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Sample records for plasma stabilization experiment

  1. Plasma stabilization experiment. First technical report, 1 May 1979-30 September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sziklas, E. A.; Fader, W. J.; Jong, R. A.; Polk, D. H.; Stufflebeam, J. H.

    1979-10-01

    The Plasma Stabilization Experiment is an effort to enhance stability in a mirror-confined plasma by stoppering cold ions with rf fields applied near the mirror throats. In this initial report period, primary and backup antennas were designed and fabricated. The primary pair was installed in the UTRC mirror facility and stabilization tests were initiated. In these initial tests rf power was applied to only one antenna at a time. Preliminary results indicate a stoppering effect at the mirror throat subjected to the rf and a simultaneous increase in the rate of decay of the confined plasma. These observations suggest the stoppering effect at one mirror throat is more than offset by an enhanced loss rate through the other throat. In the next test series rf power will be applied simultaneously in both mirror throats.

  2. Plasma stabilization experiment. Final report, 1 October 1979-30 April 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sziklas, E. A.; Fader, W. J.; Jong, R. A.; Stufflebeam, J. H.

    1980-07-01

    The Plasma Stabilization Experiment is an effort to enhance stability in a mirror-confined plasma by trapping cold ions with rf fields applied near the mirror throats. Nagoya Type III antennas, coupled to a 60 kW rf power supply are mounted in the throats of the UTRC baseball magnet. An external washer gun provides a source of plasma for both streaming and confined plasma tests. Results show a strong stoppering effect on streaming plasmas and a marginal effect on confined plasmas. Theoretical calculations provide an explanation for the experimental observations. The field generates a ponderomotive force acting on the electrons. The resultant improvement in electron confinement changes the ambipolar potential and inhibits the flow of ions through the mirror throat. Criteria are derived for the validity of this trapping concept. The requisite field strengths are significantly lower than those required to trap ions directly. Scaling laws are developed for application of cold ion trapping to large mirror devices containing dense plasmas. The use of slow-wave antenna structures operated at frequencies above the lower hybrid frequency is recommended for these applications.

  3. Fusion Reactor and Break-Even Experiment Based on Stabilized Liner Compression of Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, Peter; Frese, Sherry; Frese, Michael

    2016-10-01

    An optimum regime, known as magnetized-target or magneto-inertial fusion (MTF/MIF), requires magnetic fields at megagauss levels, which are attainable by use of dynamic conductors called liners. The stabilized liner compressor (SLC) provides the basis for controlled implosion and re-capture of the liner for reversible energy exchange between liner kinetic energy and the internal energy of a magnetized-plasma target. This exchange requires rotational stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor modes on the inner surface of the liner and pneumatically driven free-pistons that eliminate such modes at the outer surface. We discuss the implications of the SLC approach for the power reactor, a breakeven experiment, and intermediate experiments to develop the plasma target. Features include the importance of pneumatic drive and the liner-blanket for economic feasibility of MTF/MIF. Supported by ARPA-E ALPHA Program.

  4. Rayleigh-Taylor-Instability Evolution in Colliding-Plasma-Jet Experiments with Magnetic and Viscous Stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Colin Stuart [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability causes mixing in plasmas throughout the universe, from micron-scale plasmas in inertial confinement fusion implosions to parsec-scale supernova remnants. The evolution of this interchange instability in a plasma is influenced by the presence of viscosity and magnetic fields, both of which have the potential to stabilize short-wavelength modes. Very few experimental observations of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in plasmas with stabilizing mechanisms are reported in the literature, and those that are reported are in sub-millimeter scale plasmas that are difficult to diagnose. Experimental observations in well-characterized plasmas are important for validation of computational models used to make design predictions for inertial confinement fusion efforts. This dissertation presents observations of instability growth during the interaction between a high Mach-number, initially un-magnetized plasma jet and a stagnated, magnetized plasma. A multi-frame fast camera captures Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth while interferometry, spectroscopy, photodiode, and magnetic probe diagnostics are employed to estimate plasma parameters in the vicinity of the collision. As the instability grows, an evolution to longer mode wavelength is observed. Comparisons of experimental data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization. These data provide the opportunity to benchmark computational models used in astrophysics and fusion research.

  5. Rayleigh-Taylor-instability evolution in colliding-plasma-jet experiments with magnetic and viscous stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Colin Stuart [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability causes mixing in plasmas throughout the universe, from micron-scale plasmas in inertial confinement fusion implosions to parsec-scale supernova remnants. The evolution of this interchange instability in a plasma is influenced by the presence of viscosity and magnetic fields, both of which have the potential to stabilize short-wavelength modes. Very few experimental observations of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in plasmas with stabilizing mechanisms are reported in the literature, and those that are reported are in sub-millimeter scale plasmas that are difficult to diagnose. Experimental observations in well-characterized plasmas are important for validation of computational models used to make design predictions for inertial confinement fusion efforts. This dissertation presents observations of instability growth during the interaction between a high Mach-number, initially un-magnetized plasma jet and a stagnated, magnetized plasma. A multi-frame fast camera captures Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth while interferometry, spectroscopy, photodiode, and magnetic probe diagnostics are employed to estimate plasma parameters in the vicinity of the collision. As the instability grows, an evolution to longer mode wavelength is observed. Comparisons of experimental data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization. These data provide the opportunity to benchmark computational models used in astrophysics and fusion research.

  6. Wall mode stabilization at slow plasma rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Betti, Riccardo; Reimerdes, Holger; Garofalo, Andrea; Manickam, Janardhan

    2007-11-01

    Unstable pressure-driven external kink modes, which become slowly growing resistive wall modes (RWMs) in the presence of a resistive wall, can lead to tokamak plasma disruptions at high beta. It has been shown that RWMs are stabilized by fast plasma rotation (about 1-2% of the Alfv'en frequency) in experiments. Conventional theories attribute the RWM suppression to the dissipation induced by the resonances between plasma rotation and ion bounce/transit or shear Alfv'en frequencies [1]. In those theories, the kinetic effects associated with the plasma diamagnetic frequencies and trapped-particle precession drift frequencies are neglected. It has been observed in recent experiments [2,3] that the RWM suppression also occurs at very slow plasma rotation (about 0.3% of the Alfv'en frequency), where the conventional dissipation is too small to fully suppress the RWMs. Here it is shown, that the trapped-particle kinetic contribution associated with the precession motion [4] is large enough to stabilize the RWM in DIII-D at low rotation. Work supported by the US-DoE OFES. [1] A. Bondeson and M. S. Chu, Physics of Plasmas, 3,3013 (1996). [2] H. Reimerdes et al., Physical Review Letters, 98,055001 (2007). [3] M. Takechi et al., Physical Review Letters, 98,055002 (2007). [4] B. Hu and R. Betti, Physical Review Letters, 93,105002 (2004).

  7. An optimal real-time controller for vertical plasma stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz, N; Coda, S; Duval, B P; Le, H B; Rodrigues, A P; Varandas, C A F; Correia, C M B A; Goncalves, B S

    2014-01-01

    Modern Tokamaks have evolved from the initial axisymmetric circular plasma shape to an elongated axisymmetric plasma shape that improves the energy confinement time and the triple product, which is a generally used figure of merit for the conditions needed for fusion reactor performance. However, the elongated plasma cross section introduces a vertical instability that demands a real-time feedback control loop to stabilize the plasma vertical position and velocity. At the Tokamak \\`a Configuration Variable (TCV) in-vessel poloidal field coils driven by fast switching power supplies are used to stabilize highly elongated plasmas. TCV plasma experiments have used a PID algorithm based controller to correct the plasma vertical position. In late 2013 experiments a new optimal real-time controller was tested improving the stability of the plasma. This contribution describes the new optimal real-time controller developed. The choice of the model that describes the plasma response to the actuators is discussed. The ...

  8. Interferometer measurements in pulsed plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisitsyn, I.V.; Kohno, Susumu; Kawauchi, Toshinori; Sueda, Tsuyoshi; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-11-01

    The interferometer measurements are extremely informative in plasma experiments allowing direct evaluations of the electron density. The primary goal of the work presented, is to build a laser interferometer which meets the requirements of the highest possible simplicity, economy, convenience and ease of construction. These requirements are successfully satisfied while maintaining high sensitivity ({+-}0.5deg - of phase shift) and a wide density range (10{sup 14} and 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2} - line-integrated) of the interferometer. In our experiments we used a low average power (5 mW) He-Ne laser without complicated and costly stabilization or detection environments. The He-Ne laser interferometer with the Michelson arrangement was used to measure the line-integrated plasma densities in various plasma experiments. Time- and spatially-resolved density measurements were performed for a plasma opening switch, a laser produced plasma, an electrothermal launcher and railgun plasmas. (author)

  9. Plasma accelerator experiments in Yugoslavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purić, J.; Astashynski, V. M.; Kuraica, M. M.; Dojčinovié, I. P.

    2002-12-01

    An overview is given of the results obtained in the Plasma Accelerator Experiments in Belgrade, using quasi-stationary high current plasma accelerators constructed within the framework of the Yugoslavia-Belarus Joint Project. So far, the following plasma accelerators have been realized: Magnetoplasma Compressor type (MPC); MPC Yu type; one stage Erosive Plasma Dynamic System (EPDS) and, in final stage of construction two stage Quasi-Stationary High Current Plasma Accelerator (QHPA).

  10. Stabilizing effect of plasma discharge on bubbling fluidized granular bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mao-Bin; Dang, Sai-Chao; Ma, Qiang; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2015-07-01

    Fluidized beds have been widely used for processing granular materials. In this paper, we study the effect of plasma on the fluidization behavior of a bubbling fluidized bed with an atmospheric pressure plasma discharger. Experiment results show that the bubbling fluidized bed is stabilized with the discharge of plasma. When the discharge current reaches a minimum stabilization current Cms, air bubbles in the bed will disappear and the surface fluctuation is completely suppressed. A simplified model is proposed to consider the effect of electric Coulomb force generated by the plasma. It is found that the Coulomb force will propel the particles to move towards the void area, so that the bubbling fluidized bed is stabilized with a high enough plasma discharge. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11035005 and 11034010).

  11. Stability and energy confinement of highly elongated plasmas in TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, F.; Behn, R.; Dutch, M.J.; Martin, Y.; Moret, J.M.; Nieswand, C.; Pietrzyk, Z.A.; Reimerdes, H.; Ward, D.J. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1997-06-01

    One of the principal aims of TCV is the creation and active stabilization of highly elongated plasmas, {kappa}{>=}3. This implies high growth rates of axisymmetric modes and a very low stability margin. To stabilize such modes, TCV is equipped with a vertical position control system using a combination of slow coils outside the vacuum vessel (response time {approx_equal}1 ms) and a fast coil inside the vessel (response time {approx_equal}0.2 ms). The fast coil became operational in August 1996 and this paper describes the first experiments using both fast and slow coils for vertical stabilization. (author) 4 figs., 8 refs.

  12. Stability theory of Knudsen plasma diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, V. I., E-mail: victor.kuznetsov@mail.ioffe.ru; Ender, A. Ya. [Ioffe Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    A stability theory is developed for a plasma diode in which an electron beam supplied from the emitter propagates without collisions in the self-consistent electric field against the immobile ion background. An integral equation for the amplitude of the perturbed field is deduced using the Q,G method for the regime without electron reflection from a potential barrier. Analytic solutions to this equation are obtained for a number of important particular cases, and the plasma dispersion properties are examined.

  13. Alfven mode stability and wave-particle interaction in the JET tokamak: prospects for scenario development and control schemes in burning plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, D [CRPP, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland); Fasoli, A [CRPP, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland); Borba, D [Associacao EURATOM/IST (Portugal); EDFA-CSU, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom); Baar, M de [FOM-Instituut Voor Plasmafysica, Rijnhuizen (Netherlands); Bigi, M [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Brzozowski, J [NADA VR-Euratom Association, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Vries, P de [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    We have investigated the effect of different ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating schemes, of error field modes, of the plasma shape and edge magnetic shear, and of the ion {nabla}B drift direction on the stability of Alfven eigenmodes (AEs). The use of multi-frequency or 2nd harmonic minority ICRF heating at high plasma density gives rise to a lower fast ion pressure gradient in the plasma core and to a reduced mode activity in the Alfven frequency range. Externally excited low-amplitude error fields lead to a much larger AE instability threshold, which we attribute to a moderate radial redistribution of the fast ions. The edge plasma shape has a clear stabilizing effect on high-n, radially localized AEs. The damping rate of n = 1 toroidal AEs is a factor 3 higher when the ion {nabla}B drift is directed towards the divertor. These results represent a useful step towards the extrapolation of current scenarios to the inclusion of fusion-born alpha particles in ITER, with possible application for feedback control schemes for the various ITER operating regimes.

  14. Gyrokinetic stability theory of electron-positron plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Helander, Per

    2016-01-01

    The linear gyrokinetic stability properties of magnetically confined electron-positron plasmas are investigated in the parameter regime most likely to be relevant for the first laboratory experiments involving such plasmas, where the density is small enough that collisions can be ignored and the Debye length substantially exceeds the gyroradius. Although the plasma beta is very small, electromagnetic effects are retained, but magnetic compressibility can be neglected. The work of a previous publication (Helander, 2014) is thus extended to include electromagnetic instabilities, which are of importance in closed-field-line configurations, where such instabilities can occur at arbitrarily low pressure. It is found that gyrokinetic instabilities are completely absent if the magnetic field is homogeneous: any instability must involve magnetic curvature or shear. Furthermore, in dipole magnetic fields, the stability threshold for interchange modes with wavelengths exceeding the Debye radius coincides with that in i...

  15. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumlak, U., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Golingo, R. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Nelson, B. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Bowers, C. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Doty, S. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Forbes, E. G., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Hughes, M. C., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Kim, B., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Knecht, S. D., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lambert, K. K., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lowrie, W., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Ross, M. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Weed, J. R., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu [Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, 98195-2250 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  16. Stability analysis of tokamak plasmas; Analyse de stabilite de plasmas de tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdelle, C

    2000-10-01

    In a tokamak plasma, the energy transport is mainly turbulent. In order to increase the fusion reactions rate, it is needed to improve the energy confinement. The present work is dedicated to the identification of the key parameters leading to plasmas with a better confined energy in order to guide the future experiments. For this purpose, a numerical code has been developed. It calculates the growth rates characterizing the instabilities onset. The stability analysis is completed by the evaluation of the shearing rate of the rotation due to the radial electric field. When this shearing rate is greater than the growth rate the ion turbulence is fully stabilised. The shearing rate and the growth rate are determined from the density, temperature and security factor profiles of a given plasma. Three types of plasmas have been analysed. In the Radiative Improved modes of TEXTOR, high charge number ions seeding lowers the growth rates. In Tore Supra-high density plasmas, a strong magnetic shear and/or a more efficient ion heating linked to a bifurcation of the toroidal rotation direction (which is not understood) trigger the improvement of the confinement. In other Tore Supra plasmas, locally steep electron pressure gradients have been obtained following magnetic shear reversal. This locally negative magnetic shear has a stabilizing effect. In these three families of plasmas, the growth rates decrease, the confinement improves, the density and temperature profiles are steeper. This steepening induces an increase of the rotation shearing rate, which then maintains the confinement high quality. (author)

  17. Labotratory Simulation Experiments of Cometary Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Minami, S; Baum, P. J.; Kamin, G.; R. S. White; 南, 繁行

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory simulation experiment to study the interaction between a cometary plasma and the solar wind has been performed using the UCR-T 1 space simulation facility at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, the University of California, Riverside. Light emitting plasma composed of Sr, Ba and/or C simulating cometary coma plasma is produced by a plasma emitter which interacts with intense plasma flow produced by a co-axial plasma gun simulating the solar wind. The purpose of this ...

  18. Suspensions Plasma Spraying of Ceramics with Hybrid Water-Stabilized Plasma Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musalek, Radek; Medricky, Jan; Tesar, Tomas; Kotlan, Jiri; Pala, Zdenek; Lukac, Frantisek; Chraska, Tomas; Curry, Nicholas

    2016-12-01

    Technology of water-stabilized plasma torch was recently substantially updated through introduction of a so-called hybrid concept that combines benefits of water stabilization and gas stabilization principles. The high-enthalpy plasma provided by the WSP-H ("hybrid") torch may be used for thermal spraying of powders as well as liquid feedstocks with high feed rates. In this study, results from three selected experiments with suspension plasma spraying with WSP-H technology are presented. Possibility of deposition of coatings with controlled microstructures was demonstrated for three different ceramics (YSZ—yttria-stabilized zirconia, YAG—yttrium aluminum garnet and Al2O3) introduced into ethanol-based suspensions. Shadowgraphy was used for optimization of suspension injection and visualization of the liquid fragmentation in the plasma jet. Coatings were deposited onto substrates attached to the rotating carousel with integrated temperature monitoring and air cooling, which provided an excellent reproducibility of the deposition process. Deposition of columnar-like YSZ and dense YAG and Al2O3 coatings was successfully achieved. Deposition efficiency reached more than 50%, as evaluated according to EN ISO 17 836 standard.

  19. Modulating toroidal flow stabilization of edge localized modes with plasma density

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Shikui; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Recent EAST experiments have demonstrated mitigation and suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs) with toroidal rotation flow in higher collisionality regime, suggesting potential roles of plasma density. In this work, the effects of plasma density on the toroidal flow stabilization of the high-$n$ edge localized modes have been extensively studied in linear calculations for a circular-shaped limiter H-mode tokamak, using the extended MHD code NIMROD. In the single MHD model, toroidal flow has a weak stabilizing effects on the high-$n$ modes. Such a stabilization, however, can be significantly enhanced with the increase in plasma density. Furthermore, our calculations show that the enhanced stabilization of high-$n$ modes from toroidal flow with higher edge plasma density persists in the 2-fluid MHD model. These findings may explain the ELM mitigation and suppression by toroidal rotation in higher collisionality regime due to the enhancement of plasma density obtained in recent EAST experiments.

  20. Increasing plasma parameters using sheared flow stabilization of a Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Forbes, E. G.; Golingo, R. P.; Hughes, M. C.; Oberto, R. J.; Ross, M. P.; Weber, T. R.

    2017-05-01

    The ZaP and ZaP-HD Flow Z-pinch experiments at the University of Washington have successfully demonstrated that sheared plasma flows can be used as a stabilization mechanism over a range of parameters that has not previously been accessible to long-lived Z-pinch configurations. The stabilization is effective even when the plasma column is compressed to small radii, producing predicted increases in magnetic field and electron temperature. The flow shear value, extent, and duration are shown to be consistent with theoretical models of the plasma viscosity, which places a design constraint on the maximum axial length of a sheared flow stabilized Z-pinch. Measurements of the magnetic field topology indicate simultaneous azimuthal symmetry and axial uniformity along the entire 100 cm length of the Z-pinch plasma. Separate control of plasma acceleration and compression has increased the accessible plasma parameters and has generated stable plasmas with radii of 0.3 cm, as measured with a high resolution digital holographic interferometer. Compressing the plasma with higher pinch currents has produced high magnetic fields (8.5 T) and electron temperatures (1 keV) with an electron density of 2 ×1017 cm-3, while maintaining plasma stability for many Alfvén times (approximately 50 μs). The results suggest that sheared flow stabilization can be applied to extend Z-pinch plasma parameters to high energy densities.

  1. Vortex stabilized electron beam compressed fusion grade plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch, Ady [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-03-19

    Most inertial confinement fusion schemes are comprised of highly compressed dense plasmas. Those schemes involve short, extremely high power, short pulses of beams (lasers, particles) applied to lower density plasmas or solid pellets. An alternative approach could be to shoot an intense electron beam through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma.

  2. Plasma stability theory including the resistive wall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2015-12-01

    > Plasma stabilization due to a nearby conducting wall can provide access to better performance in some scenarios in tokamaks. This was proved by experiments with an essential gain in and demonstrated as a long-lasting effect at sufficiently fast plasma rotation in the DIII-D tokamak (see, for example, Strait et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 43, 2003, pp. 430-440). The rotational stabilization is the central topic of this review, though eventually the mode rotation gains significance. The analysis is based on the first-principle equations describing the energy balance with dissipation in the resistive wall. The method emphasizes derivation of the dispersion relations for the modes which are faster than the conventional resistive wall modes, but slower than the ideal magnetohydrodynamics modes. Both the standard thin wall and ideal-wall approximations are not valid in this range. Here, these are replaced by an approach incorporating the skin effect in the wall. This new element in the stability theory makes the energy sink a nonlinear function of the complex growth rate. An important consequence is that a mode rotating above a critical level can provide a damping effect sufficient for instability suppression. Estimates are given and applications are discussed.

  3. Magnetized Plasma Experiments Using Thermionic- Thermoelectronic Plasma Emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Cheng, C. Z.; Fujikawa, Nobuko; Lee, Jyun-Yi; Peng, Albert

    2008-11-01

    We are developing a magnetic mirror device, which is the first magnetized plasma device in Taiwan, to explore basic plasma sciences relevant to fusion, space and astrophysical plasmas. Our research subjects include electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), Alfven wave physics, and plasma turbulence. A large diameter (> 200 mm) plasma emitter1, which utilizes thermionic- thermoelectronic emission from a mixture of LaB6 (Lanthanum-hexaboride) and beta-eucryptite (lithium type aluminosylicate) powders, is employed as a plasma source because of its production ability of fully ionized plasma and controllability of plasma emission rate. The plasma emitter has been installed recently and investigation of its characteristics will be started. The employment of beta-eucryptite in plasma emitter is the first experimental test because such investigation of beta-eucryptite has previously been used only for Li+-ion source2. Our plan for magnetized plasma experiments and results of the plasma emitter investigation will be presented. 1. K. Saeki, S. Iizuka, N. Sato, and Y. Hatta, Appl. Phys. Lett., 37, 1980, pp. 37-38. 2. M. Ueda, R. R. Silva, R. M. Oliveira, H. Iguchi, J. Fujita and K. Kadota, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 30 1997, pp. 2711--2716.

  4. Supersonic Plasma Flow Control Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    to liquid metals , for example, the conductivities of typical plasma and electrolyte flows are relatively low. Ref. 14 cites the conductivity of...heating is the dominant effect. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Supersonic, plasma , MHD , boundary-layer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...horns in operation on Mach 5 wind tunnel with a plasma discharge. 31 Figure 17 Front view of a 100 mA DC discharge generated with upstream pointing

  5. Free surface stability of liquid metal plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiflis, P.; Christenson, M.; Szott, M.; Kalathiparambil, K.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2016-10-01

    An outstanding concern raised over the implementation of liquid metal plasma facing components in fusion reactors is the potential for ejection of liquid metal into the fusion plasma. The influences of Rayleigh-Taylor-like and Kelvin-Helmholtz-like instabilities were experimentally observed and quantified on the thermoelectric-driven liquid-metal plasma-facing structures (TELS) chamber at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. To probe the stability boundary, plasma currents and velocities were first characterized with a flush probe array. Subsequent observations of lithium ejection under exposure in the TELS chamber exhibited a departure from previous theory based on linear perturbation analysis. The stability boundary is mapped experimentally over the range of plasma impulses of which TELS is capable to deliver, and a new theory based on a modified set of the shallow water equations is presented which accurately predicts the stability of the lithium surface under plasma exposure.

  6. Dense Plasma Injection Experiment at MCX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun-Kaymak, I.; Messer, S.; Bomgardner, R.; Case, A.; Clary, R.; Ellis, R.; Elton, R.; Hassam, A.; Teodorescu, C.; Witherspoon, D.; Young, W.

    2009-09-01

    We present preliminary results of the High Density Plasma Injection Experiment at the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX). HyperV Technologies Corp. has designed, built, and installed a prototype coaxial gun to drive rotation in MCX. This gun has been designed to avoid the blow-by instability via a combination of electrode shaping and a tailored plasma armature. An array of diagnostics indicates the gun is capable of plasma jets with a mass of 160 μg at 70 km/s with an average plasma density above 1015 cm-3. Preliminary measurements are underway at MCX to understand the penetration of the plasma jet through the MCX magnetic field and the momentum transfer from the jet to the MCX plasma. Data will be presented for a wide range of MCX field parameters, and the prospects for future injection experiments will be evaluated.

  7. Enhanced toroidal flow stabilization of edge localized modes with increased plasma density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shikui; Zhu, Ping; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2017-09-01

    Toroidal flow alone is generally thought to have an important influence on tokamak edge pedestal stability, even though theoretical analysis often predicts merely a weak stabilizing effect of toroidal flow on the edge localized modes (ELMs) in experimental parameter regimes. For the first time, we find from two-fluid MHD calculations that such a stabilization, however, can be significantly enhanced by increasing the edge plasma density. Our finding resolves a long-standing mystery whether or how toroidal rotation can indeed have an effective influence on ELMs, and explains why the ELM mitigation and suppression by toroidal rotation are more favorably achieved in higher collisionality regime in recent experiments. The finding suggests a new control scheme on modulating toroidal flow stabilization of ELMs with plasma density, along with a new additional constraint on the optimal level of plasma density for the desired edge plasma conditions.

  8. Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 1017 cm-3 has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

  9. Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

  10. Hot electron stabilization of a helically symmetric plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.

    1986-04-01

    Furth and Boozer (private communication; Proceedings of the Advanced Bumpy Torus Concepts Workshop, CONF-830758, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 1983, p. 161) have suggested the use of relativistic electrons to achieve the second stability regime in a helical axis stellarator (Heliac). The hot electrons would only be required until the background plasma reached the second stability regime; the heating power maintaining the hot electron layer would then be turned off. The basic correctness of Furth and Boozer's suggestion is confirmed numerically by a localized stability analysis of helically symmetric plasma equilibria, with anisotropic pressure profiles. Stability is evaluated using the localized interchange criterion in which the hot electrons, because of their large drift speeds, are treated as rigid. A hot electron pressure profile is exhibited; it provides a stable path to the second stability regime for the background plasma.

  11. Stabilization effect of Weibel modes in relativistic laser fusion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belghit, Slimen; Sid, Abdelaziz

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the Weibel instability (WI) due to inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) absorption in a laser fusion plasma has been investigated. The stabilization effect due to the coupling of the self-generated magnetic field by WI with the laser wave field is explicitly shown. In this study, the relativistic effects are taken into account. Here, the basic equation is the relativistic Fokker-Planck (F-P) equation. The main obtained result is that the coupling of self-generated magnetic field with the laser wave causes a stabilizing effect of excited Weibel modes. We found a decrease in the spectral range of Weibel unstable modes. This decreasing is accompanied by a reduction of two orders in the growth rate of instable Weibel modes or even stabilization of these modes. It has been shown that the previous analysis of the Weibel instability due to IB has overestimated the values of the generated magnetic fields. Therefore, the generation of magnetic fields by the WI due to IB should not affect the experiences of an inertial confinement fusion.

  12. Stabilization of pulverized coal combustion by plasma assist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, M.; Maruta, K.; Takeda, K.; Solonenko, O.P.; Sakashita, M.; Nakamura, M. [Akita Prefectural University, Akita (Japan). Faculty of System Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    Ignition and stabilization of pulverized coal combustion by plasma assist is investigated with a 10 kW plasma torch for three different kinds of coal, such as high, medium and low volatile matter coals. Not only high volatile matter coal but also low quality coal can be successfully burned with plasma assist. Research for volatile component of coal shows that a higher temperature field is necessary to extract the volatile matter from inferior coal, while their compositions are almost the same.

  13. MHD equilibrium and stability in heliotron plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiguchi, Katsuji [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Recent topics in the theoretical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) analysis in the heliotron configuration are overviewed. Particularly, properties of three-dimensional equilibria, stability boundary of the interchange mode, effects of the net toroidal current including the bootstrap current and the ballooning mode stability are focused. (author)

  14. Stability of relativistic plasma-vacuum interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Trakhinin, Yuri

    2010-01-01

    We study the plasma-vacuum interface problem in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics for the case when the plasma density does not go to zero continuously, but jumps. Unlike the nonrelativistic version of this problem, we have to assume that the plasma expands into the vacuum (otherwise, the problem is underdetermined). We show that even if this necessary condition is satisfied the planar interface can be still violently unstable. By using a suitable secondary symmetrization of the Maxwell equations in vacuum, we find a sufficient condition that precludes violent instabilities. Under this condition we derive a basic a priori estimate in the anisotropic weighted Sobolev space $H^1_*$ for the variable coefficients linearized problem for nonplanar plasma-vacuum interfaces and prove the well-posedness of this problem.

  15. 3-D MHD modeling and stability analysis of jet and spheromak plasmas launched into a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin; Zhang, Yue; Wallace, Ben; Gilmore, Mark; Manchester, Ward; Arge, C. Nick

    2016-10-01

    The Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) at the University of New Mexico uses a coaxial plasma gun to launch jet and spheromak magnetic plasma configurations into the Helicon-Cathode (HelCat) plasma device. Plasma structures launched from the gun drag frozen-in magnetic flux into the background magnetic field of the chamber providing a rich set of dynamics to study magnetic turbulence, force-free magnetic spheromaks, and shocks. Preliminary modeling is presented using the highly-developed 3-D, MHD, BATS-R-US code developed at the University of Michigan. BATS-R-US employs an adaptive mesh refinement grid that enables the capture and resolution of shock structures and current sheets, and is particularly suited to model the parameter regime under investigation. CCD images and magnetic field data from the experiment suggest the stabilization of an m =1 kink mode trailing a plasma jet launched into a background magnetic field. Results from a linear stability code investigating the effect of shear-flow as a cause of this stabilization from magnetic tension forces on the jet will be presented. Initial analyses of a possible magnetic Rayleigh Taylor instability seen at the interface between launched spheromaks and their entraining background magnetic field will also be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  16. Sustained Rotational Stabilization of DIII-D Plasmas Above the No-Wall Beta Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, A. M.

    2001-10-01

    Sustained stabilization of the n=1 kink mode by plasma rotation at beta approaching twice the stability limit calculated without a wall has been achieved in DIII-D by a combination of error field reduction and sufficient rotation drive. Previous experiments have transiently exceeded the no-wall beta limit, but demonstration of sustained rotational stabilization has remained elusive. Recent theory(A. Boozer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86), 5059 (2001). predicts a resonant response to error fields in a plasma approaching marginal stability to a low-n kink mode. Enhancement of magnetic non-axisymmetry in the plasma leads to strong damping of the toroidal rotation, precisely in the high-beta regime where it is needed for stabilization. This ``error field amplification," EFA, is demonstrated in DIII-D experiments: applied n=1 error fields cause enhanced plasma response and strong rotation damping at beta above the no-wall limit, but have little effect at lower beta. The discovery of EFA has led to sustained operation above the no-wall limit through improved error field correction using an external coil set. The required correction is determined both by optimizing the external currents with respect to the plasma rotation, and by use of feedback to detect and minimize the plasma response to error fields as beta increases. Stability analysis and rotation braking experiments at different beta values show that beta is maintained 50% higher than the no-wall stability limit for duration greater than 1 second, and approaches beta twice the no-wall limit in several cases, with steady-state rotation levels. The results suggest that improved error field correction could allow plasmas to be maintained well above no-wall beta limit for as long as sufficient torque is provided.

