WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma vapor deposition

  1. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition as a Method for the Deposition of Peptide Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    peptide nanotubes, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, nano assembly 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18...Using physical vapor deposition ( PVD ) well-ordered assemblies of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) composed of dipeptide subunits are obtained on various...for the deposition of thin films (Figure 1b). A. B. Figure 1. (a) Illustration of physical vapor deposition ( PVD ) process of diphenylalanine

  2. Plasma and Ion Assistance in Physical Vapor Deposition: AHistorical Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2007-02-28

    Deposition of films using plasma or plasma-assist can betraced back surprisingly far, namely to the 18th century for arcs and tothe 19th century for sputtering. However, only since the 1960s thecoatings community considered other processes than evaporation for largescale commercial use. Ion Plating was perhaps the first importantprocess, introducing vapor ionization and substrate bias to generate abeam of ions arriving on the surface of the growing film. Ratherindependently, cathodic arc deposition was established as an energeticcondensation process, first in the former Soviet Union in the 1970s, andin the 1980s in the Western Hemisphere. About a dozen various ion-basedcoating technologies evolved in the last decades, all characterized byspecific plasma or ion generation processes. Gridded and gridless ionsources were taken from space propulsion and applied to thin filmdeposition. Modeling and simulation have helped to make plasma and ionseffects to be reasonably well understood. Yet--due to the complex, oftennon-linear and non-equilibrium nature of plasma and surfaceinteractions--there is still a place for the experience plasma"sourcerer."

  3. Oxygen Barrier Coating Deposited by Novel Plasma-enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Juan; Benter, M.; Taboryski, Rafael Jozef

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of a novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber with coaxial electrode geometry for the SiOx deposition. This novel plasma setup exploits the diffusion of electrons through the inner most electrode to the interior samples space as the major energy source. This confi......, and it increased the barrier property of the modified low-density polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and polylactide by 96.48%, 99.69%, and 99.25%, respectively....

  4. Review: Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Okada

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline diamond films have attracted considerable attention because they have a low coefficient of friction and a low electron emission threshold voltage. In this paper, the author reviews the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD of nanocrystalline diamond and mainly focuses on the growth of nanocrystalline diamond by low-pressure PE-CVD. Nanocrystalline diamond particles of 200–700 nm diameter have been prepared in a 13.56 MHz low-pressure inductively coupled CH4/CO/H2 plasma. The bonding state of carbon atoms was investigated by ultraviolet-excited Raman spectroscopy. Electron energy loss spectroscopy identified sp2-bonded carbons around the 20–50 nm subgrains of nanocrystalline diamond particles. Plasma diagnostics using a Langmuir probe and the comparison with plasma simulation are also reviewed. The electron energy distribution functions are discussed by considering different inelastic interaction channels between electrons and heavy particles in a molecular CH4/H2 plasma.

  5. Ti-doped hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating deposited by hybrid physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Rae; Sle Jun, Yee; Moon, Kyoung Il; Sunyong Lee, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon films containing titanium and hydrogen (Ti-doped DLC:H) were synthesized using a hybrid technique based on physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The film was deposited under a mixture of argon (Ar) and acetylene gas (C2H2). The amount of Ti in the Ti-doped DLC:H film was controlled by varying the DC power of the Ti sputtering target ranging from 0 to 240 W. The composition, microstructure, mechanical and chemical properties of Ti-doped DLC:H films with varying Ti concentrations, were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano indentation, a ball-on-disk tribometer, a four-point probe system and dynamic anodic testing. As a result, the optimum composition of Ti in Ti-doped DLC:H film using our hybrid method was found to be a Ti content of 18 at. %, having superior electrical conductivity and high corrosion resistance, suitable for bipolar plates. Its hardness value was measured to be 25.6 GPa with a low friction factor.

  6. Investigations on the Nature of Ceramic Deposits in Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W.; Mauer, G.; Gindrat, M.; Wäger, R.; Vaßen, R.

    2017-01-01

    In Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) process, major fractions of the feedstock powder can be evaporated so that coatings are deposited mainly from the vapor phase. In this work, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results indicate that such evaporation occurs significantly in the plasma torch nozzle and even nucleation and condensation of zirconia is highly possible there. Experimental work has been performed to investigate the nature of the deposits in the PS-PVD process, in particular coatings from condensate vapor and nano-sized clusters produced at two spraying distances of 1000 mm and 400 mm. At long spraying distance, columns in the coatings have pyramidal tops and very sharp faceted microstructures. When the spraying distance is reduced to 400 mm, the tops of columns become relatively flat and a faceted structure is not recognizable. XRD patterns show obvious preferred orientations of (110) and (002) in the coatings sprayed at 400 mm but only limited texture in the coatings sprayed at 1000 mm. Meanwhile, a non-line of sight coating was also investigated, which gives an example for pure vapor deposition. Based on these analyses, a vapor and cluster depositions are suggested to further explain the formation mechanisms of high-quality columnar-structured PS-PVD thermal barrier coatings which have already shown excellent performance in cyclic lifetime test.

  7. Plasma-Powder Feedstock Interaction During Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Baopeng

    2017-02-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a new process developed to produce coatings from the vapor phase. To achieve deposition from the vapor phase, the plasma-feedstock interaction inside the plasma torch, i.e., from the powder injection point to the nozzle exit, is critical. In this work, the plasma characteristics and the momentum and heat transfer between the plasma and powder feedstock at different torch input power levels were investigated theoretically to optimize the net plasma torch power, among other important factors such as the plasma gas composition, powder feed rate, and carrier gas. The plasma characteristics were calculated using the CEA2 code, and the plasma-feedstock interaction was studied inside the torch nozzle at low-pressure (20-25 kPa) conditions. A particle dynamics model was introduced to compute the particle velocity, coupled with Xi Chen's drag model for nonevaporating particles. The results show that the energy transferred to the particles and the coating morphology are greatly influenced by the plasma gas characteristics and the particle dynamics inside the nozzle. The heat transfer between the plasma gas and feedstock material increased with the net torch power up to an optimum at 64 kW, at which a maximum of 3.4% of the available plasma energy was absorbed by the feedstock powder. Experimental results using agglomerated 7-8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powder as feedstock material confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  8. Plasma-Powder Feedstock Interaction During Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Baopeng

    2017-01-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a new process developed to produce coatings from the vapor phase. To achieve deposition from the vapor phase, the plasma-feedstock interaction inside the plasma torch, i.e., from the powder injection point to the nozzle exit, is critical. In this work, the plasma characteristics and the momentum and heat transfer between the plasma and powder feedstock at different torch input power levels were investigated theoretically to optimize the net plasma torch power, among other important factors such as the plasma gas composition, powder feed rate, and carrier gas. The plasma characteristics were calculated using the CEA2 code, and the plasma-feedstock interaction was studied inside the torch nozzle at low-pressure (20-25 kPa) conditions. A particle dynamics model was introduced to compute the particle velocity, coupled with Xi Chen's drag model for nonevaporating particles. The results show that the energy transferred to the particles and the coating morphology are greatly influenced by the plasma gas characteristics and the particle dynamics inside the nozzle. The heat transfer between the plasma gas and feedstock material increased with the net torch power up to an optimum at 64 kW, at which a maximum of 3.4% of the available plasma energy was absorbed by the feedstock powder. Experimental results using agglomerated 7-8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powder as feedstock material confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  9. Deposition of electrochromic tungsten oxide thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henley, W.B.; Sacks, G.J. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Center of Microelectronics

    1997-03-01

    Use of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for electrochromic WO{sub 3} film deposition is investigated. Oxygen, hydrogen, and tungsten hexafluoride were used as source gases. Reactant gas flow was investigated to determine the effect on film characteristics. High quality optical films were obtained at deposition rates on the order of 100 {angstrom}/s. Higher deposition rates were attainable but film quality and optical coherence degraded. Atomic emission spectroscopy (AES), was used to provide an in situ assessment of the plasma deposition chemistry. Through AES, it is shown that the hydrogen gas flow is essential to the deposition of the WO{sub 3} film. Oxygen gas flow and tungsten hexafluoride gas flow must be approximately equal for high quality films.

  10. Plasma-enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Using Ultrashort Precursor Injection Pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, G.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2012-01-01

    An alternative plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method is developed and applied for the deposition of high-quality aluminum oxide (AlOx) films. The PECVD method combines a continuous plasma with ultrashort precursor injection pulses. We demonstrate that the modulation of the precurs

  11. CMAS Interactions with Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited via Plasma Spray- Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, B. J.; Wiesner, V. L.; Zhu, D.; Johnson, N. S.

    2017-01-01

    Materials for advanced turbine engines are expected to have temperature capabilities in the range of 1370-1500C. At these temperatures the ingestion of sand and dust particulate can result in the formation of corrosive glass deposits referred to as CMAS. The presence of this glass can both thermomechanically and thermochemically significantly degrade protective coatings on metallic and ceramic components. Plasma Spray- Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) was used to deposit advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems for investigation on their interaction with CMAS compositions. Coatings were exposed to CMAS and furnace tested in air from 1 to 50 hours at temperatures ranging from 1200-1500C. Coating composition and crystal structure were tracked with X-ray diffraction and microstructure with electron microscopy.

  12. Stress control of silicon nitride films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-ling; Feng, Xiao-fei; Wen, Zhi-yu; Shang, Zheng-guo; She, Yin

    2016-07-01

    Stress controllable silicon nitride (SiNx) films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are reported. Low stress SiNx films were deposited in both high frequency (HF) mode and dual frequency (HF/LF) mode. By optimizing process parameters, stress free (-0.27 MPa) SiNx films were obtained with the deposition rate of 45.5 nm/min and the refractive index of 2.06. Furthermore, at HF/LF mode, the stress is significantly influenced by LF ratio and LF power, and can be controlled to be 10 MPa with the LF ratio of 17% and LF power of 150 W. However, LF power has a little effect on the deposition rate due to the interaction between HF power and LF power. The deposited SiNx films have good mechanical and optical properties, low deposition temperature and controllable stress, and can be widely used in integrated circuit (IC), micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and bio-MEMS.

  13. Diagnostic for Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Etch Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's requirements for the rapid development and validation of future generation electronic devices as well as associated materials and processes, enabling technologies ion the processing of semiconductor materials arising from understanding etch chemistries are being developed through a research collaboration between Stanford University and NASA-Ames Research Center, Although a great deal of laboratory-scale research has been performed on many of materials processing plasmas, little is known about the gas-phase and surface chemical reactions that are critical in many etch and deposition processes, and how these reactions are influenced by the variation in operating conditions. In addition, many plasma-based processes suffer from stability and reliability problems leading to a compromise in performance and a potentially increased cost for the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Such a lack of understanding has hindered the development of process models that can aid in the scaling and improvement of plasma etch and deposition systems. The research described involves the study of plasmas used in semiconductor processes. An inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source in place of the standard upper electrode assembly of the Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) radio-frequency (RF) Reference Cell is used to investigate the discharge characteristics and chemistries. This ICP source generates plasmas with higher electron densities (approximately 10(exp 12)/cu cm) and lower operating pressures (approximately 7 mTorr) than obtainable with the original parallel-plate version of the GEC Cell. This expanded operating regime is more relevant to new generations of industrial plasma systems being used by the microelectronics industry. The motivation for this study is to develop an understanding of the physical phenomena involved in plasma processing and to measure much needed fundamental parameters, such as gas-phase and surface reaction rates. species

  14. High Temperature Multilayer Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited Via Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Bryan James; Zhu, Dongming; Schmitt, Michael P.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Si-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments to avoid rapid material loss. Candidate EBC materials have use temperatures only marginally above current technology, but the addition of a columnar oxide topcoat can substantially increase the durability. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) allows application of these multilayer EBCs in a single process. The PS-PVD technique is a unique method that combines conventional thermal spray and vapor phase methods, allowing for tailoring of thin, dense layers or columnar microstructures by varying deposition conditions. Multilayer coatings were deposited on CMC specimens and assessed for durability under high heat flux and load. Coated samples with surface temperatures ranging from 2400-2700F and 10 ksi loads using the high heat flux laser rigs at NASA Glenn. Coating morphology was characterized in the as-sprayed condition and after thermomechanical loading using electron microscopy and the phase structure was tracked using X-ray diffraction.

  15. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konakov, S.A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics.

  16. Plasma environment during hot cathode direct current discharge plasma chemical vapor deposition of diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晓东; 詹如娟; 周海洋; 胡敏; 温晓辉; 周贵恩; 李凡庆

    1999-01-01

    The plasma characteristics have been investigated in situ by using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and the Langmuir probe during hot cathode direct current discharge plasma chemical vapor deposition of diamond films. The changes of atomic H and CH radical in the ground state have been calculated quantitatively according to the results of OES and the Langmuir probe measurement as discharge current density varied. It is shown that atomic H and CH radicals both in the ground state and in the excited state increase with the enhancement of the discharge current density in the plasma. The electron density and CH emission intensity increase linearly with the enhancement of discharge current densities. The generation of different carbon-containing radicals is related to the elevation of electron temperature. Combining the growth process of diamond films and the diagnostic results, it is shown that atomic H in the excited state may improve the diamond growth efficiently, and the increase of electron temperat

  17. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-09-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  18. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) of Ceramics for Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Bryan J.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    In order to generate advanced multilayer thermal and environmental protection systems, a new deposition process is needed to bridge the gap between conventional plasma spray, which produces relatively thick coatings on the order of 125-250 microns, and conventional vapor phase processes such as electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) which are limited by relatively slow deposition rates, high investment costs, and coating material vapor pressure requirements. The use of Plasma Spray - Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) processing fills this gap and allows thin (coatings of less than 100 microns to be generated with the flexibility to tailor microstructures by changing processing conditions. Coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were applied to NiCrAlY bond coated superalloy substrates using the PS-PVD coater at NASA Glenn Research Center. A design-of-experiments was used to examine the effects of process variables (Ar/He plasma gas ratio, the total plasma gas flow, and the torch current) on chamber pressure and torch power. Coating thickness, phase and microstructure were evaluated for each set of deposition conditions. Low chamber pressures and high power were shown to increase coating thickness and create columnar-like structures. Likewise, high chamber pressures and low power had lower growth rates, but resulted in flatter, more homogeneous layers

  19. Mechanical and piezoresistive properties of thin silicon films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at low substrate temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, J.; Gualdino, A.; Lemke, B.; Paul, O.; Chu, V.; Conde, J. P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical and piezoresistance characterization of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin films deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) and radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using substrate temperatures between 100 and 250 °C. The microtensile technique is used to determine film properties such as Young's modulus, fracture strength and Weibull parameters, and linear and quadratic piezoresistance coefficients obtained at large applied stresses. The 95%-confidence interval for the elastic constant of the films characterized, 85.9 ± 0.3 GPa, does not depend significantly on the deposition method or on film structure. In contrast, mean fracture strength values range between 256 ± 8 MPa and 600 ± 32 MPa: nanocrystalline layers are slightly stronger than their amorphous counterparts and a pronounced increase in strength is observed for films deposited using HWCVD when compared to those grown by PECVD. Extracted Weibull moduli are below 10. In terms of piezoresistance, n-doped radio-frequency nanocrystalline silicon films deposited at 250 °C present longitudinal piezoresistive coefficients as large as -(2.57 ± 0.03) × 10-10 Pa-1 with marginally nonlinear response. Such values approach those of crystalline silicon and of polysilicon layers deposited at much higher temperatures.

  20. Characterization of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition-Physical Vapor Deposition transparent deposits on textiles to trigger various antimicrobial properties to food industry textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunon, Celine [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques (LSA), CNRS, UMR 5180, Bat. J. Raulin 5eme etage, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Chadeau, Elise; Oulahal, Nadia [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire de Recherche en Genie Industriel Alimentaire (LRGIA, E.A. 3733), Rue Henri de Boissieu, F-01000 Bourg en Bresse (France); Grossiord, Carol [Science et Surface, 64, Chemin des Mouilles, F-69130 Ecully (France); Dubost, Laurent [HEF, ZI SUD, Rue Benoit Fourneyron, F-42166 Andrezieux Boutheon (France); Bessueille, Francois [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques (LSA), CNRS, UMR 5180, Bat. J. Raulin 5eme etage, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Simon, Farida [TDV Industrie, 43 Rue du Bas des Bois, BP 121, F-53012 Laval Cedex (France); Degraeve, Pascal [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire de Recherche en Genie Industriel Alimentaire (LRGIA, E.A. 3733), Rue Henri de Boissieu, F-01000 Bourg en Bresse (France); Leonard, Didier, E-mail: didier.leonard@univ-lyon1.fr [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques (LSA), CNRS, UMR 5180, Bat. J. Raulin 5eme etage, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2011-07-01

    Textiles for the food industry were treated with an original deposition technique based on a combination of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Physical Vapor Deposition to obtain nanometer size silver clusters incorporated into a SiOCH matrix. The optimization of plasma deposition parameters (gas mixture, pressure, and power) was focused on textile transparency and antimicrobial properties and was based on the study of both surface and depth composition (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), as well as Transmission Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, SIMS depth profiling and XPS depth profiling on treated glass slides). Deposition conditions were identified in order to obtain a variable and controlled quantity of {approx} 10 nm size silver particles at the surface and inside of coatings exhibiting acceptable transparency properties. Microbiological characterization indicated that the surface variable silver content as calculated from XPS and ToF-SIMS data directly influences the level of antimicrobial activity.

  1. Practical silicon deposition rules derived from silane monitoring during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlome, Richard, E-mail: richard.bartlome@alumni.ethz.ch; De Wolf, Stefaan; Demaurex, Bénédicte; Ballif, Christophe [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and Thin-Film Electronics Laboratory, Rue de la Maladière 71b, 2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Amanatides, Eleftherios; Mataras, Dimitrios [University of Patras, Department of Chemical Engineering, Plasma Technology Laboratory, P.O. Box 1407, 26504 Patras (Greece)

    2015-05-28

    We clarify the difference between the SiH{sub 4} consumption efficiency η and the SiH{sub 4} depletion fraction D, as measured in the pumping line and the actual reactor of an industrial plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. In the absence of significant polysilane and powder formation, η is proportional to the film growth rate. Above a certain powder formation threshold, any additional amount of SiH{sub 4} consumed translates into increased powder formation rather than into a faster growing Si film. In order to discuss a zero-dimensional analytical model and a two-dimensional numerical model, we measure η as a function of the radio frequency (RF) power density coupled into the plasma, the total gas flow rate, the input SiH{sub 4} concentration, and the reactor pressure. The adjunction of a small trimethylboron flow rate increases η and reduces the formation of powder, while the adjunction of a small disilane flow rate decreases η and favors the formation of powder. Unlike η, D is a location-dependent quantity. It is related to the SiH{sub 4} concentration in the plasma c{sub p}, and to the phase of the growing Si film, whether the substrate is glass or a c-Si wafer. In order to investigate transient effects due to the RF matching, the precoating of reactor walls, or the introduction of a purifier in the gas line, we measure the gas residence time and acquire time-resolved SiH{sub 4} density measurements throughout the ignition and the termination of a plasma.

  2. Simulation of low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Lorant, Christophe; Descamps, Pierre; De Wilde, Juray; 1st BeLux workshop on “Coating, Materials, surfaces and Interfaces

    2014-01-01

    The simulation of low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactors is challenging due to the coupling of the fluid dynamics, the chemical reactions and the electric field and the stiffness of the resulting mathematical system. The model equations and the rigorous model reduction to reduce the stiffness are addressed in this paper. Considering pure nitrogen plasma, simulations with two configurations are discussed.

  3. Carbon nanofiber growth in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denysenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Cvelbar, U.; Mozetic, M.; Azarenkov, N. A.

    2008-10-01

    A theoretical model to describe the plasma-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) is proposed. Using the model, the plasma-related effects on the nanofiber growth parameters, such as the growth rate due to surface and bulk diffusion, the effective carbon flux to the catalyst surface, the characteristic residence time and diffusion length of carbon atoms on the catalyst surface, and the surface coverages, have been studied. The dependence of these parameters on the catalyst surface temperature and ion and etching gas fluxes to the catalyst surface is quantified. The optimum conditions under which a low-temperature plasma environment can benefit the CNF growth are formulated. These results are in good agreement with the available experimental data on CNF growth and can be used for optimizing synthesis of related nanoassemblies in low-temperature plasma-assisted nanofabrication.

  4. High rate deposition of microcrystalline silicon films by high-pressure radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) thin films were prepared by high- pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (rf-PECVD) with a screened plasma. The deposition rate and crystallinity varying with the deposition pressure, rf power, hydrogen dilution ratio and electrodes distance were systematically studied. By optimizing the deposition parameters the device quality μc-Si:H films have been achieved with a high deposition rate of 7.8 /s at a high pressure. The Voc of 560 mV and the FF of 0.70 have been achieved for a single-junction μc-Si:H p-i-n solar cell at a deposition rate of 7.8 /s.

  5. High quality plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotler, T.J.; Chapple-Sokol, J. (IBM General Technology Division, Hopewell Junction, NY (United States))

    1993-07-01

    The qualities of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride films can be improved by increasing the deposition temperature. This report compares PECVD silicon nitride films to low pressure chemical vapor deposited (LPCVD) films. The dependence of the film properties on process parameters, specifically power and temperature, are investigated. The stress is shown to shift from tensile to compressive with increasing temperature and power. The deposition rate, uniformity, wet etch rate, index of refraction, composition, stress, hydrogen content, and conformality are considered to evaluate the film properties. Temperature affects the hydrogen content in the films by causing decreased incorporation of N-H containing species whereas the dependence on power is due to changes in the gas-phase precursors. All PECVD film properties, with the exception of conformality, are comparable to those of LPCVD films.

  6. Electrochromic Devices Deposited on Low-Temperature Plastics by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, Joshua; Seman, Michael

    2005-09-20

    Electrochromic windows have been identified by the Basic energy Sciences Advisory committee as an important technology for the reduction of energy spent on heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings. Electrochromic devices have the ability to reversibly alter their optical properties in response to a small electric field. By blocking ultraviolet and infrared radiation, while modulating the incoming visible radiation, electrochromics could reduce energy consumption by several Quads per year. This amounts to several percent of the total annual national energy expenditures. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate proof of concept for using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for depositing all five layers necessary for full electrochromic devices, as an alternative to sputtering techniques. The overall goal is to produce electrochromic devices on flexible polymer substrates using PECVD to significantly reduce the cost of the final product. We have successfully deposited all of the films necessary for a complete electrochromic devices using PECVD. The electrochromic layer, WO3, displayed excellent change in visible transmission with good switching times. The storage layer, V2O5, exhibited a high storage capacity and good clear state transmission. The electrolyte, Ta2O5, was shown to functional with good electrical resistivity to go along with the ability to transfer Li ions. There were issues with leakage over larger areas, which can be address with further process development. We developed a process to deposit ZnO:Ga with a sheet resistance of < 50 W/sq. with > 90% transmission. Although we were not able to deposit on polymers due to the temperatures required in combination with the inverted position of our substrates. Two types of full devices were produced. Devices with Ta2O5 were shown to be functional using small aluminum dots as the top contact. The polymer electrolyte devices were shown to have a clear state transmission of

  7. A new modular multichamber plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, A.; Rava, P.; Schropp, R. E. I.; von Roedern, B.

    1993-06-01

    The present work reports on a new modular UHV multichamber PECVD system with characteristics which prevent both the incorporation of residual impurities and cross contamination between different layers. A wide range of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) materials have been produced and single junction pin solar cells with an efficiency greater than 10% have been readily obtained with little optimization. The system contains three UHV modular process zones (MPZ's); the MPZ's and a load lock chamber are located around a central isolation and transfer zone which contains the transport mechanism consisting of an arm with radial and linear movement. This configuration allows for introduction of the substrate into the MPZ's in any sequence so that any type of multilayer device can be produced. The interelectrode distance in the MPZ's can be adjusted between 1 and 5 cm. This has been found to be an important parameter in the optimisation of the deposition rate and of the uniformity. The multichamber concept also allows individually optimized deposition temperatures and interelectrode distances for the various layers. The system installed in Utrecht will be employed for further optimization of single junction solar cells and for research and development of stable a-Si:H tandem cells.

  8. Control of interface nanoscale structure created by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Someswara R; Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil K; Jiang, Hao; Enlow, Jesse; Bunning, Timothy J; Foster, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Tailoring the structure of films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to specific applications requires a depth-resolved understanding of how the interface structures in such films are impacted by variations in deposition parameters such as feed position and plasma power. Analysis of complementary X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XR, NR) data provide a rich picture of changes in structure with feed position and plasma power, with those changes resolved on the nanoscale. For plasma-polymerized octafluorocyclobutane (PP-OFCB) films, a region of distinct chemical composition and lower cross-link density is found at the substrate interface for the range of processing conditions studied and a surface layer of lower cross-link density also appears when plasma power exceeds 40 W. Varying the distance of the feed from the plasma impacts the degree of cross-linking in the film center, thickness of the surface layer, and thickness of the transition region at the substrate. Deposition at the highest power, 65 W, both enhances cross-linking and creates loose fragments with fluorine content higher than the average. The thickness of the low cross-link density region at the air interface plays an important role in determining the width of the interface built with a layer subsequently deposited atop the first.

  9. Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes through Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王升高; 汪建华; 马志斌; 王传新; 满卫东

    2005-01-01

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized on glass by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) with a mixture of methane and hydrogen gases at the low temperature of 550 ℃. The experimental results show that both the self-bias potential and the density of the catalyst particles are responsible for the alignment of CNTs. When the catalyst particle density is high enough, strong interactions among the CNTs can inhibit CNTs from growing randomly and result in parallel alignment.

  10. Electroluminescence and photoluminescence of conjugated polymer films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of naphthalene

    CERN Document Server

    Rajabi, Mojtaaba; Firouzjah, Marzieh Abbasi; Hosseini, Seyed Iman; Shokri, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Polymer light-emitting devices were fabricated utilizing plasma polymerized thin films as emissive layers. These conjugated polymer films were prepared by RF Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) using naphthalene as monomer. The effect of different applied powers on the chemical structure and optical properties of the conjugated polymers was investigated. The fabricated devices with structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/ plasma polymerized Naphthalene/Alq3/Al showed broadband Electroluminescence (EL) emission peaks with center at 535-550 nm. Using different structural and optical tests, connection between polymers chemical structure and optical properties under different plasma powers has been studied. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopies confirmed that a conjugated polymer film with a 3-D cross-linked network was developed. By increasing the power, products tended to form as highly cross-linked polymer films. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of plasma polymers showed different excimerc ...

  11. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Woehrl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A plasma enhanced vapor deposition process is used to synthesize graphene from a hydrogen/methane gas mixture on copper samples. The graphene samples were transferred onto SiO2 substrates and characterized by Raman spectroscopic mapping and atomic force microscope topographical mapping. Analysis of the Raman bands shows that the deposited graphene is clearly SLG and that the sheets are deposited on large areas of several mm2. The defect density in the graphene sheets is calculated using Raman measurements and the influence of the process pressure on the defect density is measured. Furthermore the origin of these defects is discussed with respect to the process parameters and hence the plasma environment.

  12. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of amorphous Si on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupina, G.; Strobel, C.; Dabrowski, J.; Lippert, G.; Kitzmann, J.; Krause, H. M.; Wenger, Ch.; Lukosius, M.; Wolff, A.; Albert, M.; Bartha, J. W.

    2016-05-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of thin a-Si:H layers on transferred large area graphene is investigated. Radio frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) and very high frequency (VHF, 140 MHz) plasma processes are compared. Both methods provide conformal coating of graphene with Si layers as thin as 20 nm without any additional seed layer. The RF plasma process results in amorphization of the graphene layer. In contrast, the VHF process keeps the high crystalline quality of the graphene layer almost intact. Correlation analysis of Raman 2D and G band positions indicates that Si deposition induces reduction of the initial doping in graphene and an increase of compressive strain. Upon rapid thermal annealing, the amorphous Si layer undergoes dehydrogenation and transformation into a polycrystalline film, whereby a high crystalline quality of graphene is preserved.

  13. Development of plasma assisted thermal vapor deposition technique for high-quality thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-Il; Choi, Yong Sup; Park, Hyun Jae

    2016-12-01

    The novel technique of Plasma-Assisted Vapor Deposition (PAVD) is developed as a new deposition method for thin metal films. The PAVD technique yields a high-quality thin film without any heating of the substrate because evaporated particles acquire energy from plasma that is confined to the inside of the evaporation source. Experiments of silver thin film deposition have been carried out in conditions of pressure lower than 10-3 Pa. Pure silver plasma generation is verified by the measurement of the Ag-I peak using optical emission spectroscopy. A four point probe and a UV-VIS spectrophotometer are used to measure the electrical and optical properties of the silver film that is deposited by PAVD. For an ultra-thin silver film with a thickness of 6.5 nm, we obtain the result of high-performance silver film properties, including a sheet resistance 75%. The PAVD-film properties show a low sheet resistance of 30% and the same transmittance with conventional thermal evaporation film. In the PAVD source, highly energetic particles and UV from plasma do not reach the substrate because the plasma is completely shielded by the optimized nozzle of the crucible. This new PAVD technique could be a realistic solution to improve the qualities of transparent electrodes for organic light emission device fabrication without causing damage to the organic layers.

  14. Characteristics of silicon nitride deposited by VHF (162 MHz)-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using a multi-tile push-pull plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Seok; Sirse, Nishant; Kim, Ki Hyun; Rogers Ellingboe, Albert; Kim, Kyong Nam; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-10-01

    To prevent moisture and oxygen permeation into flexible organic electronic devices formed on substrates, the deposition of an inorganic diffusion barrier material such as SiN x is important for thin film encapsulation. In this study, by a very high frequency (162 MHz) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF-PECVD) using a multi-tile push-pull plasma source, SiN x layers were deposited with a gas mixture of NH3/SiH4 with/without N2 and the characteristics of the plasma and the deposited SiN x film as the thin film barrier were investigated. Compared to a lower frequency (60 MHz) plasma, the VHF (162 MHz) multi-tile push-pull plasma showed a lower electron temperature, a higher vibrational temperature, and higher N2 dissociation for an N2 plasma. When a SiN x layer was deposited with a mixture of NH3/SiH4 with N2 at a low temperature of 100 °C, a stoichiometric amorphous Si3N4 layer with very low Si-H bonding could be deposited. The 300 nm thick SiN x film exhibited a low water vapor transmission rate of 1.18  ×  10-4 g (m2 · d)-1, in addition to an optical transmittance of higher than 90%.

  15. Conformal encapsulation of three-dimensional, bioresorbable polymeric scaffolds using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, Morgan J; Pegalajar-Jurado, Adoracion; Fisher, Ellen R

    2014-10-21

    Bioresorbable polymers such as poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) have a multitude of potential biomaterial applications such as controlled-release drug delivery and regenerative tissue engineering. For such biological applications, the fabrication of porous three-dimensional bioresorbable materials with tunable surface chemistry is critical to maximize their surface-to-volume ratio, mimic the extracellular matrix, and increase drug-loading capacity. Here, two different fluorocarbon (FC) precursors (octofluoropropane (C3F8) and hexafluoropropylene oxide (HFPO)) were used to deposit FC films on PCL scaffolds using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). These two coating systems were chosen with the intent of modifying the scaffold surfaces to be bio-nonreactive while maintaining desirable bulk properties of the scaffold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed high-CF2 content films were deposited on both the exterior and interior of PCL scaffolds and that deposition behavior is PECVD system specific. Scanning electron microscopy data confirmed that FC film deposition yielded conformal rather than blanket coatings as the porous scaffold structure was maintained after plasma treatment. Treated scaffolds seeded with human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) demonstrate that the cells do not attach after 72 h and that the scaffolds are noncytotoxic to HDF. This work demonstrates conformal FC coatings can be deposited on 3D polymeric scaffolds using PECVD to fabricate 3D bio-nonreactive materials.

  16. Low temperature metal free growth of graphene on insulating substrates by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, R.; Munuera, C.; Martínez, J. I.; Azpeitia, J.; Gómez-Aleixandre, C.; García-Hernández, M.

    2017-03-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650 °C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω sq-1. The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on mesoporous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx (x=0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds covalently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  18. Studies on non-oxide coating on carbon fibers using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Prajapati, K. K.; Vyas, M. M.; Batra, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    A new way of improving the oxidative behavior of carbon fibers coated with SiC through Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique. The complete study includes coating of SiC on glass slab and Stainless steel specimen as a starting test subjects but the major focus was to increase the oxidation temperature of carbon fibers by PECVD technique. This method uses relatively lower substrate temperature and guarantees better stoichiometry than other coating methods and hence the substrate shows higher resistance towards mechanical and thermal stresses along with increase in oxidation temperature.

  19. Synthesis of carbon nanotube array using corona discharge plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A corona discharge plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with the features of atmospheric pressure and low temperature has been developed to synthesize the carbon nanotube array. The array was synthesized from methane and hydrogen mixture in anodic aluminum oxide template channels in that cobalt was electrodeposited at the bottom. The characterization results by the scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate that the array consists of carbon nanotubes with the diameter of about 40 nm and the length of more than 4 -m, and the carbon nanotubes are mainly restrained within the channels of templates.

  20. Behavior of incorporated nitrogen in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide formed by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Nao; Itokawa, Hiroshi; Fujitsuka, Ryota; Sekine, Katsuyuki; Onoue, Seiji; Tonotani, Junichi

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of nitrogen (N) atoms in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide (SiO2) formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was characterized by physical analysis and from electrical properties. The changes in the chemical bonding and distribution of N in plasma-nitrided SiO2 were investigated for different subsequent processes. N-Si3, N-Si2O, and N2 are formed in a SiO2 film by plasma nitridation. N2 molecules diffuse out during annealing at temperatures higher than 900 °C. NH species are generated from N2 molecules and H in the SiO2 film with subsequent oxide deposition using O3 as an oxidant. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors are obtained. The negative shift of the C-V curve is caused by the increase in the density of positive fix charge traps in CVD-SiO2 induced by plasma nitridation. The C-V curve of plasma-nitrided SiO2 subjected to annealing shifts to the positive direction and that subjected to the subsequent oxide deposition shifts markedly to the negative direction. It is clarified that the density of positive charge fixed traps in plasma-nitrided SiO2 films decrease because the amount of N2 molecules is decreased by annealing, and that the density of traps increases because NH species are generated and move to the interface between SiO2 and the Si substrate with the subsequent oxide deposition.

  1. Chain Assemblies from Nanoparticles Synthesized by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition: The Computational View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, Maxim V; Zamotin, Kirill Y; Protopopova, Vera S; Alexandrov, Sergey E

    2015-12-01

    This article refers to the computational study of nanoparticle self-organization on the solid-state substrate surface with consideration of the experimental results, when nanoparticles were synthesised during atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD). The experimental study of silicon dioxide nanoparticle synthesis by AP-PECVD demonstrated that all deposit volume consists of tangled chains of nanoparticles. In certain cases, micron-sized fractals are formed from tangled chains due to deposit rearrangement. This work is focused on the study of tangled chain formation only. In order to reveal their formation mechanism, a physico-mathematical model was developed. The suggested model was based on the motion equation solution for charged and neutral nanoparticles in the potential fields with the use of the empirical interaction potentials. In addition, the computational simulation was carried out based on the suggested model. As a result, the influence of such experimental parameters as deposition duration, particle charge, gas flow velocity, and angle of gas flow was found. It was demonstrated that electrical charges carried by nanoparticles from the discharge area are not responsible for the formation of tangled chains from nanoparticles, whereas nanoparticle kinetic energy plays a crucial role in deposit morphology and density. The computational results were consistent with experimental results.

  2. Growth of nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S W; Moon, J Y; Ahn, S S; Kim, H Y; Shin, D H

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films have been deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using SiH sub 4 , CH sub 4 , and H sub 2 gases. The effects of gas mixing ratio (CH sub 4 /SiH sub 4), deposition temperature, and RF power on the film properties have been studied. The growth rate, refractive index, and the optical energy gap depends critically on the growth conditions. The dependence of the growth rate on the gas flow ratio is quite different from the results obtained for the growth using C sub 2 H sub 2 gas instead of CH sub 4. As the deposition temperature is increased from 300 .deg. C to 600 .deg. C, hydrogen and carbon content in the film decreases and as a result the optical gap decreases. At the deposition temperature of 600 .deg. C and RF power of 150 W, the film structure si nanocrystalline, As the result of the nanocrystallization the dark conductivity is greatly improved. The nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films may be used for large area optoelectronic devices...

  3. FTIR Characterization of Fluorine Doped Silicon Dioxide Thin Films Deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng-Fei; DING Shi-Jin; ZHANG Wei; ZHANG Jian-Yun; WANGJi-Tao; WEI William Lee

    2000-01-01

    Fluorine doped silicon dioxide (SiOF) thin films have been prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor depo sition. The Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) spectra of SiOF films are deliberated to reveal the structure change of SiO2 and the mechanism of dielectric constant reduction after doping fluorine. When F is doped in SiO2 films, the Si-O stretching absorption peak will have a blue-shift due to increase of the partial charge of the O atom. The FTIR spectra indicate that some Si-OH components in the thin film can be removed after doping fluorine. These changes reduce the ionic and orientational polarization, and result in the reduction in dielectric constant of the film. According to Gaussian fitting, it is found that the Si-F2 bonds will appear in the SiOF film with increase of the fluorine content. The Si-F2 structures are liable to react with water, and cause the same increase of absorbed moisture in the film.

  4. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H{sub 2} into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, CH, H{sub β}, and H{sub α} were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T{sub 2g} phonon at 1333 cm{sup −1} peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  5. Influences on ionization fraction in an inductively coupled ionized physical vapor deposition device plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Daniel R.; Ruzic, David N.; Allain, Monica M. C.; Hayden, Douglas B.

    2002-01-01

    A computer simulation was created to model the transport of sputtered atoms through an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) system. The simulation combines Monte Carlo and fluid methods to track the metal atoms that are emitted from the target, interact with the IPVD plasma, and are eventually deposited somewhere in the system. Ground-state neutral, excited, and ionized metal atoms are tracked. The simulation requires plasma conditions to be specified by the user. Langmuir probe measurements were used to determine these parameters in an experimental system in order to compare simulation results with experiment. The primary product of the simulation is a prediction of the ionization fraction of the sputtered atom flux at the substrate under various conditions. This quantity was experimentally measured and the results compared to the simulation. Experiment and simulation differ significantly. It is hypothesized that heating of the background gas due to the intense sputtered atom flux at the target is primarily responsible for this difference. Heating of the background gas is not accounted for in the simulation. Difficulties in accurately measuring plasma parameters, especially electron temperature, are also significant.

  6. Effect of plasma parameters on characteristics of silicon nitride film deposited by single and dual frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, B. B.; Yin, Yongyi; Han, Jeon G.

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride films using various low-temperature plasmas. Utilizing radio-frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) and ultra-high frequency (UHF, 320 MHz) powers, different plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition processes are conducted in the mixture of reactive N2/NH3/SiH4 gases. The processes are extensively characterized using different plasma diagnostic tools to study their plasma and radical generation capabilities. A typical transition of the electron energy distribution function from single- to bi-Maxwellian type is achieved by combining RF and ultra-high powers. Data analysis revealed that the RF/UHF dual frequency power enhances the plasma surface heating and produces hot electron population with relatively low electron temperature and high plasma density. Using various film analysis methods, we have investigated the role of plasma parameters on the compositional, structural, and optical properties of the deposited films to optimize the process conditions. The presented results show that the dual frequency power is effective for enhancing dissociation and ionization of neutrals, which in turn helps in enabling high deposition rate and improving film properties.

  7. MICROSTRUCTURE OF SiOx:H FILMS PREPARED BY PLASMA ENHANCED CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA ZHI-XUN; LIAO XIAN-BO; KONG GUANG-LIN; CHU JUN-HAO

    2000-01-01

    The micro-Raman spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy have been performed for the study of the microstructure of amorphous hydrogenated oxidized silicon (a-SiOx:H) films prepared by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique. It is found that a-SiOx :H consists of two phases: an amorphous silicon-rich phase and an oxygen-rich phase mainly comprised of HSi-SiO2 and HSi-O3. The Raman scattering results exhibit that the frequency of TO-like mode of amorphous silicon red-shifts with decreasing size of silicon-rich region. This is related to the quantum confinement effects, similar to the nanocrystalline silicon.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马旭村; 徐贵昌; 王恩哥

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on meso-porous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx( x = 0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds cova-lently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  9. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics. The PECVD technology is inherently multiscale, from macroscale processes in the chemical reactor to atomic-scale surface chemistry. Our macroscale model is based on Navier-Stokes equations for a transient laminar flow of a compressible chemically reacting gas mixture, together with the mass transfer and energy balance equations, Poisson equation for electric potential, electrons and ions balance equations. The chemical kinetics model includes 24 species and 58 reactions: 37 in the gas phase and 21 on the surface. A deposition model consists of three stages: adsorption to the surface, diffusion along the surface and embedding of products into the substrate. A new model has been validated on experimental results obtained with the "Plasmalab System 100" reactor. We present the mathematical model and simulation results investigating the influence of flow rate and source gas proportion on silicon nitride film growth rate and chemical composition.

  10. Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yoonyoung; Desta, Yohannes; Goettert, Jost; Lee, G. S.; Ajmera, P. K.

    2005-07-01

    Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon (SiCF) films achieved by wet chemical treatments and through x-ray irradiation is examined. The SiCF films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, using gas precursors of tetrafluoromethane and disilane. As-deposited SiCF film composition was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface modification of SiCF films utilizing n-lithiodiaminoethane wet chemical treatment is discussed. Sessile water-drop contact angle changed from 95°+/-2° before treatment to 32°+/-2° after treatment, indicating a change in the film surface characteristics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. For x-ray irradiation on the SiCF film with a dose of 27.4 kJ/cm3, the contact angle of the sessile water drop changed from 95°+/-2° before radiation to 39°+/-3° after x-ray exposure. The effect of x-ray exposure on chemical bond structure of SiCF films is studied using Fourier transform infrared measurements. Electroless Cu deposition was performed to test the applicability of the surface modified films. The x-ray irradiation method offers a unique advantage in making possible surface modification in a localized area of high-aspect-ratio microstructures. Fabrication of a Ti-membrane x-ray mask is introduced here for selective surface modification using x-ray irradiation.

  11. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon oxynitride films for optical waveguide bridges for use in mechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard-Larsen, Torben; Leistiko, Otto

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the influence of RF power, ammonia flow, annealing temperature, and annealing time on the optical and mechanical properties of plasma-enhanced chemically vapor deposited silicon oxynitride films, is presented. A low refractive index (1.47 to 1.48) film having tensile stress has been...

  12. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond Films on Silicon From Ethanol and Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马志斌; 汪建华; 王传新; 满卫东

    2003-01-01

    Diamond films with very smooth surface and good optical quality have been deposited onto silicon substrate using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) from a gas mixture of ethanol and hydrogen at a low substrate temperature of 450 ℃. The effects of the substrate temperature on the diamond nucleation and the morphology of the diamond film have been investigated and observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microstructure and the phase of the film have been characterized using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The diamond nucleation density significantly decreases with the increasing of the substrate temperature. There are only sparse nuclei when the substrate temperature is higher than 800 ℃ although the ethanol concentration in hydrogen is very high. That the characteristic diamond peak in the Raman spectrum of a diamond film prepared at a low substrate temperature of 450 ℃ extends into broadband indicates that the film is of nanophase. No graphite peak appeared in the XRD pattern confirms that the film is mainly composed of SP3 carbon. The diamond peak in the XRD pattern also broadens due to the nanocrystalline of the film.

  13. Characterization of diamond-like nanocomposite thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, T. S.; Liu, C. H.; Bhattacharyya, T. K.; Patel, P.; Barik, T. K.

    2010-06-01

    Diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN) thin films, comprising the networks of a-C:H and a-Si:O were deposited on pyrex glass or silicon substrate using gas precursors (e.g., hexamethyldisilane, hexamethyldisiloxane, hexamethyldisilazane, or their different combinations) mixed with argon gas, by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Surface morphology of DLN films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic result shows that the films contain nanoparticles within the amorphous structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the structural change within the DLN films. The hardness and friction coefficient of the films were measured by nanoindentation and scratch test techniques, respectively. FTIR and XPS studies show the presence of CC, CH, SiC, and SiH bonds in the a-C:H and a-Si:O networks. Using Raman spectroscopy, we also found that the hardness of the DLN films varies with the intensity ratio ID/IG. Finally, we observed that the DLN films has a better performance compared to DLC, when it comes to properties like high hardness, high modulus of elasticity, low surface roughness and low friction coefficient. These characteristics are the critical components in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and emerging nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  14. Comparison of hafnium silicate thin films on silicon (1 0 0) deposited using thermal and plasma enhanced metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangarajan, Vishwanathan; Bhandari, Harish; Klein, Tonya M

    2002-11-01

    Hafnium silicate thin films were deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Si at 400 deg. C using hafnium (IV) t-butoxide. Films annealed in O{sub 2} were compared to as-deposited films using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Hafnium silicate films were deposited by both thermal and plasma enhanced MOCVD using 2% SiH{sub 4} in He as the Si precursor. An O{sub 2} plasma increased Si content to as much as {approx}26 at.% Si. Both thermal and plasma deposited Hf silicates are amorphous as deposited, however, thermal films exhibit crystallinity after anneal. Surface roughness as measured by atomic force microscopy was found to be 1.1 and 5.1 nm for MOCVD hafnium silicate and plasma enhanced MOCVD hafnium silicate, respectively.

  15. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of iron doped thin dioxide films, their structure and photowetting effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobczyk-Guzenda, A., E-mail: anna.sobczyk-guzenda@p.lodz.pl [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lodz University of Technology, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Owczarek, S.; Szymanowski, H. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lodz University of Technology, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Wypych-Puszkarz, A. [Department of Molecular Physics, Lodz University of Technology, Zeromskiego 116, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Volesky, L. [Technical University of Liberec, Institute for Nanomaterials, Advanced Technologies and Innovation, Studentska 1402/2, 461 17 Liberec 1 (Czech Republic); Gazicki-Lipman, M. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lodz University of Technology, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland)

    2015-08-31

    Radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF PECVD) technique was applied for the purpose of deposition of iron doped titanium dioxide coatings from a gaseous mixture of oxygen with titanium (IV) chloride and iron (0) pentacarbonyl. Glass slides and silicon wafers were used as substrates. The coatings morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Their elemental and chemical composition was studied with the help of X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, respectively, while their phase composition was analyzed with the Raman spectroscopy. For the determination of the film optical properties, ultraviolet (UV–Vis) spectroscopy techniques were used. Iron content in the range of 0.07 to 11.5 at.% was found in the coatings. FTIR studies showed that iron was built-in in the structure of TiO{sub 2} matrix. Surface roughness, assessed with the SEM and AFM techniques, increases with an increasing content of this element. Trace amounts of iron resulted in a lowering of an absorption threshold of the films and their optical gap, but the tendency was reversed for high concentrations of that element. The effect of iron doping on UV photowettability of the films was also studied and, for coatings containing up to 5% of iron, it was stronger than that exhibited by pure TiO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Iron doped TiO{sub 2} films were deposited with the PECVD method. • Differences of surface morphology of the films with different iron content were shown. • Depending on the iron content, the film structure is either amorphous or crystalline. • A parabolic character of the optical gap dependence on the concentration of iron was observed. • Up to a concentration of 5% of iron, doped TiO{sub 2} films exhibit a super-hydrophilic effect.

  16. Evaluation of chemical and structural properties of germanium-carbon coatings deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamali, Hossein, E-mail: h.jamali@mut-es.ac.ir; Mozafarinia, Reza; Eshaghi, Akbar

    2015-10-15

    Germanium-carbon coatings were deposited on silicon and glass substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using three different flow ratios of GeH{sub 4} and CH{sub 4} precursors. Elemental analysis, structural evaluation and microscopic investigation of coatings were performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Based on the results, the coatings exhibited a homogeneous and dense structure free of pores with a very good adhesion to substrate. The structural evaluation revealed that the germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of a Ge-rich composite material containing the amorphous and crystalline germanium and amorphous carbon with the mixture of Ge–Ge, Ge–C, C–C, Ge–H and C–H bonds. The result suggested that the amorphisation of the coatings could be increased with raising CH{sub 4}:GeH{sub 4} flow rate ratio and subsequently increasing C amount incorporated into the coating. - Highlights: • Germanium-carbon coatings were prepared by PECVD technique. • The germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of composite material. • The amorphisation of the coatings were increased with raising CH{sub 4}:GeH{sub 4} flow ratio.

  17. Effects of deposition parameters on microstructure and thermal conductivity of diamond films deposited by DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Quan-yan; QIU Wan-qi; ZENG De-chang; LIU Zhong-wu; DAI Ming-jiang; ZHOU Ke-song

    2009-01-01

    The uniform diamond films with 60 mm in diameter were deposited by improved DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition technique. The structure of the film was characterized by scanning electronic microcopy(SEM) and laser Raman spectrometry. The thermal conductivity was measured by a photo thermal deflection technique. The effects of main deposition parameters on microstructure and thermal conductivity of the films were investigated. The results show that high thermal conductivity, 10.0 W/(K-cm), can be obtained at a CH4 concentration of 1.5% (volume fraction) and the substrate temperatures of 880-920 ℃ due to the high density and high purity of the film. A low pressure difference between nozzle and vacuum chamber is also beneficial to the high thermal conductivity.

  18. Cytotoxicity of Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Prepared by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Gou, Li; Ran, Junguo; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties and chemical stability, making it highly suitable for biomedical applications. For implant materials, the impact of boron-doped NCD films on the character of cell growth (i.e., adhesion, proliferation) is very important. Boron-doped NCD films with resistivity of 10-2 Ω·cm were grown on Si substrates by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) process with H2 bubbled B2O3. The crystal structure, diamond character, surface morphology, and surface roughness of the boron-doped NCD films were analyzed using different characterization methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The contact potential difference and possible boron distribution within the film were studied with a scanning kelvin force microscope (SKFM). The cytotoxicity of films was studied by in vitro tests, including fluorescence microscopy, SEM and MTT assay. Results indicated that the surface roughness value of NCD films was 56.6 nm and boron was probably accumulated at the boundaries between diamond agglomerates. MG-63 cells adhered well and exhibited a significant growth on the surface of films, suggesting that the boron-doped NCD films were non-toxic to cells. supported by the Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China) (No. KFJJ201313)

  19. Electrical transport properties of graphene nanowalls grown at low temperature using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rong; Ahktar, Meysam; Alruqi, Adel; Dharmasena, Ruchira; Jasinski, Jacek B.; Thantirige, Rukshan M.; Sumanasekera, Gamini U.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we report the electrical transport properties of uniform and vertically oriented graphene (graphene nanowalls) directly synthesized on multiple substrates including glass, Si/SiO2 wafers, and copper foils using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with methane (CH4) as the precursor at relatively low temperatures. The temperature for optimum growth was established with the aid of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. This approach offers means for low-cost graphene nanowalls growth on an arbitrary substrate with the added advantage of transfer-free device fabrication. The temperature dependence of the electrical transport properties (resistivity and thermopower) were studied in the temperature range, 30-300 K and analyzed with a combination of 2D-variable range hopping (VRH) and thermally activated (TA) conduction mechanisms. An anomalous temperature dependence of the thermopower was observed for all the samples and explained with a combination of a diffusion term having a linear temperature dependence plus a term with an inverse temperature dependence.

  20. Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Nanocrystalline Tungsten Carbide Thin Film and Its Electro-catalytic Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huajun ZHENG; Chunan MA; Jianguo HUANG; Guohua LI

    2005-01-01

    Nanocrystalline tungsten carbide thin films were fabricated on graphite substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at H2 and Ar atmosphere, using WF6 and CH4 as precursors. The crystal phase, structure and chemical components of the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), respectively. The results show that the film prepared at CH4/WF6concentration ratio of 20 and at 800℃ is composed of spherical particles with a diameter of 20~35 nm. Electrochemical investigations show that the electrochemical real surface area of electrode of the film is large, and the electrode of the film exhibits higher electro-catalytic activity in the reaction of methanol oxidation. The designated constant current of the film catalyst is 123.6 mA/cm2 in the mixture solution of H2SO4 and CH3OH at the concentration of 0.5 and 2.0 mol/L at 70℃, and the designated constant potential is only 0.306 V (vs SCE).

  1. Organo-Functionalization of Silicon Nanocrystals Synthesized by Inductively Coupled Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Don-Sung; Choe, Dong-Hoe; Jeong, Hyun-Dam [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Seung-Wan; Kim, Jung-Hyung [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Octadecyl-terminated silicon nanocrystals (ODE-Si NCs) are obtained via a surface-initiated thermal hydrosilylation reaction on hydride-terminated Si NCs (H-Si NCs). Pristine Si NCs were synthesized at the gram scale by using inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) . The H-Si NCs were produced through a chemical etching process with hydrofluoric acid (HF), ethanol (EtOH), and distilled water (d-H{sub 2}O). The results obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicate that the synthesized Si NCs obtained via ICP-CVD have diamond cubic-structured silicon with a grain size of 10 nm and a densely packed Si NC array consisting of individual NCs. Organo-functionalized Si NCs, i.e., ODE-Si NCs, are well soluble in organic solvent whereas pristine Si NCs synthesized through ICP-CVD are not. The surface chemistry of the ODE-Si NCs was confirmed via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-NMR), and field emission transmission electron microscopy (FE-TEM). Thereby, these newly synthesized and scalable organo-functionalized Si NCs are applicable as raw materials for practical use in devices by tuning the surface chemistry with various capping molecules.

  2. Boron nitride nanowalls: low-temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition synthesis and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenkov, Ivan S.; Kosinova, Marina L.; Maximovskii, Eugene A.

    2017-05-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanowalls (BNNWs) were synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) from a borazine (B3N3H6) and ammonia (NH3) gas mixture at a low temperature range of 400 °C-600 °C on GaAs(100) substrates. The effect of the synthesis temperature on the structure and surface morphology of h-BN films was investigated. The length and thickness of the h-BN nanowalls were in the ranges of 50-200 nm and 15-30 nm, respectively. Transmission electron microscope images showed the obtained BNNWs were composed of layered non-equiaxed h-BN nanocrystallites 5-10 nm in size. The parallel-aligned h-BN layers as an interfacial layer were observed between the film and GaAs(100) substrate. BNNWs demonstrate strong blue light emission, high transparency (>90%) both in visible and infrared spectral regions and are promising for optical applications. The present results enable a convenient growth of BNNWs at low temperatures.

  3. Microstructural Effects and Properties of Non-line-of-Sight Coating Processing via Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Bryan J.; Zhu, Dongming; Schmitt, Michael P.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2017-08-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is a unique processing method that bridges the gap between conventional thermal spray and vapor phase methods, and enables highly tailorable coatings composed of a variety of materials in thin, dense layers or columnar microstructures with modification of the processing conditions. The strengths of this processing technique are material and microstructural flexibility, deposition speed, and potential for non-line-of-sight (NLOS) capability by vaporization of the feedstock material. The NLOS capability of PS-PVD is investigated here using yttria-stabilized zirconia and gadolinium zirconate, which are materials of interest for turbine engine applications. PS-PVD coatings were applied to static cylindrical substrates approximately 6-19 mm in diameter to study the coating morphology as a function of angle. In addition, coatings were deposited on flat substrates under various impingement configurations. Impingement angle had significant effects on the deposition mode, and microscopy of coatings indicated that there was a shift in the deposition mode at approximately 90° from incidence on the cylindrical samples, which may indicate the onset of more turbulent flow and PVD-like growth. Coatings deposited at non-perpendicular angles exhibited a higher density and nearly a 2× improvement in erosion performance when compared to coatings deposited with the torch normal to the surface.

  4. Method of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond using methanol-based solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Briefly described, methods of forming diamond are described. A representative method, among others, includes: providing a substrate in a reaction chamber in a non-magnetic-field microwave plasma system; introducing, in the absence of a gas stream, a liquid precursor substantially free of water and containing methanol and at least one carbon and oxygen containing compound having a carbon to oxygen ratio greater than one, into an inlet of the reaction chamber; vaporizing the liquid precursor; and subjecting the vaporized precursor, in the absence of a carrier gas and in the absence in a reactive gas, to a plasma under conditions effective to disassociate the vaporized precursor and promote diamond growth on the substrate in a pressure range from about 70 to 130 Torr.

