superficial water velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horst-Michael Prasser; Eckhard Krepper; Thomas Frank

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: For further model development and the validation of CFD codes for two-phase flow applications experiments were carried out with a sudden change of the superficial velocity of water. The tests were performed in a vertical pipe of 51.2 mm diameter. The gas was injected through 19 capillaries of 0.8 mm inner diameter equally distributed over the cross section of the pipe. Measurements were taken by two wire-mesh sensors (24 x 24 points, 2500 Hz) mounted in a short distance (16 mm) behind each other. This sensor assembly was placed 3030 mm downstream of the gas injection. The change of the superficial water velocity was produced by a butterfly valve, the flap of which was perforated. In this way, a rapid closure of the valve caused a jump-like reduction of the liquid flow rate. The valve was located upstream of the gas injection. In a second series of tests a jump-like increase of the water flow rate was studied. Time sequences of the gas fraction profile were calculated from the wire-mesh sensor data over sampling periods of 0.2 s per profile. To increase the statistical reliability of the data, the transient was repeated several times and the data superposed (ensemble averaging). Gas velocity distributions were determined by correlation of the signals with the measurements of the second sensor. The tests enable the observation of the restructuring process of bubbly flow between two steady state conditions. The process is subdivided into three main stages: (1) the undisturbed flow before the velocity jump, (2) the passage of the bubbly flow formed under initial conditions, but travelling with the new velocity and (3) the bubbly flow generated under the new boundary conditions. Transient behaviour between these stages is reflected by the measured data. Special attention was paid to stage 2, where the radial gas fraction profiles change shape due to the excitation of the force balance acting on the bubbles. The experimental results for

  11. Horizontal and vertical velocities derived from the IDS contribution to ITRF2014, and comparisons with geophysical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreaux, G.; Lemoine, F. G.; Argus, D. F.; Santamaría-Gómez, A.; Willis, P.; Soudarin, L.; Gravelle, M.; Ferrage, P.

    2016-10-01

    In the context of the 2014 realization of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame, the International DORIS (Doppler Orbitography Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite) Service (IDS) has delivered to the IERS a set of 1140 weekly SINEX files including station coordinates and Earth orientation parameters, covering the time period from 1993.0 to 2015.0. From this set of weekly SINEX files, the IDS combination centre estimated a cumulative DORIS position and velocity solution to obtain mean horizontal and vertical motion of 160 stations at 71 DORIS sites. The main objective of this study is to validate the velocities of the DORIS sites by comparison with external models or time-series. Horizontal velocities are compared with two recent global plate models (GEODVEL 2010 and NNR-MORVEL56). Prior to the comparisons, DORIS horizontal velocities were corrected for Global Isostatic Adjustment from the ICE-6G (VM5a) model. For more than half of the sites, the DORIS horizontal velocities differ from the global plate models by less than 2-3 mm yr-1. For five of the sites (Arequipa, Dionysos/Gavdos, Manila and Santiago) with horizontal velocity differences with respect to these models larger than 10 mm yr-1, comparisons with GNSS estimates show the veracity of the DORIS motions. Vertical motions from the DORIS cumulative solution are compared with the vertical velocities derived from the latest GPS cumulative solution over the time span 1995.0-2014.0 from the University of La Rochelle solution at 31 co-located DORIS-GPS sites. These two sets of vertical velocities show a correlation coefficient of 0.83. Vertical differences are larger than 2 mm yr-1 at 23 percent of the sites. At Thule, the disagreement is explained by fine-tuned DORIS discontinuities in line with the mass variations of outlet glaciers. Furthermore, the time evolution of the vertical time-series from the DORIS station in Thule show similar trends to the GRACE equivalent water height.

  12. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Caccia

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhône-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhône-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (Mesoscale Alpine Program in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transports d'Emission in summer 2001.

    Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhône valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of "flow around" and "flow over" mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events.

    In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking, which is coherent with non-convective situations.

    Plasma flow velocity measurements using a modulated Michelson interferometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, J.; Meijer, F. G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of flow velocity reconstruction using passive spectroscopic techniques. We report some preliminary measurements of the toroidal flow velocity of hydrogen atoms in the RTP tokamak using a phase modulated Michelson interferometer. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science S.A.

  13. Magnetometer-inferred, Equatorial, Daytime Vertical ExB Drift Velocities Observed in the African Longitude Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. N.; Yizengaw, E.

    2011-12-01

    A recent paper has investigated the sharp longitude gradients in the dayside ExB drift velocities associated with the 4-cell, non-migrating structures thought to be connected with the eastward propagating, diurnal, non-migrating (DE3) tides. Observations of vertical ExB drift velocities obtained from the Ion Velocity Meter (IVM) on the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite were obtained in the Western Pacific, Eastern Pacific, Peruvian and Atlantic sectors for a few days during the months of October, March and December, 2009. Respective ExB drift velocity gradients at the cell boundaries for these 4 longitude sectors were a.) -1.3m/sec/degree, b.) 3m/sec/degree, c.) -4m/sec/degree and d.) 1m/sec/degree and were observed on a day-to-day basis. In this talk, we estimate the longitude gradients in the dayside, vertical ExB drift velocities from magnetometer H-component observations in the African sector. We briefly describe the technique for obtaining realistic ExB drift velocities associated with the difference in the H-component values between a magnetometer on the magnetic equator and one off the magnetic equator at 6 to 9 degrees dip latitude (delta H). We present magnetometer-inferred, dayside ExB drift velocities obtained from the AMBER (African Meridian B-field Education and Research) magnetometer chain in the East Africa (Ethiopian) longitude sector and the West African (Nigerian) longitude sector. We compare the longitude gradients in ExB drift velocities in the African sector with the C/NOFS- observed longitude gradients mentioned above. We also discuss the advantages of using ground-based magnetometer observations to infer ExB drift velocities compared with the C/NOFS satellite observations.

  14. Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Observation of Plasma Velocity-Space Cascade Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, T. N.; Servidio, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Chasapis, A.; Perrone, D.; Valentini, F.; Veltri, P.; Gershman, D. J.; Schwartz, S. J.; Giles, B. L.; Fuselier, S. A.; Phan, T.; Burch, J.

    2017-12-01

    Plasma turbulence is investigated using high-resolution ion velocity distributions, measured by theMagnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) in the Earth's magnetosheath. The particle distributionmanifests large fluctuations, suggesting a cascade-like process in velocity space, invoked by theoristsfor many years. This complex velocity space structure is investigated using a three-dimensional Hermitetransform that reveals a power law distribution of moments. A Kolmogorov approach leads directlyto a range of predictions for this phase-space cascade. The scaling theory is in agreement withobservations, suggesting a new path for the study of plasma turbulence in weakly collisional spaceand astrophysical plasmas.

  15. Linear Vlasov plasma oscillations in the Fourier transformed velocity space

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, Zdeněk; Nocera, L.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 296, - (2002), s. 117-124 ISSN 0375-9601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : linear Vlasov plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2002

  16. Inertia effects on the rigid displacement approximation of tokamak plasma vertical motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, R.; Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Azizov, E.A.; Montalvo, E.; Dong, J.Q.

    1991-01-01

    Elongated plasmas in tokamaks are unstable to axisymmetric vertical displacements. The vacuum vessel and passive conductors can stabilize the plasma motion in the short time scale. For stabilization of the plasma movement in the long time scale an active feedback control system is required. A widely used method of plasma stability analysis uses the Rigid Displacement Model (RDM) of plasma behavior. In the RDM it is assumed that the plasma displacement is small and usually plasma inertia effects are neglected. In addition, it is considered that no changes in plasma shape, plasma current, and plasma current profile take place throughout the plasma motion. It has been demonstrated that the massless-filament approximation (instantaneous force-balance) accurately reproduces the unstable root of the passive stabilization problem. Then, on the basis that the instantaneous force-balance approximation is correct in the passive stabilization analysis, the massless approximation is utilized also in the study of the plasma vertical stabilization by active feedback. The authors show here that the RDM (without mass effects included) does not provide correct stability results for a tokamak configuration (plasma column, passive conductors, and feedback control coils). Therefore, it is concluded that inertia effects have to be retained in the RDM system of equations. It is shown analytically and numerically that stability diagrams with and without plasma-mass corrections differ significantly. When inertia effects are included, the stability region is more restricted than obtained in the massless approximation

  17. Phase velocity of nonlinear plasma waves in the laser beat-wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The suggested plasma-laser accelerator is an attempt to achieve a very high energy gradient by resonantly exciting a longitudinal wave traveling at close to the speed of light in cold plasma by means of the beat-wave generated by the transverse fields in two laser beams. Previous calculations to all orders in v/sub z/ have been done essentially from the laboratory frame point of view and have treated the plasma wave as having sharply defined phase velocity equal to the speed of light. However a high energy particle beam undergoing acceleration sees the plasma wave from a nearly light-like frame of reference and hence is very sensitive to small deviations in its phase velocity. Here the authors introduce a calculational scheme that includes all orders in v/sub z/ and in the plasma density, and additionally takes into account the influence of plasma nonlinearities on the wave's phase velocity. The main assumption is that the laser frequencies are very large compared to the plasma frequency - under which they are able to in essence formally sum up all orders of forward Raman scattering. They find that the nonlinear plasma wave does not have simply a single phase velocity - it is really a superposition of many - but that the beat-wave which drives it is usefully described by a non-local effective phase velocity function

  18. Propagation velocities of laser-produced plasmas from copper wire targets and water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyo-Dong; Alexander, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the plasma propagation velocities resulting from KrF laser irradiation of copper wire target (75 microns diameter) and water droplets (75 microns diameter) at irradiance levels ranging from 25 to 150 GW/sq cm. Plasma propagation velocities were measured using a streak camera system oriented orthogonally to the high-energy laser propagation axis. Plasma velocities were studied as a function of position in the focused beam. Results show that both the shape of the plasma formation and material removal from the copper wire are different and depend on whether the targets are focused or slightly defocused (approximately = 0.5 mm movement in the beam axis). Plasma formation and its position relative to the target is an important factor in determining the practical focal point during high-energy laser interaction with materials. At irradiance of 100 GW/sq cm, the air plasma has two weak-velocity components which propagate toward and away from the incident laser while a strong-velocity component propagates away from the laser beam as a detonation wave. Comparison of the measured breakdown velocities (in the range of 2.22-2.27 x 10(exp 5) m/s) for air and the value calculated by the nonlinear breakdown wave theory at irradiance of 100 GW/sq cm showed a quantitative agreement within approximately 50% while the linear theory and Gaussian pulse theory failed. The detonation wave velocities of plasma generated from water droplets and copper wire targets for different focused cases were measured and analyzed theoretically. The propagation velocities of laser-induced plasma liquid droplets obtained by previous research are compared with current work.

  19. Effects of a vertical magnetic field on particle confinement in a magnetized plasma torus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, S H; Fasoli, A; Labit, B; McGrath, M; Podestà, M; Poli, F M

    2004-10-15

    The particle confinement in a magnetized plasma torus with superimposed vertical magnetic field is modeled and measured experimentally. The formation of an equilibrium characterized by a parallel plasma current canceling out the grad B and curvature drifts is described using a two-fluid model. Characteristic response frequencies and relaxation rates are calculated. The predictions for the particle confinement time as a function of the vertical magnetic field are verified in a systematic experimental study on the TORPEX device, including the existence of an optimal vertical field and the anticorrelation between confinement time and density.

  1. Vega-1 and Vega-2: vertical profiles of wind velocity according to Doppler measurements data at landing spacecrafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerzhanovich, V.V.; Antsibor, N.M.; Bakit'ko, R.V.

    1987-01-01

    Results of the measurements of the Venus atmosphere vertical motion using the ''Vega'' landing spacecrafts are presented. Signal emitted by the landing spacecraft transmitter was received by flying apparatus and retranslated to the Earth. The difference between the measured frequency of the retranslated signal and reference one (Doppler's shift) permitted to determine the velocity of the landing spacecraft with the accuracy of 2 cm/s with the pitch of 1 s

  2. On vertical velocity fluctuations and internal tides in an upwelling region off the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Antony, M.K.

    .28 at 40 m (between two stations separated by a distance of 27 km), we obtain u a T/ax = 0.26 x 10m5 “C sP ‘. If the minimum value of AT over 1 h is taken as 0.3”C, aTlatz8.3 x lOA “C s-l, which is an order of Vertical velocity and internal tides 869 60...

  3. Cross-tail velocity component in the plasma sheet fast flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Dmitrieva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The flux transfer in the magnetotail plasma sheet is mainly provided by the tail-aligned fast plasma flows (Bursty Bulk Flows – BBFs. In this paper we study the events with a large cross-tail velocity component, including their occurrence and relationship to the standard BBFs. We found out that a significant part of large Vy events are a subgroup connected with the BBFs propagation. The maximal deviation of the velocity vector from the X direction (about 40–50 degrees, on average is observed near the BBFs' leading front in the sheath, where the fast flow interacts with surrounding plasma. The average variation of the velocity direction in the vicinity of the BBF resembles a plasma vortex. Our results support the model, in which the BBF represents a polarized, bubble-like flux tube, propagating through the plasma sheet.

  4. Conceptual design of plasma position control of SST-1 tokamak using vertical field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, Hitesh Kumar; Patel, Kiritkumar B.; Dhongde, Jasraj

    2015-01-01

    SST-1 (Steady State Superconducting Tokamak) is a plasma confinement device in Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) India. SST-1 has been commissioned successfully and has been carrying out plasma experiments since the beginning of 2014 achieved a maximum plasma current of 75 kA at a central field of 1.5 T and the plasma duration ∼ 500 ms. SST-1 looks forward to carrying out elongated plasma experiments and stretching plasma pulses beyond 1s. Based on the solution of Grad-Shafranov equation the shift of plasma column center from geometrical centre of vacuum chamber is measured using various magnetic probes and flux loops installed in the machine. The closed feedback loop uses plasma current (Ip), Delta R as feedback signal and manipulate the vertical field current (Ivf). The discharge starts with feed forward loop using initially provided reference then the active feedback starts after discharge by few msec once plasma column is completely formed. The feedback loop time is of the order of 10 msec. The primary objective is to acquire plasma position control related signals, compute plasma position and generate position correction signal for VF coil power supply, communicate correction to VF coil power supply and modify VF power supply output in a deterministic time span. In this we present the methodology used for plasma horizontal displacement control using vertical field and discuss the preliminary results. (author)

  5. Cutoff effects of electron velocity distribution to the properties of plasma parameters near the plasma-sheath boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelic, N.

    2011-01-01

    The plasma properties under high thermodynamic non-equilibrium condition, established due to the presence of electrically biased electrode, are investigated. Assumption of electron cut-off velocity distribution function (VDF), as done by Andrews and Varey in their investigations of the sheath region [J. Phys. A 3, 413 (1970)], has been extended here to both plasma and sheath regions. Analytic expressions for the moments of electron VDF, as well as for the electron screening temperature function dependence on the plasma-sheath local potential are derived. In deriving the ion velocity distribution the ''standard'' assumption of strict plasma quasineutrality, or equivalently vanishing of the plasma Debye length, is employed, whereas the ions are assumed to be generated at rest over the plasma region. However, unlike the standard approach of solving the plasma equation, where pure Boltzmann electron density profile is used, here we employ modified Boltzmann's electron density profile, due to cutoff effect of the electron velocity distribution. It is shown that under these conditions the quasineutrality equation solution is characterised by the electric field singularity for any negative value of the electrode bias potential as measured with respect to the plasma potential. The point of singularity i.e., the plasma length and its dependence on the electrode bias and sheath potential is established for the particular case of ionization profile mechanism proportional to the local electron density. Relevant parameters for the kinetic Bohm criterion are explicitly calculated for both ions and electrons, for arbitrary electrode bias.

  6. Analysis of the direction of plasma vertical movement during major disruptions in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukash, Victor; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Gribov, Yuri; Fujieda, Hirobumi

    2005-01-01

    The plasma movement in the upward direction (away from the X-point) after the thermal quench (TQ) of major disruptions in ITER is favourable for the machine design, since the downward movement causes larger electromagnetic (EM) load due to the induced eddy and halo currents. Vertical directions of plasma movement after the TQ in ITER are investigated using the predictive mode of the DINA code. Three dominant parameters in determining the direction of plasma movement are identified: (i) the rate of plasma current quench (plasma temperature after the TQ) (ii) the width of plasma current mixing area just after the TQ (change of the internal plasma inductance l i ) and (iii) the initial vertical position of plasma column before the TQ. It is shown that the reference ITER plasma moves upwards after the TQ, if the electron temperature after the TQ is less than 10 eV and the drop of l i does not exceed 0.2 for the present reference initial vertical position (55.5 cm above the centre of the machine). It is also shown that the operational domain leading to the upward movement is considerably large for disruptions with fast current quench, which could generate quite severe EM load due to the induced eddy current combined with the induced halo current if the movement is downwards

  7. Velocity limitation of a neutral dust cloud colliding with a magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1986-08-01

    The problem is considered of a cloud of neutral dust which moves into a cloud of static plasma which is confined in a magnetic field. Earlier experiments and theoretical analysis on critical velocity limitation by plasma-wall interaction suggest that such limitation also arises in the case of plasma-neutral dust interaction. Nevertheless further analysis is required to provide a full and clear picture of the interaction between plasma and neutral gas on one hand and plasma and neutral dust on the other. (author)

  8. The importance of high injection velocity to reduce plasma armature growth and drag in hypervelocity railguns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, R.S.; Dixon, W.R.; Kang, S.W.; McCallen, R.C.; Susoeff, A.R.; Asay, J.R.; Shaninpoor, M.

    1987-01-01

    Plasmas are required to serve as armature in hypervelocity railguns. Typically, the plasmas are at temperatures of about 20-30,000 K and result in a high heat flux on the barrel wall. Slow moving plasmas radiate heat and melt the launcher wall causing it to ablate and resulting in a growth of the armature mass and length. As the velocity increases, the more massive and longer armature will result in greater viscous drag and ultimately limit the maximum achievable velocity. Several possible means of reducing the armature growth are possible. This paper discusses two of them, use of heat resistant barrel materials, and reduction of wall heating by reduction of exposure time through use of a high initial velocity. A summary of experimentally based, material ablation resistance calculations is presented. Second, the benefit of high injection velocity is evaluated. Finally, a joint SNLA and LLNL railgun research project based on the above considerations are described

  9. Velocity gradient induced line splitting in x-ray emission accompanying plasma-wall interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmíd, Michal; Renner, Oldřich; Liska, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 125, Aug (2013), s. 38-44 ISSN 0022-4073 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/0814; GA ČR GAP205/11/0571 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser-produced plasmas * x-ray spectroscopy * plasma-wall interaction * spectral line profiles * Doppler shift * ion velocity gradients Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.288, year: 2013

  10. Depth-dependence of time-lapse seismic velocity change detected by a joint interferometric analysis of vertical array data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawazaki, K.; Saito, T.; Ueno, T.; Shiomi, K.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, utilizing depth-sensitivity of interferometric waveforms recorded by co-located Hi-net and KiK-net sensors, we separate the responsible depth of seismic velocity change associated with the M6.3 earthquake occurred on November 22, 2014, in central Japan. The Hi-net station N.MKGH is located about 20 km northeast from the epicenter, where the seismometer is installed at the 150 m depth. At the same site, the KiK-net has two strong motion seismometers installed at the depths of 0 and 150 m. To estimate average velocity change around the N.MKGH station, we apply the stretching technique to auto-correlation function (ACF) of ambient noise recorded by the Hi-net sensor. To evaluate sensitivity of the Hi-net ACF to velocity change above and below the 150 m depth, we perform a numerical wave propagation simulation using 2-D FDM. To obtain velocity change above the 150 m depth, we measure response waveform from the depths of 150 m to 0 m by computing deconvolution function (DCF) of earthquake records obtained by the two KiK-net vertical array sensors. The background annual velocity variation is subtracted from the detected velocity change. From the KiK-net DCF records, the velocity reduction ratio above the 150 m depth is estimated to be 4.2 % and 3.1 % in the periods of 1-7 days and 7 days - 4 months after the mainshock, respectively. From the Hi-net ACF records, the velocity reduction ratio is estimated to be 2.2 % and 1.8 % in the same time periods, respectively. This difference in the estimated velocity reduction ratio is attributed to depth-dependence of the velocity change. By using the depth sensitivity obtained from the numerical simulation, we estimate the velocity reduction ratio below the 150 m depth to be lower than 1.0 % for both time periods. Thus the significant velocity reduction and recovery are observed above the 150 m depth only, which may be caused by strong ground motion of the mainshock and following healing in the shallow ground.

  11. Observation and analysis of abrupt changes in the interplanetary plasma velocity and magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R. N.; Belcher, J. W.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents a limited study of the physical nature of abrupt changes in the interplanetary plasma velocity and magnetic field based on 19 day's data from the Pioneer 6 spacecraft. The period was chosen to include a high-velocity solar wind stream and low-velocity wind. Abrupt events were accepted for study if the sum of the energy density in the magnetic field and velocity changes was above a specified minimum. A statistical analysis of the events in the high-velocity solar wind stream shows that Alfvenic changes predominate. This conclusion is independent of whether steady state requirements are imposed on conditions before and after the event. Alfvenic changes do not dominate in the lower-speed wind. This study extends the plasma field evidence for outwardly propagating Alfvenic changes to time scales as small as 1 min (scale lengths on the order of 20,000 km).

  12. Using the Vertical Component of the Surface Velocity Field to Map the Locked Zone at Cascadia Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulas, E.; Brandon, M. T.; Podladchikov, Y.; Bennett, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    At present, our understanding of the locked zone at Cascadia subduction zone is based on thermal modeling and elastic modeling of horizontal GPS velocities. The thermal model by Hyndman and Wang (1995) provided a first-order assessment of where the subduction thrust might be cold enough for stick-slip behavior. The alternative approach by McCaffrey et al. (2007) is to use a Green's function that relates horizontal surface velocities, as recorded by GPS, to interseismic elastic deformation. The thermal modeling approach is limited by a lack of information about the amount of frictional heating occurring on the thrust (Molnar and England, 1990). The GPS approach is limited in that the horizontal velocity component is fairly insensitive to the structure of the locked zone. The vertical velocity component is much more useful for this purpose. We are fortunate in that vertical velocities can now be measured by GPS to a precision of about 0.2 mm/a. The dislocation model predicts that vertical velocities should range up to about 20 percent of the subduction velocity, which means maximum values of ~7 mm/a. The locked zone is generally entirely offshore at Cascadia, except for the Olympic Peninsula region, where the underlying Juan De Fuca plate has an anomalously low dip. Previous thermal and GPS modeling, as well as tide gauge data and episodic tremors indicate the locked zone there extends about 50 to 75 km onland. This situation provides an opportunity to directly study the locked zone. With that objective in mind, we have constructed a full 3D geodynamic model of the Cascadia subduction zone. At present, the model provides a full representation of the interseismic elastic deformation due to variations of slip on the subduction thrust. The model has been benchmarked against the Savage (2D) and Okada (3D) analytical solutions. This model has an important advantage over traditional dislocation modeling in that we include temperature-sensitive viscosity for the upper and

  13. Determination of Vertical Velocity Field of Southernmost Longitudinal Valley in Eastern Taiwan: A Joint Analysis of Leveling and GPS Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horng-Yue Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide a detailed vertical velocity field in southernmost Longitudinal Valley where shows a complex three-fault system at the plate suture between Philippine Sea plate and Eurasia, we conducted leveling and GPS measurements, compiled data from previous surveys and combined them into a single data set. We compiled precise leveling results from 1984 to 2009, include 5 E-W trending and one N-S trending routes. We calculated the GPS vertical component from 10 continuous stations and from 89 campaign-mode stations from 1995 to 2010. The interseismic vertical rates are estimated by removing the co- and post-seismic effects of major large regional and nearby earthquakes. A stable continuous station S104 in the study area was adopted as the common reference station. We finally establish a map of the interseismic vertical velocity field. The interseismic vertical deformation was mainly accommodated by creeping/thrusting along two east-dipping strands of the three-fault system: the Luyeh and Lichi faults. The most dominant uplift of 30 mm yr-1 occurs at the hanging wall of the Lichi fault on the western Coastal Range. However the rate diminishes away from the fault in the hanging wall. The Quaternary tablelands inside of the Longitudinal Valley reveals uplift with a rate of 5 - 10 mm yr-1. Outside of the tablelands, the rest of the Longitudinal Valley flat area indicates substantial subsidence of -10 to -20 mm yr-1. Finally, it appears that the west-dipping blind fault under the eastern side of the Central Range does not play a significant role on interseismic deformation with subsidence rate of -5 to -10 mm yr-1.

  14. Self-tuning control studies of the plasma vertical position problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Guang Lin; Wellstead, P.E.; Browne, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma vertical position system in a tokamak device can be open-loop unstable with time-varying dynamics, such that the instability increases with system dynamical changes. Time-varying unstable dynamics makes the plasma vertical position a particularly difficult one to control with traditional fixed-coefficient controllers. A self-tuning technique offers a new solution of the plasma vertical position control problem by an adaptive control approach. Specifically, the self-tuning controller automatically tunes the controller parameters without an a priori knowledge of the system dynamics and continuously tracks dynamical changes within the system, thereby providing the system with auto-tuning and adaptive tuning capabilities. An overview of the self-tuning methods is given, and their applicability to a simulation of the Joint European Torus (JET) vertical plasma positions system is illustrated. Specifically, the applicability of pole-assignment and generalized predictive control self-tuning methods to the vertical plasma position system is demonstrated. 26 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab

  15. Fluorination of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes: from CF4 plasma chemistry to surface functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzzi, Claudia; Scardamaglia, Mattia; Colomer, Jean-François; Verdini, Alberto; Floreano, Luca; Snyders, Rony; Bittencourt, Carla

    2017-01-01

    The surface chemistry of plasma fluorinated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (vCNT) is correlated to the CF 4 plasma chemical composition. The results obtained via FTIR and mass spectrometry are combined with the XPS and Raman analysis of the sample surface showing the dependence on different plasma parameters (power, time and distance from the plasma region) on the resulting fluorination. Photoemission and absorption spectroscopies are used to investigate the evolution of the electronic properties as a function of the fluorine content at the vCNT surface. The samples suffer a limited ageing effect, with a small loss of fluorine functionalities after two weeks in ambient conditions.

  16. Fluorination of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes: from CF4 plasma chemistry to surface functionalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Struzzi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The surface chemistry of plasma fluorinated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (vCNT is correlated to the CF4 plasma chemical composition. The results obtained via FTIR and mass spectrometry are combined with the XPS and Raman analysis of the sample surface showing the dependence on different plasma parameters (power, time and distance from the plasma region on the resulting fluorination. Photoemission and absorption spectroscopies are used to investigate the evolution of the electronic properties as a function of the fluorine content at the vCNT surface. The samples suffer a limited ageing effect, with a small loss of fluorine functionalities after two weeks in ambient conditions.

  17. Ice-Tethered Profiler observations: Vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, oxygen, and ocean velocity from an Ice-Tethered Profiler buoy system

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection contains repeated vertical profiles of ocean temperature and salinity versus pressure, as well as oxygen and velocity for some instruments. Data were...

  18. Production of free radical by magnetized sheet plasma with vertical gas-flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonegawa, Akira; Takatori, Masahiko; Kawamura, Kazutaka

    1995-01-01

    Free radicals play an important role in plasma processing, environment problem, and space plasma and so on because of their outstanding physical properties. Although much work has been done on the free radicals in the reactive plasma, very little is known about the production mechanism of the free radicals against various plasma parameters. To overcome this problem, we have proposed to do a new system of a magnetized sheet plasma with vertical gas-flow. The sheet plasma is a special type of strongly magnetized highly ionized slab plasma. This system is controlled to the parameters of radicals and plasma independently. Therefore, it is possible to make a quantitative analysis of free radicals as the simple one. In this paper, we describe the magnetized sheet plasma with vertical gas-flow system and report the preliminary results of production of the free radical. In particular, we show to produce and control the OH free radical which has been the most commonly studied combustion species

  19. Measurements of ion velocity separation and ionization in multi-species plasma shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Park, H.-S.; Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P. A.; Wilks, S. C.; Katz, J.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kagan, G.; Vold, E. L.; Keenan, B. D.; Simakov, A. N.; Chacón, L.

    2018-05-01

    The ion velocity structure of a strong collisional shock front in a plasma with multiple ion species is directly probed in laser-driven shock-tube experiments. Thomson scattering of a 263.25 nm probe beam is used to diagnose ion composition, temperature, and flow velocity in strong shocks ( M ˜6 ) propagating through low-density ( ρ˜0.1 mg/cc) plasmas composed of mixtures of hydrogen (98%) and neon (2%). Within the preheat region of the shock front, two velocity populations of ions are observed, a characteristic feature of strong plasma shocks. The ionization state of the Ne is observed to change within the shock front, demonstrating an ionization-timescale effect on the shock front structure. The forward-streaming proton feature is shown to be unexpectedly cool compared to predictions from ion Fokker-Planck simulations; the neon ionization gradient is evaluated as a possible cause.

  20. Parallel ion flow velocity measurement using laser induced fluorescence method in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Okamoto, Atsushi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Ogiwara, Kohei; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi

    2010-01-01

    Parallel ion flow velocity along a magnetic field has been measured using a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) method in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) argon plasma with a weakly-diverging magnetic field. To measure parallel flow velocity in a cylindrical plasma using the LIF method, the laser beam should be injected along device axis; however, the reflection of the incident beam causes interference between the LIF emission of the incident and reflected beams. Here we present a method of quasi-parallel laser injection at a small angle, which utilizes the reflected beam as well as the incident beam to obtain the parallel ion flow velocity. Using this method, we observed an increase in parallel ion flow velocity along the magnetic field. The acceleration mechanism is briefly discussed on the basis of the ion fluid model. (author)

  1. Differences in vertical jumping and mae-geri kicking velocity between international and national level karateka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Balsalobre-Fernández

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Lower limb explosive strength and mae-geri kicking velocity are fundamental in karate competition; although it is unclear whether these variables could differentiate the high-level athletes. The objective of this research is to analyze the differences in the mae-geri kicking velocity and the counter-movement jump (CMJ between a group of international top level karateka and another group of national-level karateka.Methods: Thirteen international-level karateka and eleven national-level karateka participated in the study. After a standard warm-up, CMJ height (in cm and mae-geri kicking velocity (in m/s was measured using an IR-platform and a high-speed camera, respectively.Results: Proceeding with MANCOVA to analyze the differences between groups controlling the effect of age, the results show that the international-level karateka demonstrated significantly higher levels of CMJ than national-level competitors (+22.1%, F = 9.47, p = 0.006, η2 = 0.311. There were no significant differences between groups in the mae-geri kicking velocity (+5,7%, F=0.80; p=0.38; η2=0.03.Conclusion: Our data shows, first, the importance of CMJ assessment as a tool to detect talent in karate and, second, that to achieve international-level in karate it may be important to increase CMJ levels to values ​​similar to those offered here.

  2. Viscosity estimation utilizing flow velocity field measurements in a rotating magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2008-01-01

    The importance of viscosity in determining plasma flow structures has been widely recognized. In laboratory plasmas, however, viscosity measurements have been seldom performed so far. In this paper we present and discuss an estimation method of effective plasma kinematic viscosity utilizing flow velocity field measurements. Imposing steady and axisymmetric conditions, we derive the expression for radial flow velocity from the azimuthal component of the ion fluid equation. The expression contains kinematic viscosity, vorticity of azimuthal rotation and its derivative, collision frequency, azimuthal flow velocity and ion cyclotron frequency. Therefore all quantities except the viscosity are given provided that the flow field can be measured. We applied this method to a rotating magnetized argon plasma produced by the Hyper-I device. The flow velocity field measurements were carried out using a directional Langmuir probe installed in a tilting motor drive unit. The inward ion flow in radial direction, which is not driven in collisionless inviscid plasmas, was clearly observed. As a result, we found the anomalous viscosity, the value of which is two orders of magnitude larger than the classical one. (author)

  3. Vertical position control of the elongated INTOR plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Kojyu; Nishio, Satoshi; Fujisawa, Noboru; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Saito, Seiji; Miyamoto, Kenro.

    1983-01-01

    A newly devised rectangular shell, which has the sufficient shell effect for the stabilization of the fast mode, is presented, along with the studies of various kinds of shell-structures described on this paper. It can be expected that the rectangular shells have negligibly small effect on the breeding ratio by locating them separately on both of the front and rear surfaces of blanket. Some properties with the modelled feedback control system are elucidated under a disturbance field, B sub(d) = B sub(infinity).[1-exp(-t/tau sub(d))] (B sub(infinity): field strength at t = infinity, tau sub(d): time constant). They are studied for two kinds of decay indices, that is, -1.0 for the pump limiter and -1.3 for the divertor. Conclusively, the control system is found to have good characteristics. The PID controller seems to provide the stable control of vertical position better than the PI controller. The maximum of vertical displacement, Z sub(p)sup(max) under the disturbance field, B sub(d), are in proportion to B sub(infinity). The power required for its stabilization, P, are also in proportion to B sub(infinity)sup(2), and then to (Z sub(P)sup(MAX))sup(2), too. Therefore, some common basis for B sub(infinity) or Z sub(P)sup(MAX) is required for its estimation. Moreover, the power is found to be independent of selection of the PI or PID controller, and to have approximately the same relation with Z sub(P)sup(MAX). The difference of P between -1.0 and -1.3 in the decay index is very large when Z sub(P)sup(MAX) is more than -1.0 cm. For example, in the vicinity of Z sub(P)sup(MAX) = 1.0 cm, the power in the case of n = -1.0 is about one half of that in the case of n = -1.3. But it decreases abruptly when Z sub(P)sup(MAX) is less than 0.5 cm. (J.P.N.)

  4. Standard deviation of vertical two-point longitudinal velocity differences in the atmospheric boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1971-01-01

    Statistical estimates of wind shear in the planetary boundary layer are important in the design of V/STOL aircraft, and for the design of the Space Shuttle. The data analyzed in this study consist of eleven sets of longitudinal turbulent velocity fluctuation time histories digitized at 0.2 sec intervals with approximately 18,000 data points per time history. The longitudinal velocity fluctuations were calculated with horizontal wind and direction data collected at the 18-, 30-, 60-, 90-, 120-, and 150-m levels. The data obtained confirm the result that Eulerian time spectra transformed to wave-number spectra with Taylor's frozen eddy hypothesis possess inertial-like behavior at wave-numbers well out of the inertial subrange.

  5. Monte Carlo-based subgrid parameterization of vertical velocity and stratiform cloud microphysics in ECHAM5.5-HAM2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tonttila

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A new method for parameterizing the subgrid variations of vertical velocity and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC is presented for general circulation models (GCMs. These parameterizations build on top of existing parameterizations that create stochastic subgrid cloud columns inside the GCM grid cells, which can be employed by the Monte Carlo independent column approximation approach for radiative transfer. The new model version adds a description for vertical velocity in individual subgrid columns, which can be used to compute cloud activation and the subgrid distribution of the number of cloud droplets explicitly. Autoconversion is also treated explicitly in the subcolumn space. This provides a consistent way of simulating the cloud radiative effects with two-moment cloud microphysical properties defined at subgrid scale. The primary impact of the new parameterizations is to decrease the CDNC over polluted continents, while over the oceans the impact is smaller. Moreover, the lower CDNC induces a stronger autoconversion of cloud water to rain. The strongest reduction in CDNC and cloud water content over the continental areas promotes weaker shortwave cloud radiative effects (SW CREs even after retuning the model. However, compared to the reference simulation, a slightly stronger SW CRE is seen e.g. over mid-latitude oceans, where CDNC remains similar to the reference simulation, and the in-cloud liquid water content is slightly increased after retuning the model.

  6. Year-Long Vertical Velocity Statistics Derived from Doppler Lidar Data for the Continental Convective Boundary Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Larry K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Newsom, Rob K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Turner, David D. [Global Systems Division, NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado

    2017-09-01

    One year of Coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) data collected at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Oklahoma is analyzed to provide profiles of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis for cases of cloud-free convective boundary layers. The variance was scaled by the Deardorff convective velocity scale, which was successful when the boundary layer depth was stationary but failed in situations when the layer was changing rapidly. In this study the data are sorted according to time of day, season, wind direction, surface shear stress, degree of instability, and wind shear across the boundary-layer top. The normalized variance was found to have its peak value near a normalized height of 0.25. The magnitude of the variance changes with season, shear stress, and degree of instability, but was not impacted by wind shear across the boundary-layer top. The skewness was largest in the top half of the boundary layer (with the exception of wintertime conditions). The skewness was found to be a function of the season, shear stress, wind shear across the boundary-layer top, with larger amounts of shear leading to smaller values. Like skewness, the vertical profile of kurtosis followed a consistent pattern, with peak values near the boundary-layer top (also with the exception of wintertime data). The altitude of the peak values of kurtosis was found to be lower when there was a large amount of wind shear at the boundary-layer top.

  7. Dynamic aeroelastic stability of vertical-axis wind turbines under constant wind velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Fred

    1994-05-01

    The flutter problem associated with the blades of a class of vertical-axis wind turbines called Darrieus is studied in detail. The spinning blade is supposed to be initially curved in a particular shape characterized by a state of pure tension at the blade cross section. From this equilibrium position a three-dimensional linear perturbation pattern is superimposed to determine the dynamic aeroelastic stability of the blade in the presence of free wind speed by means of the Floquet-Lyapunov theory for periodic systems.

  8. Identification and control of plasma vertical position using neural network in Damavand tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasouli, H.; Rasouli, C.; Koohi, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a nonlinear model is introduced to determine the vertical position of the plasma column in Damavand tokamak. Using this model as a simulator, a nonlinear neural network controller has been designed. In the first stage, the electronic drive and sensory circuits of Damavand tokamak are modified. These circuits can control the vertical position of the plasma column inside the vacuum vessel. Since the vertical position of plasma is an unstable parameter, a direct closed loop system identification algorithm is performed. In the second stage, a nonlinear model is identified for plasma vertical position, based on the multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network (NN) structure. Estimation of simulator parameters has been performed by back-propagation error algorithm using Levenberg–Marquardt gradient descent optimization technique. The model is verified through simulation of the whole closed loop system using both simulator and actual plant in similar conditions. As the final stage, a MLP neural network controller is designed for simulator model. In the last step, online training is performed to tune the controller parameters. Simulation results justify using of the NN controller for the actual plant.

  9. Identification and control of plasma vertical position using neural network in Damavand tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasouli, H. [School of Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, AEOI, P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Process Automation and Control (APAC) Research Group, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 16315-1355, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rasouli, C.; Koohi, A. [School of Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, AEOI, P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    In this work, a nonlinear model is introduced to determine the vertical position of the plasma column in Damavand tokamak. Using this model as a simulator, a nonlinear neural network controller has been designed. In the first stage, the electronic drive and sensory circuits of Damavand tokamak are modified. These circuits can control the vertical position of the plasma column inside the vacuum vessel. Since the vertical position of plasma is an unstable parameter, a direct closed loop system identification algorithm is performed. In the second stage, a nonlinear model is identified for plasma vertical position, based on the multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network (NN) structure. Estimation of simulator parameters has been performed by back-propagation error algorithm using Levenberg-Marquardt gradient descent optimization technique. The model is verified through simulation of the whole closed loop system using both simulator and actual plant in similar conditions. As the final stage, a MLP neural network controller is designed for simulator model. In the last step, online training is performed to tune the controller parameters. Simulation results justify using of the NN controller for the actual plant.

  10. Implementation of vertically asymmetric toroidal-field ripple for beam heating of tokamak reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Sheffield, G.V.; Towner, H.H.; Weissenburger, D.W.

    1976-10-01

    The neutral-beam energy required for adequate penetration of tokamak plasmas of high opacity can be reduced by a large factor if the beam is injected vertically into a region of large TF (toroidal-field) ripple. Energetic ions are trapped in local magnetic wells and drift vertically toward the midplane (z = 0). If the ripple is made very small on the opposite side of the midplane, drifting ions are detrapped and thermalized in the central plasma region. This paper discusses design considerations for establishing the required vertically asymmetric ripple. Examples are given of special TF-coil configurations, and of the use of auxiliary coil windings to create the prescribed ripple profiles

  11. Velocity measurements and identification of the flow pattern of vertical air-water flows with light-beam detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebbesmeyer, D.; Leoni, B.

    1980-07-01

    A new detector for measuring fluid velocities in two-phase flows by means of Noise-Analysis (especially Transient-Cross-Correlation-technique) has been developed. The detector utilizes a light-beam which is modulated by changes in the transparency of the two-phase flow. The results of nine measurements for different flow-regimes of vertical air/water-flows are shown. A main topic of these investigations was to answer the question if it is possible to identify the flow-pattern by looking at the shape of different 'Noise-Analytical-functions' (like APSD, CPSD, CCF etc.). The results prove that light-beam sensors are good detectors for fluid-velocity measurements in different flow regimes and in a wide range of fluid velocities starting with values of about 0.08 m/s up to values of 40 m/s. With respect to flow-pattern identification only the time-signals and the shape of the cross-power-density-function (CPSD) seem to be useful. (Auth.)

  12. The density and velocity of plasma bullets propagating along one dielectric tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longfei Ji

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study shows that the propagation of plasma bullets along one dielectric tube is strongly affected by many discharge parameters, such as the waveform of applied voltage (AC or pulsed DC, peak voltage, He flow rate, and the frequency of AC voltage. Analysis indicates that the density and velocity of plasma bullets are mainly determined by the electric field at the front of plasma bullets. These discharge parameters may significantly influence the distribution of plasma potential along the tube, thus control the electric field at the front of plasma bullets and their propagation. An increase in the pulsed DC voltage with its rise time of <40-50 ns can lead to an obvious improvement in the electric field at the front of plasma bullets, resulting in generation of a plasma in the high density gas and a fast propagation of plasma bullets. He flowing through the tube can contribute to the surface diffusion of charged species, and greatly increase the electric field at the front of plasma bullets. During the propagation of plasma bullets, their density is decreased due to the surface recombination of charged species, such as electrons and ions.

  13. Determination of the Ion Velocity Distribution in a Rotating Plasma from Measurements of Doppler Broadening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard

    1979-01-01

    The Doppler-broadened profile of the He II 4685.75 AA line was measured along a chord in a rotating plasma, transverse to the magnetic field. Using a single-particle orbit picture, the corresponding velocity spectrum of ions confirm the measurements, so it can be concluded that the single-particl...

  14. Scaling laws for the rotational velocity of a J x B driven rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yasuhito; Kataoka, Tomohiro; Ikehata, Takashi; Sato, Naoyuki; Tanabe, Toshio; Mase, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    Rapidly rotating plasmas of helium and argon have been extracted from a coaxial plasma gun operated in pulsed glow mode. The rotational velocity and its parametric dependence have been analyzed systematically by means of visible - emission spectroscopy. The plasma is observed to rotate rigidly inside the diameter of the gun anode while outside the velocity decreases rapidly ; furthermore, different ions are found to rotate at different angular frequencies as ω (Ar + ) = 0.5 x 10 6 rad/sec, ω (Ar 2+ ) = 1.1 x 10 6 rad/sec, ω (C 2+ ) = 1.8 x 10 6 rad/sec, ω (N + ) = 1.2 x 10 6 rad/sec. The plasma density and rotational velocity have been measured as a function of the discharge current and magnetic field to derive experimental scaling laws. They are summarized as : 1. Ion density is proportional to the square of discharge current. 2. Rotational and axial velocities are proportional to the driving force per ion. These results are confirmed to agree well with a theoretical prediction. (author)

  15. Progress towards experimental realization of extreme-velocity flow-dominated magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T. E.; Adams, C. S.; Welch, D. R.; Kagan, G.; Bean, I. A.; Henderson, B. R.; Klim, A. J.

    2017-10-01

    Interactions of flow-dominated plasmas with other plasmas, neutral gases, magnetic fields, solids etc., take place with sufficient velocity that kinetic energy dominates the dynamics of the interaction (as opposed to magnetic or thermal energy, which dominates in most laboratory plasma experiments). Building upon progress made by the Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) at LANL, we are developing the experimental and modeling capability to increase our ultimate attainable plasma velocities well in excess of 1000 km/s. Ongoing work includes designing new pulsed power switches, triggering, and inductive adder topologies; development of novel high-speed optical diagnostics; and exploration of new numerical techniques to specifically model the unique physics of translating/stagnating flow-dominated plasmas. Furthering our understanding of the physical mechanisms of energy conversion from kinetic to other forms, such as thermal energy, non-thermal tails/accelerated populations, enhanced magnetic fields, and radiation (both continuum and line), has wide-ranging significance in basic plasma science, astrophysics, and plasma technology applications such as inertial confinement fusion and intense radiation sources. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration. LA-UR-17-25786.