  17. Plasma-Pulse-Acceleration Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    W. Pucher, Testing a new Type of Circuit Breaker for HVDC , Direct Current, Feb. 1966, pp. 3 - 6 /10/ D. Kind, E. Marx, K. Mollenhoff, J. Salge... breakers /4, 5/, exploding wires /6/, plasma jet tubes /7/, and high pressure radiation sources /8/. In particular current limiting circuit breakers ...length, radius, shaping, material to be evaporated etc.). Here it is possible to transfer design criteria from current-limiting circuit breakers and

  18. Plasma crystals: experiments and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, A.

    2017-01-01

    Dusty plasmas are a well accessible system to study crystallization of charged-particle systems at room temperature. The large mass compared to atomic particles dramatically slows down the particle velocities. The high transparency of the system allows to trace simultaneously the motion of all particles with quasi-atomic resolution. After a brief overview, the progress in this field is exemplified by studies of spherical three-dimensional plasma crystals, the so-called Yukawa balls. The static structure and eigenmodes are explained in simple terms. It is shown that shielding modifies the expansion of a Yukawa ball from a self-similar explosion to a continuous ablation process that starts at the surface. The experimental progress with three-dimensional diagnostics and laser heating and sophisticated methods for visualising the order inside the shell structure are described. Together with quantifying the diffusion coefficient these investigations reveal the details of the solid-liquid phase transition. Besides thermodynamic aspects, the liquid phase of dusty plasmas also gives access to hydrodynamic phenomena at the individual particle scale.

  19. On Stability of Targets for Plasma Jet Induced Magnetoinertial Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Samulyak, Roman; Kim, Hyoungekun

    2015-01-01

    The compression and stability of plasma targets for the plasma jet-induced magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF) have been investigated via large scale simulations using the FronTier code capable of explicit tracking of material interfaces. In the PJMIF concept, a plasma liner, formed by the merger of a large number of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on a magnetized plasma target and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. A multi-stage computational approach for simulations of the liner-target interaction and the compression of plasma targets has been developed to minimize computing time. Simulations revealed important features of the target compression process, including instability and disintegration of targets. The non-uniformity of the leading edge of the liner, caused by plasma jets as well as oblique shock waves between them, leads to instabilities during the target compression. By using front tracking, the evolution of targets has been studied in 3-dimensional simulations. Optimi...

  20. Fusion plasma experiments on TFTR: A 20 year retrospective*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Batha, S.; Blanchard, W.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Berk, H.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Breizman, B.; Bretz, N. L; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Callen, J.; Camp, R.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C. Z.; Darrow, D. S.; Dendy, R. O.; Dorland, W.; Duong, H.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Fisch, N. J.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Fu, G. Y.; Furth, H. P.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G. W.; Hanson, G. R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hill, K. W.; Hogan, J.; Hosea, J. C.; Houlberg, W. A.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R. A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kim, J. S.; Kissick, M.; Krasilnikov, A. V.; Kugel, H.; Kumar, A.; Leblanc, B.; Levinton, F. M.; Ludescher, C.; Majeski, R. P.; Manickam, J.; Mansfield, D. K.; Mazzucato, E.; McChesney, J.; McCune, D. C.; McGuire, K. M.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mika, R.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G. A.; Nazikian, R.; Okabayashi, M.; Park, H. K.; Park, W.; Paul, S. F.; Pearson, G.; Petrov, M. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Phillips, M.; Ramsey, A. T.; Redi, M. H.; Rewoldt, G.; Reznik, S.; Roquemore, A. L.; Rogers, J.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Skinner, C. H.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B. C.; Strachan, J. D.; Stodiek, W.; Synakowski, E.; Takahashi, H.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Thompson, M. E.; Von Goeler, S.; Von Halle, A.; Walters, R. T.; White, R.; Wieland, R. M.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Wong, K. L.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Yavorski, V.; Young, K. M.; Zakharov, L.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) (R. J. Hawryluk, to be published in Rev. Mod. Phys.) experiments on high-temperature plasmas, that culminated in the study of deuterium–tritium D–T plasmas containing significant populations of energetic alpha particles, spanned over two decades from conception to completion. During the design of TFTR, the key physics issues were magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and stability, plasma energy transport, impurity effects, and plasma reactivity. Energetic particle physics was given less attention during this phase because, in part, of the necessity to address the issues that would create the conditions for the study of energetic particles and also the lack of diagnostics to study the energetic particles in detail. The worldwide tokamak program including the contributions from TFTR made substantial progress during the past two decades in addressing the fundamental issues affecting the performance of high-temperature plasmas and the behavior of energetic particles. The progress has been the result of the construction of new facilities, which enabled the production of high-temperature well-confined plasmas, development of sophisticated diagnostic techniques to study both the background plasma and the resulting energetic fusion products, and computational techniques to both interpret the experimental results and to predict the outcome of experiments. © 1998 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Current drive for stability of thermonuclear plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Galli, A.; Panaccione, L.; Paoletti, F.; Schettini, G.; Spigler, R.; Tuccillo, A.

    2016-01-01

    To produce in a thermonuclear fusion reactor based on the tokamak concept a sufficiently high fusion gain together stability necessary for operations represent a major challenge, which depends on the capability of driving non-inductive current in the hydrogen plasma. This request should be satisfied by radio-frequency (RF) power suitable for producing the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect, recently demonstrated successfully occurring also at reactor-graded high plasma densities. An LHCD-based tool should be in principle capable of tailoring the plasma current density in the outer radial half of plasma column, where other methods are much less effective, in order to ensure operations in the presence of unpredictably changes of the plasma pressure profiles. In the presence of too high electron temperatures even at the periphery of the plasma column, as envisaged in DEMO reactor, the penetration of the coupled RF power into the plasma core was believed for long time problematic and, only recently, numerical modelling results based on standard plasma wave theory, have shown that this problem should be solved by using suitable parameter of the antenna power spectrum. We show here further information on the new understanding of the RF power deposition profile dependence on antenna parameters, which supports the conclusion that current can be actively driven over a broad layer of the outer radial half of plasma column, thus enabling current profile control necessary for the stability of a reactor.

  2. Power coal plasma gasification. Computation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.A. Bastyrev; V.I. Golysh; M.A. Gorokhovski; Yu.E. Karpenko; V.G. Lukiaschenko; V.E. Messerle; A.O. Nagibin; E.F. Osadchaya; S.F. Osadchy; I.G. Stepanov; K.A. Umbetkaliev; A.B. Ustimenko [Combustion Problems Institute, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2005-07-01

    Results of complex experimental and numerical investigation of coal plasma gasification in steam and air are presented. To analyse numerically the universal thermodynamic calculation code TERRA was used. The data base of it contains thermodynamic properties for 3500 individual components in temperature interval from 300 to 6000 K. Experiments were fulfilled at an original installation for coal plasma gasification. Nominal power of the plasma gasifier is 100 kW and sum consumption of the reagents is up to 25 kg/h. High integral indexes of the gasification processes were achieved. The numerical and experimental results comparison showed their satisfied agreement. 7 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S C; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven rail guns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: $n_e\\approx n_i \\sim 10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$, $T_e \\approx T_i \\approx 1.4$ eV, $V_{\\rm jet}\\approx 30$-100 km/s, mean charge $\\bar{Z}\\approx 1$...

  4. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-20

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  5. Magnetic Flux Compression Experiments Using Plasma Armatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. W.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic flux compression reaction chambers offer considerable promise for controlling the plasma flow associated with various micronuclear/chemical pulse propulsion and power schemes, primarily because they avoid thermalization with wall structures and permit multicycle operation modes. The major physical effects of concern are the diffusion of magnetic flux into the rapidly expanding plasma cloud and the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the plasma surface, both of which can severely degrade reactor efficiency and lead to plasma-wall impact. A physical parameter of critical importance to these underlying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes is the magnetic Reynolds number (R(sub m), the value of which depends upon the product of plasma electrical conductivity and velocity. Efficient flux compression requires R(sub m) less than 1, and a thorough understanding of MHD phenomena at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is essential to the reliable design and operation of practical reactors. As a means of improving this understanding, a simplified laboratory experiment has been constructed in which the plasma jet ejected from an ablative pulse plasma gun is used to investigate plasma armature interaction with magnetic fields. As a prelude to intensive study, exploratory experiments were carried out to quantify the magnetic Reynolds number characteristics of the plasma jet source. Jet velocity was deduced from time-of-flight measurements using optical probes, and electrical conductivity was measured using an inductive probing technique. Using air at 27-inHg vacuum, measured velocities approached 4.5 km/s and measured conductivities were in the range of 30 to 40 kS/m.

  6. Plasma Guns for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, F. D.; Bomgardner, R.; Case, A.; Messer, S. J.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Elton, R.; Hsu, S. C.; Cassibry, J. T.; Gilmore, M. A.

    2009-11-01

    A spherical array of minirailgun plasma accelerators is planned for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) to be located at LANL. The plasma liner would be formed via merging of 30 dense, high Mach number plasma jets (n˜10^16-17 cm-3, M˜10--35, v˜50--70 km/s, rjet˜5 cm) in a spherically convergent geometry. Small parallel-plate railguns are being developed for this purpose due to their reduced system complexity and cost, with each gun planned to operate at ˜300 kA peak current, and launching up to ˜8000 μg of high-Z plasma using a ˜50 kJ pfn. We describe experimental development of the minirailguns and their current and projected performance. Fast operating repetitive gas valves have recently been added to allow injection of high density gases including helium, argon, and (eventually) xenon. We will present the latest test results with the high-Z gases, and discuss future plans for augmenting the rails, optimizing the nozzle configuration, preionizing the injected gas, and configuring the pulse forming networks with the capacitors available to the program.

  7. Nanodomain stabilization dynamics in plasma membranes of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tamal; Maiti, Tapas K.; Chakraborty, Suman

    2011-02-01

    We discover that a synergistically amplifying role of stabilizing membrane proteins and continuous lipid recycling can explain the physics governing the stability, polydispersity, and dynamics of lipid raft domains in plasma membranes of biological cells. We establish the conjecture using a generalized order parameter based on theoretical formalism, endorsed by detailed scaling arguments and domain mapping. Quantitative agreements with morphological distributions of raft complexes, as obtained from Förster resonance energy transfer based visualization, support the present theoretical conjecture.

  8. Diagnostics for the plasma liner experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, A G; Merritt, E; Gilmore, M; Hsu, S C; Witherspoon, F D; Cassibry, J T

    2010-10-01

    The goal of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is to explore and demonstrate the feasibility of forming imploding spherical "plasma liners" via merging high Mach number plasma jets to reach peak liner pressures of ∼0.1 Mbar using ∼1.5 MJ of initial stored energy. Such a system would provide HED plasmas for a variety of fundamental HEDLP, laboratory astrophysics, and materials science studies, as well as a platform for experimental validation of rad-hydro and rad-MHD simulations. It could also prove attractive as a potential standoff driver for magnetoinertial fusion. Predicted parameters from jet formation to liner stagnation cover a large range of plasma density and temperature, varying from n(i)∼10(16) cm(-3), T(e)≈T(i)∼1 eV at the plasma gun mouth to n(i)>10(19) cm(-3), T(e)≈T(i)∼0.5 keV at stagnation. This presents a challenging problem for the plasma diagnostics suite which will be discussed.

  9. Dynamic stability experiment of Maglev systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Y.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Chen, S.S. [and others

    1995-04-01

    This report summarizes the research performed on Maglev vehicle dynamic stability at Argonne National Laboratory during the past few years. It also documents magnetic-force data obtained from both measurements and calculations. Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial Maglev system, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all Maglev systems. This report presents dynamic stability experiments on Maglev systems and compares their numerical simulation with predictions calculated by a nonlinear dynamic computer code. Instabilities of an electrodynamic system (EDS)-type vehicle model were obtained from both experimental observations and computer simulations for a five-degree-of-freedom Maglev vehicle moving on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The experimental and theoretical analyses developed in this study identify basic stability characteristics and future research needs of Maglev systems.

  10. Stability of catecholamines in whole blood, plasma, and platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, T B; Smith, C C; Round, J M; Betteridge, D J

    1986-05-01

    Checking catecholamine stability in whole blood, plasma, and platelets, we found that specimens stored at room temperature or frozen for periods ranging from 1.5 h to three weeks show no significant difference in measured catecholamine concentration. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. Stability of plasma treated superhydrophobic surfaces under different ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Faze; Liu, Jiyu; Cui, Yao; Huang, Shuai; Song, Jinlong; Sun, Jing; Xu, Wenji; Liu, Xin

    2016-05-15

    Plasma hydrophilizing of superhydrophobic substrates has become an important area of research, for example, superhydrophobic-(super)hydrophilic patterned surfaces have significant practical applications such as lab-on-chip systems, cell adhesion, and control of liquid transport. However, the stability of plasma-induced hydrophilicity is always considered as a key issue since the wettability tends to revert back to the untreated state (i.e. aging behavior). This paper focuses on the stability of plasma treated superhydrophobic surface under different ambient conditions (e.g. temperature and relative humidity). Water contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to monitor the aging process. Results show that low temperature and low relative humidity are favorable to retard the aging process and that pre-storage at low temperature (-10°C) disables the treated surface to recover superhydrophobicity. When the aging is performed in water, a long-lasting hydropholicity is obtained. As the stability of plasma-induced hydrophilcity over a desired period of time is a very important issue, this work will contribute to the optimization of storage conditions of plasma treated superhydrophobic surfaces.

  12. Stability of thermal modes in cool prominence plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, Roberto; Parenti, Susanna

    2012-01-01

    Context: Magnetohydrodynamic thermal modes may play an important role in the formation, plasma condensation, and evolution of solar prominences. Unstable thermal modes due to unbalance between radiative losses and heating can lead to rapid plasma cooling and condensation. An accurate description of the radiative loss function is therefore crucial for this process. Aims: We study the stability of thermal modes in unbounded and uniform plasmas with properties akin to those in solar prominences. Effects due to partial ionization are taken into account. Three different parametrizations of the radiative loss function are used. Methods: By means of a normal mode analysis, we investigate linear nonadiabatic perturbations superimposed on the equilibrium state. We find an approximate instability criterion for thermal modes, while the exact linear growth rate is obtained by numerically solving the general dispersion relation. The stability of thermal disturbances is compared for the three different loss functions consi...

  13. Rotation and plasma stability in the Fitzpatrick-Aydemir model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2007-08-01

    The rotational stabilization of the resistive wall modes (RWMs) is analyzed within the single-mode cylindrical Fitzpatrick-Aydemir model [R. Fitzpatrick, Phys. Plasmas 9, 3459 (2002)]. Here, the consequences of the Fitzpatrick-Aydemir dispersion relation are derived in terms of the observable growth rate and toroidal rotation frequency of the mode, which allows easy interpretation of the results and comparison with experimental observations. It is shown that this model, developed for the plasma with weak dissipation, predicts the rotational destabilization of RWM in the typical range of the RWM rotation. The model predictions are compared with those obtained in a similar model, but with the Boozer boundary conditions at the plasma surface [A. H. Boozer, Phys. Plasmas 11, 110 (2004)]. Simple experimental tests of the model are proposed.

  14. Plasma circulating fibrinogen stability and moderate beer consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorinstein, Shela; Caspi, Abraham; Zemser, Marina; Libman, Imanuel; Goshev, Ivan; Trakhtenberg, Simon

    2003-12-01

    MODERATE BEER CONSUMPTION (MBC) IS CARDIOPROTECTIVE: it positively influences plasma lipid levels and plasma antioxidant activity in beer-consuming individuals. The connection between MBC and blood coagulation is not clearly defined. Forty-two volunteers were equally divided into experimental (EG) and control (CG) groups following coronary bypass surgery. For 30 consecutive days, only patients of the EG consumed 330 mL of beer per day (about 20 g of alcohol). A comprehensive clinical investigation of 42 patients was done. Blood samples were collected before and after the investigation for a wide range of laboratory tests. The plasma fibrinogen was denatured with 8 M urea and intrinsic fluorescence (IF), hydrophobicity and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to reveal possible qualitative changes. After 30 days of moderate beer consumption, positive changes in the plasma lipid levels, plasma anticoagulant and plasma antioxidant activities were registered in patients of the EG group. In 17 out of 21 patients of the same group, differences in plasma circulating fibrinogen's (PCF), secondary and tertiary structures were found. The stability of fibrinogen, expressed in thermodynamic parameters, has shown that the loosening of the structure takes place under ethanol and urea denaturation. Also fluorescence stability of PCF was decreased. No changes in the lipid levels, anticoagulant and antioxidant activity or changes in PCF were detected in patients of CG. In conclusion, for the first time after a short term of moderate beer consumption some qualitative changes in the plasma circulating fibrinogen were detected: differences in the emission peak response, fluorescence intensity and all thermodynamic data. Together, with the decrease in the PCF concentration it may lead to an elevation of the blood anticoagulant activity.

  15. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, indicates that there are more-than-two stable points in a given condition, and it has been considered to one of the most important topics in fundamental physics. Recently, the hysteresis of plasma has become a focus of research because stable plasma operation is very important for fusion reactors, bio-medical plasmas, and industrial plasmas for nano-device fabrication process. Interestingly, the bi-stability characteristics of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop have been observed in inductive discharge plasmas Because hysteresis study in such plasmas can provide a universal understanding of plasma physics, many researchers have attempted experimental and theoretical studies. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics. This research was partially supported by Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science.

  16. ECH on the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhone, Jason; Clark, Mike; Collins, Cami; Cooper, Chris; Katz, Noam; Nonn, Paul; Wallace, John; Forest, Cary

    2012-10-01

    The Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) is a 3 meter diameter sphere consisting of 36 axisymmetric rings of samarium cobalt magnets in a ring-cusp configuration. Electrostatic electrodes on the edge will be used to spin the plasma. The purpose of MPDX is to study flow-driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. Electron cyclotron heating will be used for the ionization and heating of the plasma. A benefit of the ECH is the plasma will have hot electrons leading to good electrical conduction and high magnetic Reynolds number. In addition, direct heating of the electrons helps to obtain a large ionization fraction and a low neutral density. The ECH system on MPDX will consist of 5 separate lines distributed at various positions around the vacuum vessel. Each line will have a 20 kW magnetron operating in continuous wave mode at 2.45 GHz outputting in WR-340 waveguide. The power will be transferred to the vacuum vessel through WR-284 waveguide. Each line will contain a directional coupler for measuring reflected power. A manual 3-stub tuner will be used for impedance matching. The purpose of these elements is to optimize the efficiency of energy transfer to the plasma.

  17. Stability of Alfvén wings in uniform plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallago, P. A.; Platzeck, A. M.

    2007-12-01

    A conducting source moving uniformly through a magnetized plasma generates, among a variety of perturbations, Alfvén waves. An interesting characteristic of Alfvén waves is that they can build up structures in the plasma called Alfvén wings. These wings have been detected and measured in many solar system bodies, and their existence has also been theoretically proven. However, their stability remains to be studied. The aim of this paper is to analyze the stability of an Alfvén wing developed in a uniform background field, in the presence of an incompressible perturbation that has the same symmetry as the Alfvén wing, in the magnetohydrodynamic approximation. The study of the stability of a magnetohydrodynamic system is often performed by linearizing the equations and using either the normal modes method or the energy method. In spite of being applicable for many problems, both methods become algebraically complicated if the structure under analysis is a highly non-uniform one. Palumbo has developed an analytical method for the study of the stability of static structures with a symmetry in magnetized plasmas, in the presence of incompressible perturbations with the same symmetry as the structure (Palumbo 1998 Thesis, Universidad de Firenze, Italia). In the present paper we extend this method for Alfvén wings that are stationary structures, and conclude that in the presence of this kind of perturbation they are stable.

  18. Analysis of stability of a homogeneous state of anisotropic plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharov, V. Yu., E-mail: vladiyuz@mail.ru; Chernova, T. G., E-mail: chernova-tg@yandex.ru; Stepanov, S. E., E-mail: stepanov@bmstu-kaluga.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Kaluga Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    Small-amplitude waves in collisionless magnetized plasma are considered in the framework of one-fluid anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics with allowance for the anisotropy of the pressure and thermal flux. Stability of a homogeneous plasma state is analyzed using an eighth-order dispersion relation. Restrictions on the parameters of the homogeneous state at which the dispersion relation has no complex roots at any value of the angle between the wave vector and the unperturbed magnetic field are obtained. The applied method also makes it possible to determine the types of unstable waves.

  19. Control of magnetohydrodynamic stability by phase space engineering of energetic ions in tokamak plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, J P; Chapman, I T; Coda, S; Lennholm, M; Albergante, M; Jucker, M

    2012-01-10

    Virtually collisionless magnetic mirror-trapped energetic ion populations often partially stabilize internally driven magnetohydrodynamic disturbances in the magnetosphere and in toroidal laboratory plasma devices such as the tokamak. This results in less frequent but dangerously enlarged plasma reorganization. Unique to the toroidal magnetic configuration are confined 'circulating' energetic particles that are not mirror trapped. Here we show that a newly discovered effect from hybrid kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic theory has been exploited in sophisticated phase space engineering techniques for controlling stability in the tokamak. These theoretical predictions have been confirmed, and the technique successfully applied in the Joint European Torus. Manipulation of auxiliary ion heating systems can create an asymmetry in the distribution of energetic circulating ions in the velocity orientated along magnetic field lines. We show the first experiments in which large sawtooth collapses have been controlled by this technique, and neoclassical tearing modes avoided, in high-performance reactor-relevant plasmas.

  20. Stability analysis of collisionless plasmas with specularly reflecting boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Toan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we provide sharp criteria for linear stability or instability of equilibria of collisionless plasmas in the presence of boundaries. Specifically, we consider the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell system with specular reflection at the boundary for the particles and with the perfectly conducting boundary condition for the electromagnetic field. Here we initiate our investigation in the simple geometry of radial and longitudinal symmetry.

  1. Equilibrium and stability code for a diffuse plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, O; Garabedian, P

    1976-04-01

    A computer code to investigate the equilibrium and stability of a diffuse plasma in three dimensions is described that generalizes earlier work on a sharp free boundary model. Toroidal equilibria of a plasma are determined by considering paths of steepest descent associated with a new version of the variational principle of magnetohydrodynamics that involves mapping a fixed coordinate domain onto the plasma. A discrete approximation of the potential energy is written down following the finite element method, and the resulting expression is minimized with respect to the values of the mapping at points of a rectangular grid. If a relative minimum of the discrete analogue of the energy is attained, the corresponding equilibrium is considered to be stable.

  2. Stability of caffeic acid phenethyl amide (CAPA) in rat plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, John; Kerwin, Sean M; Bowman, Phillip D; Stavchansky, Salomon

    2012-05-01

    A validated C₁₈ reverse-phase HPLC method with UV detection at 320 nm was developed and used for the stability evaluation of caffeic acid phenethyl amide (CAPA) and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in rat plasma. CAPA is the amide derivative of CAPE, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound that has been found to be active in a variety of biological pathways. CAPA has been shown to protect endothelial cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress to a similar degree to CAPE. CAPE has been reported to be rapidly hydrolyzed in rat plasma via esterase enzymes. CAPA is expected to display a longer half-life than CAPE by avoiding hydrolysis via plasma esterases. The stability of CAPA and CAPE in rat plasma was investigated at three temperatures. The half-lives for CAPA were found to be 41.5, 10 and 0.82 h at 25, 37 and 60 °C, respectively. The half-lives for CAPE were found to be 1.95, 0.35 and 0.13 h at 4, 25 and 37 °C, respectively. The energy of activation was found to be 22.1 kcal/mol for CAPA and 14.1 kcal/mol for CAPE. A more stable compound could potentially extend the beneficial effects of CAPE.

  3. Vortex Stabilized Plasma for Rapid Water Disinfection & Pharmaceutical Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2016-10-01

    Good quality drinking water is dwindling for large segments of the world population. Aggravating the problem is proliferation of antibiotics in the water supply, which give rise to drug resistant pathogens. One option for water supply increase is recycling waste and polluted water by inexpensive, environmentally friendly methods. Presently disinfection uses chemicals and UV radiation. Chemicals are limited by residual toxicity, while UV consumes much electricity. Current methods can remove only certain classes of drugs due to their large variety of physical and chemical properties. Plasmas in water are very attractive for degrading all pharmaceuticals and deactivating pathogens: intense arc current can physically break up any molecular bonds. UV radiation, ozone, etc. generation inside the water volume disinfects. Present utilized plasmas: glow, pulsed arcs are not power efficient; vortex stabilized plasmas are power efficient that can advance water treatment state-of-the-art by orders of magnitude. Proposed techniquefeatures novel components facilitating large diameter vortex stabilized in-water arcs with optimized plasma parameters for maximal UV-C emission; and harvests hydrogen centered by the vortex.

  4. Stability of plasma metabolites and hormones in parturient dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, V N; Phillips, R W

    1978-06-01

    Metabolic changes that accompany the transition from parturition to lactation in dairy cows were studied. To measure these changes, plasma samples were obtained from 20 mature Holstein-Friesian dairy cows 10 days before through 10 days after parturition. They were analyzed for glucose, free fatty acids (FFA), lactic acid, ketone bodies, glucocorticoids, insulin, and growth hormone concentration. Lactic acid and glucocorticoids remained constant during the experiment, except for the day of parturition itself. In the prepartum period, changes were not detected in concentrations of hormones (glucocorticoids, insulin, and growth hormone), whereas, plasma metabolites began changing prior to parturition. Most evident were prepartum increased in FFA, ketones, and glucose. Postpartum plasma glucose concentration rapidly returned to prepartum concentrations. Plasma concentration of FFA and ketone bodies remained elevated for longer periods.

  5. Diagnostic for the plasma liner experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, M.; Merritt, E.; Lynn, A.G. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM (United States); Bauer, B.S.; Fuelling, S.; Siemen, R.E. [University of Nevada, Reno NV (United States); Hsu, S.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM (United States); Witherspoon, F.D.; Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Messer, S.J. [HyperV Tecnologies Corp, Chantilly VA (United States); Cassibry, J.T. [University of Alabama, Huntsville AL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) includes a class of fusion energy concepts that seek to relax the required implosion times of inertial fusion to microseconds rather than nanoseconds by utilizing magnetized targets. The Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory will explore and demonstrate the feasibility of forming imploding spherical 'plasma liners' that can reach peak pressures {approx} 0.1 Mbar upon stagnation. The liners will be formed via merging of 30 - 60 dense, high Mach number plasma jets (M {approx} 10-35, v {approx} 50-70 km/s, jet radius {approx} 5 cm) in spherically convergent geometry. This is a staged, exploratory project where scientific issues will be studied first at modest stored energies ({approx} 300 kJ) before attempting to reach MIF-relevant pressures (requiring {approx} 1.5 MJ). Key physics issues include peak parameters (n, T, radius) at stagnation, dynamics of the merging jet liner formation (e.g. lateral shocks, instabilities), and spherical symmetry of the liner. Plasmas will be high-Z species (e.g. Ar, Xe), unmagnetized, and are expected to have densities {approx} 10{sup 22} m{sup -3} and low temperature, Te {approx} Ti {approx} a few eV, when initially exiting the plasma guns where the jets are formed. Density and temperature will first decrease slightly, then increase to n {approx} 10{sup 25} - 10{sup 26} m{sup -3} and Te {approx} Ti {approx} 100 eV as stagnation is approached over a 1 meter radial distance. The large range of densities (4-5 orders of magnitude), initially cold plasma, and short optical depth as the jets merge make diagnosing the plasma a particularly challenging problem. Initial diagnostics will include multi-chord visible interferometry and polarimetry, Schlieren imaging, visible and V-UV spectroscopy, fast 1-dimensional imaging diode arrays, fast visible cameras, bolometry, magnetic and electrostatic probes, and pressure sensitive 'witness plates' to measure pressure and jet

  6. Magnetized laboratory plasma jets: Experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrafel, Peter; Bell, Kate; Greenly, John; Seyler, Charles; Kusse, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Experiments involving radial foils on a 1 M A , 100 n s current driver can be used to study the ablation of thin foils and liners, produce extreme conditions relevant to laboratory astrophysics, and aid in computational code validation. This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a 20 μ m Al foil (8111 alloy), in a radial configuration, driven by Cornell University's COBRA pulsed power generator. In these experiments ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top side of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet are observed developing midway through the current rise. With experimental and computational results this work gives a detailed description of the role of the ASP in the formation of the plasma jet with and without an applied axial magnetic field. This ˜1 T field is applied by a Helmholtz-coil pair driven by a slow, 150 μ s current pulse and penetrates the load hardware before arrival of the COBRA pulse. Several effects of the applied magnetic field are observed: (1) without the field extreme-ultraviolet emission from the ASP shows considerable azimuthal asymmetry while with the field the ASP develops azimuthal motion that reduces this asymmetry, (2) this azimuthal motion slows the development of the jet when the field is applied, and (3) with the magnetic field the jet becomes less collimated and has a density minimum (hollowing) on the axis. PERSEUS, an XMHD code, has qualitatively and quantitatively reproduced all these experimental observations. The differences between this XMHD and an MHD code without a Hall current and inertial effects are discussed. In addition the PERSEUS results describe effects we were not able to resolve experimentally and suggest a line of future experiments with better diagnostics.

  7. Calibration of the ISEE plasma composition experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugher, C. R.; Olsen, R. C.; Reasoner, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Plasma Composition experiment on the ISEE-1 satellite was designed to measure ions from 1 to 16 amu, at energies from near zero to 16 keV. The two nearly identical flight instruments were calibrated by means of preflight laboratory tests and in-flight data comparisons. This document presents most of the details of those efforts, with special emphasis on the low energy (0 to 100 eV) portion of the instrument response. The analysis of the instrument includes a ray-tracing calculation, which follows an ensemble of test particles through the detector.

  8. Neon photoionized plasma experiment at Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, D. C.; Mancini, R. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G. P.; Rochau, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss an experimental effort to study the atomic kinetics in neon photoionized plasmas via K-shell line absorption spectroscopy. The experiment employs the intense x-ray flux emitted at the collapse of a Z-pinch to heat and backlight a photoionized plasma contained within a cm-scale gas cell placed at various distances from the Z-pinch and filled with neon gas pressures in the range from 3.5 to 30 torr. The experimental platform affords an order of magnitude range in the ionization parameter characterizing the photoionized plasma from about 3 to 80 erg*cm/s. An x-ray crystal spectrometer capable of collecting both time-integrated and time-gated spectra is used to collect absorption spectra. A suite of IDL programs has been developed to process the experimental data to produce transmission spectra. The spectra show line absorption by several ionization stages of neon, including Be-, Li-, He-, and H-like ions. Analysis of these spectra yields ion areal-densities and charge state distributions, which can be compared with results from atomic kinetics codes. In addition, the electron temperature is extracted from level population ratios of nearby energy levels in Li- and Be-like ions, which can be used to test heating models of photoionized plasmas. This work was sponsored in part by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Grant DE-FG52-09NA29551, DOE Office of Science Grant DE-SC0014451, and the Z Facility Fundamental Science Program of SNL.