  5. Microwave processing of epoxy resins and synthesis of carbon nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Liming

    Microwave processing of advanced materials has been studied as an attractive alternative to conventional thermal processing. In this dissertation, work was preformed in four sections. The first section is a review on research status of microwave processing of polymer materials. The second section is investigation of the microwave curing kinetics of epoxy resins. The curing of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and 3, 3'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) system under microwave radiation at 145 °C was governed by an autocatalyzed reaction mechanism. A kinetic model was used to describe the curing progress. The third section is a study on dielectric properties of four reacting epoxy resins over a temperature range at 2.45 GHz. The epoxy resin was DGEBA. The four curing agents were DDS, Jeffamine D-230, m-phenylenediamine, and diethyltoluenediamine. The mixtures of DGEBA and the four curing agents were stoichiometric. The four reacting systems were heated under microwave irradiation to certain cure temperatures. Measurements of temperature and dielectric properties were made during free convective cooling of the samples. The cooled samples were analyzed with a Differential Scanning Calorimeter to determine the extents of cure. The Davidson-Cole model can be used to describe the dielectric data. A simplified Davidson-Cole expression was proposed to calculate the parameters in the Davidson-Cole model and describe the dielectric properties of the DGEBA/DDS system and part of the dielectric data of the other three systems. A single relaxation model was used with the Arrhenius expression for temperature dependence to model the results. The evolution of all parameters in the models during cure was related to the decreasing number of the epoxy and amine groups in the reactants and the increasing viscosity of the reacting systems. The last section is synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of a gas mixture of

  6. Optical and electrical characteristics of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition boron carbonitride thin films derived from N-trimethylborazine precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulyaeva, Veronica S., E-mail: veronica@niic.nsc.ru [Department of Functional Materials Chemistry, Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kosinova, Marina L.; Rumyantsev, Yurii M.; Kuznetsov, Fedor A. [Department of Functional Materials Chemistry, Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kesler, Valerii G. [Laboratory of Physical Principles for Integrated Microelectronics, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kirienko, Viktor V. [Laboratory of Nonequilibrium Semiconductors Systems, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-02

    Thin BC{sub x}N{sub y} films have been obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using N-trimethylborazine as a precursor. The films were deposited on Si(100) and fused silica substrates. The grown films were characterized by ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectrophotometry, capacitance–voltage and current–voltage measurements. The deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature (373–973 K) and gas phase composition were varied. Low temperature BC{sub x}N{sub y} films were found to be high optical transparent layers in the range of 300–2000 nm, the transmittance as high as 93% has been achieved. BC{sub x}N{sub y} layers are dielectrics with dielectric constant k = 2.2–8.9 depending on the synthesis conditions. - Highlights: • Thin BC{sub x}N{sub y} films have been obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. • N-trimethylborazine was used as a precursor. • Low temperature BC{sub x}N{sub y} films were found to be high optical transparent layers (93%). • BC{sub x}N{sub y} layers are dielectrics with dielectric constant k = 2.2–8.9.

  7. Selective adhesion of intestinal epithelial cells on patterned films with amine functionalities formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Seop; Choi, Changrok; Kim, Soo Heon; Choi, Kun oh [Department of Physics, Brain Korea 21 Physics Research Division and Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Min [Department of Molecular Biology and Institute of Nanosensor and Biotechnology, BK21 Graduate Program for RNA Biology, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Ja [Department of Internal Medicine, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan 330-715 (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Sanghak [R and D Center, ELBIO Incorporation, 426-5 Gasan-dong Geumchun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heonyong [Department of Molecular Biology and Institute of Nanosensor and Biotechnology, BK21 Graduate Program for RNA Biology, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Donggeun, E-mail: djung@skku.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Brain Korea 21 Physics Research Division and Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-01

    Control of cell adhesion to surfaces is important to develop analytical tools in the areas of biomedical engineering. To control cell adhesiveness of the surface, we constructed a variety of plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) thin films deposited at the plasma power range of 10-100 W by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The PPHMDSO film that was formed at 10 W was revealed to be resistant to cell adhesion. The resistance to cell adhesion is closely related to physicochemical properties of the film. Atomic force microscopic data show an increase in surface roughness from 0.52 nm to 0.74 nm with increasing plasma power. From Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy data, it was also determined that the methyl (-CH{sub 3}) peak intensity increases with increasing plasma power, whereas the hydroxyl (-OH) peak decreases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data reveal an increase in C-O bonding with increasing plasma power. These results suggest that C-O bonding and hydroxyl (-OH) and methyl (-CH{sub 3}) functional groups play a critical part in cell adhesion. Furthermore, to enhance a diversity of film surface, we accumulated the patterned plasma polymerized ethylenediamine (PPEDA) thin film on the top of the PPHMDSO thin film. The PPEDA film is established to be strongly cell-adherent. This patterned two-layer film stacking method can be used to form the selectively limited cell-adhesive PPEDA spots over the adhesion-resistant surface.

  8. Microstructural modification of nc-Si/SiO{sub x} films during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.W. [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2005-07-01

    Nanocrystalline-silicon embedded silicon oxide films are prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 300 C without post-heat treatment. Measurements of XPS, IR, XRD, and HREM are performed. Microstructural modifications are found occurring throughout the film deposition. The silica network with a high oxide state is suggested to be formed directly under the abduction of the former deposited layer, rather than processing repeatedly from the original low-oxide state of silica. Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a size of 6-10 nm are embedded in the SiO{sub x} film matrix, indicating the potential application in Si-based optoelectronic integrity. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Raman spectra investigation of the defects of chemical vapor deposited multilayer graphene and modified by oxygen plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongyao; Xu, Yu; Cao, Bing; Qi, Lin; He, Shunyu; Wang, Chinhua; Zhang, Jicai; Wang, Jianfeng; Xu, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Graphene, a two dimensional material, can be modified its properties by defects engineering. Here, we present Raman spectra studies of the multilayer graphene (MLG) fabricated by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition over copper foil, and report that the defects of MLG can be controlled by adjusting methane concentration. Moreover, MLG can be changed from metallic to semiconductoring properties by using oxygen plasma treatment, and we investigate the defects evolution of the graphene after exposing to oxygen plasma by Raman spectra. Our results indicate that the amount of defects in graphene can be changed by regulating the methane concentration and oxygen plasma exposure times, but the primary type of defect in MLG is still boundary-like defect. It is valuable for understanding the physics of defects evolution through artificially generated defects, and such defect engineering will greatly open up the future application of the novel material.

  10. Properties of silicon nitride thin overlays deposited on optical fibers — Effect of fiber suspension in radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Śmietana, M., E-mail: M.Smietana@elka.pw.edu.pl [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, Warsaw 00-662 (Poland); Dominik, M.; Myśliwiec, M.; Kwietniewski, N. [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, Warsaw 00-662 (Poland); Mikulic, P. [Centre de Recherche en Photonique, Université du Québec en Outaouais, 101 rue Saint-Jean-Bosco, Gatineau, J8X 3X7, Québec (Canada); Witkowski, B.S. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, Warsaw 02-666 (Poland); Bock, W.J. [Centre de Recherche en Photonique, Université du Québec en Outaouais, 101 rue Saint-Jean-Bosco, Gatineau, J8X 3X7, Québec (Canada)

    2016-03-31

    This work discusses the effect of sample suspension in radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process on properties of the obtained overlays. Silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) overlays were deposited on flat silicon wafers and cylindrical fused silica optical fibers. The influence of the suspension height and fiber diameter on SiN{sub x} deposition rate is investigated. It has been found that thickness of the SiN{sub x} overlay significantly increases with suspension height, and the deposition rate depends on fiber dimensions. Moreover, the SiN{sub x} overlays were also deposited on long-period gratings (LPGs) induced in optical fiber. Measurements of the LPG spectral response combined with its numerical simulations allowed for a discussion on properties of the deposited overlay. The measurements have proven higher overlay deposition rate on the suspended fiber than on flat Si wafer placed on the electrode. Results of this work are essential for precise tuning of the functional properties of new generations of optical devices such as optical sensors, filters and resonators, which typically are based on optical fibers and require the overlays with well defined properties. - Highlights: • The effect of optical fiber suspension in plasma process is discussed. • The deposition rate of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) overlay depends on fiber dimensions. • Thickness of the SiN{sub x} overlay strongly increases with suspension height. • Measurements and simulations of long-period grating confirms experimental results.

  11. Characterization of the SiO2 film deposited by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD with TEOS/N2/O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Zarchi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine how certain parameters like temperature, pressure, and gas composition affect the characteristics of SiO2 film by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD. We used of low temperature and an inductively coupled plasma (ICP for various with gas mixtures of TEOS/N2/O2 at a given RF power and dc bias voltage. For the gas mixture with 40 sccm of N2 in TEOS, 100 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccm of N2, and 500 sccm of O2, transparent and scratch-resistant SiO2 could be deposited with a deposition rate of 30 nm/min when RF power of 500 W and a dc-bias voltage of 350V were applied. The characteristics of the deposited SiO2, such as the composition, the binding energy, etc. were compared with the SiO2 deposited by using thermal CVD and evaporation. It was found that the SiO2 deposited by PECVD with TEOS/N2/O2 exhibited properties typical of SiO2 deposited applying thermal CVD and evaporation. The surface roughness of the 100 nm-thick SiO2 deposited by PECVD was similar to that of the substrate.

  12. Evaporation of Droplets in Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition Based on Energy Compensation Between Self-Cooling and Plasma Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Jun; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-08-01

    In the plasma spray-physical vapor deposition process (PS-PVD), there is no obvious heating to the feedstock powders due to the free molecular flow condition of the open plasma jet. However, this is in contrast to recent experiments in which the molten droplets are transformed into vapor atoms in the open plasma jet. In this work, to better understand the heating process of feedstock powders in the open plasma jet of PS-PVD, an evaporation model of molten ZrO2 is established by examining the heat and mass transfer process of molten ZrO2. The results reveal that the heat flux in PS-PVD open plasma jet (about 106 W/m2) is smaller than that in the plasma torch nozzle (about 108 W/m2). However, the flying distance of molten ZrO2 in the open plasma jet is much longer than that in the plasma torch nozzle, so the heating in the open plasma jet cannot be ignored. The results of the evaporation model show that the molten ZrO2 can be partly evaporated by self-cooling, whereas the molten ZrO2 with a diameter heat transfer.

  13. Resolving the nanostructure of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited nanocrystalline SiOx layers for application in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingsporn, M.; Kirner, S.; Villringer, C.; Abou-Ras, D.; Costina, I.; Lehmann, M.; Stannowski, B.

    2016-06-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon suboxides (nc-SiOx) have attracted attention during the past years for the use in thin-film silicon solar cells. We investigated the relationships between the nanostructure as well as the chemical, electrical, and optical properties of phosphorous, doped, nc-SiO0.8:H fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructure was varied through the sample series by changing the deposition pressure from 533 to 1067 Pa. The samples were then characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Raman spectroscopy, aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and a specialized plasmon imaging method. We found that the material changed with increasing pressure from predominantly amorphous silicon monoxide to silicon dioxide containing nanocrystalline silicon. The nanostructure changed from amorphous silicon filaments to nanocrystalline silicon filaments, which were found to cause anisotropic electron transport.

  14. Highly efficient shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Chen, Qi; Liang, Feng; Liu, Zewen

    2016-06-01

    Solid-state nanopore-based analysis systems are currently one of the most attractive and promising platforms in sensing fields. This work presents a highly efficient method to shrink inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology by the deposition of SiN x onto the surface of the nanopore. The contraction of the inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores when subjected to the PECVD process has been modeled and carefully analyzed, and the modeling data are in good agreement with the experimental results within a specific PECVD shrinkage period (˜0-600 s). Silicon nanopores within a 50-400 nm size range contract to sub-10 nm dimensions. Additionally, the inner structure of the nanopores after the PECVD process has been analyzed by focused ion beam cutting process. The results show an inner structure morphology change from inverted-pyramid to hourglass, which may enhance the spatial resolution of sensing devices.

  15. Highly efficient shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Chen, Qi; Liang, Feng; Liu, Zewen

    2016-06-24

    Solid-state nanopore-based analysis systems are currently one of the most attractive and promising platforms in sensing fields. This work presents a highly efficient method to shrink inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology by the deposition of SiN x onto the surface of the nanopore. The contraction of the inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores when subjected to the PECVD process has been modeled and carefully analyzed, and the modeling data are in good agreement with the experimental results within a specific PECVD shrinkage period (∼0-600 s). Silicon nanopores within a 50-400 nm size range contract to sub-10 nm dimensions. Additionally, the inner structure of the nanopores after the PECVD process has been analyzed by focused ion beam cutting process. The results show an inner structure morphology change from inverted-pyramid to hourglass, which may enhance the spatial resolution of sensing devices.

  16. Stress relief patterns of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Chengbing; Wang, Zhou; Zhang, Junyan; He, Deyan

    2008-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films were prepared on Si (1 0 0) substrates by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nature of the deposited films was characterized by Raman spectra and the stress relief patterns were observed by scanning electron microscope. Besides the well-known sinusoidal type and flower type patterns, etc., two different stress relief patterns, ring type and peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top, were observed. The ring type in this paper was a clear ridge-cracked buckle and unusual. Two competing buckle delamination morphologies ring and sinusoidal buckling coexist. The ridge-cracked buckle in ring type was narrower than the sinusoidal buckling. Meanwhile peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top in this paper was unusual. These different patterns supported the approach in which the stress relief forms have been analyzed using the theory of plate buckling.

  17. Highly Uniform Wafer-scale Synthesis of α-MoOsub>3sub> by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HyeongU; Son, Juhyun; Kulkarni, Atul; Ahn, Chisung; Kim, Ki Seok; Shin, Dongjoo; Yeom, Geun; Kim, Taesung

    2017-03-20

    Molybdenum oxide (MoOsub>3sub>) has gained immense attention because of its high electron mobility, wide band gap, and excellent optical and catalytic properties. However, the synthesis of uniform and large-area MoOsub>3sub> is challenging. Here, we report the synthesis of wafer-scale α-MoO3 by plasma oxidation of Mo-deposited on Si/SiOsub>2sub>. Mo was oxidized by Osub>2sub> plasma in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system at 150 °C. Mo was oxidized by Osub>2sub> plasma in a PECVD system at 150 °C. It was found that the synthesized α-MoOsub>3sub> had a highly uniform crystalline structure. For the as-synthesized α-MoOsub>3sub> sensor, we observed a current change when the relative humidity was increased from 11% to 95%. The sensor was exposed to different humidity levels with fast recovery time of about 8 s. Hence this feasibility study shows that MoOsub>3sub> synthesized at low temperature can be utilized for the gas sensing applications by adopting flexible device technology.

  18. Microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Shin

    Microwave plasma assisted ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film deposition was investigated using hydrogen deficient, carbon containing argon plasma chemistries with MSU-developed microwave plasma reactors. Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film deposition on mechanically scratched silicon wafers was experimentally explored over the following input variables: (1) pressure: 60--240Torr, (2) total gas flow rate: 101--642 sccm, (3) input microwave power 732--1518W, (4) substrate temperature: 500°C--770°C, (5) deposition time: 2--48 hours, and (6) N2 impurities 5--2500 ppm. H2 concentrations were less than 9%, while CH 4 concentration was 0.17--1.85%. It was desired to grow films uniformly over 3″ diameter substrates and to minimize the grain size. Large, uniform, intense, and greenish-white discharges were sustained in contact with three inch silicon substrates over a 60--240 Torr pressure regime. At a given operating pressure, film uniformity was controlled by adjusting substrate holder geometry, substrate position, input microwave power, gas chemistries, and total gas flow rates. Film ultra-nanocrystallinity and smoothness required high purity deposition conditions. Uniform ultra-nanocrystalline films were synthesized in low leak-rate system with crystal sizes ranging from 3--30 nm. Films with 11--50 nm RMS roughness and respective thickness values of 1--23 mum were synthesized over 3″ wafers under a wide range of different deposition conditions. Film RMS roughness 7 nm was synthesized with thickness of 430 nm. Film uniformities of almost 100% were achieved over three inch silicon wafers. UV Raman and XRD characterization results indicated the presence of diamond in the synthesized films. Optical Emission Spectroscopy measurements showed that the discharge gas temperature was in excess of 2000 K. The synthesized films are uniformly smooth and the as grown ultra-nanocrystalline diamond can be used for a high frequency SAW device substrate material. IR measurements

  19. Microwave Plasma-Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nitrogen-Doped Diamond. II: CH4/N2/H2 Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscott, Benjamin S; Kelly, Mark W; Potter, Katie J; Ashfold, Michael N R; Mankelevich, Yuri A

    2016-11-03

    We report a combined experimental and modeling study of microwave-activated dilute CH4/N2/H2 plasmas, as used for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond, under very similar conditions to previous studies of CH4/H2, CH4/H2/Ar, and N2/H2 gas mixtures. Using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, absolute column densities of CH(X, v = 0), CN(X, v = 0), and NH(X, v = 0) radicals in the hot plasma have been determined as functions of height, z, source gas mixing ratio, total gas pressure, p, and input power, P. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used to investigate, with respect to the same variables, the relative number densities of electronically excited species, namely, H atoms, CH, C2, CN, and NH radicals and triplet N2 molecules. The measurements have been reproduced and rationalized from first-principles by 2-D (r, z) coupled kinetic and transport modeling, and comparison between experiment and simulation has afforded a detailed understanding of C/N/H plasma-chemical reactivity and variations with process conditions and with location within the reactor. The experimentally validated simulations have been extended to much lower N2 input fractions and higher microwave powers than were probed experimentally, providing predictions for the gas-phase chemistry adjacent to the diamond surface and its variation across a wide range of conditions employed in practical diamond-growing CVD processes. The strongly bound N2 molecule is very resistant to dissociation at the input MW powers and pressures prevailing in typical diamond CVD reactors, but its chemical reactivity is boosted through energy pooling in its lowest-lying (metastable) triplet state and subsequent reactions with H atoms. For a CH4 input mole fraction of 4%, with N2 present at 1-6000 ppm, at pressure p = 150 Torr, and with applied microwave power P = 1.5 kW, the near-substrate gas-phase N atom concentration, [N]ns, scales linearly with the N2 input mole fraction and exceeds the concentrations [NH]ns, [NH2]ns

  20. A new perspective on structural and morphological properties of carbon nanotubes synthesized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salar Elahi, A.; Agah, K. Mikaili; Ghoranneviss, M.

    CNTs were produced on a silicon wafer by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) using acetylene as a carbon source, cobalt as a catalyst and ammonia as a reactive gas. The DC-sputtering system was used to prepare cobalt thin films on Si substrates. A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effects of reaction temperature and deposition time on the synthesis of the nanotubes. The deposition time was selected as 15 and 25 min for all growth temperatures. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements were used to investigate the elemental composition of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface topography of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown CNTs were characterized under Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to study the morphological properties of CNTs. Also, the grown CNTs have been investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that increasing the temperature leads to increasing the diameter of CNTs.

  1. Deposition and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Diamond Films on Mirror-Polished Si Substrate by Biased Enhanced Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, T.; Sharda, T.; Jimbo, T.; Umeno, M.

    Hard and smooth nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films were deposited on polished silicon substrates by biased enhanced growth in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. The films deposited with varying the methane concentration and biasing voltage were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, nano-indenter, x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Stress in the films increases with decreasing methane concentration in the gas-phase and with increasing biasing. The adhesion between NCD film and Si substrate is very strong sustaining the compressive stress as high as high as 85 GPa. It was hypothesized that hydrogen content of the films and graphitic content of the films are responsible in generating stress. The hardness is well correlated with the Raman peak intensity ratio of NCD peak to G peak.

  2. A solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study of post-plasma reactions in organosilicone microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Colin J; Ponnusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Murphy, Peter J; Lindberg, Mats; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Griesser, Hans J

    2014-06-11

    Plasma-polymerized organosilicone coatings can be used to impart abrasion resistance and barrier properties to plastic substrates such as polycarbonate. Coating rates suitable for industrial-scale deposition, up to 100 nm/s, can be achieved through the use of microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), with optimal process vapors such as tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO) and oxygen. However, it has been found that under certain deposition conditions, such coatings are subject to post-plasma changes; crazing or cracking can occur anytime from days to months after deposition. To understand the cause of the crazing and its dependence on processing plasma parameters, the effects of post-plasma reactions on the chemical bonding structure of coatings deposited with varying TMDSO-to-O2 ratios was studied with (29)Si and (13)C solid-state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) using both single-pulse and cross-polarization techniques. The coatings showed complex chemical compositions significantly altered from the parent monomer. (29)Si MAS NMR spectra revealed four main groups of resonance lines, which correspond to four siloxane moieties (i.e., mono (M), di (D), tri (T), and quaternary (Q)) and how they are bound to oxygen. Quantitative measurements showed that the ratio of TMDSO to oxygen could shift the chemical structure of the coating from 39% to 55% in Q-type bonds and from 28% to 16% for D-type bonds. Post-plasma reactions were found to produce changes in relative intensities of (29)Si resonance lines. The NMR data were complemented by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Together, these techniques have shown that the bonding environment of Si is drastically altered by varying the TMDSO-to-O2 ratio during PECVD, and that post-plasma reactions increase the cross-link density of the silicon-oxygen network. It appears that Si-H and Si-OH chemical groups are the most susceptible to post-plasma reactions. Coatings produced at a

  3. Characterization of low temperature graphene synthesis in inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition process with optical emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yifei; Kim, Daekyoung; Jang, Haegyu; Cho, Sung Min; Chae, Heeyeop

    2014-12-01

    Low-temperature graphene was synthesized at 400 degrees C with inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The effects of plasma power and flow rate of various carbon containing precursors and hydrogen on graphene properties were investigated with optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Various radicals monitored by OES were correlated with graphene film properties such as sheet resistance, I(D)/I(G) ratio of Raman spectra and transparency. C2H2 was used as a main precursor and the increase of plasma power enhanced intensity of carbon (C2) radical OES intensity in plasma, reduced sheet resistance and increased transparency of graphene films. The reduced flow rate of C2H2 decreased sheet resistance and increased transparency of graphene films in the range of this study. H2 addition was found to increase sheet resistance, transparency and attributed to reduction of graphene grain and etching graphene layers. OES analysis showed that C2 radicals contribute to graphite networking and sheet resistance reduction. TEM and AFM were applied to provide credible information that graphene had been successfully grown at low temperature.

  4. Morphological and optical properties changes in nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si) deposited on porous aluminum nanostructures by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition for Solar energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghrib, M., E-mail: mondherghrib@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique (L.P.V.), Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l' Energie, BP 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Gaidi, M.; Ghrib, T.; Khedher, N. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique (L.P.V.), Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l' Energie, BP 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Ben Salam, M. [L3M, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerte, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia); Ezzaouia, H. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique (L.P.V.), Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l' Energie, BP 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia)

    2011-08-15

    Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was used to determine the electrical band gap of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) deposited by plasma enhancement chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on porous alumina structure by fitting the experimental spectra using a model based on the quantum confinement of electrons in Si nanocrystallites having spherical and cylindrical forms. This model permits to correlate the PL spectra to the microstructure of the porous aluminum silicon layer (PASL) structure. The microstructure of aluminum surface layer and nc-Si films was systematically studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that the structure of the nanocrystalline silicon layer (NSL) is dependent of the porosity (void) of the porous alumina layer (PAL) substrate. This structure was performed in two steps, namely the PAL substrate was prepared using sulfuric acid solution attack on an Al foil and then the silicon was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on it. The optical constants (n and k as a function of wavelength) of the deposited films were obtained using variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in the UV-vis-NIR regions. The SE spectrum of the porous aluminum silicon layer (PASL) was modeled as a mixture of void, crystalline silicon and aluminum using the Cauchy model approximation. The specific surface area (SSA) was estimated and was found to decrease linearly when porosity increases. Based on this full characterization, it is demonstrated that the optical characteristics of the films are directly correlated to their micro-structural properties.

  5. Remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of GaP with in situ generation of phosphine precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S. W.; Lucovsky, G.; Bachmann, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    Thin homoepitaxial films of gallium phosphide (GaP) have been grown by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition utilizing in situ-generated phosphine precursors. The GaP forming reaction is kinetically controlled with an activation energy of 0.65 eV. The increase of the growth rate with increasing radio frequency (RF) power between 20 and 100 W is due to the combined effects of increasingly complete excitation and the spatial extension of the glow discharge toward the substrate; however, the saturation of the growth rate at even higher RF power indicates the saturation of the generation rate of phosphine precursors at this condition. Slight interdiffusion of P into Si and Si into GaP is indicated from GaP/Si heterostructures grown under similar conditions as the GaP homojunctions.

  6. Remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of GaP with in situ generation of phosphine precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S. W.; Lucovsky, G.; Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1993-01-01

    Thin homoepitaxial films of gallium phosphide (GaP) were grown by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition utilizing in situ generated phosphine precursors. The GaP forming reaction is kinetically controlled with an activation energy of 0.65 eV. The increase of the growth rate with increasing radio frequency (rf) power between 20 and 100 W is due to the combined effects of increasingly complete excitation and the spatial extension of the glow discharge toward the substrate, however, the saturation of the growth rate at even higher rf power indicates the saturation of the generation rate of phosphine precursors at this condition. Slight interdiffusion of P into Si and Si into GaP is indicated from GaP/Si heterostructures grown under similar conditions as the GaP homojunctions.

  7. Properties of Erbium Doped Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Layers Fabricated by Sputtering and Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prajzler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about properties of carbon layers doped with Er3+ ions fabricated by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD and by sputtering on silicon or glass substrates. The structure of the samples was characterized by X-ray diffraction and their composition was determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The Absorbance spectrum was taken in the spectral range from 400 nm to 600 nm. Photoluminescence spectra were obtained using two types of Ar laser (λex=514.5 nm, lex=488 nm and also using a semiconductor laser (λex=980 nm. Samples fabricated by magnetron sputtering exhibited typical emission at 1530 nm when pumped at 514.5 nm. 

  8. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of ortho-carborane: structural insights and interaction with Cu overlayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Robinson; Pasquale, Frank L; Kelber, Jeffry A

    2013-09-01

    X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, UPS) are used to investigate the chemical and electronic structure of boron carbide films deposited from ortho-carborane precursors using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and the reactivity of PECVD films toward sputter-deposited Cu overlayers. The XPS data provide clear evidence of enhanced ortho-carborane reactivity with the substrate, and of extra-icosahedral boron and carbon species; these results differ from results for films formed by condensation and electron beam induced cross-linking of ortho-carborane (EBIC films). The UPS data show that the valence band maximum for PECVD films is ∼1.5 eV closer to the Fermi level than for EBIC films. The XPS data also indicate that PECVD films are resistant to thermally-stimulated diffusion of Cu at temperatures up to 1000 K in UHV, in direct contrast to recently reported results, but important for applications in neutron detection and in microelectronics.

  9. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of low-loss SiON optical waveguides at 15-microm wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, F; Guidice, M D; Recca, R; Testa, F

    1991-11-01

    Good optical-quality SiON layers deposited upon a SiO(2) buffer layer placed upon silicon wafers have been obtained by using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from SiH(4), NH(3), and N(2)O. Optical planar waveguides with a thickness of 5 microm and a refractive index of 1.470 have been deposited and investigated in the wavelength region of 1.3-1.6 microm. Three absorption bands at 1.40, 1.48, and 1.54 microm have been detected and interpreted as Si-OH, N-H, and Si-H vibrational modes, respectively. Absorption losses of 3.8 dB/cm at 1.4 microm and 3.2 dB/cm at 1.51 microm have been measured. A mild annealing at approximately 800 degrees C completely removes the band at 1.40 microm, whereas strong reduction of absorption at 1.51 microm requires 3 h of annealing at 1100 degrees C. As a result, propagation losses of 0.36 to 0.54 dB/cm have been measured at 1.54-microm wavelength.

  10. Cell proliferation on modified DLC thin films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian; Manakhov, Anton; Polčák, Josef; Ondračka, Pavel; Buršíková, Vilma; Zajíčková, Renata; Medalová, Jiřina; Zajíčková, Lenka

    2015-06-12

    Recently, diamondlike carbon (DLC) thin films have gained interest for biological applications, such as hip and dental prostheses or heart valves and coronary stents, thanks to their high strength and stability. However, the biocompatibility of the DLC is still questionable due to its low wettability and possible mechanical failure (delamination). In this work, DLC:N:O and DLC: SiOx thin films were comparatively investigated with respect to cell proliferation. Thin DLC films with an addition of N, O, and Si were prepared by plasma enhanced CVD from mixtures of methane, hydrogen, and hexamethyldisiloxane. The films were optically characterized by infrared spectroscopy and ellipsometry in UV-visible spectrum. The thickness and the optical properties were obtained from the ellipsometric measurements. Atomic composition of the films was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy combined with elastic recoil detection analysis and by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The mechanical properties of the films were studied by depth sensing indentation technique. The number of cells that proliferate on the surface of the prepared DLC films and on control culture dishes were compared and correlated with the properties of as-deposited and aged films. The authors found that the level of cell proliferation on the coated dishes was high, comparable to the untreated (control) samples. The prepared DLC films were stable and no decrease of the biocompatibility was observed for the samples aged at ambient conditions.

  11. Synthesis of thin films in boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary system by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Ratandeep Singh

    The Boron Carbon Nitorgen (B-C-N) ternary system includes materials with exceptional properties such as wide band gap, excellent thermal conductivity, high bulk modulus, extreme hardness and transparency in the optical and UV range that find application in most fields ranging from micro-electronics, bio-sensors, and cutting tools to materials for space age technology. Interesting materials that belong to the B-C-N ternary system include Carbon nano-tubes, Boron Carbide, Boron Carbon Nitride (B-CN), hexagonal Boron Nitride ( h-BN), cubic Boron Nitride (c-BN), Diamond and beta Carbon Nitride (beta-C3N4). Synthesis of these materials requires precisely controlled and energetically favorable conditions. Chemical vapor deposition is widely used technique for deposition of thin films of ceramics, metals and metal-organic compounds. Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) is especially interesting because of its ability to deposit materials that are meta-stable under the deposition conditions, for e.g. diamond. In the present study, attempt has been made to synthesize beta-carbon nitride (beta-C3N4) and cubic-Boron Nitride (c-BN) thin films by MPECVD. Also included is the investigation of dependence of residual stress and thermal conductivity of the diamond thin films, deposited by MPECVD, on substrate pre-treatment and deposition temperature. Si incorporated CNx thin films are synthesized and characterized while attempting to deposit beta-C3N4 thin films on Si substrates using Methane (CH4), Nitrogen (N2), and Hydrogen (H2). It is shown that the composition and morphology of Si incorporated CNx thin film can be tailored by controlling the sequence of introduction of the precursor gases in the plasma chamber. Greater than 100mum size hexagonal crystals of N-Si-C are deposited when Nitrogen precursor is introduced first while agglomerates of nano-meter range graphitic needles of C-Si-N are deposited when Carbon precursor is introduced first in the

  12. Low-temperature synthesis of diamond films by photoemission-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawata, Mayuri, E-mail: kawata@mail.tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Ojiro, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Shuichi; Takakuwa, Yuji [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Okano, Ken [International Christian University, 3-10-2 Osawa, Mitaka 181-8585 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Photoemission-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PA-PECVD), a process in which photoelectrons emitted from a substrate irradiated with ultraviolet light are utilized as a trigger for DC discharge, was investigated in this study; specifically, the DC discharge characteristics of PA-PECVD were examined for an Si substrate deposited in advance through hot-filament chemical vapor deposition with a nitrogen-doped diamond layer of thickness ∼1 μm. Using a commercially available Xe excimer lamp (hν = 7.2 eV) to illuminate the diamond surface with and without hydrogen termination, the photocurrents were found to be 3.17 × 10{sup 12} and 2.11 × 10{sup 11} electrons/cm{sup 2}/s, respectively. The 15-fold increase in photocurrent was ascribed to negative electron affinity (NEA) caused by hydrogen termination on the diamond surfaces. The DC discharge characteristics revealed that a transition bias voltage from a Townsend-to-glow discharge was considerably decreased because of NEA (from 490 to 373 V for H{sub 2} gas and from 330 to 200 V for Ar gas), enabling a reduction in electric power consumption needed to synthesize diamond films through PA-PECVD. In fact, the authors have succeeded in growing high-quality diamond films of area 2.0 cm{sup 2} at 540 °C with a discharge power of only 1.8 W, plasma voltage of 156.4 V, and discharge current of 11.7 mA under the glow discharge of CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar mixed gases. In addition to having only negligible amounts of graphite and amorphous carbon, the diamond films exhibit a relatively high diamond growth rate of 0.5 μm/h at temperatures as low as 540 °C, which is attributed to Ar{sup +} ions impinging on the diamond surface, and causing the removal of hydrogen atoms from the surface through sputtering. This process leads to enhanced CH{sub x} radical adsorption, because the sample was applied with a negative potential to accelerate photoelectrons in PA-PECVD.

  13. Tribological and thermal stability study of nanoporous amorphous boron carbide films prepared by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liza, Shahira; Ohtake, Naoto; Akasaka, Hiroki; Munoz-Guijosa, Juan M.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the thermal stability and the oxidation and tribological behavior of nanoporous a-BC:H films are studied and compared with those in conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. a-BC:H films were deposited by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition using B(CH3)3 gas as the boron source. A DLC interlayer was used to prevent the a-BC:H film delamination produced by oxidation. Thermal stability of a-BC:H films, with no delamination signs after annealing at 500 °C for 1 h, is better than that of the DLC films, which completely disappeared under the same conditions. Tribological test results indicate that the a-BC:H films, even with lower nanoindentation hardness than the DLC films, show an excellent boundary oil lubricated behavior, with lower friction coefficient and reduce the wear rate of counter materials than those on the DLC film. The good materials properties such as low modulus of elasticity and the formation of micropores from the original nanopores during boundary regimes explain this better performance. Results show that porous a-BC:H films may be an alternative for segmented DLC films in applications where severe tribological conditions and complex shapes exist, so surface patterning is unfeasible.

  14. Morphology and Structure Properties of Boron-doped Diamond Films Prepared by Hot Cathode Direct Current Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmei PAN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Boron-doped diamond (BDD films were deposited by hot cathode direct current plasma chemical vapor deposition (HCDC-PCVD according to various mixture ratios of CH4/H2/B(OCH33 gas. The Raman performances and surface morphologies of the BDD films were then characterized by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results indicated that the flow rate of B(OCH33 had marked effects on the growth characteristics of the produced boron-doped diamond films. The presence and concentration of the doped boron atoms significantly altered both the surface morphologies and structures of the diamond films. With increasing flow rate of B(OCH33, the crystal grain surfaces became smooth as visible under SEM. The B-doping levels in these films increased from 1.75×1019cm-3 to a maximum of 2.4×1021cm-3, estimated from the Raman spectra. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.12923

  15. Growth of graphene on Cu foils by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition: The effect of in-situ hydrogen plasma post-treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Liping; Yuan, Wen; Wang, Bing; Xiong, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) is a promising method for the large-scale production of high-quality graphene. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of in-situ hydrogen plasma post-treatment on the MPCVD-grown graphene films. By simply varying the duration time of in-situ hydrogen plasma, surface morphology, number of layers and defect density of as-grown graphene films can be manipulated. The role of hydrogen plasma can be proposed from our observations, promoting to further grow graphene films in the early stage and consequently acting as an etching agent to thin graphene films in the later stage. On the basis of above mechanism, monolayer graphene films with low defect density and smooth surface can be grown by adjusting the times of the growing step and the plasma post-treatment step. This additional in-situ hydrogen plasma post-treatment may be significant for growing well-defined graphene films with controllable defects and number of layers.

  16. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon-nitride films deposited on Si(100) by direct-current saddle-field plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, H K; Lee, Y S; Whangbo, S W; Whang, C N; Yoo, Y Z; Kim, H G

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon nitride [a-C:H(N)] films were deposited using dc saddle-field plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. The structural and the compositional changes induced in the films by the different flow-rate ratios of N sub 2 to CH sub 4 (n sub N sub 2 /n sub C sub H sub sub 4) were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The deposition rate of the films abruptly decreased upon increasing the n sub N sub 2 /n sub C sub H sub sub 4 ratio. However, for n sub N sub 2 /n sub C sub H sub sub 4 >0.5, the deposition rate slightly decreased with increasing n sub N sub 2 /n sub C sub H sub sub 4. The ratio of N to C (N/C) of the films saturated to 0.25 with increasing n sub N sub 2 /n sub C sub H sub sub 4. The numbers of N-H and C ident to N bonds in the films increased with increasing n sub N sub 2 /n sub C sub H sub sub 4 , but the number of C-H bonds decreased. The optical band-gap energy of the films decreased from 2.53 eV to 2.3 eV as t...

  17. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of ZrO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanan, K.

    1993-12-09

    Amorphous ZrO{sub 2} thin films were deposited in an inductively coupled PECVD system using a Zr {beta}-diketonate, Zr(C{sub 11}H{sub 19}O{sub 2}){sub 4}, as the precursor. The deposits were air annealed at 900C for 5 min to get pure, single phase, oriented, polycrystalline {alpha}-ZrO{sub 2}. Feasibility of using 2 different types of reactors was investigated. The inductively heated horizontal reactor depositions at 600C had a lower deposition rate and the films were non-uniform in thickness with a columnar structure. The resistively heated vertical reactor depositions at 350C had a higher deposition rate and the films were more uniform in thickness with a fine grained microstructure. The statistical design was demonstrated as an effective technique to analyze the effect of process conditions on the rate of deposition and relative (h00) orientation. The factorial design was used to quantify the two responses in terms of the process variables and their mutual interactions. The statistical design for rate of deposition was found to correlate with the trends observed in classical design.

  18. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-CVD) yields better Hydrolytical Stability of Biocompatible SiOx Thin Films on Implant Alumina Ceramics compared to Rapid Thermal Evaporation Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böke, Frederik; Giner, Ignacio; Keller, Adrian; Grundmeier, Guido; Fischer, Horst

    2016-07-20

    Densely sintered aluminum oxide (α-Al2O3) is chemically and biologically inert. To improve the interaction with biomolecules and cells, its surface has to be modified prior to use in biomedical applications. In this study, we compared two deposition techniques for adhesion promoting SiOx films to facilitate the coupling of stable organosilane monolayers on monolithic α-alumina; physical vapor deposition (PVD) by thermal evaporation and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD). We also investigated the influence of etching on the formation of silanol surface groups using hydrogen peroxide and sulfuric acid solutions. The film characteristics, that is, surface morphology and surface chemistry, as well as the film stability and its adhesion properties under accelerated aging conditions were characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and tensile strength tests. Differences in surface functionalization were investigated via two model organosilanes as well as the cell-cytotoxicity and viability on murine fibroblasts and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC). We found that both SiOx interfaces did not affect the cell viability of both cell types. No significant differences between both films with regard to their interfacial tensile strength were detected, although failure mode analyses revealed a higher interfacial stability of the PE-CVD films compared to the PVD films. Twenty-eight day exposure to simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C revealed a partial delamination of the thermally deposited PVD films whereas the PE-CVD films stayed largely intact. SiOx layers deposited by both PVD and PE-CVD may thus serve as viable adhesion-promoters for subsequent organosilane coupling agent binding to α-alumina. However, PE-CVD appears to be favorable for long-term direct film exposure to aqueous

  19. The relationship between chemical structure and dielectric properties of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited polymer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Hao [Materials Sci and Tech Applications, LLC, 409 Maple Springs Drive, Dayton OH 45458 (United States)]. E-mail: hao.jiang@wpafb.af.mil; Hong Lianggou [Materials Sci and Tech Applications, LLC, 409 Maple Springs Drive, Dayton OH 45458 (United States); Venkatasubramanian, N. [Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0168 (United States); Grant, John T. [Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0168 (United States); Eyink, Kurt [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States); Wiacek, Kevin [Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate, 1950 Fifth Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7251 (United States); Fries-Carr, Sandra [Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate, 1950 Fifth Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7251 (United States); Enlow, Jesse [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States); Bunning, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States)

    2007-02-26

    Polymer dielectric films fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) have unique properties due to their dense crosslinked bulk structure. These spatially uniform films exhibit good adhesion to a variety of substrates, excellent chemical inertness, high thermal resistance, and are formed from an inexpensive, solvent-free, room temperature process. In this work, we studied the dielectric properties of plasma polymerized (PP) carbon-based polymer thin films prepared from two precursors, benzene and octafluorocyclobutane. Two different monomer feed locations, directly in the plasma zone or in the downstream region (DS) and two different pressures, 80 Pa (high pressure) or 6.7 Pa (low pressure), were used. The chemical structure of the PECVD films was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The dielectric constant ({epsilon} {sub r}) and dielectric loss (tan {delta}) of the films were investigated over a range of frequencies up to 1 MHz and the dielectric strength (breakdown voltage) (F {sub b}) was characterized by the current-voltage method. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was performed to determine the film thickness and refractive index. Good dielectric properties were exhibited, as PP-benzene films formed in the high pressure, DS region showed a F{sub b} of 610 V/{mu}m, an {epsilon} {sub r} of 3.07, and a tan {delta} of 7.0 x 10{sup -3} at 1 kHz. The PECVD processing pressure has a significant effect on final film structure and the film's physical density has a strong impact on dielectric breakdown strength. Also noted was that the residual oxygen content in the PP-benzene films significantly affected the frequency dependences of the dielectric constant and loss.

  20. Growth of carbon nanofibers in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denysenko, Igor; Ostrikov, Kostya; Tam, Eugene

    2008-10-01

    A theoretical model describing the plasma-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers with metal catalyst particles on top is proposed. Using the model, the plasma-related effects on the nanofiber growth parameters such us the surface diffusion growth rate, the effective carbon flux to the catalyst surface, the characteristic residence time and diffusion length of carbon on the catalyst surface, and the surface coverages, have been studied. It has been found how these parameters depend on the catalyst surface temperature and ion and etching gas fluxes to the catalyst surface. The optimum conditions under which a low-temperature plasma environment can benefit the carbon nanofiber growth are formulated. It has been also found how the plasma environment affects the temperature distribution over the length of the carbon nanofibers. Conditions when the temperature of the catalyst nanoparticles is higher than the temperature of the substrate holder are determined. The results here are in a good agreement with the available experimental data on the carbon nanofiber growth and can be used for optimizing synthesis of nanoassemblies in low-temperature plasma-assisted nanofabrication.

  1. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of low- loss as-grown germanosilicate layers for optical waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Feridun; Agan, Sedat; Aydinli, Atilla

    2004-08-01

    We report on systematic growth and characterization of low-loss germanosilicate layers for use in optical waveguides. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique was used to grow the films using silane, germane and nitrous oxide as precursor gases. Chemical composition was monitored by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. N-H bond concentration of the films decreased from 0.43x1022 cm-3 down to below 0.06x1022 cm-3, by a factor of seven as the GeH4 flow rate increased from 0 to 70 sccm. A simultaneous decrease of O-H related bonds was also observed by a factor of 10 in the same germane flow range. The measured TE rate increased from 5 to 50 sccm, respectively. In contrast, the propagation loss values for TE polarization at λ=632.8 nm were found to increase from are 0.20 +/- 0.02 to 6.46 +/- 0.04 dB/cm as the germane flow rate increased from 5 to 50 sccm, respectively. In contrast, the propagation loss values for TE polarization at λ=1550 nm were found to decrease from 0.32 +/- 0.03 down to 0.14 +/- 0.06 dB/cm for the same samples leading to the lowest values reported so far in the literature, eliminating the need for high temperature annealing as is usually done for these materials to be used in waveguide devices.

  2. Atmospheric pressure plasma-initiated chemical vapor deposition (AP-PiCVD) of poly(diethylallylphosphate) coating: a char-forming protective coating for cellulosic textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilt, Florian; Boscher, Nicolas D; Duday, David; Desbenoit, Nicolas; Levalois-Grützmacher, Joëlle; Choquet, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    An innovative atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method toward the deposition of polymeric layers has been developed. This latter involves the use of a nanopulsed plasma discharge to initiate the free-radical polymerization of an allyl monomer containing phosphorus (diethylallylphosphate, DEAP) at atmospheric pressure. The polymeric structure of the film is evidence by mass spectrometry. The method, highly suitable for the treatment of natural biopolymer substrate, has been carried out on cotton textile to perform the deposition of an efficient and conformal protective coating.

  3. Growth and characterization of large, high quality single crystal diamond substrates via microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nad, Shreya

    Single crystal diamond (SCD) substrates can be utilized in a wide range of applications. Important issues in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of such substrates include: shrinking of the SCD substrate area, stress and cracking, high defect density and hence low electronic quality and low optical quality due to high nitrogen impurities. The primary objective of this thesis is to begin to address these issues and to find possible solutions for enhancing the substrate dimensions and simultaneously improving the quality of the grown substrates. The deposition of SCD substrates is carried out in a microwave cavity plasma reactor via the microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. The operation of the reactor was first optimized to determine the safe and efficient operating regime. By adjusting the matching of the reactor cavity with the help of four internal tuning length variables, the system was further matched to operate at a maximum overall microwave coupling efficiency of ˜ 98%. Even with adjustments in the substrate holder position, the reactor remains well matched with a coupling efficiency of ˜ 95% indicating good experimental performance over a wide range of operating conditions. SCD substrates were synthesized at a high pressure of 240 Torr and with a high absorbed power density of 500 W/cm3. To counter the issue of shrinking substrate size during growth, the effect of different substrate holder designs was studied. An increase in the substrate dimensions (1.23 -- 2.5 times) after growth was achieved when the sides of the seeds were shielded from the intense microwave electromagnetic fields in a pocket holder design. Using such pocket holders, high growth rates of 16 -- 32 mum/hr were obtained for growth times of 8 -- 72 hours. The polycrystalline diamond rim deposition was minimized/eliminated from these growth runs, hence successfully enlarging the substrate size. Several synthesized CVD SCD substrates were laser cut and separated

  4. Glutamate biosensor based on carbon nanowalls grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomatsu, Masakazu; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are composed of few-layer graphene standing almost vertically on the substrate. Due to the large surface area of vertical nanographene network, CNWs draw attention as platform for electrochemical sensing, biosensing and energy conversion applications. In this work, CNWs were grown on nickel substrate using inductively coupled plasma with methane/Ar mixture. After the CNW growth, the surface of CNWs was oxidized using Ar atmospheric pressure plasma to obtain super-hydrophilic surface. For the biosensing application, the surface of CNWs was decorated with platinum (Pt) nanoparticles by the reduction of hydrogen hexachloroplatinate (IV) solution. The resultant Pt particle size was estimated to be 3-4 nm. From the XPS analysis, pure Pt existed without being oxidized on the CNW surface. Electrochemical surface area of the Pt catalyst was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Pt-decorated CNWs will be used as an electrode for electrochemical glutamate biosensing. L-glutamate is one of the most important in the mammalian central nervous system, playing a vital role in many physiological processes. Nanoplatform based on vertical nanographene offers great promise for providing a new class of nanostructured electrodes for electrochemical sensing.

  5. Direct Fabrication of Carbon Nanotubes STM Tips by Liquid Catalyst-Assisted Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Kuei Tung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct and facile method to make carbon nanotube (CNT tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM is presented. Cobalt (Co particles, as catalysts, are electrochemically deposited on the apex of tungsten (W STM tip for CNT growth. It is found that the quantity of Co particles is well controlled by applied DC voltage, concentration of catalyst solution, and deposition time. Using optimum growth condition, CNTs are successfully synthesized on the tip apex by catalyst-assisted microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CA-MPECVD. A HOPG surface is clearly observed at an atomic scale using the present CNT-STM tip.

  6. A comparative study of nitrogen plasma effect on field emission characteristics of single wall carbon nanotubes synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Avshish; Parveen, Shama; Husain, Samina; Ali, Javid; Zulfequar, Mohammad; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid

    2014-12-01

    Vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with large scale control of diameter, length and alignment have successfully been grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The nickel (Ni) as catalyst deposited on silicon (Si) substrate was used to grow the SWCNTs. Field emission (FE) characteristics of the as grown SWCNTs were measured using indigenously designed setup in which a diode is configured in such a way that by applying negative voltage on the copper plate (cathode) with respect to stainless steel anode plate, current density can be recorded. To measure the FE characteristics, SWCNTs film pasted on the copper plate with silver epoxy was used as electron emitter source. The effective area of anode was ∼78.5 mm2 for field emission measurements. The emission measurements were carried out under high vacuum pressure of the order of 10-6 Torr to minimize the electron scattering and degradation of the emitters. The distance between anode and cathode was kept 500 μm (constant) during entire field emission studies. The grown SWCNTs are excellent field emitters, having emission current density higher than 25 mA/cm2 at turn-on field 1.3 V/μm. In order to enhance the field emission characteristics, the as grown SWCNTs have been treated under nitrogen (N2) plasma for 5 min and again field emission characteristics have been measured. The N2 plasma treated SWCNTs show a good enhancement in the field emission properties with emission current density 81.5 mA/cm2 at turn on field 1.2 V/μm. The as-grown and N2 plasma treated SWCNTs were also characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), Raman spectrometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  7. Comparison of diamond growth with different gas mixtures in microwave plasma asssited chemical vapor deposition (MWCVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corat Evaldo J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we study the influence of oxygen addition to several halocarbon-hydrogen gas systems. Diamond growth have been performed in a high power density MWCVD reactor built in our laboratory. The growth experiments are monitored by argon actinometry as a reference to plasma temperature and atomic hydrogen production, and by mass spectrometry to compare the exhaust gas composition. Atomic hydrogen actinometry revealed that the halogen presence in the gas phase is responsible for a considerable increase of atomic hydrogen concentration in the gas phase. Mass spectrometry shows similar results for all gas mixtures tested. Growth studies with oxygen addition to CF4/H2, CCl4/H2, CCl2F2/H2 and CH3Cl/H2 reveals that oxygen increases the carbon solubility in the gas phase but no better diamond growth conditions were found. Halogens are not, per se, eligible for diamond growth. All the possible advantages, as the higher production of atomic hydrogen, have been suppressed by the low carbon solubility in the gas phase, even when oxygen is added. The diamond growth with small amount of CF4 added to CH4/H2 mixture is not aggressive to the apparatus but brings several advantages to the process.

  8. Microphase-Separated PE/PEO Thin Films Prepared by Plasma-Assisted Vapor Phase Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choukourov, Andrei; Gordeev, Ivan; Ponti, Jessica; Uboldi, Chiara; Melnichuk, Iurii; Vaidulych, Mykhailo; Kousal, Jaroslav; Nikitin, Daniil; Hanyková, Lenka; Krakovský, Ivan; Slavínská, Danka; Biederman, Hynek

    2016-03-01

    Immiscible polymer blends tend to undergo phase separation with the formation of nanoscale architecture which can be used in a variety of applications. Different wet-chemistry techniques already exist to fix the resultant polymeric structure in predictable manner. In this work, an all-dry and plasma-based strategy is proposed to fabricate thin films of microphase-separated polyolefin/polyether blends. This is achieved by directing (-CH2-)100 and (-CH2-CH2-O-)25 oligomer fluxes produced by vacuum thermal decomposition of poly(ethylene) and poly(ethylene oxide) onto silicon substrates through the zone of the glow discharge. The strategy enables mixing of thermodynamically incompatible macromolecules at the molecular level, whereas electron-impact-initiated radicals serve as cross-linkers to arrest the subsequent phase separation at the nanoscale. The mechanism of the phase separation as well as the morphology of the films is found to depend on the ratio between the oligomeric fluxes. For polyolefin-rich mixtures, polyether molecules self-organize by nucleation and growth into spherical domains with average height of 22 nm and average diameter of 170 nm. For equinumerous fluxes and for mixtures with the prevalence of polyethers, spinodal decomposition is detected that results in the formation of bicontinuous structures with the characteristic domain size and spacing ranging between 5 × 10(1) -7 × 10(1) nm and 3 × 10(2)-4 × 10(2) nm, respectively. The method is shown to produce films with tunable wettability and biologically nonfouling properties.

  9. Plasma assisted metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of hard chromium nitride thin film coatings using chromium(III) acetylacetonate as the precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Arup; Kuppusami, P.; Lawrence, Falix; Raghunathan, V.S.; Antony Premkumar, P.; Nagaraja, K.S

    2004-06-15

    A new technique has been developed for depositing hard nanocrystalline chromium nitride (CrN) thin films on metallic and ceramic substrates using plasma assisted metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (PAMOCVD) technique. In this low temperature and environment-friendly process, a volatile mixture of chromium(III) acetylacetonate and either ammonium iodide or ammonium bifluoride were used as precursors. Nitrogen and hydrogen have been used as the gas precursors. By optimizing the processing conditions, a maximum deposition rate of {approx}0.9 {mu}m/h was obtained. A comprehensive characterization of the CrN films was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), microhardness, and microscopy. The microstructure of the CrN films deposited on well-polished stainless steel (SS) showed globular particles, while a relatively smooth surface morphology was observed for coatings deposited on polished yittria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)

  10. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  11. Formation and characterization of the MgO protecting layer deposited by plasma-enhanced metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, M S; Byun, J C; Kim, D S; Choi, C K; Lee, J Y; Kim, K H

    1999-01-01

    MgO films were prepared on Si(100) and soda-lime glass substrates by using plasma-enhanced metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition. Various ratios of the O sub 2 /CH sub 3 MgO sup t Bu gas mixture and various gas flow rates were tested for the film fabrications. Highly (100)-oriented MgO films with good crystallinity were obtained with a 10 sccm CH sub 3 MgO sup t Bu flow without an O sub 2 gas flow. About 5 % carbon was contained in all the MgO films. The refractive index and the secondary electron emission coefficient for the best quality film were 1.43 and 0.45, respectively. The sputtering rate was about 0.2 nm/min for 10 sup 1 sup 1 cm sup - sup 3 Ar sup + ion density. Annealing at 500 .deg. C in an Ar ambient promoted the grain size without inducing a phase transition.

  12. Single liquid-source plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x thin films. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.; Gardiner, R.; Kirlin, P.S.; Boerstler, R.W.; Steinbeck, J.

    1992-07-29

    High quality YBa2Cu3O7-x films were grown in-situ on LaAlO3 (100) by a novel single liquid source plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process. The metalorganic complexes M(thd)n, (thd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate; M = Y, Ba, Cu) were dissolved in an organic solution and injected into a vaporizer immediately upstream of the reactor inlet The single liquid source technique dramatically simplifies current CVD processing and can significantly improve the process reproducibility. X-ray diffraction. measurements indicated that single phase, highly c-axis oriented YBa2Cu3O7-x was formed in-situ at a substrate temperature 680 degC. The as-deposited films exhibited a mirror-like surface, had transition temperature Tc = 89 K, Delta Tc < 1K, and Jc(77K) = 106 A/cm2. Plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, YBCO, superconductors.

  13. Amorphous silicon carbon films prepared by hybrid plasma enhanced chemical vapor/sputtering deposition system: Effects of r.f. power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Nur Maisarah Abdul, E-mail: nurmaisarahrashid@gmail.com [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ritikos, Richard; Othman, Maisara; Khanis, Noor Hamizah; Gani, Siti Meriam Ab. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Muhamad, Muhamad Rasat [Chancellery Office, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahman, Saadah Abdul, E-mail: saadah@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chancellery Office, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-02-01

    Silicon carbon films were deposited using a hybrid radio frequency (r.f.) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)/sputtering deposition system at different r.f. powers. This deposition system combines the advantages of r.f. PECVD and sputtering techniques for the deposition of silicon carbon films with the added advantage of eliminating the use of highly toxic silane gas in the deposition process. Silicon (Si) atoms were sputtered from a pure amorphous silicon (a-Si) target by argon (Ar) ions and carbon (C) atoms were incorporated into the film from C based growth radicals generated through the discharge of methane (CH{sub 4}) gas. The effects of r.f. powers of 60, 80, 100, 120 and 150 W applied during the deposition process on the structural and optical properties of the films were investigated. Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the silicon carbon films contain amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) and amorphous carbon (a-C) phases. The r.f. power showed significant influence on the C incorporation in the film structure. The a-C phases became more ordered in films with high C incorporation in the film structure. These films also produced high photoluminescence emission intensity at around 600 nm wavelength as a result of quantum confinement effects from the presence of sp{sup 2} C clusters embedded in the a-SiC and a-C phases in the films. - Highlights: ► Effects of radio frequency (r.f.) power on silicon carbon (SiC) films were studied. ► Hybrid plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition/sputtering technique was used. ► r.f. power influences C incorporation in the film structure. ► High C incorporation results in higher ordering of the amorphous C phase. ► These films produced high photoluminescence emission intensity.