  16. Critical ionization velocity as a mechanism for producing Titan's plasma tail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeev, A.A.; Khabibrakhmanov, I.KH.

    1984-01-01

    The phenomenon of a critical ionization velocity may explain the anomalous interaction between the magnetospheric plasma corotating with Saturn and the atmosphere of Titan. Although the dominant role will be played by the lower-hybrid instability due to the counterstreaming of the magnetospehric plasma and newly formed atmospheric ions, charge-separation effects caused by the very large Larmor radius of the new nitrogen ions also may trigger instability. The kinetic energy of the newly formed ions will be conveyed to the electrons by plasma waves generated in the counterflow, thereby exciting the atmospheric atoms to emit radiation. The limiting plasma density and electron temperature in Titan's plasma tail and the frequency spectrum of the waves that develop are determined and compared against the Voyager measurements. 11 references

  17. Critical ionisation velocity and the dynamics of a coaxial plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The dynamics of an ionising wave in a coaxial plasma gun with an azimuthal bias magnetic field is analysed in a theoretical model. Only the radial dependence is treated and instead of including a treatment of the energy balance two separate physical assumptions are made. In the first case it is assumed that the total internal electric field is given by the critical ionisation velocity condition and in the second that the ionisation rate is constant. For consistency wall sheaths are assumed to match the internal plasma potential to that of the walls. On the basis of momentum and particle balance the radial dependence of the electron density, current density, electric field and drift velocity are found. An electron source is required at the cathode and the relative contribution from ionisation within the plasma is deduced. The assumption that there are no ion sources at the electrodes leads to a restriction on the possible values of the axial electric field. (author)

  18. Enhancement of electron field emission of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes by nitrogen plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B.B. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, 69 Hongguang Rd, Lijiatuo, Banan District, Chongqing 400054 (China); Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Cheng, Q.J. [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Chen, X. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Ostrikov, K., E-mail: kostya.ostrikov@csiro.au [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-09-22

    Highlights: > A new and custom-designed bias-enhanced hot-filament chemical vapor deposition system is developed to synthesize vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. > The carbon nanotubes are later treated with nitrogen plasmas. > The electron field emission characteristics of the carbon nanotubes are significantly improved after the nitrogen plasma treatment. > A new physical mechanism is proposed to interpret the improvement of the field emission characteristics. - Abstract: The electron field emission (EFE) characteristics from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) without and with treatment by the nitrogen plasma are investigated. The VACNTs with the plasma treatment showed a significant improvement in the EFE property compared to the untreated VACNTs. The morphological, structural, and compositional properties of the VACNTs are extensively examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It is shown that the significant EFE improvement of the VACNTs after the nitrogen plasma treatment is closely related to the variation of the morphological and structural properties of the VACNTs. The high current density (299.6 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}) achieved at a low applied field (3.50 V/{mu}m) suggests that the VACNTs after nitrogen plasma treatment can serve as effective electron field emission sources for numerous applications.

  19. Enhancement of electron field emission of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes by nitrogen plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B.B.; Cheng, Q.J.; Chen, X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new and custom-designed bias-enhanced hot-filament chemical vapor deposition system is developed to synthesize vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. → The carbon nanotubes are later treated with nitrogen plasmas. → The electron field emission characteristics of the carbon nanotubes are significantly improved after the nitrogen plasma treatment. → A new physical mechanism is proposed to interpret the improvement of the field emission characteristics. - Abstract: The electron field emission (EFE) characteristics from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) without and with treatment by the nitrogen plasma are investigated. The VACNTs with the plasma treatment showed a significant improvement in the EFE property compared to the untreated VACNTs. The morphological, structural, and compositional properties of the VACNTs are extensively examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It is shown that the significant EFE improvement of the VACNTs after the nitrogen plasma treatment is closely related to the variation of the morphological and structural properties of the VACNTs. The high current density (299.6 μA/cm 2 ) achieved at a low applied field (3.50 V/μm) suggests that the VACNTs after nitrogen plasma treatment can serve as effective electron field emission sources for numerous applications.

  20. Magnetic Geared Radial Axis Vertical Wind Turbine for Low Velocity Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei Teow

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century, every country is seeking an alternative source of energy especially the renewable sources. There are considerable developments in the wind energy technology in recent years and in more particular on the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT as they are modular, less installation cost and portable in comparison with that of the horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT systems. The cut-in speed of a conventional wind turbine is 3.5 m/s to 5 m/s. Mechanical geared generators are commonly found in wind technology to step up power conversion to accommodate the needs of the generator. Wind turbine gearboxes suffer from overload problem and frequent maintenance in spite of the high torque density produced. However, an emerging alternative to gearing system is Magnetic Gear (MG as it offers significant advantages such as free from maintenance and inherent overload protection. In this project, numerical analysis is done on designed magnetic gear greatly affects the performance of the generator in terms of voltage generation. Magnetic flux density is distributed evenly across the generator as seen from the uniform sinusoidal output waveform. Consequently, the interaction of the magnetic flux of the permanent magnets has shown no disturbance to the output of the generator as the voltage generated shows uniform waveform despite the rotational speed of the gears. The simulation is run at low wind speed and the results show that the generator starts generating a voltage of 240 V at a wind speed of 1.04 m/s. This shows great improvement in the operating capability of the wind turbine.

  1. Experimental research on time-resolved evolution of cathode plasma expansion velocity in a long pulsed magnetically insulated coaxial diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Danni; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Ge, Xingjun; Gao, Jingming

    2018-02-01

    Unlike planar diodes, separate research of the axial and radial plasma expansion velocities is difficult for magnetically insulated coaxial diodes. Time-resolved electrical diagnostic which is based on the voltage-ampere characteristics has been employed to study the temporal evolution of the axial and radial cathode plasma expansion velocities in a long pulsed magnetically insulated coaxial diode. Different from a planar diode with a "U" shaped profile of temporal velocity evolution, the temporal evolution trend of the axial expansion velocity is proved to be a "V" shaped profile. Apart from the suppression on the radial expansion velocity, the strong magnetic field is also conducive to slowing down the axial expansion velocity. Compared with the ordinary graphite cathode, the carbon velvet and graphite composite cathode showed superior characteristics as judged by the low plasma expansion velocity and long-term electrical stability as a promising result for applications where long-pulsed and reliable operation at high power is required.

  2. Group velocity measurement from the propagation of the ionization front in a surface-wave-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotrino, J.; Gamero, A.; Sola, A.; Lao, C.

    1989-01-01

    During the first instant, previous to steady-state in a surface-wave-produced plasma, an ionization front advance front the launcher to the plasma column end. The velocity of the ionization front is much slower than the group velocity of the surface wave, this give a reflection of the incident signal on the moving ionization front. In this paper, the authors use this effect to calculate the surface wave group velocity

  3. Sum rule and hydrodynamic analyses of the velocity autocorrelation function in strongly coupled plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Seido; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1980-01-01

    The memory function for the velocity autocorrelation function in a strongly coupled, one-component plasma is analyzed in the short time and long time domains, respectively, with the aid of the frequency-moment sum rules and the hydrodynamic consideration evoking the idea of the generalized Stokes friction. A series of interpolation schemes with successively improved accuracies are then introduced. Numerical investigations of those interpolation schemes clarify the physical origin of the three different types of the velocity autocorrelation function observed in the molecular dynamics simulation at different regimes of the coupling constant. (author)

  4. Oxygen plasma assisted end-opening and field emission enhancement in vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, A.; Roy, S.S.; Hazra, K.S.; Wadhwa, S.; Ray, S.C.; Mitra, S.K.; Misra, D.S.; McLaughlin, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We showed Ar/O 2 plasma can be effective for the end opening of aligned CNTs. ► The field emission property was dramatically enhanced after plasma modification. ► Microstructures were clearly understood by Raman and SEM analysis. ► Surface wet-ability at various functionalised conditions was studied. - Abstract: This paper highlights the changes in micro-structural and field emission properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) via oxygen plasma treatment. We find that exposure of very low power oxygen plasma (6 W) at 13.56 MHz for 15–20 min, opens the tip of vertically aligned CNTs. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images were used to identify the quality and micro-structural changes of the nanotube morphology and surfaces. Raman spectra showed that the numbers of defects were increased throughout the oxygen plasma treatment process. In addition, the hydrophobic nature of the VACNTs is altered significantly and the contact angle decreases drastically from 110° to 40°. It was observed that the electron field emission (EFE) characteristics are significantly enhanced. The turn-on electric field (ETOE) of CNTs decreased from ∼0.80 V μm −1 (untreated) to ∼0.60 V μm −1 (oxygen treated). We believe that the open ended VACNTs would be immensely valuable for applications such as micro/nanofluidic based filtering elements and display devices.

  5. The Theory of the Kink Mode during the Vertical Plasma Disruption Events in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper explains the locked m/n = 1/1 kink mode during the vertical disruption event when the plasma has an electrical contact with the plasma facing conducting surfaces. It is shown that the kink perturbation can be in equilibrium state even with a stable safety factor q > 1, if the halo currents, excited by the kink mode, can flow through the conducting structure. This suggests a new explanation of the so-called sideway forces on the tokamak in-vessel components during the disruption event.

  6. More vertical etch profile using a Faraday cage in plasma etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byeong-Ok; Hwang, Sung-Wook; Ryu, Jung-Hyun; Moon, Sang Heup

    1999-05-01

    Scanning electron microscope images of sidewalls obtained by plasma etching of an SiO2 film with and without a Faraday cage have been compared. When the substrate film is etched in the Faraday cage, faceting is effectively suppressed and the etch profile becomes more vertical regardless of the process conditions. This is because the electric potential in the cage is nearly uniform and therefore distortion of the electric field at the convex corner of a microfeature is prevented. The most vertical etch profile is obtained when the cage is used in fluorocarbon plasmas, where faceting is further suppressed due to the decrease in the chemical sputtering yield and the increase in the radical/ion flux on the substrate.

  7. Density and velocity measurements of a sheath plasma from MPD thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, J.J.; Cho, T.S.; Choi, M.C.; Choi, E.H.; Cho, G.S.; Uhm, H.S.

    1999-07-01

    Magnetoplasma is the plasma that the electron and ion orbits are strongly confined by intense magnetic field. Recently, magnetoplasma dynamics (MPD) has been investigated in connection with applications to the rocket thruster in USA, Germany, etc. It can be widely applicable, including modification of satellite position and propulsion of the interplanetary space shuttle. A travel for a long distance journey is possible because a little amount of neutral gases is needed for the plasma source. Besides, this will provide a pollution free engine for future generations. MPD thruster is not a chemical engine. The authors have built a Mather type MPD thruster, which has 1 kV max charging, 10 kA max current flows, and has about 1 ms characteristic operation time. The Paschen curve of this thruster is measured and its minimum breakdown voltage occurs in the pressure range of 0.1 to 1 Torr. Langmuir and double probes are fabricated to diagnose the sheath plasma from the thruster. The temperature and density are calculated to be 2.5 eV and 10{sup 15} cm {sup {minus}3}, respectively, from the probe data. Making use of photo diode, an optical probe is fabricated to measure propagation velocity of the sheath plasma. The sheath plasma from the MPD thruster in the experiment propagates with velocity of 1 cm/{micro}s.

  8. Measurements of 3D slip velocities and plasma column lengths of a gliding arc discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A non-thermal gliding arc discharge was generated at atmospheric pressure in an air flow. The dynamics of the plasma column and tracer particles were recorded using two synchronized high-speed cameras. Whereas the data analysis for such systems has previously been performed in 2D (analyzing......, gives more realistic insight into the convection cooling process. Additionally, with the determination of the 3D slip velocity and the 3D length of the plasma column, we give more accurate estimates for the drag force, the electric field strength, the power per unit length, and the radius...

  9. Some necessary parameters for a critical velocity interaction between the ionospheric plasma and a xenon cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axnaes, I.

    1979-12-01

    The conditions for an experiment to study the critical ionization velocity effect in the interaction between a Xenon cloud, released from a satellite, and the ionospheric plasma are investigated. The model used is based on the assumption that there exists an effective process that transfers the energy, that is available in the relative motion, to the electrons. Some necessary conditions to obtain significant heating or deceleration of the plasma penetrating the cloud are calculated. The conditions are mainly given by the energy available in the relative motion and the rates of the different binary collision processes involved. As the released gas cloud expands the possibilities for a critical velocity interaction will exist only within a certain range of cloud radii. It is shown that the charge transfer collision cross section between the ionospheric ions and the cloud atoms is an important parameter and that Xenon is a very suitable gas in that respect. (author)

  10. Stability aspects of plasmas penetrated by neutral gas with respect to velocity driven modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlsson, D.

    1978-08-01

    A study of the stability properties of dense partially ionized plasmas immersed in strong magnetic fields with respect to velocity driven modes are presented. First we consider modes driven by mass motion perpendicular to the lines of force and the unperturbed density and temperature gradients. The presence of a third fluid, neutral gas, gives under certain conditions rise to unstable modes. This type of instability arises independently or whether the applied electric field transverse to the lines of force, driving the mass motion, being parallel or antiparallel to the unperturbed density and temperature gradient. The presence of neutral gas also corresponds to stabilizing effects which, in certain parameter regions, result in a quenching of this instability. It is shown that modes driven by velocity shear perpendicular to the lines of force are effectively stabilized by viscous and resistive effects. These effects are in certain parameter ranges strongly enhanced on account of plasma-neutral gas interaction effects. In collisionless plasmas, modes driven by velocity shear parallel to the lines of force are stabilized by compressibility effects parallel to the magnetic field and by finite Larmor radius effects. (author)

  11. Formation of vertically aligned carbon nanostructures in plasmas: numerical modelling of growth and energy exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denysenko, I; Azarenkov, N A, E-mail: idenysenko@yahoo.com [School of Physics and Technology, V N Karazin Kharkiv National University, 4 Svobody sq., 61077 Kharkiv (Ukraine)

    2011-05-04

    Results on modelling of the plasma-assisted growth of vertically aligned carbon nanostructures and of the energy exchange between the plasma and the growing nanostructures are reviewed. Growth of carbon nanofibres and single-walled carbon nanotubes is considered. Focus is made on studies that use the models based on mass balance equations for species, which are adsorbed on catalyst nanoparticles or walls of the nanostructures. It is shown that the models can be effectively used for the study and optimization of nanostructure growth in plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The results from these models are in good agreement with the available experimental data on the growth of nanostructures. It is discussed how input parameters for the models may be obtained.

  12. Comparison of vertical E × B drift velocities and ground-based magnetometer observations of DELTA H in the low latitude under geomagnetically disturbed conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, M.; Unnikrishnan, K.

    2018-04-01

    In the present work, we analyzed the daytime vertical E × B drift velocities obtained from Jicamarca Unattended Long-term Ionosphere Atmosphere (JULIA) radar and ΔH component of geomagnetic field measured as the difference between the magnitudes of the horizontal (H) components between two magnetometers deployed at two different locations Jicamarca, and Piura in Peru for 22 geomagnetically disturbed events in which either SC has occurred or Dstmax values of daytime vertical E × B drift velocity and peak value of ΔH for the three consecutive days of the events. It was observed that 45% of the events have daytime vertical E × B drift velocity peak in the magnitude range 10-20 m/s and 20-30 m/s and 20% have peak ΔH in the magnitude range 50-60 nT and 80-90 nT. It was observed that the time of occurrence of the peak value of both the vertical E × B drift velocity and the ΔH have a maximum (40%) probability in the same time range 11:00-13:00 LT. We also investigated the correlation between E × B drift velocity and Dst index and the correlation between delta H and Dst index. A strong positive correlation is found between E × B drift and Dst index as well as between delta H and Dst Index. Three different techniques of data analysis - linear, polynomial (order 2), and polynomial (order 3) regression analysis were considered. The regression parameters in all the three cases were calculated using the Least Square Method (LSM), using the daytime vertical E × B drift velocity and ΔH. A formula was developed which indicates the relationship between daytime vertical E × B drift velocity and ΔH, for the disturbed periods. The E × B drift velocity was then evaluated using the formulae thus found for the three regression analysis and validated for the 'disturbed periods' of 3 selected events. The E × B drift velocities estimated by the three regression analysis have a fairly good agreement with JULIA radar observed values under different seasons and solar activity

  13. Disturbance zonal and vertical plasma drifts in the Peruvian sector during solar minimum phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. M.; Abdu, M. A.; Souza, J. R.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Batista, I. S.

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, we investigate the behavior of the equatorial F region zonal plasma drifts over the Peruvian region under magnetically disturbed conditions during two solar minimum epochs, one of them being the recent prolonged solar activity minimum. The study utilizes the vertical and zonal components of the plasma drifts measured by the Jicamarca (11.95°S; 76.87°W) incoherent scatter radar during two events that occurred on 10 April 1997 and 24 June 2008 and model calculation of the zonal drift in a realistic ionosphere simulated by the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model-INPE. Two main points are focused: (1) the connection between electric fields and plasma drifts under prompt penetration electric field during a disturbed periods and (2) anomalous behavior of daytime zonal drift in the absence of any magnetic storm. A perfect anticorrelation between vertical and zonal drifts was observed during the night and in the initial and growth phases of the magnetic storm. For the first time, based on a realistic low-latitude ionosphere, we will show, on a detailed quantitative basis, that this anticorrelation is driven mainly by a vertical Hall electric field induced by the primary zonal electric field in the presence of an enhanced nighttime E region ionization. It is shown that an increase in the field line-integrated Hall-to-Pedersen conductivity ratio (∑H/∑P), which can arise from precipitation of energetic particles in the region of the South American Magnetic Anomaly, is capable of explaining the observed anticorrelation between the vertical and zonal plasma drifts. Evidence for the particle ionization is provided from the occurrence of anomalous sporadic E layers over the low-latitude station, Cachoeira Paulista (22.67°S; 44.9°W)—Brazil. It will also be shown that the zonal plasma drift reversal to eastward in the afternoon two hours earlier than its reference quiet time pattern is possibly caused by weakening of the zonal wind

  14. Oxygen plasma assisted end-opening and field emission enhancement in vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathur, A. [NIBEC, School of Engineering, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, BT37 0QB (United Kingdom); Roy, S.S., E-mail: sinharoy@ualberta.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6T 2G8 (Canada); Hazra, K.S. [Department of Physics, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai-400076 (India); Wadhwa, S. [NIBEC, School of Engineering, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, BT37 0QB (United Kingdom); Ray, S.C. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa); Mitra, S.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6T 2G8 (Canada); Misra, D.S. [Department of Physics, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai-400076 (India); McLaughlin, J.A. [NIBEC, School of Engineering, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, BT37 0QB (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed Ar/O{sub 2} plasma can be effective for the end opening of aligned CNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The field emission property was dramatically enhanced after plasma modification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures were clearly understood by Raman and SEM analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface wet-ability at various functionalised conditions was studied. - Abstract: This paper highlights the changes in micro-structural and field emission properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) via oxygen plasma treatment. We find that exposure of very low power oxygen plasma (6 W) at 13.56 MHz for 15-20 min, opens the tip of vertically aligned CNTs. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images were used to identify the quality and micro-structural changes of the nanotube morphology and surfaces. Raman spectra showed that the numbers of defects were increased throughout the oxygen plasma treatment process. In addition, the hydrophobic nature of the VACNTs is altered significantly and the contact angle decreases drastically from 110 Degree-Sign to 40 Degree-Sign . It was observed that the electron field emission (EFE) characteristics are significantly enhanced. The turn-on electric field (ETOE) of CNTs decreased from {approx}0.80 V {mu}m{sup -1} (untreated) to {approx}0.60 V {mu}m{sup -1} (oxygen treated). We believe that the open ended VACNTs would be immensely valuable for applications such as micro/nanofluidic based filtering elements and display devices.

  15. Control of highly vertically unstable plasmas in TCV with internal coils and fast power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, A.; Moret, J.M.; Chavan, R.; Fasel, D.; Hofmann, F.; Lister, J.B.; Mayor, J.M.; Perez, A.; Elkjaer, A.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of TCV (Tokamak a Configuration Variable) is to investigate effects of plasma shape, in particular high elongation (up to 3), on tokamak physics. Such elongated configurations (I p ≅1 MA) are highly vertically unstable with growth rates up to γ=4000 s -1 . Control of the vertical position using the poloidal coils located outside the vessel is limited to γ≤1000 s -1 because of the shielding effect of the conductive vessel and because of the relative slow time response of their power supplies (0.8 ms thyristor 12 pulse switching at 120 Hz). This dictated the necessity to install a coil set inside the vacuum vessel fed with a Fast Power Supply (FPS). The choice and design of the system with a special attention to the mechanical and electrical constraints in TCV tokamak, as the results and real performances, will be presented. (author) 3 figs., 2 tabs., 2 refs

  16. Challenges in process integration of catalytic DC plasma synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanofibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melechko, Anatoli V; Pearce, Ryan C; Hensley, Dale K; Simpson, Michael L; McKnight, Timothy E

    2011-01-01

    The ability to synthesize free-standing, individual carbon nanofibres (CNFs) aligned perpendicularly to a substrate has enabled fabrication of a large array of devices with nanoscale functional elements, including electron field emission sources, electrochemical probes, neural interface arrays, scanning probes, gene delivery arrays and many others. This was made possible by development of a catalytic plasma process, with DC bias directing the alignment of nanofibres. Successful implementation of prototypical devices has uncovered numerous challenges in the integration of this synthesis process as one of the steps in device fabrication. This paper is dedicated to these engineering and fundamental difficulties that hinder further device development. Relatively high temperature for catalytic synthesis, electrical conductivity of the substrate to maintain DC discharge and other difficulties place restrictions on substrate material. Balancing non-catalytic carbon film deposition and substrate etching, non-uniformity of plasma due to growth of the high aspect ratio structures, plasma instabilities and other factors lead to challenges in controlling the plasma. Ultimately, controlling the atomistic processes at the catalyst nanoparticle (NP) and the behaviour of the NP is the central challenge of plasma nanosynthesis of vertically aligned CNFs.

  17. Radial variation of refractive index, plasma frequency and phase velocity in laser induced air plasma

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathuthu, M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available is the concentration of the emitting species, is the transition probability, is the emitted wavelength of the detected line, is the statistical weight of the upper level of the transition, is the excitation energy, is the Boltzmann constant, and is the partition... the Boltzmann plane: (3) For each species in a sample, the slope gives the plasma tem- perature while the intercept gives the sample concentration. B. Density Measurement The collisional processes between atoms and ions affect the shape and width...

  18. Remote operation of the vertical plasma stabilization @ the GOLEM tokamak for the plasma physics education

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, V.; Kocman, J.; Grover, O.; Krbec, Jaroslav; Stöckel, Jan

    96-97, October (2015), s. 974-979 ISSN 0920-3796. [Symposium on Fusion Technology 2014(SOFT-28)/28./. San Sebastián, 29.09.2014-03.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak technology * remote participation * plasma stabilization Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.301, year: 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fusengdes.2015.06.044

  19. Design concept of conducting shell and in-vessel components suitable for plasma vertical stability and remote maintenance scheme in DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utoh, Hiroyasu, E-mail: uto.hiroyasu@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); International Fusion Energy Research Centre, 2-166, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Takase, Haruhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); International Fusion Energy Research Centre, 2-166, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Tobita, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); Mori, Kazuo; Kudo, Tatsuya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); International Fusion Energy Research Centre, 2-166, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Someya, Youji; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Hoshino, Kazuo; Nakamura, Makoto; Tokunaga, Shinsuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Conceptual design of in-vessel component including conducting shell has been investigated. • The conducting shell design for plasma vertical stability was clarified from the plasma vertical stability analysis. • The calculation results showed that the double-loop shell has the most effect on plasma vertical stability. - Abstract: In order to realize a feasible DEMO, we designed an in-vessel component including the conducting shell. The project is affiliated with the broader approach DEMO design activities and is conceptualized from a plasma vertical stability and engineering viewpoint. The dependence of the plasma vertical stability on the conducing shell parameters and the electromagnetic force at plasma disruption were investigated in numerical simulations (programmed in the 3D eddy current analysis code and a plasma position control code). The simulations assumed the actual shape and position of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components. The plasma vertical stability was most effectively maintained by the double-loop shell.

  20. Analysis of equatorial plasma bubble zonal drift velocities in the Pacific sector by imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yao

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Using 1024 nights of data from 2002–2005 taken by the Cornell Narrow Field Imager (CNFI, we examine equatorial plasma bubble (EPB zonal drift velocity characteristics. CNFI is located at the Maui Space Surveillance Site on the Haleakala Volcano (geographic: 20.71° N, 203.83° E; geomagnetic: 21.03° N, 271.84° E on the island of Maui, Hawaii. The imager is set up to view in a magnetic field-aligned geometry in order to maximize its resolution. We calculate the zonal drift velocities using two methods: a correlation routine and an EPB west-wall intensity gradient tracking routine. These two methods yield sizeable differences in the evenings, suggesting strong pre-local midnight EPB development. An analysis of the drift velocities is also performed based on the three influencing factors of season, geomagnetic activity, and solar activity. In general, our data match published trends and drift characteristics from past studies. However, we find that the drift magnitudes are much lower than results from other imagers at similar latitude sectors but at different longitude sectors, suggesting that zonal drift velocities have a longitudinal dependence.

  1. Magnetic field-aligned plasma expansion in critical ionization velocity space experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.

    1989-01-01

    Motivated by the recent Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiments in space, the temporal evolution of a plasma cloud released in an ambient plasma is studied. Time-dependent Vlasov equations for both electrons and ions, along with the Poisson equation for the self-consistent electric field parallel to the ambient magnetic field, are solved. The initial cloud is assumed to consist of cold, warm, and hot electrons with temperatures T/sub c/ ≅ 0.2 eV, T/sub w/ ≅ 2 eV, and T/sub h/ ≅ 10 eV, respectively. It is found that the minor hot electrons escape the cloud, and their velocity distribution function shows the typical time-of-flight dispersion feature - that is, the larger the distance from the cloud, the larger is the average drift velocity of the escaping electrons. The major warm electrons expand along the magnetic field line with the corresponding ion-acoustic speed. The combined effect of the escaping hot electrons and the expanding warm ones sets up an electric potential structure which accelerates the ambient electrons into the cloud. Thus, the energy loss due to the electron escape is partly replenished. The electric field distribution in the potential structure depends on the stage of the evolution; before the rarefaction waves propagating from the edges of the cloud reach its center, the electric fields point into the cloud. After this stage the cloud divides into two subclouds, with each having their own bipolar electric fields. Effects of collisions on the evolution of plasma clouds are also discussed. The relevance of the results seen from the calculations are discussed in the context of recent space experiments on CIV

  2. Vertical Jump Height is more Strongly Associated with Velocity and Work Performed Prior to Take-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, J. R.; Loehr, J. A.; DeWitt, J. K.; Lee, S. M. C.; English, K. L.; Nash, R. E.; Leach, M. A.; Hagan, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    Vertical jump (VJ) height is commonly used as a measure of athletic capability in strength and power sports. Although VJ has been shown to be a predictor of athletic performance, it is not clear which kinetic ground reaction force (GRF) variables, such as peak force (PF), peak power (PP), peak velocity (PV), total work (TW) or impulse (Imp) are the best correlates. To determine which kinetic variables (PF, PP, PV, TW, and Imp) best correlate with VJ height. Twenty subjects (14 males, 6 females) performed three maximal countermovement VJs on a force platform (Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Watertown, MA, USA). VJ jump height was calculated as the difference between standing reach and the highest reach point measured using a Vertec. PF, PP, PV, TW, and Imp were calculated using the vertical GRF data sampled at 1000 Hz from the lowest point in the countermovement through the concentric portion until take-off. GRF data were normalized to body mass measured using a standard scale (Detecto, Webb City, MO, USA). Correlation coefficients were computed between each GRF variable and VJ height using a Pearson correlation. VJ height (43.4 plus or minus 9.1 cm) was significantly correlated (p less than 0.001) with PF (998 plus or minus 321 N; r=0.51), PP (1997 plus or minus 772 W; r=0.69), PV (2.66 plus or minus 0.40 m (raised dot) s(sup -1); r=0.85), TW (259 plus or minus 93.0 kJ; r=0.82), and Imp (204 plus or minus 51.1 N(raised dot)s; r=0.67). Although all variables were correlated to VJ height, PV and TW were more strongly correlated to VJ height than PF, PP, and Imp. Therefore, since TW is equal to force times displacement, the relative displacement of the center of mass along with the forces applied during the upward movement of the jump are critical determinants of VJ height. PV and TW are key determinants of VJ height, and therefore successful training programs to increase VJ height should focus on rapid movement (PV) and TW by increasing power over time rather

  3. Theoretical and experimental zonal drift velocities of the ionospheric plasma bubbles over the Brazilian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Daniela C. S.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Abdu, M. A.; Castilho, Vivian M.; Takahashi, H.; Medeiros, A. F.; Buriti, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    This work presents equatorial ionospheric plasma bubble zonal drift velocity observations and their comparison with model calculations. The bubble zonal velocities were measured using airglow OI630 nm all-sky digital images and the model calculations were performed taking into account flux-tube integrated Pedersen conductivity and conductivity weighted neutral zonal winds. The digital images were obtained from an all-sky imaging system operated over the low-latitude station Cachoeira Paulista (Geogr. 22.5S, 45W, dip angle 31.5S) during the period from October 1998 to August 2000. Out of the 138 nights of imager observation, 29 nights with the presence of plasma bubbles are used in this study. These 29 nights correspond to geomagnetically rather quiet days (∑K P hours, the calculated zonal drift velocities were found to be larger than the experimental values. The best matching between the calculated and observed zonal velocities were seen to be for a few hours around midnight. The model calculation showed two humps around 20 LT and 24 LT that were not present in the data. Average decelerations obtained from linear regression between 20 LT and 24 LT were found to be: (a) Spring 1998, -8.61 ms -1 h -1; (b) Summer 1999, -0.59 ms -1 h -1; (c) Spring 1999, -11.72 ms -1 h -1; and (d) Summer 2000, -8.59 ms -1 h -1. Notice that Summer and Winter here correspond to southern hemisphere Summer and Winter, not northern hemisphere.

  4. Controlled density of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes in a triode plasma chemical vapor deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sung Hoon; Park, Kyu Chang; Moon, Jong Hyun; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Pribat, Didier; Bonnassieux, Yvan; Jang, Jin

    2006-01-01

    We report on the growth mechanism and density control of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes using a triode plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The deposition reactor was designed in order to allow the intermediate mesh electrode to be biased independently from the ground and power electrodes. The CNTs grown with a mesh bias of + 300 V show a density of ∼ 1.5 μm -2 and a height of ∼ 5 μm. However, CNTs do not grow when the mesh electrode is biased to - 300 V. The growth of CNTs can be controlled by the mesh electrode bias which in turn controls the plasma density and ion flux on the sample

  5. Structure of parallel-velocity-shear-driven mode in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, J.Q.; Xu, W.B.; Zhang, Y.Z.; Horton, W.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that the Fourier-ballooning representation is appropriate for the study of short-wavelength drift-like perturbation in toroidal plasmas with a parallel velocity shear (PVS). The radial structure of the mode driven by a PVS is investigated in a torus. The Reynolds stress created by PVS turbulence, and proposed as one of the sources for a sheared poloidal plasma rotation, is analyzed. It is demonstrated that a finite ion temperature may strongly enhance the Reynolds stress creation ability from PVS-driven turbulence. The correlation of this observation with the requirement that ion heating power be higher than a threshold value for the formation of an internal transport barrier is discussed. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  6. Geological implications of recently derived vertical velocities of benchmarks of the south-central United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokka, R. K.

    2005-05-01

    It has been long-recognized that the south-central United States of America bordering the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is actively subsiding, resulting in a slow, yet unrelenting inundation of the coast from south Texas to southwestern Alabama. Today's motions are but the latest chapter in the subsidence history of the GOM, a region that has accommodated the deposition of over 20 km of deltaic and continental margin sediments since mid Mesozoic time. Understanding the recent history of displacements and the processes responsible for subsidence are especially critical for near-term planning for coastal protection and restoration activities. Documentation of the true magnitude and geography of vertical motions of the surface through time has been hampered because previous measurement schemes did not employ reference datums of sufficient spatial and temporal precision. This situation has been somewhat improved recently through the recent analysis of National Geodetic Survey (NGS) 1st order leveling data from >2710 benchmarks in the region by Shinkle and Dokka (NOAA Technical Report 50 [2004]). That paper used original observations (not adjusted) and computed displacements and velocities related to NAVD88 for benchmarks visited during various leveling surveys from 1920 through 1995. Several important characteristics were observed and are summarized below. First, the data show that subsidence is not limited to areas of recent sediment accumulation such as the wetland areas of the modern delta (MRD) of the Mississippi River or its upstream alluvial valley (MAV), as supposed by most current syntheses. The entire coastal zone, as well as inland areas several hundred km from the shore, has subsided over the period of measurement. Regionally, vertical velocities range from less than -52 mm/yr in Louisiana to over +15 mm/yr in peripheral areas of eastern Mississippi-Alabama. The mean rate is ~-11 mm/yr in most coastal parishes of Louisiana. In the Mississippi River deltaic plain

  7. Plasma fluorination of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes: functionalization and thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzzi, Claudia; Scardamaglia, Mattia; Hemberg, Axel; Petaccia, Luca; Colomer, Jean-François; Snyders, Rony; Bittencourt, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Grafting of fluorine species on carbon nanostructures has attracted interest due to the effective modification of physical and chemical properties of the starting materials. Various techniques have been employed to achieve a controlled fluorination yield; however, the effect of contaminants is rarely discussed, although they are often present. In the present work, the fluorination of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes was performed using plasma treatment in a magnetron sputtering chamber with fluorine diluted in an argon atmosphere with an Ar/F2 ratio of 95:5. The effect of heavily diluted fluorine in the precursor gas mixture is investigated by evaluating the modifications in the nanotube structure and the electronic properties upon plasma treatment. The existence of oxygen-based grafted species is associated with background oxygen species present in the plasma chamber in addition to fluorine. The thermal stability and desorption process of the fluorine species grafted on the carbon nanotubes during the fluorine plasma treatment were evaluated by combining different spectroscopic techniques.

  8. Plasma fluorination of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes: functionalization and thermal stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Struzzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Grafting of fluorine species on carbon nanostructures has attracted interest due to the effective modification of physical and chemical properties of the starting materials. Various techniques have been employed to achieve a controlled fluorination yield; however, the effect of contaminants is rarely discussed, although they are often present. In the present work, the fluorination of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes was performed using plasma treatment in a magnetron sputtering chamber with fluorine diluted in an argon atmosphere with an Ar/F2 ratio of 95:5. The effect of heavily diluted fluorine in the precursor gas mixture is investigated by evaluating the modifications in the nanotube structure and the electronic properties upon plasma treatment. The existence of oxygen-based grafted species is associated with background oxygen species present in the plasma chamber in addition to fluorine. The thermal stability and desorption process of the fluorine species grafted on the carbon nanotubes during the fluorine plasma treatment were evaluated by combining different spectroscopic techniques.

  9. The influence of ethanol addition on the spatial emission distribution of traces in a vertical argon stabilized DC arc plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIJA TODOROVIC

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The plasma of a vertical argon stabilized DC arc at atmospheric pressure is applied as a spectrochemical source. The lateral distributions of relative spectral line intensities of some trace elements (Zn, Pt, Cd, Mg, Ca and Al introduced into the plasma in the form of aqueous and ethanol–aqueous solutions were experimentally determined. These distributions were correlated with the calculated equilibrium plasma composition of the arc plasma. On the basis of the obtained results, an explanation of the influence of ethanol addition on the radiation densities from an arc plasma is given.

  10. M.V.A. amplifier for plasma position control by vertical magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenk, G.

    1978-01-01

    The radial plasma position in the WEGA torus is controlled by a power amplifier, acting on the vertical magnetic field. Up to now the feedback loop contains, as amplifying elements, two 90 kW DC-transistor amplifiers, acting in push-pull operation. As increased plasma stability and lifetime is desirable, we have to increase the power amplifier to about 1 Megawatt. Industry offered a thyristor rectifier, operating at 50 or 300 Hz, and alternatively a thyristor chopper amplifier at a few kHz frequency response. Theses offers did not correspond to our demand, as far as response time, price and primary power requirements are concerned. We have implemented a bipolar switching-type amplifier (also called H-bridge converter) with the characteristics: time response < 0,05 ms., pulsed power = 1 MW (400 V, 2500 A), primary power = 2,5 kW. As power switch, a network of parallel high voltage transistors, driven by three transistor stages, has been chosen, to control a vertical magnetic field or +/- 180 G, with a precision of about one per cent. Precautions for transistor switches concerning mainly critical voltage, current, instantaneous power and selfoscillating behaviour have been taken. This systems corresponds to our demands

  11. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.

    Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  12. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  13. First Absolutely Calibrated Localized Measurements of Ion Velocity in the MST in Locked and Rotating Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, M.; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Munaretto, S.

    2015-11-01

    An Ion Doppler Spectrometer (IDS) is used on MST for high time-resolution passive and active measurements of impurity ion emission. Absolutely calibrated measurements of flow are difficult because the spectrometer records data within 0.3 nm of the C+5 line of interest, and commercial calibration lamps do not produce lines in this narrow range . A novel optical system was designed to absolutely calibrate the IDS. The device uses an UV LED to produce a broad emission curve in the desired region. A Fabry-Perot etalon filters this light, cutting transmittance peaks into the pattern of the LED emission. An optical train of fused silica lenses focuses the light into the IDS with f/4. A holographic diffuser blurs the light cone to increase homogeneity. Using this light source, the absolute Doppler shift of ion emissions can be measured in MST plasmas. In combination with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, localized ion velocities can now be measured. Previously, a time-averaged measurement along the chord bisecting the poloidal plane was used to calibrate the IDS; the quality of these central chord calibrations can be characterized with our absolute calibration. Calibration errors may also be quantified and minimized by optimizing the curve-fitting process. Preliminary measurements of toroidal velocity in locked and rotating plasmas will be shown. This work has been supported by the US DOE.

  14. The effects of rival seminal plasma on sperm velocity in the alternative reproductive tactics of Chinook salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jason A; Pitcher, Trevor E

    2017-04-01

    Sperm competition is prevalent and intense in many animal mating systems, and is a major force driving evolution of such mating systems. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of seminal plasma on sperm velocity of male Chinook salmon (Onchorhynchus tshawytscha), which possesses a mating system with male alternative reproductive tactics and intense sperm competition. Male Chinook salmon either adopt a small, precocious sneaking tactic (jack) or a large, dominant tactic (hooknose). To test whether the seminal plasma can effect sperm velocity amongst sperm competitors, two experiments were done whereby males were paired based upon the alternative tactic each male adopted, with the first experiment consisting of jack-hooknose pairs (N = 16) and the second experiment consisting of jack-jack and hooknose-hooknose pairs (N = 12 and 14, respectively). Within each pair, milt of each male was manipulated such that seminal plasma was removed and swapped between the males in each pair and sperm velocity was measured. Jack seminal plasma caused a significant decrease (∼11.9%) in hooknose sperm velocity while causing a significant increase in jack sperm velocity (∼7%), while alternatively, hooknose seminal plasma had no affect on sperm velocity of jack or other hooknose males. This study shows that rival seminal plasma may affect the outcome of sperm competition between males; males adopting a sneaking tactic, that spawn in a disadvantageous mating position, may be able to compensate for this deficit by being more competitive through the effects of their seminal plasma on their competitor's sperm velocity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Abnormal evening vertical plasma drift and effects on ESF and EIA over Brazil-South Atlantic sector during the 30 October 2003 superstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu, M. A.; de Paula, E. R.; Batista, I. S.; Reinisch, B. W.; Matsuoka, M. T.; Camargo, P. O.; Veliz, O.; Denardini, C. M.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Kherani, E. A.; de Siqueira, P. M.

    2008-07-01

    Equatorial F region vertical plasma drifts, spread F and anomaly responses, in the south American longitude sector during the superstorm of 30 October 2003, are analyzed using data from an array of instruments consisting of Digisondes, a VHF radar, GPS TEC and scintillation receivers in Brazil, and a Digisonde and a magnetometer in Jicamarca, Peru. Prompt penetrating eastward electric field of abnormally large intensity drove the F layer plasma up at a velocity ˜1200 ms-1 during post dusk hours in the eastern sector over Brazil. The equatorial anomaly was intensified and expanded poleward while the development of spread F/plasma bubble irregularities and GPS signal scintillations were weaker than their quiet time intensity. Significantly weaker F region response over Jicamarca presented a striking difference in the intensity of prompt penetration electric field between Peru and eastern longitudes of Brazil. The enhanced post dusk sector vertical drift over Brazil is attributed to electro-dynamics effects arising energetic particle precipitation in the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA). These extraordinary results and their longitudinal differences are presented and discussed in this paper.

  16. Anisotropic electron velocity distribution in an ECR helium plasma as determined from polarization of emission lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamae, A; Sato, T; Horimoto, Y; Inoue, K; Fujimoto, T; Uchida, M; Maekawa, T

    2005-01-01

    A helium plasma is produced by electron-cyclotron resonance heating in a cusp-configuration magnetic field. Several neutral helium lines are found polarized in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field; the maximum polarization degree exceeds 10%. The polarization degree and intensity of the emission lines yield, respectively, the alignment and population of the upper levels. The population-alignment collisional-radiative model is developed, and the experimental result is interpreted in terms of an anisotropic electron velocity distribution; it is of a Saturn-type with the central thermal component of 14 eV and the 'ring' component displaced by 9.2 eV from the central component. The relative number of 'ring' electrons is 40%. (letter to the editor)

  17. Doppler spectroscopic measurements of sheath ion velocities in radio-frequency plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodcock, B.K.; Busby, J.R.; Freegarde, T.G.; Hancock, G.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the distributions of N 2 + ion velocity components parallel and perpendicular to the electrode in the sheath of a radio-frequency nitrogen reactive ion etching discharge, using pulsed laser-induced fluorescence. Parallel to the electrode, the ions have throughout a thermal distribution that is found to be consistent with the rotational temperature of 355 K. In the perpendicular direction, we see clearly the acceleration of the ions towards the electrode, and our results agree well with theoretical predictions although an unexpected peak of unaccelerated ions persists. We have also determined the absolute ion concentrations in the sheath, which we have calibrated by analyzing the decay in laser-induced fluorescence in the plasma bulk after discharge extinction. At 20 mTorr, the bulk concentration of 1.0x10 10 cm -3 falls to around 2x10 8 cm -3 at 2 mm from the electrode. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. A continuous flow micro filtration device for plasma/blood separation using submicron vertical pillar gap structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Tae Goo; Ji, Hongmiao; Lim, Pei Yi; Chen, Yu; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2014-01-01

    This work demonstrates a continuous flow plasma/blood separator using a vertical submicron pillar gap structure. The working principle of the proposed separator is based on size exclusion of cells through cross-flow filtration, in which only plasma is allowed to pass through submicron vertical pillars located tangential to the main flow path of the blood sample. The maximum filtration efficiency of 99.9% was recorded with a plasma collection rate of 0.67 µl min −1 for an input blood flow rate of 12.5 µl min −1 . The hemolysis phenomenon was observed for an input blood flow rate above 30 µl min −1 . Based on the experimental results, we can conclude that the proposed device shows potential for the application of on-chip plasma/blood separation as a part of integrated point-of-care (POC) diagnostics systems. (technical note)

  19. Plasma screening effects on the energies of hydrogen atom under the influence of velocity-dependent potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahar, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    In order to examine the plasma screening and velocity-dependent potential effects on the hydrogen atom, the Schrödinger equation including a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb and velocity-dependent potential is solved numerically in the framework asymptotic iteration method. The more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential is used to model Debye and quantum plasma for the specific values of the parameters in its structure. However, in order to examine effects of velocity-dependent potential on energy values of hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasma, the isotropic form factor of velocity-dependent potential is given as harmonic oscillator type, ρ(r)=ρ o r 2 . Then, the energies of s and p states are calculated numerically without any approximation. In order to investigate thoroughly plasma screening effects and contribution of velocity-dependent potential on energy values of hydrogen atom, the corresponding calculations are carried out by using different values of parameters of more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential and isotropic dependence, results of which are discussed

  20. A Gordeyev integral for electrostatic waves in a magnetized plasma with a kappa velocity distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mace, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    A Gordeyev-type integral for the investigation of electrostatic waves in magnetized plasma having a kappa or generalized Lorentzian velocity distribution is derived. The integral readily reduces, in the unmagnetized and parallel propagation limits, to simple expressions involving the Z κ function. For propagation perpendicular to the magnetic field, it is shown that the Gordeyev integral can be written in closed form as a sum of two generalized hypergeometric functions, which permits easy analysis of the dispersion relation for electrostatic waves. Employing the same analytical techniques used for the kappa distribution, it is further shown that the well-known Gordeyev integral for a Maxwellian distribution can be written very concisely as a generalized hypergeometric function in the limit of perpendicular propagation. This expression, in addition to its mathematical conciseness, has other advantages over the traditional sum over modified Bessel functions form. Examples of the utility of these generalized hypergeometric series, especially how they simplify analyses of electrostatic waves propagating perpendicular to the magnetic field, are given. The new expression for the Gordeyev integral for perpendicular propagation is solved numerically to obtain the dispersion relations for the electrostatic Bernstein modes in a plasma with a kappa distribution

  1. Angular distributions of plasma edge velocity and integrated intensity: Update on specific impulse for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Pakhomov, Andrew V.

