WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma time evolution

  1. Time Evolution of Artificial Plasma Cloud in Atmospheric Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆启明; 杨维纮; 刘万东

    2004-01-01

    By analyzing the time evolution of artificial plasma cloud in the high altitude of atmospheric environment, we found that there are two zones, an exponential attenuation zone and a linearly attenuating zone, existing in the spatial distribution of electron density of the artificial plasma clouds. The plasma generator's particle flux density only contributes to the exponential attenuation zone, and has no effect on the linear attenuation zone. The average electron density in the linear attenuation zone is about 10-5 of neutral particle density, and can diffuse over a wider area. The conclusion will supply some valuable references to the research of electromagnetic wave and artificial plasma interaction, the plasma invisibleness research of missile and special aerocraft,and the design of artificial plasma source.

  2. Space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shanhong, E-mail: liushanhong108098@163.com; Liu, Xuandong; Shen, Xi; Feng, Lei; Zhang, Qiaogen [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, School of Electrical Engineering, Institute of High Voltage Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Tie, Weihao [Xi' an Electrical Engineering Research Institute, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Ejected plasma has been widely applied to the discharge process of gas spark switches as a trigger technology, and the development process of ejected plasma has a direct and important effect on the discharge characteristics of gas switches. In this paper, both the injection characteristics and space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas spark switch with different stored energies, pulse polarities, and pressures are studied. The discharge characteristics and breakdown process of a gas switch ignited by ejected plasma under different working coefficients are also discussed briefly. The results show that stored energy has significant influence on the characteristics of ejected plasma. With the increase of stored energy, the propulsion mode of ejected plasma in the axial direction transforms from “plasmoid” to “plasma flow,” and the distribution of the ejected plasma goes through “cloud,” “core-cloud,” and “branch” in sequence. The velocity of ejected plasma under negative pulse polarity is obviously higher than that under positive pulse polarity, especially at the very beginning time. The radial dimensions of ejected plasma under two kinds of pulse polarities follow the similar varying pattern over time, which increase first and then decrease, assuming an inverted “U”-shaped curve. With the increase of pressure, the velocity of ejected plasma significantly decreases and the “branch” channels droop earlier. Applying the ejected plasma to the triggering of a gas switch, the switch can be triggered reliably in a much wide working coefficient range of 10%–90%. With the increase of working coefficient, the breakdown process of the switch translates from slow working mode to fast working mode, and the delay time reduces from tens of μs to hundreds of ns.

  3. Space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanhong; Liu, Xuandong; Shen, Xi; Feng, Lei; Tie, Weihao; Zhang, Qiaogen

    2016-06-01

    Ejected plasma has been widely applied to the discharge process of gas spark switches as a trigger technology, and the development process of ejected plasma has a direct and important effect on the discharge characteristics of gas switches. In this paper, both the injection characteristics and space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas spark switch with different stored energies, pulse polarities, and pressures are studied. The discharge characteristics and breakdown process of a gas switch ignited by ejected plasma under different working coefficients are also discussed briefly. The results show that stored energy has significant influence on the characteristics of ejected plasma. With the increase of stored energy, the propulsion mode of ejected plasma in the axial direction transforms from "plasmoid" to "plasma flow," and the distribution of the ejected plasma goes through "cloud," "core-cloud," and "branch" in sequence. The velocity of ejected plasma under negative pulse polarity is obviously higher than that under positive pulse polarity, especially at the very beginning time. The radial dimensions of ejected plasma under two kinds of pulse polarities follow the similar varying pattern over time, which increase first and then decrease, assuming an inverted "U"-shaped curve. With the increase of pressure, the velocity of ejected plasma significantly decreases and the "branch" channels droop earlier. Applying the ejected plasma to the triggering of a gas switch, the switch can be triggered reliably in a much wide working coefficient range of 10%-90%. With the increase of working coefficient, the breakdown process of the switch translates from slow working mode to fast working mode, and the delay time reduces from tens of μs to hundreds of ns.

  4. Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Model with Time-Evolution of Energy and State Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Sankaran, Kamesh

    2012-01-01

    A model for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration is presented that consists of a set of circuit equations coupled to both a one-dimensional equation of motion and an equation governing the partitioning of energy. The latter two equations are obtained for the plasma current sheet by treating it as a single element of finite volume and integrating the governing equations over that volume. The integrated terms are replaced where necessary by physically-equivalent quantities that are calculated through the solution of other parts of the governing equation set. The model improves upon previous one-dimensional performance models by permitting the time-evolution of the energy and state properties of the plasma, the latter allowing for the tailoring of the model to different gases that may be chosen as propellants. The time evolution of the various energy modes in the system and the associated plasma properties, calculated for argon propellant, are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the model. The model produces a result where efficiency is maximized at a given value of the electrodynamic scaling term known as the dynamic impedance parameter. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the model compares favorably with performance measured for two separate inductive pulsed plasma thrusters, with disagreements attributable to simplifying assumptions employed in the generation of the model solution.

  5. Investigations on the time evolution of the plasma density in argon electron-beam plasma at intermediate pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoyan, BAI; Chen, CHEN; Hong, LI; Wandong, LIU

    2017-03-01

    The time evolution of the argon electron-beam plasma at intermediate pressure and low electron beam intensity was presented. By applying the amplitude modulation with the frequency of 20 Hz on the stable beam current, the plasma evolution was studied. A Faraday cup was used for the measurement of the electron beam current and a single electrostatic probe was used for the measurement of the ion current. Experimental results indicated that the ion current was in phase with the electron beam current in the pressure range from 200 Pa to 3000 Pa and in the beam current range lower than 20 mA, the residual density increased approximately linearly with the maximum density in the log-log plot and the fitting coefficient was irrelative to the pressure. And then three kinds of kinetic models were developed and the simulated results given by the kinetic model, without the consideration of the excited atoms, mostly approached to the experimental results. This indicated that the effect of the excited atoms on the plasma density can be ignored at intermediate pressure and low electron beam current intensity, which can greatly simplify the kinetic model. In the end, the decrease of the plasma density when the beam current was suddenly off was studied based on the simplified model and it was found that the decease characteristic at intermediate pressure was approximate to the one at high pressure at low electron beam intensity, which was in good accordance with the experimental results. Supported by National Natural Science Foundations of China (No. 11375187) and the Foundation of State key Laboratory of China (No. SKLIPR1510).

  6. Numerical analysis of a coupled problem: Time evolution of a tokamak plasma in contact with a conducting wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, R.; Formisano, A.; Fresa, R.; Martone, R.; Rubinacci, G.; Villone, F. [Univ. degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Elettrica

    1996-05-01

    In this paper the authors analyze the time evolution of a tokamak plasma after the failure of the vertical control system. In this case, the plasma eventually touches the conducting wall and gives rise to currents which flow partly in the wall, partly in the plasma. They show how, under simplifying assumptions, the problem can be analyzed by means of pure electromagnetic formulations. After a brief review of the state of the art in the analysis of this phenomenon, they propose and discuss three alternative Eulerian approaches: an evolutionary equilibrium formulation, a convection-diffusion model and a 3D error-based approach.

  7. Characterization of the ionization degree evolution of the PF-400J plasma sheath by means of time resolved optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avaria, G.; Cuadrado, O.; Moreno, J.; Pavez, C.; Soto, L.

    2016-05-01

    Spectral measurements in the visible range of the plasma sheath ionization degree evolution on the plasma focus device PF-400J are presented. The measurements were done with temporal and spatial resolution in a plasma focus device of low stored energy: PF-400J (176-539 J, 880 nF, 20-35 kV, quarter period ∼ 300ns) [1]. An ICCD was attached to a 0.5 m focal length visible spectrometer, which enabled the acquisition of time resolved spectrum with 20 ns integration time throughout the whole current pulse evolution. The spatial resolution was attained using a set of lenses which allowed the focusing of a small volume of the plasma sheath in different positions of the inter-electrode space. Discharges were carried out in mixtures of Hydrogen with gases in different proportions: 5% Neon, 5% Krypton and 2% Nitrogen. Discharges using Neon as an impurity showed no ionization of the gas, just a very low intensity emission of Ne I at times much larger than the maximum current. Nitrogen, on the other hand, showed a high ionization reaching N V (N 4+) at the end of the axial phase, with a distinctive evolution of the ionization degree as the plasma sheath moved towards the end of the electrodes. A mixed result was found when using Krypton, since the ionization degree only reached levels around Kr II/III, even though it has an ionization potential lower than Neon.

  8. Plasma density evolution in plasma opening switch obtained by a time-resolved sensitive He-Ne interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Ren, Jing; Guo, Fan; Zhou, LiangJi; Li, Ye; He, An; Jiang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    To understand the formation process of vacuum gap in coaxial microsecond conduction time plasma opening switch (POS), we have made measurements of the line-integrated plasma density during switch operation using a time-resolved sensitive He-Ne interferometer. The conduction current and conduction time in experiments are about 120 kA and 1 μs, respectively. As a result, more than 85% of conduction current has been transferred to an inductive load with rise time of 130 ns. The radial dependence of the density is measured by changing the radial location of the line-of-sight for shots with the same nominal POS parameters. During the conduction phase, the line-integrated plasma density in POS increases at all radial locations over the gun-only case by further ionization of material injected from the guns. The current conduction is observed to cause a radial redistribution of the switch plasma. A vacuum gap forms rapidly in the plasma at 5.5 mm from the center conductor, which is consistent with the location where magnetic pressure is the largest, allowing current to be transferred from the POS to the load.

  9. Time evolution of high-altitude plasma bubbles imaged at geomagnetic conjugate points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shiokawa

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Temporal and spatial evolution of two high-altitude plasma bubbles (evening and midnight was observed on 4 April 2002, at geomagnetic conjugate points at Sata, Japan (magnetic latitude 24° N, and Darwin, Australia (magnetic latitude 22° S, using two 630-nm airglow imagers. The apex height of the bubbles reached ~1500km. The upward velocity of the evolution was faster in the evening (~170m/s at 20:00-21:00 LT than around midnight (~28m/s at 23:00-00:00 LT. Bifurcating features of the bubbles into a smaller scale size of ~50km were clearly seen for both the evening and midnight bubbles, showing fairly good conjugacy between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

  10. Numerical Simulation of the Time Evolution of Small-Scale Irregularities in the F-Layer Ionospheric Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Mingalev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of magnetic field-aligned small-scale irregularities in the electron concentration, existing in the F-layer ionospheric plasma, is investigated with the help of a mathematical model. The plasma is assumed to be a rarefied compound consisting of electrons and positive ions and being in a strong, external magnetic field. In the applied model, kinetic processes in the plasma are simulated by using the Vlasov-Poisson system of equations. The system of equations is numerically solved applying a macroparticle method. The time evolution of a plasma irregularity, having initial cross-section dimension commensurable with a Debye length, is simulated during the period sufficient for the irregularity to decay completely. The results of simulation indicate that the small-scale irregularity, created initially in the F-region ionosphere, decays accomplishing periodic damped vibrations, with the process being collisionless.

  11. A Method for Measuring Fast Time Evolutions of the Plasma Potential by Means of a Simple Emissive Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iizuka, S.; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens;

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for obtaining the temporal evolution of the plasma potential, which is assumed to be given by the floating potential of a simple emissive probe. The construction of the probe is also described. The method avoids the slow time response of the usual technique where the floating...... potential is measured across a high resistance. During each sweep of the probe voltage, the changing of the sign of the probe current, which is sampled at a specific time, gives rise to a negative pulse, driving the pen-lift of an X-Y recorder. Since the real floating potential is measured where the probe...

  12. TIME EVOLUTION OF PLASMA PARAMETERS DURING THE RISE OF A SOLAR PROMINENCE INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orozco Suárez, D.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Díaz, A. J., E-mail: dorozco@iac.es [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2014-04-10

    We present high-spatial resolution spectropolarimetric observations of a quiescent hedgerow prominence taken in the He I 1083.0 nm triplet. The observation consisted of a time series in sit-and-stare mode of ∼36 minutes duration. The spectrograph's slit crossed the prominence body and we recorded the time evolution of individual vertical threads. Eventually, we observed the development of a dark Rayleigh-Taylor plume that propagated upward with a velocity, projected onto the plane of the sky, of 17 km s{sup –1}. Interestingly, the plume apex collided with the prominence threads pushing them aside. We inferred Doppler shifts, Doppler widths, and magnetic field strength variations by interpreting the He I Stokes profiles with the HAZEL code. The Doppler shifts show that clusters of threads move coherently while individual threads have oscillatory patterns. Regarding the plume we found strong redshifts (∼9-12 km s{sup –1}) and large Doppler widths (∼10 km s{sup –1}) at the plume apex when it passed through the prominence body and before it disintegrated. We associate the redshifts with perspective effects while the Doppler widths are more likely due to an increase in the local temperature. No local variations of the magnetic field strength associated with the passage of the plume were found; this leads us to conclude that the plumes are no more magnetized than the surroundings. Finally, we found that some of the threads' oscillations are locally damped, what allowed us to apply prominence seismology techniques to infer additional prominence physical parameters.

  13. Time evolution of the particle and heat flux of the detached plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianpanit, Theerasarn; Ishiguro, Seiji; Hasegawa, Hiroki

    2016-10-01

    The detached plasma is a regime when the particle and heat flux of the plasma are largely reduced before reaching the divertor target. Linear devices experiment data show that when the neutral gas pressure in front of the target increases the heat flux to the target largely decreases. The 1D-3V particle simulation with Monte Carlo collision and cumulative scattering angle Coulomb collision has been developed to study the kinetic effect of the detached plasma. The simulation was performed with the constant temperature and pressure of neutral gas in front of the target. A large decrease in the electron temperature from 5eV to below 1 eV follows a large decrease in the ion temperature inside the neutral gas area in the case with high neutral gas pressure in front of the target. The energy flux at the target decreases in the process of attaining the detached state. This work was performed with the support and under the auspices of the NIFS Collaboration Research programs NIFS14KNXN279 and NIFS14KNSS059.

  14. Long Term Evolution of Plasma Wakefields

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A; Tsung, F S; Mori, W B

    2014-01-01

    We study the long-term evolution (LTE) of plasma wakefields over multiple plasma-electron periods and few plasma-ion periods, much less than a recombination time. The evolution and relaxation of such a wakefield-perturbed plasma over these timescales has important implications for the upper limits of repetition-rates in plasma colliders. Intense fields in relativistic lasers (or intense beams) create plasma wakefields (modes around {\\omega}pe) by transferring energy to the plasma electrons. Charged-particle beams in the right phase may be accelerated with acceleration/focusing gradients of tens of GeV/m. However, wakefields leave behind a plasma not in equilibrium, with a relaxation time of multiple plasma-electron periods. Ion motion over ion timescales, caused by energy transfer from the driven plasma-electrons to the plasma-ions can create interesting plasma states. Eventually during LTE, the dynamics of plasma de-coheres (multiple modes through instability driven mixing), thermalizing into random motion (...

  15. Evolution of Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sugai, H.

    1984-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally by control of the end losses in the 'scrape off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface...

  16. Space-time Evolution Of Quantum Fluctuations And Creation Of Quark- Gluon Plasma In Ultrarelativistic Nuclear Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Surdutovich, Y

    1998-01-01

    We study the dynamics of quantum fluctuations which take place during the earliest stage of high-energy collision processes and the conditions under which the data from e– p deep- inelastic scattering(DIS) may serve as a guide for computing the initial data for heavy- ion collisions at high energies. Our method is essentially based on the space-time picture of these seemingly different phenomena. We analyze the inclusive quantum-mechanical measurements, in both cases, and derive the main results relying on causality. The main result is that the transition from the initial- state composite nuclei to the final-state dense system of quark-gluon fields, i.e. quark-gluon plasma, is possible only as a single quantum transition. We prove that the ultra-violet renormalization of virtual loops does not bring any scale into the problem. The scale appears only in connection with real processes of emission of quark and gluon fields and reveals itself through the collinear cut-off in the evolution equations. Thi...

  17. Bi-stage time evolution of nano-morphology on inductively coupled plasma etched fused silica surface caused by surface morphological transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Lijuan; Bai, Yang; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhengkun; Qiu, Keqiang; Liao, Wei; Zhang, Chuanchao; Yang, Ke; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Yilan; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we experimentally investigate the surface nano-roughness during the inductively coupled plasma etching of fused silica, and discover a novel bi-stage time evolution of surface nano-morphology. At the beginning, the rms roughness, correlation length and nano-mound dimensions increase linearly and rapidly with etching time. At the second stage, the roughening process slows down dramatically. The switch of evolution stage synchronizes with the morphological change from dual-scale roughness comprising long wavelength underlying surface and superimposed nano-mounds to one scale of nano-mounds. A theoretical model based on surface morphological change is proposed. The key idea is that at the beginning, etched surface is dual-scale, and both larger deposition rate of etch inhibitors and better plasma etching resistance at the surface peaks than surface valleys contribute to the roughness development. After surface morphology transforming into one-scale, the difference of plasma resistance between surface peaks and valleys vanishes, thus the roughening process slows down.

  18. Evolution of Externally Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugai, H.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Thomsen, Kenneth

    1983-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma, and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally in the `scrape-off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface ionization. Its interaction...

  19. Time evolution of nonplanar dust ion-acoustic solitary waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with superthermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayout, Saliha; Tribeche, Mouloud, E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Sciences- Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, U.S.T.H.B, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Sahu, Biswajit [Department of Mathematics, West Bengal State University, Barasat, Kolkata-700126 (India)

    2015-12-15

    A theoretical study on the nonlinear propagation of nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) dust ion-acoustic solitary waves (DIASW) is carried out in a dusty plasma, whose constituents are inertial ions, superthermal electrons, and charge fluctuating stationary dust particles. Using the reductive perturbation theory, a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived. It is shown that the propagation characteristics of the cylindrical and spherical DIA solitary waves significantly differ from those of their one-dimensional counterpart.

  20. Investigation of Early Plasma Evolution Induced by Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen B.

    2012-01-01

    Early plasma is generated owing to high intensity laser irradiation of target and the subsequent target material ionization. Its dynamics plays a significant role in laser-material interaction, especially in the air environment1-11. Early plasma evolution has been captured through pump-probe shadowgraphy1-3 and interferometry1,4-7. However, the studied time frames and applied laser parameter ranges are limited. For example, direct examinations of plasma front locations and electron number den...

  1. Evolution Of Nonlinear Waves in Compressing Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.F. Schmit, I.Y. Dodin, and N.J. Fisch

    2011-05-27

    Through particle-in-cell simulations, the evolution of nonlinear plasma waves is examined in one-dimensional collisionless plasma undergoing mechanical compression. Unlike linear waves, whose wavelength decreases proportionally to the system length L(t), nonlinear waves, such as solitary electron holes, conserve their characteristic size {Delta} during slow compression. This leads to a substantially stronger adiabatic amplification as well as rapid collisionless damping when L approaches {Delta}. On the other hand, cessation of compression halts the wave evolution, yielding a stable mode.

  2. Composite wire plasma formation and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielman, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the formation and evolution of plasma from rapidly heated metallic wires is a long-standing challenge in the field of plasma physics and in exploding wire engineering. This physical process is made even more complicated if the wire material is composed of a number of individual layers. The authors have successfully developed both optical and x-ray backlighting diagnostics. In particular, the x-ray backlighting technique has demonstrated the capability for quantitative determination of the plasma density over a wide range of densities. This diagnostic capability shows that the process of plasma formation is composed of two separate phases: first, current is passed through a cold wire and the wire is heated ohmically, and, second, the heated wire evolves gases that break down and forms a low-density plasma surrounding the wire.

  3. Turbulence evolution in MHD plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, M; Spanier, F

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence in the interstellar medium has been an active field of research in the last decade. Numerical simulations are the tool of choice in most cases. But while there are a number of simulations on the market some questions have not been answered finally. In this paper we are going to examine the influence of compressible and incompressible driving on the evolution of turbulent spectra in a number of possible interstellar medium scenarios. We conclude that the driving not only has an influence on the ratio of compressible to incompressible component but also on the anisotropy of turbulence.

  4. Ion temperature evolution in an ultracold neutral plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQuillen, P., E-mail: patrickmcquillen@rice.edu; Strickler, T.; Langin, T.; Killian, T. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    We study the long-time evolution of the ion temperature in an expanding ultracold neutral plasma using spatially resolved, laser-induced-fluorescence spectroscopy. Adiabatic cooling reduces the ion temperature by an order of magnitude during the plasma expansion, to temperatures as low as 0.2 K. Cooling is limited by heat exchange between ions and the much hotter electrons. We also present evidence for an additional heating mechanism and discuss possible sources. Data are described by a model of the plasma evolution, including the effects of ion-electron heat exchange. We show that for appropriate initial conditions, the degree of Coulomb coupling of ions in the plasma increases during expansion.

  5. Ion Temperature Evolution in an Ultracold Neutral Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    McQuillen, P; Langin, T; Killian, T C

    2015-01-01

    We study the long-time evolution of the ion temperature in an expanding ultracold neutral plasma using spatially resolved, laser-induced-fluorescence spectroscopy. Adiabatic cooling reduces the ion temperature by an order of magnitude during the plasma expansion, to temperatures as low as 0.2 K. Cooling is limited by heat exchange between ions and the much hotter electrons. We also present evidence for an additional heating mechanism and discuss possible sources. Data are described by a model of the plasma evolution, including the effects of ion-electron heat exchange. We show that for appropriate initial conditions, the degree of Coulomb coupling of ions in the plasma increases during expansion.

  6. Evolution of streamer groups in nonthermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Nonthermal plasmas (NTPs) induced by atmospheric nanosecond pulsed corona discharge have been studied for controlling pollution from combustors, such as boilers, incinerators, and diesel engines. In high-speed short-width high-voltage pulsed corona discharge-induced plasmas, primary streamer evolution is followed by secondary streamer evolution. Though this phenomenon is known experimentally, the details of the structures of the streamers and their evolution mechanisms have not been fully clarified. In this letter, we perform quasi two-dimensional numerical analysis of nonequilibrium NTP induced by a nanosecond positive pulsed corona discharge. The continuum fluid equations for two-temperature nonequilibrium NTP are used as governing equations. In this study, 197 gas phase reactions for 25 chemical species and 21 surface reactions on the inner glass wall surface are considered in an air plasma under atmospheric pressure. The simulated behavior of the streamer groups agrees with experimental observations. Soon after the voltage increases on the reactor, primary streamers are formed, which may transit the complete gap, disappearing near the peak voltage. Next, second streamers appear, disappearing at the end of the applied voltage pulse. The streamer wavelength and the distance between the streamers in the axial direction are determined. Moreover, ozone generation is shown to be more significant in the secondary streamer. This simulation will allow better predictions for nanosecond positive pulsed plasma systems.

  7. Evolution of streamer groups in nonthermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, M., E-mail: mokubo@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Nonthermal plasmas (NTPs) induced by atmospheric nanosecond pulsed corona discharge have been studied for controlling pollution from combustors, such as boilers, incinerators, and diesel engines. In high-speed short-width high-voltage pulsed corona discharge-induced plasmas, primary streamer evolution is followed by secondary streamer evolution. Though this phenomenon is known experimentally, the details of the structures of the streamers and their evolution mechanisms have not been fully clarified. In this letter, we perform quasi two-dimensional numerical analysis of nonequilibrium NTP induced by a nanosecond positive pulsed corona discharge. The continuum fluid equations for two-temperature nonequilibrium NTP are used as governing equations. In this study, 197 gas phase reactions for 25 chemical species and 21 surface reactions on the inner glass wall surface are considered in an air plasma under atmospheric pressure. The simulated behavior of the streamer groups agrees with experimental observations. Soon after the voltage increases on the reactor, primary streamers are formed, which may transit the complete gap, disappearing near the peak voltage. Next, second streamers appear, disappearing at the end of the applied voltage pulse. The streamer wavelength and the distance between the streamers in the axial direction are determined. Moreover, ozone generation is shown to be more significant in the secondary streamer. This simulation will allow better predictions for nanosecond positive pulsed plasma systems.

  8. Factorizing the time evolution operator

    CERN Document Server

    Quijas, P C G

    2006-01-01

    There is a widespread belief in the quantum physical community, and in textbooks used to teach Quantum Mechanics, that it is a difficult task to apply the time evolution operator on an initial wave function. That is to say, because the hamiltonian operator generally is the sum of two operators, then it is a difficult task to apply the time evolution operator on an initial wave function, because it implies to apply terms like (A+B)^n. A possible solution of this problem is to factorize the time evolution operator and then apply successively the individual exponential operator on the initial wave function. However, the exponential operator does not directly factorize. In this work we present useful ways to factorizing the time evolution operator when the argument of the exponential is a sum of two operators which obey specific commutation relations. Then, we apply the exponential operator as an evolution operator for the case of elementary unidimensional potentials, like the harmonic oscillator. Also, we argue ...

  9. Time Evolution in Dynamical Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Tiemblo, A

    1996-01-01

    We present a gauge--theoretical derivation of the notion of time, suitable to describe the Hamiltonian time evolution of gravitational systems. It is based on a nonlinear coset realization of the Poincaré group, implying the time component of the coframe to be invariant, and thus to represent a metric time. The unitary gauge fixing of the boosts gives rise to the foliation of spacetime along the time direction. The three supressed degrees of freedom correspond to Goldstone--like fields, whereas the remaining time component is a Higgs--like boson.

  10. Investigation of Early Plasma Evolution Induced by Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen B.

    2012-01-01

    Early plasma is generated owing to high intensity laser irradiation of target and the subsequent target material ionization. Its dynamics plays a significant role in laser-material interaction, especially in the air environment1-11. Early plasma evolution has been captured through pump-probe shadowgraphy1-3 and interferometry1,4-7. However, the studied time frames and applied laser parameter ranges are limited. For example, direct examinations of plasma front locations and electron number densities within a delay time of 100 picosecond (ps) with respect to the laser pulse peak are still very few, especially for the ultrashort pulse of a duration around 100 femtosecond (fs) and a low power density around 1014 W/cm2. Early plasma generated under these conditions has only been captured recently with high temporal and spatial resolutions12. The detailed setup strategy and procedures of this high precision measurement will be illustrated in this paper. The rationale of the measurement is optical pump-probe shadowgraphy: one ultrashort laser pulse is split to a pump pulse and a probe pulse, while the delay time between them can be adjusted by changing their beam path lengths. The pump pulse ablates the target and generates the early plasma, and the probe pulse propagates through the plasma region and detects the non-uniformity of electron number density. In addition, animations are generated using the calculated results from the simulation model of Ref. 12 to illustrate the plasma formation and evolution with a very high resolution (0.04 ~ 1 ps). Both the experimental method and the simulation method can be applied to a broad range of time frames and laser parameters. These methods can be used to examine the early plasma generated not only from metals, but also from semiconductors and insulators. PMID:22806170

  11. Time evolution of cascade decay

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We study non-perturbatively the time evolution of cascade decay for generic fields $\\pi \\rightarrow \\phi_1\\phi_2\\rightarrow \\phi_2\\chi_1\\chi_2$ and obtain the time dependence of amplitudes and populations for the resonant and final states. We analyze in detail the different time scales and the manifestation of unitary time evolution in the dynamics of production and decay of resonant intermediate and final states. The probability of occupation (population) ``flows'' as a function of time from the initial to the final states. When the decay width of the parent particle $\\Gamma_\\pi$ is much larger than that of the intermediate resonant state $\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$ there is a ``bottleneck'' in the flow, the population of resonant states builds up to a maximum at $t^* = \\ln[\\Gamma_\\pi/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}]/(\\Gamma_\\pi-\\Gamma_{\\phi_1})$ nearly saturating unitarity and decays to the final state on the longer time scale $1/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$. As a consequence of the wide separation of time scales in this case the cascade decay ...

  12. Time evolution of quantum fractals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik; Bialynicki-Birula; Zyczkowski

    2000-12-11

    We propose a general construction of wave functions of arbitrary prescribed fractal dimension, for a wide class of quantum problems, including the infinite potential well, harmonic oscillator, linear potential, and free particle. The box-counting dimension of the probability density P(t)(x) = |Psi(x,t)|(2) is shown not to change during the time evolution. We prove a universal relation D(t) = 1+Dx/2 linking the dimensions of space cross sections Dx and time cross sections D(t) of the fractal quantum carpets.

  13. Time Evolution of Quantum Fractals

    CERN Document Server

    Wójcik, D; Zyczkowski, K; Wojcik, Daniel; Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2000-01-01

    We propose a general construction of wave functions of arbitrary prescribed fractal dimension, for a wide class of quantum problems, including the infinite potential well, harmonic oscillator, linear potential and free particle. The box-counting dimension of the probability density $P_t(x)=|\\Psi(x,t)|^2$ is shown not to change during the time evolution. We prove a universal relation $D_t=1+D_x/2$ linking the dimensions of space cross-sections $D_x$ and time cross-sections $D_t$ of the fractal quantum carpets.

  14. Plasma-density evolution in compact polyacetal capillary discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasel, F.G.; Rocca, J.J.; Cortazar, O.D.; Szapiro, B.T. (Electrical Engineering Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)); Lee, R.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

    1993-05-01

    We have measured the temporal evolution of the electron density of plasmas produced in polyacetal capillaries with diameters between 0.5 and 1.5 mm excited by 110-ns full-width-at-half-maximum discharge pulses with currents between 13 and 42 kA. The electron density was determined from Stark-broadened line profiles of the 4[ital f]-3[ital d] O VI transition taking into account opacity effects. The electron density was found to increase continuously during the rise of the current pulse, and to decrease near the end of the current pulse, when a drop in plasma temperature causes the degree of ionization of the plasma to decrease. The peak plasma density in a 1-mm capillary excited by a 24-kA pulse was measured to be 5[times]10[sup 19] cm[sup [minus]3]. The plasma density was observed to increase linearly with discharge energy from 7.5[times]10[sup 18] cm[sup [minus]3] for a 5-J discharge to 5[times]10[sup 19] cm[sup [minus]3] for a 30-J discharge in a 1.5-mm-diam. capillary.

  15. Identification of discontinuities in plasma plume evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Gojani, Ardian B; Obayashi, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The ejection of material during laser ablation gives rise to the development of discontinuities in the ambient gas. Several of these discontinuities are observed and characterized, including externally and internally propagating shock waves, contact surface, and the ionization front. Qualitative experimental observations and analysis of these discontinuities is presented. Results from shadowgraphy enabled determination of an irradiance threshold between two different ablation mechanisms, and determination of several stages of plasma plume evolution. Consideration of the refractive index as a dynamic sum of the contributions from gas and electrons led to separate identification of ionization front from the contact surface. Furthermore, ionization front was observed to lead the shock wave at the earlier stage of the ablation.

  16. Evolution to the quark–gluon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2017-02-01

    Theoretical studies on the early-time dynamics in the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions are reviewed, including pedagogical introductions on the initial condition with small-\\text{x} gluons treated as a color glass condensate, the bottom–up thermalization scenario, plasma/glasma instabilities, basics of some formulations such as the kinetic equations and the classical statistical simulation. More detailed discussions follow to make an overview of recent developments on the fast isotropization, the onset of hydrodynamics, and the transient behavior of momentum spectral cascades.

  17. Evolution to the Quark-Gluon Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical studies on the early-time dynamics in the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions are reviewed including pedagogical introductions on the initial condition with small-x gluons treated as a color glass condensate, the bottom-up thermalization scenario, plasma/glasma instabilities, basics of some formulations such as the kinetic equations and the classical statistical simulation. More detailed discussions follow to make an overview of recent developments on the fast isotropization, the onset of hydrodynamics, and the transient behavior of momentum spectral cascades.

  18. Evolution of electron hole propating in inhomogeneous plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokgo, K.; Woo, M.; Choi, C.; Min, K. W.; Hwang, J.

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of electron hole (EH) propagation in the presence of plasma density inhomogeneity is investigated by both particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and theory. At the beginning of simulation, EH is generated by plasma blob injection. When EH passes inhomogeneous plasma region, the EH potential (1st order) increases monotonically in proportion to the background plasma density (0th order). With this 1st order growth, 2nd order back and forth oscillations of the potential are observed in faster time scale compared to EH propagation time scale. A bulk motion of trapped electrons due to density gradient produces these potential oscillations and the frequency of 2nd order oscillation is found to be comparable to the bouncing frequency of these trapped particles. Using the theoretical technique introduced by Schwarzmeier, we discovered a normal mode localized in the 1st order EH potential with frequency comparable to average bounce frequency of trapped particle. Such mode has an odd symmetry that is exactly consistent with simulation result. Furthermore, ions are pushed backward in coherence with 2nd order potential in simulation. These coherent ions form into a train of backward propagating ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) that evolve to ion hole in simulation. Finally, EH starts to dissipate by nonlinear Landau damping and converge to another stable EH as it reaches high-density, homogenous region.

  19. Delay time for the onset of beam plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, J. L.; Denig, W. F.; Raitt, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    The interaction of a nonrelativistic electron beam with a neutral gas in a large chamber is considered, and the time interval before ignition of beam plasma discharge (BPD) is studied. A new theoretical expression for the time delay before BPD ignition is found as a function of the critical current necessary for BPD to be established. There are two parameters in the theoretical expression, and both are derived from two different experiments. These parameters are used to write the time evolution equation for plasma density as a function of time.

  20. Excitation and evolution of finite-amplitude plasma wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y. W.; Wu, Y. C., E-mail: yican.wu@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Chen, M. X. [School of Electronic Science and Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Yu, M. Y., E-mail: myyu@zju.edu.cn [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation and Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Wu, B. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The evolution of a small spatially periodic perturbation in the electron velocity distribution function in collisionless plasma is reconsidered by numerically solving the Vlasov and Poisson equations. The short as well as long time behaviors of the excited oscillations and damping/modulation are followed. In the small but finite-amplitude excited plasma wave, resonant electrons become trapped in the wave potential wells and their motion affects the low-velocity electrons participating in the plasma oscillations, leading to modulation of the latter at an effective trapping frequency. It is found that the phase space of the resonant and low-velocity electrons becomes chaotic, but then self-organization takes place but remains fine-scale chaotic. It is also found that as long as particles are trapped, there is only modulation and no monotonic damping of the excited plasma wave. The modulation period/amplitude increases/decreases as the magnitude of the initial disturbance is reduced. For the initial and boundary conditions used here, linear Landau damping corresponds to the asymptotic limit of the modulation period becoming infinite, or no trapping of the resonant electrons.

  1. Evolution of fast magnetoacoustic pulses in randomly structured coronal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, D; Nakariakov, V M; Li, B; Keppens, R

    2014-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic waves interact with structured plasmas and reveal the internal magnetic and thermal structures therein, thereby having seismological applications in the solar atmosphere. We investigate the evolution of fast magnetoacoustic pulses in randomly structured plasmas, in the context of large-scale propagating waves in the solar atmosphere. We perform one dimensional numerical simulations of fast wave pulses propagating perpendicular to a constant magnetic field in a low-$\\beta$ plasma with a random density profile across the field. Both linear and nonlinear regimes are considered. We study how the evolution of the pulse amplitude and width depends on their initial values and the parameters of the random structuring. A randomly structured plasma acts as a dispersive medium for a fast magnetoacoustic pulse, causing amplitude attenuation and broadening of the pulse width. After the passage of the main pulse, secondary propagating and standing fast waves appear in the plasma. Width evolution of both...

  2. Time evolution in the presence of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Pulido, A; Tresguerres, R; Pulido, Antonio; Tiemblo, Alfredo; Tresguerres, Romualdo

    2001-01-01

    We present a suggestion on the interpretation of canonical time evolution when gravitation is present, based on the nonlinear gauge approach to gravity. Essentially, our proposal consists of an internal-time concept, with the time variable taken from the dynamical fields characteristic of the nonlinear realization of the internal time-translational symmetry. Physical time evolution requires the latter symmetry to be broken. After disregarding other breaking mechanisms, we appeal to the Jordan-Brans-Dicke action, conveniently interpreted, to achieve that goal. We show that nontrivial time evolution follows, the special relativistic limit being recovered in the absence of gravity.

  3. Experimental Research of Spontaneous Evolution from Ultracold Rydberg Atoms to Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lin-Jie; FENG Zhi-Gang; LI An-Ling; ZHAO Jian-Ming; LI Chang-Yong; JIA Suo-Tang

    2008-01-01

    @@ The spontaneous evolution from ultracold Rydberg atoms to plasma is investigated in a caesium MOT by using the method of field ionization. The plasma transferred from atoms in different Rydberg states (n = 22-32) are obtained experimentally. Dependence of the threshold time of evolving to plasma and the threshold number of initial Rydberg atoms on the principal quantum number of initial Rydberg states is studied. The experimental results are in agreement with hot-cold Rydberg-Rydberg atom collision ionization theory.

  4. Properties and evolution of anisotropic structures in collisionless plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Karimov, A R; Stenflo, L

    2016-01-01

    A new class of exact electrostatic solutions of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations based on the Jeans's theorem is proposed for studying the evolution and properties of two-dimensional anisotropic plasmas that are far from thermodynamic equilibrium. In particular, the free expansion of a slab of electron-ion plasma into vacuum is investigated.

  5. Evolution of laser pulse shape in a parabolic plasma channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, M.; Gupta, D. N.; Suk, H.

    2017-01-01

    During high-intensity laser propagation in a plasma, the group velocity of a laser pulse is subjected to change with the laser intensity due to alteration in refractive index associated with the variation of the nonlinear plasma density. The pulse front sharpened while the back of the pulse broadened due to difference in the group velocity at different parts of the laser pulse. Thus the distortion in the shape of the laser pulse is expected. We present 2D particle-in-cell simulations demonstrating the controlling the shape distortion of a Gaussian laser pulse using a parabolic plasma channel. We show the results of the intensity distribution of laser pulse in a plasma with and without a plasma channel. It has been observed that the plasma channel helps in controlling the laser pulse shape distortion. The understanding of evolution of laser pulse shape may be crucial while applying the parabolic plasma channel for guiding the laser pulse in plasma based accelerators.

  6. Evolution of an electron plasma vortex in a strain flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    Coherent vortex structures are ubiquitous in fluids and plasmas and are examples of self-organized structures in nonlinear dynamical systems. The fate of these structures in strain and shear flows is an important issue in many physical systems, including geophysical fluids and shear suppression of turbulence in plasmas. In two-dimensions, an inviscid, incompressible, ideal fluid can be modeled with the Euler equations, which is perhaps the simplest system that supports vortices. The Drift-Poisson equations for pure electron plasmas in a strong, uniform magnetic field are isomorphic to the Euler equations, and so electron plasmas are an excellent test bed for the study of 2D vortex dynamics. This talk will describe results from a new experiment using pure electron plasmas in a specially designed Penning-Malmberg (PM) trap to study the evolution of an initially axisymmetric 2D vortex subject to externally imposed strains. Complementary vortex-in-cell simulations are conducted to validate the 2D nature of the experimental results and to extend the parameter range of these studies. Data for vortex destruction using both instantaneously applied and time dependent strains with flat (constant vorticity) and extended radial profiles will be presented. The role of vortex self-organization will be discussed. A simple 2D model works well for flat vorticity profiles. However, extended profiles exhibit more complicated behavior, such as filamentation and stripping; and these effects and their consequences will be discussed. Work done in collaboration with N. C. Hurst, D. H. E. Dubin, and C. M. Surko.

  7. Spectroscopic study of plasma evolution in runaway nanosecond atmospheric-pressure He discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatom, S; Stambulchik, E; Vekselman, V; Krasik, Ya E

    2013-07-01

    Time- and space-resolved visible-emission spectroscopy measurements are applied to study plasma parameters in nanosecond electrical discharges in He gas at pressure of 10(5) Pa, using a 150 kV, 5 ns duration high-voltage pulse. The plasma evolution during the discharge is investigated by applying line-shape analysis of several He I spectral transitions, with the Stark and opacity effects accounted for. The analysis shows that the discharge plasma is not in equilibrium and that significant electric fields of several kV/cm are present in the plasma during the discharge. Regions of plasma with significantly different electron densities are identified and a qualitative model of the plasma formation and evolution is proposed.

  8. Temporal evolution of electron beam generated Argon plasma in pasotron device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Neha; Pal, U. N.; Prakash, Ram; Choyal, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The plasma- assisted slow wave oscillator (PASOTRON) is a high power microwave source in which the electron beam in the interaction region is confined by the background plasma. The plasma is generated by impact ionization of background gas with the electron beam. A model has been developed for temporal evolution of Argon plasma in pasotron device. In this model, we consider electron beam of energy E interacting with Argon gas. The resulting ionization creates quasi neutral argon plasma composed of argon Ar atoms, singly ionized ions Ar+1and electrons having energy from 0 to E. Electron impact excitation, ionization, radiative decay, radiative recombination and three body recombination processes are considered in this model. Population of ground and excited states of argon atom, ground state of argon ion as well as the population of electron energy groups is calculated by solving time dependent rate equations. Temporal evolution of electron beam generated plasma is given.

  9. Transient evolution of solitary electron holes in low pressure laboratory plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, Subroto

    2015-01-01

    Solitary electrons holes (SEHs) are localized electrostatic positive potential structures in collisionless plasmas. These are vortex-like structures in the electron phase space. Its existence is cause of distortion of the electron distribution in the resonant region. These are explained theoretically first time by Schamel et.al [Phys. Scr. 20, 336 (1979) and Phys. Plasmas 19, 020501 (2012)]. Propagating solitary electron holes can also be formed in a laboratory plasma when a fast rising high positive voltage pulse is applied to a metallic electrode [Kar et. al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 102113 (2010)] immersed in a low pressure plasma. The temporal evolution of these structures can be studied by measuring the transient electron distribution function (EDF). In the present work, transient EDF is measured after formation of a solitary electron hole in nearly uniform, unmagnetized, and collisionless plasma for applied pulse width and, where and are applied pulse width and inverse of ion plasma frequency respectively. Fo...

  10. Evolution of the plasma bubble in a narrow gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hong-Yu; Lee, Hung-Ken

    2011-11-25

    We investigate the evolution of the plasma bubble in a narrow gap. According to the morphological changes, we further show that there are three phases during the evolution for spherical fluctuating, radial fingering, and dense branching plasma bubbles, which are similar to the radial fingering pattern in a Hele-Shaw cell. The dependences of the wavelength of the fingering boundary are experimentally discussed. The dense branching plasma bubble is found with a fractal dimension of D(f)=1.74. The reduced surface tension pressure from the local heatings due to the filamentary discharges is suspected of being responsible for the growth of the radial fingering and the dense branching plasma bubbles.

  11. Faster than Hermitian Time Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl M. Bender

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available For any pair of quantum states, an initial state $|I angle$ and afinal quantum state $|F angle$, in a Hilbert space, there are many Hamiltonians $H$ under which $|I angle$ evolves into $|F angle$. Let us impose the constraint that the difference between the largest and smallest eigenvalues of $H$, $E_{max}$ and $E_{min}$, is held fixed. We can then determine the Hamiltonian $H$ that satisfies this constraint and achieves the transformation from the initial state to the final state in the least possible time $au$. For Hermitian Hamiltonians, $au$ has a nonzero lower bound. However, amongnon-Hermitian ${cal PT}$-symmetric Hamiltonians satisfying the same energy constraint, $au$ can be made arbitrarily small without violating the time-energy uncertainty principle. The minimum value of $au$ can be made arbitrarily small because for ${cal PT}$-symmetric Hamiltonians the path from the vector $|I angle$ to the vector $|F angle$, as measured using the Hilbert-space metric appropriate for this theory, can be made arbitrarily short. The mechanism described here is similar to that in general relativity in whichthe distance between two space-time points can be made small if they are connected by a wormhole. This result may have applications in quantum computing.

  12. Time of relaxation in dusty plasma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Dust particles in plasma may have different values of average kinetic energy for vertical and horizontal motion. The partial equilibrium of the subsystems and the relaxation processes leading to this asymmetry are under consideration. A method for the relaxation time estimation in nonideal dusty plasma is suggested. The characteristic relaxation times of vertical and horizontal motion of dust particles in gas discharge are estimated by analytical approach and by analysis of simulation results. These relaxation times for vertical and horizontal subsystems appear to be different. A single hierarchy of relaxation times is proposed.

  13. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woskov, Paul P.; Smatlak, Donna L.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Wittle, J. Kenneth; Titus, Charles H.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury.

  14. Time-dependent secular evolution in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, M D

    2004-01-01

    Lynden-Bell & Kalnajs (1972) presented a useful formula for computing the long-range torque between spiral arms and the disk at large. The derivation uses second-order perturbation theory and assumes that the perturbation slowly grows over a very long time: the time-asymptotic limit. This formula has been widely used to predict the angular momentum transport between spiral arms and stellar bars between disks and dark-matter halos. However, this paper shows that the LBK time-asymptotic limit is not appropriate because the characteristic evolution time for galaxies is too close to the relevant dynamical times. We demonstrate that transients, not present in the time-asymptotic formula, can play a major role in the evolution for realistic astronomical time scales. A generalisation for arbitrary time dependence is presented and illustrated by the bar--halo and satellite--halo interaction. The natural time dependence in bar-driven halo evolution causes quantitative differences in the overall torque and qualitat...

  15. Surface composition XPS analysis of a plasma treated polystyrene: Evolution over long storage periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Ousmane M; Marmey, Pascal; Anselme, Karine; Duncan, Anthony C; Ponche, Arnaud

    2016-09-01

    A polystyrene surface (PS) was initially treated by cold nitrogen and oxygen plasma in order to incorporate in particular amine and hydroxyl functions, respectively. The evolution of the chemical nature of the surface was further monitored over a long time period (580 days) by chemical assay, XPS and contact angle measurements. Surface density quantification of primary amine groups was performed using three chemical amine assays: 4-nitrobenzaldehyde (4-NBZ), Sulfo succinimidyl 6-[3'(2 pyridyldithio)-pionamido] hexanoate (Sulfo-LC-SPDP) and iminothiolane (ITL). The results showed amine densities were in the range of 2 per square nanometer (comparable to the results described in the literature) after 5min of nitrogen plasma treatment. Over the time period investigated, chemical assays, XPS and contact angles suggest a drastic significant evolution of the chemical nature of the surface within the first two weeks. Beyond that time period and up to almost two years, nitrogen plasma modified substrates exhibits a slow and continuous oxidation whereas oxygen plasma modifed polystyrene surface is chemically stable after two weeks of storage. The latter appeared to "ease of" showing relatively mild changes within the one year period. Our results suggest that it may be preferable to wait for a chemical "stabilization" period of two weeks before subsequent covalent immobilization of proteins onto the surface. The originality of this work resides in the study of the plasma treated surface chemistry evolution over long periods of storage time (580 days) considerably exceeding those described in the literature.

  16. EVOLUTION OF FAST MAGNETOACOUSTIC PULSES IN RANDOMLY STRUCTURED CORONAL PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, D.; Li, B. [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai 264209 (China); Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Keppens, R., E-mail: Ding.Yuan@wis.kuleuven.be, E-mail: bbl@sdu.edu.cn [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of fast magnetoacoustic pulses in randomly structured plasmas, in the context of large-scale propagating waves in the solar atmosphere. We perform one-dimensional numerical simulations of fast wave pulses propagating perpendicular to a constant magnetic field in a low-β plasma with a random density profile across the field. Both linear and nonlinear regimes are considered. We study how the evolution of the pulse amplitude and width depends on their initial values and the parameters of the random structuring. Acting as a dispersive medium, a randomly structured plasma causes amplitude attenuation and width broadening of the fast wave pulses. After the passage of the main pulse, secondary propagating and standing fast waves appear. Width evolution of both linear and nonlinear pulses can be well approximated by linear functions; however, narrow pulses may have zero or negative broadening. This arises because narrow pulses are prone to splitting, while broad pulses usually deviate less from their initial Gaussian shape and form ripple structures on top of the main pulse. Linear pulses decay at an almost constant rate, while nonlinear pulses decay exponentially. A pulse interacts most efficiently with a random medium with a correlation length of about half of the initial pulse width. This detailed model of fast wave pulses propagating in highly structured media substantiates the interpretation of EIT waves as fast magnetoacoustic waves. Evolution of a fast pulse provides us with a novel method to diagnose the sub-resolution filamentation of the solar atmosphere.

  17. Self-consistent evolution of plasma discharge and electromagnetic fields in a microwave pulse compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlapakovski, A. S.; Beilin, L.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion 32000 Haifa (Israel); Hadas, Y. [Department of Applied Physics, Rafael, POBox 2250, Haifa 31021 (Israel); Schamiloglu, E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Nanosecond-scale evolution of plasma and RF electromagnetic fields during the release of energy from a microwave pulse compressor with a plasma interference switch was investigated numerically using the code MAGIC. The plasma was simulated in the scope of the gas conductivity model in MAGIC. The compressor embodied an S-band cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm filled with pressurized gas. In a simplified approach, the gas discharge was initiated by setting an external ionization rate in a layer crossing the side arm waveguide in the location of the electric field antinode. It was found that with increasing ionization rate, the microwave energy absorbed by the plasma in the first few nanoseconds increases, but the absorption for the whole duration of energy release, on the contrary, decreases. In a hybrid approach modeling laser ignition of the discharge, seed electrons were set around the electric field antinode. In this case, the plasma extends along the field forming a filament and the plasma density increases up to the level at which the electric field within the plasma decreases due to the skin effect. Then, the avalanche rate decreases but the density still rises until the microwave energy release begins and the electric field becomes insufficient to support the avalanche process. The extraction of the microwave pulse limits its own power by terminating the rise of the plasma density and filament length. For efficient extraction, a sufficiently long filament of dense plasma must have sufficient time to be formed.

  18. Self-consistent evolution of plasma discharge and electromagnetic fields in a microwave pulse compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlapakovski, A. S.; Beilin, L.; Hadas, Y.; Schamiloglu, E.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-07-01

    Nanosecond-scale evolution of plasma and RF electromagnetic fields during the release of energy from a microwave pulse compressor with a plasma interference switch was investigated numerically using the code MAGIC. The plasma was simulated in the scope of the gas conductivity model in MAGIC. The compressor embodied an S-band cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm filled with pressurized gas. In a simplified approach, the gas discharge was initiated by setting an external ionization rate in a layer crossing the side arm waveguide in the location of the electric field antinode. It was found that with increasing ionization rate, the microwave energy absorbed by the plasma in the first few nanoseconds increases, but the absorption for the whole duration of energy release, on the contrary, decreases. In a hybrid approach modeling laser ignition of the discharge, seed electrons were set around the electric field antinode. In this case, the plasma extends along the field forming a filament and the plasma density increases up to the level at which the electric field within the plasma decreases due to the skin effect. Then, the avalanche rate decreases but the density still rises until the microwave energy release begins and the electric field becomes insufficient to support the avalanche process. The extraction of the microwave pulse limits its own power by terminating the rise of the plasma density and filament length. For efficient extraction, a sufficiently long filament of dense plasma must have sufficient time to be formed.

  19. Decoherence in time evolution of bound entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Z; Sun, C P; Wang, X; Sun, Zhe; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2007-01-01

    We study a dynamic process of disentanglement by considering the time evolution of bound entanglement for a quantum open system, two qutrits coupling to a common environment. Here, the initial quantum correlations of the two qutrits are characterized by the bound entanglement. In order to show the universality of the role of environment on bound entanglement, both bosonic and spin environments are considered. We found that the bound entanglement displays collapses and revivals, and it can be stable against small temperature and time change. The thermal fluctuation effects on bound entanglement are also considered.

  20. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CELLULAR AUTOMATON MODEL FOR THE EVOLUTION OF ACTIVE REGION CORONAL PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López Fuentes, Marcelo [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio, CONICET-UBA, CC. 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Klimchuk, James A., E-mail: lopezf@iafe.uba.ar [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We study a two-dimensional cellular automaton (CA) model for the evolution of coronal loop plasmas. The model is based on the idea that coronal loops are made of elementary magnetic strands that are tangled and stressed by the displacement of their footpoints by photospheric motions. The magnetic stress accumulated between neighbor strands is released in sudden reconnection events or nanoflares that heat the plasma. We combine the CA model with the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops model to compute the response of the plasma to the heating events. Using the known response of the X-Ray Telescope on board Hinode, we also obtain synthetic data. The model obeys easy-to-understand scaling laws relating the output (nanoflare energy, temperature, density, intensity) to the input parameters (field strength, strand length, critical misalignment angle). The nanoflares have a power-law distribution with a universal slope of –2.5, independent of the input parameters. The repetition frequency of nanoflares, expressed in terms of the plasma cooling time, increases with strand length. We discuss the implications of our results for the problem of heating and evolution of active region coronal plasmas.

  1. Randomness in Sequence Evolution Increases over Time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyu Wang

    Full Text Available The second law of thermodynamics states that entropy, as a measure of randomness in a system, increases over time. Although studies have investigated biological sequence randomness from different aspects, it remains unknown whether sequence randomness changes over time and whether this change consists with the second law of thermodynamics. To capture the dynamics of randomness in molecular sequence evolution, here we detect sequence randomness based on a collection of eight statistical random tests and investigate the randomness variation of coding sequences with an application to Escherichia coli. Given that core/essential genes are more ancient than specific/non-essential genes, our results clearly show that core/essential genes are more random than specific/non-essential genes and accordingly indicate that sequence randomness indeed increases over time, consistent well with the second law of thermodynamics. We further find that an increase in sequence randomness leads to increasing randomness of GC content and longer sequence length. Taken together, our study presents an important finding, for the first time, that sequence randomness increases over time, which may provide profound insights for unveiling the underlying mechanisms of molecular sequence evolution.

  2. Evolution of radiation profiles during detached plasmas and radiative collapse in LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Shwetang N., E-mail: pandya.shwetang@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [The Graduate University for Advance Studies, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Peterson, Byron J.; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Mukai, Kiyofumi [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Sano, Ryuichi [The Graduate University for Advance Studies, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Tanaka, Hirohiko; Masuzaki, Suguru; Miyazawa, Junichi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Motojima, Gen [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ohno, Noriyasu [Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The divertor heat loads can be efficiently controlled by plasma detachment, hence it is foreseen as a suitable operational regime for divertor operation of future machines. Detachment regime is normally approached by raising the plasma density to a point where plasma detaches from the divertor. If such an approach is adapted to detach the Large Helical Device (LHD) plasma, the plasma goes to radiative collapse due to thermal instabilities. Another approach to detach LHD plasma is by intrinsic impurity seeding using Ne. The discharges detach but ultimately collapse at comparatively lower densities. The detachment is achieved and sustained at high densities by the induction of an m/n = 1/1 resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) in the stochastic edge of the LHD plasma. First quantitative measurements of the two-dimensional (2D) impurity radiation profiles from the three-dimensional (3D) plasma edge of LHD showing the time evolution of radiative collapse and RMP assisted detachment measured by recently upgraded and calibrated Infrared imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) are presented in this article.

  3. Time evolution of Wikipedia network ranking

    CERN Document Server

    Eom, Young-Ho; Benczúr, András; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2013-01-01

    We study the time evolution of ranking and spectral properties of the Google matrix of English Wikipedia hyperlink network during years 2003 - 2011. The statistical properties of ranking of Wikipedia articles via PageRank and CheiRank probabilities, as well as the matrix spectrum, are shown to be stabilized for 2007 - 2011. A special emphasis is done on ranking of Wikipedia personalities and universities. We show that PageRank selection is dominated by politicians while 2DRank, which combines PageRank and CheiRank, gives more accent on personalities of arts. The Wikipedia PageRank of universities recovers 80 percents of top universities of Shanghai ranking during the considered time period.

  4. Time evolution of Wikipedia network ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Frahm, Klaus M.; Benczúr, András; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-12-01

    We study the time evolution of ranking and spectral properties of the Google matrix of English Wikipedia hyperlink network during years 2003-2011. The statistical properties of ranking of Wikipedia articles via PageRank and CheiRank probabilities, as well as the matrix spectrum, are shown to be stabilized for 2007-2011. A special emphasis is done on ranking of Wikipedia personalities and universities. We show that PageRank selection is dominated by politicians while 2DRank, which combines PageRank and CheiRank, gives more accent on personalities of arts. The Wikipedia PageRank of universities recovers 80% of top universities of Shanghai ranking during the considered time period.