  14. Sub-micro a-C:H patterning of silicon surfaces assisted by atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boileau, Alexis; Gries, Thomas; Noël, Cédric; Perito Cardoso, Rodrigo; Belmonte, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Micro and nano-patterning of surfaces is an increasingly popular challenge in the field of the miniaturization of devices assembled via top-down approaches. This study demonstrates the possibility of depositing sub-micrometric localized coatings—spots, lines or even more complex shapes—made of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) thanks to a moving XY stage. Deposition was performed on silicon substrates using chemical vapor deposition assisted by an argon atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. Acetylene was injected into the post-discharge region as a precursor by means of a glass capillary with a sub-micrometric diameter. A parametric study was carried out to study the influence of the geometric configurations (capillary diameter and capillary-plasma distance) on the deposited coating. Thus, the patterns formed were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, the chemical composition of large coated areas was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy according to the chosen atmospheric environment. The observed chemical bonds show that reactions of the gaseous precursor in the discharge region and both chemical and morphological stability of the patterns after treatment are strongly dependent on the surrounding gas. Various sub-micrometric a-C:H shapes were successfully deposited under controlled atmospheric conditions using argon as inerting gas. Overall, this new process of micro-scale additive manufacturing by atmospheric plasma offers unusually high-resolution at low cost.

  15. Effect of residual stresses on the strength, adhesion and wear resistance of SiC coatings obtained by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on low alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kattamis, T.Z. (Department of Metallurgy, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States)); Chen, M. (Department of Metallurgy, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States)); Skolianos, S. (Aristoteles University, Thessaloniki (Greece)); Chambers, B.V. (Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States))

    1994-11-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbide thin coatings were deposited on AISI 4340 low alloy steel wafers and thicker steel specimens by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The cohesion of the coating, its adhesion to the substrate and its friction coefficient were evaluated by automatic scratch testing, and its wear resistance by pin-on-disk tribometry. During annealing, the residual stress attributed to hydrogen entrapment during deposition gradually changed from compressive to tensile and its rate of increase decreased with increasing annealing time. The cohesion and adhesion failure loads and the abrasive wear resistance decreased with decreasing residual compressive stress and increasing residual tensile stress. The friction coefficient between the coating surface and a diamond stylus decreased with increasing annealing time. ((orig.))

  16. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy analysis of low-temperature plasma-enhanced chemically vapor deposited a-C:H films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A.J.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.; Kazmerski, L.L.; Wager, J.F.

    1989-05-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) has been applied to the analysis of a-C:H films grown on various substrates by a unique low-temperature (<100 /sup 0/C) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process using ethylene and hydrogen gases. EELS data are used to characterize the relative amounts of fourfold coordinated sp/sup 3/ carbon bonding to threefold coordinated sp/sup 2/ carbon bonding as well as the relative order/disorder due to substrate effects. Ellipsometric and transmission measurements provide optical constants for the PECVD a-C:H films.

  17. Synthesis of few-layer graphene on a Ni substrate by using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hyuk; Castro, Edward Joseph; Hwang, Yong Gyoo; Lee, Choong Hun [Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    In this work, few-layer graphene (FLG) was successfully grown on polycrystalline Ni a large scale by using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC PE-CVD), which may serve as an alternative route in large-scale graphene synthesis. The synthesis time had an effect on the quality of the graphene produced. The applied DC voltage, on the other hand, influenced the minimization of the defect densities in the graphene grown. We also present a method of producing a free-standing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)/graphene membrane on a FeCl{sub 3(aq)} solution, which could then be transferred to the desired substrate.

  18. Simultaneous synthesis of nanodiamonds and graphene via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW PE-CVD) on copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Steven; Wöhrl, Nicolas; Schulz, Stephan; Buck, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous growth of both nanodiamonds and graphene on copper samples is described for the first time. A PE-CVD process is used to synthesize graphene layers and nanodiamond clusters from a hydrogen/methane gas mixture as it is typically done successfully in thermal CVD processes for graphene synthesis. However, the standard thermal CVD process is not without problems since the deposition of graphene is affected by the evaporation of a notable amount of copper caused by the slow temperature increase typical for thermal CVD resulting in a long process time. In sharp contrast, the synthesis of graphene by PE-CVD can circumvent this problem by substantially shortening the process time at holding out the prospect of a lower substrate temperature. The reduced thermal load and the possibility to industrially scale-up the PE-CVD process makes it a very attractive alternative to the thermal CVD process with respect to the graphene production in the future. Nanodiamonds are synthesized in PE-CVD reactors for a long time because these processes offer a high degree of control over the film's nanostructure and simultaneously providing a significant high deposition rate. To model the co-deposition process, the three relevant macroscopic parameters (pressure, gas mixture and microwave power) are correlated with three relevant process properties (plasma ball size, substrate temperature and C2/Hα-ratio) and the influence on the quality of the deposited carbon allotropes is investigated. For the evaluation of the graphene as well as the nanodiamond quality, Raman spectroscopy used whereas the plasma properties are measured by optical methods. It is found that the diamond nucleation can be influenced by the C2/Hα-ratio in the plasma, while the graphene quality remains mostly unchanged by this parameter. Moreover it is derived from the experimental data that the direct plasma contact with the copper surface is beneficial for the nucleation of the diamond while the growth and

  19. Atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor for 100 mm wafers, optimized for minimum contamination at low gas flow rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, Venu, E-mail: venuanand@cense.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: venuanand83@gmail.com; Shivashankar, S. A. [Centre for Nano Science and Engineering (CeNSE), Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore 560012 (India); Nair, Aswathi R.; Mohan Rao, G. [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics (IAP), Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2015-08-31

    Gas discharge plasmas used for thinfilm deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) must be devoid of contaminants, like dust or active species which disturb the intended chemical reaction. In atmospheric pressure plasma systems employing an inert gas, the main source of such contamination is the residual air inside the system. To enable the construction of an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) system with minimal contamination, we have carried out fluid dynamic simulation of the APP chamber into which an inert gas is injected at different mass flow rates. On the basis of the simulation results, we have designed and built a simple, scaled APP system, which is capable of holding a 100 mm substrate wafer, so that the presence of air (contamination) in the APP chamber is minimized with as low a flow rate of argon as possible. This is examined systematically by examining optical emission from the plasma as a function of inert gas flow rate. It is found that optical emission from the plasma shows the presence of atmospheric air, if the inlet argon flow rate is lowered below 300 sccm. That there is minimal contamination of the APP reactor built here, was verified by conducting an atmospheric pressure PECVD process under acetylene flow, combined with argon flow at 100 sccm and 500 sccm. The deposition of a polymer coating is confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the polymer coating contains only 5% of oxygen, which is comparable to the oxygen content in polymer deposits obtained in low-pressure PECVD systems.

  20. Characterization of amorphous hydrogenated carbon formed by low-pressure inductively coupled plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using multiple low-inductance antenna units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Osamu; Ishihara, Masatou; Koga, Yoshinori; Fujiwara, Shuzo; Setsuhara, Yuichi; Sato, Naoyuki

    2005-03-24

    Three-dimensional plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) has been demonstrated using a new type high-density volumetric plasma source with multiple low-inductance antenna system. The plasma density in the volume of phi 200 mm x 100 mm is 5.1 x 10(10) cm(-3) within +/-5% in the lateral directions and 5.2 x 10(10)cm(-3) within +/-10% in the axial direction for argon plasma under the pressure of 0.1 Pa and the total power as low as 400 W. The uniformity of the thickness and refractive index is within +/-3.5% and +/-1%, respectively, for the a-C:H films deposited on the substrates placed on the six side walls, the top of the phi 60 mm x 80 mm hexagonal substrate holder in the pure toluene plasma under the pressure is as low as 0.04 Pa, and the total power is as low as 300 W. It is also found that precisely controlled ion bombardment by pulse biasing led to the explicit observation in Raman and IR spectra of the transition from polymer-like structure to diamond-like structure accompanied by dehydrogenation due to ion bombardment. Moreover, it is also concluded that the pulse biasing technique is effective for stress reduction without a significant degradation of hardness. The stress of 0.6 GPa and the hardness of 15 GPa have been obtained for 2.0 microm thick films deposited with the optimized deposition conditions. The films are durable for the tribology test with a high load of 20 N up to more than 20,000 cycles, showing the specific wear rate and the friction coefficient were 1.2 x 10(-7) mm3/Nm and 0.04, respectively.

  1. Tribological properties and thermal stability of hydrogenated, silicon/nitrogen-coincorporated diamond-like carbon films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Hideki; Okuno, Saori; Magara, Kohei; Nakamura, Kazuki; Miura, Soushi; Enta, Yoshiharu

    2016-12-01

    We have deposited hydrogenated, silicon/nitrogen-incorporated diamond-like carbon (Si-N-DLC) films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using hexamethyldisilazane [((CH3)3Si)2NH; HMDS] as the Si and N source, and compared the tribological performance and thermal stability of the Si-N-DLC films with those of hydrogenated, Si-incorporated DLC (Si-DLC) films prepared using dimethylsilane [SiH2(CH3)2] as the Si source. The deposited films were annealed at 723-873 K in air atmosphere. The friction coefficients of hydrogenated DLC films after annealing significantly increased at the initial stages of friction tests. On the other hand, the friction coefficients of the Si-N-DLC films deposited at an HMDS flow ratio [HMDS/(HMDS+CH4)] of 2.27% remained low after the annealing even at 873 K. We found that the wear rate of the Si-N-DLC film deposited at 2.27% and -1000 V remained almost unchanged after the annealing at 873 K, whereas that of the Si-DLC film with a similar Si fraction deposited at -1000 V significantly increased after the annealing at 773 K.

  2. Temperature-dependent electrical and photo-sensing properties of horizontally-oriented carbon nanotube networks synthesized by sandwich-growth microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, I-Ju [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Hui-Lin [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 3G4 (Canada); Jian, Sheng-Rui, E-mail: srjian@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 84041, Taiwan (China); Wang, Li-Chun; Chen, Kai-Ling [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Cheng-Tzu, E-mail: kurt.kuotw@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Pan, Fu-Ming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Wang, Wei-Hsiang [Teraxtal Technology Corporation, Hsinchu 30075, Taiwan (China); Juang, Jenh-Yih [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-01

    The electrical and photo-sensing properties of horizontally-oriented interconnected carbon nanotube networks (CNT-NWs) prepared by means of a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition sandwich-growth process are investigated. The temperature-dependent dark and illuminated current–voltage and transfer characteristics of CNT-NW-assisted devices are measured. Results show that the current–voltage characteristics of the devices exhibit nonlinear behavior, and the current can be further modulated by a gate voltage, revealing p-type semiconducting behavior with a device mobility of ∼ 14.5 cm{sup 2}/V·s and an on-off current ratio of ∼ 10{sup 3}. Moreover, when the CNT-NW-assisted devices are irradiated with 1.25–25 μm infrared (IR) from 300 to 11 K, the photo currents increase approximately 1.1- to 2.7-fold compared to the dark currents at ± 2 V bias voltage. Such results demonstrate that the presented CNT-NWs have high potential for IR photo-sensor applications. - Highlights: ► Horizontally-oriented interconnected carbon nanotube networks (CNT-NWs) were grown. ► A microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition sandwich-growth process was employed. ► Temperature-dependent electrical and photo-sensing properties were investigated. ► Devices based on CNT-NWs exhibit promising transistor characteristics. ► CNT-NWs are capable to detect light in the infrared wavelength range.

  3. Impact of In doping on GeTe phase-change materials thin films obtained by means of an innovative plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkutnik, P. D.; Aoukar, M.; Todorova, V.; Angélidès, L.; Pelissier, B.; Jourde, D.; Michallon, P.; Vallée, C.; Noé, P.

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the deposition and the phase-change properties of In-doped GeTe thin films obtained by plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and doped with indium using a solid delivery system. The sublimated indium precursor flow rate was calculated as a function of sublimation and deposition parameters. Indium related optical emission recorded by means of optical emission spectroscopy during deposition plasma allowed proposing the dissociation mechanisms of the [In(CH3)2N(CH3)2]2 solid precursor. In particular, using an Ar + H2 + NH3 deposition plasma, sublimated indium molecules are completely dissociated and do not induce by-product contamination by addition of nitrogen or carbon in the films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy evidences the formation of In-Te bonds in amorphous as-deposited In-doped GeTe films. The formation of an InTe phase after 400 °C annealing is also evidenced by means of X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystallization temperature Tx, deduced from monitoring of optical reflectivity of In-doped GeTe films with doping up to 11 at. % slightly varies as a function of the In dopant level with a decrease of Tx down to a minimum value for an In doping level of about 6-8 at. %. In this In doping range, the structure of crystallized In-GeTe films changes and is dominated by the presence of a crystalline In2Te3 phase. Finally, the Kissinger activation energy for crystallization Ea is showing to monotonically decrease as the indium content in the GeTe film is increased indicating a promising effect of In doping on crystallization speed in memory devices while keeping a good thermal stability for data retention.

  4. Direct fabrication of 3D graphene on nanoporous anodic alumina by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Hualin; Garrett, David J.; Apollo, Nicholas V.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Lau, Desmond; Prawer, Steven; Cervenka, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    High surface area electrode materials are of interest for a wide range of potential applications such as super-capacitors and electrochemical cells. This paper describes a fabrication method of three-dimensional (3D) graphene conformally coated on nanoporous insulating substrate with uniform nanopore size. 3D graphene films were formed by controlled graphitization of diamond-like amorphous carbon precursor films, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Plasma-assisted graphitization was found to produce better quality graphene than a simple thermal graphitization process. The resulting 3D graphene/amorphous carbon/alumina structure has a very high surface area, good electrical conductivity and exhibits excellent chemically stability, providing a good material platform for electrochemical applications. Consequently very large electrochemical capacitance values, as high as 2.1 mF for a sample of 10 mm3, were achieved. The electrochemical capacitance of the material exhibits a dependence on bias voltage, a phenomenon observed by other groups when studying graphene quantum capacitance. The plasma-assisted graphitization, which dominates the graphitization process, is analyzed and discussed in detail.

  5. Tensile test of a silicon microstructure fully coated with submicrometer-thick diamond like carbon film using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlei; Uesugi, Akio; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports the tensile properties of single-crystal silicon (SCS) microstructures fully coated with sub-micrometer thick diamond like carbon (DLC) film using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). To minimize the deformations or damages caused by non-uniform coating of DLC, which has high compression residual stress, released SCS specimens with the dimensions of 120 µm long, 4 µm wide, and 5 µm thick were coated from the top and bottom side simultaneously. The thickness of DLC coating is around 150 nm and three different bias voltages were used for deposition. The tensile strength improved from 13.4 to 53.5% with the increasing of negative bias voltage. In addition, the deviation in strength also reduced significantly compared to bare SCS sample.

  6. Tungsten chemical vapor deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kiichi; Takeda, Nobuo.

    1993-07-13

    A tungsten chemical vapor deposition method is described, comprising: a first step of selectively growing a first thin tungsten film of a predetermined thickness in a desired region on the surface of a silicon substrate by reduction of a WF[sub 6] gas introduced into an atmosphere of a predetermined temperature containing said silicon substrate; and a second step of selectively growing a second tungsten film of a predetermined thickness on said first thin tungsten film by reduction of said WF[sub 6] with a silane gas further introduced into said atmosphere, wherein the surface state of said substrate is monitored by a pyrometer and the switching from said first step to said second step is performed when the emissivity of infrared light from the substrate surfaces reaches a predetermined value.

  7. Engineering vapor-deposited polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Feng-Yu

    The vapor deposition polymerization (VDP) of PMDA-ODA polyimide was studied parametrically to produce microcapsules and thin films with desirable properties and quality for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments. The mechanical properties and gas permeability were determined at temperatures from 10 to 573 K. The VDP polyimide possessed distinct properties including lower gas permeability and stronger tensile properties from those of solution-cast Kapton, which were attributed to the presence of cross-linking. Processing parameters determining the properties of the VDP polyimide were identified: (1) utilizing air instead of nitrogen as the atmosphere of imidization increased the permeability by 140%, lowered the activation energy for permeation, and reduced the tensile strength by 30% without affecting the Young's modulus; (2) imidizing at faster heating rates increased the permeability by up to 50% and reduced the activation energy for permeation with 50% lowered tensile strength and impervious Young's modulus; (3) bi-axial stretching increased the permeability by up to three orders of magnitude. Analyses via IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density measurement revealed that the effects of the processing parameters were results of the modifications in the crystallinity and molecular weight. The VDP polyimide underwent minor degradation in the tensile strength and elongation at break with unaffected Young's modulus and permeability upon absorbing 120 MGy of beta-radiation. Substituting a fluorinated dianhydride monomer, 6FDA, for PMDA in the optimized VDP process yielded 6FDA-ODA polyimide microcapsules and films with 50-fold increased permeability and comparable mechanical properties. The results of this study enable the production of polyimide microcapsules that will greatly facilitate the ICF experiments, and will broaden the applications of vapor-deposited polyimides in other technology fields.

  8. Single liquid source plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of high-quality YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiming; Gardiner, Robin A.; Kirlin, Peter S.; Boerstler, Robert W.; Steinbeck, John

    1992-01-01

    High quality YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films were grown in-situ on LaAlO3 (100) by a novel single liquid source plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process. The metalorganic complexes M(thd) (sub n), (thd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate; M = Y, Ba, Cu) were dissolved in an organic solution and injected into a vaporizer immediately upstream of the reactor inlet. The single liquid source technique dramatically simplifies current CVD processing and can significantly improve the process reproducibility. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated that single phase, highly c-axis oriented YBa2Cu3O(7-x) was formed in-situ at substrate temperature 680 C. The as-deposited films exhibited a mirror-like surface, had transition temperature T(sub cO) approximately equal to 89 K, Delta T(sub c) less than 1 K, and Jc (77 K) = 10(exp 6) A/sq cm.

  9. Single liquid source plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of high-quality YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiming; Gardiner, Robin A.; Kirlin, Peter S.; Boerstler, Robert W.; Steinbeck, John

    1992-01-01

    High quality YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films were grown in-situ on LaAlO3 (100) by a novel single liquid source plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process. The metalorganic complexes M(thd) (sub n), (thd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate; M = Y, Ba, Cu) were dissolved in an organic solution and injected into a vaporizer immediately upstream of the reactor inlet. The single liquid source technique dramatically simplifies current CVD processing and can significantly improve the process reproducibility. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated that single phase, highly c-axis oriented YBa2Cu3O(7-x) was formed in-situ at substrate temperature 680 C. The as-deposited films exhibited a mirror-like surface, had transition temperature T(sub cO) approximately equal to 89 K, Delta T(sub c) less than 1 K, and Jc (77 K) = 10(exp 6) A/sq cm.

  10. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films using chromium hexacarbonyl (Cr(CO){sub 6}) precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jinwen [Center for Materials for Information Technology and Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)], E-mail: wang006@bama.ua.edu; Gupta, Arunava; Klein, Tonya M. [Center for Materials for Information Technology and Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Chromium oxide (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films have been deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on c-cut sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and oxidized silicon substrates at temperatures between 250 and 400 deg. C using the precursor chromium hexacarbonyl (Cr(CO){sub 6}). The film growth rate ranges between 5 and 14 A/min, with the growth rate going through a maximum at 300 deg. C before decreasing at higher temperature, suggesting the presence of competing deposition and desorption reaction channels. Scanning electron microscope images indicate that the density of grains and film crystallinity increases with increasing substrate temperatures, while atomic force microscopy shows an overall decrease in film roughness with increasing temperature. Normal {theta} - 2{theta} Bragg X-ray diffraction results show that films deposited on SiO{sub 2} are polycrystalline, while those on sapphire have a preferred (0 0 0 l) orientation. The epitaxial nature of the film growth on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been confirmed from the symmetry of off-axis X-ray scans.

  11. Preparation of Aligned Ultra-long and Diameter-controlled Silicon Oxide Nanotubes by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Electrospun PVP Nanofiber Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Ming

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Well-aligned and suspended polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP nanofibers with 8 mm in length were obtained by electrospinning. Using the aligned suspended PVP nanofibers array as template, aligned ultra-long silicon oxide (SiOx nanotubes with very high aspect ratios have been prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD process. The inner diameter (20–200 nm and wall thickness (12–90 nm of tubes were controlled, respectively, by baking the electrospun nanofibers and by coating time without sacrificing the orientation degree and the length of arrays. The micro-PL spectrum of SiOx nanotubes shows a strong blue–green emission with a peak at about 514 nm accompanied by two shoulders around 415 and 624 nm. The blue–green emission is caused by the defects in the nanotubes.

  12. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nano-Structured Sn/C Composite Thin-Film Anodes for Li-ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, Cynthia; Marcinek, M.; Hardwick, L.J.; Richardson, T.J.; Song, X.; Kostecki, R.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we report results of a novel synthesis method of thin-film composite Sn/C anodes for lithium batteries. Thin layers of graphitic carbon decorated with uniformly distributed Sn nanoparticles were synthesized from a solid organic precursor Sn(IV) tert-butoxide by a one step microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The thin-film Sn/C electrodes were electrochemically tested in lithium half cells and produced a reversible capacity of 440 and 297 mAhg{sup -1} at C/25 and 5C discharge rates, respectively. A long term cycling of the Sn/C nanocomposite anodes showed 40% capacity loss after 500 cycles at 1C rate.

  13. Synthesis, structural and field emission properties of multiwall carbon nanotube-graphene-like nanocarbon hybrid films grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chockalingam, Sreekumar, E-mail: sreekuc@nplindia.org [Polymorphic Carbon Thin Films Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Bisht, Atul [Polymorphic Carbon Thin Films Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Panwar, O.S., E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [Polymorphic Carbon Thin Films Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Kesarwani, A.K. [Polymorphic Carbon Thin Films Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Singh, B.P. [Physics and Engineering of Carbon, Materials Physics and Engineering Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Chand, Jagdish [Polymorphic Carbon Thin Films Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Singh, V.N. [Electron and Ion Microscopy, Sophisticated and Analytical Instruments, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2015-04-15

    Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-graphene-like nanocarbon hybrid films were directly deposited on nickel substrate without any pre-treatment in a single-step by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW PECVD) technique at 600 °C. The effects of hydrogen partial pressure on the growth of MWCNT-graphene-like nanocarbon hybrid films and their structural, morphological and field emission properties were investigated. High resolution scanning electron microscope revealed MWCNT structure. High resolution transmission electron microscope images and Raman spectra revealed graphene-like nanocarbon film. Raman spectra showed 2D, G, D and D + G peaks at approximately 2690, 1590, 1350 and 2930 cm{sup −1}, respectively. The minimum threshold field for electron emission was found to be 3.6 V/μm corresponding to 1 μA/cm{sup 2} current density for the MWCNT-graphene-like nanocarbon hybrid film deposited at 20 Torr pressure whereas the maximum current density of 0.12 mA/cm{sup 2} and field enhancement factor of ∼3356 was obtained for the sample deposited at 5 Torr pressure. - Highlights: • MWCNT-graphene-like nanocarbon hybrid films were synthesized by MWPECVD technique. • Effect of pressure on the structural and field emission properties has been studied. • FESEM revealed MWCNT and HRTEM revealed graphene-like nanocarbon film structure. • Minimum E{sub T} = 3.6 V/μm with β = 3164 has been obtained in the film deposited at 20 Torr. • Maximum J = 0.12 mA/cm{sup 2} with β = 3356 has been obtained in the film deposited at 5 Torr.

  14. Ionized Physical Vapor Deposition and Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzic, D. N.; Hayden, D. B.; Juliano, D. R.

    1997-11-01

    Magnetron sputtering is a typical method of physical vapor deposition (PVD) often used in depositing metal interconnects between layers of a semiconductor substrate. However, conventional PVD places an upper limit on the aspect ratio (depth:width) of features to be filled due to the isotropic velocity distribution of the sputtered neutrals. At higher aspect ratios the sputtered particles can coat the sides of a trench before filling it, thus pinching off the trench and leaving either an open circuit or a high resistivity connection. In our system an ICP coil is introduced between the magnetron target and substrate, creating a secondary plasma that can ionize a significant fraction of the sputtered neutral atoms. A negatively biased substrate will accelerate these ions normally, giving a directional flux that can fill the trench from the bottom up. The deposition rates and metal flux ionization fractions are measured with a quartz crystal microbalance and a multi-grid analyzer. Plasma conditions are measured with a time-resolved Langmuir probe system. Both diagnostics are employed for various pressures, magnetron and RF powers, and background gas types. The ability of the system to fill higher aspect ratio features is also discussed.

  15. Performance Improvement of Microcrystalline p-SiC/i-Si/n-Si Thin Film Solar Cells by Using Laser-Assisted Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ying Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microcrystalline p-SiC/i-Si/n-Si thin film solar cells treated with hydrogen plasma were fabricated at low temperature using a CO2 laser-assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (LAPECVD system. According to the micro-Raman results, the i-Si films shifted from 482 cm−1 to 512 cm−1 as the assisting laser power increased from 0 W to 80 W, which indicated a gradual transformation from amorphous to crystalline Si. From X-ray diffraction (XRD results, the microcrystalline i-Si films with (111, (220, and (311 diffraction were obtained. Compared with the Si-based thin film solar cells deposited without laser assistance, the short-circuit current density and the power conversion efficiency of the solar cells with assisting laser power of 80 W were improved from 14.38 mA/cm2 to 18.16 mA/cm2 and from 6.89% to 8.58%, respectively.

  16. Impact of Hydrocarbon Control in Ultraviolet-Assisted Restoration Process for Extremely Porous Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition SiOCH Films with k = 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Dai; Nakano, Akinori; Kobayashi, Akiko; Matsushita, Kiyohiro; de Roest, David; Kobayashi, Nobuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the effects of UV-assisted restoration on porous plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) SiOCH films with k = 2.0 and 2.3 having high porosities. By applying the UV-assisted restoration to O2-plasma-damaged films with k = 2.0 and 2.3, the recovery of the k-value was observed on the k = 2.3 film in proportion to -OH group reduction. However, the k = 2.0 film did not show recovery in spite of -OH group reduction. We found that hydrocarbon content in the k = 2.0 film was significantly increased by the UV-assisted restoration compared with the k = 2.3 film. According to these findings, we optimized the UV-assisted restoration to achieve improved controllability of the hydrocarbon uptake in the k = 2.0 film and confirmed the recovery of the k-value for O2-plasma-damaged film. Thus, adjusting the hydrocarbon uptake was crucial for restoring extremely porous SiOCH film.

  17. Si nanowires grown by Al-catalyzed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition: synthesis conditions, electrical properties and application to lithium battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toan, Le Duc; Moyen, Eric; Zamfir, Mihai Robert; Joe, Jemee; Kim, Young Woo; Pribat, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Silicon nanowires have been synhesized using Al as a catalyst. Silane (SiH4) diluted in H2 carrier gas was employed as Si precursor in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system operated at various temperatures (450 °C and 550 °C). Those growth temperatures, which are lower than the eutectic temperature in the Al-Si system (577 °C) suggests a vapor-solid-solid growth mechanism. Four point resistance measurements and back-gated current-voltage measurements indicated that silicon nanowires were heavily doped (p type), with a doping concentration of a few 1019 cm-3. We have measured hole mobility values of ˜16 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 450 °C and ˜30 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 550 °C. Transmission electron microscope analyses showed that the silicon nanowires were highly twinned even when they grow epitaxially on (111) Si substrates. We have also evaluated the use of those highly doped Si nanowires for lithium-ion battery anodes. We have observed a good cycling behavior during the first 65 charge-discharge cycles, followed by a slow capacity decay. After 150 cycles at a charge-discharge rate of 0.1 C, the electrode capacity was still 1400 mAh g-1. The ageing mechanism seems to be related to the delamination of the SiNWs from the stainless steel substrate on which they were grown.

  18. High throughput production of nanocomposite SiO x powders by plasma spray physical vapor deposition for negative electrode of lithium ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichiro Homma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite Si/SiO x powders were produced by plasma spray physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD at a material throughput of 480 g h−1. The powders are fundamentally an aggregate of primary ~20 nm particles, which are composed of a crystalline Si core and SiO x shell structure. This is made possible by complete evaporation of raw SiO powders and subsequent rapid condensation of high temperature SiO x vapors, followed by disproportionation reaction of nucleated SiO x nanoparticles. When CH4 was additionally introduced to the PS-PVD, the volume of the core Si increases while reducing potentially the SiO x shell thickness as a result of the enhanced SiO reduction, although an unfavorable SiC phase emerges when the C/Si molar ratio is greater than 1. As a result of the increased amount of Si active material and reduced source for irreversible capacity, half-cell batteries made of PS-PVD powders with C/Si = 0.25 have exhibited improved initial efficiency and maintenance of capacity as high as 1000 mAh g−1 after 100 cycles at the same time.

  19. Optical and morphological properties of SiN{sub x}/Si amorphous multilayer structures grown by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, G.; Melo, O. de; Monroy, B.M.; Fandino, J.; Ortiz, A.; Alonso, J.C. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cd. Universitaria, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacan (Mexico); Aguilar-Hernandez, J.; Cruz, F.; Contreras-Puentes, G. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del Instituto Politecnico Nacional; Edificio 9, U.P.A.L.M. (Mexico)

    2005-08-01

    Very thin layers of Si were grown in between silicon nitride layers using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) technique and SiH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}/H{sub 2}/NH{sub 3} mixtures. Deposition conditions were selected to favor Si cluster formation. Room Temperature Photoluminescence (RT-PL) and optical transmission in different ranges were used to evaluate the optical and structural properties of the films. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of the cross section of cleaved samples allowed to observe a clear pattern of Si clusters embedded in the SiN matrix. The UV-VIS absorption spectra present two band edges. We assume that the higher band gap is due to the amorphous Si clusters. RT-PL spectra are characterized by two broad bands: one centered at 1.5 eV and the other at 2.1 eV. The broad luminescence centered at 2.1 eV could be associated with the higher band gap observed in absorption spectrum. After vacuum annealing of the samples at 400 and ordm;C, the band at 2.1 eV disappears. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Frequency-dependent capacitance-voltage and conductance-voltage characteristics of low-dielectric-constant SiOC(-H) thin films deposited by using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Young; Lee, Heang Seuk; Woo, Jong Kwan; Choi, Chi Kyu; Lee, Kwang Man; Hyun, Myung Taek [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Navamathavan, Rangaswamy [Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    We report on the electrical characteristics of the metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure of low-dielectric-constant SiOC(-H) films. SiOC(-H) thin films were deposited on p-Si(100) substrates by using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The frequency dependence of the capacitance-voltage (C-V) and the conductance-voltage (G/{omega}-V) characteristics of the A1/SiOC(-H)/p-Si(100)/Al MIS structures was analyzed. C-V and G/{omega}-V measurements were carried out over a frequency range of 1 kHz to 5 MHz. Based on our analysis, the C-V and the G/{omega}-V characteristics confirmed that the surface states and the series resistance were important parameters that strongly influenced the electrical properties of the A1/SiOC(-H)/p-Si(100)/Al MIS structures.

  1. Impacts of light illumination on monocrystalline silicon surfaces passivated by atomic layer deposited Al2O3 capped with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited SiN x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fen; Toh, Mei Gi; Thway, Maung; Li, Xinhang; Nandakumar, Naomi; Gay, Xavier; Dielissen, Bas; Raj, Samuel; Aberle, Armin G.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we investigate the impact of light illumination on crystalline silicon surfaces passivated with inline atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide capped with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride. It is found that, for dedicated n-type lifetime samples under illumination, there is no light induced degradation (LID) but enhanced passivation. The lifetime increase happened with a much faster speed compared to the lifetime decay during dark storage, resulting in the overall lifetime enhancement for actual field application scenarios (sunshine during the day and darkness during the night). In addition, it was found that the lifetime enhancement is spectrally dependent and mainly associated with the visible part of the solar spectrum. Hence, it has negligible impact for such interfaces applied on the rear of the solar cells, for example p-type aluminum local back surface field (Al-LBSF) cells.

  2. Controlling the resistivity gradient in chemical vapor deposition-deposited aluminum-doped zinc oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarev, M. V.; Verheijen, M. A.; Keuning, W.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) generally exhibit a major drawback, i.e., a gradient in resistivity extending over a large range of film thickness. The present contribution addresses the plasma-enhanced CVD deposition of ZnO: Al layers by focusing on the control

  3. Effect of nickel oxide seed layers on annealed-amorphous titanium oxide thin films prepared using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Cheng-Yang; Hong, Shao-Chyang [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Huwei, Yunlin, 63201, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Fu-Tsai [Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, National United University, Miao-Li, 36003, Taiwan (China); Lai, Li-Wen [ITRI South, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Liujia, Tainan, 73445, Taiwan (China); Lin, Tan-Wei [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Huwei, Yunlin, 63201, Taiwan (China); Liu, Day-Shan, E-mail: dsliu@sunws.nfu.edu.tw [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Huwei, Yunlin, 63201, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-31

    The effect of a nickel oxide (NiO{sub x}) seed layer on the crystallization and photocatalytic activity of the sequentially plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited amorphous titanium oxide (TiO{sub x}) thin film processed by a post-annealing process was investigated. The evolution of the crystalline structures, chemical bond configurations, and surface/cross-sectional morphologies of the annealed TiO{sub x} films, with and without a NiO{sub x} seed layer, was examined using X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscope measurements. Thermo- and photo-induced hydrophilicity was determined by measuring the contact angle of water droplet. Photocatalytic activity after UV light irradiation was evaluated from the decolorization of a methylene blue solution. The crystallization temperature of the TiO{sub x} film, deposited on a NiO{sub x} seed layer, was found to be lower than that of a pure TiO{sub x} film, further improving the thermo- and photo-induced surface super-hydrophilicity. The TiO{sub x} film deposited onto the NiO{sub x} seed layer, resulting in significant cluster boundaries, showed a rough surface morphology and proved to alleviate the anatase crystal growth by increasing the post-annealing temperature, which yielded a more active surface area and prohibited the recombination of photogenerated electrons and holes. The photocatalytic activity of the NiO{sub x}/TiO{sub x} system with such a textured surface therefore was enhanced and optimized through an adequate post-annealing process.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Vinod; Mulpuri, Rao

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  5. Growth of Ge nanoparticles on SiO{sub 2}/Si interfaces during annealing of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foss, S. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1048-Blindern, N-0316 (Norway)]. E-mail: stefoss@fys.uio.no; Finstad, T.G. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1048-Blindern, N-0316 (Norway); Dana, A. [Department of Physics, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Aydinli, A. [Department of Physics, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-06-04

    Multilayer germanosilicate (Ge:SiO{sub 2}) films have been grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Each Ge:SiO{sub 2} layer is separated by a pure SiO{sub 2} layer. The samples were heat treated at 900 deg. C for 15 and 45 min. Transmission electron microscopy investigations show precipitation of particles in the layers of highest Ge concentration. Furthermore there is evidence of diffusion between the layers. This paper focuses mainly on observed growth of Ge particles close to the interface, caused by Ge diffusion from the Ge:SiO{sub 2} layer closest to the interface through a pure SiO{sub 2} layer and to the interface. The particles grow as spheres in a direction away from the interface. Particles observed after 15 min anneal time are 4 nm in size and are amorphous, while after 45 min anneal time they are 7 nm in size and have a crystalline diamond type Ge structure.

  6. Nanocrystalline-Si-dot multi-layers fabrication by chemical vapor deposition with H-plasma surface treatment and evaluation of structure and quantum confinement effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kosemura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 100-nm-thick nanocrystalline silicon (nano-Si-dot multi-layers on a Si substrate were fabricated by the sequential repetition of H-plasma surface treatment, chemical vapor deposition, and surface oxidation, for over 120 times. The diameter of the nano-Si dots was 5–6 nm, as confirmed by both the transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The annealing process was important to improve the crystallinity of the nano-Si dot. We investigated quantum confinement effects by Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL measurements. Based on the experimental results, we simulated the Raman spectrum using a phenomenological model. Consequently, the strain induced in the nano-Si dots was estimated by comparing the experimental and simulated results. Taking the estimated strain value into consideration, the band gap modulation was measured, and the diameter of the nano-Si dots was calculated to be 5.6 nm by using PL. The relaxation of the q ∼ 0 selection rule model for the nano-Si dots is believed to be important to explain both the phenomena of peak broadening on the low-wavenumber side observed in Raman spectra and the blue shift observed in PL measurements.

  7. Anisotropic growth of single-crystal graphite plates by nickel-assisted microwave-plasma chemical-vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badzian, Teresa; Badzian, Andrzej; Roy, Rustum; Cheng, Shang-Cong

    2000-02-01

    Growth of single-crystal graphite free-standing plates has been achieved by a microwavehydrogen-plasma etching of graphite powder and nickel mesh. The plates resemble a knife blade and grow in the direction with long crystals exceeding 100 μm. Hexagonal growth features at the edges and electron diffraction patterns confirm the single-crystal nature of these ultrathin plates. Electron microprobe and Raman spectroscopy indicate the presence of graphite. Diamond crystals nucleate on these plates and they grow simultaneously. We suggest that the paradoxical growth of graphite in a hydrogen plasma, under conditions in which graphite is usually etched away, is possible because of a protective coating by a Ni-C-H phase. This thin coating allows for transport of carbon atoms from the gas phase to the growing graphite surface.

  8. Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) obtained through chemical vapor deposition assisted by plasma; Peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo hidrogenado (a-C:H) obtenidas mediante deposito quimico de vapores asistido por plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia H, J.A.; Camps C, E.E.; Escobar A, L.; Romero H, S.; Chirino O, S. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Muhl S, S. [IIM-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) were deposited using one source of microwave plasma with magnetic field (type ECR), using mixtures of H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} in relationship of 80/20 and 95/05 as precursory gases, with work pressures of 4X10{sup -4} to 6x10{sup -4} Torr and an incident power of the discharge of microwaves with a constant value of 400 W. It was analyzed the influence among the properties of the films, as the deposit rate, the composition and the bonding types, and the deposit conditions, such as the flow rates of the precursory gases and the polarization voltage of the sample holders. (Author)

  9. Pulsed-Plasma Physical Vapor Deposition Approach Toward the Facile Synthesis of Multilayer and Monolayer Graphene for Anticoagulation Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, Rajani K; Gaman, Cezar; Jose, Bincy; McCoy, Anthony P; Cafolla, Tony; McNally, Patrick J; Daniels, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the growth of multilayer and single-layer graphene on copper foil using bipolar pulsed direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering of a graphite target in pure argon atmosphere. Single-layer graphene (SG) and few-layer graphene (FLG) films are deposited at temperatures ranging from 700 °C to 920 °C within graphene films formed. The films were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and optical transmission spectroscopy techniques. Based on the above studies, a diffusion-controlled mechanism was proposed for the graphene growth. A single-step whole blood assay was used to investigate the anticoagulant activity of graphene surfaces. Platelet adhesion, activation, and morphological changes on the graphene/glass surfaces, compared to bare glass, were analyzed using fluorescence microscopy and SEM techniques. We have found significant suppression of the platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation on the graphene-covered surfaces, compared to the bare glass, indicating the anticoagulant activity of the deposited graphene films. Our production technique represents an industrially relevant method for the growth of SG and FLG for various applications including the biomedical field.

  10. Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors using organic-inorganic hybrid films deposited by low-temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for all dielectric layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chao-Jui; Chang, Ching-Hsiang; Chang, Kuei-Ming; Wu, Chung-Chih

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the deposition of high-performance organic-inorganic hybrid dielectric films by low-temperature (close to room temperature) inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) with hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO)/O2 precursor gas. The hybrid films exhibited low leakage currents and high breakdown fields, suitable for thin-film transistor (TFT) applications. They were successfully integrated into the gate insulator, the etch-stop layer, and the passivation layer for bottom-gate staggered amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) TFTs having the etch-stop configuration. With the double-active-layer configuration having a buffer a-IGZO back-channel layer grown in oxygen-rich atmosphere for better immunity against plasma damage, the etch-stop-type bottom-gate staggered a-IGZO TFTs with good TFT characteristics were successfully demonstrated. The TFTs showed good field-effect mobility (μFE), threshold voltage (V th), subthreshold swing (SS), and on/off ratio (I on/off) of 7.5 cm2 V-1 s-1, 2.38 V, 0.38 V/decade, and 2.2 × 108, respectively, manifesting their usefulness for a-IGZO TFTs.

  11. Nanocrystalline diamond thin films on titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium alloy temporomandibular joint prosthesis simulants by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Marc Douglas

    A course of research has been performed to assess the suitability of nanocrystal-line diamond (NCD) films on Ti-6Al-4V alloy as wear-resistant coatings in biomedical implant use. A series of temporomandibular (TMJ) joint condyle simulants were polished and acid-passivated as per ASTM F86 standard for surface preparation of implants. A 3-mum-thick coating of NCD film was deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) over the hemispherical articulation surfaces of the simulants. Plasma chemistry conditions were measured and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), using hydrogen as a relative standard. The films consist of diamond grains around 20 nm in diameter embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix, free of any detectable film stress gradient. Hardness averages 65 GPa and modulus measures 600 GPa at a depth of 250 nm into the film surface. A diffuse film/substrate boundary produces a minimal film adhesion toughness (GammaC) of 158 J/m2. The mean RMS roughness is 14.6 +/- 4.2 nm, with an average peak roughness of 82.6 +/- 65.9 nm. Examination of the surface morphology reveals a porous, dendritic surface. Wear testing resulted in two failed condylar coatings out of three tests. No macroscopic delamination was found on any sample, but micron-scale film pieces broke away, exposing the substrate. Electrochemical corrosion testing shows a seven-fold reduction in corrosion rate with the application of an NCD coating as opposed to polished, passivated Ti-6Al-4V, producing a corrosion rate comparable to wrought Co-Cr-Mo. In vivo biocompatibility testing indicates that implanted NCD films did not elicit an immune response in the rabbit model, and osteointegration was apparent for both compact and trabecular bone on both NCD film and bare Ti-6Al-4V. Overall, NCD thin film material is reasonably smooth, biocompatible, and very well adhered. Wear testing indicates that this material is unacceptable for use in demanding TMJ applications without

  12. Chemical-vapor-deposition reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, S.

    1979-01-01

    Reactor utilizes multiple stacked trays compactly arranged in paths of horizontally channeled reactant gas streams. Design allows faster and more efficient deposits of film on substrates, and reduces gas and energy consumption. Lack of dead spots that trap reactive gases reduces reactor purge time.

  13. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of High c-axis ZnO Thin Film by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition System and its UV Photodetector Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chung-Hua; Wei, Da-Hua

    2015-10-03

    In this study, zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films with high c-axis (0002) preferential orientation have been successfully and effectively synthesized onto silicon (Si) substrates via different synthesized temperatures by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The effects of different synthesized temperatures on the crystal structure, surface morphologies and optical properties have been investigated. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated that the intensity of (0002) diffraction peak became stronger with increasing synthesized temperature until 400 (o)C. The diffraction intensity of (0002) peak gradually became weaker accompanying with appearance of (10-10) diffraction peak as the synthesized temperature up to excess of 400 (o)C. The RT photoluminescence (PL) spectra exhibited a strong near-band-edge (NBE) emission observed at around 375 nm and a negligible deep-level (DL) emission located at around 575 nm under high c-axis ZnO thin films. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images revealed the homogeneous surface and with small grain size distribution. The ZnO thin films have also been synthesized onto glass substrates under the same parameters for measuring the transmittance. For the purpose of ultraviolet (UV) photodetector application, the interdigitated platinum (Pt) thin film (thickness ~100 nm) fabricated via conventional optical lithography process and radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. In order to reach Ohmic contact, the device was annealed in argon circumstances at 450 (o)C by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) system for 10 min. After the systematic measurements, the current-voltage (I-V) curve of photo and dark current and time-dependent photocurrent response results exhibited a good responsivity and reliability, indicating that the high c-axis ZnO thin film is a suitable sensing layer for UV photodetector application.

  15. High-temperature degradation in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface passivation layers on crystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühnhold, Saskia [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstraße 2, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Freiburg Materials Research Center FMF, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Stefan-Meier-Straße 21 (Germany); Saint-Cast, Pierre; Kafle, Bishal; Hofmann, Marc [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstraße 2, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Colonna, Francesco [Freiburg Materials Research Center FMF, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Stefan-Meier-Straße 21 (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM, Wöhlerstraße 11, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Zacharias, Margit [Department of Microsystems Engineering IMTEK, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-08-07

    In this publication, the activation and degradation of the passivation quality of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) layers with different thicknesses (10 nm, 20 nm, and 110 nm) on crystalline silicon (c-Si) during long and high temperature treatments are investigated. As indicated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, the concentration of tetrahedral and octahedral sites within the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer changes during temperature treatments and correlates with the amount of negative fixed charges at the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface, which was detected by Corona Oxide Characterization of Semiconductors. Furthermore, during a temperature treatment at 820 °C for 30 min, the initial amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer crystallize into the γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} structure and was enhanced by additional oxygen as was proven by x-ray diffraction measurements and underlined by Density Functional Theory simulations. The crystallization correlates with the increase of the optical density up to 20% while the final Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer thickness decreases at the same time up to 26%. All observations described above were detected to be Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer thickness dependent. These observations reveal novel aspects to explain the temperature induced passivation and degradation mechanisms of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers at a molecular level like the origin of the negative fixe charges at the Si/SiO{sub x}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface or the phenomena of blistering. Moreover, the crystal phase of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} does not deliver good surface passivation due to a high concentration of octahedral sites leading to a lower concentration of negative fixed charges at the interface.

  16. Physical Vapor Deposition of Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A unified treatment of the theories, data, and technologies underlying physical vapor deposition methods With electronic, optical, and magnetic coating technologies increasingly dominating manufacturing in the high-tech industries, there is a growing need for expertise in physical vapor deposition of thin films. This important new work provides researchers and engineers in this field with the information they need to tackle thin film processes in the real world. Presenting a cohesive, thoroughly developed treatment of both fundamental and applied topics, Physical Vapor Deposition of Thin Films incorporates many critical results from across the literature as it imparts a working knowledge of a variety of present-day techniques. Numerous worked examples, extensive references, and more than 100 illustrations and photographs accompany coverage of: * Thermal evaporation, sputtering, and pulsed laser deposition techniques * Key theories and phenomena, including the kinetic theory of gases, adsorption and condensation, high-vacuum pumping dynamics, and sputtering discharges * Trends in sputter yield data and a new simplified collisional model of sputter yield for pure element targets * Quantitative models for film deposition rate, thickness profiles, and thermalization of the sputtered beam

  17. Chemical vapor deposition coating for micromachines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MANI,SEETHAMBAL S.; FLEMING,JAMES G.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; IRWIN,LAWRENCE W.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; TANNER,DANELLE M.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.

    2000-04-21

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors will present a process used to selectively coat MEMS devices with tungsten using a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process. The selective W deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially solve both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}, which results in a self-limiting reaction. The selective deposition of W only on polysilicon surfaces prevents electrical shorts. Further, the self-limiting nature of this selective W deposition process ensures the consistency necessary for process control. Selective tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize process integration problems. This tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, requirements for device performance. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release stuck parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. Results from tungsten deposition on MEMS structures with dimples will be presented. The effect of wet and vapor phase cleanings prior to the deposition will be discussed along with other process details. The W coating improved wear by orders of magnitude compared to uncoated parts. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable.

  18. Monitoring particle growth in deposition plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlebrowski, T.; Bahre, H.; Böke, M.; Winter, J.

    2013-12-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods are frequently used to deposit barrier layers, e.g. on polymers for food packaging. These plasmas may suffer from particle (dust) formation. We report on a flexible monitoring system for dust. It is based on scanning a 3D plasma volume for particles by laser light scattering. The lower size limit of particles detected in the presented system is 20 nm. We report on existence diagrams for obtaining dust free or dust loaded capacitively or inductively coupled rf-plasmas in C2H2 depending on pressure, flow and rf-power. We further present growth rates for dust in these plasmas and show that monodisperse particles are only obtained during the first growth cycle.

  19. The Role of Oxygen Partial Pressure in Controlling the Phase Composition of La1- x Sr x Co y Fe1- y O3- δ Oxygen Transport Membranes Manufactured by Means of Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcano, D.; Mauer, G.; Sohn, Y. J.; Vaßen, R.; Garcia-Fayos, J.; Serra, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    La0.58Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 - δ (LSCF) deposited on a metallic porous support by plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a promising candidate for oxygen-permeation membranes. Ionic transport properties are regarded to depend on the fraction of perovskite phase present in the membrane. However, during processing, the LSCF powder decomposes into perovskite and secondary phases. In order to improve the ionic transport properties of the membranes, spraying was carried out at different oxygen partial pressures p(O2). It was found that coatings deposited at lower and higher oxygen partial pressures consist of 70% cubic/26% rhombohedral and 61% cubic/35% rhombohedral perovskite phases, respectively. During annealing, the formation of non-perovskite phases is driven by oxygen non-stoichiometry. The amount of oxygen added during spraying can be used to increase the perovskite phase fraction and suppress the formation of non-perovskite phases.

  20. Designing polymer surfaces via vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Asatekin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD methods significantly augment the capabilities of traditional surface modification techniques for designing polymeric surfaces. In CVD polymerization, the monomer(s are delivered to the surface through the vapor phase and then undergo simultaneous polymerization and thin film formation. By eliminating the need to dissolve macromolecules, CVD enables insoluble polymers to be coated and prevents solvent damage to the substrate. Since de-wetting and surface tension effects are absent, CVD coatings conform to the geometry of the underlying substrate. Hence, CVD polymers can be readily applied to virtually any substrate: organic, inorganic, rigid, flexible, planar, three-dimensional, dense, or porous. CVD methods integrate readily with other vacuum processes used to fabricate patterned surfaces and devices. CVD film growth proceeds from the substrate up, allowing for interfacial engineering, real-time monitoring, thickness control, and the synthesis of films with graded composition. This article focuses on two CVD polymerization methods that closely translate solution chemistry to vapor deposition; initiated CVD and oxidative CVD. The basic concepts underlying these methods and the resultant advantages over other thin film coating techniques are described, along with selected applications where CVD polymers are an enabling technology.

  1. Handbook of chemical vapor deposition principles, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pierson, Hugh O

    1999-01-01

    Turn to this new second edition for an understanding of the latest advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. CVD technology has recently grown at a rapid rate, and the number and scope of its applications and their impact on the market have increased considerably. The market is now estimated to be at least double that of a mere seven years ago when the first edition of this book was published. The second edition is an update with a considerably expanded and revised scope. Plasma CVD and metallo-organic CVD are two major factors in this rapid growth. Readers will find the latest

  2. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  3. A nucleation and growth model of vertically-oriented carbon nanofibers or nanotubes by plasma-enhanced catalytic chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, C S; Senger, A; Le Normand, F

    2006-05-01

    Carbon nanofibers are grown by direct current and hot filaments-activated catalytic chemical vapor deposition while varying the power of the hot filaments. Observations of these carbon nanofibers vertically oriented on a SiO2 (8 nm thick)/Si(100) substrate covered with Co nanoparticles (10-15 nm particle size) by Scanning Electron and Transmission Electron Microscopies show the presence of a graphitic "nest" either on the surface of the substrate or at the end of the specific nanofiber that does not encapsulate the catalytic particle. Strictly in our conditions, the activation by hot filaments is required to grow nanofibers with a C2H2 - H2 gas mixture, as large amounts of amorphous carbon cover the surface of the substrate without using hot filaments. From these observations as well as data of the literature, it is proposed that the nucleation of carbon nanofibers occurs through a complex process involving several steps: carbon concentration gradient starting from the catalytic carbon decomposition and diffusion from the surface of the catalytic nanoparticles exposed to the activated gas and promoted by energetic ionic species of the gas phase; subsequent graphitic condensation of a "nest" at the interface of the Co particle and substrate. The large concentration of highly reactive hydrogen radicals mainly provided by activation with hot filaments precludes further spreading out of this interfacial carbon nest over the entire surface of the substrate and thus selectively orientates the growth towards the condensation of graphene over facets that are perpendicular to the surface. Carbon nanofibers can then be grown within the well-known Vapor-Liquid-Solid process. Thus the effect of energetic ions and highly reactive neutrals like atomic hydrogen in the preferential etching of carbon on the edge of graphene shells and on the broadening of the carbon nanofiber is underlined.

  4. Plasma Processes : Microwave plasma deposition of diamond like carbon coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D S Patil; K Ramachandran; N Venkatramani; M Pandey; R D'Cunha

    2000-11-01

    The promising applications of the microwave plasmas have been appearing in the fields of chemical processes and semiconductor manufacturing. Applications include surface deposition of all types including diamond/diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings, etching of semiconductors, promotion of organic reactions, etching of polymers to improve bonding of the other materials etc. With a 2.45 GHz, 700 W, microwave induced plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system set up in our laboratory we have deposited diamond like carbon coatings. The microwave plasma generation was effected using a wave guide single mode applicator. We have deposited DLC coatings on the substrates like stainless steel, Cu–Be, Cu and Si. The deposited coatings have been characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and ellipsometric techniques. The results show that we have achieved depositing ∼ 95% sp3 bonded carbon in the films. The films are uniform with golden yellow color. The films are found to be excellent insulators. The ellipsometric measurements of optical constant on silicon substrates indicate that the films are transparent above 900 nm.

  5. Surface functionalization of PET fabric with atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition%常压等离子体增强化学气相沉积法表面功能化聚酯织物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. H. Kale; S. S. Palaskar; 刘鹏(译); 罗艳(校)

    2012-01-01

    Plasma technology is emerging as a novel and environmentally friendly technology for surface modification of textile materials. It is possible to deposit very thin film with specific functional properties on the surface of textiles. The current study describes a novel approach for surface modification of 100% polyester textiles with plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The chemical and structural nature of plasma polymers deposited at the surface of the samples with respect to discharge power was studied with FTIR spectroscopy. The functional property i. e. water repellency imparted was determined with spray test and contact angle measurement.%对于纺织材料的表面改性来说,等离子体技术正成为一种新兴且环境友好的技术。等离子体技术在纺织品表面可沉积具有特殊功能的薄膜。阐述了一种常压等离子体增强化学气相沉积法表面改性100%聚酯织物的新型方法。通过傅里叶变换红外光谱研究了沉积于样品表面上相对于放电功率的等离子体聚合物化学和结构性质。采用雾化试验和接触角测量赋予织物诸如疏水等的功能特性。

  6. SiO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} thin films with variable refractive index prepared by ion beam induced and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracia, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-Univ. Sevilla) and Dpt. Q. Inorganica, Avda. Americo Vespucio s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Yubero, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-Univ. Sevilla) and Dpt. Q. Inorganica, Avda. Americo Vespucio s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Holgado, J.P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-Univ. Sevilla) and Dpt. Q. Inorganica, Avda. Americo Vespucio s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Espinos, J.P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-Univ. Sevilla) and Dpt. Q. Inorganica, Avda. Americo Vespucio s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-Univ. Sevilla) and Dpt. Q. Inorganica, Avda. Americo Vespucio s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)]. E-mail: arge@icmse.csic.es; Girardeau, T. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique de Poitiers, UMR 6630 CNRS, Bat SP2MI BP 30179, 86962-Futuroscope-Chasseneuil Cedex (France)

    2006-04-03

    SiO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} optical thin films with variable compositions have been prepared by ion beam induced and plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (IBICVD and PECVD). While the films obtained by IBICVD were very compact, the PECVD ones with a high content of Ti presented a columnar microstructure. The formation of Si-O-Ti bonds and a change in the environment around titanium from four- to six-coordinated has been proved by vibrational and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. The refractive index increased with the titanium content from 1.45 to 2.46 or 2.09 for, respectively, the IBICVD and PECVD films. Meanwhile, the band gap decreased, first sharply and then more smoothly up to the value of pure TiO{sub 2}. It is concluded that the optical properties of SiO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} thin films can be properly tailored by using these two procedures.

  7. Ultrafast deposition of silicon nitride and semiconductor silicon thin films by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Verlaan, V.; Rath, J.K.; Li, H. B. T.