    2005-04-01

    This work concludes our discussion of the image processing technique developed earlier for determination of specific impulse (Isp) for Ablative Laser Propulsion (ALP). The plasma plumes are recorded with a time-resolved intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera. The plasma was formed in vacuum (˜ 3×10-3 Torr) by focusing output pulses of a laser system (100-ps pulsewidth at 532 nm wavelength and ˜35 mJ energy) on surfaces of C (graphite), Al, Si, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sn, and Pb elements. Angular profiles for integrated intensity and plasma expansion velocity were determined for the tested elements. Such profiles were used further for assessment of specific impulse. Specific impulses derived from angular distributions of plasma expansion velocity and integral intensity appeared in excellent agreement with the data derived earlier from force measurements.

  2. Angular distributions of plasma edge velocity and integrated intensity: Update on specific impulse for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jun; Pakhomov, Andrew V.

    2005-01-01

    This work concludes our discussion of the image processing technique developed earlier for determination of specific impulse (Isp) for Ablative Laser Propulsion (ALP). The plasma plumes are recorded with a time-resolved intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera. The plasma was formed in vacuum (∼ 3x10-3 Torr) by focusing output pulses of a laser system (100-ps pulsewidth at 532 nm wavelength and ∼35 mJ energy) on surfaces of C (graphite), Al, Si, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sn, and Pb elements. Angular profiles for integrated intensity and plasma expansion velocity were determined for the tested elements. Such profiles were used further for assessment of specific impulse. Specific impulses derived from angular distributions of plasma expansion velocity and integral intensity appeared in excellent agreement with the data derived earlier from force measurements

  3. HRP facility for fabrication of ITER vertical target divertor full scale plasma facing units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visca, Eliseo; Roccella, S.; Candura, D.; Palermo, M.; Rossi, P.; Pizzuto, A.; Sanguinetti, G.P.; Mancini, A.; Verdini, L.; Cacciotti, E.; Cerri, V.; Mugnaini, G.; Reale, A.; Giacomi, G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • R&D activities for the manufacturing of ITER divertor high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC). • ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components. • ENEA and ANSALDO NUCLEARE jointly participate to the European program for the qualification of the manufacturing technology for the ITER divertor IVT. • Successful manufacturing by HRP (Hot Radial Pressing) of first full-scale full-W armored IVT qualification prototype. - Abstract: ENEA and Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A. (ANN) have being deeply involved in the European development activities for the manufacturing of the ITER Divertor Inner Vertical Target (IVT) plasma-facing components. During normal operation the heat flux deposited on the bottom segment of divertor is 5–10 MW/m 2 but the capability to remove up to 20 MW/m 2 during transient events of 10 s must also be demonstrated. In order to fulfill ITER requirements, ENEA has set up and widely tested a manufacturing process, named Hot Radial Pressing (HRP). The last challenge is now to fabricate full-scale prototypes of the IVT, aimed to be qualified for the next step, i.e. the series production. On the basis of the experience of manufacturing hundreds of small mock-ups, ENEA designed and installed a new suitable HRP facility. The objective of getting a final shaped plasma facing unit (PFU) that satisfies these requirements is an ambitious target because tolerances set by ITER/F4E are very tight. The setting-up of the equipment started with the fabrication of full scale and representative ‘dummies’ in which stainless steel instead of CFC or W was used for monoblocks. The results confirmed that dimensions were compliant with the required tolerances. The paper reports a brief description of the innovative HRP equipment and the dimensional check results after HRP of the first full-scale full-W PFU.

  4. HRP facility for fabrication of ITER vertical target divertor full scale plasma facing units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visca, Eliseo, E-mail: eliseo.visca@enea.it [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Roccella, S. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Candura, D.; Palermo, M. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16152 Genova (Italy); Rossi, P.; Pizzuto, A. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Sanguinetti, G.P. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16152 Genova (Italy); Mancini, A.; Verdini, L.; Cacciotti, E.; Cerri, V.; Mugnaini, G.; Reale, A.; Giacomi, G. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • R&D activities for the manufacturing of ITER divertor high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC). • ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components. • ENEA and ANSALDO NUCLEARE jointly participate to the European program for the qualification of the manufacturing technology for the ITER divertor IVT. • Successful manufacturing by HRP (Hot Radial Pressing) of first full-scale full-W armored IVT qualification prototype. - Abstract: ENEA and Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A. (ANN) have being deeply involved in the European development activities for the manufacturing of the ITER Divertor Inner Vertical Target (IVT) plasma-facing components. During normal operation the heat flux deposited on the bottom segment of divertor is 5–10 MW/m{sup 2} but the capability to remove up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} during transient events of 10 s must also be demonstrated. In order to fulfill ITER requirements, ENEA has set up and widely tested a manufacturing process, named Hot Radial Pressing (HRP). The last challenge is now to fabricate full-scale prototypes of the IVT, aimed to be qualified for the next step, i.e. the series production. On the basis of the experience of manufacturing hundreds of small mock-ups, ENEA designed and installed a new suitable HRP facility. The objective of getting a final shaped plasma facing unit (PFU) that satisfies these requirements is an ambitious target because tolerances set by ITER/F4E are very tight. The setting-up of the equipment started with the fabrication of full scale and representative ‘dummies’ in which stainless steel instead of CFC or W was used for monoblocks. The results confirmed that dimensions were compliant with the required tolerances. The paper reports a brief description of the innovative HRP equipment and the dimensional check results after HRP of the first full-scale full-W PFU.

  5. The Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX): Centrifugal Confinement and Velocity Shear Stabilization of Plasmas in Shaped Open Magnetic Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassam, Adil; Ellis, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    The Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) Project has investigated the concepts of centrifugal plasma confinement and stabilization of instabilities by velocity shear. The basic requirement is supersonic plasma rotation about a shaped, open magnetic field. Overall, the MCX Project attained three primary goals that were set out at the start of the project. First, supersonic rotation at Mach number up to 2.5 was obtained. Second, turbulence from flute interchange modes was found considerably reduced from conventional. Third, plasma pressure was contained along the field, as evidenced by density drops of x10 from the center to the mirror throats.

  6. Coma Berenices: The First Evidence for Incomplete Vertical Phase-mixing in Local Velocity Space with RAVE—Confirmed with Gaia DR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monari, G.; Famaey, B.; Minchev, I.; Antoja, T.; Bienaymé, O.; Gibson, B. K.; Grebel, E. K.; Kordopatis, G.; McMillan, P.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Quillen, A. C.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siebert, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zwitter, T.

    2018-05-01

    Before the publication of the Gaia DR2 we confirmed with RAVE and TGAS an observation recently made with the GALAH survey by Quillen ey al. concerning the Coma Berenices moving group in the Solar neighbourhood, namely that it is only present at negative Galactic latitudes. This allowed us to show that it is coherent in vertical velocity, providing a first evidence for incomplete vertical phase-mixing. We estimated for the first time from dynamical arguments that the moving group must have formed at most ~ 1.5 Gyr ago, and related this to a pericentric passage of the Sagittarius dwarf satellite galaxy. The present note is a rewritten version of the original arXiv post on this result now also including a confirmation of our finding with Gaia DR2.

  7. On the phase velocity of plasma waves in a self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreev, N. E.; Kirsanov, V. I.; Sakharov, A. S.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Goloviznin, V. V.

    1996-01-01

    The properties of the wake field excited by a flattop laser pulse with a sharp leading edge and a power below the critical one for relativistic self-focusing are studied analytically and numerically with emphasis on the phase velocity of the plasma wave. The paraxial model describing modulation of

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of argon ion velocities near the sheath boundary of an argon-xenon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dongsoo; Severn, Greg; Oksuz, Lutfi; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2006-01-01

    The Bohm sheath criterion in single- and two-ion species plasma is studied with laser-induced fluorescence using a diode laser. Xenon is added to a low pressure unmagnetized dc hot filament argon discharge confined by surface multidipole magnetic fields. The Ar II transition at 668.614 nm is adopted for optical pumping to detect the fluorescence from the plasma and to measure the argon ion velocity distribution functions with respect to positions relative to a negatively biased boundary plate. The structures of the plasma sheath and presheath are measured by an emissive probe. The ion concentrations of the two-species in the bulk plasma are calculated from ion acoustic wave experiments. Results are compared with previous experiments of Ar-He plasmas in which the argon ions were the heavier ion species. Unlike the previous results, the argon speed is slower than its own Bohm velocity near the sheath-presheath boundary in the Ar-Xe plasma where argon ions are the lighter ion species. We argue that this result is consistent with the behaviour of the helium ion required by the generalized Bohm criterion in the previous experiments with Ar-He plasmas. Further, our results suggest that the measured argon ion speed approaches the ion sound speed of the system

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of argon and xenon ion velocities near the sheath boundary in 3 ion species plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Severn, Greg [Department of Physics, University of San Diego, San Diego, California 92110 (United States); Baalrud, Scott D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The Bohm sheath criterion is studied with laser-induced fluorescence in three ion species plasmas using two tunable diode lasers. Krypton is added to a low pressure unmagnetized DC hot filament discharge in a mixture of argon and xenon gas confined by surface multi-dipole magnetic fields. The argon and xenon ion velocity distribution functions are measured at the sheath-presheath boundary near a negatively biased boundary plate. The potential structures of the plasma sheath and presheath are measured by an emissive probe. Results are compared with previous experiments with Ar–Xe plasmas, where the two ion species were observed to reach the sheath edge at nearly the same speed. This speed was the ion sound speed of the system, which is consistent with the generalized Bohm criterion. In such two ion species plasmas, instability enhanced collisional friction was demonstrated [Hershkowitz et al., Phys. Plasmas 18(5), 057102 (2011).] to exist which accounted for the observed results. When three ion species are present, it is demonstrated under most circumstances the ions do not fall out of the plasma at their individual Bohm velocities. It is also shown that under most circumstances the ions do not fall out of the plasma at the system sound speed. These observations are also consistent with the presence of the instabilities.

  10. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and “wind pressure” resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional “drive parameter,” is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance

  11. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auluck, S. K. H., E-mail: skhauluck@gmail.com, E-mail: skauluck@barc.gov.in [Physics Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai (India)

    2014-09-15

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and “wind pressure” resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional “drive parameter,” is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance.

  12. Daytime, low latitude, vertical ExB drift velocities, inferred from ground-based magnetometer observations in the Peruvian, Philippine and Indian longitude sectors under quiet and disturbed conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, D; Chau, J; Yumoto, K; Bhattacharya, A; Alex, S

    2006-01-01

    Daytime, low latitude, vertical ExB drift velocities, inferred from ground-based magnetometer observations in the Peruvian, Philippine and Indian longitude sectors under quiet and disturbed conditions

  13. Study of microinstabilities due to an anisotropic velocity distribution function of the particles of a homogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennion, F.

    1966-06-01

    A study is made of instabilities in a plasma with an ion velocity distribution function of the form: f oi = 1 / (2*π*α p e i *α p a i ) * λ(ν p e - α p e i ) * e -(v p a 2 /α p a i 2 ) . The plasma is assumed to have finite dimensions limited by infinitely conductive boundary surfaces. A theoretical and numerical analysis of marginal stability locates the regions of stability as a function of several parameters; i.e. plasma length, ion anisotropy (τ) and electron temperature (T e ). A limiting plasma length is found, below which the plasma is stable regardless of its density. For the parameters of the injection experiment M.M.I.I. at Fontenay-aux-roses it is found that the type of instabilities studied here should not occur. (author) [fr

  14. Ultrafast modulation of the plasma frequency of vertically aligned indium tin oxide rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Daniel B; Li, Shi-Qiang; Tagliazucchi, Mario; Buchholz, D Bruce; Weiss, Emily A; Chang, Robert P H

    2014-03-12

    Light-matter interaction at the nanoscale is of particular interest for future photonic integrated circuits and devices with applications ranging from communication to sensing and imaging. In this Letter a combination of transient absorption (TA) and the use of third harmonic generation as a probe (THG-probe) has been adopted to investigate the response of the localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) of vertically aligned indium tin oxide rods (ITORs) upon ultraviolet light (UV) excitation. TA experiments, which are sensitive to the extinction of the LSPR, show a fluence-dependent increase in the frequency and intensity of the LSPR. The THG-probe experiments show a fluence-dependent decrease of the LSPR-enhanced local electric field intensity within the rod, consistent with a shift of the LSPR to higher frequency. The kinetics from both TA and THG-probe experiments are found to be independent of the fluence of the pump. These results indicate that UV excitation modulates the plasma frequency of ITO on the ultrafast time scale by the injection of electrons into, and their subsequent decay from, the conduction band of the rods. Increases to the electron concentration in the conduction band of ∼13% were achieved in these experiments. Computer simulation and modeling have been used throughout the investigation to guide the design of the experiments and to map the electric field distribution around the rods for interpreting far-field measurement results.

  15. ATCA digital controller hardware for vertical stabilization of plasmas in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, A. J. N.; Sousa, J.; Varandas, C. A. F.

    2006-01-01

    The efficient vertical stabilization (VS) of plasmas in tokamaks requires a fast reaction of the VS controller, for example, after detection of edge localized modes (ELM). For controlling the effects of very large ELMs a new digital control hardware, based on the Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture trade mark sign (ATCA), is being developed aiming to reduce the VS digital control loop cycle (down to an optimal value of 10 μs) and improve the algorithm performance. The system has 1 ATCA trade mark sign processor module and up to 12 ATCA trade mark sign control modules, each one with 32 analog input channels (12 bit resolution), 4 analog output channels (12 bit resolution), and 8 digital input/output channels. The Aurora trade mark sign and PCI Express trade mark sign communication protocols will be used for data transport, between modules, with expected latencies below 2 μs. Control algorithms are implemented on a ix86 based processor with 6 Gflops and on field programmable gate arrays with 80 GMACS, interconnected by serial gigabit links in a full mesh topology

  16. Local Void Fractions and Bubble Velocity in Vertical Air-Water Two-Phase Flows Measured by Needle-Contact Capacitance Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanfang Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiphase flow measurements have become increasingly important in a wide range of industrial fields. In the present study, a dual needle-contact capacitance probe was newly designed to measure local void fractions and bubble velocity in a vertical channel, which was verified by digital high-speed camera system. The theoretical analyses and experiments show that the needle-contact capacitance probe can reliably measure void fractions with the readings almost independent of temperature and salinity for the experimental conditions. In addition, the trigger-level method was chosen as the signal processing method for the void fraction measurement, with a minimum relative error of −4.59%. The bubble velocity was accurately measured within a relative error of 10%. Meanwhile, dynamic response of the dual needle-contact capacitance probe was analyzed in detail. The probe was then used to obtain raw signals for vertical pipe flow regimes, including plug flow, slug flow, churn flow, and bubbly flow. Further experiments indicate that the time series of the output signals vary as the different flow regimes and are consistent with each flow structure.

  17. Measurements of the toroidal plasma rotation velocity in TFTR major-radius compression experiments with auxiliary neutral beam heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitter, M.; Wong, K.L.; Scott, S.; Hsuan, H.; Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; Tait, G.

    1990-01-01

    The time history of the central toroidal plasma rotation velocity in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experiments [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2587 (1985)] with auxiliary heating by neutral deuterium beam injection and major-radius compression has been measured from the Doppler shift of the emitted Ti XXI Kα line radiation. The experiments were conducted for neutral beam powers in the range 2.1--3.8 MW and line-averaged densities in the range 1.8--3.0x10 19 m -2 . The observed rotation velocity increase during compression is consistent with theoretical estimates

  18. Velocity-space diffusion due to resonant wave-wave scattering of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugaya, Reija

    1991-01-01

    The velocity-space diffusion equation describing distortion of the velocity distribution function due to resonant wave-wave scattering of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves in an unmagnetized plasma is derived from the Vlasov-Maxwell equations by perturbation theory. The conservation laws for total energy and momentum densities of waves and particles are verified, and the time evolutions of the energy and momentum densities of particles are given in terms of the nonlinear wave-wave coupling coefficient in the kinetic wave equation. (author)

  19. Ten kilometer vertical Moho offset and shallow velocity contrast along the Denali fault zone from double-difference tomography, receiver functions, and fault zone head waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, A. A.; Schulte-Pelkum, V.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Tape, C.; Ruppert, N.; Ross, Z. E.

    2017-11-01

    We examine the structure of the Denali fault system in the crust and upper mantle using double-difference tomography, P-wave receiver functions, and analysis (spatial distribution and moveout) of fault zone head waves. The three methods have complementary sensitivity; tomography is sensitive to 3D seismic velocity structure but smooths sharp boundaries, receiver functions are sensitive to (quasi) horizontal interfaces, and fault zone head waves are sensitive to (quasi) vertical interfaces. The results indicate that the Mohorovičić discontinuity is vertically offset by 10 to 15 km along the central 600 km of the Denali fault in the imaged region, with the northern side having shallower Moho depths around 30 km. An automated phase picker algorithm is used to identify 1400 events that generate fault zone head waves only at near-fault stations. At shorter hypocentral distances head waves are observed at stations on the northern side of the fault, while longer propagation distances and deeper events produce head waves on the southern side. These results suggest a reversal of the velocity contrast polarity with depth, which we confirm by computing average 1D velocity models separately north and south of the fault. Using teleseismic events with M ≥ 5.1, we obtain 31,400 P receiver functions and apply common-conversion-point stacking. The results are migrated to depth using the derived 3D tomography model. The imaged interfaces agree with the tomography model, showing a Moho offset along the central Denali fault and also the sub-parallel Hines Creek fault, a suture zone boundary 30 km to the north. To the east, this offset follows the Totschunda fault, which ruptured during the M7.9 2002 earthquake, rather than the Denali fault itself. The combined results suggest that the Denali fault zone separates two distinct crustal blocks, and that the Totschunda and Hines Creeks segments are important components of the fault and Cretaceous-aged suture zone structure.

  20. Investigation and visualization of liquid–liquid flow in a vertically mounted Hele-Shaw cell: flow regimes, velocity and shape of droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shad, S; Gates, I D; Maini, B B

    2009-01-01

    The motion and shape of a liquid drop flowing within a continuous, conveying liquid phase in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell were investigated experimentally. The continuous phase was more viscous and wetted the bounding walls of the Hele-Shaw cell. The gap between the Hele-Shaw plates was set equal to 0.0226 cm. Four different flow regimes were observed: (a) small-droplet flow, (b) elongated-droplet flow, (c) churn flow and (d) channel flow. At low capillary number, that is, when capillary forces are larger than viscous forces, the droplet shape was irregular and changed with time and distance, and it moved with lower velocity than that of the conveying phase. At higher capillary number, several different shapes of stabilized elongated and flattened drops were observed. In contrast to gas–liquid systems, the velocities of droplets are higher than that of conveying liquid. New correlations derived from dimensionless analysis and fitted to the experimental data were generated to predict the elongated-drop velocity and aspect ratio

  1. Investigation and visualization of liquid-liquid flow in a vertically mounted Hele-Shaw cell: flow regimes, velocity and shape of droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shad, S.; Gates, I. D.; Maini, B. B.

    2009-11-01

    The motion and shape of a liquid drop flowing within a continuous, conveying liquid phase in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell were investigated experimentally. The continuous phase was more viscous and wetted the bounding walls of the Hele-Shaw cell. The gap between the Hele-Shaw plates was set equal to 0.0226 cm. Four different flow regimes were observed: (a) small-droplet flow, (b) elongated-droplet flow, (c) churn flow and (d) channel flow. At low capillary number, that is, when capillary forces are larger than viscous forces, the droplet shape was irregular and changed with time and distance, and it moved with lower velocity than that of the conveying phase. At higher capillary number, several different shapes of stabilized elongated and flattened drops were observed. In contrast to gas-liquid systems, the velocities of droplets are higher than that of conveying liquid. New correlations derived from dimensionless analysis and fitted to the experimental data were generated to predict the elongated-drop velocity and aspect ratio.

  2. Effect of Weakly Nonthermal Ion Velocity Distribution on Jeans Instability in a Complex Plasma in Presence of Secondary Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.; Maity, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the effect of weak nonthermality of ion velocity distribution on Jean’s instability in a complex plasma in presence of secondary electrons and negatively charged dust grains. The primary and secondary electron temperatures are assumed equal. Thus plasma under consideration consists of three components: Boltzman distributed electrons, non-thermal ions and negatively charged inertial dust grains. From the linear dispersion relation we have calculated the real frequency and growth rate of the Jean’s mode. Numerically we have found that secondary electron emission destabilizes Jean’s mode when ion nonthermality is weak. (author)

  3. The analog of Blanc's law for drift velocities of electrons in gas mixtures in weakly ionized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiflikian, R.V.

    1995-01-01

    The analog of Blanc's law for drift velocities of electrons in multicomponent gas mixtures in weakly ionized spatially homogeneous low-temperature plasma is derived. The obtained approximate-analytical expressions are valid for average electron energy in the 1--5 eV range typical for plasma conditions of low-pressure direct current (DC) discharges. The accuracy of these formulas is ±5%. The analytical criterion of the negative differential conductivity (NDC) of electrons in binary mixtures of gases is obtained. NDC of electrons is predicted in He:Kr and He:Xe rare gas mixtures. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  4. Convenient method for estimating underground s-wave velocity structure utilizing horizontal and vertical components microtremor spectral ratio; Bido no suiheido/jogedo supekutoru hi wo riyoshita kan`i chika s ha sokudo kozo suiteiho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H; Yoshioka, M; Saito, T [Iwate University, Iwate (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-05-01

    Studies were conducted about the method of estimating the underground S-wave velocity structure by inversion making use of the horizontal/vertical motion spectral ratio of microtremors. For this purpose, a dynamo-electric velocity type seismograph was used, capable of processing the east-west, north-south, and vertical components integratedly. For the purpose of sampling the Rayleigh wave spectral ratio, one out of all the azimuths was chosen, whose horizontal motion had a high Fourier frequency component coherency with the vertical motions. For the estimation of the underground S-wave velocity structure, parameters (P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and layer thickness) were determined from the minimum residual sum of squares involving the observed microtremor spectral ratio and the theoretical value calculated by use of a model structure. The known boring data was utilized for the study of the S-wave velocity in the top layer, and it was determined using an S-wave velocity estimation formula for the Morioka area constructed using the N-value, depth, and geological classification. It was found that the optimum S-wave velocity structure even below the top layer well reflects the S-wave velocity obtained by the estimation formula. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Measurements of the toroidal plasma rotation velocity in TFTR major-radius compression experiments with auxiliary neutral beam heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitter, M.; Scott, S.; Wong, K.L.

    1986-07-01

    The time history of the central toroidal plasma rotation velocity in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experiments with auxiliary heating by neutral deuterium beam injection and major-radius compression has been measured from the Doppler shift of the emitted TiXXI-Kα line radiation. The experiments were conducted for neutral beam powers in the range from 2.1 to 3.8 MW and line-averaged densities in the range from 1.8 to 3.0 x 10 19 m -2 . The observed rotation velocity increase during compression is in agreement with results from modeling calculations which assume classical slowing-down of the injected fast deuterium ions and momentum damping at the rate established in the precompression plasma

  6. Plasma Vertical Control with Internal and External Coils in Nest Step Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.E. Kessel; P. Heitzenroeder; C. Jun

    2000-11-03

    Vertical stability and control are examined for a tokamak configuration intended to be a generic representation of next step devices. Vertical stability calculations show that a critical resistive wall location can be determined for realistic structures, and that the introduction of small amounts of low resistivity material to an all steel structure can significantly reduce the vertical instability growth rate. Vertical control simulations show that internal control coils require significantly less feedback power than external coils, and that low resistivity materials can allow very low feedback powers or coils to be located externally with reasonable feedback powers.

  7. Determination of charge on vertically aligned particles in a complex plasma using laser excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Prior, N J; Samarian, A A

    2003-01-01

    Experimental studies on vertical oscillations of few particle vertical structures are described. One and two particle strings were subjected to two types of vertically driven oscillations. The first was electrode driven, which excites the structure as a whole, while the second was laser driven, which excites one particle in the structure only. The latter experiments are highly original, enabling us to excite two vertical resonances in our two particle structures. From the close agreement between our experimental data and theoretical model, several important physical parameters have been estimated, including the charge ratio and the Debye length.

  8. Anomalous resistivity due to low-frequency turbulence. [of collisionless plasma with limited acceleration of high velocity runaway electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, H. L.; Palmadesso, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    Large amplitude ion cyclotron waves have been observed on auroral field lines. In the presence of an electric field parallel to the ambient magnetic field these waves prevent the acceleration of the bulk of the plasma electrons leading to the formation of a runaway tail. It is shown that low-frequency turbulence can also limit the acceleration of high-velocity runaway electrons via pitch angle scattering at the anomalous Doppler resonance.

  9. Superexponentially damped Vlasov plasma oscillations in the Fourier transformed velocity space

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, Zdeněk; Nocera, L.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, supplement D (2002), s. 65-69 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology/20th./. Prague, 10.06.2002-13.06.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : Vlasov plasma, oscillator Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2002

  10. A coaxial plasma gun with a controllable streaming velocity in the range of 2-90 km secsup(-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataramani, N.; Mattoo, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    A coaxial plasma gun capable of producing a plasma stream of velocity ranging between 2 and 90 km secsup(-1) is described. The velocity of the stream is controlled by a variable (0.2-25 Ω) NaCl salt solution resistor in the discharge path of the energy storage connected across the gun. The resistor dissipates an energy of 200 J in the gun discharge current pulse period of 25 μ sec and the consequent heating and dissociation of the electrolyte are insignificant. The electron density of the plasma stream ranges between 10 18 and 10 19 msup(-3) and the temperature is approximately 10 eV. The total number of ions per plasma pulse is approximately 10 18 . The energy transfer efficiency of the gun is approximately 10%. The low transfer efficiency is explained in terms of the experimental requirements and the performance of the valve which admits gas into the gun region. For evaluation of the performance of the gun, several diagnostics have been deployed. A specially designed high voltage capacitor probe is described. (author)

  11. Feasibility studies on plasma vertical position control by ex-vessel coils in ITER-like tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Shimomura, Yasuo

    1993-01-01

    Feasibility of the plasma vertical position control by control coils installed outside the vacuum vessel (ex-vessel) in a tokamak fusion reactor is examined for an ITER-like device. When a pair of ex-vessel control coils is made of normal conductor material and located near the outmost superconducting (SC) poloidal field (PF) coils, the applied voltage of several hundred volts on the control coils is the maximum allowable value which is limited by the maximum allowable induced voltage and eddy current heating on the SC PF coils, under the conditions that the SC PF coils are connected in series and a partitioning connection is employed for each of these PF coils. A proportional and derivative (PD) controller with and without voltage limitation has been employed to examine the feasibility. Indices of settling time and overshoot are introduced to measure the controllability of the control system. Based on these control schemes and indices, higher elongation (κ=2) and moderate elongation (κ=1.6) plasmas are examined for normal and deteriorated (low beta value and peaked current profile) plasma conditions within the restriction of applied voltage and current of control coils. The effect of the time constant of the passive stabilizer is also examined. The major results are: (1) A plasma with an elongation of 2.0 inevitably requires a passive stabilizer close to the plasma surface, (2) in case of a higher elongation than κ=2, even the ex-vessel control coil system is marginally controllable under normal plasma conditions, while it is difficult to control the deteriorated plasma conditions, (3) the time constant of the passive stabilizer is not an essential parameter for the controllability, (4) when the elongation is reduced down to 1.6, the ex-vessel control coil system can control the plasma even under deteriorated plasma conditions. (orig.)

  12. Visualization study of interaction with 2-D film flow on the vertical plate and lateral air velocity for DVI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Sol; Lee, Jae Young [Handong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Euh, Dong Jin; Kim, Jong Rok [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The present study investigates liquid film flow generated in a downcomer of direct vessel injection (DVI) system which is employed as an emergency core cooling (ECC) system during a loss of coolant accident in the Korea nuclear power plant APR1400. During the late reflooding, complicated multi-phase flow phenomena including the wavy film flow, film breakup, entrainment, liquid film shift due to interfacial drag and gas jet impingement occur. In order to obtain a proper scaling law of the flow, local information of the flow was investigated experimentally and also numerically. A series of experiments were conducted in the 1/20 modified linear scaled plate type test rig to analyze a liquid film from ECC water injection through the DVI nozzle to the downcomer wall. A confocal chromatic sensor was used to measure the local instantaneous liquid film thickness. In this study, the average flow information of the downcomer was analyzed through the information about the thickness, speed, droplet size and speed of highly precise liquid film flow in the structure that occurs in a 2-dimensional liquid film flow, rather than film flow, onset of entrainment, droplet velocity, and size which have been studied in 1-dimension of the existing annular flow. The multi-dimensional flow characteristic information of downcomer can be utilized as the basic data for nuclear safety analysis in the future.

  13. Modifications to the pulsar kick velocity due to magnetic interactions in dense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhya, S P; Roy, P K; Dutt-Mazumder, A K

    2014-01-01

    In this work we calculate the pulsar kick velocity of a magnetized neutron star (NS) composed of a degenerate quark matter core with non-Fermi liquid (NFL) correction. Both the leading order (LO) and next to LO (NLO) corrections to the kick velocity have been incorporated. In addition, the NFL corrections to the specific heat of magnetized quark matter have been presented. This has been taken into account to calculate the kick velocity of the NS. The results show a significant departure from the normal Fermi liquid estimates. The relation between radius and temperature has been shown with a kick velocity of 100 km s −1 with and without NFL corrections. (paper)

  14. X-ray line transfer in plasmas with large velocity gradients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kerr, F.M.; Gouveia, A.; Lee, R. W.; Patel, P. K.; Renner, Oldřich; Rose, S. J.; Scott, H.A.; Wark, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 298, 1-2 (2005), s. 171-178 ISSN 0004-640X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : plasmas * radiation transport * high-power laserplasmas * high-power lasers Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.495, year: 2005

  15. Nonlinear control of turbulence and velocity space diffusion in beam plasma systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Results of low energy electron beam-plasma heating experiments are discussed. A figure of merit which can be used to compare different beam heating experiments is presented. Some general observations about the possibility of useful beam plasma heating are mentioned. (U.S.)

  16. Controllability study of EAST plasma vertical instability and improvement in future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L., E-mail: liulei@ipp.ac.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Xiao, B.J., E-mail: bjxiao@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Humphreys, D.A., E-mail: dave.humphreys@gat.com [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Luo, Z.P., E-mail: zhpluo@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Chen, S.L., E-mail: slchen@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China)

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • The discontinuous passive plate model is developed and verified by experiment. • The power supply upgrade requirements for VDE control are evaluated. • We investigate efficacy of internal control coil location for VDE control. • Maximum controllable vertical displacement experiments are done. • EAST VDE controllability is roughly given by VDE experiments. - Abstract: In order to enhance control speed, each up/down Cu passive plate in EAST is cut into 8 pieces. These discontinuous plate segments are still connected to the inner vacuum vessel by steel supporting legs. A model of this plate segments-vessel-supporting leg loop is developed and verified by EAST vertical displacement event (VDE) experiments. The internal coil (IC) power supply requirements for VDE control are also evaluated. In particularly, we investigate the efficacy of internal control coil location to minimize the power supply capability. The IC power supply upgrade requirements for the optimized location and actual location are discussed. VDE experiments to evaluate maximum controllable vertical displacement (dZmax) were done with varying elongation and resulting EAST vertical controllability estimates are summarized here. These experimental results verified previous simulation results that present IC power supply capacity cannot provide robust vertical control.

  17. Controllability study of EAST plasma vertical instability and improvement in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.; Xiao, B.J.; Humphreys, D.A.; Luo, Z.P.; Chen, S.L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The discontinuous passive plate model is developed and verified by experiment. • The power supply upgrade requirements for VDE control are evaluated. • We investigate efficacy of internal control coil location for VDE control. • Maximum controllable vertical displacement experiments are done. • EAST VDE controllability is roughly given by VDE experiments. - Abstract: In order to enhance control speed, each up/down Cu passive plate in EAST is cut into 8 pieces. These discontinuous plate segments are still connected to the inner vacuum vessel by steel supporting legs. A model of this plate segments-vessel-supporting leg loop is developed and verified by EAST vertical displacement event (VDE) experiments. The internal coil (IC) power supply requirements for VDE control are also evaluated. In particularly, we investigate the efficacy of internal control coil location to minimize the power supply capability. The IC power supply upgrade requirements for the optimized location and actual location are discussed. VDE experiments to evaluate maximum controllable vertical displacement (dZmax) were done with varying elongation and resulting EAST vertical controllability estimates are summarized here. These experimental results verified previous simulation results that present IC power supply capacity cannot provide robust vertical control

  18. Cytocompatibility studies of vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes: Raw material and functionalized by oxygen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, A.O., E-mail: loboao@yahoo.com [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais, INPE, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, ITA, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Laboratorio de Nanotecnologia Biomedica, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Corat, M.A.F. [Centro Multidisciplinar para Investigacao Biologica na Area da Ciencia em Animais de Laboratorio, CEMIB, UNICAMP, Campinas/SP (Brazil); Antunes, E.F. [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais, INPE, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, ITA, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.C. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, ITA, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Pacheco-Soares, C. [Laboratorio de Dinamica de Compartimentos Celulares, UNIVAP, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); and others

    2012-05-01

    It was presented a strong difference on cell adhesion and proliferation of functionalized vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube (VACNT) scaffolds compared to raw-VACNT. Biocompatibility in vitro tests were performed on raw-VACNT after superficial modification by oxygen plasma, which changes its superhydrophobic character to superhydrophilic. Two cytocompatibility tests were applied: 1) total lactate dehydrogenase colorimetric assay for the study of proliferating cells; and 2) cellular adhesion by scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that superhydrophilic VACNT scaffolds stimulate cell growth with proliferation up to 70% higher than normal growth of cell culture.

  19. Atomic layer deposition of ruthenium on plasma-treated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes for high-performance ultracapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Woo; Kim, Byungwoo; Park, Suk Won; Kim, Woong; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2014-10-31

    It is challenging to realize a conformal metal coating by atomic layer deposition (ALD) because of the high surface energy of metals. In this study, ALD of ruthenium (Ru) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was carried out. To activate the surface of CNTs that lack surface functional groups essential for ALD, oxygen plasma was applied ex situ before ALD. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy confirmed surface activation of CNTs by the plasma pretreatment. Transmission electron microscopy analysis with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy composition mapping showed that ALD Ru grew conformally along CNTs walls. ALD Ru/CNTs were electrochemically oxidized to ruthenium oxide (RuOx) that can be a potentially useful candidate for use in the electrodes of ultracapacitors. Electrode performance of RuOx/CNTs was evaluated using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements.

  20. Vertically-oriented graphenes supported Mn3O4 as advanced catalysts in post plasma-catalysis for toluene decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Zheng; Hao, Han; Yang, Shiling; Zhu, Jinhui; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2018-04-01

    This work reports the catalytic performance of vertically-oriented graphenes (VGs) supported manganese oxide catalysts toward toluene decomposition in post plasma-catalysis (PPC) system. Dense networks of VGs were synthesized on carbon paper (CP) via a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. A constant current approach was applied in a conventional three-electrode electrochemical system for the electrodeposition of Mn3O4 catalysts on VGs. The as-obtained catalysts were characterized and investigated for ozone conversion and toluene decomposition in a PPC system. Experimental results show that the Mn3O4 catalyst loading mass on VG-coated CP was significantly higher than that on pristine CP (almost 1.8 times for an electrodeposition current of 10 mA). Moreover, the decoration of VGs led to both enhanced catalytic activity for ozone conversion and increased toluene decomposition, exhibiting a great promise in PPC system for the effective decomposition of volatile organic compounds.

  1. Turbulent transport and shear at the E x B velocity in wall plasma of the TF-2 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budaev, V.P.

    1999-01-01

    Turbulence of near-the-wall plasma and potentialities of affecting the turbulence and periphery transport of the TF-2 tokamak by inducing radial electric fields and ergodization of periphery magnetic structure have been investigated, the results are presented. Essential role of the E x B velocity shear in suppression of the turbulence and turbulent transport in periphery has been pointed out. Decrease in transport losses stemming from effect of radial electric fields is brought about suppression of turbulence amplitude, decrease in correlations and decrease in the width of the wave numbers spectrum. Profiles of plasma density, electron temperature, turbulence level, electric fields over entire periphery of discharge change as a result. Ergodization of magnetic structure also results in the change of properties of periphery turbulence and turbulent transport [ru

  2. The Relationship Between Latent Heating, Vertical Velocity, and Precipitation Processes: the Impact of Aerosols on Precipitation in Organized Deep Convective Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen

    2016-01-01

    A high-resolution, two-dimensional cloud-resolving model with spectral-bin microphysics is used to study the impact of aerosols on precipitation processes in both a tropical oceanic and a midlatitude continental squall line with regard to three processes: latent heating (LH), cold pool dynamics, and ice microphysics. Evaporative cooling in the lower troposphere is found to enhance rainfall in low cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration scenarios in the developing stages of a midlatitude convective precipitation system. In contrast, the tropical case produced more rainfall under high CCN concentrations. Both cold pools and low-level convergence are stronger for those configurations having enhanced rainfall. Nevertheless, latent heat release is stronger (especially after initial precipitation) in the scenarios having more rainfall in both the tropical and midlatitude environment. Sensitivity tests are performed to examine the impact of ice and evaporative cooling on the relationship between aerosols, LH, and precipitation processes. The results show that evaporative cooling is important for cold pool strength and rain enhancement in both cases. However, ice microphysics play a larger role in the midlatitude case compared to the tropics. Detailed analysis of the vertical velocity-governing equation shows that temperature buoyancy can enhance updraftsdowndrafts in the middlelower troposphere in the convective core region; however, the vertical pressure gradient force (PGF) is of the same order and acts in the opposite direction. Water loading is small but of the same order as the net PGF-temperature buoyancy forcing. The balance among these terms determines the intensity of convection.

  3. Superexponentially damped Vlasov plasma oscillations in the Fourier transformed velocity space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlacek, Z.; Nocera, L.

    2002-01-01

    The Landau (exponentially) damped solutions of the Vlasov-Poisson equation Fourier transformed with respect to velocity are genuine eigenmodes corresponding to complex eigenvalues. In addition there exist solutions decaying faster than exponentially which exhibit no oscillatory behaviour. A new characterization is given of the initial conditions that give rise to these solutions together with a numerical demonstration

  4. Turbulent transport reduction by E x B velocity shear during edge plasma biasing in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Oost, G. [Dept. of Applied Physics, Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium); Adamek, J.; Antoni, V.; Balan, P.; Boedo, J.A.; Devynck, P.; Duran, I.; Eliseev, L.; Gunn, J.P.; Hron, M.; Ionita, C.; Jachmich, S.; Kirnev, G.S.; Martines, E.; Melnikov, A.; Peleman, P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Silva, C.; Stoeckel, J.; Tendler, M.; Varandas, C.; Van Schoor, M.; Vershkov, V.; Weynants, R.R.

    2004-07-01

    Experiments in the tokamaks TEXTOR, CASTOR, T-10 and ISTTOK have provided new and complementary evidence on the physics of the universal mechanism of E x B velocity shear stabilization of turbulence, concomitant transport barrier formation and radial conductivity by using various edge biasing techniques. (orig.)

  5. Increase of electrodeposited catalyst stability via plasma grown vertically oriented graphene nanoparticle movement restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanrenterghem, Bart; Hodnik, Nejc; Bele, Marjan; Šala, Martin; Amelinckx, Giovanni; Neukermans, Sander; Zaplotnik, Rok; Primc, Gregor; Mozetič, Miran; Breugelmans, Tom

    2017-08-17

    Beside activity, electrocatalyst stability is gaining in importance. The most common degradation mechanism is the loss of the active surface area due to nanoparticle growth via coalescence/agglomeration. We propose a particle confinement strategy via vertically oriented graphene deposition to overcome degradation of the nanoparticles.

  6. Visualization tool for three-dimensional plasma velocity distributions (ISEE_3D) as a plug-in for SPEDAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keika, Kunihiro; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Machida, Shinobu; Ieda, Akimasa; Seki, Kanako; Hori, Tomoaki; Miyashita, Yukinaga; Shoji, Masafumi; Shinohara, Iku; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Lewis, Jim W.; Flores, Aaron

    2017-12-01

    This paper introduces ISEE_3D, an interactive visualization tool for three-dimensional plasma velocity distribution functions, developed by the Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Japan. The tool provides a variety of methods to visualize the distribution function of space plasma: scatter, volume, and isosurface modes. The tool also has a wide range of functions, such as displaying magnetic field vectors and two-dimensional slices of distributions to facilitate extensive analysis. The coordinate transformation to the magnetic field coordinates is also implemented in the tool. The source codes of the tool are written as scripts of a widely used data analysis software language, Interactive Data Language, which has been widespread in the field of space physics and solar physics. The current version of the tool can be used for data files of the plasma distribution function from the Geotail satellite mission, which are publicly accessible through the Data Archives and Transmission System of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS)/Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The tool is also available in the Space Physics Environment Data Analysis Software to visualize plasma data from the Magnetospheric Multiscale and the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms missions. The tool is planned to be applied to data from other missions, such as Arase (ERG) and Van Allen Probes after replacing or adding data loading plug-ins. This visualization tool helps scientists understand the dynamics of space plasma better, particularly in the regions where the magnetohydrodynamic approximation is not valid, for example, the Earth's inner magnetosphere, magnetopause, bow shock, and plasma sheet.

  7. The postsunset vertical plasma drift during geomagnetic storms and its effects on the generation of equatorial spread F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.

    2017-12-01

    We will present two distinct phenomena related to the postsunset vertical plasma drift and equatorial spread F (ESF) observed by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellite over six years. The first phenomenon is the behavior of the prereversal enhancement (PRE) of the vertical plasma drift during geomagnetic storms. Statistically, storm-time disturbance dynamo electric fields cause the PRE to decrease from 30 to 0 m/s when Dst changes from -60 to -100 nT, but the PRE does not show obvious variations when Dst varies from 0 to -60 nT. The observations show that the storm activities affect the evening equatorial ionosphere only for Dst correlated with the PRE and that the occurrence of small-amplitude ESF irregularities does not show a clear pattern at low solar activity but is anti-correlated with large-amplitude irregularities and the PRE at moderate solar activity. That is, the months and longitudes with high occurrence probability of large-amplitude irregularities are exactly those with low occurrence probability of small-amplitude irregularities, and vice versa. The generation of large-amplitude ESF irregularities is controlled by the PRE, and the generation of small-amplitude ESF irregularities may be caused by gravity waves and other disturbances, rather than by the PRE.

  8. Vertically aligned Si nanocrystals embedded in amorphous Si matrix prepared by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogay, G. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Center of Solar Energy Research and Application (GÜNAM), Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Saleh, Z.M., E-mail: zaki.saleh@aauj.edu [Center of Solar Energy Research and Application (GÜNAM), Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Department of Physics, Arab American University–Jenin (AAUJ), Jenin, Palestine (Country Unknown); Özkol, E. [Center of Solar Energy Research and Application (GÜNAM), Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Department of Chemical Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Turan, R. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Center of Solar Energy Research and Application (GÜNAM), Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Inductively-coupled plasma is used for nanostructured silicon at room temperature. • Low temperature deposition allows device processing on various substrates. • Deposition pressure is the most effective parameter in controlling nanostructure. • Films consist of quantum dots in a-Si matrix and exhibit columnar vertical growth. • Films are porous to oxygen infusion along columnar grain boundaries. - Abstract: Vertically-aligned nanostructured silicon films are deposited at room temperature on p-type silicon wafers and glass substrates by inductively-coupled, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (ICPCVD). The nanocrystalline phase is achieved by reducing pressure and increasing RF power. The crystalline volume fraction (X{sub c}) and the size of the nanocrystals increase with decreasing pressure at constant power. Columnar growth of nc-Si:H films is observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The films exhibit cauliflower-like structures with high porosity that leads to slow but uniform oxidation after exposure to air at room temperature. Films deposited at low pressures exhibit photoluminescence (PL) signals that may be deconvoluted into three distinct Gaussian components: 760–810, 920–935, and 990–1000 nm attributable to the quantum confinement and interface defect states. Hydrogen dilution is manifested in significant enhancement of the PL, but it has little effect on the nanocrystal size and X{sub c}.