  5. Time-dependent Cooling in Photoionized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnat, Orly

    2017-02-01

    I explore the thermal evolution and ionization states in gas cooling from an initially hot state in the presence of external photoionizing radiation. I compute the equilibrium and nonequilibrium cooling efficiencies, heating rates, and ion fractions for low-density gas cooling while exposed to the ionizing metagalactic background radiation at various redshifts (z = 0 ‑ 3), for a range of temperatures (108–104 K), densities (10‑7–103 cm‑3), and metallicities (10‑3–2 times solar). The results indicate the existence of a threshold ionization parameter, above which the cooling efficiencies are very close to those in photoionization equilibrium (so that departures from equilibrium may be neglected), and below which the cooling efficiencies resemble those in collisional time-dependent gas cooling with no external radiation (and are thus independent of density).

  6. Equilibrium Reconstructions with V3FIT and Current Evolution Modeling for 3-D Stellarator Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J. C.; Cianciosa, M.; Geiger, J.; Lazerson, S.

    2016-10-01

    V3FIT is a powerful equilibrium reconstruction tool for magnetic confinement fusion experiments which are inherently 3-D in nature (i.e. stellarators) or have 3-D components (tokamaks with 3-D shaping, reversed field pinches with helical states, etc). Here, we present details of the diagnostic modeling, constraints and the user interface for reconstructions of W7-X plasmas. For typical discharges during the OP1.1 run campaign of W7-X, the net toroidal current and current density profile do not reach steady-state. When modeling the current evolution in 3-D plasmas, both poloidal and toroidal currents are linked with both poloidal and toroidal fluxes. In contrast, in toroidally axisymmetric plasmas, the poloidal flux is linked only with the toroidal current and the toroidal current is linked only with the poloidal flux. Compared to an equivalently-sized axisymmetric configuration, the current diffusion in 3-D plasmas is enhanced, leading to a faster relaxation of the current profile to its steady-state. Implications for the time-evolution of the current and rotational transform profiles in stellarator plasmas are discussed. This work is supported by DoE Grant DE-SC00014529.

  7. An optimal real-time controller for vertical plasma stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz, N; Coda, S; Duval, B P; Le, H B; Rodrigues, A P; Varandas, C A F; Correia, C M B A; Goncalves, B S

    2014-01-01

    Modern Tokamaks have evolved from the initial axisymmetric circular plasma shape to an elongated axisymmetric plasma shape that improves the energy confinement time and the triple product, which is a generally used figure of merit for the conditions needed for fusion reactor performance. However, the elongated plasma cross section introduces a vertical instability that demands a real-time feedback control loop to stabilize the plasma vertical position and velocity. At the Tokamak \\`a Configuration Variable (TCV) in-vessel poloidal field coils driven by fast switching power supplies are used to stabilize highly elongated plasmas. TCV plasma experiments have used a PID algorithm based controller to correct the plasma vertical position. In late 2013 experiments a new optimal real-time controller was tested improving the stability of the plasma. This contribution describes the new optimal real-time controller developed. The choice of the model that describes the plasma response to the actuators is discussed. The ...

  8. Black-hole universe: time evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Chul-Moon; Okawa, Hirotada; Nakao, Ken-ichi

    2013-10-18

    Time evolution of a black hole lattice toy model universe is simulated. The vacuum Einstein equations in a cubic box with a black hole at the origin are numerically solved with periodic boundary conditions on all pairs of faces opposite to each other. Defining effective scale factors by using the area of a surface and the length of an edge of the cubic box, we compare them with that in the Einstein-de Sitter universe. It is found that the behavior of the effective scale factors is well approximated by that in the Einstein-de Sitter universe. In our model, if the box size is sufficiently larger than the horizon radius, local inhomogeneities do not significantly affect the global expansion law of the Universe even though the inhomogeneity is extremely nonlinear.

  9. Spatio-temporal evolution of uranium emission in laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S.S., E-mail: hari@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Diwakar, P.K. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); LaHaye, N.L.; Phillips, M.C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy provides much impetus as a nuclear forensics tool because of its capability of standoff detection and real-time analysis. However, special nuclear materials like U, Pu, etc. provide very crowded spectra and, when combined with shifts and broadening of spectral lines caused by ambient atmospheric operation, generate a complex plasma spectroscopy system. We explored the spatio-temporal evolution of excited U species in a laser ablation plume under various ambient pressure conditions. Plasmas were generated using 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from a Nd:YAG laser on a U containing glass matrix target. The role of air ambient pressure on U line intensities, signal-to-background ratios, and linewidths were investigated. Spatially and temporally resolved optical time-of-flight emission spectroscopy of excited uranium atoms were used for studying the expansion hydrodynamics and the persistence of U species in the plume. Our results showed that U emission linewidths increased with pressure due to increased Stark broadening; however, the broadening was less than that for Ca. A comparison with U emission features in the presence of an inert gas showed the persistence of U species in plasmas in ambient air is significantly reduced; this could be due to oxide and other reactive species formation. - Highlights: • Spatio-temporal evolution of U species in a multicomponent laser-induced plasma (LIP) is explored. • The linewidth of U species in LIP is compared to other species in a multicomponent system. • The position-time mapping of U species in LIP show complex expansion dynamics with varying pressure levels. • The persistence of U species in LIP is greatly influenced by nature and pressure of the ambient gas. • The plasma chemistry is affecting the persistence of the species as well as analytical merits.

  10. Revisiting Waiting Times in DNA evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nicodeme, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factors are short stretches of DNA (or $k$-mers) mainly located in promoters sequences that enhance or repress gene expression. With respect to an initial distribution of letters on the DNA alphabet, Behrens and Vingron consider a random sequence of length $n$ that does not contain a given $k$-mer or word of size $k$. Under an evolution model of the DNA, they compute the probability $\\mathfrak{p}_n$ that this $k$-mer appears after a unit time of 20 years. They prove that the waiting time for the first apparition of the $k$-mer is well approximated by $T_n=1/\\mathfrak{p}_n$. Their work relies on the simplifying assumption that the $k$-mer is not self-overlapping. They observe in particular that the waiting time is mostly driven by the initial distribution of letters. Behrens et al. use an approach by automata that relaxes the assumption related to words overlaps. Their numerical evaluations confirms the validity of Behrens and Vingron approach for non self-overlapping words, but provides up to 44...

  11. Temporal evolution of the spectral lines emission and temperatures in laser induced plasmas through characteristic parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredice, F., E-mail: faustob@ciop.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas, P.O. Box 3 C. P.1897 Gonnet, La Plata (Argentina); Pacheco Martinez, P. [Grupo de Espectroscopía Óptica de Emisión y Láser, Universidad del Atlántico, Barranquilla (Colombia); Sánchez-Aké, C.; Villagrán-Muniz, M. [Laboratorio de Fotofísica, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-186, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose an extended Boltzmann plot method to determine the usefulness of spectral lines for plasma parameter calculations. Based on the assumption that transient plasmas are under ideal conditions during an specific interval of time Δt, (i.e. thin, homogeneous and in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE)), the associated Boltzmann plots describe a surface in the space defined by the coordinates X = Energy, Y = Time and Z = ln (λ{sub jl}I{sub j}/g{sub j}A{sub jl}), where I{sub j} is the integrated intensity of the spectral line, g{sub j} is the statistical weight of the level j, λ{sub jl} is the wavelength of the considered line and A{sub jl} is its transition rate. In order to express the Boltzmann plot surface in terms of a reduced set of constants B{sub i}, and δ{sub i}, we developed as a power series of time, the logarithm of I{sub n}(t)/I{sub n}(t{sub 0}), where I{sub n}(t) is the integrated intensity of any spectral line at time t, and I{sub n}(t{sub 0}) at initial time. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the intensity of any spectral line and consequently the temperature of the plasma can be also expressed with these constants. The comparison of the temporal evolution of the line intensity calculated using these constants with their experimental values, can be used as a criterion for selecting useful lines in plasma analysis. Furthermore, this method can also be applied to determine self-absorption or enhancement of the spectral lines, to evaluate a possible departure of LTE, and to check or estimate the upper level energy value of any spectral line. An advantage of this method is that the value of these constants does not depend on the spectral response of the detection system, the uncertainty of the transition rates belonging to the analyzed spectral lines or any other time-independent parameters. In order to prove our method, we determined the constants B{sub i} and δ{sub i} and therefore the Boltzmann plot surface from the temporal

  12. Composition and species evolution in a laser-induced LuMnO3 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bator, Matthias; Hu, Yi; Esposito, Martin; Schneider, Christof W.; Lippert, Thomas; Wokaun, Alexander

    2012-09-01

    Pulsed laser deposition is often used to grow multi-elemental thin films from stoichiometric targets. The growth process is influenced by a wide variety of parameters like the target composition, background gases, laser wavelength, laser fluence, or spot size. The changes these parameters induce in the film growth also affect the plasma plume and species formed during laser ablation. For oxide growth O2, and sometimes N2O, is utilized as background gas to achieve the required oxygen composition for the as-grown film. Mass spectrometry combined with time- and space resolved emission spectroscopy is used to investigate the behavior and evolution of plasma species in the plasma plume during the ablation process of LuMnO3 dependent on the background gas.

  13. Modulation and nonlinear evolution of multi-dimensional Langmuir wave envelopes in a relativistic plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmansouri, M.; Misra, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    The modulational instability (MI) and the evolution of weakly nonlinear two-dimensional (2D) Langmuir wave (LW) packets are studied in an unmagnetized collisionless plasma with weakly relativistic electron flow. By using a 2D self-consistent relativistic fluid model and employing the standard multiple-scale technique, a coupled set of Davey-Stewartson (DS)-like equations is derived, which governs the slow modulation and the evolution of LW packets in relativistic plasmas. It is found that the relativistic effects favor the instability of LW envelopes in the k - θ plane, where k is the wave number and θ ( 0 ≤ θ ≤ π ) the angle of modulation. It is also found that as the electron thermal velocity or θ increases, the growth rate of MI increases with cutoffs at higher wave numbers of modulation. Furthermore, in the nonlinear evolution of the DS-like equations, it is seen that with an effect of the relativistic flow, a Gaussian wave beam collapses in a finite time, and the collapse can be arrested when the effect of the thermal pressure or the relativistic flow is slightly relaxed. The present results may be useful to the MI and the formation of localized LW envelopes in cosmic plasmas with a relativistic flow of electrons.

  14. Hydrogen Evolution by Plasma Electrolysis in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Tadahiko; Akimoto, Tadashi; Azumi, Kazuhisa; Ohmori, Tadayoshi; Aoki, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Akito

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen has recently attracted attention as a possible solution to environmental and energy problems. If hydrogen should be considered an energy storage medium rather than a natural resource. However, free hydrogen does not exist on earth. Many techniques for obtaining hydrogen have been proposed. It can be reformulated from conventional hydrocarbon fuels, or obtained directly from water by electrolysis or high-temperature pyrolysis with a heat source such as a nuclear reactor. However, the efficiencies of these methods are low. The direct heating of water to sufficiently high temperatures for sustaining pyrolysis is very difficult. Pyrolysis occurs when the temperature exceeds 4000°C. Thus plasma electrolysis may be a better alternative, it is not only easier to achieve than direct heating, but also appears to produce more hydrogen than ordinary electrolysis, as predicted by Faraday’s laws, which is indirect evidence that it produces very high temperatures. We also observed large amounts of free oxygen generated at the cathode, which is further evidence of direct decomposition, rather than electrolytic decomposition. To achieve the continuous generation of hydrogen with efficiencies exceeding Faraday efficiency, it is necessary to control the surface conditions of the electrode, plasma electrolysis temperature, current density and input voltage. The minimum input voltage required induce the plasma state depends on the density and temperature of the solution, it was estimated as 120 V in this study. The lowest electrolyte temperature at which plasma forms is ˜75°C. We have observed as much as 80 times more hydrogen generated by plasma electrolysis than by conventional electrolysis at 300 V.

  15. Evolution of heavy quark distribution function on quark-gluon plasma: Using the Iterative Laplace Transform Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pari Sharareh Mehrabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The “Laplace Transform Method” is used to solve the Fokker-Plank equation for finding the time evolution of the heavy quarks distribution functions such as charm and bottom in quark gluon plasma. These solutions will lead us to calculation of nuclear suppression factor RAA. The results have good agreement with available experiment data from the PHENIX collaboration.

  16. Evolution of Baryon Rich Quark-Gluon Plasma and radiation of Single Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Sastry, S; Mohanty, A K; Srivastava, D K

    2002-01-01

    The (3+1) dimensional expansion of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) produced at finite baryon density has been studied using relativistic hydrodynamical approach. The pressure functional of the equation of state (EoS) has been determined for the interacting nuclear matter with mesons exchange. The EoS has been used to solve hydrodynamical equations using RHLLE algorithm. The space time expansion of the plasma has been studied for the cases of SPS energy and RHIC energy both at finite baryon density and for a hypothetical case of SPS energy at zero baryon density. The space-time evolution is slowed and the life times of QGP and mixed phases are shortened in the presence of finite baryon density. The space time integrated total photon yields have been estimated by convoluting the static emission rates with the space time expansion of the plasma. It has been shown that the total photon yield at zero rapidity is not significantly affected by the baryon density for SPS energy. The total photon yield is unaffected by t...

  17. Radiation properties and hydrodynamics evolution of highly charged ions in laser-produced silicon plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Qi; Su, Maogen; Cao, Shiquan; Sun, Duixiong; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Dong, Chenzhong

    2016-11-15

    We present a simplified radiation hydrodynamic model based on the fluid dynamic equations and the radiative transfer equation, which can be used to investigate the radiation properties and dynamics evolution of highly charged ions in a laser-produced plasma in vacuum. The outputs of the model consist of the evolution of the electron temperature, atom, and ion density, and the temporal and spatial evolution of various transient particles in plasma, as well as the simulated spectrum related to certain experimental conditions in a specified spectral window. In order to test the model and provide valuable experimental feedback, a series of EUV emission spectra of silicon plasmas have been measured using the spatio-temporally resolved laser produced plasma technique. The temporal and spatial evolution of the plasma is reliably reconstructed by using this model.

  18. Time-dependent Integrated Predictive Modeling of ITER Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.V. Budny

    2007-01-01

    @@ Introduction Modeling burning plasmas is important for speeding progress toward practical Tokamak energy production. Examples of issues that can be elucidated by modelinginclude requirements for heating, fueling, torque, and current drive systems, design of diagnostics, and estimates of the plasma performance (e.g., fusion power production) in various plasma scenarios. The modeling should be time-dependent to demonstrate that burning plasmas can be created, maintained (controlled), and terminated successfully. The modeling also should be integrated to treat self-consistently the nonlinearities and strong coupling between the plasma, heating, current drive, confinement, and control systems.

  19. Modulation and nonlinear evolution of multi-dimensional Langmuir wave envelopes in a relativistic plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Shahmansouri, M

    2016-01-01

    The modulational instability (MI) and the evolution of weakly nonlinear two-dimensional (2D) Langmuir wave (LW) packets are studied in an unmagnetized collisionless plasma with weakly relativistic electron flow. By using a 2D self-consistent relativistic fluid model and employing the standard multiple-scale technique, a coupled set of Davey-Stewartson (DS)-like equations is derived which governs the slow modulation and the evolution of LW packets in relativistic plasmas. It is found that the relativistic effects favor the instability of LW envelopes in the k{\\theta} plane, where k is the wave number and {\\theta} the angle of modulation. It is also found that as the electron thermal velocity or {\\theta} increases, the growth rate of MI increases with cutoffs at higher wave numbers of modulation. Furthermore, in the nonlinear evolution of the DS-like equations, it is seen that with an effect of the relativistic flow, a Gaussian wave beam collapses in a finite time, and the collapse can be arrested when the effe...

  20. The Time-Frequency Characteristics of Pulse Propagation Through Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, propagated δ pulses through different distance of Plasma are calculated, and their time-frequency characteristics are studied using CWD (Choi-William distrilution). It is found that several horizontal spectra appear at early arrival time like discrete spectruml at last time a hyperbolic curve lies in the time-frequency spectrum which corresponds to the frequency-group delay curve of plasma. To understand the time-frequency, the property of a signal is helpful for obtaining the plasma parameters.

  1. Temperature and density evolution during decay in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance plasma: Off-resonant and resonant cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortázar, O. D. [ESS Bilbao, Edificio Cosimet, Landabarri 2, 48940-Leioa, Vizcaya (Spain); Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, ETSII, C.J. Cela s/n, 13170 Ciudad Real (Spain); Megía-Macías, A.; Vizcaíno-de-Julián, A. [ESS Bilbao, Edificio Cosimet, Landabarri 2, 48940-Leioa, Vizcaya (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Time resolved electron temperature and density measurements during the decay stage in a hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma are presented for a resonance and off-resonance magnetic field configurations. The measurements are conducted on a ECR plasma generator excited at 2.45 GHz denominated test-bench for ion-sources plasma studies at ESS Bilbao. The plasma parameters evolution is studied by Langmuir probe diagnostic with synchronized sample technique developed for repetitive pulsed plasmas with a temporal resolution of 200 ns in typical decay processes of about 40 μs. An afterglow transient is clearly observed in the reflected microwave power signal from the plasma. Simultaneously, the electron temperature evolution shows rebounding peaks that may be related to the interplay between density drop and microwave coupling with deep impact on the Electron Energy Distribution Function. The correlation of such structures with the plasma absorbed power and the coupling quality is also reported.

  2. Evolution of transiently melt damaged tungsten under ITER-relevant divertor plasma heat loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardin, S., E-mail: s.bardin@differ.nl [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Ass EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Morgan, T.W. [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Ass EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Glad, X. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Pitts, R.A. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Ass EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-08-15

    A high-repetition-rate ELM simulation system was used at both the Pilot-PSI and Magnum-PSI linear plasma devices to investigate the nature of W damage under multiple shallow melt events and the subsequent surface evolution under ITER relevant plasma fluence and high ELM number. First, repetitive shallow melting of two W monoblocks separated by a 0.5 mm gap was obtained by combined pulsed/steady-state hydrogen plasma loading at normal incidence in the Pilot-PSI device. Surface modifications including melting, cracking and strong net-reshaping of the surface are obtained. During the second step, the pre-damaged W sample was exposed to a high flux plasma regime in the Magnum-PSI device with a grazing angle of 35°. SEM analysis indicates no measurable change to the surface state after the exposure in Magnum-PSI. An increase in transient-induced temperature rise of 40% is however observed, indicating a degradation of thermal properties over time.

  3. Time-resolved characterization of laser-induced plasma from fresh potatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wenqi; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Boueri, Myriam; Ma, Qianli; Zhang, Dacheng; Zheng, Lijuan; Zeng, Heping; Yu, Jin

    2009-09-01

    Optical emission of laser-induced plasma on the surface of fresh vegetables provides sensitive analysis of trace elements for in situ or online detection of these materials. This emergent technique promises applications with expected outcomes in food security or nutrition quality, as well as environment pollution detection. Characterization of the plasma induced on such soft and humid materials represents the first step towards quantitative measurement using this technique. In this paper, we present the experimental setup and protocol that optimize the plasma generation on fresh vegetables, potatoes for instance. The temporal evolution of the plasma properties are investigated using time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). In particular, the electron density and the temperatures of the plasma are reported as functions of its decay time. The temperatures are evaluated from the well known Boltzmann and Saha-Boltzmann plot methods. These temperatures are further compared to that of the typical molecular species, CN, for laser-induced plasma from plant materials. This comparison validates the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in the specific case of fresh vegetables ablated in the typical LIBS conditions. A study of the temporal evolution of the signal to noise ratio also provides practical indications for an optimized detection of trace elements. We demonstrate finally that, under certain conditions, the calibration-free LIBS procedure can be applied to determine the concentrations of trace elements in fresh vegetables.

  4. Erratum for the time-like evolution in QCDNUM

    CERN Document Server

    Botje, M

    2016-01-01

    A recent comparison of the evolution programs QCDNUM and APFEL showed a discrepancy in the time-like evolution of the singlet fragmentation function at NLO. It was found that the splitting functions of this evolution were wrongly assigned in QCDNUM, and also that the fragmentation functions were not correctly matched at the flavour thresholds. These errors are corrected in a new release of the program.

  5. Real-Time Fault Classification for Plasma Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ryan; Chen, Rongshun

    2011-01-01

    Plasma process tools, which usually cost several millions of US dollars, are often used in the semiconductor fabrication etching process. If the plasma process is halted due to some process fault, the productivity will be reduced and the cost will increase. In order to maximize the product/wafer yield and tool productivity, a timely and effective fault process detection is required in a plasma reactor. The classification of fault events can help the users to quickly identify fault processes, ...

  6. Real-time optical plasma boundary reconstruction for plasma position control at the TCV Tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommen, G.; Baar, M. de; Duval, B.P.; Andrebe, Y.; Le, H.B.; Klop, M.A.; Doelman, N.J.; Witvoet, G.; Steinbuch, M.

    2014-01-01

    A dual, high speed, real-time visible light camera setup was installed on the TCV tokamak to reconstruct optically and in real-time the plasma boundary shape. Localized light emission from the plasma boundary in tangential view, broadband visible images results in clearly resolved boundary edge-feat

  7. Formation and evolution of vortices in a collisional strongly coupled dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, Sayanee [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, a/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Banerjee, Debabrata, E-mail: debu@ustc.edu.cn [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Chakrabarti, Nikhil [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, a/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2016-07-29

    Formation and evolution of vortices are studied in a collisional strongly coupled dusty plasma in the framework of a Generalized Hydrodynamic model (GH). Here we mainly present the nonlinear dynamical response of this strongly coupled system in presence of dust-neutral collisional drag. It is shown that the interplay between the nonlinear elastic stress and the dust-neutral collisional drag results in the generation of non-propagating monopole vortex for some duration before it starts to propagate like transverse shear wave. It is also found that the interaction between two unshielded monopole vortices having both same (co-rotating) and opposite (counter rotating) rotations result in the formation of two propagating dipole vortices of equal and unequal strength respectively. These results will provide some new understanding on the transport properties in such a strongly coupled system. The numerical simulation is carried out using a de-aliased doubly periodic pseudo-spectral code with Runge–Kutta–Gill time integrator. - Highlights: • A numerical study of vortex evolution in strongly coupled dusty plasma is presented. • Dust-neutral drag is first time considered with the Generalized Hydrodynamic model (GH). • Dust-neutral drag force balances the nonlinear effect of elastic stress. • Localized non-propagating monopole structure is generated for some duration. • Dipole vortices are produced after interaction between two monopole vortices.

  8. A note on the time evolution of generalized coherent states

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Michael

    2000-01-01

    I consider the time evolution of generalized coherent states based on non-standard fiducial vectors, and show that only for a restricted class of fiducial vectors does the associated classical motion determine the quantum evolution of the states. I discuss some consequences of this for path integral representations.

  9. Entropy, biological evolution and the psychological arrow of time

    CERN Document Server

    Heinrich, Torsten; Päs, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    We argue that in Universes where future and past differ only by the entropy content a psychological arrow of time pointing in the direction of entropy increase can arise from natural selection in biological evolution. We show that this effect can be demonstrated in very simple toy computer simulations of evolution in an entropy increasing or decreasing environment.

  10. Wakefield evolution and electron acceleration in interaction of frequency-chirped laser pulse with inhomogeneous plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei-Pandari, M.; Niknam, A. R.; Massudi, R.; Jahangiri, F.; Hassaninejad, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    The nonlinear interaction of an ultra-short intense frequency-chirped laser pulse with an underdense plasma is studied. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity and laser parameters such as chirp, pulse duration, and intensity on plasma density and wakefield evolutions, and electron acceleration are examined. It is found that a properly chirped laser pulse could induce a stronger laser wakefield in an inhomogeneous plasma and result in higher electron acceleration energy. It is also shown that the wakefield amplitude is enhanced by increasing the slope of density in the inhomogeneous plasma.

  11. Evolution of the SOL plasma background at density shoulder formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Isa, Federico Antonio; Carralero, Daniel; Lunt, Tilmann; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-12-15

    observed that filaments, namely coherent structures that enhance the transport in the outer region of Tokamaks, undergo a regime transition that enhances their transport at the outboard midplane. It is believed that inhomogeneous perpendicular transport related to the filaments is responsible for the density shoulder formation. The regime transition occurs because of the increase of the global collisionality. Since the plasma parameters (n{sub e},T{sub e}) change significantly along a field line it is needed a full description of the plasma in the SOL in order to study where such increase of the collisionaly takes place. The first part of this work is focused on use EMC3-EIRENE simulations, in continuation of previous work, to provide a detailed 3D plasma background of the SOL condition in two different L-mode discharges carried out in the ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak, featuring different different degrees of shoulder formation: case A (simulation of discharge 29231) in which no shoulder is observed and case B (simulation of discharge 29887) after the transition. In the simulation, cross field transport is described by the perpendicular particle and energy diffusive time independent transport coefficients: D {sub perpendicular} {sub to}, χ {sup e,i} {sub perpendicular} {sub to}. The simulations are compared with the experimental measurements at the midplane, the X-point and the divertor targets. The comparison shows that previous simulations of case B strongly underestimate the electron and ion temperatures. In order to improve the simulation results and provide a realistic description of the SOL plasma background several simulations are performed. As a result, the final agreement between experimental measurement and numerical results has been improved with respect to the original work. The simulations show that: - It is possible to simulate the density shoulder formation by increasing transport a factor of 3 only at the outer midplane, in good agreement with the experimental

  12. Experimental determination of the weld penetration evolution in keyhole plasma arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Qingxian; Wu Chuansong; Zhang Yuming

    2007-01-01

    Keyhole plasma arc welding experiments are conducted to measure the weld geometry and penetration at different moments during the initial phase from igniting arc to quasi-steady state. Indirect information on keyhole formation and evolution in plasma arc welding can be extracted based on the weld macrophotograph at cross section. It has laid foundation to verify the mathematical models of keyhole plasma arc welding.

  13. On Reduced Time Evolution for Initially Correlated Pure States

    CERN Document Server

    Aniello, P; Marmo, G; Ventriglia, F; Vitale, P

    2009-01-01

    A new method to deal with reduced dynamics of open systems by means of the Schr\\"odinger equation is presented. It allows one to consider the reduced time evolution for correlated and uncorrelated initial conditions.

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor-Instability Evolution in Colliding-Plasma-Jet Experiments with Magnetic and Viscous Stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Colin Stuart [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability causes mixing in plasmas throughout the universe, from micron-scale plasmas in inertial confinement fusion implosions to parsec-scale supernova remnants. The evolution of this interchange instability in a plasma is influenced by the presence of viscosity and magnetic fields, both of which have the potential to stabilize short-wavelength modes. Very few experimental observations of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in plasmas with stabilizing mechanisms are reported in the literature, and those that are reported are in sub-millimeter scale plasmas that are difficult to diagnose. Experimental observations in well-characterized plasmas are important for validation of computational models used to make design predictions for inertial confinement fusion efforts. This dissertation presents observations of instability growth during the interaction between a high Mach-number, initially un-magnetized plasma jet and a stagnated, magnetized plasma. A multi-frame fast camera captures Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth while interferometry, spectroscopy, photodiode, and magnetic probe diagnostics are employed to estimate plasma parameters in the vicinity of the collision. As the instability grows, an evolution to longer mode wavelength is observed. Comparisons of experimental data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization. These data provide the opportunity to benchmark computational models used in astrophysics and fusion research.

  15. Rayleigh-Taylor-instability evolution in colliding-plasma-jet experiments with magnetic and viscous stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Colin Stuart [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability causes mixing in plasmas throughout the universe, from micron-scale plasmas in inertial confinement fusion implosions to parsec-scale supernova remnants. The evolution of this interchange instability in a plasma is influenced by the presence of viscosity and magnetic fields, both of which have the potential to stabilize short-wavelength modes. Very few experimental observations of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in plasmas with stabilizing mechanisms are reported in the literature, and those that are reported are in sub-millimeter scale plasmas that are difficult to diagnose. Experimental observations in well-characterized plasmas are important for validation of computational models used to make design predictions for inertial confinement fusion efforts. This dissertation presents observations of instability growth during the interaction between a high Mach-number, initially un-magnetized plasma jet and a stagnated, magnetized plasma. A multi-frame fast camera captures Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth while interferometry, spectroscopy, photodiode, and magnetic probe diagnostics are employed to estimate plasma parameters in the vicinity of the collision. As the instability grows, an evolution to longer mode wavelength is observed. Comparisons of experimental data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization. These data provide the opportunity to benchmark computational models used in astrophysics and fusion research.

  16. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION: LITERATURE REVIEW AND TIME EVOLUTION.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pintea Mirela-Oana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Performance evaluation of an economic entity requires approaching several criteria, such as industry and economic entity type, managerial and entrepreneurial strategy, competitive environment, human and material resources available, using a system of appropriate performance indicators for this purpose.The exigencies of communication occurred on the growing number of phenomena that marked the global economy in recent decades (internationalization and relocation of business crises and turmoil in financial markets, demand performance measurement to be made in a comprehensive way by financial and non-financial criteria. Indicators are measures of performance used by management to measure, report and improve performance of the economic entity. The relationship between indicators and management is ensured by the existence of performance measurement systems. Studies to date indicate that economic entities using balanced performance measurement systems as a key management tool registered superior performance compared to entities not using such systems. This study attempts to address the issue of performance evaluation by presenting opinions of different authors concerning the process of performance measurement and to present, after revising the literature, the evolution of the performance evaluation systems. We tried to do this literature review because sustainable development and, therefore, globalization require new standards of performance that exceeds the economic field, both for domestic companies as well as international ones. So, these standards should be integrated into corporate strategy development to ensure sustainability of activities undertaken by harmonizing the economic, social and environmental objectives. To assess the performance of economic entities it is required that performance evaluation to be done with a balanced multidimensional system, including both financial ratios and non-financial indicators in order to reduce the limits of

  17. Holographic Brownian motion and time scales in strongly coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atmaja, Ardian Nata [Research Center for Physics, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Kompleks PUSPITEK Serpong, Tangerang 15310 (Indonesia); Indonesia Center for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics (ICTMP), Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Boer, Jan de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Shigemori, Masaki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics (YITP), Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hakubi Center, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Ushinomiyacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    We study Brownian motion of a heavy quark in field theory plasma in the AdS/CFT setup and discuss the time scales characterizing the interaction between the Brownian particle and plasma constituents. Based on a simple kinetic theory, we first argue that the mean-free-path time is related to the connected 4-point function of the random force felt by the Brownian particle. Then, by holographically computing the 4-point function and regularizing the IR divergence appearing in the computation, we write down a general formula for the mean-free-path time, and apply it to the STU black hole which corresponds to plasma charged under three U(1)R-charges. The result indicates that the Brownian particle collides with many plasma constituents simultaneously.

  18. Recurrence for discrete time unitary evolutions

    CERN Document Server

    Grünbaum, F A; Werner, A H; Werner, R F

    2012-01-01

    We consider quantum dynamical systems specified by a unitary operator U and an initial state vector \\phi. In each step the unitary is followed by a projective measurement checking whether the system has returned to the initial state. We call the system recurrent if this eventually happens with probability one. We show that recurrence is equivalent to the absence of an absolutely continuous part from the spectral measure of U with respect to \\phi. We also show that in the recurrent case the expected first return time is an integer or infinite, for which we give a topological interpretation. A key role in our theory is played by the first arrival amplitudes, which turn out to be the (complex conjugated) Taylor coefficients of the Schur function of the spectral measure. On the one hand, this provides a direct dynamical interpretation of these coefficients; on the other hand it links our definition of first return times to a large body of mathematical literature.

  19. Chemical Evolution of Strongly Interacting Quark-Gluon Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hua Pan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At very initial stage of relativistic heavy ion collisions a wave of quark-gluon matter is produced from the break-up of the strong color electric field and then thermalizes at a short time scale (~1 fm/c. However, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP system is far out of chemical equilibrium, especially for the heavy quarks which are supposed to reach chemical equilibrium much late. In this paper a continuing quark production picture for strongly interacting QGP system is derived, using the quark number susceptibilities and the equation of state; both of them are from the results calculated by the Wuppertal-Budapest lattice QCD collaboration. We find that the densities of light quarks increase by 75% from the temperature T=400 MeV to T=150 MeV, while the density of strange quark annihilates by 18% in the temperature region. We also offer a discussion on how this late production of quarks affects the final charge-charge correlations.

  20. Mechanism of laser-induced plasma shock wave evolution in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Rui; Liang Zhong-Cheng; Han Bing; Zhang Hong-Chao; Xu Rong-Qing; Lu Jian; Ni Xiao-Wu

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to describe the mechanism of laser-induced plasma shock wave evolution in air. To verify the validity of the theoretical model, an optical beam deflection technique is employed to track the plasma shock wave evolution process. The theoretical model and the experimental signals are found to be in good agreement with each other. It is shown that the laser-induced plasma shock wave undergoes formation, increase and decay processes; the increase and the decay processes of the laser-induced plasma shock wave result from the overlapping of the compression wave and the rarefaction wave, respectively. In addition, the laser-induced plasma shock wave speed and pressure distributions, both a function of distance, are presented.

  1. Pressure-anisotropy-driven microturbulence and magnetic-field evolution in shearing, collisionless plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Melville, S; Kunz, M W

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear state of a high-beta collisionless plasma is investigated when an imposed linear shear amplifies or diminishes a uniform magnetic field, driving pressure anisotropies and hence firehose/mirror instabilities. The evolution of the resulting microscale turbulence is considered when the shear is switched off or reversed after one shear time (mimicking local behaviour of a macroscopic flow), so a new macroscale configuration is superimposed on the microscale state left behind by the previous one. There is a threshold value of plasma beta: when $\\beta\\ll\\Omega/S$ (ion cyclotron frequency/shear rate), the emergence of firehose/mirror fluctuations driven unstable by shear and their disappearance when the shear is removed/reversed are quasi-instantaneous compared to the shear time, viz., the decay time of these fluctuations is $\\sim\\beta/\\Omega \\ll 1/S$ (this result follows from the free decay of the fluctuations being constrained by the same marginal-stability thresholds as their growth). In contrast, w...

  2. Time inversion, Self-similar evolution, and Issue of time

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, D P

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the question, "how does time flow?" and show that time may change by inversions as well. We discuss its implications to a simple class of linear systems. Instead of introducing any unphysical behaviour, inversions can lead to a new multi- time scale evolutionary path for the linear system exhibiting late time stochastic fluctuations. We explain how stochastic behaviour is injected into the linear system as a combined effect of an uncertainty in the definition of inversion and the irrationality of the golden mean number. We also give an ansatz for the nonlinear stochastic behaviour of (fractal) time which facilitates us to estimate the late and short time limits of a two-time correlation function relevant for the stochastic fluctuations in linear systems. These fluctuations are shown to enjoy generic 1/f spectrum. The implicit functional definition of the fractal time is shown to satisfy the differential equation dx=dt. We also discuss the relevance of intrinsic time in the present formalism, st...

  3. THz time-domain spectroscopy for tokamak plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causa, F.; Zerbini, M.; Buratti, P.; Gabellieri, L.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O. [ASSOCIAZIONE EURATOM ENEA sulla Fusione, C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Johnston, M. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E. [ENEA C.R. Frascati UTAPRAD, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)

    2014-08-21

    The technology is now becoming mature for diagnostics using large portions of the electromagnetic spectrum simultaneously, in the form of THz pulses. THz radiation-based techniques have become feasible for a variety of applications, e.g., spectroscopy, imaging for security, medicine and pharmaceutical industry. In particular, time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) is now being used also for plasma diagnostics in various fields of application. This technique is promising also for plasmas for fusion applications, where plasma characteristics are non-uniform and/or evolve during the discharge This is because THz pulses produced with femtosecond mode-locked lasers conveniently span the spectrum above and below the plasma frequency and, thus, can be used as very sensitive and versatile probes of widely varying plasma parameters. The short pulse duration permits time resolving plasma characteristics while the large frequency span permits a large dynamic range. The focus of this work is to present preliminary experimental and simulation results demonstrating that THz TDS can be realistically adapted as a versatile tokamak plasma diagnostic technique.

  4. Dynamic structure evolution of time-dependent network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beibei; Zhou, Yadong; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dai; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we research the long-voided problem of formulating the time-dependent network structure evolution scheme, it focus not only on finding new emerging vertices in evolving communities and new emerging communities over the specified time range but also formulating the complex network structure evolution schematic. Previous approaches basically applied to community detection on time static networks and thus failed to consider the potentially crucial and useful information latently embedded in the dynamic structure evolution process of time-dependent network. To address these problems and to tackle the network non-scalability dilemma, we propose the dynamic hierarchical method for detecting and revealing structure evolution schematic of the time-dependent network. In practice and specificity, we propose an explicit hierarchical network evolution uncovering algorithm framework originated from and widely expanded from time-dependent and dynamic spectral optimization theory. Our method yields preferable results compared with previous approaches on a vast variety of test network data, including both real on-line networks and computer generated complex networks.

  5. Plasma Formation and Evolution on Cu, Al, Ti, and Ni Surfaces Driven by a Mega-Ampere Current Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Kevin C.

    Metal alloy mm-diameter rods have been driven by a 1-MA, 100-ns current pulse from the Zebra z-pinch. The intense current produces megagauss surface magnetic fields that diffuse into the load, ohmically heating the metal until plasma forms. Because the radius is much thicker than the skin depth, the magnetic field reaches a much higher value than around a thin-wire load. With the "barbell" load design, plasma formation in the region of interest due to contact arcing or electron avalanche is avoided, allowing for the study of ohmically heated loads. Work presented here will show first evidence of a magnetic field threshold for plasma formation in copper 101, copper 145, titanium, and nickel, and compare with previous work done with aluminum. Copper alloys 101 and 145, titanium grade II, and nickel alloy 200 form plasma when the surface magnetic field reaches 3.5, 3.0, 2.2, and 2.6 megagauss, respectively. Varying the element metal, as well as the alloy, changes multiple physical properties of the load and affects the evolution of the surface material through the multiple phase changes. Similarities and differences between these metals will be presented, giving motivation for continued work with different material loads. During the current rise, the metal is heated to temperatures that cause multiple phase changes. When the surface magnetic field reaches a threshold, the metal ionizes and the plasma becomes pinched against the underlying cooler, dense material. Diagnostics fielded have included visible light radiometry, two-frame shadowgraphy (266 and 532 nm wavelengths), time-gated EUV spectroscopy, single-frame/2ns gated imaging, and multi-frame/4ns gated imaging with an intensified CCD camera (ICCD). Surface temperature, expansion speeds, instability growth, time of plasma formation, and plasma uniformity are determined from the data. The time-period of potential plasma formation is scrutinized to understand if and when plasma forms on the surface of a heated

  6. Time Delay Evolution of Five Active Galactic Nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Kovačević; L. Č. Popović; A. I. Shapovalova; D. Ilić; A. N. Burenkov; V. H. Chavushyan

    2015-12-01

    Here we investigate light curves of the continuum and emission lines of five type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN) from our monitoring campaign, to test time-evolution of their time delays. Using both modeled and observed AGN light curves, we apply Gaussian kernel-based estimator to capture variation of local patterns of their time evolving delays. The largest variations of time delays of all objects occur in the period when continuum or emission lines luminosity is the highest. However, Gaussian kernel-based method shows instability in the case of NGC 5548, 3C 390.3, E1821+643 and NGC 4051 possibly due to numerical discrepancies between damped random walk (DRW) time scale of light curves and sliding time windows of the method. The temporal variations of time lags of Arp 102B can correspond to the real nature of the time lag evolution.

  7. On the time delay evolution of five Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kovacevic, Andjelka; Shapovalova, Alla I; Ilic, Dragana; Burenkov, Aleksandr N; Chavushyan, Vahram H

    2015-01-01

    Here we investigate light curves of the continuum and emission lines of five type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN) from our monitoring campaign, to test time-evolution of their time delays.Using both modeled and observed AGN light curves we apply Gaussian-kernel based estimator to capture variation of local patterns of their time evolving delays. The largest variations of time delays of all objects occur in the period when continuum or emission lines luminosity is the highest. However, Gaussian kernel based method shows instability in the case of NGC 5548, 3C 390.3, E1821+643 and NGC 4051 possible due to numerical discrepancies between Damped Random Walk (DRW) time scale of light curves and sliding time windows of the method. The temporal variations of time lags of Arp 102B can correspond to the real nature of the time lag evolution.

  8. Temporal Evolution of the Plasma Sheath Surrounding Solar Cells in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Emily M.; Pour, Maria Z. A.

    2017-01-01

    High voltage solar array interactions with the space environment can have a significant impact on array performance and spacecraft charging. Over the past 10 years, data from the International Space Station has allowed for detailed observations of these interactions over long periods of time. Some of the surprising observations have been floating potential transients, which were not expected and are not reproduced by existing models. In order to understand the underlying processes producing these transients, the temporal evolution of the plasma sheath surrounding the solar cells in low Earth orbit is being investigated. This study includes lumped element modeling and particle-in-cell simulation methods. This presentation will focus on recent results from the on-going investigations.

  9. Time evolution of the wave equation using rapid expansion method

    KAUST Repository

    Pestana, Reynam C.

    2010-07-01

    Forward modeling of seismic data and reverse time migration are based on the time evolution of wavefields. For the case of spatially varying velocity, we have worked on two approaches to evaluate the time evolution of seismic wavefields. An exact solution for the constant-velocity acoustic wave equation can be used to simulate the pressure response at any time. For a spatially varying velocity, a one-step method can be developed where no intermediate time responses are required. Using this approach, we have solved for the pressure response at intermediate times and have developed a recursive solution. The solution has a very high degree of accuracy and can be reduced to various finite-difference time-derivative methods, depending on the approximations used. Although the two approaches are closely related, each has advantages, depending on the problem being solved. © 2010 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  10. Time rescaling and pattern formation in biological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2014-09-01

    Biological evolution is analyzed as a process of continuous measurement in which biosystems interpret themselves in the environment resulting in changes of both. This leads to rescaling of internal time (heterochrony) followed by spatial reconstructions of morphology (heterotopy). The logical precondition of evolution is the incompleteness of biosystem's internal description, while the physical precondition is the uncertainty of quantum measurement. The process of evolution is based on perpetual changes in interpretation of information in the changing world. In this interpretation the external biospheric gradients are used for establishment of new features of organization. It is concluded that biological evolution involves the anticipatory epigenetic changes in the interpretation of genetic symbolism which cannot generally be forecasted but can provide canalization of structural transformations defined by the existing organization and leading to predictable patterns of form generation.

  11. The influence of gas-kinetic evolution on plasma reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Diver, D A; MacLachlan, C S; Potts, H E

    2008-01-01

    Plasmas in which there is a threshold for a dominant reaction to take place (such as recombination or attachment) will have particle distributions that evolve as the reaction progresses. The form of the Boltzmann collision term in such a context will cause the distribution to drift from its initial form, and so cause for example temperature fluctuations in the plasma if the distribution is originally Maxwellian. This behaviour will impact on the relevant reaction rates in a feedback loop that is missing from simple chemical kinetic descriptions since the plasma cannot be considered to be isothermal, as is the case in the latter approach. In this article we present a simple kinetic model that captures these essential features, showing how cumulative differences in the instantaneous species levels can arise over the purely chemical kinetic description, with implications for process yields and efficiencies.

  12. Angular momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Bouteiller, M Le; Phuoc, K Ta; Davoine, X; Rax, J -M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extend in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for non-planar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in laser- plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  13. Angular-momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-09-27

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  14. Angular-Momentum Evolution in Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.135002

    2013-01-01

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  15. Shock Formation in Electron-Ion Plasmas: Mechanism and Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bret, Antoine; Stockem Novo, Anne; Ricardo, Fonseca; Luis, Silva

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the formation of a collisionless shock in electron-ion plasmas in theory and simulations. In initially un-magnetized relativistic plasmas, such shocks are triggered by the Weibel instability. While in pair plasmas the shock starts forming right after the instability saturates, it is not so in electron-ion plasmas because the Weibel filaments at saturation are too small. An additional merging phase is therefore necessary for them to efficiently stop the flow. We derive a theoretical model for the shock formation time, taking into account filament merging in the nonlinear phase of the Weibel instability. This process is much slower than in electron-positron pair shocks, and so the shock formation is longer by a factor proportional to √{mi /me } ln(mi /me).

  16. Spectral evolution of two-dimensional kinetic plasma turbulence in the wavenumber-frequency domain

    CERN Document Server

    Comişel, H; Narita, Y; Motschmann, U

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for studying the evolution of plasma turbulence by tracking dispersion relations in the energy spectrum in the wavenumber-frequency domain. We apply hybrid plasma simulations in a simplified two-dimensional geometry to demonstrate our method and its applicability to plasma turbulence in the ion kinetic regime. We identify four dispersion relations: ion-Bernstein waves, oblique whistler waves, oblique Alfv\\'en/ion-cyclotron waves, and a zero-frequency mode. The energy partition and frequency broadening are evaluated for these modes. The method allows us to determine the evolution of decaying plasma turbulence in our restricted geometry and shows that it cascades along the dispersion relations during the early phase with an increasing broadening around the dispersion relations.

  17. Quantum Dynamics in Classical Time Evolution of Correlation Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Wetterich, C

    1997-01-01

    The time-dependence of correlation functions under the influence of cla= ssical equations of motion is described by an exact evolution equation. For conservative systems thermodynamic equilibrium is a fixed point of these equations. We show that this fixed point is not universally stable, since infinitely many conserved correlation functions obstruct the approach to equilibrium. Equilibrium can therefore be reached at most for suitably av= eraged quantities or for subsystems, similar to quantum statistics. The classica= l time evolution of correlation functions shows many dynamical features of quant= um mechanics.

  18. Level crossings, excess times and transient plasma-wall interactions in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsen, Audun

    2016-01-01

    Based on a stochastic model for intermittent fluctuations in the boundary region of magnetically confined plasmas, an expression for the level crossing rate is derived from the joint distribution of the process and its derivative. From this the average time spent by the process above a certain threshold level is obtained. This provides novel predictions of plasma-wall interactions due to transient transport events associated with radial motion of blob-like structures in the scrape-off layer.

  19. Determination of electron temperature temporal evolution in laser-induced plasmas through Independent Component Analysis and 3D Boltzmann plot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredice, F.; Pacheco Martinez, P.; Sarmiento Mercado, R.; Sánchez-Aké, C.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.; Sirven, J. B.; El Rakwe, M.; Grifoni, E.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Pagnotta, S.; Palleschi, V.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we present the application of Independent Component Analysis to a set of time-resolved LIBS spectra, acquired on a brass sample at different delay times. The decomposition of the LIBS spectra in few Independent Components with a given temporal evolution is then exploited for obtaining the temporal evolution of the plasma electron temperature, through the application of the three-dimensional Boltzmann plot method recently proposed by the authors. This method allows the determination of the electron temperature temporal evolution without any knowledge of the spectral parameters (transition probability, degeneracy of the levels, etc.…) of the emitting lines. Only the knowledge of the energy of the upper level of the transition is required. The reduction of the LIBS spectral dataset to few Independent Components and associated proportions, further simplifies the determination of the plasma electron temperature temporal evolution, since the intensity of the emission lines does not need to be calculated. The results obtained are compared with the ones obtained using classical two-dimensional Boltzmann plot approach.

  20. Study on Performance Parameters of the Plasma Source for a Short-Conduction-Time Plasma Opening Switch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Weixi; ZENG Zhengzhong; WANG Liangping; LEI Tianshi; HU Yixiang; HUANG Tao; SUN Tieping

    2012-01-01

    Plasma source performance parameters, including plasma ejection density and velocity, greatly affect the operation of a short-conduction-time plasma opening switch (POS). In this paper, the plasma source used in the POS of Qiangguang I generator is chosen as the study object. At first the POS working process is analyzed. The result shows that the opening performance of the POS can be improved by increasing the plasma ejection velocity and decreasing the plasma density. The influence of the cable plasma gun structure and number on the plasma ejection parameters is experimentally investigated with two charge collectors. Finally a semi-empirical model is proposed to describe the experimental phenomenon.

  1. Time Evolution in the external field problem of Quantum Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarovici, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    A general problem of quantum field theories is the fact that the free vacuum and the vacuum for an interacting theory belong to different, non-equivalent representations of the canonical (anti-)commutation relations. In the external field problem of QED, we encounter this problem in the form that the Dirac time evolution for an external field with non-vanishing magnetic components will not satisfy the Shale-Stinespring condition, known to be necessary and sufficient for the existence of an implementation on the fermionic Fock space. Therefore, a second quantization of the time evolution in the usual way is impossible. In this thesis, we present several rigorous approaches to QED with time-dependent, external fields and analyze in what sense a time evolution can exist in the second quantized theory. We study different constructions of the fermionic Fock space and prove their equivalence. We study and compare the results of Deckert et. al. (2010), where the time evolution is realized as unitary transformations ...

  2. Piezospectroscopic measurements capturing the evolution of plasma spray-coating stresses with substrate loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freihofer, Gregory; Fugon-Dessources, Daniela; Ergin, Emrecan; Van Newkirk, Amy; Gupta, Ankur; Seal, Sudipta; Schülzgen, Axel; Raghavan, Seetha

    2014-02-12

    Plasma-spray coatings have a unique microstructure composed of various types of microcracks and weakly bonded interfaces which dictate their nonlinear mechanical properties. The intrinsic photo-luminescence (PL) characteristics of alpha-alumina (α-Al2O3) within these coatings offer a diagnostic functionality, enabling these properties to be probed experimentally at the microscale, under substrate loading. The piezospectroscopic (PS) measurements from the coatings are capable of revealing microstructural stress at high spatial resolution. Here, for the first time, the evolution of stresses within air plasma spray (APS) coatings under increasing substrate loads were captured using piezospectroscopy. With mechanical cycling of the substrate, the PS properties revealed anelastic and inelastic behavior and a relaxation of residual tensile stress within the APS coatings. With decreasing substrate thickness, the coating was observed to sustain more stress, as the substrate's influence on the mechanical behavior decreased. The findings provide an insight into the microstructural response that can serve as the basis for model validation and subsequently drive the design process for these coatings.

  3. Unifying time evolution and optimization with matrix product states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegeman, Jutho; Lubich, Christian; Oseledets, Ivan; Vandereycken, Bart; Verstraete, Frank

    2016-10-01

    We show that the time-dependent variational principle provides a unifying framework for time-evolution methods and optimization methods in the context of matrix product states. In particular, we introduce a new integration scheme for studying time evolution, which can cope with arbitrary Hamiltonians, including those with long-range interactions. Rather than a Suzuki-Trotter splitting of the Hamiltonian, which is the idea behind the adaptive time-dependent density matrix renormalization group method or time-evolving block decimation, our method is based on splitting the projector onto the matrix product state tangent space as it appears in the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational principle. We discuss how the resulting algorithm resembles the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm for finding ground states so closely that it can be implemented by changing just a few lines of code and it inherits the same stability and efficiency. In particular, our method is compatible with any Hamiltonian for which ground-state DMRG can be implemented efficiently. In fact, DMRG is obtained as a special case of our scheme for imaginary time evolution with infinite time step.

  4. Time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy of pulsed plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adámek, P; Olejníček, J; Čada, M; Kment, Š; Hubička, Z

    2013-07-15

    A method for time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been developed. In this Letter, we describe in detail a developed electronic module that controls the time resolution of the LAS system. The transistor-transistor logic signal triggering the plasma pulse is used for generation of two signals: the first one triggers fine tuning of the laser wavelength and the second one controls time-defined signal sampling from the absorption detector. The described method and electronic system enable investigation of the temporal evolution of the density and temperature of selected particles in technological plasma systems. The high-power impulse magnetron sputtering system with a period of 10 ms and a duty cycle of 1% has been used to verify this method. The temporal evolution of argon metastable density was measured in the active part of the pulse and in the afterglow. The resulting density of Ar* displays a double-peak structure with a first peak in the plasma "ON" phase and a second peak in the afterglow approximately 1 ms after the end of the pulse.

  5. Real-Time Fault Classification for Plasma Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Yang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasma process tools, which usually cost several millions of US dollars, are often used in the semiconductor fabrication etching process. If the plasma process is halted due to some process fault, the productivity will be reduced and the cost will increase. In order to maximize the product/wafer yield and tool productivity, a timely and effective fault process detection is required in a plasma reactor. The classification of fault events can help the users to quickly identify fault processes, and thus can save downtime of the plasma tool. In this work, optical emission spectroscopy (OES is employed as the metrology sensor for in-situ process monitoring. Splitting into twelve different match rates by spectrum bands, the matching rate indicator in our previous work (Yang, R.; Chen, R.S. Sensors 2010, 10, 5703-5723 is used to detect the fault process. Based on the match data, a real-time classification of plasma faults is achieved by a novel method, developed in this study. Experiments were conducted to validate the novel fault classification. From the experimental results, we may conclude that the proposed method is feasible inasmuch that the overall accuracy rate of the classification for fault event shifts is 27 out of 28 or about 96.4% in success.

  6. Real-time fault classification for plasma processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ryan; Chen, Rongshun

    2011-01-01

    Plasma process tools, which usually cost several millions of US dollars, are often used in the semiconductor fabrication etching process. If the plasma process is halted due to some process fault, the productivity will be reduced and the cost will increase. In order to maximize the product/wafer yield and tool productivity, a timely and effective fault process detection is required in a plasma reactor. The classification of fault events can help the users to quickly identify fault processes, and thus can save downtime of the plasma tool. In this work, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is employed as the metrology sensor for in-situ process monitoring. Splitting into twelve different match rates by spectrum bands, the matching rate indicator in our previous work (Yang, R.; Chen, R.S. Sensors 2010, 10, 5703-5723) is used to detect the fault process. Based on the match data, a real-time classification of plasma faults is achieved by a novel method, developed in this study. Experiments were conducted to validate the novel fault classification. From the experimental results, we may conclude that the proposed method is feasible inasmuch that the overall accuracy rate of the classification for fault event shifts is 27 out of 28 or about 96.4% in success.

  7. Evolution of Modulated Dispersive Electron Waves in a Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugai, H.; Lynov, Jens-Peter; Michelsen, Poul

    1979-01-01

    The linear propagation of amplitude-modulated electron waves was examined in a low-density Q-machine plasma. Three effects of the strong dispersion on the modulated wave have been demonstrated: (i) a wavepacket expands along its direction of propagation, followed by a shift of the frequency through...... the wavepacket, (ii) the number of oscillations in the temporally observed packet is not identical with that in the spatially observed packet and (iii) continuously modulated waves exhibit recurrence of modulation. The experimental results agree with both a simple analysis based on the Schrodinger equation...

  8. Inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for beam plasma research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yushkov, Yu. G., E-mail: yuyushkov@gmail.com; Zolotukhin, D. B.; Tyunkov, A. V. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Savkin, K. P. [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15

    The paper describes the design and principle of operation of an inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for research in the plasma produced by an electron beam in the forevacuum pressure range (5–20 Pa). In the spectrometer, the deflecting plates as well as the drift tube and the primary ion beam measuring system are at high potential with respect to ground. This provides the possibility to measure the mass-charge constitution of the plasma created by a continuous electron beam with a current of up to 300 mA and electron energy of up to 20 keV at forevacuum pressures in the chamber placed at ground potential. Research results on the mass-charge state of the beam plasma are presented and analyzed.

  9. 2D cellular automaton model for the evolution of active region coronal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fuentes, Marcelo López

    2016-01-01

    We study a 2D cellular automaton (CA) model for the evolution of coronal loop plasmas. The model is based on the idea that coronal loops are made of elementary magnetic strands that are tangled and stressed by the displacement of their footpoints by photospheric motions. The magnetic stress accumulated between neighbor strands is released in sudden reconnection events or nanoflares that heat the plasma. We combine the CA model with the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL) model to compute the response of the plasma to the heating events. Using the known response of the XRT telescope on board Hinode we also obtain synthetic data. The model obeys easy to understand scaling laws relating the output (nanoflare energy, temperature, density, intensity) to the input parameters (field strength, strand length, critical misalignment angle). The nanoflares have a power-law distribution with a universal slope of -2.5, independent of the input parameters. The repetition frequency of nanoflares, expressed in t...

  10. Evolution of laser induced electromagnetic postsolitons in multi-species plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yue, E-mail: yue.liu@eli-beams.eu; Gu, Yanjun; Weber, Stefan; Korn, Georg [Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Klimo, Ondřej [Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague 11519 (Czech Republic); Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Bulanov, Sergei V. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The evolution of an s-polarized relativistic electromagnetic soliton created in multi-species plasma by an intense short laser pulse is investigated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The multi-component plasma consists of electrons and high-Z ions with a small addition of protons. By comparison, the evolution of postsoliton is very different from that in hydrogen plasma. A halo-like structure is found in spatial patterns of both electromagnetic fields and electron densities. The process of energy depletion is much slower due to the smaller charge-to-mass ratio of ions, which implies a better way of detecting postsolitons in simulations and experiments. In addition, it is found that the Coulomb explosion of high-Z ions in the postsoliton stage facilitates low-Z ion acceleration, and the maximum energy of low-Z ions increases with the component ratio of high-Z to low-Z ions.