    2009-01-01

    The technology of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) or Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition (Cat-CVD) has made great progress during the last couple of years. This review discusses examples of significant progress. Specifically, silicon nitride deposition by HWCVD (HW-SiNx) is highlighted, a

  8. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  9. Directed vapor deposition of lithium manganese oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sang-Wan

    times higher than the deposition rate reported for the growth of this material by sputtering (1.5 nm/s) and other vapor deposition techniques. As-deposited lithium manganese oxide films grown on substrates at ambient temperature using high pressure ratios were found to have a disordered structure intermediate between that of the spinel (Fd3m) and rock-salt (Fm3m) phases. Post-annealing of the films in air led to a gradual structural ordering to the Fd3m, spinel structure (the thermodynamically stable phase in air) as the temperature increased to 700°C. The fully transformed films had a pure cubic spinel structure with a slightly manganese deficient composition, Li1+xMn2-yO4 where 0.08 texture. The change in film porosity and texture could be explained by the degree of homogeneous vapor phase clustering that was controllable by the gas jet pressure ratio. When deposition was conducted at elevated temperatures up to 700°C, films with various atomic structures could be fabricated. Films grown below 500°C contained mixtures of the orthorhombic LiMnO2 and the metastable rock-salt structures. Annealing these films in air resulted in a transformation to a single phase spinel structure. Films grown above 600°C had a single phase orthorhombic LiMnO2 structure. Post-annealing of these films in air led to mixtures of the spinel structure and the Li 2MnO3 type structure. Varying the amount of the metastable rock-salt phase in the film by changing substrate temperature enabled the Mn/Li ratio to be controlled. In addition, careful selection of the substrate temperature and post-annealing conditions enabled synthesis of cubic spinel lithium manganese oxide films with controlled film textures. Films with a highly crystalline cubic spinel structure could be fabricated directly at a relatively low temperature (˜500°C) without the post annealing step using a hollow cathode plasma activation DVD process and an oxygen doped helium gas jet. The dissertation demonstrates that lithium

  10. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  11. Formation of size-controlled silicon nanocrystals in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition grown SiO{sub x}N{sub y}/SiO{sub 2} superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartel, A.M., E-mail: andreas.hartel@imtek.uni-freiburg.de [IMTEK, Faculty of Engineering, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Hiller, D.; Gutsch, S. [IMTEK, Faculty of Engineering, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Loeper, P. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Estrade, S. [MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); TEM-MAT, SCT- UB, Sole i Sabaris 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Peiro, F.; Garrido, B. [MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Zacharias, M. [IMTEK, Faculty of Engineering, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2011-10-31

    Size controlled silicon nanocrystals (SiNC) in silicon oxynitride matrix were prepared using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The as-deposited superlattices (SLs) and the corresponding bulk films were treated by thermal annealing. Hydrogen effusion was performed during the heating up by choosing a sufficiently low heating ramp. The phase separation of the layers into SiNCs and surrounding oxynitride matrix was studied at temperatures of up to 1150 {sup o}C. The influence of the annealing temperature on SiO{sub x}N{sub y}/SiO{sub 2} - SLs with varying SiO{sub x}N{sub y} layer thickness was investigated by several analytical techniques including variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Before annealing FTIR investigations show in addition to the expected Si-O bonds also the formation of nitrogen and hydrogen related bonds. The shift of the Si-O-Si stretching vibration to higher wave numbers after annealing indicates phase separation. The disappearance of the hydrogen related bonds indicates the hydrogen effusion. The PL signal is rising significantly with increasing annealing temperature and the PL peak position is strongly related to the thickness of the SiO{sub x}N{sub y} sublayers due to quantum confinement effects. TEM investigations confirm the size-controlled growth of SiNCs within the oxynitride matrix. The role of incorporated nitrogen and hydrogen is discussed.

  12. Thin alumina and silica films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

    OpenAIRE

    Hofman, R.; Morssinkhof, R.W.J.; Fransen, T.; Westheim, J.G.F.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alumina and silica coatings have been deposited by MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) on alloys to protect them against high temperature corrosion. Aluminium Tri-lsopropoxide (ATI) and DiAcetoxyDitertiaryButoxySilane (DAOBS) have been used as metal organic precursors to prepare these ceramic coatings. The influence of several process steps on the deposition rate and surface morphology is discussed. The deposition of SiO2 at atmospheric pressure is kinetically limited below 833 K ...

  13. Aspects of thin film deposition on granulates by physical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Andreas; Schmid, Gerwin H. S.; Mahr, Harald; Eisenmenger-Sittner, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    Thin film and coating technology has entered fields which may show significant deviations from classical coating applications where films are deposited on plane, sometimes large substrates. Often surfaces of small and irregularly shaped bodies have to be improved in respect to electrical, thermal or mechanical properties. Film deposition and characterization on such small substrates is not a trivial task. This specially holds for methods based on Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) processes such as sputter deposition and its ion- and plasma assisted varieties. Due to their line of sight nature a key issue for homogenous films is efficient intermixing. If this problem is mastered, another task is the prediction and determination of the film thickness on single particles as well as on large scale ensembles thereof. In this work a mechanism capable of uniformly coating up to 1000 cm3 of granulate with particle sizes ranging from approx. 10 μm to 150 μm by magnetron sputtering is thoroughly described. A method for predicting the average film thickness on the particles is presented and tested for several differently shaped objects like microspheres, irregular grains of sinter powder or micro diamonds. For assessing the film thickness on single particles as well as on particle ensembles several complementary methods based on optics, X-ray analysis and gravimetry are employed. Their respective merits and limitations are discussed. Finally an outlook on adapting the described technology for surface modification by plasma based reactive and non-reactive processes is given.

  14. Silicon Nitride Film Deposition by Photochemical Vapor Deposition Using an Argon Excimer Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maezono, Yoshinari; Toshikawa, Kiyohiko; Kurosawa, Kou; Amari, Kouichi; Ishimura, Sou; Katto, Masahito; Yokotani, Atsushi

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we report the deposition of silicon nitride (SiNx) films for the production of semiconductor devices and flat panel displays, by chemical vapor deposition with vacuum ultraviolet excimer lamps (VUV-CVD) using SiH4 and NH3 as raw materials. An Ar2* excimer lamp (λ=126 nm, hν=9.8 eV) with a high photon energy was used to directly excite and dissociate SiH4 through a photochemical reaction. SiNx films were successfully formed at a low temperature of 100 °C with the Ar2* excimer lamp. Although the Si-rich films were obtained using an Ar2* lamp, they showed a quality almost similar to that of films obtained by conventional plasma-CVD at 400 °C.

  15. Optimization of an ionized metal physical vapor deposition reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, J.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Conventional sputtering for microelectronic fabrication produces poorly collimated neutral atom fluxes. Ion fluxes, however, can be accelerated and collimated by using a conventional dc or rf substrate bias. Hence, magnetron ionized metal physical vapor deposition (IMPVD) can produce highly ionized metal fluxes that can be used to fill high-aspect-ratio vias and trenches in microelectronic devices. Hopwood and Qian have examined design issues in IMPVD systems. In this study, a Design of Experiment (DOE) has been numerically performed for an IMPVD reactor using an inductively coupled plasma and a capacitively biased substrate. Gas pressure, reactor geometry, ICP power, and number of inductive coils are the design variables. Uniformity, magnitude, and ionization fraction of the depositing fluxes are the response variables. The influence of the design variables on the response variables is examined, with the goals of obtaining high uniformity, high magnitude, and high ionization fraction of the depositing metal fluxes. The computational tool used in this study is the two-dimensional Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM). The aspect ratio of the reactor (height/radius) ranges from 0.5 to 1.0, the gas pressure ranges from 10 to 40 mTorr, the ICP power ranges from 0.5 to 2.0 kW, and the number of ICP coils ranges from 2 to 6. It was found that: (a) uniformity maximizes at high aspect ratio, low power, and high pressure; (b) flux magnitude maximizes at low aspect ratio, high power, and low pressure; (c) ionization fraction maximizes at high aspect ratio, high power, and high pressure.

  16. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  17. Thin alumina and silica films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, R.; Morssinkhof, R.W.J.; Fransen, T.; Westheim, J.G.F.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alumina and silica coatings have been deposited by MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) on alloys to protect them against high temperature corrosion. Aluminium Tri-lsopropoxide (ATI) and DiAcetoxyDitertiaryButoxySilane (DAOBS) have been used as metal organic precursors to prepare these ce

  18. Chemical vapor deposition reactor. [providing uniform film thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, S. S.; Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition reactor is characterized by a vapor deposition chamber configured to substantially eliminate non-uniformities in films deposited on substrates by control of gas flow and removing gas phase reaction materials from the chamber. Uniformity in the thickness of films is produced by having reactive gases injected through multiple jets which are placed at uniformally distributed locations. Gas phase reaction materials are removed through an exhaust chimney which is positioned above the centrally located, heated pad or platform on which substrates are placed. A baffle is situated above the heated platform below the mouth of the chimney to prevent downdraft dispersion and scattering of gas phase reactant materials.

  19. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nad, Shreya; Gu, Yajun; Asmussen, Jes

    2015-07-01

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (η) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100-260 Torr pressure range and 1.5-2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve η > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (η(coup)) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance.

  20. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Coatings on LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 for Li-Ion Battery Composite Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeff, M.M.; Kostecki, R.; Marcinek, M.; Wilcoc, J.D.

    2008-12-10

    In this paper, we report results of a novel synthesis method of thin film conductive carbon coatings on LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} cathode active material powders for lithium-ion batteries. Thin layers of graphitic carbon were produced from a solid organic precursor, anthracene, by a one-step microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) method. The structure and morphology of the carbon coatings were examined using SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. The composite LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrodes were electrochemically tested in lithium half coin cells. The composite cathodes made of the carbon-coated LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} powder showed superior electrochemical performance and increased capacity compared to standard composite LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrodes.

  1. Characteristics of carbon coatings on optical fibers prepared by radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition with different H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hung-Chien; Yu, Jen-Feng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Shiue, Sham-Tsong, E-mail: stshiue@dragon.nchu.edu.t [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hung-Yi [Mechanical and Systems Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 310, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-01

    Characteristics of carbon coatings on optical fibers prepared by radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition with different H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratios are investigated. Five kinds of carbon coatings are prepared with H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratios of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10. Experimental results show that the deposition rate and surface roughness of carbon coatings decrease as the H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratio increases. When the H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratio changes from 2 to 8, the increase of H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratios detrimentally yields sp{sup 3} carbon atoms and sp{sup 3}-CH{sub 3} bonds in the carbon coatings. However, when the H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratio exceeds 8, the hydrogen retards the growth of the graphite structure. Moreover, the redundant hydrogen radicals favor bonding with the dangling bonds in the coating surface. Therefore, when the H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratio increases from 8 to 10, the amounts of sp{sup 3} carbon atoms and sp{sup 3}-CH{sub 3} bonds in the carbon coatings increase. At an H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratio of 8, the carbon coating exhibits excellent water-repellency and thermal-loading resistance, and so this ratio is the best for producing a hermetically sealed optical fiber coating.

  2. Making Lightweight Structures By Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goela, Jitendra S.; Pickering, Michael A.; Taylor, Raymond L.

    1990-01-01

    Technique developed for fabrication of stiff, strong, lightweight structures of silicon carbide or other materials by any of several deposition processes. Structures made by method can have complicated shapes. Ability to manufacture complex shape from pure deposited SiC useful and leads to new products in several fields. These lightweight structures used as backup structures for optical components, as structural components in automotive, aerospace, and outer space applications, and as lightweight parts of furniture for outer space.

  3. Chemistry, phase formation, and catalytic activity of thin palladium-containing oxide films synthesized by plasma-assisted physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2010-11-26

    The chemistry, microstructure, and catalytic activity of thin films incorporating palladium were studied using scanning and transmission electron microscopies, X-ray diffraction, spectrophotometry, 4-point probe and catalytic tests. The films were synthesized using pulsed filtered cathodic arc and magnetron sputter deposition, i.e. techniques far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Catalytic particles were formed by thermally cycling thin films of the Pd-Pt-O system. The evolution and phase formation in such films as a function of temperature were discussed in terms of the stability of PdO and PtO2 in air. The catalytic efficiency was found to be strongly affected by the chemical composition, with oxidized palladium definitely playing a major role in the combustion of methane. Reactive sputter deposition of thin films in the Pd-Zr-Y-O system allowed us forming microstructures ranging from nanocrystalline zirconia to palladium nanoparticles embedded in a (Zr,Y)4Pd2O matrix. The sequence of phase formation is put in relation to simple thermodynamic considerations.

  4. Solution deposition of nanometer scale silver films as an alternative to vapor deposition for plasmonic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Derek S.; Sathish, R. Sai; Kostov, Yordan [Center for Advanced Sensor Technology and Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Rao, Govind, E-mail: grao@umbc.ed [Center for Advanced Sensor Technology and Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States)

    2010-05-03

    We report the attainment of surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) from highly uniform thin silver films, solution-deposited on glass substrates by a wet chemistry approach. The surface morphology of these films was characterized by atomic force microscopy. The SPCE emission enhancements, polarization and angularity obtained from solution-deposited silver on BK7 glass were comparable to that achieved from conventional SPCE slides prepared via vapor deposition. This facile, wet chemistry procedure for the deposition of SPCE films provides an inexpensive, low maintenance alternative to vapor deposition for SPCE substrate preparation. This would allow the fluorescence observation technique to become more readily available for high sensitivity, low cost applications.

  5. Surface chemistry of the preferred (111) and (220) crystal oriented microcrystalline Si films by radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohba, Daisuke; Koshino, Hideto; Tang, Zeguo; Shirai, Hajime [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Sakura (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    The surface chemistry of the preferentially (111) and (220) crystal orientated chlorinated hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon ({mu}c-Si:H:Cl) films was studied using a rf PE-CVD of a dichlorosilane (SiH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) and H{sub 2} mixture. The growing surface for the preferentially (220) crystal oriented {mu}c-Si:H:Cl films included much voids and dangling bonds, whereas the growing surface with the preferential (111) crystal orientation was chemically stable relatively. These findings suggest that the sticking process of deposition precursors and/or the reconstruction of Si clusters within the sub-surface determine the preferential crystal orientation. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica films, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  7. Infrared analysis of vapor phase deposited tricresylphosphate (TCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Hanyaloglu, Bengi; Graham, Earl E.

    1994-01-01

    Infrared transmission was employed to study the formation of a lubricating film deposited on two different substrates at 700 C. The deposit was formed from tricresylphosphate vapors and collected onto a NaCl substrate and on an iron coated NaCl substrate. Analysis of the infrared data suggests that a metal phosphate is formed initially, followed by the formation of organophosphorus polymeric compounds.

  8. Oxidation Resistance of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    carbonaceous residuoe were overcome, and dense, iadherent, coat-ings which :ýtop oxidat-ion Of the substrate art! reliably produced. The iridium deposition...flow, pressure and geometry within the reaction chamber, and substrate material. For the coating to have high integrity and adhesion to the substrate...entirely produced by Ultramet using chemical vapor deposition and a novel integrated fabrication technique. Coating the inside of a long chamber presents

  9. Advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Tantalum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Christensen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The chemical stability of tantalum in hot acidic media has made it a key material in the protection of industrial equipment from corrosion under such conditions. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of tantalum to achieve such thin corrosion resistant coatings is one of the most widely mentioned examples...

  10. A novel induction heater for chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, C. W.; Wong, H. K.; Sin, K. S.; Yip, S. T.; Chik, K. P.

    1989-06-01

    We report how an induction cooker for household use can be modified for heating substrate or heating gases to high temperature in a chemical vapor deposition system. Only minor changes of the cooker are necessary. Stable substrate temperature as high as 900 °C was achieved with input power of about 1150 W.

  11. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  12. A Comparison between Thin-Film Transistors Deposited by Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition and PECVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Zarchi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of new growth techniques on the mobility and stability of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H thin film transistors (TFTs has been studied. It was suggested that the key parameter controlling the field-effect mobility and stability is the intrinsic stress in the a-Si:H layer. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films were deposited by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD at 100 ºC and 25 ºC. Structural properties of these films were measured by Raman Spectroscopy. Electronic properties were measured by dark conductivity, σd, and photoconductivity, σph. For amorphous silicon films deposited by RF-PECVD on PET, photosensitivity's of >105 were obtained at both 100 º C and 25 ºC. For amorphous silicon films deposited by HW-CVD, a photosensitivity of > 105 was obtained at 100 ºC. Microcrystalline silicon films deposited by HW-CVD at 95% hydrogen dilution show σph~ 10-4 Ω-1cm-1, while maintaining a photosensitivity of ~102 at both 100 ºC and 25 ºC. Microcrystalline silicon films with a large crystalline fraction (> 50% can be deposited by HW-CVD all the way down to room temperature.

  13. Clean diffusion coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnes, B.M.; Punola, D.C. [Howmet Thermatech Coatings, Whitehall, MI (United States)

    1997-10-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to identify diffusion coating impurities introduced by standard aluminizing processes and to evaluate the impact of those impurities on oxidation resistance of the resultant Pt aluminide coating. IN-738 tabs and foils were platinum-electroplated, and then aluminized using three different processes: high-activity pack cementation, high-activity CVD and low-activity CVD. The results suggest that aluminizing processes which involve aluminum bearing alloys in the coating retort with H{sub 2} or H{sub 2}/HCl gas at high temperature can contaminate the diffusion coating during deposition. CVD low-activity aluminizing (coating gas generated at low temperature outside the coating chamber from 99.999% Al) did not introduce any coating impurities. In addition, the data indicates that harmful impurities from the IN-738 substrate (sulfur, boron and tungsten) and the electroplating process (phosphorus) were removed from the coating during deposition. The CVD low-activity Pt aluminide coating was the `cleanest` in the study, and it exhibited the best high-temperature oxidation resistance of the coatings considered. It can be concluded that trace elements in diffusion coatings from the superalloy substrate and/or the aluminizing process can adversely effect the oxidation resistance of those coatings, and that CVD low-activity aluminizing yields cleaner coatings than other commercially available aluminizing techniques. (orig.) 10 refs.

  14. Vaporization of a mixed precursors in chemical vapor deposition for YBCO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Meng, Guangyao; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1995-01-01

    Single phase YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films with T(c) values around 90 K are readily obtained by using a single source chemical vapor deposition technique with a normal precursor mass transport. The quality of the films is controlled by adjusting the carrier gas flow rate and the precursor feed rate.

  15. Molecular structure of vapor-deposited amorphous selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldan, A. H.; Li, C.; Pennycook, S. J.; Schneider, J.; Blom, A.; Zhao, W.

    2016-10-01

    The structure of amorphous selenium is clouded with much uncertainty and contradictory results regarding the dominance of polymeric chains versus monomer rings. The analysis of the diffraction radial distribution functions are inconclusive because of the similarities between the crystalline allotropes of selenium in terms of the coordination number, bond length, bond angle, and dihedral angle. Here, we took a much different approach and probed the molecular symmetry of the thermodynamically unstable amorphous state via analysis of structural phase transformations. We verified the structure of the converted metastable and stable crystalline structures using scanning transmission electron microscopy. In addition, given that no experimental technique can tell us the exact three-dimensional atomic arrangements in glassy semiconductors, we performed molecular-dynamic simulations using a well-established empirical three-body interatomic potential. We developed a true vapor-deposited process for the deposition of selenium molecules onto a substrate using empirical molecular vapor compositions and densities. We prepared both vapor-deposited and melt-quenched samples and showed that the simulated radial distribution functions match very well to experiment. The combination of our experimental and molecular-dynamic analyses shows that the structures of vapor- and melt-quenched glassy/amorphous selenium are quite different, based primarily on rings and chains, respectively, reflecting the predominant structure of the parent phase in its thermodynamic equilibrium.

  16. Solid coatings deposited from liquid methyl methacrylate via Plasma Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurlitzer, Lisa; Maus-Friedrichs, Wolfgang; Dahle, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    The polymerization of methyl methacrylate via plasma discharges is well known today. Usually, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is used to deposit polymer coatings. Solid coatings are formed out of the liquid phase from methyl methacrylate via dielectric barrier discharge. The formation of the coating proceeds in the gas and the liquid phase. To learn more about the reactions in the two phases, the coatings from MMA monomer will be compared to those from MMA resin. Finally, attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are employed to characterize the solid coatings. In conclusion, the plasma enhanced chemical solution deposition is compared to the classical thermal polymerization of MMA.

  17. Tandem solar cells deposited using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, M.K. van

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis, the application of the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) technique for the deposition of silicon thin films is described. The HWCVD technique is based on the dissociation of silicon-containing gasses at the catalytic surface of a hot filament. Advantages of this technique ar

  18. Hydrogen plasma treatment of silicon dioxide for improved silane deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul; Madaan, Nitesh; Jensen, David S; Kunzler, Shawn C; Linford, Matthew R

    2013-03-19

    We describe a method for plasma cleaning silicon surfaces in a commercial tool that removes adventitious organic contamination and enhances silane deposition. As shown by wetting, ellipsometry, and XPS, hydrogen, oxygen, and argon plasmas effectively clean Si/SiO2 surfaces. However, only hydrogen plasmas appear to enhance subsequent low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of silanes. Chemical differences between the surfaces were confirmed via (i) deposition of two different silanes: octyldimethylmethoxysilane and butyldimethylmethoxysilane, as evidenced by spectroscopic ellipsometry and wetting, and (ii) a principal components analysis (PCA) of TOF-SIMS data taken from the different plasma-treated surfaces. AFM shows no increase in surface roughness after H2 or O2 plasma treatment of Si/SiO2. The effects of surface treatment with H2/O2 plasmas in different gas ratios, which should allow greater control of surface chemistry, and the duration of the H2 plasma (complete surface treatment appeared to take place quickly) are also presented. We believe that this work is significant because of the importance of silanes as surface functionalization reagents, and in particular because of the increasing importance of gas phase silane deposition.

  19. Dynamical heterogeneity in a vapor-deposited polymer glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wengang; Douglas, Jack F.; Starr, Francis W.

    2017-05-01

    Recently, there has been great interest in "ultrastable" glasses formed via vapor deposition, both because of emerging engineering applications of these materials (e.g., active layers in light-emitting diodes and photovoltaics) and, theoretically, as materials for probing the equilibrium properties of glassy materials below their glass transition, based on the conjecture that these materials are equivalent to glassy materials aged over astronomical time scales. We use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the properties of ultrastable vapor-deposited and ordinary polymer glasses. Based on the difference in the energy of the deposited and ordinary films, we estimate the effective cooling rate for the vapor deposited films to be 1 to 3 orders of magnitude larger than that of the ordinary film, depending on the deposition temperature. Similarly, we find an increase in the average segmental relaxation time of the vapor-deposited film compared to the ordinary glass. On the other hand, the normal mode spectrum is essentially identical for the vapor-deposited and the ordinary glass film, suggesting that the high-frequency dynamics should be similar. In short, the segmental relaxation dynamics of the polymer vapor-deposited glass are consistent with those of an ordinary polymer glass with a somewhat slower effective cooling rate. Of course, one would expect a larger effect on dynamics approaching the experimental glass transition, where the cooling rates are much slower than accessible in simulation. To more precisely probe the relationship between the dynamics of these glasses, we examine dynamical heterogeneity within the film. Due to the substantial mobility gradient in the glassy films, we find that it is crucial to distinguish the dynamics of the middle part of the film from those of the entire film. Considering the film as a whole, the average dynamical heterogeneity is dominated by the mobility gradient, and as a consequence the heterogeneity is nearly

  20. Chemical vapor deposition coating of fibers using microwave application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Hoover, Gordon (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition coating is carried out in a cylindrical cavity. The fibers are heated by a microwave source that is uses a TM0N0 mode, where O is an integer, and produces a field that depends substantially only on radius. The fibers are observed to determine their heating, and their position can be adjusted. Once the fibers are uniformly heated, a CVD reagent is added to process the fibers.

  1. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  2. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  3. Research on chemical vapor deposition processes for advanced ceramic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Our interdisciplinary background and fundamentally-oriented studies of the laws governing multi-component chemical vapor deposition (VD), particle deposition (PD), and their interactions, put the Yale University HTCRE Laboratory in a unique position to significantly advance the 'state-of-the-art' of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) R&D. With NASA-Lewis RC financial support, we initiated a program in March of 1988 that has led to the advances described in this report (Section 2) in predicting chemical vapor transport in high temperature systems relevant to the fabrication of refractory ceramic coatings for turbine engine components. This Final Report covers our principal results and activities for the total NASA grant of $190,000. over the 4.67 year period: 1 March 1988-1 November 1992. Since our methods and the technical details are contained in the publications listed (9 Abstracts are given as Appendices) our emphasis here is on broad conclusions/implications and administrative data, including personnel, talks, interactions with industry, and some known applications of our work.

  4. Adhesion improvement of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films by pre-deposition plasma treatment of rubber substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, X.L.; Pei, Y.T.; Mulder, E.D.G.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2009-01-01

    For reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) via magnetron-enhanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (ME-PCVD). Pre-deposition plasma trea

  5. Development of vapor deposited thin films for bio-microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popat, Ketul Chandrakant

    Increasing demands for more biocompatible and sophisticated bio-microsystems in recent years has led to the development of a new technology called BioMEMS (biological micro-electro-mechanical systems). The foundation of this technology is the same as that of the traditional field of IC (integrated circuits), but an emphasis on developing new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Micro- and nano-fabrication techniques are currently being used to develop implants that can record, sense, stimulate and deliver to biological systems. Micromachined substrates can provide unique advantages over traditional implantable devices in terms of their ability to control surface micro-architecture, topography and feature size in micron and nano sizes. However, as BioMEMS technology is rapidly being developed, the practical use of these bio-microsystems is limited due to the inability to effectively interface with the biological system in non-immunogenic and stable manner. This is one of the most important considerations, and hence it is useful to focus on the fundamental scientific issues relating to material science, surface chemistry and immunology of silicon based bio-microsystems. This results in development of biomolecular interfaces that are compatible with both microfabrication processing and biological systems. The overall thrust of this research is to develop, characterize and integrate vapor deposited thin films with bio-microsystems in a manner that it is both reproducible and fully integrated with existing technologies. The main strategy is to use silane coatings precursor coatings on which poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) will be coated in vapor phase. Silane has been coated user vapor phase, but its chemical and biological characterization and stability of the films under physiological conditions has not been investigated for biological applications. PEG has been coated in solution phase on silicon surface. However, it has not been coated under vapor phase. Here we are

  6. Copper-vapor-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition of graphene on dielectric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Tianru; Wang, Haomin; Zhang, Xuefu; Shi, Zhiyuan; Xie, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    Direct synthesis of high-quality graphene on dielectric substrates is important for its application in electronics. In this work, we report the process of copper-vapor-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition of high-quality and large graphene domains on various dielectric substrates. The copper vapor plays a vital role on the growth of transfer-free graphene. Both single-crystal domains that are much larger than previous reports and high-coverage graphene films can be obtained by adjusting the growth duration. The quality of the obtained graphene was verified to be comparable with that of graphene grown on Cu foil. The progress reported in this work will aid the development of the application of transfer-free graphene in the future.

  7. A perspective of microplasma oxidation (MPO) and vapor deposition coatings in surface engineering of aluminum alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AWAD Samir Hamid; QIAN Han-cheng

    2004-01-01

    Over the past years, great achievements have been made in the development of coating technologies for surface improvement of aluminum alloys. Despite these achievements, the role in the market strongly depends on the ability of surface coating technology under technical and economic considerations to meet the increased demands for heavy tribological applications of aluminum alloys. Microplasma oxidation (MPO) technology has recently been studied as a novel and effective means to provide thick and hard ceramic coating with improved properties such as excellent load-bearing and wear resistance properties on aluminum alloys. The present work covers the evaluation of the performances of current single and duplex coatings combining MPO, physical vapor deposition (PVD), and plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) coatings on aluminum alloys. It suggests that the MPO coating is a promising candidate for design engineers to apply aluminum alloys to heavy load-bearing applications. The prospective future for the research on MPO coatings is introduced as well.

  8. Platinum-ruthenium bimetallic clusters on graphite: a comparison of vapor deposition and electroless deposition methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhenage, Randima P; Xie, Kangmin; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John Meynard M; Seuser, Grant S; Monnier, John R; Chen, Donna A

    2015-11-14

    Bimetallic Pt-Ru clusters have been grown on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by vapor deposition and by electroless deposition. These studies help to bridge the material gap between well-characterized vapor deposited clusters and electrolessly deposited clusters, which are better suited for industrial catalyst preparation. In the vapor deposition experiments, bimetallic clusters were formed by the sequential deposition of Pt on Ru or Ru on Pt. Seed clusters of the first metal were grown on HOPG surfaces that were sputtered with Ar(+) to introduce defects, which act as nucleation sites for Pt or Ru. On the unmodified HOPG surface, both Pt and Ru clusters preferentially nucleated at the step edges, whereas on the sputtered surface, clusters with relatively uniform sizes and spatial distributions were formed. Low energy ion scattering experiments showed that the surface compositions of the bimetallic clusters are Pt-rich, regardless of the order of deposition, indicating that the interdiffusion of metals within the clusters is facile at room temperature. Bimetallic clusters on sputtered HOPG were prepared by the electroless deposition of Pt on Ru seed clusters from a Pt(+2) solution using dimethylamine borane as the reducing agent at pH 11 and 40 °C. After exposure to the electroless deposition bath, Pt was selectively deposited on Ru, as demonstrated by the detection of Pt on the surface by XPS, and the increase in the average cluster height without an increase in the number of clusters, indicating that Pt atoms are incorporated into the Ru seed clusters. Electroless deposition of Ru on Pt seed clusters was also achieved, but it should be noted that this deposition method is extremely sensitive to the presence of other metal ions in solution that have a higher reduction potential than the metal ion targeted for deposition.

  9. Novel photochemical vapor deposition reactor for amorphous silicon solar cell deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Richard E.; Hegedus, Steven S.; Buchanan, Wayne A.; Jackson, Scott C.

    1987-07-01

    A novel photochemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) reactor having a flexible ultraviolet-transparent Teflon curtain and a secondary gas flow to eliminate deposition on the window has been used to deposit amorphous silicon films and p-i-n solar cells. The background levels of atmospheric contaminants (H2O, CO2, N2) depend strongly on the vacuum procedures but not on the presence of a Teflon curtain in the reactor. Intrinsic films with a midgap density of states of 3×1015 eV-1 cm-3 and all-photo-CVD pin solar cells with efficiencies of 8.5% have been deposited.

  10. Microwave plasma deposition of diamond like carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, D. S.; Ramachandran, K.; Venkataramani, N.; Pandey, M.; D'Cunha, R.

    2000-11-01

    he promising applications of the microwave plasmas have been appearing in the fields of chemical processes and semiconductor manufacturing. Applications include surface deposition of all types including diamond/diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings, etching of semiconductors, promotion of organic reactions, etching of polymers to improve bonding of the other materials etc. With a 2.45 GHz, 700 W, microwave induced plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system set up in our laboratory we have deposited diamond like carbon coatings. The microwave plasma generation was effected using a wave guide single mode applicator. We have deposited DLC coatings on the substrates like stainless steel, Cu--Be, Cu and Si. The deposited coatings have been characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and ellipsometric techniques. The results show that we have achieved depositing ~ 95% sp3 bonded carbon in the films. The films are uniform with golden yellow color. The films are found to be excellent insulators. The ellipsometric measurements of optical constant on silicon substrates indicate that the films are transparent above 900 nm.

  11. Plasma enhanced diamond deposition on steel and Si substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.S. Li; Y. Tang; W. Chen; Q. Yang; C. Xiao; A. Hirose

    2009-01-01

    Diamond growth on Fe-Cr-Al-Si steel and Si substrates was comparatively investigated in microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor with different deposition parameters. Adherent nanocrystalline diamond films were directly deposited on this steel substrate under a typical deposition condition, whereas microcrystalline diamond films were produced on Si wafer. With increasing CH4 concentration, reaction pressure, or the total gas flow rate, the quality of nanocrystalline diamond films formed on Fe-Cr-Al-Si substrates is gradually deteriorated in terms of density and adhesion. This impaired diamond quality on steels is primarily associated with a combined effect by the substrate composition and the specific process conditions that favor excessive nucleation of diamond.

  12. Initiated chemical vapor deposition of antimicrobial polymer coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T P; Kooi, S E; Chang, S H; Sedransk, K L; Gleason, K K

    2007-02-01

    The vapor phase deposition of polymeric antimicrobial coatings is reported. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD), a solventless low-temperature process, is used to form thin films of polymers on fragile substrates. For this work, finished nylon fabric is coated by iCVD with no affect on the color or feel of the fabric. Infrared characterization confirms the polymer structure. Coatings of poly(dimethylaminomethyl styrene) of up to 540 microg/cm2 were deposited on the fabric. The antimicrobial properties were tested using standard method ASTM E2149-01. A coating of 40 microg/cm2 of fabric was found to be very effective against gram-negative Escherichia coli, with over a 99.99%, or 4 log, kill in just 2 min continuing to over a 99.9999%, or 6 log, reduction in viable bacteria in 60 min. A coating of 120 microg/cm2 was most effective against the gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. Further tests confirmed that the iCVD polymer did not leach off the fabric.

  13. Electrical properties of plasma-deposited silicon oxide clarified by chemical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, A.Y.; Boogaard, A.; Brunets, I.; Aarnink, A.A.I.; Wolters, R.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Our study is focused on Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon dioxide films at low temperatures (< 150 oC) using Inductively Coupled (IC) High-Density (HD) plasma source. We recently fabricated Thin Film Transistors (TFTs) with high-quality ICPECVD gate oxides, which exhibited

  14. Chemical Vapor Deposited Zinc Sulfide. SPIE Press Monograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Tustison, Randal W.

    2013-04-22

    Zinc sulfide has shown unequaled utility for infrared windows that require a combination of long-wavelength infrared transparency, mechanical durability, and elevated-temperature performance. This book reviews the physical properties of chemical vapor deposited ZnS and their relationship to the CVD process that produced them. An in-depth look at the material microstructure is included, along with a discussion of the material's optical properties. Finally, because the CVD process itself is central to the development of this material, a brief history is presented.

  15. The Corrosion Protection of Metals by Ion Vapor Deposited Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  16. Plasma deposition of antimicrobial coating on organic polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rżanek-Boroch, Zenobia; Dziadczyk, Paulina; Czajkowska, Danuta; Krawczyk, Krzysztof; Fabianowski, Wojciech

    2013-02-01

    Organic materials used for packing food products prevent the access of microorganisms or gases, like oxygen or water vapor. To prolong the stability of products, preservatives such as sulfur dioxide, sulfites, benzoates, nitrites and many other chemical compounds are used. To eliminate or limit the amount of preservatives added to food, so-called active packaging is sought for, which would limit the development of microorganisms. Such packaging can be achieved, among others, by plasma modification of a material to deposit on its surface substances inhibiting the growth of bacteria. In this work plasma modification was carried out in barrier discharge under atmospheric pressure. Sulfur dioxide or/and sodium oxide were used as the coating precursors. As a result of bacteriological studies it was found that sulfur containing coatings show a 16% inhibition of Salmonella bacteria growth and 8% inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria growth. Sodium containing coatings show worse (by 10%) inhibiting properties. Moreover, films with plasma deposited coatings show good sealing properties against water vapor. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  17. Low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride nanoparticles by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan-Soo; Youn, Woong-Kyu; Lee, Dong-Kwon; Seol, Kwang-Soo; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2009-07-01

    The nanocrystalline alpha silicon nitride (α-Si 3N 4) was deposited on a silicon substrate by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at the substrate temperature of 700 °C under 4 and 40 Torr at the wire temperatures of 1430 and 1730 °C, with a gas mixture of SiH 4 and NH 3. The size and density of crystalline nanoparticles on the substrate increased with increasing wire temperature. With increasing reactor pressure, the crystallinity of α-Si 3N 4 nanoparticles increased, but the deposition rate decreased.

  18. Synthesis of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHOU Ming; MA Weiwei; CAI Lan

    2009-01-01

    Single crystal silicon was found to be very beneficial to the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition with C2H2 as carbon source. A thin film of Ni served as catalyst was deposited on the Si substrate by the K575X Peltier Cooled High Resolution Sputter Coater before growth. The growth properties of carbon nanotubes were studied as a function of the Ni catalyst layer thickness. The diameter, growth rate and areal density of the carbon nanotubes were controlled by the initial thickness of the catalyst layer. Steric hindrance between nanotubes forces them to grow in well-aligned manner at an initial stage of growth. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that nanotubes grew by a tip growth mechanism.

  19. Synthesis of mullite coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulpuri, R.P.; Auger, M.; Sarin, V.K. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Mullite is a solid solution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} with a composition of 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{circ}2SiO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}-SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. With the aid of these diagrams and consideration of kinetic rate limiting factors, initial process parameters were determined. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  20. Electrical Field Effects in Phthalocyanine Film Growth by Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Zhu, Shen; Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin; Abdeldayem, Hossin; Hicks, Roslin; Sarkisov, Sergey

    1999-01-01

    Phthalocyanine, an organic material, is a very good candidate for non-linear optical application, such as high-speed switching and optical storage devices. Phthalocyanine films have been synthesized by vapor deposition on quartz substrates. Some substrates were coated with a very thin gold film for introducing electrical field. These films have been characterized by surface morphology, material structure, chemical and thermal stability, non-linear optical parameters, and electrical behaviors. The films have excellent chemical and optical stability. However, the surface of these films grown without electrical field shows flower-like morphology. When films are deposited under an electrical field ( an aligned structure is revealed on the surface. A comparison of the optical and electrical properties and the growth mechanism for these films grown with and without an electrical field will be discussed.

  1. Chemical vapor deposited fiber coatings and chemical vapor infiltrated ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmetz, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) and Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) were employed to deposit a series of interfacial coatings on SiC and carbon yarn. Molybdenum, tungsten and chromium hexacarbonyls were utilized as precursors in a low temperature (350[degrees]C) MOCVD process to coat SiC yarn with Mo, W and Cr oxycarbides. Annealing studies performed on the MoOC and WOC coated SiC yarns in N[sub 2] to 1,000[degrees]C establish that further decomposition of the oxycarbides occurred, culminating in the formation of the metals. These metals were then found to react with Si to form Mo and W disilicide coatings. In the Cr system, heating in N[sub 2] above 800[degrees]C resulted in the formation of a mixture of carbides and oxides. Convention CVD was also employed to coat SiC and carbon yarn with C, Bn and a new interface designated BC (a carbon-boron alloy). The coated tows were then infiltrated with SiC, TiO[sub 2], SiO[sub 2] and B[sub 4]C by a chemical vapor infiltration process. The B-C coatings were found to provide advantageous interfacial properties over carbon and BN coatings in several different composite systems. The effectiveness of these different coatings to act as a chemically inert barrier layer and their relationship to the degree of interfacial debonding on the mechanical properties of the composites were examined. The effects of thermal stability and strength of the coated fibers and composites were also determined for several difference atmospheres. In addition, a new method for determining the tensile strength of the as-received and coated yarns was also developed. The coated fibers and composites were further characterized by AES, SEM, XPS, IR and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition coatings for oxidation protection of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnington, G. R.; Robinson, J. C.; Clark, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the oxidation protection afforded to Ti-14Al-21Nb and Ti-14Al-23Nb-2V titanium aluminides and Ti-17Mo-3Al-3Nb titanium alloy by aluminum-boron-silicon and boron-silicon coatings are presented. These coatings are applied by a combination of physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The former is for the application of aluminum, and the latter is for codeposition of boron and silicon. Coating thickness is in the range of 2 to 7 microns, and coating weights are 0.6 to 2.0 mg/sq cm. Oxidation testing was performed in air at temperatures to 1255 K in both static and hypersonic flow environments. The degree of oxidation protection provided by the coatings is determined from weight change measurements made during the testing and post test compositional analyses. Temperature-dependent total normal emittance data are also presented for four coating/substrate combinations. Both types of coatings provided excellent oxidation protection for the exposure conditions of this investigation. Total normal emittances were greater than 0.80 in all cases.

  3. Oxidative chemical vapor deposition of polyaniline thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Yuriy Y; Soroush, Masoud; Lau, Kenneth K S

    2017-01-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) is synthesized via oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) using aniline as monomer and antimony pentachloride as oxidant. Microscopy and spectroscopy indicate that oCVD processing conditions influence the PANI film chemistry, oxidation, and doping level. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that a substrate temperature of 90 °C is needed to minimize the formation of oligomers during polymerization. Lower substrate temperatures, such as 25 °C, lead to a film that mostly includes oligomers. Increasing the oxidant flowrate to nearly match the monomer flowrate favors the deposition of PANI in the emeraldine state, and varying the oxidant flowrate can directly influence the oxidation state of PANI. Changing the reactor pressure from 700 to 35 mTorr does not have a significant effect on the deposited film chemistry, indicating that the oCVD PANI process is not concentration dependent. This work shows that oCVD can be used for depositing PANI and for effectively controlling the chemical state of PANI.

  4. Self-organization and nanostructure formation in chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walgraef, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    When thin films are grown on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition, the evolution of the first deposited layers may be described, on mesoscopic scales, by dynamical models of the reaction-diffusion type. For monatomic layers, such models describe the evolution of atomic coverage due to the combined effect of reaction terms representing adsorption-desorption and chemical processes and nonlinear diffusion terms that are of the Cahn-Hilliard type. This combination may lead, below a critical temperature, to the instability of uniform deposited layers. This instability triggers the formation of nanostructures corresponding to regular spatial variations of substrate coverage. Patterns wavelengths and symmetries are selected by dynamical variables and not by variational arguments. According to the balance between reaction- and diffusion-induced nonlinearities, a succession of nanostructures including hexagonal arrays of dots, stripes, and localized structures of various types may be obtained. These structures may initiate different growth mechanisms, including Volmer-Weber and Frank-Van der Merwe types of growth. The relevance of this approach to the study of deposited layers of different species is discussed.

  5. Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Deposited by Electron Assisted Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films were deposited on polished Si wafer surface with electron assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition at 1 kPa gas pressure, the deposited films were characterized and observed by Raman spectrum, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and semiconductor characterization system. The results show that when 8 A bias current is applied for 5 h, the surface roughness decreases to 28.5 nm. After 6 and 8 A bias current are applied for 1 h, and the nanocrystalline films deposition continue for 4 h with 0 A bias current at 1 kPa gas pressure. The nanocrystalline diamond films with 0.5×109 and 1×1010 Ω·cm resistivity respectively are obtained. It is demonstrated that electron bombardment plays an important role of nucleation to deposit diamond films with smooth surface and high resistivity.

  6. Low temperature plasma deposition of silicon thin films: From amorphous to crystalline

    OpenAIRE

    Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere; Cariou, Romain; Labrune, Martin

    2012-01-01

    International audience; We report on the epitaxial growth of crystalline silicon films on (100) oriented crystalline silicon substrates by standard plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 175 °C. Such unexpected epitaxial growth is discussed in the context of deposition processes of silicon thin films, based on silicon radicals and nanocrystals. Our results are supported by previous studies on plasma synthesis of silicon nanocrystals and point toward silicon nanocrystals being the most p...

  7. Large improvement of phosphorus incorporation efficiency in n-type chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Janssens, Stoffel D.; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Koizumi, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a promising way to generate n-type, e.g., phosphorus-doped, diamond layers for the fabrication of electronic components, which can operate at extreme conditions. However, a deeper understanding of the doping process is lacking and low phosphorus incorporation efficiencies are generally observed. In this work, it is shown that systematically changing the internal design of a non-commercial chemical vapor deposition chamber, used to grow diamond layers, leads to a large increase of the phosphorus doping efficiency in diamond, produced in this device, without compromising its electronic properties. Compared to the initial reactor design, the doping efficiency is about 100 times higher, reaching 10%, and for a very broad doping range, the doping efficiency remains highly constant. It is hypothesized that redesigning the deposition chamber generates a higher flow of active phosphorus species towards the substrate, thereby increasing phosphorus incorporation in diamond and reducing deposition of phosphorus species at reactor walls, which additionally reduces undesirable memory effects.

  8. Adhesion improvement of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films by pre-deposition plasma treatment of rubber substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Bui, X. L.; Pei, Y.T.; Mulder, E.D.G.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2009-01-01

    For reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) via magnetron-enhanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (ME-PCVD). Pre-deposition plasma treatment of HNBR substrate is proved to be crucial for the improvement of film performance due to enhanced interfacial adhesion. The columnar structure and the crack network formed during deposition e...

  9. Controlling the quality of nanocrystalline silicon made by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition by using a reverse H2 profiling technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Stolk, R.L.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen profiling, i.e., decreasing the H2 dilution during deposition, is a well-known technique to maintain a proper crystalline ratio of the nanocrystalline (nc-Si:H) absorber layers of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited (PECVD) thin film solar cells. With this technique a large increase in

  10. Controlling the quality of nanocrystalline silicon made by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition by using a reverse H2 profiling technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Stolk, R.L.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen profiling, i.e., decreasing the H2 dilution during deposition, is a well-known technique to maintain a proper crystalline ratio of the nanocrystalline (nc-Si:H) absorber layers of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited (PECVD) thin film solar cells. With this technique a large increase in

  11. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution.

  12. High Quality SiGe Layer Deposited by a New Ultrahigh Vacuum Chemical Vapor Deposition System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV/CVD) system is developed and the details of its construction and operation are reported. Using high purity SiH4 and GeH4 reactant gases,the Si0.82Ge0.18 layer is deposited at 550℃. With the measurements by double crystal X-ray diffraction (DCXRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) techniques, it is shown that the crystalline quality of the SiGe layer is good,and the underlying SiGe/Si heterointerface is sharply defined.

  13. Deposition of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on patterned substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    In this work we study the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of copper films on blanket and patterned substrates at high filament temperatures. A vertical chemical vapor deposition reactor was used in which the chemical reactions were assisted by a tungsten filament heated at 650 degrees C. Hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) vapors were used, directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a liquid injection system using N2 as carrier gas. Copper thin films grown also by thermal and hot-wire CVD. The substrates used were oxidized silicon wafers on which trenches with dimensions of the order of 500 nm were formed and subsequently covered with LPCVD W. HWCVD copper thin films grown at filament temperature of 650 degrees C showed higher growth rates compared to the thermally ones. They also exhibited higher resistivities than thermal and HWCVD films grown at lower filament temperatures. Thermally grown Cu films have very uniform deposition leading to full coverage of the patterned substrates while the HWCVD films exhibited a tendency to vertical growth, thereby creating gaps and incomplete step coverage.

  14. MBMS studies of gas-phase kinetics in diamond chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, C.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); McMaster, M.C. [IBM San Jose, CA (United States); Tung, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    A molecular beam mass spectrometer system (MBMS) has been used to determine the near-surface gaseous composition involved in the low pressure chemical vapor deposition of diamond. With this system, radical and stable species can be detected with a sensitivity better than 10 ppm. Threshold ionization techniques have been employed to distinguish between radical species in the deposition environment from radical species generated by parent molecule cracking. An extensive calibration procedure was used to enable the quantitative determination of H-atom and CH{sub 3} radical mole fractions. Using the MBMS system, the gaseous composition involved in LPCVD of diamond has been measured for a wide variety of deposition conditions, including hot-filament gas activation, microwave-plasma gas activation, and a variety of precursor feed mixtures (ex: CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}). For microwave-plasma activation (MPCVD), the radical concentrations (H-atom and CH{sub 3} radicals) are independent of the identity of the precursor feed gas provided the input carbon mole fraction is constant. However, in hot-filament diamond deposition (HFCVD), the atomic hydrogen concentration decreased by an order of magnitude as the mole fraction of carbon in the precursor mixture is increased to .07; this sharp reduction has been attributed to filament poisoning of the catalytic tungsten surface via hydrocarbon deposition. Additionally, the authors find that the H-atom concentration is independent of the substrate temperature for both hot-filament and microwave plasma deposition; radial H-atom diffusion is invoked to explain this observation.

  15. Field emission properties of chemical vapor deposited individual graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamri Yusop, Mohd [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan); Department of Materials, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Kalita, Golap, E-mail: kalita.golap@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan); Center for Fostering Young and Innovative Researchers, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan); Yaakob, Yazid; Takahashi, Chisato; Tanemura, Masaki [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan)

    2014-03-03

    Here, we report field emission (FE) properties of a chemical vapor deposited individual graphene investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Free-standing bilayer graphene is mounted on a cathode microprobe and FE processes are investigated varying the vacuum gap of cathode and anode. The threshold field for 10 nA current were found to be 515, 610, and 870 V/μm for vacuum gap of 400, 300, and 200 nm, respectively. It is observed that the structural stability of a high quality bilayer graphene is considerably stable during emission process. By contacting the nanoprobe with graphene and applying a bias voltage, structural deformation and buckling are observed with significant rise in temperature owing to Joule heating effect. The finding can be significant for practical application of graphene related materials in emitter based devices as well as understanding the contact resistance influence and heating effect.

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloy films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin Jinhong [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78750 (United States); Waheed, Abdul [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Winkenwerder, Wyatt A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Kim, Hyun-Woo [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Agapiou, Kyriacos [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Jones, Richard A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hwang, Gyeong S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Ekerdt, John G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)]. E-mail: ekerdt@che.utexas.edu

    2007-05-07

    Chemical vapor deposition growth of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus films on SiO{sub 2} containing {approx} 15% phosphorus is reported. cis-Ruthenium(II)dihydridotetrakis-(trimethylphosphine), cis-RuH{sub 2}(PMe{sub 3}){sub 4} (Me = CH{sub 3}) was used at growth temperatures ranging from 525 to 575 K. Both Ru and P are zero-valent. The films are metastable, becoming increasingly more polycrystalline upon annealing to 775 and 975 K. Surface studies illustrate that demethylation is quite efficient near 560 K. Precursor adsorption at 135 K or 210 K and heating reveal the precursor undergoes a complex decomposition process in which the hydride and trimethylphosphine ligands are lost at temperatures as low at 280 K. Phosphorus and its manner of incorporation appear responsible for the amorphous-like character. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented to suggest the local structure in the films and the causes for phosphorus stabilizing the amorphous phase.

  17. Chemical Vapor Deposition at High Pressure in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Sonya; Bachmann, Klaus; LeSure, Stacie; Sukidi, Nkadi; Wang, Fuchao

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an evaluation of critical requirements of organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) at elevated pressure for a channel flow reactor in a microgravity environment. The objective of using high pressure is to maintain single-phase surface composition for materials that have high thermal decomposition pressure at their optimum growth temperature. Access to microgravity is needed to maintain conditions of laminar flow, which is essential for process analysis. Based on ground based observations we present an optimized reactor design for OMCVD at high pressure and reduced gravity. Also, we discuss non-intrusive real-time optical monitoring of flow dynamics coupled to homogeneous gas phase reactions, transport and surface processes. While suborbital flights may suffice for studies of initial stages of heteroepitaxy experiments in space are essential for a complete evaluation of steady-state growth.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition synthesis of tunable unsubstituted polythiophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati, Siamak; Lau, Kenneth K S

    2011-12-20

    Despite having exceptional electroactive properties, applications of unsubstituted polythiophene (PTh) have been limited due to its insolubility. To overcome this challenge, we have employed oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) as a unique liquid-free technique to enable the oxidative polymerization of PTh using thiophene as the starting monomer and vanadium oxytrichloride as an effective vaporizable oxidant initiator. Vibrational and phototelectron spectroscopy indicated the formation of unsubstituted polythiophene. Cyclic voltammetry revealed its electrochromic behavior in solution. Significantly, polymer conjugation length and electrical conductivity can be tuned by controlling oCVD process variables. Polymerization is found to be adsorption-limited, so by providing sufficient monomer and limiting the amount of initiator at the growth surface, PTh is believed to be formed through α-α thiophene linkages.

  19. Nanostructured zinc oxide thin film by simple vapor transport deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athma, P. V.; Martinez, Arturo I.; Johns, N.; Safeera, T. A.; Reshmi, R.; Anila, E. I.

    2015-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures find applications in optoelectronic devices, photo voltaic displays and sensors. In this work zinc oxide nanostructures in different forms like nanorods, tripods and tetrapods have been synthesized by thermal evaporation of zinc metal and subsequent deposition on a glass substrate by vapor transport in the presence of oxygen. It is a comparatively simpler and environment friendly technique for the preparation of thin films. The structure, morphology and optical properties of the synthesized nanostructured thin film were characterized in detail by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and photoluminescence (PL). The film exhibited bluish white emission with Commission International d'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates x = 0.22, y = 0.31.

  20. Strain relaxation in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troppenz, Gerald V., E-mail: gerald.troppenz@helmholtz-berlin.de; Gluba, Marc A.; Kraft, Marco; Rappich, Jörg; Nickel, Norbert H. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institut für Silizium Photovoltaik, Kekuléstr. 5, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-07

    The growth of single layer graphene by chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline Cu substrates induces large internal biaxial compressive strain due to thermal expansion mismatch. Raman backscattering spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the strain relaxation during and after the transfer process from Cu foil to SiO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the growth of graphene results in a pronounced ripple structure on the Cu substrate that is indicative of strain relaxation of about 0.76% during the cooling from the growth temperature. Removing graphene from the Cu substrates and transferring it to SiO{sub 2} results in a shift of the 2D phonon line by 27 cm{sup −1} to lower frequencies. This translates into additional strain relaxation. The influence of the processing steps, used etching solution and solvents on strain, is investigated.

  1. Gas permeation barriers deposited by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Lukas, E-mail: lhoffmann@uni-wuppertal.de; Theirich, Detlef; Hasselmann, Tim; Räupke, André; Schlamm, Daniel; Riedl, Thomas, E-mail: t.riedl@uni-wuppertal.de [Institute of Electronic Devices, University of Wuppertal, Rainer-Gruenter-Str. 21, 42119 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    This paper reports on aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin film gas permeation barriers fabricated by atmospheric pressure atomic layer deposition (APPALD) using trimethylaluminum and an Ar/O{sub 2} plasma at moderate temperatures of 80 °C in a flow reactor. The authors demonstrate the ALD growth characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on silicon and indium tin oxide coated polyethylene terephthalate. The properties of the APPALD-grown layers (refractive index, density, etc.) are compared to that deposited by conventional thermal ALD at low pressures. The films films deposited at atmospheric pressure show water vapor transmission rates as low as 5 × 10{sup −5} gm{sup −2}d{sup −1}.

  2. The effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on nucleation density of chemical vapor deposition diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi; Ingram, David C.

    1995-11-01

    Using statistical design of experiments, the effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on the nucleation density of diamond was studied. The parameters investigated included ultrasonic excitation power, concentration of diamond powder in water, duration of ultrasonic excitation, and duration of cleaning with water after ultrasonic excitation. Diamond films were deposited on silicon (100) substrates using microwave assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nucleation density varied from 106 nuclei/cm2 to 109 nuclei/cm2. The results illustrated that the dominant effect in ultrasonic pre-treatment was seeding. Moreover, scratches caused by the seeds during the treatment enabled more seeds to be retained on the surface. Based on these results, an optimized ultrasonic pretreatment has been developed. The new procedure yields a uniform nucleation density of 109 nuclei/cm2 on silicon (100) substrates.