  9. Difference of horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios of observed earthquakes and microtremors and its application to S-wave velocity inversion based on the diffuse field concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Hiroshi; Mori, Yuta; Nagashima, Fumiaki

    2018-01-01

    We have been discussing the validity of using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios (HVRs) as a substitute for S-wave amplifications after Nakamura first proposed the idea in 1989. So far a formula for HVRs had not been derived that fully utilized their physical characteristics until a recent proposal based on the diffuse field concept. There is another source of confusion that comes from the mixed use of HVRs from earthquake and microtremors, although their wave fields are hardly the same. In this study, we compared HVRs from observed microtremors (MHVR) and those from observed earthquake motions (EHVR) at one hundred K-NET and KiK-net stations. We found that MHVR and EHVR share similarities, especially until their first peak frequency, but have significant differences in the higher frequency range. This is because microtremors mainly consist of surface waves so that peaks associated with higher modes would not be prominent, while seismic motions mainly consist of upwardly propagating plain body waves so that higher mode resonances can be seen in high frequency. We defined here the spectral amplitude ratio between them as EMR and calculated their average. We categorize all the sites into five bins by their fundamental peak frequencies in MHVR. Once we obtained EMRs for five categories, we back-calculated EHVRs from MHVRs, which we call pseudo-EHVRs (pEHVR). We found that pEHVR is much closer to EHVR than MHVR. Then we use our inversion code to invert the one-dimensional S-wave velocity structures from EHVRs based on the diffuse field concept. We also applied the same code to pEHVRs and MHVRs for comparison. We found that pEHVRs yield velocity structures much closer to those by EHVRs than those by MHVRs. This is natural since what we have done up to here is circular except for the average operation in EMRs. Finally, we showed independent examples of data not used in the EMR calculation, where better ground structures were successfully identified from p

  10. Kinetic transverse dispersion relation for relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas with Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Rodrigo A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Moya, Pablo S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, DC 20064 (United States); Muñoz, Víctor [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Valdivia, J. Alejandro [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-09-15

    We use a kinetic treatment to study the linear transverse dispersion relation for a magnetized isotropic relativistic electron-positron plasma with finite relativistic temperature. The explicit linear dispersion relation for electromagnetic waves propagating along a constant background magnetic field is presented, including an analytical continuation to the whole complex frequency plane for the case of Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution functions. This dispersion relation is studied numerically for various temperatures. For left-handed solutions, the system presents two branches, the electromagnetic ordinary mode and the Alfvén mode. In the low frequency regime, the Alfvén branch has two dispersive zones, the normal zone (where ∂ω/∂k > 0) and an anomalous zone (where ∂ω/∂k < 0). We find that in the anomalous zone of the Alfvén branch, the electromagnetic waves are damped, and there is a maximum wave number for which the Alfvén branch is suppressed. We also study the dependence of the Alfvén velocity and effective plasma frequency with the temperature. We complemented the analytical and numerical approaches with relativistic full particle simulations, which consistently agree with the analytical results.

  11. Inversion methods for fast-ion velocity-space tomography in fusion plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Stagner, L.; Salewski, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Velocity-space tomography has been used to infer 2D fast-ion velocity distribution functions. Here we compare the performance of five different tomographic inversion methods: truncated singular value decomposition, maximum entropy, minimum Fisher information and zeroth and first-order Tikhonov...... regularization. The inversion methods are applied to fast-ion Dα measurements taken just before and just after a sawtooth crash in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak as well as to synthetic measurements from different test distributions. We find that the methods regularizing by penalizing steep gradients or maximizing...... entropy perform best. We assess the uncertainty of the calculated inversions taking into account photon noise, uncertainties in the forward model as well as uncertainties introduced by the regularization which allows us to distinguish regions of high and low confidence in the tomographies. In high...

  12. Analysis of two-phase flow instability in vertical boiling channels I: development of a linear model for the inlet velocity perturbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, D.H.; Yoo, Y.J.; Kim, K.K.

    1998-08-01

    A linear model, named ALFS, is developed for the analysis of two-phase flow instabilities caused by density wave oscillation and flow excursion in a vertical boiling channel with constant pressure drop conditions. The ALFS code can take into account the effect of the phase velocity difference and the thermally non-equilibrium phenomena, and the neutral boundary of the two-phase flow instability was analyzed by D-partition method. Three representative two-phase flow models ( i.e. HEM, DEM, and DNEM) were examined to investigate the effects on the stability analysis. As the results, it reveals that HEM shows the most conservative prediction of heat flux at the onset of flow instability. three linear models, Ishiis DEM, Sahas DNEM, and ALFS model, were applied to Sahas experimental data of density wave oscillation, and as the result, the mean and standard deviation of the predicted-to-measured heat flux at the onset of instability were calculated as 0.93/0.162, 0.79/0.112, and 0.95/0.143, respectively. For the long test section, however, ALFS model tends to predict the heat fluxes about 30 % lower than the measured values. (author). 14 refs

  13. Measurements of long-range enhanced collisional velocity drag through plasma wave damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, M.; Anderegg, F.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Driscoll, C. F.

    2018-05-01

    We present damping measurements of axial plasma waves in magnetized, multispecies ion plasmas. At high temperatures T ≳ 10-2 eV, collisionless Landau damping dominates, whereas, at lower temperatures T ≲ 10-2 eV, the damping arises from interspecies collisional drag, which is dependent on the plasma composition and scales roughly as T-3 /2 . This drag damping is proportional to the rate of parallel collisional slowing, and is found to exceed classical predictions of collisional drag damping by as much as an order of magnitude, but agrees with a new collision theory that includes long-range collisions. Centrifugal mass separation and collisional locking of the species occur at ultra-low temperatures T ≲ 10-3 eV, which reduce the drag damping from the T-3 /2 collisional scaling. These mechanisms are investigated by measuring the damping of higher frequency axial modes, and by measuring the damping in plasmas with a non-equilibrium species profile.

  14. Ion temperature gradient driven mode in presence of transverse velocity shear in magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, N.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Michelsen, Poul

    2005-01-01

    The effect of sheared poloidal flow on the toroidal branch of the ion temperature gradient driven mode of magnetized nonuniform plasma is studied. A novel "nonmodal" calculation is used to analyze the problem. It is shown that the transverse shear flow considerably reduced the growth...

  15. Velocity-space tomography of fusion plasmas by collective Thomson scattering of gyrotron radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Jacobsen, A.S.; Jensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    -tonoise ratio becomes fairly low for MeV-range ions. Ions at any energy can be detected well by collective Thomson scattering of mm-wave radiation from a high-power gyrotron. We demonstrate how collective Thomson scattering can be used to measure 푓2퐷푣 in the MeV-range in reactor relevant plasmas...

  16. Unified solution of the Boltzmann equation for electron and ion velocity distribution functions and transport coefficients in weakly ionized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Dmitry A.; Cocks, Daniel G.; White, Ronald D.

    2017-10-01

    The velocity distribution function and transport coefficients for charged particles in weakly ionized plasmas are calculated via a multi-term solution of Boltzmann's equation and benchmarked using a Monte-Carlo simulation. A unified framework for the solution of the original full Boltzmann's equation is presented which is valid for ions and electrons, avoiding any recourse to approximate forms of the collision operator in various limiting mass ratio cases. This direct method using Lebedev quadratures over the velocity and scattering angles avoids the need to represent the ion mass dependence in the collision operator through an expansion in terms of the charged particle to neutral mass ratio. For the two-temperature Burnett function method considered in this study, this amounts to avoiding the need for the complex Talmi-transformation methods and associated mass-ratio expansions. More generally, we highlight the deficiencies in the two-temperature Burnett function method for heavy ions at high electric fields to calculate the ion velocity distribution function, even though the transport coefficients have converged. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2016)", edited by Goran Poparic, Bratislav Obradovic, Dragana Maric and Aleksandar Milosavljevic.

  17. Use of acoustic backscatter and vertical velocity to estimate concentration and dynamics of suspended solids in Upper Klamath Lake, south-central Oregon: Implications for Aphanizomenon flos-aquae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Tamara M.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Vertical velocity and acoustic backscatter measurements by acoustic Doppler current profilers were used to determine seasonal, subseasonal (days to weeks), and diel variation in suspended solids in a freshwater lake where massive cyanobacterial blooms occur annually. During the growing season, the suspended material in the lake is dominated by the buoyancy-regulating cyanobacteria, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. Measured variables (water velocity, relative backscatter [RB], wind speed, and air and water temperatures) were averaged over the deployment season at each sample time of day to determine average diel cycles. Phase shifts between diel cycles in RB and diel cycles in wind speed, vertical water temperature differences (delta T(degree)), and horizontal current speeds were found by determining the lead or lag that maximized the linear correlation between the respective diel cycles. Diel cycles in RB were more in phase with delta T(degree) cycles, and, to a lesser extent, wind cycles, than to water current cycles but were out of phase with the cycle that would be expected if the vertical movement of buoyant cyanobacteria colonies was controlled primarily by light. Clear evidence of a diel cycle in vertical velocity was found only at the two deepest sites in the lake. Cycles of vertical velocity, where present, were out of phase with expected vertical motion of cyanobacterial colonies based on the theoretical cycle for light-driven vertical movement. This suggests that water column stability and turbulence were more important factors in controlling vertical distribution of colonies than light. Variations at subseasonal time scales were determined by filtering data to pass periods between 1.2 and 15 days. At subseasonal time scales, correlations between RB and currents or air temperature were consistent with increased concentration of cyanobacterial colonies near the surface when water column stability increased (higher air temperatures or weaker currents) and

  18. In situ Raman spectroscopy for growth monitoring of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes in plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbaye, T.; Gaillard, M.; Lecas, T.; Kovacevic, E.; Boulmer-Leborgne, Ch.; Guimbretière, G. [GREMI, Université-CNRS, BP6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Canizarès, A.; Raimboux, N.; Simon, P.; Ammar, M. R., E-mail: mohamed-ramzi.ammar@cnrs-orleans.fr [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Univ. Orléans, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Strunskus, T. [Institute of Material Science, Chritian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, D-24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2014-11-24

    Portable and highly sensitive Raman setup was associated with a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor enabling in situ growth monitoring of multi-wall carbon nanotubes despite the combination of huge working distance, high growth speed and process temperature and reactive plasma condition. Near Edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used for ex situ sample analysis as a complementary method to in situ Raman spectroscopy. The results confirmed the fact that the “alternating” method developed here can accurately be used for in situ Raman monitoring under reactive plasma condition. The original analytic tool can be of great importance to monitor the characteristics of these nanostructured materials and readily define the ultimate conditions for targeted results.

  19. Low-velocity ion stopping in a dense and low-temperature plasma target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Claude; Popoff, Romain

    2007-07-01

    We investigate the stopping specificities involved in the heating of thin foils irradiated by intense ion beams in the 0.3-3 MeV/amu energy range and in close vicinity of the Bragg peak. Considering a swiftly ionized target to eV temperatures before expansion while retaining solid-state density, a typical warm dense matter (WDM) situation thus arises. We stress low Vp stopping through ion diffusion in the given target plasma. This allows to include the case of a strongly magnetized target in a guiding center approximation. We also demonstrate that the ion projectile penetration depth in target is significantly affected by multiple scattering on target electrons. The given plasma target is taken weakly coupled with Maxwell electron either with no magnetic field ( B=0) or strongly magnetized ( B≠0). Dynamical coupling between ion projectiles energy losses and projectiles charge state will also be addressed.

  20. The influence of beam boundaries and velocity reduction on Pierce instability in laboratory plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, D.

    1982-01-01

    The influences of the beam-plasma boundary and of weak nonlinearities on the Pierce instability are investigated. It is shown that the finite width of the beam has negligible influence on both the stability of the system and growth rate. In the nonlinear regime the wavelength decreases and enhancement of the wave potential close to the beam inlet boundary is observed. The relationship between this effect and the formation of double layers is discussed. (Auth.)

  1. Effect of finite conductivity on the vertical stability of a tokamak plasma column with a noncircular cross section without conducting shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Keiichi; Okuda, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Yuji.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of finite conductivity on the stability of a tokamak plasma column with noncircular cross section without conducting shell was investigated by considering the current filaments model. The study is made for the plasma with rectangular cross section, and in this case, the position control of plasma column is a serious problem. The equation of motion of the plasma column is described for the vertical force applied to the column. The calculation of stability was made for the cases with cross sections of circular, rectangular and D type shapes. The plasma column was considered as an assembly of a lot of circular conductors, and this method can be applied to the plasma column with proper distribution of conductivity. As the results of calculation, it can be said that the electromotive force produced by the column moving in the magnetic field generates surface current on the plasma column, and in case of the finite conductivity of plasma, this current attenuates with time, and the distribution of the current soaks into the plasma column. Consequently, the recovery force acting on the plasma column is reduced, but contributes to the vertical stabilization for several hundreds μsec. (Kato, T.)

  2. Helical structures in vertically aligned dust particle chains in a complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Truell W.; Kong, Jie; Matthews, Lorin S.

    2013-05-01

    Self-assembly of structures from vertically aligned, charged dust particle bundles within a glass box placed on the lower, powered electrode of a Gaseous Electronics Conference rf reference cell were produced and examined experimentally. Self-organized formation of one-dimensional vertical chains, two-dimensional zigzag structures, and three-dimensional helical structures of triangular, quadrangular, pentagonal, hexagonal, and heptagonal symmetries are shown to occur. System evolution is shown to progress from a one-dimensional chain structure, through a zigzag transition to a two-dimensional, spindlelike structure, and then to various three-dimensional, helical structures exhibiting multiple symmetries. Stable configurations are found to be dependent upon the system confinement, γ2=ω0h/ω0v2 (where ω0h,v are the horizontal and vertical dust resonance frequencies), the total number of particles within a bundle, and the rf power. For clusters having fixed numbers of particles, the rf power at which structural phase transitions occur is repeatable and exhibits no observable hysteresis. The critical conditions for these structural phase transitions as well as the basic symmetry exhibited by the one-, two-, and three-dimensional structures that subsequently develop are in good agreement with the theoretically predicted configurations of minimum energy determined employing molecular dynamics simulations for charged dust particles confined in a prolate, spheroidal potential as presented theoretically by Kamimura and Ishihara [Kamimura and Ishihara, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.85.016406 85, 016406 (2012)].

  3. The Influences of H2Plasma Pretreatment on the Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Hua-Chiang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe effects of H2flow rate during plasma pretreatment on synthesizing the multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by using the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition are investigated in this study. A H2and CH4gas mixture with a 9:1 ratio was used as a precursor for the synthesis of MWCNT on Ni-coated TaN/Si(100 substrates. The structure and composition of Ni catalyst nanoparticles were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The present findings showed that denser Ni catalyst nanoparticles and more vertically aligned MWCNTs could be effectively achieved at higher flow rates. From Raman results, we found that the intensity ratio of G and D bands (ID/IG decreases with an increasing flow rate. In addition, TEM results suggest that H2plasma pretreatment can effectively reduce the amorphous carbon and carbonaceous particles. As a result, the pretreatment plays a crucial role in modifying the obtained MWCNTs structures.

  4. Reflection of electromagnetic radiation from plasma with an anisotropic electron velocity distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagin, K. Yu.; Uryupin, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The reflection of a test electromagnetic pulse from the plasma formed as a result of tunnel ionization of atoms in the field of a circularly polarized high-power radiation pulse is analyzed using the kinetic approach to describe electron motion. It is shown that the reflected pulse is significantly amplified due to the development of Weibel instability. The amplification efficiency is determined by the maximum value of the instability growth rate, which depends on the degree of anisotropy of the photoelectron distribution function

  5. Space and velocity distributions of fast ions in magnetically confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolesnichenko, Ya.I.; Lutsenko, V.V.; Lisak, M.; Wising, F.

    1994-01-01

    General expressions in terms of the orbit averaged distribution function are obtained for local characteristic quantities of fast ions, such as the velocity distribution, energy density and power deposition. The resulting expressions are applied to the case of a very peaked production profile of fast ions, characterized by particularly strong orbital effects. It is shown that in this case the radial profiles of the fast ions can be qualitatively different from the source profile, being e.g. strongly non-monotonic. The analysis is carried out for a straight as well as for a tokamak magnetic field. It is predicted that marginally co-passing and semi-trapped particles (i.e. particles that are trapped in only one azimuthal direction) can be transformed to trapped and circulating particles due to electron drag. This leads to e.g. different distribution functions of fast ions in the cases of co- or counter-injection. Collisional constants of motion are obtained

  6. Extremely fast vertical displacement event induced by a plasma βp collapse in high βp tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yukiharu; Yoshino, Ryuji; Pomphrey, N.; Jardin, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    In a vertically elongated (κ ∼ 1.5), high β p (β p ∼ 1.7) tokamak with a resistive shell, extremely fast vertical displacement events (VDE's) induced by a model of strong β p collapse were found through computer simulations using the Tokamak Simulation Code. Although the plasma current quench, which had been shown to be the prime cause of VDE's in a relatively low β p tokamak (β p ∼ 0.2), was not observed during the VDE evolution, the observed growth rate of VDE's was almost five times (γ ∼ 655 sec -1 ) faster than the growth rate of the usual positional instability (γ ∼ 149 sec -1 ). The essential mechanism of the β p collapse-induced VDE was clarified to be the significant destabilization of positional instability due to a large and sudden degradation of the decay n-index in addition to a reduction of the stability index n s . It is pointed out that the shell-geometry characterizes the VDE dynamics, and that the VDE rate depends strongly both on the magnitude of the β p collapse and the n-index of the equilibria just before the β p collapse occurs. A new guide line for designing the fusion reactor is proposed with considering the impact of disruptions. (author)

  7. Acceleration of a solid-density plasma projectile to ultrahigh velocities by a short-pulse ultraviolet laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badziak, J.; Jablonski, S. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Euratom Association, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-08-15

    It is shown by means of particle-in-cell simulations that a high-fluence ({>=}1 GJ/cm{sup 2}) solid-density plasma projectile can be accelerated up to sub-relativistic velocities by radiation pressure of an ultraviolet (UV) picosecond laser pulse of moderate values of dimensionless laser amplitude a{sub 0}{approx}10. The efficiency of acceleration by the UV laser is significantly higher than in the case of long-wavelength ({lambda} {approx} 1 {mu}m) driver of a comparable value of a{sub 0}, and the motion of the projectile is fairly well described by the ''Light Sail'' acceleration model.

  8. Shape, size, velocity and field-aligned currents of dayside plasma injections: a multi-altitude study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marchaudon

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available On 20 February 2005, Cluster in the outer magnetosphere and Double Star-2 (TC-2 at mid-altitude are situated in the vicinity of the northern cusp/mantle, with Cluster moving sunward and TC-2 anti-sunward. Their magnetic footprints come very close together at about 15:28 UT, over the common field-of-view of SuperDARN radars. Thanks to this conjunction, we determine the velocity, the transverse sizes, perpendicular and parallel to this velocity, and the shape of three magnetic flux tubes of magnetosheath plasma injection. The velocity of the structures determined from the Cluster four-spacecraft timing analysis is almost purely antisunward, in contrast with the antisunward and duskward convection velocity inside the flux tubes. The transverse sizes are defined from the Cluster-TC-2 separation perpendicular to the magnetic field, and from the time spent by a Cluster spacecraft in one structure; they are comprised between 0.6 and 2 RE in agreement with previous studies. Finally, using a comparison between the eigenvectors deduced from a variance analysis of the magnetic perturbation at the four Cluster and at TC-2, we show that the upstream side of the injection flux tubes is magnetically well defined, with even a concave front for the third one giving a bean-like shape, whereas the downstream side is far more turbulent. We also realise the first quantitative comparison between field-aligned currents at Cluster calculated with the curlometer technique and with the single-spacecraft method, assuming infinite parallel current sheets and taking into account the velocity of the injection flux tubes. The results agree nicely, confirming the validity of both methods. Finally, we compare the field-aligned current distribution of the three injection flux tubes at the altitudes of Cluster and TC-2. Both profiles are fairly similar, with mainly a pair of opposite field-aligned currents, upward at low-latitude and downward at high-latitude. In terms of

  9. The influence of plasma-surface interaction on the performance of tungsten at the ITER divertor vertical targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Temmerman, G.; Hirai, T.; Pitts, R. A.

    2018-04-01

    The tungsten (W) material in the high heat flux regions of the ITER divertor will be exposed to high fluxes of low-energy particles (e.g. H, D, T, He, Ne and/or N). Combined with long-pulse operations, this implies fluences well in excess of the highest values reached in today’s tokamak experiments. Shaping of the individual monoblock top surface and tilting of the vertical targets for leading-edge protection lead to an increased surface heat flux, and thus increased surface temperature and a reduced margin to remain below the temperature at which recrystallization and grain growth begin. Significant morphology changes are known to occur on W after exposure to high fluences of low-energy particles, be it H or He. An analysis of the formation conditions of these morphology changes is made in relation to the conditions expected at the vertical targets during different phases of operations. It is concluded that both H and He-related effects can occur in ITER. In particular, the case of He-induced nanostructure (also known as ‘fuzz’) is reviewed. Fuzz formation appears possible over a limited region of the outer vertical target, the inner target being generally a net Be deposition area. A simple analysis of the fuzz growth rate including the effect of edge-localized modes (ELMs) and the reduced thermal conductivity of fuzz shows that the fuzz thickness is likely to be limited by the occurrence of annealing during ELM-induced thermal excursions. Not only the morphology, but the material mechanical and thermal properties can be modified by plasma exposure. A review of the existing literature is made, but the existing data are insufficient to conclude quantitatively on the importance and extent of these effects for ITER. As a consequence of the high surface temperatures in ITER, W recrystallization is an important effect to consider, since it leads to a decrease in material strength. An approach is proposed here to develop an operational budget for the W material, i

  10. Theory of the acoustic instability and behavior of the phase velocity of acoustic waves in a weakly ionized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torosyan, O.S.; Mkrtchyan, A.R.

    2003-01-01

    The amplification of acoustic waves due to the transfer of thermal energy from electrons to the neutral component of a glow discharge plasma is studied theoretically. It is shown that, in order for acoustic instability (sound amplification) to occur, the amount of energy transferred should exceed the threshold energy, which depends on the plasma parameters and the acoustic wave frequency. The energy balance equation for an electron gas in the positive column of a glow discharge is analyzed for conditions typical of experiments in which acoustic wave amplification has been observed. Based on this analysis, one can affirm that, first, the energy transferred to neutral gas in elastic electron-atom collisions is substantially lower than the threshold energy for acoustic wave amplification and, second, that the energy transferred from electrons to neutral gas in inelastic collisions is much higher than that transferred in elastic collisions and thus may exceed the threshold energy. It is also shown that, for amplification to occur, there should exist some heat dissipation mechanism more efficient than gas heat conduction. It is suggested that this may be convective radial mixing within a positive column due to acoustic streaming in the field of an acoustic wave. The features of the phase velocity of sound waves in the presence of acoustic instability are investigated

  11. Electron velocity-space diffusion in a micro-unstable ECRH [electron cyclotron resonance heated] mirror plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokin, S.A.

    1987-09-01

    An experimental study of the velocity-space diffusion of electrons in an electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) mirror plasma, in the presence of micro-unstable whistler rf emission, is presented. It is found that the dominant loss mechanism for hot electrons is endloss produced by rf diffusion into the mirror loss cone. In a standard case with 4.5 kW of ECRH power, this loss limits the stored energy to 120 J with an energy confinement time of 40 ms. The energy confinement time associated with collisional scattering is 350 ms in this case. Whistler microinstability rf produces up to 25% of the rf-induced loss. The hot electron temperature is not limited by loss of adiabaticity, but by rf-induced loss of high energy electrons, and decreases with increasing rf power in strong diffusion regimes. Collisional loss is in agreement with standard scattering theory. No super-adiabatic effects are clearly seen. Experiments in which the vacuum chamber walls are lined with microwave absorber reveal that single pass absorption is limited to less than 60%, whereas experiments with reflecting walls exhibit up to 90% absorption. Stronger diffusion is seen in the latter, with a hot electron heating rate which is twice that of the absorber experiments. This increase in diffusion can be produced by two distinct aspects of wall-reflected rf: the broader spatial rf profile, which enlarges the resonant region in velocity space, or a reduction in super-adiabatic effects due to randomization of the electron gyrophase. Since no other aspects of super-adiabaticity are observed, the first mechanism appears more likely. 39 refs., 54 figs

  12. Experimental determination of some equilibrium parameter of Damavand tokamak by magnetic probe measurements for representing a physical model for plasma vertical movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, N Darestani; Davani, F Abbasi

    2015-10-01

    This investigation is about plasma modeling for the control of vertical instabilities in Damavand tokamak. This model is based on online magnetic measurement. The algebraic equation defining the vertical position in this model is based on instantaneous force-balance. Two parameters in this equation, including decay index, n, and lambda, Λ, have been considered as functions of time-varying poloidal field coil currents and plasma current. Then these functions have been used in a code generated for modeling the open loop response of plasma. The main restriction of the suitability analysis of the model is that the experiments always have to be performed in the presence of a control loop for stabilizing vertical position. As a result, open loop response of the system has been identified from closed loop experimental data by nonlinear neural network identification method. The results of comparison of physical model with identified open loop response from closed loop experiments show root mean square error percentage less than 10%. The results are satisfying that the physical model is useful as a Damavand tokamak vertical movement simulator.

  13. Velocity distribution of electrons in time-varying low-temperature plasmas: progress in theoretical procedures over the past 70 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makabe, Toshiaki

    2018-03-01

    A time-varying low-temperature plasma sustained by electrical powers with various kinds of fRequencies has played a key role in the historical development of new technologies, such as gas lasers, ozonizers, micro display panels, dry processing of materials, medical care, and so on, since World War II. Electrons in a time-modulated low-temperature plasma have a proper velocity spectrum, i.e. velocity distribution dependent on the microscopic quantum characteristics of the feed gas molecule and on the external field strength and the frequency. In order to solve and evaluate the time-varying velocity distribution, we have mostly two types of theoretical methods based on the classical and linear Boltzmann equations, namely, the expansion method using the orthogonal function and the procedure of non-expansional temporal evolution. Both methods have been developed discontinuously and progressively in synchronization with those technological developments. In this review, we will explore the historical development of the theoretical procedure to evaluate the electron velocity distribution in a time-varying low-temperature plasma over the past 70 years.

  14. Effect of Plasma, RF, and RIE Treatments on Properties of Double-Sided High Voltage Solar Cells with Vertically Aligned p-n Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola O. Semenenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Si-based solar cells with vertically aligned p-n junctions operating at high voltage were designed and fabricated. The plasma treatments and antireflection coating deposition on the working surfaces of both single- and multijunction cells were made using the special holders. It was shown that additional treatment of solar cells in argon plasma prior to hydrogen plasma treatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon antireflection films led to the improvement of the cell efficiency by up to 60%. Radio frequency waves support plasma generation and improve photoelectric conversion mainly due to reduction of internal stresses at the interfaces. Application of reactive ion etching technique removes the broken layer, reduces elastic strain in the wafer, decreases recombination of charge carriers in the bulk, and provides cell efficiency increase by up to ten times.

  15. On-line control of the plasma spraying process by monitoring the temperature, velocity, and trajectory of in-flight particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, C.; Gougeon, P.; Lamontagne, M.; Lacasse, V.; Vaudreuil, G.; Cielo, P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a new optical sensing device for on-line monitoring of the temperature, velocity and trajectory of in-flight particles during industrial coating production. Thermal radiation emitted by the in-flight particles is collected by a small and robust sensing head that can be attached to the plasma gun providing continuous monitoring of the spray process. The collected radiation is transmitted through optical fibers to a detection cabinet located away from the dusty environment around the operating plasma gun. On-line measurement of the particle velocity, temperature and trajectory can provide an efficient diagnostic tool to maintain optimum spraying conditions leading to a better reproducibility of the coating properties

  16. Failure analysis of thermally cycled columnar thermal barrier coatings produced by high-velocity-air fuel and axial-suspension-plasma spraying: A design perspective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ganvir, A.; Vaidhyanathan, V.; Markocsan, N.; Gupta, M.; Pala, Zdeněk; Lukáč, František

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 3 (2018), s. 3161-3172 ISSN 0272-8842 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings * Axial Suspension Plasma spraying * Thermal Cyclic Fatigue * High Velocity Air Fuel Spraying Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 2.986, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272884217325403

  17. Micro manometer and pitot tube for measuring the velocity distribution in a natural convection water stream between two vertical parallel plates (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santon, L.; Vernier, Ph.

    1961-01-01

    For heat transfer studies in certain cases of cooling in swimming-pool type nuclear reactors, a knowledge of the distribution of the velocities between two heating elements is of prime importance. A Pitot tube and a micro-manometer have been developed for making these measurements on an experimental model. (authors) [fr

  18. The effect of dielectric tube diameter on the propagation velocity of ionization waves in a He atmospheric-pressure micro-plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talviste, Rasmus; Jõgi, Indrek; Raud, Jüri; Paris, Peeter

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this study was to investigate the effect of the dielectric tube diameter on the velocity of the ionization wave in an atmospheric pressure plasma jet in He gas flow. Plasma was ignited in quartz tubes with inner diameter in the range of 80–500 μm by 6 kHz sinusoidal voltage applied to a cylindrical electrode surrounding the quartz tube and positioned 10 mm from the tube orifice. A grounded plane was placed 2–3 cm downstream from the powered electrode to measure the plasma current. The spatial development of ionization waves was monitored by registering the optical emission along the axis of the tube. The ionization wave velocity was deduced from the temporal shift of the onset of radiation at different axial positions. The velocity of ionization wave increased by almost an order of magnitude with the tube diameter decreasing from 500 to 80 μm and was for the 80 μm microtube 1.7 · 10 5 m s −1 during the positive half-cycle and 1.45 · 10 5 m s −1 during the negative half-cycle. (paper)

  19. LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS OF A SEPARATION/REATTACHMENT BUBBLE IN A TURBULENT-BOUNDARY-LAYER SUBJECTED TO A PRESCRIBED UPPER-BOUNDARY, VERTICAL-VELOCITY PROFILE

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Wan

    2015-06-30

    We describe large-eddy simulations of turbulent boundary-layer flow over a flat plate at high Reynolds number in the presence of an unsteady, three-dimensional flow separation/reattachment bubble. The stretched-vortex subgrid-scale model is used in the main flow domain combined with a wall-model that is a two-dimensional extension of that developed by Chung & Pullin (2009). Flow separation and re-attachment of the incoming boundary layer is induced by prescribing wall-normal velocity distribution on the upper boundary of the flow domain that produces an adverse-favorable stream-wise pressure distribution at the wall. The LES predicts the distribution of mean shear stress along the wall including the interior of the separation bubble. Several properties of the separation/reattachment flow are discussed.

  20. Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.L.; Broennimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E.F.; Ince-Cushman, A.; Lee, S.G.; Rice, J.E.; Scott, S.; Barnsley, R.

    2008-01-01

    A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of T i and ν φ on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and nuclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER

  1. Effect of Gas Velocity on the Dust Sediment Layer in the Coupled Field of Corona Plasma and Cyclone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Mingshan; Ma Chaochen; Li Minghua; Danish, S N

    2006-01-01

    A dust sediment layer was found on the outer tube wall when the ESCP (electrostatic centrifugal precipitator) trapped diesel particulates or ganister sand. The Compton back scatter method was used to measure the sediment thickness during the experiment. The effect of the inlet gas velocity on the dust sediment layer was investigated. PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) was used to measure the velocity field between the inner barb tube wall and the outer tube wall. Experiments showed that the thickness of the sediment increased with time, and the sediment layer at the lower end was much thicker than that at the upper end. The agglomeration on the outer tube wall could be removed when the inlet gas velocity was increased to a certain value

  2. Planar and nonplanar electron-acoustic solitary waves in a plasma with a q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jiu-Ning; Luo, Jun-Hua; Sun, Gui-Hua; Liu, Zhen-Lai; Ge, Su-Hong; Wang, Xin-Xing; Li, Jun-Xiu

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) electron-acoustic solitary wave structures in an unmagnetized, collisionless plasma composed of stationary ions, cold fluid electrons and hot q-nonextensive distributed electrons are theoretically studied. We discuss the effects of the nonplanar geometry, nonextensivity of hot electrons and ‘hot’ to ‘cold’ electron number density ratio on the time evolution characters of cylindrical and spherical solitary waves. Moreover, the effects of plasma parameters on the nonlinear structure induced by the interaction between two planar solitary waves are also investigated. It is found that these plasma parameters have significant influences on the properties of the above-mentioned nonlinear structures. Our theoretical study may be useful to understand the nonlinear features of electron-acoustic wave structures in astrophysical plasma systems. (paper)

  3. Particle-in-cell simulations of the plasma interaction with poloidal gaps in the ITER divertor outer vertical target.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komm, Michael; Gunn, J. P.; Dejarnac, Renaud; Pánek, Radomír; Pitts, R.A.; Podolník, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 12 (2017), č. článku 126047. ISSN 0029-5515 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-14228S; GA MŠk(CZ) 8D15001 Grant - others:Ga MŠk(CZ) LM2015070 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * plasma * ITER * particle-in-cell * heat loads * monoblock Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1741-4326/aa8a9a/meta

  4. Effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity and Catalyst Diameter on Performance of Hybrid Catalytic-Plasma Reactor for Biodiesel Synthesis over Sulphated Zinc Oxide Acid Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqman Buchori

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel synthesis through transesterification of soybean oil with methanol on hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor over sulphated zinc oxide (SO42-/ZnO active acid catalyst was investigated. This research was aimed to study effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity (WHSV and the catalyst diameter on performance of the hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor for biodiesel synthesis. The amount (20.2 g of active sulphated zinc oxide solid acid catalysts was loaded into discharge zone of the reactor. The WHSV and the catalyst diameter were varied between 0.89 to 1.55 min-1 and 3, 5, and 7 mm, respectively. The molar ratio of methanol to oil as reactants of 15:1 is fed to the reactor, while operating condition of the reactor was kept at reaction temperature of 65 oC and ambient pressure. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME component in biodiesel product was identified by Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS. The results showed that the FAME yield decreases with increasing WHSV. It was found that the optimum FAME yield was achieved of 56.91 % at WHSV of 0.89 min-1 and catalyst diameter of 5 mm and reaction time of 1.25 min. It can be concluded that the biodiesel synthesis using the hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor system exhibited promising the FAME yield. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 15th November 2016; Revised: 24th December 2016; Accepted: 16th February 2017 How to Cite: Buchori, L., Istadi, I., Purwanto, P. (2017. Effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity and Catalyst Diameter on Performance of Hybrid Catalytic-Plasma Reactor for Biodiesel Synthesis over Sulphated Zinc Oxide Acid Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (2: 227-234 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.2.775.227-234 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.2.775.227-234

  5. The critical ionization velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1980-06-01

    The critical ionization velocity effect was first proposed in the context of space plasmas. This effect occurs for a neutral gas moving through a magnetized plasma and leads to rapid ionization and braking of the relative motion when a marginal velocity, 'the critical velocity', is exceeded. Laboratory experiments have clearly established the significance of the critical velocity and have provided evidence for an underlying mechanism which relies on the combined action of electron impact ionization and a collective plasma interaction heating electrons. There is experimental support for such a mechanism based on the heating of electrons by the modified two-stream instability as part of a feedback process. Several applications to space plasmas have been proposed and the possibility of space experiments has been discussed. (author)

  6. Propagation of Electron Acoustic Soliton, Periodic and Shock Waves in Dissipative Plasma with a q-Nonextensive Electron Velocity Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hanbaly, A. M.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Elgarayhi, A.; Kassem, A. I.

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear properties of small amplitude electron-acoustic (EA) solitary and shock waves in a homogeneous system of unmagnetized collisionless plasma with nonextensive distribution for hot electrons have been investigated. A reductive perturbation method used to obtain the Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers equation. Bifurcation analysis has been discussed for non-dissipative system in the absence of Burgers term and reveals different classes of the traveling wave solutions. The obtained solutions are related to periodic and soliton waves and their behavior are shown graphically. In the presence of the Burgers term, the EXP-function method is used to solve the Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers equation and the obtained solution is related to shock wave. The obtained results may be helpful in better conception of waves propagation in various space plasma environments as well as in inertial confinement fusion laboratory plasmas.

  7. Background and Pickup Ion Velocity Distribution Dynamics in Titan's Plasma Environment: 3D Hybrid Simulation and Comparison with CAPS T9 Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Simpson, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    In this report we discuss the ion velocity distribution dynamics from the 3D hybrid simulation. In our model the background, pickup, and ionospheric ions are considered as a particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid. Inhomogeneous photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our model. We also take into account the collisions between the ions and neutrals. The current simulation shows that mass loading by pickup ions H(+); H2(+), CH4(+) and N2(+) is stronger than in the previous simulations when O+ ions are introduced into the background plasma. In our hybrid simulations we use Chamberlain profiles for the atmospheric components. We also include a simple ionosphere model with average mass M = 28 amu ions that were generated inside the ionosphere. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. Special attention will be paid to comparing the simulated pickup ion velocity distribution with CAPS T9 observations. Our simulation shows an asymmetry of the ion density distribution and the magnetic field, including the formation of the Alfve n wing-like structures. The simulation also shows that the ring-like velocity distribution for pickup ions relaxes to a Maxwellian core and a shell-like halo.

  8. Plasma Renalase is Not Associated with Blood Pressure and Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Chinese Adults With Normal Renal Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to investigate the association of renalase with blood pressure (BP and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV in order to better understand the role of renalase in the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis. Methods: A total of 344 subjects with normal kidney function were recruited from our previously established cohort in Shaanxi Province, China. They were divided into the normotensive (NT and hypertensive (HT groups or high baPWV and normal baPWV on the basis of BP levels or baPWV measured with an automatic waveform analyzer. Plasma renalase was determined through an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Plasma renalase did not significantly differ between HT and NT groups (3.71 ± 0.69 µg/mL vs. 3.72 ± 0.73 μg/mL, P = 0.905 and between subjects with and without high baPWV (3.67 ± 0.66 µg/mL vs. 3.73 ± 0.74 µg/mL, P = 0.505. However, baPWV was significantly higher in the HT group than in the NT group (1460.4 ± 236.7 vs. 1240.7 ± 174.5 cm/s, P Conclusion: Plasma renalase may not be associated with BP and baPWV in Chinese subjects with normal renal function.

  9. Velocity-space sensitivities of neutron emission spectrometers at the tokamaks JET and ASDEX upgrade in deuterium plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, A.S.; Binda, F.; Cazzaniga, C.

    2017-01-01

    systems such as neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron resonance heating. In order to diagnose these fast ions, several different fast-ion diagnostics have been developed and implemented in the various experiments around the world. The velocity-space sensitivities of fast-ion diagnostics are given by so......Future fusion reactors are foreseen to be heated by the energetic alpha particles produced in fusion reactions. For this to happen, it is important that the energetic ions are sufficiently confined. In present day fusion experiments, energetic ions are primarily produced using external heating...

  10. Measurement of OH free radical in magnetized sheet plasma crossed with vertical gas-flow by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonegawa, Akira; Takatori, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Kawamura, Kazutaka; Takayama, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    We demonstrated the production of OH free radicals in an argon magnetized sheet plasma crossed with vertical gas-flow mixed with an oxygen gas O 2 and a hydrogen gas H 2 . The density and the rotational-vibrational temperature of the OH free radicals were measured by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The density of OH free radicals increases with increasing O 2 gas-flow, while the high energy part of the electron-energy-distribution-function f e (E) above 8 eV decreases. These results suggest the high energy part of f e (E) is contributed to the dissociation of O 2 and the production of OH free radicals. (author)

  11. Flat reflector versus curved reflector in the stability of an inversion operator for seismic and geological models with vertical variation of velocity; O refletor plano versus o curvo na estabilizacao de um operador de inversao de modelos sismico-geologicos com variacao vertical de velocidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiro, Wilson Mouzer [Bahia Univ., Salvador, BA (Brazil). Programa de Pesquisa e Pos-Graduacao em Geofisica

    1995-12-31

    It is known that, in seismic reflection tomography, the slowness parameters of the model are worse determined the reflector parameters. In a matter of fact, the slowness field has a great influence in the ambiguity and instability found in the seismic inverse problems. Here it is verified numerically that models with a curved reflector instead of a flat reflector improves significantly the situation of uniqueness and stability of the operator that is used in the method of Gauss-Newton. Models that have vertical variation of velocity are considered. At first with a flat reflector and linear variation with depth of the square of the slowness function without damping. For each reflector depth, the matrix A{sup T}A shows very small eigenvalues and extremely high condition numbers. In many cases the use of a damping does not work well and it is necessary to find another way to stabilize the operator A{sup T}A. Replacing the flat reflector by a curved and varying the depth as in the previous case and keeping fixed the other parameters, we get minimum eigenvalues and condition numbers much more large and small, respectively. It was observed that the condition number of A{sup T}A in the curved reflector case is less than in the flat reflector damped case. It is possible, then, to say that the curved reflector produces a very better situation of stability, in comparison with the flat case, when we have a vertical variation of the seismic velocity. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  12. Response to 'Comment on 'Mathematical and physical aspects of Kappa velocity distribution'' [Phys. Plasmas 16, 094701 (2009)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hau, L.-N.; Fu, W.-Z.; Chuang, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    The comment questions the formulation of the κ velocity distribution function used in our paper as compared to a slightly different form used by the authors. The difference in the distribution function necessarily leads to different number densities, thermal pressures, etc. We show that the restriction with their distribution function is that the macroscopic temperature (or average kinetic energy) is the same for all spatially uniform systems with a family of κ distributions including the Maxwellian case. The distribution function used in our paper and widely adopted in various studies of nonthermal systems, however, does not impose such a constraint; in particular, the temperature has κ dependence reflecting the kinetic nature of different statistical systems. The points made in the comment are trivial and misleading.

  13. Study of microinstabilities due to an anisotropic velocity distribution function of the particles of a homogeneous plasma; Etude des microinstabilities liees a l'anisotropie de la fonction de distribution des vitesses des particules d'un plasma homogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennion, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-06-01

    A study is made of instabilities in a plasma with an ion velocity distribution function of the form: f{sub oi} = 1 / (2*{pi}*{alpha}{sub p}e{sub i}*{alpha}{sub p}a{sub i}) * {lambda}({nu}{sub p}e - {alpha}{sub p}e{sub i}) * e{sup -}(v{sub pa2}/{alpha}{sub pai2}). The plasma is assumed to have finite dimensions limited by infinitely conductive boundary surfaces. A theoretical and numerical analysis of marginal stability locates the regions of stability as a function of several parameters; i.e. plasma length, ion anisotropy ({tau}) and electron temperature (T{sub e}). A limiting plasma length is found, below which the plasma is stable regardless of its density. For the parameters of the injection experiment M.M.I.I. at Fontenay-aux-roses it is found that the type of instabilities studied here should not occur. (author) [French] L'etude est faite en choisissant une fonction de distribution des ions de la forme f{sub oi} = 1 / (2*{pi}*{alpha}{sub p}e{sub i}*{alpha}{sub p}a{sub i}) * {lambda}({nu}{sub p}e - {alpha}{sub p}e{sub i}) * e{sup -}(v{sub pa2}/{alpha}{sub pai2}) et en supposant une conductivite infinie sur les limites du plasma de dimensions finies. L'etude theorique et numerique de la stabilite marginale determine les domaines de stabilite qui sont etudies en fonction de plusieurs parametres: longueur du plasma, anisotropie des ions ({tau}), temperature electronique (T{sub e}). Il apparait une longueur limite du plasma au-dessous de laquelle le plasma est stable, independemment de la densite. L'application faite avec les valeurs des parametres de l'experience d'injection M.M.I.I, a Fontenay-aux-Roses permet de conclure a la non existence dans cet appareil du type d'instabilite etudie ici. (auteur)

  14. The Surface Interface Characteristics of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube and Graphitic Carbon Fiber Arrays Grown by Thermal and Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance; Nguyen, Cattien; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The development of nano-arrays for sensors and devices requires the growth of arrays with the proper characteristics. One such application is the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic carbon fibers (GCFs) for the chemical attachment of probe molecules. The effectiveness of such an array is dependent not only upon the effectiveness of the probe and the interface between that probe and the array, but also the array and the underlaying substrate. If that array is a growth of vertically aligned CNTs or GCFs then the attachment of that array to the surface is of the utmost importance. This attachment provides the mechanical stability and durability of the array, as well as, the electrical properties of that array. If the detection is to be acquired through an electrical measurement, then the appropriate resistance between the array and the surface need to be fabricated into the device. I will present data on CNTs and GCFs grown from both thermal and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The focus will be on the characteristics of the metal film from which the CNTs and GCFs are grown and the changes that occur due to changes within the growth process.