  9. Statistical Physics Experiments Using Dusty Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goree, John

    2016-10-01

    Compared to other areas of physics research, Statistical Physics is heavily dominated by theory, with comparatively little experiment. One reason for the lack of experiments is the impracticality of tracking of individual atoms and molecules within a substance. Thus, there is a need for a different kind of experimental system, one where individual particles not only move stochastically as they collide with one another, but also are large enough to allow tracking. A dusty plasma can meet this need. A dusty plasma is a partially ionized gas containing small particles of solid matter. These micron-size particles gain thousands of electronic charges by collecting more electrons than ions. Their motions are dominated by Coulomb collisions with neighboring particles. In this so-called strongly coupled plasma, the dust particles self-organize in much the same way as atoms in a liquid or solid. Unlike atoms, however, these particles are large and slow, so that they can be tracked easily by video microscopy. Advantages of dusty plasma for experimental statistical physics research include particle tracking, lack of frictional contact with solid surfaces, and avoidance of overdamped motion. Moreover, the motion of a collection of dust particles can mimic an equilibrium system with a Maxwellian velocity distribution, even though the dust particles themselves are not truly in thermal equilibrium. Nonequilibrium statistical physics can be studied by applying gradients, for example by imposing a shear flow. In this talk I will review some of our recent experiments with shear flow. First, we performed the first experimental test to verify the Fluctuation Theorem for a shear flow, showing that brief violations of the Second Law of Thermodynamics occur with the predicted probabilities, for a small system. Second, we discovered a skewness of a shear-stress distribution in a shear flow. This skewness is a phenomenon that likely has wide applicability in nonequilibrium steady states

  10. Magnetized plasma jets in experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrafel, Peter; Greenly, John; Gourdain, Pierre; Seyler, Charles; Blesener, Kate; Kusse, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a thing (20 micron) Al foil driven on the 1 MA-in-100 ns COBRA through a 5 mm diameter cathode in a radial configuration. In these experiments, ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet can be observed developing midway through current-rise. Our goal is to establish the relationship between the ASP and the jet. These jets are of interest for their potential relevance to astrophysical phenomena. An independently pulsed 200 μF capacitor bank with a Helmholtz coil pair allows for the imposition of a slow (150 μs) and strong (~1 T) axial magnetic field on the experiment. Application of this field eliminates significant azimuthal asymmetry in extreme ultraviolet emission of the ASP. This asymmetry is likely a current filamentation instability. Laser-backlit shadowgraphy and interferometry confirm that the jet-hollowing is correlated with the application of the axial magnetic field. Visible spectroscopic measurements show a doppler shift consistent with an azimuthal velocity in the ASP caused by the applied B-field. Computational simulations with the XMHD code PERSEUS qualitatively agree with the experimental results.

  11. Nanostructured yttria stabilized zirconia coatings deposited by air plasma spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hong; LI Fei; HE Bo; WANG Jun; SUN Bao-de

    2007-01-01

    Nanostructured yttria partially stabilized zirconia coatings were deposited by air plasma spraying with reconstituted nanosized powder. The microstructures and phase compositions of the powder and the as-sprayed nanostructured coatings were characterized by transmission electron microscopy(TEM), scanning electron microscopy(SEM) and X-ray diffraction(XRD). The results demonstrate that the microstructure of as-sprayed nanostructured zirconia coating exhibits a unique tri-modal distribution including the initial nanostructure of the powder, equiaxed grains and columnar grains. Air plasma sprayed nanostructured zirconia coatings consist of only the nontransformable tetragonal phase, though the reconstituted nanostructured powder shows the presence of the monoclinic, the tetragonal and the cubic phases. The mean grain size of the coating is about 42 nm.

  12. Stability study for matching in laser driven plasma acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, A.R., E-mail: andrea.rossi@mi.infn.it [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Anania, M.P. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Bacci, A. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Belleveglia, M.; Bisesto, F.G.; Chiadroni, E. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [Tor Vergata University, Physics Department, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Curcio, A.; Gallo, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Marocchino, A.; Massimo, F. [La Sapienza University, SBAI Department, via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); Mostacci, A. [La Sapienza University, SBAI Department, via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Petrarca, M. [La Sapienza University, SBAI Department, via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); Pompili, R. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Serafini, L. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Tomassini, P. [University of Milan, Physics Department, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Vaccarezza, C. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); and others

    2016-09-01

    In a recent paper [14], a scheme for inserting and extracting high brightness electron beams to/from a plasma based acceleration stage was presented and proved to be effective with an ideal bi-Gaussian beam, as could be delivered by a conventional photo-injector. In this paper, we extend that study, assessing the method stability against some jitters in the properties of the injected beam. We find that the effects of jitters in Twiss parameters are not symmetric in results; we find a promising configuration that yields better performances than the setting proposed in [14]. Moreover we show and interpret what happens when the beam charge profiles are modified.

  13. Microseconds-scale magnetic actuators system for plasma feedback stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, K.; Be'ery, I.; Seemann, O.

    2016-10-01

    Many magnetic confinement machines use active feedback stabilization with magnetic actuators. We present a novel magnetic actuators system with a response time much faster than previous ones, making it capable of coping with the fast plasma instabilities. The system achieved a response time of 3 μs with maximal current of 500 A in a coil with inductance of 5.2 μH. The system is based on commercial solid-state switches and FPGA state machine, making it easily scalable to higher currents or higher inductivity.

  14. Stability of plasma metabolites and hormones in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R W; Athanasiou, V N

    1978-06-01

    Plasma concentration stability of glucose, free fatty acids, ketone bodies, growth hormone, insulin were determined in lactating dairy cows. Concentrations of these metabolites and hormones were measured during a 36- to 48-hour period in 3 normal, mature dairy cows in the 2nd month of lactation. Samples were taken at 30-minute intervals; also, intensive sampling (every 10 minutes) was done at varying times in relation to feeding and milking. Of the 5 components measured, glucose concentration was the most stable, easiest to assay, and most reliable for use as a diagnostic aid in assessing metabolic carbohydrate disturbances in dairy cattle.

  15. Optmized stability of a modulated driver in a plasma wakefield

    CERN Document Server

    Martorelli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the transverse stability for a configuration of multiple gaussian bunches subject to the self-generated plasma wakefield. Through a semi-analytical approach we first study the equilibrium configuration for the modulated beam and then we investigate the evolution of the equilibrium configuration due to the emittance-driven expansion of the beam front that results in a rigid backward shift. The rear-directed shift brings the modulated beam out of the equilibrium, with the possibility for some of the bunch particles to be lost with a consequent deterioration of the driver. We look therefore for the proper position of the single bunches that maximize the stability without severely affecting the accelerating field behind the driver. We then compare the results with 3D PIC simulations.

  16. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiechula, J., E-mail: wiechula@physik.uni-frankfurt.de; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J. [Plasma Physics Group, Institute of Applied Physics, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH{sub 2} at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ⋅ 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ⋅ 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  17. A Physics Exploratory Experiment on Plasma Liner Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Momentum flux for imploding a target plasma in magnetized target fusion (MTF) may be delivered by an array of plasma guns launching plasma jets that would merge to form an imploding plasma shell (liner). In this paper, we examine what would be a worthwhile experiment to do in order to explore the dynamics of merging plasma jets to form a plasma liner as a first step in establishing an experimental database for plasma-jets driven magnetized target fusion (PJETS-MTF). Using past experience in fusion energy research as a model, we envisage a four-phase program to advance the art of PJETS-MTF to fusion breakeven Q is approximately 1). The experiment (PLX (Plasma Liner Physics Exploratory Experiment)) described in this paper serves as Phase I of this four-phase program. The logic underlying the selection of the experimental parameters is presented. The experiment consists of using twelve plasma guns arranged in a circle, launching plasma jets towards the center of a vacuum chamber. The velocity of the plasma jets chosen is 200 km/s, and each jet is to carry a mass of 0.2 mg - 0.4 mg. A candidate plasma accelerator for launching these jets consists of a coaxial plasma gun of the Marshall type.

  18. Relevant parameter space and stability of spherical tokamaks with a plasma center column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampugnani, L. G.; Garcia-Martinez, P. L.; Farengo, R.

    2017-02-01

    A spherical tokamak (ST) with a plasma center column (PCC) can be formed inside a simply connected chamber via driven magnetic relaxation. From a practical perspective, the ST-PCC could overcome many difficulties associated with the material center column of the standard ST reactor design. Besides, the ST-PCC concept can be regarded as an advanced helicity injected device that would enable novel experiments on the key physics of magnetic relaxation and reconnection. This is because the concept includes not only a PCC but also a coaxial helicity injector (CHI). This combination implies an improved level of flexibility in the helicity injection scheme required for the formation and sustainment phases. In this work, the parameter space determining the magnetic structure of the ST-PCC equilibria is studied under the assumption of fully relaxed plasmas. In particular, it is shown that the effect of the external bias field of the PCC and the CHI essentially depends on a single parameter that measures the relative amount of flux of these two entities. The effect of plasma elongation on the safety factor profile and the stability to the tilt mode are also analyzed. In the first part of this work, the stability of the system is explained in terms of the minimum energy principle, and relevant stability maps are constructed. While this picture provides an adequate insight into the underlying physics of the instability, it does not include the stabilizing effect of line-tying at the electrodes. In the second part, a dynamical stability analysis of the ST-PCC configurations, including the effect of line-tying, is performed by numerically solving the magnetohydrodynamic equations. A significant stability enhancement is observed when the PCC contains more than the 70% of the total external bias flux, and the elongation is not higher than two.

  19. First results of the plasma wakefield acceleration experiment at PITZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishilin, O.; Gross, M.; Brinkmann, R.; Engel, J.; Grüner, F.; Koss, G.; Krasilnikov, M.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Mehrling, T.; Osterhoff, J.; Pathak, G.; Philipp, S.; Renier, Y.; Richter, D.; Schroeder, C.; Schütze, R.; Stephan, F.

    2016-09-01

    The self-modulation instability of long particle beams was proposed as a new mechanism to produce driver beams for proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). The PWFA experiment at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ) was launched to experimentally demonstrate and study the self-modulation of long electron beams in plasma. Key aspects for the experiment are the very flexible photocathode laser system, a plasma cell and well-developed beam diagnostics. In this contribution we report about the plasma cell design, preparatory experiments and the results of the first PWFA experiment at PITZ.

  20. First results of the plasma wakefield acceleration experiment at PITZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lishilin, O., E-mail: osip.lishilin@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Gross, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Brinkmann, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Engel, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Grüner, F. [Universität Hamburg, UHH, Hamburg (Germany); Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, CFEL, Hamburg (Germany); Koss, G.; Krasilnikov, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Mehrling, T.; Osterhoff, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Pathak, G.; Philipp, S.; Renier, Y. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Richter, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, HZB, Berlin (Germany); Schroeder, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, LBNL, Berkeley (United States); Schütze, R.; Stephan, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    The self-modulation instability of long particle beams was proposed as a new mechanism to produce driver beams for proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). The PWFA experiment at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ) was launched to experimentally demonstrate and study the self-modulation of long electron beams in plasma. Key aspects for the experiment are the very flexible photocathode laser system, a plasma cell and well-developed beam diagnostics. In this contribution we report about the plasma cell design, preparatory experiments and the results of the first PWFA experiment at PITZ. - Highlights: • A self-modulation mechanism for producing driver beams for PWFA is proposed. • A proof-of-principle experiment is launched at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY. • The self-modulation instability occurs in long particle beams passing through plasma. • A heat pipe oven and a laser are used to produce plasma.

  1. Construction of the plasma-wall experiment Magnum-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; Koppers, W.R.; van Eck, H.J.N.; van Rooij, G.J.; Goedheer, W.J.; de Groot, B.; Al, R.; Graswinckel, M.F.; van den Berg, M.A.; Kruyt, O.; Smeets, P.; van der Meiden, H.J.; Vijvers, W.; Scholten, J.; van de Pol, M.; Brons, S.; Melissen, W.; van der Grift, T.; Koch, R.; Schweer, B.; Samm, U.; Philipps, V.; Engeln, R.A.H.; Schram, D.C.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Kleyn, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    The FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen is constructing Magnum-PSI; a magnetized (3 T), steady-state, large area (80 cm2) high-flux (up to 1024 H+ ions m−2 s−1) plasma generator. Magnum-PSI will be a highly accessible laboratory experiment in which the interaction of magnetized plasma with d

  2. The Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) description and test program. [electrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignaczak, L. R.; Haley, F. A.; Domino, E. J.; Culp, D. H.; Shaker, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma interaction experiment (PIX) is a battery powered preprogrammed auxiliary payload on the LANDSAT-C launch. This experiment is part of a larger program to investigate space plasma interactions with spacecraft surfaces and components. The varying plasma densities encountered during available telemetry coverage periods are deemed sufficient to determine first order interactions between the space plasma environment and the biased experimental surfaces. The specific objectives of the PIX flight experiment are to measure the plasma coupling current and the negative voltage breakdown characteristics of a solar array segment and a gold plated steel disk. Measurements will be made over a range of surface voltages up to plus or minus kilovolt. The orbital environment will provide a range of plasma densities. The experimental surfaces will be voltage biased in a preprogrammed step sequence to optimize the data returned for each plasma region and for the available telemetry coverage.

  3. From laboratory plasma experiments to space plasma experiments with `CubeSat' nano-satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christine

    2016-09-01

    `CubeSat' nano-satellites provide low-cost access to space. SP3 laboratory's involvement in the European Union `QB50' `CubeSat' project [www.qb50.eu] which will launch into space 50 `CubeSats' from 27 Countries to study the ionosphere and the lower thermosphere will be presented. The Chi Kung laboratory plasma experiment and the Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype can be tailored to investigate expanding magnetized plasma physics relevant to space physics (solar corona, Earth's aurora, adiabatic expansion and polytropic studies). Chi Kung is also used as a plasma wind tunnel for ground-based calibration of the University College London QB50 Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer. Space qualification of the three Australian QB50 `CubeSats' (June 2016) is carried out in the WOMBAT XL space simulation chamber. The QB50 satellites have attitude control but altitude control is not a requirement. SP3 is developing end-to-end miniaturised radiofrequency plasma propulsion systems (such as the Pocket Rocket and the MiniHel thrusters with power and propellant sub-systems) for future `CubeSat' missions.

  4. Dust-acoustic waves and stability in the permeating dust plasma: II. Power-law distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Jingyu; Du, Jiulin

    2012-01-01

    The dust-acoustic waves and their stability driven by a flowing dust plasma when it cross through a static (target) dust plasma (the so-called permeating dust plasma) are investigated when the components of the dust plasma obey the power-law q-distributions in nonextensive statistics. The frequency, the growth rate and the stability condition of the dust-acoustic waves are derived under this physical situation, which express the effects of the nonextensivity as well as the flowing dust plasma velocity on the dust-acoustic waves in this dust plasma. The numerical results illustrate some new characteristics of the dust-acoustic waves, which are different from those in the permeating dust plasma when the plasma components are the Maxwellian distribution. In addition, we show that the flowing dust plasma velocity has a significant effect on the dust-acoustic waves in the permeating dust plasma with the power-law q-distribution.

  5. Progress of plasma wakefield self-modulation experiments at FACET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adli, E., E-mail: Erik.Adli@fys.uio.no [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Berglyd Olsen, V.K.; Lindstrøm, C.A. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Muggli, P.; Reimann, O. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Vieira, J.M.; Amorim, L.D. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Téchnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Clarke, C.I.; Gessner, S.J.; Green, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; Litos, M.D.; O' Shea, B.D.; Yakimenko, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Clayton, C.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Joshi, C.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Williams, O. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Simulations and theory predict that long electron and positron beams may under favorable conditions self-modulate in plasmas. We report on the progress of experiments studying the self-modulation instability in plasma wakefield experiments at FACET. The experimental results obtained so far, while not being fully conclusive, appear to be consistent with the presence of the self-modulation instability.

  6. Intrinsic stability of Brassicaceae plasma membrane in relation to changes in proteins and lipids as a response to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalbi, Najla; Martínez-Ballesta, Ma Carmen; Youssef, Nabil Ben; Carvajal, Micaela

    2015-03-01

    Changes in plasma membrane lipids, such as sterols and fatty acids, have been observed as a result of salt stress. These alterations, together with modification of the plasma membrane protein profile, confer changes in the physical properties of the membrane to be taken into account for biotechnological uses. In our experiments, the relationship between lipids and proteins in three different Brassicaceae species differing in salinity tolerance (Brassica oleracea, B. napus and Cakile maritima) and the final plasma membrane stability were studied. The observed changes in the sterol (mainly an increase in sitosterol) and fatty acid composition (increase in RUFA) in each species led to physical adaptation of the plasma membrane to salt stress. The in vitro vesicles stability was higher in the less tolerant (B. oleracea) plants together with low lipoxygenase activity. These results indicate that the proteins/lipids ratio and lipid composition is an important aspect to take into account for the use of natural vesicles in plant biotechnology.

  7. Transport studies in fusion plasmas: Perturbative experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, N. L.

    1998-01-01

    By inducing in a small temperature perturbation in a plasma in a steady state one can determine the conductive and convective components of the heat flux, and the associated thermal diffusivity and convection velocity. The same can be done for the density, and in principle also other plasma paramete

  8. One dimensional simulation on stability of detached plasma in a tokamak divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazawa, Shinji; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Okamoto, Masao; Ohyabu, Nobuyoshi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    The stability of radiation front in the Scrape-Off-Layer (SOL) of a tokamak is studied with a one dimensional fluid code; the time-dependent transport equations are solved in the direction parallel to a magnetic field line. The simulation results show that stable detached solutions exist, where the plasma temperature near the divertor target is {approx}2 eV. It is found that whenever such stable detached states are attained, the strong radiation front is contact with or at a small distance from the divertor target. When the energy externally injected into the SOL is decreased below a critical value, the radiation front starts to move towards the X-point, cooling the SOL plasma. In such cases, no stationary solutions such that the radiation front rests in the divertor channel are observed in our parameter space. This qualitatively corresponds to the results of tokamak divertor experiments which show the movement of radiation front. (author)

  9. Plasma arc cutting technology: simulation and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantoro, G; Colombo, V; Concetti, A; Ghedini, E; Sanibondi, P; Zinzani, F; Rotundo, F [Department of Mechanical Engineering (D.I.E.M.) and Research Center for Applied Mathematics (C.I.R.A.M.), Alma Mater Studiorum-Universita di Bologna, Via Saragozza 8, 40123 Bologna (Italy); Dallavalle, S; Vancini, M, E-mail: emanuele.ghedini@unibo.it [Cebora S.p.A., Via Andrea Costa 24, 40057 Cadriano di Granarolo (Italy)

    2011-01-01

    Transferred arc plasma torches are widely used in industrial processes for cutting of metallic materials because of their ability to cut a wide range of metals with very high productivity. The process is characterized by a transferred electric arc established between an electrode inside the torch (the cathode) and another electrode, the metallic workpiece to be cut (the anode). In order to obtain a high quality cut and a high productivity, the plasma jet must be as collimated as possible and must have the higher achievable power density. Plasma modelling and numerical simulation can be very useful tools for the designing and optimizing these devices, but research is still in the making for finding a link between simulation of the plasma arc and a consistent prevision of cut quality. Numerical modelling of the behaviour of different types of transferred arc dual gas plasma torches can give an insight on the physical reasons for the industrial success of various design and process solutions that have appeared over the last years. Diagnostics based on high speed imaging and Schlieren photography can play an important role for investigating piercing, dross generation, pilot arcing and anode attachment location. Also, the behaviour of hafnium cathodes at high current levels at the beginning of their service life can been experimentally investigated, with the final aim of understanding the phenomena that take place during those initial piercing and cutting phases and optimizing the initial shape of the surface of the emissive insert exposed to plasma atmosphere.

  10. Progress in the Design of the Stabilized Liner Compressor for MTF/MIF Plasma Target Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, Sherry; Frese, Michael; Turchi, Peter; Gale, Don

    2016-10-01

    The Stabilized Liner Compressor (SLC) seeks to extend concepts for repetitive, rotationally stabilized, liquid-metal liners driven by free-pistons to much higher drive pressures (25 vs 5 kpsi) and faster implosion speeds (2000 vs 100 m/s) than previously demonstrated. Such extension is needed to enable experiments with magnetized-plasma targets presently offering sizes and lifetimes of 10's cm diam and 10's microsec. SLC represents the confluence of several difficult technologies, including pulsed high pressures, high-speed rotating machinery and alkali-metal (Na, NaK) handling. Solution of the two-dimensional, unsteady, compressible flow of a rotating liquid-metal liner requires advanced numerical techniques. We report the use of the 2-1/2 dimensional MHD code MACH2 to explore flow options, including magnetic flux compression, and to provide pulsed pressure distributions for mechanical design. Supported by ARPA-E ALPHA Program.

  11. Accelerating Vaccine Formulation Development Using Design of Experiment Stability Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahl, Patrick L; Mensch, Christopher; Hu, Binghua; Pixley, Heidi; Zhang, Lan; Dieter, Lance; Russell, Ryann; Smith, William J; Przysiecki, Craig; Kosinski, Mike; Blue, Jeffrey T

    2016-10-01

    Vaccine drug product thermal stability often depends on formulation input factors and how they interact. Scientific understanding and professional experience typically allows vaccine formulators to accurately predict the thermal stability output based on formulation input factors such as pH, ionic strength, and excipients. Thermal stability predictions, however, are not enough for regulators. Stability claims must be supported by experimental data. The Quality by Design approach of Design of Experiment (DoE) is well suited to describe formulation outputs such as thermal stability in terms of formulation input factors. A DoE approach particularly at elevated temperatures that induce accelerated degradation can provide empirical understanding of how vaccine formulation input factors and interactions affect vaccine stability output performance. This is possible even when clear scientific understanding of particular formulation stability mechanisms are lacking. A DoE approach was used in an accelerated 37(°)C stability study of an aluminum adjuvant Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B vaccine. Formulation stability differences were identified after only 15 days into the study. We believe this study demonstrates the power of combining DoE methodology with accelerated stress stability studies to accelerate and improve vaccine formulation development programs particularly during the preformulation stage. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hall MHD Stability and Turbulence in Magnetically Accelerated Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. R. Strauss

    2012-11-27

    The object of the research was to develop theory and carry out simulations of the Z pinch and plasma opening switch (POS), and compare with experimental results. In the case of the Z pinch, there was experimental evidence of ion kinetic energy greatly in excess of the ion thermal energy. It was thought that this was perhaps due to fine scale turbulence. The simulations showed that the ion energy was predominantly laminar, not turbulent. Preliminary studies of a new Z pinch experiment with an axial magnetic field were carried out. The axial magnetic is relevant to magneto - inertial fusion. These studies indicate the axial magnetic field makes the Z pinch more turbulent. Results were also obtained on Hall magnetohydrodynamic instability of the POS.

  13. Construction of the plasma-wall experiment Magnum-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; Koppers, W. R.; van Eck, H. J. N.; van Rooij, G. J.; W. J. Goedheer,; de Groot, B.; Al, R.; Graswinckel, M. F.; van den Berg, M. A.; Kruyt, O.; Smeets, P.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Vijvers, W.; Scholten, J.; van de Pol, M.; Brons, S.; Melissen, W.; Van der Grift, T.; Koch, R.; Schweer, B.; Samm, U.; Philipps, V.; Engeln, R. A. H.; D.C. Schram,; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Kleyn, A. W.

    2010-01-01

    The FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen is constructing Magnum-PSI: a magnetized (3 T), steady-state, large area (80 cm(2)) high-flux (up to 10(24) H+ ions m(-2) s(-1)) plasma generator. Magnum-PSI will be a highly accessible laboratory experiment in which the interaction of magnetized plasm

  14. Plasma Cells For Hire: Prior Experience Required

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Activation of IgG+ memory B cells accounts for much of the antibodies in secondary immune responses. Here, Khometani et al. (2013) demonstrate that reduced amounts of Bach2 in antigen-experienced memory B cells control the robust production of IgG1+ plasma cells.

  15. Transport Studies in Fusion Plasmas - Perturbative Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, N. J. L.

    1994-01-01

    By subjecting a plasma in steady state to small perturbations and measuring the response, it is possible to determine elements of the matrix of transport coefficients. Experimentally this is difficult, and results are mainly limited to tranpsport driven by the pressure and temperature gradients. Imp

  16. Transport studies in fusion plasmas: Perturbative experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, N. J. L.

    1996-01-01

    By subjecting a plasma in steady state to small perturbations and measuring the response, it is possible to determine elements of the matrix of transport coefficients. Experimentally this is difficult, and results are mainly limited to tranpsport driven by the pressure and temperature gradients. Imp

  17. Electron cyclotron plasma startup in the GDT experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, D. V.; Shalashov, A. G.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Savkin, V. Ya.; Bagryansky, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on a new plasma startup scenario in the gas dynamic trap (GDT) magnetic mirror device. The primary 5 MW neutral beam injection (NBI) plasma heating system fires into a sufficiently dense plasma target (‘seed plasma’), which is commonly supplied by an arc plasma generator. In the reported experiments, a different approach to seed plasma generation is explored. One of the channels of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating system is used to ionize the neutral gas and build up the density of plasma to a level suitable for NBI capture. After a short transition of approximately 1 ms the discharge becomes essentially similar to a standard one initiated by the plasma gun. This paper presents the discharge scenario and experimental data on the seed plasma evolution during ECRH, along with the dependencies on incident microwave power, magnetic configuration and pressure of a neutral gas. The characteristics of the consequent high-power NBI discharge are studied and differences from the conventional scenario are discussed. A theoretical model describing the ECR breakdown and the seed plasma accumulation in a large-scale mirror trap is developed on the basis of the GDT experiment.

  18. Contoured-gap coaxial guns for imploding plasma liner experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, F. D.; Case, A.; Brockington, S.; Cassibry, J. T.; Hsu, S. C.

    2014-10-01

    Arrays of supersonic, high momentum flux plasma jets can be used as standoff compression drivers for generating spherically imploding plasma liners for driving magneto-inertial fusion, hence the name plasma-jet-driven MIF (PJMIF). HyperV developed linear plasma jets for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL where two guns were successfully tested. Further development at HyperV resulted in achieving the PLX goal of 8000 μg at 50 km/s. Prior work on contoured-gap coaxial guns demonstrated an approach to control the blowby instability and achieved substantial performance improvements. For future plasma liner experiments we propose to use contoured-gap coaxial guns with small Minirailgun injectors. We will describe such a gun for a 60-gun plasma liner experiment. Discussion topics will include impurity control, plasma jet symmetry and topology (esp. related to uniformity and compactness), velocity capability, and techniques planned for achieving gun efficiency of >50% using tailored impedance matched pulse forming networks. Mach2 and UAH SPH code simulations will be included. Work supported by US DOE DE-FG02-05ER54810.

  19. Plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Chattopadhyay, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Chen, P. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1993-04-01

    We intend to carry out a series of plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam facility at SLAC. These experiments will be the first to study the focusing of particle beams by plasma focusing devices in the parameter regime of interest for high energy colliders, and is expected to lead to plasma lens designs capable of unprecedented spot sizes. Plasma focusing of positron beams will be attempted for the first time. We will study the effects of lens aberrations due to various lens imperfections. Several approaches will be applied to create the plasma required including laser ionization and beam ionization of a working gas. At an increased bunch population of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 10}, tunneling ionization of a gas target by an electron beam -- an effect which has never been observed before -- should be significant. The compactness of our device should prove to be of interest for applications at the SLC and the next generation linear colliders.

  20. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, V; Solberg, J; Ferriera, T; Tully, L; Stephan, P

    2008-10-02

    We have developed and tested a compact collimated sixteen channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with {approx}mm spatial and sub-{micro}s temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore Fixed Hybrid Armature experiment are presented and compared with 1-D simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  1. An Experiment to Tame the Plasma Material Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldston, R J; Menard, J E; Allain, J P; Brooks, J N; Canik, J M; Doerner, R; Fu, G; Gates, D A; Gentile, C A; Harris, J H; Hassanein, A; Gorelenkov, N N; Kaita, R; Kaye, S M; Kotschenreuther, M; Kramer, G J; Kugel, H W; Maingi, R; Mahajan, S M; Majeski, R; Neumeyer, C L; Nygren, R E; Ono, M; Owen, L W; Ramakrishnan, S; Rognlien, T D; Ruzic, D N; Ryutov, D D; Sabbagh, S A; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V A; Stevenson, T N; Ulrickson, M A; Valanju, P M; Woolley, R D

    2009-01-08

    The plasma material interface in Demo will be more challenging than that in ITER, due to requirements for approximately four times higher heat flux from the plasma and approximately five times higher average duty factor. The scientific and technological solutions employed in ITER may not extrapolate to Demo. The key questions to be resolved for Demo and the resulting key requirements for an experiment to 'tame the plasma material interface' are analyzed. A possible design point for such an experiment is outlined.

  2. A large volume uniform plasma generator for the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Min; Li Xiaoping; Xie Kai; Liu Donglin [School of Electronical and Mechanical Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an Shaanxi 710071 (China); Liu Yanming [School of Telecommunications Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an Shaanxi 710071 (China)

    2013-01-15

    A large volume uniform plasma generator is proposed for the experiments of electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in plasma, to reproduce a 'black out' phenomenon with long duration in an environment of the ordinary laboratory. The plasma generator achieves a controllable approximate uniform plasma in volume of 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 180 mm without the magnetic confinement. The plasma is produced by the glow discharge, and the special discharge structure is built to bring a steady approximate uniform plasma environment in the electromagnetic wave propagation path without any other barriers. In addition, the electron density and luminosity distributions of plasma under different discharge conditions were diagnosed and experimentally investigated. Both the electron density and the plasma uniformity are directly proportional to the input power and in roughly reverse proportion to the gas pressure in the chamber. Furthermore, the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma are conducted in this plasma generator. Blackout phenomena at GPS signal are observed under this system and the measured attenuation curve is of reasonable agreement with the theoretical one, which suggests the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Optimizing stability, transport, and divertor operation through plasma shaping for steady-state scenario development in DIII-Da)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, C. T.; Ferron, J. R.; Luce, T. C.; Petrie, T. W.; Politzer, P. A.; Challis, C.; DeBoo, J. C.; Doyle, E. J.; Greenfield, C. M.; Groebner, R. J.; Groth, M.; Hyatt, A. W.; Jackson, G. L.; Kessel, C.; La Haye, R. J.; Makowski, M. A.; McKee, G. R.; Murakami, M.; Osborne, T. H.; Park, J.-M.; Prater, R.; Porter, G. D.; Reimerdes, H.; Rhodes, T. L.; Shafer, M. W.; Snyder, P. B.; Turnbull, A. D.; West, W. P.