  3. Thermal recrystallization of physical vapor deposition based germanium thin films on bulk silicon (100)

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2013-08-16

    We demonstrate a simple, low-cost, and scalable process for obtaining uniform, smooth surfaced, high quality mono-crystalline germanium (100) thin films on silicon (100). The germanium thin films were deposited on a silicon substrate using plasma-assisted sputtering based physical vapor deposition. They were crystallized by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 700 °C to 1100 °C. We report that the best quality germanium thin films are obtained above the melting point of germanium (937 °C), thus offering a method for in-situ Czochralski process. We show well-behaved high-κ /metal gate metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) using this film. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Time Dependent DD Neutrons Measurement Using a Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Detector on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tengfei; Peng, Xingyu; Chen, Zhongjing; Hu, Zhimeng; Ge, Lijian; Hu, Liqun; Zhong, Guoqiang; Pu, Neng; Chen, Jinxiang; Fan, Tieshuan

    2016-09-01

    A single crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector has been successfully employed for neutron measurements in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) plasmas. The scCVD diamond detector coated with a 5 μm 6LiF (95% 6Li enriched) layer was placed inside a polyethylene moderator to enhance the detection efficiency. The time-dependent neutron emission from deuteron plasmas during neutral beam injection (NBI) heating was obtained. The measured results are compared with that of fission chamber detectors, which always act as standard neutron flux monitors. The scCVD diamond detector exhibits good reliability, stability and the capability to withstand harsh radiation environments despite its low detection efficiency due to the small active volume. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB106004 and 2012GB101003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 91226102)

  5. Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys by Chemical Vapor Deposition Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reye, John T.; McFadden, Lisa S.; Gatica, Jorge E.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    With the rise of environmental awareness and the renewed importance of environmentally friendly processes, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has targeted surface pre-treatment processes based on chromates. Indeed, this process has been subject to regulations under the Clean Water Act as well as other environmental initiatives, and there is today a marked movement to phase the process out in the near future. Therefore, there is a clear need for new advances in coating technology that could provide practical options for replacing present industrial practices. Depending on the final application, such coatings might be required to be resistant to corrosion, act as chemically resistant coatings, or both. This research examined a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) mechanism to deposit uniform conversion coatings onto aluminum alloy substrates. Robust protocols based on solutions of aryl phosphate ester and multi-oxide conversion coating (submicron) films were successfully grown onto the aluminum alloy samples. These films were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Preliminary results indicate the potential of this technology to replace aqueous-based chromate processes.

  6. Thirty Gigahertz Optoelectronic Mixing in Chemical Vapor Deposited Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Alberto; Mzali, Sana; Mazellier, Jean-Paul; Bezencenet, Odile; Larat, Christian; Molin, Stephanie; Morvan, Loïc; Legagneux, Pierre; Dolfi, Daniel; Dlubak, Bruno; Seneor, Pierre; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Hofmann, Stephan; Robertson, John; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia

    2016-05-11

    The remarkable properties of graphene, such as broadband optical absorption, high carrier mobility, and short photogenerated carrier lifetime, are particularly attractive for high-frequency optoelectronic devices operating at 1.55 μm telecom wavelength. Moreover, the possibility to transfer graphene on a silicon substrate using a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible process opens the ability to integrate electronics and optics on a single cost-effective chip. Here, we report an optoelectronic mixer based on chemical vapor-deposited graphene transferred on an oxidized silicon substrate. Our device consists in a coplanar waveguide that integrates a graphene channel, passivated with an atomic layer-deposited Al2O3 film. With this new structure, 30 GHz optoelectronic mixing in commercially available graphene is demonstrated for the first time. In particular, using a 30 GHz intensity-modulated optical signal and a 29.9 GHz electrical signal, we show frequency downconversion to 100 MHz. These results open promising perspectives in the domain of optoelectronics for radar and radio-communication systems.

  7. All hot wire chemical vapor deposition low substrate temperature transparent thin film moisture barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, D.A.; Schipper, M.R.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2013-01-01

    We deposited a silicon nitride/polymer hybrid multilayer moisture barrier for flexible electronics in a hot wire chemical vapor deposition process, entirely below 100 °C. We were able to reach a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) as low as 5×10−6 g/m2/day at a temperature of 60 °C and a relative h

  8. Plasma-enhanced Deposition of Nano-Structured Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Qiaoqin (杨巧勤); Xiao Chijin (肖持进); A. Hirose

    2005-01-01

    By pre-treating substrate with different methods and patterning the catalyst, selective and patterned growth of diamond and graphitic nano-structured carbon films have been realized through DC Plasma-Enhanced Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-HFCVD).Through two-step processing in an HFCVD reactor, novel nano-structured composite diamond films containing a nanocrystalline diamond layer on the top of a nanocone diamond layer have been synthesized. Well-aligned carbon nanotubes, diamond and graphitic carbon nanocones with controllable alignment orientations have been synthesized by using PE-HFCVD. The orientation of the nanostructures can be controlled by adjusting the working pressure. In a Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW-PECVD) reactor, high-quality diamond films have been synthesized at low temperatures (310 ℃~550 ℃) without adding oxygen or halogen gas in a newly developed processing technique. In this process, carbon source originates from graphite etching, instead of hydrocarbon. The lowest growth temperature for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond films with a reasonable growth rate without addition of oxygen or halogen is 260 ℃.

  9. Characterization of nanocarbon deposited on insulator substrate by alcohol chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Marina; Murata, Hidenobu; Tachibana, Masaru

    2016-10-01

    Single-layer-graphene-like nanocarbon materials were directly deposited on c-plane sapphire substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition with ethanol as a carbon source. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that the deposited materials have sheetlike grains of around 100 nm diameter. Most of them have “hills” with 32 nm diameter on the grains. According to atomic force microscopy (AFM) observation, the height of the sheetlike grains is below 1 nm, which is comparable to that of single-layer graphene, while the hills have a height of several nm. Raman spectra show that the material is similar to graphitic nanocarbon, which has a strong D band. This result implies that there are a number of defects in the nanocarbon materials.

  10. Study of nickel silicide formation by physical vapor deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancharatnam, Shanti

    Metal silicides are used as contacts to the highly n-doped emitter in photovoltaic devices. Thin films of nickel silicide (NiSi) are of particular interest for Si-based solar cells, as they form at lower temperature and consume less silicon. However, interfacial oxide limits the reduction in sheet resistance. Hence, different diffusion barriers were investigated with regard to optimizing the conductivity and thermal stability. The formation of NiSi, and if it can be doped to have good contact with the n-side of a p-n junction were studied. Reduction of the interfacial oxide by the interfacial Ti layer to allow the formation of NiSi was observed. Silicon was treated in dilute hydrofluoric acid for removing the surface oxide layer. Ni and a Ti diffusion barrier were deposited on Si by physical vapor deposition (PVD) methods - electron beam evaporation and sputtering. The annealing temperature and time were varied to observe the stability of the deposited film. The films were then etched to observe the retention of the silicide. Characterization was done using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and Rutherford back scattering (RBS). Sheet resistance was measured using the four-point probe technique. Annealing temperatures from 300°C showed films began to agglomerate indicating some diffusion between Ni and Si in the Ti layer, also supported by the compositional analysis in the Auger spectra. Films obtained by evaporation and sputtering were of high quality in terms of coverage over substrate area and uniformity. Thicknesses of Ni and Ti were optimized to 20 nm and 10 nm respectively. Resistivity was low at these thicknesses, and reduced by about half post annealing at 300°C for 8 hours. Thus a low resistivity contact was obtained at optimized thicknesses of the metal layers. It was also shown that some silicide formation occurs at temperatures starting from 300°C and can thus be used to make good silicide contacts.

  11. Silicon nitride at high growth rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, V.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx) is a widely studied alloy with many commercial applications. This thesis describes the application of SiNx deposited at high deposition rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) for solar cells and thin film transistors (TFTs). The deposition process of H

  12. Silicon nitride at high growth rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, V.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx) is a widely studied alloy with many commercial applications. This thesis describes the application of SiNx deposited at high deposition rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) for solar cells and thin film transistors (TFTs). The deposition process of H

  13. Local plasma deposition on polymer components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, P.J.; Theelen, M.J.; Habets, D.; Winands, G.J.J.; Staemmler, L.

    2011-01-01

    For the modification of the surface energy of polymers, organosilicon coatings provide good optical and mechanical properties and are excellent candidates for the modification of the surface energy of polymers. These coatings can be deposited by plasma polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO)

  14. Diagnostics in ? helicon plasmas for ? deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granier, A.; Nicolazo, F.; Vallée, C.; Goullet, A.; Turban, G.; Grolleau, B.

    1997-05-01

    0963-0252/6/2/008/img3 and 0963-0252/6/2/008/img4 helicon plasmas used for plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of 0963-0252/6/2/008/img5 films are investigated in the 1 - 10 mTorr pressure and 0 - 800 W rf power ranges. The positive oxygen ions are analysed by energy selective mass spectrometry and Langmuir probes. The oxygen atom concentration is monitored by actinometry and ionization threshold mass spectrometry. In oxygen plasmas it is shown that 0963-0252/6/2/008/img6 is the major positive ion, and that the oxygen molecules are far from being completely dissociated, due to a very high oxygen atom recombination frequency on the reactor walls. The dissociation degree increases with the rf power reaching 10% at 500 W. In 0963-0252/6/2/008/img4 plasmas, the plasma density and electron temperature decrease as the TEOS fraction increases. In contrast, the degree of oxygen dissociation increases sharply with the addition of a few per cent TEOS, is maximum for about 5% TEOS and decreases as TEOS fraction is further increased. In a 95:5 0963-0252/6/2/008/img4 plasma (5 mTorr, 300 W) the fluxes of oxygen positive ions and atoms impinging onto a floating substrate are estimated to be 0963-0252/6/2/008/img9 and 0963-0252/6/2/008/img10 respectively. Under these plasma conditions, near-stoichiometric 0963-0252/6/2/008/img11 films, with low OH content, are deposited at ambient temperature. The corresponding atom to ion flux ratio is about 250, which suggests the dominant role of oxygen atoms in the deposition kinetics. The comparison of the compositions of layers grown in a 5 mTorr 95:5 0963-0252/6/2/008/img4 plasma at two rf powers confirms the major role of oxygen atoms.

  15. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers.

  16. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnOx-CVD layers.

  17. On the intrinsic moisture permeation rate of remote microwave plasma-deposited silicon nitride layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assche, F.J.H. Van; Unnikrishnan, S.; Michels, J.J.; Mol, A.M.B. van; Weijer, P. van de; Sanden, M.C.M. van de; Creatore, M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a low substrate temperature (110°C) remote microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process of silicon nitride barrier layers against moisture permeation for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and other moisture sensitive devices such as organic photovoltaic cells

  18. Plasma deposited fluorinated films on porous membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gancarz, Irena [Department of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Wrocław University of Technology, 50-370 Wrocław (Poland); Bryjak, Marek, E-mail: marek.bryjak@pwr.edu.pl [Department of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Wrocław University of Technology, 50-370 Wrocław (Poland); Kujawski, Jan; Wolska, Joanna [Department of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Wrocław University of Technology, 50-370 Wrocław (Poland); Kujawa, Joanna; Kujawski, Wojciech [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Faculty of Chemistry, 7 Gagarina St., 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2015-02-01

    75 KHz plasma was used to modify track etched poly(ethylene terephthalate) membranes and deposit on them flouropolymers. Two fluorine bearing monomers were used: perflourohexane and hexafluorobenzene. The modified surfaces were analyzed by means of attenuated total reflection infra-red spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and wettability. It was detected that hexaflourobenxene deposited to the larger extent than perflourohaxane did. The roughness of surfaces decreased when more fluoropolymer was deposited. The hydrophobic character of surface slightly disappeared during 20-days storage of hexaflourobenzene modified membrane. Perfluorohexane modified membrane did not change its character within 120 days after modification. It was expected that this phenomenon resulted from post-reactions of oxygen with radicals in polymer deposits. The obtained membranes could be used for membrane distillation of juices. - Highlights: • Plasma deposited hydrophobic layer of flouropolymers. • Deposition degree affects the surface properties. • Hydrohilization of surface due to reaction of oxygen with entrapped radicals. • Possibility to use modified porous membrane for water distillation and apple juice concentration.

  19. Direct synthesis of large area graphene on insulating substrate by gallium vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Katsuhisa, E-mail: k.murakami@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Hiyama, Takaki; Kuwajima, Tomoya; Fujita, Jun-ichi [Institute of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Tanaka, Shunsuke; Hirukawa, Ayaka [Institute of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Kano, Emi [Institute of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Takeguchi, Masaki [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2015-03-02

    A single layer of graphene with dimensions of 20 mm × 20 mm was grown directly on an insulating substrate by chemical vapor deposition using Ga vapor catalysts. The graphene layer showed highly homogeneous crystal quality over a large area on the insulating substrate. The crystal quality of the graphene was measured by Raman spectroscopy and was found to improve with increasing Ga vapor density on the reaction area. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the synthesized graphene had a perfect atomic-scale crystal structure within its grains, which ranged in size from 50 nm to 200 nm.

  20. Radio-frequency oxygen-plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition of IGZO films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Man Chou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the crystalline structures, optical transmittance, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, chemical compositions, and electrical properties of indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO-based thin films deposited on glass and silicon substrates through pulsed laser deposition (PLD incorporated with radio-frequency (r.f.-generated oxygen plasma. The plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition (PEPLD-based IGZO thin films exhibited a c-axis-aligned crystalline (CAAC structure, which was attributed to the increase in Zn-O under high oxygen vapor pressure (150 mTorr. High oxygen vapor pressure (150 mTorr and low r.f. power (10 W are the optimal deposition conditions for fabricating IGZO thin films with improved electrical properties.

  1. Radio-frequency oxygen-plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition of IGZO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Man; Lai, Chih-Chang; Chang, Chih-Wei; Wen, Kai-Shin; Hsiao, Vincent K. S.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate the crystalline structures, optical transmittance, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, chemical compositions, and electrical properties of indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO)-based thin films deposited on glass and silicon substrates through pulsed laser deposition (PLD) incorporated with radio-frequency (r.f.)-generated oxygen plasma. The plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition (PEPLD)-based IGZO thin films exhibited a c-axis-aligned crystalline (CAAC) structure, which was attributed to the increase in Zn-O under high oxygen vapor pressure (150 mTorr). High oxygen vapor pressure (150 mTorr) and low r.f. power (10 W) are the optimal deposition conditions for fabricating IGZO thin films with improved electrical properties.

  2. High surface area graphene foams by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drieschner, Simon; Weber, Michael; Wohlketzetter, Jörg; Vieten, Josua; Makrygiannis, Evangelos; Blaschke, Benno M.; Morandi, Vittorio; Colombo, Luigi; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Garrido, Jose A.

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based structures combine the unique physical properties of graphene with the opportunity to get high electrochemically available surface area per unit of geometric surface area. Several preparation techniques have been reported to fabricate 3D graphene-based macroscopic structures for energy storage applications such as supercapacitors. Although reaserch has been focused so far on achieving either high specific capacitance or high volumetric capacitance, much less attention has been dedicated to obtain high specific and high volumetric capacitance simultaneously. Here, we present a facile technique to fabricate graphene foams (GF) of high crystal quality with tunable pore size grown by chemical vapor deposition. We exploited porous sacrificial templates prepared by sintering nickel and copper metal powders. Tuning the particle size of the metal powders and the growth temperature allow fine control of the resulting pore size of the 3D graphene-based structures smaller than 1 μm. The as-produced 3D graphene structures provide a high volumetric electric double layer capacitance (165 mF cm-3). High specific capacitance (100 Fg-1) is obtained by lowering the number of layers down to single layer graphene. Furthermore, the small pore size increases the stability of these GFs in contrast to the ones that have been grown so far on commercial metal foams. Electrodes based on the as-prepared GFs can be a boost for the development of supercapacitors, where both low volume and mass are required.

  3. Charged impurity-induced scatterings in chemical vapor deposited graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ming-Yang; Tang, Chiu-Chun [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei 25137, Taiwan (China); Li, L. J. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-21

    We investigate the effects of defect scatterings on the electric transport properties of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene by measuring the carrier density dependence of the magneto-conductivity. To clarify the dominant scattering mechanism, we perform extensive measurements on large-area samples with different mobility to exclude the edge effect. We analyze our data with the major scattering mechanisms such as short-range static scatters, short-range screened Coulomb disorders, and weak-localization (WL). We establish that the charged impurities are the predominant scatters because there is a strong correlation between the mobility and the charge impurity density. Near the charge neutral point (CNP), the electron-hole puddles that are induced by the charged impurities enhance the inter-valley scattering, which is favorable for WL observations. Away from the CNP, the charged-impurity-induced scattering is weak because of the effective screening by the charge carriers. As a result, the local static structural defects govern the charge transport. Our findings provide compelling evidence for understanding the scattering mechanisms in graphene and pave the way for the improvement of fabrication techniques to achieve high-quality CVD graphene.

  4. Carbon-assisted chemical vapor deposition of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismach, Ariel; Chou, Harry; Mende, Patrick; Dolocan, Andrei; Addou, Rafik; Aloni, Shaul; Wallace, Robert; Feenstra, Randall; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Colombo, Luigi

    2017-06-01

    We show that in a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system, the residual oxygen and/or air play a crucial role in the mechanism of the growth of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) films on Ni foil ‘enclosures’. Hexagonal-BN films grow on the Ni foil surface via the formation of an intermediate boric-oxide (BO x ) phase followed by a thermal reduction of the BO x by a carbon source (either amorphous carbon powder or methane), leading to the formation of single- and bi-layer h-BN. Low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and diffraction (LEED) were used to map the number of layers over large areas; Raman spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) were used to characterize the structure and physical quality of the ultra-thin h-BN film. The growth procedure reported here leads to a better understanding and control of the synthesis of ultra-thin h-BN films.

  5. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mopeli Fabiane

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD. Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT to yield poly (methyl methacrylate (PMMA/graphene/glass or (2 inverted transfer (IT to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called “inverted wedding cake” stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

  6. Temperature admittance spectroscopy of boron doped chemical vapor deposition diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubkov, V. I., E-mail: VZubkovspb@mail.ru; Kucherova, O. V.; Zubkova, A. V.; Ilyin, V. A.; Afanas' ev, A. V. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University (LETI), Professor Popov Street 5, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bogdanov, S. A.; Vikharev, A. L. [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ul' yanov Street 46, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Butler, J. E. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University (LETI), Professor Popov Street 5, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ul' yanov Street 46, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), P.O. Box 37012 Smithsonian Inst., Washington, D.C. 20013-7012 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    Precision admittance spectroscopy measurements over wide temperature and frequency ranges were carried out for chemical vapor deposition epitaxial diamond samples doped with various concentrations of boron. It was found that the experimentally detected boron activation energy in the samples decreased from 314 meV down to 101 meV with an increase of B/C ratio from 600 to 18000 ppm in the gas reactants. For the heavily doped samples, a transition from thermally activated valence band conduction to hopping within the impurity band (with apparent activation energy 20 meV) was detected at temperatures 120–150 K. Numerical simulation was used to estimate the impurity DOS broadening. Accurate determination of continuously altering activation energy, which takes place during the transformation of conduction mechanisms, was proposed by numerical differentiation of the Arrhenius plot. With increase of boron doping level the gradual decreasing of capture cross section from 3 × 10{sup −13} down to 2 × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} was noticed. Moreover, for the hopping conduction the capture cross section becomes 4 orders of magnitude less (∼2 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}). At T > T{sub room} in doped samples the birth of the second conductance peak was observed. We attribute it to a defect, related to the boron doping of the material.

  7. Plasma transferred arc deposition of beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, K.; Bartram, B.; Withers, J.; Storm, R.; Massarello, J.

    2006-12-01

    The exceptional properties of beryllium (Be), including low density and high elastic modulus, make it the material of choice in many defense and aerospace applications. However, health hazards associated with Be material handling limit the applications that are suited for its use. Innovative solutions that enable continued use of Be in critical applications while addressing worker health concerns are highly desirable. Plasma transferred arc solid free-form fabrication is being evaluated as a Be fabrication technique for civilian and military space-based components. Initial experiments producing Be deposits are reported here. Deposit shape, microstructure, and mechanical properties are reported.

  8. Rare-earth-doped optical-fiber core deposition using full vapor-phase SPCVD process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnini, A.; Robin, T.; Cadier, B.; Aka, G.; Caurant, D.; Gotter, T.; Guyon, C.; Pinsard, E.; Guitton, P.; Laurent, A.; Montron, R.

    2017-02-01

    One key parameter in the race toward ever-higher power fiber lasers remains the rare earth doped optical core quality. Modern Large Mode Area (LMA) fibers require a fine radial control of the core refractive index (RI) close to the silica level. These low RI are achieved with multi-component materials that cannot be readily obtained using conventional solution doping based Modified Chemical Vapor Deposition (MCVD) technology. This paper presents a study of such optical material obtained through a full-vapor phase Surface Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (SPCVD). The SPCVD process generates straight glassy films on the inner surface of a thermally regulated synthetic silica tube under vacuum. The first part of the presented results points out the feasibility of ytterbium-doped aluminosilicate fibers by this process. In the second part we describe the challenge controlling the refractive index throughout the core diameter when using volatile fluorine to create efficient LMA fiber profiles. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to counter-act the loss of fluorine at the center of the core by adjusting the core composition locally. Our materials yielded, when used in optical fibers with numerical apertures ranging from 0.07 to 0.09, power conversion efficiency up to 76% and low background losses below 20 dB/km at 1100nm. Photodarkening has been measured to be similar to equivalent MCVD based fibers. The use of cerium as a co-dopant allowed for a complete mitigation of this laser lifetime detrimental effect. The SPCVD process enables high capacity preforms and is particularly versatile when it comes to radial tailoring of both rare earth doping level and RI. Large core diameter preforms - up to 4mm - were successfully produced.

  9. Dielectric and specific heat relaxations in vapor deposited glycerol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasina, A., E-mail: angeline.kasina@fys.kuleuven.be, E-mail: wubbenhorst@fys.kuleuven.be; Putzeys, T.; Wübbenhorst, M., E-mail: angeline.kasina@fys.kuleuven.be, E-mail: wubbenhorst@fys.kuleuven.be [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Soft Matter and Biophysics Section, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-12-28

    Recently [S. Capponi, S. Napolitano, and M. Wübbenhorst, Nat. Commun. 3, 1233 (2012)], vapor deposited glasses of glycerol have been found to recover their super-cooled liquid state via a metastable, ordered liquid (MROL) state characterized by a tremendously enhanced dielectric strength along with a slow-down of the relaxation rate of the structural relaxation. To study the calorimetric signature of this phenomenon, we have implemented a chip-based, differential AC calorimeter in an organic molecular beam deposition setup, which allows the simultaneous measurement of dielectric relaxations via interdigitated comb electrodes and specific heat relaxation spectra during deposition and as function of the temperature. Heating of the as-deposited glass just above the bulk T{sub g} and subsequent cooling/reheating revealed a step-wise increase in c{sub p} by in total 9%, indicating unambiguously that glycerol, through slow vapour deposition, forms a thermodynamically stable glass, which has a specific heat as low as that of crystalline glycerol. Moreover, these glasses were found to show excellent kinetic stability as well as evidenced by both a high onset-temperature and quasi-isothermal recovery measurements at −75 °C. The second goal of the study was to elucidate the impact of the MROL state on the specific heat and its relaxation to the super-cooled state. Conversion of “MROL glycerol” to its “normal” (ordinary liquid, OL) state revealed a second, small (∼2%) increase of the glassy c{sub p}, a little gain (<10%) in the relaxed specific heat, and no signs of deviations of τ{sub cal} from that of normal “bulk” glycerol. These findings altogether suggest that the MROL state in glycerol comprises largely bulk-type glycerol that coexist with a minor volume fraction (<10%) of PVD-induced structural anomalies with a crystal-like calorimetric signature. Based on the new calorimetric findings, we have proposed a new physical picture that assumes the

  10. Compensation of decreased ion energy by increased hydrogen dilution in plasma deposition of thin film silicon solar cells at low substrate temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D. Verkerk; M.M. de Jong; J.K. Rath; M. Brinza; R.E.I. Schropp; W.J. Goedheer; V.V. Krzhizhanovskaya; Y.E. Gorbachev; K.E. Orlov; E.M. Khilkevitch; A.S. Smirnov

    2008-01-01

    In order to deposit thin film silicon solar cells on plastics and papers, the deposition process needs to be adapted for low deposition temperatures. In a very high frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) process, both the gas phase and the surface processes are affected by l

  11. Initiated-chemical vapor deposition of organosilicon layers: Monomer adsorption, bulk growth, and process window definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresta, G.; Palmans, J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Organosilicon layers have been deposited from 1,3,5-trivinyl-1,3,5-trimethylcyclotrisiloxane (V3D3) by means of the initiated-chemical vapor deposition (i-CVD) technique in a deposition setup, ad hoc designed for the engineering of multilayer moisture permeation barriers. The application of Fourier

  12. Industrialization of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition for thin film applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schropp, R.E.I., E-mail: r.e.i.schropp@tue.nl

    2015-11-30

    The consequences of implementing a Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) chamber into an existing in-line or roll-to-roll reactor are described. The hardware and operation of the HWCVD production reactor is compared to that of existing roll-to-roll reactors based on Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition. The most important consequences are the technical consequences and the economic consequences, which are both discussed. The technical consequences are adaptations needed to the hardware and to the processing sequences due to the different interaction of the HWCVD process with the substrate and already deposited layers. The economic consequences are the reduced investments in radio frequency (RF) supplies and RF components. This is partially offset by investments that have to be made in higher capacity pumping systems. The most mature applications of HWCVD are moisture barrier coatings for thin film flexible devices such as Organic Light Emitting Diodes and Organic Photovoltaics, and passivation layers for multicrystalline Si solar cells, high mobility field effect transistors, and silicon heterojunction cells (also known as heterojunction cells with intrinsic thin film layers). Another example is the use of Si in thin film photovoltaics. The cost perspective per unit of thin film photovoltaic product using HWCVD is estimated at 0.07 €/Wp for the Si thin film component. - Highlights: • Review of consequences of implementing Hot Wire CVD into a manufacturing plant • Aspects of scaling up to large area and continuous manufacturing are discussed • Economic advantage of introducing a HWCVD process in a production system is estimated • Using HWCVD, the cost for the Si layers in photovoltaic products is 0.08 €/Wp.

  13. Luminescent Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide Thin Film Deposited by Helicon Wave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wan-bing; YU Wei; WU Li-ping; CUI Shuang-kui; FU Guang-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon carbide (SiC) thin films were deposited on the single-crystal silicon substrate using the helicon wave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HW-PECVD) technique. The influences of magnetic field and hydrogen dilution ratio on the structures of SiC thin film were investigated with the atomic force microscopy (AFM), the Fourier transform infrared absorption (FTIR) and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicate that the high plasma activity of the helicon wave mode proves to be a key factor to grow crystalline SiC thin films at a relative low substrate temperature. Also, the decrease in the grain sizes from the level of microcrystalline to that of nanocrystalline can be achieved by increasing the hydrogen dilution ratios. Transmission electron microscopy measurements reveal that the size of most nanocrystals in the film deposited under the higher hydrogen dilution ratios is smaller than the doubled Bohr radius of 3C-SiC (approximately 5.4 nm), and the light emission measurements also show a strong blue photoluminescence at the room temperature, which is considered to be caused by the quantum confinement effect of small-sized SiC nanocrystals.

  14. PARTICLE COATING BY CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION IN A FLUIDI7ED BED REACTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gregor; Czok; Joachim; Werther

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum coatings were created onto glass beads by chemical vapor deposition in a fluidized bed reactor at different temperatures. Nitrogen was enriched with Triisobutylaluminum (TIBA) vapor and the latter was thermally decomposed inside the fluidized bed to deposit the elemental aluminum. To ensure homogeneous coating on the bed material, the fluidizing conditions necessary to avoid agglomeration were investigated for a broad range of temperatures.The deposition reaction was modeled on the basis of a discrete particle simulation to gain insight into homogeneity and thickness of the coating throughout the bed material. In particular, the take-up of aluminum was traced for selected particles that exhibited a large mass of deposited aluminum.

  15. Rapid synthesis of tantalum oxide dielectric films by microwave microwave-assisted atmospheric chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndiege, Nicholas [School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)], E-mail: ndiege@uiuc.edu; Subramanian, Vaidyanathan [School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)], E-mail: ravisv@unr.edu; Shannon, Mark A. [Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)], E-mail: mshannon@uiuc.edu; Masel, Richard I. [School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)], E-mail: r-masel@uiuc.edu

    2008-10-01

    Microwave-assisted chemical vapor deposition has been used to generate high quality, high-k dielectric films on silicon at high deposition rates with film thicknesses varying from 50 nm to 110 {mu}m using inexpensive equipment. Characterization of the post deposition products was performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Film growth was determined to occur via rapid formation and accumulation of tantalum oxide clusters from tantalum (v) ethoxide (Ta(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 5}) vapor on the deposition surface.

  16. Preparation of membranes using solvent-less vapor deposition followed by in-situ polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Kevin C [San Ramon, CA; Letts, Stephan A [San Ramon, CA; Spadaccini, Christopher M [Oakland, CA; Morse, Jeffrey C [Pleasant Hill, CA; Buckley, Steven R [Modesto, CA; Fischer, Larry E [Los Gatos, CA; Wilson, Keith B [San Ramon, CA

    2012-01-24

    A system of fabricating a composite membrane from a membrane substrate using solvent-less vapor deposition followed by in-situ polymerization. A first monomer and a second monomer are directed into a mixing chamber in a deposition chamber. The first monomer and the second monomer are mixed in the mixing chamber providing a mixed first monomer and second monomer. The mixed first monomer and second monomer are solvent-less vapor deposited onto the membrane substrate in the deposition chamber. The membrane substrate and the mixed first monomer and second monomer are heated to produce in-situ polymerization and provide the composite membrane.

  17. Preparation of membranes using solvent-less vapor deposition followed by in-situ polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Kevin C [San Ramon, CA; Letts, Stephan A [San Ramon, CA; Spadaccini, Christopher M [Oakland, CA; Morse, Jeffrey C [Pleasant Hill, CA; Buckley, Steven R [Modesto, CA; Fischer, Larry E [Los Gatos, CA; Wilson, Keith B [San Ramon, CA

    2010-07-13

    A system of fabricating a composite membrane from a membrane substrate using solvent-less vapor deposition followed by in-situ polymerization. A first monomer and a second monomer are directed into a mixing chamber in a deposition chamber. The first monomer and the second monomer are mixed in the mixing chamber providing a mixed first monomer and second monomer. The mixed first monomer and second monomer are solvent-less vapor deposited onto the membrane substrate in the deposition chamber. The membrane substrate and the mixed first monomer and second monomer are heated to produce in-situ polymerization and provide the composite membrane.

  18. Tungsten Deposition on Graphite using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Uttam; Chauhan, Sachin S.; Sharma, Jayshree; Sanyasi, A. K.; Ghosh, J.; Choudhary, K. K.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    The tokamak concept is the frontrunner for achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction on earth, an environment friendly way to solve future energy crisis. Although much progress has been made in controlling the heated fusion plasmas (temperature ∼ 150 million degrees) in tokamaks, technological issues related to plasma wall interaction topic still need focused attention. In future, reactor grade tokamak operational scenarios, the reactor wall and target plates are expected to experience a heat load of 10 MW/m2 and even more during the unfortunate events of ELM's and disruptions. Tungsten remains a suitable choice for the wall and target plates. It can withstand high temperatures, its ductile to brittle temperature is fairly low and it has low sputtering yield and low fuel retention capabilities. However, it is difficult to machine tungsten and hence usages of tungsten coated surfaces are mostly desirable. To produce tungsten coated graphite tiles for the above-mentioned purpose, a coating reactor has been designed, developed and made operational at the SVITS, Indore. Tungsten coating on graphite has been attempted and successfully carried out by using radio frequency induced plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf -PECVD) for the first time in India. Tungsten hexa-fluoride has been used as a pre-cursor gas. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) clearly showed the presence of tungsten coating on the graphite samples. This paper presents the details of successful operation and achievement of tungsten coating in the reactor at SVITS.

  19. Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladwig, Angela

    2008-01-23

    There is great demand for thin functional coatings in the semiconductor, optics, electronics, medical, automotive and aerospace industries [1-13]. As fabricated components become smaller and more complex, the properties of the materials’ surface take on greater importance. Thin coatings play a key role in tailoring surfaces to give them the desired hardness, wear resistance, chemical inertness, and electrical characteristics. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings possess an array of desirable properties, including outstanding abrasion and wear resistance, chemical inertness, hardness, a low coefficient of friction and exceptionally high dielectric strength [14-22]. Diamond-like carbon is considered to be an amorphous material, containing a mixture of sp2 and sp3 bonded carbon. Based on the percentage of sp3 carbon and the hydrogen content, four different types of DLC coatings have been identified: tetrahedral carbon (ta-C), hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) hard, a-C:H soft, and hydrogenated tetrahedral carbon (ta-C:H) [20,24,25]. Possessing the highest hardness of 80 GPa, ta-C possesses an sp3 carbon content of 80 to 88u%, and no appreciable hydrogen content whereas a-C:H soft possesses a hardness of less than 10 GPa, contains an sp3 carbon content of 60% and a hydrogen content between 30 to 50%. Methods used to deposit DLC coatings include ion beam deposition, cathodic arc spray, pulsed laser ablation, argon ion sputtering, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition [73-83]. Researchers contend that several advantages exist when depositing DLC coatings in a low-pressure environment. For example, ion beam processes are widely utilized since the ion bombardment is thought to promote denser sp3-bonded carbon networks. Other processes, such as sputtering, are better suited for coating large parts [29,30,44]. However, the deposition of DLC in a vacuum system has several disadvantages, including high equipment cost and restrictions on the size and shape of

  20. 等离子体激活电子束物理气相沉积NiCoCrAlY涂层的制备及微观组织结构研究%Microstructures of NiCoCrAlY Coatings Grown by Plasma Activated Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常健; 郑蕾; 彭徽; 郭洪波; 宫声凯

    2012-01-01

    针对传统电子束物理气相沉积(EB-PVD)制备的柱状晶结构MCrAlY涂层存在线性缺陷的问题,本文建立了等离子体激活EB-PVD(PA EB-PVD)设备,并采用PA EB-PVD技术制备出了具有等轴晶结构的新型NiCoCrAlY涂层.结果表明,增大电弧放电电压和基板偏压均可以提高沉积粒子的能量.随着沉积粒子能量增强,涂层逐渐由柱状晶结构转变为致密等轴晶结构,晶粒尺寸增大;另一方面,涂层成份离析效应增强,主要体现在Al含量降低和Cr含量升高.%a novel technique - the plasma activated electron beam-physical vapor deposition (PAEB-PVD) - was developed by modifying the conventional electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) to significantly reduce the columnar and linear defects of the NiCoCrAlY coatings, grown by EB-PVD. The high quality NiCoCrAlY coatings were deposited by the newly-developed technique. The impacts of the deposition conditions on microstructures and mechanical properties of the coating were evaluated, The results show that the energy of the impinging adatom strongly affects its microstructures . The energy of the adatom can be increased by increasing the arc discharge voltage and substrate bias. As the adatom energy increased, the columnar grains of the coating changed into the more compact equiaxial ones, accompanied with grain growth. Meanwhile, strong segregation was observed, resulting in an increased of Al content, a decreased Gr content, and an increase of plasticity.

  1. Low temperature plasma vapor treatment of thermo-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Tang, X. L.; Chen, B. T.; Qiu, G.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the novel methods of depositing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) coatings on the surface of glass slides and PS petri dish by plasma polymerization are provided. PNIPAAm can be obtained by plasma polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide by using the self-made equipment of plasma vapor treatment. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle. SEM analysis has revealed that the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) coatings were formed on the surface of the smooth glass slides. Further evaluation by using XPS, it has shown the presence of PNIPAAm. The wettability can be significantly modified by changing of the temperatures at above and below of the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) from the data of the contact angle test. These results have advantage for further application on the thermo-sensitive textile materials. On the deposition of PNIPAAm onto Polybutylene Terephthalate (PBT) melt-blown nonwovens in atmospheric pressure plasma, water permeability was significantly modified at around LCST. Due to the LCST is close to the temperature of human body, it has advantage on application of PBT melt-blown nonwovens.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of uranium for alpha spectrometry; Deposicion quimica de vapor (CVD) de uranio para espectrometria alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez V, M. L.; Rios M, C.; Ramirez O, J.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F., E-mail: luisalawliet@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The uranium determination through radiometric techniques as alpha spectrometry requires for its proper analysis, preparation methods of the source to analyze and procedures for the deposit of this on a surface or substrate. Given the characteristics of alpha particles (small penetration distance and great loss of energy during their journey or its interaction with the matter), is important to ensure that the prepared sources are thin, to avoid problems of self-absorption. The routine methods used for this are the cathodic electro deposition and the direct evaporation, among others. In this paper the use of technique of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the preparation of uranium sources is investigated; because by this, is possible to obtain thin films (much thinner than those resulting from electro deposition or evaporation) on a substrate and comprises reacting a precursor with a gas, which in turn serves as a carrier of the reaction products to achieve deposition. Preliminary results of the chemical vapor deposition of uranium are presented, synthesizing and using as precursor molecule the uranyl acetylacetonate, using oxygen as carrier gas for the deposition reaction on a glass substrate. The uranium films obtained were found suitable for alpha spectrometry. The variables taken into account were the precursor sublimation temperatures and deposition temperature, the reaction time and the type and flow of carrier gas. Of the investigated conditions, two depositions with encouraging results that can serve as reference for further work to improve the technique presented here were selected. Alpha spectra obtained for these depositions and the characterization of the representative samples by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are also presented. (Author)

  3. Synthesis of one-dimensional boron-related nanostructures by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li

    in the submicron range were used to synthesize aligned BNNTs. Fine BN nanostructures with a diameter around 10-20 nm and length up to 10 microns were grown and dispersed in the Ni dots. Nanosized Ni dots were suggested for the growth of the vertically aligned BNNTs. Boron nanowires (BNWs) were also grown by the decomposition of diborane using a thermal CVD process at a temperature of 900°C, a pressure of 20 torr, diborane flow rate (5 vol.% in hydrogen) of 5 sccm, and nitrogen flow rate of 55 sccm. These BNWs had diameters in a range of 20-200 nanometers and lengths up to several tens of micrometers. Repeatable Raman spectra indicated icosahedra B12 to be the basic building units forming the B nanowires. Amorphous BNWs with rough surface were obtained without any catalysts on different substrates, such as Si wafer or ZrB2 powders. A vapor-solid (VS) growth was proposed for the amorphous BNWs, in which the solid phase precipitated directly from the vapor phase reactions. The amorphous BNWs were modified for size and composition using a plasma CVD process containing argon, ammonia and hydrogen. The diameters of these BNWs were reduced from 200 nm to several tens of nanometers, and a small amount of N was incorporated into BNWs after the plasma treatment. On the other hand, the metal catalyst proved to be effective for the growth of crystalline BNWs. Tetragonal BNWs with smooth surface were grown on thin Ni film (1 nm) coated Si substrates. Ni attachment was observed at the tip of the BNW for the first time, which indicated that the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism can be used for synthesis of the BNW. The diameters of these BNWs were strongly dependent on the size of the metal particles encapsulated in the BNWs. In summary, two boron-related nanostructures were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in this work. A new method was successfully developed to decrease the substrate temperature more than 400°C to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes in a

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition Al2O3 Thin Films in Magnetized Radio Frequency Plasma Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingcun; Chen, Qiang; Sang, Lijun; Yang, Lizhen; Liu, Zhongwei; Wang, Zhenduo

    Self-limiting deposition of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) thin films were accomplished by the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using trimethyl aluminum (TMA) and O2 as precursor and oxidant, respectively, where argon was kept flowing in whole deposition process as discharge and purge gas. In here we present a novel plasma source for the atomic layer deposition technology, magnetized radio frequency (RF) plasma. Difference from the commercial RF source, magnetic coils were amounted above the RF electrode, and the influence of the magnetic field strength on the deposition rate and morphology are investigated in detail. It concludes that a more than 3 Å/ purging cycle deposition rate and the good quality of ALD Al2O3 were achieved in this plasma source even without extra heating. The ultra-thin films were characterized by including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The high deposition rates obtained at ambient temperatures were analyzed after in-situ the diagnostic of plasmas by Langmuir probe.

  5. Recent Advances in Atmospheric Vapor-Phase Deposition of Transparent and Conductive Zinc Oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Poodt, P.; Roozeboom, F.

    2014-01-01

    The industrial need for high-throughput and low-cost ZnO deposition processes has triggered the development of atmospheric vapor-phase deposition techniques which can be easily applied to continuous, in-line manufacturing. While atmospheric CVD is a mature technology, new processes for the growth of

  6. Low temperature junction growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi; Page, Matthew; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Wang, Tihu; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-04

    A system and a process for forming a semi-conductor device, and solar cells (10) formed thereby. The process includes preparing a substrate (12) for deposition of a junction layer (14); forming the junction layer (14) on the substrate (12) using hot wire chemical vapor deposition; and, finishing the semi-conductor device.

  7. Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposition: Basics, Opportunities, and Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Profijt, H. B.; Potts, S. E.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) is an energy-enhanced method for the synthesis of ultra-thin films with A angstrom-level resolution in which a plasma is employed during one step of the cyclic deposition process. The use of plasma species as reactants allows for more freedom in processi

  8. Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposition: Basics, Opportunities, and Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Profijt, H. B.; Potts, S. E.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) is an energy-enhanced method for the synthesis of ultra-thin films with A angstrom-level resolution in which a plasma is employed during one step of the cyclic deposition process. The use of plasma species as reactants allows for more freedom in

  9. Vapor-deposited thin films with negative real refractive index in the visible regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Yi-Jun; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Yu, Ching-Wei; Lin, Chin-Te

    2009-05-11

    A thin film comprising parallel tilted nanorods was deposited by directing silver vapor obliquely towards a plane substrate. The reflection and transmission coefficients of the thin film were measured at three wavelengths in the visible regime for normal-illumination conditions, using ellipsometry and walk-off interferometry. The thin film was found to display a negative real refractive index. Since vapor deposition is a well-established industrial technique to deposit thin films, this finding is promising for large-scale production of negatively refracting metamaterials.

  10. Synthesis of silicon carbide nanowires by solid phase source chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Jie; LI Zhengcao; ZHANG Zhengjun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we report a simple approach to synthesize silicon carbide(SiC)nanowires by solid phase source chemical vapor deposition(CVD) at relatively low temperatures.3C-SiC nanowires covered by an amorphous shell were obtained on a thin film which was first deposited on silicon substrates,and the nanowires are 20-80 am in diameter and several μm in length,with a growth direction of[200].The growth of the nanowires agrees well on vapor-liquid-solid (VLS)process and the film deposited on the substrates plays an important role in the formation of nanowires.

  11. Effect of Different Catalyst Deposition Technique on Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed Saheed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reported the investigation of the substrate preparation technique involving deposition of iron catalyst by electron beam evaporation and ferrocene vaporization in order to produce vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array needed for fabrication of tailored devices. Prior to the growth at 700°C in ethylene, silicon dioxide coated silicon substrate was prepared by depositing alumina followed by iron using two different methods as described earlier. Characterization analysis revealed that aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array of 107.9 µm thickness grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique can only be achieved for the sample with iron deposited using ferrocene vaporization. The thick layer of partially oxidized iron film can prevent the deactivation of catalyst and thus is able to sustain the growth. It also increases the rate of permeation of the hydrocarbon gas into the catalyst particles and prevents agglomeration at the growth temperature. Combination of alumina-iron layer provides an efficient growth of high density multiwalled carbon nanotubes array with the steady growth rate of 3.6 µm per minute for the first 12 minutes and dropped by half after 40 minutes. Thicker and uniform iron catalyst film obtained from ferrocene vaporization is attributed to the multidirectional deposition of particles in the gaseous form.

  12. Silicon epitaxy using tetrasilane at low temperatures in ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazbun, Ramsey; Hart, John; Hickey, Ryan; Ghosh, Ayana; Fernando, Nalin; Zollner, Stefan; Adam, Thomas N.; Kolodzey, James

    2016-06-01

    The deposition of silicon using tetrasilane as a vapor precursor is described for an ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition tool. The growth rates and morphology of the Si epitaxial layers over a range of temperatures and pressures are presented. The layers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Atomic Force Microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Based on this characterization, high quality single crystal silicon epitaxy was observed. Tetrasilane was found to produce higher growth rates relative to lower order silanes, with the ability to deposit crystalline Si at low temperatures (T=400 °C), with significant amorphous growth and reactivity measured as low as 325 °C, indicating the suitability of tetrasilane for low temperature chemical vapor deposition such as for SiGeSn alloys.

  13. Analysis on Residual Stress in Electron Beam-Physical Vapor Deposited Thermal Barrier Coating using Hard Synchrotron X-Rays

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 賢治; 松本, 一秀; 久保, 貴博; 町屋, 修太郎; 田中, 啓介; 秋庭, 義明; SUZUKI, Kenji; MATSUMOTO, Kazuhide; Kubo, Takahiro; Machiya, Syutaro; Tanaka, Keisuke; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of the residual stress in the thermal barrier coating, which was made by an electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) method, was determined using X-ray stress measurements. As the bond coating, NiCoCrAlY was low-pressure plasma sprayed on the substrate of austenitic stainless steel. The 8 mass% Y_2O_3-ZrO_2 was coated on the bond coating using the EB-PVD method as the top coating. The top coating had the preferred orientation with the axis direction perpendicular to ...

  14. Control of crystallite size in diamond film chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Mark B.; Johnson, Linda F.; Klemm, Karl A.

    1992-12-01

    In depositing an adhering, continuous, polycrystalline diamond film of optical or semiconductor quality on a substrate, as by forming on the substrate a layer of a refractory nitride interlayer and depositing diamond on the interlayer without mechanical treatment or seeding of the substrate or the interlayer, the substrate is heated in a vacuum chamber containing a microwave activated mixture of hydrogen and a gas including carbon, and the size of deposited diamond crystallites and their rate of deposition selectively varied by a bias voltage applied to the substrate.

  15. Fabrication of Isotropic Pyrocarbon at 1400℃ by Thermal Gradient Chemical Vapor Deposition Apparatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Lingjun; ZHANG Dongsheng; LI Kezhi; LI Hejun

    2009-01-01

    An experiment was designed to prepare isotropic pyrocarbon by thermal gradient chemical vapor deposition apparatus.The deposition was performed under ambient atmosphere at 1400℃,with natural gas volume flow of 3.5 m~3/h for 80 h.The results show that the thickness and the bulk density of the deposit are about 1.95 g/cm~3 and 10 mm,respectively.The microstructure of the deposit was examined by polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy,which shows that the deposit is constituted of sphere isotropic pyrocarbon,pebble pyrocarbon and laminar pyrocarbon.

  16. Interaction of platelets, fibrinogen and endothelial cells with plasma deposited PEO-like films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhilu; Wang, Jin; Li, Xin; Tu, Qiufen; Sun, Hong; Huang, Nan

    2012-02-01

    For blood-contacting biomedical implants like retrievable vena cava filters, surface-based diagnostic devices or in vivo sensors, limiting thrombosis and cell adhesion is paramount, due to a decrease even failure in performance. Plasma deposited PEO-like films were investigated as surface modifications. In this work, mixed gas composed of tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (tetraglyme) vapor and oxygen was used as precursor. It was revealed that plasma polymerization under high ratio of oxygen/tetraglyme led to deposition of the films that had high content of ether groups. This kind of PEO-like films had good stability in phosphate buffer solution. In vitro hemocompatibility and endothelial cell (EC) adhesion revealed low platelet adhesion, platelet activation, fibrinogen adhesion, EC adhesion and proliferation on such plasma deposited PEO-like films. This made it a potential candidate for the applications in anti-fouling surfaces of blood-contacting biomedical devices.

  17. Thickness and component distributions of yttrium-titanium alloy films in electron-beam physical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ShuaiHui; SHU YongHua; FAN Jing

    2008-01-01

    Thickness and component distributions of large-area thin films are an issue of in-ternational concern in the field of material processing. The present wor0k employs experiments and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to investigate three-dimensional low-density, non-equilibrium jets of yttrium and titanium vapor atoms in an electron-beams physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) system furnished with two or three electron-beams, and obtains their deposition thickness and component distributions onto 4-inch and 6-inch mono-crystal silicon wafers. The DSMC results are found in excellent agreement with our measurements, such as evaporation rates of yttrium and titanium measured in-situ by quartz crystal reso-nators, deposited film thickness distribution measured by Rutherford backscat-tering spectrometer (RBS) and surface profilometer and deposited film molar ratio distribution measured by RBS and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). This can be taken as an indication that a combination of DSMC method with elaborate measurements may be satisfactory for predicting and designing accurately the transport process of EBPVD at the atomic level.

  18. Thickness and component distributions of yttrium-titanium alloy films in electron-beam physical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Thickness and component distributions of large-area thin films are an issue of in-ternational concern in the field of material processing. The present work employs experiments and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to investigate three-dimensional low-density, non-equilibrium jets of yttrium and titanium vapor atoms in an electron-beams physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) system furnished with two or three electron-beams, and obtains their deposition thickness and component distributions onto 4-inch and 6-inch mono-crystal silicon wafers. The DSMC results are found in excellent agreement with our measurements, such as evaporation rates of yttrium and titanium measured in-situ by quartz crystal reso-nators, deposited film thickness distribution measured by Rutherford backscat-tering spectrometer (RBS) and surface profilometer and deposited film molar ratio distribution measured by RBS and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). This can be taken as an indication that a combination of DSMC method with elaborate measurements may be satisfactory for predicting and designing accurately the transport process of EBPVD at the atomic level.

  19. Tribological characteristics of gold films deposited on metals by ion plating and vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    The graded interface between an ion-plated film and a substrate is discussed as well as the friction and wear properties of ion-plated gold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and microhardness depth profiling were used to investigate the interface. The friction and wear properties of ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films were studied both in an ultra high vacuum system to maximize adhesion and in oil to minimize adhesion. The results indicate that the solubility of gold on the substrate material controls the depth of the graded interface. Thermal diffusion and chemical diffusion mechanisms are thought to be involved in the formation of the gold-nickel interface. In iron-gold graded interfaces the gold was primarily dispersed in the iron and thus formed a physically bonded interface. The hardness of the gold film was influenced by its depth and was also related to the composition gradient between the gold and the substrate. The graded nickel-gold interface exhibited the highest hardness because of an alloy hardening effect. The effects of film thickness on adhesion and friction were established.

  20. Half-sandwich cobalt complexes in the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgi, Colin [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Faculty of Natural Science, Institute of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Chemnitz 09107 (Germany); Hapke, Marko; Thiel, Indre [Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse e.V. an der Universität Rostock (LIKAT), Albert-Einstein-Straße 29a, Rostock 18059 (Germany); Hildebrandt, Alexander [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Faculty of Natural Science, Institute of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Chemnitz 09107 (Germany); Waechtler, Thomas; Schulz, Stefan E. [Fraunhofer Institute of Electronic Nano Systems (ENAS), Technologie-Campus 3, Chemnitz 09126 (Germany); Technische Universität Chemnitz, Center for Microtechnologies (ZfM), Chemnitz 09107 (Germany); Lang, Heinrich, E-mail: heinrich.lang@chemie.tu-chemnitz.de [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Faculty of Natural Science, Institute of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Chemnitz 09107 (Germany)

    2015-03-02

    A series of cobalt half-sandwich complexes of type [Co(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5})(L)(L′)] (1: L, L′ = 1,5-hexadiene; 2: L = P(OEt){sub 3}, L′ = H{sub 2}C=CHSiMe{sub 3}; 3: L = L′ = P(OEt){sub 3}) has been studied regarding their physical properties such as the vapor pressure, decomposition temperature and applicability within the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process, with a focus of the influence of the phosphite ligands. It could be shown that an increasing number of P(OEt){sub 3} ligands increases the vapor pressure and thermal stability of the respective organometallic compound. Complex 3 appeared to be a promising MOCVD precursor with a high vapor pressure and hence was deposited onto Si/SiO{sub 2} (100 nm) substrates. The resulting reflective layer is closed, dense and homogeneous, with a slightly granulated surface morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies demonstrated the formation of metallic cobalt, cobalt phosphate, cobalt oxide and cobalt carbide. - Highlights: • Thermal studies and vapor pressure measurements of cobalt half-sandwich complexes was carried out. • Chemical vapor deposition with cobalt half-sandwich complexes is reported. • The use of Co-phosphites results in significant phosphorous-doped metallic layers.

  1. Si Passivation and Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Nitride: Final Technical Report, March 18, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwater, H. A.

    2007-11-01

    This report investigated chemical and physical methods for Si surface passivation for application in crystalline Si and thin Si film photovoltaic devices. Overall, our efforts during the project were focused in three areas: i) synthesis of silicon nitride thin films with high hydrogen content by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition; ii) investigation of the role of hydrogen passivation of defects in crystalline Si and Si solar cells by out diffusion from hydrogenated silicon nitride films; iii) investigation of the growth kinetics and passivation of hydrogenated polycrystalline. Silicon nitride films were grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition and film properties have been characterized as a function of SiH4/NH3 flow ratio. It was demonstrated that hot-wire chemical vapor deposition leads to growth of SiNx films with controllable stoichiometry and hydrogen.

  2. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere.

  3. Growth behavior of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films on graphene substrate grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Wan [Thin Film Materials Research Group, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gun Hwan; Kang, Min A.; An, Ki-Seok; Lee, Young Kuk [Thin Film Materials Research Group, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seong Gu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungjun [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    A comparative study of the substrate effect on the growth mechanism of chalcogenide Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films was carried out. Obvious microstructural discrepancy in both the as-deposited Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films was observed when grown on graphene or SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films deposited on the graphene substrate were observed to be grown epitaxially along c-axis and show very smooth surface compared to that on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. Based on the experimental results of this study, the initial adsorption sites on graphene substrate during deposition process, which had been discussed theoretically, could be demonstrated empirically. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Plasma properties of a new-type surface wave-sustained plasma source under the conditions of depositing DLC films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junqi; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Umehara, Noritsugu; Diao, Dongfeng

    2006-01-01

    Surface wave-sustained plasma (SWP) is one of the low-pressure, high- density plasma. Applying this technique, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films with excellent characteristics can be prepared by physical vapor deposition (PVD) method. However, the films' application is restricted in some degree, because it is difficult to control the film properties. In this paper, SWP was excited along a conductive rod at a frequency of 2.45 GHz without magnetic fields around the chamber wall. The fundamental theories of plasma diagnostic were presented and plasma properties were studied with a Langmuir probe under the conditions of depositing DLC films by PVD method with a graphite target. Plasma density, electron temperature, plasma potential and target current were measured at difference technique parameters such as gas pressure, microwave power, and so on. As a result, it was proved that plasma properties are greatly affected by microwave power, target voltage and argon gas pressure in chamber. The gas mass flow rate had almost no effect on plasma characters. At the same time, the results indicated that electron density is up to 10 11-10 12cm -3 even at the low pressure of 1 Pa.

  5. Investigation of polycrystalline CdTe thin films deposited by physical vapor deposition, close-spaced sublimation, and sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, H.R.; Hasoon, F.S.; Abulfotuh, F.; Kazmerski, L.L. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    1995-11-01

    CdTe thin films, deposited on different substrate structures by physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and close-spaced sublimation, have been treated with CdCl{sub 2} at several temperatures. The morphology of the films has been studied by atomic force microscopy, and the observations were correlated to results obtained from x-ray diffraction, cathodoluminescence, and minority-carrier lifetime measurements. The samples treated at 400 {degree}C resulted in the best device-quality films, independent of deposition method and underlying substrate structure. For the first time, a nanograin structure was observed in CdTe sputtered samples. copyright {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}.

  6. Effects of post-deposition argon implantation on the memory properties of plasma-deposited silicon nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Q. A.; Brown, W. D.

    1989-10-01

    Post-deposition ion implantation has been used to introduce argon into plasma-enhanced chemically vapor deposited silicon nitride films in an attempt to influence the transfer, trapping, and emission of charge during write/erase exercising of the metal-silicon nitride-silicon oxide-silicon structure. Argon was implanted into the SiH4 -NH3 -N2 deposited films at energies ranging from 25 to 75 keV, current densities ranging from 0.1 to 75 μA/cm2 and fluences ranging from 1×1012 to 1×1016 ions/cm2. Physical properties of the films were studied by ellipsometry and infrared spectroscopy, while high frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves were used to obtain programming, retention, and endurance characteristics.