  15. Helicopter In-flight Resuscitation with Freeze-dried Plasma of a Patient with a High-velocity Gunshot Wound to the Neck in Afghanistan - A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellerfors, Mikael; Linde, Joacim; Gryth, Dan

    2015-10-01

    Massive hemorrhage with coagulopathy is one of the leading causes of preventable death in the battlefield. The development of freeze-dried plasma (FDP) allows for early treatment with coagulation-optimizing resuscitation fluid in the prehospital setting. This report describes the first prehospital use of FDP in a patient with carotid artery injury due to a high-velocity gunshot wound (HVGSW) to the neck. It also describes in-flight constitution and administration of FDP in a Medevac Helicopter. Early administration of FDP may contribute to hemodynamic stabilization and reduction in trauma-induced coagulopathy and acidosis. However, large-scale studies are needed to define the prehospital use of FDP and other blood products.

  16. Study of plasma meniscus and beam halo in negative ion sources using three dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space particle in cell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishioka, S., E-mail: nishioka@ppl.appi.keio.ac.jp; Goto, I.; Hatayama, A. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Miyamoto, K. [School of Natural and Living Sciences Education, Naruto University of Education, 748 Nakashima, Takashima, Naruto-cho, Naruto-shi, Tokushima 772-8502 (Japan); Okuda, S.; Fukano, A. [Toshiba, 33 Isogo-chou, Isogo-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 235-001 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Our previous study by two dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space-particle in cell model shows that the curvature of the plasma meniscus causes the beam halo in the negative ion sources. The negative ions extracted from the periphery of the meniscus are over-focused in the extractor due to the electrostatic lens effect, and consequently become the beam halo. The purpose of this study is to verify this mechanism with the full 3D model. It is shown that the above mechanism is essentially unchanged even in the 3D model, while the fraction of the beam halo is significantly reduced to 6%. This value reasonably agrees with the experimental result.

  17. Study of plasma meniscus and beam halo in negative ion sources using three dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space particle in cell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, S.; Goto, I.; Hatayama, A.; Miyamoto, K.; Okuda, S.; Fukano, A.

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study by two dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space-particle in cell model shows that the curvature of the plasma meniscus causes the beam halo in the negative ion sources. The negative ions extracted from the periphery of the meniscus are over-focused in the extractor due to the electrostatic lens effect, and consequently become the beam halo. The purpose of this study is to verify this mechanism with the full 3D model. It is shown that the above mechanism is essentially unchanged even in the 3D model, while the fraction of the beam halo is significantly reduced to 6%. This value reasonably agrees with the experimental result

  18. Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical Considerations for Centrifugally Confined Plasmas and Other Interchange-Limited Fusion Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassam, Adil [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-09-21

    We studied the feasibility of resonantly driving GAMs in tokamaks. A numerical simulation was carried out and showed the essential features and limitations. It was shown further that GAMs can damp by phase-mixing, from temperature gradients, or nonlinear detuning, thus broadening the resonance. Experimental implications of this were quantified. Theoretical support was provided for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, funded in a separate grant by DOE. Plasma diamagnetism from supersonic rotation was established. A theoretical model was built to match the data. Additional support to the experiment in terms of numerical simulation of the interchange turbulence was provided. Spectra from residual turbulence on account of velocity shear suppression were obtained and compared favorably to experiment. A new drift wave, driven solely by the thermal force, was identified.

  19. Improved Holistic Analysis of Rayleigh Waves for Single- and Multi-Offset Data: Joint Inversion of Rayleigh-Wave Particle Motion and Vertical- and Radial-Component Velocity Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Moro, Giancarlo; Moustafa, Sayed S. R.; Al-Arifi, Nassir S.

    2018-01-01

    Rayleigh waves often propagate according to complex mode excitation so that the proper identification and separation of specific modes can be quite difficult or, in some cases, just impossible. Furthermore, the analysis of a single component (i.e., an inversion procedure based on just one objective function) necessarily prevents solving the problems related to the non-uniqueness of the solution. To overcome these issues and define a holistic analysis of Rayleigh waves, we implemented a procedure to acquire data that are useful to define and efficiently invert the three objective functions defined from the three following "objects": the velocity spectra of the vertical- and radial-components and the Rayleigh-wave particle motion (RPM) frequency-offset data. Two possible implementations are presented. In the first case we consider classical multi-offset (and multi-component) data, while in a second possible approach we exploit the data recorded by a single three-component geophone at a fixed offset from the source. Given the simple field procedures, the method could be particularly useful for the unambiguous geotechnical exploration of large areas, where more complex acquisition procedures, based on the joint acquisition of Rayleigh and Love waves, would not be economically viable. After illustrating the different kinds of data acquisition and the data processing, the results of the proposed methodology are illustrated in a case study. Finally, a series of theoretical and practical aspects are discussed to clarify some issues involved in the overall procedure (data acquisition and processing).

  20. Plasma Renalase is Not Associated with Blood Pressure and Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Chinese Adults With Normal Renal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Lv, Yong-Bo; Chu, Chao; Wang, Man; Xie, Bing-Qing; Wang, Lan; Yang, Fan; Yan, Ding-Yi; Yang, Rui-Hai; Yang, Jun; Ren, Yong; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of renalase with blood pressure (BP) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in order to better understand the role of renalase in the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis. A total of 344 subjects with normal kidney function were recruited from our previously established cohort in Shaanxi Province, China. They were divided into the normotensive (NT) and hypertensive (HT) groups or high baPWV and normal baPWV on the basis of BP levels or baPWV measured with an automatic waveform analyzer. Plasma renalase was determined through an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma renalase did not significantly differ between HT and NT groups (3.71 ± 0.69 µg/mL vs. 3.72 ± 0.73 μg/mL, P = 0.905) and between subjects with and without high baPWV (3.67 ± 0.66 µg/mL vs. 3.73 ± 0.74 µg/mL, P = 0.505). However, baPWV was significantly higher in the HT group than in the NT group (1460.4 ± 236.7 vs. 1240.7 ± 174.5 cm/s, P function. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Unusual photoluminescence properties of vertically aligned InN nanorods grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, C.H.; Chen, H.Y.; Lin, H.W.; Wu, C.Y.; Gwo, S.; Klochikhin, A.A.; Davydov, V.Yu.

    2007-01-01

    We report the unusual photoluminescence (PL) properties of vertically aligned InN nanorod arrays grown on Si(111) with a Si 3 N 4 buffer layer. The optimum growth conditions of InN nanorods are obtained by controlling the III/V ratio and the growth temperature. Structural characterization by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy indicates that individual nanorods are wurtzite InN single crystals with the growth direction along the c-axis. Near-infrared PL from InN nanorods is clearly observed at room temperature. However, in comparison to the PL from InN epitaxial films, the PL from InN nanorods is significantly lower in efficiency and exhibit anomalous temperature dependence. We propose that these unusual PL properties are results of considerable structural disorder (especially for the low-temperature grown InN nanorods) and strong surface electron accumulation effect. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. In situ growth rate measurements during plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, M; Nerushev, O A; Campbell, E E B

    2007-01-01

    In situ laser reflectivity measurements are used to monitor the growth of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films grown by DC plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) from an iron catalyst film deposited on a silicon wafer. In contrast to thermal CVD growth, there is no initial increase in the growth rate; instead, the initial growth rate is high (as much as 10 μm min -1 ) and then drops off rapidly to reach a steady level (2 μm min -1 ) for times beyond 1 min. We show that a limiting factor for growing thick films of multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs) using PECVD can be the formation of an amorphous carbon layer at the top of the growing nanotubes. In situ reflectivity measurements provide a convenient technique for detecting the onset of the growth of this layer

  3. Plasma concentration of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) after 100 drop to vertical jumps and after a 1200-km bicycle race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, M; Kilian, Y; Montag, J; Geesmann, B; Mester, J

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has recently been reported to be involved in proinflammation and tissue repair. Therefore, we hypothesized that HMGB1 is released into the bloodstream after eccentric exercises or prolonged endurance activities. Blood samples from 11 participants that performed 100 drop to vertical jumps (DVJ) and from 10 participants that took part in the 1200-km 'Paris-Brest-Paris' bicycle race (PBP) were tested for HMGB1 and creatine kinase (CK) levels. CK increased after both DVJ (pre: 150.6 ± 81.5 U/L; post: 188.8 ± 95.5 U/L 8 h: 790.5 ± 346.4 U/L) and PBP (pre: 81.3 ± 36.4 U/L; post: 725.2 ± 229.5 U/L; 12 h: 535.8 ± 188.6 U/L), indicating membrane damage. However, HMGB1 plasma levels remained below the detection limit (78 pg/mL) of the applied enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit for all blood samples analysed. That is, neither high intensity eccentric exercises (DVJ) nor prolonged endurance events (PBP) seemed to affect HMGB1 levels in blood at selected time points.

  4. Experimental study of K-shell ionization of low-Z solids in collisions with intermediate-velocity carbon ions and the local plasma approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadhane, U [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Montanari, C C [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Tribedi, Lokesh C [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2003-07-28

    K-shell vacancy production in low-atomic-number (Z{sub t} = 17-29) solid targets has been measured in collisions of highly charged carbon ions with energies of 1.5-6 MeV u{sup -1}. The K-shell ionization cross sections of Cl, K, Ti, Fe and Cu are derived from the measured K x-ray cross sections. The present data-set has been used to test the predictions of a theoretical model based on the local plasma approximation (LPA). This theory takes into account the response of solid core electrons working within the dielectric formalism. We find that this ab initio ion-solid model gives very good agreement with the measured data for Fe and Cu targets, while it tends to under-estimate the data for the most symmetric collision systems studied here. We discuss the range of validity of the LPA in terms of the symmetry parameter and the impact velocity. On the other hand, a model based on the perturbed stationary state approximation, designed for ion-atom collisions (ECPSSR) is found to give excellent agreement with the measured data for all target elements over the whole energy range. All the measured cross sections for different targets are found to follow a universal scaling rule predicted by the ECPSSR.

  5. Scrape-off layer tokamak plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisai, N.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2012-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) interchange turbulence in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas and their subsequent contribution to anomalous plasma transport has been studied in recent years using electron continuity, current balance, and electron energy equations. In this paper, numerically it is demonstrated that the inclusion of ion energy equation in the simulation changes the nature of plasma turbulence. Finite ion temperature reduces floating potential by about 15% compared with the cold ion temperature approximation and also reduces the radial electric field. Rotation of plasma blobs at an angular velocity about 1.5×105 rad/s has been observed. It is found that blob rotation keeps plasma blob charge separation at an angular position with respect to the vertical direction that gives a generation of radial electric field. Plasma blobs with high electron temperature gradients can align the charge separation almost in the radial direction. Influence of high ion temperature and its gradient has been presented.

  6. A randomized, controlled, double-blind crossover study on the effects of 2-L infusions of 0.9% saline and plasma-lyte® 148 on renal blood flow velocity and renal cortical tissue perfusion in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Abeed H; Cox, Eleanor F; Francis, Susan T; Lobo, Dileep N

    2012-07-01

    We compared the effects of intravenous infusions of 0.9% saline ([Cl] 154 mmol/L) and Plasma-Lyte 148 ([Cl] 98 mmol/L, Baxter Healthcare) on renal blood flow velocity and perfusion in humans using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Animal experiments suggest that hyperchloremia resulting from 0.9% saline infusion may affect renal hemodynamics adversely, a phenomenon not studied in humans. Twelve healthy adult male subjects received 2-L intravenous infusions over 1 hour of 0.9% saline or Plasma-Lyte 148 in a randomized, double-blind manner. Crossover studies were performed 7 to 10 days apart. MRI scanning proceeded for 90 minutes after commencement of infusion to measure renal artery blood flow velocity and renal cortical perfusion. Blood was sampled and weight recorded hourly for 4 hours. Sustained hyperchloremia was seen with saline but not with Plasma-Lyte 148 (P Blood volume changes were identical (P = 0.867), but there was greater expansion of the extravascular fluid volume after saline (P = 0.029). There was a significant reduction in mean renal artery flow velocity (P = 0.045) and renal cortical tissue perfusion (P = 0.008) from baseline after saline, but not after Plasma-Lyte 148. There was no difference in concentrations of urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin after the 2 infusions (P = 0.917). This is the first human study to demonstrate that intravenous infusion of 0.9% saline results in reductions in renal blood flow velocity and renal cortical tissue perfusion. This has implications for intravenous fluid therapy in perioperative and critically ill patients. NCT01087853.

  7. Alcator C vertical viewing electron cyclotron emission diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, K.; Hutchinson, I.H.

    1986-03-01

    Electron cyclotron emission measured vertically through the center of a tokamak plasma yields detailed information about the electron velocity distribution. A diagnostic developed for this purpose on Alcator C tokamak uses specialized focusing optics to obtain a well collimated viewing chord, a compact viewing dump made of pyrex or Macor to reduce the effects of wall reflection and depolarization, and a rapid-scan polarizing Michelson interferometer - InSb detector system for the spectrum measurement; all constrained by the limited access and the compact size of Alcator C. Results of diffraction analysis are used to evaluate the theoretical performance of the optical system

  8. Vertical integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antill, N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses on the trend in international energy companies towards vertical integration in the gas chain from wellhead to power generation, horizontal integration in refining and marketing businesses, and the search for larger projects with lower upstream costs. The shape of the petroleum industry in the next millennium, the creation of super-major oil companies, and the relationship between size and risk are discussed. The dynamics of vertical integration, present events and future developments are considered. (UK)

  9. Multidisk neutron velocity selectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammouda, B.

    1992-01-01

    Helical multidisk velocity selectors used for neutron scattering applications have been analyzed and tested experimentally. Design and performance considerations are discussed along with simple explanation of the basic concept. A simple progression is used for the inter-disk spacing in the 'Rosta' design. Ray tracing computer investigations are presented in order to assess the 'coverage' (how many absorbing layers are stacked along the path of 'wrong' wavelength neutrons) and the relative number of neutrons absorbed in each disk (and therefore the relative amount of gamma radiation emitted from each disk). We discuss whether a multidisk velocity selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration (i.e. the selector is turned by 180 0 around a vertical axis with the rotor spun in the reverse direction). Experimental tests and calibration of a multidisk selector are reported together with evidence that a multidisk selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration. (orig.)

  10. Development of an optimal velocity selection method with velocity obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Geuk; Oh, Jun Ho [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The Velocity obstacle (VO) method is one of the most well-known methods for local path planning, allowing consideration of dynamic obstacles and unexpected obstacles. Typical VO methods separate a velocity map into a collision area and a collision-free area. A robot can avoid collisions by selecting its velocity from within the collision-free area. However, if there are numerous obstacles near a robot, the robot will have very few velocity candidates. In this paper, a method for choosing optimal velocity components using the concept of pass-time and vertical clearance is proposed for the efficient movement of a robot. The pass-time is the time required for a robot to pass by an obstacle. By generating a latticized available velocity map for a robot, each velocity component can be evaluated using a cost function that considers the pass-time and other aspects. From the output of the cost function, even a velocity component that will cause a collision in the future can be chosen as a final velocity if the pass-time is sufficiently long enough.

  11. The TEXT upgrade vertical interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallock, G.A.; Gartman, M.L.; Li, W.; Chiang, K.; Shin, S.; Castles, R.L.; Chatterjee, R.; Rahman, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    A far-infrared interferometer has been installed on TEXT upgrade to obtain electron density profiles. The primary system views the plasma vertically through a set of large (60-cm radialx7.62-cm toroidal) diagnostic ports. A 1-cm channel spacing (59 channels total) and fast electronic time response is used, to provide high resolution for radial profiles and perturbation experiments. Initial operation of the vertical system was obtained late in 1991, with six operating channels

  12. Analyses of Current And Wave Forces on Velocity Caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Buhrkall, Jeppe; Eskesen, Mark C. D.

    2015-01-01

    Velocity caps are often used in connection with for instance offshore intake sea water for the use of for cooling water for power plants or as a source for desalinization plants. The intakes can also be used for river intakes. The velocity cap is placed on top of a vertical pipe. The vertical pipe......) this paper investigates the current and wave forces on the velocity cap and the vertical cylinder. The Morison’s force model was used in the analyses of the extracted force time series in from the CFD model. Further the distribution of the inlet velocities around the velocity cap was also analyzed in detail...

  13. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: The mechanism of the drilling of holes in vertical metallic plates by cw CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhanskii, V. V.; Loboiko, A. I.; Antonova, G. F.; Krasyukov, A. G.; Sayapin, V. P.

    1999-02-01

    The possibility of making a hole in a vertical plate with the aid of laser radiation at a surface temperature not exceeding the boiling point is analysed neglecting the vapour pressure. The mechanism of the degradation of the liquid layer involving a reduction of its thickness, as a result of the redistribution of the molten mass owing to the operation of the force of gravity and of thermocapillary convection, is examined. The theoretical dependence of the critical size of the molten zone on the plate thickness is obtained and a comparison is made with experimental data.

  14. A method for calculating active feedback system to provide vertical

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The active feedback system is applied to control slow motions of plasma. The objective of the ... The other problem is connected with the control of plasma vertical position with active feedback system. Calculation of ... Current Issue Volume 90 ...

  15. Vertical field and equilibrium calculation in ETE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, Antonio; Shibata, Carlos Shinya.

    1996-01-01

    The free-boundary MHD equilibrium code HEQ is used to study the plasma behaviour in the tokamak ETE, with optimized compensations coils and vertical field coils. The changes on the equilibrium parameters for different plasma current values are also investigated. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  16. CoFe2O4 nanoparticles as a catalyst: synthesis of a forest of vertically aligned CNTs of uniform diameters by plasma-enhanced CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baliyan, Ankur; Fukuda, Takahiro; Hayasaki, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Takashi; Nakajima, Yoshikata; Hanajiri, Tatsuro; Maekawa, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Controlling actively the structures of carbon nanotubes such as the alignment, length, diameter, chirality and the number of walls still remains a crucial challenge. The properties of CNTs are highly structure sensitive and particularly dependent on the diameter and number of walls. In this brief communication, we synthesise monodisperse CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles of uniform diameters, i.e. 4.8 and 6.9 nm, which are modified with oleic acid as a catalyst for the growth of CNTs. We show that a forest of vertically aligned CNTs of uniform diameters and lengths can be grown using CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles. The internal diameters and lengths of CNTs grown using CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles of 4.8 and 6.9 nm diameters are, respectively, 4.4 and 6.2 nm and 10 and 15 μm. It is clearly shown that the number of walls of CNTs can be engineered changing the materials of the catalytic nanoparticles. The present results may well encourage further systematic studies on the growth of CNTs using various combinations of elements for the catalytic nanoparticles under different external conditions, which may provide not only the possibilities of controlling the properties of CNTs but also an insight into the nucleation and growth mechanisms.

  17. Remote determination of the velocity index and mean streamwise velocity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. D.; Cowen, E. A.

    2017-09-01

    When determining volumetric discharge from surface measurements of currents in a river or open channel, the velocity index is typically used to convert surface velocities to depth-averaged velocities. The velocity index is given by, k=Ub/Usurf, where Ub is the depth-averaged velocity and Usurf is the local surface velocity. The USGS (United States Geological Survey) standard value for this coefficient, k = 0.85, was determined from a series of laboratory experiments and has been widely used in the field and in laboratory measurements of volumetric discharge despite evidence that the velocity index is site-specific. Numerous studies have documented that the velocity index varies with Reynolds number, flow depth, and relative bed roughness and with the presence of secondary flows. A remote method of determining depth-averaged velocity and hence the velocity index is developed here. The technique leverages the findings of Johnson and Cowen (2017) and permits remote determination of the velocity power-law exponent thereby, enabling remote prediction of the vertical structure of the mean streamwise velocity, the depth-averaged velocity, and the velocity index.

  18. Plasma shutdown device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosogane, Nobuyuki; Nakayama, Takahide.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent concentration of plasma currents to the plasma center upon plasma shutdown in a torus type thermonuclear device by the injection of fuels to the plasma center thereby prevent plasma disruption at the plasma center. Constitution: The plasma shutdown device comprises a plasma current measuring device that measures the current distribution of plasmas confined within a vacuum vessel and outputs a control signal for cooling the plasma center when the plasma currents concentrate to the plasma center and a fuel supply device that supplies fuels to the plasma center for cooling the center. The fuels are injected in the form of pellets into the plasmas. The direction and the velocity of the injection are set such that the pellets are ionized at the center of the plasmas. (Horiuchi, T.)

  19. On whistler-mode group velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazhin, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical of the group velocity of whistler-mode waves propagating parallel to the magnetic field in a hot anisotropic plasma is presented. Some simple approximate formulae, which can be used for the magnetospheric applications, are derived. These formulae can predict some properties of this group velocity which were not previously recognized or were obtained by numerical methods. In particular, it is pointed out that the anisotropy tends to compensate for the influence of the electron temperature on the value of the group velocity when the wave frequency is well below the electron gyrofrequency. It is predicted, that under conditions at frequencies near the electron gyrofrequency, this velocity tends towards zero

  20. Equilibrium vertical field in the TBR Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, A.Y.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study on the influence of the vertical magnetic field of the TBR tokamak on the stability and equilibrium of plasma column, was done. Magnetic pick-up coils were built to measure plasma current and position, together with active networks, necessary fo the electronic processing of signals. Some measurements were on the space configuration of the vertical field, and on the influence due to the toroidal vessel. From the data obtained it was possible to discuss the influence of the currents induced on the vessel surface, on plasma equilibrium. Theoretical and experimental results of the vertica field, as a function of plasma current were compared, and allowed an evaluation of the plasma kinetic pressure and temperature. (Author) [pt

  1. Modeling tides and vertical tidal mixing: A reality check

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great interest in the tidal contribution to vertical mixing in the ocean. In models, vertical mixing is estimated using parameterization of the sub-grid scale processes. Estimates of the vertical mixing varied widely depending on which vertical mixing parameterization was used. This study investigated the performance of ten different vertical mixing parameterizations in a terrain-following ocean model when simulating internal tides. The vertical mixing parameterization was found to have minor effects on the velocity fields at the tidal frequencies, but large effects on the estimates of vertical diffusivity of temperature. Although there was no definitive best performer for the vertical mixing parameterization, several parameterizations were eliminated based on comparison of the vertical diffusivity estimates with observations. The best performers were the new generic coefficients for the generic length scale schemes and Mellor-Yamada's 2.5 level closure scheme.

  2. Segmental and Kinetic Contributions in Vertical Jumps Performed with and without an Arm Swing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltner, Michael E.; Bishop, Elijah J.; Perez, Cassandra M.

    2004-01-01

    To determine the contributions of the motions of the body segments to the vertical ground reaction force ([F.sub.z]), the joint torques produced by the leg muscles, and the time course of vertical velocity generation during a vertical jump, 15 men were videotaped performing countermovement vertical jumps from a force plate with and without an arm…

  3. Vertical injection of compact torus into the STOR-M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.; Singh, A.K.; Hirose, A.; Xiao, C.

    2005-01-01

    Vertical compact torus injection into the STOR-M tokamak has been conducted with the University of Saskatchewan Compact Torus Injector (USCTI). The injector stayed at the horizontal position and the CT was bent by 90 deg. using a curved conducting drift tube. The curved drift tube did not have significant effects on the CT velocity. Furthermore, the curved drift tube did not change the magnetic field topology. Preliminary vertical CT injection experiments have been carried out on the STOR-M tokamak. CT injection induced prompt increase in the electron density and in the soft x-ray radiation level. Further modifications of the 90 deg. are underway to improve the CT parameters and to further study the effects of CT injection on the tokamak plasma parameters. (author)

  4. Vertical stability, high elongation, and the consequences of loss of vertical control on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellman, A.G.; Ferron, J.R.; Jensen, T.H.; Lao, L.L.; Luxon, J.L.; Skinner, D.G.; Strait, E.J.; Reis, E.; Taylor, T.S.; Turnbull, A.D.; Lazarus, E.A.; Lister, J.B.

    1990-09-01

    Recent modifications to the vertical control system for DIII-D has enabled operation of discharges with vertical elongation κ, up to 2.5. When vertical stability is lost, a disruption follows and a large vertical force on the vacuum vessel is observed. The loss of plasma energy begins when the edge safety factor q is 2 but the current decay does not begin until q ∼1.3. Current flow on the open field lines in the plasma scrapeoff layer has been measured and the magnitude and distribution of these currents can explain the observed force on the vessel. Equilibrium calculations and simulation of this vertical displacement episode are presented. 7 refs., 4 figs

  5. Microstructure and Wear Behavior of FeCoCrNiMo0.2 High Entropy Coatings Prepared by Air Plasma Spray and the High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spray Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianchen Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, the spherical FeCoCrNiMo0.2 high entropy alloy (HEA powders with a single FCC solid solution structure were prepared by gas atomization. Subsequently, the FeCoCrNiMo0.2 coatings with a different content of oxide inclusions were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS and high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying (HVOF, respectively. The microstructure, phase composition, mechanical properties, and tribological behaviors of these HEA coatings were investigated. The results showed that both HEA coatings showed a typical lamellar structure with low porosity. Besides the primary FCC phase, a mixture of Fe2O3, Fe3O4, and AB2O4 (A = Fe, Co, Ni, and B = Fe, Cr was identified as the oxide inclusions. The oxide content of the APS coating and HVOF coating was calculated to be 47.0% and 12.7%, respectively. The wear resistance of the APS coating was approximately one order of magnitude higher than that of the HVOF coating. It was mainly attributed to the self-lubricated effect caused by the oxide films. The mass loss of the APS coating was mainly ascribed to the breakaway of the oxide film, while the main wear mechanism of the HVOF coating was the abrasive wear.

  6. TFTR plasma feedback systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hojsak, W.; Marsala, R.J.; Mueller, D.; Rauch, W.; Tait, G.D.; Taylor, G.; Thompson, M.

    1985-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor employs feedback control systems for four plasma parameters, i.e. for plasma current, for plasma major radius, for plasma vertical position, and for plasma density. The plasma current is controlled by adjusting the rate of change of current in the Ohmic Heating (OH) coil system. Plasma current is continuously sensed by a Rogowski coil and its associated electronics; the error between it and a preprogrammed reference plasma current history is operated upon by a ''proportional-plusintegral-plus-derivative'' (PID) control algorithm and combined with various feedforward terms, to generate compensating commands to the phase-controlled thyristor rectifiers which drive current through the OH coils. The plasma position is controlled by adjusting the currents in Equilibrium Field and Horizontal Field coil systems, which respectively determine the vertical and radial external magnetic fields producing J X B forces on the plasma current. The plasma major radius position and vertical position, sensed by ''B /sub theta/ '' and ''B /sub rho/ '' magnetic flux pickup coils with their associated electronics, are controlled toward preprogrammed reference histories by allowing PID and feedforward control algorithms to generate commands to the EF and HF coil power supplies. Plasma density is controlled by adjusting the amount of gas injected into the vacuum vessel. Time-varying gains are used to combine lineaveraged plasma density measurements from a microwave interferometer plasma diagnostic system with vacuum vessel pressure measurements from ion gauges, with various other measurements, and with preprogrammed reference histories, to determine commands to piezoelectric gas injection valves

  7. Rotation of dust plasma crystals in an axial magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, F.; Prior, N.; Mitchell, L.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Micron-sized melamine formaldehyde particles were introduced into argon plasma. As a result, the particles were negatively charged due to collision with the electrons within the plasma. With the right conditions, these particles formed a stable macroscopic crystal lattice, known as dust plasma crystal. In our experiment we conduct at Flinders University, we apply an external axial magnetic field to various configurations of dust plasma crystal. These configurations include small crystal lattices consisting of one to several particles, and large crystal lattices with many hundreds of particles. The magnetic field strength ranged from 0-32G and was uniform over the extent of the crystal. The crystals were observed to be rotating collectively in the left-handed direction under the influence of the axial magnetic field. In the case of the large crystals, the angular velocity was about 2 complete rotations per minute and was proportional to the applied magnetic field. The angular velocity changes only slightly depending on the plasma conditions. Neither radial variance in the angular velocity nor shear velocity in the vertical direction was observed in the crystal's rotational motion. In the case of the small crystals, we managed to rotate 2-6 particles (whether they are planar, 2 layers or tetrahedral). We discovered that the ease and the uniformity of the rotation of the different crystals increase as its rotational symmetry increases. Also an increase in the magnetic field strength will correspond to an increase in the angular velocity. Crystals in the shape of an annulus were also tested for theoretical reasons. The poster presentation will contain the experimental procedures, a detailed analysis and an explanation for such dust plasma crystal rotational motion

  8. On the excess energy of nonequilibrium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2012-01-01

    The energy that can be released in plasma due to the onset of instability (the excess plasma energy) is estimated. Three potentially unstable plasma states are considered, namely, plasma with an anisotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution of plasma particles, plasma with a two-beam velocity distribution, and an inhomogeneous plasma in a magnetic field with a local Maxwellian velocity distribution. The excess energy can serve as a measure of the degree to which plasma is nonequilibrium. In particular, this quantity can be used to compare plasmas in different nonequilibrium states.

  9. Decoration of vertical graphene with aerosol nanoparticles for gas sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Shumao; Guo, Xiaoru; Ren, Ren; Zhou, Guihua; Chen, Junhong

    2015-01-01

    A facile method was demonstrated to decorate aerosol Ag nanoparticles onto vertical graphene surfaces using a mini-arc plasma reactor. The vertical graphene was directly grown on a sensor electrode using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The aerosol Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple vapor condensation process using a mini-arc plasma source. Then, the nanoparticles were assembled on the surface of vertical graphene through the assistance of an electric field. Based on our observation, nonagglomerated Ag nanoparticles formed in the gas phase and were assembled onto vertical graphene sheets. Nanohybrids of Ag nanoparticle-decorated vertical graphene were characterized for ammonia gas detection at room temperature. The vertical graphene served as the conductance channel, and the conductance change upon exposure to ammonia was used as the sensing signal. The sensing results show that Ag nanoparticles significantly improve the sensitivity, response time, and recovery time of the sensor. (paper)

  10. Phenomena accompanying gradient-B drift injection of energetic ions into Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    The application of vertically asymmetric toroidal-field ripple, in order to permit the gradient B-drift injection and subsequent capture of energetic ions, results in a new radial diffusion of banana orbits. The nearly mono-kinetic velocity distribution of gradient B-drifting ions in the outer plasma region represents a large source of free energy; and the nonambipolar inward drift of these ions modifies the radial electric field

  11. Plasma centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehata, Takashi; Mase, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    The plasma centrifuge is one of statistical isotope separation processes which uses the centrifugal force of a J x B driven rotating plasma in a magnetic field to give rise to the mass-dependent radial transport of isotopic ions. The system has been developed as an alternative to the gas centrifuge because a much higher rotational velocity and separation factor have been achieved. In this review, the physical aspects of the plasma centrifuge followed by the recent experimental achievements are described, especially in comparison with the gas centrifuge. (author)

  12. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamae, Atsushi; Horimoto, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Noboru; Sukegawa, Kouta; Kawachi, Tetsuya

    2005-01-01

    The electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in plasma can be anisotropic in laser-produced plasmas. We have developed a new technique to evaluate the polarization degree of the emission lines in the extreme vacuum ultra violet wavelength region. The polarization of the emission lines and the continuums from the lithium-like nitrogen and from helium- and hydrogen-like carbon in recombining plasma is evaluated. Particle simulation in the velocity space gives the time scale for relaxation of anisotropic EVDFs. (author)

  13. Role of the vertical pressure gradient in wave boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Lindegård; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Vittori, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    By direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the flow in an oscillatory boundary layer, it is possible to obtain the pressure field. From the latter, the vertical pressure gradient is determined. Turbulent spots are detected by a criterion involving the vertical pressure gradient. The vertical pressure...... gradient is also treated as any other turbulence quantity like velocity fluctuations and statistical properties of the vertical pressure gradient are calculated from the DNS data. The presence of a vertical pressure gradient in the near bed region has significant implications for sediment transport....

  14. Control, pressure perturbations, displacements, and disruptions in highly elongated tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.B.; Hofmann, F.; Tonetti, G.; Jardin, S.C.; Noll, P.

    1989-06-01

    The control and evolution of highly elongated tokamak plasmas with large growth rates are simulated with the axisymmetric, resistive MHD code TSC in the geometry of the TCV tokamak. Pressure perturbations such as sawteeth and externally programmed displacements create initial velocity perturbations which may be stabilized by low power, rapid response coils inside the passively stabilizing vacuum vessel, together with slower shaping coils outside the vessel. Vertical disruption induced voltages and forces on the rapid coils and vessel are investigated, and a model is proposed for an additional vertical force due to poloidal currents. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 26 refs

  15. Global Vertical Reference Frame

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burša, Milan; Kenyon, S.; Kouba, J.; Šíma, Zdislav; Vatrt, V.; Vojtíšková, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 33, - (2004), s. 404-407 ISSN 1436-3445 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : geopotential WO * vertical systems * global vertical frame Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  16. Control rod velocity limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cearley, J.E.; Carruth, J.C.; Dixon, R.C.; Spencer, S.S.; Zuloaga, J.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a velocity control arrangement for a reciprocable, vertically oriented control rod for use in a nuclear reactor in a fluid medium, the control rod including a drive hub secured to and extending from one end therefrom. The control device comprises: a toroidally shaped control member spaced from and coaxially positioned around the hub and secured thereto by a plurality of spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the toroidal member spaced therefrom in coaxial position. The side of the control member toward the control rod has a smooth generally conical surface. The side of the control member away from the control rod is formed with a concave surface constituting a single annular groove. The device also comprises inner and outer annular vanes radially spaced from one another and spaced from the side of the control member away from the control rod and positioned coaxially around and spaced from the hub and secured thereto by spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the vanes. The vanes are angled toward the control member, the outer edge of the inner vane being closer to the control member and the inner edge of the outer vane being closer to the control member. When the control rod moves in the fluid in the direction toward the drive hub the vanes direct a flow of fluid turbulence which provides greater resistance to movement of the control rod in the direction toward the drive hub than in the other direction

  17. Dynamic plasma screening effects on atomic collisions in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young-Dae Jung

    1999-01-01

    Dynamic plasma screening effects are investigated on electron-ion collisional excitation and Coulomb Bremsstrahlung processes in dense plasmas. The electron-ion interaction potential is considered by introduction of the plasma dielectric function. The straight-ling trajectory method is applied to the path of the projectile electron. The transition probability including the dynamic plasma screening effect is found to be always greater than that including the static plasma screening effects. It is found that the differential Bremsstrahlung radiation cross section including the dynamic plasma screening effect is also greater than that including the static plasma screening effect. When the projectile velocity is smaller than the electron thermal velocity, the dynamic polarization screening effect becomes the static plasma screening effect. However, when the projectile velocity is greater than the electron thermal velocity, the interaction potential is almost unshielded

  18. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see ...

  19. The velocity of sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews the work carried out on the velocity of sound in liquid alkali metals. The experimental methods to determine the velocity measurements are described. Tables are presented of reported data on the velocity of sound in lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium. A formula is given for alkali metals, in which the sound velocity is a function of shear viscosity, atomic mass and atomic volume. (U.K.)

  20. Vertical axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivcov, Vladimir [Miass, RU; Krivospitski, Vladimir [Miass, RU; Maksimov, Vasili [Miass, RU; Halstead, Richard [Rohnert Park, CA; Grahov, Jurij [Miass, RU

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  1. Relation of zonal plasma drift and wind in the equatorial F region as derived from CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Park

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we estimate zonal plasma drift in the equatorial ionospheric F region without counting on ion drift meters. From June 2001 to June 2004 zonal plasma drift velocity is estimated from electron, neutral, and magnetic field observations of Challenging Mini-satellite Payload (CHAMP in the 09:00–20:00 LT sector. The estimated velocities are validated against ion drift measurements by the Republic of China Satellite-1/Ionospheric Plasma and Electrodynamics Instrument (ROCSAT-1/IPEI during the same period. The correlation between the CHAMP (altitude ~ 400 km estimates and ROCSAT-1 (altitude ~ 600 km observations is reasonably high (R ≈ 0.8. The slope of the linear regression is close to unity. However, the maximum westward drift and the westward-to-eastward reversal occur earlier for CHAMP estimates than for ROCSAT-1 measurements. In the equatorial F region both zonal wind and plasma drift have the same direction. Both generate vertical currents but with opposite signs. The wind effect (F region wind dynamo is generally larger in magnitude than the plasma drift effect (Pedersen current generated by vertical E field, thus determining the direction of the F region vertical current.

  2. On the how latitude scanning photometer signatures of equatorial ionosphere plasma bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdu, M.A.; Sobral, J.H.A.; Nakamura, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Meridional and east-west scan 6300 (angstrom) night airglow photometer are being extensively used at the low latitude station Cachoeira Paulista (23 0 S 45 0 W, dip latitude 14 0 ), Brazil, for investigation of trans-equatorial ionospheric plasma bubble dynamics. The zonal velocities of the flux aligned plasma bubbles can be determined, in a straingforward way, from the east-west displacement of the airglow intensity valleys observed by the east-west scan photometer. On the other hand, the determination of the other velocity component of the plasma bubble motion (namely, vertical motion in the equatorial plane) has to be based on the meridional propagation of the airglow valleys observed by the meriodinal scan photometer. Such determinatios of the bubbles vertical rise velocity should, however, involved considerations on different bubble parameters such as, for exemple, the phase of the bubble event (whether growth, mature or decay phase), the limited east-west extension, and the often observed westward tilt of the bubble. In this brief report there were condidered in some detail, possible influences of these different factors on the interpretation of low latitude scanning photometer data to infer trans-equatorial plasma bubble dynamics. (author) [pt

  3. Toroidal inhomogeneity of the vertical field in a tokamak apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sometani, Taro; Takashima, Hidekazu

    1977-01-01

    An experiment with a model device has been made on the toroidal inhomogeneity of the vertical field in a Tokamak with an iron core. The D.C. vertical field is increased near the yokes of the iron core, while the gross plasma image field (consisting of the components due to the plasma current, the primary current, and its image) is reduced there. These two vertical fields, when superposed, exert force on the plasma as a less inhomogeneous external vertical field. The vertical field can be homogenized satisfactorily by using a compensation winding wound at a proper position on the iron core even if the shielding plates, which are mounted on some Tokamaks, are dispensed with. (auth.)

  4. The COMPASS Tokamak Plasma Control Software Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcarcel, Daniel F.; Neto, André; Carvalho, Ivo S.; Carvalho, Bernardo B.; Fernandes, Horácio; Sousa, Jorge; Janky, Filip; Havlicek, Josef; Beno, Radek; Horacek, Jan; Hron, Martin; Panek, Radomir

    2011-08-01

    The COMPASS tokamak has began operation at the IPP Prague in December 2008. A new control system has been built using an ATCA-based real-time system developed at IST Lisbon. The control software is implemented on top of the MARTe real-time framework attaining control cycles as short as 50 μs, with a jitter of less than 1 μs. The controlled parameters, important for the plasma performance, are the plasma current, position of the plasma current center, boundary shape and horizontal and vertical velocities. These are divided in two control cycles: slow at 500 μs and fast at 50 μs. The project has two phases. First, the software implements a digital controller, similar to the analog one used during the COMPASS-D operation in Culham. In the slow cycle, the plasma current and position are measured and controlled with PID and feedforward controllers, respectively, the shaping magnetic field is preprogrammed. The vertical instability and horizontal equilibrium are controlled with the faster 50-μs cycle PID controllers. The second phase will implement a plasma-shape reconstruction algorithm and controller, aiming at optimized plasma performance. The system was designed to be as modular as possible by breaking the functional requirements of the control system into several independent and specialized modules. This splitting enabled tuning the execution of each system part and to use the modules in a variety of applications with different time constraints. This paper presents the design and overall performance of the COMPASS control software.

  5. Geophysical aspects of vertical streamer seismic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sognnes, Walter

    1999-12-31

    Vertical cable acquisition is performed by deploying a certain number of vertical hydrophone arrays in the water column, and subsequently shooting a source point on top of it. The advantage of this particular geometry is that gives a data set with all azimuths included. Therefore a more complete 3-D velocity model can be derived. In this paper there are presented some results from the Fuji survey in the Gulf of Mexico. Based on these results, improved geometries and review recommendations for future surveys are discussed. 7 figs.

  6. Geophysical aspects of vertical streamer seismic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sognnes, Walter

    1998-12-31

    Vertical cable acquisition is performed by deploying a certain number of vertical hydrophone arrays in the water column, and subsequently shooting a source point on top of it. The advantage of this particular geometry is that gives a data set with all azimuths included. Therefore a more complete 3-D velocity model can be derived. In this paper there are presented some results from the Fuji survey in the Gulf of Mexico. Based on these results, improved geometries and review recommendations for future surveys are discussed. 7 figs.

  7. Feedback control of vertical instability in TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frantz, E.R.

    1978-05-01

    Due to the unfavorable curvature of the vertical vacuum magnetic field, elongated plasmas are vertically unstable when the elongation, epsilon, becomes too large. The TNS (The Next Step) tokamak, as evolved in the Westinghouse-ORNL studies has an inside-D configuration (epsilon = 1.6, A = 5/1.25 = 4) characterized by an average decay index n approximately equal -0.75 at the plasma flux surface near the magnetic axis and is vertically unstable with a growth rate γ 0 approximately 10 5 sec -1 . Eddy currents produced in the vacuum vessel wall will slow this instability to growth rates γ 0 approximately 10 2 sec -1 provided there are no transverse insulating gaps in the vessel wall. A matrix equation has been developed for calculating the eddy currents induced in the EF coils and their stabilizing effect. Control theory for feedback systems with and without delay time is presented and possible plasma position detectors are discussed. For a plasma current of 6.1 MA, the controller peak power requirements using separate controller circuits are approximately 1 MW depending upon EF coil configurations and time delay. This feedback system is designed to stabilize a maximum plasma excursion of 10 cm from the midplane with delay times up to 2 sec

  8. Injection of electrons with predominantly perpendicular energy into an area of toroidal field ripple in a tokamak plasma to improve plasma confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Masayuki; Furth, Harold

    1993-01-01

    An electron injection scheme for controlling transport in a tokamak plasma. Electrons with predominantly perpendicular energy are injected into a ripple field region created by a group of localized poloidal field bending magnets. The trapped electrons then grad-B drift vertically toward the plasma interior until they are detrapped, charging the plasma negative. Calculations indicate that the highly perpendicular velocity electrons can remain stable against kinetic instabilities in the regime of interest for tokamak experiments. The penetration distance can be controlled by controlling the "ripple mirror ratio", the energy of the injected electrons, and their v.sub..perp. /v.sub.51 ratio. In this scheme, the poloidal torque due to the injected radial current is taken by the magnets and not by the plasma. Injection is accomplished by the flat cathode containing an ECH cavity to pump electrons to high v.sub..perp..