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] have elucidated key aspects of the dependence of stability, confinement, and density control on the plasma magnetic configuration, leading to the demonstration of nearly noninductive operation for >1 s with pressure 30% above the ideal no-wall stability limit. Achieving fully noninductive tokamak operation requires high pressure, good confinement, and density control through divertor pumping. Plasma geometry affects all of these. Ideal magnetohydrodynamics modeling of external kink stability suggests that it may be optimized by adjusting the shape parameter known as squareness (ζ). Optimizing kink stability leads to an increase in the maximum stable pressure. Experiments confirm that stability varies strongly with ζ, in agreement with the modeling. Optimization of kink stability via ζ is concurrent with an increase in the H-mode edge pressure pedestal stability. Global energy confinement is optimized at the lowest ζ tested, with increased pedestal pressure and lower core transport. Adjusting the magnetic divertor balance about a double-null configuration optimizes density control for improved noninductive auxiliary current drive. The best density control is obtained with a slight imbalance toward the divertor opposite the ion grad(B) drift direction, consistent with modeling of these effects. These optimizations have been combined to achieve noninductive current fractions near unity for over 1 s with normalized pressure of 3.565%, and a normalized confinement factor of H98(y ,2)≈1.5.

  4. CREATION OF GRADIENT PLASMA-SPRAYED COATINGS ON BASIS OF ZIRCONIUM DIOXIDE STABILIZED WITH YTTERBIUM DIOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Okovity

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The process has been investigated and technological parameters for spraying gradient plasma coatings on the basis of zirconium dioxide stabilized with ytterbium dioxide have been optimized in the paper.

  5. Scaled Laboratory Collisionless Shock Experiments in the Large Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S. E.; Schaeffer, D.; Everson, E.; Bondarenko, A.; Winske, D.; Constantin, C.; Niemann, C.

    2013-12-01

    Collisionless shocks in space plasmas have been investigated since the fifties and are typically studied via in-situ satellite observations, which are limited due to the large structure of collisionless shocks in space environments relative to the satellite observation platform. Scaled, repeatable experiments in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA provide a test bed for studying collisionless shocks in the laboratory, where questions of ion and electron heating and acceleration can be addressed and examined in detail. The experiments are performed by ablating a graphite or plastic target using the Raptor kilojoule-class laser facility at UCLA. The laser provides an on-target energy in the range of 100-500 J that drives a super-Alfvénic (MA > 1) debris plasma across a background magnetic field (200-800 G) into the ambient, magnetized LAPD plasma. Typical plasma parameters in the LAPD consist of a H+ or He+ ambient plasma with a core column (diameter > 20 cm ) density ni ~ 1013 cm-3 and electron temperature Te ~ 10 eV embedded in a larger plasma discharge (diameter ~ 80 cm) of density ni ~ 1012 cm-3 and Te ~ 5 eV. The ambient ion temperature is Ti ~ 1 eV. Experimental results from the latest collisionless shock campaign will be presented and compared with two dimensional hybrid simulations of the experiment. Fielded diagnostics include Thomson scattering, ion spectroscopy, magnetic flux probes, Langmuir probes, and microwave reflectometry.

  6. Electron-cyclotron plasma startup in the GDT experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Yakovlev, D V; Gospodchikov, E D; Solomakhin, A L; Savkin, V Ya; Bagryansky, P A

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports on a new plasma startup scenario in the Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) magnetic mirror device. The primary 5 MW neutral beam injection (NBI) plasma heating system fires into a sufficiently dense plasma target ("seed plasma"), which is commonly supplied by an arc plasma generator. In the reported experiments, a different approach to seed plasma generation is explored. One of the channels of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating system is used to ionize the neutral gas and build up the density of plasma to a level suitable for NBI capture. After a short transition (about 1 ms) the discharge becomes essentially similar to a standard one initiated by the plasma gun. The paper presents the discharge scenario and experimental data on the seed plasma evolution during ECR heating, along with the dependencies on incident microwave power, magnetic configuration and pressure of a neutral gas. The characteristics of consequent high-power NBI discharge are studied and differences to the conventional sce...

  7. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma emission light for plasma-based acceleration experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced particle accelerators are based on the excitation of large amplitude plasma waves driven by either electron or laser beams. Future experiments scheduled at the SPARC_LAB test facility aim to demonstrate the acceleration of high brightness electron beams through the so-called resonant Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme in which a train of electron bunches (drivers) resonantly excites wakefields into a preformed hydrogen plasma; the last bunch (witness) injected at the proper accelerating phase gains energy from the wake. The quality of the accelerated beam depends strongly on plasma density and its distribution along the acceleration length. The measurements of plasma density of the order of 1016-1017 cm-3 can be performed with spectroscopic measurements of the plasma-emitted light. The measured density distribution for hydrogen filled capillary discharge with both Balmer alpha and Balmer beta lines and shot-to-shot variation are here reported.

  8. A 1D (radial) Plasma Jet Propagation Study for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. R.; Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.; Welch, D. R.; Thoma, C.; Golovkin, I.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Case, A.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Cassibry, J. T.; Awe, T. J.; Hsu, S. C.

    2011-10-01

    The Plasma Liner Experiment will explore the formation of imploding spherical ``plasma liners'' that reach peak pressures of 0.1 Mbar upon stagnation. The liners will be formed through the merging of dense, high velocity plasma jets (n ~1017 cm-3, T ~3 eV, v ~50 km/s) in a spherically convergent geometry. The focus of this 1D (radial) study is argon plasma jet evolution during propagation from the rail gun source to the jet merging radius. The study utilizes the Large Scale Plasma (LSP) PIC code with atomic physics included through the use of a non-Local Thermal Equilibrium (NLTE) Equation of State (EOS) table. We will present scenarios for expected 1D (radial) plasma jet evolution, from upon exiting the PLX rail gun to reaching the jet merging radius. The importance of radiation cooling early in the simulation is highlighted. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-05ER54835.

  9. Non-modal stability analysis and transient growth in a magnetized Vlasov plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ratushnaya, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Collisionless plasmas, such as those encountered in tokamaks, exhibit a rich variety of instabilities. The physical origin, triggering mechanisms and fundamental understanding of many plasma instabilities, however, are still open problems. We investigate the stability properties of a collisionless Vlasov plasma in a stationary homogeneous magnetic field. We narrow the scope of our investigation to the case of Maxwellian plasma. For the first time using a fully kinetic approach we show the emergence of the local instability, a transient growth, followed by classical Landau damping in a stable magnetized plasma. We show that the linearized Vlasov operator is non-normal leading to the algebraic growth of the perturbations using non-modal stability theory. The typical time scales of the obtained instabilities are of the order of several plasma periods. The first-order distribution function and the corresponding electric field are calculated and the dependence on the magnetic field and perturbation parameters is s...

  10. Stability of glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucagon in human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Bak, Monika Judyta; Hartmann, Bolette;

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the stability of glucagon-like peptide-1(GLP-1) and glucagon in plasma under short- and long-term storage conditions. Methods: Pooled human plasma (n=20), to which a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitor and aprotinin were added, was spiked with synthetic GLP-1 (intact, 7-36NH2 ...

  11. A plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using CLARA beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, G., E-mail: guoxing.xia@cockcroft.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Angal-Kalinin, D.; Clarke, J. [STFC/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Smith, J. [Tech-X UK Corporation, Daresbury Innovation Centre, Warrington (United Kingdom); Cormier-Michel, E. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Jones, J.; Williams, P.H.; Mckenzie, J.W.; Militsyn, B.L. [STFC/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Hanahoe, K.; Mete, O. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Aimidula, A.; Welsch, C.P. [The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); The University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-11

    We propose a Plasma Accelerator Research Station (PARS) based at proposed FEL test facility CLARA (Compact Linear Accelerator for Research and Applications) at Daresbury Laboratory. The idea is to use the relativistic electron beam from CLARA, to investigate some key issues in electron beam transport and in electron beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration, e.g. high gradient plasma wakefield excitation driven by a relativistic electron bunch, two bunch experiment for CLARA beam energy doubling, high transformer ratio, long bunch self-modulation and some other advanced beam dynamics issues. This paper presents the feasibility studies of electron beam transport to meet the requirements for beam driven wakefield acceleration and presents the plasma wakefield simulation results based on CLARA beam parameters. Other possible experiments which can be conducted at the PARS beam line are also discussed.

  12. A plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using CLARA beam

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, G; Clarke, J; Smith, J; Cormier-Michel, E; Jones, J; Williams, P H; Mckenzie, J W; Militsyn, B L; Hanahoe, K; Mete, O; Aimidula, A; Welsch, C P

    2014-01-01

    We propose a Plasma Accelerator Research Station (PARS) based at proposed FEL test facility CLARA (Compact Linear Accelerator for Research and Applications) at Daresbury Laboratory. The idea is to use the relativistic electron beam from CLARA, to investigate some key issues in electron beam transport and in electron beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration, e.g. high gradient plasma wakefield excitation driven by a relativistic electron bunch, two bunch experiment for CLARA beam energy doubling, high transformer ratio, long bunch self-modulation and some other advanced beam dynamics issues. This paper presents the feasibility studies of electron beam transport to meet the requirements for beam driven wakefield acceleration and presents the plasma wakefield simulation results based on CLARA beam parameters. Other possible experiments which can be conducted at the PARS beam line are also discussed.

  13. AWAKE: Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E

    2014-01-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is a promising alternative reaching accelerating fields a magnitude of up to 3 higher (GV/m) when compared to conventional RF acceleration. AWAKE, world’s first proton-driven plasma wakefield experiment, was launched at CERN to verify this concept. In this experiment proton bunches at 400 GeV/c will be extracted from the CERN SPS and sent to the plasma cell, where the proton beam drives the plasma wakefields and creates a large accelerating field. This large gradient of ~GV/m can be achieved by relying on the self-modulation instability (SMI) of the proton beam; when seeded by ionization through a short laser pulse, a train of micro-bunches with a period on the order of the plasma wavelength (~mm) develops, which can drive such a large amplitude wake from a long proton bunch (~12 cm). An electron beam will be injected into the plasma to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment is being installed at CERN in the former CNGS facility, which must be modified to mat...

  14. Numerical Investigation of Plasma Detachment in Magnetic Nozzle Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Kamesh; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2008-01-01

    At present there exists no generally accepted theoretical model that provides a consistent physical explanation of plasma detachment from an externally-imposed magnetic nozzle. To make progress towards that end, simulation of plasma flow in the magnetic nozzle of an arcjet experiment is performed using a multidimensional numerical simulation tool that includes theoretical models of the various dispersive and dissipative processes present in the plasma. This is an extension of the simulation tool employed in previous work by Sankaran et al. The aim is to compare the computational results with various proposed magnetic nozzle detachment theories to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms that cause detachment. An applied magnetic field topology is obtained using a magnetostatic field solver (see Fig. I), and this field is superimposed on the time-dependent magnetic field induced in the plasma to provide a self-consistent field description. The applied magnetic field and model geometry match those found in experiments by Kuriki and Okada. This geometry is modeled because there is a substantial amount of experimental data that can be compared to the computational results, allowing for validation of the model. In addition, comparison of the simulation results with the experimentally obtained plasma parameters will provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to plasma detachment, revealing how they scale with different input parameters. Further studies will focus on modeling literature experiments both for the purpose of additional code validation and to extract physical insight regarding the mechanisms driving detachment.

  15. Scintillation Detectors in Experiments on Plasma Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Bystritsky, V M; Gerasimov, V V; Kublikov, R V; Nechaev, B A; Padalko, V M; Parzhitski, S S; Smirnov, V S; Wozniak, J

    2005-01-01

    The gating circuits for photomultipliers of scintillation detectors operating in powerful pulsed electromagnetic and nuclear radiation fields are investigated. PMTs with the jalousie-type dynode system and with the linear dynode system are considered. The basic gating circuits of the photomultipliers involving active and resistor high-voltage dividers are given. The results of the investigations are important for experiments in which it is necessary to discriminate in time the preceding background radiation and the process of interest.

  16. Modelling of three dimensional equilibrium and stability of MAST plasmas with magnetic perturbations using VMEC and COBRA

    CERN Document Server

    Ham, C J; Kirk, A; Saarelma, S

    2013-01-01

    It is known that magnetic perturbations can mitigate edge localized modes (ELMs) in experiments, for example MAST (Kirk et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 043007). One hypothesis is that the magnetic perturbations cause a three dimensional corrugation of the plasma and this corrugated plasma has different stability properties to peeling-ballooning modes compared to an axisymmetric plasma. It has been shown in an up-down symmetric plasma that magnetic perturbations in tokamaks will break the usual axisymmetry of the plasma causing three dimensional displacements (Chapman et al 2012 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 54 105013). We produce a free boundary three-dimensional equilibrium of a lower single null MAST relevant plasma using VMEC (S P Hirshman and J C Whitson 1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3553). The current and pressure profiles used for the modelling are similar to those deduced from axisymmetric analysis of experimental data with ELMs. We focus on the effect of applying $n=3$ and $n=6$ magnetic perturbations using the RMP ...

  17. MHD Spectroscopic Study of the Stabilizing Effect of Plasma Flow on the Resistive Wall Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimerdes, H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Navratil, G. A.; Chu, M. S.; Jackson, G. L.; Jensen, T. H.; La Haye, R. J.; Scoville, J. T.; Strait, E. J.; Edgell, D. H.; Jayakumar, R. J.; Okabayashi, M.

    2003-10-01

    MHD Spectroscopic Study of the Stabilizing Effect of Plasma Flow on the Resistive Wall Mode,* H. Reimerdes, A.M. Garofalo, G.A. Navratil, Columbia U, M.S. Chu, G.L. Jackson, T.H. Jensen, R.J. La Haye, J.T. Scoville, E.J. Strait, GA, D.H. Edgell, FAR-TECH, Inc., R.J. Jayakumar, LLNL, M. Okabayashi, PPPL - Resistive wall mode (RWM) stabilization by plasma rotation has been under study for the last decade. Dissipation caused by an interaction between the quasi-static magnetic perturbation and a near-sonic plasma flow alters the RWM stability [Bondeson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2709 (1994)]. To probe the RWM stability in DIII-D, we extend the technique of MHD spectroscopy, which was previously applied at frequencies above 10 kHz [Fasoli, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 645 (1995)], to frequencies of a few Hz. Internal coils generate a rotating magnetic field, whose spatial structure largely overlaps with the RWM structure. The plasma response, measured as the perturbed field at the wall, is rigid and peaks when the external field rotates at a fraction of the inverse wall time in the direction of the plasma rotation, which is in good agreement with a single mode model [Garofalo, et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 4573 (2002)]. This measurement is used to determine the contribution of the proposed dissipation mechanisms to the stabilization of the RWM.

  18. Stability of tokamak plasmas with internal transport barriers against high n ideal magnetohydrodynamic ballooning mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Bing-Ren; Qu Wen-Xiao

    2006-01-01

    A ballooning mode equation for tokamak plasma, with the toroidicity and the Shafranov shift effects included, is derived for a shift circular flux tokamak configuration. Using this equation, the stability of the plasma configuration with an internal transport barrier (IT2 against the high n (the toroidal mode number) ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ballooning mode is analysed. It is shown that both the toroidicity and the Shafranov shift effects are stabilizing.In the ITB region, these effects give rise to a low shear stable channel between the first and the second stability regions.Out of the ITB region towards the plasma edge, the stabilizing effect of the Shafranov shift causes the unstable zone to be significantly narrowed.

  19. Thermonuclear dynamo inside ultracentrifuge with supersonic plasma flow stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winterberg, F. [University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, Nevada (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Einstein's general theory of relativity implies the existence of virtual negative masses in the rotational reference frame of an ultracentrifuge with the negative mass density of the same order of magnitude as the positive mass density of a neutron star. In an ultracentrifuge, the repulsive gravitational field of this negative mass can simulate the attractive positive mass of a mini-neutron star, and for this reason can radially confine a dense thermonuclear plasma placed inside the centrifuge, very much as the positive mass of a star confines its plasma by its own attractive gravitational field. If the centrifuge is placed in an externally magnetic field to act as the seed field of a magnetohydrodynamic generator, the configuration resembles a magnetar driven by the release of energy through nuclear fusion, accelerating the plasma to supersonic velocities, with the magnetic field produced by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect insulating the hot plasma from the cold wall of the centrifuge. Because of the supersonic flow and the high plasma density the configuration is stable.

  20. The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Canik, J.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Duckworth, R. C.; Goulding, R. H.; Hillis, D. L.; Lore, J. D.; Lumsdaine, A.; McGinnis, W. D.; Meitner, S. J.; Owen, L. W.; Shaw, G. C.; Luo, G.-N.

    2014-10-01

    Next generation plasma generators have to be able to access the plasma conditions expected on the divertor targets in ITER and future devices. The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will address this regime with electron temperatures of 1--10 eV and electron densities of 1021--1020 m-3. The resulting heat fluxes are about 10 MW/m2. MPEX is designed to deliver those plasma conditions with a novel Radio Frequency plasma source able to produce high density plasmas and heat electron and ions separately with Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) heating and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). Preliminary modeling has been used for pre-design studies of MPEX. MPEX will be capable to expose neutron irradiated samples. In this concept targets will be irradiated in ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) or possibly at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and then subsequently (after a sufficient long cool-down period) exposed to fusion reactor relevant plasmas in MPEX. The current state of the pre-design of MPEX including the concept of handling irradiated samples will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  1. Stability of silanols and grafted alkylsilane monolayers on plasma-activated mica surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberelle, Benoît; Banquy, Xavier; Giasson, Suzanne

    2008-04-01

    We investigated the effect of physical and chemical modifications of mica surfaces induced by water vapor-based plasma treatments on the stability of silanols and grafted alkylsilane monolayers. The plasma-activated substrates were characterized using XPS, TOF-SIMS, and contact angle measurements. They revealed a large surface coverage of silanol groups (Si-OH) and a loss of aluminum atoms compared to freshly cleaved mica surfaces. The stability of plasma-induced silanol groups was investigated by contact angle measurements using ethylene glycol as a probe liquid. The Si-OH surface coverage decreased rapidly under vacuum or thermal treatment to give rise to hydrophobic dehydrated surfaces. The stability of end-grafted monofunctionalized n-alkylsilanes was investigated in different solvents and at different pH using water contact angle measurements. The degrafting of alkylsilanes from the activated mica was promoted in acidic aqueous solutions. This detachment was associated with the hydrolysis of covalent bonds between the alkylsilanes and the mica surface. The monolayer stability was enhanced by increasing the length of the alkyl chains that probably act as a hydrophobic protective layer against hydrolysis reactions. Stable alkylsilane monolayers in water with pH greater than 5.5 were obtained on mica surfaces activated at low plasma pressure. We attributed this stability to the loss of surface Al atoms induced by the plasma treatment.

  2. Edge and divertor plasma: detachment, stability, and plasma-wall interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Lee, Wonjae; Phsenov, A. A.; Smirnov, R. D.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Stepanenko, A. A.; Zhang, Yanzeng

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents an overview of the results of studies on a wide range of the edge plasma related issues. The rollover of the plasma flux to the target during progressing detachment process is shown to be caused by the increase of the impurity radiation loss and volumetric plasma recombination, whereas the ion-neutral friction, although important for establishing the necessary edge plasma conditions, does not contribute per se to the rollover of the plasma flux to the target. The processes limiting the power loss by impurity radiation are discussed and a simple estimate of this limit is obtained. Different mechanisms of meso-scale thermal instabilities driven by impurity radiation and resulting in self-sustained oscillations in the edge plasma are identified. An impact of sheared magnetic field on the dynamics of the blobs and ELM filaments playing an important role in the edge and SOL plasma transport is discussed. Trapping of He, which is an intrinsic impurity for the fusion plasmas, in the plasma-facing tungsten material is considered. A newly developed model, accounting for the generation of additional He traps caused by He bubble growth, fits all the available experimental data on the layer of nano-bubbles observed in W under irradiation by low energy He plasma.

  3. Payload isolation and stabilization by a Suspended Experiment Mount (SEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Wayne L.; Desanctis, Carmine E.; Nicaise, Placide D.; Schultz, David N.

    1992-01-01

    Many Space Shuttle and Space Station payloads can benefit from isolation from crew or attitude control system disturbances. Preliminary studies have been performed for a Suspended Experiment Mount (SEM) system that will provide isolation from accelerations and stabilize the viewing direction of a payload. The concept consists of a flexible suspension system and payload-mounted control moment gyros. The suspension system, which is rigidly locked for ascent and descent, isolates the payload from high frequency disturbances. The control moment gyros stabilize the payload orientation. The SEM will be useful for payloads that require a lower-g environment than a manned vehicle can provide, such as materials processing, and for payloads that require stabilization of pointing direction, but not large angle slewing, such as nadir-viewing earth observation or solar viewing payloads.

  4. Comparative proteomics evaluation of plasma exosome isolation techniques and assessment of the stability of exosomes in normal human blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Hina; Adda, Christopher G; Liem, Michael; Ang, Ching-Seng; Mechler, Adam; Simpson, Richard J; Hulett, Mark D; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2013-11-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles released by a variety of cells and are detected in body fluids including blood. Recent studies have highlighted the critical application of exosomes as personalized targeted drug delivery vehicles and as reservoirs of disease biomarkers. While these research applications have created significant interest and can be translated into practice, the stability of exosomes needs to be assessed and exosome isolation protocols from blood plasma need to be optimized. To optimize methods to isolate exosomes from blood plasma, we performed a comparative evaluation of three exosome isolation techniques (differential centrifugation coupled with ultracentrifugation, epithelial cell adhesion molecule immunoaffinity pull-down, and OptiPrep(TM) density gradient separation) using normal human plasma. Based on MS, Western blotting and microscopy results, we found that the OptiPrep(TM) density gradient method was superior in isolating pure exosomal populations, devoid of highly abundant plasma proteins. In addition, we assessed the stability of exosomes in plasma over 90 days under various storage conditions. Western blotting analysis using the exosomal marker, TSG101, revealed that exosomes are stable for 90 days. Interestingly, in the context of cellular uptake, the isolated exosomes were able to fuse with target cells revealing that they were indeed biologically active.

  5. The Stability of Magnetized Rotating Plasmas with Superthermal Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2005-01-01

    findings for the stability of cold, magnetically dominated, rotating fluids and argue that, for these systems, the curvature of toroidal field lines cannot be neglected even when short wavelength perturbations are considered. We also comment on the implications of our results for the validity of shearing...

  6. Freak waves in negative-ion plasmas: an experiment revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourakis, Ioannis; Elkamash, Ibrahem; Reville, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Extreme events in the form of rogue waves (freak waves) occur widely in the open sea. These are space- and time-localised excitations, which appear unexpectedly and are characterised by a significant amplitude. Beyond ocean dynamics, the mechanisms underlying rogue wave formation are now being investigated in various physical contexts, including materials science, nonlinear optics and plasma physics, to mention but a few. We have undertaken an investigation, from first principles, of the occurrence of rogue waves associated with the propagation of electrostatic wavepackets in plasmas. Motivated by recent experimental considerations involving freak waves in negative-ion plasmas (NIP), we have addresed the occurrence of freak waves in NIP from first principles. An extended range of plasma parameter values was identified, where freak wave formation is possible, in terms of relevant plasma parameters. Our results extend -and partly contradict- the underlying assumptions in the interpretation of the aforementioned experiment, where a critical plasma configuration was considered and a Gardner equation approach was adopted. This work was supported from CPP/QUB funding. One of us (I. Elkamash) acknowledges financial support by an Egyptian Government fellowship.

  7. Stability of Rayleigh-Taylor Vortices in Dusty Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jun; CHEN Yin-Hua; GAN Bao-Xia; WANG Fei-Hu; WANG Dong

    2006-01-01

    @@ The evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor mode in dusty plasma with vortex-flow is investigated. Based on fluid theory and Bayly's method, we derive the coupling equations describing the Rayleigh-Taylor mode in the core of vortex,and research the evolution characteristics of the perturbation amplitude with time numerically. It is shown that the eccentric of vortex and the content of dust have considerable effects on the amplitude evolutions.

  8. Dynamics of Fluctuations, Flows and Global Stability Under Electrode Biasing in a Linear Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tiffany

    2015-11-01

    Various bias electrodes have been inserted into the Helicon-Cathode (HelCat) device at the University of New Mexico, in order to affect intrinsic drift-wave turbulence and flows. The goal of the experiments was to suppress and effect the intrinsic turbulence and with detailed measurements, understand the changes that occur during biasing. The drift-mode in HelCat varies from coherent at low magnetic field (1kG). The first electrode consists of 6 concentric rings set in a ceramic substrate; these rings act as a boundary condition, sitting at the end of the plasma column 2-m away from the source. A negative bias has been found to have no effect on the fluctuations, but a positive bias (Vr>5Te) is required in order to suppress the drift-mode. Two molybdenum grids can also be inserted into the plasma and sit close to the source. Floating or grounding a grid results in suppressing the drift-mode of the system. A negative bias (>-5Te) is found to return the drift-mode, and it is possible to drive a once coherent mode into a broad-band turbulent one. From a bias voltage of -5Tenew mode, which is identified as a parallel-driven Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. At high positive bias, Vg>10Te, a new large-scale global mode is excited. This mode exhibits fluctuations in the ion saturation current, as well as in the potential, with a magnitude >50%. This mode has been identified as the potential relaxation instability (PRI). In order to better understand the modes and changes observed in the plasma, a linear stability code, LSS, was employed. As well, a 1D3V-PIC code utilizing Braginskii's equations was also utilized to understand the high-bias instability.

  9. Stabilization effect ofWeibel modes due to inverse bremsstrahlung absorption in laser fusion plasma using Krook collisions model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S BELGHIT; A SID

    2016-12-01

    In this work, the Weibel instability due to inverse bremsstrahlung absorption in laser fusion plasma has been investigated. The stabilization effect due to the coupling of the self-generated magnetic field by Weibel instability with the laser wave field is explicitly showed. The main result obtained in this work is that the inclusion of self-generated magnetic field due to Weibel instability to the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption causes a stabilizing effect of excited Weibel modes. We found a decrease in the spectral range of Weibel unstable modes.This decrease is accompanied by a reduction of two orders in the growth rate of instability or even stabilization of these modes. It has been shown that the previous analyses of the Weibel instability due to inverse bremsstrahlunghave overestimated the values of the generated magnetic fields. Therefore, the generation of magnetic fields by the Weibel instability due to inverse bremsstrahlung should not affect the experiences of an inertial confinement fusion.

  10. Flow shear stabilization of rotating plasmas due to the Coriolis effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkort, J W; de Blank, H J

    2012-07-01

    A radially decreasing toroidal rotation frequency can have a stabilizing effect on nonaxisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. We show that this is a consequence of the Coriolis effect that induces a restoring pressure gradient force when plasma is perturbed radially. In a rotating cylindrical plasma, this Coriolis-pressure effect is canceled by the centrifugal effect responsible for the magnetorotational instability. In a magnetically confined toroidal plasma, a large aspect ratio expansion shows that only half of the effect is canceled. This analytical result is confirmed by numerical computations. When the plasma rotates faster toroidally in the core than near the edge, the effect can contribute to the formation of transport barriers by stabilizing MHD instabilities.

  11. Modelling of three dimensional equilibrium and stability of MAST plasmas with magnetic perturbations using VMEC and COBRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, C. J., E-mail: christopher.ham@ccfe.ac.uk; Chapman, I. T.; Kirk, A.; Saarelma, S. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    It is known that magnetic perturbations can mitigate edge localized modes (ELMs) in experiments, for example, MAST [Kirk et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 043007 (2013)]. One hypothesis is that the magnetic perturbations cause a three dimensional corrugation of the plasma and this corrugated plasma has different stability properties to peeling-ballooning modes compared to an axisymmetric plasma. It has been shown in an up-down symmetric plasma that magnetic perturbations in tokamaks will break the usual axisymmetry of the plasma causing three dimensional displacements [Chapman et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 105013 (2012)]. We produce a free boundary three-dimensional equilibrium of a lower single null MAST relevant plasma using VMEC [S. P. Hirshman and J. C. Whitson, Phys. Fluids 26, 3553 (1983)]. The safety factor and pressure profiles used for the modelling are similar to those deduced from axisymmetric analysis of experimental data with ELMs. We focus on the effect of applying n = 3 and n = 6 magnetic perturbations using the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) coils. A midplane displacement of over ±1 cm is seen when the full current is applied. The current in the coils is scanned and a linear relationship between coil current and midplane displacement is found. The pressure gradient in real space in different toroidal locations is shown to change when RMPs are applied. This effect should be taken into account when diagnosing plasmas with RMPs applied. The helical Pfirsch-Schlüter currents which arise as a result of the assumption of nested flux surfaces are estimated for this equilibrium. The effect of this non-axisymmetric equilibrium on infinite n ballooning stability is investigated using COBRA [Sanchez et al., J. Comput. Phys. 161, 576–588 (2000)]. The infinite n ballooning stability is analysed for two reasons; it may give an indication of the effect of non-axisymmetry on finite n peeling-ballooning modes, responsible for ELMs; and

  12. Single time point isothermal drug stability experiments at constant humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jian-Lin; Zhan, Xian-Cheng; Li, Lin-Li; Lin, Bing; Jiang, Lu

    2009-03-01

    A single time point isothermal drug stability experiments at constant humidity is introduced. In the new method, kinetic parameters related to both moisture and temperature were obtained by a single pair of experiments: these related to moisture by one with a group of testing humidities and a fixed temperature, those related to temperature by the other with a group of testing temperatures and a constant humidity. By a simulation, the estimates for the kinetic parameters (E(a), m, A) obtained by the proposed method and the reported programmed humidifying and heating method were statistically evaluated and were compared with those obtained by the isothermal measurements at constant humidity. Results indicated that under the same experimental conditions, the estimates obtained by the proposed method were significantly more precise than those obtained by the reported programmed humidifying and heating method. The estimates obtained by the isothermal method at constant humidity were somewhat more precise than those obtained by the proposed method. However, the experimental period needed by the isothermal method at constant humidity was greatly longer than that needed by the proposed method. The stability of dicloxacillin sodium, as a solid state model, was investigated by the single time point isothermal drug stability experiments at constant humidity. The results indicated that the kinetic parameters obtained by the proposed method were comparable to those from the reported.

  13. Assessing the temporal stability of surface functional groups introduced by plasma treatments on the outer shells of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenda, Andrea; Ligneris, Elise Des; Sears, Kallista; Chaffraix, Thomas; Magniez, Kevin; Cornu, David; Schütz, Jürg A.; Dumée, Ludovic F.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma treatments are emerging as superior efficiency treatment for high surface to volume ratio materials to tune functional group densities and alter crystallinity due to their ability to interact with matter at the nanoscale. The purpose of this study is to assess for the first time the long term stability of surface functional groups introduced across the surface of carbon nanotube materials for a series of oxidative, reductive and neutral plasma treatment conditions. Both plasma duration dose matrix based exposures and time decay experiments, whereby the surface energy of the materials was evaluated periodically over a one-month period, were carried out. Although only few morphological changes across the graphitic planes of the carbon nanotubes were found under the uniform plasma treatment conditions, the time dependence of pertinent work functions, supported by Raman analysis, suggested that the density of polar groups decreased non-linearly over time prior to reaching saturation from 7 days post treatment. This work provides critical considerations on the understanding of the stability of functional groups introduced across high specific surface area nano-materials used for the design of nano-composites, adsorptive or separation systems, or sensing materials and where interfacial interactions are key to the final materials performance.