  11. Time evolution of damage in thermally induced creep rupture

    KAUST Repository

    Yoshioka, N.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of a bundle of fibers subject to a constant external load. Breaking events are initiated by thermally induced stress fluctuations followed by load redistribution which subsequently leads to an avalanche of breakings. We compare analytic results obtained in the mean-field limit to the computer simulations of localized load redistribution to reveal the effect of the range of interaction on the time evolution. Focusing on the waiting times between consecutive bursts we show that the time evolution has two distinct forms: at high load values the breaking process continuously accelerates towards macroscopic failure, however, for low loads and high enough temperatures the acceleration is preceded by a slow-down. Analyzing the structural entropy and the location of consecutive bursts we show that in the presence of stress concentration the early acceleration is the consequence of damage localization. The distribution of waiting times has a power law form with an exponent switching between 1 and 2 as the load and temperature are varied.

  12. Evolution of plasma parameters in an Ar-N2/He inductive plasma source with magnetic pole enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Younus; N, U. Rehman; M, Shafiq; M, Naeem; M, Zaka-Ul-Islam; M, Zakaullah

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic pole enhanced inductively coupled plasmas (MaPE-ICPs) are a promising source for plasma-based etching and have a wide range of material processing applications. In the present study Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy were used to monitor the evolution of plasma parameters in a MaPE-ICP Ar-N2/He mixture plasma. Electron density ({n}{{e}}) and temperature ({T}{{e}}), excitation temperature ({T}{{exc}}), plasma potential ({V}{{p}}), skin depth (δ ) and the evolution of the electron energy probability function (EEPF) are reported as a function of radiofrequency (RF) power, pressure and argon concentration in the mixture. It is observed that {n}{{e}} increases while {T}{{e}} decreases with increase in RF power and argon concentration in the mixture. The emission intensity of the argon line at 750.4 nm is also used to monitor the variation of the ‘high-energy tail’ of the EEPF with RF power and gas pressure. The EEPF has a ‘bi-Maxwellian’ distribution at low RF powers and higher pressure in a pure {{{N}}}2 discharge. However, it evolves into a ‘Maxwellian’ distribution at RF powers greater than 70 W for pure {{{N}}}2, and at 50 W for higher argon concentrations in the mixture. The effect of argon concentration on the temperatures of two electron groups in the ‘bi-Maxwellian’ EEPF is examined. The temperature of the low-energy electron group {T}{{L}} shows a decreasing trend with argon addition until the ‘thermalization’ of the two temperatures occurs, while the temperature of high-energy electrons {T}{{H}} decreases continuously.

  13. Real-time Numerical Solution for the Plasma Response Matrix for Disruption Avoidance in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Alexander; Kolemen, Egemen; Glasser, A. H.

    2016-10-01

    Real-time analysis of plasma stability is essential to any active feedback control system that performs ideal MHD disruption avoidance. Due to singularities and poor numerical conditioning endemic to ideal MHD models of tokamak plasmas, current state-of-the-art codes require serial operation, and are as yet inoperable on the sub- O (1s) timescale required by ITER's MHD evolution time. In this work, low-toroidal-n ideal MHD modes are found in near real-time as solutions to a well-posed boundary value problem. Using a modified parallel shooting technique and linear methods to subdue numerical instability, such modes are integrated with parallelization across spatial and ``temporal'' parts, via a Riccati approach. The resulting state transition matrix is shown to yield the desired plasma response matrix, which describes how magnetic perturbations may be employed to maintain plasma stability. Such an algorithm may be helpful in designing a control system to achieve ITER's high-performance operational objectives. Sponsored by US DOE under DE-SC0015878 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  14. Observation of Rayleigh-Taylor-Instability Evolution in a Plasma Regime Expected to Provide Magnetic and Viscous Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Colin S; Hsu, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    We present time-resolved observations of Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth at the interface between an unmagnetized plasma jet colliding with a stagnated, magnetized plasma. The observed instability growth time ($\\sim 10$ $\\mu$s) is consistent with the estimated linear Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate calculated using experimentally inferred values of density ($\\sim 10^{14}$ cm$^{-3}$) and acceleration ($10^9$ m/s$^2$). The observed instability wavelengths ($\\gtrsim 1$ cm) are consistent with stabilization of short wavelengths by a magnetic field of the experimentally measured magnitude ($\\sim 15$ G) and direction. Comparisons of data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization.

  15. Characterization of a microsecond-conduction-time plasma opening switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commisso, R. J.; Goodrich, P. J.; Grossmann, J. M.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Weber, B. V.

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents data and analyses from which emerges a physical picture of microsecond-conduction-time plasma opening switch operation. During conduction, a broad current channel penetrates axially through the plasma, moving it toward the load. Opening occurs when the current channel reaches the load end of the plasma, far from the load. During conduction, the axial line density in the interelectrode region is reduced from its value with no current conduction as a result of radial hydrodynamic forces associated with the current channel. A factor of 20 reduction is observed at opening in a small, localized region between the electrodes. When open, the switch plasma behaves like a section of magnetically insulated transmission line with an effective gap of 2 to 3 mm. Increasing the magnetic field in this gap by 50% results in an improvement of 50% in the peak load voltage and load current rise time, to 1.2 MV and 20 nsec, respectively. An erosion opening mechanism explains the inferred gap growth rate using the reduced line density at opening. Improved switch performance results when the maximum gap size is increased by using a rising load impedance.

  16. Surface morphology evolution during plasma etching of silicon: roughening, smoothing and ripple formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kouichi; Nakazaki, Nobuya; Tsuda, Hirotaka; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji

    2017-10-01

    Atomic- or nanometer-scale roughness on feature surfaces has become an important issue to be resolved in the fabrication of nanoscale devices in industry. Moreover, in some cases, smoothing of initially rough surfaces is required for planarization of film surfaces, and controlled surface roughening is required for maskless fabrication of organized nanostructures on surfaces. An understanding, under what conditions plasma etching results in surface roughening and/or smoothing and what are the mechanisms concerned, is of great technological as well as fundamental interest. In this article, we review recent developments in the experimental and numerical study of the formation and evolution of surface roughness (or surface morphology evolution such as roughening, smoothing, and ripple formation) during plasma etching of Si, with emphasis being placed on a deeper understanding of the mechanisms or plasma–surface interactions that are responsible for. Starting with an overview of the experimental and theoretical/numerical aspects concerned, selected relevant mechanisms are illustrated and discussed primarily on the basis of systematic/mechanistic studies of Si etching in Cl-based plasmas, including noise (or stochastic roughening), geometrical shadowing, surface reemission of etchants, micromasking by etch inhibitors, and ion scattering/chanelling. A comparison of experiments (etching and plasma diagnostics) and numerical simulations (Monte Carlo and classical molecular dynamics) indicates a crucial role of the ion scattering or reflection from microscopically roughened feature surfaces on incidence in the evolution of surface roughness (and ripples) during plasma etching; in effect, the smoothing/non-roughening condition is characterized by reduced effects of the ion reflection, and the roughening-smoothing transition results from reduced ion reflections caused by a change in the predominant ion flux due to that in plasma conditions. Smoothing of initially rough

  17. The Evolution of Galaxy Clusters Across Cosmic Time

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaud, M; Jones, C; McNamara, B; Ohashi, T; Patnaude, D; Arnaud, K; Bautz, M; Blanchard, A; Bregman, J; Chartas, G; Croston, J; David, L; Donahue, M; Fabian, A; Finoguenov, A; Furuzawa, A; Gallagher, S; Haba, Y; Hornschemeier, A; Heinz, S; Kaastra, J; Kapferer, W; Lamer, G; Mahdavi, A; Makishima, K; Matsushita, K; Nakazawa, K; Nulsen, P; Ogle, P; Perlman, E; Ponman, T; Proga, D; Pratt, G; Randall, S; Richards, G; Romer, K; Ruszkowski, M; Schmidt, R; Smith, R; Tananbaum, H; Vrtilek, J; Worrall, D

    2009-01-01

    The large scale structure of the present Universe is determined by the growth of dark matter density fluctuations and by the dynamical action of dark energy and dark matter. While much progress has been made in recent years in constraining the cosmological parameters, and in reconstructing the evolution in the large--scale structure of the dark matter distribution, we still lack an understanding of the evolution of the baryonic component of the Universe. Located at nodes of the cosmic web, clusters of galaxies are the largest collapsed structures in the Universe with total masses up to 10$^{15}$ M$_{\\sun}$. Over 80% of their mass resides in the form of dark matter. The remaining mass is composed of baryons, most of which (about 85%) is a diffuse, hot plasma that radiates primarily in X-rays. X-ray observations of the evolving cluster population provide a unique opportunity to address such open and fundamental questions as: How do hot diffuse baryons dynamically evolve in dark matter potentials? How and when w...

  18. Continuous Time Random Walks for the Evolution of Lagrangian Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Dentz, Marco; Comolli, Alessandro; Borgne, Tanguy Le; Lester, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    We develop a continuous time random walk (CTRW) approach for the evolution of Lagrangian velocities in steady heterogeneous flows based on a stochastic relaxation process for the streamwise particle velocities. This approach describes persistence of velocities over a characteristic spatial scale, unlike classical random walk methods, which model persistence over a characteristic time scale. We first establish the relation between Eulerian and Lagrangian velocities for both equidistant and isochrone sampling along streamlines, under transient and stationary conditions. Based on this, we develop a space continuous CTRW approach for the spatial and temporal dynamics of Lagrangian velocities. While classical CTRW formulations have non-stationary Lagrangian velocity statistics, the proposed approach quantifies the evolution of the Lagrangian velocity statistics under both stationary and non-stationary conditions. We provide explicit expressions for the Lagrangian velocity statistics, and determine the behaviors of...

  19. Time evolution of dimethyl carbinol in water vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omocea, Ioana-Laura; Damian, Iulia-Rodica; Simionescu, Štefan-Mugur; Bǎlan, Corneliu; Mihǎilescu, Mona

    2015-02-01

    The paper is concerned with the experimental study of the time evolution of a single laminar vortex ring generated at the interface between water and dimethyl carbinol. The experiments were performed by the submerged injection with a constant rate of dimethyl carbinol (isopropyl alcohol) in a water tank. The dynamics of the vortex formation was recorded at 1000 fps with a Photron Fastcam SA1 camera, equipped with a microscopic Edmund Optics objective. A symmetrical buoyant vortex ring with an elongated topology was observed at the interface between the two immiscible liquids. The analyses of the time dependence of the vortex rings disclosed three regions for the evolution of the interface: one dominated by inertia force, a transition region and a third region, dominated by buoyancy force.

  20. Restudy on Time-Evolution of SUSY Dark Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Tai-Fu; LI Xue-Qian; MENG Qing-Wei; REN Zhen-Yu

    2002-01-01

    We restudy the Lee-Weinberg time-evolution equation including the R-parity violation. We carefullyanalyze the intluence of the boundary conditions, equation of state, SUSY parameters, especially the R-parity violation,and other factors on the time-evolution of the SUSY cold dark matter. Our numerical results show that without Rparity violation, only two ranges 20 < mx01 < 30 GeV and 75 < mx01 < 110 GeV can be consistent with data, if30 < mx01 < 75 GeV, there must be at least two kinds of heavy particles contributing to the cold dark matter. However,with the R-parity violation, the heavy neutralino can be dark matter constituent, but it must decay and the R-parityviolation parameter is constrained by the present data.

  1. Nonlinear evolution of the electromagnetic electron-cyclotron instability in bi-Kappa distributed plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliasson, B., E-mail: bengt.eliasson@strath.ac.uk [SUPA, Physics Department, John Anderson Building, Strathclyde University, Glasgow G4 0NG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Lazar, M., E-mail: mlazar@tp4.rub.de [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents a numerical study of the linear and nonlinear evolution of the electromagnetic electron-cyclotron (EMEC) instability in a bi-Kappa distributed plasma. Distributions with high energy tails described by the Kappa power-laws are often observed in collision-less plasmas (e.g., solar wind and accelerators), where wave-particle interactions control the plasma thermodynamics and keep the particle distributions out of Maxwellian equilibrium. Under certain conditions, the anisotropic bi-Kappa distribution gives rise to plasma instabilities creating low-frequency EMEC waves in the whistler branch. The instability saturates nonlinearly by reducing the temperature anisotropy until marginal stability is reached. Numerical simulations of the Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations show excellent agreement with the growth-rate and real frequency of the unstable modes predicted by linear theory. The wave-amplitude of the EMEC waves at nonlinear saturation is consistent with magnetic trapping of the electrons.

  2. Evolution of the electron temperature profile of ohmically heated plasmas in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; Arunasalam, V.; Goldston, R.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; McGuire, K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stauffer, F.J.

    1985-08-01

    Blackbody electron cyclotron emission was used to ascertain and study the evolution and behavior of the electron temperature profile in ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The emission was measured with absolutely calibrated millimeter wavelength radiometers. The temperature profile normalized to the central temperature and minor radius is observed to broaden substantially with decreasing limiter safety factor q/sub a/, and is insensitive to the plasma minor radius. Sawtooth activity was seen in the core of most TFTR discharges and appeared to be associated with a flattening of the electron temperature profile within the plasma core where q less than or equal to 1. Two types of sawtooth behavior were identified in large TFTR plasmas (minor radius, a less than or equal to 0.8 m) : a typically 35 to 40 msec period ''normal'' sawtooth, and a ''compound'' sawtooth with 70 to 80 msec period.

  3. Finite-time singularity in the evolution of hyperinflation episodes

    OpenAIRE

    Szybisz, Martin A.; Leszek Szybisz

    2008-01-01

    A model proposed by Sornette, Takayasu, and Zhou for describing hyperinflation regimes based on adaptive expectations expressed in terms of a power law which leads to a finite-time singularity is revisited. It is suggested to express the price index evolution explicitly in terms of the parameters introduced along the theoretical formulation avoiding any combination of them used in the original work. This procedure allows to study unambiguously the uncertainties of such parameters when an erro...

  4. Spectral functions and time evolution from the Chebyshev recursion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, F. Alexander; Justiniano, Jorge A.; McCulloch, Ian P.; Schollwöck, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    We link linear prediction of Chebyshev and Fourier expansions to analytic continuation. We push the resolution in the Chebyshev-based computation of T =0 many-body spectral functions to a much higher precision by deriving a modified Chebyshev series expansion that allows to reduce the expansion order by a factor ˜1/6 . We show that in a certain limit the Chebyshev technique becomes equivalent to computing spectral functions via time evolution and subsequent Fourier transform. This introduces a novel recursive time-evolution algorithm that instead of the group operator e-i H t only involves the action of the generator H . For quantum impurity problems, we introduce an adapted discretization scheme for the bath spectral function. We discuss the relevance of these results for matrix product state (MPS) based DMRG-type algorithms, and their use within the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We present strong evidence that the Chebyshev recursion extracts less spectral information from H than time evolution algorithms when fixing a given amount of created entanglement.

  5. Evolution and structure of the plasma of current sheets forming in two-dimensional magnetic fields with a null line at low initial gas ionization and their interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskaya, G. V.; Frank, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    An analysis of the experimental data obtained by holographic interferometry in our work [1] makes it possible to explain most of the observed specific features of the structure and evolution of the plasma sheets developing in a two-dimensional magnetic field with a null line in a plasma with a low initial degree of ionization (≈10-4). The following two processes are shown to play a key role here: additional gas ionization in an electric field and the peculiarities of plasma dynamics in a current sheet expanding in time.

  6. Spin Magnetohydrodynamics. Energy density and vorticity evolution in electron-ion quantum plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Trukhanova, Mariya Iv

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we explain a magneto quantum hydrodynamics (MQHD) method for the study of the quantum evolution of a system of spinning fermions in an external electromagnetic field. The fundamental equations of microscopic quantum hydrodynamics (the momentum balance equation, the energy evolution equation and the magnetic moment density equation) were derived from the many-particle microscopic Schredinger equation with a Spin-spin and Coulomb modified Hamiltonian. It has been showed that in the absence of external electromagnetic field the system of particles are subject to the usual quantum force (Bohm potential) and spin-dependent addition (Spin stress). Using the developed approach, an extended vorticity evolution equation for the quantum spinning plasma has been derived. The effects of the new spin forces and Spin-spin interaction contributions on the motion of fermions, the evolution of the magnetic moment density, the energy dynamics and vorticity generation have been predicted. The explicated MQHD appr...

  7. Evolution of local ideal helical perturbations in cylindrical plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wen-Lu; Li Ding

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of a local helical perturbation and its stability property for arbitrary magnetic shear configurations are investigated for the case of in cylindrical geometry. An analytic stability criterion has been obtained which predicts that a strong magnetic shear will enhance the instability in the positive shear region but enhance the stability in the negative shear region. The perturbations with the poloidal and toroidal perturbation mode numbers m/n = 1/1 is most unstable due to the stabilizing terms increasing with m. For m/n = 1/1 local perturbations in the conventional positivemagnetic shear (PMS) configurations, a larger qmin exhibits a weaker shear in the core and is favourable to the stability,while in the reversed magnetic shear (RMS) configurations, a larger q0 corresponds to a stronger positive shear in the middle region, which enhances the instability. No instabilities are found for m ≥ 2 local perturbations. The stability for RMS configuration is not better than that for PMS configuration.

  8. Feature Profile Evolution of SiO2 Trenches In Fluorocarbon Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Helen; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arunachalam, Valli; Rauf, Shahid; Coronell, Dan; Carroll, Carol W. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Etching of silicon microstructures for semiconductor manufacturing in chlorine plasmas has been well characterized. The etching proceeds in a two-part process, where the chlorine neutrals passivate the Si surface and then the ions etch away SiClx. However, etching in more complicated gas mixtures and materials, such as etching of SiO2 in Ar/C4F8, requires knowledge of the ion and neutral distribution functions as a function of angle and velocity, in addition to modeling the gas surface reactions. In order to address these needs, we have developed and integrated a suite of models to simulate the etching process from the plasma reactor level to the feature profile evolution level. This arrangement allows for a better understanding, control, and prediction of the influence of equipment level process parameters on feature profile evolution. We are currently using the HPEM (Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model) and PCMCM (Plasma Chemistry Monte Carlo Model) to generate plasma properties and ion and neutral distribution functions for argon/fluorocarbon discharges in a GEC Reference Cell. These quantities are then input to the feature scale model, Simulation of Profile Evolution by Level Sets (SPELS). A surface chemistry model is used to determine the interaction of the incoming species with the substrate material and simulate the evolution of the trench profile. The impact of change of gas pressure and inductive power on the relative flux of CFx and F to the wafer, the etch and polymerization rates, and feature profiles will be examined. Comparisons to experimental profiles will also be presented.

  9. Exploring the temporally resolved electron density evolution in EUV induced plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, R M; Beckers, J; Kroesen, G M W

    2014-01-01

    We measured for the first time the electron density in an Extreme Ultra-Violet induced plasma. This is achieved in a low-pressure argon plasma by using a method called microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. Good agreement is found between the measured electron density at the end of the EUV pulse and a theoretical prediction. The plasma (i.e. electron density) decays in tens of microseconds.

  10. Investigation of Vortex Structures in Gas-Discharge Nonneutral Electron Plasma: II. Vortex Formation, Evolution and Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kervalishvili, N A

    2015-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of inhomogeneities of gas-discharge nonneutral electron plasma obtained by using the nonperturbing experimental methods [N.A. Kervalishvili, arXiv:1502.02516 [physics.plasm-ph] (2015)] have been presented. Inhomogeneities are the dense solitary vortex structures stretched along the magnetic field, the lifetime of which is much greater than the time of electron-neutral collisions. The processes of formation, evolution and dynamics of vortex structures were studied. The periodic sequence of these processes is described for different geometries of discharge device.

  11. Evolution of plasma parameters in a He - N2/Ar magnetic pole enhanced inductive plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younus, Maria; Rehman, N. U.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.; Abrar, M.

    2016-02-01

    A magnetic pole enhanced inductively coupled H e - N2/A r plasma is studied at low pressure, to monitor the effects of helium mixing on plasma parameters like electron number density (ne) , electron temperature (Te) , plasma potential (Vp ) , and electron energy probability functions (EEPFs). An RF compensated Langmuir probe is employed to measure these plasma parameters. It is noted that electron number density increases with increasing RF power and helium concentration in the mixture, while it decreases with increase in filling gas pressure. On the other hand, electron temperature shows an increasing trend with helium concentration in the mixture. At low RF powers and low helium concentration in the mixture, EEPFs show a "bi-Maxwellian" distribution with pressure. While at RF powers greater than 50 W and higher helium concentration in the mixture, EEPFs evolve into "Maxwellian" distribution. The variation of skin depth with RF power and helium concentration in the mixture, and its relation with EEPF are also studied. The effect of helium concentrations on the temperatures of two electron groups ( Tb u l k and Tt a i l ) in the "bi-Maxwellian" EEPFs is also observed. The temperature of low energy electron group ( Tb u l k) shows significant increase with helium addition, while the temperature of tail electrons ( Tt a i l) increases smoothly as compared to ( Tb u l k).

  12. Time Evolution of Entanglement Entropy from Black Hole Interiors

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We compute the time-dependent entanglement entropy of a CFT which starts in relatively simple initial states. The initial states are the thermofield double for thermal states, dual to eternal black holes, and a particular pure state, dual to a black hole formed by gravitational collapse. The entanglement entropy grows linearly in time. This linear growth is directly related to the growth of the black hole interior measured along "nice" spatial slices. These nice slices probe the spacelike direction in the interior, at a fixed special value of the interior time. In the case of a two-dimensional CFT, we match the bulk and boundary computations of the entanglement entropy. We briefly discuss the long time behavior of various correlators, computed via classical geodesics or surfaces, and point out that their exponential decay comes about for similar reasons. We also present the time evolution of the wavefunction in the tensor network description.

  13. Time evolution of entanglement entropy from black hole interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Thomas; Maldacena, Juan

    2013-05-01

    We compute the time-dependent entanglement entropy of a CFT which starts in relatively simple initial states. The initial states are the thermofield double for thermal states, dual to eternal black holes, and a particular pure state, dual to a black hole formed by gravitational collapse. The entanglement entropy grows linearly in time. This linear growth is directly related to the growth of the black hole interior measured along "nice" spatial slices. These nice slices probe the spacelike direction in the interior, at a fixed special value of the interior time. In the case of a two-dimensional CFT, we match the bulk and boundary computations of the entanglement entropy. We briefly discuss the long time behavior of various correlators, computed via classical geodesics or surfaces, and point out that their exponential decay comes about for similar reasons. We also present the time evolution of the wavefunction in the tensor network description.

  14. Exact relativistic time evolution for a step potential barrier

    CERN Document Server

    Villavicencio, J

    2000-01-01

    We derive an exact analytic solution to a Klein-Gordon equation for a step potential barrier with cutoff plane wave initial conditions, in order to explore wave evolution in a classical forbidden region. We find that the relativistic solution rapidly evanesces within a depth $2x_p$ inside the potential, where $x_p$ is the penetration length of the stationary solution. Beyond the characteristic distance $2x_p$, a Sommerfeld-type precursor travels along the potential at the speed of light, $c$. However, no spatial propagation of a main wavefront along the structure is observed. We also find a non-causal time evolution of the wavefront peak. The effect is only an apparent violation of Einstein causality.

  15. The Black Hole Evolution and Space Time (BEST) Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczynski, Henric; Barthelmy, Scott; Schnittman, Jeremy; Zhang, William; Krolik, Julian; Baring, Matthew G; Treister, Ezequiel; Mushotzky, Richard; Beilicke, Matthias; Buckley, James; Cowsik, Ram; Israel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In this white paper, we discuss the concept of a next-generation X-ray mission called BEST (Black hole Evolution and Space Time). The mission concept uses a 3000 square centimeter effective area mirror (at 6 keV) to achieve unprecedented sensitivities for hard X-ray imaging spectrometry (5-70 keV) and for broadband X-ray polarimetry (2-70 keV). BEST can make substantial contributions to our understanding of the inner workings of accreting black holes, our knowledge about the fabric of extremely curved spacetime, and the evolution of supermassive black holes. BEST will allow for time resolved studies of accretion disks. With a more than seven times larger mirror area and a seven times wider bandpass than GEMS, BEST will take X-ray polarimetry to a new level: it will probe the time variability of the X-ray polarization from stellar mass and supermassive black holes, and it will measure the polarization properties in 30 independent energy bins. These capabilities will allow BEST to conduct tests of accretion dis...

  16. Testing optimality with experimental evolution: lysis time in a bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineman, Richard H; Bull, James J

    2007-07-01

    Optimality models collapse the vagaries of genetics into simple trade-offs to calculate phenotypes expected to evolve by natural selection. Optimality approaches are commonly criticized for this neglect of genetic details, but resolution of this disagreement has been difficult. The importance of genetic details may be tested by experimental evolution of a trait for which an optimality model exists and in which genetic details can be studied. Here we evolved lysis time in bacteriophage T7, a virus of Escherichia coli. Lysis time is equivalent to the age of reproduction in an organism that reproduces once and then dies. Delaying lysis increases the number of offspring but slows generation time, and this trade-off renders the optimum sensitive to environmental conditions: earlier lysis is favored when bacterial hosts are dense, later lysis is favored when hosts are sparse. In experimental adaptations, T7 evolved close to the optimum in conditions favoring early lysis but not in conditions favoring late lysis. One of the late lysis adaptations exhibited no detectable phenotypic evolution despite genetic evolution; the other evolved only partly toward the expected optimum. Overall, the lysis time of the adapted phages remained closer to their starting values than predicted by the model. From the perspective of the optimality model, the experimental conditions were expected to select changes only along the postulated trade-off, but a trait outside the trade-off evolved as well. Evidence suggests that the model's failure ultimately stems from a violation of the trade-off, rather than a paucity of mutations.

  17. Nonlinear wave evolution in VLASOV plasma: a lie-transform analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary, J.R.

    1979-08-01

    Nonlinear wave evolution in Vlasov plasma is analyzed using the Lie transform, a powerful mathematical tool which is applicable to Hamiltonian systems. The first part of this thesis is an exposition of the Lie transform. Dewar's general Lie transform theory is explained and is used to construct Deprit's Lie transform perturbation technique. The basic theory is illustrated by simple examples.

  18. There is No Deadline - Time Evolution of Wikipedia Discussions

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltenbrunner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Wikipedia articles are by definition never finished. Many of them have associated talk pages, where their content is discussed by editors. Here we analyse the evolution of these discussions to unveil temporal patterns in the interactions in such a large production community. First, we investigate peaks in the discussion activity and their relation with peaks in edits to articles; furthermore we introduce a measure to account for how fast discussions grow in complexity. The results point out the high impact of time instant specific hot topics on the amount and speed of the discussions, suggesting them as a mirror of a collective stream of consciousness.

  19. Time Evolution of Electric Fields in CDMS Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Leman, S W; Brink, P L; Cabrera, B; Chagani, H; Cherry, M; Cushman, P; Silva, E Do Couto E; Doughty, T; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Mandic, V; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Pyle, M; Reisetter, A; Resch, R; Sadoulet, B; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Tomada, A; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2011-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) utilizes large mass, 3" diameter x 1" thick target masses as particle detectors. The target is instrumented with both phonon and ionization sensors, the later providing a $\\sim$1 V cm$^{-1}$ electric field in the detector bulk. Cumulative radiation exposure which creates $\\sim 200\\times 10^6$ electron-hole pairs is sufficient to produce a comparable reverse field in the detector thereby degrading the ionization channel performance. To study this, the existing CDMS detector Monte Carlo has been modified to allow for an event by event evolution of the bulk electric field, in three spatial dimensions. Our most resent results and interpretation are discussed.

  20. Space-time isogeometric analysis of parabolic evolution problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Ulrich; Moore, Stephen E.; Neumüller, Martin

    2016-07-01

    We present and analyze a new stable space-time Isogeometric Analysis (IgA) method for the numerical solution of parabolic evolution equations in fixed and moving spatial computational domains. The discrete bilinear form is elliptic on the IgA space with respect to a discrete energy norm. This property together with a corresponding boundedness property, consistency and approximation results for the IgA spaces yields an a priori discretization error estimate with respect to the discrete norm. The theoretical results are confirmed by several numerical experiments with low- and high-order IgA spaces.

  1. Non-Markovian time evolution of an accelerated qubit

    CERN Document Server

    Moustos, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method for evaluating the response of a moving qubit detector interacting with a scalar field in Minkowski spacetime. We treat the detector as an open quantum system, but we do not invoke the Markov approximation. The evolution equations for the qubit density matrix are valid at all times, for all qubit trajectories and they incorporate non-Markovian effects. We analyze in detail the case of uniform acceleration, providing a detailed characterization of all regimes where non-Markovian effects are significant. We argue that the most stable characterization of acceleration temperature refers to the late time behavior of the detector, because interaction with the field vacuum brings the qubit to a thermal state at the Unruh temperature. In contrast, the early-time transition rate, that is invoked in most discussions of acceleration temperature, does not exhibit a thermal behavior when non-Markovian effects are taken into account. Finally, we note that the non-Markovian evolution derived here als...

  2. Study of plasma pressure evolution driven by strong picosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Wang, J. X.; Xu, Y. X.; Zhu, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Through one dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulation of strong laser interaction with the solid-density plasma, the evolution of the plasma impact pressure behind a thin foil has been investigated in details. An energy-compression mechanism has been proposed to help optimizing the laser and plasma parameters. It has been found that by using a picosecond laser with intensity 1015 W cm-2, an impact pressure as high as several hundreds of GPa order of magnitude can be obtained. The numerical analysis demonstrates that the peak pressure is mainly resulted from the ion contribution. These results are of potential application to the laser loading upon solids in order to study the material properties under extra-high dynamic pressure.

  3. Pump depletion limited evolution of the relativistic plasma wave-front in a forced laser-wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, F; Clayton, C E; Marsh, K A; Pak, A E; Ralph, J E; Joshi, C [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Lopes, N C [Grupo de Lasers e Plasmas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: cclayton@ucla.edu

    2009-02-15

    In a forced laser-wakefield accelerator experiment (Malka et al 2002 Science 298 1596) where the length of the pump laser pulse is a few plasma periods long, the leading edge of the laser pulse undergoes frequency downshifting and head erosion as the laser energy is transferred to the wake. Therefore, after some propagation distance, the group velocity of the leading edge of the pump pulse-and thus of the driven electron plasma wave-will slow down. This can have implications for the dephasing length of the accelerated electrons and therefore needs to be understood experimentally. We have carried out an experimental investigation where we have measured the velocity v{sub f} of the 'wave-front' of the plasma wave driven by a nominally 50 fs (full width half maximum), intense (a{sub 0} {approx_equal} 1), 0.815 {mu}m laser pulse. To determine the speed of the wave front, time- and space-resolved refractometry, interferometry and Thomson scattering were used. Although a laser pulse propagating through a relatively low-density plasma (n{sub e} = 1.3 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) showed no measurable changes in v{sub f} over 1.3 mm (and no accelerated electrons), a high-density plasma (n{sub e} = 5 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) generated accelerated electrons and showed a continuous change in v{sub f} as the laser pulse propagated through the plasma. Possible causes and consequences of the observed v{sub f} evolution are discussed.

  4. Time- and space-resolved spectroscopic characterization of laser-induced swine muscle tissue plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, J.J. [Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Diaz, L., E-mail: luis.diaz@csic.es [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CFMAC, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Ramirez, S. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CFMAC, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Caceres, J.O. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense, Cuidad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    The spatial-temporal evolution of muscle tissue sample plasma induced by a high-power transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO{sub 2} pulsed laser at vacuum conditions (0.1–0.01 Pa) has been investigated using high-resolution optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and imaging methods. The induced plasma shows mainly electronically excited neutral Na, K, C, Mg, H, Ca, N and O atoms, ionized C{sup +}, C{sup 2+}, C{sup 3+}, Mg{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, N{sup +}, N{sup 2+}, Ca{sup +}, O{sup +} and O{sup 2+} species and molecular band systems of CN(B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}), C{sub 2}(d{sup 3}Π{sub g}–a{sup 3}Π{sub u}), CH(B{sup 2}Σ{sup −}–X{sup 2}Π; A{sup 2}Δ–X{sup 2}Π), NH(A{sup 3}Π–X{sup 3}Σ{sup −}), OH(A{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2} Σ{sup +}), and CaOH(B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}; A{sup 2}Π–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}). Time-resolved two-dimensional emission spectroscopy is used to study the expanded distribution of different species ejected during ablation. Spatial and temporal variations of different atoms and ionic excited species are reported. Plasma parameters such as electron density and temperature were measured from the spatio-temporal analysis of different species. Average velocities of some plasma species were estimated. - Highlights: • LIBS of swine muscle tissue sample generated by CO{sub 2} laser pulses has been done for the first time. • Average velocities of some plasma species have been calculated from spatial and temporally resolved 2D OES images. • Electron density (~ 9 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) has been studied with spatial and temporal resolution. • Temporal evolution of the plasma temperature has been calculated by means of Boltzmann plots.

  5. Time Ordering Effects on Hydrogen Zeeman-Stark Line Profiles in Low-Density Magnetized Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rosato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stark broadening of hydrogen lines is investigated in low-density magnetized plasmas, at typical conditions of magnetic fusion experiments. The role of time ordering is assessed numerically, by using a simulation code accounting for the evolution of the microscopic electric field generated by the charged particles moving at the vicinity of the atom. The Zeeman effect due to the magnetic field is also retained. Lyman lines with a low principal quantum number n are first investigated, for an application to opacity calculations; next Balmer lines with successively low and high principal quantum numbers are considered for diagnostic purposes. It is shown that neglecting time ordering results in a dramatic underestimation of the Stark effect on the low-n lines. Another conclusion is that time ordering becomes negligible only when ion dynamics effects vanish, as shown in the case of high-n lines.

  6. Evolution of the notion of time in hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, T. N.

    1986-10-01

    The AGU Hydrology Section sponsored a special session on History and Heritage of Hydrology between 8:30 A.M. and 12 noon on Monday, December 9, 1985, during the Fall Meeting at San Francisco. The session was chaired by T. N. Narasimhan of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (Berkeley, Calif.). The attendance of between 100 and 120 for each talk was indicative of a healthy interest among researchers on matters related to history.The first part of the session focused attention on the theme “The Evolution of the Notion of Time in Hydrogeology.” The last two speakers addressed topics outside of this theme. Simon Ince (University of Arizona, Tucson) presented a historical account of the contributions of 19th century French scientist Barre de Saint-Venant to transient flow of water in open channels. Olaf H. Pfannkuch (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) presented a historical account of the Cult of Saint Barbara and the mining profession of medieval Europe. The following summary is restricted to an overview of those presentations that dealt with the evolution of the notion of time in hydrogeology.

  7. Feature profile evolution in plasma processing using on-wafer monitoring system

    CERN Document Server

    Samukawa, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    This book provides for the first time a good understanding of the etching profile technologies that do not disturb the plasma. Three types of sensors are introduced: on-wafer UV sensors, on-wafer charge-up sensors and on-wafer sheath-shape sensors in the plasma processing and prediction system of real etching profiles based on monitoring data. Readers are made familiar with these sensors, which can measure real plasma process surface conditions such as defect generations due to UV-irradiation, ion flight direction due to charge-up voltage in high-aspect ratio structures and ion sheath conditions at the plasma/surface interface. The plasma etching profile realistically predicted by a computer simulation based on output data from these sensors is described.

  8. Efficient numerical modelling of the emittance evolution of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehrling, T.J., E-mail: timon.mehrling@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Robson, R.E. [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, School of Natural Sciences, Griffith University, Brisbane (Australia); Erbe, J-H.; Osterhoff, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a semi-analytic numerical approach (SANA) for the rapid computation of the transverse emittance of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators in the blowout regime. The SANA method is used to model the beam emittance evolution when injected into and extracted from realistic plasma profiles. Results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations, establishing the accuracy and efficiency of the procedure. In addition, it is demonstrated that the tapering of vacuum-to-plasma and plasma-to-vacuum transitions is a viable method for the mitigation of emittance growth of beams during their injection and extraction from and into plasma cells.

  9. Evolution of the construction and performances in accordance to the applications of non-thermal plasma reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatiuc, B.; Brisset, J. L.; Astanei, D.; Ursache, M.; Mares, M.; Hnatiuc, E.; Felea, C.

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to present the evolution of the construction and performances of non-thermal plasma reactors, identifying specific requirements for various known applications, setting out quality indicators that would allow on the one hand comparing devices that use different kinds of electrical discharges but also their rigorous classification by identification of criteria in order to choose the correct cold plasma reactors for a specific application. It briefly comments the post-discharge effect but also the current dilemma on non-thermal plasma direct treatments versus indirect treatments, using plasma activated water (PAW) or plasma activated medium (PAM), promising in cancer treatment.

  10. Etching in Chlorine Discharges Using an Integrated Feature Evolution-Plasma Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Etching of semiconductor materials is reliant on plasma properties. Quantities such as ion and neutral fluxes, both in magnitude and in direction, are often determined by reactor geometry (height, radius, position of the coils, etc.) In order to obtain accurate etching profiles, one must also model the plasma as a whole to obtain local fluxes and distributions. We have developed a set of three models that simulates C12 plasmas for etching of silicon, ion and neutral trajectories in the plasma, and feature profile evolution. We have found that the location of the peak in the ion densities in the reactor plays a major role in determining etching uniformity across the wafer. For a stove top coil inductively coupled plasma (ICP), the ion density is peaked at the top of the reactor. This leads to nearly uniform neutral and ion fluxes across the wafer. A side coil configuration causes the ion density to peak near the sidewalls. Ion fluxes are thus greater toward the wall's and decrease toward the center. In addition, the ions bombard the wafer at a slight angle. This angle is sufficient to cause slanted profiles, which is highly undesirable.

  11. RAPTOR: Optimization, real-time simulation and control of the tokamak q profile evolution using a simplified transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, Federico; Sauter, Olivier; Goodman, Timothy; Paley, James

    2010-11-01

    Control of the plasma current density and safety factor profile evolution in a tokamak is crucial for accessing advanced regimes. The evolution of the current density profile is steered by a combination of inductive voltage and auxiliary current drive actuators, and is nonlinearly coupled to the evolution of the (ion/electron) temperature and density profiles. Using appropriate simplifications, a model has been obtained which can be simulated on time scales faster than the tokamak discharge itself, but still retains the essential physics describing the nonlinear coupling between the profiles. This model, dubbed RAPTOR (Rapid Plasma Transport simulatOR) has been implemented in the new real-time control system on the TCV tokamak at CRPP, and can be used for real-time reconstruction and model-based control of the q profile. It can also be used off-line to determine optimal actuator trajectories in open loop simulations to steer the plasma profiles towards their required steady-state shapes while remaining within a constrained set of allowable profiles.

  12. Influence of irradiation conditions on plasma evolution in laser-surface interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, J.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Dubreuil, B.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    1993-09-01

    The plasma plume induced by pulsed CO2 laser irradiation of a Ti target at power densities up to 4×108 W cm-2 was studied by emission spectroscopy. Time- and space-resolved measurements were performed by varying laser intensity, laser temporal pulse shape, ambient gas pressure, and the nature of the ambient gas. Experimental results are discussed by comparison with usual models. We show that shock wave and plasma propagation depend critically on the ratio Ivap/Ii, Ivap being the intensity threshold for surface vaporization and Ii the plasma ignition threshold of the ambient gas. Spectroscopic diagnostics of the helium breakdown plasma show maximum values of electron temperature and electron density in the order of kTe˜10 eV and ne=1018 cm-3, respectively. The plasma cannot be described by local thermodynamic equilibrium modeling. Nevertheless, excited metal atoms appear to be in equilibrium with electrons, hence, they can be used like a probe to measure the electron temperature. In order to get information on the role of the plasma in the laser-surface interaction, Ti surfaces were investigated by microscopy after irradiation. Thus an enhanced momentum transfer from the plasma to the target due to the recoil pressure of the breakdown plasma could be evidenced.

  13. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser-induced copper plasma by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Unnikrishnan; Kamlesh Alti; V B Kartha; C Santhosh; G P Gupta; B M Suri

    2010-06-01

    Plasma produced by a 355 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 6 ns focussed onto a copper solid sample in air at atmospheric pressure is studied spectroscopically. The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion line emissions in the time window of 300–2000 ns. An echelle spectrograph coupled with a gated intensified charge coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions. The temperature is obtained using the Boltzmann plot method and the electron density is determined using the Saha– Boltzmann equation method. Both parameters are studied as a function of delay time with respect to the onset of the laser pulse. The results are discussed. The time window where the plasma is optically thin and is also in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), necessary for the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of samples, is deduced from the temporal evolution of the intensity ratio of two Cu I lines. It is found to be 700–1000 ns.

  14. The Evolution of Galaxy Structure Over Cosmic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conselice, Christopher J.

    2014-08-01

    I present a comprehensive review of the evolution of galaxy structure in the Universe from the first galaxies currently observable at z ˜ 6 down to galaxies observable in the local Universe. Observed changes in galaxy structures reveal formation processes that only galaxy structural analyses can provide. This pedagogical review provides a detailed discussion of the major methods used to study galaxies morphologically and structurally, including the well-established visual method for morphology; Sérsic fitting to measure galaxy sizes and surface brightness profile shapes; and nonparametric structural methods [such as the concentration (C), asymmetry (A), clumpiness (S) (CAS) method and the Gini/M20 parameters, as well as newer structural indices]. These structural indices measure fundamental properties of galaxies, such as their scale, star-formation rate, and ongoing merger activity. Extensive observational results demonstrate how broad galaxy morphologies and structures change with time up to z ˜ 3, from small, compact and peculiar systems in the distant Universe to the formation of the Hubble sequence, dominated by spirals and ellipticals. Structural methods accurately identify galaxies in mergers and allow measurements of the merger history out to z ˜ 3. I depict properties and evolution of internal structures of galaxies, such as bulges, disks, bars, and at z>1 large star-forming clumps. I describe the structure and morphologies of host galaxies of active galactic nuclei and starbursts/submillimeter galaxies, along with how morphological galaxy quenching occurs. The role of environment in producing structural changes in galaxies over cosmic time is also discussed. Galaxy sizes can also change with time, with measured sizes up to a factor of 2-5 smaller at high redshift at a given stellar mass. I conclude with a discussion of how the evolving trends, in sizes, structures, and morphologies, reveal the formation mechanisms behind galaxies and provides a new

  15. Evolution of the Ainu language in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sean; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Languages evolve over space and time. Illuminating the evolutionary history of language is important because it provides a unique opportunity to shed light on the population history of the speakers. Spatial and temporal aspects of language evolution are particularly crucial for understanding demographic history, as they allow us to identify when and where the languages originated, as well as how they spread across the globe. Here we apply Bayesian phylogeographic methods to reconstruct spatiotemporal evolution of the Ainu language: an endangered language spoken by an indigenous group that once thrived in northern Japan. The conventional dual-structure model has long argued that modern Ainu are direct descendants of a single, Pleistocene human lineage from Southeast Asia, namely the Jomon people. In contrast, recent evidence from archaeological, anthropological and genetic evidence suggest that the Ainu are an outcome of significant genetic and cultural contributions from Siberian hunter-gatherers, the Okhotsk, who migrated into northern Hokkaido around 900-1600 years ago. Estimating from 19 Ainu language varieties preserved five decades ago, our analysis shows that they are descendants of a common ancestor who spread from northern Hokkaido around 1300 years ago. In addition to several lines of emerging evidence, our phylogeographic analysis strongly supports the hypothesis that recent expansion of the Okhotsk to northern Hokkaido had a profound impact on the origins of the Ainu people and their culture, and hence calls for a refinement to the dual-structure model.

  16. On the Evolution of Memory: A Time for Clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Robert Gerstner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available What was the earliest engram? Biology has evolved to encode representations of past events, and in neuroscience, we are attempting to link experience-dependent changes in molecular signaling with cellular processes that ultimately lead to behavioral output. The theory of evolution has guided biological research for decades, and since phylogenetically conserved mechanisms drive circadian rhythms, these processes may serve as common predecessors underlying more complex behavioral phenotypes. For example, the cAMP/MAPK/CREB cascade is interwoven with the clock to trigger circadian output, and is also known to affect memory formation. Time-of-day dependent changes have been observed in long-term potentiation (LTP within the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus and hippocampus, along with light-induced circadian phase resetting and fear conditioning behaviors. Together this suggests during evolution, similar processes underlying metaplasticity in more simple circuits may have been redeployed in higher-order brain regions. Therefore, this notion predicts a model that LTP and metaplasticity may exist in clock-forming circuits of lower-order species, through phylogenetically conserved pathways, leading to several testable hypotheses.

  17. Interface evolution and shear strength of Al/Ti bi-metals processed by a spark plasma sintering (SPS) apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriyev, Aslan, E-mail: aslan.miriyev@columbia.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University in the City of New York, 500 W. 120th St., Mudd 220, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Levy, Asaf; Kalabukhov, Sergey; Frage, Nachum [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, Beer Sheva 8410501 (Israel)

    2016-09-05

    Microstructural evolution of the Al/Ti bi-metal interface during heat treatment in a spark plasma sintering (SPS) apparatus was investigated under various conditions for the first time. A mechanism of interfacial layer growth was suggested based on the results of SEM, TEM and X-ray diffraction analysis. A continuous TiAl{sub 3} intermetallic layer was formed at the Al/Ti interface even after a processing time as short as about a minute. The TiAl{sub 3} layer grew mainly into the Ti part, while only a few individual grains grew into the Al part. Evolution of the interlayer was determined by Al diffusion through the (TiAl{sub 3}/TiAl{sub 3}) grain boundary. The activation energy of the process was 140 kJ/mol. The shear strength of the interface in the Al/Ti bi-metal was determined after various heat treatments. The shear strength of the bi-metal was limited by the properties of aluminum, with no effect of interlayer thickness or current mode and pulse pattern of the SPS treatment being detected. - Highlights: • Spark plasma sintering apparatus was used for heat treatment of Al/Ti bi-metals. • Microstructural evolution of Al/Ti interface during SPS treatment was investigated. • A continuous TiAl{sub 3} intermetallic layer was formed at the Al/Ti interface. • The bi-metal shear strength was limited by the properties of pure aluminum. • No effect of TiAl{sub 3} thickness or SPS current mode and pulse pattern was detected.

  18. Temporal evolution of electron density and temperature in capillary discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seong Y.; Uhm, Han S.; Kang, Hoonsoo; Lee, In W.; Suk, Hyyong

    2010-05-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a capillary discharge plasma of helium gas were carried out to obtain detailed information about dynamics of the discharge plasma column, where the fast plasma dynamics is determined by the electron density and temperature. Our measurements show that the electron density of the capillary plasma column increases sharply after gas breakdown and reaches its peak of the order of 1018 cm-3 within less than 100 ns, and then it decreases as time goes by. The result indicates that a peak electron density of 2.3×1018 cm-3 occurs about 65 ns after formation of the discharge current, which is ideal for laser wakefield acceleration experiments reported by Karsch et al. [New J. Phys. 9, 415 (2007)].

  19. Time Evolution of Elemental Ratios in Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelina, P.; Dalla, S.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    Heavy ion ratio abundances in solar energetic particle (SEP) events, e.g., Fe/O, often exhibit decreases over time. Using particle instruments on the Advanced Composition Explorer, Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft, we analyzed heavy ion data from 4 SEP events taking place between 2006 December and 2014 December. We constructed 36 different ionic pairs and studied their time evolution in each event. We quantified the temporal behavior of abundant SEP ratios by fitting the data to derive a decay time constant B. We also considered the ratio of ionic mass-to-charge for each pair, the S value given, e.g., for Fe/O by {S}{Fe/{{O}}}={(M/Q)}{Fe}/{(M/Q)}{{O}}. We found that the temporal behavior of SEP ratios is ordered by the value of S: ratios with S> 1 showed decreases over time (i.e., B 0). We plotted B as a function of S and observed a clear monotonic dependence: ratios with a large S decayed at a higher rate. A prominent discontinuity at S = 2.0 (corresponding to He/H) was found in three of the four events, suggesting anomalous behavior of protons. The X/H ratios often show an initial increase followed by a decrease, and decay at a slower rate. We discuss possible causes of the observed B versus S trends within current understanding of SEP propagation.

  20. Gut microbiota may predict host divergence time during Glires evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Qu, Jiapeng; Li, Tongtong; Yao, Minjie; Li, Jiaying; Li, Xiangzhen

    2017-03-01

    The gut microbial communities of animals play key roles in host evolution. However, the possible relationship between gut microbiota and host divergence time remains unknown. Here, we investigated the gut microbiota of eight Glires species (four lagomorph species and four rodent species) distributed throughout the Qinghai-Tibet plateau and Inner Mongolia grassland. Lagomorphs and rodents had distinct gut microbial compositions. Three out of four lagomorph species were dominated by Firmicutes, while rodents were dominated by Bacteroidetes in general. The alpha diversity values (Shannon diversity and evenness) exhibited significant differences between any two species within the lagomorphs, whereas there were no significant differences among rodents. The structure of the gut microbiota showed significant differences between lagomorphs and rodents. In addition, we calculated host phylogeny and divergence times, and used a phylogenetic approach to reconstruct how the animal gut microbiota has diverged from their ancestral species. Some core bacterial genera (e.g. Prevotella and Clostridium) shared by more than nine-tenths of all the Glires individuals associated with plant polysaccharide degradation showed marked changes within lagomorphs. Differences in Glires gut microbiota (based on weighted UniFrac and Bray-Curtis dissimilarity metrics) were positively correlated with host divergence time. Our results thus suggest the gut microbial composition is associated with host phylogeny, and further suggest that dissimilarity of animal gut microbiota may predict host divergence time. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Scalar field as a time variable during gravitational evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nakonieczna, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Using a scalar field as an intrinsic 'clock' while investigating the dynamics of gravitational systems has been successfully pursued in various researches on the border between classical and quantum gravity. The objective of our research was to check explicitly whether the scalar field can serve as a time variable during dynamical evolution of the matter-geometry system, especially in regions of high curvature, which are essential from the perspective of quantum gravity. For this purpose, we analyzed a gravitational collapse of a self-interacting scalar field within the framework of general relativity. The obtained results indicated that the hypersurfaces of constant scalar field are spacelike in dynamical regions nearby the singularities formed during the investigated process. The scalar field values change monotonically in the areas, in which the constancy hypersurfaces are spacelike.

  2. Nonconvex evolution inclusions generated by time-dependent subdifferential operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Arseni-Benou

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider nonlinear nonconvex evolution inclusions driven by time-varying subdifferentials ∂ϕ(t,x without assuming that ϕ(t,. is of compact type. We show the existence of extremal solutions and then we prove a strong relaxation theorem. Moreover, we show that under a Lipschitz condition on the orientor field, the solution set of the nonconvex problem is path-connected in C(T,H. These results are applied to nonlinear feedback control systems to derive nonlinear infinite dimensional versions of the “bang-bang principle.” The abstract results are illustrated by two examples of nonlinear parabolic problems and an example of a differential variational inequality.

  3. There’s plenty of time for evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilf, Herbert S.; Ewens, Warren J.

    2010-01-01

    Objections to Darwinian evolution are often based on the time required to carry out the necessary mutations. Seemingly, exponential numbers of mutations are needed. We show that such estimates ignore the effects of natural selection, and that the numbers of necessary mutations are thereby reduced to about K log L, rather than KL, where L is the length of the genomic “word,” and K is the number of possible “letters” that can occupy any position in the word. The required theory makes contact with the theory of radix-exchange sorting in theoretical computer science, and the asymptotic analysis of certain sums that occur there. PMID:21149677

  4. Time evolution of the autocorrelation function in dynamical replica theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, A.

    2013-04-01

    Asynchronous dynamics given by the master equation in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) spin-glass model is studied based on dynamical replica theory (DRT) with an extension to take into account the autocorrelation function. The dynamical behaviour of the system is approximately described by dynamical equations of the macroscopic quantities: magnetization, energy contributed by randomness and the autocorrelation function. The dynamical equations under the replica symmetry assumption are derived by introducing the subshell equipartitioning assumption and exploiting the replica method. The obtained dynamical equations are compared with Monte Carlo simulations, and it is demonstrated that the proposed formula describes well the time evolution of the autocorrelation function in some parameter regions. The study offers a reasonable description of the autocorrelation function in the SK spin-glass system.

  5. The evolution of interstellar clouds in a streaming hot plasma including heat conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Vieser, W

    2007-01-01

    To examine the evolution of giant molecular clouds in the stream of a hot plasma we performed two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations that take full account of self-gravity, heating and cooling effects and heat conduction by electrons. We use the thermal conductivity of a fully ionized hydrogen plasma proposed by Spitzer and a saturated heat flux according to Cowie & McKee in regions where the mean free path of the electrons is large compared to the temperature scaleheight. Significant structural and evolutionary differences occur between simulations with and without heat conduction. Dense clouds in pure dynamical models experience dynamical destruction by Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. In static models heat conduction leads to evaporation of such clouds. Heat conduction acting on clouds in a gas stream smooths out steep temperature and density gradients at the edge of the cloud because the conduction timescale is shorter than the cooling timescale. This diminishes the velocity gradient between the...

  6. The evolution of high-temperature plasma in magnetar magnetospheres and its implications for giant flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamoto, Makoto [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg D69117 (Germany); Kisaka, Shota [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, 1-1, Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Suzuki, Takeru K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Terasawa, Toshio, E-mail: makoto.takamoto@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: kisaka@post.kek.jp, E-mail: stakeru@nagoya-u.jp, E-mail: terasawa@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa city, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2014-05-20

    In this paper we propose a new mechanism describing the initial spike of giant flares in the framework of the starquake model. We investigate the evolution of a plasma on a closed magnetic flux tube in the magnetosphere of a magnetar in the case of a sudden energy release, and discuss the relationship with observations of giant flares. We perform one-dimensional, numerical simulations of the relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in Schwarzschild geometry. We assume energy is injected at the footpoints of the loop by a hot star surface containing random perturbations of the transverse velocity. Alfvén waves are generated and propagate upward, accompanying very hot plasma which is also continuously heated by nonlinearly generated compressive waves. We find that the front edges of the fireball regions collide at the top of the tube with their symmetrically launched counterparts. This collision results in an energy release that can describe the light curve of the initial spikes of giant flares.

  7. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5–7.5 × 1013 cm−3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d–4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20–40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  8. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Hayato; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sasaki, Akira; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tamura, Naoki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; LHD Experiment Group

    2017-08-01

    The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA) emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5-7.5) × 1013 cm-3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d-4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20-40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  9. Applying Boundary Conditions Using a Time-Dependent Lagrangian for Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Jonathan; Shadwick, B. A.

    2016-10-01

    Modeling the evolution of a short, intense laser pulse propagating through an underdense plasma is of particular interest in the physics of laser-plasma interactions. Numerical models are typically created by first discretizing the equations of motion and then imposing boundary conditions. Using the variational principle of Chen and Sudan, we spatially discretize the Lagrangian density to obtain discrete equations of motion and a discrete energy conservation law which is exactly satisfied regardless of the spatial grid resolution. Modifying the derived equations of motion (e.g., enforcing boundary conditions) generally ruins energy conservation. However, time-dependent terms can be added to the Lagrangian which force the equations of motion to have the desired boundary conditions. Although some foresight is needed to choose these time-dependent terms, this approach provides a mechanism for energy to exit the closed system while allowing the conservation law to account for the loss. An appropriate time discretization scheme is selected based on stability analysis and resolution requirements. We present results using this variational approach in a co-moving coordinate system and compare such results to those using traditional second-order methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008382 and by the National Science Foundation under Contract No. PHY- 1104683.

  10. Storm time plasma transport in a unified and inter-coupled global magnetosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Toth, G.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from the two-way self-consistent coupling between the kinetic Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI) model and the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF). HEIDI solves the time dependent, gyration and bounced averaged kinetic equation for the phase space density of different ring current species and computes full pitch angle distributions for all local times and radial distances. During geomagnetic times the dipole approximation becomes unsuitable even in the inner magnetosphere. Therefore the HEIDI model was generalized to accommodate an arbitrary magnetic field and through the coupling with SWMF it obtains a magnetic field description throughout the HEIDI domain along with a plasma distribution at the model outer boundary from the Block Adaptive Tree Solar Wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model within SWMF. Electric field self-consistency is assured by the passing of convection potentials from the Ridley Ionosphere Model (RIM) within SWMF. In this study we test the various levels of coupling between the 3 physics based models, highlighting the role that the magnetic field, plasma sheet conditions and the cross polar cap potential play in the formation and evolution of the ring current. We show that the dynamically changing geospace environment itself plays a key role in determining the geoeffectiveness of the driver. The results of the self-consistent coupling between HEIDI, BATS-R-US and RIM during disturbed conditions emphasize the importance of a kinetic self-consistent approach to the description of geospace.