  9. Superconducting plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Toshiro; Ohno, J.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting (SC) plasmas are proposed and investigated. The SC plasmas are not yet familiar and have not yet been studied. However, the existence and the importance of SC plasmas are stressed in this report. The existence of SC plasmas are found as follows. There is a fundamental property of Meissner effect in superconductors, which shows a repulsive effect of magnetic fields. Even in that case, in a microscopic view, there is a region of magnetic penetration. The penetration length λ is well-known as London's penetration depth, which is expressed as δ = (m s /μ 0 n s q s 2 ) 1/2 where m s , n s , q s and μ o show the mass, the density, the charge of SC electron and the permeability in free space, respectively. Because this expression is very simple, no one had tried it into more simple and meaningful form. Recently, one of the authors (T.O.) has found that the length can be expressed into more simple and understandable fundamental form as λ = c/ω ps where c = (ε 0 μ 0 ) -1/2 and ω ps = (n s q s 2 /m s ε 0 ) 1/2 are the light velocity and the superconducting plasma frequency. From this simple expression, the penetration depth of the magnetic field to SC is found as a SC plasma skin depth, that is, the fundamental property of SC can be expressed by the SC plasmas. This discovery indicates an importance of the studies of superconducting plasmas. From these points, several properties (propagating modes et al) of SC plasmas, which consist of SC electrons, normal electrons and lattice ions, are investigated in this report. Observations of SC plasma frequency is also reported with a use of Terahertz electromagnet-optical waves

  10. Vertical pump assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohnal, M.; Rosel, J.; Skarka, V.

    1988-01-01

    The mounting is described of the drive assembly of a vertical pump for nuclear power plants in areas with seismic risk. The assembly is attached to the building floor using flexible and damping elements. The design allows producing seismically resistant pumps without major design changes in the existing types of vertical pumps. (E.S.). 1 fig

  11. Vertical and horizontal access configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1987-01-01

    A number of configuration features and maintenance operations are influenced by the choice of whether a design is based on vertical or horizontal access for replacing reactor components. The features which are impacted most include the first wall/blanket segmentation, the poloidal field coil locations, the toroidal field coil number and size, access port size for in-vessel components, and facilities. Since either configuration can be made to work, the choice between the two is not clear cut because both have certain advantages. It is apparent that there are large cost benefits in the poloidal field coil system for ideal coil locations for high elongation plasmas and marginal savings for the INTOR case. If we assume that a new tokamak design will require a higher plasma elongation, the recommendation is to arrange the poloidal field coils in a cost-effective manner while providing reasonable midplane access for heating interfaces and test modules. If a new design study is not based on a high elongation plasma, it still appears prudent to consider this approach so that in-vessel maintenance can be accomplished without moving very massive structures such as the bulk shield. 10 refs., 29 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Geotail observations of FTE velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Korotova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the plasma velocity signatures expected in association with flux transfer events (FTEs. Events moving faster than or opposite the ambient media should generate bipolar inward/outward (outward/inward flow perturbations normal to the nominal magnetopause in the magnetosphere (magnetosheath. Flow perturbations directly upstream and downstream from the events should be in the direction of event motion. Flows on the flanks should be in the direction opposite the motion of events moving at subsonic and subAlfvénic speeds relative to the ambient plasma. Events moving with the ambient flow should generate no flow perturbations in the ambient plasma. Alfvén waves propagating parallel (antiparallel to the axial magnetic field of FTEs may generate anticorrelated (correlated magnetic field and flow perturbations within the core region of FTEs. We present case studies illustrating many of these signatures. In the examples considered, Alfvén waves propagate along event axes away from the inferred reconnection site. A statistical study of FTEs observed by Geotail over a 3.5-year period reveals that FTEs within the magnetosphere invariably move faster than the ambient flow, while those in the magnetosheath move both faster and slower than the ambient flow.

  13. Measurement of vertical stability metrics in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sang-Hee; Humphreys, D. A.; Mueller, D.; Bak, J. G.; Eidietis, N. W.; Kim, H.-S.; Ko, J. S.; Walker, M. L.; Kstar Team

    2017-10-01

    The paper summarizes results of multi-year ITPA experiments regarding measurement of the vertical stabilization capability of KSTAR discharges, including most recent measurements at the highest achievable elongation (κ 2.0 - 2.1). The measurements of the open-loop growth rate of VDE (γz) and the maximum controllable vertical displacement (ΔZmax) are done by the release-and-catch method. The dynamics of the vertical movement of the plasma is verified by both relevant magnetic reconstructions and non-magnetic diagnostics. The measurements of γz and ΔZmax were done for different plasma currents, βp, internal inductances, elongations and different configurations of the vessel conductors that surround the plasma as the first wall. Effects of control design choice and diagnostics noise are discussed, and comparison with the axisymmetric plasma response model is given for partial accounting for the measured control capability. This work supported by Ministry of Science, ICT, and Future Planning under KSTAR project.

  14. Simultaneous measurements with 3D PIV and Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanckaert, K.J.F.; McLelland, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous velocity measurements were taken using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and an Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP) in a sharp open-channel bend with an immobile gravel bed. The PIV measures 3D velocity vectors in a vertical plane (~40cm x 20cm) at a frequency of 7.5 Hz, whereas

  15. Water velocity meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C. W.; Smith, D. L.

    1970-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive drag sphere velocity meter with a zero to 6 ft/sec range measures steady-state flow. When combined with appropriate data acquisition system, it is suited to applications where large numbers of simultaneous measurements are needed for current mapping or velocity profile determination.

  16. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  17. Plasma equilibrium control during slow plasma current quench with avoidance of plasma-wall interaction in JT-60U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, R.; Nakamura, Y.; Neyatani, Y.

    1997-08-01

    In JT-60U a vertical displacement event (VDE) is observed during slow plasma current quench (Ip quench) for a vertically elongated divertor plasma with a single null. The VDE is generated by an error in the feedback control of the vertical position of the plasma current centre (ZJ). It has been perfectly avoided by improving the accuracy of the ZJ measurement in real time. Furthermore, plasma-wall interaction has been avoided successfully during slow Ip quench owing to the good performance of the plasma equilibrium control system

  18. Converging-barrel plasma accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, T.O.

    1971-01-01

    The invention comprises a device for generating and accelerating plasma to extremely high velocity, while focusing the plasma to a decreasing cross section for attaining a very dense high-velocity plasma burst capable of causing nuclear fusion reactions. A converging coaxial accelerator-electrode configuration is employed with ''high-pressure'' gas injection in controlled amounts to achieve acceleration by deflagration and focusing by the shaped electromagnetic fields. (U.S.)

  19. Eccentricity samples: Implications on the potential and the velocity distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cubarsi R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Planar and vertical epicycle frequencies and local angular velocity are related to the derivatives up to the second order of the local potential and can be used to test the shape of the potential from stellar disc samples. These samples show a more complex velocity distribution than halo stars and should provide a more realistic test. We assume an axisymmetric potential allowing a mixture of independent ellipsoidal velocity distributions, of separable or Staeckel form in cylindrical or spherical coordinates. We prove that values of local constants are not consistent with a potential separable in addition in cylindrical coordinates and with a spherically symmetric potential. The simplest potential that fits the local constants is used to show that the harmonical and non-harmonical terms of the potential are equally important. The same analysis is used to estimate the local constants. Two families of nested subsamples selected for decreasing planar and vertical eccentricities are used to borne out the relation between the mean squared planar and vertical eccentricities and the velocity dispersions of the subsamples. According to the first-order epicycle model, the radial and vertical velocity components provide accurate information on the planar and vertical epicycle frequencies. However, it is impossible to account for the asymmetric drift which introduces a systematic bias in estimation of the third constant. Under a more general model, when the asymmetric drift is taken into account, the rotation velocity dispersions together with their asymmetric drift provide the correct fit for the local angular velocity. The consistency of the results shows that this new method based on the distribution of eccentricities is worth using for kinematic stellar samples. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. No 176011: Dynamics and Kinematics of Celestial Bodies and Systems

  20. Approaching space-time through velocity in doubly special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloisio, R.; Galante, A.; Grillo, A.F.; Luzio, E.; Mendez, F.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the definition of velocity as dE/d vertical bar p vertical bar, where E, p are the energy and momentum of a particle, in doubly special relativity (DSR). If this definition matches dx/dt appropriate for the space-time sector, then space-time can in principle be built consistently with the existence of an invariant length scale. We show that, within different possible velocity definitions, a space-time compatible with momentum-space DSR principles cannot be derived

  1. Coordination in vertical jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.; van Ingen Schenau, Gerrit Jan

    1988-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate for vertical jumping the relationships between muscle actions, movement pattern and jumping achievement. Ten skilled jumpers performed jumps with preparatory countermovement. Ground reaction forces and cinematographic data were recorded. In addition,

  2. Mirror plasma apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A mirror plasma apparatus which utilizes shielding by arc discharge to form a blanket plasma and lithium walls to reduce neutron damage to the wall of the apparatus. An embodiment involves a rotating liquid lithium blanket for a tandem mirror plasma apparatus wherein the first wall of the central mirror cell is made of liquid lithium which is spun with angular velocity great enough to keep the liquid lithium against the first material wall, a blanket plasma preventing the lithium vapor from contaminating the plasma

  3. Coding of Velocity Storage in the Vestibular Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei B. Yakushin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Semicircular canal afferents sense angular acceleration and output angular velocity with a short time constant of ≈4.5 s. This output is prolonged by a central integrative network, velocity storage that lengthens the time constants of eye velocity. This mechanism utilizes canal, otolith, and visual (optokinetic information to align the axis of eye velocity toward the spatial vertical when head orientation is off-vertical axis. Previous studies indicated that vestibular-only (VO and vestibular-pause-saccade (VPS neurons located in the medial and superior vestibular nucleus could code all aspects of velocity storage. A recently developed technique enabled prolonged recording while animals were rotated and received optokinetic stimulation about a spatial vertical axis while upright, side-down, prone, and supine. Firing rates of 33 VO and 8 VPS neurons were studied in alert cynomolgus monkeys. Majority VO neurons were closely correlated with the horizontal component of velocity storage in head coordinates, regardless of head orientation in space. Approximately, half of all tested neurons (46% code horizontal component of velocity in head coordinates, while the other half (54% changed their firing rates as the head was oriented relative to the spatial vertical, coding the horizontal component of eye velocity in spatial coordinates. Some VO neurons only coded the cross-coupled pitch or roll components that move the axis of eye rotation toward the spatial vertical. Sixty-five percent of these VO and VPS neurons were more sensitive to rotation in one direction (predominantly contralateral, providing directional orientation for the subset of VO neurons on either side of the brainstem. This indicates that the three-dimensional velocity storage integrator is composed of directional subsets of neurons that are likely to be the bases for the spatial characteristics of velocity storage. Most VPS neurons ceased firing during drowsiness, but the firing

  4. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  5. Velocity Feedback Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Choi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Transient response such as ringing in a control system can be reduced or removed by velocity feedback. It is a useful control technique that should be covered in the relevant engineering laboratory courses. We developed velocity feedback experiments using two different low cost technologies, viz., operational amplifiers and microcontrollers. These experiments can be easily integrated into laboratory courses on feedback control systems or microcontroller applications. The intent of developing these experiments was to illustrate the ringing problem and to offer effective, low cost solutions for removing such problem. In this paper the pedagogical approach for these velocity feedback experiments was described. The advantages and disadvantages of the two different implementation of velocity feedback were discussed also.

  6. High Velocity Gas Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  7. The role of vertical shear on the horizontal oceanic dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Lanotte; R. Corrado; G. Lacorata; L. Palatella; C. Pizzigalli; I. Schipa; R. Santoleri

    2015-01-01

    The effect of vertical shear on the horizontal dispersion properties of passive tracer particles on the continental shelf of South Mediterranean is investigated by means of observative and model data. In-situ current measurements reveal that vertical velocity gradients in the upper mixed layer decorrelate quite fast (∼ 1 day), whereas basin-scale ocean circulation models tend to overestimate such decorrelation time because of finite resolution effects. Horizontal dispers...

  8. TFTR vertically viewing electron cyclotron emission diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.

    1990-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Michelson interferometer has a spectral coverage of 75--540 GHz, allowing measurement of the first four electron cyclotron harmonics. Until recently the instrument has been configured to view the TFTR plasma on the horizontal midplane, primarily in order to measure the electron temperature profile. Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) extraordinary mode spectra from TFTR Supershot plasmas exhibit a pronounced, spectrally narrow feature below the second harmonic. A similar feature is seen with the ECE radiometer diagnostic below the electron cyclotron fundamental frequency in the ordinary mode. Analysis of the ECE spectra indicates the possibility of a non-Maxwellian 40--80 keV tail on the electron distribution in or near the core. During 1990 three vertical views with silicon carbide viewing targets will be installed to provide a direct measurement of the electron energy distribution at major radii of 2.54, 2.78, and 3.09 m with an energy resolution of approximately 20% at 100 keV. To provide the maximum flexibility, the optical components for the vertical views will be remotely controlled to allow the Michelson interferometer to be reconfigured to either the midplane horizontal view or one of the three vertical views between plasma shots

  9. Plasma position and shape control for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portone, A.; Gribov, Y.; Huguet, M.

    1995-01-01

    Key features and main results about the control of the plasma shape in ITER are presented. A control algorithm is designed to control up to 6 gaps between the plasma separatrix and the plasma facing components during the reference burn phase. Nonlinear simulations show the performances of the controller in the presence of plasma vertical position offsets, beta drops and power supply voltage saturation

  10. Gas injected washer plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, K.K.; John, P.I.; Punithavelu, A.M.; Rao, P.P.

    1980-01-01

    A plasma gun similar in geometry to the washer plasma gun has been operated with gas injected externally. hydrogen, nitrogen and argon plasmas have been ionised and accelerated to velocities of the order of 10 7 mm s -1 and densities 10 11 mm -3 . Higher parameter range is possible with higher electrical input power. (author)

  11. Twilight vertical migrations of zooplankton in a Chilean fjord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Castro, Leonardo; Cáceres, Mario; Pizarro, Oscar

    2014-12-01

    Time series of acoustic backscatter and vertical velocity profiles were obtained at three sites along a Chilean fjord with the purpose of determining dominant structures of vertical migrations of the sound scattering layer. Ancillary data obtained with stratified net samples indicated that the sound scattering layer may have been dominated by euphausiids and decapods. Therefore, distributions of acoustic backscatter anomalies and vertical velocities were attributed to vertical migrations of predominantly these organisms. Migration patterns were dominated by twilight excursions in which organisms swam toward the water surface at sunset, spent 100 m). This migration strategy can also be termed 'semidiel migration' as two double excursions were linked to light levels. The reasons for this twilight migration remain uncertain. But it is possible that the up and down motion around sunset was related to predation avoidance, hunger-satiation state, ontogeny, seaward transport evasion, or reaction to the environmental shock from the pycnocline, or a combination of all or some of them. In contrast, the sunrise double excursion was probably linked to feeding requirements by organisms that need to spend the day at great depth with no food available. This study demonstrated the existence of semidiel patterns throughout the fjord and through prolonged periods. In addition, identification of this pattern by acoustic backscatter was complemented by direct vertical velocity measurements. It is proposed that twilight vertical migration is a common strategy in Chilean fjords.

  12. Limiting velocity of reconnection in a current layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podgornyj, A.N.; Syrovatskij, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    Formation of a plasma current layer from a strong perturbation wave with the Mach magnetic number Msub(a)=1 is investigated numerically within the framework of magnetic hydrodynamics. It is shown that velocity of plasma flowing into the layer is established as small one as compared with the Alfven velocity. At the current layer boundary the Mach magnetic number Msub(a, c)=0.14-0.2. A great decrease in plasma velocity to the current layer results from the counterpressure of a magnetic field, intensity of which near the layer increases due to the storage of magnetic force lines which do not yet reconnect. Calculational results demonstrate the existence of limiting velocity of magnetic reconnection constituting tenth shares of the Mach magnetic number. Influence of this phenomenon on a character of reconnection in the Earth magnetosphere is discussed

  13. Vertical and horizontal subsidiarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan V. Daniluk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article makes an attempt to analyze the principle of subsidiarity in its two main manifestations, namely vertical and horizontal, to outline the principles of relations between the state and regions within the vertical subsidiarity, and features a collaboration of the government and civil society within the horizontal subsidiarity. Scientists identify two types, or two levels of the subsidiarity principle: vertical subsidiarity and horizontal subsidiarity. First, vertical subsidiarity (or territorial concerning relations between the state and other levels of subnational government, such as regions and local authorities; second, horizontal subsidiarity (or functional concerns the relationship between state and citizen (and civil society. Vertical subsidiarity expressed in the context of the distribution of administrative responsibilities to the appropriate higher level lower levels relative to the state structure, ie giving more powers to local government. However, state intervention has subsidiary-lower action against local authorities in cases of insolvency last cope on their own, ie higher organisms intervene only if the duties are less authority is insufficient to achieve the goals. Horizontal subsidiarity is within the relationship between power and freedom, and is based on the assumption that the concern for the common good and the needs of common interest community, able to solve community members (as individuals and citizens’ associations and role of government, in accordance horizontal subsidiarity comes to attracting features subsidiarity assistance, programming, coordination and possibly control.

  14. Analysis of vertical stability limits and vertical displacement event behavior on NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Mark; Battaglia, Devon; Gerhardt, Stefan; Menard, Jonathan; Mueller, Dennis; Myers, Clayton; Sabbagh, Steven; Smith, David

    2017-10-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) completed its first run campaign in 2016, including commissioning a larger center-stack and three new tangentially aimed neutral beam sources. NSTX-U operates at increased aspect ratio due to the larger center-stack, making vertical stabilization more challenging. Since ST performance is improved at high elongation, improvements to the vertical control system were made, including use of multiple up-down-symmetric flux loop pairs for real-time estimation, and filtering to remove noise. Similar operating limits to those on NSTX (in terms of elongation and internal inductance) were achieved, now at higher aspect ratio. To better understand the observed limits and project to future operating points, a database of vertical displacement events and vertical oscillations observed during the plasma current ramp-up on NSTX/NSTX-U has been generated. Shots were clustered based on the characteristics of the VDEs/oscillations, and the plasma parameter regimes associated with the classes of behavior were studied. Results provide guidance for scenario development during ramp-up to avoid large oscillations at the time of diverting, and provide the means to assess stability of target scenarios for the next campaign. Results will also guide plans for improvements to the vertical control system. Work supported by U.S. D.O.E. Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Investigations on the propagation of free surface boiling in a vertical superheated liquid column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, P.K.; Bhat, G.S.; Arakeri, V.H.

    1987-04-01

    Some experimental studies on boiling propagation in a suddenly depressurized superheated vertical liquid column are reported. The propagation velocity of this phase change has been measured using an optical method. This velocity is strongly dependent on liquid superheat, liquid purity and test section size. The measured velocities of less than 5 m s/sup -1/ are significantly lower than the sonic velocity. Present observations suggest that the dominant mechanism for boiling propagation is convection.

  16. Investigations on the propagation of free surface boiling in a vertical superheated liquid column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, P.K.; Bhat, G.S.; Arakeri, V.H.

    1987-01-01

    Some experimental studies on boiling propagation in a suddenly depressurized superheated vertical liquid column are reported. The propagation velocity of this phase change has been measured using an optical method. This velocity is strongly dependent on liquid superheat, liquid purity and test section size. The measured velocities of less than 5 m s -1 are significantly lower than the sonic velocity. Present observations suggest that the dominant mechanism for boiling propagation is convection. (author)

  17. From Boltzmann equations to steady wall velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstandin, Thomas; Rues, Ingo; Nardini, Germano; California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA

    2014-07-01

    By means of a relativistic microscopic approach we calculate the expansion velocity of bubbles generated during a first-order electroweak phase transition. In particular, we use the gradient expansion of the Kadanoff-Baym equations to set up the fluid system. This turns out to be equivalent to the one found in the semi-classical approach in the non-relativistic limit. Finally, by including hydrodynamic deflagration effects and solving the Higgs equations of motion in the fluid, we determine velocity and thickness of the bubble walls. Our findings are compared with phenomenological models of wall velocities. As illustrative examples, we apply these results to three theories providing first-order phase transitions with a particle content in the thermal plasma that resembles the Standard Model.

  18. Modified circular velocity law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeghloul, Nazim

    2018-05-01

    A modified circular velocity law is presented for a test body orbiting around a spherically symmetric mass. This law exhibits a distance scale parameter and allows to recover both usual Newtonian behaviour for lower distances and a constant velocity limit at large scale. Application to the Galaxy predicts the known behaviour and also leads to a galactic mass in accordance with the measured visible stellar mass so that additional dark matter inside the Galaxy can be avoided. It is also shown that this circular velocity law can be embedded in a geometrical description of spacetime within the standard general relativity framework upon relaxing the usual asymptotic flatness condition. This formulation allows to redefine the introduced Newtonian scale limit in term of the central mass exclusively. Moreover, a satisfactory answer to the galactic escape speed problem can be provided indicating the possibility that one can also get rid of dark matter halo outside the Galaxy.

  19. Development of coaxial rotating-plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehata, Takashi; Tanabe, Toshio; Mase, Hiroshi

    1985-01-01

    A rotating-plasma gun has been devised to produce plasma streams with higher rotational velocities. The working mechanism of the gun and the results of a preliminary experiment have been described. (author)

  20. Diagnostics of laser-produced plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batani Dimitri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the general challenges of plasma diagnostics for laser-produced plasmas and give a few more detailed examples: spherically bent crystals for X-ray imaging, velocity interferometers (VISAR for shock studies, and proton radiography.

  1. Observation of plasma hole in a rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Kenichi; Ishihara, Tatsuzo; Okamoto, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Shinji; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2001-01-01

    Plasma hole, a cylindrical density cavity, formed in a rotating plasma has been investigated experimentally. The plasma hole is characterized by large aspect ratio (length/radius ≥ 30), steep boundary layer between the hole and the ambient plasma (10 ion Larmor radius), and extremely high positive potential (130 V). The flow velocity field associated with plasma hole structure has been measured, and is found to have interesting features: (1) plasma rotates in azimuthal direction at a maximum velocity of order of ion sound speed, (2) plasma flows radially inward across the magnetic field line, (3) there present an axial flow reversal between core and peripheral region. It is found that the flow pattern of the plasma hole is very similar to the that of well-developed typhoon with core. (author)

  2. [Duane vertical surgical treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, M L; Gómez de Liaño, P; Merino, P; Franco, G

    2014-04-01

    We report 3 cases with a vertical incomitance in upgaze, narrowing of palpebral fissure, and pseudo-overaction of both inferior oblique muscles. Surgery consisted of an elevation of both lateral rectus muscles with an asymmetrical weakening. A satisfactory result was achieved in 2 cases, whereas a Lambda syndrome appeared in the other case. The surgical technique of upper-insertion with a recession of both lateral rectus muscles improved vertical incomitance in 2 of the 3 patients; however, a residual deviation remains in the majority of cases. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Vertical market participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrader, Alexander; Martin, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    Firms that operate at both levels of vertically related Cournot oligopolies will purchase some input supplies from independent rivals, even though they can produce the good at a lower cost, driving up input price for nonintegrated firms at the final good level. Foreclosure, which avoids this stra......Firms that operate at both levels of vertically related Cournot oligopolies will purchase some input supplies from independent rivals, even though they can produce the good at a lower cost, driving up input price for nonintegrated firms at the final good level. Foreclosure, which avoids...

  4. Vertical Protocol Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groß, Thomas; Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The security of key exchange and secure channel protocols, such as TLS, has been studied intensively. However, only few works have considered what happens when the established keys are actually used—to run some protocol securely over the established “channel”. We call this a vertical protocol.......e., that the combination cannot introduce attacks that the individual protocols in isolation do not have. In this work, we prove a composability result in the symbolic model that allows for arbitrary vertical composition (including self-composition). It holds for protocols from any suite of channel and application...

  5. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...

  6. Multidisc neutron velocity selector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosta, L.; Zsigmond, Gy.; Farago, B.; Mezei, F.; Ban, K.; Perendi, J.

    1987-12-01

    The prototype of a velocity selector for neutron monochromatization in the 4-20 A wavelength range is presented. The theoretical background of the multidisc rotor system is given together with a description of the mechanical construction and electronic driving system. The first tests and neutron measurements prove easy handling and excellent parameters. (author) 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. Vertical Search Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Kevin; Mc Glinchey, Jude

    2017-01-01

    This paper outlines the growth in popularity of vertical search engines, their origins, the differences between them and well-known broad based search engines such as Google and Yahoo. We also discuss their use in business-to-business, their marketing and advertising costs, what the revenue streams are and who uses them.

  8. Vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides a vertical cavity laser comprising a grating layer comprising an in-plane grating, the grating layer having a first side and having a second side opposite the first side and comprising a contiguous core grating region having a grating structure, wherein an index...

  9. Global Vertical Reference Frame

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burša, Milan; Kenyon, S.; Kouba, J.; Šíma, Zdislav; Vatrt, V.; Vojtíšková, M.

    -, č. 5 (2009), s. 53-63 ISSN 1801-8483 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/0328 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : sea surface topography * satellite altimetry * vertical frames Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  10. Railgun armature velocity improvement, SBIR phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurmond, Leo E.; Bauer, David P.

    1992-08-01

    Railgun hypervelocity performance has not been repeatably demonstrated at velocities over 6 km/s. A significant performance limiting phenomena is the formation of secondary current paths in parallel with the main projectile accelerating plasma. A confined plasma armature technique was developed to prevent secondary armature formation. Confinement prevents loss of ionized material from the plasma armature and thereby prevents formation of a low rail-to-rail conductance. We controlled pressure in the confined armature via controlled venting through ports in the rails. Railgun tests with the confined armature show that sealing at the rail-confinement vessel interface is critical and difficult to achieve. Our tests show that during low seal leakage operation secondaries are prevented. However, maintaining good seal for the entire launch is very difficult.

  11. Anomalous Skin Effect for Anisotropic Electron Velocity Distribution Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igor Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Gennady Shvets

    2004-01-01

    The anomalous skin effect in a plasma with a highly anisotropic electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) is very different from skin effect in a plasma with the isotropic EVDF. An analytical solution was derived for the electric field penetrated into plasma with the EVDF described as a Maxwellian with two temperatures Tx >> Tz, where x is the direction along the plasma boundary and z is the direction perpendicular to the plasma boundary. The skin layer was found to consist of two distinctive regions of width of order nTx/w and nTz/w, where nTx,z/w = (Tx,z/m)1/2 is the thermal electron velocity and w is the incident wave frequency

  12. Vertical deformation at western part of Sumatra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Febriyani, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.fanuel@students.itb.ac.id; Prijatna, Kosasih, E-mail: prijatna@gd.itb.ac.id; Meilano, Irwan, E-mail: irwan.meilano@gd.itb.ac.id

    2015-04-24

    This research tries to make advancement in GPS signal processing to estimate the interseismic vertical deformation field at western part of Sumatra Island. The data derived by Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) from Badan Informasi Geospasial (BIG) between 2010 and 2012. GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) software are used to process the GPS signal to estimate the vertical velocities of the CGPS station. In order to minimize noise due to atmospheric delay, Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) is used as atmospheric parameter model and include daily IONEX file provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) as well. It improves GAMIT daily position accuracy up to 0.8 mm. In a second step of processing, the GLOBK is used in order to estimate site positions and velocities in the ITRF08 reference frame. The result shows that the uncertainties of estimated displacement velocity at all CGPS stations are smaller than 1.5 mm/yr. The subsided deformation patterns are seen at the northern and southern part of west Sumatra. The vertical deformation at northern part of west Sumatra indicates postseismic phase associated with the 2010 and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes and also the long-term postseismic associated with the 2004 and 2005 Northern Sumatra earthquakes. The uplifted deformation patterns are seen from Bukit Tinggi to Seblat which indicate a long-term interseismic phase after the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and 2010 Mentawai earthquake. GANO station shows a subsidence at rate 12.25 mm/yr, indicating the overriding Indo-Australia Plate which is dragged down by the subducting Southeast Asian Plate.

  13. Ion velocities in a micro-cathode arc thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Taisen; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael; Beilis, Isak

    2012-01-01

    Ion velocities in the plasma jet generated by the micro-cathode arc thruster are studied by means of time-of-flight method using enhanced ion detection system (EIDS). The EIDS triggers perturbations (spikes) on arc current waveform, and the larger current in the spike generates denser plasma bunches propagating along with the mainstream plasma. The EIDS utilizes double electrostatic probes rather than single probes. The average Ti ion velocity is measured to be around 2×10 4 m/s without a magnetic field. It was found that the application of a magnetic field does not change ion velocities in the interelectrode region while leads to ion acceleration in the free expanding plasma plume by a factor of about 2. Ion velocities of about 3.5×10 4 m/s were detected for the magnetic field of about 300 mT at distance of about 100–200 mm from the cathode. It is proposed that plasma is accelerated due to Lorentz force. The average thrust is calculated using the ion velocity measurements and the cathode mass consumption rate, and its increase with the magnetic field is demonstrated.

  14. MHD flow of a uniformly stretched vertical permeable membrane in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a magneto - hydrodynamic flow of a uniformly stretched vertical permeable surface undergoing Arrhenius heat reaction. The analytical solutions are obtained for concentration, temperature and velocity fields using an asymptotic approximation, similar to that of Ayeni et al 2004. It is shown that the temperature ...

  15. Surface vertical deposition for gold nanoparticle film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diao, J J; Qiu, F S; Chen, G D; Reeves, M E

    2003-01-01

    In this rapid communication, we present the surface vertical deposition (SVD) method to synthesize the gold nanoparticle films. Under conditions where the surface of the gold nanoparticle suspension descends slowly by evaporation, the gold nanoparticles in the solid-liquid-gas junction of the suspension aggregate together on the substrate by the force of solid and liquid interface. When the surface properties of the substrate and colloidal nanoparticle suspension define for the SVD, the density of gold nanoparticles in the thin film made by SVD only depends on the descending velocity of the suspension surface and on the concentration of the gold nanoparticle suspension. (rapid communication)

  16. Plasma sheath criterion in thermal electronegative plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghomi, Hamid; Khoramabadi, Mansour; Ghorannevis, Mahmod; Shukla, Padma Kant

    2010-01-01

    The sheath formation criterion in electronegative plasma is examined. By using a multifluid model, it is shown that in a collisional sheath there will be upper as well as lower limits for the sheath velocity criterion. However, the parameters of the negative ions only affect the lower limit.

  17. Axisymmetric stability of vertically asymmetric tokamaks at large beta poloidal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Fishman, H.; Okabayashi, M.; Todd, A.M.M.

    1981-09-01

    The stability of high-β vertically asymmetric tokamak equilibria to rigid displacements is investigated analytically. It is found that vertical stability at large beta poloidal is mainly determined by a coupling between the shape of the plasma surface and the Shafranov shift of the magnetic axis. To the lowest order, symmetric components of the plasma surface shape are found to be the critical destabilizing elements. Asymmetric components have little effect. The inclusion of higher order terms in the high β tokamak expansion leads to further destabilization. Qualitative agreement between these analytic results and numerical stability calculations using the PEST code is demonstrated

  18. Theoretic base of Edge Local Mode triggering by vertical displacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z. T. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); College of Physics Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); He, Z. X.; Wang, Z. H. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wu, N.; Tang, C. J. [College of Physics Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Vertical instability is studied with R-dependent displacement. For Solovev's configuration, the stability boundary of the vertical instability is calculated. The pressure gradient is a destabilizing factor which is contrary to Rebhan's result. Equilibrium parallel current density, j{sub //}, at plasma boundary is a drive of the vertical instability similar to Peeling-ballooning modes; however, the vertical instability cannot be stabilized by the magnetic shear which tends towards infinity near the separatrix. The induced current observed in the Edge Local Mode (ELM) triggering experiment by vertical modulation is derived. The theory provides some theoretic explanation for the mitigation of type-I ELMS on ASDEX Upgrade. The principle could be also used for ITER.

  19. Diagnosis of mildly relativistic electron velocity distributions by electron cyclotron emission in the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, K.

    1986-09-01

    Mildly relativistic electron velocity distributions are diagnosed from measurements of the first few electron cyclotron emission harmonics in the Alcator C tokamak. The approach employs a vertical viewing chord through the center of the tokamak plasma terminating at a compact, high-performance viewing dump. The cyclotron emission spectra obtained in this way are dominated by frequency downshifts due to the relativistic mass increase, which discriminates the electrons by their total energy. In this way a one-to-one correspondence between the energy and the emission frequency is accomplished in the absence of harmonic superpositions. The distribution, described by f/sub p/, the line-averaged phase space density, and Λ, the anisotropy factor, is determined from the ratio of the optically thin harmonics or polarizations. Diagnosis of spectra in the second and the third harmonic range of frequencies obtained during lower hybrid heating, current drive, and low density ohmic discharges are carried out, using different methods depending on the degree of harmonic superposition present in the spectrum and the availability of more than one ratio measurement. Discussions of transient phenomena, the radiation temperature measurement from the optically thick first harmonic, and the measurements compared to the angular hard x-ray diagnostic results illuminate the capabilities of the vertically viewing electron cyclotron emission diagnostic

  20. A space vehicle rotating with a uniform angu- lar velocity about a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A space vehicle rotating with a uniform angu- lar velocity about a vertical axis fixed to it is falling freely vertically downwards, say, with its engine shut off. It carries two astronauts inside it. One astronaut throws a tiny tool towards the other astronaut. The motion of the tiny tool with reference to a rotating frame rigidly fixed.

  1. Optical properties of cluster plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Downer, M C

    1998-03-01

    It is shown that unlike a gas plasma or an electron plasma in a metal, an ionized clustered material (`cluster plasma`) permits propagation below the plasma cut-off of electromagnetic (EM) waves whose phase velocity is close to but below the speed of light. This results from the excitation of a plasma oscillation mode (and/or polarization mode) through the cluster surface which does not exist in usual gaseous plasma. The existence of this new optical mode, cluster mode, is confirmed via numerical simulation. (author)

  2. Charge dependence of the plasma travel length in atmospheric-pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Masuda, Seiya

    2016-01-01

    Plasma plume is generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and foil electrode by applying AC high voltage under the atmosphere. The plasma plume is released into the atmosphere from inside of the quartz tube and is seen as the continuous movement of the plasma bullet. The travel length of plasma bullet is defined from plasma energy and force due to electric field. The drift velocity of plasma bullet has the upper limit under atmospheric-pressure because the drift velocity is determined from the balance between electric field and resistive force due to collisions between plasma and air. The plasma plume charge depends on the drift velocity. Consequently, in the laminar flow of helium gas flow state, the travel length of the plasma plume logarithmically depends on the plasma plume charge which changes with both the electric field and the resistive force.

  3. Charge dependence of the plasma travel length in atmospheric-pressure plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Masuda, Seiya [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Plasma plume is generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and foil electrode by applying AC high voltage under the atmosphere. The plasma plume is released into the atmosphere from inside of the quartz tube and is seen as the continuous movement of the plasma bullet. The travel length of plasma bullet is defined from plasma energy and force due to electric field. The drift velocity of plasma bullet has the upper limit under atmospheric-pressure because the drift velocity is determined from the balance between electric field and resistive force due to collisions between plasma and air. The plasma plume charge depends on the drift velocity. Consequently, in the laminar flow of helium gas flow state, the travel length of the plasma plume logarithmically depends on the plasma plume charge which changes with both the electric field and the resistive force.

  4. Vertical steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuda, F.; Kondr, M.; Kresta, M.; Kusak, V.; Manek, O.; Turon, S.

    1982-01-01

    A vertical steam generator for nuclear power plants and dual purpose power plants consists of a cylindrical vessel in which are placed heating tubes in the form upside-down U. The heating tubes lead to the jacket of the cylindrical collector placed in the lower part of the steam generator perpendicularly to its vertical axis. The cylindrical collector is divided by a longitudinal partition into the inlet and outlet primary water sections of the heating tubes. One ends of the heating tube leads to the jacket of the collector for primary water feeding and the second ends of the heating tubes into the jacket of the collector which feeds and offtakes primary water from the heating tubes. (B.S.)

  5. Vertical organic transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-11

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100 nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-μm structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted.

  6. Retrieving Vertical Air Motion and Raindrop Size Distributions from Vertically Pointing Doppler Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. R.; Chandra, C. V.

    2017-12-01

    The vertical evolution of falling raindrops is a result of evaporation, breakup, and coalescence acting upon those raindrops. Computing these processes using vertically pointing radar observations is a two-step process. First, the raindrop size distribution (DSD) and vertical air motion need to be estimated throughout the rain shaft. Then, the changes in DSD properties need to be quantified as a function of height. The change in liquid water content is a measure of evaporation, and the change in raindrop number concentration and size are indicators of net breakup or coalescence in the vertical column. The DSD and air motion can be retrieved using observations from two vertically pointing radars operating side-by-side and at two different wavelengths. While both radars are observing the same raindrop distribution, they measure different reflectivity and radial velocities due to Rayleigh and Mie scattering properties. As long as raindrops with diameters greater than approximately 2 mm are in the radar pulse volumes, the Rayleigh and Mie scattering signatures are unique enough to estimate DSD parameters using radars operating at 3- and 35-GHz (Williams et al. 2016). Vertical decomposition diagrams (Williams 2016) are used to explore the processes acting on the raindrops. Specifically, changes in liquid water content with height quantify evaporation or accretion. When the raindrops are not evaporating, net raindrop breakup and coalescence are identified by changes in the total number of raindrops and changes in the DSD effective shape as the raindrops. This presentation will focus on describing the DSD and air motion retrieval method using vertical profiling radar observations from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility in Northern Oklahoma.

  7. Echo phenomena in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlenko, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanism of echo phenomenon in different plasma media: laboratory and cosmic plasma, metals and semiconductors is analyzed to get a more comprehensive idea on collective processes in a plasma and for practical applications in radiophysics and plasma diagnostics. The echo phenomenon permitted to confirm a reversible nature of the Landau damping, to prove the fact that the information on perturbation is conserved in a plasma (as non-damping oscillations of the distribution function) even after disappearing of the macroscopic field. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the velocity is measured, microturbulences in a plasma are investigated. New ways of the plasma wave conversion are suggested, as well as ''lightning'' of super-critical plasma layers and regions of plasma non-transparency. Prospective advantages of using echo for studying the mechanisms of charged particle interaction with the surface bounding a plasma are revealed

  8. Particle acceleration by plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, C.

    2006-01-01

    In an advanced particle accelerator particles are driven near by light velocity through ionized gas. Such plasma devices are compact, cost efficient and usable in many fields. Examples are given in detail. (GL)

  9. Disruption, vertical displacement event and halo current characterization for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesley, J.; Fujisawa, N.; Ortolani, S.; Putvinski, S.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1997-01-01

    Characteristics, in ITER, of plasma disruptions, vertical displacement events (VDEs) and the conversion of plasma current to runaway electron current in a disruption are presented. In addition to the well known potential of disruptions to produce rapid thermal energy and plasma current quenches and theoretical predictions that show the likelihood of ∼ 50% runaway conversion, an assessment of VDE and halo current characteristics in vertically elongated tokamaks shows that disruptions in ITER will result in VDEs with peak in-vessel halo currents of up to 50% of the predisruption plasma current and with toroidal peaking factors (peak/average current density) of up to 4:1. However, the assessment also shows an inverse correlation between the halo current magnitude and the toroidal peaking factor; hence, ITER VDEs can be expected to have a product of normalized halo current magnitude times toroidal peaking factor of ≤ 75%. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  10. Control of the vertical instability in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarus, E.A.; Lister, J.B.; Neilson, G.H.

    1989-05-01

    The problem of control of the vertical instability is formulated for a massless filamentary plasma. The massless approximation is justified by an examination of the role of inertia in the control problem. The system is solved using Laplace transform techniques. The linear system is studied to determine the stability boundaries. It is found that the system can be stabilized up to a critical decay index, which is predominantly a function of the geometry of the passive stabilizing shell. A second, smaller critical index, which is a function of the geometry of the control coils, determines the limit of stability in the absence of derivative gain in the control circuit. The system is also studied numerically in order to incorporate the non-linear effects of power supply dynamics. The power supply bandwidth requirement is determined by the open-loop growth rate of the instability. The system is studied for a number of control coil options which are available on the DIII-D tokamak. It is found that many of the coils will not provide adequate stabilization and that the use of inboard coils is advantageous in stabilizing the system up to the critical index. Experiments carried out on DIII-D confirm the appropriateness of the model. Using the results of the model study, we have stabilized DIII-D plasmas with decay indices up to 98% of the critical index. Measurement of the plasma vertical position is also discussed. (author) 27 figs., 6 refs

  11. Compressive and Shear Wave Velocity Profiles using Seismic Refraction Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziman, M; Hazreek, Z A M; Azhar, A T S; Haimi, D S

    2016-01-01

    Seismic refraction measurement is one of the geophysics exploration techniques to determine soil profile. Meanwhile, the borehole technique is an established way to identify the changes of soil layer based on number of blows penetrating the soil. Both techniques are commonly adopted for subsurface investigation. The seismic refraction test is a non-destructive and relatively fast assessment compared to borehole technique. The soil velocities of compressive wave and shear wave derived from the seismic refraction measurements can be directly utilised to calculate soil parameters such as soil modulus and Poisson’s ratio. This study investigates the seismic refraction techniques to obtain compressive and shear wave velocity profile. Using the vertical and horizontal geophones as well as vertical and horizontal strike directions of the transient seismic source, the propagation of compressive wave and shear wave can be examined, respectively. The study was conducted at Sejagung Sri Medan. The seismic velocity profile was obtained at a depth of 20 m. The velocity of the shear wave is about half of the velocity of the compression wave. The soil profiles of compressive and shear wave velocities were verified using the borehole data and showed good agreement with the borehole data. (paper)

  12. Intra- and inter-tidal variability of the vertical current structure in the Marsdiep basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J. J.; Ridderinkhof, H.; Maas, L. R. M.; van Aken, H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The vertical structure of the along-stream current in the main channel of the periodically-stratified estuarine Marsdiep basin is investigated by combining velocity measurements collected during three different seasons with a one-dimensional water column model. The observed vertical shears in the

  13. Correlation of right atrial appendage velocity with left atrial appendage velocity and brain natriuretic Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bu-Kyung; Heo, Jung-Ho; Lee, Jae-Woo; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Byung-Joo; Cha, Tae-Joon

    2012-03-01

    Left atrial appendage (LAA) anatomy and function have been well characterized both in healthy and diseased people, whereas relatively little attention has been focused on the right atrial appendage (RAA). We sought to evaluate RAA flow velocity and to compare these parameters with LAA indices and with a study of biomarkers, such as brain natriuretic peptide, among patients with sinus rhythm (SR) and atrial fibrillation (AF). In a series of 79 consecutive patients referred for transesophageal echocardiography, 43 patients (23 with AF and 20 controls) were evaluated. AF was associated with a decrease in flow velocity for both LAA and RAA [LAA velocity-SR vs. AF: 61 ± 22 vs. 29 ± 18 m/sec (p vs. AF: 46 ± 20 vs. 19 ± 8 m/sec (p brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). AF was associated with decreased RAA and LAA flow velocities. RAA velocity was found to be positively correlated with LAA velocity and negatively correlated with BNP. The plasma BNP concentration may serve as a determinant of LAA and RAA functions.

  14. White noise excitation in a hot plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masataka

    1977-01-01

    In a low frequency range, a property of white noise in a hot plasma is studied experimentally. A frequency component of white noise is observed to propagate with a phase velocity which is equal to the ion accoustic wave velocity. The white noise, which is launched in a plasma, is considered as the sum of ion acoustic waves. (auth.)

  15. Oscillations in quasineutral plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the limit, as the vacuum electric permittivity goes to zero, of a plasma physics system, deduced from the Vlasov-Poisson system for special initial data (distribution functions which are analytic in the space variable, with compact support in velocity), a limit also called open-quotes quasineutral regimeclose quotes of the plasma, and the related oscillations of the electric field, with high frequency in time. 20 refs

  16. Plasma waves in hot relativistic beam-plasma systems: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magneville, A.

    1990-01-01

    Dispersion relations of plasma waves in a beam-plasma system are computed in the general case where the plasma and beam temperatures, and the velocity of the beam, may be relativistic. The two asymptotic temperature cases, and different contributions of plasma or beam particles to wave dispersion are considered. (author)

  17. Biomineralization of superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsi, Teresa Cristina O; Santos, Tiago G; Pacheco-Soares, Cristina; Corat, Evaldo J; Marciano, Fernanda R; Lobo, Anderson O

    2012-03-06

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT) promise a great role for the study of tissue regeneration. In this paper, we introduce a new biomimetic mineralization routine employing superhydrophilic VACNT films as highly stable template materials. The biomineralization was obtained after VACNT soaking in simulated body fluid solution. Detailed structural analysis reveals that the polycrystalline biological apatites formed due to the -COOH terminations attached to VACNT tips after oxygen plasma etching. Our approach not only provides a novel route for nanostructured materials, but also suggests that COOH termination sites can play a significant role in biomimetic mineralization. These new nanocomposites are very promising as nanobiomaterials due to the excellent human osteoblast adhesion.

  18. Electron velocity distributions near collisionless shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    Recent studies of the amount of electron heating and of the shapes of electron velocity distributions across shocks near the earth are reviewed. It is found that electron heating increases with increasing shock strength but is always less than the ion heating. The scale length of electron heating is also less than that for the ions. Electron velocity distributions show characteristic shapes which depend on the strength of the shocks. At the weaker shocks, electron heating is mostly perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, bar B, and results in Gaussian-shaped velocity distributions at low-to-moderate energies. At the stronger shocks, parallel heating predominates resulting in flat-topped velocity distributions. A reasonable interpretation of these results indicates that at the weaker shocks electron heating is dominated by a tendency toward conservation of the magnetic moment. At the stronger fast-mode shocks, this heating is thought to be dominated by an acceleration parallel to bar B produced by the macroscopic shock electric field followed by beam driven plasma instabilities. Some contribution to the heating at the stronger shocks from conservation of the magnetic moment and cross-field current-driven instabilities cannot be ruled out. Although the heating at slow-mode shocks is also dominated by instabilities driven by magnetic field-aligned electron beams, their acceleration mechanism is not yet established

  19. Effects of Unsteady Flow Past An Infinite Vertical Plate With Variable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of unsteady flow past an infinite vertical plate with variable temperature and constant mass flux are investigated. Laplace transform technique is used to obtain velocity and concentration fields. The computation of the results indicates that the velocity profiles increase with increase in Grashof numbers, mass ...