  14. The Application of a Smartphone in Ship Stability Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Abdelkader Djebli; Benameur Hamoudi; Omar Imine; Lahouari Adjlout

    2015-01-01

    The inclining experiment is the only regulatory tool to assess ship stability. This experiment is a time consuming process for both real-life tests and ship model experiments. The difficulty is mainly due to a bias in the measurement of heel angle. Nowadays, digital inclinometers are available, but they are expensive. In this study, the use of a smartphone application is presented for ship inclination and rolling-period tests. The idea consists of using accelerometer and gyroscope sensors built into the current smartphones for the measurements. Therefore, some experiments are carried out on an example trawler model to exhibit the uses and advantages of this method. The obtained results are in good agreement with those provided from the pendulum method and natural roll-period test. This application is new, easy, and more accurately assesses metacentric height during the inclining and rolling-period tests.

  15. Victimization Experiences and the Stabilization of Victim Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eGollwitzer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available People reliably differ in the extent to which they are sensitive to being victimized by others. Importantly, victim sensitivity predicts how people behave in social dilemma situations: Victim-sensitive individuals are less likely to trust others and more likely to behave uncooperatively - especially in socially uncertain situations. This pattern can be explained with the Sensitivity to Mean Intentions (SeMI model, according to which victim sensitivity entails a specific and asymmetric sensitivity to contextual cues that are associated with untrustworthiness. Recent research is largely in line with the model’s prediction, but some issues have remained conceptually unresolved so far. For instance, it is unclear why and how victim sensitivity becomes a stable trait and which developmental and cognitive processes are involved in such stabilization. In the present article, we will discuss the psychological processes that contribute to a stabilization of victim sensitivity within persons, both across the life span (ontogenetic stabilization and across social situations (actual-genetic stabilization. Our theoretical framework starts from the assumption that experiences of being exploited threaten a basic need, the need to trust. This need is so fundamental that experiences that threaten it receive a considerable amount of attention and trigger strong affective reactions. Associative learning processes can then explain (a how certain contextual cues (e.g., facial expressions become conditioned stimuli that elicit equally strong responses, (b why these contextual untrustworthiness cues receive much more attention than, for instance, trustworthiness cues, and (c how these cues shape spontaneous social expectations (regarding other people’s intentions. Finally, avoidance learning can explain why these cognitive processes gradually stabilize and become a trait: the trait which is referred to as victim sensitivity.

  16. Nanosize stabilization of cubic and tetragonal phases in reactive plasma synthesized zirconia powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, S., E-mail: sjayakumar.physics@gmail.com [Research and Development Centre, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 014 (India); Department of Physics, Pollachi Institute of Engineering and Technology, Pollachi 642 205 (India); Ananthapadmanabhan, P.V.; Thiyagarajan, T.K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, BARC, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Perumal, K. [Vision for Wisdom, Temple of Consciousness, Aliyar 642 101 (India); Mishra, S.C. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engg, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela 769 008 (India); Suresh, G. [Department of Physics, Park College of Engineering and Technology, Coimbatore 641 659 (India); Su, L.T.; Tok, A.I.Y. [School of Materials Science and Engg, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639 798 (Singapore)

    2013-06-15

    Pure zirconium oxide powders with particle size 2–33 nm are synthesized by reactive plasma processing. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of these particles revealed size dependent behavior for their phase stabilization. The monoclinic phase is found to be stable when particle size is ≥20 nm; Tetragonal is found to be stabilized in the range of 7–20 nm and as the particle size decreases to 6 nm and less, the cubic phase is stabilized. - Highlights: ► Direct conversion of micron-sized zirconium hydride powder to single crystal ZrO{sub 2} nanopowder. ► Size dependent stabilization of cubic, tetragonal and monoclinic phases in the reactive plasma synthesized ZrO{sub 2} nanopowder. ► Transmission electron microscopic investigation to identify particles of different sizes and their corresponding phase structure.

  17. Numerical Experiments Providing New Insights into Plasma Focus Fusion Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sing Lee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent extensive and systematic numerical experiments have uncovered new insights into plasma focus fusion devices including the following: (1 a plasma current limitation effect, as device static inductance is reduced towards very small values; (2 scaling laws of neutron yield and soft x-ray yield as functions of storage energies and currents; (3 a global scaling law for neutron yield as a function of storage energy combining experimental and numerical data showing that scaling deterioration has probably been interpreted as neutron ‘saturation’; and (4 a fundamental cause of neutron ‘saturation’. The ground-breaking insights thus gained may completely change the directions of plasma focus fusion research.

  18. Stability studies of plasma modification effects of polylactide and polycaprolactone surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraczewski, Krzysztof; Stepczyńska, Magdalena; Malinowski, Rafał; Rytlewski, Piotr; Jagodziński, Bartłomiej; Żenkiewicz, Marian

    2016-07-01

    The article presents results of research on the stability of oxygen plasma modification effects of polylactide and polycaprolactone surface layers. The modified samples were aged for three, six or nine weeks. The studies were carried out using scanning electron microscopy, goniometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Studies have shown that the plasma modification has significant impact on the geometric structure and chemical composition of the surface, wettability and surface energy of tested polymers. The modification effects are not permanent. It has been observed that over time the effects of plasma modification fade. Studies have shown that modifying effect lasts longer in the case of polycaprolactone.

  19. A Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    The AWAKE Collaboration has been formed in order to demonstrate protondriven plasma wakefield acceleration for the first time. This technology could lead to future colliders of high energy but of a much reduced length compared to proposed linear accelerators. The SPS proton beam in the CNGS facility will be injected into a 10m plasma cell where the long proton bunches will be modulated into significantly shorter micro-bunches. These micro-bunches will then initiate a strong wakefield in the plasma with peak fields above 1 GV/m that will be harnessed to accelerate a bunch of electrons from about 20MeV to the GeV scale within a few meters. The experimental program is based on detailed numerical simulations of beam and plasma interactions. The main accelerator components, the experimental area and infrastructure required as well as the plasma cell and the diagnostic equipment are discussed in detail. First protons to the experiment are expected at the end of 2016 and this will be followed by an initial 3–4 yea...

  20. Inductive inhibition of cold-plasma stabilization of curvature-driven modes in finite-length plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guest, G.E.; Miller, R.L.; Caponi, M.Z.

    1986-08-01

    A modified quasistatic theory that incorporates inductive effects in earlier electrostatic models connects the conventional electrostatic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pictures of line tying by cold plasma. The modified theory predicts that curvature-driven flute modes in mirror-confined plasmas can be stabilized by moderate concentrations of cold plasma if the beta of the hot, mirror-confined plasma is less than a critical value. The maximum stable beta for an idealized stratified model of a hot-ion plasma, separated from conducting end walls by cold plasma, is given approximately by ..beta../sub crit/approx. =(4R-italic/sub p-italic/R-italic/sub c-italic//L-italic/sub h-italic/L-italic/sub c-italic/) x (..omega../sup 2//sub p-italic//sub e-italic//sub (cold)// (k-italic/sup 2//sub perpendicular/c-italic/sup 2/+..omega../sup 2//sub p-italic//sub e-italic//sub (cold)/)). For ..omega../sup 2//sub p-italic//sub e-italic//sub (cold)/ <plasmas if the hot-plasma beta exceeds a limiting value estimated to be ..pi../sup 2/R-italic/sub p-italic/R-italic/sub c-italic//L-italic/sup 2/.

  1. Design and evaluation of an emulsion vehicle for paclitaxel. I. Physicochemical properties and plasma stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jihong; Davis, Stanley S; Papandreou, Catherine; Melia, Colin D; Washington, Clive

    2004-09-01

    The current formulation of paclitaxel contains ethanol and Cremophor EL and has been reported to cause serious adverse reactions. The purpose of the present work was to develop an improved emulsion vehicle for paclitaxel and to study the physicochemical properties of such a system. Emulsions were prepared by either microfluidization or sonication method and the droplet size characterized by dynamic light scattering and light microscopy. Stable emulsions could be made using mixtures of lecithin/sodium deoxycholate as the emulsifiers. The formulation was further improved by using a combination of free acid and the sodium salt. Paclitaxel could be loaded into the emulsions at 2.5 mg/ml without the formation of drug crystals. While these emulsions were stable on storage, they flocculated when mixed with plasma. Steric stabilization of the emulsion droplets with poloxamer 188 increased the stability of the emulsions in plasma but promoted the crystallization of paclitaxel. The crystallization tendency could be reduced by using PEG5000PE (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[poly (ethylene glycol) 5000]), a less water-soluble stabilizer. Emulsions with good stability characteristics containing 2.5 mg/ml paclitaxel could be made using bile salt/acid and lecithin, and the excellent stability of these emulsions in plasma was achieved by steric stabilization using PEG5000PE.

  2. Atomic kinetics of a neon photoionized plasma experiment at Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Daniel C.; Mancini, Roberto; E Bailey, James; Loisel, Guillaume; Rochau, Gregory

    2017-06-01

    We discuss an experimental effort to study the atomic kinetics in neon photoionized plasmas via K-shell line absorption spectroscopy. The experiment employs the intense x-ray flux emitted at the collapse of a Z-pinch to heat and backlight a photoionized plasma contained within a cm-scale gas cell placed at various distances from the Z-pinch and filled with neon gas pressures in the range from 3.5 to 30 torr. The experimental platform affords an order of magnitude range in the ionization parameter characterizing the photoionized plasma from about 3 to 80 erg*cm/s. Thus, the experiment allows for the study of trends in ionization distribution as a function of the ionization parameter. An x-ray crystal spectrometer capable of collecting both time-integrated and time-gated spectra is used to collect absorption spectra. A suite of IDL programs has been developed to process the experimental data to produce transmission spectra. The spectra show line absorption by several ionization stages of neon, including Be-, Li-, He-, and H-like ions. Analysis of these spectra yields ion areal-densities and charge state distributions, which can be compared with results from atomic kinetics codes. In addition, the electron temperature is extracted from level population ratios of nearby energy levels in Li- and Be-like ions, which can be used to test heating models of photoionized plasmas.

  3. Non-modal stability analysis and transient growth in a magnetized Vlasov plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Ratushnaya, V.

    2014-12-01

    Collisionless plasmas, such as those encountered in tokamaks, exhibit a rich variety of instabilities. The physical origin, triggering mechanisms and fundamental understanding of many plasma instabilities, however, are still open problems. We investigate the stability properties of a 3-dimensional collisionless Vlasov plasma in a stationary homogeneous magnetic field. We narrow the scope of our investigation to the case of Maxwellian plasma and examine its evolution with an electrostatic approximation. For the first time using a fully kinetic approach we show the emergence of the local instability, a transient growth, followed by classical Landau damping in a stable magnetized plasma. We show that the linearized Vlasov operator is non-normal leading to the algebraic growth of the perturbations using non-modal stability theory. The typical time scales of the obtained instabilities are of the order of several plasma periods. The first-order distribution function and the corresponding electric field are calculated and the dependence on the magnetic field and perturbation parameters is studied. Our results offer a new scenario of the emergence and development of plasma instabilities on the kinetic scale.

  4. A comparative study of ideal kink stability in two reactor-relevant tokamak plasma configurations with negative and positive triangularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jing; Liu, Yueqiang; Liu, Yue; Medvedev, S. Yu; Wang, Zhirui; Xia, Guoliang

    2016-11-01

    The effects of an ideal/resistive conducting wall, the drift kinetic resonances, as well as the toroidal plasma flow, on the stability of the ideal external kink mode are numerically investigated for a reactor-relevant tokamak plasma with strongly negative triangularity (NTR) shaping. Comparison is made for a similar plasma equilibrium, but with positive triangularity (PTR). It is found that the ideal wall stabilization is less efficient for the kink stabilization in the NTR plasma due to a less ‘external’ eigenmode structure compared to the PTR plasma. The associated plasma displacement in the NTR plasma does not ‘balloon’ near the outboard mid-plane, as is normally the case for the pressure-driven kink-ballooning instability in PTR plasmas, but being more pronounced near the X-points. The toroidal flow plays a similar role for the kink stability for both NTR and PTR plasmas. The drift kinetic damping is less efficient for the ideal external kink mode in the NTR plasma, despite a somewhat larger fraction of the particle trapping near the plasma edge compared to the PTR equilibrium. However, the drift kinetic damping of the resistive wall mode (RWM) in the NTR plasma is generally as efficient as that of the PTR plasma, although the RWM window, in terms of the normalized pressure, is narrower for the NTR plasma.

  5. Stability of Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Induced Changes on Polycarbonate Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajesh; Holcomb, Edward; Trigwell, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Polycarbonate films are subjected to plasma treatment in a number of applications such as improving adhesion between polycarbonate and silicon alloy in protective and optical coatings. The changes in surface chemistry due to plasma treatment have tendency to revert back. Thus stability of the plasma induced changes on polymer surfaces over desired time period is very important. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of ageing on atmospheric pressure helium-plasma treated polycarbonate (PC) sample as a function of treatment time. The ageing effects were studied over a period of 10 days. The samples were plasma treated for 0.5, 2, 5 and 10 minutes. Contact angle measurements were made to study surface energy changes. Modification of surface chemical structure was examined using, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Contact angle measurements on untreated and plasma treated surfaces were made immediately, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after treatment. Contact angle decreased from 93 deg for untreated sample to 30 deg for sample plasma treated for 10 minutes. After 10 days the contact angles for the 10 minute plasma treated sample increased to 67 deg, but it never reverted back to that of untreated surface. Similarly the O/C ratio increased from 0.136 for untreated sample to 0.321 for 10 minute plasma treated sample indication increase in surface energy.

  6. Confinement projections for the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldston, R.J.; Bateman, G.; Kaye, S.M.; Perkins, F.W.; Pomphrey, N.; Stotler, D.P.; Zarnstorff, M.C. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Houlberg, W.A.; Neilson, G.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Porkolab, M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Reidel, K.S. (New York Univ., NY (USA)); Stambaugh, R.D.; Waltz, R.E. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The mission of the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX, formerly CIT) is to study the physics of self-heated fusion plasmas (Q = 5 to ignition), and to demonstrate the production of substantial amounts of fusion power (P{sub fus} = 100 to 500 MW). Confinement projections for BPX have been made on the basis of (1) dimensional extrapolation (2) theory-based modeling calibrated to experiment, and (3) statistical scaling from the available empirical data base. The results of all three approaches, discussed in this paper, roughly coincide. We presently view the third approach, statistical scaling, as the most reliable means for projecting the confinement performance of BPX, and especially for assessing the uncertainty in the projection. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Sensitivity of transport and stability to the current profile in steady-state scenario plasmas in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turco, F.; Hanson, J. M. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Holcomb, C. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Ferron, J. R.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Park, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); White, A. E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Brennan, D. P. [University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Okabayashi, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton 08543, New Jersey (United States); In, Y. [Far-Tech, Inc., San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have provided the first systematic data on the impact of the current profile on the transport and stability properties of high-performance, steady-state scenario plasmas. In a future tokamak, to achieve 100% noninductive conditions and produce net power, the current profile J must be sustained by a large fraction of bootstrap current J{sub BS}, which is nonlinearly coupled with the kinetic profiles. Systematic scans of q{sub min} and q{sub 95} were performed to determine empirically the best alignment of the noninductive currents with J and the variation of the transport properties with q. Transport analysis indicates that {chi}{sub e} and {chi}{sub i} are sensitive to the details of J in a way that makes the pressure profile peaking and J{sub BS} scale nonlinearly with both q and {beta} in the experiment. Drift wave stability analysis yields linear growth rates that do not reproduce experimental trends in {chi} with q{sub min} and q{sub 95}. At high beta, necessary to maximize f{sub BS}, the plasma duration is often limited by n=1 tearing modes, whose stability also depends on the J profile. Broadly deposited electron cyclotron (EC) current at mid-radius was found to supply part of the required noninductive current and to positively affect the tearing stability. The modes appear when J{sub EC} is turned off for stable cases and always appear when the EC deposition is shifted outwards. The variation in the EC scan results is consistent with PEST3 calculations, showing that the tearing stability becomes extremely sensitive to small perturbations of the equilibrium in wall-stabilized plasmas run close to the ideal MHD limit. These modeling results are being used to design new experiments with higher ideal and tearing limits. A new capability for off-axis neutral beam injection system will be used to explore higher q{sub min} scenarios and different current alignments.

  8. Flow shear stabilization of rotating plasmas due to the Coriolis effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, J. W.; de Blank, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    A radially decreasing toroidal rotation frequency can have a stabilizing effect on nonaxisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. We show that this is a consequence of the Coriolis effect that induces a restoring pressure gradient force when plasma is perturbed radially. In a rotating cyli

  9. The Effect of Plasma Beta on High-n Ballooning Stability at Low Magnetic Shear

    CERN Document Server

    Connor, J W; Hastie, R J

    2016-01-01

    An explanation of the observed improvement in H-mode pedestal characteristics with increasing core plasma pressure or poloidal beta, as observed in MAST and JET, is sought in terms of the impact of the Shafranov shift, d', on ideal ballooning MHD stability.

  10. Flow shear stabilization of rotating plasmas due to the Coriolis effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, J. W.; de Blank, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    A radially decreasing toroidal rotation frequency can have a stabilizing effect on nonaxisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. We show that this is a consequence of the Coriolis effect that induces a restoring pressure gradient force when plasma is perturbed radially. In a rotating cyli

  11. Modeling of pulverized coal combustion stabilization by means of plasma torches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miroslav Sijercic; Srdjan Belosevic; Predrag Stefanovic [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Science, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-07-01

    Application of plasma-system for pulverized coal ignition and combustion stabilization in utility boiler furnaces promises to achieve certain savings compared to the use of heavy oil burners. Plasma torches are built in air-coal dust mixture ducts between coal mills and burners. Characteristics of processes in the ducts with plasma-system for pulverized coal combustion stabilization are analyzed in the paper, with respect to the modeling and numerical simulation of mass, momentum and heat transfer in two-phase turbulent gas particle flow. The simulations have been performed for three different geometries of the air-coal dust mixture ducts with plasma torches, for TENT A1 utility boiler and pulverized lignite Kolubara-Field 'D'. Selected results of numerical simulation of processes are presented. The plasma-system thermal effect is discussed regarding corresponding savings of liquid fuel. The results of numerical simulations have been analyzed with respect to the processes in the duct and especially with respect to the influence of the duct shape to a temperature field at the out let cross section, as a basis for the duct geometry optimization. It has been emphasized that numerical simulation of processes can be applied in analysis and optimization of pulverized coal ignition and combustion stabilization and enables efficient and cost-effective scaling-up procedure from laboratory to industrial level. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Towards higher stability of resonant absorption measurements in pulsed plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britun, Nikolay, E-mail: nikolay.britun@umons.ac.be [Chimie des Interactions Plasma Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Michiels, Matthieu [Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Snyders, Rony [Chimie des Interactions Plasma Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    Possible ways to increase the reliability of time-resolved particle density measurements in pulsed gaseous discharges using resonant absorption spectroscopy are proposed. A special synchronization, called “dynamic source triggering,” between a gated detector and two pulsed discharges, one representing the discharge of interest and another being used as a reference source, is developed. An internal digital delay generator in the intensified charge coupled device camera, used at the same time as a detector, is utilized for this purpose. According to the proposed scheme, the light pulses from the reference source follow the gates of detector, passing through the discharge of interest only when necessary. This allows for the utilization of short-pulse plasmas as reference sources, which is critical for time-resolved absorption analysis of strongly emitting pulsed discharges. In addition to dynamic source triggering, the reliability of absorption measurements can be further increased using simultaneous detection of spectra relevant for absorption method, which is also demonstrated in this work. The proposed methods are illustrated by the time-resolved measurements of the metal atom density in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge, using either a hollow cathode lamp or another HiPIMS discharge as a pulsed reference source.

  13. On plasma edge ideal MHD stability/instability condition in Mercier stable magnetic hill configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchepetov, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The stability of peeling modes in zero net current stellarator plasma is studied in high poloidal mode number m \\gg 1 approximation. The vacuum region solution is taken into account. Under these conditions in Mercier stable magnetic hill plasmas internal peeling modes are stable. External peeling modes can be unstable, but several limitations on them are found. It is shown that an analytically derived pressure gradient threshold is in reasonable agreement with the experimental observations and numerical calculations. The threshold decreases with increasing poloidal mode number m. It is shown, however, that higher modes may be stabilized due to finite ion Larmor radius effects. For the sake of definiteness, we have investigated peeling mode behavior in Mercier unstable plasma. It is shown that both external and internal peeling modes can be unstable in this regime. However, external and internal peeling modes in this case are definitely different.

  14. Experiments on Plasma Injection into a Centrifugally Confined System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, S.; Bomgardner, R.; Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Uzun-Kaymak, I.; Elton, R.; Young, W.; Teodorescu, C.; Morales, C. H.; Ellis, R. F.

    2009-11-01

    We describe the cross-field injection of plasma into a centrifugally-confined system. Two different types of plasma railgun have been installed on the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) in an attempt to drive that plasma's rotation. The initial gun was a coaxial device designed to mitigate the blowby instability. The second one was a MiniRailgun with a rectangular bore oriented so that the MCX magnetic field augments the railgun's internal magnetic field. Tests at HyperV indicate this MiniRailgun reaches much higher densities than the original gun, although muzzle velocity is slightly reduced. We discuss the impact of these guns on MCX for various conditions. Initial results show that even for a 2 kG field, firing the MiniRailgun modifies oscillations of the MCX diamagnetic loops and can impact the core current and voltage. The gun also has a noticeable impact on MCX microwave emissions. These observations suggest plasma enters the MCX system. We also compare diagnostic data collected separately from MCX for these and other guns, focussing primarily on magnetic measurements.

  15. Investment, Macroeconomic Stability and Growth: The Latin American Experience Investment, Macroeconomic Stability and Growth: The Latin American Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Rojas

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of factor accumulation, economic policies, and economic and political uncertainties on growth performance of Latin American countries in the last three decades. We extend the work of Corbo and Rojas (1992 in two directions suggested by recent work in this area. First, we extend the model by considering term of trade effects and an additional measure of distortion, the black marker premium. Second, we provide further evidence of the channels through which economic policies affect growth by endogenizing the investment rate. The main conclusions are that the terms of trade affect growth directly, and indirectly through its effect in the investment rate: the black market premium is more a measure of macroeconomic instability than of the degree of oppenness; and stability of economic policies can affect growth directly through the law of motion for growth and indirectly through investment rates. Investment, Macroeconomic Stability and Growth: The Latin American Experience

  16. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; White, A. E. [MIT-Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lee, K. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub e} ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  17. Surface-wave capillary plasmas in helium: modeling and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M.; Alves, L. L.; Noel, C.; Belmonte, T.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we use both simulations and experiments to study helium discharges (99.999% purity) sustained by surface-waves (2.45 GHz frequency), in capillary tubes (3 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. Simulations use a self-consistent homogeneous and stationary collisional-radiative model that solves the rate balance equations for the different species present in the plasma (electrons, the He^+ and He2^+ ions, the He(nexcimers) and the gas thermal balance equation, coupled to the two-term electron Boltzmann equation (including direct and stepwise collisions as well as electron-electron collisions). Experiments use optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to measure the electron density (Hβ Stark broadening), the gas temperature (ro-vibrational transitions of OH, present at trace concentrations), and the populations of different excited states. Model predictions at 1.7x10^13 cm-3 electron density (within the range estimated experimentally) are in good agreement with measurements (deviations < 10%) of (i) the excitation spectrum and the excitation temperatures (2795 ± 115 K, obtained from the Boltzmann-plot of the excited state populations, with energies lying between 22.7 and 24.2 eV), (ii) the power coupled to the plasma (˜ 180 ± 10 W), and (iii) the gas temperature (˜ 1700 ± 100 K). We discuss the extreme dependence of model results (particularly the gas temperature) on the power coupled to the plasma.

  18. Integrated parametric study of a hybrid-stabilized argon-water arc under subsonic, transonic and supersonic plasma flow regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeništa, J.; Takana, H.; Nishiyama, H.; Bartlová, M.; Aubrecht, V.; Křenek, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Kavka, T.; Sember, V.; Mašláni, A.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of characteristics and processes in the worldwide unique type of thermal plasma generator with combined stabilization of arc by argon flow and water vortex, the so-called hybrid-stabilized arc. The arc has been used for spraying of ceramic or metallic particles and for pyrolysis of biomass. The net emission coefficients as well as the partial characteristics methods for radiation losses from the argon-water arc are employed. Calculations for 300-600 A with 22.5-40 standard litres per minute (slm) of argon reveal transition from a transonic plasma flow for 400 A to a supersonic one for 600 A with a maximum Mach number of 1.6 near the exit nozzle of the plasma torch. A comparison with available experimental data near the exit nozzle shows very good agreement for the radial temperature profiles. Radial velocity profiles calculated 2 mm downstream of the nozzle exit show good agreement with the profiles determined from the combination of calculation and experiment (the so-called integrated approach). A recent evaluation of the Mach number from the experimental data for 500 and 600 A confirmed the existence of the supersonic flow regime.

  19. Stability of polyphenols in chokeberry juice treated with gas phase plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursać Kovačević, Danijela; Gajdoš Kljusurić, Jasenka; Putnik, Predrag; Vukušić, Tomislava; Herceg, Zoran; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica

    2016-12-01

    Chokeberry juice was subjected to cold atmospheric gas phase plasma and changes in hydroxycinnamic acids, flavonols and anthocyanins were monitored. Plasma treatments were carried out under different treatment times and juice volumes under constant gas flow (0.75dm(3)min(-1)). The results were compared against control (untreated) and pasteurized chokeberry juice (80°C/2min). During pasteurization, the most unstable were hydroxycinnamic acids with losses of up to 59%, while flavonols and anthocyanins increased by 5% and 9%, respectively. On the contrary, plasma treated chokeberry juice showed higher concentrations of hydroxycinnamic acids and 23% loss of anthocyanins in comparison to untreated juice. In order to obtain the optimal cold plasma treatment parameters principal component and sensitivity analysis were used. Such parameters can be potentially used for pasteurization in terms of phenolic stability of chokeberry juice. Optimal treatment was at 4.1min and sample volume of 3cm(3). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Toward a design for the ITER plasma shape and stability control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, D.A.; Leuer, J.A.; Kellman, A.G. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Haney, S.W.; Bulmer, R.H.; Pearlstein, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Portone, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). ITER Joint Central Team

    1994-07-01

    A design strategy for an integrated shaping and stability control algorithm for ITER is described. This strategy exploits the natural multivariable nature of the system so that all poloidal field coils are used to simultaneously control all regulated plasma shape and position parameters. A nonrigid, flux-conserving linearized plasma response model is derived using a variational procedure analogous to the ideal MHD Extended Energy Principle. Initial results are presented for the non-rigid plasma response model approach applied to an example DIII-D equilibrium. For this example, the nonrigid model is found to yield a higher passive growth rate than a rigid current-conserving plasma response model. Multivariable robust controller design methods are discussed and shown to be appropriate for the ITER shape control problem.

  1. Shaping Effects on Resistive-Plasma Resistive-Wall Mode Stability in a Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Dov; Cole, A. J.; Navratil, G. A.; Levesque, J. P.; Mauel, M. E.; Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    2016-10-01

    A sharp-boundary MHD model is used to explore the effects of toroidal curvature and cross-sectional shaping on resistive-plasma resistive-wall modes in a tokamak. Building on the work of Fitzpatrick, we investigate mode stability with fixed toroidal number n =1 and a broad spectrum of poloidal m-numbers, given varying aspect-ratio, elongation, triangularity and up-down asymmetry. The speed and versatility of the sharp-boundary model facilitate exploration of a large parameter space, revealing qualitative trends to be further investigated by larger codes. In addition, the study addresses the effect of geometric mode-coupling on higher beta stability limits associated with an ideal-plasma or ideal-wall. These beta limits were used by Brennan and Finn to identify plasma response domains for feedback control. Present results show how geometric mode-coupling affects the stability limits and plasma response domains. The results are explained by an analytic reduced-MHD model with two coupled modes having different m-numbers. The next phase of this work will explore feedback control in different tokamak geometries. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  2. ZaP-HD: High Energy Density Z-Pinch Plasmas using Sheared Flow Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Hughes, M. C.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.; Weed, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP-HD flow Z-pinch project investigates scaling the flow Z-pinch to High Energy Density Plasma, HEDP, conditions by using sheared flow stabilization. ZaP used a single power supply to produce 100 cm long Z-pinches that were quiescent for many radial Alfven times and axial flow-through times. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve HED plasmas, which are dimensionally large and persist for extended durations. The ZaP-HD device replaces the single power supply from ZaP with two separate power supplies to independently control the plasma flow and current in the Z-pinch. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements of the density with interferometry and digital holography, the plasma flow and temperature with passive spectroscopy, the magnetic field with surface magnetic probes, and plasma emission with optical imaging. The diagnostics fully characterize the plasma from its initiation in the coaxial accelerator, through the pinch, and exhaust from the assembly region. The plasma evolution is modeled with high resolution codes: Mach2, WARPX, and NIMROD. Experimental results and scaling analyses are presented. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration.

  3. Design of a Compact Coaxial Magnetized Plasma Gun for Magnetic Bubble Expansion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    COAXIAL MAGNETIZED PLASMA GUN FOR MAGNETIC BUBBLE EXPANSION EXPERIMENTS Y. Zhang1, A. G. Lynn1, S. C. Hsu2, M. Gilmore1, C... coaxial magnetized plasma gun and its associated hardware systems are discussed in detail. The plasma gun is used for experimental studies of...and coaxial plasma guns - which is the method employed in this work. The first coaxial plasma gun experiment was performed five decades ago by

  4. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: a facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, C M; Brookhart, M; Clark, M; Collins, C; Ding, W X; Flanagan, K; Khalzov, I; Li, Y; Milhone, J; Nornberg, M; Nonn, P; Weisberg, D; Whyte, D G; Zweibel, E; Forest, C B

    2013-01-01

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and other high-$\\beta$ phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains $\\sim$14 m$^{3}$ of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized $(>50\\%)$. At present, up to 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB$_6$) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB$_6$ cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through ${\\bf J}\\times{\\bf B}$ torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies...

  5. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: A facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C. M.; Wallace, J.; Brookhart, M.; Clark, M.; Collins, C.; Ding, W. X.; Flanagan, K.; Khalzov, I.; Li, Y.; Milhone, J.; Nornberg, M.; Nonn, P.; Weisberg, D.; Whyte, D. G.; Zweibel, E.; Forest, C. B.

    2014-01-01

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and other high-β phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets, which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains ˜14 m3 of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized (>50%). At present, 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB6 cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through J × B torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies on MPDX require a high magnetic Reynolds number Rm > 1000, and an adjustable fluid Reynolds number 10 1). Initial results from MPDX are presented along with a 0-dimensional power and particle balance model to predict the viscosity and resistivity to achieve dynamo action.