  7. Processing Research on Chemically Vapor Deposited Silicon Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    7 A-A79 328 GENERAL ELECTR IC Co PHILADELPH IA PA RE-ENTRY AND ENV--ETC F/S 3/ PROCESING RESEARCH ON CHEMICALLY VAPR DEPOSITED SILICON HITRI ETCIU) I...NH)2] x-- .Si3N 4 as well as NH 3 2) 3SiCI + 6H --- 3i + 6 HC - Si N 4 2 (V,l1) 3 4 pressure may play a part in shifting the deposition sequence from...hot-wall reactor should be further refined with em- phasis on the formation of figured geometries (hemispherical and ogive shells). As part of this

  8. Optical spectroscopic analyses of CVD plasmas used in the deposition of transparent and conductive ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Espinos, J.P.; Yubero, F.; Barranco, A.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R. [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Cotrino, J. [Universidad de Sevilla, Facultad de Fisica, Dept. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Sevilla (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Transparent conducting ZnO:A1 thin films have been prepared by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Emission line profiles were recorded as a function of different plasma gas composition (oxygen and hydrogen mixtures) and different rates of precursors (Zn(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2} and A1(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) in the downstream zone of the plasma reactor. Optical emission spectroscopy were used to characterize the oxygen/hydrogen plasma as a function of hydrogen flow rate. The variation of plasma hydrogen content has an important influence in the resistivity of the films. (authors)

  9. Antireflection coatings on plastics deposited by plasma polymerization process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K M K Srivatsa; M Bera; A Basu; T K Bhattacharya

    2008-08-01

    Antireflection coatings (ARCs) are deposited on the surfaces of optical elements like spectacle lenses to increase light transmission and improve their performance. In the ophthalmic industry, plastic lenses are rapidly displacing glass lenses due to several advantageous features. However, the deposition of ARCs on plastic lenses is a challenging task, because the plastic surface needs treatment for adhesion improvement and surface hardening before depositing the ARC. This surface treatment is usually done in a multi-stage process—exposure to energetic radiations, followed by deposition of a carbonyl hard coating by spin or dip coating processes, UV curing, etc. However, this treatment can also be done by plasma processes. Moreover, the plasma polymerization process allows deposition of optical films at room temperature, essential for plastics. The energetic ions in plasma processes provide similar effects as in ion assisted physical deposition processes to produce hard coatings, without requiring sophisticated ion sources. The plasma polymerization process is more economical than ion-assisted physical vapour deposition processes as regards equipment and source materials and is more cost-effective, enabling the surface treatment and deposition of the ARC in the same deposition system in a single run by varying the system parameters at each step. Since published results of the plasma polymerization processes developed abroad are rather sketchy and the techniques are mostly veiled in commercial secrecy, innovative and indigenous plasma-based techniques have been developed in this work for depositing the complete ARCs on plastic substrates.

  10. Chemical vapor deposition polymerization the growth and properties of parylene thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Fortin, Jeffrey B

    2004-01-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposition Polymerization - The Growth and Properties of Parylene Thin Films is intended to be valuable to both users and researchers of parylene thin films. It should be particularly useful for those setting up and characterizing their first research deposition system. It provides a good picture of the deposition process and equipment, as well as information on system-to-system variations that is important to consider when designing a deposition system or making modifications to an existing one. Also included are methods to characterizae a deposition system's pumping properties as well as monitor the deposition process via mass spectrometry. There are many references that will lead the reader to further information on the topic being discussed. This text should serve as a useful reference source and handbook for scientists and engineers interested in depositing high quality parylene thin films.

  11. TiOxNy coatings grown by atmospheric pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Maury, Francis; Duminica, Florin-Daniel

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Titanium oxynitride coatings were deposited on various substrates by an original atmospheric pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process using titanium tetra-iso-propoxide as titanium and oxygen precursors and hydrazine as a nitrogen source. The films composition was monitored by controlling the N2H4 mole fraction in the initial reactive gas phase. The variation of the N content in the films results in significant changes in morphological, structur...

  12. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of physical vapor deposition of thin Cu film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; CHEN Chang-qi; ZHU Wu

    2004-01-01

    A two-dimensional Kinetic Monte Carlo method has been developed for simulating the physical vapor deposition of thin Cu films on Cu substrate. An improved embedded atom method was used to calculate the interatomic potential and determine the diffusion barrier energy and residence time. Parameters, including incident angle,deposition rate and substrate temperature, were investigated and discussed in order to find their influences on the thin film morphology.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide for large area mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilman, R. L.; Maguire, E. A.

    1982-05-01

    CVD-SiC has been identified as the leading mirror material for high energy synchrotron radiation because of its high K/alpha ratio and its ability to be super-polished to less than or equal to 10 A rms roughness. Technology already exists for depositing SiC over large areas (approximately 70 cm x 20 cm). The CVD process, substrate selection, and mirror design considerations are discussed.

  14. Density-controlled growth of well-aligned ZnO nanowires using chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Well-aligned ZnO nanowires were grown on Si substrate by chemical vapor deposition.The experimental results showed that the density of nanowires was related to the heating process and growth temperature.High-density ZnO nanowires were obtained under optimal conditions.The growth mechanism of the ZnO nanowires was presented as well.

  15. Tip-based chemical vapor deposition with a scanning nano-heater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaitas, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this preliminary effort, a moving nano-heater directs a chemical vapor deposition reaction (nano-CVD) demonstrating a tip-based nanofabrication (TBN) method. Localized nano-CVD of copper (Cu) and copper oxide (CuO) on a silicon (Si) and silicon oxide (SiO2) substrate from gasses, namely sublimate

  16. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Atomically-Thin Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    photoluminescence. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) Nanotechnology Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) Raman spectroscopy 16...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 UNCLASSIFIED Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. i CONTENTS Page Introduction 1...UNCLASSIFIED Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 1 INTRODUCTION Recently, an explosion of interest in low-dimensional

  17. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  18. Growth Process Conditions of Tungsten Oxide Thin Films Using Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, Z.S.; Geus, J.W.; de Jong, M.; Harks, P.P.R.M.L.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2011-01-01

    We report the growth conditions of nanostructured tungsten oxide (WO3−x) thin films using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). Two tungsten filaments were resistively heated to various temperatures and exposed to an air flow at various subatmospheric pressures. The oxygen partial pressure was

  19. Kinetic Study of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Tantalum in Long Narrow Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Petrushina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    A kinetic study of the chemical vapor deposition of tantalum in long narrow channels is done to optimize the industrial process for the manufacture of tantalum coated plate heat exchangers. The developed model fits well at temperatures between 750 and 850 °C, and in the pressure range of25–990 mb...

  20. Effects of additional vapors on sterilization of microorganism spores with plasma-excited neutral gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Some fundamental experiments are carried out in order to develop a plasma process that will uniformly sterilize both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Air, oxygen, argon, and nitrogen are each used as the plasma source gas to which mixed vapors of water and ethanol at different ratios are added. The reactor chamber is remotely located from the plasma area and a metal mesh for eliminating charged particles is installed between them. Thus, only reactive neutral particles such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals are utilized. As a result, adding vapors to the source gas markedly enhances the sterilization effect. In particular, air with water and/or ethanol vapor and oxygen with ethanol vapor show more than 6-log reduction for Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores.

  1. Ultrafine Microstructure Composites Prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    pressed AIN from Denka , hot pressed BN+AlN from Union Carbide (71%BN, 20%AIN, and 4%B203 ) ..... . 217 5-57 XRD patterns of BN+AlN deposited on A1203 at...side wall of the top section of the graphite extension tube as shown in Figure 3-9. The top end of the extension tube was sealed using graphite cement ...samples) are shown in Figures 5-34 through 5-36. Also, the XRD spectra of uncoated A 20,O and hot-pressed AlN ( Denka , Inc.) are included in Figure 5-34 for

  2. Amorphous Silicon Film Deposition from SiH4 by Chemical Vapor Deposition with Argon Excimer Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshikawa, Kiyohiko; Yokotani, Atsushi; Kurosawa, Kou

    2005-11-01

    We have deposited amorphous silicon thin films from monosilane (SiH4) gas by photochemical vapor deposition using a vacuum ultraviolet excimer lamp (VUV-CVD). We used an argon excimer lamp (λ=126 nm, hν=9.8 eV) whose photons are strongly absorbed by SiH4 gas. The substrate temperatures were changed from 25 to 300°C. When the temperature was lower than 150°C, the films included H--Si--H units and H2 molecules in its structure. When it was higher than 150°C, the main structural unit was Si--H.

  3. Silicon doping techniques using chemical vapor dopant deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popadic, M.

    2009-11-12

    Ultrashallow junctions are essential for the achievement of superior transistor performance, both in MOSFET and bipolar transistors. The stringent demands require state-of-the-art fabrication techniques. At the same time, in a different context, the accurate fabrication of various n type doping profiles by low-temperature Si epitaxy is a challenge due to autodoping. In this thesis, these two, apparently unrelated, problems are both addressed as the layer of CVD surface-deposited dopant atoms is used as a doping source. It is demonstrated that a layer of dopants deposited on the Si surface can be used as a doping source by either thermal or laser drive-in for the fabrication of both deep and ultrashallow defect-free junctions. In low-temperature CVD epitaxy, autodoping is a consequence of dopant surface segregation and doping from the surface layer. This process has been characterized, and consequently excellent controllability is achieved. In addition, new results related to the CVD of dopants itself are obtained, and two theoretical achievements are made: the analytical model of arbitrarily shallow junctions is derived, and a new C-V profiling technique suitable for the characterization of ultrashallow junctions is developed.

  4. LASER-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF METAL CARBONYLS FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF MICROSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten and nickel carbonyls were used to produce metal microstructures by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various substrates. The deposition rate of microstructures produced by thermodecomposition of W(CO)6 on Si substrates heated with a cw Ar+ laser beam was relatively low (10 to 30 nm/s) even at high temperatures (above 900°C). Ni microstructures were deposited on quartz substrates irradiated with a CO2 laser beam. Relatively high laser powers were needed to heat the Ni s...

  5. Structure and Morphology of Phthalocyanine Films Grown in Electrical Fields by Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Banks, C. E.; Frazier, D. O.; Penn, B.; Abdeldayem, H.; Hicks, R.; Burns, H. D.; Thompson, G. W.

    1999-01-01

    Phthalocyanine (Pc) films have been synthesized by vapor deposition on quartz substrates, some of which were coated with a very thin gold film before depositing Pc films. Electrical fields up to 6200 V/cm between a mech electrode and the substrate are introduced during film growth. These films have been characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The molecular orientations and surface morphology of Pc films were changed under the electrical fields. The surface of these films grown without electrical field shows whisk-like morphology. When films are deposited under an electrical field, a dense film with flat surface is obtained.

  6. Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition of Few-Layer Graphene on Copper Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Víctor-Manuel Freire; Badia-Canal, Jordi; Roca, Carles Corbella; Miralles, Esther Pascual; Serra, Enric Bertran; Bella, José-Luís Andújar

    2013-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on copper is an efficient technology for producing high-quality graphene for large areas. The objective of this work is to deposit graphene/few-layer graphene (FLG) using different types of copper substrate by a new hot-wire CVD process. We carried out the processes at temperatures below 1000 °C with acetylene (C2H2) as a precursor gas. After a general characterization of the samples, the results mostly indicate the formation of FLG on copper samples by this method. Nevertheless, the presence of pure, crystalline, and sufficiently flat surfaces is needed for depositing high-quality graphene layers.

  7. A Study on Medium Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (MT-CVD) Technology and Super Coating Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jian; LI Jian-ping; ZENG Xiang-cai; MA Wen-cun

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the dense and columnar crystalline TiCN coating layers with very good bonding strength between a layer and another layer was deposited using Medium Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (MT-CVD) where CH3CN organic composite with C/N atomic clusters etc. was utilized at 700 ~ 900 ℃. Effect of coating processing parameters, such as coating temperature, pressure and different gas flow quantity on structures and properties of TiCN coating layers were investigated. The super coating mechanis mand structures were analyzed. The new coating processing parameters and properties of carbide inserts with super coating layers were gained by using the improved high temperature chemical vapor deposition (HTCVD) equipment and HT-CVD, in combination with MT-CVD technology.

  8. Discrete formulation of mixed finite element methods for vapor deposition chemical reaction equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhen-dong; ZHOU Yan-jie; ZHU Jiang

    2007-01-01

    The vapor deposition chemical reaction processes, which are of extremely extensive applications, can be classified as a mathematical modes by the following governing nonlinear partial differential equations containing velocity vector,temperature field,pressure field,and gas mass field.The mixed finite element(MFE)method is employed to study the system of equations for the vapor deposition chemical reaction processes.The semidiscrete and fully discrete MFE formulations are derived.And the existence and convergence(error estimate)of the semidiscrete and fully discrete MFE solutions are deposition chemical reaction processes,the numerical solutions of the velocity vector,the temperature field,the pressure field,and the gas mass field can be found out simultaneonsly.Thus,these researches are not only of important theoretical means,but also of extremely extensive applied vistas.

  9. Experimental investigation of vapor shielding effects induced by ELM-like pulsed plasma loads using the double plasma gun device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, I.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a unique experimental device of so-called double plasma gun, which consists of two magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) devices, in order to clarify effects of vapor shielding on material erosion due to transient events in magnetically confined fusion devices. Two ELM-like pulsed plasmas produced by the two MCPG devices were injected into a target chamber with a variable time difference. For generating ablated plasmas in front of a target material, an aluminum foil sample in the target chamber was exposed to a pulsed plasma produced by the 1st MCPG device. The 2nd pulsed plasma was produced with a time delay of 70 μs. It was found that a surface absorbed energy measured by a calorimeter was reduced to ∼66% of that without the Al foil sample. Thus, the reduction of the incoming plasma energy by the vapor shielding effect was successfully demonstrated in the present experiment.

  10. Experimental investigation of vapor shielding effects induced by ELM-like pulsed plasma loads using the double plasma gun device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, I., E-mail: eu13z002@steng.u-hyogo.ac.jp; Kikuchi, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2015-08-15

    We have developed a unique experimental device of so-called double plasma gun, which consists of two magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) devices, in order to clarify effects of vapor shielding on material erosion due to transient events in magnetically confined fusion devices. Two ELM-like pulsed plasmas produced by the two MCPG devices were injected into a target chamber with a variable time difference. For generating ablated plasmas in front of a target material, an aluminum foil sample in the target chamber was exposed to a pulsed plasma produced by the 1st MCPG device. The 2nd pulsed plasma was produced with a time delay of 70 μs. It was found that a surface absorbed energy measured by a calorimeter was reduced to ∼66% of that without the Al foil sample. Thus, the reduction of the incoming plasma energy by the vapor shielding effect was successfully demonstrated in the present experiment.

  11. Plasma reactor for deposition of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Zh; Mitev, D.; Kiss'ovski, Zh

    2016-10-01

    In this study a novel plasma reactor for deposition of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure is constructed and characterized. A low power microwave discharge is used as a plasma source and working gas of Ar/H2/CH4 gas mixture. The substrate is heated by plasma flame and its temperature is in the range 600-700 C. The chemical composition of the plasma and the gas mixture effect on the concentration of the various particles in the plasma is investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. The emission spectrum of the plasma jet in Ar/H2/CH4 mixture shows the presence of carbon (Swan band) and an intensive line of CH (388 nm), which are necessary species for deposition of carbon nanostructures. Additional voltage in the range from -20 V to -100 V is applied in order to ensure the vertical growth of graphene walls. Results of deposited carbon nanostructures on metal substrate are shown.

  12. Plasma-Assisted Deposition of Au/SiO2 Multi-layers as Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Red-Colored Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyene, H. T.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Verheijen, M. A.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the expanding thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition in combination with radio frequency magnetron sputtering is used to deposit dielectric/metal multi-layers with controlled size and density of nanoparticles. The multi-layer structure serves the purpose of increasing the

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of ceramic coatings on metals and ceramic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nable, Jun Co

    2005-07-01

    The research presented in this study consists of two major parts. The first part is about the development of ceramic coatings on metals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Ceramics such as Al2O3 and Cr2O3, are used as protective coatings for materials used at elevated temperatures (>700°C). These metal oxides either exhibit oxidation resistance or have been used as environmental bond coats. Conventional methods of coating by chemical vapor deposition requires deposition temperatures of >950°C which could damage the substrate material during the coating process. Lower deposition temperatures (400 to 600°C) by MOCVD of these metal oxides were successful on Ni metal substrates. Surface modification such as pre-oxidation and etching were also investigated. In addition, a novel approach for the CVD of TiN on metals was developed. This new approach utilizes ambient pressure conditions which lead to deposition temperatures of 800°C or lower compared to conventional CVD of TiN at 1000°C. Titanium nitride can be used as an abrasive and wear coating on cutting and grinding tools. This nitride can also serve as a diffusion coating in metals. The second major part of this research involves the synthesis of interfacial coatings on ceramic reinforcing fibers for ceramic matrix composites. Aluminum and chromium oxides were deposited onto SiC, and Al2O3-SiO 2 fibers by MOCVD. The effects of the interface coatings on the tensile strength of ceramic fibers are also discussed. New duplex interface coatings consisting of BN or TiN together with Al2O3 or ZrO 2 were also successfully deposited and evaluated on SiC fibers.

  14. Shaping thin film growth and microstructure pathways via plasma and deposition energy: a detailed theoretical, computational and experimental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Bibhuti Bhusan; Han, Jeon Geon; Kersten, Holger

    2017-02-15

    Understanding the science and engineering of thin films using plasma assisted deposition methods with controlled growth and microstructure is a key issue in modern nanotechnology, impacting both fundamental research and technological applications. Different plasma parameters like electrons, ions, radical species and neutrals play a critical role in nucleation and growth and the corresponding film microstructure as well as plasma-induced surface chemistry. The film microstructure is also closely associated with deposition energy which is controlled by electrons, ions, radical species and activated neutrals. The integrated studies on the fundamental physical properties that govern the plasmas seek to determine their structure and modification capabilities under specific experimental conditions. There is a requirement for identification, determination, and quantification of the surface activity of the species in the plasma. Here, we report a detailed study of hydrogenated amorphous and crystalline silicon (c-Si:H) processes to investigate the evolution of plasma parameters using a theoretical model. The deposition processes undertaken using a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method are characterized by a reactive mixture of hydrogen and silane. Later, various contributions of energy fluxes on the substrate are considered and modeled to investigate their role in the growth of the microstructure of the deposited film. Numerous plasma diagnostic tools are used to compare the experimental data with the theoretical results. The film growth and microstructure are evaluated in light of deposition energy flux under different operating conditions.

  15. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollis, Kendall J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pena, Maria I [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  16. Reactivity of water vapor in an atmospheric argon flowing post-discharge plasma torch

    CERN Document Server

    Collette, S; Reniers, F

    2016-01-01

    The reactivity of water vapor introduced in the flowing post-discharge of an RF atmospheric plasma torch is investigated through electrical characterization, optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry measurements. Due to the technical features of the plasma torch, the post-discharge can be considered as divided into two regions: an inner region (inside the plasma torch device) where the water vapor is injected and an outer region which directly interacts with the ambient air. The main reactions induced by the injection of water vapor are identified as well as those indicative of the influence of the ambient air. Plausible pathways allowing the production of H, OH, O radicals and H2O2 are discussed as well as reactions potentially responsible for inhomogeneities and for a low DC current measured in the flowing post-discharge. Keywords: atmospheric post-discharge, H2O plasma reactivity, RF plasma torch

  17. Column IIIA metal film deposition by dissociative photoionization of metal halide vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geohegan, D. B.; Eden, J. G.

    1984-11-01

    Films of column IIIA metals (In, Al, and Tl) have been deposited on several different substrates (stainless steel, nickel, copper, and silver) by dissociatively photoionizing the corresponding metal iodide in a uniform electric field. Thin (≲0.2 μm) indium films have been grown on nickel by photoionizing indium monoiodide (InI) vapor with an argon fluoride (ArF) excimer laser at 193 nm. A similar process has resulted in thallium films produced from thallium iodide (TlI) vapor with a high pressure xenon lamp.

  18. ZnO Nanowires Synthesized by Vapor Phase Transport Deposition on Transparent Oxide Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dongshan; Trad, Tarek; McLeskey, James T; Craciun, Valentin; Taylor, Curtis R

    2010-05-28

    Zinc oxide nanowires have been synthesized without using metal catalyst seed layers on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates by a modified vapor phase transport deposition process using a double-tube reactor. The unique reactor configuration creates a Zn-rich vapor environment that facilitates formation and growth of zinc oxide nanoparticles and wires (20-80 nm in diameter, up to 6 μm in length, density oxide nanostructure solar cells. For example, it is preferable to have nanowires no more than 40 nm apart to minimize exciton recombination in polymer solar cells.

  19. Spontaneous oscillations and pattern formation during chemical vapor deposition of metastable InN.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, F.; Munkholm, A.; Wang, R.-V.; Streiffer, S. K.; Thompson, C.; Fuoss, P. H.; Latifi, K.; Elder, K. R.; Stephenson, G. B.; Philips Lumileds Lighting Co.; Northern Illinois Univ.; Oakland Univ.; Ohio Univ.; Intel Corp.

    2008-01-01

    We report observations of self-sustaining spatiotemporal chemical oscillations during metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of InN onto GaN. Under constant supply of vapor precursors trimethylindium and NH{sub 3}, the condensed-phase cycles between crystalline islands of InN and elemental In droplets. Propagating fronts between regions of InN and In occur with linear, circular, and spiral geometries. The results are described by a model in which the nitrogen activity produced by surface-catalyzed NH{sub 3} decomposition varies with the exposed surface areas of GaN, InN, and In.

  20. Spontaneous oscillations and waves during chemical vapor deposition of InN.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, F.; Munkholm, A.; Wang, R.-V.; Streiffer, S. K.; Thompson, C.; Fuoss, P. H.; Latifi, K.; Elder, K. R.; Stephenson, G. B.; Philips Lumileds Lighting Co.; Northern Illinois Univ.; Oakland Univ.

    2008-08-22

    We report observations of self-sustaining spatiotemporal chemical oscillations during metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of InN onto GaN. Under constant supply of vapor precursors trimethylindium and NH{sub 3}, the condensed-phase cycles between crystalline islands of InN and elemental In droplets. Propagating fronts between regions of InN and In occur with linear, circular, and spiral geometries. The results are described by a model in which the nitrogen activity produced by surface-catalyzed NH{sub 3} decomposition varies with the exposed surface areas of GaN, InN, and In.

  1. Deoiled asphalt as carbon source for preparation of various carbon materials by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xuguang; Yang, Yongzhen; Lin, Xian; Xu, Bingshe; Zhang, Yan [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2006-10-15

    Various carbon materials, including vapor grown carbon fibers (VGCFs) and carbon trees, were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition in argon atmosphere, using deoiled asphalt as carbon source and ferrocene as catalyst. Pure carbon microbeads (CMBs) were also obtained by this method in the absence of ferrocene. The influence of different growth parameters, such as ferrocene content, reaction temperature, retention time and argon flow rate, was investigated, with respect to morphology and product yield. The products were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. (author)

  2. Evaluation of blood compatibility of plasma deposited heparin-like films and SF6 plasma treated surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanira Antunes Perrenoud

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In devices used in open-heart surgery and dialysis, blood must be continuously processed using extracorporeal circuits composed of peristaltic pumps and active components such as specific filters and oxygenators. Several procedures have been employed to avoid blood coagulation induced by contact with the artificial surfaces of such devices. Often heparin, a bioactive protein able to prevent clot formation, is employed. In this work, we have used heparin-containing gas plasmas to evaluate the possibility of depositing adherent anticoagulant films onto PVC and glass surfaces. The films were produced by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from heparin/isopropanol and heparin/hexamethyldisiloxane solutions. In addition, the effects of exposure to SF6 plasmas on the compatibility of such surfaces have also been investigated. The blood compatibility was evaluated through the determination of the density of platelets and fibrinogen and activated partial thromboplastin (APTT and prothrombin times (PT of human blood freshly collected and after contact for 2.5 hours with different surfaces. The deposited films were also characterized by infrared spectroscopy, contact angle and surface energy measurements. The coagulation time of blood, placed in contact with glass substrates coated by PECVD films of heparin/isopropanol mixtures, and in contact with SF6 plasma-treated PVC, increased by about 60 and 20%, respectively, compared to the values measured with untreated samples.

  3. High-Rate Vapor Deposition of Cadmium Telluride Films for Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nasim Akhter

    1992-01-01

    High rate vapor deposition is presently used for large scale low cost deposition of thin films for packaging and other applications. The feasibility of using this technology for low cost deposition of solar cells was explored. After an exhaustive literature survey, the cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cell was found to be most suitable candidate for high rate vapor deposition. The high rate vapor deposition was investigated by sublimation with a short distance between sublimation source and the substrate (Close-Spaced Sublimation, CSS). Cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells were fabricated by depositing CdTe films at different rates on cadmium sulphide (CdS) films deposited by CSS or by evaporation. The CdTe films deposited at higher deposition rates were observed to have open circuit voltages (V_{ rm oc}) comparable to those deposited at lower rates. The effect of CdS film which acts as window layer for the cells were also investigated on the V_ {rm oc} of the solar cells. The results achieved proved the fact that CdS window layer is necessary to achieve higher V_{ rm oc} from solar cells. The substrate temperature during deposition of films by close space sublimation plays a vital role in the performance of solar cell. The increase in the substrate temperature during deposition of CdTe films increased the V_{rm oc} of solar cells. The solar cells with indium tin oxide (ITO) as top conductor, i.e. ITO/CdS/CdTe configuration were fabricated at rates up to 34 mum/minute and with tin oxide (TO) i.e. TO/CdTe configuration fabricated at rates up to 79 mum/minute have shown similar V_{rm oc} compared to those produced at lower rates. Higher CdTe film deposition rates are possible with larger capacity experimental setup. The method of contacting CdTe, used in this study, results in higher series resistance. An improved method of contacting CdTe needs to be developed.

  4. Calculation of transport coefficients of air-water vapor mixtures thermal plasmas used in circuit breakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOHIO Niéssan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we calculate the transport coefficients of plasmas formed by air and water vapor mixtures. The calculation, which assume local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE are performed in the temperature range from 500 to 12000 K. We use the Gibbs free energy minimization method to determine the equilibrium composition of the plasmas, which is necessary to calculate the transport coefficients. We use the Chapman-Enskog method to calculate the transport coefficients. The results are presented and discussed according to the rate of water vapor. The results of the total thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity show in particular that the increasing of the rate of water vapor in air can be interesting for power cut. This could be improve the performance of plasma during current breaking in air contaminate by the water vapor.

  5. Localised plasma deposition of organosilicon layers on polymer substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.J.; Habets, D.; Staemmler, L.; Winands, H.; Bolt, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Organosilicon coatings provide good optical and mechanical properties and are excellent candidates for the modification of the surface energy of polymers. These coatings can be deposited by plasma polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) under atmospheric pressure and at room temperature. The

  6. Modified drug release using atmospheric pressure plasma deposited siloxane coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, D. P.; Maher, S.; Law, V. J.; Ardhaoui, M.; Stallard, C.; Keenan, A.

    2016-09-01

    This pilot study evaluates the potential of atmospheric plasma polymerised coatings to modify the rate of drug release from polymeric substrates. The antibiotic rifampicin was deposited in a prototype multi-layer drug delivery system, consisting of a nebulized layer of active drug between a base layer of TEOS deposited on a plastic substrate (polystyrene) and an overlying layer of plasma polymerised PDMS. The polymerised TEOS and PDMS layers were deposited using a helium atmospheric plasma jet system. Elution of rifampicin was measured using UV-VIS spectroscopy, in addition to a antimicrobial well diffusion assay with an established indicator organism. The multi-layered plasma deposited coatings significantly extended the duration of release of the rifampicin from 24 h for the uncoated polymer to 144 h for the coated polymer.

  7. Plasma deposition of silver nanoparticles on ultrafiltration membranes: antibacterial and anti-biofouling properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Mercedes Cecilia; Ruano, Gustavo; Wolf, Marcus; Hecker, Dominic; Vidaurre, Elza Castro; Schmittgens, Ralph; Rajal, Verónica Beatriz

    2015-02-01

    A novel and versatile plasma reactor was used to modify Polyethersulphone commercial membranes. The equipment was applied to: i) functionalize the membranes with low-temperature plasmas, ii) deposit a film of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and, iii) deposit silver nanoparticles (SNP) by Gas Flow Sputtering. Each modification process was performed in the same reactor consecutively, without exposure of the membranes to atmospheric air. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the particles and modified membranes. SNP are evenly distributed on the membrane surface. Particle fixation and transport inside membranes were assessed before- and after-washing assays by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling analysis. PMMA addition improved SNP fixation. Plasma-treated membranes showed higher hydrophilicity. Anti-biofouling activity was successfully achieved against Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis) and -negative (Salmonella Typhimurium) bacteria. Therefore, disinfection by ultrafiltration showed substantial resistance to biofouling. The post-synthesis functionalization process developed provides a more efficient fabrication route for anti-biofouling and anti-bacterial membranes used in the water treatment field. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a gas phase condensation process combined with a PECVD procedure in order to deposit SNP on commercial membranes to inhibit biofouling formation.

  8. Plasma deposition of silver nanoparticles on ultrafiltration membranes: antibacterial and anti-biofouling properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Mercedes Cecilia; Ruano, Gustavo; Wolf, Marcus; Hecker, Dominic; Vidaurre, Elza Castro; Schmittgens, Ralph; Rajal, Verónica Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    A novel and versatile plasma reactor was used to modify Polyethersulphone commercial membranes. The equipment was applied to: i) functionalize the membranes with low-temperature plasmas, ii) deposit a film of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and, iii) deposit silver nanoparticles (SNP) by Gas Flow Sputtering. Each modification process was performed in the same reactor consecutively, without exposure of the membranes to atmospheric air. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the particles and modified membranes. SNP are evenly distributed on the membrane surface. Particle fixation and transport inside membranes were assessed before- and after-washing assays by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling analysis. PMMA addition improved SNP fixation. Plasma-treated membranes showed higher hydrophilicity. Anti-biofouling activity was successfully achieved against Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis) and -negative (Salmonella Typhimurium) bacteria. Therefore, disinfection by ultrafiltration showed substantial resistance to biofouling. The post-synthesis functionalization process developed provides a more efficient fabrication route for anti-biofouling and anti-bacterial membranes used in the water treatment field. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a gas phase condensation process combined with a PECVD procedure in order to deposit SNP on commercial membranes to inhibit biofouling formation. PMID:26166926

  9. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  10. Self-Catalytic Growth of Tin Oxide Nanowires by Chemical Vapor Deposition Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongani S. Thabethe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis of tin oxide (SnO2 nanowires by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD process. Commercially bought SnO nanopowders were vaporized at 1050°C for 30 minutes with argon gas continuously passing through the system. The as-synthesized products were characterized using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. The band gap of the nanowires determined from UV-visible absorption was around 3.7 eV. The SEM micrographs revealed “wool-like” structure which contains nanoribbons and nanowires with liquid droplets at the tips. Nanowires typically have diameter in the range of 50–200 nm and length 10–100 μm. These nanowires followed the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS growth mechanism.

  11. Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of conformal Pt films in high aspect ratio trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkens, I. J. M.; Verheijen, M. A.; Knoops, H. C. M.; Keuning, W.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2017-02-01

    To date, conventional thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been the method of choice to deposit high-quality Pt thin films grown typically from (MeCp)PtMe3 vapor and O2 gas at 300 °C. Plasma-assisted ALD of Pt using O2 plasma can offer several advantages over thermal ALD, such as faster nucleation and deposition at lower temperatures. In this work, it is demonstrated that plasma-assisted ALD at 300 °C also allows for the deposition of highly conformal Pt films in trenches with high aspect ratio ranging from 3 to 34. Scanning electron microscopy inspection revealed that the conformality of the deposited Pt films was 100% in trenches with aspect ratio (AR) up to 34. These results were corroborated by high-precision layer thickness measurements by transmission electron microscopy for trenches with an aspect ratio of 22. The role of the surface recombination of O-radicals and the contribution of thermal ALD reactions is discussed.

  12. Plasma assisted deposition of metal fluorides for 193nm applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Martin; Sode, Maik; Gaebler, Dieter; Kaiser, Norbert; Tuennermann, Andreas

    2008-10-01

    The ArF lithography technology requires a minimization of optical losses due to scattering and absorption. Consequently it is necessary to optimize the coating process of metal fluorides. The properties of metal fluoride thin films are mainly affected by the deposition methods, their parameters, and the vacuum conditions. Until now the best results were achieved by metal boat evaporation with high substrate temperature and without plasma assistance. In fact, it was demonstrated that the plasma assisted deposition process results in optical thin films with high packing density but the losses due to absorption were extremely high for deep and vacuum ultraviolet applications. This paper will demonstrate that most of the common metal fluorides can be deposited by electron beam evaporation with plasma assistance. In comparison to other deposition methods, the prepared thin films show low absorption in the VUV spectral range, high packing density, and less water content. The densification of the thin films was performed by a Leybold LION plasma source. As working gas, a variable mixture of fluorine and argon gas was chosen. To understand the deposition process and the interaction of the plasma with the deposition material, various characterization methods like plasma emission spectroscopy and ion current measurements were implemented.

  13. Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride from Bis(tert-butylamino)silane and N2 Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoops, Harm C M; Braeken, Eline M J; de Peuter, Koen; Potts, Stephen E; Haukka, Suvi; Pore, Viljami; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2015-09-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiNx) is deemed essential for a variety of applications in nanoelectronics, such as gate spacer layers in transistors. In this work an ALD process using bis(tert-butylamino)silane (BTBAS) and N2 plasma was developed and studied. The process exhibited a wide temperature window starting from room temperature up to 500 °C. The material properties and wet-etch rates were investigated as a function of plasma exposure time, plasma pressure, and substrate table temperature. Table temperatures of 300-500 °C yielded a high material quality and a composition close to Si3N4 was obtained at 500 °C (N/Si=1.4±0.1, mass density=2.9±0.1 g/cm3, refractive index=1.96±0.03). Low wet-etch rates of ∼1 nm/min were obtained for films deposited at table temperatures of 400 °C and higher, similar to that achieved in the literature using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of SiNx at >700 °C. For novel applications requiring significantly lower temperatures, the temperature window from room temperature to 200 °C can be a solution, where relatively high material quality was obtained when operating at low plasma pressures or long plasma exposure times.

  14. Growth of aligned ZnO nanowires via modified atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuping; Li, Chengchen [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Chen, Mingming, E-mail: andychain@live.cn [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Yu, Xiao; Chang, Yunwei [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Chen, Anqi [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics & Information Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center (University Town), Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Zhu, Hai, E-mail: zhuhai5@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics & Information Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center (University Town), Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Tang, Zikang, E-mail: zktang@umac.mo [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics & Information Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center (University Town), Guangzhou, 510006 (China); The Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering, University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade, Taipa, Macau (China)

    2016-12-09

    In this work, we report the growth of high-quality aligned ZnO nanowires via a facile atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The CVD reactor chamber used was more complicated than a conventional one due to the quartz boats loaded with sources (ZnO/C) and substrates being inserted into a semi-open quartz tube, and then placed inside the CVD reactor. The semi-open quartz tube played a very important role in growing the ZnO nanowires, and demonstrated that the transportation properties of Zn and O vapor differ from those in the conventional CVD reactor chamber. Aligned ZnO nanowires were successfully obtained, though they were only found at substrates located upstream. The very high crystalline quality of the obtained ZnO nanowires was demonstrated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and room temperature photoluminescence investigations. Such ZnO nanowires with high crystalline quality may provide opportunities for the fabrication of ZnO-based nano-devices in future. - Highlights: • High-quality aligned ZnO nanowires were obtained via modified chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure. • The semi-open quartz tube plays very important roles in growing ZnO nanowires. • The transportation properties of Zn and O vapor differ from those in the conventional CVD reactor chamber.

  15. MgB{sub 2} thin films by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, X.X. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]. E-mail: xxx4@psu.edu; Pogrebnyakov, A.V. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Xu, S.Y.; Chen, K.; Cui, Y.; Maertz, E.C. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhuang, C.G. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Qi [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Lamborn, D.R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Redwing, J.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Liu, Z.K.; Soukiassian, A.; Schlom, D.G.; Weng, X.J.; Dickey, E.C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Chen, Y.B.; Tian, W.; Pan, X.Q. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Cybart, S.A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dynes, R.C. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) has been the most effective technique for depositing MgB{sub 2} thin films. It generates high magnesium vapor pressures and provides a clean environment for the growth of high purity MgB{sub 2} films. The epitaxial pure MgB{sub 2} films grown by HPCVD show higher-than-bulk T {sub c} due to tensile strain in the films. The HPCVD films are the cleanest MgB{sub 2} materials reported, allowing basic research, such as on magnetoresistance, that reveals the two-band nature of MgB{sub 2}. The carbon-alloyed HPCVD films demonstrate record-high H {sub c2} values promising for high magnetic field applications. The HPCVD films and multilayers have enabled the fabrication of high quality MgB{sub 2} Josephson junctions.

  16. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-Pressure Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  17. Development of Nb{sub 3}Sn Cavity Vapor Diffusion Deposition System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremeev, Grigory V.; Macha, Kurt M.; Clemens, William A.; Park, HyeKyoung; Williams, R. Scott

    2014-02-01

    Nb{sub 3}Sn is a BCS superconductors with the superconducting critical temperature higher than that of niobium, so theoretically it surpasses the limitations of niobium in RF fields. The feasibility of technology has been demonstrated at 1.5 GHz with Nb{sub 3}Sn vapor deposition technique at Wuppertal University. The benefit at these frequencies is more pronounced at 4.2 K, where Nb{sub 3}Sn coated cavities show RF resistances an order of magnitude lower than that of niobium. At Jefferson Lab we started the development of Nb{sub 3}Sn vapor diffusion deposition system within an R\\&D development program towards compact light sources. Here we present the current progress of the system development.

  18. Communication: Surface-facilitated softening of ordinary and vapor-deposited glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeta, Ulyana; Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2017-08-01

    A common distinction between the ordinary glasses formed by melt cooling and the stable amorphous films formed by vapor deposition is the apparent mechanism of their devitrification. Using quasi-adiabatic, fast scanning calorimetry that is capable of heating rates in excess of 105 K s-1, we have investigated the softening kinetics of micrometer-scale, ordinary glass films of methylbenzene and 2-propanol. At the limit of high heating rates, the transformation mechanism of ordinary glasses is identical to that of their stable vapor-deposited counterparts. In both cases, softening is likely to begin at the sample surface and progress into its bulk via a transformation front. Furthermore, such a surface-facilitated mechanism complies with zero-order, Arrhenius rate law. The activation energy barriers for the softening transformation imply that the kinetics must be defined, at least in part, by the initial thermodynamic and structural state of the samples.

  19. Low Temperature Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes via Floating Catalyst Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.R. Atiyan; D.R. Awang Biak; F. Ahmadun; I.S. Ahamad; F. Mohd Yasin; H. Mohamed Yusoff

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) below 600℃ using supporting catalyst chemical vapor deposition method was reported by many research groups. However, the floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition received less attention due to imperfect nanotubes produced. In this work, the effects of varying the preheating temperature on the synthesis of CNT were investigated. The reaction temperature was set at 570℃. The preheating set temperature was varied from 150 to 400℃ at 50℃ interval. Three O-ring shape heating mantels were used as heating source for the preheater. In situ monitoring device was used to observe the temperature profile in the reactor. Benzene and ferrocene were used as the carbon source and catalyst precursor, respectively. Vertically aligned CNTs were synthesized when the preheating temperature was set at 400℃. When the preheating temperature was increased up to 400℃, both the length and the alignment of CNTs produced were improved.

  20. Investigations of chemical vapor deposition of GaN using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, C.; Stephenson, G. B.; Eastman, J. A.; Munkholm, A.; Auciello, O.; Murty, M. V. R.; Fini, P.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.

    2000-05-25

    The authors apply synchrotron x-ray analysis techniques to probe the surface structure of GaN films during synthesis by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Their approach is to observe the evolution of surface structure and morphology in real time using grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS). This technique combines the ability of x-rays to penetrate the chemical vapor deposition environment for in situ measurements, with the sensitivity of GIXS to atomic scale structure. In this paper they present examples from some of their studies of growth modes and surface evolution as a function of process conditions that illustrate the capabilities of synchrotron x-ray analysis during MOCVD growth. They focus on studies of the homoepitaxial growth mode, island coarsening dynamics, and effects of impurities.

  1. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) grown bi-layer graphene transistor characteristics at high temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2014-05-15

    We report the characteristics of atmospheric chemical vapor deposition grown bilayer graphene transistors fabricated on ultra-scaled (10 nm) high-κ dielectric aluminum oxide (Al2O3) at elevated temperatures. We observed that the drive current increased by >400% as temperature increased from room temperature to 250 °C. Low gate leakage was maintained for prolonged exposure at 100 °C but increased significantly at temperatures >200 °C. These results provide important insights for considering chemical vapor deposition graphene on aluminum oxide for high temperature applications where low power and high frequency operation are required. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition: A review of physics,technology, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Jacques; Anders, Andre

    2005-05-16

    After pioneering work in the 1980s, plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) and plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBIID) can now be considered mature technologies for surface modification and thin film deposition. This review starts by looking at the historical development and recalling the basic ideas of PBII. Advantages and disadvantages are compared to conventional ion beam implantation and physical vapor deposition for PBII and PBIID, respectively, followed by a summary of the physics of sheath dynamics, plasma and pulse specifications, plasma diagnostics, and process modeling. The review moves on to technology considerations for plasma sources and process reactors. PBII surface modification and PBIID coatings are applied in a wide range of situations. They include the by-now traditional tribological applications of reducing wear and corrosion through the formation of hard, tough, smooth, low-friction and chemically inert phases and coatings, e.g. for engine components. PBII has become viable for the formation of shallow junctions and other applications in microelectronics. More recently, the rapidly growing field of biomaterial synthesis makes used of PBII&D to produce surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible surfaces and coatings, etc. With limitations, also non-conducting materials such as plastic sheets can be treated. The major interest in PBII processing originates from its flexibility in ion energy (from a few eV up to about 100 keV), and the capability to efficiently treat, or deposit on, large areas, and (within limits) to process non-flat, three-dimensional workpieces, including forming and modifying metastable phases and nanostructures. We use the acronym PBII&D when referring to both implantation and deposition, while PBIID implies that deposition is part of the process.

  3. Fabrication of Rare Earth-Doped Transparent Glass Ceramic Optical Fibers by Modified Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Rare earth (RE) doped silica-based optical fibers with transparent glass ceramic (TGC) core was fabricated through the well-known modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process without going through the commonly used stage of post-ceramming. The main characteristics of the RE-doped oxyde nanoparticles namely, their density and mean diameter in the fibers are dictated by the concentration of alkaline earth element used as phase separating agent. Magnesium and erbium ...

  4. High index of refraction films for dielectric mirrors prepared by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brusasco, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    A wide variety of metal oxides with high index of refraction can be prepared by Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition. We present some recent optical and laser damage results on oxide films prepared by MOCVD which could be used in a multilayer structure for highly reflecting (HR) dielectric mirror applications. The method of preparation affects both optical properties and laser damage threshold. 10 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Theoretical Descriptions of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis in a Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactor: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Lubej, M.; Plazl, I.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which carbon nanotubes nucleate and grow are still poorly understood. Understanding and mathematically describing the process is crucial for its optimization. This paper reviews different models which have been proposed to explain carbon nanotube growth in the chemical vapor deposition process. The review is divided into two sections, the first section describes some nucleation, growth and termination simulations based on molecular dynamics, and the second section describes ...

  6. Formation of perfectly aligned nitrogen-vacancy-center ensembles in chemical-vapor-deposition-grown diamond (111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Hayato; Tahara, Kosuke; Ishiwata, Hitoshi; Hatano, Mutsuko; Iwasaki, Takayuki

    2017-04-01

    Selectively aligning a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) ensemble in diamond is an important technique for obtaining a high-sensitivity magnetic sensor. Nitrogen-doped diamonds were grown on (111) substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition to perform the selective alignment of high-density NV ensembles, yielding perfectly aligned NV ensembles along the [111] direction with a density greater than 1016 cm‑3 and a spin relaxation time of 2 µs. Such alignment results in a high signal contrast with an optical magnetic resonance close to the typical value reported with an isolated NV center. These results indicate the possibility of achieving a high sensitivity through the selective alignment of NV ensembles.

  7. Influence of deposition rate on the structural properties of plasma-enhanced CVD epitaxial silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanghua; Cariou, Romain; Hamon, Gwenaëlle; Léal, Ronan; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i

    2017-01-01

    Solar cells based on epitaxial silicon layers as the absorber attract increasing attention because of the potential cost reduction. In this work, we studied the influence of the deposition rate on the structural properties of epitaxial silicon layers produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (epi-PECVD) using silane as a precursor and hydrogen as a carrier gas. We found that the crystalline quality of epi-PECVD layers depends on their thickness and deposition rate. Moreover, increasing the deposition rate may lead to epitaxy breakdown. In that case, we observe the formation of embedded amorphous silicon cones in the epi-PECVD layer. To explain this phenomenon, we develop a model based on the coupling of hydrogen and built-in strain. By optimizing the deposition conditions to avoid epitaxy breakdown, including substrate temperatures and plasma potential, we have been able to synthesize epi-PECVD layers up to a deposition rate of 8.3 Å/s. In such case, we found that the incorporation of hydrogen in the hydrogenated crystalline silicon can reach 4 at. % at a substrate temperature of 350 °C. PMID:28262840

  8. Boron coating on boron nitride coated nuclear fuels by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmazuçar, Hasan H.; Gündüz, Güngör

    2000-12-01

    Uranium dioxide-only and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide (5% and 10%) ceramic nuclear fuel pellets which were already coated with boron nitride were coated with thin boron layer by chemical vapor deposition to increase the burn-up efficiency of the fuel during reactor operation. Coating was accomplished from the reaction of boron trichloride with hydrogen at 1250 K in a tube furnace, and then sintering at 1400 and 1525 K. The deposited boron was identified by infrared spectrum. The morphology of the coating was studied by using scanning electron microscope. The plate, grainy and string (fiber)-like boron structures were observed.

  9. Patterned growth of single-walled carbon nanotube arrays from a vapor-deposited Fe catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, H B; Ristroph, T. G.; Schurmann, G. M.; King, G. M.; Yoon, J; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh; Golovchenko, Jene Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been grown on a variety of substrates by chemical vapor deposition using low-coverage vacuum-deposited iron as a catalyst. Ordered arrays of suspended nanotubes ranging from submicron to several micron lengths have been obtained on Si, SiO2,SiO2, Al2O3,Al2O3, and Si3N4Si3N4 substrates that were patterned on hundred nanometer length scales with a focused ion beam machine. Electric fields applied during nanotubegrowth allow the control of growth direction. Na...

  10. The influence of methanol addition during the film growth of SnO 2 by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volintiru, I.; Graaf, A. de; Deelen, J. van; Poodt, P.W.G.

    2011-01-01

    Undoped tin oxide (SnO2) thin films have been deposited in a stagnant point flow chemical vapor deposition reactor from a water/tin tetrachloride mixture. By adding methanol during the deposition process the film electrical properties change significantly: ten times more conductive SnO 2 films are o

  11. Influence of gas phase equilibria on the chemical vapor deposition of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Amanda M; Derby, Brian; Kinloch, Ian A

    2013-04-23

    We have investigated the influence of gas phase chemistry on the chemical vapor deposition of graphene in a hot wall reactor. A new extended parameter space for graphene growth was defined through literature review and experimentation at low pressures (≥0.001 mbar). The deposited films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and dark field optical microscopy, with the latter showing promise as a rapid and nondestructive characterization technique for graphene films. The equilibrium gas compositions have been calculated across this parameter space. Correlations between the graphene films grown and prevalent species in the equilibrium gas phase revealed that deposition conditions associated with a high acetylene equilibrium concentration lead to good quality graphene deposition, and conditions that stabilize large hydrocarbon molecules in the gas phase result in films with multiple defects. The transition between lobed and hexagonal graphene islands was found to be linked to the concentration of the monatomic hydrogen radical, with low concentrations associated with hexagonal islands.

  12. The Metastable Persistence of Vapor-Deposited Amorphous Ice at Anomalously High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F.; Jenniskens, Peter; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Studies of the gas release, vaporization behavior and infrared (IR) spectral properties of amorphous and crystalline water ice have direct application to cometary and planetary outgassing phenomena and contribute to an understanding of the physical properties of astrophysical ices. Several investigators report anomalous phenomena related to the warming of vapor-deposited astrophysical ice analogs. However gas release, ice volatilization and IR spectral features are secondary or tertiary manifestations of ice structure or morphology. These observations are useful in mimicking the bulk physical and chemical phenomena taking place in cometary and other extraterrestrial ices but do not directly reveal the structural changes which are their root cause. The phenomenological interpretation of spectral and gas release data is probably the cause of somewhat contradictory explanations invoked to account for differences in water ice behavior in similar temperature regimes. It is the microstructure, micromorphology and microchemical heterogeneity of astrophysical ices which must be characterized if the mechanisms underlying the observed phenomena are to be understood. We have been using a modified Transmission Electron Microscope to characterize the structure of vapor-deposited astrophysical ice analogs as a function of their deposition, temperature history and composition. For the present experiments, pure water vapor is deposited at high vacuum onto a 15 K amorphous carbon film inside an Hitachi H-500H TEM. The resulting ice film (approx. 0.05 micrometers thick) is warmed at the rate of 1 K per minute and diffraction patterns are collected at 1 K intervals. These patterns are converted into radial intensity distributions which are calibrated using patterns of crystalline gold deposited on a small part of the carbon substrate. The small intensity contributed by the amorphous substrate is removed by background subtraction. The proportions of amorphous and crystalline material

  13. INDUCTION PLASMA REACTIVE DEPOSITION OF TUNGSTENCARBIDE FROM TUNGSTEN METAL POWDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.L. Jiang; M.I. Boulos

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results are reported on the primary carburization reaction between the tungsten powder and methane in the induction plasma, and the secondary carburization of the deposit on substrate at high temperature. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine the microstructures of starting tungsten powder, carburized powder, and deposit. X-ray diffraction analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis and microhardness measurement were used to characterize the structures and properties of the powder and the deposit. It is found that the primary carburization reaction in the induction plasma starts from the surface of tungsten particles when the particles are melted. Tungsten particles are partially carburized inside the reactive plasma. Complete carburization is achieved through the secondary carburization reaction of the deposit on substrate at high temperature.``

  14. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of silicon nitride using neopentasilane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.Weeks@intermolecular.com; Nowling, Greg; Fuchigami, Nobi; Bowes, Michael; Littau, Karl [Intermolecular, 3011 North 1st Street, San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Progress in transistor scaling has increased the demands on the material properties of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) thin films used in device fabrication and at the same time placed stringent restrictions on the deposition conditions employed. Recently, low temperature plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition has emerged as a viable technique for depositing these films with a thermal budget compatible with semiconductor processing at sub-32 nm technology nodes. For these depositions, it is desirable to use precursors that are free from carbon and halogens that can incorporate into the film. Beyond this, it is necessary to develop processing schemes that minimize the wet etch rate of the film as it will be subjected to wet chemical processing in subsequent fabrication steps. In this work, the authors introduce low temperature deposition of SiN{sub x} using neopentasilane [NPS, (SiH{sub 3}){sub 4}Si] in a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process with a direct N{sub 2} plasma. The growth with NPS is compared to a more common precursor, trisilylamine [TSA, (SiH{sub 3}){sub 3 }N] at identical process conditions. The wet etch rates of the films deposited with NPS are characterized at different plasma conditions and the impact of ion energy is discussed.

  15. Low temperature deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films on a flexible polymer substrate by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-hoon; Jung, Jae-soo; Lee, Sung-soo; Lee, Sung-bo; Hwang, Nong-moon

    2016-11-01

    For the applications such as flexible displays and solar cells, the direct deposition of crystalline silicon films on a flexible polymer substrate has been a great issue. Here, we investigated the direct deposition of polycrystalline silicon films on a polyimide film at the substrate temperature of 200 °C. The low temperature deposition of crystalline silicon on a flexible substrate has been successfully made based on two ideas. One is that the Si-Cl-H system has a retrograde solubility of silicon in the gas phase near the substrate temperature. The other is the new concept of non-classical crystallization, where films grow by the building block of nanoparticles formed in the gas phase during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total amount of precipitation of silicon nanoparticles decreased with increasing HCl concentration. By adding HCl, the amount and the size of silicon nanoparticles were reduced remarkably, which is related with the low temperature deposition of silicon films of highly crystalline fraction with a very thin amorphous incubation layer. The dark conductivity of the intrinsic film prepared at the flow rate ratio of RHCl=[HCl]/[SiH4]=3.61 was 1.84×10-6 Scm-1 at room temperature. The Hall mobility of the n-type silicon film prepared at RHCl=3.61 was 5.72 cm2 V-1s-1. These electrical properties of silicon films are high enough and could be used in flexible electric devices.

  16. Behavior of vapor/plasma within the keyhole and above the workpiece during CO2 laser penetration welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a high-speed camera and an optical emission monitor were used to study the behavior of vapor/plasma during CO2 laser welding of SUS304 stainless steel. Results of optical emission from vapor/plasma show that two characteristic frequency bands exist, 100-500 Hz and 1 500-3 500 Hz. At the same time, the changing images of vapor/plasma and bottom pool also confirm that there are two different fluctuation frequency bands. One of the frequency bands represents the characteristic of vapor/plasma within the keyhole, and it is within 167-500 Hz. Another frequency band is within 1 500-3 500 Hz, and it obviously derives from the shielding gas. Some factors may cause these frequency differences between the keyhole plasma and the shielding gas plasma. One of them is that the vapor/plasma pressure within the keyhole will increase slowly.

  17. Stability increase of fuel clad with zirconium oxynitride thin film by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jee, Seung Hyun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon Dong, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Materials Research and Education Center, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Labs, AL 36849-5341 (United States); Kim, Jun Hwan; Baek, Jong Hyuk [Recycled Fuel Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Joo [Materials Research and Education Center, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Labs, AL 36849-5341 (United States); Kang, Seong Sik [Regulatory Research Division, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19, Guseong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Soo, E-mail: yoonys@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon Dong, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-01

    A zirconium oxynitride (ZON) thin film was deposited onto HT9 steel as a cladding material by a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in order to prevent a fuel-clad chemical interaction (FCCI) between a U-10 wt% Zr metal fuel and a clad material. X-ray diffraction spectrums indicated that the mixture of structures of zirconium nitride, oxide and carbide in the MOCVD grown ZON thin films. Also, typical equiaxial grain structures were found in plane and cross sectional images of the as-deposited ZON thin films with a thickness range of 250-500 nm. A depth profile using auger electron microscopy revealed that carbon and oxygen atoms were decreased in the ZON thin film deposited with hydrogen gas flow. Diffusion couple tests at 800 Degree-Sign C for 25 hours showed that the as-deposited ZON thin films had low carbon and oxygen content, confirmed by the Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, which showed a barrier behavior for FCCI between the metal fuel and the clad. This result suggested that ZON thin film cladding by MOCVD, even with the thickness below the micro-meter level, has a high possibility as an effective FCCI barrier. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zirconium oxynitride (ZON) deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prevention of fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfusion reduced by between metal fuel (U-10 wt% Zr) and a HT9 cladding material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogenation of the ZON during growth improved the FCCI barrier performance.

  18. Regular growth combined with lateral etching in diamond deposited over silicon substrate by using hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2013-05-01

    Hot filament chemical vapor deposition has proved to be an attractive method for growing diamond films with good quality and higher growth rate. Diamond films were produced at deposition parameters under which, it is possible to have regular growth combined with lateral etching (RGCLE). Fracture cross-section SEM images showed that RGCLE initiated over polycrystalline diamond film and proceeded by the growth of consecutive steps in each crystallite, which terminated with square/rectangle shaped facets. All the diamond films exhibit RGCLE but with different type of growth behavior. Present work discusses the cyclic formation of the steps in diamond crystallites and RGCLE modes. RGCLE in diamond film may find important applications where heat absorption and dissipation are key issues.

  19. Nanoparticle formation and thin film deposition in aniline containing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattyn, Cedric; Dias, Ana; Hussain, Shahzad; Strunskus, Thomas; Stefanovic, Ilija; Boulmer-Leborgne, Chantal; Lecas, Thomas; Kovacevic, Eva; Berndt, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    This contribution deals with plasma based polymerization processes in mixtures of argon and aniline. The investigations are performed in a capacitively coupled RF discharge (in pulsed and continuous mode) and concern both the observed formation of nanoparticles in the plasma volume and the deposition of films. The latter process was used for the deposition of ultra-thin layers on different kind of nanocarbon materials (nanotubes and free standing graphene). The analysis of the plasma and the plasma chemistry (by means of mass spectroscopy and in-situ FTIR spectroscopy) is accompanied by several ex-situ diagnostics of the obtained materials which include NEXAFS and XPS measurements as well as Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The decisive point of the investigations concern the preservation of the original monomer structure during the plasma polymerization processes and the stability of the thin films on the different substrates.