  20. Vertical axis wind turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obretenov, V.; Tsalov, T.; Chakarov, T.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in wind turbines with vertical axis noticeably increased. They have some important advantages: low cost, relatively simple structure, reliable packaging system of wind aggregate long period during which require no maintenance, low noise, independence of wind direction, etc.. The relatively low efficiency, however, makes them applicable mainly for small facilities. The work presents a methodology and software for approximately aerodynamic design of wind turbines of this type, and also analyzed the possibility of improving the efficiency of their workflow

  1. A randomized, controlled, double-blind crossover study on the effects of 1-L infusions of 6% hydroxyethyl starch suspended in 0.9% saline (voluven) and a balanced solution (Plasma Volume Redibag) on blood volume, renal blood flow velocity, and renal cortical tissue perfusion in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Abeed H; Cox, Eleanor F; Francis, Susan T; Lobo, Dileep N

    2014-05-01

    We compared the effects of intravenous administration of 6% hydroxyethyl starch (maize-derived) in 0.9% saline (Voluven; Fresenius Kabi, Runcorn, United Kingdom) and a "balanced" preparation of 6% hydroxyethyl starch (potato-derived) [Plasma Volume Redibag (PVR); Baxter Healthcare, Thetford, United Kingdom] on renal blood flow velocity and renal cortical tissue perfusion in humans using magnetic resonance imaging. Hyperchloremia resulting from 0.9% saline infusion may adversely affect renal hemodynamics when compared with balanced crystalloids. This phenomenon has not been studied with colloids. Twelve healthy adult male subjects received 1-L intravenous infusions of Voluven or PVR over 30 minutes in a randomized, double-blind manner, with crossover studies 7 to 10 days later. Magnetic resonance imaging proceeded for 60 minutes after commencement of infusion to measure renal artery blood flow velocity and renal cortical perfusion. Blood was sampled, and weight was recorded at 0, 30, 60, 120, 180, and 240 minutes. Mean peak serum chloride concentrations were 108 and 106 mmol/L, respectively, after Voluven and PVR infusion (P = 0.032). Changes in blood volume (P = 0.867), strong ion difference (P = 0.219), and mean renal artery flow velocity (P = 0.319) were similar. However, there was a significant increase in mean renal cortical tissue perfusion after PVR when compared with Voluven (P = 0.033). There was no difference in urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated liopcalin to creatinine ratios after the infusion (P = 0.164). There was no difference in the blood volume-expanding properties of the 2 preparations of 6% hydroxyethyl starch. The balanced starch produced an increase in renal cortical tissue perfusion, a phenomenon not seen with starch in 0.9% saline.

  2. Rotational Angles and Velocities During Down the Line and Diagonal Across Court Volleyball Spikes

    OpenAIRE

    Justin R. Brown; Bader J. Alsarraf; Mike Waller; Patricia Eisenman; Charlie A. Hicks-Little

    2014-01-01

    The volleyball spike is an explosive movement that is frequently used to end a rally and earn a point. High velocity spikes are an important skill for a successful volleyball offense. Although the influence of vertical jump height and arm velocity on spiked ball velocity (SBV) have been investigated, little is known about the relationship of shoulder and hip angular kinematics with SBV. Other sport skills, like the baseball pitch share similar movement patterns and suggest trunk rotation is i...

  3. Micro manometer and pitot tube for measuring the velocity distribution in a natural convection water stream between two vertical parallel plates (1961); Micromano metre et tube de pitot destines a l'exploration du profil de vitesse dans un ecoulement d'eau de convection naturelle entre deux plaques verticales paralleles (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santon, L; Vernier, Ph [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    For heat transfer studies in certain cases of cooling in swimming-pool type nuclear reactors, a knowledge of the distribution of the velocities between two heating elements is of prime importance. A Pitot tube and a micro-manometer have been developed for making these measurements on an experimental model. (authors) [French] Pour l'etude du transfert de chaleur dans certains cas de refroidissement des reacteurs nucleaires du type piscine, la connaissance de la repartition des vitesses entre deux elements chauffants est primordiale. On a mis au point un tube de Pitot et un micromanometre pour effectuer ces mesures sur une maquette experimentale. (auteurs)

  4. Global Plate Velocities from the Global Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Philipsen, Steven

    1997-01-01

    We have analyzed 204 days of Global Positioning System (GPS) data from the global GPS network spanning January 1991 through March 1996. On the basis of these GPS coordinate solutions, we have estimated velocities for 38 sites, mostly located on the interiors of the Africa, Antarctica, Australia, Eurasia, Nazca, North America, Pacific, and South America plates. The uncertainties of the horizontal velocity components range from 1.2 to 5.0 mm/yr. With the exception of sites on the Pacific and Nazca plates, the GPS velocities agree with absolute plate model predictions within 95% confidence. For most of the sites in North America, Antarctica, and Eurasia, the agreement is better than 2 mm/yr. We find no persuasive evidence for significant vertical motions (less than 3 standard deviations), except at four sites. Three of these four were sites constrained to geodetic reference frame velocities. The GPS velocities were then used to estimate angular velocities for eight tectonic plates. Absolute angular velocities derived from the GPS data agree with the no net rotation (NNR) NUVEL-1A model within 95% confidence except for the Pacific plate. Our pole of rotation for the Pacific plate lies 11.5 deg west of the NNR NUVEL-1A pole, with an angular speed 10% faster. Our relative angular velocities agree with NUVEL-1A except for some involving the Pacific plate. While our Pacific-North America angular velocity differs significantly from NUVEL-1A, our model and NUVEL-1A predict very small differences in relative motion along the Pacific-North America plate boundary itself. Our Pacific-Australia and Pacific- Eurasia angular velocities are significantly faster than NUVEL-1A, predicting more rapid convergence at these two plate boundaries. Along the East Pacific Pise, our Pacific-Nazca angular velocity agrees in both rate and azimuth with NUVFL-1A.

  5. Theory of nonaxisymmetric vertical displacement events in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    2011-01-01

    A semi-analytic sharp-boundary model of a nonaxisymmetric vertical displacement event (VDE) in a large aspect-ratio, high-beta (i.e. β ∼ ε), vertically elongated tokamak plasma is developed. The model is used to simulate nonaxisymmetric VDEs with a wide range of different plasma equilibrium and vacuum vessel parameters. These simulations yield poloidal halo current fractions and toroidal peaking factors whose magnitudes are similar to those seen in experiments, and also reproduce the characteristic inverse scaling between the halo current fraction and the toroidal peaking factor. Moreover, the peak poloidal halo current density in the vacuum vessel is found to correlate strongly with the reciprocal of the minimum edge safety factor attained during the VDE. In addition, under certain circumstances, the ratio of the net sideways force acting on the vacuum vessel to the net vertical force is observed to approach unity. Finally, the peak vertical force per unit area acting on the vessel is found to have a strong correlation with the equilibrium toroidal plasma current at the start of the VDE, but is also found to increase with increasing vacuum vessel resistivity relative to the scrape-off layer plasma.

  6. Vertical vector face lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoano, Brian; Chan, Joanna; Morganroth, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Facial rejuvenation using local anesthesia has evolved in the past decade as a safer option for patients seeking fewer complications and minimal downtime. Mini- and short-scar face lifts using more conservative incision lengths and extent of undermining can be effective in the younger patient with lower face laxity and minimal loose, elastotic neck skin. By incorporating both an anterior and posterior approach and using an incision length between the mini and more traditional face lift, the Vertical Vector Face Lift can achieve longer-lasting and natural results with lesser cost and risk. Submentoplasty and liposuction of the neck and jawline, fundamental components of the vertical vector face lift, act synergistically with superficial musculoaponeurotic system plication to reestablish a more youthful, sculpted cervicomental angle, even in patients with prominent jowls. Dramatic results can be achieved in the right patient by combining with other procedures such as injectable fillers, chin implants, laser resurfacing, or upper and lower blepharoplasties. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Vertical organic transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100 nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-μm structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted. (topical review)

  8. Kinetic theory of surface waves in plasma jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokri, B.

    2002-01-01

    The kinetic theory analysis of surface waves propagating along a semi-bounded plasma jet is presented. The frequency spectra and their damping rate are obtained in both the high and low frequency regions. Finally, the penetration of the static field in the plasma jet under the condition that the plasma jet velocity is smaller than the sound velocity is studied

  9. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...

  10. CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles as a catalyst: synthesis of a forest of vertically aligned CNTs of uniform diameters by plasma-enhanced CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baliyan, Ankur [Graduate School of Interdisciplinary New Science, Toyo University (Japan); Fukuda, Takahiro [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University (Japan); Hayasaki, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Takashi; Nakajima, Yoshikata; Hanajiri, Tatsuro; Maekawa, Toru, E-mail: maekawa@toyo.jp [Graduate School of Interdisciplinary New Science, Toyo University (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    Controlling actively the structures of carbon nanotubes such as the alignment, length, diameter, chirality and the number of walls still remains a crucial challenge. The properties of CNTs are highly structure sensitive and particularly dependent on the diameter and number of walls. In this brief communication, we synthesise monodisperse CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles of uniform diameters, i.e. 4.8 and 6.9 nm, which are modified with oleic acid as a catalyst for the growth of CNTs. We show that a forest of vertically aligned CNTs of uniform diameters and lengths can be grown using CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. The internal diameters and lengths of CNTs grown using CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles of 4.8 and 6.9 nm diameters are, respectively, 4.4 and 6.2 nm and 10 and 15 {mu}m. It is clearly shown that the number of walls of CNTs can be engineered changing the materials of the catalytic nanoparticles. The present results may well encourage further systematic studies on the growth of CNTs using various combinations of elements for the catalytic nanoparticles under different external conditions, which may provide not only the possibilities of controlling the properties of CNTs but also an insight into the nucleation and growth mechanisms.

  11. STARE velocities: 2. Evening westward electron flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uspensky

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Four evening events and one morning event of joint EISCAT/STARE observations during ~22h are considered and the differences between observed STARE line-of-sight (l-o-s velocities and EISCAT electron drift velocities projected onto the STARE beams are studied. We demonstrate that the double-pulse technique, which is currently in use in the STARE routine data handling, typically underestimates the true phase velocity as inferred from the multi-pulse STARE data. We show that the STARE velocities are persistently smaller (1.5–2 times than the EISCAT velocities, even for the multi-pulse data. The effect seems to be more pronounced in the evening sector when the Finland radar observes at large flow angles. We evaluate the performance of the ion-acoustic approach (IAA, Nielsen and Schlegel, 1985 and the off-orthogonal fluid approach (OOFA, Uspensky et al., 2003 techniques to predict the true electron drift velocity for the base event of 12 February 1999. The IAA technique predicts the convection reasonably well for enhanced flows of >~1000m/s, but not so well for slower ones. By considering the EISCAT N(h profiles, we derive the effective aspect angle and effective altitude of backscatter, and use this information for application of the OOFA technique. We demonstrate that the OOFA predictions for the base event are superior over the IAA predictions and thus, we confirm that OOFA predicts the electron velocities reasonably well in the evening sector, in addition to the morning sector, as concluded by Uspensky et al. (2003. To check how "robust" the OOFA model is and how successful it is for convection estimates without the EISCAT support, we analysed three additional evening events and one additional morning event for which information on N(h profiles was intentionally ignored. By accepting the mean STARE/EISCAT velocity ratio of 0.55 and the mean azimuth rotation of 9° (derived for the basic event, we show that the OOFA performs

  12. Spatially-resolved velocities of thermally-produced spray droplets using a velocity-divided Abel inversion of photographed streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Yamagata, Y.; Miyazaki, F.; Yamasaki, M.; Muraoka, K.

    2017-10-01

    Droplet velocities of thermal spray are known to have profound effects on important coating qualities, such as adhesive strength, porosity, and hardness, for various applications. For obtaining the droplet velocities, therefore, the TOF (time-of-flight) technique has been widely used, which relies on observations of emitted radiation from the droplets, where all droplets along the line-of-sight contribute to signals. Because droplets at and near the flow axis mostly contribute coating layers, it has been hoped to get spatially resolved velocities. For this purpose, a velocity-divided Abel inversion was devised from CMOS photographic data. From this result, it has turned out that the central velocity is about 25% higher than that obtained from the TOF technique for the case studied (at the position 150 mm downstream of the plasma spray gun, where substrates for spray coatings are usually placed). Further implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  13. Muscle Force-Velocity Relationships Observed in Four Different Functional Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivkovic, Milena Z; Djuric, Sasa; Cuk, Ivan; Suzovic, Dejan; Jaric, Slobodan

    2017-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the shape and strength of the force-velocity relationships observed in different functional movement tests and explore the parameters depicting force, velocity and power producing capacities of the tested muscles. Twelve subjects were tested on maximum performance in vertical jumps, cycling, bench press throws, and bench pulls performed against different loads. Thereafter, both the averaged and maximum force and velocity variables recorded from individual trials were used for force-velocity relationship modeling. The observed individual force-velocity relationships were exceptionally strong (median correlation coefficients ranged from r = 0.930 to r = 0.995) and approximately linear independently of the test and variable type. Most of the relationship parameters observed from the averaged and maximum force and velocity variable types were strongly related in all tests (r = 0.789-0.991), except for those in vertical jumps (r = 0.485-0.930). However, the generalizability of the force-velocity relationship parameters depicting maximum force, velocity and power of the tested muscles across different tests was inconsistent and on average moderate. We concluded that the linear force-velocity relationship model based on either maximum or averaged force-velocity data could provide the outcomes depicting force, velocity and power generating capacity of the tested muscles, although such outcomes can only be partially generalized across different muscles.

  14. ARE TORNADO-LIKE MAGNETIC STRUCTURES ABLE TO SUPPORT SOLAR PROMINENCE PLASMA?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Priest, E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent high-resolution and high-cadence observations have surprisingly suggested that prominence barbs exhibit apparent rotating motions suggestive of a tornado-like structure. Additional evidence has been provided by Doppler measurements. The observations reveal opposite velocities for both hot and cool plasma on the two sides of a prominence barb. This motion is persistent for several hours and has been interpreted in terms of rotational motion of prominence feet. Several authors suggest that such barb motions are rotating helical structures around a vertical axis similar to tornadoes on Earth. One of the difficulties of such a proposal is how to support cool prominence plasma in almost-vertical structures against gravity. In this work we model analytically a tornado-like structure and try to determine possible mechanisms to support the prominence plasma. We have found that the Lorentz force can indeed support the barb plasma provided the magnetic structure is sufficiently twisted and/or significant poloidal flows are present

  15. Are Tornado-Like Magnetic Structures Able to Support Solar Prominence Plasma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunjo, S. T.; Luna Bennasar, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Priest, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    Recent high-resolution and high-cadence observations have surprisingly suggested that prominence barbs exhibit apparent rotating motions suggestive of a tornado-like structure. Additional evidence has been provided by Doppler measurements. The observations reveal opposite velocities for both hot and cool plasma on the two sides of a prominence barb. This motion is persistent for several hours and has been interpreted in terms of rotational motion of prominence feet. Several authors suggest that such barb motions are rotating helical structures around a vertical axis similar to tornadoes on Earth. One of the difficulties of such a proposal is how to support cool prominence plasma in almost-vertical structures against gravity. In this work we model analytically a tornado-like structure and try to determine possible mechanisms to support the prominence plasma. We have found that the Lorentz force can indeed support the barb plasma provided the magnetic structure is sufficiently twisted and/or significant poloidal flows are present.

  16. ARE TORNADO-LIKE MAGNETIC STRUCTURES ABLE TO SUPPORT SOLAR PROMINENCE PLASMA?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Priest, E. [Mathematics Institute, University of St Andrews, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-20

    Recent high-resolution and high-cadence observations have surprisingly suggested that prominence barbs exhibit apparent rotating motions suggestive of a tornado-like structure. Additional evidence has been provided by Doppler measurements. The observations reveal opposite velocities for both hot and cool plasma on the two sides of a prominence barb. This motion is persistent for several hours and has been interpreted in terms of rotational motion of prominence feet. Several authors suggest that such barb motions are rotating helical structures around a vertical axis similar to tornadoes on Earth. One of the difficulties of such a proposal is how to support cool prominence plasma in almost-vertical structures against gravity. In this work we model analytically a tornado-like structure and try to determine possible mechanisms to support the prominence plasma. We have found that the Lorentz force can indeed support the barb plasma provided the magnetic structure is sufficiently twisted and/or significant poloidal flows are present.

  17. On the nature of the plasma sheet boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hones, E.W. Jr. (Mission Research Corp., Los Alamos, NM (USA) Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The regions of the plasma sheet adjacent to the north and south lobes of the magnetotail have been described by many experimenters as locations of beams of energetic ions and fast-moving plasma directed primarily earthward and tailward along magnetic field lines. Measurements taken as satellites passed through one or the other of these boundary layers have frequently revealed near-earth mirroring of ions and a vertical segregation of velocities of both earthward-moving and mirroring ions with the fastest ions being found nearest the lobe-plasma sheet interface. These are features expected for particles from a distant tail source {bar E} {times} {bar B} drifting in a dawn-to-dusk electric field and are consistent with the source being a magnetic reconnection region. The plasma sheet boundary layers are thus understood as separatrix layers, bounded at their lobeward surfaces by the separatrices from the distant neutral line. This paper will review the observations that support this interpretation. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Hip joint kinetics in the table tennis topspin forehand: relationship to racket velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Yoichi

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine hip joint kinetics during a table tennis topspin forehand, and to investigate the relationship between the relevant kinematic and kinetic variables and the racket horizontal and vertical velocities at ball impact. Eighteen male advanced table tennis players hit cross-court topspin forehands against backspin balls. The hip joint torque and force components around the pelvis coordinate system were determined using inverse dynamics. Furthermore, the work done on the pelvis by these components was also determined. The peak pelvis axial rotation velocity and the work done by the playing side hip pelvis axial rotation torque were positively related to the racket horizontal velocity at impact. The sum of the work done on the pelvis by the backward tilt torques and the upward joint forces was positively related to the racket vertical velocity at impact. The results suggest that the playing side hip pelvis axial rotation torque exertion is important for acquiring a high racket horizontal velocity at impact. The pelvis backward tilt torques and upward joint forces at both hip joints collectively contribute to the generation of the racket vertical velocity, and the mechanism for acquiring the vertical velocity may vary among players.

  19. Plasma expansion: fundamentals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engeln, R; Mazouffre, S; Vankan, P; Bakker, I; Schram, D C

    2002-01-01

    The study of plasma expansion is interesting from a fundamental point of view as well as from a more applied point of view. We here give a short overview of the way properties like density, velocity and temperature behave in an expanding thermal plasma. Experimental data show that the basic phenomena of plasma expansion are to some extent similar to those of the expansion of a hot neutral gas. From the application point of view, we present first results on the use of an expanding thermal plasma in the plasma-activated catalysis of ammonia, from N 2 -H 2 mixtures

  20. Constraining fault interpretation through tomographic velocity gradients: application to northern Cascadia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ramachandran

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Spatial gradients of tomographic velocities are seldom used in interpretation of subsurface fault structures. This study shows that spatial velocity gradients can be used effectively in identifying subsurface discontinuities in the horizontal and vertical directions. Three-dimensional velocity models constructed through tomographic inversion of active source and/or earthquake traveltime data are generally built from an initial 1-D velocity model that varies only with depth. Regularized tomographic inversion algorithms impose constraints on the roughness of the model that help to stabilize the inversion process. Final velocity models obtained from regularized tomographic inversions have smooth three-dimensional structures that are required by the data. Final velocity models are usually analyzed and interpreted either as a perturbation velocity model or as an absolute velocity model. Compared to perturbation velocity model, absolute velocity models have an advantage of providing constraints on lithology. Both velocity models lack the ability to provide sharp constraints on subsurface faults. An interpretational approach utilizing spatial velocity gradients applied to northern Cascadia shows that subsurface faults that are not clearly interpretable from velocity model plots can be identified by sharp contrasts in velocity gradient plots. This interpretation resulted in inferring the locations of the Tacoma, Seattle, Southern Whidbey Island, and Darrington Devil's Mountain faults much more clearly. The Coast Range Boundary fault, previously hypothesized on the basis of sedimentological and tectonic observations, is inferred clearly from the gradient plots. Many of the fault locations imaged from gradient data correlate with earthquake hypocenters, indicating their seismogenic nature.

  1. Characteristics of Vertical Mantle Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Louise Jivan; Morrison, G.L.; Behnia, M.

    1999-01-01

    - The flow structure in vertical mantle heat exchangers was investigated using a full-scale tank designed to facilitate flow visualisation. The flow structure and velocities in the mantle were measured using a particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. A CFD simulation model of vertical mantle heat...... exchangers was also developed for detailed evaluation of the heat flux distribution over the mantle surface. Both the experimental and simulation results indicate that distribution of the flow around the mantle gap is governed by buoyancy driven recirculation in the mantle. The operation of the mantle...

  2. Dynamics of imploding argon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.; Richardson, R.; Brannon, J.; Wilkinson, M.; Katzenstein, J.

    1982-01-01

    The BLACKJACK 5 pulse generator has been used to implode annular argon plasmas to form dense Z pinches. Visible streak photography, framing photography, and laser shadowgraphy were used to observe the radial position and velocity of the plasmas as they imploded. The measured position and velocity of the imploding plasmas have been compared with the results of calculations based on a one-dimensional snowplow model. Good agreement is obtained between the snowplow calculations and the optical measurements. Empirically determined optimum implosion parameters are also found to agree with those predicted by the model

  3. Relation of vertical stability and aspect ratio in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stambaugh, R.D.; Lao, L.L.; Lazarus, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    It is evaluated how the upper limit to plasma elongation κ, caused by vertical stability, varies with the aspect ratio A=R/a of the tokamak. Equilibria were generated with EFITD and the vertical stability was assessed by GATO. For a 'generic' tokamak with a superconducting wall conformal to the plasma shape and a distance 0.5 a away from the plasma edge and a constant current profile (q 0 =1.0, l i ≅1.0, q 95 =3.2) it is found that the maximum stable κ decreased only slowly from 2.65 at A=2.0 to 2.4 at A=6.0. To first order, a reasonable assumption in trade-off studies of new machine designs is no dependence of κ max on A. (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 13 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  4. Seismic Tomography and the Development of a State Velocity Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, S. J.; Nakata, N.

    2017-12-01

    Earthquakes have been a growing concern in the State of Oklahoma in the last few years and as a result, accurate earthquake location is of utmost importance. This means using a high resolution velocity model with both lateral and vertical variations. Velocity data is determined using ambient noise seismic interferometry and tomography. Passive seismic data was acquired from multiple IRIS networks over the span of eight years (2009-2016) and filtered for earthquake removal to obtain the background ambient noise profile for the state. Seismic Interferometry is applied to simulate ray paths between stations, this is done with each possible station pair for highest resolution. Finally the method of seismic tomography is used to extract the velocity data and develop the state velocity map. The final velocity profile will be a compilation of different network analyses due to changing station availability from year to year. North-Central Oklahoma has a dense seismic network and has been operating for the past few years. The seismic stations are located here because this is the most seismically active region. Other parts of the state have not had consistent coverage from year to year, and as such a reliable and high resolution velocity profile cannot be determined from this network. However, the Transportable Array (TA) passed through Oklahoma in 2014 and provided a much wider and evenly spaced coverage. The goal of this study is to ultimately combine these two arrays over time, and provide a high quality velocity profile for the State of Oklahoma.

  5. Validation of the iPhone app using the force platform to estimate vertical jump height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos-Vivas, Jorge; Martin-Martinez, Juan P; Hernandez-Mocholi, Miguel A; Perez-Gomez, Jorge

    2018-03-01

    Vertical jump performance has been evaluated with several devices: force platforms, contact mats, Vertec, accelerometers, infrared cameras and high-velocity cameras; however, the force platform is considered the gold standard for measuring vertical jump height. The purpose of this study was to validate an iPhone app called My Jump, that measures vertical jump height by comparing it with other methods that use the force platform to estimate vertical jump height, namely, vertical velocity at take-off and time in the air. A total of 40 sport sciences students (age 21.4±1.9 years) completed five countermovement jumps (CMJs) over a force platform. Thus, 200 CMJ heights were evaluated from the vertical velocity at take-off and the time in the air using the force platform, and from the time in the air with the My Jump mobile application. The height obtained was compared using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Correlation between APP and force platform using the time in the air was perfect (ICC=1.000, PJump, is an appropriate method to evaluate the vertical jump performance; however, vertical jump height is slightly overestimated compared with that of the force platform.

  6. Three-dimensional effects of curved plasma actuators in quiescent air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chincheng; Durscher, Ryan; Roy, Subrata

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents results on a new class of curved plasma actuators for the inducement of three-dimensional vortical structures. The nature of the fluid flow inducement on a flat plate, in quiescent conditions, due to four different shapes of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators is numerically investigated. The three-dimensional plasma kinetic equations are solved using our in-house, finite element based, multiscale ionized gas (MIG) flow code. Numerical results show electron temperature and three dimensional plasma force vectors for four shapes, which include linear, triangular, serpentine, and square actuators. Three-dimensional effects such as pinching and spreading the neighboring fluid are observed for serpentine and square actuators. The mechanisms of vorticity generation for DBD actuators are discussed. Also the influence of geometric wavelength (λ) and amplitude (Λ) of the serpentine and square actuators on vectored thrust inducement is predicted. This results in these actuators producing significantly better flow mixing downstream as compared to the standard linear actuator. Increasing the wavelengths of serpentine and square actuators in the spanwise direction is shown to enhance the pinching effect giving a much higher vertical velocity. On the contrary, changing the amplitude of the curved actuator varies the streamwise velocity significantly influencing the near wall jet. Experimental data for a serpentine actuator are also reported for validation purpose.

  7. Miniature Coaxial Plasma injector Diagnostics by Beam Plasma Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Tayeb, H.; El-Gamal, H.

    2003-01-01

    A miniature coaxial gun has been used to study the interaction between plasma beam and low density plasma formed in glow discharge. The peak discharge current flow between the coaxial electrodes was 5.25 kA as a single pulse with pulse width of 60 mu. Investigations are carried out with argon gas at pressure 0.4 Torr. The plasma stream ejected from the coaxial discharge propagates in the neutral argon atoms with mean velocity of 1.2x10 5 cm/s. The plasma stream temperature and density were 4.2 eV and 2.4x10 13 cm -3 respectively. An argon negative glow has been used as base plasma where its electron temperature and density were 2.2 eV and 6.2x10 7 cm -3 respectively. When the plasma stream propagates through the negative glow discharge region its velocity decreased to 8.8 x 10 4 cm/s and also the plasma electron temperature decreased to 3.1 eV, while the stream density remained the same. An excited wave appeared on the electric probe having frequency equal to the plasma frequency of the plasma under consideration. Simulation of the problem showed that this method could be applied for plasma diagnostics within the region of investigation. Those further studies for high temperature, dense, and magnetized plasma will be considered

  8. A comprehensive study of electrostatic turbulence and transport in the laboratory basic plasma device TORPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furno, I.; Fasoli, A.; Avino, F.; Bovet, A.; Gustafson, K.; Iraji, D.; Labit, B.; Loizu, J.; Ricci, P.; Theiler, C.

    2012-04-01

    TORPEX is a toroidal device located at the CRPP-EPFL in Lausanne. In TORPEX, a vertical magnetic field superposed on a toroidal field creates helicoidal field lines with both ends terminating on the torus vessel. The turbulence driven by magnetic curvature and plasma gradients causes plasma transport in the radial direction while at the same time plasma is progressively lost along the field lines. The relatively simple magnetic geometry and diagnostic access of the TORPEX configuration facilitate the experimental study of low frequency instabilities and related turbulent transport, and make an accurate comparison between simulations and experiments possible. We first present a detailed investigation of electrostatic interchange turbulence, associated structures and their effect on plasma using high-resolution diagnostics of plasma parameters and wave fields throughout the whole device cross-section, fluid models and numerical simulations. Interchange modes nonlinearly develop blobs, radially propagating filaments of enhanced plasma pressure. Blob velocities and sizes are obtained from probe measurements using pattern recognition and are described by an analytical expression that includes ion polarization currents, parallel sheath currents and ion-neutral collisions. Then, we describe recent advances of a non-perturbative Li 6+ miniaturized ion source and a detector for the investigation of the interaction between supra thermal ions and interchange-driven turbulence. We present first measurements of the spatial and energy space distribution of the fast ion beam in different plasma scenarios, in which the plasma turbulence is fully characterized. The experiments are interpreted using two-dimensional fluid simulations describing the low-frequency interchange turbulence, taking into account the plasma source and plasma losses at the torus vessel. By treating fast ions as test particles, we integrate their equations of motion in the simulated electromagnetic fields, and

  9. A simulation of equatorial plasma bubble signatures on the OI 6300A nightglow meridional profile over Brazilian low latitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Sobral, J.H.A.; Abdu, M.A.

    1981-11-01

    A quantitative interpretation of the meridional propagation of the airglow disturbance for events that have their onsets well westward of the photometer observing longitude, representing the post growth phase of a bubble, is attempted by carrying out a numerical simulation of the phenomenon. Airglow intensity as a function of zenith angle in the photometer scanning range was calculated using electron density profiles perturbed by field aligned plasma bubble whose vertical velocity and electron density depletion profile were determined from a numerical simulation of the nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability under ionospheric conditions that best represented those of the observing period and location. (L.C.) [pt

  10. Strong Turbulence in Low-beta Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchen, C. M.; Pécseli, Hans; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of the spectral structure of turbulence in a plasma confined by a strong homogeneous magnetic field was made by means of a fluid description. The turbulent spectrum is divided into subranges. Mean gradients of velocity and density excite turbulent motions, and govern the production......-cathode reflex arc, Stellarator, Zeta discharge, ionospheric plasmas, and auroral plasma turbulence....

  11. Relationship between vertical ExB drift and F2-layer characteristics in the equatorial ionosphere at solar minimum conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyekola, Oyedemi S.

    2012-07-01

    Equatorial and low-latitude electrodynamics plays a dominant role in determining the structure and dynamics of the equatorial and low-latitude ionospheric F-region. Thus, they constitute essential input parameters for quantitative global and regional modeling studies. In this work, hourly median value of ionosonde measurements namely, peak height F2-layer (hmF2), F2-layer critical frequency (foF2) and propagation factor M(3000)F2 made at near equatorial dip latitude, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso (12oN, 1.5oW; dip: 1.5oN) and relevant F2-layer parameters such as thickness parameter (Bo), electron temperature (Te), ion temperature (Ti), total electron content (TEC) and electron density (Ne, at the fixed altitude of 300 km) provided by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model for the longitude of Ouagadougou are contrasted with the IRI vertical drift model to explore in detail the monthly climatological behavior of equatorial ionosphere and the effects of equatorial vertical plasma drift velocities on the diurnal structure of F2-layer parameters. The analysis period covers four months representative of solstitial and equinoctial seasonal periods during solar minimum year of 1987 for geomagnetically quiet-day. We show that month-by-month morphological patterns between vertical E×B drifts and F2-layer parameters range from worst to reasonably good and are largely seasonally dependent. A cross-correlation analysis conducted between equatorial drift and F2-layer characteristics yield statistically significant correlations for equatorial vertical drift and IRI-Bo, IRI-Te and IRI-TEC, whereas little or no acceptable correlation is obtained with observational evidence. Assessment of the association between measured foF2, hmF2 and M(3000)F2 illustrates consistent much more smaller correlation coefficients with no systematic linkage. In general, our research indicates strong departure from simple electrodynamically controlled behavior.

  12. Downshift of electron plasma oscillations in the electron foreshock region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuselier, S.A.; Gurnett, D.A.; Fitzenreiter, R.J.; NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD)

    1985-01-01

    Electron plasma oscillations in the earth's electron foreshock region are observed to shift above and below the local electron plasma frequency. As plasma oscillations shift downward from the plasma frequency, their bandwidth increases and their wavelength decreases. Observations of plasma oscillations well below the plasma frequency are correlated with times when ISEE 1 is far downstream of the electron foreshock boundary. Although wavelengths of plasma oscillations below the plasma frequency satisfy k x lambda-De approximately 1 the Doppler shift due to the motion of the solar wind is not sufficient to produce the observed frequency shifts. A beam-plasma interaction with beam velocities on the order of the electron thermal velocity is suggested as an explanation for plasma oscillations above and below the plasma frequency. Frequency, bandwidth, and wavelength changes predicted from the beam-plasma interaction are in good agreement with the observed characteristics of plasma oscillations in the foreshock region. 28 references

  13. Downshift of electron plasma oscillations in the electron foreshock region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuselier, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    Electron plasma oscillations in the Earth's electron foreshock region are observed to shift above and below the local electron plasma frequency. As plasma oscillations shift from the plasma frequency, their bandwidth increases and their wavelength decreases. Observations of plasma oscillations well below the plasma frequency are correlated with times when ISEE-I is far downstream of the electron foreshock boundary. Although wavelengths of plasma oscillations below the plasma frequency satisfy klambda/sub De/ approx. = 1, the Doppler shift due to the motion of the solar wind is not sufficient to produce the observed frequency shifts. A beam-plasma interaction with beam velocities on the order of the electron thermal velocity is suggested as an explanation for plasma oscillations above and below the plasma frequency. Frequency, bandwidth, and wavelength changes predicted from the beam-plasma interaction are in good agreement with the observed characteristics of plasma oscillations in the foreshock region

  14. Modal Analysis on Fluid-Structure Interaction of MW-Level Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Tower

    OpenAIRE

    Tan Jiqiu; Zhong Dingqing; Wang Qiong

    2014-01-01

    In order to avoid resonance problem of MW-level vertical axis wind turbine induced by wind, a flow field model of the MW-level vertical axis wind turbine is established by using the fluid flow control equations, calculate flow’s velocity and pressure of the MW-level vertical axis wind turbine and load onto tower’s before and after surface, study the Modal analysis of fluid-structure interaction of MW-level vertical axis wind turbine tower. The results show that fluid-structure interaction fie...

  15. Velocities of Subducted Sediments and Continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, B. R.; van Keken, P. E.; Abers, G. A.; Seward, G.

    2009-12-01

    The growing capability to measure seismic velocities in subduction zones has led to unusual observations. For example, although most minerals have VP/ VS ratios around 1.77, ratios 1.8 have been observed. Here we explore the velocities of subducted sediments and continental crust from trench to sub-arc depths using two methods. (1) Mineralogy was calculated as a function of P & T for a range of subducted sediment compositions using Perple_X, and rock velocities were calculated using the methodology of Hacker & Abers [2004]. Calculated slab-top temperatures have 3 distinct depth intervals with different dP/dT gradients that are determined by how coupling between the slab and mantle wedge is modeled. These three depth intervals show concomitant changes in VP and VS: velocities initially increase with depth, then decrease beyond the modeled decoupling depth where induced flow in the wedge causes rapid heating, and increase again at depth. Subducted limestones, composed chiefly of aragonite, show monotonic increases in VP/ VS from 1.63 to 1.72. Cherts show large jumps in VP/ VS from 1.55-1.65 to 1.75 associated with the quartz-coesite transition. Terrigenous sediments dominated by quartz and mica show similar, but more-subdued, transitions from ~1.67 to 1.78. Pelagic sediments dominated by mica and clinopyroxene show near-monotonic increases in VP/ VS from 1.74 to 1.80. Subducted continental crust that is too dry to transform to high-pressure minerals has a VP/ VS ratio of 1.68-1.70. (2) Velocity anisotropy calculations were made for the same P-T dependent mineralogies using the Christoffel equation and crystal preferred orientations measured via electron-backscatter diffraction for typical constituent phases. The calculated velocity anisotropies range from 5-30%. For quartz-rich rocks, the calculated velocities show a distinct depth dependence because crystal slip systems and CPOs change with temperature. In such rocks, the fast VP direction varies from slab-normal at

  16. LONGITUDINAL AND TRANSVERSAL PLASMA WAVE INSTABILITIES IN TWO COUNTERSTREAMING PLASMAS WITHOUT EXTERNAL FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buenemann, D

    1963-03-15

    Some aspects of the theory of longitudinal and transversal waves in a collisionless nonrelativistic plasma are treated. A dispersion relation for multicomponent plasmas is derived from the linearized Boltzmann-Vlasov equation using the full set of Maxwell's equations without an external field. The velocity distributions of the plasma streams are assumed to be Maxwellian. For the particular case of two counterstreaming plasmas it is shown that there exists transversal instabilities for all counterstreaming velocities whereas the well known two stream instabilities only exist for velocities greater than a critical velocity. Exact solutions for the onset of the instabilities can be given. This kind of instability may occur for any nonisotropic velocity distribution in a collisionless plasma. (auth)

  17. Effects of wind velocity and slope on flame properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Weise; Gregory S. Biging

    1996-01-01

    Abstract: The combined effects of wind velocity and percent slope on flame length and angle were measured in an open-topped, tilting wind tunnel by burning fuel beds composed of vertical birch sticks and aspen excelsior. Mean flame length ranged from 0.08 to 1.69 m; 0.25 m was the maximum observed flame length for most backing fires. Flame angle ranged from -46o to 50o...

  18. Rocket studies of plasma turbulence in the equatorial and auroral electrojets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfaff, R.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Rocket observations of plasma turbulence in the equatorial and auroral electrojets have been studied in detail. Intense electric field and plasma density fluctuations characterize the collisional two-stream and gradient drift instabilities, showing a marked spectral differentiation with respect to height consistent with changes in the local sources of free energy. The interpretation of the frequencies and amplitudes of irregularities detected by in-situ probes travelling at comparable speeds to the waves is discussed in detail. Observations from three rockets in the daytime equatorial electrojet during strong, mild, and weak currents show that the linear theory accounts for the general height and wavelength domains of the irregularities. In the strong case, laminar two-stream waves were observed where the current was strongest and the density gradient was stable. The data suggest phase velocities that were comparable to the electron drift velocity (∼500 m/s) and peak wavelengths (2-3 m) that agree with kinetic theory. Vertically propagating waves observed here may have been generated by mode coupling. Where the gradient was unstable, large amplitude, kilometer scale waves dominated, although the linear gradient drift growth rate peaks at a few hundred meters. The amplitudes (10-15 mV/m) of these horizontal waves were strong enough to drive vertical two-stream waves

  19. Study on particle deposition in vertical square ventilation duct flows by different models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jinping; Li Angui

    2008-01-01

    A proper representation of the air flow in a ventilation duct is crucial for adequate prediction of the deposition velocity of particles. In this paper, the mean turbulent air flow fields are predicted by two different numerical models (the Reynolds stress transport model (RSM) and the realizable k-εmodel). Contours of mean streamwise velocity deduced from the k-ε model are compared with those obtained from the Reynolds stress transport model. Dimensionless deposition velocities of particles in downward and upward ventilation duct flows are also compared based on the flow fields presented by the two different numerical models. Trajectories of the particles are tracked using a one way coupling Lagrangian eddy-particle interaction model. Thousands of individual particles are released in the represented flow, and dimensionless deposition velocities are evaluated for the vertical walls in fully developed smooth vertical downward and upward square duct flows generated by the RSM and realizable k-ε model. The effects of particle diameter, dimensionless relaxation time, flow direction and air speed in vertical upward and downward square duct flows on the particle deposition velocities are discussed. The effects of lift and gravity on the particle deposition velocities are evaluated in vertical flows presented by the RSM. It is shown that the particle deposition velocities based on the RSM and realizable k-εmodel have subtle differences. The flow direction and the lift force significantly affect the particle deposition velocities in vertical duct flows. The simulation results are compared with earlier experimental data and the numerical results for fully developed duct flows. It is shown that the deposition velocities predicted are in agreement with the experimental data and the numerical results

  20. Vertical guidance of shearers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pocock, J.

    1985-01-01

    Mining Engineers have always been aware of the basic need to avoid contamination of the mined product, by controlling the cutting horizon at the coal face. The ability to maintain the optimum cutting horizon results in more effective roof control and ensures a safer and more efficient working environment, for men and machinery. The cost of treatment in the surface coal preparation plant is reduced. Transportation through the total mine system of material finally destined for the spoil heap is minimised. A reduction in product contamination is achieved and makes more effective use of the mine capacity. These benefits make possible significant improvements in productivity and financial returns. Exploitation of micro computer based systems has enabled the successful development of equipment which employs sensors to detect the very low natural gamma radiation from roof strata; to determine and allow control of the position of the cut relative to the roof and floor. This paper reviews the experience gained by the National Coal Board, particularly in South Yorkshire Area, with the vertical steering of ranging drum shearers. It outlines the benefits and considers the future for this technology and its contribution to total coal face automation

  1. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv; Fisher, David

    2010-01-01

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (σ*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  2. Waveform inversion of lateral velocity variation from wavefield source location perturbation

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2013-09-22

    It is challenge in waveform inversion to precisely define the deep part of the velocity model compared to the shallow part. The lateral velocity variation, or what referred to as the derivative of velocity with respect to the horizontal distance, with well log data can be used to update the deep part of the velocity model more precisely. We develop a waveform inversion algorithm to obtain the lateral velocity variation by inverting the wavefield variation associated with the lateral shot location perturbation. The gradient of the new waveform inversion algorithm is obtained by the adjoint-state method. Our inversion algorithm focuses on resolving the lateral changes of the velocity model with respect to a fixed reference vertical velocity profile given by a well log. We apply the method on a simple-dome model to highlight the methods potential.

  3. Experimental analysis of turbulence effect in settling velocity of suspended sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Salinas–Tapia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Settling velocities of sediment particles for different size ranges were measured in this work using PIV with the help of discriminatory filters. An experimental channel 10x15 cm cross section was used in order to obtain two set of turbulent characteristics corresponding with two different flow rates. The purpose was to analyze the effect of turbulence on the solids settling velocity. The technique allowed us to measure the individual settling velocity of the particles and the flow velocity field of the fluid. Capture and image analysis was performed with digital cameras (CCD using the software Sharp–provision PIV and the statistical cross correlation technique. Results showed that settling velocity of particles is affected by turbulence which enhances the fluid drag coefficient. Physical explanation of this phenomenon is related with the magnitude of the vertical fluctuating velocity of the fluid. However, more research is needed in order to define settling velocity formulas that takes into account this effect

  4. On linear relationship between shock velocity and particle velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandache, H.

    1986-11-01

    We attempt to derive the linear relationship between shock velocity U s and particle velocity U p from thermodynamic considerations, taking into account an ideal gas equation of state and a Mie-Grueneisen equation of state for solids. 23 refs

  5. Analysis of plasma behavior and electro-magnetic interaction between plasma and device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tomofumi

    1980-01-01

    A simulation program for the analysis of plasma behavior and the electromagnetic interaction between plasma and device has been developed. The program consists of a part for the analysis of plasma behavior (plasma system) and a part for the analysis of the electro-magnetic interaction between plasma and devices (circuit system). The parameters which connect the plasma system and the circuit system are the electric resistance of plasma, the internal inductance, and the plasma current. For the plasma system, the simultaneous equations which describe the density distribution of plasma particles, the temperature distribution of electrons and ions, and the space-time variation of current density distribution were derived. The one-dimensional plasma column in γ-direction was considered. The electric resistance and the internal inductance can be deduced. The circuit components are a current transformer, a vertical field coil, a quadrupole field coil, a vacuum chamber and others. An equation which describes plasma position and the shape of cross section is introduced. The plasma position can be known by solving the Mukhavatov's formula of equilibrium. By using this program, the build-up process of plasma current in JT-60 was analysed. It was found that the expansion of plasma sub radius and the control of current distribution by gas injection are the effective methods to obtain high temperature and high density plasma. The eddy current induced in a vacuum vessel shields 40 percent of magnetic field made in the plasma region by a vertical field coil. (Kato, T.)

  6. Observation of floating potential asymmetry in the edge plasma of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Floating potential; vertical magnetic field; vertical electric field reversal; vertical electric field reversal ... Similar exchange of behavior for bottom probe of figure 1 with top probe of ... In our case rate of rise of plasma currents and also the total ...