  11. Molecular Fossils as Time Indicators for the Evolution of Diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampen, S. W.; Schouten, S.; Muyzer, G.; Abbas, B.; Rowland, S. J.; Moldowan, M.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    Bacillariophyta (diatoms) are one of the most abundant divisions of phytoplankton, and contribute to almost 50% of the primary productivity of today's oceans. However, their ecological dominance is relatively young and little is known about the exact pace of their rapid evolution. DNA analyses on diatoms and the use of molecular clock calculations can help to reconstruct their evolution, but this molecular clock rate needs to be calibrated against the fossil record to determine the mutation rate. Until now, diatom silica skeletons have been used for reconstructing the evolution of diatoms, but their use is limited due to destruction by diagenesis. Molecular fossils may prove to be more useful for time reconstruction. To search for suitable compounds, we have analyzed both the lipid composition and 18S rRNA sequences of ca. 100 marine diatoms. This revealed that some specific phylogenetic clusters within the diatoms produce specific organic compounds, so-called diatom biomarkers. One group of diatom biomarkers are the C25 highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) alkenes (1,2). HBI biosynthesis evolved independently at least twice in the diatoms. The first group of HBI producers consists of the centric diatoms of the genus Rhizosolenia, the second group comprises pennate diatoms of the genera Haslea, Navicula and Pleurosigma. Based on the constructed phylogenetic tree it is likely that the HBI biosynthesis evolved first in the older group of centric diatoms (i.e. the Rhizosolenia genus). The fossil record was studied to determine the geological occurrence of C25 HBI alkenes, and this data set shows that HBI biosynthesis evolved ca. 91.5 My ago, so we can date the evolution of the genus Rizosolenia to ca. 91.5 My. With this information, we can now accurately predict the mutation rate of the 18S rDNA gene to 1% per 14.8 My for Rhizosolenia, which is substantially faster than the 1% per 18-26 My reported previously for diatoms in general. Another specific biomarker is 24

  12. Influence of Noise on Time Evolution of Intensity Correlation Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Using the linear approximation method, we have studied how the correlation function C(t) of the laser intensity changes with time in the loss-noise model of the single-mode laser driven by the colored pump noise with signal modulation and the quantum noise with cross-correlation between the real and imaginary parts. We have found that when the pump noise self-correlation time τ changes, (I) in the case ofτ 1, the curve only exhibits periodically surging with descending envelope. When τ < 1 and τ does not change, with the increase of the pump noise intensity P, the curve experiences a repeated changing process, that is, from the monotonous descending to the appearance of a maximum, then to monotonous rise, and finally to the appearance of a maximum again. With the increase of the quantum noise intensity Q, the curve experiences a changing process from the monotonous rise to the appearance of a maximum, and finally to the monotonous descending. The increase of the quantum noise with cross-correlation between the real and imaginary parts will lead to the fall of the whole curve, but not affect the form of the time evolution of C(t).

  13. Time-Resolved Optical Emission Spectroscopy Diagnosis of CO2 Laser-Produced SnO2 Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Hui; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo

    2016-09-01

    The spectral emission and plasma parameters of SnO2 plasmas have been investigated. A planar ceramic SnO2 target was irradiated by a CO2 laser with a full width at half maximum of 80 ns. The temporal behavior of the specific emission lines from the SnO2 plasma was characterized. The intensities of Sn I and Sn II lines first increased, and then decreased with the delay time. The results also showed a faster decay of Sn I atoms than that of Sn II ionic species. The temporal evolutions of the SnO2 plasma parameters (electron temperature and density) were deduced. The measured temperature and density of SnO2 plasma are 4.38 eV to 0.5 eV and 11.38×1017 cm-3 to 1.1×1017 cm-3, for delay times between 0.1 μs and 2.2 μs. We also investigated the effect of the laser pulse energy on SnO2 plasma. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11304235) and the Director Fund of WNLO

  14. Numerical Simulation of Dust Void Evolution in Complex Plasmas with Ionization Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yue; WANG Zheng-Xiong; WANG Xiao-Gang

    2006-01-01

    We develop the nonlinear theory of dust voids [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 (2003) 075001], focusing particularly on effects of the ionization, to investigate numerically the void evolution under cylindrical coordinates [Phys. Plasmas 13(2006) 064502]. The ion velocity profile is solved by a more accurate ion motion equation with the ion convection and ionization terms. It is shown that the differences between the previous result and the one obtained with ionizations are significant for the distributions of the ion and dust velocities, the dust density, and etc., in the void formation process. Furthermore, the ionization can slow down the void formation process effectively.

  15. Determination of Ar Concentration Evolution Within DIII-D Core Plasma by X-ray Ross Filter Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Edgell, D. H.; Brooks, N. H.; Snider, R. T.; West, W. P.; Wade, M. R.

    2001-10-01

    Injection of the non-recycling noble gas Ar into the DIII-D divertor is a promising technique for reducing the heat load on the plates; it also seems to improve thermal transport in an advanced operating mode. During such experiments core plasma contamination by migrating Ar can be investigated by measuring the evolution of the Ar concentration profile using the Ross filter method implemented on the fan shaped X-ray poloidal diagnostics on DIII-D. A Ross filter with energy pass band centered on the ArXVII K_α line at 3.14 keV, discriminating Ar K_α line against background radiation, was used on DIII-D. A high sensitivity to the injected quantity of Ar and good discrimination against Ne was observed. We present reconstruction of Ar concentration profiles from the chord-integrated measurements using the measured Te and ne profiles. Using the transport code MIST, the impurity diffusion coefficients can be determined by matching the time evolution of the Ar concentration evolution.

  16. Evolution of the plasma and tissue kallikreins, and their alternative splicing isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliki Lila Koumandou

    Full Text Available Kallikreins are secreted serine proteases with important roles in human physiology. Human plasma kallikrein, encoded by the KLKB1 gene on locus 4q34-35, functions in the blood coagulation pathway, and in regulating blood pressure. The human tissue kallikrein and kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs have diverse expression patterns and physiological roles, including cancer-related processes such as cell growth regulation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA, the product of the KLK3 gene, is the most widely used biomarker in clinical practice today. A total of 15 KLKs are encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome (19q13.3-13.4, which makes them ideal for evolutionary analysis of gene duplication events. Previous studies on the evolution of KLKs have traced mammalian homologs as well as a probable early origin of the family in aves, amphibia and reptilia. The aim of this study was to address the evolutionary and functional relationships between tissue KLKs and plasma kallikrein, and to examine the evolution of alternative splicing isoforms. Sequences of plasma and tissue kallikreins and their alternative transcripts were collected from the NCBI and Ensembl databases, and comprehensive phylogenetic analysis was performed by Bayesian as well as maximum likelihood methods. Plasma and tissue kallikreins exhibit high sequence similarity in the trypsin domain (>50%. Phylogenetic analysis indicates an early divergence of KLKB1, which groups closely with plasminogen, chymotrypsin, and complement factor D (CFD, in a monophyletic group distinct from trypsin and the tissue KLKs. Reconstruction of the earliest events leading to the diversification of the tissue KLKs is not well resolved, indicating rapid expansion in mammals. Alternative transcripts of each KLK gene show species-specific divergence, while examination of sequence conservation indicates that many annotated human KLK isoforms

  17. Evolution over time of the Milky Way's disc shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amôres, E. B.; Robin, A. C.; Reylé, C.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Galactic structure studies can be used as a path to constrain the scenario of formation and evolution of our Galaxy. The dependence with the age of stellar population parameters would be linked with the history of star formation and dynamical evolution. Aims: We aim to investigate the structures of the outer Galaxy, such as the scale length, disc truncation, warp and flare of the thin disc and study their dependence with age by using 2MASS data and a population synthesis model (the so-called Besançon Galaxy Model). Methods: We have used a genetic algorithm to adjust the parameters on the observed colour-magnitude diagrams at longitudes 80° ≤ ℓ ≤ 280° for | b | ≤ 5.5°. We explored parameter degeneracies and uncertainties. Results: We identify a clear dependence of the thin disc scale length, warp and flare shapes with age. The scale length is found to vary between 3.8 kpc for the youngest to about 2 kpc for the oldest. The warp shows a complex structure, clearly asymmetrical with a node angle changing with age from approximately 165° for old stars to 195° for young stars. The outer disc is also flaring with a scale height that varies by a factor of two between the solar neighbourhood and a Galactocentric distance of 12 kpc. Conclusions: We conclude that the thin disc scale length is in good agreement with the inside-out formation scenario and that the outer disc is not in dynamical equilibrium. The warp deformation with time may provide some clues to its origin.

  18. Time evolution of morphology in mechanically alloyed Fe-Cu

    KAUST Repository

    Wille, Catharina Gabriele

    2011-05-01

    Being widely accessible as well as already utilised in many applications, Fe-Cu acts as an ideal binary model alloy to elaborate the enforced nonequilibrium enhanced solubility in such a solution system that shows a limited regime of miscibility and characterised by a large positive heat of mixing. In addition to the detailed analysis of ball milled Fe-Cu powders by means of Atom Probe Tomography (APT), site specific structural analysis has been performed in this study using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).In this contribution results on powders with low Cu concentrations (2.5-10 at%) are presented. Combining a ductile element (Cu, fcc) and a brittle one (Fe, bcc), striking differences in morphology were expected and found on all length-scales, depending on the mixing ratio of the two elements. However, not only could the atomic mixing of Fe and Cu be evaluated, but also the distribution of impurities, mostly stemming from the fabrication procedure. The combination of APT and TEM enables a correlation between the structural evolution and the chemical mixing during the milling process. For the first time, a clear distinction can be drawn between the morphological evolution at the surface and in the interior of the powder particles. This became possible owing to the site specific sample preparation of TEM lamellae by Focussed Ion Beam (FIB). Surprisingly, the texture arising from the ball milling process can directly be related to the classical rolling texture of cold rolled Fe. In addition, full homogeneity can be achieved even on the nano-scale for this material as shown by APT, resulting in an extended miscibility region in comparison to the equilibrium phase diagram. Grain sizes were determined by means of XRD and TEM. The strain corrected XRD results are in very good agreement with the values derived by TEM, both confirming a truly nanocrystalline structure. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Resonant Damping of Propagating Kink Waves in Time-Dependent Magnetic Flux Tube. I. Zero Plasma-pmb{\\upbeta}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2014-11-01

    We explore the notion of resonant absorption in a dynamic time-dependent magnetised plasma background. Very many works have investigated resonance in the Alfvén and slow MHD continua under both ideal and dissipative MHD regimes. Jump conditions in static and steady systems have been found in previous works, connecting solutions at both sides of the resonant layer. Here, we derive the jump conditions in a temporally dependent, magnetised, inhomogeneous plasma background to leading order in the Wentzel-Kramers-Billouin (WKB) approximation. Next, we exploit the results found in Williamson and Erdélyi ( Solar Phys. 289, 899, 2014) to describe the evolution of the jump condition in the dynamic model considered. The jump across the resonant point is shown to increase exponentially in time. We determined the damping as a result of the resonance over the same time period and investigated the temporal evolution of the damping itself. We found that the damping coefficient, as a result of the evolution of the resonance, decreases as the density gradient across the transitional layer decreases. This has the consequence that in such time-dependent systems resonant absorption may not be as efficient as time progresses.

  20. The time evolution of gaps in tidal streams

    CERN Document Server

    Helmi, Amina

    2016-01-01

    We model the time evolution of gaps in tidal streams caused by the impact of a dark matter subhalo, while both orbit a spherical gravitational potential. To this end, we make use of the simple behaviour of orbits in action-angle space. A gap effectively results from the divergence of two nearby orbits whose initial phase-space separation is, for very cold thin streams, largely given by the impulse induced by the subhalo. We find that in a spherical potential the size of a gap increases linearly with time, while its density decreases as 1/t^2 for sufficiently long timescales. We have derived an analytic expression that shows how the growth rate depends on the mass of the perturbing subhalo, its scale and its relative velocity with respect to the stream. We have verified these scalings using N-body simulations and find excellent agreement. For example, a subhalo of mass 10^8 Msun directly impacting a very cold thin stream on an inclined orbit can induce a gap that may reach a size of several tens of kpc after a...

  1. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  2. Experimental Investigation on the Ignition Delay Time of Plasma-Assisted Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yang; Yu, Jin-Lu; He, Li-Ming; Jiang, Yong-Jian; Wu, Yong

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the ignition performances of plasma-assisted ignition in propane/air mixture. The results show that a shorter ignition delay time is obtained for the plasma ignition than the spark ignition and the average ignition delay time of plasma-assisted ignition can be reduced at least by 50%. The influence of air flow rate of combustor, the arc current and argon flow rate of plasma igniter on ignition delay time are also investigated. The ignition delay time of plasma-assisted ignition increases with increasing air flow rate in the combustor. By increasing the arc current, the plasma ignition will gain more ignition energy to ignite the mixture more easily. The influence of plasma ignition argon flow rates on the ignition delay time is quite minor.

  3. Recovery of the Time-Evolution Equation of Time-Delay Systems from Time Series

    CERN Document Server

    Bünner, M J; Kittel, A; Parisi, J; Meyer, Th.

    1997-01-01

    We present a method for time series analysis of both, scalar and nonscalar time-delay systems. If the dynamics of the system investigated is governed by a time-delay induced instability, the method allows to determine the delay time. In a second step, the time-delay differential equation can be recovered from the time series. The method is a generalization of our recently proposed method suitable for time series analysis of {\\it scalar} time-delay systems. The dynamics is not required to be settled on its attractor, which also makes transient motion accessible to the analysis. If the motion actually takes place on a chaotic attractor, the applicability of the method does not depend on the dimensionality of the chaotic attractor - one main advantage over all time series analysis methods known until now. For demonstration, we analyze time series, which are obtained with the help of the numerical integration of a two-dimensional time-delay differential equation. After having determined the delay time, we recover...

  4. Plasma confinement time in trimix-M galatea multipole magnetic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishaev, A. M.; Bugrova, A. I.; Kozintseva, M. V.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sigov, A. S.; Kharchevnikov, V. K.

    2010-05-01

    The confinement time of hydrogen plasma trapped in a Trimix-M magnetic multipole galatea was studied in a range of plasma densities (1 × 1016 - 6 × 1018 m-3) and ion energies (˜100-300 eV). It is established that (i) the confinement time increases with decreasing plasma density in the trap and (ii) as the barrier magnetic field is increased, the plasma confinement time grows faster than according to a linear law. The obtained results are indicative of a collisional character of plasma diffusion through the barrier field in the trap.

  5. Nonlinear evolution of multi-helicity neo-classical tearing modes in rotating tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lai; Wang, Zheng-Xiong; Wang, Jialei; Yang, Xuefeng

    2016-10-01

    Plasma perturbations from the core and/or boundary regions of tokamaks can provide seed islands for the excitation of neo-classical tearing modes (NTMs) with negative {{ Δ }\\prime} , where {{ Δ }\\prime} is the linear instability parameter of the classical tearing mode. In this work, by means of reduced magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we numerically investigate the nonlinear evolution of multi-helicity NTMs in rotating tokamak plasmas with these two types of plasma perturbations with different boundary conditions. In the first case of initial plasma perturbations from the core region with a zero boundary condition, the meta-stable property of seed-island triggered NTM with negative {{ Δ }\\prime} is verified in the single helicity simulation. Nevertheless in the multiple helicity simulation, this seed-island triggered NTM with negative {{ Δ }\\prime} can be suppressed by a spontaneous NTM with positive {{ Δ }\\prime} through the competitive interaction between NTMs with different helicities. If a fixed poloidal rotation is taken into account in the first case, two different helicity NTMs could coexist in the saturation stage, which is different qualitatively from the process without plasma rotation. In the second case of initial plasma perturbations from the boundary region with a nonzero boundary condition, as the amplitude of plasma perturbations on the boundary increases, the mode with negative {{ Δ }\\prime} gradually changes from the driven-reconnection state to the NTM state, accompanied by an enhancement of magnetic island width in the single helicity simulation. Nevertheless in the multi-helicity simulation, the spontaneous NTM with positive {{ Δ }\\prime} can make the driven-reconnection triggered NTM with negative {{ Δ }\\prime} transfer from the NTM state back to the driven-reconnection state again. The underlying mechanism behind these transitions is analyzed step by step. Effects of fixed and unfixed poloidal rotations on the nonlinear

  6. Analysis of non-Gaussian laser mode guidance and evolution in leaky plasma channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Blagoje; Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2016-10-01

    The evolution and propagation of a non-Gaussian laser pulse under varying circumstances, including a typical matched parabolic channel as well as leaky channels, are investigated. It has previously been shown for a Gaussian pulse that matched guiding can be achieved using parabolic plasma channels. In the low power regime, it can be shown directly that for multi-mode pulses there is significant transverse beating. Given the adverse behavior of non-Gaussian pulses in traditional guiding designs, we examine the use of leaky channels to filter out higher modes as a means of optimizing laser conditions. The interaction between different modes can have an adverse effect on the laser pulse as it propagates through the primary channel. To improve guiding of the pulse we propose using leaky channels. Realistic plasma channel profiles are considered. Higher order mode content is lost through the leaky channel, while the fundamental mode remains well-guided. This is demonstrated using both numerical simulations as well as the source-dependent Laguerre-Gaussian modal expansion. In conclusion, an idealized plasma lens based on leaky channels is found to filter out the higher order modes and leave a near-Gaussian profile before the pulse enters the primary channel.

  7. Boosting persistence time of laser-induced plasma by electric arc discharge for optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S., E-mail: simon.eschlboeck-fuchs@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Kolmhofer, P.J.; Bodea, M.A.; Hechenberger, J.G.; Huber, N. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rössler, R. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, A-4031 Linz (Austria); Pedarnig, J.D., E-mail: johannes.pedarnig@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2015-07-01

    Plasma induced by nanosecond laser ablation is re-excited by a pulsed electric discharge and the parameters and optical emission of the plasma are measured. The discharge is a low-voltage and high-current electric arc that is triggered by the laser-induced plasma and slowly decaying with time. The optical emission of such combined plasma lasts up to several milliseconds which is much longer than without re-excitation (μs range). The emission spectra of re-excited plasma measured on different sample materials show higher line intensities than spectra measured by conventional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Moreover, emission lines of fluorine (spectral range 683–691 nm) and sulfur (range 520–550 nm) not detected by conventional LIBS become easily detectable with the combined plasma. The concentration of major components in metallurgical slags, as determined by calibration-free LIBS, agrees very well to the reference data evaluating the spectra taken from re-excited plasma. - Highlights: • Persistence time of laser-induced plasma in air is increased from ~ 10 μs to ~ 1 ms. • Laser-induced plasma triggers an electric arc discharge that boosts the plasma. • The combined laser-arc plasma is in LTE state over very long time (ms range). • CF-LIBS method delivers accurate results evaluating spectra of combined plasma. • Emission from S and F, not detected by LIBS, is detected with combined plasma.

  8. Evolution of the plasma parameters in the expanding laser ablation plume of silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen; Hansen, T.N.;

    2002-01-01

    The angular and radial variation of the ion density and electron temperature in the plasma plume produced by laser ablation of silver at fluences of 0.8-1.3 J cm(-2) at 355 nm have been studied using a time-resolving Langmuir probe. The angular dependence of the electron temperature and the magni...

  9. Time Curves: Folding Time to Visualize Patterns of Temporal Evolution in Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Benjamin; Shi, Conglei; Heulot, Nicolas; Madhyastha, Tara; Grabowski, Tom; Dragicevic, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We introduce time curves as a general approach for visualizing patterns of evolution in temporal data. Examples of such patterns include slow and regular progressions, large sudden changes, and reversals to previous states. These patterns can be of interest in a range of domains, such as collaborative document editing, dynamic network analysis, and video analysis. Time curves employ the metaphor of folding a timeline visualization into itself so as to bring similar time points close to each other. This metaphor can be applied to any dataset where a similarity metric between temporal snapshots can be defined, thus it is largely datatype-agnostic. We illustrate how time curves can visually reveal informative patterns in a range of different datasets.

  10. Carotenoid-dependent signals and the evolution of plasma carotenoid levels in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Mirre J P; Maia, Rafael; Leenknegt, Bas; Verhulst, Simon

    2014-12-01

    Sexual selection has resulted in a wide array of ornaments used in mate choice, and such indicator traits signal quality honestly when they bear costs, precluding cheating. Carotenoid-dependent coloration has attracted considerable attention in this context, because investing carotenoids in coloration has to be traded off against its physiological functions; carotenoids are antioxidants and increase immunocompetence. This trade-off is hypothesized to underlie the honesty of carotenoid-dependent coloration, signaling the "handicap" of allocating carotenoids away from somatic maintenance toward sexual display. Utilizing recent advances in modeling adaptive evolution, we used a comparative approach to investigate the evolution of plasma carotenoid levels using a species-level phylogeny of 178 bird species. We find that the evolutionary optimum for carotenoid levels is higher in lineages that evolved carotenoid-dependent coloration, with strong attraction toward this optimum. Hence, carotenoids do not appear to be limiting, given that higher carotenoid levels readily evolve in response to the evolution of carotenoid-dependent coloration. These findings challenge the assumption that carotenoids are a scarce resource and thus also challenge the hypothesis that physiological resource value of carotenoids underlies honesty of carotenoid-dependent traits. Therefore, the comparative evidence suggests that other factors, such as the acquisition and incorporation of carotenoids, are involved in maintaining signal honesty.

  11. Collective Landmarks for Deep Time: A New Tool for Evolution Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Evolution is a fundamental, organising concept in biology, yet there is widespread resistance to evolution among US students and there are rising creationist challenges in Europe. Resistance to evolution is linked to lack of understanding of the age of the Earth. An understanding of deep time is thus essential for effective biology education.…

  12. Introduction to the Time Evolution of Open Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rivas, Ángel

    2011-01-01

    We revise fundamental concepts in the dynamics of open quantum systems in the light of modern developments in the field. Our aim is to present a unified approach to the quantum evolution of open systems that incorporates the concepts and methods traditionally employed by different communities. We present in some detail the mathematical structure and the general properties of the dynamical maps underlying open system dynamics. We also discuss the microscopic derivation of dynamical equations, including both Markovian and non-Markovian evolutions.

  13. The distribution of radio plasma in time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Katherine M

    2005-03-15

    The influence of jet-ejected plasma has been an important theme of this meeting; I draw attention to the prevalence of jet-ejected plasma, in particular that which has not been properly accounted for in the past. There are three strands to this paper: important emission which is prominent only at the lowest radio frequencies; relic radio plasma which must exist if even the most basic aspects of radio source evolutionary models are correct; and evidence that some 'radio-quiet' quasars could be FR-I radio sources.

  14. Time dependent atomic processes in discharge produced low Z plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuyama, M.; Sasaki, T.; Horioka, K.; Kawamura, T.

    2008-05-01

    The z-pinch simulation have been performed with magneto-hydro dynamics and atomic population kinetics codes. A factor associated with transient atomic processes was proposed. The atomic transient degrees of dopant lithium in hydrogen plasma were calculated with initial plasma densities of 1.0 × 1016 ~ 5.0 × 1017cm-3. The higher initial plasma density is, the lower is the transient degree generally. It is also found that the transient properties of the atomic processes are sensitive to ionization energy and electron temperature.

  15. Time evolution of linearized gauge field fluctuations on a real-time lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Peuron, Jarkko

    2016-01-01

    Classical real-time lattice simulations play an important role in understanding non-equilibrium phenomena in gauge theories and are used in particular to model the prethermal evolution of heavy-ion collisions. Due to instabilities, small quantum fluctuations on top of the classical background may significantly affect the dynamics of the system. In this paper we argue for the need for a numerical calculation of a system of classical gauge fields and small linearized fluctuations in a way that keeps the separation between the two manifest. We derive and test an explicit algorithm to solve these equations on the lattice, maintaining gauge invariance and Gauss's law.

  16. Microstructure evolution and tribological properties of acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber surface modified by atmospheric plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ming-xue; Zhang, Zhao-xiang; Peng, Xu-dong; Lin, Xiu-zhou

    2017-09-01

    For the purpose of prolonging the service life for rubber sealing elements, the frictional behavior of acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) surface by dielectric barrier discharge plasma treatments was investigated in this paper. Surface microstructure and chemical composition were measured by atomic force microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Water contact angles of the modified rubber surface were also measured to evaluate the correlation between surface wettability and tribological properties. The results show that plasma treatments can improve the properties of the NBR against friction and wear effectively, the surface microstructure and roughness of plasma-modified NBR surface had an important influence on the surface tribological behavior, and the wear depth first decreased and then increased along with the change of plasma treatment time. It was found that the wettability of the modified surface was gradually improved, which was mainly due to the change of the chemical composition after the treatment. This study suggests that the plasma treatment could effectively improve the tribological properties of the NBR surface, and also provides information for developing wear-resistant NBR for industrial applications.

  17. Training Concept, Evolution Time, and the Maximum Entropy Production Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Bezryadin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The maximum entropy production principle (MEPP is a type of entropy optimization which demands that complex non-equilibrium systems should organize such that the rate of the entropy production is maximized. Our take on this principle is that to prove or disprove the validity of the MEPP and to test the scope of its applicability, it is necessary to conduct experiments in which the entropy produced per unit time is measured with a high precision. Thus we study electric-field-induced self-assembly in suspensions of carbon nanotubes and realize precise measurements of the entropy production rate (EPR. As a strong voltage is applied the suspended nanotubes merge together into a conducting cloud which produces Joule heat and, correspondingly, produces entropy. We introduce two types of EPR, which have qualitatively different significance: global EPR (g-EPR and the entropy production rate of the dissipative cloud itself (DC-EPR. The following results are obtained: (1 As the system reaches the maximum of the DC-EPR, it becomes stable because the applied voltage acts as a stabilizing thermodynamic potential; (2 We discover metastable states characterized by high, near-maximum values of the DC-EPR. Under certain conditions, such efficient entropy-producing regimes can only be achieved if the system is allowed to initially evolve under mildly non-equilibrium conditions, namely at a reduced voltage; (3 Without such a “training” period the system typically is not able to reach the allowed maximum of the DC-EPR if the bias is high; (4 We observe that the DC-EPR maximum is achieved within a time, Te, the evolution time, which scales as a power-law function of the applied voltage; (5 Finally, we present a clear example in which the g-EPR theoretical maximum can never be achieved. Yet, under a wide range of conditions, the system can self-organize and achieve a dissipative regime in which the DC-EPR equals its theoretical maximum.

  18. Evolution analysis of EUV radiation from laser-produced tin plasmas based on a radiation hydrodynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, M. G.; Min, Q.; Cao, S. Q.; Sun, D. X.; Hayden, P.; O’Sullivan, G.; Dong, C. Z.

    2017-01-01

    One of fundamental aims of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is to maximize brightness or conversion efficiency of laser energy to radiation at specific wavelengths from laser produced plasmas (LPPs) of specific elements for matching to available multilayer optical systems. Tin LPPs have been chosen for operation at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. For an investigation of EUV radiation of laser-produced tin plasmas, it is crucial to study the related atomic processes and their evolution so as to reliably predict the optimum plasma and experimental conditions. Here, we present a simplified radiation hydrodynamic model based on the fluid dynamic equations and the radiative transfer equation to rapidly investigate the evolution of radiation properties and dynamics in laser-produced tin plasmas. The self-absorption features of EUV spectra measured at an angle of 45° to the direction of plasma expansion have been successfully simulated and explained, and the evolution of some parameters, such as the plasma temperature, ion distribution and density, expansion size and velocity, have also been evaluated. Our results should be useful for further understanding of current research on extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray source development for applications such as lithography, metrology and biological imaging. PMID:28332621

  19. An advanced time-dependent collisional-radiative model of helium plasma discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claustre, J.; Boukandou-Mombo, C.; Margot, J.; Matte, J.-P.; Vidal, F.

    2017-10-01

    A new spatially averaged time-dependent collisional-radiative model for helium plasmas, coupled to the electron Boltzmann equation (EBE), has been developed. Its main novelties are: (1) full time dependence for both the multi-species kinetics and the EBE. It is shown that this is necessary to correctly simulate discharges where the parameters vary on nanoseconds-microsecond timescales. (2) All electron processes are accounted for accurately. In particular, for the various ionization and recombination processes, free electrons are added or removed at the appropriate energy, with the appropriate interpolation on the energy grid. (3) The energy dependence of the electron loss by ambipolar diffusion is taken into account approximately. (4) All of the processes which are known to be important in helium discharges for pressure P≤slant 760 Torr are included, and 42 energy levels up to n = 6, where n is the main quantum number, are taken into account. Atomic and molecular ions, as well as excimers, are also included. (5) The gas temperature is calculated self-consistently. The model is validated through comparisons with known numerical steady-state results of Santos et al (2014 J. Phys. D. 47 265201) which they compared to their experimental results, and good agreement is obtained for their measured quantities. It is then applied to post-discharge decay cases with very short power decay times. The time evolution of the population densities and reaction rates are analyzed in detail with emphasis on the observed large increase of the metastable density.

  20. Global dynamic evolution of the cold plasma inferred with neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Shprits, Yuri; Spasojevic, Maria

    2017-04-01

    The electron number density is a fundamental parameter of plasmas and is critical for the wave-particle interactions. Despite its global importance, the distribution of cold plasma and its dynamic dependence on solar wind conditions remains poorly quantified. Existing empirical models present statistical averages based on static geomagnetic parameters, but cannot reflect the dynamics of the highly structured and quickly varying plasmasphere environment, especially during times of high geomagnetic activity. Global imaging provides insights on the dynamics but quantitative inversion to electron number density has been lacking. We propose an empirical model for reconstruction of global dynamics of the cold plasma density distribution based only on solar wind data and geomagnetic indices. We develop a neural network that is capable of globally reconstructing the dynamics of the cold plasma density distribution for L shells from 2 to 6 and all local times. We utilize the density database obtained using the NURD algorithm [Zhelavskaya et al., 2016] in conjunction with solar wind data and geomagnetic indices to train the neural network. This study demonstrates how the global dynamics can be reconstructed from local in-situ observations by using machine learning tools. We describe aspects of the validation process in detail and discuss the selected inputs to the model and their physical implication.

  1. The effect of magnetic field strength on the time evolution of high energy bremsstrahlung radiation created by an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropponen, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)], E-mail: tommi.ropponen@phys.jyu.fi; Tarvainen, O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Jones, P.; Peura, P.; Kalvas, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Suominen, P. [Prizztech Ltd/Magnet Technology Centre, Tiedepuisto 4, FI-28600 Pori (Finland); Koivisto, H.; Arje, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)

    2009-03-11

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is one of the most used ion source types for high charge state heavy ion production. In ECR plasma the electrons are heated by radio frequency microwaves in order to provide ionization of neutral gases. As a consequence, ECR heating also generates very high electron energies (up to MeV region) which can produce a vast amount of bremsstrahlung radiation causing problems with radiation shielding and heating superconducting cryostat of an ECR ion source. To gain information about the time evolution of the electron energies in ECR plasma radial bremsstrahlung measurements were performed. JYFL 14 GHz ECR ion source was operated in pulsed mode and time evolution measurements were done with different axial magnetic field strengths with oxygen and argon plasmas. Bremsstrahlung data were analyzed with a time interval of 2 ms yielding information at unprecedented detail about the time evolution of high energy bremsstrahlung radiation from an ECR ion source. It was observed, for example, that reaching the steady state phase of the plasma bremsstrahlung requires several hundred milliseconds and the steady state time can be different with different gases.

  2. Evolution of Electron Phase Orbits of Multi-photon Nonlinear Compton Scattering in High Power Laser-plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Dong-shan; L(U) Jian

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of the electron phase orbits based on the multi-photon nonlinear Compton scattering with the high power laser-plasma is discussed by using Kroll-Morton-Rosenbluth theory. The random evolution of the un-captured electron phase orbits from periodicity to non-periodicity is found after the energy has been exchanged between the electron and photons. With the increase of the absorbed photon number n by an electron,this evolution will be more and more intense, while which is rapidly decreased with the enhancement of the collision non-flexibility ξ and their initial speeds of the electrons and photons, but this evolution is lower than that in the high power laser field. When the electrons are captured by the laser field, the evolution is finished, and the electrons will stably transport,and the photons don't provide the energy for these electrons any more.

  3. Time evolution of the diffraction pattern of an ultrashort laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrancois, M; Pereira, S

    2003-05-19

    An analytical expression for the time evolution of the diffraction pattern of an ultrashort laser pulse passing through a circular aperture is obtained in the Fresnel regime. The diffraction is not constant in time as the pulse travels through the aperture. This may have implications in experiments involving fast dynamics. Examples of the evolution of the diffraction pattern are given.

  4. Modeling the time evolution of the nanoparticle-protein corona in a body fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Dell'Orco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nanoparticles in contact with biological fluids interact with proteins and other biomolecules, thus forming a dynamic corona whose composition varies over time due to continuous protein association and dissociation events. Eventually equilibrium is reached, at which point the continued exchange will not affect the composition of the corona. RESULTS: We developed a simple and effective dynamic model of the nanoparticle protein corona in a body fluid, namely human plasma. The model predicts the time evolution and equilibrium composition of the corona based on affinities, stoichiometries and rate constants. An application to the interaction of human serum albumin, high density lipoprotein (HDL and fibrinogen with 70 nm N-iso-propylacrylamide/N-tert-butylacrylamide copolymer nanoparticles is presented, including novel experimental data for HDL. CONCLUSIONS: The simple model presented here can easily be modified to mimic the interaction of the nanoparticle protein corona with a novel biological fluid or compartment once new data will be available, thus opening novel applications in nanotoxicity and nanomedicine.

  5. Statistical behavior of time dynamics evolution of HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ramón E. R.; Santos, Iury A. X.; Nunes, Marcos G. P.; de Oliveira, Viviane M.; Barbosa, Anderson L. R.

    2017-09-01

    We use the tools of the random matrix theory (RMT) to investigate the statistical behavior of the evolution of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. By means of the nearest-neighbor spacing distribution we have identified four distinct regimes of the evolution of HIV infection. We verified that at the beginning of the so-called clinical latency phase the concentration of infected cells grows slowly and evolves in a correlated way. This regime is followed by another one in which the correlation is lost and that in turn leads the system to a regime in which the increase of infected cells is faster and correlated. In the final phase, the one in which acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is stablished, the system presents maximum correlation as demonstrated by GOE distribution.

  6. Long-time memory in non-Markovian evolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej; Pascazio, Saverio

    2010-03-01

    If the dynamics of an open quantum system is non-Markovian, its asymptotic state strongly depends on the initial conditions, even if the dynamics possesses an invariant state. This is the very essence of memory effects. In particular, the asymptotic state can remember and partially preserve its initial entanglement. Interestingly, even if the non-Markovian evolution relaxes to an equilibrium state, this state needs not be invariant. Therefore, the noninvariance of equilibrium becomes a clear sign of non-Markovianity.

  7. Time Evolution of Galaxy Scaling Relations in Cosmological Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Philip

    2016-01-01

    We predict the evolution of galaxy scaling relationships from cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations, that reproduce the scaling relations of present-day galaxies. Although we do not assume co-evolution between galaxies and black holes a priori, we are able to reproduce the black hole mass--velocity dispersion relation. This relation does not evolve, and black holes actually grow along the relation from significantly less massive seeds than have previously been used. AGN feedback does not very much affect the chemical evolution of our galaxies. In our predictions, the stellar mass--metallicity relation does not change its shape, but the metallicity significantly increases from $z\\sim2$ to $z\\sim1$, while the gas-phase mass-metallicity relation does change shape, having a steeper slope at higher redshifts ($z\\lesssim3$). Furthermore, AGN feedback is required to reproduce observations of the most massive galaxies at $z\\lesssim1$, specifically their positions on the star formation main sequence and galaxy mass...

  8. Role of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the evolution of magnetized relativistic sheared plasma flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D; Newman, William I

    2013-04-01

    We explore, via analytical and numerical methods, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in relativistic magnetized plasmas, with applications to astrophysical jets. We solve the single-fluid relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations in conservative form using a scheme which is fourth order in space and time. To recover the primitive RMHD variables, we use a highly accurate, rapidly convergent algorithm which improves upon such schemes as the Newton-Raphson method. Although the exact RMHD equations are marginally stable, numerical discretization renders them unstable. We include numerical viscosity to restore numerical stability. In relativistic flows, diffusion can lead to a mathematical anomaly associated with frame transformations. However, in our KH studies, we remain in the rest frame of the system, and therefore do not encounter this anomaly. We use a two-dimensional slab geometry with periodic boundary conditions in both directions. The initial unperturbed velocity peaks along the central axis and vanishes asymptotically at the transverse boundaries. Remaining unperturbed quantities are uniform, with a flow-aligned unperturbed magnetic field. The early evolution in the nonlinear regime corresponds to the formation of counter-rotating vortices, connected by filaments, which persist in the absence of a magnetic field. A magnetic field inhibits the vortices through a series of stages, namely, field amplification, vortex disruption, turbulent breakdown, and an approach to a flow-aligned equilibrium configuration. Similar stages have been discussed in MHD literature. We examine how and to what extent these stages manifest in RMHD for a set of representative field strengths. To characterize field strength, we define a relativistic extension of the Alfvénic Mach number M(A). We observe close complementarity between flow and magnetic field behavior. Weaker fields exhibit more vortex rotation, magnetic reconnection, jet broadening, and intermediate turbulence

  9. Time evolution of relativistic d + Au and Au + Au collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Wolschin, G; Mizoguchi, T; Suzuki, N; Biyajima, Minoru; Mizoguchi, Takuya; Suzuki, Naomichi; Wolschin, Georg

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of charged-particle production in collisions of heavy ions at relativistic energies is investigated as function of centrality in a nonequilibrium-statistical framework. Precise agreement with recent d + Au and Au + Au data at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV is found in a Relativistic Diffusion Model with three sources for particle production. Only the midrapidity source comes very close to local equilibrium, whereas the analyses of the overall pseudorapidity distributions show that the systems remain far from statistical equilibrium.

  10. Evolution of non-local observables in an expanding boost-invariant plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Pedraza, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we compute analytically the late-time behavior of two-point functions, Wilson loops and entanglement entropy in a strongly-coupled $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super-Yang-Mills plasma undergoing a boost-invariant expansion. We take into account the effects of first order dissipative hydrodynamics and investigate the effects of the (time dependent) shear viscosity on the various observables. The two-point functions decay exponentially at late times and are unaffected by the viscosity if the points are separated along the transverse directions. For longitudinal separation we find a much richer structure. In this case the exponential is modulated by a non-monotonic function of the rapidities and a dimensionless combination of the shear viscosity and proper time. Similar results are found for certain Wilson loops and entanglement entropies.

  11. Influence of Ionization Degrees on the Evolutions of Charged Particles in Atmospheric Plasma at Low Altitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Xuexia; DENG Zechao; JIA Pengying; LIANG Weihua; LI Xia

    2012-01-01

    A zero-dimensional model which includes 56 species of reactants and 427 reactions is used to study the behavior of charged particles in atmospheric plasmas with different ionization degrees at low altitude (near 0 km). The constant coefficient nonlinear equations are solved by using the Quasi-steady-state approximation method. The electron lifetimes are obtained for afterglow plasma with different initial values, and the temporal evolutions of the main charged species are presented, which are dominant in reaction processes. The results show that the electron number density decays quickly. The lifetimes of electrons are shortened by about two orders with increasing ionization degree. Electrons then attach to neutral particles and produce negative ions. When the initial electron densities are in the range of 10l~ ~ 1014 cm-3, the negative ions have sufficiently high densities and long lifetimes for air purification, disinfection and sterilization. Electrons, O(2,-), O(4,-) CO(4,-) and CO(3,-) are the dominant negative species when the initial electron density neo ≤ 1013 cm^(-3), and only electrons and CO3 are left when neo 〉 1015 cm^(-3). N(+,2), N+ and O(+,2) are dominant in the positive charges for any ionization degree. Other positive species, such as 0(+,4), N(+,3), NO(+,2), NO(+,2), Ar(+,2) and H3O+. H2O, are dominant only for a certain ionization degree and in a certain period.

  12. Temporal evolution of linear kinetic Alfvén waves in inhomogeneous plasmas and turbulence generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Ravinder; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    The coronal ion heating in the Sun is primarily considered due to Alfvén wave dissipation. The Hinode data which has provided strong evidence for the presence of Alfvén waves in the corona and in coronal loops, has lead laboratory investigations and numerical simulations of Alfvén wave propagation and damping. The inhomogeneous plasmas with steep density gradients can be employed to study such phenomenon in relatively shorter systems. This article presents a model for the propagation of Kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) in inhomogeneous plasma when the inhomogeneity is in transverse and parallel directions relative to the background magnetic field. The semi-analytical technique and numerical simulations have been performed to study the KAW dynamics when plasma inhomogeneity is incorporated in the dynamics. The model equations are solved in order to study the localization of KAW and their magnetic power spectrum which indicates the direct transfer of energy from lower to higher wave numbers as well as frequencies. The inhomogeneity scale lengths in both directions may control the nature of fluctuations and localization of the waves and play a very important role in the turbulence generation and its level. We present a theoretical study of the localization of KAWs, variations in magnetic field amplitude in time, and variation in the frequency spectra arising from inhomogeneities. The relevance of the model to space and laboratory observations is discussed.

  13. Time window for magnetic reconnection in plasma configurations with velocity shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faganello, M; Califano, F; Pegoraro, F

    2008-10-24

    It is shown that the rate of magnetic field line reconnection can be clocked by the evolution of the large-scale processes that are responsible for the formation of the current layers where reconnection can take place. In unsteady plasma configurations, such as those produced by the onset of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a plasma with a velocity shear, qualitatively different magnetic structures are produced depending on how fast the reconnection process develops on the external clock set by the evolving large-scale configuration.

  14. Evolution of Arbitrary States under Fock-Darwin Hamiltonian and a Time-Dependent Electric Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晓飞; 杨涛; 翟智远; 潘孝胤

    2012-01-01

    The method of path integral is employed to calculate the time evolution of the eigenstates of a charged particle under the Fock-Darwin (FD) Hamiltonian subjected to a time-dependent electric field in the plane of the system. An exact analytical expression is established for the evolution of the eigenstates. This result then provides a general solution to the time-dependent Schrodinger equation.

  15. THE LONG TIME BEHAVIORS OF NON-AUTONOMOUS EVOLUTION SYSTEM DESCRIBING GEOPHYSICAL FLOW WITHIN THE EARTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chunshan; LI Kaitai; HUANG Aixiang

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the long time behaviors of non-autonomous evolution system describing geophysical flow within the earth are studied. The uniqueness and existence of the solution to the evolution system and the existence of uniform attractor are proven.Moreover, the upper bounds of the uniform attractor's Hausdorff and Fractal dimensions are obtained.

  16. THE LONG TIME BEHAVIORS OF NON-AUTONOMOUS EVOLUTION SYSTEM DESCRIBING GEOPHYSICAL FLOW WITHIN THE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,the long time behaviors of non-autonomous evolution system describing geophysical flow within the earth are studied.The uniqueness and existence of the solution to the evolution system and the existence of uniform attractor are proven.Moreover,the upper bounds of the uniform attractor's hausdorff and Fractal dimensions are obtained.

  17. Dose-time relation in BF3 plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jiqun; Round, Mark; Qin, Shu; Chan, Chung

    1995-03-01

    Etching and deposition rates of silicon and SiO2 during BF3 plasma immersion ion implantation are measured. The relation between total dose and plasma immersion ion implantation processing time is developed through computer modeling. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data. Comparison with a previously published model is also given.

  18. Non-Markovian Quantum Evolution: Time-Local Generators and Memory Kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Należyty, Paweł

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we provide a basic introduction to the topic of quantum non-Markovian evolution presenting both time-local and memory kernel approach to the evolution of open quantum systems. We start with the standard notion of a classical Markovian stochastic process and generalize it to classical Markovian stochastic evolution which in turn becomes a starting point of the quantum setting. Our approach is based on the notion of P-divisible, CP-divisible maps and their refinements to k-divisible maps. Basic methods enabling one to detect non-Markovianity of the quantum evolution are also presented. Our analysis is illustrated by several simple examples.

  19. Chimpocentrism and reconstructions of human evolution (a timely reminder).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaesen, Krist

    2014-03-01

    Chimpanzees, but very few other animals, figure prominently in (recent) attempts to reconstruct the evolution of uniquely human traits. In particular, the chimpanzee is used (i) to identify traits unique to humans, and thus in need of reconstruction; (ii) to initialize the reconstruction, by taking its state to reflect the state of the last common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees; (iii) as a baseline against which to test evolutionary hypotheses. Here I point out the flaws in this three-step procedure, and show how they can be overcome by taking advantage of much broader phylogenetic comparisons. More specifically, I explain how such comparisons yield more reliable estimations of ancestral states and how they help to resolve problems of underdetermination inherent to chimpocentric accounts. To illustrate my points, I use a recent chimpocentric argument by Kitcher. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A unified cosmic evolution: Inflation to late time acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Subenoy; Saha, Subhajit

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with a cosmological model having particle creation mechanism in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. In the second order non-equilibrium thermodynamical prescription, the particle creation rate is treated as the dissipative effect. The non-equilibrium thermodynamical process is assumed to be isentropic, and, as a consequence, the entropy per particle is constant, and, hence, the dissipative pressure can be expressed linearly in terms of the particle creation rate in the background of the homogeneous and isotropic flat FLRW model. By proper choice of the particle creation rate as a function of the Hubble parameter, the model shows the evolution of the universe starting from the inflationary scenario to the present accelerating phase, considering the cosmic matter as normal perfect fluid with barotropic equation of state.

  1. Shock formation in magnetised electron-positron plasmas: mechanism and timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Bret, A.; Sinha, U.

    2016-10-01

    The shock formation process in electron-positron pair plasmas is investigated in the presence of an ambient perpendicular magnetic field. In initially unmagnetised plasmas, which are dominated by the Weibel or filamentation instability, the shock formation time is a multiple of the saturation time of the linear instability. While in weakly magnetised plasmas the mechanism is still the same, higher magnetisations induce synchrotron maser modes such that the shock formation is dominated by magnetic reflection. As a consequence the formation times are reduced. The focus is on the detailed picture of the particle kinetics, in which the transition between Weibel and magneto-hydrodynamic shocks can be clearly identified.

  2. Hydration Heat Evolution of Cement and Its Relation With Setting Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to veritably measure the first peak of hydration heat evolution that has been illustrated important in indicating cement behavior in early hydration, an improved way of water addition into cement in isothermally calorimetric experiment is put forward. The experimental results indicated that: the magnitude of first peak of heat evolution varies from sample to sample, correlation between heat evolution during first peak of heat evolution and initial (as well as final) setting time is unsatisfactory when samples are not classified; while groups of sample classified based on strength grade represent satisfactory correlations, which indicating the existence of close relation between hydration heat evolution in much earlier hydration age and setting property of cement in rather later age. Importance of first peak in hydration heat evolution for understanding cement setting property and reasons for sample classification are also discussed in this paper.

  3. The evolution of plasma cholesterol: direct utility or a "spandrel" of hepatic lipid metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Patrick J; Gibbons, Geoffrey F

    2009-03-01

    Fats provide a concentrated source of energy for multicellular organisms. The efficient transport of fats through aqueous biological environments raises issues concerning effective delivery to target tissues. Furthermore, the utilization of fatty acids presents a high risk of cytotoxicity. Improving the efficiency of fat transport while simultaneously minimizing the cytotoxic risk confers distinct selective advantages. In humans, most of the plasma cholesterol is associated with low-density lipoprotein (LDL), a metabolic by-product of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), which originates in the liver. However, the functions of VLDL are not clear. This paper reviews the evidence that LDL arose as a by-product during the natural selection of VLDL. The latter, in turn, evolved as a means of improving the efficiency of diet-derived fatty acid storage and utilization, as well as neutralizing the potential cytotoxicity of fatty acids while conserving their advantages as a concentrated energy source. The evolutionary biology of lipid transport processes has provided a fascinating insight into how and why these VLDL functions emerged during animal evolution. As causes of historical origin must be separated from current utilities, our spandrel-LDL theory proposes that LDL is a spandrel of VLDL selection, which appeared non-adaptively and may later have become crucial for vertebrate fitness.

  4. Delay time embedding of mass loss avalanches in a fusion plasma-oriented sandpile model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, C. A.; Dendy, R. O.; Hole, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    The sandpile paradigm is widely used to model aspects of the phenomenology of magnetically confined fusion (MCF) plasmas, including enhanced confinement, edge pedestals and, potentially, the impulsive energy and particle release process known as ELMing. Here we identify new points of contact between ELMing and the systemwide avalanches in a sandpile. We compare the quantified response [Calderon et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 042306 (2014)] to increased fuelling of the time sequence of edge localised mode events in a series of similar Joint European Torus plasmas with the response to increased fuelling of the time sequence of systemwide avalanches in a sandpile model [Chapman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2814 (2001)] that has well established links to MCF plasma phenomenology. Both the probability density functions of inter-event time intervals, and delay time embeddings of event time sequences, at different fuelling rates, show common features and point to shared underlying physics.

  5. Long-term evolution of broken wakefields in finite radius plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Lotov, Konstantin; Petrenko, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    A novel effect of fast heating and charging a finite-radius plasma is discovered in the context of plasma wakefield acceleration. As the plasma wave breaks, the most of its energy is transferred to plasma electrons which create strong charge-separation electric field and azimuthal magnetic field around the plasma. The slowly varying field structure is preserved for hundreds of wakefield periods and contains (together with hot electrons) up to 80% of the initial wakefield energy.

  6. Influence of Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance in turbulent plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588, South Korea and Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The influence of Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance for the electron-ion collision is investigated in turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal method and the effective Dupree potential term associated with the plasma turbulence are employed to obtain the occurrence scattering time as a function of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, thermal energy, and Debye length. The result shows that the occurrence scattering time advance decreases with an increase of the Dupree diffusivity. Hence, we have found that the influence of plasma turbulence diminishes the occurrence time advance in forward electron-ion collisions in thermal turbulent plasmas. The occurrence time advance shows that the propensity of the occurrence time advance increases with increasing scattering angle. It is also found that the effect of turbulence due to the Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance decreases with an increase of the thermal energy. In addition, the variation of the plasma turbulence on the occurrence scattering time advance due to the plasma parameters is also discussed.

  7. Evolution of a Voltage-Time Model of Thermal Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    MARK I1 VOLTAGE-TIME MODEL 7 6 MARKt III VOLTAGE-TIME MODEL 10 6.1 Capacity degradation II 6,2 Allowance ’for time-dependent polarisation If 6,3...period is sub- divided into two or more segments in the model input data, in all of which the TM MS 1163 13 same current or resistor value operates as

  8. Embeddings and time evolution of the Schwarzschild wormhole

    CERN Document Server

    Collas, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We show how to embed spacelike slices of the Schwarzschild wormhole (or Einstein-Rosen bridge) in R^3. Graphical images of embeddings are given, including depictions of the dynamics of this non-traversable wormhole at constant Kruskal times up to, and beyond, the "pinching off" at Kruskal times \\pm1.

  9. Modulational instability and nonlinear evolution of two-dimensional electrostatic wave packets in ultra-relativistic degenerate dense plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, A P

    2010-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear propagation of electrostatic wave packets in an ultra-relativistic (UR) degenerate dense electron-ion plasma, whose dynamics is governed by the nonlocal two-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger-like equations. The coupled set of equations are then used to study the modulational instability (MI) of a uniform wave train to an infinitesimal perturbation of multi-dimensional form. The condition for the MI is obtained, and it is shown that the nondimensional parameter, $\\beta\\propto\\lambda_C n_0^{1/3}$ (where $\\lambda_C$ is the reduced Compton wavelength and $n_0$ is the particle number density), associated with the UR pressure of degenerate electrons, shifts the stable (unstable) regions at $n_{0}\\sim10^{30}$ cm$^{-3}$ to unstable (stable) ones at higher densities, i.e. $n_{0}\\gtrsim7\\times10^{33}$. It is also found that higher the values of $n_{0}$, the lower is the growth rate of MI with cut-offs at lower wave numbers of modulation. Furthermore, the dynamical evolution of the wave packet...

  10. Steady States of Infinite-Size Dissipative Quantum Chains via Imaginary Time Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangat, Adil A.; I, Te; Kao, Ying-Jer

    2017-07-01

    Directly in the thermodynamic limit, we show how to combine local imaginary and real-time evolution of tensor networks to efficiently and accurately find the nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs) of one-dimensional dissipative quantum lattices governed by a local Lindblad master equation. The imaginary time evolution first bypasses any highly correlated portions of the real-time evolution trajectory by directly converging to the weakly correlated subspace of the NESS, after which, real-time evolution completes the convergence to the NESS with high accuracy. We demonstrate the power of the method with the dissipative transverse field quantum Ising chain. We show that a crossover of an order parameter shown to be smooth in previous finite-size studies remains smooth in the thermodynamic limit.

  11. Reference results for time-like evolution up to $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s^3)$

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, Valerio; Nocera, Emanuele R

    2015-01-01

    We present high-precision numerical results for time-like Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution in the $\\overline{\\rm MS}$ factorisation scheme, for the first time up to next-to-next-to-leading order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics. First, we scrutinise the analytical expressions of the splitting functions available in the literature, in both x and N space, and check their mutual consistency. Second, we implement time-like evolution in two publicly available, entirely independent and conceptually different numerical codes, in x and N space respectively: the already existing APFEL code, which has been updated with time-like evolution, and the new MELA code, which has been specifically developed to perform the study in this work. Third, by means of a model for fragmentation functions, we provide results for the evolution in different factorisation schemes, for different ratios between renormalisation and factorisation scales and at different final scales. Our results are collected in the forma...

  12. Time-scale invariances in preseismic electromagnetic radiation, magnetization and damage evolution of rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kawada

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the time-scale invariant changes in electromagnetic and mechanical energy releases prior to a rock failure or a large earthquake. The energy release processes are caused by damage evolutions such as crack propagation, motion of charged dislocation, area-enlargement of sheared asperities and repetitive creep-rate changes. Damage mechanics can be used to represent the time-scale invariant evolutions of both brittle and plastic damages. Irreversible thermodynamics applied to the damage mechanics reveals that the damage evolution produces the variations in charge, dipole and electromagnetic signals in addition to mechanical energy release, and yields the time-scale invariant patterns of Benioff electromagnetic radiation and cumulative Benioff strain-release. The irreversible thermodynamic framework of damage mechanics is also applicable to the seismo-magnetic effect, and the time-scale invariance is recognized in the remanent magnetization change associated with damage evolution prior to a rock failure.

  13. Time-evolution of dense hadronic matter in high energy heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otuka, Naohiko; Ohnishi, Akira [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Nara, Yasushi; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Niita, Koji

    1997-05-01

    Time evolution of hadronic resonance matter in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the framework of cascade models. We investigate the role of higher baryonic resonances during the time evolution of hot and dense hadronic matter at AGS energies. Although final hadronic spectrum can reproduced well with and without higher baryonic resonances, the inclusion of higher resonances is shown to prevent the temperature from going beyond 200 MeV. (author)

  14. Time-scale invariances in preseismic electromagnetic radiation, magnetization and damage evolution of rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Kawada, Y.; H. Nagahama; Nakamura, N.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; We investigate the time-scale invariant changes in electromagnetic and mechanical energy releases prior to a rock failure or a large earthquake. The energy release processes are caused by damage evolutions such as crack propagation, motion of charged dislocation, area-enlargement of sheared asperities and repetitive creep-rate changes. Damage mechanics can be used to represent the time-scale invariant evolutions of both brittle and plastic damages. Irreversible thermod...

  15. Two-time-scale population evolution on a singular landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song; Jiao, Shuyun; Jiang, Pengyao; Ao, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Under the effect of strong genetic drift, it is highly probable to observe gene fixation or gene loss in a population, shown by singular peaks on a potential landscape. The genetic drift-induced noise gives rise to two-time-scale diffusion dynamics on the bipeaked landscape. We find that the logarithmically divergent (singular) peaks do not necessarily imply infinite escape times or biological fixations by iterating the Wright-Fisher model and approximating the average escape time. Our analytical results under weak mutation and weak selection extend Kramers's escape time formula to models with B (Beta) function-like equilibrium distributions and overcome constraints in previous methods. The constructed landscape provides a coherent description for the bistable system, supports the quantitative analysis of bipeaked dynamics, and generates mathematical insights for understanding the boundary behaviors of the diffusion model.