  6. Stability of current-driven electrostatic waves in a magnetized and collisional negative ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopal, Chandu; Varghese, Anu; S, Jyothi [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadarshini Hills, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India); Issac, Molly [Department of Physics, All Saints' College, Thiruvananthapuram 695 007, Kerala (India); Renuka, G [Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India)], E-mail: cvgmgphys@yahoo.co.in

    2008-10-15

    The stability of electrostatic waves, propagating nearly parallel to a uniform external magnetic field, is studied in a fully ionized, collisional plasma of positive and negative ions and a field-aligned current of drifting electrons. Expressions have been derived for the dispersion relation and growth rate using fluid theory and retaining the collisional and conductivity terms for the electrons. The plasma can, in general, support two modes, which have frequencies that are a composite of the ion acoustic and ion gyro frequencies. The growth rate of the modes increases with increasing drift velocities of the electrons and decreases with increasing negative ion densities.

  7. The AMPTE/CCE Hot-Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, E. G.; Ghielmetti, A.; Hertzberg, E.; Battel, S. J.; Altwegg-Von Burg, K.; Balsiger, H.

    1985-01-01

    The Hot-Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) on the AMPTE-CCE spacecraft consists of an energetic ions-mass spectrometer and an electron background-environment monitor (EBEM). The mass spectrometer covers the entire mass per charge range from below 1 to greater than 150 amu/e and the energy per charge range from 0 eV/e (spacecraft potential) to 17 keV/e. The EBEM measures electrons between 50 eV and 25 keV in eight broad energy bands. The ion and electron data are processed into color spectrogram formats for the data pool.

  8. The AMPTE/CCE Hot-Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, E. G.; Ghielmetti, A.; Hertzberg, E.; Battel, S. J.; Altwegg-von Burg, K.; Balsiger, H.

    1985-05-01

    The Hot-Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) on the AMPTE-CCE spacecraft consists of an energetic ions-mass spectrometer and an electron background-environment monitor (EBEM). The mass spectrometer covers the entire mass per charge range from below 1 to greater than 150 amu/e and the energy per charge range from 0 eV/e (spacecraft potential) to 17 keV/e. The EBEM measures electrons between 50 eV and 25 keV in eight broad energy bands. The ion and electron data are processed into color spectrogram formats for the data pool.

  9. Quark-Gluon Plasma: from accelerator experiments to early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Rosnet, P

    2015-01-01

    In the Big Bang scenario, the early Universe is characterized by the {\\it particle era}, i.e. a Universe made of particles. This period connects both scales of fundamental physics: infinitesimally small and infinitely large. So, particle physics and in particular experimental programs at accelerators can bring valuable inputs for the understanding of the early Universe and its evolution. These proceedings discuss the impact of the Quantum ChromoDynamics phase transition experienced by the {\\it particle era} in the expanding Universe, which is connected to the study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma produced in heavy-ion physics experiments.

  10. Non-equilibrium plasma experiments at The Pennsylvania State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Sean; Bilen, Sven; Micci, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The authors have recently established the capability at The Pennsylvania State University to generate non-equilibrium plasma in atmospheric-pressure air and liquids such as water and saline. The plasma is generated using a high-voltage pulser (Pacific-Electronics PT-55), which is capable of voltage pulses of 75-ns width, peak voltage >50 kV, with rise-times on the order of nanoseconds. The electrodes are tungsten wires of various diameters (50 μm, 175 μm, 254 μm) insulated with nylon tubing. The spacing of the electrodes is controlled with translating mounts with resolution of tens of microns. Spectroscopy (Ocean Optics Model HR2000) is presently used for line identification only. Current and voltage vs. time will be measured with a 500-MHz bandwidth oscilloscope, a high-voltage probe and a shunt resistor connected to the ground side of the circuit. Research directions presently being pursued include the effects of solution electrical conductivity on plasma production and propellant ignition studies. Data from several types of experiments will be presented.

  11. Relaunch of the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, A.; Rusaitis, L.; Zwicker, A.; Stotler, D. P.

    2015-11-01

    In the late 1990's PPPL's Science Education Department developed an innovative online site called the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX). It featured (among other modules) two Java based applications which simulated tokamak physics: A steady state tokamak (SST) and a time dependent tokamak (TDT). The physics underlying the SST and the TDT are based on the ASPECT code which is a global power balance code developed to evaluate the performance of fusion reactor designs. We have relaunched the IPPEX site with updated modules and functionalities: The site itself is now dynamic on all platforms. The graphic design of the site has been modified to current standards. The virtual tokamak programming has been redone in Javascript, taking advantage of the speed and compactness of the code. The GUI of the tokamak has been completely redesigned, including more intuitive representations of changes in the plasma, e.g., particles moving along magnetic field lines. The use of GPU accelerated computation provides accurate and smooth visual representations of the plasma. We will present the current version of IPPEX as well near term plans of incorporating real time NSTX-U data into the simulation.

  12. Flowing dusty plasma experiments: generation of flow and measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-12-01

    A variety of experimental techniques for the generation of subsonic/supersonic dust fluid flows and means of measuring such flow velocities are presented. The experiments have been carried out in a \\Pi -shaped dusty plasma experimental device with micron size kaolin/melamine formaldehyde particles embedded in a background of argon plasma created by a direct current glow discharge. A stationary dust cloud is formed over the cathode region by precisely balancing the pumping speed and gas flow rate. A flow of dust particles/fluid is generated by additional gas injection from a single or dual locations or by altering the dust confining potential. The flow velocity is then estimated by three different techniques, namely, by super particle identification code, particle image velocimetry analysis and the excitation of dust acoustic waves. The results obtained from these three different techniques along with their merits and demerits are discussed. An estimation of the neutral drag force responsible for the generation as well as the attenuation of the dust fluid flow is made. These techniques can be usefully employed in laboratory devices to investigate linear and non-linear collective excitations in a flowing dusty plasma.

  13. Magnetic helicity balance in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, B. W.; Hooper, E. B.; Woodruff, S.; Bulmer, R. H.; Hill, D. N.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.

    2003-07-01

    The magnetic helicity balance between the helicity input injected by a magnetized coaxial gun, the rate-of-change in plasma helicity content, and helicity dissipation in electrode sheaths and Ohmic losses have been examined in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment (SSPX) [E. B. Hooper, L. D. Pearlstein, and R. H. Bulmer, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)]. Helicity is treated as a flux function in the mean-field approximation, allowing separation of helicity drive and losses between closed and open field volumes. For nearly sustained spheromak plasmas with low fluctuations, helicity balance analysis implies a decreasing transport of helicity from the gun input into the spheromak core at higher spheromak electron temperature. Long pulse discharges with continuously increasing helicity and larger fluctuations show higher helicity coupling from the edge to the spheromak core. The magnitude of the sheath voltage drop, inferred from cathode heating and a current threshold dependence of the gun voltage, shows that sheath losses are important and reduce the helicity injection efficiency in SSPX.

  14. Simulating the magnetized liner inertial fusion plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments [Simulating the MagLIF plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cuneo, M. E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herrmann, M. C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sinars, D. B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Slutz, S. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-06-20

    The recently proposed magnetized liner inertial fusion approach to a Z-pinch driven fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 056303 (2010)] is based on the use of an axial magnetic field to provide plasma thermal insulation from the walls of the imploding liner. The characteristic plasma transport regimes in the proposed approach cover parameter domains that have not been studied yet in either magnetic confinement or inertial confinement experiments. In this article, an analysis is presented of the scalability of the key physical processes that determine the plasma confinement. The dimensionless scaling parameters are identified and conclusion is drawn that the plasma behavior in scaled-down experiments can correctly represent the full-scale plasma, provided these parameters are approximately the same in two systems. Furthermore, this observation is important in that smaller-scale experiments typically have better diagnostic access and more experiments per year are possible.

  15. Stability and Variability in Aesthetic Experience: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas; Beudt, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Based on psychophysics’ pragmatic dualism, we trace the cognitive neuroscience of stability and variability in aesthetic experience. With regard to different domains of aesthetic processing, we touch upon the relevance of cognitive schemata for aesthetic preference. Attitudes and preferences are explored in detail. Evolutionary constraints on attitude formation or schema generation are elucidated, just as the often seemingly arbitrary influences of social, societal, and cultural nature are. A particular focus is put on the concept of critical periods during an individual’s ontogenesis. The latter contrasting with changes of high frequency, such as fashion influences. Taken together, these analyses document the state of the art in the field and, potentially, highlight avenues for future research. PMID:28223955

  16. Stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in quantum magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; He, X. T. [HEDPS and CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Yang, B. L. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Graduate School, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2012-07-15

    In this research, stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) due to density gradients, magnetic fields, and quantum effects, in an ideal incompressible plasma, is studied analytically and numerically. A second-order ordinary differential equation (ODE) for the RTI including quantum corrections, with a continuous density profile, in a uniform external magnetic field, is obtained. Analytic expressions of the linear growth rate of the RTI, considering modifications of density gradients, magnetic fields, and quantum effects, are presented. Numerical approaches are performed to solve the second-order ODE. The analytical model proposed here agrees with the numerical calculation. It is found that the density gradients, the magnetic fields, and the quantum effects, respectively, have a stabilizing effect on the RTI (reduce the linear growth of the RTI). The RTI can be completely quenched by the magnetic field stabilization and/or the quantum effect stabilization in proper circumstances leading to a cutoff wavelength. The quantum effect stabilization plays a central role in systems with large Atwood number and small normalized density gradient scale length. The presence of external transverse magnetic fields beside the quantum effects will bring about more stability on the RTI. The stabilization of the linear growth of the RTI, for parameters closely related to inertial confinement fusion and white dwarfs, is discussed. Results could potentially be valuable for the RTI treatment to analyze the mixing in supernovas and other RTI-driven objects.

  17. The Stability of Weakly Collisional Plasmas with Thermal and Composition Gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Pessah, Martin E; 10.1088/0004-637X/764/1/13

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, substantial efforts have been devoted to understanding the stability properties, transport phenomena, and long-term evolution of weakly-collisional, magnetized plasmas which are stratified in temperature. These studies have improved our understanding of the physics governing the intra-cluster medium (ICM), but assumed that ICM is a homogeneous. This, however, might not be a good approximation if heavy elements sediment in the inner region of the galaxy cluster. In this paper, we analyze the stability of a weakly-collisional, magnetized plane-parallel atmosphere which is stratified in both temperature and composition. This allows us to discuss for the first time the dynamics of weakly-collisional environments where heat conduction, momentum transport, and ion-diffusion are anisotropic with respect to the direction of the magnetic field. We show that, depending on the relative signs and magnitudes of the gradients in the temperature and the mean molecular weight, the plasma can be subject ...

  18. ISEE-1 data reduction and analysis plasma composition experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, W.; Sharp, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The plasma composition experiment covers energies from OeV to 17 keV/e and has a mass-per-charge range from less than 1 to about 150 amu. Measurements were made from the inner ring current region to the plasma sheet, magnetotail lobes, and the magnetopause boundary layers and beyond. Possibly the most significant results from the experiment are those related to energetic (0+) ions of terrestrial origin. These ions are found in every region of the magnetosphere reached by the spacecraft and can have energy and pitch-angle distributions that are similar to those traditionally associated with protons of solar wind origin. The (0+) ions are commonly the most numerous ions in the 0.1 - 17 keV/e energy range and are often a substantial part of the ion population at large distances as well, especially during geomagnetically disturbed conditions. An overview of results obtained for the (0+) and other ions with energies in the 0.1 - 17 keV/e range in the magnetosphere is given.

  19. ISEE-1 data reduction and analysis plasma composition experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, W.; Sharp, R. D.

    1985-03-01

    The plasma composition experiment covers energies from OeV to 17 keV/e and has a mass-per-charge range from less than 1 to about 150 amu. Measurements were made from the inner ring current region to the plasma sheet, magnetotail lobes, and the magnetopause boundary layers and beyond. Possibly the most significant results from the experiment are those related to energetic (0+) ions of terrestrial origin. These ions are found in every region of the magnetosphere reached by the spacecraft and can have energy and pitch-angle distributions that are similar to those traditionally associated with protons of solar wind origin. The (0+) ions are commonly the most numerous ions in the 0.1 - 17 keV/e energy range and are often a substantial part of the ion population at large distances as well, especially during geomagnetically disturbed conditions. An overview of results obtained for the (0+) and other ions with energies in the 0.1 - 17 keV/e range in the magnetosphere is given.

  20. Measurement of stability of electron beam generated by laser-driven plasma-based accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, S; Miura, E; Koyama, K; Kato, S [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)], E-mail: shi-masuda@aist.go.jp

    2008-05-01

    Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams with the energy of 30-80 MeV and large number of electrons more than 10{sup 8} were produced by focusing a 8TW, 50 fs Ti:sapphire laser pulse onto 1.6-1.9 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} plasmas. Stability of the quasi-monoenergetic electron beam generation was evaluated using an in-situ observation system for the electron beam diagnostics.

  1. Adhesion and receptor clustering stabilizes lateral heterogeneity in cell plasma membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    The thermodynamic properties of plasma membrane lipids play a vital role in many functions that initiate at the mammalian cell surface. Some functions are thought to occur, at least in part, because plasma membrane lipids have a tendency to separate into two distinct liquid phases, called liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered. We find that isolated cell plasma membranes are poised near a miscibility critical point separating these two liquid phases, and postulate that critical composition fluctuations provide the physical basis of functional membrane heterogeneity in intact cells. In this talk I will describe several possible mechanisms through which dynamic fluctuations can be stabilized in super-critical membranes, and will present some preliminary evidence suggesting that these structures can be visualized in intact cells using quantitative super-resolution fluorescence localization imaging.

  2. Stability study of Prulifloxacin and Ulifloxacin in human plasma by HPLC-DAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Marcello; Cifelli, Roberta; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Romagnoli, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    A new and specific HPLC-DAD method for the direct determination of Prulifloxacin and its active metabolite, Ulifloxacin, in human plasma has been developed. Plasma samples were analysed after a simple solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up using a new HILIC stationary phase based high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) column and an ammonium acetate buffer (5 mM, pH 5.8)/acetonitrile (both with 1% Et(3)N, v/v) mobile phase in isocratic elution mode, with Danofloxacin as the internal standard. Detection was performed using DAD from 200 to 500 nm and quantitative analyses were carried out at 278 nm. The LOQ of the method was 1 μg/mL of the cited analytes and the calibration curve showed a good linearity up to 25 μg/mL. For both analytes the precision (RSD%) and the trueness (bias%) of the method fulfil with International Guidelines. The method was applied for stability studies, at three QC concentration levels, in human plasma samples stored at different temperature of + 25, + 4 and -20 °C in order to evaluate plasma stability profiles.

  3. Stability of magnetite nanoparticles with different coatings in a simulated blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favela-Camacho, Sarai E.; Pérez-Robles, J. Francisco; García-Casillas, Perla E.; Godinez-Garcia, Andrés

    2016-07-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) have demonstrated to be a potential platform for simultaneous anticancer drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, magnetite is unstable at the blood plasma conditions. Therefore, to study their stability in a broad range of particle size, the MNPs were synthesized using two methods, the fast injection co-precipitation method (FIC) and the reflux co-precipitation method (RC). The MNPs obtained by the RC and the FIC methods have an average size of agglomerates of 200 and 45 nm respectively. They were dispersed using sodium citrate as surfactant and were coated with silica and chitosan. A total of four kind of coated MNPs were synthesized: magnetite/sodium citrate, magnetite/silica, magnetite/sodium citrate/silica and magnetite/sodium citrate/silica/chitosan. Different samples of the coated MNPs were immersed in a simulated blood plasma solution (Phosphate-Buffered Saline, PBS, Gibco®), for periods of 24, 48 and 72 h. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) technique was used to analyze the composition of the simulated plasma after those periods of time. The obtained results suggest that the uncoated samples showed an appreciable weight loss, and the iron composition in the simulated plasma increased. This last means that the used coatings avoid iron dissolution from the MNPs.

  4. Stability studies of plasma modification effects of polylactide and polycaprolactone surface layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraczewski, Krzysztof, E-mail: kmm@ukw.edu.pl [Kazimierz Wielki University, Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Stepczyńska, Magdalena [Kazimierz Wielki University, Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Malinowski, Rafał [Institute for Engineering of Polymer Materials and Dyes, Marii Skłodowskiej-Curie 55, 87‐100 Toruń (Poland); Rytlewski, Piotr; Jagodziński, Bartłomiej; Żenkiewicz, Marian [Kazimierz Wielki University, Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    2016-07-30

    Highlights: • Plasma modification affects surface roughness, wettability and surface energy. • Polylactide and polycaprolactone aging causes decay of the modification effects. • Changes in the surface characteristic and wettability deterioration were observed. • The decay occurs due to migration of low molecular weight molecules to the surface. • Plasma modification effect lasts longer in the case of polycaprolactone. - Abstract: The article presents results of research on the stability of oxygen plasma modification effects of polylactide and polycaprolactone surface layers. The modified samples were aged for three, six or nine weeks. The studies were carried out using scanning electron microscopy, goniometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Studies have shown that the plasma modification has significant impact on the geometric structure and chemical composition of the surface, wettability and surface energy of tested polymers. The modification effects are not permanent. It has been observed that over time the effects of plasma modification fade. Studies have shown that modifying effect lasts longer in the case of polycaprolactone.

  5. Cryogenic heat loads analysis from SST-1 plasma experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairagi, N.; Tanna, V. L.; Pradhan, S.

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic heat load analysis is an important aspect for stable operation of Tokamaks employing large scale superconducting magnets. Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) at IPR is equipped with superconducting magnets system (SCMS) comprising sixteen numbers of modified ‘D’ shaped toroidal field (TF) and nine poloidal field (PF) superconducting coils which are wound using NbTi/Cu based cable-in conduit conductor (CICC). SST-1 magnets operation has flexibility to cool either in two-phase with sub-cooling, two-phase without sub-cooling or single phase (supercritical) helium using a dedicated 1.3 kW helium refrigerator cum liquefier (HRL). Here, we report gross heat losses for integrated TF superconducting magnets of SST-1 during the plasma campaign using cryogenic helium supply/return thermodynamic data from cryoplant. Heat loads mainly comprising of steady state as well as transient loads are smoothly absorbed by SST-1 cryogenic helium plant during plasma experiments. The corresponding heat produced in the coils is totally released to the helium flowing through the TF coils, which in turn is dumped into liquid helium stored in main control Dewar. These results are very useful reference for heat loss analysis for TF as well as PF coils and provides database for future operation of SST-1 machine.

  6. Flowing dusty plasma experiments: Generation of flow and measurement techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, S; Sen, A

    2016-01-01

    A variety of experimental techniques for the generation of subsonic/supersonic dust fluid flows and means of measuring such flow velocities are presented. The experiments have been carried out in a $\\Pi-$shaped Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device with micron size kaolin/Melamine Formaldehyde (MF) particles embedded in a background of Argon plasma created by a direct current (DC) glow discharge. A stationary dust cloud is formed over the cathode region by precisely balancing the pumping speed and gas flow rate. A flow of dust particles/fluid is generated by additional gas injection from a single or dual locations or by altering the dust confining potential. The flow velocity is then estimated by three different techniques, namely, by super Particle Identification (sPIT) code, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) analysis and the excitation of Dust Acoustic Waves (DAWs). The results obtained from these three different techniques along with their merits and demerits are discussed. An estimation of the neutral dr...

  7. Experimental research on electrical propulsion. Note 2: Experimental research on a plasma jet with vortex type stabilization for propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotti, A. C.; Oggero, M.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental electric propulsion research are presented. A plasma generator, with an arc stabilized by an air vortex is examined. The heat transfer efficiency between arc and fluid environment at a varying current and flow rate is discussed.

  8. Detection of inverse Compton scattering in plasma wakefield experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohlen, Simon

    2016-12-15

    Inverse Compton scattering (ICS) is the process of scattering of photons and electrons, where the photons gain a part of the electrons energy. In combination with plasma wakefield acceleration (PWA), ICS offers a compact MeV γ-ray source. A numerical study of ICS radiation produced in PWA experiments at FLASHForward was performed, using an ICS simulation code and the results from particle-in-cell modelling. The possibility of determining electron beam properties from measurements of the γ-ray source was explored for a wide range of experimental conditions. It was found that information about the electron divergence, the electron spectrum and longitudinal information can be obtained from measurements of the ICS beams for some cases. For the measurement of the ICS profile at FLASHForward, a CsI(Tl) scintillator array was chosen, similar to scintillators used in other ICS experiments. To find a suitable detector for spectrum measurements, an experimental test of a Compton spectrometer at the RAL was conducted. This test showed that a similar spectrometer could also be used at FLASHForward. However, changes to the spectrometer could be needed in order to use the pair production effect. In addition, further studies using Geant4 could lead to a better reconstruction of the obtained data. The studies presented here show that ICS is a promising method to analyse electron parameters from PWA experiments in further detail.

  9. Interrelationship between Plasma Experiments in the Laboratory and in Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, Mark E. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Funds were expended to offset the travel costs of three students and three postdoctoral research associates to participate in and present work at the 2015 International Workshop on the Interrelationship between Plasma Experiments in the Laboratory and in Space (IPELS2015), 23-28 August 2015, Pitlochry, Scotland, UK. Selection was priority-ranked by lab-space engagement, first, and topic relevance, second. Supplementary selection preference was applied to under-represented populations, applicants lacking available travel-resources in their home research group, applicants unusually distant from the conference venue, and the impact of the applicant’s attendance in increasing the diversity of conference participation. One support letter per student was required. The letters described the specific benefit of IPELS2015 to the student dissertation or the postdoc career development, and document the evidence for the ordering criteria.

  10. Plasma Jog Experiments on MRX in Collaboration with MMS team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masaaki; Yoo, Jongsoo; Tharp, Tim; Ji, Hantao; Lawrence, Eric

    2011-10-01

    In the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX), a multi-probe mock-up system is utilized to investigate the fine structure of the diffusion region of the reconnection layer and to identify data signatures which indicate the nearby presence of a reconnection neutral sheet. The reconnection layer is swept through the probe system in controlled speeds of 0.01-0.2 of the Alfvén velocity. This situation is very similar to the space measurements in which the current sheet moves with respect to satellites as expected in the Magnetosphere Multi-scale Satellite (MMS) cluster configuration. The main objectives of the proposed joint research are (1) to compare basic properties of the reconnection regions in the neutral sheet of space and laboratory plasmas, (2) to study their roles in the process of magnetic reconnection, and (3) to measure fine scale profiles of the thin electron diffusion layer. A series of the first results from the experimental campaign are presented.

  11. Understanding Solar Coronal Heating through Atomic and Plasma Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Daniel Wolf; Arthanayaka, Thusitha; Bose, Sayak; Hahn, Michael; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Gekelman, Walter; Vincena, Steve

    2017-08-01

    Recent solar observations suggest that the Sun's corona is heated by Alfven waves that dissipate at unexpectedly low heights in the corona. These observations raise a number of questions. Among them are the problems of accurately quantifying the energy flux of the waves and that of describing the physical mechanism that leads to the wave damping. We are performing laboratory experiments to address both of these issues.The energy flux depends on the electron density, which can be measured spectroscopically. However, spectroscopic density diagnostics have large uncertainties, because they depend sensitively on atomic collisional excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transition rates for multiple atomic levels. Essentially all of these data come from theory and have not been experimentally validated. We are conducting laboratory experiments using the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that will provide accurate empirical calibrations for spectroscopic density diagnostics and which will also help to guide theoretical calculations.The observed rapid wave dissipation is likely due to inhomogeneities in the plasma that drive flows and currents at small length scales where energy can be more efficiently dissipated. This may take place through gradients in the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, which causes wave reflection and generates turbulence. Alternatively, gradients in the Alfvén speed across the field can lead to dissipation through phase-mixing. Using the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California Los Angeles, we are studying both of these dissipation mechanisms in the laboratory in order to understand their potential roles in coronal heating.

  12. Scaling of the Sheared-Flow Stabilized Z-Pinch: The Fusion Z-Pinch Experiment ``FuZE''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, B. A.; Shumlak, U.; Claveau, E. L.; Golingo, R. P.; Weber, T. R.; McLean, H. S.; Tummel, K. K.; Higginson, D. P.; Schmidt, A. E.; UW/LLNL Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The sheared flow stabilized (SFS) Z-pinch ZaP experiment was constructed based on calculations [1] showing stabilization of kink and sausage instabilities. ZaP experimentally demonstrated production and sustainment of an SFS Z-pinch for a wide range of plasma parameters, with densities up to n =1023 m-3 and a pinch radius of a = 1 cm. [2-4] The SFS Z-pinch is resistant to the instabilities of conventional Z-pinches, yet maintains the same favorable radial scaling, making it an energy-efficient way to achieve fusion-relevant conditions. The ZaP-HD (high density) experiment has demonstrated scaling of the SFS Z-pinch to 2-3 × smaller a and 10 × higher n. [5] Supported by ZaP and ZaP-HD, the Fusion Z-pinch Experiment (FuZE) project investigates scaling plasma parameters toward fusion conditions by decreasing a 2-3 × to 1 mm, and increasing n 10 × to 1025 m-3. The approach combines improved gas injection and flexible power supplies with the successful ZaP SFS Z-pinch formation. Detailed fluid and kinetic simulations complement the experimental studies to gain scientific insight into the plasma behavior and predict scaling to higher performance. Supported by DoE FES, NNSA, and ARPA-E ALPHA.

  13. Schlieren, Phase-Contrast, and Spectroscopy Diagnostics for the LBNL HIF Plasma Channel Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, D. M.; Niemann, C.; Fessenden, T. J.; Leemans, W.; Vandersloot, K.; Dahlbacka, G.; Yu, S. S.; Sharp, W. M.; Tauschwitz, A.

    1999-11-01

    The LBNL Plasma Channel experiment has demonstrated stable 42-cm Z-pinch discharge plasma channels with peak currents in excess of 50 kA for a 7 torr nitrogen, 30 kV discharge. These channels offer the possibility of transporting heavy-ion beams for inertial fusion. We postulate that the stability of these channels resides in the existance of a neutral-gas density depresion created by a pre-pulse discharge before the main capacitor bank discharge is created. Here, we present the results and experimental diagnostics setup used for the study of the pre-pulse and main bank channels. Observation of both the plasma and neutral gas dynamics is achieved. Schlieren, Zernike's phase-contrast, and spectroscopic techniques are used. Preliminary Schlieren results show a gas shockwave moving radially at a rate of ≈ 10^6 mm/sec as a result of the fast and localized deposited energy during the evolution of the pre-pulse channel. This data will be used to validate simulation codes (BUCKY and CYCLOPS).

  14. Results from D-T Experiments on TFTR and Implications for Achieving an Ignited Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J. and the TFTR Group

    1998-07-14

    Progress in the performance of tokamak devices has enabled not only the production of significant bursts of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET) but, more importantly, the initial study of the physics of burning magnetically confined plasmas. As a result of the worldwide research on tokamaks, the scientific and technical issues for achieving an ignited plasma are better understood and the remaining questions more clearly defined. The principal research topics which have been studied on TFTR are transport, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and energetic particle confinement. The integration of separate solutions to problems in each of these research areas has also been of major interest. Although significant advances, such as the reduction of turbulent transport by means of internal transport barriers, identification of the theoretically predicted bootstrap current, and the study of the confinement of energetic fusion alpha-particles have been made, interesting and important scientific and technical issues remain for achieving a magnetic fusion energy reactor. In this paper, the implications of the TFTR experiments for overcoming these remaining issues will be discussed.

  15. Results from D-T experiments on TFTR and implications for achieving an ignited plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Blanchard, W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)] [and others

    1998-07-01

    Progress in the performance of tokamak devices has enable not only the production of significant bursts of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET) but, more importantly, the initial study of the physics of burning magnetically confined plasmas. As a result of the worldwide research on tokamaks, the scientific and technical issues for achieving an ignited plasma are better understood and the remaining questions more clearly defined. The principal research topics which have been studied on TFTR are transport, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and energetic particle confinement. The integration of separate solutions to problems in each of these research areas has also been of major interest. Although significant advances, such as the reduction of turbulent transport by means of internal transport barriers, identification of the theoretically predicted bootstrap current, and the study of the confinement of energetic fusion alpha-particles have been made, interesting and important scientific and technical issues remain. In this paper, the implications for the TFTR experiments for overcoming these remaining issues will be discussed.

  16. Design concept of conducting shell and in-vessel components suitable for plasma vertical stability and remote maintenance scheme in DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utoh, Hiroyasu, E-mail: uto.hiroyasu@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); International Fusion Energy Research Centre, 2-166, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Takase, Haruhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); International Fusion Energy Research Centre, 2-166, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Tobita, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); Mori, Kazuo; Kudo, Tatsuya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); International Fusion Energy Research Centre, 2-166, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Someya, Youji; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Hoshino, Kazuo; Nakamura, Makoto; Tokunaga, Shinsuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Conceptual design of in-vessel component including conducting shell has been investigated. • The conducting shell design for plasma vertical stability was clarified from the plasma vertical stability analysis. • The calculation results showed that the double-loop shell has the most effect on plasma vertical stability. - Abstract: In order to realize a feasible DEMO, we designed an in-vessel component including the conducting shell. The project is affiliated with the broader approach DEMO design activities and is conceptualized from a plasma vertical stability and engineering viewpoint. The dependence of the plasma vertical stability on the conducing shell parameters and the electromagnetic force at plasma disruption were investigated in numerical simulations (programmed in the 3D eddy current analysis code and a plasma position control code). The simulations assumed the actual shape and position of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components. The plasma vertical stability was most effectively maintained by the double-loop shell.

  17. Stabilizing the cold plasma-stimulated medium by regulating medium’s composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dayun; Nourmohammadi, Niki; Bian, Ka; Murad, Ferid; Sherman, Jonathan H.; Keidar, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Over past several years, the cold plasma-stimulated medium (PSM) has shown its remarkable anti-cancer capacity in par with the direct cold plasma irradiation on cancer cells or tumor tissues. Independent of the cold plasma device, PSM has noticeable advantage of being a flexible platform in cancer treatment. Currently, the largest disadvantage of PSM is its degradation during the storage over a wide temperature range. So far, to stabilize PSM, it must be remained frozen at ‑80 °C. In this study, we first reveal that the degradation of PSM is mainly due to the reaction between the reactive species and specific amino acids; mainly cysteine and methionine in medium. Based on this finding, both H2O2 in PSM and the anti-cancer capacity of PSM can be significantly stabilized during the storage at 8 °C and ‑25 °C for at least 3 days by using phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and cysteine/methionine-free Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM). In addition, we demonstrate that adding a tyrosine derivative, 3-Nitro-L-tyrosine, into DMEM can mitigate the degradation of PSM at 8 °C during 3 days of storage. This study provides a solid foundation for the future anti-cancer application of PSM.