  7. Turbulent structure of thermal plume. Velocity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillou, B.; Brahimi, M.; Doan-kim-son

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation and a numerical study of the dynamics of a turbulent plume rising from a strongly heated source are described. This type of flow is met in thermal effluents (air, vapor) from, e.g., cooling towers of thermal power plants. The mean and fluctuating values of the vertical component of the velocity were determined using a Laser-Doppler anemometer. The measurements allow us to distinguish three regions in the plume-a developing region near the source, an intermediate region, and a self-preserving region. The characteristics of each zone have been determined. In the self-preserving zone, especially, the turbulence level on the axis and the entrainment coefficient are almost twice of the values observed in jets. The numerical model proposed takes into account an important phenomenon, the intermittency, observed in the plume. This model, established with the self-preserving hypothesis, brings out analytical laws. These laws and the predicted velocity profile are in agreement with the experimental evolutions [fr

  8. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  9. Trade Liberalisation and Vertical Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Peter Arendorf; Laugesen, Anders

    We build a three-country model of international trade in final goods and intermediate inputs and study the relation between different types of trade liberalisation and vertical integration. Firms are heterogeneous with respect to both productivity and factor intensity as observed in data. Final......-good producers face decisions on exporting, vertical integration of intermediate-input production, and whether the intermediate-input production should be offshored to a low-wage country. We find that the fractions of final-good producers that pursue either vertical integration, offshoring, or exporting are all...... increasing when intermediate-input or final-goods trade is liberalised and when the fixed cost of vertical integration is reduced. At the same time, one observes firms that shift away from either vertical integration, offshoring, or exporting. Further, we provide guidance for testing the open...

  10. CFD simulations of a bubbly flow in a vertical pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krepper, E.

    1999-01-01

    Even at the very simple conditions of two phase flow in a vertical pipe, strong 3D effects are observed. The distribution of the gas phase over the cross section varies significantly between the different flow patterns, which are known for the vertical two-phase flow. The air water flow in a vertical tube having a diameter of 50 mm and a length of about 3 m was investigated in steady state tests for different liquid and gas superficial velocities. Several two phase flow measuring techniques were used. Applying a wire mesh sensor, developed in FZR, the void fraction could be determined over the whole cross section of the pipe. The working principle is based on the measurement of the local instantaneous conductivity of the two-phase mixture. At the investigated flow velocities, the rate of the image acquisition is sufficient to record the same bubble several times. This enables to determine bubble diameter distributions. Applying two similar wire mesh sensors with a distance of 50 mm one above the other, the influence of the wire mesh to the flow could be investigated. No essential disturbances of the two-phase flow by the mesh could be found for the investigated flow regimes. Performing an auto correlation between the signals of both sensors, also profiles of the gas velocity were determined. (orig.)

  11. Anomalous cross-field velocities in a CIV laboratory experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axnaes, I.

    1988-10-01

    The axial and radial ion velocities and the electron radial velocity are determined in coaxial plasma gun operated under critical velocity conditions. The particle celocities are determined from probe measurement together with He I 3889 AA absolute intensity measurements and the consideration of the total momentum balance of the current sheet. The ions are found move axially and the electrons radially much faster than predicted by the E/B drift in the macroscopic fields. These results agree with what can be expected from the instability processes, which has earlier been proposed to operate in these experiments. It is therefore a direct experimental demonstration that instability processes have to be invoked not only for the electron heating, but also to explain the macroscopic velocities and currents. (author)

  12. POLARIZED LINE FORMATION IN NON-MONOTONIC VELOCITY FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampoorna, M.; Nagendra, K. N., E-mail: sampoorna@iiap.res.in, E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560034 (India)

    2016-12-10

    For a correct interpretation of the observed spectro-polarimetric data from astrophysical objects such as the Sun, it is necessary to solve the polarized line transfer problems taking into account a realistic temperature structure, the dynamical state of the atmosphere, a realistic scattering mechanism (namely, the partial frequency redistribution—PRD), and the magnetic fields. In a recent paper, we studied the effects of monotonic vertical velocity fields on linearly polarized line profiles formed in isothermal atmospheres with and without magnetic fields. However, in general the velocity fields that prevail in dynamical atmospheres of astrophysical objects are non-monotonic. Stellar atmospheres with shocks, multi-component supernova atmospheres, and various kinds of wave motions in solar and stellar atmospheres are examples of non-monotonic velocity fields. Here we present studies on the effect of non-relativistic non-monotonic vertical velocity fields on the linearly polarized line profiles formed in semi-empirical atmospheres. We consider a two-level atom model and PRD scattering mechanism. We solve the polarized transfer equation in the comoving frame (CMF) of the fluid using a polarized accelerated lambda iteration method that has been appropriately modified for the problem at hand. We present numerical tests to validate the CMF method and also discuss the accuracy and numerical instabilities associated with it.

  13. Visual guidance of forward flight in hummingbirds reveals control based on image features instead of pattern velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Roslyn; Fellows, Tyee K; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2016-08-02

    Information about self-motion and obstacles in the environment is encoded by optic flow, the movement of images on the eye. Decades of research have revealed that flying insects control speed, altitude, and trajectory by a simple strategy of maintaining or balancing the translational velocity of images on the eyes, known as pattern velocity. It has been proposed that birds may use a similar algorithm but this hypothesis has not been tested directly. We examined the influence of pattern velocity on avian flight by manipulating the motion of patterns on the walls of a tunnel traversed by Anna's hummingbirds. Contrary to prediction, we found that lateral course control is not based on regulating nasal-to-temporal pattern velocity. Instead, birds closely monitored feature height in the vertical axis, and steered away from taller features even in the absence of nasal-to-temporal pattern velocity cues. For vertical course control, we observed that birds adjusted their flight altitude in response to upward motion of the horizontal plane, which simulates vertical descent. Collectively, our results suggest that birds avoid collisions using visual cues in the vertical axis. Specifically, we propose that birds monitor the vertical extent of features in the lateral visual field to assess distances to the side, and vertical pattern velocity to avoid collisions with the ground. These distinct strategies may derive from greater need to avoid collisions in birds, compared with small insects.

  14. Effects of Isometric Scaling on Vertical Jumping Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.

    2013-01-01

    Jump height, defined as vertical displacement in the airborne phase, depends on vertical takeoff velocity. For centuries, researchers have speculated on how jump height is affected by body size and many have adhered to what has come to be known as Borelli’s law, which states that jump height does not depend on body size per se. The underlying assumption is that the amount of work produced per kg body mass during the push-off is independent of size. However, if a big body is isometrically downscaled to a small body, the latter requires higher joint angular velocities to achieve a given takeoff velocity and work production will be more impaired by the force-velocity relationship of muscle. In the present study, the effects of pure isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance were investigated using a biologically realistic model of the human musculoskeletal system. The input of the model, muscle stimulation over time, was optimized using jump height as criterion. It was found that when the human model was miniaturized to the size of a mouse lemur, with a mass of about one-thousandth that of a human, jump height dropped from 40 cm to only 6 cm, mainly because of the force-velocity relationship. In reality, mouse lemurs achieve jump heights of about 33 cm. By implication, the unfavourable effects of the small body size of mouse lemurs on jumping performance must be counteracted by favourable effects of morphological and physiological adaptations. The same holds true for other small jumping animals. The simulations for the first time expose and explain the sheer magnitude of the isolated effects of isometric downscaling on jumping performance, to be counteracted by morphological and physiological adaptations. PMID:23936494

  15. Effects of isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten F Bobbert

    Full Text Available Jump height, defined as vertical displacement in the airborne phase, depends on vertical takeoff velocity. For centuries, researchers have speculated on how jump height is affected by body size and many have adhered to what has come to be known as Borelli's law, which states that jump height does not depend on body size per se. The underlying assumption is that the amount of work produced per kg body mass during the push-off is independent of size. However, if a big body is isometrically downscaled to a small body, the latter requires higher joint angular velocities to achieve a given takeoff velocity and work production will be more impaired by the force-velocity relationship of muscle. In the present study, the effects of pure isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance were investigated using a biologically realistic model of the human musculoskeletal system. The input of the model, muscle stimulation over time, was optimized using jump height as criterion. It was found that when the human model was miniaturized to the size of a mouse lemur, with a mass of about one-thousandth that of a human, jump height dropped from 40 cm to only 6 cm, mainly because of the force-velocity relationship. In reality, mouse lemurs achieve jump heights of about 33 cm. By implication, the unfavourable effects of the small body size of mouse lemurs on jumping performance must be counteracted by favourable effects of morphological and physiological adaptations. The same holds true for other small jumping animals. The simulations for the first time expose and explain the sheer magnitude of the isolated effects of isometric downscaling on jumping performance, to be counteracted by morphological and physiological adaptations.

  16. Microinstabilities in a moderately inhomogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    We describe the onset of plasma instability due to heat conduction in a fully ionized hydrogen plasma with small temperature, pressure, and electric potential gradients. The effect of these gradients on plasma stability depends on a single inhomogeneity parameter B/sub t/, which is a measure of the ratio of the electron mean free path to the scale height of the plasma. A large value of vertical-barB/sub t/vertical-bar indicates that the plasma is collisionless. We find the least value of vertical-barB/sub t/vertical-bar needed to produce instability for the range of electron to hydrogen ion temperature ratios T and ion to magnetic pressure ratios β/sub i/, relevant to the solar wind and other plasmas. The wave parameters of the first unstable modes (the modes which become unstable for the least value of vertical-barB/sub t/vertical-bar) are described. The fast mode is the first unstable mode at high β/sub i/, the intermediate mode is the first unstable mode at low β/sub i/, and low temperature ratios, and the slow mode is the first unstable mode at low β/sub i/ and higher temperature ratios

  17. Streaming metal plasma generation by vacuum arc plasma guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGill, R.A.; Dickinson, M.R.; Anders, A.; Monteiro, O.R.; Brown, I.G.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed several different embodiments of repetitively pulsed vacuum arc metal plasma gun, including miniature versions, multicathode versions that can produce up to 18 different metal plasma species between which one can switch, and a compact high-duty cycle well-cooled version, as well as a larger dc gun. Plasma guns of this kind can be incorporated into a vacuum arc ion source for the production of high-energy metal ion beams, or used as a plasma source for thin film formation and for metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. The source can also be viewed as a low-energy metal ion source with ion drift velocity in the range 20 - 200 eV depending on the metal species used. Here we describe the plasma sources that we have developed, the properties of the plasma generated, and summarize their performance and limitations. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  18. Is Fish Response related to Velocity and Turbulence Magnitudes? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. A.; Hockley, F. A.; Cable, J.

    2013-12-01

    Riverine fish are subject to heterogeneous velocities and turbulence, and may use this to their advantage by selecting regions which balance energy expenditure for station holding whilst maximising energy gain through feeding opportunities. This study investigated microhabitat selection by guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in terms of the three-dimensional velocity structure generated by idealised boulders in an experimental flume. Velocity and turbulence influenced intra-species variation in swimming behaviour with respect to size, sex and parasite intensity. With increasing body length, fish swam further and more frequently between boulder regions. Larger guppies spent more time in the high velocity and low turbulence region, whereas smaller guppies preferred the low velocity and high shear stress region directly behind the boulders. Male guppies selected the region of low velocity, indicating a possible reduced swimming ability due to hydrodynamic drag imposed by their fins. With increasing parasite (Gyrodactylus turnbulli) burden, fish preferentially selected the region of moderate velocity which had the lowest bulk measure of turbulence of all regions and was also the most spatially homogeneous velocity and turbulence region. Overall the least amount of time was spent in the recirculation zone which had the highest magnitude of shear stresses and mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio. Shear stresses were a factor of two greater than in the most frequented moderate velocity region, while mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio were six times greater. Indeed the mean longitudinal turbulent scale was 2-6 times greater than the fish length in all regions. While it is impossible to discriminate between these two turbulence parameters (shear stress and turbulent length to fish length ratio) in influencing the fish preference, our study infers that there is a bias towards fish spending more time in a region where both the bulk

  19. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    Current ultrasound scanners can only estimate the velocity along the ultrasound beam and this gives rise to the cos() factor on all velocity estimates. This is a major limitation as most vessels are close to perpendicular to the beam. Also the angle varies as a function of space and time making ...

  20. Acceleration of solid pellets using a plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buller, T.L.; Turnbull, R.J.; Kim, K.

    1979-01-01

    The use of solid pellets of hydrogen isotopes to refuel thermonuclear fusion reactors based on the tokamak configuration will require that the pellets be accelerated to high velocities. One possible method of acceleration is to interact a fast plasma from a plasma gun with the pellets. In this paper preliminary results are given on the acceleration of solid pellets with a plasma gun. The plasma-gun requirements for successful acceleration to high velocities are discussed

  1. Theory of edge plasma in a spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.

    1998-01-01

    Properties of the edge plasma in the SSPX spheromak during the plasma formation and sustainment phases are discussed. For the breakdown and formation phase, the main emphasis is on the analysis of possible plasma contamination by impurities from the electrodes of the plasma gun (helicity injector). The issue of an azimuthally uniform breakdown initiation is also discussed. After the plasma settles down in the main vacuum chamber, one has to sustain the current between the electrodes, in order to continuously inject helicity. We discuss properties of the plasma on the field lines intersecting the electrodes. We conclude that the thermal balance of this plasma is maintained by Joule heating competing with parallel heat losses to the electrodes. The resulting plasma temperature is in the range of 15 - 30 eV. Under the expected operational conditions, the ''current'' velocity of the electrons is only slightly below their thermal velocity. Implications of this observation are briefly discussed

  2. A saw-tooth plasma actuator for film cooling efficiency enhancement of a shaped hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guozhan; Yu, Jianyang; Liu, Huaping; Chen, Fu; Song, Yanping

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports the large eddy simulations of the effects of a saw-tooth plasma actuator and the laidback fan-shaped hole on the film cooling flow characteristics, and the numerical results are compared with a corresponding standard configuration (cylindrical hole without the saw-tooth plasma actuator). For this numerical research, the saw-tooth plasma actuator is installed just downstream of the cooling hole and a phenomenological plasma model is employed to provide the 3D plasma force vectors. The results show that thanks to the downward force and the momentum injection effect of the saw-tooth plasma actuator, the cold jet comes closer to the wall surface and extends further downstream. The saw-tooth plasma actuator also induces a new pair of vortex which weakens the strength of the counter-rotating vortex pair (CRVP) and entrains the coolant towards the wall, and thus the diffusion of the cold jet in the crossflow is suppressed. Furthermore, the laidback fan-shaped hole reduces the vertical jet velocity causing the disappearance of downstream spiral separation node vortices, this compensates for the deficiency of the saw-tooth plasma actuator. Both effects of the laidback fan-shaped hole and the saw-tooth plasma actuator effectively control the development of the CRVP whose size and strength are smaller than those of the anti-counter rotating vortex pair in the far field, thus the centerline and the spanwise-averaged film cooling efficiency are enhanced. The average film cooling efficiency is the biggest in the Fan-Dc = 1 case, which is 80% bigger than that in the Fan-Dc = 0 case and 288% bigger than that in the Cyl-Dc = 0 case.

  3. Stabilization of the Vertical Mode in Tokamaks by Localized Nonaxisymmetric Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, A.

    2007-01-01

    Vertical instability of a tokamak plasma can be controlled by nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields localized near the plasma edge at the bottom and top of the torus. The required magnetic fields can be produced by a relatively simple set of parallelogram-shaped coils.

  4. Non-gyrotropic pressure anisotropy induced by velocity shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenerani, A.; Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss how, in a collisionless magnetized plasma, a sheared velocity field may lead to the anisotropization of an initial Maxwellian state. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show, analytically and numerically, that a sheared velocity field makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic and non-gyrotropic [1], i.e., makes the plasma pressure tensor anisotropic also in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The propagation of transverse magneto-elastic waves in the anisotropic plasma affects the process of formation of a non-gyrotropic pressure and can lead to its spatial filamentation. This plasma dynamics implies in particular that isotropic MHD equilibria cease to be equilibria in presence of a stationary sheared flow. Similarly, in the case of turbulence, where small-scale spatial inhomogeneities are naturally developed during the direct cascade, we may expect that isotropic turbulent states are not likely to exist whenever a full pressure tensor evolution is accounted for. These results may be relevant to understanding the agyrotropic pressure configurations which are well documented in solar wind measurements and possibly correlated to plasma flows (see e.g. Refs.[2,3]), and which have also been measured in Vlasov simulations of Alfvenic turbulence [4]. [1] D. Del Sarto, F. Pegoraro, F. Califano, "Pressure anisotropy and small spatial scales induced by a velocity shear", http://arxiv.org/abs/1507.04895 [2] H.F. Astudillo, E. Marsch, S. Livi, H. Rosenbauer, "TAUS measurements of non-gyrotropic distribution functions of solar wind alpha particles", AIP Conf. Proc. 328, 289 (1996). [3] A. Posner, M.W. Liemhon, T.H. Zurbuchen, "Upstream magnetospheric ion flux tube within a magnetic cloud: Wind/STICS", Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, (2003). [4] S. Servidio, F. Valentini, F. Califano, P. Veltri, "Local kinetic effects in Two-Dimensional Plasma Turbulence", Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 045001 (2012).

  5. Diffraction imaging and velocity analysis using oriented velocity continuation

    KAUST Repository

    Decker, Luke

    2014-08-05

    We perform seismic diffraction imaging and velocity analysis by separating diffractions from specular reflections and decomposing them into slope components. We image slope components using extrapolation in migration velocity in time-space-slope coordinates. The extrapolation is described by a convection-type partial differential equation and implemented efficiently in the Fourier domain. Synthetic and field data experiments show that the proposed algorithm is able to detect accurate time-migration velocities by automatically measuring the flatness of events in dip-angle gathers.

  6. Mudflow rheology in a vertically rotating flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Robert R.; Westphal, Jerome A.; Jobson, Harvey E.; ,

    1990-01-01

    Joint research by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Missouri-Rolla currently (1990) is being conducted on a 3.05 meters in diameter vertically rotating flume used to simulate mudflows under steady-state conditions. Observed mudflow simulations indicate flow patterns in the flume are similar to those occurring in natural mudflows. Variables such as mean and surface velocity, depth, and average boundary shear stress can be measured in this flume more easily than in the field or in a traditional tilting flume. Sensitive variables such as sediment concentration, grain-size distribution, and Atterberg limits also can be precisely and easily controlled. A known Newtonian fluid, SAE 30 motor oil, was tested in the flume and the computed value for viscosity was within 12.5 percent of the stated viscosity. This provided support that the data from the flume can be used to determine the rheological properties of fluids such as mud. Measurements on mud slurries indicate that flows with sediment concentrations ranging from 81 to 87 percent sediment by weight can be approximated as Bingham plastic for strain rates greater than 1 per second. In this approximation, the yield stress and Bingham viscosity were extremely sensitive to sediment concentration. Generally, the magnitude of the yield stress was large relative to the change in shear stress with increasing mudflow velocity.

  7. Combination of fast-ion diagnostics in velocity-space tomographies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh

    2013-01-01

    Fast-ion Dα (FIDA) and collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics provide indirect measurements of fast-ion velocity distribution functions in magnetically confined plasmas. Here we present the first prescription for velocity-space tomographic inversion of CTS and FIDA measurements that can ...

  8. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, J.C.B.; Dukler, A.E.

    1985-10-01

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data

  9. Vertical motions in an intense magnetic flux tube. Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, A.R.; Roberts, B.

    1980-01-01

    It is of interest to examine the effect of radiative relaxation on the propagation of waves in an intense magnetic flux tube embedded in a stratified atmosphere. The radiative energy loss (assuming Newton's law of cooling) leads to a decrease in the vertical phase-velocity of the waves, and to a damping of the amplitude for those waves with frequencies greater than the adiabatic value (ωsub(upsilon)) of the tube cut-off frequency. The cut-off frequency is generalized to include the effects of radiative relaxation, and allows the waves to be classified as mainly progressive or mainly damped. The phase-shift between velocity oscillations at two different levels and the phase-difference between temperature and velocity perturbations are compared with the available observations. Radiative dissipation of waves propagating along an intense flux tube may be the cause of the high temperature (and excess brightness) observed in the network. (orig.)

  10. Inservice testing of vertical pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornman, R.E. Jr.; Schumann, K.E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper focuses on the problems that may occur with vertical pumps while inservice tests are conducted in accordance with existing American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code, Section XI, standards. The vertical pump types discussed include single stage, multistage, free surface, and canned mixed flow pumps. Primary emphasis is placed on the hydraulic performance of the pump and the internal and external factors to the pump that impact hydraulic performance. In addition, the paper considers the mechanical design features that can affect the mechanical performance of vertical pumps. The conclusion shows how two recommended changes in the Code standards may increase the quality of the pump's operational readiness assessment during its service life

  11. Radial velocity asymmetries from jets with variable velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqueira, A. H.; Vasconcelos, M. J.; Velazquez, P. F.; Raga, A. C.; De Colle, F.

    2006-01-01

    We have computed a set of 3-D numerical simulations of radiatively cooling jets including variabilities in both the ejection direction (precession) and the jet velocity (intermittence), using the Yguazu-a code. In order to investigate the effects of jet rotation on the shape of the line profiles, we also introduce an initial toroidal rotation velocity profile. Since the Yguazu-a code includes an atomic/ionic network, we are able to compute the emission coefficients for several emission lines, and we generate line profiles for the Hα, [O I]λ6300, [S II]λ6716 and [N II]λ6548 lines. Using initial parameters that are suitable for the DG Tau microjet, we show that the computed radial velocity shift for the medium-velocity component of the line profile as a function of distance from the jet axis is strikingly similar for rotating and non-rotating jet models

  12. The Plasma Environment Associated With Equatorial Ionospheric Irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathon M.; Heelis, R. A.

    2018-02-01

    We examine the density structure of equatorial depletions referred to here as equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs). Data recorded by the Ion Velocity Meter as part of the Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) aboard the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite are used to study EPBs from 1600 to 0600 h local time at altitudes from 350 to 850 km. The data are taken during the 7 years from 2008 to 2014, more than one half of a magnetic solar cycle, that include solar minimum and a moderate solar maximum. Using a rolling ball algorithm, EPBs are identified by profiles in the plasma density, each having a depth measured as the percent change between the background and minimum density (ΔN/N). During solar moderate activity bubbles observed in the topside postsunset sector are more likely to have large depths compared to those observed in the topside postmidnight sector. Large bubble depths can be observed near 350 km in the bottomside F region in the postsunset period. Conversely at solar minimum the distribution of depths is similar in the postsunset and postmidnight sectors in all longitude sectors. Deep bubbles are rarely observed in the topside postsunset sector and never in the bottomside above 400 km in altitude. We suggest that these features result from the vertical drift of the plasma for these two solar activity levels. These drift conditions affect both the background density in which bubbles are embedded and the growth rate of perturbations in the bottomside where bubbles originate.

  13. A contoured gap coaxial plasma gun with injected plasma armature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah J.; Bomgardner, Richard II; Phillips, Michael W.; Brockington, Samuel; Elton, Raymond [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 20151 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    A new coaxial plasma gun is described. The long term objective is to accelerate 100-200 {mu}g of plasma with density above 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} to greater than 200 km/s with a Mach number above 10. Such high velocity dense plasma jets have a number of potential fusion applications, including plasma refueling, magnetized target fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, high energy density plasmas, and others. The approach uses symmetric injection of high density plasma into a coaxial electromagnetic accelerator having an annular gap geometry tailored to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. The injected plasma is generated by numerous (currently 32) radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of the angled annular injection region of the accelerator. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling identified electrode profiles that can achieve the desired plasma jet parameters. The experimental hardware is described along with initial experimental results in which approximately 200 {mu}g has been accelerated to 100 km/s in a half-scale prototype gun. Initial observations of 64 merging injector jets in a planar cylindrical testing array are presented. Density and velocity are presently limited by available peak current and injection sources. Steps to increase both the drive current and the injected plasma mass are described for next generation experiments.

  14. A contoured gap coaxial plasma gun with injected plasma armature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, F Douglas; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah J; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael W; Brockington, Samuel; Elton, Raymond

    2009-08-01

    A new coaxial plasma gun is described. The long term objective is to accelerate 100-200 microg of plasma with density above 10(17) cm(-3) to greater than 200 km/s with a Mach number above 10. Such high velocity dense plasma jets have a number of potential fusion applications, including plasma refueling, magnetized target fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, high energy density plasmas, and others. The approach uses symmetric injection of high density plasma into a coaxial electromagnetic accelerator having an annular gap geometry tailored to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. The injected plasma is generated by numerous (currently 32) radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of the angled annular injection region of the accelerator. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling identified electrode profiles that can achieve the desired plasma jet parameters. The experimental hardware is described along with initial experimental results in which approximately 200 microg has been accelerated to 100 km/s in a half-scale prototype gun. Initial observations of 64 merging injector jets in a planar cylindrical testing array are presented. Density and velocity are presently limited by available peak current and injection sources. Steps to increase both the drive current and the injected plasma mass are described for next generation experiments.

  15. A contoured gap coaxial plasma gun with injected plasma armature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah J.; Bomgardner, Richard II; Phillips, Michael W.; Brockington, Samuel; Elton, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    A new coaxial plasma gun is described. The long term objective is to accelerate 100-200 μg of plasma with density above 10 17 cm -3 to greater than 200 km/s with a Mach number above 10. Such high velocity dense plasma jets have a number of potential fusion applications, including plasma refueling, magnetized target fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, high energy density plasmas, and others. The approach uses symmetric injection of high density plasma into a coaxial electromagnetic accelerator having an annular gap geometry tailored to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. The injected plasma is generated by numerous (currently 32) radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of the angled annular injection region of the accelerator. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling identified electrode profiles that can achieve the desired plasma jet parameters. The experimental hardware is described along with initial experimental results in which approximately 200 μg has been accelerated to 100 km/s in a half-scale prototype gun. Initial observations of 64 merging injector jets in a planar cylindrical testing array are presented. Density and velocity are presently limited by available peak current and injection sources. Steps to increase both the drive current and the injected plasma mass are described for next generation experiments.

  16. Vertical pellet injection in FTU discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannozzi, E.; Annibaldi, S.V.; Buratti, P.

    2005-01-01

    Central fuelling and pellet enhanced performance modes have been obtained with pellets injected vertically from the high field side on the FTU tokamak. Four phases have been recognized: ablation of the pellets, drifting plasmoids, MHD modes which take the density to the centre of the discharge and finally an anomalous drift which further increases the density peaking. Pellet ablation data have been compared with values from a pellet ablation and deposition code. Comparison between 0.8 and 1.1 MA discharges at a high magnetic field (B T = 7 T) has been carried out: a higher performance has been obtained with the latter due to the higher target density and the larger inversion radius which would increase the effects of m = 1 modes to take the density to the plasma centre

  17. Experimental investigation of a hydrogen plasma railgun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harden, B.; Howell, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the plasma velocity and temperature and composition distributions in a hydrogen plasma railgun were measured. Typical velocities near the muzzle were ∼95 km/s at an initial capacitor bank stored energy of 4.1 kJ. Temperatures ranged from a peak of ∼24000 K in the current-carrying plasma, to ∼85000 K in the tail. The current-carrying plasma was composed of roughly equal parts of hydrogen and copper. Also, computer modeling of armature B probe signals has yielded a simple interpretation of the signal

  18. Fractals control in particle's velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongping; Liu Shutang; Shen Shulan

    2009-01-01

    Julia set, a fractal set of the literature of nonlinear physics, has significance for the engineering applications. For example, the fractal structure characteristics of the generalized M-J set could visually reflect the change rule of particle's velocity. According to the real world requirement, the system need show various particle's velocity in some cases. Thus, the control of the nonlinear behavior, i.e., Julia set, has attracted broad attention. In this work, an auxiliary feedback control is introduced to effectively control the Julia set that visually reflects the change rule of particle's velocity. It satisfies the performance requirement of the real world problems.

  19. Southern high-velocity stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augensen, H.J.; Buscombe, W.

    1978-01-01

    Using the model of the Galaxy presented by Eggen, Lynden-Bell and Sandage (1962), plane galactic orbits have been calculated for 800 southern high-velocity stars which possess parallax, proper motion, and radial velocity data. The stars with trigonometric parallaxes were selected from Buscombe and Morris (1958), supplemented by more recent spectroscopic data. Photometric parallaxes from infrared color indices were used for bright red giants studied by Eggen (1970), and for red dwarfs for which Rodgers and Eggen (1974) determined radial velocities. A color-color diagram based on published values of (U-B) and (B-V) for most of these stars is shown. (Auth.)

  20. Transient radiative hydromagnetic free convection flow past an impulsively started vertical plate with uniform heat and mass flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Ramachandra V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of free convection with thermal radiation of viscous incompressible MHD unsteady flow past an impulsively started vertical plate with uniform heat and mass flux is analyzed. This type of problem finds application in many technological and engineering fields such as rocket propulsion systems, space craft re-entry aerothermodynamics, cosmical flight aerodynamics, plasma physics, glass production and furnace engineering .The Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat transfer in the limit of the optically thin fluid. The non-linear, coupled equations are solved using an implicit finite difference scheme of Crank-Nicolson type. Velocity, temperature and concentration of the flow have been presented for various parameters such as thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number, Prandtl number, Schmidt number, radiation parameter and magnetic parameter. The local and average skin friction, Nusslet number and Sherwood number are also presented graphically. It is observed that, when the radiation parameter increases the velocity and temperature decrease in the boundary layer. .

  1. Hiro and Evans currents in Vertical Disruption Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Leonid; Xujing Li Team; Sergei Galkin Team

    2014-10-01

    The notion of Tokamak Magneto-Hydrodynamics (TMHD), which explicitly reflects the anisotropy of a high temperature tokamak plasma is introduced. The set of TMHD equations is formulated for simulations of macroscopic plasma dynamics and disruptions in tokamaks. Free from the Courant restriction on the time step, this set of equations is appropriate for high performance plasmas and does not require any extension of the MHD plasma model. At the same time, TMHD requires the use of magnetic field aligned numerical grids. The TMHD model was used for creation of theory of the Wall Touching Kink and Vertical Modes (WTKM and WTVM), prediction of Hiro and Evans currents, design of an innovative diagnostics for Hiro current measurements, installed on EAST device. While Hiro currents have explained the toroidal asymmetry in the plasma current measurements in JET disruptions, the Evans currents explain the tile current measurements in tokamaks. The recently developed Vertical Disruption Code (VDE) have demonstrated 5 regimes of VDE and confirmed the generation of both Hiro and Evans currents. The results challenge the 24 years long misinterpretation of the tile currents in tokamaks as ``halo'' currents, which were a product of misuse of equilibrium reconstruction for VDE. This work is supported by US DoE Contract No. DE-AC02-09-CH1146.

  2. Vertical displacement events: a serious concern in future ITER operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Sizyuk, T.; Ulrickson, M.

    2007-01-01

    The strongly elongated plasma configuration in ITER-like devices is vertically unstable unless an active control feedback at the vertical position is applied. A malfunction of this feedback system for variety of reasons can lead to a rapid plasma vertical displacement at full plasma current. As the plasma contacts the top or bottom of the vacuum vessel, the current is rapidly forced to zero, similar to the behavior of the plasma after the thermal quench of a disruption. This phenomenon constitutes the vertical displacement events (VDE). This can result in melting and vaporization of the plasma-facing component (PFC) as well as melting of the copper substrate and burnout of the coolant channels. The upgraded HEIGHTS simulation package is used to simulate in full 3D the response of an entire ITER module response to a VDE. The initial temperature distribution of the PFC and the bulk substrate prior to the VDE is calculated according to steady state heat flux, module design, and initial coolant temperature. The models used in the upgraded HEIGHTS were recently benchmarked against VDE simulation experiments using powerful electron beam and show an excellent agreement with the data.The surface temperature can then be very high and could result in significant melting of substrate copper and damage the coolant channels. In the case of Be surface, surface vaporization is quite high and will remove most incoming plasma power at typical ITER VDE condition. Therefore, the transmitted heat flux to the substrate and the coolant channels are low enough to cause any significant damage. However, if tungsten is exposed to the VDE the situation is quite different. No significant surface vaporization will occur at the tungsten surface thus, leaving the majority of the incident plasma power to be conducted to the copper substrate causing melting at the interface and burnout of coolant channel with serious implications on the integrity and subsequent performance of this module. The

  3. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  4. Trade Liberalisation and Vertical Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Peter Arendorf; Laugesen, Anders Rosenstand

    We build a three-country model of international trade in final goods and intermediate inputs and study the relation between four different types of trade liberalisation and vertical integration. Firms are heterogeneous with respect to both productivity and factor (headquarter) intensity. Final......-good producers face decisions on exporting, vertical integration of intermediate-input production, and whether the intermediate-input production should be offshored to a low-wage country. We find that the fractions of final-good producers that pursue either vertical integration, offshoring, or exporting are all...... increasing when intermediate-input trade or final-goods trade is liberalised. Finally, we provide guidance for testing the open-economy property rights theory of the firm using firm-level data and surprisingly show that the relationship between factor (headquarter) intensity and the likelihood of vertical...

  5. Propagation velocity analysis of a single blob in the SOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Satoru; Yagi, Masatoshi; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2008-01-01

    Nonlinear simulation of plasma blob propagation in the tokamak scrape-off layer is reported. Three types of model equations are introduced and the simulation results are compared. It is found that in the parameter regime where the intercharge instability appears during the propagation process, the theoretical model of propagation velocity determined by the initial blob size provides a good approximation of the simulation results. In the regime where the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability appears, however, the blob velocity saturates at a lower value. (author)

  6. Axisymmetric stability of vertically asymmetric Tokamaks at large beta poloidal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, K.; Fishman, H.; Okabayashi, M. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Todd, A.M.M. (Grumman Aerospace Corp., Princeton, NJ (USA))

    1983-11-01

    The rigid-mode stability of high-..beta.. vertically asymmetric Tokamak equilibria with quasi-uniform current profile is investigated analytically using toroidicity-shaping double expansion method. It is found that vertical stability at large beta poloidal is mainly determined by a coupling between the shape of the plasma surface and the Shafranov shift of the magnetic axis. To the lowest order, symmetric components of the plasma surface shape are found to be the critical destabilizing elements. Asymmetric components have little effect. The inclusion of higher order terms in the high-..beta.. Tokamak expansion leads to further destabilization. These analytic insights are qualitatively confirmed by numerical stability calculations using the PEST code with parabolic safety-factor profile.

  7. Sound Velocity in Soap Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Gong-Tao; Lü Yong-Jun; Liu Peng-Fei; Li Yi-Ning; Shi Qing-Fan

    2012-01-01

    The velocity of sound in soap foams at high gas volume fractions is experimentally studied by using the time difference method. It is found that the sound velocities increase with increasing bubble diameter, and asymptotically approach to the value in air when the diameter is larger than 12.5 mm. We propose a simple theoretical model for the sound propagation in a disordered foam. In this model, the attenuation of a sound wave due to the scattering of the bubble wall is equivalently described as the effect of an additional length. This simplicity reasonably reproduces the sound velocity in foams and the predicted results are in good agreement with the experiments. Further measurements indicate that the increase of frequency markedly slows down the sound velocity, whereas the latter does not display a strong dependence on the solution concentration

  8. Settling velocities in batch sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, A.M.; Thompson, B.E.

    1982-10-01

    The sedimentation of mixtures containing one and two sizes of spherical particles (44 and 62 μm in diameter) was studied. Radioactive tracing with 57 Co was used to measure the settling velocities. The ratio of the settling velocity U of uniformly sized particles to the velocity predicted to Stokes' law U 0 was correlated to an expression of the form U/U 0 = epsilon/sup α/, where epsilon is the liquid volume fraction and α is an empirical constant, determined experimentally to be 4.85. No effect of viscosity on the ratio U/U 0 was observed as the viscosity of the liquid medium was varied from 1x10 -3 to 5x10 -3 Pa.s. The settling velocities of particles in a bimodal mixture were fit by the same correlation; the ratio U/U 0 was independent of the concentrations of different-sized particles

  9. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes for microelectrode arrays applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Smirnov, J R; Jover, Eric; Amade, Roger; Gabriel, Gemma; Villa, Rosa; Bertran, Enric

    2012-09-01

    In this work a methodology to fabricate carbon nanotube based electrodes using plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition has been explored and defined. The final integrated microelectrode based devices should present specific properties that make them suitable for microelectrode arrays applications. The methodology studied has been focused on the preparation of highly regular and dense vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) mat compatible with the standard lithography used for microelectrode arrays technology.

  10. Online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righettini, Paolo; Strada, Roberto; KhademOlama, Ehsan; Valilou, Shirin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a new online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator (WCE) over position and acceleration data gathered from an electro hydraulic servo shaking table. This is a batch estimator type that is based on the wavelet filter banks which extract the high and low resolution of data. The proposed complementary estimator combines these two resolutions of velocities which acquired from numerical differentiation and integration of the position and acceleration sensors by considering a fixed moving horizon window as input to wavelet filter. Because of using wavelet filters, it can be implemented in a parallel procedure. By this method the numerical velocity is estimated without having high noise of differentiators, integration drifting bias and with less delay which is suitable for active vibration control in high precision Mechatronics systems by Direct Velocity Feedback (DVF) methods. This method allows us to make velocity sensors with less mechanically moving parts which makes it suitable for fast miniature structures. We have compared this method with Kalman and Butterworth filters over stability, delay and benchmarked them by their long time velocity integration for getting back the initial position data. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Instabilities in inhomogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailovsky, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    The plasma inhomogeneity across the magnetic field causes a wide class of instabilities which are called instabilities of an inhomogeneous plasma or gradient instabilities. The instabilities that can be studied in the approximation of a magnetic field with parallel straight field lines are treated first, followed by a discussion of the influence of shear on these instabilities. The instabilities of a weakly inhomogeneous plasma with the Maxwellian velocity distribution of particles caused by the density and temperature gradients are often called drift instabilities, and the corresponding types of perturbations are the drift waves. An elementary theory of drift instabilities is presented, based on the simplest equations of motion of particles in the field of low-frequency and long-wavelength perturbations. Following that is a more complete theory of inhomogeneous collisionless plasma instabilities which uses the permittivity tensor and, in the case of electrostatic perturbations, the scalar of permittivity. The results are used to study the instabilities of a strongly inhomogeneous plasma. The instabilities of a plasma in crossed fields are discussed and the electromagnetic instabilities of plasma with finite and high pressure are described. (Auth.)

  12. Plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates

  13. Dynamic plasma screening effects on semiclassical inelastic electron endash ion collisions in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Y.

    1997-01-01

    In dense plasmas, dynamic plasma screening effects are investigated on 1s→2p dipole transition probabilities for electron-impact excitation of hydrogenic ions. The electron endash ion interaction potential is considered by introduction of the plasma dielectric function. A semiclassical straight-line trajectory method is applied to the path of the projectile electron in order to visualize the semiclassical transition probability as a function of the impact parameter, projectile energy, and plasma parameters. The transition probability including the dynamic plasma screening effect is always greater than that including the static plasma screening effect. When the projectile velocity is smaller than the electron thermal velocity, the dynamic polarization screening effect becomes the static plasma screening effect. When the projectile velocity is greater than the electron thermal velocity, then the interaction potential is almost unshielded. The difference between the dynamic and static plasma screening effects is more significant for low-energy projectiles. It is also found that the static plasma screening formula obtained by the Debye endash Hueckel model overestimates the plasma screening effects on the atomic excitation processes in dense plasmas. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  14. Optimizing velocities and transports for complex coastal regions and archipelagos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Patrick J.; Agarwal, Arpit; Lermusiaux, Pierre F. J.

    2015-05-01

    We derive and apply a methodology for the initialization of velocity and transport fields in complex multiply-connected regions with multiscale dynamics. The result is initial fields that are consistent with observations, complex geometry and dynamics, and that can simulate the evolution of ocean processes without large spurious initial transients. A class of constrained weighted least squares optimizations is defined to best fit first-guess velocities while satisfying the complex bathymetry, coastline and divergence strong constraints. A weak constraint towards the minimum inter-island transports that are in accord with the first-guess velocities provides important velocity corrections in complex archipelagos. In the optimization weights, the minimum distance and vertical area between pairs of coasts are computed using a Fast Marching Method. Additional information on velocity and transports are included as strong or weak constraints. We apply our methodology around the Hawaiian islands of Kauai/Niihau, in the Taiwan/Kuroshio region and in the Philippines Archipelago. Comparisons with other common initialization strategies, among hindcasts from these initial conditions (ICs), and with independent in situ observations show that our optimization corrects transports, satisfies boundary conditions and redirects currents. Differences between the hindcasts from these different ICs are found to grow for at least 2-3 weeks. When compared to independent in situ observations, simulations from our optimized ICs are shown to have the smallest errors.

  15. Interaction of the Modulated Electron Beam with Plasma: Kinetic Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, I.O.; Kiyanchuk, M.J.; Soroka, S.V.; Velikanets', D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Evolution of the velocity distribution functions of plasma and beam electrons during modulated electron beam propagation in homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas was studied numerically. Velocity distribution function of plasma electrons at the late time moments strongly differs from the initially Maxwellian one. In the regions of strong electric field plasma electrons' bunches are formed. Comparison of distribution functions of beam electrons for modulated and non-modulated beams shows that deep initial modulation suppresses resonant instability development. In the inhomogeneous plasma acceleration of electrons in the plasma resonance point can be observed

  16. Magnetic Detachment and Plume Control in Escaping Magnetized Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmit, P.F.; Fisch, N.J.

    2008-01-01

    The model of two-fluid, axisymmetric, ambipolar magnetized plasma detachment from thruster guide fields is extended to include plasmas with non-zero injection angular velocity profiles. Certain plasma injection angular velocity profiles are shown to narrow the plasma plume, thereby increasing exhaust efficiency. As an example, we consider a magnetic guide field arising from a simple current ring and demonstrate plasma injection schemes that more than double the fraction of useful exhaust aperture area, more than halve the exhaust plume angle, and enhance magnetized plasma detachment

  17. On neutral plasma oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadwick, B.A.; Morrison, P.J.

    1993-06-01

    We examine the conditions for the existence of spectrally stable neutral modes in a Vlasov-Poisson plasma and show that for stable equilibria of systems that have unbounded spatial domain, the only possible neutral modes are those with phase velocities that correspond to stationary inflection points of the equilibrium distribution function. It is seen that these neutral modes can possess positive or negative free energy

  18. Fundamental Processes in Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Charles Fred [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2017-11-03

    This Final Technical Report gives brief summaries of the plasma physics results developed under DOE grant DE-SC0002451; and provides reference to the published journal articles giving full scientific descriptions. General topics include 1) cyclotron modes; 2) damping and decay of Langmuir modes; 3) 2D vortex dynamics and diocotron modes; 4) separatrix-induced transport and damping; and 5) long-range collisional velocity slowing.

  19. On neutral plasma oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadwick, B.A.; Texas Univ., Austin; Morrison, P.J.; Texas Univ., Austin

    1994-01-01

    We examine the conditions for the existence of spectrally stable neutral modes in a Vlasov-Poisson plasma and show that for stable equilibria of systems that have unbounded spatial domain, the only possible neutral modes are those with phase velocities that correspond to stationary inflection points of the equilibrium distribution function. It is seen that these neutral modes can posses positive or negative free energy. (orig.)

  20. Simulation of VDE under intervention of vertical stability control and vertical electromagnetic force on the ITER vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, S.; Sugihara, M.; Shinya, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Toshimitsu, S.; Lukash, V.E.; Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Sugie, T.; Kusama, Y.; Yoshino, R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Taking account of intervention of VS control, VDE simulations were carried out. ► Malfunctioning of VS circuit (positive feedback) enhances the vertical force. ► The worst case was explored for vertical force on the ITER vacuum vessel. ► We confirmed the force is still within the design margin even if the worst case. - Abstract: Vertical displacement events (VDEs) and disruptions usually take place under intervention of vertical stability (VS) control and the vertical electromagnetic force induced on vacuum vessels is potentially influenced. This paper presents assessment of the force that arises from the VS control in ITER VDEs using a numerical simulation code DINA. The focus is on a possible malfunctioning of the ex-vessel VS control circuit: radial magnetic field is unintentionally applied to the direction of enhancing the vertical displacement further. Since this type of failure usually causes the largest forces (or halo currents) observed in the present experiments, this situation must be properly accommodated in the design of the ITER vacuum vessel. DINA analysis shows that although the ex-vessel VS control modifies radial field, it does not affect plasma motion and current quench behavior including halo current generation because the vacuum vessel shields the field created by the ex-vessel coils. Nevertheless, the VS control modifies the force on the vessel by directly acting on the eddy current carried by the conducting structures of the vessel. Although the worst case was explored in a range of plasma inductance and pattern of VS control in combination with the in-vessel VS control circuit, the result confirmed that the force is still within the design margin.