  16. Evolution of the Australian-Antarctic discordance since Miocene time

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, Karen M.; Stock, Joann M.; Quinn, Katherine J.

    1999-01-01

    In this study we chronicle the development of the Australian-Antarctic discordance (AAD), the crenelated portion of the Southeast Indian Ridge between ∼120° and 128°E, since anomaly 6y time (19 Ma). We reconstruct satellite-derived marine gravity fields and depth anomalies at selected times by first removing anomalies overlying seafloor younger than the selected age, and then rotating the remaining anomalies through improved finite rotations based on a very detailed set of magnetic anomaly id...

  17. Exact analytic expressions for the evolution of polarization for radiation propagating in a plasma with non uniformly sheared magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segre, S.E. [Rome Univ. 2. Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy). Istituto Nazionale Fisica della Materia, Dipartimento di Fisica

    2001-07-01

    The known analytic expressions for the evolution of the polarization of electromagnetic waves propagating in a plasma with uniformly sheared magnetic field are extended to the case where the shear is not constant. Exact analytic expressions are found for the case when the space variations of the medium are such that the magnetic field components and the plasma density satisfy a particular condition (eq. 13), possibly in a convenient reference frame of polarization space. [Italian] Le espressioni, gia' note, per l'evoluzione della polarizzazione di onde elettromagnetiche propaganti in un plasma magnetizzato con shear costante vengono estese a casi in cui questo non e' costante. Si trovano soluzioni analitiche esatte per il caso in cui le variazioni spaziali del mezzo sono tali da soddisfare una particolare condizione (eq. 13), eventualmente in un opportuno sistema di riferimento nello spazio della polarizzazione (lo spazio di Poincare').

  18. Role of magnetic field fluctuations in the Evolution of the kappa Distribution Functions in the Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Cristobal; Antonova, Elizaveta; Stepanova, Marina; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The evolution with the distance to Earth of ion and electron distribution functions in the plasma sheet, approximated by kappa distributions, was studied by Stepanova and Antonova (2015, JGRA 120). Using THEMIS data for 5 events of satellite alignments along the tail, covering between 5 and 30 Earth radii, they found that the kappa parameter increases tailwards, for both ions and electrons. In this work we analyse the magnetic fluctuations present in THEMIS data for the same 5 events. The aim is to explore the hypothesis proposed by Navarro et al. (2014, PRL 112), for solar wind plasmas, that the observed magnetic fluctuations could be closely related to spontaneous fluctuations in the plasma, if this can be described by stable distributions. Here we present our first results on the correlation between the spectral properties of the magnetic fluctuations and the observed parameters of the kappa distributions for different distances from Earth.

  19. Discreteness of time in the evolution of the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizal, Mir; Ali, Ahmed Farag; Das, Saurya

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we will first derive the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the generalized geometry which occurs in M-theory. Then we will observe that M2-branes act as probes for this generalized geometry, and as M2-branes have an extended structure, their extended structure will limits the resolution to which this generalized geometry can be defined. We will demonstrate that this will deform the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the generalized geometry. We analyze such a deformed Wheeler-DeWitt equation in the minisuperspace approximation, and observe that this deformation can be used as a solution to the problem of time. This is because this deformation gives rise to time crystals in our universe due to the spontaneous breaking of time reparametrization invariance.

  20. The gain in Thick GEM multipliers and its time-evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeev, M; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Buechele, M; Chiosso, M; Ciliberti, P; Dalla Torre, S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O; Duic, V; Finger, M; Finger Jr, M; Fischer, H; Gobbo, B; Gregori, M; Herrmann, F; Koenigsmann, K; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Makke, N; Martin, A; Menon, G; Novakova, K; Novy, J; Panzieri, D; Pereira, F A; Santos, C A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schopferer, S; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Steiger, L; Sulc, M; Takekawa, S; Tessarotto, F; Veloso, J F C A

    2016-01-01

    In the context of a project to upgrade the gas photon detectors of COMPASS RICH-1, we have performed an R&D programme aimed to develop photon detectors based on multi-layer arrangements of thick GEM electron multipliers coupled to a CsI photoconverter. For this purpose, thick GEMs have been characterised in detail including the gain performance, its dependance on the geometrical parameters and its time-evolution, a feature exhibited by the gas detectors with open insulator surfaces. The variation due to this evolution drammatically depends on the parameters themselves. In the present article we summarise the outcomes of the studies dedicated to the thick GEM gain and its evolution versus time. We also include a qualitative model which accounts for the peculiar details of the observed thick GEM gain time-evolution.

  1. Evolution of Management Thought in the Medieval Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, C. L.

    The medieval times witnessed progress toward the growth of larger and more complex organizations and the application of increasingly sophisticated management techniques. Feudalism contributed the concept of decentralization. The concepts evolved by the Catholic Church can scarcely be improved on and are very much pertinent to the management of…

  2. GrainGenes: Changing Times, Changing Databases, Digital Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The GrainGenes database is one of few agricultural databases that had an early start on the Internet and that has changed with the times. Initial goals were to collect a wide range of data relating to the developing maps and attributes of small grains crops, and to make them easily accessible. The ...

  3. Time Evolution of the Dynamical Variables of a Stochastic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Pena, L.

    1980-01-01

    By using the method of moments, it is shown that several important and apparently unrelated theorems describing average properties of stochastic systems are in fact particular cases of a general law; this method is applied to generalize the virial theorem and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to the time-dependent case. (Author/SK)

  4. Evolution of Management Thought in the Medieval Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, C. L.

    The medieval times witnessed progress toward the growth of larger and more complex organizations and the application of increasingly sophisticated management techniques. Feudalism contributed the concept of decentralization. The concepts evolved by the Catholic Church can scarcely be improved on and are very much pertinent to the management of…

  5. The time evolution of the Bohmian Pilot Wave

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlowski, Miroslaw; Marciak-Kozlowska, Janina

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the Newton-Schrodinger-Bohm equation is solved for particles with m>M_P. It is shown that the Bohmian pilot wave for particles with m>M_P oscillates with frequency omega=tau^{-1}_P, where tau_P is the Planck time. Key words: Macroscopic particles; Pilot wave.

  6. Microstructure Evolution in Nano-reinforced Ferritic Steel Processed By Mechanical Alloying and Spark Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulnat, Xavier; Perez, Michel; Fabregue, Damien; Douillard, Thierry; Mathon, Marie-Hélène; de Carlan, Yann

    2013-11-01

    Oxide-dispersion strengthened ferritic steel was produced by high-energy attrition, leading to a complex nanostructure with deformed ferritic grains. After mechanical alloying, the powder was then consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) using various thermo-mechanical treatments. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was also performed on the same powder for comparison. Above 1123 K (850 °C), SPS consolidation-induced heterogeneous microstructure composed of ultra-fine-grained regions surrounded by larger grains. Spatial distribution of the stored energy was measured in the bimodal microstructure using the Kernel average misorientation. In contrary to large recrystallized grains, ultra-fine grains are still substructured with low-angle grain boundaries. The precipitation kinetics of the nano-oxides during consolidation was determined by small-angle neutron scattering. Precipitation mainly occurred during the heating stage, leading to a high density of nanoclusters that are of prime importance for the mechanical properties. Other coarser titanium-enriched oxides were also detected. The multiscale characterization allowed us to understand and model the evolution of the complex microstructure. An analytical evaluation of the contributing mechanisms explains the appearance of the complex grain structure and its thermal stability during further heat treatments. Inhomogeneous distribution of plastic deformation in the powder is the major cause of heterogeneous recrystallization and further grain growth during hot consolidation. Then, the thermal stability of coherent nano-oxides is responsible for effective grain boundary pinning in recovered regions where the driving pressure for recrystallization is lowered. This scenario is confirmed in both SPSed and HIPed materials.

  7. Microstructural Evolution and Residual Stresses of Air-Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jae-Young; Kim, Jae-Hyoun; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Cho, Hyun; Yi, Dong-Kee; Paik, Ungyu

    Microstructural evolution and fracture behavior of zirconia (ZrO2)-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were investigated under thermal exposure. New ZrO2 granule with 8 wt.% yttria (Y2O3) with a deformed hollow morphology was developed through a spray drying process and employed to prepare TBCs. The thermal exposure tests were conducted at 1210°C with a dwell time of 100 h till 800 h. The residual stress at the interface between top coat and thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer was measured using a nanoindentation technique before and after thermal exposure. Vertical cracks on the top coat were newly formed and interlamellar cracks at the interface were enhanced after the thermal exposure of 800 h. Especially, partial delamination was observed at the interface after the thermal exposure of 800 h in TBC samples tested. The microstructural evolution in the top coat could be defined through load-displacement curves, showing a higher load or a less displacement after the thermal exposure of 800 h. The stress state was strongly dependent on the TGO geometry, resulting in the compressive stresses at the "valleys" or the "troughs," and the tensile stresses at the "crests" or peak areas, in the ranges of -500 to -75 MPa and of +168 to + 24 MPa, respectively. These stress terms incorporated with resintering during thermal exposure affected the mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus of the top coat.

  8. TIME DOMAIN ANALYSIS OF TRANSIENT PROPAGATION IN INHOMOGENEOUS MAGNETIZED PLASMA USING Z-TRANSFORMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Shoujiang; Li Fang

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic propagation through an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma slab is studied using the Z-transform formulation of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain(FDTD) method. The direction of electromagnetic propagation is parallel to the biasing magnetic filed. To validate the Z-transform algorithm, the reflection and transmission coefficients for the right-hand circularly polarized wave of the homogeneous magnetized plasma slab are computed by means of discrete Fourier transform. The comparison between the reflection and transmission coefficients of the homogeneous plasma slab and analytical values indicates that Z-transform algorithm is very accurate. When the plasma frequency varies according to the square root and parabolic relations, the reflection and transmission coefficients of the inhomogeneous magnetized plasma slab are computed.

  9. Performances and recent evolutions of EMSC Real Time Information services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazet-Roux, G.; Godey, S.; Bossu, R.

    2009-04-01

    The EMSC (http://www.emsc-csem.org) operates Real Time Earthquake Information services for the public and the scientific community which aim at providing rapid and reliable information on the seismic-ity of the Euro-Mediterranean region and on significant earthquakes worldwide. These services are based on parametric data rapidly provided by 66 seismological networks which are automatically merged and processed at EMSC. A web page which is updated every minute displays a list and a map of the latest earthquakes as well as additional information like location maps, moment tensors solutions or past regional seismicity. Since 2004, the performances and the popularity of these services have dramatically increased. The number of messages received from the contributors and the number of published events have been multiplied by 2 since 2004 and by 1.6 since 2005 respectively. The web traffic and the numbers of users of the Earthquake Notification Service (ENS) have been multiplied by 15 and 7 respectively. In terms of performances of the ENS, the median dissemination time for Euro-Med events is minutes in 2008. In order to further improve its performances and especially the speed and robustness of the reception of real time data, EMSC has recently implemented a software named QWIDS (Quake Watch Information Distribution System) which provides a quick and robust data exchange system through permanent TCP connections. At the difference with emails that can sometimes be delayed or lost, QWIDS is an actual real time communication system that ensures the data delivery. In terms of hardware, EMSC imple-mented a high availability, dynamic load balancing, redundant and scalable web servers infrastructure, composed of two SUN T2000 and one F5 BIG-IP switch. This will allow coping with constantly increas-ing web traffic and the occurrence of huge peaks of traffic after widely felt earthquakes.

  10. Enhancements and Evolution of the Real Time Mission Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, M.; Blakeslee, R.; Hardin, D.; Hall, J.; He, Y.; Regner, K.

    2008-12-01

    The Real Time Mission Monitor (RTMM) is a visualization and information system that fuses multiple Earth science data sources, to enable real time decision-making for airborne and ground validation experiments. Developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center, RTMM is a situational awareness, decision-support system that integrates satellite imagery, radar, surface and airborne instrument data sets, model output parameters, lightning location observations, aircraft navigation data, soundings, and other applicable Earth science data sets. The integration and delivery of this information is made possible using data acquisition systems, network communication links, network server resources, and visualizations through the Google Earth virtual earth application. RTMM has proven extremely valuable for optimizing individual Earth science airborne field experiments. Flight planners, mission scientists, instrument scientists and program managers alike appreciate the contributions that RTMM makes to their flight projects. RTMM has received numerous plaudits from a wide variety of scientists who used RTMM during recent field campaigns including the 2006 NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA), 2007 Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling (TC4), 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) missions, the 2007-2008 NOAA-NASA Aerosonde Hurricane flights and the 2008 Soil Moisture Active-Passive Validation Experiment (SMAP-VEX). Improving and evolving RTMM is a continuous process. RTMM recently integrated the Waypoint Planning Tool, a Java-based application that enables aircraft mission scientists to easily develop a pre-mission flight plan through an interactive point-and-click interface. Individual flight legs are automatically calculated for altitude, latitude, longitude, flight leg distance, cumulative distance, flight leg time, cumulative time, and

  11. Viewing the Chemical Evolution of the Quark-Gluon Plasma with Charge Balance Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Correlations from charge conservation are affected by when charge/anticharge pairs are created during the course of a relativistic heavy ion collision. For charges created early, balancing charges are typically separated by the order of one unit of spatial rapidity by the end of the collision, whereas those charges produced later in the collision are far more correlated. By analyzing correlations from STAR for different species, I show that one can distinguish the two separate waves of charge creation expected in a high-energy collision, one at early times when the QGP is formed and a second at hadronization. Further, I extract the density of up, down and strange quarks at in the QGP and find agreement at the 20% level with expectations for a chemically thermalized plasma.

  12. Floquet Topological Phases Driven by $\\mathcal{PT}$ Symmetric Nonunitary Time Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Dakyeong; Kawakami, Norio; Obuse, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    We study Floquet topological phases driven by $\\mathcal{PT}$ symmetric nonunitary time evolution in one dimension, based on an experimental setup of discrete-time quantum walks. We develop, for nonunitary time-evolution operators, a procedure to calculate topological invariants for Floquet topological phases and find that the bulk-edge correspondence gives correct predictions of the emergent edge states. These edge states make exponential growth of wavefunction amplitudes at specific positions with time controllable. Hereby, we propose that these phenomena inherent in open quantum systems are feasibly observed by present experiments of quantum walks in both classical and quantum regimes.

  13. Lie algebras for time evolution with applications from chaos studies to spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, Tim G.; Berrondo, Manuel; Beus, Ty; Sayer, Ryan T.; van Huele, Jean-Francois S.

    2012-10-01

    We illustrate the power of Lie algebras in computing the time evolution of quantum systems with time-dependent physical parameters. By factorizing the quantum mechanical time evolution operator and using the linear independence of the Lie algebra generators, we reduce the operator equations to systems of coupled ordinary differential equations of scalar functions applicable to a variety of dynamical systems. We use the results to explore the possibility of detecting chaos in quantum nonlinear oscillators based on criteria from classical chaos studies and to follow spin currents in time-dependent spin-orbit coupled media.

  14. Investigating the Dynamics and Density Evolution of Returning Plasma Blobs from the 2011 June 7 Eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Carlyle, Jack; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Innes, Davina; Hillier, Andrew; Matthews, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This work examines infalling matter following an enormous Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) on 2011 June 7. The material formed discrete concentrations, or blobs, in the corona and fell back to the surface, appearing as dark clouds against the bright corona. In this work we examined the density and dynamic evolution of these blobs in order to formally assess the intriguing morphology displayed throughout their descent. The blobs were studied in five wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193 and 211 \\AA) using the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), comparing background emission to attenuated emission as a function of wavelength to calculate column densities across the descent of four separate blobs. We found the material to have a column density of hydrogen of approximately 2 $\\times$ 10$^{19}$ cm$^{-2}$, which is comparable with typical pre-eruption filament column densities. Repeated splitting of the returning material is seen in a manner consistent with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Furthe...

  15. Evolution of Small Scale Density Perturbations of Plasma and Charged Aerosol Particles in Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) Layers%Evolution of Small Scale Density Perturbations of Plasma and Charged Aerosol Particles in Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡祖权; 陈银华; 郑聚高; 刘昊; 郁明阳; 吴剑

    2011-01-01

    Time evolution of ionospheric D-region plasmas including the perturbations of electrons and charged aerosol particles is investigated under the conditions of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). It is shown that the time scale of decay of the electron density is in the order of an hour under typical PMSE conditions, in the majority of cases, the electron density is anticorrelated to the ion density, except that the radius of aerosol particles is greater than 50 nm. Also, the evolutions under varied parameters, such as the amplitude and width of perturbation, the aerosol particle radius, and the altitude of the PMSE occurrence are investigated. The obtained results are useful for interpreting the experimental observations.

  16. Real-time evolution of quenched quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeckel, Michael

    2009-06-24

    Detailed geometries in heterostructures allow for nonequilibrium transport measurements in correlated systems, pump-probe experiments for time-resolved study of many-body relaxation in molecules and solids and ultracold atom gases loaded onto optical lattices for high control of system parameters in real time. In all of these fields of research the nonequilibrium properties of a Fermi liquid can be relevant. A first approach to their understanding is the main content of this thesis. At the beginning I collect a variety of nonequilibrium phenomena and introduce to basic questions and concepts for their study. The key observation of this thesis, namely a characteristic mismatch of expectation values in equilibrium and nonequilibrium, is first illustrated for the squeezed oscillator. Afterwards, these observations are generalized to a larger class of one-particle models. Then the nonequilibrium behavior of a Fermi liquid is examined by analyzing the Fermi liquid phase of the Hubbard model in more than one dimension. After a sudden switch-on of a weak two-particle interaction to the noninteracting Fermi gas the relaxation of the many-body system is observed. For this purpose, the flow equation transformation is implemented for the Hubbard Hamiltonian. Then the discussion of the momentum distribution function and of the kinetic energy displays a three-step relaxation behavior of the Fermi liquid from the initial perturbation until thermalization is reached. In order to extend the study of sudden switching to arbitrary switching processes the calculation is repeated using the Keldysh perturbation theory. (orig.)

  17. Time in Redox Adaptation Processes: From Evolution to Hormesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille M. J. P. E. Sthijns

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Life on Earth has to adapt to the ever changing environment. For example, due to introduction of oxygen in the atmosphere, an antioxidant network evolved to cope with the exposure to oxygen. The adaptive mechanisms of the antioxidant network, specifically the glutathione (GSH system, are reviewed with a special focus on the time. The quickest adaptive response to oxidative stress is direct enzyme modification, increasing the GSH levels or activating the GSH-dependent protective enzymes. After several hours, a hormetic response is seen at the transcriptional level by up-regulating Nrf2-mediated expression of enzymes involved in GSH synthesis. In the long run, adaptations occur at the epigenetic and genomic level; for example, the ability to synthesize GSH by phototrophic bacteria. Apparently, in an adaptive hormetic response not only the dose or the compound, but also time, should be considered. This is essential for targeted interventions aimed to prevent diseases by successfully coping with changes in the environment e.g., oxidative stress.

  18. Plio-Pleistocene time evolution of the 100-ky cycle in marine paleoclimate records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeffrey; Maasch, Kirk A.

    1992-01-01

    To constrain theories for the dynamical evolution of global ice mass through the late Neogene, it is important to determine whether major changes in the record were gradual or rapid. Of particular interest is the evolution of the near 100-ky ice age cycle in the middle Pleistocene. We have applied a new technique based on multiple taper spectrum analysis which allows us to model the time evolution of quasi-periodic signals. This technique uses both phase and amplitude information, and enables us to address the question of abrupt versus gradual onset of the 100-ky periodicity in the middle Pleistocene.

  19. Entropy evolution of field with a time-varying frequency in the Jaynes-Cummings model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Changdong

    2012-01-01

    Following Jaynes-Cummings model, the evolution of the field entropy in the system of a two-level atom inter- acting with the single mode coherent field is investigated under rotating-wave approximation. The typical case -- the field frequency variance with time in the form of sine ω = ω0 + usin(wt) has been considered. The influences of the amplitude and angle frequency of the field frequency variance on entropy evolution of the field are discussed by numerical calculations. Calculation results indicate that the field frequency variance influences violently the behavior of field entropy evolution; the larger the amplitude of the field frequency variance is, the stronger the influence of the field frequency variance on the time evolution of field entropy is.

  20. Mineralization through geologic time: Evolution of continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veizer, Jan; Laznicka, Peter; Jansen, S. L.

    1988-01-01

    In analogy to living systems, geologic entities (e.g., rocks, mineral deposits, tectonic realms and domains) are involved in the process of perpetual generation and destruction (birth/death cycles). This results in time distribution patterns akin to age structures in living populations and the systematics is amenable to treatment by the concepts of population dynamics. Utilizing this theoretical approach, the survivorship patterns for major realms of the plate tectonic system, for consitutent rocks, and for the entombed mineral resources are predicted. The present inventory encompasses global economic accumulations of metals by geologic age. The deposits of these metals were assigned to nine broad genetic categories, with an attempt to relate each category to tectonic setting within the framework of global plate tectonics.

  1. Mineralization through geologic time: Evolution of continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veizer, Jan; Laznicka, Peter; Jansen, S. L.

    In analogy to living systems, geologic entities (e.g., rocks, mineral deposits, tectonic realms and domains) are involved in the process of perpetual generation and destruction (birth/death cycles). This results in time distribution patterns akin to age structures in living populations and the systematics is amenable to treatment by the concepts of population dynamics. Utilizing this theoretical approach, the survivorship patterns for major realms of the plate tectonic system, for consitutent rocks, and for the entombed mineral resources are predicted. The present inventory encompasses global economic accumulations of metals by geologic age. The deposits of these metals were assigned to nine broad genetic categories, with an attempt to relate each category to tectonic setting within the framework of global plate tectonics.

  2. Real-time DSP-based shape determination and plasma position control in the ISTTOK tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, B. E-mail: bernardo@cfn.ist.utl.pt; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Borba, D.; Varandas, C.A.F

    2004-06-01

    We have developed a digital signal processor-based system for real-time control of the ISTTOK plasma position based on a low-cost digital signal processor (DSP) board. A novel plasma shape reproduction method was developed using a Cauchy-condition expansion applied to the vacuum region around the plasma. This method showed to be best suited than classic methods such as Legendre-Fourier expansion (LFE) or current filaments (CF), particularly in small tokamaks with passive stabilizer conductors where the presence of strong eddy currents can cause significant errors in magnetic field sensors. We compare the results of the boundary reconstruction method with the measurements from a microwave interferometer diagnostic. We present an implementation in the DSP system that allows the real time control of the plasma position with a required 1 ms period.

  3. Long Time Evolution of Populations under Selection and Vanishing Mutations

    KAUST Repository

    Raoul, Gaël

    2011-02-08

    In this paper, we consider a long time and vanishing mutations limit of an integro-differential model describing the evolution of a population structured with respect to a continuous phenotypic trait. We show that the asymptotic population is a steady-state of the evolution equation without mutations, and satisfies an evolutionary stability condition. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  4. A principal possibility for computer investigation of evolution of dynamical systems independent on time accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurzadyan, V.G. [Sapienza University of Rome, SIA, Rome (Italy); Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Harutyunyan, V.V. [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Kocharyan, A.A. [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Monash University, School of Mathematical Sciences, Clayton (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Extensive N-body simulations are among the key means for the study of numerous astrophysical and cosmological phenomena, so various schemes are developed for possibly higher accuracy computations. We demonstrate the principal possibility for revealing the evolution of a perturbed Hamiltonian system with an accuracy independent on time. The method is based on the Laplace transform and the derivation and analytical solution of an evolution equation in the phase space for the resolvent and using computer algebra. (orig.)

  5. Space-Time Localization of Plasma Turbulence Using Multiple Spacecraft Radio Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, John W.; Estabrook, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Space weather is described as the variability of solar wind plasma that can disturb satellites and systems and affect human space exploration. Accurate prediction requires information of the heliosphere inside the orbit of the Earth. However, for predictions using remote sensing, one needs not only plane-of-sky position but also range information the third spatial dimension to show the distance to the plasma disturbances and thus when they might propagate or co-rotate to create disturbances at the orbit of the Earth. Appropriately processed radio signals from spacecraft having communications lines-of-sight passing through the inner heliosphere can be used for this spacetime localization of plasma disturbances. The solar plasma has an electron density- and radio-wavelength-dependent index of refraction. An approximately monochromatic wave propagating through a thin layer of plasma turbulence causes a geometrical-optics phase shift proportional to the electron density at the point of passage, the radio wavelength, and the thickness of the layer. This phase shift is the same for a wave propagating either up or down through the layer at the point of passage. This attribute can be used for space-time localization of plasma irregularities. The transfer function of plasma irregularities to the observed time series depends on the Doppler tracking mode. When spacecraft observations are in the two-way mode (downlink radio signal phase-locked to an uplink radio transmission), plasma fluctuations have a two-pulse response in the Doppler. In the two-way mode, the Doppler time series y2(t) is the difference between the frequency of the downlink signal received and the frequency of a ground reference oscillator. A plasma blob localized at a distance x along the line of sight perturbs the phase on both the up and down link, giving rise to two events in the two-way tracking time series separated by a time lag depending the blob s distance from the Earth: T2-2x/c, where T2 is the

  6. Digital Holography for in Situ Real-Time Measurement of Plasma-Facing-Component Erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ThomasJr., C. E. [Third Dimension Technologies, LLC, Knoxville, TN; Granstedt, E. M. [Tri-Alpha Energy; Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J [ORNL; Hillis, Donald Lee [ORNL; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

    2014-01-01

    In situ, real time measurement of net plasma-facing-component (PFC) erosion/deposition in a real plasma device is challenging due to the need for good spatial and temporal resolution, sufficient sensitivity, and immunity to fringe-jump errors. Design of a high-sensitivity, potentially high-speed, dual-wavelength CO2 laser digital holography system (nominally immune to fringe jumps) for PFC erosion measurement is discussed.

  7. Effect of q-nonextensive parameter and saturation time on electron density steepening in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemzadeh, M.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of q-nonextensive parameter and saturation time on the electron density steepening in electron-positron-ion plasmas is studied by particle in cell method. Phase space diagrams show that the size of the holes, and consequently, the number of trapped particles strongly depends on the q-parameter and saturation time. Furthermore, the mechanism of the instability and exchange of energy between electron-positron and electric field is explained by the profiles of the energy density. Moreover, it is found that the q-parameter, saturation time, and electron and positron velocities affect the nonlinear evolution of the electron density which leads to the steepening of its structure. The q-nonextensive parameter or degree of nonextensivity is the relation between temperature gradient and potential energy of the system. Therefore, the deviation of q-parameter from unity indicates the degree of inhomogeneity of temperature or deviation from equilibrium. Finally, using the kinetic theory, a generalized q-dispersion relation is presented for electron-positron-ion plasma systems. It is found that the simulation results in the linear regime are in good agreement with the growth rate results obtained by the kinetic theory.

  8. The march of time and the "evolution" of change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Van Tonder

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Change and organisational change are some of the most discussed topics of our time. Yet despite this, reported success rates for major organisational change initiatives remain exceptionally poor. Part of the problem is that contemporary change management practices assume a stable, unidimensional concept of organisational change. By contrast an analysis of organisational and systems thinking over the past five decades or so reveals an evolving concept of organisation and consequently invalidates the assumption of organisational change as a stable unidimensional concept. The evolving character of organisational change and its implications for change management practices are briefly indicated. Opsomming Verandering en organisasieverandering is van die mees besproke onderwerpe van ons tyd. Ten spyte hiervan bly die gerapporteerde sukseskoers vir primêre organisasieveranderingsinisiatiewe buitengewoon swak. Deel van die probleem is daarin geleë dat kontemporêre veranderingsbestuurspraktyke die aanname maak dat organisasieverandering ’n stabiele, een-dimensionele konsep is. In stryd hiermee toon ’n ontleding van organisasieen sisteemdenke oor die afgelope vyf of so dekades egter ’n ontwikkelende konsep van organisasie wat gevolglik die aanname van ’n stabiele en een-dimensionele organisasieveranderingskonsep ongeldig verklaar. Die ontwikkelende karakter van organisasieverandering en die implikasies daarvan vir veranderingsbestuurspraktyke word kortliks aangedui.

  9. Online evolution reconstruction from a single measurement record with random time intervals for quantum communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Su, Yang; Wang, Rong; Zhu, Yong; Shen, Huiping; Pu, Tao; Wu, Chuanxin; Zhao, Jiyong; Zhang, Baofu; Xu, Zhiyong

    2017-10-01

    Online reconstruction of a time-variant quantum state from the encoding/decoding results of quantum communication is addressed by developing a method of evolution reconstruction from a single measurement record with random time intervals. A time-variant two-dimensional state is reconstructed on the basis of recovering its expectation value functions of three nonorthogonal projectors from a random single measurement record, which is composed from the discarded qubits of the six-state protocol. The simulated results prove that our method is robust to typical metro quantum channels. Our work extends the Fourier-based method of evolution reconstruction from the version for a regular single measurement record with equal time intervals to a unified one, which can be applied to arbitrary single measurement records. The proposed protocol of evolution reconstruction runs concurrently with the one of quantum communication, which can facilitate the online quantum tomography.

  10. Novel quantum description for nonadiabatic evolution of light wave propagation in time-dependent linear media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakehal, Halim; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2016-02-01

    A simple elegant expression of nonadiabatic light wave evolution is necessary in order to have a deeper insight for complicated optical phenomena in light science as well as in everyday life. Light wave propagation in linear media which have time-dependent electromagnetic parameters is investigated by utilizing a quadratic invariant of the system. The time behavior of the nonadiabatic geometric phase of the waves that yield a cyclic nonadiabatic evolution is analyzed in detail. Various quantum properties of light waves in this situation, such as variances of electric and magnetic fields, uncertainty product, coherent and squeezed states, and their classical limits, are developed. For better understanding of our research, we applied our analysis in a particular case. The variances of the fields D and B are illustrated and their time behaviors are addressed. Equivalent results for the corresponding classical systems are deduced from the study of the time evolution of the appropriate coherent and squeezed states.

  11. Study of Simulation Method of Time Evolution of Atomic and Molecular Systems by Quantum Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a method to follow step-by-step time evolution of atomic and molecular systems based on QED (Quantum Electrodynamics). Our strategy includes expanding the electron field operator by localized wavepackets to define creation and annihilation operators and following the time evolution using the equations of motion of the field operator in the Heisenberg picture. We first derive a time evolution equation for the excitation operator, the product of two creation or annihilation operators, which is necessary for constructing operators of physical quantities such as the electronic charge density operator. We then describe our approximation methods to obtain time differential equations of the electronic density matrix, which is defined as the expectation value of the excitation operator. By solving the equations numerically, we show "electron-positron oscillations", the fluctuations originated from virtual electron-positron pair creations and annihilations, appear in the charge density of a hydrogen atom an...

  12. Novel quantum description for nonadiabatic evolution of light wave propagation in time-dependent linear media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakehal, Halim; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2016-02-05

    A simple elegant expression of nonadiabatic light wave evolution is necessary in order to have a deeper insight for complicated optical phenomena in light science as well as in everyday life. Light wave propagation in linear media which have time-dependent electromagnetic parameters is investigated by utilizing a quadratic invariant of the system. The time behavior of the nonadiabatic geometric phase of the waves that yield a cyclic nonadiabatic evolution is analyzed in detail. Various quantum properties of light waves in this situation, such as variances of electric and magnetic fields, uncertainty product, coherent and squeezed states, and their classical limits, are developed. For better understanding of our research, we applied our analysis in a particular case. The variances of the fields D and B are illustrated and their time behaviors are addressed. Equivalent results for the corresponding classical systems are deduced from the study of the time evolution of the appropriate coherent and squeezed states.

  13. Time evolution of electron structure in femtosecond heated warm dense molybdenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recoules, V.; Dorchies, F.; Bouchet, J.; Fourment, C.; Leguay, P. M.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Ozkan, C.; Tshentscher, T.; Harmand, M.; Toleikis, S.; Stormer, M.; Galtier, E.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Heimann, P. A.; Gaudin, J.

    2015-11-01

    The time evolution of the electron structure is investigated in a molybdenum foil heated up to the warm dense matter regime by a femtosecond laser pulse, through time-resolved XANES spectroscopy. Spectra are measured with independent control of temperature and density. They are successfully compared with ab initio quantum molecular dynamic calculations and an analytical model. We demonstrate that the observed white line in the L3-edge reveals the time evolution of the electron density of state from the solid to the hot (a few eV) and expanding liquid.

  14. The plasma structure of coronal hole solar wind: Origins and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    2016-06-01

    Whereas slow solar wind is known to be highly structured, the fast (coronal hole origin) wind is usually considered to be homogeneous. Using measurements from Helios 1 + 2, ACE, Wind, and Ulysses, structure in the coronal hole origin solar wind is examined from 0.3 AU to 2.3 AU. Care is taken to collect and analyze intervals of "unperturbed coronal hole plasma." In these intervals, solar wind structure is seen in the proton number density, proton temperature, proton specific entropy, magnetic field strength, magnetic field to density ratio, electron heat flux, helium abundance, heavy-ion charge-state ratios, and Alfvenicity. Typical structure amplitudes are factors of 2, far from homogeneous. Variations are also seen in the solar wind radial velocity. Using estimates of the motion of the solar wind origin footpoint on the Sun for the various spacecraft, the satellite time series measurements are converted to distance along the photosphere. Typical variation scale lengths for the solar wind structure are several variations per supergranule. The structure amplitude and structure scale sizes do not evolve with distance from the Sun from 0.3 to 2.3 AU. An argument is quantified that these variations are the scale expected for solar wind production in open magnetic flux funnels in coronal holes. Additionally, a population of magnetic field foldings (switchbacks, reversals) in the coronal hole plasma is examined: this population evolves with distance from the Sun such that the magnetic field is mostly Parker spiral aligned at 0.3 AU and becomes more misaligned with distance outward.

  15. Photoluminescence, time-resolved emission and photoresponse of plasma-modified porous silicon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benyahia, Be., E-mail: benyahiabedra@hotmail.com [Unité de Développement de la Technologie du Silicium, 2 Boulevard Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140, Alger-7 Merveilles, Algiers 16200 (Algeria); Guerbous, L. [Centre de Recherche Nucléaire d' Alger, 2 Boulevard Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-Gare, Algiers 16000 (Algeria); Gabouze, N.; Mahmoudi, Br. [Unité de Développement de la Technologie du Silicium, 2 Boulevard Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140, Alger-7 Merveilles, Algiers 16200 (Algeria)

    2013-07-01

    Photoluminescence and photoelectrical study on plasma-modified porous silicon (PS) thin films is presented. Porous silicon passivated by hydrocarbon groups (CH{sub x}) shows an intense broad and stable photoluminescence (PL) band centered at 623 nm whereas the maximum of the photosensitivity spectrum is placed around 400 nm. Along with its potential utilization for silicon-based light emitters' fabrication, it could also represent an appealing option for the improvement of energy conversion efficiency in silicon-based solar cells whether by using its luminescence properties (photon down-conversion) or the excess photocurrent produced by an improved high-energy photon's absorption. Excitation spectra (PLE) under steady-state conditions are reported. PLE shows that visible PL is excited by light from UV region. The time-resolved photoluminescence of CH{sub x}/PS in the range of some tenth of μs are investigated at room temperature. The PL decay line shape, in CH{sub x}/PS is well described by stretched exponential. The photosensitivity spectroscopy shows a significant increase of absorption at high photon energy excitation. - Highlights: • Coating porous silicon (PS) by hydrocarbon (CH{sub x}) reduces nonradiative transition. • Drop of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity. • The PL of CH{sub x}/PS is due to radiative transitions at 1.8 and 1.87 eV. • Photosensitivity revealed an excess spectral response (SR) at high-energy excitation. • For photovoltaic PL and SR could be used for the evolution of the silicon solar cells.

  16. Solution of time-dependent Boltzmann equation for electrons in non-thermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trunec, D; Bonaventura, Z; Necas, D [Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2006-06-21

    The time development of the electron distribution function and electron macroscopic parameters was studied by solving the time-dependent Boltzmann equation for low temperature plasma. A new technique for solving the time-dependent Boltzmann equation was developed. This technique is based on a multi-term approximation of the electron distribution function expansion in Legendre polynomials. The results for electron relaxation in Reid's ramp model and argon plasma are presented. The effect of negative mobility was studied and is discussed for argon plasma. Finally, the time-dependent Boltzmann equation was solved for pulsed microwave discharge in nitrogen. The accuracy of all results was confirmed by the Monte Carlo simulation.

  17. The evolution of ion charge states in cathodic vacuum arc plasmas: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2011-12-18

    Cathodic vacuum arc plasmas are known to contain multiply charged ions. 20 years after “Pressure Ionization: its role in metal vapour vacuum arc plasmas and ion sources” appeared in vol. 1 of Plasma Sources Science and Technology, it is a great opportunity to re-visit the issue of pressure ionization, a non-ideal plasma effect, and put it in perspective to the many other factors that influence observable charge state distributions, such as the role of the cathode material, the path in the density-temperature phase diagram, the “noise” in vacuum arc plasma as described by a fractal model approach, the effects of external magnetic fields and charge exchange collisions with neutrals. A much more complex image of the vacuum arc plasma emerges putting decades of experimentation and modeling in perspective.

  18. Feature Profile Evolution During Etching of SiO2 in Radio-Frequency or Direct-Current Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhanqiang; Dai, Zhongling; Wang, Younian

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a plasma etching simulator to investigate the evolution of pattern profiles in SiO2 material under different plasma conditions. This model focuses on energy and angular dependent etching yield (physical sputtering in this paper), neutral and ion angular distributions, and reflection of ions or neutrals on the surface of a photoresist or SiO2. The effect of positive charge accumulation on the surface of insulated mask or SiO2 is studied and the charge accumulation contributes to a deflection of ion trajectory. The wafer profile evolution has been simulated using a cellular-automata-like method under radio-frequency (RF) bias and direct-current (DC) bias, respectively. On the basis of the critical role of angular distribution of ions or neutrals, the wafer profile evolution has been simulated for different variances of angles. Observed microtrenching has been well reproduced in the simulator. The ratio of neutrals to ions has been considered and the result shows that because the neutrals are not accelerated by an electric field, their energy is much lower compared with ions, so they are easily reflected on the surface of SiO2, which makes the trench shallower.

  19. Timing and flux evolution of the galactic center magnetar SGR J1745–2900

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.; Archibald, Robert F.; Bhalerao, Varun;

    2014-01-01

    We present the X-ray timing and spectral evolution of the Galactic Center magnetar SGR J1745–2900 for the first ∼4 months post-discovery using data obtained with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array and Swift observatories. Our timing analysis reveals a large increase in the magnetar spin-do...

  20. Time resolved measurements of the CF{sub 2} rotational temperature in pulsed fluorocarbon rf plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, O; Stepanov, S; Pfafferott, M; Meichsner, J [Institute of Physics, University of Greifswald, Domstrasse 10a, D-17498, Greifswald (Germany)

    2006-11-01

    Knowledge of the absolute densities of small radicals like CF, CF{sub 2} and CF{sub 3} in fluorocarbon plasmas is essential for a fundamental understanding of plasma chemical processes and plasma surface interaction. Infrared absorption spectroscopy by means of tunable diode lasers (IR-TDLAS) was established and widely used for density measurements in the last decade. The often unknown parameter in the calculation of absolute radical densities from a measured absorption of a single line is the rotational temperature. In particular, a strong dependence of the line strength on rotational temperature has a significant influence on density calculation. In this paper we report on measurements of the CF{sub 2} rotational temperature in capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2} plasmas (CCP) with rf (13.56 MHz) powers up to 200 W. Rotational temperatures in continuous and pulsed modes of the discharge were found to be between 300 and 450 K. Furthermore, first measurements of the time dependence of the rotational temperature in pulsed rf plasma are presented. The rotational temperature rises in the plasma phase within 0.1 s and goes down again to the temperature of the background gas in the plasma pause within 0.5 s. It is also shown that accurate density measurements of the radicals by means of single line absorption need correct information about the rotational temperature and careful selection of a suitable absorption line.

  1. The Early-Time Evolution of the Cosmological Perturbations in f(R) Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Je-An; Wu, Yen-Ting; Chen, Pisin; Hwang, W-Y Pauchy

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of the linear cosmological perturbations in f(R) gravity, an alternative to dark energy for explaining the late-time cosmic acceleration. We numerically calculate the early-time evolution with an approximation we contrive to solve a problem that commonly appears when one solves the full evolution equations. With the approximate evolution equations we can fairly assess the effect of the gravity modification on the early-time evolution, thereby examining the validity of the general-relativity (GR) approximation that is widely used for the early universe. In particular, we compare the CMB photon density perturbation and the matter density perturbation obtained respectively by our approximation and the conventional GR approximation. We find that the effect of the gravity modification at early times in f(R) gravity may not be negligible. We conclude that to be self-consistent, in the f(R) theory one should employ the approximation presented in this paper instead of that of GR in the tr...

  2. Multirate Particle-in-Cell Time Integration Techniques of Vlasov-Maxwell Equations for Collisionless Kinetic Plasma Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Guangye [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chacon, Luis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knoll, Dana Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barnes, Daniel C [Coronado Consulting

    2015-07-31

    A multi-rate PIC formulation was developed that employs large timesteps for slow field evolution, and small (adaptive) timesteps for particle orbit integrations. Implementation is based on a JFNK solver with nonlinear elimination and moment preconditioning. The approach is free of numerical instabilities (ωpeΔt >>1, and Δx >> λD), and requires many fewer dofs (vs. explicit PIC) for comparable accuracy in challenging problems. Significant gains (vs. conventional explicit PIC) may be possible for large scale simulations. The paper is organized as follows: Vlasov-Maxwell Particle-in-cell (PIC) methods for plasmas; Explicit, semi-implicit, and implicit time integrations; Implicit PIC formulation (Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) with nonlinear elimination allows different treatments of disparate scales, discrete conservation properties (energy, charge, canonical momentum, etc.)); Some numerical examples; and Summary.

  3. Convergence for Imaginary Time Step evolution in the Fermi and Dirac seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The convergence for the Imaginary Time Step (ITS) evolution with time step is investigated by performing the ITS evolution for the Schrdinger-like equation and the charge-conjugate Schrdinger-like equation deduced from Dirac equation for the single proton levels of 12C in both the Fermi and Dirac seas. For the guaranteed convergence of the ITS evolution to the "exact" results,the time step should be smaller than a "critical" time step Δtc for a given single-particle level. The "critical" time step Δtc is more sensitive to the quantum numbers |κ| than to the energy of the single-particle level. For the single-particle levels with the same κ,their "critical" time steps are in the same order. For the single-particle levels with similar energy,a relatively small (large) "critical" time step for larger (smaller) |κ| is needed. These conclusions can be used in the future self-consistent calculation to optimize the evolution procedure.

  4. Optical and Thermal Analysis of the Time Evolution of Curing in Resins by Photothermal Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, P.; Zambrano-Arjona, M.; Aguilar, G.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    Four shades of a commercial visible-light curing dental resin are analyzed using photothermal techniques. The thermal effusivities of the dental resin shades before curing are measured using a variant of the conventional photoacoustic technique. The thermal diffusivities before and after curing are measured using infrared photothermal radiometry in the forward emission configuration. The time evolution process of the photocuring resin is monitored by photothermal radiometry in the forward and backward emission configurations. Inversion of the time evolution signal of the different configurations used permits one to obtain the time evolution of the thermal and optical properties during the photocuring. The thermal effusivity and thermal diffusivity exhibit exponential growth, while the optical absorption decreases exponentially due to the curing process. The relationship of these phenomena with the decrease of monomer concentration induced by the curing is discussed.

  5. Effect of the gas temperature and pressure on the nucleation time of particles in low pressure Ar-C2H2 rf plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiashu; Henault, Marie; Orazbayev, Sagi; Boufendi, Laïa; Takahashi, Kazuo; Al Farabi Kazakh National University Collaboration; Kyoto Institute Of Technology Team; Gremi Team

    2016-09-01

    Particle formation in low pressure plasmas is a 3-step process. The first one corresponds to the nucleation and growth of nano-crystallites by ion-molecular reactions, the agglomeration phase to form large particles, and the growth by radical deposition on the particle surface. The nucleation phase was demonstrated to be sensitive to gas temperature and pressure. In this work, time of nucleation phase of particles formation in low pressure cold rf C2H2/Ar plasmas studied by varying gas temperature from 265 K to 375 K, gas pressure from 0.4 mbar to 0.8 mbar and rf power from 6 W to 20 W. The ratio of C2H2/Ar is fixed to 2/98 in terms of pressure. Several previous works reported that particle formation takes a few sec at room temperature in C2 H2 plasmas and the time is much shorter than 0.1 s in SiH4 plasmas. Time evolution of self-bias voltage was mainly used to determine nucleation time. The self-bias voltage was modified by phase transition between the steps from nucleation to coagulation. The experimental results showed that the nucleation time increased with gas temperature, decreased with gas pressure and discharge power. At constant gas pressure of 0.4 mbar and discharge power of 6 W, for example, the nucleation time increased from 5 sec to 30 sec with increas

  6. HARDENING OF CRANE RAILS BY PLASMA DISCRETE-TIME SURFACE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Samotugin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Crane wheels and rails are subjected to intensive wear in the process of operation. Therefore, improvement of these components’ performance can be considered a task of high importance. A promising direction in this regard is surface treatment by highly concentrated energy flows such as laser beams or plasma jets. This thesis suggests that the use of gradient plasma surface treatment can improve the performance of crane rails. A research was conducted, according to which hardened zones were deposited on crane rails under different treatment modes. Microhardness was measured both at the surface and in depth using custom-made microsections. The article includes the results of study of plasma surface hardening effects on wear resistance of crane rails. Change of plasma surface treatment parameters (current, plasma torch movement speed, argon gas flow rate allows for desired steel hardness and structure, while the choice of optimal location for hardened zones makes it possible to significantly improve wear resistance and crack resistance. As a result of plasma surface hardening, the fine-grained martensite structure is obtained with mainly lamellar morphology and higher hardness rate compared toinduction hardening or overlaying. Wear test of carbon steels revealed that plasma surfacing reduces abrasive wear rate compared to the irinitial state by 2 to 3 times. Enough sharp boundary between hardened and non-hardened portions has a positive effect on the performance of parts under dynamic loads, contributing to the inhibition of cracks during the transition from solid to a soft metal. For carbon and low alloy rail steels, the properties achieved by plasma surface hardening can effectively replace induction hardening or overlaying.The mode range for plasma surface treatment that allow sobtaining a surface layer with certain operating properties has been determined.

  7. Development of efficient time-evolution method based on three-term recurrence relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akama, Tomoko, E-mail: a.tomo---s-b-l-r@suou.waseda.jp; Kobayashi, Osamu; Nanbu, Shinkoh, E-mail: shinkoh.nanbu@sophia.ac.jp [Department of Materials and Life Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2015-05-28

    The advantage of the real-time (RT) propagation method is a direct solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation which describes frequency properties as well as all dynamics of a molecular system composed of electrons and nuclei in quantum physics and chemistry. Its applications have been limited by computational feasibility, as the evaluation of the time-evolution operator is computationally demanding. In this article, a new efficient time-evolution method based on the three-term recurrence relation (3TRR) was proposed to reduce the time-consuming numerical procedure. The basic formula of this approach was derived by introducing a transformation of the operator using the arcsine function. Since this operator transformation causes transformation of time, we derived the relation between original and transformed time. The formula was adapted to assess the performance of the RT time-dependent Hartree-Fock (RT-TDHF) method and the time-dependent density functional theory. Compared to the commonly used fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, our new approach decreased computational time of the RT-TDHF calculation by about factor of four, showing the 3TRR formula to be an efficient time-evolution method for reducing computational cost.

  8. Time-related surface modification of denture base acrylic resin treated by atmospheric pressure cold plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kun; Pan, Hong; Li, Yinglong; Wang, Guomin; Zhang, Jue; Pan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The changes of denture base acrylic resin surface properties under cold plasma and the relationships with time were investigated. Cold plasma treated the specimens for 30 s, 60 s, 90 s, and 120 s, respectively. Water contact angles were measured immediately after the treatment, 48 h, 15 days and 30 days later. Surface roughness was measured with 3-D laser scanning microscope. Candida albicans adherence was evaluated by CFU counting. Chemical composition was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Water contact angle reduced after treated for 30 s. No changes were observed with time prolonged, except the durability. There were no differences in roughness among all groups. However, treatment groups showed significantly lower C. albicans adherence. XPS demonstrated a decrease in C/O, and this reduction was affected by treatment time. Cold plasma was an effective means of increasing hydrophilicity of acrylic resin and reducing C. albicans adherence without affecting physical properties.

  9. Linear MHD Wave Propagation in Time-Dependent Flux Tube. III. Leaky Waves in Zero-Beta Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we evaluate the time-dependent wave properties and the damping rate of propagating fast magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) waves when energy leakage into a magnetised atmosphere is considered. By considering a cold plasma, initial investigations into the evolution of MHD wave damping through this energy leakage will take place. The time-dependent governing equations have been derived previously in Williamson and Erdélyi (2014a, Solar Phys. 289, 899 - 909) and are now solved when the assumption of evanescent wave propagation in the outside of the waveguide is relaxed. The dispersion relation for leaky waves applicable to a straight magnetic field is determined in both an arbitrary tube and a thin-tube approximation. By analytically solving the dispersion relation in the thin-tube approximation, the explicit expressions for the temporal evolution of the dynamic frequency and wavenumber are determined. The damping rate is, then, obtained from the dispersion relation and is shown to decrease as the density ratio increases. By comparing the decrease in damping rate to the increase in damping for a stationary system, as shown, we aim to point out that energy leakage may not be as efficient a damping mechanism as previously thought.

  10. Nonlinear Evolutions of Stimulated Raman and Brillouin Scattering Processes in Partially Stripped-Ion Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡业民; 胡希伟

    2001-01-01

    Numerical analyses for the nonlinear evolutions of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) processes are given. Various effects of the second- and third-order nonlinear susceptibilities on the SRS and SBS processes are studied. The nonlinear evolutions of SRS and SBS processes are atfected more efficiently than their linear growth rates by the nonlinear susceptibility.

  11. Application of generalized operator representation in the time evolution of quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rui; Liu, Xiangyuan; Song, Jun

    2016-10-01

    We have systematically explored the application of generalized operator representation including P-, W-, and Husimi representation in the time evolution of quantum systems. In particular, by using the method of differentiation within an ordered product of operators, we give the normally and antinormally ordered forms of the integral kernels of Husimi operator representations and its corresponding formulations. By making use of the generalized operator representation, we transform exponentially complex operator equations into tractable phase-space equations. As a simple application, the time evolution equation of Husimi function in the amplitude dissipative channel is clearly obtained.

  12. Space-time evolution of ultrarelativistic quantum dipoles in quantum electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, B.

    2004-09-01

    We discuss space-time evolution of ultrarelativistic quantum dipole in QED. We show that the space-time evolution can be described, in a certain approximation, by means of a regularized wave function, whose parameters are determined by the process of the dipole creation by a local current. Using these wave functions, we derive the dipole expansion law that is found to coincide parametrically in the leading order with the one suggested by G. R. Farrar et al. (G. R. Farrar, H. Liu, L. Frankfurt and M. Strikman, Phys. Rev. Lett, Vol.61, p.686, 1988).

  13. Towards investigation of evolution of dynamical systems with independence of time accuracy: more classes of systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurzadyan, V.G. [SIA, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Kocharyan, A.A. [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Monash University, School of Mathematical Sciences, Clayton (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    The recently developed method (Paper 1) enabling one to investigate the evolution of dynamical systems with an accuracy not dependent on time is developed further. The classes of dynamical systems which can be studied by that method are much extended, now including systems that are: (1) non-Hamiltonian, conservative; (2) Hamiltonian with time-dependent perturbation; (3) non-conservative (with dissipation). These systems cover various types of N-body gravitating systems of astrophysical and cosmological interest, such as the orbital evolution of planets, minor planets, artificial satellites due to tidal, non-tidal perturbations and thermal thrust, evolving close binary stellar systems, and the dynamics of accretion disks. (orig.)

  14. Evolution processes of a group of equatorial plasma bubble (EPBs) simultaneously observed by ground-based and satellite measurements in the equatorial region of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Longchang; Xu, Jiyao; Wang, Wenbin; Yuan, Wei; Zhu, Yajun

    2017-04-01

    This paper for the first time reports conjugate observations of a group of evolving equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) generated in the longitudinal sector of China on 4/5 November 2013 using simultaneous airglow and Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) observations. The airglow depletion structures seen by two all-sky airglow imagers had the same zonal wavelength as that of the longitudinally periodic electron density depletions observed by the C/NOFS satellite which occurred at almost the same time but at magnetically conjugate latitudes. Data from a VHF radar and a Digisonde were combined to investigate the evolution of the EPB group, including their generation, development, and dissipation. Results indicate that the EPB group developed from the bottomside large-scale wave-like structure (LSWS) at about 195-210 km height with a characteristic zonal wavelength and longitudinal extension of about 450 km and 2250 km, respectively. The EPB group also caused periodic bottomside type spread F associated with the LSWS. We found that the development of the EPB group and their associated spread F could be limited by the equatorward motion of equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) and the southwestward motion of an extremely bright airglow region (SMEBAR). The SMEBAR is a newly discovered structure of plasma density increase but not a plasma blob reported before. Both EIA and SMEBAR could feed high plasma density into an EPB airglow depletion structure that was eventually seen as a bright airglow structure or disappeared. Meanwhile, spread F associated with the EPBs did not evolve from the bottomside type into the strong range type.

  15. Optical diagnostics of femtosecond laser plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉同; 张杰; 陈黎明; 夏江帆; 腾浩; 赵理曾; 林景全; 李英骏; 魏志义; 王龙; 江文勉

    2001-01-01

    Optical diagnostics of evolution of plasmas produced by ultrashort laser pulses is carried out using a femtosecond probing beam. The time sequence of plasma shadowgrams and interferograms are obtained. The filamentation instability in high_density region induces the local density modification. Large_scale toroidal magnetic fields confine plasma expansion in the transverse direction, resulting in the formation of a plasma jet. The plasma expansion along the target normal direction is found to scale as 1 2.

  16. Real-time wavelet detection of crashes in limit cycles of non-stationary fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkel, M. van, E-mail: m.v.berkel@tue.nl [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Witvoet, G.; Baar, M.R. de [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Nuij, P.W.J.M. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Morsche, H.G. ter [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Steinbuch, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose a new wavelet-based method for accurate and robust detection of limit cycle crashes in fusion plasmas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method is optimized for real-time applications such that it has small delay. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method is implemented in a real-time algorithm and is tested on experimental data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost all crashes are detected flawlessly including off-waveforms with high SNR. - Abstract: The high performance mode (H-mode) is one of the baseline plasma scenarios for the experimental fusion reactor ITER. This scenario features a periodic crash-like reorganization of the plasma pressure and the magnetic flux in the plasma core and plasma periphery. The core instability is often referred to as the sawtooth instability while the instability at the edge of the plasma is referred to as ELM. In this paper we present an algorithm for optimized (low latency, robust and high fidelity) real-time sensing of the crashes. The algorithm is based on time-scale wavelet theory and edge-detection. It is argued that detection of crashes has considerably less delay than the other methods. The realized accuracy of the detection algorithm is well below the uncertainty of the crash period for most crashes. Multiresolution analysis enables distinction between different sizes of sawtooth crashes due to the different sizes of wavelets (scales), resulting in an algorithm, which is robust and accurate. Although strictly speaking, the crash detection method is demonstrated for sawteeth measured with ECE only, it can be applied to any periodic crash, measured with any temporally resolved data. Note that the possibility of differentiating between crash like events of different nature depends on their individual time-scales and used measurement setup.

  17. Microstructural evolution and growth kinetics of thermally grown oxides in plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoju Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of thermally grown oxide (TGO during high temperature is a key factor to the degradation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs applied on hot section components. In the present study both the CoNiCrAlY bond coat and ZrO2-8 wt.% Y2O3 (8YSZ ceramic coat of TBCs were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS. The composition and microstructure of TGO in TBCs were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The growth rate of TGO for TBC and pure BC were gained after isothermal oxidation at 1100 °C for various times. The results showed that as-sprayed bond coat consisted of β and γ/γ′phases, β phase reducesd as the oxidation time increased. The TGO comprised α-Al2O3 formed in the first 2 h. CoO, NiO, Cr2O3 and spinel oxides appeared after 20 h of oxidation. Contents of CoO and NiO reduced while that of Cr2O3 and spinel oxides increased in the later oxidation stage. The TGO eventually consisted of a sub-Al2O3 layer with columnar microstructure and the upper porous CS clusters. The TGO growth kinetics for two kinds of samples followed parabolic laws, with oxidation rate constant of 0.344 μm/h0.5 for TBCs and 0.354 μm/h0.5 for pure BCs.