  18. Stabilizing the cold plasma-stimulated medium by regulating medium's composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dayun; Nourmohammadi, Niki; Bian, Ka; Murad, Ferid; Sherman, Jonathan H; Keidar, Michael

    2016-05-13

    Over past several years, the cold plasma-stimulated medium (PSM) has shown its remarkable anti-cancer capacity in par with the direct cold plasma irradiation on cancer cells or tumor tissues. Independent of the cold plasma device, PSM has noticeable advantage of being a flexible platform in cancer treatment. Currently, the largest disadvantage of PSM is its degradation during the storage over a wide temperature range. So far, to stabilize PSM, it must be remained frozen at -80 °C. In this study, we first reveal that the degradation of PSM is mainly due to the reaction between the reactive species and specific amino acids; mainly cysteine and methionine in medium. Based on this finding, both H2O2 in PSM and the anti-cancer capacity of PSM can be significantly stabilized during the storage at 8 °C and -25 °C for at least 3 days by using phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and cysteine/methionine-free Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM). In addition, we demonstrate that adding a tyrosine derivative, 3-Nitro-L-tyrosine, into DMEM can mitigate the degradation of PSM at 8 °C during 3 days of storage. This study provides a solid foundation for the future anti-cancer application of PSM.

  19. Receptor dimer stabilization by hierarchical plasma membrane microcompartments regulates cytokine signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Changjiang; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T; Richter, Christian Paolo; Wilmes, Stephan; Moraga, Ignacio; Garcia, K Christopher; Leier, André; Piehler, Jacob

    2016-12-01

    The interaction dynamics of signaling complexes is emerging as a key determinant that regulates the specificity of cellular responses. We present a combined experimental and computational study that quantifies the consequences of plasma membrane microcompartmentalization for the dynamics of type I interferon receptor complexes. By using long-term dual-color quantum dot (QD) tracking, we found that the lifetime of individual ligand-induced receptor heterodimers depends on the integrity of the membrane skeleton (MSK), which also proved important for efficient downstream signaling. By pair correlation tracking and localization microscopy as well as by fast QD tracking, we identified a secondary confinement within ~300-nm-sized zones. A quantitative spatial stochastic diffusion-reaction model, entirely parameterized on the basis of experimental data, predicts that transient receptor confinement by the MSK meshwork allows for rapid reassociation of dissociated receptor dimers. Moreover, the experimentally observed apparent stabilization of receptor dimers in the plasma membrane was reproduced by simulations of a refined, hierarchical compartment model. Our simulations further revealed that the two-dimensional association rate constant is a key parameter for controlling the extent of MSK-mediated stabilization of protein complexes, thus ensuring the specificity of this effect. Together, experimental evidence and simulations support the hypothesis that passive receptor confinement by MSK-based microcompartmentalization promotes maintenance of signaling complexes in the plasma membrane.

  20. Small scale experiment on the plasma assisted thermal chemical preparation and combustion of pulverized coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaya, Sugimoto; Koichi, Takeda [Akita Prefectural University (Japan); Solonenko, O.P. [Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sakashita, M.; Nakamura, M. [Japan Technical Information Service, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Ignition and stable combustion of pulverized coal with Nitrogen and Air plasmas are investigated experimentally for some different types of coal. The experimental results show that air plasma has strong effect for ignition and stabilization of coal combustion. In addition, suppression of NO{sub x} production could be possible even in air plasma. It is possible to ignite and burn stably for the inferior coal that contains volatile matter in the ratio of only 10% of dry total mass. (authors)

  1. Small satellite attitude determination during plasma brake deorbiting experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Osama; Selkäinaho, Jorma; Soken, Halil Ersin; Kallio, Esa; Visala, Arto

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a study on attitude estimation during the Plasma Brake Experiment (PBE) onboard a small satellite. The PBE demands that the satellite be spun at a very high angular velocity, up to 200 deg/s, to deploy the tether using centrifugal force. The spin controller, based on purely magnetic actuation, and the PBE demands accurate attitude estimation for the successful execution of the experiment. The biases are important to be estimated onboard small satellites due to the closely integrated systems and relatively higher interference experienced by the sensors. However, bias estimation is even more important for PBE due to the presence of a high voltage unit, onboard the satellite, that is used to charge the tether and can be the source of interference. The attitude and the biases, when estimated simultaneously, results in an augmented state vector that poses a challenge to the proper tuning of process noise. The adaptation of process noise covariance has, therefore, been studied and analysed for the challenging PBE. It has been observed that adapting the process noise covariance improves the estimation accuracy during the spin-up phase. Therefore, it is very important to use adaptive process noise covariance estimation.

  2. Internal Transport Barrier Broadening through Subdominant Mode Stabilization in Reversed Field Pinch Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, R.; Auriemma, F.; Fassina, A.; Martines, E.; Terranova, D.; Sattin, F.

    2016-05-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) device RFX-mod features strong internal transport barriers when the plasma accesses states with a single dominant helicity. Such transport barriers enclose a hot helical region with high confinement whose amplitude may vary from a tiny one to an amplitude encompassing an appreciable fraction of the available volume. The transition from narrow to wide thermal structures has been ascribed so far to the transport reduction that occurs when the dominant mode separatrix, which is a preferred location for the onset of stochastic field lines, disappears. In this Letter we show instead that the contribution from the separatrix disappearance, by itself, is marginal and the main role is instead played by the progressive stabilization of secondary modes. The position and the width of the stochastic boundary encompassing the thermal structures have been estimated by applying the concept of a 3D quasiseparatrix layer, developed in solar physics to treat reconnection phenomena without true separatrices and novel to toroidal laboratory plasmas. Considering the favorable scaling of secondary modes with the Lundquist number, these results open promising scenarios for RFP plasmas at temperatures higher than the presently achieved ones, where lower secondary modes and, consequently, larger thermal structures are expected. Furthermore, this first application of the quasiseparatrix layer to a toroidal plasma indicates that such a concept is ubiquitous in magnetic reconnection, independent of the system geometry under investigation.

  3. RF plasma enhanced MOCVD of yttria stabilized zirconia thin films using octanedionate precursors and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopade, S.S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Nayak, C.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Jha, S.N.; Tokas, R.B.; Sahoo, N.K. [Atomic & Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Deo, M.N. [High Pressure & Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Biswas, A. [Atomic & Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Rai, Sanjay [Indus Synchrotron Utilization Division, RRCAT, Indore 452013 (India); Thulasi Raman, K.H.; Rao, G.M. [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Kumar, Niranjan [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Patil, D.S., E-mail: dspatil@iitb.ac.in [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • YSZ films are deposited by RF plasma MOCVD using Zr(tod){sub 4} and Y(tod){sub 3} precursors. • Films are deposited under the influence of RF self-bias on the substrates. • Films are characterized by different techniques. • Films properties are dependent on yttria content and film structure. - Abstract: Yttria stabilized zirconia thin films have been deposited by RF plasma enhanced MOCVD technique on silicon substrates at substrate temperature of 400 °C. Plasma of precursor vapors of (2,7,7-trimethyl-3,5-octanedionate) yttrium (known as Y(tod){sub 3}), (2,7,7-trimethyl-3,5-octanedionate) zirconium (known as Zr(tod){sub 4}), oxygen and argon gases is used for deposition. To the best of our knowledge, plasma assisted MOCVD of YSZ films using octanediaonate precursors have not been reported in the literature so far. The deposited films have been characterized by GIXRD, FTIR, XPS, FESEM, AFM, XANES, EXAFS, EDAX and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Thickness of the films has been measured by stylus profilometer while tribological property measurement has been done to study mechanical behavior of the coatings. Characterization by different techniques indicates that properties of the films are dependent on the yttria content as well as on the structure of the films.

  4. Plasma etching to enhance the surface insulating stability of alumina for fusion applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Malo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A significant increase in the surface electrical conductivity of alumina, considered one of the most promising insulating materials for numerous applications in fusion devices, has been observed during ion bombardment in vacuum due to oxygen loss by preferential sputtering. Although this is expected to cause serious limitations to insulating components functionality, recent studies showed it is possible to restore the damaged lattice by oxygen reincorporation during thermal treatments in air. These studies also revealed a correlation between conductivity and ion beam induced luminescence, which is being used to monitor surface electrical conductivity degradation and help qualify the post irradiation recovery. Work now carried out for Wesgo alumina considers oxygen implantation and plasma etching as additional methods to improve recovered layer depth and quality. Both conductivity and luminescence results indicate the potential use of plasma etching not only for damage recovery, but also as a pre-treatment to enhance material stability during irradiation.

  5. Synthesis, solubility, plasma stability, and pharmacological evaluation of novel sulfonylhydrazones designed as anti-diabetic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zapata-Sudo G

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gisele Zapata-Sudo,1,2 Isabelle Karine da Costa Nunes,2 Josenildo Segundo Chaves Araujo,1,2 Jaqueline Soares da Silva,2 Margarete Manhães Trachez,2,3 Tiago Fernandes da Silva,1 Filipe P da Costa,2 Roberto Takashi Sudo,1,2 Eliezer J Barreiro,1,2 Lídia Moreira Lima1,2 1National Institute of Science and Technology on Drugs and Medicines, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Laboratory of Evaluation and Synthesis of Bioactive Compounds, Center of Health Sciences, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Program of Research in Drug Development, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 3Department of Anesthesiology, Fluminense Federal University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Abstract: Neuropathy is a serious complication of diabetes that has a significant socioeconomic impact, since it frequently demands high levels of health care consumption and compromises labor productivity. Recently, LASSBio-1471 (3 was demonstrated to improve oral glucose tolerance, reduce blood glucose levels, and display an anti-neuropathy effect in a murine streptozotocin-induced diabetes model. In the present work, we describe the design, synthesis, solubility, plasma stability, and pharmacological evaluation of novel sulfonylhydrazone derivatives (referred to herein as compounds 4–9, which were designed by molecular modification based on the structure of the prototype LASSBio-1471 (3. Among the compounds tested, better plasma stability was observed with 4, 5, and 9 in comparison to compounds 6, 7, and 8. LASSBio-1773 (7, promoted not only hypoglycemic activity but also the reduction of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in a murine model of streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathic pain. Keywords: diabetes, sulfonylhydrazone, hypoglycemic activity, druglikeness, plasma stability, metabolite

  6. Mean flow stability analysis of oscillating jet experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Oberleithner, Kilian; Soria, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Linear stability analysis is applied to the mean flow of an oscillating round jet with the aim to investigate the robustness and accuracy of mean flow stability wave models. The jet's axisymmetric mode is excited at the nozzle lip through a sinusoidal modulation of the flow rate at amplitudes ranging from 0.1 % to 100 %. The instantaneous flow field is measured via particle image velocimetry and decomposed into a mean and periodic part utilizing proper orthogonal decomposition. Local linear stability analysis is applied to the measured mean flow adopting a weakly nonparallel flow approach. The resulting global perturbation field is carefully compared to the measurements in terms of spatial growth rate, phase velocity, and phase and amplitude distribution. It is shown that the stability wave model accurately predicts the excited flow oscillations during their entire growth phase and during a large part of their decay phase. The stability wave model applies over a wide range of forcing amplitudes, showing no pr...

  7. Stability of glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucagon in human plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Bak, Monika J; Hartmann, Bolette; Christensen, Louise Wulff; Kuhre, Rune E; Deacon, Carolyn F; Holst, Jens J

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the stability of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucagon in plasma under short- and long-term storage conditions. Pooled human plasma (n=20), to which a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitor and aprotinin were added, was spiked with synthetic GLP-1 (intact, 7–36NH2 as well as the primary metabolite, GLP-1 9–36NH2) or glucagon. Peptide recoveries were measured in samples kept for 1 and 3 h at room temperature or on ice, treated with various enzyme inhibitors, after up to three thawing–refreezing cycles, and after storage at −20 and −80 °C for up to 1 year. Recoveries were unaffected by freezing cycles or if plasma was stored on ice for up to 3 h, but were impaired when samples stood at RT for more than 1 h. Recovery of intact GLP-1 increased by addition of a DPP4 inhibitor (no ice), but was not further improved by neutral endopeptidase 24.11 inhibitor or an inhibitor cocktail. GLP-1, but not glucagon, was stable for at least 1 year. Surprisingly, the recovery of glucagon was reduced by almost 50% by freezing compared with immediate analysis, regardless of storage time. Plasma handling procedures can significantly influence results of subsequent hormone analysis. Our data support addition of DPP4 inhibitor for GLP-1 measurement as well as cooling on ice of both GLP-1 and glucagon. Freeze–thaw cycles did not significantly affect stability of GLP-1 or glucagon. Long-term storage may affect glucagon levels regardless of storage temperature and results should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25596009

  8. Optmized stability of a modulated driver in a plasma wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Martorelli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the transverse stability for a configuration of multiple gaussian bunches subject to the self-generated plasma wakefield. Through a semi-analytical approach we first study the equilibrium configuration for the modulated beam and then we investigate the evolution of the equilibrium configuration due to the emittance-driven expansion of the beam front that results in a rigid backward shift. The rear-directed shift brings the modulated beam out of the equilibrium, with the possibility for some of the bunch particles to be lost with a consequent deterioration of the driver. We look therefore for the proper position of the single bunches that maximize the stability without severely affecting the accelerating field behind the driver. We then compare the results with 3D PIC simulations.

  9. The stability of weakly collisional plasmas with thermal and composition gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, M.E.; Chakraborty, S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, substantial efforts have been devoted to understanding the stability properties, transport phenomena, and long-term evolution of weakly collisional, magnetized plasmas which are stratified in temperature. The insights gained via these studies have led to a significant...... approximation if heavy elements are able to sediment in the inner region of the galaxy cluster. Motivated by the need to obtain a more complete picture of the dynamical properties of the ICM, we analyze the stability of a weakly collisional, magnetized plane-parallel atmosphere which is stratified in both...... in homogeneous media. We also find that there are new modes which are driven by heat conduction and particle diffusion. We discuss the astrophysical implications of our findings for a representative galaxy cluster where helium has sedimented. Our findings suggest that the core insulation that results from...

  10. Long-term performance and stability of molecular shotgun lipidomic analysis of human plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Laura A; Suoniemi, Matti; Ta, Hung Xuan; Tarasov, Kirill; Ekroos, Kim

    2013-09-17

    The stability of the lipid concentration levels in shotgun lipidomics analysis was tracked over a period of 3.5 years. Concentration levels in several lipid classes, such as phospholipids, were determined in human plasma lipid extracts. Impact of the following factors on the analysis was investigated: sample amount, internal standard amount, and sample dilution factor. Moreover, the reproducibility of lipid profiles obtained in both polarity modes was evaluated. Total number of samples analyzed was approximately 6800 and 7300 samples in negative and positive ion modes, respectively, out of which 610 and 639 instrument control samples were used in stability calculations. The assessed shotgun lipidomics approach showed to be remarkably robust and reproducible, requiring no batch corrections. Coefficients of variation (CVs) of lipid mean concentration measured with optimized analytical parameters were typically less than 15%. The high reproducibility indicated that no lipid degradation occurred during the monitored time period.

  11. Vertical stability of ITER plasmas with 3D passive structures and a double-loop control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portone, A. [EFDA-CSU, Max Planck Institute for Plasmaphysics, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: alfredo.portone@tech.efda.org; Albanese, R. [Assoc. Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, University Mediterranea RC, Loc. Feo di Vito, I-89060, RC (Italy); Fresa, R. [DIFA, University della Bastilicata, Contrada Macchia Romana I-85100, Potenza (Italy); Mattei, M. [Assoc. Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, University Mediterranea RC, Loc. Feo di Vito, I-89060, RC (Italy); Rubinacci, G. [Assoc. Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, University Cassino, Via Di Biasio 43, I-03043, Cassino (FR) (Italy); Villone, F. [Assoc. Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, University Cassino, Via Di Biasio 43, I-03043, Cassino (FR) (Italy)

    2005-11-15

    In this study we derive linear models describing the dynamics of the n 0 plasma displacements around the main ITER equilibrium configurations. The models derived are consistent with the MHD equilibrium constraint as well as with the 3D geometry of the vacuum vessel and blanket outer triangular support where the main eddy currents flow takes place. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of the stability margin, growth time and minimum stabilization voltage. The performances of the present ITER control system (single loop) are compared to those of an upgraded system (double-loop) that is here proposed to improve the stability domain of the ITER plasmas forecast.

  12. Advanced plasma flow simulations of cathodic-arc and ferroelectric plasma sources for neutralized drift compression experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B. Sefkow

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Large-space-scale and long-time-scale plasma flow simulations are executed in order to study the spatial and temporal evolution of plasma parameters for two types of plasma sources used in the neutralized drift compression experiment (NDCX. The results help assess the charge neutralization conditions for ion beam compression experiments and can be employed in more sophisticated simulations, which previously neglected the dynamical evolution of the plasma. Three-dimensional simulations of a filtered cathodic-arc plasma source show the coupling efficiency of the plasma flow from the source to the drift region depends on geometrical factors. The nonuniform magnetic topology complicates the well-known general analytical considerations for evaluating guiding-center drifts, and particle-in-cell simulations provide a self-consistent evaluation of the physics in an otherwise challenging scenario. Plasma flow profiles of a ferroelectric plasma source demonstrate that the densities required for longitudinal compression experiments involving ion beams are provided over the drift length, and are in good agreement with measurements. Simulations involving azimuthally asymmetric plasma creation conditions show that symmetric profiles are nevertheless achieved at the time of peak on-axis plasma density. Also, the ferroelectric plasma expands upstream on the thermal expansion time scale, and therefore avoids the possibility of penetration into the acceleration gap and transport sections, where partial neutralization would increase the beam emittance. Future experiments on NDCX will investigate the transverse focusing of an axially compressing intense charge bunch to a sub-mm spot size with coincident focal planes using a strong final-focus solenoid. In order to fill a multi-tesla solenoid with the necessary high-density plasma for beam charge neutralization, the simulations predict that supersonically injected plasma from the low-field region will penetrate and

  13. Laboratory experiments on plasma jets in a magnetic field using high-power lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishio K.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The experiments to simulate astrophysical jet generation are performed using Gekko XII (GXII HIPER laser system at the Institute of Laser Engineering. In the experiments a fast plasma flow generated by shooting a CH plane (10 μm thickness is observed at the rear side of the plane. By separating the focal spot of the main beams, a non-uniform plasma is generated. The non-uniform plasma flow in an external magnetic field (0.2∼0.3 T perpendicular to the plasma is more collimated than that without the external magnetic field. The plasma β, the ratio between the plasma and magnetic pressure, is ≫ 1, and the magnetic Reynolds number is ∼150 in the collimated plasma. It is considered that the magnetic field is distorted by the plasma flow and enhances the jet collimation.

  14. Laboratory experiments on plasma jets in a magnetic field using high-power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, K.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Morita, T.; Ide, T.; Kuwada, M.; Koga, M.; Kato, T.; Norimatsu, T.; Gregory, C.; Woolsey, N.; Murphy, C.; Gregori, G.; Schaar, K.; Diziere, A.; Koenig, M.; Pelka, A.; Wang, S.; Dong, Q.; Li, Y.; Takabe, H.

    2013-11-01

    The experiments to simulate astrophysical jet generation are performed using Gekko XII (GXII) HIPER laser system at the Institute of Laser Engineering. In the experiments a fast plasma flow generated by shooting a CH plane (10 μm thickness) is observed at the rear side of the plane. By separating the focal spot of the main beams, a non-uniform plasma is generated. The non-uniform plasma flow in an external magnetic field (0.2˜0.3 T) perpendicular to the plasma is more collimated than that without the external magnetic field. The plasma β, the ratio between the plasma and magnetic pressure, is ≫ 1, and the magnetic Reynolds number is ˜150 in the collimated plasma. It is considered that the magnetic field is distorted by the plasma flow and enhances the jet collimation.

  15. The effect of thermophoresis on the discharge parameters in complex plasma experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Land, Victor; Creel, James; Schmoke, Jimmy; Cook, Mike; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2010-01-01

    Thermophoresis is a tool often applied in complex plasma experiments. One of the usual stated benefits over other experimental tools is that changes induced by thermophoresis neither directly depend on, nor directly influence, the plasma parameters. From electronic data, plasma emission profiles in the sheath, and Langmuir probe data in the plasma bulk, we conclude that this assumption does not hold. An important effect on the levitation of dust particles in argon plasma is observed as well. The reason behind the changes in plasma parameters seems to be the change in neutral atom density accompanying the increased gas temperature while running at constant pressure.

  16. The effect of electrode heating on the discharge parameters in complex plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, Victor; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Creel, James; Schmoke, Jimmy; Cook, Mike; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell, E-mail: victor_land@baylor.edu [Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics, and Engineering Research, Baylor University, Waco, TX, 76798-7316 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Thermophoresis is a tool often applied in complex plasma experiments. One of the usual stated benefits over other experimental tools is that electrode temperature changes required to induce thermophoresis do not directly influence the plasma parameters. From electronic data, plasma emission profiles in the sheath, and Langmuir probe data in the plasma bulk, we conclude that this assumption does not hold. An important effect on the levitation of dust particles in argon plasma is observed as well. The reason behind the changes in plasma parameters seems to be the change in neutral atom density accompanying the increased gas temperature while running at constant pressure.

  17. Improvement of stability of sinusoidally driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet using auxiliary bias voltage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jin Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have proposed the auxiliary bias pulse scheme to improve the stability of atmospheric pressure plasma jets driven by an AC sinusoidal waveform excitation source. The stability of discharges can be significantly improved by the compensation of irregular variation in memory voltage due to the effect of auxiliary bias pulse. From the parametric study, such as the width, voltage, and onset time of auxiliary bias pulse, it has been demonstrated that the auxiliary bias pulse plays a significant role in suppressing the irregular discharges caused by the irregular variation in memory voltage and stable discharge can be initiated with the termination of the auxiliary bias pulse. As a result of further investigating the effects of the auxiliary pulse scheme on the jet stability under various process conditions such as the distance between the jet head and the counter electrode, and carrier gas flow, the jet stability can be improved by adjusting the amplitude and number of the bias pulse depending on the variations in the process conditions.

  18. The Plasma Interaction Experiment /PIX/ - Description and flight qualification test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignaczak, L. R.; Haley, F. A.; Domino, E. J.; Culp, D. H.; Shaker, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) is a battery powered preprogrammed auxiliary payload on the Landsat-C launch. This experiment is part of a larger program to investigate space plasma interactions with spacecraft surfaces and components. The varying plasma densities encountered during available telemetry coverage periods are deemed sufficient to determine first order interactions between the space plasma environment and the biased experimental surfaces. The specific objectives of the PIX flight experiment are to measure the plasma coupling current and the negative voltage breakdown characteristics of a solar array segment and a gold plated steel disk. Measurements will be made over a range of surface voltages up to plus or minus 1 kilovolt. The orbital environment will provide a range of plasma densities. The experimental surfaces will be voltage-biased in a preprogrammed step sequence to optimize the data returned for each plasma region and for the available telemetry coverage.

  19. Numerical Simulations of Collisionless Shock Formation in Merging Plasma Jet Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    experiment [5], which uses counter-propagating hydrogen plasma jets formed and launched by plasma railguns [11] mounted on opposite sides of a...hydrogen plasma jet propagating from the railgun nozzle to the center of the chamber in order to connect the plasma jet parameters at the railgun exit...the jet at the railgun exit and center of the chamber (z = 0 cm) are given in Table 1. So this simulation determines the approximate parameter regime

  20. A Laboratory Plasma Experiment for Studying Magnetic Dynamics of Accretion Discs and Jets

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S. C.; Bellan, P. M.

    2002-01-01

    This work describes a laboratory plasma experiment and initial results which should give insight into the magnetic dynamics of accretion discs and jets. A high-speed multiple-frame CCD camera reveals images of the formation and helical instability of a collimated plasma, similar to MHD models of disc jets, and also plasma detachment associated with spheromak formation, which may have relevance to disc winds and flares. The plasmas are produced by a planar magnetized coaxial gun. The resulting...

  1. Stability analysis of the Gravito-Electrostatic Sheath-based solar plasma equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, P. K.; Goutam, H. P.; Lal, M.; Dwivedi, C. B.

    2016-08-01

    We present approximate solutions of non-local linear perturbational analysis for discussing the stability properties of the Gravito-Electrostatic Sheath (GES)-based solar plasma equilibrium, which is indeed non-uniform on both the bounded and unbounded scales. The relevant physical variables undergoing perturbations are the self-solar gravity, electrostatic potential and plasma flow along with plasma population density. We methodologically derive linear dispersion relation for the GES fluctuations, and solve it numerically to identify and characterize the existent possible natural normal modes. Three distinct natural normal modes are identified and named as the GES-oscillator mode, GES-wave mode and usual (classical) p-mode. In the solar wind plasma, only the p-mode survives. These modes are found to be linearly unstable in wide-range of the Jeans-normalized wavenumber, k. The local plane-wave approximation marginally limits the validity or reliability of the obtained results in certain radial- and k-domains only. The phase and group velocities, time periods of these fluctuation modes are investigated. It is interesting to note that, the oscillation time periods of these modes are 3-10 min, which match exactly with those of the observed helio-seismic waves and solar surface oscillations. The proposed GES model provides a novel physical view of the waves and oscillations of the Sun from a new perspective of plasma-wall interaction physics. Due to simplified nature of the considered GES equilibrium, it is a neonatal stage to highlight its applicability in the real Sun. The proposed GES model and subsequent fluctuation analysis need further improvements to make it more realistic.

  2. A Chemical Stability Study of Trimethylsilane Plasma Nanocoatings for Coronary Stents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John Eric; Yu, Qingsong; Chen, Meng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, trimethylsilane (TMS) plasma nanocoatings were deposited onto 316L stainless steel coupons in direct current (DC) and radio frequency (RF) glow discharges and additional NH3/O2 plasma treatment to tailor the coating surface properties. The chemical stability of the plasma nanocoatings were evaluated after 12 week (~3 month) storage under dry condition (25 °C) and immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C. It was found that nanocoatings did not impact surface roughness of underlying stainless steel substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to characterize surface chemistry and compositions. Both DC and RF TMS plasma nanocoatings had Si– and C– rich composition; and the O– and N– contents on the surfaces were substantially increased after NH3/O2 plasma treatment. Contact angle measurements showed that DC TMS nanocoating with NH3/O2 treatment generated very hydrophilic surfaces. DC TMS nanocoatings with NH3/O2 treatment showed minimal surface chemistry change after 12 week immersion in SBF. However, nitrogen functionalities on RF-TMS coating with NH3/O2 post treatment were not as stable as in DC case. Cell culture studies revealed that the surfaces with DC coating and NH3/O2 post treatment demonstrated substantially improved proliferation of endothelial cells over the 12 week storage period at both dry and wet conditions, as compared to other coated surfaces. Therefore, DC nanocoatings with NH3/O2 post treatment may be chemically stable for long-term properties, including shelf-life storage and exposure to the bloodstream for coronary stent applications. PMID:27712432

  3. Morphological stability of the atomically clean surface of silicon (100) crystals after microwave plasma-chemical processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yafarov, R. K., E-mail: pirpc@yandex.ru; Shanygin, V. Ya. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Saratov Branch of the Kotel’nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The morphological stability of atomically clean silicon (100) surface after low-energy microwave plasma-chemical etching in various plasma-forming media is studied. It is found that relaxation changes in the surface density and atomic bump heights after plasma processing in inert and chemically active media are multidirectional in character. After processing in a freon-14 medium, the free energy is minimized due to a decrease in the surface density of microbumps and an increase in their height. After argon-plasma processing, an insignificant increase in the bump density with a simultaneous decrease in bump heights is observed. The physicochemical processes causing these changes are considered.

  4. Modeling ultrafast shadowgraphy in laser-plasma interaction experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Siminos, E; Sävert, A; Cole, J M; Mangles, S P D; Kaluza, M C

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast shadowgraphy is a new experimental technique that uses few cycle laser pulses to image density gradients in a rapidly evolving plasma. It enables structures that move at speeds close to the speed of light, such as laser driven wakes, to be visualized. Here we study the process of shadowgraphic image formation during the propagation of a few cycle probe pulse transversely through a laser-driven wake using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. In order to construct synthetic shadowgrams a near-field snapshot of the ultrashort probe pulse is analyzed by means of Fourier optics, taking into account the effect of a typical imaging setup. By comparing synthetic and experimental shadowgrams we show that the generation of synthetic data is crucial for the correct interpretation of experiments. Moreover, we study the dependence of synthetic shadowgrams on various parameters such as the imaging system aperture, the position of the object plane and the probe pulse delay, duration and wavelength. Fina...

  5. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    Gschwendtner, E; Adli, E.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.(CERN, Geneva, Switzerland); Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; AMORIM, L.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D; experiment at CERN and the world׳s first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of ...

  6. Confinement and stability of plasmas with externally driven steady-state elevated q-profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bock, Alexander; Stober, Joerg; Fischer, Rainer; Fable, Emiliano; Reich, Matthias [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-05-01

    The helicity profile of the magnetic field lines is an important quantity for the operation of Tokamak fusion devices and can be expressed as the so-called safety factor q. It has profound influence on both the stability of the fusion plasma, as well as its confinement properties. Operation scenarios with centrally elevated and flat, or even reversed q-profiles promise fewer central instabilities and better core confinement and are thus considered potentially attractive for future fusion power plants. To verify these predictions, centrally elevated q-profiles are created using external counter current drive, with additional heating power added afterwards to explore the stability limits and transport properties of the resulting plasmas. The tailored q-profiles are calculated using magnetic equilibrium reconstruction constrained by internal motional Stark effect data to confirm to the presence of the desired helicities. They are then used as a basis for simulations of the transport properties with the gyro-Landau-fluid code TGLF. The simulation results are then compared to the experimentally measured kinetic profiles.

  7. Optimization of Plasma Performance by RWM Stabilization Using the I-Coil in DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, A. M.; Navratil, G. A.; Reimerdes, H.; Jackson, G. L.; Jensen, T. H.; Schaffer, M. J.; Scoville, J. T.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; Jayakumar, R. J.; Okabayashi, M.

    2003-10-01

    Stabilization of the resistive wall mode by plasma rotation has opened access to reliable tokamak operation at β above the n=1 no-wall limit. In order to maintain the fluid rotation speed that is necessary to stabilize the RWM, it is critical to avoid the braking produced by magnetic field asymmetries in this β regime. RWM feedback operation at high stable gain using the C-coil in DIII-D provided a method to determine the optimal correction of these magnetic field errors. The working paradigm was that the feedback system senses and opposes the resonant response of the stable RWM to the field asymmetries. The new internal control coil in DIII-D, the I-coil, has afforded us additional degrees of freedom for the poloidal and toroidal spectra of the external fields. Comparing the optimized magnetic configurations obtained with different spectra provides both a new test of our paradigm and information that can illustrate the mechanism by which field asymmetries interact with the plasma.

  8. EDITORIAL: Stability and nonlinear dynamics of plasmas: A symposium celebrating Professor Robert Dewar's accomplishments in plasma physics Stability and nonlinear dynamics of plasmas: A symposium celebrating Professor Robert Dewar's accomplishments in plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2012-01-01

    covered in the talks at the Symposium. The paper by David Barmaz and coworkers published in this issue discusses the problem diamagnetic stabilization of ballooning instabilities in stellarators. It is not surprising that Bob's work on ballooning modes shows an accomplished master of WKB theory at work, for it is the culmination of a process that began many years earlier. His involvement in applications of WKB theory to problems involving instability and turbulence began in 1970, when he was a graduate student. At this time he wrote a very influential paper, discussed at the Symposium, on the interaction between hydromagnetic waves and a timedependent inhomogeneous medium. This paper is widely cited, especially in the astrophysical and space plasma literature, for it gives a rigorous method of evaluating the effects of lowfrequency hydromagnetic fluctuations on a slowly varying background medium. The method has found use in problems as diverse as the self-sustainment of molecular clouds, the heating and acceleration of the solar wind, and the effect of cosmic rays on the interplanetary medium. Attentive readers will note that Bob has been drafted as a co-author and participant in about half of the publications in this issue. This is a reflection of Bob's continued and tireless involvement in a wide spectrum of research problems that have their genesis in his fundamental contributions to plasma physics, as well as the eagerness with which we all welcome his involvement in our own projects. We hope to have this continue for many years to come.