  20. Plasma-deposited hybrid silica membranes with a controlled retention of organic bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngamou, P.H.T.; Creatore, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Overbeek, J.P.; Kreiter, R.; Van Veen, H.M.; Vente, J.F. [ECN, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands, Petten (Netherlands); Wienk, I.M.; Cuperus, P.F. [SolSep BV, Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    2013-03-05

    Hybrid organically bridged silica membranes are suitable for energy-efficient molecular separations under harsh industrial conditions. Such membranes can be useful in organic solvent nanofiltration if they can be deposited on flexible, porous and large area supports. Here, we report the proof of concept for applying an expanding thermal plasma to the synthesis of perm-selective hybrid silica films from an organically bridged monomer, 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane. This membrane is the first in its class to be produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. By tuning the plasma and process parameters, the organic bridging groups could be retained in the separating layer. This way, a defect free film could be made with pervaporation performances of an n-butanol-water mixture comparable with those of conventional ceramic supported membranes made by sol-gel technology (i.e. a water flux of [similar]1.8 kg m'-{sup 2} h{sup -1}, a water concentration in the permeate higher than 98% and a separation factor of >1100). The obtained results show the suitability of expanding thermal plasma as a technology for the deposition of hybrid silica membranes for molecular separations.

  1. Ultra-Smooth Nanostructured Diamond Films Deposited from He/H2/CH4/N2 Microwave Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Konovalov, Valery V.; Melo, Andrew; Catledge, Shane A.; Chowdhury, Shafiul; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2006-01-01

    Addition of He to a high CH4 content (10.7 vol%) H2/CH4/N2 feedgas mixture for microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition produced hard (56–72 GPa), ultra-smooth nanostructured diamond films on Ti-6Al-4V alloy substrates. Upon increase in He content up to 71 vol%, root mean squared (RMS) surface roughness of the film decreased to 9–10 nm and average diamond grain size to 5–6 nm. Our studies show that increased nanocrystallinity with He addition in plasma is related to plasma dilution, enhance...

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of poly-p-xylylene in narrow tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröskamp, Sara Felicitas; Redka, David; Möhlmann, Alexander; Franz, Gerhard; Jocham, Dieter

    2017-07-01

    Depositing a film via chemical vapor deposition results in superior conformity compared with other deposition techniques, primarily due to the unique chemical interactions between the surface and the reactive compounds. This technique requires a readily accessible surface and so, if the transport of the reactive species is impeded, irrespective of whether this depletion is caused by diffusion or convective flow, a homogeneous layer thickness cannot be achieved. This is often the case when applying films to the interiors of tubes, especially tubes with a dead-end, such that the inevitable loss of film-building components leads to a drop in thickness along the deposition length. The present work examined the deposition of the organic polymer poly-p-xylylene, using a reactor with dimensions that were large compared with the mean free path and tubes in which this factor (the Knudsen number) becomes unity, such that the deposition can be approximately described with the continuum model. A so-called temperature seesaw was employed to mitigate variations in layer thickness by generating an opposing temperature gradient. It was found that, under a vacuum of several tens of mTorr, the polymer could be deposited on the interior wall of a tube with an aspect ratio of at least 100 with an accuracy of ±7.5 %. The true ceiling temperature for the N derivate of this polymer was also determined to be 70 ±2 °C.

  3. A multifunctional plasma and deposition sensor for the characterization of plasma sources for film deposition and etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Michael; Seeger, Stefan; Harbauer, Karsten; Welzel, Thomas; Ellmer, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    Our recently reported multifunctional plasma and deposition sensor [Welzel et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 211605 (2013)] was used for the characterization of two different plasma sources: a magnetron sputtering deposition source and an ion beam source. The multifunctional sensor, based on a conventional quartz crystal monitor (microbalance) for mass increase/decrease measurements, can measure quasi-simultaneously the deposition/etching flux, the energy flux, and the charged particle flux. By moving the sensor or the plasma source stepwise against each other, the lateral (radial) flux profiles of the different sources can be measured with a lateral resolution of about 8 mm, the diameter of aperture in front of the quartz crystal. It is demonstrated that this compact and simple multifunctional sensor is a versatile tool for the characterization of different kinds of plasma sources for deposition and etching purposes. By combining the different measured quantities, the ion-to-neutral ratio and the mean energy per deposited atom can be calculated, parameters that are essential for the characterization of plasma deposition and etch processes.

  4. Heteroepitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor compounds by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Ward J.; Abul-Fadl, Ali

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to design, install and operate a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition system which is to be used for the epitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor binary compounds, and ternary and quaternary alloys. The long-term goal is to utilize this vapor phase deposition in conjunction with existing current controlled liquid phase epitaxy facilities to perform hybrid growth sequences for fabricating integrated optoelectronic devices.

  5. Fabrication of CdTe solar cells by laser-driven physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.; Bhat, A.; Tabory, C.; Liu, S.; Nguyen, M.; Aydinli, A.; Tsien, L.H.; Bohn, R.G. (Toledo Univ., OH (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1991-05-01

    Polycrystalline cadmium sulfide-cadmium telluride heterojunction solar cells were fabricated for the first time using a laser-driven physical vapor deposition method. An XeCl excimer laser was used to deposit both of the II-VI semiconductor layers in a single vacuum chamber from pressed powder targets. Results are presented from optical absorption. Raman scattering, X-ray diffraction, and electrical characterization of the films. Solar cells were fabricated by deposition onto SnO{sub 2}-coated glass with top contacts produced by gold evaporation. Device performance was evaluated from the spectral quantum efficiency and current-voltage measurements in the dark and with air mass 1.5 solar illumination. (orig.).

  6. Simultaneous growth of diamond and nanostructured graphite thin films by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond and graphite films on silicon wafer were simultaneously synthesized at 850 °C without any additional catalyst. The synthesis was achieved in hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactor by changing distance among filaments in traditional gas mixture. The inter-wire distance for diamond and graphite deposition was kept 5 and 15 mm, whereas kept constant from the substrate. The Raman spectroscopic analyses show that film deposited at 5 mm is good quality diamond and at 15 mm is nanostructured graphite and respective growths confirm by scanning auger electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscope results exhibit that black soot graphite is composed of needle-like nanostructures, whereas diamond with pyramidal featured structure. Transformation of diamond into graphite mainly attributes lacking in atomic hydrogen. The present study develops new trend in the field of carbon based coatings, where single substrate incorporate dual application can be utilized.

  7. FABRICATION OF DIAMOND TUBES IN BIAS-ENHANCED HOT-FILAMENT CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ming; MA Yuping; XIANG Daohui; SUN Fanghong

    2007-01-01

    Deposition of diamond thin films on tungsten wire Substrate with the gas mixture of acetone and hydrogen by using bias-enhanced hol filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with the tantalum wires being optimized arranged is investigated. The self-supported diamond tubes are obtained by etching away the tungsten Substrates. The quality of the diamond film before and after the removal of Substrates is observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectrum. The results show that the cylindrical diamond tubes with good quality and uniform thickness are obtained on tungsten wires by using bias enhanced hot filament CVD. The compressive stress in diamond film formed during the deposition is released after the Substrate etches away by mixture of H202 and NH4OH. There is no residual stress in diamond tube after Substrate removal.

  8. Using hot wire and initiated chemical vapor deposition for gas barrier thin film encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spee, D.A., E-mail: diederickspee@gmail.com; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2015-01-30

    Hot wire CVD (HWCVD) and initiated CVD (iCVD) are very well suited deposition techniques for the fabrication of transparent thin film gas barriers. Single inorganic or organic layers, however, face challenges, which are hard to overcome: unavoidable defects and low intrinsic barrier function. We demonstrate that by combining inorganic HWCVD films and organic iCVD films, a water vapor transmission rate a low as 5 ∗ 10{sup −6} g/m{sup 2}/day at 60 °C and 90% RH for a simple pinhole free three layer structure is obtained even with non-optimized individual layers. Given the 100 °C deposition temperature, the layer stacks can be deposited on any sensitive electronic device.

  9. Formation of β-FeSi 2 thin films by partially ionized vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Noriyuki; Takai, Hiroshi

    2003-05-01

    The partially ionized vapor deposition (PIVD) is proposed as a new method to realize low temperature formation of β-FeSi 2 thin films. In this method, Fe is evaporated by E-gun and a few percents of Fe atoms are ionized. We have investigated influences of the ion content and the accelerating voltage of Fe ions on the structural properties of β-FeSi 2 films deposited on Si substrates. It was confirmed that β-FeSi 2 can be formed on Si(1 0 0) substrate by PIVD even at substrate temperature as low as 350, while FeSi by the conventional vacuum deposition. It was concluded that the influence of Fe ions on preferential orientation of β-FeSi 2 depends strongly on the content and the acceleration energy of ions.

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of Pd/Cu alloy films from a new single source precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisyuk, Vladislav V.; Shubin, Yuriy V.; Senocq, François; Turgambaeva, Asiya E.; Duguet, Thomas; Igumenov, Igor K.; Vahlas, Constantin

    2015-03-01

    Cu/Pd alloys were deposited onto Si(100) and SiO2 (fused silica) substrates by MOCVD from PdL2×CuL2, (L=2-methoxy-2,6,6-trimethylheptane-3,5-dionate), a new single source bimetallic precursor. Deposition was performed at 10 Torr in a temperature range between 200 °C and 350 °C and was assisted by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation of the precursor vapor from an excimer Xe-lamp. It was shown that the elemental and phase composition of the films can be controlled by varying the deposition temperature and by stimulating by VUV the precursor decomposition. The bulk compositional properties of the obtained films confirmed the feasibility of proposed approach and precursor to prepare Pd alloy membrane materials by the CVD method.

  11. Non-classical crystallization of silicon thin films during hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Soo; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Da-Seul; Kim, Kun-Su; Park, Soon-Won; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2017-01-01

    The deposition behavior of silicon films by hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) was approached by non-classical crystallization, where the building block of deposition is a nanoparticle generated in the gas phase of the reactor. The puzzling phenomenon of the formation of an amorphous incubation layer on glass could be explained by the liquid-like property of small charged nanoparticles (CNPs), which are generated in the initial stage of the HWCVD process. Using the liquid-like property of small CNPs, homo-epitaxial growth as thick as 150 nm could be successfully grown on a silicon wafer at 600 °C under the processing condition where CNPs as small as possible could be supplied steadily by a cyclic process which periodically resets the process. The size of CNPs turned out to be an important parameter in the microstructure evolution of thin films.

  12. Fabrication of a multifunctional carbon nanotube "cotton" yarn by the direct chemical vapor deposition spinning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiao-Hua; Li, Ya-Li; Feng, Jian-Min; Kang, Yan-Ru; Han, Shuai-Shuai

    2012-09-21

    A continuous cotton-like carbon nanotube fiber yarn, consisting of multiple threads of high purity double walled carbon nanotubes, was fabricated in a horizontal CVD gas flow reactor with water vapor densification by the direct chemical vapor deposition spinning process. The water vapor interaction leads to homogeneous shrinking of the CNT sock-like assembly in the gas flow. This allows well controlled continuous winding of the dense thread inside the reactor. The CNT yarn is quite thick (1-3 mm), has a highly porous structure (99%) while being mechanically strong and electrically conductive. The water vapor interaction leads to homogeneous oxidation of the CNTs, offering the yarn oxygen-functionalized surfaces. The unique structure and surface of the CNT yarn provide it multiple processing advantages and properties. It can be mechanically engineered into a dense yarn, infiltrated with polymers to form a composite and mixed with other yarns to form a blend, as demonstrated in this research. Therefore, this CNT yarn can be used as a "basic yarn" for various CNT based structural and functional applications.

  13. Metallorganic chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition approaches for the growth of hafnium-based thin films from dialkylamide precursors for advanced CMOS gate stack applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Steven P.

    To continue the rapid progress of the semiconductor industry as described by Moore's Law, the feasibility of new material systems for front end of the line (FEOL) process technologies needs to be investigated, since the currently employed polysilicon/SiO2-based transistor system is reaching its fundamental scaling limits. Revolutionary breakthroughs in complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology were recently announced by Intel Corporation and International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), with both organizations revealing significant progress in the implementation of hafnium-based high-k dielectrics along with metal gates. This announcement was heralded by Gordon Moore as "...the biggest change in transistor technology since the introduction of polysilicon gate MOS transistors in the late 1960s." Accordingly, the study described herein focuses on the growth of Hf-based dielectrics and Hf-based metal gates using chemical vapor-based deposition methods, specifically metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). A family of Hf source complexes that has received much attention recently due to their desirable properties for implementation in wafer scale manufacturing is the Hf dialkylamide precursors. These precursors are room temperature liquids and possess sufficient volatility and desirable decomposition characteristics for both MOCVD and ALD processing. Another benefit of using these sources is the existence of chemically compatible Si dialkylamide sources as co-precursors for use in Hf silicate growth. The first part of this study investigates properties of MOCVD-deposited HfO2 and HfSixOy using dimethylamido Hf and Si precursor sources using a customized MOCVD reactor. The second part of this study involves a study of wet and dry surface pre-treatments for ALD growth of HfO2 using tetrakis(ethylmethylamido)hafnium in a wafer scale manufacturing environment. The third part of this study is an investigation of

  14. Improvement of the Crystallinity of Silicon Films Deposited by Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition with Negative Substrate Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Shen, Honglie; You, Jiayi

    2013-08-01

    We have investigated the effect of negative substrate bias on microcrystalline silicon films deposited on glass and stainless steel by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) to gain insight into the effect of negative substrate bias on crystallization. Structural characterization of the silicon films was performed by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the crystallinity of the films is obviously improved by applying the substrate bias, especially for films on stainless steel. At hot-wire temperature of 1800°C and negative substrate bias of -800 V, grain size as large as 200 nm was obtained on stainless-steel substrate with crystalline fraction 9% higher than that of films deposited on glass and 15% higher than that of films deposited without substrate bias. It is deduced that the improvement of the crystallinity is mainly related to the accelerated electrons emitted from the hot wires. The differences in this improvement between different substrates are caused by the different electrical potential of the substrates. A solar cell fabricated by HWCVD with -800 V substrate bias is demonstrated, showing an obviously higher conversion efficiency than that without substrate bias.

  15. Surface modification of reverse osmosis desalination membranes by thin-film coatings deposited by initiated chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaydin-Ince, Gozde, E-mail: gozdeince@sabanciuniv.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Matin, Asif, E-mail: amatin@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Zafarullah, E-mail: zukhan@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Zaidi, S.M. Javaid, E-mail: zaidismj@kfupm.edu.sa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Gleason, Karen K., E-mail: kkgleasn@mit.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-07-31

    Thin-film polymeric reverse osmosis membranes, due to their high permeation rates and good salt rejection capabilities, are widely used for seawater desalination. However, these membranes are prone to biofouling, which affects their performance and efficiency. In this work, we report a method to modify the membrane surface without damaging the active layer or significantly affecting the performance of the membrane. Amphiphilic copolymer films of hydrophilic hydroxyethylmethacrylate and hydrophobic perfluorodecylacrylate (PFA) were synthesized and deposited on commercial RO membranes using an initiated chemical vapor deposition technique which is a polymer deposition technique that involves free-radical polymerization initiated by gas-phase radicals. Relevant surface characteristics such as hydrophilicity and roughness could be systematically controlled by varying the polymer chemistry. Increasing the hydrophobic PFA content in the films leads to an increase in the surface roughness and hydrophobicity. Furthermore, the surface morphology studies performed using the atomic force microscopy show that as the thickness of the coating increases average surface roughness increases. Using this knowledge, the coating thickness and chemistry were optimized to achieve high permeate flux and to reduce cell attachment. Results of the static bacterial adhesion tests show that the attachment of bacterial cells is significantly reduced on the coated membranes. - Highlights: • Thin films are deposited on reverse osmosis membranes. • Amphiphilic thin films are resistant to protein attachment. • The permeation performance of the membranes is not affected by the coating. • The thin film coatings delayed the biofouling.

  16. Laser initiation and decay processes in an organic vapor plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Guowen

    A large volume organic molecular plasma (hundreds of cm3) is created by a 193 nm laser ionizing an organic molecule, Tetrakis-(dimethylamino)-ethylene (TMAE). The plasma is found to be characterized by high electron density (10 13-1011cm-3), low electron temperature (~0.1 eV), fast creation (~10 ns) and rapid decaying (electron-ion recombination coefficient ~10-6 cm3/s). Fast Langmuir probe (LP) techniques are developed for diagnosing this plasma, including a novel probe design and fabrication, a fast detection system, sampling, indirect probe heating, electro-magnetic shielding and dummy probe techniques. Plasma physical processes regarding fast LP diagnostics for different time scales (t> and <100 ns) are studied. A theory for the correction due to a rapidly decaying plasma to LP measurements is developed. The mechanisms responsible for the plasma decay are studied, and a delayed ionization process is found to be important in interpreting the decay processes. It is also found that nitrogen can enhance the delayed emission of a TMAE Rydberg state from the TMAE plasma. This result strongly suggests that a long-lifetime highly-excited state is important in the TMAE plasma decay process. This result supports the delayed ionization mechanism. A model combining electron-ion recombination and delayed ionization processes is developed to calculate the delayed ionization lifetime.

  17. Plasma diagnostic approach for the low-temperature deposition of silicon quantum dots using dual frequency PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, B. B.; Yin, Y.; Lee, J. S.; Han, Jeon G.; Shiratani, M.

    2016-10-01

    Although studies of silicon (Si) quantum dots (QDs) were started just a few years ago, progress is noteworthy concerning unique film properties and their potential application for devices. In particular, relating to the Si QD process optimization, it is essential to control the deposition environment by studying the role of plasma parameters and atomic and molecular species in the process plasmas. In this work, we report on advanced material processes for the low-temperature deposition of Si QDs by utilizing radio frequency and ultrahigh frequency dual frequency (DF) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. DF PECVD can generate a very high plasma density in the range ~9  ×  1010 cm-3 to 3.2  ×  1011 cm-3 at a very low electron temperature (T e) ~ 1.5 to 2.4 eV. The PECVD processes, using a reactive mixture of H2/SiH4/NH3 gases, are carefully studied to investigate the operating regime and to optimize the deposition parameters by utilizing different plasma diagnostic tools. The analysis reveals that a higher ion flux at a higher plasma density on the substrate is conducive to enhancing the overall crystallinity of the deposited film. Along with high-density plasmas, a high concentration of atomic H and N is simultaneously essential for the high growth rate deposition of Si QDs. Numerous plasma diagnostics methods and film analysis tools are used to correlate the effect of plasma- and atomic-radical parameters on the structural and chemical properties of the deposited Si QD films prepared in the reactive mixtures of H2/SiH4/NH3 at various pressures.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition fabrication and characterization of silica-coated carbon fiber ultramicroelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, G; Giolando, D M; Kirchhoff, J R

    1995-08-01

    Carbon fiber disk ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs) with well-defined geometries were prepared by chemical vapor deposition techniques. Transparent silica films with thicknesses from 1 to 600 microns were deposited on the cylindrical length of 5 and 10 microns carbon fibers from a SiCl4, H2, and O2 ternary precursor system at 850-1150 degrees C or sequential deposition from Si(OEt)4 as a single source precursor at 700 degrees C followed by the SiCl4, H2, and O2 precursor system. Film thickness, film adhesion to the fiber substrate, and the overall dimensions of the silica-coated carbon fiber were studied and found to be a function of the precursor system, precursor concentrations, fiber diameter, deposition time, and fiber temperature. The silica films were found to be free of microcracks and characterized by a quality seal between the carbon fiber and the coating. As a result, the silica-coated disk UME exhibits an excellent electrochemical response without the need to use an epoxy sealant at the electrode tip. Furthermore, the deposition of hard and inert ceramic materials imparts durability to fragile carbon fibers and facilitates the handling of UMEs in microenvironments. Finally, the advantage of concentric deposition about the fibers to produce a disk UME in the center of an insulating plane was used to examine the effect of the thickness of the insulating coating on the limiting current response.

  19. Preparation and characterization of boron nitride coatings on carbon fibers from borazine by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Junsheng, E-mail: charlesljs@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, 410073 (China); Zhang Changrui; Li Bin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, 410073 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Boron nitride (BN) coatings were deposited on carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using borazine as single source precursor. The deposited coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. The effect of temperatures on growth kinetics, morphology, composition and structure of the coatings was investigated. In the low temperature range of 900 deg. C-1000 deg. C, the growth rate increased with increasing temperature complying with Arrhenius law, and an apparent active energy of 72 kJ/mol was calculated. The coating surface was smooth and compact, and the coatings uniformly deposited on individual fibers of carbon fiber bundles. The growth was controlled by surface reaction. At 1000 deg. C, the deposition rate reached a maximum (2.5 {mu}m/h). At the same time, the limiting step of the growth translated to be mass-transportation. Above 1100 deg. C, the growth rate decreased drastically due to the occurrence of gas-phase nucleation. Moreover, the coating surface became loose and rough. Composition and structure examinations revealed that stoichiometric BN coatings with turbostratic structure were obtained below 1000 deg. C, while hexagonal BN coatings were deposited above 1100 deg. C. A penetration of carbon element from the fibers to the coatings was observed.

  20. Eggshell- and fur-like microstructures of yttrium silicate film prepared by laser chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Akihiko, E-mail: itonium@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Miyagi (Japan); Endo, Jun; Kimura, Teiichi; Goto, Takashi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Miyagi (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    Yttrium silicate (Y-Si-O) films with eggshell- and fur-like microstructures were prepared by laser chemical vapor deposition using a Nd:YAG laser, and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and yttrium dipivaloylmethane (Y(dpm){sub 3}) precursors. Amorphous Y-Si-O films were prepared at deposition temperature below 1200 K. The crystalline Y-Si-O films with mixtures of Y{sub 4.67}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3}O and {alpha}-Y{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases were obtained at deposition temperature above 1200 K. y-Y{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} and X1-Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} minor phases were also formed at a higher deposition temperature. At deposition temperature ranging between 1285 and 1355 K, a dome-like structure covered with fine fur-like projections was formed under a total pressure of 3.5 kPa, whereas an eggshell-like structure 200-300 {mu}m in diameter and 10-20 {mu}m in shell thickness was formed at 7.5 kPa. The deposition rate for the Y-Si-O films with fur- and eggshell-like microstructures reached 300 and 1000 {mu}m h{sup -1}, respectively.

  1. a Design of Experiment Study of the Nucleation of Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi

    1995-01-01

    Because of its property, diamond has a unique role in the semiconductor and tool industry. As diamond synthesis technology advances, more and more applications are emerging. However, in order to take advantage of its exceptional property, reliable control of nucleation and growth must be accomplished. In this study, the author systematically studies the nucleation process in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds. Among many important intricacies concerning diamond nucleation on foreign surfaces, this study addresses the following issues: the role of ultrasonic pre-treatment in CVD; the correlation between hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) and microwave assisted chemical vapor deposition (MACVD) control parameters and the nucleation processes; the role of biasing substrates on the nucleation density in MACVD; the correlation between parameters of biasing substrates and the nucleation density; the reliable control of nucleation in CVD diamond synthesis. To achieve the goal of this research, a multi -purpose deposition system was built enabling the author to eliminate unnecessary variables in the deposition process. To ensure the accuracy of the nucleation effects of parameters investigated, great effort was made to calibrate measurement instruments so that noise or fluctuations in the experiments were minimized. The implementation of design of experiments (DOE), a systematic investigating technique, vastly improved the efficiency of this study over the less sophisticated empirical approach. In addition, DOE allowed the author to quantitatively estimate the effects of control parameters. Finally, diamond deposition was confirmed by Scanning Electron microscope, Micro Raman Scattering and Rutherford Backscattering. This research has successfully implemented DOE in estimating the effects of diamond nucleation quantitatively. The mechanism of ultrasonic pre-treatment is explained, and its effects are ascribed to seeding. The effects of primary CVD

  2. Upstream Density for Plasma Detachment with Conventional and Lithium Vapor-Box Divertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldston, Rj; Schwartz, Ja

    2016-10-01

    Fusion power plants are likely to require detachment of the divertor plasma from material targets. The lithium vapor box divertor is designed to achieve this, while limiting the flux of lithium vapor to the main plasma. We develop a simple model of near-detachment to evaluate the required upstream plasma density, for both conventional and lithium vapor-box divertors, based on particle and dynamic pressure balance between up- and down-stream, at near-detachment conditions. A remarkable general result is found, not just for lithium-induced detachment, that the upstream density divided by the Greenwald-limit density scales as (P 5 / 8 /B 3 / 8) Tdet1 / 2 / (ɛcool + γTdet) , with no explicit size scaling. Tdet is the temperature just before strong pressure loss, 1/2 of the ionization potential of the dominant recycling species, ɛcool is the average plasma energy lost per injected hydrogenic and impurity atom, and γ is the sheath heat transmission factor. A recent 1-D calculation agrees well with this scaling. The implication is that the plasma exhaust problem cannot be solved by increasing R. Instead significant innovation, such as the lithium vapor box divertor, will be required. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes: a review on growth mechanism and mass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukul; Ando, Yoshinori

    2010-06-01

    This review article deals with the growth mechanism and mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Different aspects of CNT synthesis and growth mechanism are reviewed in the light of latest progresses and understandings in the field. Materials aspects such as the roles of hydrocarbon, catalyst and catalyst support are discussed. Many new catalysts and new carbon sources are described. Growth-control aspects such as the effects of temperature, vapor pressure and catalyst concentration on CNT diameter distribution and single- or multi-wall formation are explained. Latest reports of metal-catalyst-free CNT growth are considered. The mass-production aspect is discussed from the perspective of a sustainable CNT technology. Existing problems and challenges of the process are addressed with future directions.

  4. Growth mechanisms of zinc oxide and zinc sulfide films by mist chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamasaki, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    The growth mechanisms of zinc oxide and zinc sulfide films by mist chemical vapor deposition (mist-CVD) were experimentally investigated from the viewpoint of mist behaviors and chemical reactions. The proper growth model, either vaporization or the Leidenfrost model, was studied by supplying two kinds of mists with different kinds of sources, such as H2 16O and H2 18O for ZnO growth and ZnCl2 and thiourea for ZnS growth. Moreover, the origin of the oxygen atoms of ZnO was investigated using a quantitative analysis. The role of chloro complex of zinc in the growth of ZnS from aqueous solutions was also examined by systematic studies.

  5. Method of chemical vapor deposition of boron nitride using polymeric cyanoborane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Leon

    1994-01-01

    Polymeric cyanoborane is volatilized, decomposed by thermal or microwave plasma energy, and deposited on a substrate as an amorphous film containing boron, nitrogen and carbon. Residual carbon present in the film is removed by ammonia treatment at an increased temperature, producing an adherent, essentially stoichiometric boron nitride film.

  6. Plasma-deposited a-C(N) H films

    CERN Document Server

    Franceschini, D E

    2000-01-01

    The growth behaviour, film structure and mechanical properties of plasma-deposited amorphous hydrogenated carbon-nitrogen films are shortly reviewed. The effect of nitrogen-containing gas addition to the deposition to the hydrocarbon atmospheres used is discussed, considering the modifications observed in the chemical composition growth kinetics, carbon atom hybridisation and chemical bonding arrangements of a-C(N):H films. The overall structure behaviour is correlated to the variation of the mechanical properties.

  7. An Investigation of Solid-State Amidization and Imidization Reactions in Vapor Deposited Poly (amic acid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthamatten, M; Letts, S A; Day, K; Cook, R C; Gies, A P; Hamilton, T P; Nonidez, W K

    2004-06-28

    The condensation polymerization reaction of 4,4'-oxydianiline (ODA) with pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) to form poly(amic acid) and the subsequent imidization reaction to form polyimide were investigated for films prepared using vapor deposition polymerization techniques. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of films at different temperatures indicate that additional solid-state polymerization occurs prior to imidization reactions. Experiments reveal that, upon vapor deposition, poly(amic acid) oligomers form that have a number-average molecular weight of about 1500 Daltons. Between 100 - 130 C these chains undergo additional condensation reaction to form slightly higher molecular weight oligomers. Calorimetry measurements show that this reaction is exothermic ({Delta}H {approx} -30 J/g) with an activation energy of about 120 kJ/mol. Experimental reaction enthalpies are compared to results from ab initio molecular modeling calculations to estimate the number of amide groups formed. At higher temperatures (150 - 300 C) imidization of amide linkages occurs as an endothermic reaction ({Delta}H {approx} +120 J/g) with an activation energy of about 130 kJ/mol. Solid-state kinetics were found to depend on reaction conversion as well as the processing conditions used to deposit films.

  8. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using the cobalt nanocatalyst by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, S.S. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, K. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghoranneviss, M. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salar Elahi, A., E-mail: Salari_phy@yahoo.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-05

    The three main synthesis methods of Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the arc discharge, the laser ablation and the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) with a special regard to the latter one. CNTs were produced on a silicon wafer by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (TCVD) using acetylene as a carbon source, cobalt as a catalyst and ammonia as a reactive gas. The DC-sputtering system was used to prepare cobalt thin films on Si substrates. A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effects of reaction temperature and deposition time on the synthesis of the nanotubes. The deposition time was selected as 15 and 25 min for all growth temperatures. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements were used to investigate the elemental composition of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface topography of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown CNTs were characterized under Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to study the morphological properties of CNTs. Also, the grown CNTs have been investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that increasing the temperature leads to increasing the diameter of CNTs. The ideal reaction temperature was 850 °C and the deposition time was 15 min. - Graphical abstract: FESEM images of CNTs grown on the cobalt catalyst at growth temperatures of (a) 850 °C, (b) 900 °C, (c) 950 °C and (d) 1000 °C during the deposition time of 15 min. - Highlights: • Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced on a silicon wafer by TCVD technique. • EDX and AFM were used to investigate the elemental composition and surface topography. • FESEM was used to study the morphological properties of CNTs. • The grown CNTs have been investigated by HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy.

  9. MgB2 superconducting whiskers synthesized by using the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhou; Zhuang, Chenggang; Gao, Jingyun; Shan, Xudong; Zhang, Jingmin; Liao, Zhimin; Xu, Hongjun; Yu, Dapeng; Feng, Qingrong

    2009-02-25

    In this work, MgB(2) whiskers were fabricated on a copper substrate by using the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition, which was one of the most effective ways to make high quality pure MgB(2) films, with the possible growth mechanism discussed. The whiskers are hexagonal and conelike and grow along the [0001] direction with a single-crystal structure. The onset transition temperature is approximately 39 K, which is among the best in the published nanostructure MgB(2) papers. Fabrication of nanoscale MgB(2) whiskers provides the fundamental understanding of the effect of dimensionality and size on superconductivity.

  10. Vapor Phase Sensing Using Metal Nanorod Thin Films Grown by Cryogenic Oblique Angle Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Shah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the chemical sensing capability of silver nanostructured films grown by cryogenic oblique angle deposition (OAD. For comparison, the films are grown side by side at cryogenic (~100 K and at room temperature (~300 K by e-beam evaporation. Based on the observed structural differences, it was hypothesized that the cryogenic OAD silver films should show an increased surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS sensitivity. COMSOL simulation results are presented to validate this hypothesis. Experimental SERS results of 4-aminobenzenethiol (4-ABT Raman test probe molecules in vapor phase show good agreement with the simulation and indicate promising SERS applications for these nanostructured thin films.

  11. MgB2 ultrathin films fabricated by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition and ion milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Narendra; Wolak, Matthäus A.; Tan, Teng; Lee, Namhoon; Lang, Andrew C.; Taheri, Mitra; Cunnane, Dan; Karasik, Boris. S.; Xi, X. X.

    2016-08-01

    In this letter, we report on the structural and transport measurements of ultrathin MgB2 films grown by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition followed by low incident angle Ar ion milling. The ultrathin films as thin as 1.8 nm, or 6 unit cells, exhibit excellent superconducting properties such as high critical temperature (Tc) and high critical current density (Jc). The results show the great potential of these ultrathin films for superconducting devices and present a possibility to explore superconductivity in MgB2 at the 2D limit.

  12. Synthesis and oxidation behavior of boron-substituted carbon powders by hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Boron-substituted carbon powder, BxC1-x with x up to 0.17, has been successfully synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The boron concentration in prepared BxC1-x samples can be controlled by varying the relative proportions of methane and diborane. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectrum confirm the successful synthesis of an amorphous BC5 compound, which consists of 10―20 nm particles with disk-like morphology. Thermogravimetry measurement shows that BC5 compound starts to oxidize ap-proximately at 620℃ and has a higher oxidation resistance than carbon.

  13. Synthesis of magnetic tunnel junctions with full in situ atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.imm.cnr.it [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Vangelista, S.; Kutrzeba-Kotowska, B.; Cocco, S.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Mameli, D. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, 09042 Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli studi Milano-Bicocca, Via R Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions, i.e. the combination of two ferromagnetic electrodes separated by an ultrathin tunnel oxide barrier, are core elements in a large variety of spin-based devices. We report on the use of combined chemical vapor and atomic layer deposition processes for the synthesis of magnetic tunnel junctions with no vacuum break. Structural, chemical and morphological characterizations of selected ferromagnetic and oxide layers are reported, together with the evidence of tunnel magnetoresistance effect in patterned Fe/MgO/Co junctions.

  14. Dendrimer-Mediated Adhesion between Vapor-Deposited Au and Glass or Si Wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L A; Zamborini, F P; Sun, L; Crooks, R M

    1999-10-01

    Here, we report the use of amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers as adhesion promoters between vapor-deposited Au films and Si-based substrates. This method is relatively simple, requiring only substrate cleaning, dipping, and rinsing. Proof of concept is illustrated by coating glass slides and single-crystal Si wafers with monolayers of PAMAM dendrimers and then evaporating adherent, 150-nm-thick Au films atop the dendritic adhesion promoter. Scanning tunneling microscopy and cyclic voltammetry have been used to assess the surface roughness and electrochemical stability of the Au films. The effectiveness of the dendrimer adhesion layer is demonstrated using standard adhesive-tape peel tests.

  15. High efficiency AIGaAs/Si monolithic tandem solar cell grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsuo, Soga; T.", "Kato; M., Yang; Masayoshi, Umeno; Takashi, Jimbo

    1995-01-01

    The improvements of the AlGaAs solar cell grown on the Si substrate and the AlGaAs/Si tandem solar cell by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition have been investigated. The active‐area conversion efficiency of the Al0.1Ga0.9As solar cell on the Si substrate as high as 12.9% has been obtained by improving the growth sequence and adopting an Al compositionally graded band emitter layer. A high efficiency monolithic AlGaAs/Si tandem solar cell with the active‐area conversion efficiency of 19.9%...

  16. Growth of straight carbon nanotubes by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao-ping; H. ABE; T. SHIMIZU; A. ANDO; H. TOKUMOTO; ZHU Shen-ming; ZHOU Hao-shen

    2006-01-01

    Straight carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were achieved by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition(STCVD) catalyzed by Mo-Fe alloy catalyst on silica supporting substrate at 700 ℃. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that the straight CNTs are well graphitized with no attached amorphous carbon. Mo-Fe alloy catalyst particles play a very crucial role in the growth of straight CNTs. The straight carbon nanotubes contain much less defects than the curved nanotubes and might have potential applications for nanoelectrical devices in the future. The simple synthesis of straight CNTs may have benefit for large-scale productions.

  17. MgB2 ultrathin films fabricated by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition and ion milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Acharya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we report on the structural and transport measurements of ultrathin MgB2 films grown by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition followed by low incident angle Ar ion milling. The ultrathin films as thin as 1.8 nm, or 6 unit cells, exhibit excellent superconducting properties such as high critical temperature (Tc and high critical current density (Jc. The results show the great potential of these ultrathin films for superconducting devices and present a possibility to explore superconductivity in MgB2 at the 2D limit.

  18. Self-catalytic growth of tin oxide nanowires by chemical vapor deposition process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thabethe, BS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporation Journal of Nanomaterials Volume 2013, Article ID 712361, 7 pages http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/712361 Research Article Self-Catalytic Growth of Tin Oxide Nanowires by Chemical Vapor Deposition Process Bongani S. Thabethe,1,2 Gerald F. Malgas,1... Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535, South Africa Correspondence should be addressed to Gerald F. Malgas; gmalgas@csir.co.za and David E. Motaung; dmotaung@csir.co.za Received 20 February 2013; Accepted 10...

  19. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Phosphorous- and Boron-Doped Graphene Using Phenyl-Containing Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekan Ovezmyradov; Magedov, Igor V; Frolova, Liliya V; Chandler, Gary; Garcia, Jill; Bethke, Donald; Shaner, Eric A; Kalugin, Nikolai G

    2015-07-01

    Simultaneous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene and "in-situ" phosphorous or boron doping of graphene was accomplished using Triphenylphosphine (TPP) and 4-Methoxyphenylboronic acid (4-MPBA). The TPP and 4-MPBA molecules were sublimated and supplied along with CH4 molecules during graphene growth at atmospheric pressure. The grown graphene samples were characterized using Raman spectroscopy. Phosphorous and boron presence in phosphorous and boron doped graphene was confirmed with Auger electron spectroscopy. The possibility of obtaining phosphorous and boron doped graphene using solid-source molecule precursors via CVD can lead to an easy and rapid production of modified large area graphene.

  20. In situ observations during chemical vapor deposition of hexagonal boron nitride on polycrystalline copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidambi, Piran R.; Blume, Raoul; Kling, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Using a combination of complementary in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we study the fundamental mechanisms underlying the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on polycrystalline Cu. The nucleation and growth of h-BN layers is found to occur...... processing, and that this negatively affects the stability of h-BN on the catalyst. For extended air exposure Cu oxidation is observed, and upon re-heating in vacuum an oxygen-mediated disintegration of the h-BN film via volatile boron oxides occurs. Importantly, this disintegration is catalyst mediated, i...

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V.; Lutz, Victoriya A.; Dontsova, Tatiana A.; Astrelin, Igor M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parameters of tin(IV) oxide samples were defined, the bandgap of samples were calculated.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    OpenAIRE

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V.; Lutz, Victoriya A.; Dontsova, Tatiana A.; Astrelin, Igor M.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parame...

  3. High-purity cobalt thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ootera, Yasuaki; Shimada, Takuya; Kado, Masaki; Quinsat, Michael; Morise, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Shiho; Kondo, Tsuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    A study of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of high-purity cobalt thin films is described. The Co layer prepared by a thermal CVD technique with a Pt/Ta underlayer and a Pt cap layer shows a saturation magnetization (Ms) of ∼1.8 T and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with an anisotropy energy (Ku) of ∼105 J/m3. The cobalt thickness dependence of Ku reveals that the interfacial anisotropy at the Pt/Co interface is most likely the origin of the obtained PMA.

  4. Synthesize of N-doped Carbon nanotube according to gas flow rate by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. B.; Kim, C. D.; Kong, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Min, B. K.; Jung, W. S.; Lee, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrogen-doped (N-doped) Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been prepared by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). As doping accompanies with the recombination of carbon atoms into CNTs in the CVD process, N atoms can be substitutionally doped into the CNTs lattice, which is hard to realize by other synthetic methods. The synthesis technique and the characteristic analysis of N-doped CNT will move up the industrialization and the basic study of CNT. We will elucidate the basic properties of CNT such as the structural characteristics of the N-doped CNT material and study for the industrial application of the N-doped CNTs to the electrode of fuel cell.

  5. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-04-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. Observation of growth modes during metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, G.B.; Eastman, J.A.; Thompson, C.; Auciello, O.; Thompson, L.J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Munkholm, A. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Fini, P.; DenBaars, S.P.; Speck, J.S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    We present real-time surface x-ray scattering measurements during homoepitaxial growth of GaN by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. We observed intensity oscillations corresponding to the completion of each monolayer during layer-by-layer growth. The growth rate was found to be temperature independent and Ga-transport limited. Transitions between step-flow, layer-by-layer, and three-dimensional growth modes were determined as a function of temperature and growth rate. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Thermal/residual stress in an electron beam physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, J.; Jordan, E.H.; Barber, B.; Gell, M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1998-10-09

    Elastic-plastic finite element models are used to define the thermal/residual stress state responsible for the observed failure behavior of an electron beam physical vapor deposited yttria stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating on a Pt-Al bond coat. The failures were observed to start at grain boundary ridges, some of which evolved into oxide filled cavities. Finite element models are made of the actual interface geometries through the use of metallographic sectioning and imaging processing. There is a one to one correspondence of calculated tension in the oxide layer and the observed localized damage. Purely elastic analysis failed to show some important tensile regions associated with the observed failure.

  8. An Investigation on the Formation of Carbon Nanotubes by Two-Stage Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Shamsudin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has been synthesized from agricultural hydrocarbon: camphor oil using a one-hour synthesis time and a titanium dioxide sol gel catalyst. The pyrolysis temperature is studied in the range of 700–900°C at increments of 50°C. The synthesis process is done using a custom-made two-stage catalytic chemical vapor deposition apparatus. The CNT characteristics are investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that structural properties of CNT are highly dependent on pyrolysis temperature changes.

  9. A sub-atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process for deposition of oxide liner in high aspect ratio through silicon vias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisker, Marco; Marschmeyer, Steffen; Kaynak, Mehmet; Tekin, Ibrahim

    2011-09-01

    The formation of a Through Silicon Via (TSV) includes a deep Si trench etching and the formation of an insulating layer along the high-aspect-ratio trench and the filling of a conductive material into the via hole. The isolation of the filling conductor from the silicon substrate becomes more important for higher frequencies due to the high coupling of the signal to the silicon. The importance of the oxide thickness on the via wall isolation can be verified using electromagnetic field simulators. To satisfy the needs on the Silicon dioxide deposition, a sub-atmospheric chemical vapor deposition (SA-CVD) process has been developed to deposit an isolation oxide to the walls of deep silicon trenches. The technique provides excellent step coverage of the 100 microm depth silicon trenches with the high aspect ratio of 20 and more. The developed technique allows covering the deep silicon trenches by oxide and makes the high isolation of TSVs from silicon substrate feasible which is the key factor for the performance of TSVs for mm-wave 3D packaging.

  10. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon [School Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungjun, E-mail: hyungjun@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Han-Bo-Ram, E-mail: hbrlee@inu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Incheon National University, 406-840 Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Fundamental research plasma process for thin film deposition is presented. • VHF plasma source for PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was employed to reduce plasma damage. • The use of VHF plasma improved all of the film qualities and growth characteristics. - Abstract: Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  11. Enhanced Bactericidal Activity of Silver Thin Films Deposited via Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Ponja, S. D.; Sehmi, S. K.; Allan, E.; MacRobert, A. J.; Parkin, I. P.; Carmalt, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Silver thin films were deposited on SiO2-barrier-coated float glass, fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass, Activ glass, and TiO2-coated float glass via AACVD using silver nitrate at 350 °C. The films were annealed at 600 °C and analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV/vis/near-IR spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. All the films were crystalline, and the silver was present in its elemental form and of nanometer dimension. The antibacterial activit...

  12. The technology of Plasma Spray Physical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Góral

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The deposition of thermal barrier coatings is currently the most effective means of protecting the surface of aircraft engine turbine blades from the impact of aggressive environment of combustion gases. The new technologies of TBC depositions are required.Design/methodology/approach: The essential properties of the PS-PVD process have been outlined, as well as recent literature references. In addition, the influence of a set process condition on the properties of the deposited coatings has been described.Findings: The new plasma-spraying PS-PVD method is a promising technology for the deposition of modern thermal barrier coatings on aircraft engine turbine blades.Research limitations/implications: The constant progress of engine operating temperatures and increasing pollution restrictions determine the intensive development of heat-resistant coatings, which is directed to new deposition technologies and coating materials.Practical implications: The article presents a new technology of thermal barrier coating deposition - LPPS Thin Film and Plasma Spray - Physical Vapour Deposition.Originality/value: The completely new technologies was described in article.

  13. The Aging Study on Polyethylene Terephthalate with Surface Modification by Water Vapor Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The aging effects of the contact angle and surface energy on polyethylene tereph thalate (PET) have been investigated with surface modification by water vapor plasma. The experimental results show that the contact angle of water and PET decreases obviously and sur face energy increases. However, with the increase of the aging time, the contact angle and surface energy change back gradually to original state.

  14. Thermal Vapor Deposition and Characterization of Polymer-Ceramic Nanoparticle Composite Thin Films and Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Crystal L.

    Thin films composed of the polymer polyvinylidene uoride (PVDF) and the ceramic nanoparticle titanium dioxide (TiO2) were fabricated via thermal vapor deposition. The goal of this research was to improve the amount of TiO2 deposited by varying the temperature and deposition time, to obtain more accurate thickness measurements, and to improve on the electrical properties. The electrical properties analyzed in this study were the dielectric constant, capacitance, breakdown strength and energy density of the capacitors. A starting mixture of PVDF, TiO2, and dimethylformamide (DMF) was prepared prior to deposition, where DMF was used only as a solvent. The elemental composition of the films was determined with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Elemental mapping of the films shows that the nanoparticles are homogeneously distributed in the polymer. The ideal initial concentrations (which yield the largest TiO2 concentration) of PVDF and TiO2 were determined to be 83% and 17% respectively by weight. The highest weight percent of Ti was 32.4%, which was made with a deposition temperature of 474°C (corresponding to a current of 27 A) and deposition time of 13 minutes. Thefilm thickness was measured by combining EDS and ImageJ to be 243--46 nm. Parallel plate capacitors were fabricated by combining thermal vapor deposition for the dielectric and sputter coating for the electrodes. For the electrodes, the parallel plates are gold palladium (AuPd) with PVDF:TiO2 as the dielectric. The AuPd electrodes were deposited via sputter coating. Each electrode was sputtered for 100s, which yielded a thickness of 33 nm. The dielectric constant was determined experimentally to be 10.8 and estimated using the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium approximation to be 13.1. The capacitance of these capacitors averaged 30--2 nF. The breakdown voltage of the capacitor was 25--4 V, which corresponds to a breakdown strength of 103 MV/m. Lastly

  15. Ultrasonic Spray-Assisted Solution-Based Vapor-Deposition of Aluminum Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Jinchun; Katori, Shigetaka; Ikenoue, Takumi; Fujita, Shizuo

    2011-02-01

    Aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq3) thin films were fabricated by a vapor-deposition technique from its methanol solution, that is, by the ultrasonic-assisted mist deposition technique. The application of high ultrasonic power to the Alq3-methanol mixture resulted in a stable and transparent solution. Mist particles formed by ultrasonic atomization of the solution were used as the source for vapor-deposition at the substrate temperature of 100-200 °C. Optical absorption and photoluminescence characteristics indicated the formation of Alq3 thin films. The results promise the formation of thin films of a variety of organic materials by the solution-based technique.

  16. High-rate diamond deposition by microwave plasma CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianglin

    In this dissertation, the growth of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond thin films is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The goal of this research is to deposit high quality HOD (Highly Oriented Diamond) films with a growth rate greater than 1 mum/hr. For the (100)-oriented HOD films, the growth rate achieved by the traditional process is only 0.3 mum/hr while the theoretical limit is ˜0.45 mum/hr. This research increases the growth rate up to 5.3 mum/hr (with a theoretical limit of ˜7 mum/hr) while preserving the crystal quality. This work builds a connection between the theoretical study of the CVD process and the experimental research. The study is extended from the growth of regular polycrystalline diamond to highly oriented diamond (HOD) films. For the increase of the growth rate of regular polycrystalline diamond thin films, a scaling growth model developed by Goodwin is introduced in details to assist in the understanding of the MPCVD (Microwave Plasma CVD) process. Within the Goodwin's scaling model, there are only four important sub-processes for the growth of diamond: surface modification, adsorption, desorption, and incorporation. The factors determining the diamond growth rate and film quality are discussed following the description of the experimental setup and process parameters. Growth rate and crystal quality models are reviewed to predict and understand the experimental results. It is shown that the growth rate of diamond can be increased with methane input concentration and the amount of atomic hydrogen (by changing the total pressure). It is crucial to provide enough atomic hydrogen to conserve crystal quality of the deposited diamond film. The experimental results demonstrate that for a fixed methane concentration, there is a minimum pressure for growth of good diamond. Similarly, for a fixed total pressure, there is a maximum methane concentration for growth of good diamond, and this maximum methane concentration increases

  17. Deposition of TiC film on titanium for abrasion resistant implant material by ion-enhanced triode plasma CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Yuhe, E-mail: zyh1120@hotmail.co.jp [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shen Yang (China); Wang Wei; Jia Xingya [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shen Yang (China); Akasaka, Tsukasa [Department of Health Science, School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Liao, Susan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Watari, Fumio [Department of Health Science, School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deposition of Titanium Carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. - Abstract: Deposition of titanium carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using a TiCl{sub 4} + CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2} gas mixture. Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the specimen was consisted of TiC and Ti. Carbide layer of about 6 {mu}m thickness was observed on the cross section of the specimen by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance.

  18. Low-Temperature Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Moisture Permeation Barrier Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andringa, Anne-Marije; Perrotta, Alberto; de Peuter, Koen; Knoops, Harm C M; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M; Creatore, Mariadriana

    2015-10-14

    Encapsulation of organic (opto-)electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells, and field-effect transistors, is required to minimize device degradation induced by moisture and oxygen ingress. SiNx moisture permeation barriers have been fabricated using a very recently developed low-temperature plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) approach, consisting of half-reactions of the substrate with the precursor SiH2(NH(t)Bu)2 and with N2-fed plasma. The deposited films have been characterized in terms of their refractive index and chemical composition by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The SiNx thin-film refractive index ranges from 1.80 to 1.90 for films deposited at 80 °C up to 200 °C, respectively, and the C, O, and H impurity levels decrease when the deposition temperature increases. The relative open porosity content of the layers has been studied by means of multisolvent ellipsometric porosimetry (EP), adopting three solvents with different kinetic diameters: water (∼0.3 nm), ethanol (∼0.4 nm), and toluene (∼0.6 nm). Irrespective of the deposition temperature, and hence the impurity content in the SiNx films, no uptake of any adsorptive has been observed, pointing to the absence of open pores larger than 0.3 nm in diameter. Instead, multilayer development has been observed, leading to type II isotherms that, according to the IUPAC classification, are characteristic of nonporous layers. The calcium test has been performed in a climate chamber at 20 °C and 50% relative humidity to determine the intrinsic water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of SiNx barriers deposited at 120 °C. Intrinsic WVTR values in the range of 10(-6) g/m2/day indicate excellent barrier properties for ALD SiNx layers as thin as 10 nm, competing with that of state-of-the-art plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited SiNx layers of a few hundred

  19. Nanoscale arrays of antimony telluride single crystals by selective chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruomeng; Benjamin, Sophie L.; Gurnani, Chitra; Wang, Yudong; Hector, Andrew L.; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; De Groot, C. H. (Kees)

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of individual single nanocrystals of Sb2Te3 have been formed using selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a single source precursor. Crystals are self-assembled reproducibly in confined spaces of 100 nm diameter with pitch down to 500 nm. The distribution of crystallite sizes across the arrays is very narrow (standard deviation of 15%) and is affected by both the hole diameter and the array pitch. The preferred growth of the crystals in the orientation along the diagonal of the square holes strongly indicates that the diffusion of adatoms results in a near thermodynamic equilibrium growth mechanism of the nuclei. A clear relationship between electrical resistivity and selectivity is established across a range of metal selenides and tellurides, showing that conductive materials result in more selective growth and suggesting that electron donation is of critical importance for selective deposition. PMID:27283116

  20. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes supported on carbon fiber paper synthesized by simple chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ya-hao [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhengzhou Research Institute of Chalco, Zhengzhou 450041 (China); Gao, Hong-quan [Zhengzhou Research Institute of Chalco, Zhengzhou 450041 (China); Yang, Jian-hong, E-mail: zyy_yjh@rilm.com.cn [Zhengzhou Research Institute of Chalco, Zhengzhou 450041 (China); Gao, Wen-liang; Xiang, Jia [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Li, Qing-yu, E-mail: 13975808173@126.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We deposited multi-wall carbon nanotubes on carbon fiber paper with a simple CVD. • We investigated the inherent mechanism of Ni particle's self-dispersion. • The MWCNTs/CFP composite possesses wonderful electrical conductivity. - Abstract: Aiming at developing a novel carbon/carbon composite as an electrode in the electrochemical capacitor applications, multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/carbon fiber paper (CFP) composite has been synthesized using a simple chemical vapor deposition, in which different metal catalysts such as Fe, Ni and Cu are used. However, randomly oriented MWCNTs were only obtained on Ni particles. The mechanism for this unique phenomenon is investigated in this article. The physical and electrochemical properties of as-prepared MWCNTs/CFP composite are characterized and the results show that the as-prepared composite is a promising substrate for electrochemical capacitor applications.

  1. Preparation of diamond/Cu microchannel heat sink by chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘学璋; 罗浩; 苏栩; 余志明

    2015-01-01

    A Ti interlayer with thickness about 300 nm was sputtered on Cu microchannels, followed by an ultrasonic seeding with nanodiamond powders. Adherent diamond film with crystalline grains close to thermal equilibrium shape was tightly deposited by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD). The nucleation and growth of diamond were investigated with micro-Raman spectroscope and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX). Results show that the nucleation density is found to be up to 1010 cm−2. The enhancement of the nucleation kinetics can be attributed to the nanometer rough Ti interlayer surface. An improved absorption of nanodiamond particles is found, which act as starting points for the diamond nucleation during HF-CVD process. Furthermore, finite element simulation was conducted to understand the thermal management properties of prepared diamond/Cu microchannel heat sink.

  2. Synthesis of zirconia (ZrO2) nanowires via chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, M. K.; Park, S. J.; Choi, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    Monoclinic zirconia nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using ZrCl4 powder as a starting material at 1200 °C and 760 Torr. Graphite was employed as a substrate, and an Au thin film was pre-deposited on the graphite as a catalyst. The zirconia nanostructure morphology was observed through scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Based on X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy data, the resulting crystal structure was found to be single crystalline monoclinic zirconia. The homogeneous distributions of Zr, O and Au were studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping, and there was no metal droplet at the nanowire tips despite the use of an Au metal catalyst. This result is apart from that of conventional metal catalyzed nanowires.

  3. Surface modification of titanium membrane by chemical vapor deposition and its electrochemical self-cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. W.; Li, J. X.; Gao, C. Y.; Chang, M.

    2011-10-01

    Membrane separation is applied widely in many fields, while concentration polarization and membrane fouling, limiting its promotion and application greatly, are the bottlenecks in membrane application. Among which, membrane fouling is irreversible, membrane must be periodically cleaned or even replaced to restore permeability. Membrane cleaning has become one of the key issues in membrane separation areas. Considering incomparable electrochemical advantages of boron-doped diamond (BDD) film electrode over conventional electrode, a new composite membrane Ti/BDD, made by depositing CVD (chemical vapor deposition) boron-doped diamond film on titanium(Ti) membrane to modify porous titanium surface, that can be cleaned electrochemically is proposed. Feasibility of its preparation and application is discussed in this paper. Results shows that based on the unique electrochemical properties of diamond, cleaning level of this composite Ti/BDD membrane is significantly increased, making membrane life and efficiency improved prominently.

  4. Preparation of γ-Al2O3 films by laser chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Ito, Akihiko; Goto, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    γ- and α-Al2O3 films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition using CO2, Nd:YAG, and InGaAs lasers to investigate the effects of varying the laser wavelength and deposition conditions on the phase composition and microstructure. The CO2 laser was found to mostly produce α-Al2O3 films, whereas the Nd:YAG and InGaAs lasers produced γ-Al2O3 films when used at a high total pressure. γ-Al2O3 films had a cauliflower-like structure, while the α-Al2O3 films had a dense and columnar structure. Of the three lasers, it was the Nd:YAG laser that interacted most with intermediate gas species. This promoted γ-Al2O3 nucleation in the gas phase at high total pressure, which explains the cauliflower-like structure of nanoparticles observed.