  18. Microstructural evolution and growth kinetics of thermally grown oxides in plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoju Liu; Teng Wang; Caicai Li; Zhenhuan Zheng; Qiang Li

    2016-01-01

    The formation of thermally grown oxide (TGO) during high temperature is a key factor to the degradation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied on hot section components. In the present study both the CoNiCrAlY bond coat and ZrO2-8 wt.% Y2O3 (8YSZ) ceramic coat of TBCs were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS). The composition and microstructure of TGO in TBCs were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The growth rate of TGO for TBC and pure BC were gained after isothermal oxidation at 1100 °C for various times. The results showed that as-sprayed bond coat consisted of β and γ/γ'phases,β phase reducesd as the oxidation time increased. The TGO comprised α-Al2O3 formed in the first 2 h. CoO, NiO, Cr2O3 and spinel oxides appeared after 20 h of oxidation. Contents of CoO and NiO reduced while that of Cr2O3 and spinel oxides increased in the later oxidation stage. The TGO eventually consisted of a sub-Al2O3 layer with columnar microstructure and the upper porous CS clusters. The TGO growth kinetics for two kinds of samples followed parabolic laws, with oxidation rate constant of 0.344 μm/h0.5 for TBCs and 0.354 μm/h0.5 for pure BCs.

  19. Following the rapid evolution of the central star of the Stingray Nebula in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reindl, Nicole

    2014-10-01

    SAO 244567 is an unusually fast evolving star. Within twenty years only, it has turned from a B-type supergiant into the central star of the Stingray nebula. Space and ground-based observations obtained over the last decades have revealed that its spectrum changes noticeably over just a few years, showing stellar evolution in real time. Previous analysis indicates it must be a low mass star and thus the observed fast evolution is in strong contradiction with canonical post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) evolution. A late He-shell flash is able to account for the rapid evolution. This scenario would predict an evolution back to the AGB, e.g. a decrease of the effective temperature (which is already indicated by the FUSE observations in 2006) and an increase of luminosity. With COS spectroscopy we want to follow the evolution of the surface properties of SAO 244567 to verify this thesis. The very compact nebula of SAO 244567 makes it impossible to derive these parameters from optical spectra, because most of the photospheric lines are blended by nebular emission lines thus they are not suitable for a spectral analysis. The derived surface parameters will establish constraints for late thermal pulse evolutionary calculations. With these calculations we aim not only to explain the nature of SAO 244567, but they also will provide a deeper insight in the formation process of hydrogen deficient stars, which make up 25% of the post AGB-stars and white dwarfs.

  20. Introducing time delay in the evolution of new technology: the case study of nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgalis, Evangelos E.; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2013-12-01

    Starting with Feynman's "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom" prophetic lecture at Caltech in the 1960s, the term "nanotechnology" was first coined in the scientific literature in the 1980s. This was followed by the unprecedented growth in the corresponding scientific field in 2000 due to the financial incentive provided by President Clinton in the US, followed up by similar efforts in Europe, Japan, China and Russia. Today, nanotechnology has become a driving force for economic development, with applications in all fields of engineering, information technology, transport and energy, as well as biology and medicine. Thus, it is important to forecast its future growth and evolution on the basis of two different criteria: (1) the government and private capital invested in related activities, and (2) the number of scientific publications and popular articles dedicated to this field. This article aims to extract forecasts on the evolution of nanotechnology, using the standard logistic equation that result in familiar sigmoid curves, as well as to explore the effect of time delay on its evolution. Time delay is commonly known from previous biological and ecological models, in which time lag is either already known or can be experimentally measured. In contrast, in the case of a new technology, we must first define the method for determining time delay and then interpret its existence and role. Then we describe the implications that time delay may have on the stability of the sigmoidal behavior of nanotechnology evolution and on the related oscillations that may appear.

  1. On the magnetic field evolution time-scale in superconducting neutron star cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Andrea; Akgün, Taner; Pons, José A.; Miralles, Juan A.

    2017-08-01

    We revisit the various approximations employed to study the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in neutron star cores and discuss their limitations and possible improvements. A recent controversy on the correct form of the induction equation and the relevant evolution time-scale in superconducting neutron star cores is addressed and clarified. We show that this ambiguity in the estimation of time-scales arises as a consequence of nominally large terms that appear in the induction equation, but which are, in fact, mostly irrotational. This subtlety leads to a discrepancy by many orders of magnitude when velocity fields are absent or ignored. Even when internal velocity fields are accounted for, only the solenoidal part of the electric field contributes to the induction equation, which can be substantially smaller than the irrotational part. We also argue that stationary velocity fields must be incorporated in the slow evolution of the magnetic field as the next level of approximation.

  2. Fluorescence interference contrast based approach to study real time interaction of melittin with plasma membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sharad; Gui, Dong; Zandi, Roya; Gill, Sarjeet; Mohideen, Umar

    2014-03-01

    Melittin is an anti-bacterial and hemolytic toxic peptide found in bee venom. Cell lysis behavior of peptides has been widely investigated, but the exact interaction mechanism of lytic peptides with lipid membranes and its constituents has not been understood completely. In this paper we study the melittin interaction with lipid plasma membranes in real time using non-invasive and non-contact fluorescence interference contrast microscopy (FLIC). Particularly the interaction of melittin with plasma membranes was studied in a controlled molecular environment, where these plasma membrane were composed of saturated lipid, 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) and unsaturated lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine(DOPC) with and without cholesterol. We found out that melittin starts to form nanometer size pores in the plasma membranes shortly after interacting with membranes. But the addition of cholesterol in plasma membrane slows down the pore formation process. Our results show that inclusion of cholesterol to the plasma membranes make them more resilient towards pore formation and lysis of membrane.

  3. Real time control of long duration plasma discharges in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint-Laurent, F.; Bucalossi, J.; Buravand, Y.; Chatelier, E.; Guillerminet, B.; Leroux, F.; Martin, G.; Moulin, D.; Spuig, P.; Van Houtte, D

    2003-07-01

    The in-vessel components and water cooling loops were fully renewed in order to permit Tore-Supra to explore the route of long duration plasma discharges. This renovation has implied important upgrades of both the data acquisition system (DAS) and the plasma control system. This paper is dedicated to these 2 upgrades. The new DAS design allows: -) a continuous data acquisition, -) high data flow rate management (the flow rate can reach 18 MB/s per front-end unit), -) continuous data access and processing, and -) real-time data processing. The upgrade of the plasma control system implies to share information at a real time level. This system is supported by the SCRAMNet network that has proved its flexibility (continuous addition of nodes), and its robustness (no network failure during 7 years of operation). The possibility to share VME units as well as PC units enable us to strongly increase the available real-time CPU power. The development of advanced real-time plasma control algorithms becomes thus accessible. The real-time equilibrium reconstruction is a first example of such a generation of algorithms. (A.C.)

  4. Real-Time Plasma Process Condition Sensing and Abnormal Process Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Yang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The plasma process is often used in the fabrication of semiconductor wafers. However, due to the lack of real-time etching control, this may result in some unacceptable process performances and thus leads to significant waste and lower wafer yield. In order to maximize the product wafer yield, a timely and accurately process fault or abnormal detection in a plasma reactor is needed. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES is one of the most frequently used metrologies in in-situ process monitoring. Even though OES has the advantage of non-invasiveness, it is required to provide a huge amount of information. As a result, the data analysis of OES becomes a big challenge. To accomplish real-time detection, this work employed the sigma matching method technique, which is the time series of OES full spectrum intensity. First, the response model of a healthy plasma spectrum was developed. Then, we defined a matching rate as an indictor for comparing the difference between the tested wafers response and the health sigma model. The experimental results showed that this proposal method can detect process faults in real-time, even in plasma etching tools.

  5. Time evolution of the electron energy distribution function in pulsed microwave magnetoplasma in H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauberteau, J. L., E-mail: jean-louis.jauberteau@unilim.fr; Jauberteau, I. [UMR 7315 CNRS, SPCTS, 12 Rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges (France); Cortázar, O. D. [Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, ETSII-INEI, Av. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071-Ciudad Real (Spain); Megía-Macías, A. [ESS Bilbao Consortium, Polígono Ugaldeguren-III Pol. A 7B, 48170-Zamudio, Vizcaya (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    Time evolution of the Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) is measured in pulsed hydrogen microwave magnetoplasma working at 2.45 GHz. Analysis is performed both in resonance (B = 0.087 T) and off-resonance conditions (B = 0.120 T), at two pressures (0.38 Pa and 0.62 Pa), respectively, and for different incident microwave powers. The important effect of the magnetic field on the electron kinetic is discussed, and a critical analysis of Langmuir probe measurements is given. The Electron Energy Distribution Function is calculated using the Druyvesteyn theory (EEDF) and is corrected using the theory developed by Arslanbekov in the case of magnetized plasma. Three different components are observed in the EEDF, whatever the theory used. They are: (a) a low electron energy component at energy lower than 10 eV, which is ascribed to the electron having inelastic collisions with heavy species (H{sub 2}, H, ions), (b) a high energy component with a mean energy ranging from 10 to 20 eV, which is generally ascribed to the heating of the plasma by the incident microwave power, and (c) a third component observed between the two other ones, mainly at low pressure and in resonance conditions, has been correlated to the electron rotation in the magnetic field.

  6. Evolution of large-sclae plasma structures in comets: Kinematics and physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, John C.

    1988-01-01

    Disconnection Events are the dramatic part of the periodic morphology involving the separation of the entire plasma tail from the head region of the comet and the growth of a new plasma. The coordinated observations of Comet Halley recorded approximately 30 DEs during the 7 months of plasma activity; 19 of these are obvious. The plasma physics of these events were approached via a detailed, kinematic investigation of specific DEs and the solar-wind environment associated with it. As the detailed investigations are completed, researchers should be able to answer the question of a single or multiple mechanism(s) for DEs and determine which mechanism(s) are important. At present, the mechanism of sunward magnetic reconnection caused by interplanetary sector boundary crossing in consistent with the data available.

  7. Numerical study of drift-kinetic evolution of collisional plasmas in tori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, Jr., C. O.; Meier, H. K.; van Rij, W. I.; McCune, J. E.

    1976-03-01

    Preliminary numerical results for the dynamics of toroidally confined plasmas in the drift-kinetic, Fokker--Planck description are discussed. These solutions were obtained by using the techniques inherent to the collisional plasma model (CPM) described in detail elsewhere. An initial value problem is solved in the local approximation in which collisions and particle dynamics compete in a given magnetic field to set up a quasi-equilibrium. Both the plasma (guiding center) distribution function and many macroscopic quantities of interest are monitored. Good agreement with corresponding but more approximate theories is obtained over a wide range of collisionality, particularly with regard to the neoclassical particle flux. Encouraging confirmation of earlier results for the distribution function is achieved when due account is taken of the differing collisionality of particles with differing energies. These initial results indicate the potential importance of certain non-local effects as well as inclusion of self-consistency between fields and plasma currents and densities.

  8. Analysis of time phase of characteristic rad iation in plasma induced by laser ablating aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    With time- and space-resolved technique, we have recorde d time-resolved spectra of irradiation of the plasma induced by Nd: YAG laser a blating metal Aluminum in Ar, in which, laser pulse-energy was set up to 145 mJ /pulse and the buffer pressure 100 kpa. The continuum radiation and special emis sion of Aluminum plasma were studied based on the records. According to time dis tribution of Al Ⅰ396.15 nm emission, we analyzed the time differences between c haracteristic and continuum radiation evolving. We tried to explain the time pha ses of characteristic radiation evolving with traditional theoretical model of a tomic transition. As the result, we found that it was difficult to explain our e xperimental results with the model. In order to explain our experimental results , we need new model or to improve the traditional theoretical model of atomic tr ansition.

  9. Analysis of defects in externally driven dust-density wavefronts in cogenerated dusty plasma using the time-resolved Hilbert-Huang transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sanjib; Barman, Chiranjib; Mondal, Malay; Bose, M.; Mukherjee, S.

    2016-05-01

    Analysis of defects in externally driven dust-density wavefronts (DDWs) in cogenerated dusty plasma has been carried out. The DDWs are excited for threshold positive bias through another T-shaped electrode which is placed inbetween two main discharge electrodes. Spatiotemporal evolution of the DDWs reveals a wave defect and non-propagating wave mode in the DDW field. A space-time plot and the time-resolved Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) were employed to analyze the spatiotemporal wave data at a specific location in the wave field.

  10. Time evolution of chiral phase transition at finite temperature and density in the linear sigma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Koide, Tomoi; Maruyama, Masahiro [Tohoku Univ., Faculty of Science, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    There are various approaches to nonequilibrium system. We use the projection operator method investigated by F. Shibata and N. Hashitsume on the linear sigma model at finite temperature and density. We derive a differential equation of the time evolution for the order parameter and pion number density in chiral phase transition. (author)

  11. Structural evolution of Ti destroyable interlayer in large-size diamond film deposition by DC arc plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianchao; Li, Chengming; Liu, Jinlong; Wei, Junjun; Chen, Liangxian; Hua, Chenyi; Yan, Xiongbo

    2016-05-01

    The addition of titanium (Ti) interlayer was verified to reduce the residual stress of diamond films by self-fracturing and facilitate the harvest of a crack-free free-standing diamond film prepared by direct current (DC) arc plasma jet. In this study, the evolution of the Ti interlayer between large-area diamond film and substrate was studied and modeled in detail. The evolution of the interlayer was found to be relevant to the distribution of the DC arc plasma, which can be divided into three areas (arc center, arc main, and arc edge). The formation rate of titanium carbide (TiC) in the arc main was faster than in the other two areas and resulted in the preferred generation of crack in the diamond film in the arc main during cooling. Sandwich structures were formed along with the growth of TiC until the complete transformation of the Ti interlayer. The interlayer released stress via self-fracture. Avoiding uneven fragile regions that formed locally in the interlayer and achieving cooperatively released stress are crucial for the preparation of large crack-free diamond films.

  12. A high performance real-time plasma control and event detection DSP based VME system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, A.P. E-mail: pinto@ci.uc.pt; Correia, Carlos; Varandas, Carlos

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the digital signal processors module of a high performance system, specially designed for real-time plasma control and event detection on the next generation fusion experiments with long duration discharges. The system is composed of a commercial CPU board and several on-site developed intelligent modules inserted in the same VME crate.

  13. Time-related contact angle measurements with human plasma on biomaterial surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakhorst, G; Van der Mei, HC; Van Oeveren, W; Spijker, HT; Busscher, HJ

    1999-01-01

    Axisymmetric drop shape analysis by profile (ADSA-P) was used to assess in time contact angle changes of human plasma drops placed on four different biomaterials. Results were related with conventional blood compatibility measurements: albumin adsorption, fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion.

  14. Development of real-time plasma analysis and control algorithms for the TCV tokamak using Simulink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felici, F.; Le, H. B.; J. I. Paley,; Duval, B. P.; Coda, S.; Moret, J. M.; Bortolon, A.; L. Federspiel,; Goodman, T. P.; Hommen, G.; A. Karpushov,; Piras, F.; A. Pitzschke,; J. Romero,; G. Sevillano,; Sauter, O.; Vijvers, W.; TCV team,

    2014-01-01

    One of the key features of the new digital plasma control system installed on the TCV tokamak is the possibility to rapidly design, test and deploy real-time algorithms. With this flexibility the new control system has been used for a large number of new experiments which exploit TCV's powerful

  15. Losing track of the time: the chemical clock of prestellar core evolution in hydrodynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, L.; Glover, S.; Caselli, P.

    2016-05-01

    The ortho:para ratio of H2D+ is a proposed observational indicator of prestellar core ages, and thus a possible tool to determine the typical star formation time scale. The conversion of the measured ratio to an age estimate requires modelling of the chemical evolution. Such models usually consider static, one zone models of physical conditions. The relevant chemical time scales, however, are comparable to the dynamic time scale, therefore the history of gas might affect the ratio. To investigate the significance of gas dynamics and history on the spin-state ratio, we analyse prestellar cores formed in various environment in a hydrodynamic simulation. The fully time dependent, spatially resolved chemical evolution of the cores are computed using a state-of-art ortho:para and deuteration chemical network. The true ages are compared to the once indicated by the ortho:para ratio.

  16. The relation between doses or post-plasma time points and apoptosis of leukemia cells induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD plasma was applied to induce apoptosis of LT-12 leukemia cells. Plasma effects on cell death was evaluated by MTT assay and FCM apoptosis assay with Annexin V/PI double staining, suggesting that plasma killing cells rate and inducing cell apoptosis rate both positively were related to the plasma doses or the post-plasma time points. The cell death rates increased from 15.2% to 33.1% and the apoptosis rate raise from 23.8% to 28% when the dose raise from 60s to 120 s at 8 h post-plasma, while they increased from 15.4% to 34.9% and from 48% to 55.3% respectively at the same doses at 12 h post-plasma. Furthermore, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members were measured for exploring the related apoptotic mechanisms phenomenon. We found ROS immediately increased to 1.24 times of the original amount, then increasing to 5.39-fold at 20 h after treatment. The gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members are very active at 8-12 h post-plasma. Our results demonstrate that DBD plasma can effectively induce tumor cell death through primarily related apoptotic mechanisms.

  17. Well-Posedness and Output Regulation for Implicit Time-Varying Evolution Variational Inequalities

    OpenAIRE

    Tanwani, Aneel; Brogliato, Bernard; Prieur, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    A class of evolution variational inequalities (EVIs), which comprises ordinary differential equations (ODEs) coupled with variational inequalities (VIs) associated with time-varying set-valued mappings, is proposed in this paper. We first study the conditions for existence and uniqueness of solutions. The central idea behind the proof is to rewrite the system dynamics as a differential inclusion which can be decomposed into a single-valued Lipschitz map, and a time-dependent maximal monotone ...

  18. Quantum evolution of scalar fields in Robertson-Walker space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Éboli, Oscar J P

    1995-01-01

    We study the \\lambda \\phi^4 field theory in a flat Robertson-Walker space-time using the functional Sch\\"odinger picture. We introduce a simple Gaussian approximation to analyze the time evolution of pure states and we establish the renormalizability of the approximation. We also show that the energy-momentum tensor in this approximation is finite once we consider the usual mass and coupling constant renormalizations.

  19. Multifrequency Acoustic Emissions (AE) for Monitoring the Time Evolution of Microprocesses within Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparo, Gabriele; Gregori, Giovanni P.

    2003-03-01

    Microprocesses occur like chain reactions where bonds progressively yield. The temporal evolution can be tracked by multifrequency AE. Two principle ideas. One relies on time series of AE of increasingly lower frequency. The second compares time histories of every AE event (fixed frequency) with a lognormal distribution: deviations reveal additional parameters, and the tail results modulated by external effects, envisaging what triggers every AE. Natural environmental phenomena are effective feasibility tests, for subsequent laboratory implementation.

  20. \\mathbf{E}\\times \\mathbf{B} staircases and barrier permeability in magnetised plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, G.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Clairet, F.; Sarazin, Y.; Sabot, R.; Hennequin, P.; Verdoolaege, G.

    2017-01-01

    In-depth experimental characterisation of spontaneous shear flow patterning into a so-called \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} staircase—named after its planetary analogue—is shown in magnetised plasma turbulence, using ultrafast-sweeping reflectometry in the Tore Supra tokamak. Staircase signatures are found in a large variety of L-mode plasma conditions. Sensitivity to the dominant source of free energy is highlighted for the first time. A connection between staircase shear layer permeability and deviation from gyro-Bohm confinement scaling is strongly suggested, opening new routes to understanding confinement in drift-wave turbulence.

  1. On the evolution of jet energy and opening angle in strongly coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesler, Paul M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University,Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Rajagopal, Krishna [Center for Theoretical Physics, MIT,Cambridge MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-05-17

    We calculate how the energy and the opening angle of jets in N=4 SYM theory evolve as they propagate through the strongly coupled plasma of that theory. We define the rate of energy loss dE{sub jet}/dx and the jet opening angle in a straightforward fashion directly in the gauge theory before calculating both holographically, in the dual gravitational description. In this way, we rederive the previously known result for dE{sub jet}/dx without the need to introduce a finite slab of plasma. We obtain a striking relationship between the initial opening angle of the jet, which is to say the opening angle that it would have had if it had found itself in vacuum instead of in plasma, and the thermalization distance of the jet. Via this relationship, we show that N=4 SYM jets with any initial energy that have the same initial opening angle and the same trajectory through the plasma experience the same fractional energy loss. We also provide an expansion that describes how the opening angle of the N=4 SYM jets increases slowly as they lose energy, over the fraction of their lifetime when their fractional energy loss is not yet large. We close by looking ahead toward potential qualitative lessons from our results for QCD jets produced in heavy collisions and propagating through quark-gluon plasma.

  2. Streamflow forecast uncertainty evolution and its effect on real-time reservoir operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Singh, Vijay P.; Lu, Weiwei; Zhang, Junhong; Zhou, Jianzhong; Guo, Shenglian

    2016-09-01

    When employing streamflow forecasting in practical applications, such as reservoir operation, one important issue is to deal with the uncertainty involved in forecasting. Traditional studies dealing with the uncertainty in streamflow forecasting have been limited in describing the evolution of forecast uncertainty. This paper proposes a copula-based uncertainty evolution (CUE) model to describe the evolution of streamflow forecast uncertainty. The generated forecast uncertainty series fits the observed series well in terms of observed mean, standard deviation and skewness. Daily flow with forecast uncertainty are simulated and used to determine the effect of forecast uncertainty on real-time reservoir operation of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), China. Results show that using the forecast inflow coupled with the pre-release module for reservoir operation of TGR in flood season cannot increase the flood risk.

  3. A VHDL Core for Intrinsic Evolution of Discrete Time Filters with Signal Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Dutton, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    Evolution of a novel low-pass filter design has been presented along with an assessment of its capabilities. (1) Performed well with the two added sines used as input during the evolution. (2) Also performs well when the input includes more sine at frequencies between the two used during evolution. (3) Fails to perform when input is a sine sweep with wider bandwidth. (4) This illustrates the importance of designing the evolutionary process to be representative of the environment that will be seen by the evolved design during deployment. The use of non-standard operators and fewer resources should allow the EMVCore to implement more compact representations of digital filters and to provide fault tolerance by implementing a new solution in the remaining tiles after some are damaged. The EMVCore can be used to implement standard discrete time filters in addition to evolved components.

  4. Time dependent couplings in the dark sector: from background evolution to nonlinear structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Baldi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    We present a complete numerical study of cosmological models with a time dependent coupling between the dark energy component driving the present accelerated expansion of the Universe and the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) fluid. Depending on the functional form of the coupling strength, these models show a range of possible intermediate behaviors between the standard LCDM background evolution and the widely studied case of interacting dark energy models with a constant coupling. These different background evolutions play a crucial role in the growth of cosmic structures, and determine strikingly different effects of the coupling on the internal dynamics of nonlinear objects. By means of a suitable modification of the cosmological N-body code GADGET-2 we have performed a series of high-resolution N-body simulations of structure formation in the context of interacting dark energy models with variable couplings. Depending on the type of background evolution, the halo density profiles are found to be either less or more...

  5. On nonlinear evolution of low-frequency Alfvén waves in weakly-expanding solar wind plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nariyuki, Y. [Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190 Toyama City, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    A multi-dimensional nonlinear evolution equation for Alfvén waves in weakly-expanding solar wind plasmas is derived by using the reductive perturbation method. The expansion of solar wind plasma parcels is modeled by an expanding box model, which includes the accelerating expansion. It is shown that the resultant equation agrees with the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin prediction of the low-frequency Alfvén waves in the linear limit. In the cold and one-dimensional limit, a modified derivative nonlinear Schrodinger equation is obtained. Direct numerical simulations are carried out to discuss the effect of the expansion on the modulational instability of monochromatic Alfvén waves and the propagation of Alfvén solitons. By using the instantaneous frequency, it is quantitatively shown that as far as the expansion rate is much smaller than wave frequencies, effects of the expansion are almost adiabatic. It is also confirmed that while shapes of Alfvén solitons temporally change due to the expansion, some of them can stably propagate after their collision in weakly-expanding plasmas.

  6. Application of poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance in determination of input power time of Damavand tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Ehsanallah; Sadeghi, Yahya; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2016-10-01

    In this study, magnetic measurement of poloidal fields were used to determine poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance of Damavand tokamak combination of poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance (β _p+{l_i}/{2} ), known as Shafranov parameter, was obtained experimentally in terms of normal and tangential components of the magnetic field. Plasma internal inductance and poloidal beta were obtained using parametrization method based on analytical solution of Grad-Shafranov equation (GSE) and compared with parabolic-like profile of toroidal current density approach for determination of the plasma internal inductance. Finding evolution of β _p+{l_i}/{2} and plasma internal inductance. Finding poloidal beta (Shafranov parameter and internal inductance) and using energy balance equation, thermal energy and energy confinement were determined qualitatively in terms of poloidal beta during a regular discharge of Damavand tokamak.

  7. Tracking Time Evolution of Collective Attention Clusters in Twitter: Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Saito

    Full Text Available Micro-blogging services, such as Twitter, offer opportunities to analyse user behaviour. Discovering and distinguishing behavioural patterns in micro-blogging services is valuable. However, it is difficult and challenging to distinguish users, and to track the temporal development of collective attention within distinct user groups in Twitter. In this paper, we formulate this problem as tracking matrices decomposed by Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation for time-sequential matrix data, and propose a novel extension of Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation, which we refer to as Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation (TENMF. In our method, we describe users and words posted in some time interval by a matrix, and use several matrices as time-sequential data. Subsequently, we apply Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation to these time-sequential matrices. TENMF can decompose time-sequential matrices, and can track the connection among decomposed matrices, whereas previous NMF decomposes a matrix into two lower dimension matrices arbitrarily, which might lose the time-sequential connection. Our proposed method has an adequately good performance on artificial data. Moreover, we present several results and insights from experiments using real data from Twitter.

  8. Tracking Time Evolution of Collective Attention Clusters in Twitter: Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shota; Hirata, Yoshito; Sasahara, Kazutoshi; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Micro-blogging services, such as Twitter, offer opportunities to analyse user behaviour. Discovering and distinguishing behavioural patterns in micro-blogging services is valuable. However, it is difficult and challenging to distinguish users, and to track the temporal development of collective attention within distinct user groups in Twitter. In this paper, we formulate this problem as tracking matrices decomposed by Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation for time-sequential matrix data, and propose a novel extension of Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation, which we refer to as Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation (TENMF). In our method, we describe users and words posted in some time interval by a matrix, and use several matrices as time-sequential data. Subsequently, we apply Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation to these time-sequential matrices. TENMF can decompose time-sequential matrices, and can track the connection among decomposed matrices, whereas previous NMF decomposes a matrix into two lower dimension matrices arbitrarily, which might lose the time-sequential connection. Our proposed method has an adequately good performance on artificial data. Moreover, we present several results and insights from experiments using real data from Twitter.

  9. Time-resolved spectra of dense plasma focus using spectrometer, streak camera, and CCD combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldin, F. J. [Livermore Operations, National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [North Las Vegas Facility, National Security Technologies, LLC, North Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States); Wilkins, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A time-resolving spectrographic instrument has been assembled with the primary components of a spectrometer, image-converting streak camera, and CCD recording camera, for the primary purpose of diagnosing highly dynamic plasmas. A collection lens defines the sampled region and couples light from the plasma into a step index, multimode fiber which leads to the spectrometer. The output spectrum is focused onto the photocathode of the streak camera, the output of which is proximity-coupled to the CCD. The spectrometer configuration is essentially Czerny-Turner, but off-the-shelf Nikon refraction lenses, rather than mirrors, are used for practicality and flexibility. Only recently assembled, the instrument requires significant refinement, but has now taken data on both bridge wire and dense plasma focus experiments.

  10. Time-Resolved Spectra of Dense Plasma Focus Using Spectrometer, Streak Camera, CCD Combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. J. Goldin, B. T. Meehan, E. C. Hagen, P. R. Wilkins

    2010-10-01

    A time-resolving spectrographic instrument has been assembled with the primary components of a spectrometer, image-converting streak camera, and CCD recording camera, for the primary purpose of diagnosing highly dynamic plasmas. A collection lens defines the sampled region and couples light from the plasma into a step index, multimode fiber which leads to the spectrometer. The output spectrum is focused onto the photocathode of the streak camera, the output of which is proximity-coupled to the CCD. The spectrometer configuration is essentially Czerny–Turner, but off-the-shelf Nikon refraction lenses, rather than mirrors, are used for practicality and flexibility. Only recently assembled, the instrument requires significant refinement, but has now taken data on both bridge wire and dense plasma focus experiments.

  11. Real-time dielectric-film thickness measurement system for plasma processing chamber wall monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Yong; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-12-01

    An in-situ real-time processing chamber wall monitoring system was developed. In order to measure the thickness of the dielectric film, two frequencies of small sinusoidal voltage (∼1 V) signals were applied to an electrically floated planar type probe, which is positioned at chamber wall surface, and the amplitudes of the currents and the phase differences between the voltage and current were measured. By using an equivalent sheath circuit model including a sheath capacitance, the dielectric thickness can be obtained. Experiments were performed in various plasma condition, and reliable dielectric film thickness was obtained regardless of the plasma properties. In addition, availability in commercial chamber for plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was verified. This study is expected to contribute to the control of etching and deposition processes and optimization of periodic maintenance in semiconductor manufacturing process.

  12. The effect of rf pulse pattern on bremsstrahlung and ion current time evolution of an ECRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropponen, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Toivanen, V.; Peura, P.; Jones, P.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae FI-40014 (Finland); Noland, J.; Leitner, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Time-resolved helium ion production and bremsstrahlung emission from JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS is presented with different radio frequency pulse lengths. rf on times are varied from 5 to 50 ms and rf off times from 10 to 1000 ms between different measurement sets. It is observed that the plasma breakdown occurs a few milliseconds after launching the rf power into the plasma chamber, and in the beginning of the rf pulses a preglow transient is seen. During this transient the ion beam currents are increased by several factors compared to a steady state situation. By adjusting the rf pulse separation the maximum ion beam currents can be maintained during the so-called preglow regime while the amount of bremsstrahlung radiation is significantly decreased.

  13. Size and density evolution of a single microparticle embedded in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnaz, Oguz Han; Jung, Hendrik; Greiner, Franko; Piel, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    This article presents two measurement techniques to determine the diameter of a single dust particle during plasma operation. Using long-distance microscopy (LDM), the particle is imaged from outside the plasma chamber. In combination with phase-resolved resonance measurements, the development of volume-averaged particle mass density is measured over several hours. The measurements show a significant decrease of mass density for polymethyl methacrylate particles due to a plasma etching process on the surface. This is explained by a core-shell model and is supported by a surface roughness effect seen in the LDM images, an out-of-focus imaging of the angular Mie scattering pattern and ex-situ laser scattering microscopy measurements.

  14. On a link between a species survival time in an evolution model and the Bessel distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Guiol, Herve; Schinazi, Rinaldo B

    2011-01-01

    We consider a stochastic model for species evolution. A new species is born at rate lambda and a species dies at rate mu. A random number, sampled from a given distribution F, is associated with each new species at the time of birth. Every time there is a death event, the species that is killed is the one with the smallest fitness. We consider the (random) survival time of a species with a given fitness f. We show that the survival time distribution depends crucially on whether ff_c where f_c is a critical fitness that is computed explicitly.

  15. Time Evolution Caused by Hamiltonian Composed of Quadratic Combination of Canonical Operators and Time-Dependent Two-Mode Fresnel Operator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi; LU Hai-Liang

    2006-01-01

    We show that the time-dependent two-mode Fresnel operator is just the time-evolutional unitary operator governed by the Hamiltonian composed of quadratic combination of canonical operators in the way of exhibiting SU(1,1)algebra. This is an approach for obtaining the time-dependent Hamiltonian from the preassigned time evolution in classical phase space, an approach which is in contrast to Lewis-Riesenfeld's invariant operator theory of treating time-dependent harmonic oscillators.

  16. Aspects of late-time evolution in mimetic F(R) gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate how to describe in an unified way early and late-time acceleration in the context of mimetic F(R) gravity. As we show, an exponential F(R) gravity model has appealing features, with regard to unification and we perform an analysis of the late-time evolution. The resulting picture is interesting since in the mimetic case, certain pathologies of some ordinary F(R) models are remedied in a consistent way, owing to the presence of the mimetic potential and the Lagrange multiplier. We quantify the late-time evolution analysis by studying the scaled dark energy density, the dark energy equation of state and the total effective equation of state, and as we show the late-time evolution is crucially affected by the functional form of the F(R) gravity. It is intriguing that the most appealing case corresponds to the exponential F(R) gravity which unifies late- and early-time acceleration. Finally, we study the behavior of the effective gravitational constant and the growth factor, and as we show, significant differences between the mimetic and ordinary F(R) exponential model are spotted in the growth factor.

  17. Evolution of localized states in Lieb lattices under time-dependent magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, J. D.; Maceira, I. A.; Dias, R. G.

    2016-11-01

    We study the slow time evolution of localized states of the open-boundary Lieb lattice when a magnetic flux is applied perpendicularly to the lattice and increased linearly in time. In this system, Dirac cones periodically disappear, reappear, and touch the flat band as the flux increases. We show that the slow time evolution of a localized state in this system is analogous to that of a zero-energy state in a three-level system whose energy levels intersect periodically and that this evolution can be mapped into a classical precession motion with a precession axis that rotates as times evolves. Beginning with a localized state of the Lieb lattice, as the magnetic flux is increased linearly and slowly, the evolving state precesses around a state with a small itinerant component and the amplitude of its localized component oscillates around a constant value (below but close to 1), except at multiples of the flux quantum where it may vary sharply. This behavior reflects the existence of an electric field (generated by the time-dependent magnetic field) which breaks the C4 symmetry of the constant flux Hamiltonian.

  18. Aspects of Late-time Evolution in Mimetic $F(R)$ Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Oikonomou, V K

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to describe in an unified way early and late-time acceleration in the context of mimetic $F(R)$ gravity. As we show, an exponential $F(R)$ gravity model has appealing features, with regard to unification, and we perform an analysis of the late-time evolution. The resulting picture is interesting since in the mimetic case, certain pathologies of some ordinary $F(R)$ models are remedied in a consistent way, owing to the presence of the mimetic potential and the Lagrange multiplier. We quantify the late-time evolution analysis by studying the scaled dark energy density, the dark energy equation of state and the total effective equation of state, and as we show the late-time evolution is crucially affected by the functional form of the $F(R)$ gravity. It is intriguing that the most appealing case corresponds to the exponential $F(R)$ gravity which unifies late and early-time acceleration. Finally, we study the behavior of the effective gravitational constant and the growth factor, and as we sho...

  19. A procedure for estimating the electron temperature and the departure of the LTE condition in a time-dependent, spatially homogeneous, optically thin plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredice, F. [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas, La Plata (Argentina); Borges, F.O., E-mail: borges@if.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica. Lab. de Plasma e Espectroscopia; Di Rocco, H.O. [Instituto de Fisica Arroyo Seco (IFAS), Universidad Nacional del Centro, Tandil (Argentina); Mercado, R.S. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Optica de Emision y Laser (GEOEL), Universidad del Atlantico, Barranquilla (Colombia); Villagran-Muniz, M. [Laboratorio de Fotofisica, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Palleschi, V. [Applied Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory, ICCOM-CNR, Pisa (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    We present a method to estimate the temperature of transient plasmas and their degree of departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Our method is based on application of the Saha–Boltzmann equations on the temporal variation of the intensity of the spectral lines of the plasma, under the assumption that the plasmas at the different times when the spectra were obtained are in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The method requires no knowledge of the spectral efficiency of the spectrometer/detector, transition probabilities of the considered lines, or degeneracies of the upper and lower levels. Provided that the conditions of optically thin, homogeneous plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium are satisfied, the accuracy of the procedure is limited only by the precision with which the line intensities and densities can be determined at two different temperatures. The procedure generates an equation describing the temporal evolution of the electron number density of transient plasmas under local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The method is applied to the analysis of two laser-induced breakdown spectra of cadmium at different temperatures. (author)

  20. Evolution of CO lines in time-dependent models of protostellar disk formation

    CERN Document Server

    Harsono, Daniel; Bruderer, Simon; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Kristensen, Lars E

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) Star and planet formation theories predict an evolution in the density, temperature, and velocity structure as the envelope collapses and forms an accretion disk. The aim of this work is to model the evolution of the molecular excitation, line profiles, and related observables during low-mass star formation. Specifically, the signatures of disks during the deeply embedded stage are investigated. Semi-analytic 2D axisymmetric models have been used to describe the evolution of the density, stellar mass, and luminosity from the pre-stellar to the T-Tauri phase. A full radiative transfer calculation is carried out to accurately determine the time-dependent dust temperatures and CO abundance structure. We present non-LTE near-IR, FIR, and submm lines of CO have been simulated at a number of time steps. In contrast to the dust temperature, the CO excitation temperature derived from submm/FIR lines does not vary during the protostellar evolution, consistent with C18O observations obtained with Herschel an...

  1. Robust GRMHD Evolutions of Merging Black-Hole Binaries in Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard; Etienne, Zachariah; Giacomazzo, Bruno; Baker, John

    2016-03-01

    Black-hole binary (BHB) mergers are expected to be powerful sources of gravitational radiation at stellar and galactic scales. A typical astrophysical environment for these mergers will involve magnetized plasmas accreting onto each hole; the strong-field gravitational dynamics of the merger may churn this plasma in ways that produce characteristic electromagnetic radiation visible to high-energy EM detectors on and above the Earth. Here we return to a cutting-edge GRMHD simulation of equal-mass BHBs in a uniform plasma, originally performed with the Whisky code. Our new tool is the recently released IllinoisGRMHD, a compact, highly-optimized ideal GRMHD code that meshes with the Einstein Toolkit. We establish consistency of IllinoisGRMHD results with the older Whisky results, and investigate the robustness of these results to changes in initial configuration of the BHB and the plasma magnetic field, and discuss the interpretation of the ``jet-like'' features seen in the Poynting flux post-merger. Work supported in part by NASA Grant 13-ATP13-0077.

  2. Near Real Time Tools for ISS Plasma Science and Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Parker, Linda Neergaard; Shim, Ja Soon; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Pulkkinen, Antti, A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program utilizes a plasma environment forecast for estimating electrical charging hazards for crews during extravehicular activity (EVA). The process uses ionospheric electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) measurements from the ISS Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) instrument suite with the assumption that the plasma conditions will remain constant for one to fourteen days with a low probability for a space weather event which would significantly change the environment before an EVA. FPMU data is typically not available during EVA's, therefore, the most recent FPMU data available for characterizing the state of the ionosphere during EVA is typically a day or two before the start of an EVA or after the EVA has been completed. Three near real time space weather tools under development for ISS applications are described here including: (a) Ne from ground based ionosonde measurements of foF2 (b) Ne from near real time satellite radio occultation measurements of electron density profiles (c) Ne, Te from a physics based ionosphere model These applications are used to characterize the ISS space plasma environment during EVA periods when FPMU data is not available, monitor for large changes in ionosphere density that could render the ionosphere forecast and plasma hazard assessment invalid, and validate the "persistence of conditions" forecast assumption. In addition, the tools are useful for providing space environment input to science payloads on ISS and anomaly investigations during periods the FPMU is not operating.

  3. Faster convergence of imaginary time evolution tensor network algorithms by recycling the environment

    CERN Document Server

    Phien, Ho N; Vidal, Guifré

    2014-01-01

    We propose an environment recycling scheme to speed up a class of tensor network algorithms that produce an approximation to the ground state of a local Hamiltonian by simulating an evolution in imaginary time. Specifically, we consider the time-evolving block decimation (TEBD) algorithm applied to infinite systems in 1D and 2D, where the ground state is encoded, respectively, in a matrix product state (MPS) and in a projected entangled-pair state (PEPS). An important ingredient of the TEBD algorithm (and a main computational bottle-neck, especially with PEPS in 2D) is the computation of the so-called environment, which is used to determine how to optimally truncate the bond indices of the tensor network so that their dimension is kept constant. In current algorithms, the environment is computed at each step of the imaginary time evolution, to account for the changes that the time evolution introduces in the many-body state represented by the tensor network. Our key insight is that close to convergence, most ...

  4. Plasma discharge and time-dependence of its effect to bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justan, I; Cernohorska, L; Dvorak, Z; Slavicek, P

    2014-07-01

    Several types of plasma discharge have been proven to have a capacity for sterilization. Our goal is to introduce new nonthermal plasma pencil. We used it to sterilize different microbial populations with differing ages. We used a plasma discharge of the following characteristics: radio frequency barrier discharger at atmospheric pressure with a working frequency of 13.56 MHz, and the working gas used was argon. We performed 110 tests with the following microbial populations: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus species, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. All populations were inoculated on the previous day and also on the day of our experiment. We made our evaluations the following day and also after 5 days, with all our microbial populations. Eradication of microbial populations is dependent on the plasma discharge exposure time in all cases. With regard to freshly inoculated microbes, we were able to sterilize agar with intensive exposure lasting for 10 s of colonies Pseudomonas, Proteus, and Klebsiella. The most resistant microbe seems to be S. aureus, which survives 5 s of coherent exposure in half of the cases. Using the lightest plasma discharge exposure, we achieved a maximum of 10(4)-10(5) CFU/mL (colony-forming unit - CFU). Regarding older microbial populations inoculated the day before the experiment, we can only decrease population growth to 10(5) CFU/mL approximately, but never completely sterilize. The plasma discharge with our characteristics could be used for the sterilization of the aforementioned superficially growing microbes, but does not sufficiently affect deeper layers and thus seems to be a limitation for eradication of the already erupted colonies.

  5. A turbidimetric assay for the measurement of clotting times of procoagulant venoms in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Margaret A; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of the procoagulant effect of snake venoms is important for understanding their effects. The aim of this study was to develop a simple automated method to measure clotting times to assess procoagulant venoms. A turbidimetric assay was developed which monitors changes in optical density when plasma and venom are mixed. Plasma was added simultaneously to venom solutions in a 96 well microtitre plate. After mixing, the optical density at 340 nm was monitored in a microplate reader every 30 s over 30 min. The clotting time was defined as the lag time until the absorbance sharply increased. The turbidimetric method was compared to manual measurement of the clotting time defined as the time when a strand of fibrin can be drawn out of the mixture. The two methods were done simultaneously, with the same venom and plasma, and compared by plotting the manual versus turbidimetric clotting times. Within-day and between-day runs were done and the coefficient of variation (CV) was calculated. Plots comparing manual clotting times to the lag time in the turbidimetric assay showed good correlation between the two methods for brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis) venom, including 24 determinations in triplicate over six days for seven different venom concentrations. Good correlation was also found for four other venoms: tiger snake (Notechis scutatus), Carpet viper (Echis carinatus), Russell's viper (Daboia russelii) and Malaysian pit piper (Calloselasma rhodostoma). Between-day CV was in the range 10-20% for both methods, while within-day CV <10%. The turbidimetric assay appears to be a simple and convenient automated method for the measurement of clotting times to assess the effects of procoagulant venoms. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in Earth's plasma sheet. From more than 80 Cluster plasma sheet crossings (660 h data at the altitude of about 15–20 RE in the summer and fall of 2001, we have identified 116 Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and 35 Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have estimated typical values of the scale size and life time of the CLRs and the CGRs. We find that a majority of the observed ECRs are rather stationary in space, but varying in time. Assuming that the ECRs are cylindrically shaped and equal in size, we conclude that the typical scale size of the ECRs is 2 RE≲ΔSECR≲5 RE. The ECRs hence occupy a significant portion of the mid altitude plasma sheet. Moreover, the CLRs appear to be somewhat larger than the CGRs. The life time of the ECRs are of the order of 1–10 min, consistent with the large scale magnetotail MHD simulations of Birn and Hesse (2005. The life time of the CGRs is somewhat shorter than for the CLRs. On time scales of 1–10 min, we believe that ECRs rise and vanish in significant regions of the plasma sheet, possibly oscillating between load and generator character. It is probable that at least some of the observed ECRs oscillate energy back and forth in the plasma sheet instead of channeling it to the ionosphere.

  7. Holonomy Spin Foam Models: Boundary Hilbert spaces and Time Evolution Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Dittrich, Bianca; Kaminski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    In this and the companion paper a novel holonomy formulation of so called Spin Foam models of lattice gauge gravity are explored. After giving a natural basis for the space of simplicity constraints we define a universal boundary Hilbert space, on which the imposition of different forms of the simplicity constraints can be studied. We detail under which conditions this Hilbert space can be mapped to a Hilbert space of projected spin networks or an ordinary spin network space. These considerations allow to derive the general form of the transfer operators which generates discrete time evolution. We will describe the transfer operators for some current models on the different boundary Hilbert spaces and highlight the role of the simplicity constraints determining the concrete form of the time evolution operators.

  8. Stellar evolution in real time: The exciting star of the Stingray nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reindl, N.; Rauch, T.; Parthasarathy, M.; Kruk, J. W.

    2014-04-01

    SAO 244567 (Hen 3-1357) was classified as a B-type supergiant in the 1970s. Within twenty years only, nebula emission lines became visible in the ultraviolet and optical wavelength range. Imaging in 1994 showed that SAO 244567 had become the central star of the bi-polar Stingray nebula. Prominent P-Cygni profiles that were exhibited in the first ultraviolet spectra from 1988 became weaker with time, but can still be seen in the FUSE spectrum in 2006. Recent observations show that the rapid evolution of this enigmatic star is still going on. For the first time, we performed a comprehensive spectral analysis by means of state-of-the NLTE models for static and expanding atmospheres based on all available spectra from 1988 until 2006. We determined the temporal evolution of its effective temperature, surface gravity, mass-loss rate, and photospheric abundances. We discuss possible single- and binary-star evolutionary scenarios.

  9. Time evolution of superradiant instabilities for charged black holes in a cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Degollado, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Frequency domain studies have recently demonstrated that charged scalar fields exhibit fast growing superradiant instabilities when interacting with charged black holes in a cavity. Here, we present a time domain analysis of the long time evolution of test charged scalar field configurations on the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om background, with or without a mirror-like boundary condition. Initial data is taken to be either a Gaussian wave packet or a regularised (near the horizon) quasi-bound state. Then, Fourier transforming the data obtained in the evolution confirms the results obtained in the frequency domain analysis, in particular for the fast growing modes. We show that spherically symmetric (l=0) modes have even faster growth rates than the l=1 modes for `small' field charge. Thus, our study confirms that this setup is particularly promising for considering the non-linear development of the superradiant instability, since the fast growth makes the signal overcome the numerical error that dominates for small gr...

  10. Real-time evolution of strongly coupled fermions driven by dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, E.; Banerjee, D.; Chandrasekharan, S.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the real-time evolution of a strongly coupled system of lattice fermions whose dynamics is driven entirely by dissipative Lindblad processes, with linear or quadratic quantum jump operators. The fermion 2-point functions obey a closed set of differential equations, which can be solved with linear algebra methods. The staggered occupation order parameter of the t- V model decreases exponentially during the dissipative time evolution. The structure factor associated with the various Fourier modes shows the slowing down of low-momentum modes, which is due to particle number conservation. The processes with nearest-neighbor-dependent Lindblad operators have a decay rate that is proportional to the coordination number of the spatial lattice.

  11. CHARACTERISTICS OF A FAST RISE TIME POWER SUPPLY FOR A PULSED PLASMA REACTOR FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DESTRUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotating spark gap devices for switching high-voltage direct current (dc) into a corona plasma reactor can achieve pulse rise times in the range of tens of nanoseconds. The fast rise times lead to vigorous plasma generation without sparking at instantaneous applied voltages highe...

  12. Time fractional effect on ion acoustic shock waves in ion-pair plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahed, H. G., E-mail: hgomaa-eg@hotmail.com [Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Physics Department (Saudi Arabia); El-Shewy, E. K.; Mahmoud, A. A. [Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    The nonlinear properties of ion acoustic shock waves are studied. The Burgers equation is derived and converted into the time fractional Burgers equation by Agrawal’s method. Using the Adomian decomposition method, shock wave solutions of the time fractional Burgers equation are constructed. The effect of the time fractional parameter on the shock wave properties in ion-pair plasma is investigated. The results obtained may be important in investigating the broadband electrostatic shock noise in D- and F-regions of Earth’s ionosphere.

  13. Sobolev gradient approach for the time evolution related to energy minimization of Ginzburg-Landau functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Nauman; Sial, Sultan; Siddiqi, Shahid S.

    2009-04-01

    The Sobolev gradient technique has been discussed previously in this journal as an efficient method for finding energy minima of certain Ginzburg-Landau type functionals [S. Sial, J. Neuberger, T. Lookman, A. Saxena, Energy minimization using Sobolev gradients: application to phase separation and ordering, J. Comput. Phys. 189 (2003) 88-97]. In this article a Sobolev gradient method for the related time evolution is discussed.

  14. Interplay between intrinsic plasma rotation and magnetic island evolution in disruptive discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchi, G.; Severo, J. H. F.; Salzedas, F.; Galvão, R. M. O.; Sanada, E. K.

    2016-05-01

    The behavior of the intrinsic toroidal rotation of the plasma column during the growth and eventual saturation of m/ n = 2/1 magnetic islands, triggered by programmed density rise, has been carefully investigated in disruptive discharges in TCABR. The results show that, as the island starts to grow and rotate at a speed larger than that of the plasma column, the angular frequency of the intrinsic toroidal rotation increases and that of the island decreases, following the expectation of synchronization. As the island saturates at a large size, just before a major disruption, the angular speed of the intrinsic rotation decreases quite rapidly, even though the island keeps still rotating at a reduced speed. This decrease of the toroidal rotation is quite reproducible and can be considered as an indicative of disruption.

  15. A discrete adaptive near-time optimum control for the plasma vertical position in a Tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Scibile, L

    2001-01-01

    A nonlinear controller for the plasma vertical position in a Tokamak, based on a discrete-time adaptive near time optimum control algorithm (DANTOC) is designed to stabilize the system and to maximize the state-space region over which stability can be guaranteed. The controller is also robust to the edge localized modes (ELMs) and the 600 Hz noise from the thyristor power supplies that are the primary source of disturbances and measurement noise. The controller is tested in simulation for the JET Tokamak and the results confirm its efficacy in controlling the vertical position for different plasma configurations. The controller is also tested experimentally on a real Tokamak, COMPASS-D, and the results demonstrate the improvement with respect to a simple linear PD controller in the presence of disturbances and measurement noise. The emphasis of the is on the development of the design methodology. (38 refs).

  16. Turbulence evolution and transport behavior during current ramp-up in ITER-like plasmas on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, G. R.; Austin, M.; Boedo, J.; Bravenec, R.; Holland, C.; Jackson, G.; Luce, T. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Rudakov, D.; Wang, G.; Yan, Z.; Zeng, L.; Zhao, Y.

    2017-08-01

    Low-wavenumber density fluctuations exhibit unique characteristics during the current ramp-up phase of ITER-like discharges that can partially explain the challenges of correctly modeling transport behavior and predicting global plasma parameters during this period. A strong interaction takes place between the evolving transport, safety factor (q) and kinetic profiles as well as the appearance and evolution of low-order rational surfaces. Density fluctuations from 0.75  qualitative consistency with measured fluctuation levels, but calculations don’t exhibit reduced growth rates near low-order rational surfaces, which is inconsistent with experimental observations. This indicates a mechanism that can contribute to reconciling observed turbulence behavior with transport models, allowing for the development of more accurate predictive tools.

  17. A Linearized Boltzmann transport model for jet propagation in the quark-gluon plasma: Heavy quark evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Shanshan; Qin, Guang-You; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2016-01-01

    A Linearized Boltzmann Transport (LBT) model coupled with hydrodynamical background is established to describe the evolution of jet shower partons and medium excitations in high energy heavy-ion collisions. We extend the LBT model to include both elastic and inelastic processes for light and heavy partons in the quark-gluon plasma. A hybrid model of fragmentation and coalescence is developed for the hadronization of heavy quarks. Within this framework, we investigate how heavy flavor observables depend on various ingredients, such as different energy loss and hadronization mechanisms, the momentum and temperature dependences of the transport coefficients, and the radial flow of the expanding fireball. Our model calculations show good descriptions of $D$ meson suppression and elliptic flow observed at the LHC and RHIC. The prediction for the Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}}$=5.02 TeV is provided.

  18. Formation and evolution of flapping and ballooning waves in magnetospheric plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J. Z. G.; Hirose, A.

    2016-05-01

    By adopting Lembége & Pellat's 2D plasma-sheet model, we investigate the flankward flapping motion and Sunward ballooning propagation driven by an external source (e.g., magnetic reconnection) produced initially at the sheet center. Within the ideal MHD framework, we adopt the WKB approximation to obtain the Taylor-Goldstein equation of magnetic perturbations. Fourier spectral method and Runge-Kutta method are employed in numerical simulations, respectively, under the flapping and ballooning conditions. Studies expose that the magnetic shears in the sheet are responsible for the flapping waves, while the magnetic curvature and the plasma gradient are responsible for the ballooning waves. In addition, the flapping motion has three phases in its temporal development: fast damping phase, slow recovery phase, and quasi-stabilized phase; it is also characterized by two patterns in space: propagating wave pattern and standing wave pattern. Moreover, the ballooning modes are gradually damped toward the Earth, with a wavelength in a scale size of magnetic curvature or plasma inhomogeneity, only 1-7% of the flapping one; the envelops of the ballooning waves are similar to that of the observed bursty bulk flows moving toward the Earth.

  19. Estimating time of last oral ingestion of cannabis from plasma THC and THCCOOH concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, Marilyn A; Elsohly, Mahmoud; Nebro, Wesenyalsh; Barnes, Allan; Gustafson, Richard A; Smith, Michael L

    2006-08-01

    Estimating the time of last cannabis use is important in assessing possible impairment of drivers involved in accidents, in verifying accuracy of court testimony and in the future, helpful in therapeutic monitoring of cannabis agonists. In 1992, Huestis et al developed model 1, based on plasma Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentrations, and model 2, on plasma 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannbinol/THC ratios, that predicted 95% confidence intervals for time of last cannabis use. These models seemed to be valuable when applied to the small amount of data from published studies of oral ingestion, a route of administration more popular with the advent of cannabis therapies. A study was designed to further validate the models after oral ingestion of THC, and to determine whether they could predict last usage after multiple oral doses. Eighteen subjects in IRB-approved studies participated after providing informed consent. Each of 12 subjects in one group received a single 10 mg oral dose of dronabinol (synthetic THC). In another protocol, 6 subjects received 4 different oral daily doses, divided into thirds and administered with meals for 5 consecutive days. There was a 10-day washout period between each dosing regimen. Daily doses were 0.39, 0.47, and 14.8 mg THC in hemp oil and 7.5 mg dronabinol. Blood specimens were collected throughout the study and analyzed for plasma THC and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannbinol by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with limits of quantification (LOQs) of 0.5 and 1.0 ng/mL, respectively. Actual times between ingestion of THC and blood collection spanned 0.5 to 16 hours. All plasma specimens with analyte concentrations >LOQ (n=90) were evaluated. Models 1 and 2 correctly predicted time of last THC ingestion for 74.4% and 90.0% of plasma specimens, respectively. 96.7% of predicted times were correct with one overestimate and 2 underestimates using the time interval defined by the lowest and highest 95

  20. Time Evolution of Thermo-Mechanically and Chemically Coupled Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozimek, C.; Karlstrom, L.; Erickson, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Complexity in the volcanic eruption cycle reflects time variation both of magma inputs to the crustal plumbing system and of crustal melt storage zones (magma chambers). These data include timing and volumes of eruptions, as well as erupted compositions. Thus models must take into account the coupled nature of physical attributes. Here we combine a thermo-mechanical model for magma chamber growth and pressurization with a chemical model for evolving chamber compositions, in the limit of rapid mixing, to study controls on eruption cycles and compositions through time. We solve for the mechanical evolution of a 1D magma chamber containing melt, crystals and bubbles, in a thermally evolving and viscoelastic crust. This pressure and temperature evolution constrains the input values of a chemical box model (Lee et al., 2013) that accounts for recharge, eruption, assimilation and fractional crystallization (REAFC) within the chamber. We plan to study the influence of melt supply, input composition, and chamber depth eruptive fluxes and compositions. Ultimately we will explore multiple chambers coupled by elastic-walled dikes. We expect that this framework will facilitate self-consistent inversion of long-term eruptive histories in terms of magma transport physics. Lee, C.-T. A., Lee, T.-C., Wu, C.-T., 2013. Modeling the compositional evolution of recharging, evacuating, and fractionating (REFC) magma chambers: Implications for differentiationof arc magmas. Geochemica Cosmochimica Acta, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2013.08.009.

  1. Laser Plasmas : Lie-optics, geometrical phase and nonlinear dynamics of self-focusing and soliton evolution in a plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Subbarao; R Uma; H Singh; Kamal Goyal; Sanjeev Goyal; Ravinder Kumar

    2000-11-01

    It is useful to state propagation laws for a self-focusing laser beam or a soliton in grouptheoretical form to be called Lie-optical form for being able to predict self-focusing dynamics conveniently and amongst other things, the geometrical phase. It is shown that the propagation of the gaussian laser beam is governed by a rotation group in a non-absorbing medium and by the Lorentz group in an absorbing medium if the additional symmetry of paraxial propagation is imposed on the laser beam. This latter symmetry, however, needs care in its implementation because the electromagnetic wave of the laser sees a different refractive index profile than the laboratory observer in this approximation. It is explained how to estimate this non-Taylor paraxial power series approximation. The group theoretical laws so-stated are used to predict the geometrical or Berry phase of the laser beam by a technique developed by one of us elsewhere. The group-theoretical Lie-optic (or ABCD) laws are also useful in predicting the laser behavior in a more complex optical arrangement like in a laser cavity etc. The nonlinear dynamical consequences of these laws for long distance (or time) predictions are also dealt with. Ergodic dynamics of an ensemble of laser beams on the torus during absorptionless self-focusing is discussed in this context. From the point of view of new physics concepts, we introduce a stroboscopic invariant torus and a stroboscopic generating function in classical mechanics that is useful for long-distance predictions of absorptionless self-focusing.

  2. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine\\ud exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the ...

  3. Renal function and plasma dabigatran level measured at trough by diluted thrombin time assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta E. Martinuzzo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Dabigatran etexilate (direct thrombin inhibitor is effective in preventing embolic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. It does not require laboratory control, but given the high renal elimination, its measurement in plasma is important in renal failure. The objectives of the study were to verify the analytical quality of the diluted thrombin time assay for measurement of dabigatran plasma concentration (cc, correlate cc with classic coagulation assays, prothrombin time (PT and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT, and evaluate them according to the creatinine clearance (CLCr. Forty plasma samples of patients (34 consecutive and 6 suspected of drug accumulation receiving dabigatran at 150 (n = 19 or 110 (n = 21 mg/12 hours were collected. Blood samples were drawn at 10-14 hours of the last intake. Dabigatran concentration was determined by diluted thrombin time (HemosIl DTI, Instrumentation Laboratory (IL. PT and APTT (IL were performed on two fotooptical coagulometers, ACL TOP 300 and 500 (IL. DTI presented intra-assay coefficient of variation < 5.4% and inter-assay < 6%, linearity range 0-493 ng/ml. Patients' cc: median 83 (4-945 ng/ml. Individuals with CLCr in the lowest tertile (22.6-46.1 ml/min showed significantly higher median cc: 308 (49-945, compared to the average 72 (12-190 and highest tertile, 60 (4-118 ng/ml. Correlation between cc and APTT or PT were moderate, r2 = 0.59 and -0.66, p < 0.0001, respectively. DTI test allowed us to quantify plasma dabigatran levels, both in patients with normal or altered renal function, representing a useful tool in clinical situations such as renal failure, pre surgery or emergencies

  4. Time effect and aliquot concentration in Streptococcus mutans elimination by plasma needle

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alcantara, E.; López-Callejas, R.; Peña-Eguiluz, R.; Lagunas-Bernabé, S.; Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Barocio, S. R.; Muñoz-Castro, A. E.; Rodríguez-Méndez, B. G.; de la Piedad-Beneitez, A.

    2012-06-01

    Atmospheric plasma needle systems are being intensively studied with a view to potential applications in medicine. The aim of this in vitro study is the improved elimination of Streptococcus Mutants (S. mutans) bacteria. A 5 ml volume of Luria-Bertani culture medium has been inoculated with a test bacterial population and incubated during 24 hours, followed by ten dilutions producing aliquots at 20, 50 and 100 micro l per dilution. Each aliquot is deposited on a paper filter and then exposed to a 2 W RF room pressure helium plasma needle discharge at a 1.5 l.p.m. rate for 1, 3, 5 or 7 minutes. Each sample paper is placed in a test tube, again containing Luria-Bertani fluid, in order to develop a new bacterium colony after a 24h incubation period. The plasma needle lethality has been evaluated from absorbance studies by means of a 6305 Jeway spectrophotometer at a 600 nm wavelength, indicating a clear correlation with exposure time. These studies validate the high disinfection efficacy of the plasma needle.

  5. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebizadeh, Pouyan; Rahimzadeh, Hassan; Babaie, Meisam; Javadi Anaghizi, Saeed; Ghomi, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode. PMID:26496630

  6. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouyan Talebizadeh

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasma (NTP has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode.

  7. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebizadeh, Pouyan; Rahimzadeh, Hassan; Babaie, Meisam; Javadi Anaghizi, Saeed; Ghomi, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode.

  8. Re-appraisal and extension of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus evolution in the context of contemporary research

    CERN Document Server

    Auluck, S K H

    2013-01-01

    Recent resurgence of interest in applications of dense plasma focus and doubts about the conventional view of dense plasma focus as a purely irrotational compressive flow have re-opened questions concerning device optimization. In this context, this paper re-appraises and extends the analytical snowplow model of plasma focus sheath evolution developed by F. Gratton and J.M. Vargas (GV) (Energy Storage, Compression and Switching, Ed. V. Nardi, H. Sahlin, and W. H. Bostick, Eds., vol. 2. New York: Plenum, 1983, p. 353) and shows its relevance to contemporary research. The GV model enables construction of a special orthogonal coordinate system in which the plasma flow problem can be simplified and a model of sheath structure can be formulated. The LPP plasma focus facility, which reports neutron yield better than global scaling law, is shown to be operating closer to an optimum operating point of the GV model as compared with PF-1000.

  9. A numerical method based on the Fourier-Fourier transform approach for modeling 1-D electron plasma evolution. [in earth bow shock region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for studying one-dimensional electron plasma evolution under typical interplanetary conditions. The method applies the Fourier-Fourier transform approach to a plasma model that is a generalization of the electrostatic Vlasov-Poisson system of equations. Conservation laws that are modified to include the plasma model generalization and also the boundary effects of nonperiodic solutions are given. A new conservation law for entropy in the transformed space is then introduced. These conservation laws are used to verify the numerical solutions. A discretization error analysis is presented. Two numerical instabilities and the methods used for their suppression are treated. It is shown that in interplanetary plasma conditions, the bump-on-tail instability produces significant excitation of plasma oscillations at the Bohm-Gross frequency and its second harmonic. An explanation of the second harmonic excitation is given in terms of wave-wave coupling during the growth phase of the instability.

  10. Chemical and microstructural characterizations of plasma polymer films by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossement, Damien; Renaux, Fabian; Thiry, Damien; Ligot, Sylvie; Francq, Rémy; Snyders, Rony

    2015-11-01

    It is accepted that the macroscopic properties of functional plasma polymer films (PPF) are defined by their functional density and their crosslinking degree (χ) which are quantities that most of the time behave in opposite trends. If the PPF chemistry is relatively easy to evaluate, it is much more challenging for χ. This paper reviews the recent work developed in our group on the application of principal component analysis (PCA) to time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometric (ToF-SIMS) positive spectra data in order to extract the relative cross-linking degree (χ) of PPF. NH2-, COOR- and SH-containing PPF synthesized in our group by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) varying the applied radiofrequency power (PRF), have been used as model surfaces. For the three plasma polymer families, the scores of the first computed principal component (PC1) highlighted significant differences in the chemical composition supported by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data. The most important fragments contributing to PC1 (loadings > 90%) were used to compute an average C/H ratio index for samples synthesized at low and high PRF. This ratio being an evaluation of χ, these data, accordingly to the literature, indicates an increase of χ with PRF excepted for the SH-PPF. These results have been cross-checked by the evaluation of functional properties of the plasma polymers namely a linear correlation with the stability of NH2-PPF in ethanol and a correlation with the mechanical properties of the COOR-PPF. For the SH-PPF family, the peculiar evolution of χ is supported by the understanding of the growth mechanism of the PPF from plasma diagnostic. The whole set of data clearly demonstrates the potential of the PCA method for extracting information on the microstructure of plasma polymers from ToF-SIMS measurements.

  11. Ionospheric plasma flow over large high-voltage space platforms. I - Ion-plasma-time scale interactions of a plate at zero angle of attack. II - The formation and structure of plasma wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Hastings, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the theory and particle simulation results for the ionospheric plasma flow over a large high-voltage space platform at a zero angle of attack and at a large angle of attack. Emphasis is placed on the structures in the large, high-voltage regime and the transient plasma response on the ion-plasma time scale. Special consideration is given to the transient formation of the space-charge wake and its steady-state structure.

  12. Morphology evolution of gold nanoparticles as function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priolisi, Ornella; Fabrizi, Alberto; Deon, Giovanna; Bonollo, Franco; Cattini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In this work the morphology evolution of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), obtained by direct reduction, was studied as a function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio. The NPs morphology was examined by transmission electron microscope with image analysis, while time evolution was investigated by visible and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. It is found that initially formed star-like NPs transform in more spheroidal particles and the evolution appears more rapid by increasing the temperature while a large amount of reducing agent prevents the remodeling of AuNPs. An explication of morphology evolution is proposed.

  13. Morphology evolution of gold nanoparticles as function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priolisi, Ornella, E-mail: ornella.priolisi@depretto.gov.it [ITIS “De Pretto” (Italy); Fabrizi, Alberto, E-mail: fabrizi@gest.unipd.it [University of Padova, Department of Management and Engineering (Italy); Deon, Giovanna, E-mail: giovanna.deon@depretto-vi.it [ITIS “De Pretto” (Italy); Bonollo, Franco, E-mail: bonollo@gest.unipd.it [University of Padova, Department of Management and Engineering (Italy); Cattini, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.cattini@unimore.it [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Engineering Enzo Ferrari (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    In this work the morphology evolution of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), obtained by direct reduction, was studied as a function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio. The NPs morphology was examined by transmission electron microscope with image analysis, while time evolution was investigated by visible and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. It is found that initially formed star-like NPs transform in more spheroidal particles and the evolution appears more rapid by increasing the temperature while a large amount of reducing agent prevents the remodeling of AuNPs. An explication of morphology evolution is proposed.

  14. Stochastic analysis of the time evolution of laminar-turbulent bands of plane Couette flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Joran

    2015-11-01

    This article is concerned with the time evolution of the oblique laminar-turbulent bands of transitional plane Couette flow under the influence of turbulent noise. Our study is focused on the amplitude of modulation of turbulence (the bands). In order to guide the numerical study of the flow, we first perform an analytical and numerical analysis of a Stochastic Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation for a complex order parameter. The modulus of this order parameter models the amplitude of modulation of turbulence. Firstly, we compute the autocorrelation function of said modulus once the band is established. Secondly, we perform a calculation of average and fluctuations around the exponential growth of the order parameter. This type of analysis is similar to the Stochastic Structural Stability Theory (S3T). We then perform numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations in order to confront these predictions with the actual behaviour of the bands. Computation of the autocorrelation function of the modulation of turbulence shows quantitative agreement with the model: in the established band regime, the amplitude of modulation follows an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. In order to test the S3T predictions, we perform quench experiments, sudden decreases of the Reynolds number from uniform turbulence, in which modulation appears. We compute the average evolution of the amplitude of modulation and the fluctuations around it. We find good agreement between numerics and modeling. The average trajectory grows exponentially, at a rate clearly smaller than that of the formation of laminar holes. Meanwhile, the actual time evolution remains in a flaring envelope, centered on the average, and expanding at the same rate. These results provide further validation of the stochastic modeling for the time evolution of the bands for further studies. Besides, they stress on the difference between the oblique band formation and the formation of laminar holes.

  15. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A.

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  16. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudhir, Dass, E-mail: dass.sudhir@iter-india.org; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29 GIDC, Sec-25, Gandhinagar, 382016 Gujarat (India)

    2016-02-15

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  17. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M; Chakraborty, A

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  18. Microstructural evolution of diamond films from CH4/H2/N2 plasma and their enhanced electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, K. J.; Tai, N. H.; Lin, I. N.

    2015-02-01

    The influence of N2 concentration in CH4/H2/N2 plasma on microstructural evolution and electrical properties of diamond films is systematically investigated. While the diamond films grown in CH4/H2 plasma contain large diamond grains, for the diamond films grown using CH4/H2/(4%)N2 plasma, the microstructure drastically changed, resulting in ultra-nanosized diamond grains with Fd3m structure and a0 = 0.356 nm, along with the formation of n-diamond (n-D), a metastable form of diamond with space group Fm3m and a0 = 0.356 nm, and i-carbon (i-C) clusters, the bcc structured carbon with a0 = 0.432 nm. In addition, these films contain wide grain boundaries containing amorphous carbon (a-C). The electron field emission (EFE) studies show the best EFE behavior for 4% N2 films among the CH4/H2/N2 grown diamond films. They possess the lowest turn-on field value of 14.3 V/μm and the highest EFE current density value of 0.37 mA/cm2 at an applied field of 25.4 V/μm. The optical emission spectroscopy studies confirm that CN species are the major criterion to judge the changes in the microstructure of the films. It seems that the grain boundaries can provide electron conduction networks to transport efficiently the electrons to emission sites for field emission, as long as they have sufficient thickness. Whether the matrix nano-sized grains are 3C-diamond, n-D or i-C is immaterial.

  19. Single-step propagators for calculation of time evolution in quantum systems with arbitrary interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonoskov, Ivan; Marklund, Mattias

    2016-05-01

    We propose and develop a general method of numerical calculation of the wave function time evolution in a quantum system which is described by Hamiltonian of an arbitrary dimensionality and with arbitrary interactions. For this, we obtain a general n-order single-step propagator in closed-form, which could be used for the numerical solving of the problem with any prescribed accuracy. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach by considering a quantum problem with non-separable time-dependent Hamiltonian: the propagation of an electron in focused electromagnetic field with vortex electric field component.

  20. Real-time shape evolution of nanoimprinted polymer structures during thermal annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald L; Hu, Tengjiao; Soles, Christopher L; Lin, Eric K; Reano, Ronald M; Pang, Stella W; Casa, Diego M

    2006-08-01

    The real-time shape evolution of nanoimprinted polymer patterns is measured as a function of annealing time and temperature using critical dimension small-angle X-ray scattering (CD-SAXS). Periodicity, line width, line height, and sidewall angle are reported with nanometer resolution for parallel line/space patterns in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) both below and above the bulk glass transition temperature (T(G)). Heating these patterns below T(G) does not produce significant thermal expansion, at least to within the resolution of the measurement. However, above T(G) the fast rate of loss in pattern size at early times transitions to a reduced rate in longer time regimes. The time-dependent rate of polymer flow from the pattern into the underlying layer, termed pattern "melting", is consistent with a model of elastic recovery from stresses induced by the molding process.

  1. A note on voice timing and the evolution of connected speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourcin, Adrian

    2010-07-01

    Voice is a dominant component of everyday speech in all languages. The possibility is examined that its use may have evolved so that its timing in connected speech is ideal from the point of view of information theory-with voicing taking up 50% of the total speaking time. Initial measurements have been made of voice timing proportions using Laryngograph (EGG) signals as the basis of timing analyses. The results of these analyses for data from two groups of speakers are reported: single native speakers of each of 8 different languages; and 56 speakers of British English. The average 51% and 52% voice timing proportions that were found closely approximate the ideal of 50%. Implications of this finding for voice evolution are briefly discussed.

  2. Real-time evolution of a large-scale relativistic jet

    CERN Document Server

    Martí, Josep; Romero, Gustavo E; Sánchez-Sutil, Juan R; Muñoz-Arjonilla, Álvaro J

    2015-01-01

    Context. Astrophysical jets are ubiquitous in the Universe on all scales, but their large-scale dynamics and evolution in time are hard to observe since they usually develop at a very slow pace. Aims. We aim to obtain the first observational proof of the expected large-scale evolution and interaction with the environment in an astrophysical jet. Only jets from microquasars offer a chance to witness the real-time, full-jet evolution within a human lifetime, since they combine a 'short', few parsec length with relativistic velocities. Methods. The methodology of this work is based on a systematic recalibraton of interferometric radio observations of microquasars available in public archives. In particular, radio observations of the microquasar GRS 1758-258 over less than two decades have provided the most striking results. Results. Significant morphological variations in the extended jet structure of GRS 1758-258 are reported here that were previously missed. Its northern radio lobe underwent a major morphologi...

  3. Control of HIV-1 in Elite Suppressors despite Ongoing Replication and Evolution in Plasma Virus▿

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Karen A; Brennan, Timothy P.; Bailey, Justin R.; Ray, Stuart C.; Robert F. Siliciano; Blankson, Joel N.

    2010-01-01

    A subset of HIV-1-infected patients known as elite controllers or suppressors (ES) control the virus naturally. We have previously demonstrated sequence discordance between proviral and plasma gag clones in ES, much of which can be attributed to selective pressure from the host (J. R. Bailey, T. M. Williams, R. F. Siliciano, and J. N. Blankson, J. Exp. Med. 203:1357-1369, 2006). However, it is not clear whether ongoing viral replication continues in ES once the control of viremia has been est...

  4. A study of the conditions and accuracy of the thrombin time assay of plasma fibrinogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, J; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen

    1982-01-01

    The conditions, accuracy, precision and possible error of the thrombin time assay of plasma fibrinogen are determined. Comparison with an estimation of clottable protein by absorbance at 280 nm gave a correlation coefficient of 0.96 and the regression line y = 1.00 x + 0.56 (n = 34). Comparison...... with a radial immunodiffusion method yielded the correlation coefficient 0.97 and the regression line y = 1.18 x = 2.47 (n = 26). The presence of heparin in clinically applied concentrations produced a slight shortening of the clotting times. The resulting error in the estimated concentrations of fibrinogen...

  5. Nonlinear ion dynamics in Hall thruster plasma source by ion transit-time instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Youbong; Choe, Wonho; Mazouffre, Stéphane; Park, Jae Sun; Kim, Holak; Seon, Jongho; Garrigues, L.

    2017-03-01

    High-energy tail formation in an ion energy distribution function (IEDF) is explained in a Hall thruster plasma with the stationary crossed electric and magnetic fields whose discharge current is oscillated at the ion transit-time scale with a frequency of 360 kHz. Among ions in different charge states, singly charged Xe ions (Xe+) have an IEDF that is significantly broadened and shifted toward the high-energy side, which contributes to tail formation in the entire IEDF. Analytical and numerical investigations confirm that the IEDF tail is due to nonlinear ion dynamics in the ion transit-time oscillation.

  6. Salivary but not plasma cortisone tracks the plasma cortisol response to exercise: effect of time of day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Corral, P; Schurman, R C; Kinza, S S; Fitzgerald, M J; Kordick, C A; Rusch, J L; Nadolski, J B

    2016-03-01

    The cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, and CBG responses to exercise in the AM and PM have not been described. This study examined the response of these glucocorticoids and CBG to intense exercise in 12 endurance-trained men in plasma (Pl) and saliva (Sa). Each subject completed treadmill exercise in the morning and evening. Paired blood and Sa samples were obtained at rest before and after exercise. Significant time effect existed for Pl-cortisol and Sa-cortisol from baseline in the AM and PM (p cortisone and CBG significantly increased in the PM (p cortisone, Sa-cortisone was significantly higher in the AM compared to the PM, increasing in the AM and PM (All p cortisone (r = 0.81, p cortisone (~90 %) and corticosterone (~200 %) in the AM and PM, whereas exercise increases CBG in the PM, but not in the AM; (2) vigorous exercise increases Sa-cortisone; (3) Sa-cortisone and cortisol are equally strongly correlated to Pl-cortisol, suggesting a significant role for Sa-cortisone as a novel marker of free cortisol during exercise.

  7. The time evolution of cosmological redshift in non-standard dark energy models

    CERN Document Server

    Balbi, A

    2007-01-01

    The variation of the expansion rate of the universe with time produces an evolution in the cosmological redshift of distant sources (for example quasars), that might be directly observed (over a decade or so) by future ultra stable, high-resolution spectrographs (such as CODEX) coupled to extremely large telescopes (such as ESO's ELT). This would open a new window to explore the physical mechanism responsible for the current acceleration of the universe. We investigate the evolution of cosmological redshift from a variety of non-standard dark energy models, and compare it with simulated data based on realistic assumptions. We perform a Fisher matrix analysis, in order to estimate the expected constraints on the parameters of the models. We find that there are interesting prospects for constraining the parameters of non-standard dark energy models and for discriminating among competing candidates.

  8. Children of time: the extended synthesis and major metaphors of evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Brooks

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is time for an expansion and enrichment of evolutionary theory. The "back to the future" proposal contained herein is based on three postulates: 1 Neo-Darwinism is too impoverished for this task; 2 its predecessor, Darwinism, contained the necessary breadth of vision and metaphor to be the basis for an inclusive and unifying theory of biology; and 3 the necessary framework for this new stage in the evolution of evolutionary theory is largely in place. We make our case through the use of a number of metaphorical dualisms designed to help focus discussions toward a more cooperative and productive approach to the study of living systems. Along the way, we suggest a number of self-induced paradoxes in neo-Darwinian accounts of evolution that are resolved by our perspective.

  9. Towards Real-Time Detection and Tracking of Blob-Filaments in Fusion Plasma Big Data

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Lingfei; Sim, Alex; Churchill, Michael; Choi, Jong Y; Stathopoulos, Andreas; Chang, Cs; Klasky, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fusion could provide an inexhaustible, clean, and safe solution to the global energy needs. The success of magnetically-confined fusion reactors demands steady-state plasma confinement which is challenged by the blob-filaments driven by the edge turbulence. Real-time analysis can be used to monitor the progress of fusion experiments and prevent catastrophic events. However, terabytes of data are generated over short time periods in fusion experiments. Timely access to and analyzing this amount of data demands properly responding to extreme scale computing and big data challenges. In this paper, we apply outlier detection techniques to effectively tackle the fusion blob detection problem on extremely large parallel machines. We present a real-time region outlier detection algorithm to efficiently find blobs in fusion experiments and simulations. In addition, we propose an efficient scheme to track the movement of region outliers over time. We have implemented our algorithms with hybrid MPI/OpenMP and ...

  10. Space-Time Localization of Inner Heliospheric Plasma Turbulence Using Multiple Spacecraft Radio Links

    CERN Document Server

    Richie-Halford, Adam C; Tortora, Paolo; Armstrong, John W; Asmar, Sami W; Woo, Richard; Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Morgan, Huw; 10.1029/2009SW000499

    2010-01-01

    Radio remote sensing of the heliosphere using spacecraft radio signals has been used to study the near-sun plasma in and out of the ecliptic, close to the sun, and on spatial and temporal scales not accessible with other techniques. Studies of space-time variations in the inner solar wind are particularly timely because of the desire to understand and predict space weather, which can disturb satellites and systems at 1AU and affect human space exploration. Here we demonstrate proof-of-concept of a new radio science application for spacecraft radio science links. The differing transfer functions of plasma irregularities to spacecraft radio up- and downlinks can be exploited to localize plasma scattering along the line of sight. We demonstrate the utility of this idea using Cassini radio data taken in 2001-2002. Under favorable circumstances we demonstrate how this technique, unlike other remote sensing methods, can determine center-of-scattering position to within a few thousandths of an AU and thickness of sc...

  11. Effects of plasma treatment time on modification of acrylic denture material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To study the relationship between plasma treatment time and efficacy. Methods:Test specimens were prepared from an acrylic resin denture material in the size of 2 mm × 10 mm × 10 mm. Plasma treatment was carried out on the surface of Polymethyl methacrylate(PMMA) at different time. XPS studies, IR spectra studies and measurement of wetting angle were performed. Results: XPS showed the peak corresponding to C-O getting higher as the treatment proceeded, however at 120 seconds, the peak did not increase any longer and partly crossed with the peak at the duration of 60 seconds. IR spectra showed the wave corresponding to C-H was reduced as O2-plasma treatment proceeded, and then changed little. Wetting angle initially decreased dramatically, however, as the reaction proceeded, wetting angle increased slightly. Conclusion:Equilibrium was reached for introducing oxygen-containing groups and changing of C-H. As the treatment proceeded, wetting angle increased slightly.

  12. Propagation of a laser beam in a time-varying waveguide. [plasma heating for controlled fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J. M.; Kevorkian, J.

    1978-01-01

    The propagation of an axisymmetric laser beam in a plasma column having a radially parabolic electron density distribution is reported. For the case of an axially uniform waveguide it is found that the basic characteristics of alternating focusing and defocusing beams are maintained. However, the intensity distribution is changed at the foci and outer-beam regions. The features of paraxial beam propagation are discussed with reference to axially varying waveguides. Laser plasma coupling is considered noting the case where laser heating produces a density distribution radially parabolic near the axis and the energy absorbed over the focal length of the plasma is small. It is found that: (1) beam-propagation stability is governed by the relative magnitude of the density fluctuations existing in the axial variation of the waveguides due to laser heating, and (2) for beam propagation in a time-varying waveguide, the global instability of the propagation is a function of the initial fluctuation growth rate as compared to the initial time rate of change in the radial curvature of the waveguide.

  13. Equatorial nighttime vertical f-region plasma drifts during disturbed-time in the african sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyekola, O. S.; Ojo, A.; Akinrimisi, J.

    The terrestrial ionosphere deals with the basic structure and variability of plasma within the upper atmosphere of the Earth Furthermore the ionosphere comprises less than one percent of the mass of the upper atmosphere yet it has a significant influence on advanced communication and navigation systems both have important economic consequences As society beings to rely on more complex technologies those systems become more susceptible to environmental effects However there is still considerable difficulty in the understanding of the equatorial ionospheric phenomena under different solar and geomagnetic conditions despite all extensive studies in the middle and high latitudes and in equatorial and low latitude American and Indian sectors By contrast there is a remarkably sparse database at equatorial African continent of the globe Consequently we infer F-region vertical plasma drifts at the magnetic equatorial station Ibadan 7 4 o N 3 9 o E 6 o S dip from the time variation of the hourly recorded ionosonde virtual height of F layer h F data obtained during 1957-58 International Geophysical Year IGY period corresponding to a year of high solar flux under geomagnetic disturbed night hours 1800-0600 LT The results show a strong geomagnetic control of ionospheric plasma drifts velocities variability in month-to-month and at three different seasonal conditions The largest random fluctuations are observed in June solstice months The evening and morning reversal times are highly variable The average magnitude of the downward

  14. Chemical and microstructural characterizations of plasma polymer films by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and principal component analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossement, Damien, E-mail: damien.cossement@materianova.be [Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, 1, Avenue Nicolas Copernic, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Renaux, Fabian [Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, 1, Avenue Nicolas Copernic, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Thiry, Damien; Ligot, Sylvie [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Francq, Rémy; Snyders, Rony [Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, 1, Avenue Nicolas Copernic, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Plasma polymer films have a chemical selectivity and a cross-linking degree which are known to vary in opposite trends. • Three plasma polymers families were used as model organic layers for cross-linking evaluation by ToF-SIMS and principal component analysis. • The data were cross-checked with related functional properties that are known to depend on the cross-linking degree (stability in solvent, mechanical properties, …). • The suggested cross-linking evaluation method was validated for different families of plasma polymers demonstrating that it can be seen as a “general” method. - Abstract: It is accepted that the macroscopic properties of functional plasma polymer films (PPF) are defined by their functional density and their crosslinking degree (χ) which are quantities that most of the time behave in opposite trends. If the PPF chemistry is relatively easy to evaluate, it is much more challenging for χ. This paper reviews the recent work developed in our group on the application of principal component analysis (PCA) to time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometric (ToF-SIMS) positive spectra data in order to extract the relative cross-linking degree (χ) of PPF. NH{sub 2}-, COOR- and SH-containing PPF synthesized in our group by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) varying the applied radiofrequency power (P{sub RF}), have been used as model surfaces. For the three plasma polymer families, the scores of the first computed principal component (PC1) highlighted significant differences in the chemical composition supported by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data. The most important fragments contributing to PC1 (loadings > 90%) were used to compute an average C/H ratio index for samples synthesized at low and high P{sub RF}. This ratio being an evaluation of χ, these data, accordingly to the literature, indicates an increase of χ with P{sub RF} excepted for the SH-PPF. These results have

  15. Real-time detection of an extreme scattering event: constraints on Galactic plasma lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Bannister, Keith W; Tuntsov, Artem V; Walker, Mark A; Johnston, Simon; Reynolds, Cormac; Bignall, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    Extreme scattering events (ESEs) are distinctive fluctuations in the brightness of astronomical radio sources caused by occulting plasma lenses in the interstellar medium. The inferred plasma pressures of the lenses are $\\sim 10^3$ times the ambient pressure, challenging our understanding of gas conditions in the Milky Way. Using a new survey technique, we have discovered an ESE while it was in progress. We report radio and optical follow-up observations. Modelling of the radio data demonstrates that the lensing structure is a density enhancement and that the lens is diverging, ruling out one of two competing physical models. Our technique will uncover many more ESEs, addressing a long-standing mystery of the small-scale gas structure of the Galaxy.

  16. Determination of structure tilting in magnetized plasmas - Time delay estimation in two dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Guszejnov, Dávid; Zoletnik, Sándor; Andreas-Krämer-Flecken,

    2013-01-01

    Time delay estimation (TDE) is a well-known technique to investigate poloidal flows in fusion plasmas. The present work is an extension of the earlier works of A. Bencze and S. Zoletnik 2005 and B. T\\'al et al. 2011. From the prospective of the comparison of theory and experiment it seem to be important to estimate the statistical properties of the TDE based on solid mathematical groundings. This paper provides analytic derivation of the variance of the TDE using a two-dimensional model for coherent turbulent structures in the plasma edge and also gives an explicit method for determination of the tilt angle of structures. As a demonstration this method is then applied to the results of a quasi-2D Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) measurement performed at the TEXTOR tokamak.

  17. Chimeric External Control to Quantify Cell Free DNA in Plasma Samples by Real Time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eini, Maryam; Behzad-Behbahani, Abbas; Takhshid, Mohammad Ali; Ramezani, Amin; Rafiei Dehbidi, Gholam Reza; Okhovat, Mohammad Ali; Farhadi, Ali; Alavi, Parniyan

    2016-01-01

    Background: DNA isolation procedure can significantly influence the quantification of DNA by real time PCR specially when cell free DNA (cfDNA) is the subject. To assess the extraction efficiency, linearity of the extraction yield, presence of co-purified inhibitors and to avoid problems with fragment size relevant to cfDNA, development of appropriate External DNA Control (EDC) is challenging. Using non-human chimeric nucleotide sequences, an EDC was developed for standardization of qPCR for monitoring stability of cfDNA concentration in blood samples over time. Methods: A0 DNA fragment of 167 bp chimeric sequence of parvovirus B19 and pBHA designated as EDC fragment was designed. To determine the impact of different factors during DNA extraction processing on quantification of cfDNA, blood samples were collected from normal subjects and divided into aliquots with and without specific treatment. In time intervals, the plasma samples were isolated. The amplicon of 167 bp EDC fragment in final concentration of 1.1 pg/500 μl was added to each plasma sample and total DNA was extracted by an in house method. Relative and absolute quantification real time PCR was performed to quantify both EDC fragment and cfDNA in extracted samples. Results: Comparison of real time PCR threshold cycle (Ct) for cfDNA fragment in tubes with and without specific treatment indicated a decrease in untreated tubes. In contrast, the threshold cycle was constant for EDC fragment in treated and untreated tubes, indicating the difference in Ct values of the cfDNA is because of specific treatments that were made on them. Conclusions: Spiking of DNA fragment size relevant to cfDNA into the plasma sample can be useful to minimize the bias due to sample preparation and extraction processing. Therefore, it is highly recommended that standard external DNA control be employed for the extraction and quantification of cfDNA for accurate data analysis. PMID:27141267

  18. Investigating the dynamics and density evolution of returning plasma blobs from the 2011 June 7 eruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlyle, Jack; Williams, David R.; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Matthews, Sarah [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Innes, Davina [Max-Planck Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Hillier, Andrew, E-mail: j.carlyle@ucl.ac.uk [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2014-02-20

    This work examines in-falling matter following an enormous coronal mass ejection on 2011 June 7. The material formed discrete concentrations, or blobs, in the corona and fell back to the surface, appearing as dark clouds against the bright corona. In this work we examined the density and dynamic evolution of these blobs in order to formally assess the intriguing morphology displayed throughout their descent. The blobs were studied in five wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193, and 211 Å) using the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, comparing background emission to attenuated emission as a function of wavelength to calculate column densities across the descent of four separate blobs. We found the material to have a column density of hydrogen of approximately 2 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –2}, which is comparable with typical pre-eruption filament column densities. Repeated splitting of the returning material is seen in a manner consistent with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Furthermore, the observed distribution of density and its evolution is also a signature of this instability. By approximating the three-dimensional geometry (with data from STEREO-A), volumetric densities were found to be approximately 2 × 10{sup –14} g cm{sup –3}, and this, along with observed dominant length scales of the instability, was used to infer a magnetic field of the order 1 G associated with the descending blobs.

  19. Dynamical evolution of the chiral magnetic effect: applications to the quark-gluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Manuel, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    We study the dynamical evolution of the so-called chiral magnetic effect in an electromagnetic conductor. To this end, we consider the coupled set of corresponding Maxwell and chiral anomaly equations, and we prove that these can be derived from chiral kinetic theory. After integrating the chiral anomaly equation over space in a closed volume, it leads to a quantum conservation law of the total helicity of the system. A change in the magnetic helicity density comes together with a modification of the chiral fermion density. We study in Fourier space the coupled set of anomalous equations and we obtain the dynamical evolution of the magnetic fields, magnetic helicity density, and chiral fermion imbalance. Depending on the initial conditions we observe how the helicity might be transferred from the fermions to the magnetic fields, or vice versa, and find that the rate of this transfer also depends on the scale of wavelengths of the gauge fields in consideration. We then focus our attention on the quark-gluon pl...

  20. Time-resolved fast-neutron pinhole camera for studying thermonuclear plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, R.W.; Weingart, R.C.

    1976-02-02

    A fast-neutron pinhole camera with high detection efficiency and nanosecond time-resolution has been developed and applied to the investigation of the spatial and temporal distributions of DD- and DT-neutrons produced by thermonuclear plasmas. The pinhole consists of a specially designed 1.15 m long copper collimator with an effective aperture of 1 mm diameter. Several different types of spatial resolution detectors have been used at the image plane: (1) a multi-element, scintillation-photomultiplier system used for time-resolved measurements consisting of sixty-one individual detectors, (2) a scintillation-fiber-chamber coupled to a gated image-intensifier tube used for direct photographing of the neutron image, and (3) a propane bubble chamber used for time-integrated recording with a capability to distinguish DD- from DT-neutrons. Pulsed neutron sources with typical dimensions of 1 cm emitting of the order of 10/sup 12/ neutrons over a time period of 10-100 nsec have been investigated. A spatial resolution of 1 mm and a time resolution of approximately 10 nsec was achieved in the investigations of dense plasma compression phenomena.

  1. Simulating Time-Dependent Energy Transfer Between Crossed Laser Beams in an Expanding Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hittinger, J F; Dorr, M R; Berger, R L; Williams, E A

    2004-10-11

    A coupled mode system is derived to investigate a three-wave parametric instability leading to energy transfer between co-propagating laser beams crossing in a plasma flow. The model includes beams of finite width refracting in a prescribed transverse plasma flow with spatial and temporal gradients in velocity and density. The resulting paraxial light equations are discretized spatially with a Crank-Nicholson-type scheme, and these algebraic constraints are nonlinearly coupled with ordinary differential equations in time that describe the ion acoustic response. The entire nonlinear differential-algebraic system is solved using an adaptive, backward-differencing method coupled with Newton's method. A numerical study is conducted in two dimensions that compares the intensity gain of the fully time-dependent coupled mode system with the gain computed under the further assumption of a strongly-damped ion acoustic response. The results demonstrate a time-dependent gain suppression when the beam diameter is commensurate with the velocity gradient scale length. The gain suppression is shown to depend on time-dependent beam refraction and is interpreted as a time-dependent frequency shift.

  2. Time evolution of photon propagation in scattering and absorbing media: the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakopoulos, A; Georgiou, E

    2016-01-01

    A new dynamic system approach to the problem of radiative transfer inside scattering and absorbing media is presented, directly based on firsthand physical principles. This method, the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System (DRTS), calculates accurately the time evolution of photon propagation in media of complex structure and shape. DRTS employs a dynamical system formality using a global sparse matrix which characterizes the physical, optical and geometrical properties of the material volume of interest. The new system state vector is generated by the above time-independent matrix, using simple matrix vector multiplication addition for each subsequent time step. DRTS simulation results are presented for 3D light propagation in different optical media, demonstrating greatly reduced computational cost and resource requirements compared to other methods. Flexibility of the method allows the integration of time-dependent sources, boundary conditions, different media and several optical phenomena like reflection and ...

  3. Space-time evolution of Gaussian wave packets through superlattices containing left-handed layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyra, P; Romero-Serrano, M [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Mexico DF (Mexico); Robledo-Martinez, A, E-mail: ppereyra@correo.azc.uam.m, E-mail: a.robledo@mailaps.or [Departamento de EnergIa, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    We study the space-time evolution of Gaussian electromagnetic wave packets moving through (L/R){sup n} superlattices, containing alternating layers of left and right-handed materials. We show that the time spent by the wave packet moving through arbitrary (L/R){sup n} superlattices are well described by the phase time. We show that in the particular case where the thicknesses d{sub L,R} and indices n{sub l,r} of the layers satisfy the condition d{sub L}|n{sub L}| = d{sub R}n{sub R}, the usual band structure becomes a sequence of isolated and equidistant peaks with negative phase times.

  4. Language at Three Timescales: The Role of Real-Time Processes in Language Development and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Bob

    2016-04-01

    Evolutionary developmental systems (evo-devo) theory stresses that selection pressures operate on entire developmental systems rather than just genes. This study extends this approach to language evolution, arguing that selection pressure may operate on two quasi-independent timescales. First, children clearly must acquire language successfully (as acknowledged in traditional evo-devo accounts) and evolution must equip them with the tools to do so. Second, while this is developing, they must also communicate with others in the moment using partially developed knowledge. These pressures may require different solutions, and their combination may underlie the evolution of complex mechanisms for language development and processing. I present two case studies to illustrate how the demands of both real-time communication and language acquisition may be subtly different (and interact). The first case study examines infant-directed speech (IDS). A recent view is that IDS underwent cultural to statistical learning mechanisms that infants use to acquire the speech categories of their language. However, recent data suggest is it may not have evolved to enhance development, but rather to serve a more real-time communicative function. The second case study examines the argument for seemingly specialized mechanisms for learning word meanings (e.g., fast-mapping). Both behavioral and computational work suggest that learning may be much slower and served by general-purpose mechanisms like associative learning. Fast-mapping, then, may be a real-time process meant to serve immediate communication, not learning, by augmenting incomplete vocabulary knowledge with constraints from the current context. Together, these studies suggest that evolutionary accounts consider selection pressure arising from both real-time communicative demands and from the need for accurate language development.

  5. Current evolution and plasma density space distribution in the reflex discharge with ring cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhin, A. A.; Liziakin, G. D.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Usmanov, R. A.; Smirnov, V. P.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper the numerical model of direct current gas discharge in drift-diffusion approximation is considered. For two-component plasma the processes of the gas discharge development in the reflex geometry with ring cathodes at a helium pressure of 35 mTorr are studied. We investigate the influence of: (a) the boundary conditions on the dielectric, (b) the electron temperature and (c) the coefficient of the secondary ion-electron emission on the I-U curve of the discharge. In a magnetic field of 50 Gauss the impact of the discharge voltage U = 300-700 V on the evolutionary process of the discharge is examined. The effect of diffusion on maintaining steady state discharge is researched. The parameters of the existence of a high-current (tens of μA) and low voltage (tens of mA) discharge modes are defined.

  6. Stability and evolution of wave packets in strongly coupled degenerate plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, A P

    2011-01-01

    We study the nonlinear propagation of electrostatic wave packets in a collisional plasma composed of strongly coupled ions and relativistically degenerate electrons. The equilibrium of ions is maintained by an effective temperature associated with their strong coupling, whereas that of electrons is provided by the relativistic degeneracy pressure. Using a multiple scale technique, a (3+1)-dimensional coupled set of nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equations with nonlocal nonlinearity is derived from a generalized viscoelastic hydrodynamic model. These coupled equations, which govern the dynamics of wave packets, are used to study the oblique modulational instability of a Stoke's wave train to a small plane wave perturbation. We show that the wave packets, though stable to the parallel modulation, becomes unstable against oblique modulations. In contrast to the long-wavelength carrier modes, the wave packets with short-wavelengths are shown to be stable in the weakly relativistic case, whereas they can be stable...

  7. Plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings: numerical study on damage localization and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Slámečka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs are advanced material systems used to enhance performance and in-service life of components operated at high temperatures in gas turbines and other power-generation devices. Because of complexity, numerical methods became important tools both for design of these coatings and for in-service life estimations and optimization. In this contribution, two main features that affect the TBCs’ performance, namely the roughness of the bond coat and the microstructure of the ceramic top coat, are discussed based on Finite Element Method (FEM and Finite Element Microstructure MEshfree (FEMME simulations that were used to calculate stresses and assess damage within the coating. Roughness data obtained from plasma-sprayed CoNiCrAlY + YSZ coated samples are supplemented to discuss assumptions and results of employed numerical models.

  8. Derivation and Testing of Computer Algorithms for Automatic Real-Time Determination of Space Vehicle Potentials in Various Plasma Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-31

    COMPUTER ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIALS IN VARIOUS PLASMA ENVIRONMENTS May 31, 1988 Stanley L. Spiegel...crrnaion DiviSiofl 838 12 2 DERIVATION AND TESTING OF COMPUTER ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIALS IN VARIOUS...S.L., "Derivation and testing of computer algorithms for automatic real time determination of space vehicle poteuatials in various plasma

  9. Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Inconel 625 Alloy during Pulsed Plasma Arc Deposition Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fujia Xu; Yaohui Lv; Yuxin Liu; Fengyuan Shu; Peng He; Binshi Xu

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed plasma arc deposition (PPAD),which combines pulsed plasma cladding with rapid prototyping,is a promising technology for manufacturing near net shape components due to its superiority in cost and convenience of processing.In the present research,PPAD was successfully used to fabricate the Ni-based superalloy Inconel 625 components.The microstructures and mechanical properties of deposits were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),optical microscopy (OM),transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS),microhardness and tensile testers.It was found that the as-deposited structure exhibited homogenous columnar dendrite structure,which grew epitaxially along the deposition direction.Moreover,some intermetallic phases such as Laves phase,minor MC (NbC,TiC) carbides and needle-like δ-Ni3Nb were observed in γ-Ni matrix.Precipitation mechanism and distribution characteristics of these intermetallic phases in the as-deposited 625 alloy sample were analyzed.In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of the deposits,microhardness was measured at various location (including transverse plane and longitudinal plane).The results revealed hardness was in the range of 260-285 HVo.2.In particular,microhardness at the interface region between two adjacent deposited layers was slightly higher than that at other regions due to highly refined structure and the disperse distribution of Laves particles.Finally,the influence of precipitation phases and fabrication strategies on the tensile properties of the as-deposited samples was investigated.The failure modes of the tensile specimens were analyzed with fractography.

  10. Ensemble Space-Time Correlation of Plasma Turbulence in the Solar Wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaeus, W H; Weygand, J M; Dasso, S

    2016-06-17

    Single point measurement turbulence cannot distinguish variations in space and time. We employ an ensemble of one- and two-point measurements in the solar wind to estimate the space-time correlation function in the comoving plasma frame. The method is illustrated using near Earth spacecraft observations, employing ACE, Geotail, IMP-8, and Wind data sets. New results include an evaluation of both correlation time and correlation length from a single method, and a new assessment of the accuracy of the familiar frozen-in flow approximation. This novel view of the space-time structure of turbulence may prove essential in exploratory space missions such as Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter for which the frozen-in flow hypothesis may not be a useful approximation.

  11. Time evolution of snow regions and planet traps in an evolving protoplanetary disk

    CERN Document Server

    Baillié, Kévin; Pantin, Éric

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We track the time evolution of planet traps and snowlines in a viscously evolving protoplanetary disk using an opacity table that accounts for the composition of the dust material. Methods. We coupled a dynamical and thermodynamical disk model with a temperature-dependent opacity table (that accounts for the sublimation of the main dust components) to investigate the formation and evolution of snowlines and planet traps during the first million years of disk evolution. Results. Starting from a minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN), we find that the disk mid-plane temperature profile shows several plateaux (0.1-1 AU wide) at the different sublimation temperatures of the species that make up the dust. For water ice, the correspond- ing plateau can be larger than 1 AU, which means that this is a snow "region" rather than a snow "line". As a consequence, the surface density of solids in the snow region may increase gradually, not abruptly. Several planet traps and desert regions appear naturally as a result of a...

  12. On the definition of the time evolution operator for time-independent Hamiltonians in non-relativistic quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaku, Marcos; Coutinho, Francisco A. B.; Masafumi Toyama, F.

    2017-09-01

    The usual definition of the time evolution operator e-i H t /ℏ=∑n=0∞1/n ! (-i/ℏHt ) n , where H is the Hamiltonian of the system, as given in almost every book on quantum mechanics, causes problems in some situations. The operators that appear in quantum mechanics are either bounded or unbounded. Unbounded operators are not defined for all the vectors (wave functions) of the Hilbert space of the system; when applied to some states, they give a non-normalizable state. Therefore, if H is an unbounded operator, the definition in terms of the power series expansion does not make sense because it may diverge or result in a non-normalizable wave function. In this article, we explain why this is so and suggest, as an alternative, another definition used by mathematicians.

  13. Clues to the nature of SN 2009ip from photometric and spectroscopic evolution to late times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, M. L. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sand, D. J. [Physics Department, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A.; Parrent, J. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Halford, M.; Zaritsky, D. [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bianco, F. [Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dilday, B., E-mail: melissagraham@berkeley.edu [North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Avenue, Coeur d' Alene, ID 83814 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We present time series photometric and spectroscopic data for the transient SN 2009ip from the start of its outburst in 2012 September until 2013 November. These data were collected primarily with the new robotic capabilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, a specialized facility for time domain astrophysics, and includes supporting high-resolution spectroscopy from the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and Gemini Observatory. Based on our nightly photometric monitoring, we interpret the strength and timing of fluctuations in the light curve as interactions between fast-moving ejecta and an inhomogeneous circumstellar material (CSM) produced by past eruptions of this massive luminous blue variable (LBV) star. Our time series of spectroscopy in 2012 reveals that, as the continuum and narrow Hα flux from CSM interactions declines, the broad component of Hα persists with supernova (SN)-like velocities that are not typically seen in LBVs or SN impostor events. At late times, we find that SN 2009ip continues to decline slowly, at ≲ 0.01 mag day{sup –1}, with small fluctuations in slope similar to Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) or SN impostors but no further LBV-like activity. The late-time spectrum features broad calcium lines similar to both late-time SNe and SN impostors. In general, we find that the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of SN 2009ip is more similar to SNe IIn than either continued eruptions of an LBV star or SN impostors but we cannot rule out a nonterminal explosion. In this context, we discuss the implications for episodic mass loss during the late stages of massive star evolution.

  14. An empirical study of cultural evolution: the development of European cooking from medieval to modern times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindenfors, Patrik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out an empirical study of long-term change in European cookery to test if the development of this cultural phenomenon matches a general hypothesis about cultural evolution: that human cultural change is characterized by cumulativity. Data from seven cookery books, evenly spaced across time, the oldest one written in medieval times (~1200 and the most recent one dating from late modernity (1999, were compared. Ten recipes from each of the categories “poultry recipes”, “fish recipes” and “meat recipes” were arbitrarily selected from each cookery book by selecting the first ten recipes in each category, and the numbers (per recipe of steps, separate partial processes, methods, ingredients, semi-manufactured ingredients, compound semi-manufactured ingredients (defined as semi-manufactured ingredients containing no less than two raw products, and self-made semi-manufactured ingredients were counted. Regression analyses were used to quantitatively compare the cookery from different ages. We found a significant increase in the numbers (per recipe of steps, separate partial processes, methods, ingredients and semi-manufactured ingredients. These significant increases enabled us to identify the development of cookery as an example of the general trend of cumulativity in long-term cultural evolution. The number of self-made semi-manufactured ingredients per recipe, however, may have decreased somewhat over time, something which may reflect the cumulative characteristics of cultural evolution at the level of society, considering the accumulation of knowledge that is required to industrialize food production.

  15. Real-time imaging, spectroscopy, and structural investigation of cathodic plasma electrolytic oxidation of molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojadinović, Stevan, E-mail: sstevan@ff.bg.ac.rs; Tadić, Nenad; Šišović, Nikola M.; Vasilić, Rastko [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-06-21

    In this paper, the results of the investigation of cathodic plasma electrolytic oxidation (CPEO) of molybdenum at 160 V in a mixed solution of borax, water, and ethylene glycol are presented. Real-time imaging and optical emission spectroscopy were used for the characterization of the CPEO. During the process, vapor envelope is formed around the cathode and strong electric field within the envelope caused the generation of plasma discharges. The spectral line shape analysis of hydrogen Balmer line H{sub β} (486.13 nm) shows that plasma discharges are characterized by the electron number density of about 1.4 × 10{sup 21 }m{sup −3}. The electron temperature of 15 000 K was estimated by measuring molybdenum atomic lines intensity. Surface morphology, chemical, and phase composition of coatings formed by CPEO were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. The elemental components of CPEO coatings are Mo and O and the predominant crystalline form is MoO{sub 3}.

  16. Time evolution analysis of the electron distribution in Thomson/Compton back-scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Maroli, C.; Serafini, L.; Rossi, A. R. [INFN-Universitá degli Studi Milano, Via Celoria, 16 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-07-28

    We present the time evolution of the energy distribution of a relativistic electron beam after the Compton back-scattering with a counter-propagating laser field, performed in the framework of the Quantum Electrodynamics, by means of the code CAIN. As the correct angular distribution of the spontaneous emission is accounted, the main effect is the formation of few stripes, followed by the diffusion of the more energetic particles toward lower values in the longitudinal phase space. The Chapman-Kolmogorov master equation gives results in striking agreement with the numerical ones. An experiment on the Thomson source at SPARC-LAB is proposed.

  17. Time evolution analysis of the electron distribution in Thomson/Compton back-scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Maroli, C.; Serafini, L.; Rossi, A. R.

    2013-07-01

    We present the time evolution of the energy distribution of a relativistic electron beam after the Compton back-scattering with a counter-propagating laser field, performed in the framework of the Quantum Electrodynamics, by means of the code CAIN. As the correct angular distribution of the spontaneous emission is accounted, the main effect is the formation of few stripes, followed by the diffusion of the more energetic particles toward lower values in the longitudinal phase space. The Chapman-Kolmogorov master equation gives results in striking agreement with the numerical ones. An experiment on the Thomson source at SPARC-LAB is proposed.

  18. Evolution of perturbed dynamical systems: analytical computation with time independent accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurzadyan, A. V.; Kocharyan, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    An analytical method for investigation of the evolution of dynamical systems with independent on time accuracy is developed for perturbed Hamiltonian systems. The error-free estimation using of computer algebra enables the application of the method to complex multi-dimensional Hamiltonian and dissipative systems. It also opens principal opportunities for the qualitative study of chaotic trajectories. The performance of the method is demonstrated on perturbed two-oscillator systems. It can be applied to various non-linear physical and astrophysical systems, e.g. to long-term planetary dynamics.

  19. On the long term evolution of white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables and their recurrence times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sion, E. M.; Starrfield, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    The relevance of the long term quasi-static evolution of accreting white dwarfs to the outbursts of Z Andromeda-like symbiotics; the masses and accretion rates of classical nova white dwarfs; and the observed properties of white dwarfs detected optically and with IUE in low M dot cataclysmic variables is discussed. A surface luminosity versus time plot for a massive, hot white dwarf bears a remarkable similarity to the outburst behavior of the hot blue source in Z Andromeda. The long term quasi-static models of hot accreting white dwarfs provide convenient constraints on the theoretically permissible parameters to give a dynamical (nova-like) outburst of classic white dwarfs.

  20. Ex vivo Time Evolution of Thrombus Growth through Optical and Electrical Impedance data fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affanni, A.; Specogna, R.; Trevisan, F.

    2013-09-01

    We designed a novel sensor specifically aimed at ex vivo measurements of white thrombus volume growth; a white thrombus is induced within an artificial micro-channel where hemostasis takes place starting from whole blood under flow conditions. The advantage of the proposed methodology is to identify the time evolution of the thrombus volume by means of an original data fusion methodology based on 2D optical and electrical impedance data simultaneously processed. On the contrary, the present state of the art optical imaging methodologies allow the thrombus volume estimation only at the end of the hemostatic process.

  1. The mineralogic evolution of the Martian surface through time: Implications from chemical reaction path modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ridley, W. I.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reaction path calculations were used to model the minerals that might have formed at or near the Martian surface as a result of volcano or meteorite impact driven hydrothermal systems; weathering at the Martian surface during an early warm, wet climate; and near-zero or sub-zero C brine-regolith reactions in the current cold climate. Although the chemical reaction path calculations carried out do not define the exact mineralogical evolution of the Martian surface over time, they do place valuable geochemical constraints on the types of minerals that formed from an aqueous phase under various surficial and geochemically complex conditions.

  2. Quantum state reduction and conditional time evolution of wave-particle correlations in cavity QED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, G T; Orozco, L A; Castro-Beltran, H M; Carmichael, H J

    2000-10-09

    We report measurements in cavity QED of a wave-particle correlation function which records the conditional time evolution of the field of a fraction of a photon. Detection of a photon prepares a state of well-defined phase that evolves back to equilibrium via a damped vacuum Rabi oscillation. We record the regression of the field amplitude. The recorded correlation function is nonclassical and provides an efficiency independent path to the spectrum of squeezing. Nonclassicality is observed even when the intensity fluctuations are classical.

  3. Evolution of perturbed dynamical systems: analytical computation with time independent accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurzadyan, A.V. [Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Modelling, Yerevan (Armenia); Kocharyan, A.A. [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Clayton (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    An analytical method for investigation of the evolution of dynamical systems with independent on time accuracy is developed for perturbed Hamiltonian systems. The error-free estimation using of computer algebra enables the application of the method to complex multi-dimensional Hamiltonian and dissipative systems. It also opens principal opportunities for the qualitative study of chaotic trajectories. The performance of the method is demonstrated on perturbed two-oscillator systems. It can be applied to various non-linear physical and astrophysical systems, e.g. to long-term planetary dynamics. (orig.)

  4. Evolution of perturbed dynamical systems: analytical computation with time independent accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, A V

    2016-01-01

    An analytical method for investigation of the evolution of dynamical systems {\\it with independent on time accuracy} is developed for perturbed Hamiltonian systems. The error-free estimation using of computer algebra enables the application of the method to complex multi-dimensional Hamiltonian and dissipative systems. It also opens principal opportunities for the qualitative study of chaotic trajectories. The performance of the method is demonstrated on perturbed two-oscillator systems. It can be applied to various non-linear physical and astrophysical systems, e.g. to the long-term planetary dynamics.

  5. Perturbative evolution of particle orbits around Kerr black holes time domain calculation

    CERN Document Server

    López-Aleman, R; Pullin, J; Lopez-Aleman, Ramon; Khanna, Gaurav; Pullin, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Treating the Teukolsky perturbation equation numerically as a 2+1 PDE and smearing the singularities in the particle source term by the use of narrow Gaussian distributions, we have been able to reproduce earlier results for equatorial circular orbits that were computed using the frequency domain formalism. A time domain prescription for a more general evolution of nearly geodesic orbits under the effects of radiation reaction is presented. This approach can be useful when tackling the more realistic problem of a stellar-mass black hole moving on a generic orbit around a supermassive black hole under the influence of radiation reaction forces.