  5. Analysis of gallium arsenide deposition in a horizontal chemical vapor deposition reactor using massively parallel computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinger, A.G.; Shadid, J.N.; Hutchinson, S.A. [and others

    1998-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the deposition of gallium from trimethylgallium (TMG) and arsine in a horizontal CVD reactor with tilted susceptor and a three inch diameter rotating substrate is performed. The three-dimensional model includes complete coupling between fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and species transport, and is solved using an unstructured finite element discretization on a massively parallel computer. The effects of three operating parameters (the disk rotation rate, inlet TMG fraction, and inlet velocity) and two design parameters (the tilt angle of the reactor base and the reactor width) on the growth rate and uniformity are presented. The nonlinear dependence of the growth rate uniformity on the key operating parameters is discussed in detail. Efficient and robust algorithms for massively parallel reacting flow simulations, as incorporated into our analysis code MPSalsa, make detailed analysis of this complicated system feasible.

  6. Deposition of low stress, high transmittance SiC as an x-ray mask membrane using ECR plasma CVD

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S Y; Lim, S T; Ahn, J H

    1998-01-01

    SiC for x-ray mask membrane is deposited by Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition from SiH sub 4 /CH sub 4 Ar mixtures. Stoichiometric SiC is deposited at SiH sub 4 /CH sub 4 ratio of 0.4, deposition temperature of 600.deg.C and microwave power of 500 W with +- 5% thickness uniformity, As-deposited film has compressive residual stress, very smooth surface (31 A rms) and high optical transmittance of 90% at 633 nm wavelength. The microstructure of this film consists of the nanocrystalline particle (100 A approx 200A) embedded in amorphous matrix. Residual stress can be turned to tensile stress via Rapid Thermal Annealing in N sub 2 atmosphere, while suppressing structural change during annealing, As a result, smooth (37 A rms) SiC film with moderate tensile stress and high optical transmittance (85% at 633 nm wavelength) is obtained.

  7. Effect of surface tension, viscosity, and process conditions on polymer morphology deposited at the liquid-vapor interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Patrick D; Bradley, Laura C; Gupta, Malancha

    2013-09-17

    We have observed that the vapor-phase deposition of polymers onto liquid substrates can result in the formation of polymer films or particles at the liquid-vapor interface. In this study, we demonstrate the relationship between the polymer morphology at the liquid-vapor interface and the surface tension interaction between the liquid and polymer, the liquid viscosity, the deposition rate, and the deposition time. We show that the thermodynamically stable morphology is determined by the surface tension interaction between the liquid and the polymer. Stable polymer films form when it is energetically favorable for the polymer to spread over the surface of the liquid, whereas polymer particles form when it is energetically favorable for the polymer to aggregate. For systems that do not strongly favor spreading or aggregation, we observe that the initial morphology depends on the deposition rate. Particles form at low deposition rates, whereas unstable films form at high deposition rates. We also observe a transition from particle formation to unstable film formation when we increase the viscosity of the liquid or increase the deposition time. Our results provide a fundamental understanding about polymer growth at the liquid-vapor interface and can offer insight into the growth of other materials on liquid surfaces. The ability to systematically tune morphology can enable the production of particles for applications in photonics, electronics, and drug delivery and films for applications in sensing and separations.

  8. Plasma deposition of amorphous silicon-based materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Giovanni; Madan, Arun

    1995-01-01

    Semiconductors made from amorphous silicon have recently become important for their commercial applications in optical and electronic devices including FAX machines, solar cells, and liquid crystal displays. Plasma Deposition of Amorphous Silicon-Based Materials is a timely, comprehensive reference book written by leading authorities in the field. This volume links the fundamental growth kinetics involving complex plasma chemistry with the resulting semiconductor film properties and the subsequent effect on the performance of the electronic devices produced. Key Features * Focuses on the plasma chemistry of amorphous silicon-based materials * Links fundamental growth kinetics with the resulting semiconductor film properties and performance of electronic devices produced * Features an international group of contributors * Provides the first comprehensive coverage of the subject, from deposition technology to materials characterization to applications and implementation in state-of-the-art devices.

  9. Temperature regulated-chemical vapor deposition for incorporating NiO nanoparticles into mesoporous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Wook; Kim, Il Hee; Kim, Dae Han; Park, Ki Jung; Park, Eun Ji; Jeong, Myung-Geun; Kim, Young Dok

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a novel strategy for incorporating NiO nanoparticles into mesoporous Al2O3 with a mean pore size of ∼12 nm and particle size of ∼1 mm. Ni-precursor vapor and ambient atmosphere were filled in a closed chamber with mesoporous Al2O3, and the chamber was initially heated at ∼100 °C, at which no chemical reaction between the inorganic precursor, oxygen, water vapor in the atmosphere, and the surface of Al2O3 took place. Next, the temperature of the system was increased to 260 °C for deposition of NiO. We found that NiO nanoparticles were not only deposited on the surface, but were also incorporated in a 50 μm-deep region of the mesoporous Al2O3 gel. We also demonstrated high CO oxidation activity and reusability of the deactivated NiO/Al2O3 catalysts prepared by the aforementioned method. These results suggest that our strategy could be widely applicable to the incorporation of various nanoparticles into mesoporous supports.

  10. PROPERTIES AND OPTICAL APPLICATION OF POLYCRYSTALLINE ZINC SELENIDE OBTAINED BY PHYSICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Dunaev

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Findings on production technology, mechanical and optical properties of polycrystalline zinc selenide are presented. The combination of its physicochemical properties provides wide application of ZnSe in IR optics. Production technology is based on the method of physical vapor deposition on a heated substrate (Physical Vapor Deposition - PVD. The structural features and heterogeneity of elemental composition for the growth surfaces of ZnSe polycrystalline blanks were investigated using CAMEBAX X-ray micro-analyzer. Characteristic pyramid-shaped crystallites were recorded for all growth surfaces. The measurements of the ratio for major elements concentrations show their compliance with the stoichiometry of the ZnSe compounds. Birefringence, optical homogeneity, thermal conductivity, mechanical and optical properties were measured. It is established that regardless of polycrystalline condensate columnar and texturing, the optical material is photomechanically isotropic and homogeneous. The actual performance of parts made of polycrystalline optical zinc selenide in the thermal spectral ranges from 3 to 5 μm and from 8 to 14 μm and in the CO2 laser processing plants with a power density of 500 W/cm2 is shown. The developed technology gives the possibility to produce polycrystalline optical material on an industrial scale.

  11. Femtosecond to nanosecond excited state dynamics of vapor deposited copper phthalocyanine thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplins, Benjamin W; Mullenbach, Tyler K; Holmes, Russell J; Blank, David A

    2016-04-28

    Vapor deposited thin films of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) were investigated using transient absorption spectroscopy. Exciton-exciton annihilation dominated the kinetics at high exciton densities. When annihilation was minimized, the observed lifetime was measured to be 8.6 ± 0.6 ns, which is over an order of magnitude longer than previous reports. In comparison with metal free phthalocyanine (H2Pc), the data show evidence that the presence of copper induces an ultrafast relaxation process taking place on the ca. 500 fs timescale. By comparison to recent time-resolved photoemission studies, this is assigned as ultrafast intersystem crossing. As the intersystem crossing occurs ca. 10(4) times faster than lifetime decay, it is likely that triplets are the dominant excitons in vapor deposited CuPc films. The exciton lifetime of CuPc thin films is ca. 35 times longer than H2Pc thin films, while the diffusion lengths reported in the literature are typically quite similar for the two materials. These findings suggest that despite appearing to be similar materials at first glance, CuPc and H2Pc may transport energy in dramatically different ways. This has important implications on the design and mechanistic understanding of devices where phthalocyanines are used as an excitonic material.

  12. Suitable alkaline for graphene peeling grown on metallic catalysts using chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamat, S.; Sonuşen, S.; Çelik, Ü.; Uysallı, Y.; Oral, A.

    2016-04-01

    In chemical vapor deposition, the higher growth temperature roughens the surface of the metal catalyst and a delicate method is necessary for the transfer of graphene from metal catalyst to the desired substrates. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu foil via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) method and further alkaline water electrolysis was used to peel off graphene from the metallic catalyst. We used different electrolytes i.e., sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and barium hydroxide Ba(OH)2 for electrolysis, hydrogen bubbles evolved at the Pt cathode (graphene/Pt/PMMA stack) and as a result graphene layer peeled off from the substrate without damage. The peeling time for KOH and LiOH was ∼6 min and for NaOH and Ba(OH)2 it was ∼15 min. KOH and LiOH peeled off graphene very efficiently as compared to NaOH and Ba(OH)2 from the Pt electrode. In case of copper, the peeling time is ∼3-5 min. Different characterizations like optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were done to analyze the as grown and transferred graphene samples.

  13. Multifaceted and route-controlled "click" reactions based on vapor-deposited coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ting-Pi; Tai, Ching-Heng; Wu, Jyun-Ting; Wu, Chih-Yu; Liang, Wei-Chieh; Chen, Hsien-Yeh

    2016-02-01

    "Click" reactions provide precise and reliable chemical transformations for the preparation of functional architectures for biomaterials and biointerfaces. The emergence of a multiple-click reaction strategy has paved the way for a multifunctional microenvironment with orthogonality and precise multitasking that mimics nature. We demonstrate a multifaceted and route-controlled click interface using vapor-deposited functionalized poly-para-xylylenes. Distinctly clickable moieties of ethynyl and maleimide were introduced into poly-para-xylylenes in one step via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) copolymerization process. The advanced interface coating allows for a double-click route with concurrent copper(i)-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC) and the thiol-maleimide click reaction. Additionally, double-click reactions can also be performed in a cascade manner by controlling the initiation route to enable the CuAAC and/or thiol-yne reaction using a mono-functional alkyne-functionalized poly-para-xylylene. The use of multifaceted coatings to create straightforward and orthogonal interface properties with respect to protein adsorption and cell attachment is demonstrated and characterized.

  14. Synthesis of coaxial nanotubes of polyaniline and poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate by oxidative/initiated chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Balkan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Vapor-phase synthesis techniques of polymeric nanostructures offer unique advantages over conventional, solution-based techniques because of their solventless nature. In this work, we report the fabrication of coaxial polymer nanotubes using two different chemical vapor deposition methods. The fabrication process involves the deposition of an outer layer of the conductive polyaniline (PANI by oxidative chemical vapor deposition, followed by the deposition of the inner layer of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (pHEMA hydrogel by initiated chemical vapor deposition. The vapor-phase techniques allowed for fine-tuning of the thickness of the individual layers, keeping the functionalities of the polymers intact. The response of the single components and the coaxial nanotubes to changes in humidity was investigated for potential humidity sensor applications. For single-component conductive PANI nanotubes, the resistance changed parabolically with relative humidity because of competing effects of doping and swelling of the PANI polymer under humid conditions. Introducing a hydrogel inner layer increased the overall resistance, and enhanced swelling, which caused the resistance to continuously increase with relative humidity.

  15. Shape correction of optical surfaces using plasma chemical vaporization machining with a hemispherical tip electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takino, Hideo; Yamamura, Kazuya; Sano, Yasuhisa; Mori, Yuzo

    2012-01-20

    We propose a plasma chemical vaporization machining device with a hemispherical tip electrode for optical fabrication. Radio-frequency plasma is generated close to the electrode under atmospheric conditions, and a workpiece is scanned relative to the stationary electrode under three-axis motion control to remove target areas on a workpiece surface. Experimental results demonstrate that surface removal progresses although process gas is not forcibly supplied to the plasma. The correction of shape errors on conventionally polished spheres is performed. As a result, highly accurate smooth surfaces with the desired rms shape accuracy of 3 nm are successfully obtained, which confirms that the device is effective for the fabrication of optics.

  16. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joulaei, A. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); University of Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moody, J. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Berti, N.; Kasparian, J. [University of Geneva (Switzerland); Mirzanejhad, S. [University of Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Muggli, P. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment. - Highlights: • Discussion the AWAKE plasma source based on photoionization of rubidium vapor with a TW/cm^2 Intensity laser with a spectrum across valence ground state transition resonances. • Examines the propagation of the AWAKE ionization laser through rubidium vapor at design density on a small scale and reduced intensity with a linear numerical model compared to experimental results. • Discusses physics of pulse propagation through the vapor at high intensity regime where strong ionization occurs within the laser pulse.

  17. Nucleation and growth of chemically vapor deposited tungsten on various substrate materials: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, E.K.

    1987-11-01

    W films produced by chemical-vapor deposition (CVD), typically via reduction of WF/sub 6/, are being used for numerous applications in very large scale integrated circuit technology. Blanket and selectively deposited films require nucleation and growth on a specific underlayer material: Si, metal, or metal silicide. The compatibility of CVD W with various underlayers is reviewed for the device applications of contact/via fill, diffusion barrier, metal interconnect, and source/drain coating. Nucleation of W directly on single crystal Si can sometimes produce tunnel-defect structures at the edges or along the entire interface of the deposit. Sputtered Mo and W, and to some extent TiW and TiN, have been shown to be suitable nucleation layers for CVD W, yielding a fluorine-free interface with low-electrical contact resistance. A sputtered W/Ti adhesion bilayer is demonstrated for a blanket W deposition+etchback process. CoSi/sub 2/ appears an appropriate choice where CVD W and salicide technologies are combined.

  18. Nucleation and growth of single layer graphene on electrodeposited Cu by cold wall chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shantanu; Drucker, Jeff

    2017-03-01

    The nucleation density and average size of graphene crystallites grown using cold wall chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on 4 μm thick Cu films electrodeposited on W substrates can be tuned by varying growth parameters. Growth at a fixed substrate temperature of 1000 °C and total pressure of 700 Torr using Ar, H2 and CH4 mixtures enabled the contribution of total flow rate, CH4:H2 ratio and dilution of the CH4/H2 mixture by Ar to be identified. The largest variation in nucleation density was obtained by varying the CH4:H2 ratio. The observed morphological changes are analogous to those that would be expected if the deposition rate were varied at fixed substrate temperature for physical deposition using thermal evaporation. The graphene crystallite boundary morphology progresses from irregular/jagged through convex hexagonal to regular hexagonal as the effective C deposition rate decreases. This observation suggests that edge diffusion of C atoms along the crystallite boundaries, in addition to H2 etching, may contribute to shape evolution of the graphene crystallites. These results demonstrate that graphene grown using cold wall CVD follows a nucleation and growth mechanism similar to hot wall CVD. As a consequence, the vast knowledge base relevant to hot wall CVD may be exploited for graphene synthesis by the industrially preferable cold wall method.

  19. Structure and mechanical properties of pyrolytic carbon produced by fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Honorato, E.; Meadows, P.J. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Xiao, P. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Ping.Xiao@manchester.ac.uk; Marsh, G.; Abram, T.J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., Springfields PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    Pyrolytic carbon was deposited on spherical particles using a multi-spout fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition reactor to fabricate TRISO fuel for the High Temperature Reactor (HTR). Modern techniques such as Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation supported by porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to analyze the particle coatings directly. Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation were given special attention due to their capacity to provide information on the internal structure of pyrolytic carbon and its mechanical properties without the necessity of complex sample preparation. The results obtained were used to study the relationship deposition conditions-microstructure-mechanical properties in more detail. Increasing the deposition temperature reduced the density and Young's modulus as porosity and in-plane disorder of carbon domains increased. There was also a change from a laminar microstructure of PyC to that containing more spherical particles. It appeared that anisotropy, domain size and level of graphitization (examined by Raman and TEM) had a strong influence on the mechanical properties. Clear differences were observed between acetylene and the acetylene/propylene mixture as precursor gases.

  20. Copper-vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition for high-quality and metal-free single-layer graphene on amorphous SiO2 substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungki; Song, Intek; Park, Chibeom; Son, Minhyeok; Hong, Misun; Kim, Youngwook; Kim, Jun Sung; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Baik, Jaeyoon; Choi, Hee Cheul

    2013-08-27

    We report that high-quality single-layer graphene (SLG) has been successfully synthesized directly on various dielectric substrates including amorphous SiO2/Si by a Cu-vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The Cu vapors produced by the sublimation of Cu foil that is suspended above target substrates without physical contact catalyze the pyrolysis of methane gas and assist nucleation of graphene on the substrates. Raman spectra and mapping images reveal that the graphene formed on a SiO2/Si substrate is almost defect-free and homogeneous single layer. The overall quality of graphene grown by Cu-vapor-assisted CVD is comparable to that of the graphene grown by regular metal-catalyzed CVD on a Cu foil. While Cu vapor induces the nucleation and growth of SLG on an amorphous substrate, the resulting SLG is confirmed to be Cu-free by synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The SLG grown by Cu-vapor-assisted CVD is fabricated into field effect transistor devices without transfer steps that are generally required when SLG is grown by regular CVD process on metal catalyst substrates. This method has overcome two important hurdles previously present when the catalyst-free CVD process is used for the growth of SLG on fused quartz and hexagonal boron nitride substrates, that is, high degree of structural defects and limited size of resulting graphene, respectively.

  1. Properties of N-rich Silicon Nitride Film Deposited by Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Pei-Ci; Lu, Chi-Pin; Shieh, Jung-Yu; Yang, Ling-Wu; Yang, Tahone; Chen, Kuang-Chao; Lu, Chih-Yuan

    2017-07-01

    An N-rich silicon nitride film, with a lower refractive index (RI) than the stoichiometric silicon nitride (RI = 2.01), was deposited by alternating the exposure of dichlorosilane (DCS, SiH2Cl2) and that of ammonia (NH3) in a plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process. In this process, the plasma ammonia was easily decomposed to reactive radicals by RF power activating so that the N-rich silicon nitride was easily formed by excited ammonia radicals. The growth kinetics of N-rich silicon nitride were examined at various deposition temperatures ranging from 400 °C to 630 °C; the activation energy (Ea) decreased as the deposition temperature decreased below 550 °C. N-rich silicon nitride film with a wide range of values of refractive index (RI) (RI = 1.86-2.00) was obtained by regulating the deposition temperature. At the optimal deposition temperature, the effects of RF power, NH3 flow rate and NH3 flow time were on the characteristics of the N-rich silicon nitride film were evaluated. The results thus reveal that the properties of the N-rich silicon nitride film that was formed by under plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) are dominated by deposition temperature. In charge trap flash (CTF) study, an N-rich silicon nitride film was applied to MAONOS device as a charge-trapping layer. The films exhibit excellent electron trapping ability and favor a fresh cell data retention performance as the deposition temperature decreased.

  2. Vapor-Phase Deposition and Modification of Metal-Organic Frameworks: State-of-the-Art and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassen, Ivo; De Vos, Dirk; Ameloot, Rob

    2016-10-04

    Materials processing, and thin-film deposition in particular, is decisive in the implementation of functional materials in industry and real-world applications. Vapor processing of materials plays a central role in manufacturing, especially in electronics. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of nanoporous crystalline materials on the brink of breakthrough in many application areas. Vapor deposition of MOF thin films will facilitate their implementation in micro- and nanofabrication research and industries. In addition, vapor-solid modification can be used for postsynthetic tailoring of MOF properties. In this context, we review the recent progress in vapor processing of MOFs, summarize the underpinning chemistry and principles, and highlight promising directions for future research. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Properties of CdTe layers deposited by a novel method -Pulsed Plasma Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Ancora, C.; Nozar, P.; Mittica, G.; Prescimone, F.; A. Neri; Contaldi, S.; Milita, S.; Albonetti, C.; Corticelli, F.; Brillante, A.; Bilotti, I.; Tedeschi, G.; Taliani, C.

    2011-01-01

    CdTe and CdS are emerging as the most promising materials for thin film photovoltaics in the quest of the achievement of grid parity. The major challenge for the advancement of grid parity is the achievement of high quality at the same time as low fabrication cost. The present paper reports the results of the new deposition technique, Pulsed Plasma Deposition (PPD), for the growth of the CdTe layers on CdS/ZnO/quartz and quartz substrates. The PPD method allows to deposit at low temperature. ...

  4. Evaporation and Vapor Shielding of CFC Targets Exposed to Plasma Heat Fluxes Relevant to ITER ELMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research, TRINITI, Kostromskaya, 12A, 79, RU-142092 Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Landman, I. [FZK-Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association Euratom-FZK, Technik und Umwelt, Postfach 3640, D-7602l Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Carbon-fibre composite (CFC) is foreseen presently as armour material for the divertor target in ITER. During the transient processes such as instabilities of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) the target as anticipated will be exposed to the plasma heat loads of a few MJ/m{sup 2} on the time scale of a fraction of ms, which causes an intense evaporation at the target surface and contaminates tokamak plasma by evaporated carbon. The ITER transient loads are not achievable at existing tokamaks therefore for testing divertor armour materials other facilities, in particular plasma guns are employed. In the present work the CFC targets have been tested for ITER at the plasma gun facility MK- 200 UG in Troitsk by ELM relevant heat fluxes. The targets in the applied magnetic field up to 2 T were irradiated by hydrogen plasma streams of diameter 6 - 8 cm, impact ion energy 2 - 3 keV, pulse duration 0.05 ms and energy density varying in the range 0.05 - 1 MJ/m{sup 2}. Primary attention has been focused on the measurement of evaporation threshold and investigation of carbon vapor properties. Fast infrared pyrometer, optical and VUV spectrometers, framing cameras and plasma calorimeters were applied as diagnostics. The paper reports the results obtained on the evaporation threshold of CFC, the evaporation rate of the carbon fibers oriented parallel and perpendicular to the exposed target surface, the velocity of carbon vapor motion along and across the magnetic field lines, and the parameters of carbon plasma such as temperature, density and ionization state measured up to the distance 15 cm at varying plasma load. First experimental results on investigation of the vapor shield onset conditions are presented also. (authors)

  5. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulaei, A.; Moody, J.; Berti, N.; Kasparian, J.; Mirzanejhad, S.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  6. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Joulaei, Atefeh; Berti, Nicolas; Kasparian, Jerome; Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Muggli, Patric

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  7. Caracterisation of Titanium Nitride Layers Deposited by Reactive Plasma Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Popescu, Mihaela; Uţu, Dragoş

    2011-01-01

    Forming and cutting tools are subjected to the intense wear solicitations. Usually, they are either subject to superficial heat treatments or are covered with various materials with high mechanical properties. In recent years, thermal spraying is used increasingly in engineering area because of the large range of materials that can be used for the coatings. Titanium nitride is a ceramic material with high hardness which is used to cover the cutting tools increasing their lifetime. The paper presents the results obtained after deposition of titanium nitride layers by reactive plasma spraying (RPS). As deposition material was used titanium powder and as substratum was used titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Macroscopic and microscopic (scanning electron microscopy) images of the deposited layers and the X ray diffraction of the coatings are presented. Demonstration program with layers deposited with thickness between 68,5 and 81,4 μm has been achieved and presented.

  8. Magmatic-vapor expansion and the formation of high-sulfidation gold deposits: Chemical controls on alteration and mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, R.W.; Berger, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Large bulk-tonnage high-sulfidation gold deposits, such as Yanacocha, Peru, are the surface expression of structurally-controlled lode gold deposits, such as El Indio, Chile. Both formed in active andesite-dacite volcanic terranes. Fluid inclusion, stable isotope and geologic data show that lode deposits formed within 1500. m of the paleo-surface as a consequence of the expansion of low-salinity, low-density magmatic vapor with very limited, if any, groundwater mixing. They are characterized by an initial 'Sulfate' Stage of advanced argillic wallrock alteration ?? alunite commonly with intense silicification followed by a 'Sulfide' Stage - a succession of discrete sulfide-sulfosalt veins that may be ore grade in gold and silver. Fluid inclusions in quartz formed during wallrock alteration have homogenization temperatures between 100 and over 500 ??C and preserve a record of a vapor-rich environment. Recent data for El Indio and similar deposits show that at the commencement of the Sulfide Stage, 'condensation' of Cu-As-S sulfosalt melts with trace concentrations of Sb, Te, Bi, Ag and Au occurred at > 600 ??C following pyrite deposition. Euhedral quartz crystals were simultaneously deposited from the vapor phase during crystallization of the vapor-saturated melt occurs to Fe-tennantite with progressive non-equilibrium fractionation of heavy metals between melt-vapor and solid. Vugs containing a range of sulfides, sulfosalts and gold record the changing composition of the vapor. Published fluid inclusion and mineralogical data are reviewed in the context of geological relationships to establish boundary conditions through which to trace the expansion of magmatic vapor from source to surface and consequent alteration and mineralization. Initially heat loss from the vapor is high resulting in the formation of acid condensate permeating through the wallrock. This Sulfate Stage alteration effectively isolates the expansion of magmatic vapor in subsurface fracture arrays

  9. Nanocharacterization of TiN films obtained by Ion Vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara O, L; Jerez A, M; Morantes M, L [Universidad Industrial de Santander (Colombia); Plata, A; Torres, Y; Lasprilla, M [Grupo de Optica y Tratamiento de Senales (Colombia); Zhabon, V, E-mail: laura_lara_ortiz@hotmail.com [Fisica y Tecnologia del Plasma (Colombia)

    2011-01-01

    We evaluate and characterize the surface at the nanoscale level and take into account the temperature variation effect in the process of plasma ion deposition for H13 steel samples coated by Titanium Nitride (TiN). The interferometric microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to measure the film to analyze the variation of structural and morphological properties of nanofilms that depend on the temperature of sustrate.

  10. Growth process conditions of tungsten oxide thin films using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houweling, Z. Silvester, E-mail: Z.S.Houweling@uu.nl [Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands); Geus, John W. [Electron Microscopy, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Jong, Michiel de; Harks, Peter-Paul R.M.L.; Werf, Karine H.M. van der; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Process parameters to control hot-wire CVD of WO{sub 3-x} are categorized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth time, oxygen partial pressure, filament and substrate temperature are varied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical and crystal structure, optical bandgap and morphology are determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen partial pressure determines the deposition rate up to as high as 36 {mu}m min{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanostructures, viz. wires, crystallites and closed crystallite films, are controllably deposited. - Abstract: We report the growth conditions of nanostructured tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3-x}) thin films using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). Two tungsten filaments were resistively heated to various temperatures and exposed to an air flow at various subatmospheric pressures. The oxygen partial pressure was varied from 6.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} to 1.0 mbar and the current through the filaments was varied from 4.0 to 9.0 A, which constitutes a filament temperature of 1390-2340 Degree-Sign C in vacuum. It is observed that the deposition rate of the films is predominantly determined by the oxygen partial pressure; it changes from about 1 to about 36,000 nm min{sup -1} in the investigated range. Regardless of the oxygen partial pressure and filament temperature used, thin films with a nanogranular morphology are obtained, provided that the depositions last for 30 min or shorter. The films consist either of amorphous or partially crystallized WO{sub 3-x} with high averaged transparencies of over 70% and an indirect optical band gap of 3.3 {+-} 0.1 eV. A prolonged deposition time entails an extended exposure of the films to thermal radiation from the filaments, which causes crystallization to monoclinic WO{sub 3} with diffraction maxima due to the (0 0 2), (2 0 0) and (0 2 0) crystallographic planes, furthermore the nanograins sinter and the films exhibit a cone

  11. Three Filtered Vacuum Arc Plasma Sources Deposition & Implantation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xian-ying; ZHANG Hui-xing; LI Qiang

    2004-01-01

    A deposition & implantation system, which includes three filtered vacuum arc plasma sources, has been built. Vacuum arc discharge is used to produce high-density metal plasma; Curved magnetic filtering technique is used to transfer the plasma into out-of-sight vacuum chamber and reduce macro-particles from the vacuum arc plasma in order to drastically reduce the macro-particles contamination of the films. The up to 30 kV negative bias applied to the target can be used for ion implantation in order to improve the film adhesion; or for ion sputtering to clear the substrate surface. The 0 to 300 V negative bias can be used to adjust the ion energy which forming films. The system is designed for various thin films synthesizing, such as single-layer, compound layer, multi-layer films. It's principle, components and applications are described in the literature.

  12. Simulation of damage to tokamaks plasma facing components during intense abnormal power deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genco, F., E-mail: fgenco@purdue.edu; Hassanein, A., E-mail: hassanein@purdue.edu

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • HEIGHTS-PIC a new technique based on particle in cell method to study disruptions events, ELMS and VDE is benchmarked in this paper with the use of the MK-200 experiments. • Disruptions simulations results for erosion and erosion rate are proposed showing good agreement with published experimental available data for such conditions. • Results are also compared with other published results produced by FOREV1/FOREV2 computer package and the original HEIGHTS computer package. • Accuracy of the simulations results is proposed with specific aim to address the use of number of super particles adopted versus computational time. - Abstract: Intense power deposition on plasma facing components (PFC) is expected in tokamaks during loss of confinement events such as disruptions, vertical displacement events (VDE), runaway electrons (RE), or during normal operating conditions such as edge-localized modes (ELM). These highly energetic events are damaging enough to hinder long term operation and may not be easily mitigated without loss of structural or functional performance of the PFC. Surface erosion, melted/ablated-vaporized material splashing, and material transport into the bulk plasma are reliability-threatening for the machine and system performance. A novel particle-in-cell (PIC) technique has been developed and integrated into the existing HEIGHTS package in order to obtain a global view of the plasma evolution upon energy impingement. This newly developed PIC technique is benchmarked against plasma gun experimental data, the original HEIGHTS computer package, and laser experiments. Benchmarking results are shown in this paper for various relevant reactor and experimental devices. The evolution of the plasma vapor cloud is followed temporally and results are explained and commented as a function of the computational time needed and the accuracy of the calculation.

  13. Criteria for significance of simultaneous presence of both condensible vapors and aerosol particles on mass transfer (deposition) rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    The simultaneous presence of aerosol particles and condensible vapors in a saturated boundary layer which may affect deposition rates to subcooled surfaces because of vapor-particle interactions is discussed. Scavenging of condensible vapors by aerosol particles may lead to increased particle size and decreased vapor mass fraction, which alters both vapor and particle deposition rates. Particles, if sufficiently concentrated, may also coagulate. Criteria are provided to assess the significance of such phenomena when particles are already present in the mainstream and are not created inside the boundary layer via homogeneous nucleation. It is determined that there is direct proportionality with: (1) the mass concentration of both condensible vapors and aerosol particles; and (2) the square of the boundary layer thickness to particle diameter ratio (delta d sub p) square. Inverse proportionality was found for mainstream to surface temperature difference if thermophoresis dominates particle transport. It is concluded that the square of the boundary layer thickness to particle diameter ratio is the most critical factor to consider in deciding when to neglect vapor-particle interactions.

  14. Facile plasma-enhanced deposition of ultrathin crosslinked amino acid films for conformal biometallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kyle D; Slocik, Joseph M; McConney, Michael E; Enlow, Jesse O; Jakubiak, Rachel; Bunning, Timothy J; Naik, Rajesh R; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2009-03-01

    A novel method for the facile fabrication of conformal, ultrathin, and uniform synthetic amino acid coatings on a variety of practical surfaces by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is introduced. Tyrosine, which is utilized as an agent to reduce gold nanoparticles from solution, is sublimed into the plasma field and directly deposited on a variety of substrates to form a homogeneous, conformal, and robust polyamino acid coating in a one-step, solvent-free process. This approach is applicable to many practical surfaces and allows surface-induced biometallization while avoiding multiple wet-chemistry treatments that can damage many soft materials. Moreover, by placing a mask over the substrate during deposition, the tyrosine coating can be micropatterned. Upon its exposure to a solution of gold chloride, a network of gold nanoparticles forms on the surface, replicating the initial micropattern. This method of templated biometallization is adaptable to a variety of practical inorganic and organic substrates, such as silicon, glass, nitrocellulose, polystyrene, polydimethylsiloxane, polytetrafluoroethylene, polyethylene, and woven silk fibers. No special pretreatment is necessary, and the technique results in a rapid, conformal amino acid coating that can be utilized for further biometallization.

  15. The physical properties of cubic plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition TaN films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Lavoie, C.; Copel, M.; Narayanan, V.; Park, D.-G.; Rossnagel, S. M.

    2004-05-01

    Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) is a promising technique to produce high quality metal and nitride thin films at low growth temperature. In this study, very thin (<10 nm) low resistivity (350 μΩ cm) cubic TaN Cu diffusion barrier were deposited by PE-ALD from TaCl5 and a plasma of both hydrogen and nitrogen. The physical properties of TaN thin films including microstructure, conformality, roughness, and thermal stability were investigated by various analytical techniques including x-ray diffraction, medium energy ion scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The Cu diffusion barrier properties of PE-ALD TaN thin films were studied using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, optical scattering, and sheet resistance measurements during thermal annealing of the test structures. The barrier failure temperatures were obtained as a function of film thickness and compared with those of PE-ALD Ta, physical vapor deposition (PVD) Ta, and PVD TaN. A diffusion kinetics analysis showed that the microstructure of the barrier materials is one of the most critical factors for Cu diffusion barrier performance.

  16. Hydrophobicity enhancement of Al2O3 thin films deposited on polymeric substrates by atomic layer deposition with perfluoropropane plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Kamran; Choi, Kyung-Hyun; Kim, Chang Young; Doh, Yang Hoi; Jo, Jeongdai

    2014-06-01

    The optoelectronics devices such as organic light emitting diodes are greatly vulnerable to moisture, which reduces their functionality and life cycle. The Al2O3 thin films are mostly used as barrier coatings in such electronic devices to protect them from water vapors. The performance of the Al2O3 barrier films can be improved by enhancing their hydrophobicity. Greater the hydrophobicity of the barrier films, greater will be their protection against water vapors. This paper reports on the enhancement of hydrophobicity of Al2O3 thin films through perfluoropropane (C3F8) plasma treatment. Firstly, good quality Al2O3 films have been fabricated through atomic layer deposition (ALD) on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrates at different temperatures. The fabricated films are then plasma treated with C3F8 to enhance their hydrophobicity. Hydrophobic Al2O3 thin films have shown good morphological and optical properties. Low average arithmetic roughness (Ra) of 1.90 nm, 0.93 nm and 0.88 nm have been recorded for the C3F8 plasma treated films deposited at room temperature (RT), 50 °C and 150 °C, respectively. Optical transmittance of more than 90% has been achieved for the C3F8 plasma treated films grown at 50 °C and 150 °C. The contact angle has been increased from 48° ± 3 to 158° ± 3 for the films deposited at RT and increased from 41° ± 3 to 148° ± 3 for the films deposited at 150 °C.

  17. Suitable alkaline for graphene peeling grown on metallic catalysts using chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamat, S., E-mail: shumailakaramat@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 54000 (Pakistan); Sonuşen, S. [Sabancı Üniversitesi (SUNUM), İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Çelik, Ü. [Nanomagnetics Instruments, Ankara (Turkey); Uysallı, Y. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Oral, A., E-mail: orahmet@metu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Graphene layers were grown on Pt and Cu foil via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition method and for the delicate removal of graphene from metal catalysts, electrolysis method was used by using different alkaline (sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide and barium hydroxide). • The delamination speed of PMMA/graphene stack was higher during the KOH and LiOH electrolysis as compare to NaOH and Ba(OH){sub 2}. Ba(OH){sub 2} is not advisable because of the residues left on the graphene surface which would further trapped in between graphene and SiO{sub 2}/Si surface after transfer. The average peeling time in case of Pt electrode is ∼6 min for KOH and LiOH and ∼15 min for NaOH and Ba(OH){sub 2}. • Electrolysis method also works for the Cu catalyst. The peeling of graphene was faster in the case of Cu foil due to small size of bubbles which moves faster between the stack and the electrode surface. The average peeling time was ∼3–5 min. • XPS analysis clearly showed that the Pt substrates can be re-used again. Graphene layer was transferred to SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates and to the flexible substrate by using the same peeling method. - Abstract: In chemical vapor deposition, the higher growth temperature roughens the surface of the metal catalyst and a delicate method is necessary for the transfer of graphene from metal catalyst to the desired substrates. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu foil via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) method and further alkaline water electrolysis was used to peel off graphene from the metallic catalyst. We used different electrolytes i.e., sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and barium hydroxide Ba(OH){sub 2} for electrolysis, hydrogen bubbles evolved at the Pt cathode (graphene/Pt/PMMA stack) and as a result graphene layer peeled off from the substrate without damage. The peeling time for KOH and Li

  18. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon; Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2016-11-01

    Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al2O3 were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al2O3 shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al2O3, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al2O3 on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  19. Power Deposition on Tokamak Plasma-Facing Components

    CERN Document Server

    Arter, Wayne; Fishpool, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    The SMARDDA software library is used to model plasma interaction with complex engineered surfaces. A simple flux-tube model of power deposition necessitates the following of magnetic fieldlines until they meet geometry taken from a CAD (Computer Aided Design) database. Application is made to 1) models of ITER tokamak limiter geometry and 2) MASTU tokamak divertor designs, illustrating the accuracy and effectiveness of SMARDDA, even in the presence of significant nonaxisymmetric ripple field. SMARDDA's ability to exchange data with CAD databases and its speed of execution also give it the potential for use directly in the design of tokamak plasma facing components.

  20. Engineering the Crystalline Morphology of Polymer Thin Films via Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyuncheol; Arnold, Craig; Priestley, Rodney

    Thin-film growth via physical vapor deposition (PVD) has been successfully exploited for the delicate control of film structure for molecular and atomic systems. The application of such a high-energetic process to polymeric film growth has been challenged by chemical degradation. However, recent development of Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique opened up a way to deposit a variety of macromolecules in a PVD manner. Here, employing MAPLE technique to the growth of semicrystalline polymer thin films, we show the engineering of crystalline film morphology can be achieved via manipulation of substrate temperature. This is accomplished by exploiting temperature effect on crystallization kinetics of polymers. During the slow film growth crystallization can either be permitted or suppressed, and crystal thickness can be tuned via temperature modulation. In addition, we report that the crystallinity of polymer thin films may be significantly altered with deposition temperature in MAPLE processing. We expect that this ability to manipulate crystallization kinetics during polymeric film growth will open the possibility to engineer structure in thin film polymeric-based devices in ways that are difficult by other means.

  1. Growth of High TcYBaCuO Thin Films by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirlin, Peter S.; Binder, R.; Gardiner, R.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1990-03-01

    Thin films of YBa2Cu3O7-x were grown on MgO(100) by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Low pressure growth studies were carried out between 400 and 600°C using metal β-diketonate complexes as source reagents for Y, Ba, and Cu. As-deposited films were amorphous and a two stage annealing protocol was used in which fluorine was first removed in a Ar/H20 stream between 700 and 850°C, followed by calcination in flowing oxygen between 500 and 950°C. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive analysis indicate that good compositional and dimensional uniformity could be achieved. The temperature of the oxygen annealing step was shown to have a dramatic impact on the physical and electrical properties of the YBa2Cu307-x thin films. Annealing temperatures exceeding 910°C gave large crystallites and semiconducting resistivity above Tc; annealing temperatures below 910°C yielded films with metallic conductivity whose density and superconducting transition varied inversely with maximum annealing temperature. Optimized deposition/annealing protocols yielded films with a preferred c-axis orientation, R273/R100 ratios of 2, onsets as high as 94K and zero resistance exceeding 90K.

  2. Fabrication of copper nanorods by low-temperature metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying; Frank Leung-Yuk Lam; HU Xijun; YAN Zifeng

    2006-01-01

    Copper nanorods have been synthesized in mesoporous SBA-15 by a low-temperature metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)employing copper (Ⅱ) acetylacetonate, Cu(acac)2,and hydrogen as a precursor and reactant gas, respectively. The hydrogen plays an important role in chemical reduction of oganometallic precursor which enhances mass transfer in the interior of the SBA-15 porous substrate. Such copper nanostructures are of great potentials in the semiconductor due to their unusual optical, magnetic and electronic properties.In addition, it has been found that chemically modifying the substrate surface by carbon deposition is crucial to such synthesis of copper nanostructures in the interior of the SBA-15, which is able to change the surface properties of SBA-15 from hydrophilic to hydrophobic to promote the adsorption of organic cupric precursor. It has also been found that the copper nanoparticles deposited on the external surface are almost eliminated and the copper nanorods are more distinct while the product was treated with ammonia. This approach could be achieved under a mild condition: a low temperature (400℃) and vacuum (2 kPa) which is extremely milder than the conventional method. It actually sounds as a foundation which is the first time to synthesize a copper nanorod at a mild condition of a low reaction temperature and pressure.

  3. The Dynamic Scaling Study of Vapor Deposition Polymerization: A Monte Carlo Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tangirala, Sairam; Zhao, Y -P; 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.011605

    2010-01-01

    The morphological scaling properties of linear polymer films grown by vapor deposition polymerization (VDP) are studied by 1+1D Monte Carlo simulations. The model implements the basic processes of random angle ballistic deposition ($F$), free-monomer diffusion ($D$) and monomer adsorption along with the dynamical processes of polymer chain initiation, extension, and merger. The ratio $G=D/F$ is found to have a strong influence on the polymer film morphology. Spatial and temporal behavior of kinetic roughening has been extensively studied using finite-length scaling and height-height correlations $H(r,t)$. The scaling analysis has been performed within the no-overhang approximation and the scaling behaviors at local and global length scales were found to be very different. The global and local scaling exponents for morphological evolution have been evaluated for varying free-monomer diffusion by growing the films at $G$ = $10$, $10^2$, $10^3$, and $10^4$ and fixing the deposition flux $F$. With an increase in ...

  4. Epitaxial film growth of chromium dioxide by low pressure chemical vapor deposition using chromium carbonyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jinwen [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Pathak, Manjit [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Zhong Xing [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); LeClair, Patrick [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Klein, Tonya M. [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Gupta, Arunava, E-mail: agupta@mint.ua.ed [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2010-09-30

    Epitaxial chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) thin films have been deposited by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) on (100) TiO{sub 2} substrates using the precursor chromium hexacarbonyl (Cr(CO){sub 6}) within a narrow temperature window of 380-400 {sup o}C. Normal {theta}-2{theta} Bragg x-ray diffraction results show that the predominant phase is CrO{sub 2} with only a small amount of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} present, mostly at the film surface. The LPCVD films have a reasonably smooth surface morphology with a root mean square roughness of 4 nm on a scale of 5 {mu}m. Raman spectroscopy confirms the existence of rutile CrO{sub 2} in the deposited films, while transmission electron microscopy confirms the single-crystalline nature of the films. The LPCVD films showing a dominant CrO{sub 2} phase exhibit clear uniaxial magnetic anisotropy with the easy axis oriented along the c direction.

  5. Multilayer Coating Formation at the Deposition from Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Shanin, Sergei Aleksandrovich; Knyazeva, Anna Georgievna

    2016-01-01

    The numerical experiment was carried out for the process of the coating composition formation during deposition from plasma. The chemical reactions between elements are taken into account. The nonuniform composition of the coating is determined by various transfer processes, including diffusion under stress action. To find the stress field the equilibrium problem was solved numerically because all physical and mechanical properties depend on composition. Stress field has been also obtained no...

  6. Improved amorphous/crystalline silicon interface passivation for heterojunction solar cells by low-temperature chemical vapor deposition and post-annealing treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyou; Zhang, Xiaodan; Wang, Liguo; Jiang, Yuanjian; Wei, Changchun; Xu, Shengzhi; Zhao, Ying

    2014-10-07

    In this study, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films are deposited using a radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) system. The Si-H configuration of the a-Si:H/c-Si interface is regulated by optimizing the deposition temperature and post-annealing duration to improve the minority carrier lifetime (τeff) of a commercial Czochralski (Cz) silicon wafer. The mechanism of this improvement involves saturation of the microstructural defects with hydrogen evolved within the a-Si:H films due to the transformation from SiH2 into SiH during the annealing process. The post-annealing temperature is controlled to ∼180 °C so that silicon heterojunction solar cells (SHJ) could be prepared without an additional annealing step. To achieve better performance of the SHJ solar cells, we also optimize the thickness of the a-Si:H passivation layer. Finally, complete SHJ solar cells are fabricated using different temperatures for the a-Si:H film deposition to study the influence of the deposition temperature on the solar cell parameters. For the optimized a-Si:H deposition conditions, an efficiency of 18.41% is achieved on a textured Cz silicon wafer.

  7. Vapor transport deposition of large-area polycrystalline CdTe for radiation image sensor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Keedong; Cha, Bokyung; Heo, Duchang; Jeon, Sungchae [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, 111 Hanggaul-ro, Ansan-si, Gyeonggi-do 426-170 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Vapor transport deposition (VTD) process delivers saturated vapor to substrate, resulting in high-throughput and scalable process. In addition, VTD can maintain lower substrate temperature than close-spaced sublimation (CSS). The motivation of this work is to adopt several advantages of VTD for radiation image sensor application. Polycrystalline CdTe films were obtained on 300 mm x 300 mm indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass. The polycrystalline CdTe film has columnar structure with average grain size of 3 μm ∝ 9 μm, which can be controlled by changing the substrate temperature. In order to analyze electrical and X-ray characteristics, ITO-CdTe-Al sandwich structured device was fabricated. Effective resistivity of the polycrystalline CdTe film was ∝1.4 x 10{sup 9}Ωcm. The device was operated under hole-collection mode. The responsivity and the μτ product estimated to be 6.8 μC/cm{sup 2}R and 5.5 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2}/V. The VTD can be a process of choice for monolithic integration of CdTe thick film for radiation image sensor and CMOS/TFT circuitry. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Initiated chemical vapor deposition of thermoresponsive poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) thin films for cell sheet engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bora; Jiao, Alex; Yu, Seungjung; You, Jae Bem; Kim, Deok-Ho; Im, Sung Gap

    2013-08-01

    Poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PNVCL) is a thermoresponsive polymer known to be nontoxic, water soluble and biocompatible. Here, PNVCL homopolymer was successfully synthesized for the first time by use of a one-step vapor-phase process, termed initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results showed that radical polymerization took place from N-vinylcaprolactam monomers without damaging the functional caprolactam ring. A sharp lower critical solution temperature transition was observed at 31°C from the iCVD poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PNVCL) film. The thermoresponsive PNVCL surface exhibited a hydrophilic/hydrophobic alteration with external temperature change, which enabled the thermally modulated attachment and detachment of cells. The conformal coverage of PNVCL film on various substrates with complex topography, including fabrics and nanopatterns, was successfully demonstrated, which can further be utilized to fabricate cell sheets with aligned cell morphology. The advantage of this system is that cells cultured on such thermoresponsive surfaces could be recovered as an intact cell sheet by simply lowering the temperature, eliminating the need for conventional enzymatic treatments.

  9. ZnO Nanowires Synthesized by Vapor Phase Transport Deposition on Transparent Oxide Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Zinc oxide nanowires have been synthesized without using metal catalyst seed layers on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO substrates by a modified vapor phase transport deposition process using a double-tube reactor. The unique reactor configuration creates a Zn-rich vapor environment that facilitates formation and growth of zinc oxide nanoparticles and wires (20–80 nm in diameter, up to 6 μm in length, density <40 nm apart at substrate temperatures down to 300°C. Electron microscopy and other characterization techniques show nanowires with distinct morphologies when grown under different conditions. The effect of reaction parameters including reaction time, temperature, and carrier gas flow rate on the size, morphology, crystalline structure, and density of ZnO nanowires has been investigated. The nanowires grown by this method have a diameter, length, and density appropriate for use in fabricating hybrid polymer/metal oxide nanostructure solar cells. For example, it is preferable to have nanowires no more than 40 nm apart to minimize exciton recombination in polymer solar cells.

  10. The growth and characterization of ZnSe nanoneedles by a simple chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hongzhi; Li, Huanyong; Jie, Wanqi; Yang, Lan

    2006-04-01

    ZnSe nanoneedles were successfully synthesized with the assistance of NiSe through a simple chemical vapor deposition method for the first time. The ZnSe nanoneedles, with the average bottom diameters of 400 nm and the lengths of more than 50 μm, decrease in diameters from bottom to tip. The diameter of the nanoneedle can be controlled by the size of NiSe source. The products were also characterized by XRD, HRTEM, EDS and PL spectrum. The ZnSe nanoneedles are of a single crystal in nature with high crystalline quality, and is the preferential growth direction. A strong emission band around 438.9 nm is observed at room temperature, being attributed to the excitonic emission. A combined mechanism of the redox effect and the VLS mechanism is proposed to understand the growth of ZnSe nanoneedles.

  11. Selective Patterning of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes by Physical Vapor Deposition of Photosensitive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroyama, Masakazu; Saito, Ichiro; Yokokura, Seiji; Tanaka, Kuniaki; Usui, Hiroaki

    2009-04-01

    A novel method of patterning polymeric thin films by the vapor deposition of a photosensitive layer followed by photopolymerization and development was proposed. This method was applied to the patterning of the emissive layer (EML) of an organic light-emitting diode (OLED). For the hole transport layer (HTL), N,N,N'-triphenyl-N'-(4-vinylphenyl)-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (vTPD) and a zinc acrylate (ZnAc) crosslinker were coevaporated. The film was polymerized by postdeposition annealing to yield a polymeric HTL with a high resistance to organic solvents. On this HTL, the photosensitive EML was prepared by coevaporating a 9H-carbazole-9-ethylmethacrylate (CEMA) host material and 4-(dimethylamino)benzophenone (DABP) photoinitiator. UV irradiation on the EML through a photomask initiated radical polymerization, leaving a negative pattern of the irradiated region after immersion in tetrahydrofuran (THF). The photopatterning process was found to cause no damage to the film morphology or the device characteristics.

  12. Growth of GaN micro/nanolaser arrays by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haitao; Zhang, Hanlu; Dong, Lin; Zhang, Yingjiu; Pan, Caofeng

    2016-09-01

    Optically pumped ultraviolet lasing at room temperature based on GaN microwire arrays with Fabry-Perot cavities is demonstrated. GaN microwires have been grown perpendicularly on c-GaN/sapphire substrates through simple catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The GaN microwires are [0001] oriented single-crystal structures with hexagonal cross sections, each with a diameter of ˜1 μm and a length of ˜15 μm. A possible growth mechanism of the vertical GaN microwire arrays is proposed. Furthermore, we report room-temperature lasing in optically pumped GaN microwire arrays based on the Fabry-Perot cavity. Photoluminescence spectra exhibit lasing typically at 372 nm with an excitation threshold of 410 kW cm-2. The result indicates that these aligned GaN microwire arrays may offer promising prospects for ultraviolet-emitting micro/nanodevices.

  13. Imaging coherent transport in chemical vapor deposition graphene wide constriction by scanning gate microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Chiashain; Matsunaga, Masahiro; Ochiai, Yuichi; Aoki, Nobuyuki, E-mail: n-aoki@faculty.chiba-u.jp, E-mail: ctliang@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Liu, Fan-Hung [Graduate Institute of Applied Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Woo, Tak-Pong [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, Li-Hung [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 600, Taiwan (China); Oto, Kenichi [Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Liang, Chi-Te, E-mail: n-aoki@faculty.chiba-u.jp, E-mail: ctliang@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Applied Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-21

    We use a scanning gate microscopy to perturb coherent transport in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene wide constriction. Particularly, we observe conductance oscillations in the wide constriction region (W ∼ 800 nm) characterized by spatial conductance variations, which imply formation of the nanometer-scale ring structure due to the merged domains and intrinsic grain boundaries. Moreover, additional hot charges from high current can suppress the coherent transport, suggesting that the hot carriers with a wide spreading kinetic energy could easily tunnel merged domains and intrinsic grain boundaries in CVD-grown graphene due to the heating effect, a great advantage for applications in graphene-based interference-type nano-electronics.

  14. Influences of H+ Implantation on the Boron-Doped Synthesized by Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuang-Bao

    2000-01-01

    Diamond films (DF) were preliminarily B doped in situ during chemical vapor deposition. Subsequently, the films were implanted with 120keV H+ to dose of 5 × 1014 ~ 5 × 1016cm-2. After the implantation, the B doped DF become insulating and Raman measurements indicate that the implantation has amorphous carbon and graphite etched. It is known that the formation of H-B pairs plays an important pole in property changes. However, for larger dose cases, the electrical resistance of DF is influenced by radiation damage and/or non-diamond phases. In addition to them, annealing makes the specimens conducting again. This phenomenon maybe has potential for application in designing DF device.

  15. Tungsten-Carbon X-ray Multilayered Mirror Prepared by Photo-Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshihiko

    1989-05-01

    A tungsten-carbon(W/C) X-ray multilayered mirror was prepared by photoinduced chemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) using a low-pressure mercury lamp and an argon-fluoride (ArF) excimer laser. The 40% reflectivity of this mirror was measured using a small-angle X-ray diffractometer with Cu-Kα radiation. This reflectivity is lower than the theoretical reflectivity of 80%. From observations of the transmission electron micrograph from this multilayered mirror, it seems that the reduction of the reflectivity was caused by the indistinct interfaces of the diffused films, and by the roughness of the films introduced by partial crystallization of the tungsten films.

  16. Bifacial solar cell with SnS absorber by vapor transport deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wangperawong, Artit [Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Hsu, Po-Chun; Yee, Yesheng; Herron, Steven M.; Clemens, Bruce M.; Cui, Yi; Bent, Stacey F., E-mail: sbent@stanford.edu [Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    The SnS absorber layer in solar cell devices was produced by vapor transport deposition (VTD), which is a low-cost manufacturing method for solar modules. The performance of solar cells consisting of Si/Mo/SnS/ZnO/indium tin oxide (ITO) was limited by the SnS layer's surface texture and field-dependent carrier collection. For improved performance, a fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate was used in place of the Mo to smooth the topography of the VTD SnS and to make bifacial solar cells, which are potentially useful for multijunction applications. A bifacial SnS solar cell consisting of glass/FTO/SnS/CdS/ZnO/ITO demonstrated front- and back-side power conversion efficiencies of 1.2% and 0.2%, respectively.

  17. Growth inhibition to enhance conformal coverage in thin film chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navneet; Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Daly, Scott R; Girolami, Gregory S; Abelson, John R

    2008-12-31

    We introduce the use of a growth inhibitor to enhance thin film conformality in low temperature chemical vapor deposition. Films of TiB(2) grown from the single source precursor Ti(BH(4))(3)(dme) are much more highly conformal when grown in the presence of one of the film growth byproducts, 1,2-dimethoxyethane (dme). This effect can be explained in terms of two alternative inhibitory mechanisms: one involving blocking of surface reactive sites, which is equivalent to reducing the rate of the forward reaction leading to film growth, the other analogous to Le Chatelier's principle, in which the addition of a reaction product increases the rate of the back reaction. The reduction in growth rate corresponds to a reduction in the sticking probability of the precursor, which enhances conformality by enabling the precursor to diffuse deeper into a recessed feature before it reacts.

  18. III-nitride quantum cascade detector grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yu, E-mail: yusong@princeton.edu; Huang, Tzu-Yung; Badami, Pranav; Gmachl, Claire [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Bhat, Rajaram; Zah, Chung-En [Corning Incorporated, Corning, New York 14831 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    Quantum cascade (QC) detectors in the GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N material system grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition are designed, fabricated, and characterized. Only two material compositions, i.e., GaN as wells and Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N as barriers are used in the active layers. The QC detectors operates around 4 μm, with a peak responsivity of up to ∼100 μA/W and a detectivity of up to 10{sup 8} Jones at the background limited infrared performance temperature around 140 K.

  19. The structure of small, vapor-deposited particles. II - Experimental study of particles with hexagonal profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacaman, M. J.; Heinemann, K.; Yang, C. Y.; Poppa, H.

    1979-01-01

    'Multiply-twinned' gold particles with hexagonal bright field TEM profile were determined to be icosahedra composed of 20 identical and twin-related tetrahedral building units that do not have an fcc structure. The crystal structure of these slightly deformed tetrahedra is rhombohedral. Experimental evidence supporting this particle model was obtained by selected-zone dark field and weak beam dark field electron microscopy. In conjunction with the results of part I, it has been concluded that multiply-twinned gold particles of pentagonal or hexagonal profile that are found during the early stages of the vapor deposition growth process on alkali halide surfaces do not have an fcc crystal structure, which is in obvious contrast to the structure of bulk gold.

  20. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitors: Consideration of cost and chemical vapor deposition techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zheng; Weizhong Qian; Chaojie Cui; Guanghui Xu; Mengqiang Zhao; Guili Tian; Fei Wei

    2012-01-01

    In this topic,we first discussed the requirement and performance of supercapacitors using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the electrode,including specific surface area,purity and cost.Then we reviewed the preparation technique of single walled CNTs (SWNTs) in relatively large scale by chemical vapor deposition method.Its catalysis on the decomposition of methane and other carbon source,the reactor type and the process control strategies were discussed.Special focus was concentrated on how to increase the yield,selectivity,and purity of SWNTs and how to inhibit the formation of impurities,including amorphous carbon,multiwalled CNTs and the carbon encapsulated metal particles,since these impurities seriously influenced the performance of SWNTs in supercapacitors.Wish it be helpful to further decrease its product cost and for the commercial use in supercapacitors.