  6. Evolution of the magnetospheric storm-ring current with a constant time delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cluadegonzalez, A.L.; Gonzalez, W.D.; Detman, T.R.; Joselyn, J.A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Using the energy balance equation for the ring current during magnetic storms, a theoretical study of the response of this current is done, for the case of a constant time decay tau. The input energy function for the balance equation is assumed to be described by a simple time variation during the injection time, such that an analytical response can be obtained. The model is used for 5 of the 10 intense storms in the interval August 1978-December 1979, for which the ISEE-3 interplanetary data are available. The energy input function for these 5 events (those with less data gaps) is assumed to be one of both, the azimuthal interplanetary electric field or the Akasofu`s coupling function. These input functions are approximated by one of the simple mentioned input functions and the solution obtained from the energy balance equation, for different values of tau, is compared to the actual evolution of the ring current (derived from the geomagnetic index Dst). The sets of input functions and tau values that better reproduce the observed storm evolution are adopted as the best approximation. As a conclusion, it is found that the more appropriate values of tau are longer than those determined in previous studies, especially for the case of more intense storms.

  7. Imitation, genetic lineages, and time influenced the morphological evolution of the violin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Chitwood

    Full Text Available Violin design has been in flux since the production of the first instruments in 16th century Italy. Numerous innovations have improved the acoustical properties and playability of violins. Yet, other attributes of the violin affect its performance less, and with fewer constraints, are potentially more sensitive to historical vagaries unrelated to quality. Although the coarse shape of violins is integral to their design, details of the body outline can vary without significantly compromising sound quality. What can violin shapes tell us about their makers and history, including the degree that luthiers have influenced each other and the evolution of complex morphologies over time? Here, I provide an analysis of morphological evolution in the violin family, sampling the body shapes of over 9,000 instruments over 400 years of history. Specific shape attributes, which discriminate instruments produced by different luthiers, strongly correlate with historical time. Linear discriminant analysis reveals luthiers who likely copied the outlines of their instruments from others, which historical accounts corroborate. Clustering of averaged violin shapes places luthiers into four major groups, demonstrating a handful of discrete shapes predominate in most instruments. Violin shapes originating from multi-generational luthier families tend to cluster together, and familial origin is a significant explanatory factor of violin shape. Together, the analysis of four centuries of violin shapes demonstrates not only the influence of history and time leading to the modern violin, but widespread imitation and the transmission of design by human relatedness.

  8. Restoration of Normal Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio With Fresh Frozen Plasma in Hypocoagulable Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Only, Arthur J; DeChristopher, Phillip J; Iqal, Omer; Fareed, Jawed

    2016-01-01

    Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is an effective reversal agent for hypocoagulable patients. Its proven efficacy continues to prompt its usage as both a prophylactic and a therapeutic therapy. Although published guidelines encouraging the appropriate administration of FFP exist, overutilization continues. The purpose of these ex vivo studies was to determine the effects of succeeding volumes of FFP supplementation on hypocoagulable plasma prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR). By analyzing the decline in PT/INR with varying volumes of FFP, a minimal required volume of FFP could be identified representing the optimal volume to administer while still providing therapeutic effect. A total of 497 plasma samples were screened for elevated PT/INR values and 50 samples were selected for inclusion in this experiment. The initial PTs/INRs ranged from 12.5 to 43.4 seconds/1.42 to 4.91. Subsequent declines in PT/INR values were analyzed following addition of 50, 100, and 150 µL of FFP to a fixed volume of 250 µL of plasma (26.4 ± 5.318 seconds/2.99 ± 0.603, 13.3 ± 1.077 seconds/1.51 ± 0.122, 11.2 ± 0.712 seconds/1.27 ± 0.081, and 10.3 ± 0.533 seconds/1.16 ± 0.06, respectively). A nonlinear relationship between decline in INR values and percentage of FFP supplementation was demonstrated. The greatest effect on INR was obtained after supplementation with 50 µL (49%). Doubling and tripling the volume of FFP lead to significantly lower declines in INR (16% and 8%, respectively). Analysis of variance indicated a statistical significance with subsequent volume supplementation of FFP, but marginal clinical benefits exist between the PTs/INRs obtainable with increased FFP volume administration.

  9. Stellar evolution in real time: Period variations in galactic RR Lyr stars

    CERN Document Server

    Poretti, E; Vandenbroere, J; Paschke, A; Klotz, A; Boër, M; Damerdji, Y; Martignoni, M; Acerbi, F

    2007-01-01

    The times of maximum brightness collected in the GEOS RR Lyr database allowed us to trace the period variations of a sample of 123 galactic RRab variables. These data span a time baseline exceeding 100 years. Clear evidence of period increases or decreases at constant rates has been found, suggesting evolutionary effects. The observed rates are slightly larger than those predicted by theoretical models; moreover, there is an unexpected large percentage of RRab stars showing a period decrease. The new possibilities offered by the use of robotic telecopes (TAROTs, REM) and of data from satellite (CoRoT) are expected to speed up the project to measure stellar evolution in real time. It is noteworthy that the outlines of this project have been sketched during several GEOS meetings, where the different knowledge of amateur and professional astronomers found a very profitable synthesis.

  10. SANS investigation on evolution of pore morphology for varying sintering time in porous ceria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Patra; S Ramanathan; D Sen; S Mazumder

    2004-08-01

    Precipitates of ceria were synthesized by homogeneous precipitation method using cerium nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine at 80°C. The precipitates were ground to fine particles of average size ∼0.7 m. Circular disks with 10 mm diameter, 2 and 3 mm thickness were prepared from the green compacts by sintering at 1300°C for three different sintering times. Evolution of the pore structures in these specimens with sintering time was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results show that the peak of the pore size distribution shifts towards the larger size with increasing sintering time although the extent of porosity decreases. This indicates that finer pores are eliminated from the system at a faster rate than the coarser ones as sintering proceeds and some of the finer pores coalesce to form bigger ones.

  11. Study of Gutenberg-Richter coefficients considering time evolution for different mexican seismic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrizales Velazquez, Carlos; Angulo Brown, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, we propose a division of the Mexican Pacific coast and we study the time evolution of the Gutenberg-Richter coefficients ("a" and "b" values) along the 2006-2016 period by means of the sliding time window method. We observed that the sequences of a and b values obtained, are positively correlated as it must be, because otherwise it would represent a seismic dynamics incompatible with a self-organized critical system "the earth crust". Furthermore, we analyze the variation of the modal value "a/b" showing be a better estimator of seismic activity that only a or b parameters. Finally, we perform size window variation analysis to keep constant the seismic energy released by N-events into the time window.

  12. Two new fern chloroplasts and decelerated evolution linked to the long generation time in tree ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bojian; Fong, Richard; Collins, Lesley J; McLenachan, Patricia A; Penny, David

    2014-04-30

    We report the chloroplast genomes of a tree fern (Dicksonia squarrosa) and a "fern ally" (Tmesipteris elongata), and show that the phylogeny of early land plants is basically as expected, and the estimates of divergence time are largely unaffected after removing the fastest evolving sites. The tree fern shows the major reduction in the rate of evolution, and there has been a major slowdown in the rate of mutation in both families of tree ferns. We suggest that this is related to a generation time effect; if there is a long time period between generations, then this is probably incompatible with a high mutation rate because otherwise nearly every propagule would probably have several lethal mutations. This effect will be especially strong in organisms that have large numbers of cell divisions between generations. This shows the necessity of going beyond phylogeny and integrating its study with other properties of organisms.

  13. Connections between abstract quantum theory and space-time structure. II. A model of cosmological evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goernitz, T.

    1988-06-01

    In the first part of the present work, I treated the global structure of space by ur-theoretic considerations and also introduced a smallest physically accessible length. This enterprise led to a cosmography, a description of a cosmic model at a fixed time. Of course, there must also be a description of its time development, of the change of the number of urs with time. There has been no a priori assumption for this process. Here an attempt is made to treat this evolution by means of general relativity and to compare the result with observations. This means that general relativity is used as an existing and adequate theory; it is hoped that general relativity can be reconstructed from ur theory.

  14. Time Evolution of Temperature and Entropy of a Gravitationally Collapsing de Sitter Schwarzschild Domain Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Halstead, Evan

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of the temperature and entropy of a gravitationally collapsing de Sitter Schwarzschild domain wall as seen by an asymptotic observer. Recent work has completed this analysis for Schwarzschild and 3+1 BTZ domain walls. There were some striking qualitative differences between the two. Specifically, the BTZ domain wall exhibited a decrease in entropy over time. However, it contained both a cosmological constant and a different topology from the Schwarzschild domain wall, and we wish to isolate which of these is responsible for the qualitative differences. Hence, we will study the de Sitter Schwarzschild domain wall, as it has identical topology to the Schwarzschild domain wall yet also contains a cosmological constant. We utilize a wavefunctional approach where we couple a scalar field to the background of the collapsing domain wall and determine the spectrum of the radiation as a function of time. The fact that the distribution is thermal allows for the determination of the tem...

  15. Universal time-evolution of a Rydberg lattice gas with perfect blockade

    CERN Document Server

    Olmos, B; Lesanovsky, I; Velázquez, L

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a strongly interacting spin system that is motivated by current experimental realizations of strongly interacting Rydberg gases in lattices. In particular we are interested in the temporal evolution of quantities such as the density of Rydberg atoms and density-density correlations when the system is initialized in a fully polarized state without Rydberg excitations. We show that in the thermodynamic limit the expectation values of these observables converge at least logarithmically to universal functions and outline a method to obtain these functions. We prove that a finite one-dimensional system follows this universal behavior up to a given time. The length of this universal time period depends on the actual system size. This shows that already the study of small systems allows to make precise predictions about the thermodynamic limit provided that the observation time is sufficiently short. We discuss this for various observables and for systems with different dimensions, int...

  16. Time-resolved study of the extreme-ultraviolet emission and plasma dynamics of a sub-Joule, fast capillary discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, J. C., E-mail: jcval@ucsd.edu [Instituto de Físca, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Macul, Santiago (Chile); Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-08-15

    In this work, we discuss experimental observations on the dynamics of a fast, low energy capillary discharge when operated in argon and its properties as an intense source of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. The discharge pre-ionization and self-triggering were accomplished by the use of the hollow cathode effect. This allowed a compact size and low inductance discharge with multi-kA current level and a quarter-period of ∼10 ns at sub-Joule energy level. We used the novel moiré and schlieren diagnostics with a 12 ps laser to obtain the time evolution of the line electron density and to study the plasma dynamics. EUV spectroscopy and filtered diodes were also implemented to estimate the plasma temperature and density throughout the evolution of the discharge. EUV source size was measured by using a filtered slit-wire camera. We observed that EUV emission starts from a compressed plasma on axis during the second quarter-period of the current and continues until the fifth quarter-period. Ionization levels from Ar VII to X were observed. By comparing the EUV emission spectra with synthetic spectra, we found that at the onset of emission (∼7 ns), the plasma is well fitted by a single Maxwellian electron distribution function with T{sub e} ∼ 12 eV and n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3}. Close to peak emission (∼13 ns), plasma temperature and density increase to ∼20 eV and n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}, respectively. However, in order to successfully match the experimental data, a two component electron distribution function was necessary. Later in time, a smaller fraction in the high energy component and higher temperature suggests homogenization of the plasma. The moiré and schlieren diagnostics showed multiple radial compression-waves merging on axis throughout the discharge; they are an important heating mechanism that leads to a period of severe turbulence at peak EUV emission. It was also observed that emission

  17. Time-resolved study of the extreme-ultraviolet emission and plasma dynamics of a sub-Joule, fast capillary discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, J. C.; Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we discuss experimental observations on the dynamics of a fast, low energy capillary discharge when operated in argon and its properties as an intense source of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. The discharge pre-ionization and self-triggering were accomplished by the use of the hollow cathode effect. This allowed a compact size and low inductance discharge with multi-kA current level and a quarter-period of ˜10 ns at sub-Joule energy level. We used the novel moiré and schlieren diagnostics with a 12 ps laser to obtain the time evolution of the line electron density and to study the plasma dynamics. EUV spectroscopy and filtered diodes were also implemented to estimate the plasma temperature and density throughout the evolution of the discharge. EUV source size was measured by using a filtered slit-wire camera. We observed that EUV emission starts from a compressed plasma on axis during the second quarter-period of the current and continues until the fifth quarter-period. Ionization levels from Ar VII to X were observed. By comparing the EUV emission spectra with synthetic spectra, we found that at the onset of emission (˜7 ns), the plasma is well fitted by a single Maxwellian electron distribution function with Te ˜ 12 eV and ne ˜ 1017 cm-3. Close to peak emission (˜13 ns), plasma temperature and density increase to ˜20 eV and ne ˜ 1018 cm-3, respectively. However, in order to successfully match the experimental data, a two component electron distribution function was necessary. Later in time, a smaller fraction in the high energy component and higher temperature suggests homogenization of the plasma. The moiré and schlieren diagnostics showed multiple radial compression-waves merging on axis throughout the discharge; they are an important heating mechanism that leads to a period of severe turbulence at peak EUV emission. It was also observed that emission ceases when the axial maximum of the electron density collapses.

  18. A TIEGCM numerical study of the source and evolution of ionospheric F-region tongues of ionization: Universal time and interplanetary magnetic field dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Burns, Alan; Liu, Libo; McInerney, Joe

    2017-04-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) has been employed to systematically study the source and evolution of the ionospheric F-region Tongue of Ionization (TOI), which is electron density enhancement in the polar region. The model is run for different Universal Times (UT), season and Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) conditions. It is found that: (1) The TOI formation is critically dependent on UT, preferentially near 2000 UT in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and near 1600 UT in the Southern Hemisphere (SH). These are the intervals when the high-latitude ion convection throat is closer to the middle-latitude high plasma density source region, so that more plasma can be directly transported into the polar cap region; (2) this different UT dependence between the two Hemispheres occurs, not only because of the different separation of the magnetic poles from the geographic poles in the two hemispheres, but also because of the UT dependence of the mid-latitude source locations (local time, latitude) and the magnitude of plasma density enhancements; (3) the TOI is generally stronger in the SH than it is in the NH, and in winter than in summer; (4) IMF By operates in the opposite sense in the two hemispheres in terms of the TOI pattern such that positive/negative IMF By tends to deflect the TOI toward the morning/afternoon sector in the NH. The opposite condition occurs in the SH.

  19. Time and space correlated investigations of confinement effects due to static axial magnetic fields acting on laser produced carbon plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Mario; Wyndham, Edmund; Veloso, Felipe; Bhuyan, Heman; Reyes, Sebastian; Ruiz, Hugo Marcelo; Caballero-Bendixsen, Luis Sebastian

    2016-10-01

    We present further detailed studies of the dynamics and plasma properties of a laser produced Carbon plasma expanding in a static axial magnetic field. The laser plasmas are produced in vacuum, 1 .10-6 Torr, using a graphite target, with a Nd:YAG laser, 3.5 ns, 340 mJ at 1.06 μm, focused at 2 .109 W/cm2, and propagate in static magnetic fields of maximum value 0.2 T. 15 ns time and spaced resolved OES is used to investigate plasma composition. 50 ns time resolved plasma imaging is used to visualize the plasma dynamics. A mm size B-dot probe is used, in combination with a Faraday cup, to characterize the interaction between the expanding plasma and the magnetic field. As a result of time and space correlated measurements, unique features of the laser plasma dynamics in the presence of the magnetic field are identified, which highlight the confinement effects of the static magnetic field Funded by project FONDECYT 1141119.

  20. Synthesis of low carbon boron carbide powder using a minimal time processing route: Thermal plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinna Mishra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Boron carbide powder was synthesized by thermal plasma reduction of boric acid in presence of graphite with a very minimal processing time. Subsequently, the as-synthesized products were leached to minimize the impurities content. Based on the results of X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, the effect of leaching on phase purity and crystallinity was studied. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to identify the chemical composition which highlighted the absence of the BO bonding in the deconvoluted B 1s core-level spectrum. Finally, the temperature dependent thermal conductivity behavior of the leached materials was analyzed and presented.

  1. Detection of plasma fluctuations in white-light images of the outer solar corona: investigation of the spatial and temporal evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Telloni, D; Romano, P; Spadaro, D; Antonucci, E

    2013-01-01

    This work focus on the first results on the identification and characterization of periodic plasma density fluctuations in the outer corona, observed in STEREO-A COR1 white-light image time series. A 2D reconstruction of the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the coronal fluctuation power has been performed over the whole plane of the sky, from 1.4 to 4.0 solar radii. The adopted diagnostic tool is based on wavelet transforms. This technique, with respect to the standard Fourier analysis, has the advantage of localizing non-persistent fluctuating features and exploring the variations of the relating wavelet power in both space and time. The map of the variance of the coronal brightness clearly outlines intermittent, spatially coherent fluctuating features, localized along, or adjacent to, the strongest magnetic field lines. In most cases they do not correspond to the coronal structures visible in the brightness maps. The results obtained provide a scenario in which the solar corona shows quasi-per...

  2. Short-time plasma surface modification of HDPE powder in a Plasma Downer Reactor - process, wettability improvement and ageing effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpagaus, C. [ETH Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Institute of Process Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zentrum, Sonneggstrasse 3, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Rossi, A. [ETH Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Hoenggerberg, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Universita degli Studi di Cagliari, Dipartimento di Chimica Inorganica ed Analitica, UdR INSTM I-09100 Cagliari (Italy); Rudolf von Rohr, Ph. [ETH Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Institute of Process Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zentrum, Sonneggstrasse 3, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: vonrohr@ipe.mavt.ethz.ch

    2005-12-15

    The effectiveness of improving the wettability of HDPE powders within less than 0.1 s by plasma surface modification in a Plasma Downer Reactor is investigated. A correlation is revealed between the XPS results (O/C-ratio) and the wettability (contact angle, polar surface tension by capillary rise method). The O{sub 2}-content in the plasma feed gas has been adjusted for best wettability properties. XPS results indicate the formation of C=O and COOH functional groups on the powder surface. The O/C-ratio increased from 0.0 (no oxygen on the non-treated powder) up to 0.15 for the plasma treated HDPE powder surface. With pure O{sub 2}-plasma treatment, a water contact angle reduction from >90{sup o} (no water penetration into the untreated PE powder) down to 65{sup o} was achieved. The total surface free energy increased from 31.2 to 45 mN/m. Ageing of treated powders occurs and proceeds mostly within the first 7 days of storage. Contact angle measurements and O1s/O2s intensity ratio data support that ageing is mainly a diffusion-controlled process. Nevertheless, XPS results show the presence of oxygen functional groups even after 40 days, which explains why the powder is still dispersible in water without any addition of surfactants.

  3. Experimental studies of the effect target geometry on the evolution of laser produced plasma plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Cuyler; Anderson, Austin; Iratcabal, Jeremy; Dutra, Eric; Covington, Aaron

    2016-10-01

    The expansion of the laser plumes was shown to be dependent on the initial target geometry. A 16 channel framing camera was used to record the plume shape and propagation speeds were determined from analysis of the images. Plastic targets were manufactured using different methods including 3D printing, CNC machining and vacuum casting. Preliminary target designs were made using a 3D printer and ABS plastic material. These targets were then tested using a 3 J laser with a 5 ns duration pulse. Targets with a deep conical depression were shown to produce highly collimated plumes when compared to flat top targets. Preliminary results of these experiments will be discussed along with planned future experiments that will use the indented targets with a 30 J laser with a 0.8 ns duration pulse in preparation for pinched laser plume experiments at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. Other polymers that are readily available in a deuterated form will also be explored as part of an effort to develop a cost effective plasma plume target for follow on neutron production experiments. Dr. Austin Anderson.

  4. Real-time wavelet detection of crashes in limit cycles of non-stationary fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkel, M.; Witvoet, G.; M.R. de Baar,; Nuij, Pwjm; Morschec, H. G. ter; Steinbuch, M.

    2011-01-01

    The high performance mode (H-mode) is one of the baseline plasma scenarios for the experimental fusion reactor ITER. This scenario features a periodic crash-like reorganization of the plasma pressure and the magnetic flux in the plasma core and plasma periphery. The core instability is often referre

  5. Direct Photon Anisotropy and the Time Evolution of the Quark-Gluon Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00360979

    2016-07-22

    Historically, the thermal photon inverse slope parameter has been interpreted as the thermalization temperature of the QGP. Observation of the thermal photon spectrum in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the ALICE and PHENIX experiments obtain the inverse slope parameter, but the obtained values are inconsistent with the thermalization temperature predicted by the hydrodynamic model. It has therefore been argued that the inverse slope parameter is not representative of the true QGP thermalization temperature because not all thermal photons are emitted at thermalization. This research will probe this assertion using an investigation of flow and nuclear suppression of thermal photons from ALICE Pb-Pb collisions at '\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76' TeV and comparison to p-p data at '\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76' TeV.

  6. Space-and time-resolved diagnostics of the ENEA EUV discharge-produced-plasma source used for metrology and other applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Bollanti; P.Di Lazzaro; F.Flora; L.Mezi; D.Murra; A.Torre

    2015-01-01

    A discharge-produced-plasma(DPP) source emitting in the extreme ultraviolet(EUV) spectral region is running at the ENEA Frascati Research Centre. The plasma is generated in low-pressure xenon gas and efficiently emits 100-ns duration radiation pulses in the 10–20-nm wavelength range, with an energy of 20 m J/shot/sr at a 10-Hz repetition rate. The complex discharge evolution is constantly examined and controlled with electrical measurements, while a nsgated CCD camera allowed observation of the discharge development in the visible, detection of time-resolved plasmacolumn pinching, and optimization of the pre-ionization timing. Accurately calibrated Zr-filtered PIN diodes are used to monitor the temporal behaviour and energy emission of the EUV pulses, while the calibration of a dosimetric film allows quantitative imaging of the emitted radiation. This comprehensive plasma diagnostics has demonstrated its effectiveness in suitably adjusting the source configuration for several applications, such as exposures of photonic materials and innovative photoresists.

  7. Experimental palaeobiomechanics: What can engineering tell us about evolution in deep time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Philip

    2016-04-01

    What did Tyrannosaurus rex eat? This is the sort of question that immediately bombards any palaeontologist when interacting with the general public. Even among scientists, how extinct animals moved or fed is a major objective of the palaeobiological research agenda. The last decade has seen a sharp increase in the technology and experimental methods available for collecting biomechanical data, which has greatly improved out ability to examine the function of both live and extinct animals. With new technologies and methods come new pitfalls and opportunities. In this review, I address three aspects of experimental biomechanics that exemplify the challenges and opportunities it provides for addressing deep-time problems in palaeontology. 1) Interpretation: It has never been easier to acquire large amounts of high-quality biomechanical data on extinct animals. However, the lack of behavioural information means that interpreting this data can be problematic. We will never know precisely what a dinosaur ate, but we can explore what constraints there might have been on the mechanical function of its jaws. Palaeobiomechanics defines potential function and becomes especially effective when dealing with multiple examples. 2) Comparison: Understanding the potential function of one extinct animal is interesting; however, examining mechanical features across multiple taxa allows for a greater understanding of biomechanical variation. Comparative studies help identify common trends and underlying mechanical principles which can have long reaching influences on morphological evolution. 3) Evolution: The physical principles established through comparative biomechanical studies can be utilized in phylogenetic comparative methods in order to explore evolutionary morphology across clades. Comparative evolutionary biomechanics offers potential for exploring the evolution of functional systems in deep time utilizing experimental biomechanical data.

  8. Effect of storage conditions on prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen concentration on canine plasma samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Stefania; Giannetto, Claudia; Giudice, Elisabetta

    2010-01-01

    The present study was to assess the effect of storage conditions on prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and fibrinogen concentration in blood samples of healthy dogs. Thirty-five dogs of various breeds were included in the study. Citrated blood samples were obtained and plasma was divided into four aliquots to assess selected clotting parameters by means of a coagulometer. The first aliquot was analysed within 1 h after collection, while the remaining 3 were stored at 8℃ for 4, 8 and 24 h, respectively. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance documented a significant decreasing effect on PT at 24 h compared to 8 h and on fibrinogen concentration after 8 and 24 h compared to sampling time and at 4 and 24 h compared to 8 h post sampling. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that only fibrinogen appears prone to significant decrease. In fact, aPTT is not substantially affected by refrigeration for at least 24 h post sampling and PT showed a statistical difference that does not necessary indicate biological significance as the results obtained were within reference intervals for the dog. PMID:20458152

  9. Unraveling the plasma-material interface with real time diagnosis of dynamic boron conditioning in extreme tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Gutiérrez, F. Javier; Bedoya, Felipe; Krstić, Predrag S.; Allain, Jean P.; Irle, Stephan; Skinner, Charles H.; Kaita, Robert; Koel, Bruce

    2017-08-01

    We present a study of the role of boron and oxygen in the chemistry of deuterium retention in boronized ATJ graphite irradiated by the extreme environment of a tokamak deuterium plasma. The experimental results were obtained by the first XPS measurements inside the plasma chamber of the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade, between the plasma exposures. The subtle interplay of boron, carbon, oxygen and deuterium chemistry is explained by reactive molecular dynamics simulations, verified by quantum-classical molecular dynamics and successfully compared to the measured data. The calculations deciphered the roles of oxygen and boron for the deuterium retention and predict deuterium uptake into a boronized carbon surface close in value to that previously predicted for a lithiated and oxidized carbon surface.

  10. Uncovering the genetic signature of quantitative trait evolution with replicated time series data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, S U; Kofler, R; Schlötterer, C

    2017-01-01

    The genetic architecture of adaptation in natural populations has not yet been resolved: it is not clear to what extent the spread of beneficial mutations (selective sweeps) or the response of many quantitative trait loci drive adaptation to environmental changes. Although much attention has been given to the genomic footprint of selective sweeps, the importance of selection on quantitative traits is still not well studied, as the associated genomic signature is extremely difficult to detect. We propose 'Evolve and Resequence' as a promising tool, to study polygenic adaptation of quantitative traits in evolving populations. Simulating replicated time series data we show that adaptation to a new intermediate trait optimum has three characteristic phases that are reflected on the genomic level: (1) directional frequency changes towards the new trait optimum, (2) plateauing of allele frequencies when the new trait optimum has been reached and (3) subsequent divergence between replicated trajectories ultimately leading to the loss or fixation of alleles while the trait value does not change. We explore these 3 phase characteristics for relevant population genetic parameters to provide expectations for various experimental evolution designs. Remarkably, over a broad range of parameters the trajectories of selected alleles display a pattern across replicates, which differs both from neutrality and directional selection. We conclude that replicated time series data from experimental evolution studies provide a promising framework to study polygenic adaptation from whole-genome population genetics data.

  11. A QCD space-time analysis of quarkonium formation and evolution in hadronic collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kinder-Geiger, Klaus

    1998-01-01

    The production of heavy quarkonium as QQbar bound-states in hadron-hadron collisions is considered within the framework of a space-time description, combining parton-cascade evolution with a coalescence model for bound-state formation. The `hard' production of the initial QQbar, directly or via gluon fragmentation and including both color-singlet and color-octet contributions, is calculated from the PQCD cross-sections. The subsequent development of the QQbar system is described within a space-time generalization of the DGLAP parton-evolution formalism in position- and momentum-space. The actual formation of the bound-states is accomplished through overlap of the QQbar pair and a spectrum of quarkonium wave-functions. This coalescence can only occur after sufficent gluon radiation reduces the QQbar relative velocity to a value commensurate with the non-relativistic kinematics of these bound systems. The presence of gluon participants in the cascade then is both necessary and leads to the natural inclusion of ...

  12. Time evolution of shear-induced particle margination and migration in a cellular suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qin M.; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2016-11-01

    The inhomogeneous center-of-mass distributions of red blood cells and platelets normal to the flow direction in small vessels play a significant role in hemostasis and drug delivery. Under pressure-driven flow in channels, the migration of deformable red blood cells at steady state is characterized by a cell-free or Fahraeus-Lindqvist layer near the vessel wall. Rigid particles such as platelets, however, "marginate" and thus develop a near-wall excess concentration. In order to evaluate the role of branching and design suitable microfluidic devices, it is important to investigate the time evolution of particle margination and migration from a non-equilibrium state and determine the corresponding entrance lengths. From a mechanistic point of view, deformability-induced hydrodynamic lift and shear-induced diffusion are essential mechanisms for the cross-flow migration and margination. In this talk, we determine the concentration distribution of red blood cells and platelets by solving coupled Boltzmann advection-diffusion equations for both species and explore their time evolution. We verify our model by comparing with large-scale, multi-cell simulations and experiments. Our Boltzmann collision theory serves as a fast alternative to large-scale simulations.

  13. Isolation of table olive damage causes and bruise time evolution during fruit detachment with trunk shaker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Jimenez, F.; Castro-Garcia, S.; Blanco-Roldan, G. L.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, E. J.; Gil-Ribes, J. A.

    2013-05-01

    The high sensitivity of table olives to mechanical damage limits mechanical harvesting with trunk shakers. The objective of this study was the identification, evaluation and temporal evolution assessment of the sources of damage caused to the fruits. To do this, digital image analysis was used for the objective determination of damage produced to table olives. Harvesting tests were performed in an intensive olive orchard with trees of the Manzanilla variety in Seville, Spain. Mechanical harvesting with trunk shakers and subsequent detachment of the fruits to the ground produced a level of bruise 12 times greater than the levels obtained from manual harvesting. Fruit-fruit and fruit branch impacts and friction from the movement of the fruit in the tree canopy during vibration and detachment were the main causes of damage to the fruits. These causes represented a mean value of 60% of the damage produced to the fruits from mechanical harvesting. In addition, most bruising from mechanical damage occurred in the first hour after harvesting and followed an exponential tendency. The information obtained about table olive damage causes and bruise time evolution during fruit detachment with trunk shaker can be used by the producers to determine how to reduce and prevent bruising during harvesting operations. (Author) 34 refs.

  14. Metallicity gradients in Local Universe galaxies: time evolution and effects of radial migration

    CERN Document Server

    Magrini, L; Stanghellini, L; Casasola, V; Galli, D

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of the shape of radial metallicity gradients in disc galaxies has recently improved. Conversely, the understanding of their time evolution is more complex, since it requires analysis of stellar populations with different ages, or systematic studies of galaxies at different redshifts. In the Local Universe, Hii regions and planetary nebulae (PNe) are important tools to investigate it. We present an in-depth study of all nearby spiral galaxies (M33, M31, NGC300, and M81) with direct-method nebular abundances of both populations. For the first time, we also evaluate the radial migration of PN populations. We analyse Hii region and PN properties to: determine whether oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for past interstellar medium (ISM) composition; homogenise the published datasets; estimate the migration of the oldest stellar populations; determine the overall chemical enrichment and slope evolution. We confirm that oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for the past ISM metallicity. We find that PN gr...

  15. Timing and flux evolution of the galactic center magnetar SGR J1745–2900

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.; Archibald, Robert F.; Dufour, François; An, Hongjun [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Bhalerao, Varun [Inter-University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Gotthelf, Eric V.; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bachetti, Matteo [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kennea, Jamie A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Astrophysics Office, ZP 12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Markwardt, Craig B. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: vkaspi@physics.mcgill.ca [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); and others

    2014-05-10

    We present the X-ray timing and spectral evolution of the Galactic Center magnetar SGR J1745–2900 for the first ∼4 months post-discovery using data obtained with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array and Swift observatories. Our timing analysis reveals a large increase in the magnetar spin-down rate by a factor of 2.60 ± 0.07 over our data span. We further show that the change in spin evolution was likely coincident with a bright X-ray burst observed in 2013 June by Swift, and if so, there was no accompanying discontinuity in the frequency. We find that the source 3-10 keV flux has declined monotonically by a factor of ∼2 over an 80 day period post-outburst accompanied by a ∼20% decrease in the source's blackbody temperature, although there is evidence for both flux and kT having leveled off. We argue that the torque variations are likely to be magnetospheric in nature and will dominate over any dynamical signatures of orbital motion around Sgr A*.

  16. A study of evolution/suppression parameters of equatorial postsunset plasma instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Oyekola

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Evening equatorial pre-reversal vertical ion E×B drift (VZP and the peak of the ionospheric F2 maximum altitude (hmF2P of the postsunset equatorial F-layer, which are the essential parameters requisite for the generation or inhibition of postsunset bottomside equatorial irregularities were deduced from ionosonde observations made in the Africa region (Ouagadougou: ~3° N dip latitude between January 1987 and December 1990 for solar activity minimum, medium, and maxima (F10.7=85, 141, 214, and 190, respectively for quiet geomagnetic conditions. We investigate variations of evening equatorial pre-reversal drift and the corresponding altitude at four levels of solar activity. Our observations show strong variations with solar variability. Correlation analysis between these parameters indicates that the correlation coefficient value between hmF2P versus VZP decreases considerably with increasing solar flux value. There seems to be no significant link between these parameters under high solar activity, especially for solar intensity F10.7>200 units. We conclude that meridional neutral wind in the F-region contributes substantially to the variations of the pre-reversal vertical plasma drifts enhancement and the peak hmF2, particularly the electrodynamics during twilight high solar flux conditions.

  17. Development of real-time plasma analysis and control algorithms for the TCV tokamak using SIMULINK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felici, F., E-mail: f.felici@tue.nl [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Suisse, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Le, H.B.; Paley, J.I.; Duval, B.P.; Coda, S.; Moret, J.-M.; Bortolon, A.; Federspiel, L.; Goodman, T.P. [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Suisse, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Hommen, G. [FOM-Institute DIFFER, Association EURATOM-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Karpushov, A.; Piras, F.; Pitzschke, A. [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Suisse, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Romero, J. [National Laboratory of Fusion, EURATOM-CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Sevillano, G. [Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering, Bilbao University of the Basque Country, Bilbao (Spain); Sauter, O.; Vijvers, W. [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Suisse, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • A new digital control system for the TCV tokamak has been commissioned. • The system is entirely programmable by SIMULINK, allowing rapid algorithm development. • Different control system nodes can run different algorithms at varying sampling times. • The previous control system functions have been emulated and improved. • New capabilities include MHD control, profile control, equilibrium reconstruction. - Abstract: One of the key features of the new digital plasma control system installed on the TCV tokamak is the possibility to rapidly design, test and deploy real-time algorithms. With this flexibility the new control system has been used for a large number of new experiments which exploit TCV's powerful actuators consisting of 16 individually controllable poloidal field coils and 7 real-time steerable electron cyclotron (EC) launchers. The system has been used for various applications, ranging from event-based real-time MHD control to real-time current diffusion simulations. These advances have propelled real-time control to one of the cornerstones of the TCV experimental program. Use of the SIMULINK graphical programming language to directly program the control system has greatly facilitated algorithm development and allowed a multitude of different algorithms to be deployed in a short time. This paper will give an overview of the developed algorithms and their application in physics experiments.

  18. Detection of Plasma Fluctuations in White-light Images of the Outer Solar Corona: Investigation of the Spatial and Temporal Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telloni, D.; Ventura, R.; Romano, P.; Spadaro, D.; Antonucci, E.

    2013-04-01

    This work focuses on the first results from the identification and characterization of periodic plasma density fluctuations in the outer corona, observed in STEREO-A COR1 white-light image time series. A two-dimensional reconstruction of the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the coronal fluctuation power has been performed over the whole plane of the sky, from 1.4 to 4.0 R ⊙. The adopted diagnostic tool is based on wavelet transforms. This technique, with respect to the standard Fourier analysis, has the advantage of localizing non-persistent fluctuating features and exploring variations of the relating wavelet power in both space and time. The map of the variance of the coronal brightness clearly outlines intermittent spatially coherent fluctuating features, localized along, or adjacent to, the strongest magnetic field lines. In most cases, they do not correspond to the visible coronal structures in the brightness maps. The results obtained provide a scenario in which the solar corona shows quasi-periodic, non-stationary density variations characterized by a wide range of temporal and spatial scales and strongly confined by the magnetic field topology. In addition, structures fluctuating with larger power are larger in size and evolve more slowly. The characteristic periodicities of the fluctuations are comparable to their lifetimes. This suggests that plasma fluctuations lasting only one or two wave periods and initially characterized by a single dominant periodicity either rapidly decay into a turbulent mixed flow via nonlinear interactions with other plasma modes, or they are damped by thermal conduction. The periodic non-stationary coronal fluctuations outlined by the closed field lines at low and mid latitudes might be associated with the existence of slow standing magneto-acoustic waves excited by the convective supergranular motion. The fluctuating ray-like structures observed along open field lines appear to be linked either to the

  19. Stability of cylindrical thin shell wormhole during evolution of universe from inflation to late time acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setare, M.R. [Department of Science, Campus of Bijar, University of Kurdistan,Bijar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sepehri, A. [Faculty of Physics, Shahid Bahonar University,P.O. Box 76175, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-16

    In this paper, we consider the stability of cylindrical wormholes during evolution of universe from inflation to late time acceleration epochs. We show that there are two types of cylindrical wormholes. The first type is produced at the corresponding point where k black F-strings are transited to BIon configuration. This wormhole transfers energy from extra dimensions into our universe, causes inflation, loses it’s energy and vanishes. The second type of cylindrical wormhole is created by a tachyonic potential and causes a new phase of acceleration. We show that wormhole parameters grow faster than the scale factor in this era, overtake it at ripping time and lead to the destruction of universe at big rip singularity.

  20. Magnetars: Time Evolution, Superfluid Properties, and Mechanism of Magnetic Field Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Arras, P; Thompson, C; Wang, Bing; Tang, Huanwen; Guo, Chonghui; Xiu, Zhilong

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the coupled thermal evolution and magnetic field decay in relativistic model neutron stars threaded by superstrong magnetic fields (B > 10^{15} G). Our main goal is to evaluate how such ``magnetars'' evolve with time and how field decay modifies the transitions to core superfluidity and cooling dominated by surface X-ray emission. Observations of a thermal X-ray spectral component and fast timing noise place strong constraints on the presence of a superfluid core. We find that the transition to core superfluidity can be significantly delayed by field decay in the age range ~ 10^3-10^5 yrs. The mechanism of Hall drift is related to the stability of the core magnetic field, and to currents flowing outward through the crust. The heating effect is enhanced if it is continuous rather than spasmodic. Condensation of a heavy element layer at the surface is shown to cause only modest changes in the outward conduction of heat.

  1. Purity of Gaussian states: measurement schemes and time-evolution in noisy channels

    CERN Document Server

    Paris, M A G; Serafini, A; De Siena, S

    2003-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the purity for Gaussian states of single-mode continuous variable systems. We prove the connection of purity to observable quantities for these states, and show that the joint measurement of two conjugate quadratures is necessary and sufficient to determine the purity at any time. The statistical reliability and the range of applicability of the proposed measurement scheme is tested by means of Monte Carlo simulated experiments. We then consider the dynamics of purity in noisy channels. We derive an evolution equation for the purity of general Gaussian states both in thermal and squeezed thermal baths. We show that purity is maximized at any given time for an initial coherent state evolving in a thermal bath, or for an initial squeezed state evolving in a squeezed thermal bath whose asymptotic squeezing is orthogonal to that of the input state.

  2. A new time tree reveals Earth history's imprint on the evolution of modern birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramunt, Santiago; Cracraft, Joel

    2015-12-01

    Determining the timing of diversification of modern birds has been difficult. We combined DNA sequences of clock-like genes for most avian families with 130 fossil birds to generate a new time tree for Neornithes and investigated their biogeographic and diversification dynamics. We found that the most recent common ancestor of modern birds inhabited South America around 95 million years ago, but it was not until the Cretaceous-Paleogene transition (66 million years ago) that Neornithes began to diversify rapidly around the world. Birds used two main dispersion routes: reaching the Old World through North America, and reaching Australia and Zealandia through Antarctica. Net diversification rates increased during periods of global cooling, suggesting that fragmentation of tropical biomes stimulated speciation. Thus, we found pervasive evidence that avian evolution has been influenced by plate tectonics and environmental change, two basic features of Earth's dynamics.

  3. [Some remarks on the evolution of medical language across the times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann D, Walter

    2011-02-01

    The language employed by the physicians in their communications has been suffering a continuous evolution through the times, from the sober beauty that in their conciseness and accuracy had the Greek and the Latin, to the verbosity and flowery of the Middle Age and posterior centuries, for ended in the poverty and monotony characteristics of the today publications. A brief selection of different papers and book's extracts is presented in order to illustrate these changes, including words of Hippocrates, Celsus, Leonardo, Van Leeunwenhoek, Spallanzani, Jenner, Koch, Laveran, Manson, Grassi and other less conspicuous, ending with the assertion that the scarce time for read adduced by physicians must not serves like an excuse for ignorance and lack of culture.

  4. A new time tree reveals Earth history’s imprint on the evolution of modern birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramunt, Santiago; Cracraft, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Determining the timing of diversification of modern birds has been difficult. We combined DNA sequences of clock-like genes for most avian families with 130 fossil birds to generate a new time tree for Neornithes and investigated their biogeographic and diversification dynamics. We found that the most recent common ancestor of modern birds inhabited South America around 95 million years ago, but it was not until the Cretaceous-Paleogene transition (66 million years ago) that Neornithes began to diversify rapidly around the world. Birds used two main dispersion routes: reaching the Old World through North America, and reaching Australia and Zealandia through Antarctica. Net diversification rates increased during periods of global cooling, suggesting that fragmentation of tropical biomes stimulated speciation. Thus, we found pervasive evidence that avian evolution has been influenced by plate tectonics and environmental change, two basic features of Earth’s dynamics. PMID:26824065

  5. Fast, deep record length, time-resolved visible spectroscopy of plasmas using fiber grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockington, Samuel; Case, Andrew; Cruz, Edward; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Horton, Robert; Klauser, Ruth; Hwang, D. Q.

    2016-10-01

    HyperV Technologies is developing a fiber-coupled, deep-record-length, low-light camera head for performing high time resolution spectroscopy on visible emission from plasma events. New solid-state Silicon Photo-Multiplier (SiPM) chips are capable of single photon event detection and high speed data acquisition. By coupling the output of a spectrometer to an imaging fiber bundle connected to a bank of amplified SiPMs, time-resolved spectroscopic imagers of 100 to 1,000 pixels can be constructed. Target pixel performance is 10 Megaframes/sec with record lengths of up to 256,000 frames yielding 25.6 milliseconds of record at10 Megasamples/sec resolution. Pixel resolutions of 8 to 12 bits are pos- sible. Pixel pitch can be refined by using grids of 100 μm to 1000 μm diameter fibers. A prototype 32-pixel spectroscopic imager employing this technique was constructed and successfully tested at the University of California at Davis Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX) as a full demonstration of the concept. Experimental results will be dis-cussed, along with future plans for the Phase 2 project, and potential applications to plasma experiments . Work supported by USDOE SBIR Grant DE-SC0013801.

  6. On the evolution of the phase-space distributions of a non-spherical molecular ultracold plasma in a supersonic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Weiling, Markus; Sadeghi, Hossein; Hung, Jachin; Grant, Edward

    2016-10-01

    This paper offers a toolbox for characterizing the initial conditions and predicting the evolution of the ultracold plasma that forms after resonant laser preparation of a Rydberg gas entrained in a differentially pumped supersonic molecular beam. The conditions afforded by a skimmed free-jet expansion combined with the geometry of laser excitation, determines the phase-space volume of the excited gas. A hydrodynamic shell model, that accounts for the ellipsoidal spatial distribution of this excitation volume in concert with the deforming effects of dissociative recombination, serves to simulate the ambipolar expansion of this molecular ultracold plasma.

  7. Convergence of statistical moments of particle density time series in scrape-off layer plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kube, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Particle density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer of magnetically confined plasmas, as measured by gas-puff imaging or Langmuir probes, are modeled as the realization of a stochastic process in which a superposition of pulses with a fixed shape, an exponential distribution of waiting times and amplitudes represents the radial motion of blob-like structures. With an analytic formulation of the process at hand, we derive expressions for the mean-squared error on estimators of sample mean and sample variance as a function of sample length, sampling frequency, and the parameters of the stochastic process. % Employing that the probability distribution function of a particularly relevant shot noise process is given by the gamma distribution, we derive estimators for sample skewness and kurtosis, and expressions for the mean-squared error on these estimators. Numerically generated synthetic time series are used to verify the proposed estimators, the sample length dependency of their mean-squared errors, and thei...

  8. Real time observables for the quark-gluon plasma from the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Christian

    2014-07-01

    In this thesis we studied real time quantities and processes of the quark-gluon plasma. We employed the fundamental theory of QCD allowing for predictions from first principles. Treating QCD on the lattice enabled us to access non-perturbative regimes and for the very first time we computed a hydrodynamic transport coefficient without having to resort to maximum entropy methods or functional input. Furthermore we established a semi-classical formulation of QCD that we applied to investigate the effects of dynamic fermions as well as of using the correct colour group of QCD, SU(3), on the isotropization process of the quark-gluon plasma. In this work we have calculated the second order hydrodynamic transport coefficient κ for the Yang-Mills plasma using lattice perturbation theory and Monte Carlo simulations. From calculations both in strong and weak coupling limits, we expect a temperature dependence of κ∝T{sup 2}. In the investigated temperature range 2T{sub c}time. For this reason we established a semiclassical lattice approach to QCD facilitating a first principle description of real time processes far from equilibrium. In the investigation of the isotropization process in heavy-ion collisions, we borrowed initial conditions from the colour-glass-condensate effective theory. Studying the pure bosonic dynamics with colour group SU(3) in a static box, we

  9. A real-time lattice simulation of the thermalization of a gluon plasma: first results

    CERN Document Server

    Attems, Maximilian; Schäfer, Christian; Wagenbach, Björn; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2016-01-01

    To achieve an understanding of the thermalization of a quark-gluon plasma, starting from QCD without using model assumptions, is a formidable task. We study the early stage dynamics of a relativistic heavy ion collision in the framework of real time simulations of classical Yang-Mills theory in a static box with the color glass condensate as initial condition. Our study generalizes a previous one by Fukushima and Gelis from SU(2) to the realistic case of SU(3). We calculate the chromo-electric and chromo-magnetic energy densities as well as the ratio of longitudinal and transverse pressure as a function of time as probes for thermalization. Our preliminary results on coarse lattices show the occurrence of Weibel instabilities prior to thermalization.

  10. 纳秒激光烧蚀固体靶产生的等离子体在外加横向磁场中膨胀时的温度和密度参数演化∗%Temp oral evolutions of the plasma density and temp erature of laser-pro duced plasma expansion in an external transverse magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁亦寒; 胡广月; 袁鹏; 王雨林; 赵斌; 宋法伦; 陆全明; 郑坚

    2015-01-01

    The nanosecond laser produced plasma expansion in an external transverse magnetic field is explored by using optical imaging of plasma self-luminescence, optical spectrum and optical interferometry techniques. The plasma displays bifurcation and focusing phenomena in a transverse magnetic field, which is different from the scenarios without external magnetic field significantly. We set up a simplified magnetohydrodynamics model according to the feature of experimental parameters. The theoretical results of the temporal evolutions of the plasma density and the temperature are in good agreement with the experimental results, which confirms the important role of the magnetic diffusion in the plasma evolution.

  11. Introducing the Illustris project: the evolution of galaxy populations across cosmic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Springel, Volker; Sijacki, Debora; Nelson, Dylan; Snyder, Greg; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Torrey, Paul; Hernquist, Lars

    2014-11-01

    We present an overview of galaxy evolution across cosmic time in the Illustris simulation. Illustris is an N-body/hydrodynamical simulation that evolves 2 × 18203 resolution elements in a (106.5 Mpc)3 box from cosmological initial conditions down to z = 0 using the AREPO moving-mesh code. The simulation uses a state-of-the-art set of physical models for galaxy formation that was tuned to reproduce the z = 0 stellar mass function and the history of the cosmic star formation rate density. We find that Illustris successfully reproduces a plethora of observations of galaxy populations at various redshifts, for which no tuning was performed, and provide predictions for future observations. In particular, we discuss (a) the buildup of galactic mass, showing stellar mass functions and the relations between stellar mass and halo mass from z = 7 to 0, (b) galaxy number density profiles around massive central galaxies out to z = 4, (c) the gas and total baryon content of both galaxies and their haloes for different redshifts, and as a function of mass and radius, and (d) the evolution of galaxy specific star formation rates up to z = 8. In addition, we (i) present a qualitative analysis of galaxy morphologies from z = 5 to 0, for the stellar as well as the gaseous components, and their appearance in Hubble Space Telescope mock observations, (ii) follow galaxies selected at z = 2 to their z = 0 descendants, and quantify their growth and merger histories, and (iii) track massive z = 0 galaxies to high redshift and study their joint evolution in star formation activity and compactness. We conclude with a discussion of several disagreements with observations, and lay out possible directions for future research.

  12. Effects of Long-Term Storage Time and Original Sampling Month on Biobank Plasma Protein Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enroth, Stefan; Hallmans, Göran; Grankvist, Kjell; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2016-10-01

    The quality of clinical biobank samples is crucial to their value for life sciences research. A number of factors related to the collection and storage of samples may affect the biomolecular composition. We have studied the effect of long-time freezer storage, chronological age at sampling, season and month of the year and on the abundance levels of 108 proteins in 380 plasma samples collected from 106 Swedish women. Storage time affected 18 proteins and explained 4.8-34.9% of the observed variance. Chronological age at sample collection after adjustment for storage-time affected 70 proteins and explained 1.1-33.5% of the variance. Seasonal variation had an effect on 15 proteins and month (number of sun hours) affected 36 proteins and explained up to 4.5% of the variance after adjustment for storage-time and age. The results show that freezer storage time and collection date (month and season) exerted similar effect sizes as age on the protein abundance levels. This implies that information on the sample handling history, in particular storage time, should be regarded as equally prominent covariates as age or gender and need to be included in epidemiological studies involving protein levels.

  13. Correlations and Non-predictability in the Time Evolution of Earthquake Ruptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhoury, J. E.; Knopoff, L.

    2007-12-01

    The characterization of the time evolution of ruptures is one of the important aspects of the earthquake process. What makes a rupture, that starts small, to become a big one or end very quickly resulting in a small earthquake is central to understanding the physics of the time evolution of ruptures. Establishing whether there are any correlations in time, between the initiation of the rupture and its ultimate size, is a step in the right direction. Here, we analyze three source-time function data sets. The first is produced by the generation of repeated rupture events on a 2D heterogeneous, in-plane, dynamical model, while the second is produced by an-age dependent critical branching model. The third is the source-time function data base of Ruff [1]. We formulate the problem in terms of two questions. 1) Are there any correlations between the moment release at the beginning of the rupture and the total moment release during the entire rupture? 2) Can we predict the final size of an earthquake, once it has started and without any a posteriori information, by just knowing the moment release up to a certain time τ? Using the three data bases, the answer to the first question is yes and no to the second. The longer τ is, the stronger the correlations are between what goes on at the initiation and the final size. But, for τ fixed, and not a major fraction of the rupture time, there is no predictability of the rupture size. In particular, if a rupture starts with a very large moment release during time τ, it becomes a large earthquake. On the other hand, large earthquakes might start with very small moment release during τ; the non-predictability is due to the heterogeneities. The randomness in the critical branching model mimics the effect of the heterogeneities in the crust and in the 2D model. \\begin{thebibliography}{99} \\bibitem{ruff} Ruff, L. J., http://www.geo.lsa.umich.edu/SeismoObs/STF.html

  14. Use of erroneous wolf generation time in assessments of domestic dog and human evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L. David; Barber-meyer, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    Scientific interest in dog domestication and parallel evolution of dogs and humans (Wang et al. 2013) has increased recently (Freedman et al. 2014, Larson and Bradley 2014, Franz et al. 2016,), and various important conclusions have been drawn based on how long ago the calculations show dogs were domesticated from ancestral wolves (Canis lupus). Calculation of this duration is based on “the most commonly assumed mutation rate of 1 x 10-8 per generation and a 3-year gray wolf generation time . . .” (Skoglund et al. 2015:3). It is unclear on what information the assumed generation time is based, but Ersmark et al. (2016) seemed to have based their assumption on a single wolf (Mech and Seal 1987). The importance of assuring that such assumptions are valid is obvious. Recently, two independent studies employing three large data sets and three methods from two widely separated areas have found that wolf generation time is 4.2-4.7 years. The first study, based on 200 wolves in Yellowstone National Park used age-specific birth and death rates to calculate a generation time of 4.16 years (vonHoldt et al. 2008). The second, using estimated first-breeding times of 86 female wolves in northeastern Minnesota found a generation time of 4.3 years and using uterine examination of 159 female wolves from throughout Minnesota yielded a generation time of 4.7 years (Mech et al. 2016). We suggest that previous studies using a 3-year generation time recalculate their figures and adjust their conclusions based on these generation times and publish revised results.

  15. Real-time 3-D hybrid simulation of Titan's plasma interaction during a solar wind excursion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Simon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The plasma environment of Saturn's largest satellite Titan is known to be highly variable. Since Titan's orbit is located within the outer magnetosphere of Saturn, the moon can leave the region dominated by the magnetic field of its parent body in times of high solar wind dynamic pressure and interact with the thermalized magnetosheath plasma or even with the unshocked solar wind. By applying a three-dimensional hybrid simulation code (kinetic description of ions, fluid electrons, we study in real-time the transition that Titan's plasma environment undergoes when the moon leaves Saturn's magnetosphere and enters the supermagnetosonic solar wind. In the simulation, the transition between both plasma regimes is mimicked by a reversal of the magnetic field direction as well as a change in the composition and temperature of the impinging plasma flow. When the satellite enters the solar wind, the magnetic draping pattern in its vicinity is reconfigured due to reconnection, with the characteristic time scale of this process being determined by the convection of the field lines in the undisturbed plasma flow at the flanks of the interaction region. The build-up of a bow shock ahead of Titan takes place on a typical time scale of a few minutes as well. We also analyze the erosion of the newly formed shock front upstream of Titan that commences when the moon re-enters the submagnetosonic plasma regime of Saturn's magnetosphere. Although the model presented here is far from governing the full complexity of Titan's plasma interaction during a solar wind excursion, the simulation provides important insights into general plasma-physical processes associated with such a disruptive change of the upstream flow conditions.

  16. Time-of-Flight Measurement of a 355-nm Nd:YAG Laser-Produced Aluminum Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Baclayon

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available An aluminum target in air was irradiated by a 355-nm Nd:YAG laser with a pulse width of 10 ns and arepetition rate of 10 Hz. The emission spectra of the laser-produced aluminum plasma were investigatedwith varying distances from the target surface. The results show the presence of a strong continuum veryclose to the target surface, but as the plasma evolve in space, the continuum gradually disappears and theemitted spectra are dominated by stronger line emissions. The observed plasma species are the neutraland singly ionized aluminum and their speeds were investigated using an optical time-of-flight measurementtechnique. Results show that the speeds of the plasma species decreases gradually with distance from thetarget surface. Comparison of the computed speeds of the plasma species shows that the singly ionizedspecies have relatively greater kinetic energy than the neutral species.

  17. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  18. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  19. Kinetic theory of time correlation functions for a dense one-component plasma in a magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoolderman, A.J.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    The time-dependent correlations of a one-component plasma in a uniform magnetic field are studied with the help of kinetic theory. The time correlation functions of the particle density, the momentum density, and the kinetic energy density are evaluated for large time intervals. In the collision-dom

  20. Liquid-Mercury-Supported Langmuir Films of Ionic Liquids: Isotherms, Structure, and Time Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfassy, Eitan; Mastai, Yitzhak; Pontoni, Diego; Deutsch, Moshe

    2016-04-05

    Ionic liquids have been intensively developed for the last few decades and are now used in a wide range of applications, from electrochemistry to catalysis and nanotechnology. Many of these applications involve ionic liquid interfaces with other liquids and solids, the subnanometric experimental study of which is highly demanding, and has been little studied to date. We present here a study of mercury-supported Langmuir films of imidazolium-based ionic liquids by surface tensiometry and X-ray reflectivity. The charge-delocalized ionic liquids studied here exhibit no 2D lateral order but show diffuse surface-normal electron density profiles exhibiting gradual mercury penetration into the ionic liquid film, and surface-normal structure evolution over a period of hours. The effect of increasing the nonpolar alkyl chain length was also investigated. The results obtained provide insights into the interactions between these ionic liquids and liquid mercury and about the time evolution of the structure and composition of their interface.