  9. Transverse oscillations in plasma wakefield experiments at FACET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adli, E., E-mail: Erik.Adli@fys.uio.no [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Lindstrøm, C.A. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Allen, J.; Clarke, C.I.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.J.; Green, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; Litos, M.D.; White, G.R.; Yakimenko, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Joshi, C.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Corde, S. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 91762 Palaiseau (France); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Lu, W. [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-09-01

    We study transverse effects in a plasma wakefield accelerator. Experimental data from FACET with asymmetry in the beam-plasma system is presented. Energy dependent centroid oscillations are observed on the accelerated part of the charge. The experimental results are compared to PIC simulations and theoretical estimates.

  10. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turco, F., E-mail: turcof@fusion.gat.com; Hanson, J. M.; Navratil, G. A. [Columbia University, 116th and Broadway, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall β{sub N} limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing β{sub N}, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externally applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ∼13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest β{sub N} levels (∼90% of the ideal no-wall limit). The toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high β{sub N}.

  11. Development of high energy pulsed plasma simulator for plasma-lithium trench experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Soonwook

    To simulate detrimental events in a tokamak and provide a test-stand for a liquid lithium infused trench (LiMIT) device, a pulsed plasma source utilizing a theta pinch in conjunction with a coaxial plasma accelerator has been developed. An overall objective of the project is to develop a compact device that can produce 100 MW/m2 to 1 GW/m2 of plasma heat flux (a typical heat flux level in a major fusion device) in ~ 100 mus (≤ 0.1 MJ/m2) for a liquid lithium plasma facing component research. The existing theta pinch device, DEVeX, was built and operated for study on lithium vapor shielding effect. However, a typical plasma energy of 3 - 4 kJ/m2 is too low to study an interaction of plasma and plasma facing components in fusion devices. No or little preionized plasma, ringing of magnetic field, collisions of high energy particles with background gas have been reported as the main issues. Therefore, DEVeX is reconfigured to mitigate these issues. The new device is mainly composed of a plasma gun for a preionization source, a theta pinch for heating, and guiding magnets for a better plasma transportation. Each component will be driven by capacitor banks and controlled by high voltage / current switches. Several diagnostics including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, optical emission measurement, Rogowski coil, flux loop, and fast ionization gauge are used to characterize the new device. A coaxial plasma gun is manufactured and installed in the previous theta pinch chamber. The plasma gun is equipped with 500 uF capacitor and a gas puff valve. The increase of the plasma velocity with the plasma gun capacitor voltage is consistent with the theoretical predictions and the velocity is located between the snowplow model and the weak - coupling limit. Plasma energies measured with the calorimeter ranges from 0.02 - 0.065 MJ/m2 and increases with the voltage at the capacitor bank. A cross-check between the plasma energy measured with the calorimeter and the triple probe

  12. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  13. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschwendtner, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Adli, E. [University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); Amorim, L. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Apsimon, R. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Assmann, R. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, München 80805 (Germany); Bauche, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Berglyd Olsen, V.K. [University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); Bernardini, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bingham, R. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Biskup, B. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Czech Technical University, Zikova 1903/4, 166 36 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Bohl, T.; Bracco, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Burrows, P.N. [John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Buttenschön, B. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, Greifswald 17491 (Germany); Butterworth, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Caldwell, A. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, München 80805 (Germany); Cascella, M. [UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  14. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V.K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A.A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V.A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Oz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z.M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A.P.; Spitsyn, R.I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P.V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected to sample the wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  15. Plasma Density Measurements in Cable Gun Experiments with a Sensitive He-Ne Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lin; HE An; JIANG Wei; XU Min; WU Shoudong; LI Ye

    2007-01-01

    A time-resolved sensitive He-Ne laser interferometer without complicated active stabilization was built up and applied to low-density plasma measurements. A precision of about 0.2° in phase measurements was achieved with a minimum line-integrated plasma density as low as 8.3×l013 cm-2. With this interferometer, the characteristics of the plasma generated by a cable plasma gun was investigated systematically. The reproducibility, spatial and temporal distributions and the averaged injection velocity of the plasma are presented. In addition, the interaction of the plasma flow with a conductor was studied by placing a metal plate in the downstream of the cable gun.

  16. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon; Pettitt, Will; Young, R. Paul [Applied Seismology Consultants Ltd., Shrewsbury (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    This report describes the results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring of the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The APSE is being undertaken to demonstrate the current capability to predict spalling in a fractured rock mass using numerical modelling techniques, and to demonstrate the effect of backfill and confining pressure on the propagation of micro-cracks in rock adjacent to deposition holes within a repository. An ultrasonic acquisition system has provided acoustic emission and ultrasonic survey monitoring throughout the various phases of the experiment. Results from the entire data set are provided with this document so that they can be effectively compared to several numerical modelling studies, and to mechanical and thermal measurements conducted around the pillar volume, in an 'integrated analysis' performed by SKB staff. This document provides an in-depth summary of the AE and ultrasonic survey results for future reference. The pillar has been produced by excavating two 1.8 m diameter deposition holes 1 m apart. These were bored in 0.8 m steps using a Tunnel Boring Machine specially adapted for vertical drilling. The first deposition hole was drilled in December 2003. Preceding this a period of background monitoring was performed so as to obtain a datum for the results. The hole was then confined to 0.7 MPa internal over pressure using a specially designed water-filled bladder. The second deposition hole was excavated in March 2004. Heating of the pillar was performed over a two month period between ending in July 2004, when the confined deposition hole was slowly depressurised. Immediately after depressurisation the pillar was allowed to cool with cessation of monitoring occurring a month later. A total of 36,676 AE triggers were recorded over the reporting period between 13th October 2003 and 14th July 2004. Of these 15,198 have produced AE locations. The AE data set

  17. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon; Pettitt, Will; Young, R. Paul [Applied Seismology Consultants Ltd., Shrewsbury (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    This report describes the results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring of the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The APSE is being undertaken to demonstrate the current capability to predict spalling in a fractured rock mass using numerical modelling techniques, and to demonstrate the effect of backfill and confining pressure on the propagation of micro-cracks in rock adjacent to deposition holes within a repository. An ultrasonic acquisition system has provided acoustic emission and ultrasonic survey monitoring throughout the various phases of the experiment. Results from the entire data set are provided with this document so that they can be effectively compared to several numerical modelling studies, and to mechanical and thermal measurements conducted around the pillar volume, in an 'integrated analysis' performed by SKB staff. This document provides an in-depth summary of the AE and ultrasonic survey results for future reference. The pillar has been produced by excavating two 1.8 m diameter deposition holes 1 m apart. These were bored in 0.8 m steps using a Tunnel Boring Machine specially adapted for vertical drilling. The first deposition hole was drilled in December 2003. Preceding this a period of background monitoring was performed so as to obtain a datum for the results. The hole was then confined to 0.7 MPa internal over pressure using a specially designed water-filled bladder. The second deposition hole was excavated in March 2004. Heating of the pillar was performed over a two month period between ending in July 2004, when the confined deposition hole was slowly depressurised. Immediately after depressurisation the pillar was allowed to cool with cessation of monitoring occurring a month later. A total of 36,676 AE triggers were recorded over the reporting period between 13th October 2003 and 14th July 2004. Of these 15,198 have produced AE locations. The AE data set

  18. Rare gas flow structuration in plasma jet experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, E.; Sarron, V.; Darny, T.; Riès, D.; Dozias, S.; Fontane, J.; Joly, L.; Pouvesle, J.-M.

    2014-02-01

    Modifications of rare gas flow by plasma generated with a plasma gun (PG) are evidenced through simultaneous time-resolved ICCD imaging and schlieren visualization. The geometrical features of the capillary inside which plasma propagates before in-air expansion, the pulse repetition rate and the presence of a metallic target are playing a key role on the rare gas flow at the outlet of the capillary when the plasma is switched on. In addition to the previously reported upstream offset of the laminar to turbulent transition, we document the reverse action leading to the generation of long plumes at moderate gas flow rates together with the channeling of helium flow under various discharge conditions. For higher gas flow rates, in the l min-1 range, time-resolved diagnostics performed during the first tens of ms after the PG is turned on, evidence that the plasma plume does not start expanding in a laminar neutral gas flow. Instead, plasma ignition leads to a gradual laminar-like flow build-up inside which the plasma plume is generated. The impact of such phenomena for gas delivery on targets mimicking biological samples is emphasized, as well as their consequences on the production and diagnostics of reactive species.

  19. Plasma-filled applied B ion diode experiments using a plasma opening switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renk, T. J.

    1994-12-01

    In order for a plasma opening switch (POS) to open quickly and transfer power efficiently from an inductively charged vacuum transmission line to an applied B ion diode, the load impedance of the ion diode may be required to have an initial low impedance phase. A plasma-filled diode has such an impedance history. To test the effect of a plasma-filled diode on POS-diode coupling, a drifting plasma was introduced from the cathode side of an applied B ion diode operated on the LION accelerator (1.5 MV, 4 Ohm, 40 ns) at Cornell University. This plasma readily crossed the 2.1 T magnetic insulation field of the diode, and resulted in both increased diode electrical power, and an increased ability of the ion beam to remove material from a target. The plasma did not appear to have a noticeable effect on local beam steering angle.

  20. Plasma Shock Wave Modification Experiments in a Temperature Compensated Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, Frances J.; Mankowski, John J.; Saeks, Richard E.; Chow, Alan S.

    2003-01-01

    A number of researchers have observed that the intensity of a shock wave is reduced when it passes through a weakly ionized plasma. While there is little doubt that the intensity of a shock is reduced when it propagates through a weakly ionized plasma, the major question associated with the research is whether the reduction in shock wave intensity is due to the plasma or the concomitant heating of the flow by the plasma generator. The goal of this paper is to describe a temperature compensated experiment in a "large" diameter shock tube with an external heating source, used to control the temperature in the shock tube independently of the plasma density.

  1. The Effect of Polarization on the Stability of Current Sheaths in Space Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyahov, Vladimir; Neshchadim, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    The procedure of study of the stability of current sheath taking into account the effect of plasma polarization is proposed. The kinetic equation with self-consistent electromagnetic field for perturbation of distribution function is solved. On the basis of this solution the tensor of dielectric permeability of nonelectroneutral sharply-irregular current sheath plasma is calculated and the dispersion equation to study the possible instability modes of this sheath is obtained. Instability of the current sheath of magnetospheric tail with respect to the tearing-perturbations as well as influence of the effect of plasma polarization on the development of tearing instability is investigated. As a result of application of the offered procedure the existence of low-frequency tearing-like modes which essentially differ from the formerly known tiring-perturbations is revealed even for the case of an electroneutral current sheath. The increment of growth of those modes is positive within very wide interval of wave lengths and attains much bigger quantities than it was supposed earlier for the tearing-instability. Due to this polarization effect, the area of existence of those low-frequency tearing-like modes is displaced from the area of strong stationary electric field more close to the magnitoneutral (and electroneutral) plane at the center of symmetry of the current sheath. The problem of structural stability of the nonelectroneutral current sheath is explored. The equilibrium model represents a system of four connected non-linear first-order differential equations and hence it should manifest the property of structural instability - sensitivity to infinitesimal changes of the parameters and initial conditions. The solution for such current sheath is realized only in some areas of 7-dimensional space of model parameters. The phase volume of those areas is small in comparison with the entire phase volume in the interval on which the parameters are defined. The above is

  2. Stability theory of a confined toroidal plasma. Part II. Modified energy principle and growth rate. Technical summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, P.; Shen, M.C.

    1982-03-01

    Based upon the existence and uniqueness of a solution to the linearized Lundquist equations established previously, the modified energy principle for the sigma-stability of a confined toroidal plasma is rigorously justified. A variational principle is developed to find the infimum of sigma, and an estimate for the maximum growth rate is obtained. The results are also extended to a diffuse pinch and a multiple tori plasma.

  3. Plasma-surface interactions in TFTR D-T experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, D.K.; Adler, H.; Alling, P. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.] [and others

    1995-03-01

    TFTR has begun its campaign to study deuterium-tritium fusion under reactor-like conditions. Variable amounts of deuterium and tritium neutral beam power have been used to maximize fusion power, study alpha heating, investigate alpha particle confinement, and search for alpha driven plasma instabilities. Additional areas of study include energy and particle transport and confinement, ICRF heating schemes for DT plasmas, tritium retention, and fusion in high {beta}{sub p} plasmas. The majority of this work is done in the TFTR supershot confinement regime. To obtain supershots, extensive limiter conditioning using helium fueled ohmic discharges and lithium pellet injection into ohmic and neutral beam heated plasmas is performed, resulting in a low recycling limiter. The relationship between recycling and core plasma confinement has been studied by using helium, deuterium and high-Z gas puffs to simulate high recycling limiter conditions. These studies show that confinement in TFTR supershots is very sensitive to the influx of neutral particles at the plasma edge.

  4. PLASMA THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS BASED ON ZIRCONIUM DIOXIDE WITH HIGH THERMAL STABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Devoino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents optimization of  processes for obtaining maximum content of tetragonal phase in the initial material and thermal barrier coatings (TBC based on zirconium dioxide and hafnium oxide.  Results of the investigations on phase composition of oxide HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O3  system have been given in the paper. The system represents  a microstructure which is similar to  zirconia dioxide and  transformed for its application at 1300 °C. The paper explains a mechanism of hafnium oxide influence on formation of the given microstructure. The research methodology has been based on complex metallography, X – ray diffraction and electron microscopic investigations of  structural elements of the composite plasma coating HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O system.In order to stabilize zirconium dioxide  dopant oxide should not only have an appropriate size of  metal ion, but also form a solid solution with the zirconia. This condition severely limits the number of possible stabilizers. In fact, such stabilization is possible only with the help of rare earth oxides (Y2O3, Yb2O3, CeO2, HfO2. Chemical purity of the applied materials plays a significant role for obtaining high-quality thermal barrier coatings. Hafnium oxide has been selected as powder for thermal barrier coatings instead of zirconium dioxide due to their similarities in structural modification, grating, chemical and physical properties and its high temperature structural transformations. It has been established that plasma thermal barrier HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O3 coatings consist of  one tetragonal phase. This phase is equivalent to a non-equilibrium tetragonal t' phase in the “zirconium dioxide stabilized with yttrium oxide” system. Affinity of  Hf+4 and Zr+4 cations leads to the formation of identical metastable phases during rapid quenching.

  5. Vlasov fluid stability of a 2-D plasma with a linear magnetic field null

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Vlasov fluid stability of a 2-dimensional plasma near an O type magnetic null is investigated. Specifically, an elongated Z-pinch is considered, and applied to Field Reversed Configurations at Los Alamos National Laboratory by making a cylindrical approximation of the compact torus. The orbits near an elliptical O type null are found to be very complicated; the orbits are large and some are stochastic. The kinetic corrections to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are investigated by evaluating the expectation values of the growth rates of a Vlasov fluid dispersion functional by using set of trial functions based on ideal MHD. The dispersion functional involves fluid parts and orbit dependent parts. The latter involves phase integral of two time correlations. The phase integral is replaced by the time integral both for the regular and for the stochastic orbits. Two trial functions are used; one has a large displacement near the null and the other away from the null.

  6. Stability properties and fast ion confinement of hybrid tokamak plasma configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Pfefferle, D.; Faustin, J. M. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Kleiner, A.; Lanthaler, S.; Patten, H. W.; Raghunathan, M.

    2015-11-01

    In hybrid scenarios with flat q just above unity, extremely fast growing tearing modes are born from toroidal sidebands of the near resonant ideal internal kink mode. New scalings of the growth rate with the magnetic Reynolds number arise from two fluid effects and sheared toroidal flow. Non-linear saturated 1/1 dominant modes obtained from initial value stability calculation agree with the amplitude of the 1/1 component of a 3D VMEC equilibrium calculation. Viable and realistic equilibrium representation of such internal kink modes allow fast ion studies to be accurately established. Calculations of MAST neutral beam ion distributions using the VENUS-LEVIS code show very good agreement of observed impaired core fast ion confinement when long lived modes occur. The 3D ICRH code SCENIC also enables the establishment of minority RF distributions in hybrid plasmas susceptible to saturated near resonant internal kink modes.

  7. Vlasov Fluid stability of a 2-D plasma with a linear magnetic field null

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Vlasov Fluid stability of a 2-dimensional plasma near an O type magnetic null is investigated. Specifically, an elongated Z-pinch is considered, and applied to Field Reversed Configurations at Los Alamos National Laboratory by making a cylindrical approximation of the compact torus. The orbits near an elliptical O type null are found to be very complicated; the orbits are large and some are stochastic. The kinetic corrections to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are investigated by evaluating the expectation values of the growth rates of a Vlasov Fluid dispersion functional by using a set of trial functions based on ideal MHD. The dispersion functional involves fluid parts and orbit dependent parts. The latter involves phase integral of two time correlations. The phase integral is replaced by the time integral both for the regular and for the stochastic orbits. Two trial functions are used; one has a large displacement near the null and the other away from the null.

  8. Control and Stabilization: Making Millikan's Oil Drop Experiment Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Hill, Christoph; Heering, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Educational versions of Millikan's oil-drop experiment have frequently been criticized; suggestions for improvement either focus on technical innovations of the setup or on replacing the experiment by other approaches of familiarization, such as computer simulations. In our approach, we have analysed experimental procedures. In doing so, we were…

  9. Experiments of discharge guiding using strongly and weakly ionized plasma channels for laser-triggered lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yoshinori; Uchida, Shigeaki; Yamanaka, Chiyoe; Ogata, Akihisa; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Zen-ichiro; Fujiwara, Etsuo; Ishikubo, Yuji; Kawabata, Kinya

    2000-01-01

    Generation of a long laser-plasma channel capable of triggering and guiding an electrical discharge is a crucial issue for laser-triggering protection system. We make a long plasma channel to increase the probability of triggered lightning by laser. To produce a long laser plasma channel, we propose da new technique called hybrid plasma channel method which combines weakly and strongly ionized plasma channels to maximize laser-energy efficiency of discharge guiding. We investigate the characteristics of the hybrid plasma channels to maximize laser-energy efficiency of discharge guiding. We investigate the characteristics of the hybrid plasma channel method through several laboratory experiments. The weakly ionized channel was generated by UV laser pulses in air. As the number density of electrons in weakly ionized channel is proportional to 1.1 power of laser intensity, nitrogen and oxygen molecules can not attributed to the source of ionized plasma. It is suggested that dissociation process of impurities in air whose density is 1011 - 1012 cm-3 plays an important role in plasma formation and leader triggering effect. The 50 percent flashover voltage using the hybrid plasma channel method is lower than that without the weakly ionized plasma channel. It was also found that higher repetition rate of the plasma generation on lowers the V50 furthermore.

  10. [Mechanisms of human plasma proteins adsorption on the surface of perfluorocarbon emulsion stabilized with proxanol 268].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhalimov, V K; Sklifas, A N; Kukushkin, N I

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that sorption of most proteins with the molecular weight lower than 200 kDa from human blood plasma on the surface of perfluorocarbon emulsion, stabilized with proxanol 268, is mainly based on hydrophobic interaction, whereas sorption of immunoglobulin G is mainly the result of electrostatic interaction. The removal of lipidic components from plasma leads to the increase of a total amount of adsorbed proteins by 35%. Particularly, when lipidic components are removed, sorption of apolipoprotein AI and immunoglobulin G is considerably bettered as well as sorption of other proteins with the molecular weight of about 50 and 60 kDa occurs. It has been out that apolipoprotein AI in the adsorbed condition loses its capability of tryptophan fluorescence, which might be probably determined by the quenching influence of the perfluorocarbon core of nanoparticle. We think that the findings obtained also indicates considerable conformational rearrangements of this protein during adsorption. It was shown, that the fluorescence of proteins with sorption on nanoparticles in emulsion based on the hydrophobic interaction, is completely or partially quenched.

  11. Stability of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in a multi-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M J Kurian; S Jyothi; S K Leju; Molly Isaac; Chandu Venugopal; G Renuka

    2009-12-01

    We have studied the stability of the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave in a plasma consisting of isotropic hydrogen ions (+) and temperature-anisotropic positively (+) and negatively (−) charged oxygen ions, with the electrons drifting parallel to the magnetic field. Analytical expressions have been derived for the frequency and growth/damping rate of ion cyclotron waves around the first harmonic of both hydrogen and oxygen ion gyrofrequencies. We find that the frequencies and growth/damping rates are dependent on the densities and temperatures of all species of ions. A detailed numerical study, for parameters relevant to comet Halley, shows that the growth rate is dependent on the magnitude of the frequency. The ion cyclotron waves are driven by the electron drift parallel to the magnetic field; the temperature anisotropy of the oxygen ions only slightly enhance the growth rates for small values of temperature anisotropies. A simple explanation, in terms of wave exponentiation times, is offered for the absence of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in the multi-ion plasma of comet Halley.

  12. In vitro stability and metabolism of salvinorin A in rat plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, K; Kuwayama, K; Miyaguchi, H; Kanamori, T; Iwata, Y T; Inoue, H

    2009-05-01

    Salvinorin A is the main active psychoactive ingredient in Salvia divinorum, a Mexican plant that has been widely available as a hallucinogen in recent years. The aims of this study were to investigate the stability of salvinorin A in rat plasma, esterases responsible for its degradation, and estimation of the degradation products. The apparent first-order rate constants of salvinorin A at 37 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 4 degrees C were 3.8 x 10(-1), 1.1 x 10(-1), and Salvinorin A degradation was markedly inhibited by the addition of sodium fluoride, an esterase inhibitor. Moreover, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (serine esterase inhibitor) and bis-p-nitrophenylphosphate (carboxylesterase inhibitor) also inhibited salvinorin A degradation. In contrast, little or no suppression of the degradation was seen with 5,5'-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid (arylesterase inhibitor),ethopropazine (butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor), and BW284c51 (acetylcholineseterase inhibitor). These findings indicated that carboxylesterase was mainly involved in the salvinorin A hydrolysis in rat plasma.4. The degradation products of salvinorin A estimated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry included the deacetylated form (salvinorin B) and the lactone-ring-open forms of salvinorin A and salvinorin B. This lactone-ring-opening reactions were involved in calcium-dependent lactonase.

  13. Factors affecting the microstructural stability and durability of thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helminiak, M.A.; Yanar, N.M.; Pettit, F.S.; Meier, G.H. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, 636 Benedum Hall, 3700 O& #x27; Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Taylor, T.A. [Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc., 1400 Polco Street, Indianapolis, IN 46224 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The high-temperature behavior of high-purity, low-density (HP-LD) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The high purity yttria-stabilized zirconia resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The thermal conductivity of the as-processed TBC is low but increases during high temperature exposure even before densification occurs. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in good spallation resistance during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, topcoat density, and the thermal cycle frequency. The failure mechanisms are described and the durability of the HP-LD coatings is compared with that of state-of-the-art electron beam physical vapor deposition TBCs. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. ITER Vertical Stability Guidance from Multi-machine Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, D. A.; Eidietis, N.; Jackson, G. L.; Leuer, J. A.; Walker, M. L.; Welander, A. S.; Casper, T. A.; Lodestro, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Ferrara, M.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Wolfe, S. M.; Gates, D. A.; Kolemen, E.; Lister, J.; Sartori, F.; Treutterer, W.

    2008-11-01

    Sufficiently robust vertical stability control is critical to ITER, in which the consequences of a vertical displacement event (VDE) disruption can be very severe. Experimental results from many devices have provided guidance to determine the necessary level of robustness, and theoretical analysis has quantified the tradeoffs inherent in various design choices. The maximum controllable displacement normalized by minor radius is shown to be a useful metric for performance, and must be greater than 4% for robustness to VDEs in operating machines. Analysis of controllability limits, axisymmetric control performance, noise environments, and disturbances in operating devices including Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, NSTX, TCV, and JET will be presented.

  15. Stability analysis and investigation of higher order Schroedinger equation for strongly dispersive ion-acoustic wave in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogoi, R; Kalita, L; Devi, N, E-mail: runmoni_gogoi@rediffmail.co, E-mail: latikakalita@rediffmail.co, E-mail: nirupama_cotton@rediffmail.co [Department of Mathematics, Cotton College, Guwahati-781001, Assam (India)

    2010-02-01

    Much interest was shown towards the studies on nonlinear stability in the late sixties. Plasma instabilities play an important role in plasma dynamics. More attention has been given towards stability analysis after recognizing that they are one of the principal obstacles in the way of a successful resolution of the problem of controlled thermonuclear fusion. Nonlinearity and dispersion are the two important characteristics of plasma instabilities. Instabilities and nonlinearity are the two important and interrelated terms. In our present work, the continuity and momentum equations for both ions and electrons together with the Poisson equation are considered as cold plasma model. Then we have adopted the modified reductive perturbation technique (MRPT) from Demiray [1] to derive the higher order equation of the Nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE). In this work, detailed mathematical expressions and calculations are done to investigate the changing character of the modulation of ion acoustic plasma wave through our derived equation. Thus we have extended the application of MRPT to derive the higher order equation. Both progressive wave solutions as well as steady state solutions are derived and they are plotted for different plasma parameters to observe dark/bright solitons. Interesting structures are found to exist for different plasma parameters.

  16. Stability and Reliability of Plasma Level of Lipid Biomarkers and Their Correlation with Dietary Fat Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Ah Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The reliability and stability of plasma lipid biomarkers and their association with dietary fat intake were evaluated among 48 subjects who were randomly chosen from the participants of a validation study of the population-based cohort, the Shanghai Men's Health Study (SMHS. Four spot blood samples, one taken each season, were measured for total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol levels. The reliability and stability of these measurements were assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC and by the correlations between a randomly chosen measurement with the mean of measurements across seasons using a bootstrap approach. The median levels for total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol were 177.5, 164.5, 41.0, and 102.5 (mg/dl, respectively. The ICCs of the biomarkers ranged from 0.58 (LDL-cholesterol to 0.83 (HDL-cholesterol. The correlation between randomly chosen spot measurements and the mean measurement were 0.91, 0.86, 0.93, and 0.83 for total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol, respectively. The correlations of lipid biomarkers with dietary fat intake and other lifestyle factors were comparable to other previous reports. In conclusion, this study suggests that measurements of lipid biomarkers from a single spot blood sample are a good representation of the average blood levels of these biomarkers in the study population and could be a useful tool for epidemiological studies.

  17. Driving Flows in Laboratory Astrophysical Plasma Jets: The Mochi.LabJet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Evan G.

    Mochi.Labjet is a new experiment at the University of Washington developed to investigate the interaction of shear flows in plasma jets with boundary conditions similar to an accretion disc system. This thesis details the engineering design and first plasmas of the Mochi.Labjet experiment. The experiment required construction of a new three electrode plasma gun with azimuthal symmetric gas injection, two optically-isolated pulsed power supplies for generating and sustaining plasma, and one optically-isolated pulsed power supply for generating a background magnetic field. Optical isolation is achieved with four custom circuits: the TTL-optical transmitter, optical-TTL receiver, optical-relay, and optical-tachometer circuits. First plasmas, during the commissioning phase of the apparatus, show evidence of flared jet structures with significant azimuthal symmetry.

  18. Measurement and Modelling of Tearing Mode Stability for Steady-State Plasmas in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turco, F; Luce, T; Ferron, J; Petty, C; Politzer, P; Turnbull, A; Brennan, D; Murakami, M; LoDestro, L; Pearlstein, L; Casper, T; Jayakumar, R; Holcomb, C

    2009-06-23

    High-beta, quasi-steady state scenarios represent a fundamental step towards the performance required for future fusion reactors. In DIII-D steady-state scenario discharges, the normalized beta {beta}{sub N} {triple_bond} {beta}(%) {center_dot} a(m) {center_dot} B{sub T}(T)/I{sub p}(MA) (where {beta} is the ratio of the plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure, {alpha} the plasma minor radius, B{sub T} the toroidal magnetic field and I{sub p} the plasma current) exceeds the no-wall ideal kink beta limit. The performance of this scenario is limited by the onset of an n = 1 tearing mode, which appears on the resistive evolution time-scale (1-2 s) at constant pressure and causes both a loss of confinement and a radial redistribution of the current density from which the available current drive sources cannot recover. It is routinely observed that the injection of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), with a broad deposition localized around {rho} {approx} 0.35, can prevent the mode from appearing. It must be noted that this is not a case of a direct stabilization due to the interaction with the mode's rational surface. These variations of the scenario are illustrated in Fig. 1, where the total injected power [neutral beam injection (NBI) and ECCD], {beta}{sub N} and the n = 1 magnetic perturbation at the outer wall are shown. In case (a), the onset of the n = 1 mode is observed when the EC power is not present or if it is stopped before the end of the high {beta} phase, whereas in case (b) the difference is pointed out between broad and narrow current deposition (with the narrow deposition case becoming unstable). The current density profile evolution and the MHD modes of several sets of significant discharges with and without ECCD (at different locations) have been analyzed, using motional Stark effect (MSE) spectroscopy measurements for the former and edge magnetic probes measurements, toroidal rotation profiles and fast electron cyclotron emission

  19. Long Term Stability of Coriolis Flow Meters: DESY experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckmann, T.; Bozhko, Y.; Escherich, K.; Petersen, B.; Putselyk, S.; Schnautz, T.; Sellmann, D.; Zhirnov, A.

    2017-02-01

    The measurement of coolant flow is important operational parameter for reliable operation of cryogenic system with superconducting magnets or cavities as well as for the system diagnostics in case of non-steady-state operation, e.g. during cool-down/warm-up or other transients. Proper flowmeter is chosen according to the different parameters, e.g. turn-down, operating temperature range, leak-tightness, pressure losses, long-term stability, etc. For helium cryogenics, the Venturi tube or Orifice, as well as Coriolis flow meters are often applied. For the present time, the orifices are usually used due to their simplicity and low costs, however, low turn-down range, large pressure drop, restriction of flow area, susceptibility to thermoacoustic oscillations limit their useful operation range. Operational characteristics of Venturi tubes is substantially improved in comparison to orifices, however, relative high costs and susceptibility to thermoacoustic oscillations still limit their application to special cases. The Coriolis flow meters do not have typical drawbacks of Venturi tube and orifices, however long-term stability over many years was not demonstrated yet. This paper describes the long-term behaviour of Coriolis flow meters after many years of operation at AMTF and XMTS facilities.

  20. On the nonlinear trapping nature of undamped, coherent structures in collisionless plasmas and its impact on stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamel, Hans; Mandal, Debraj; Sharma, Devendra

    2017-03-01

    An outstanding notion for collisionless plasmas is the essential nonlinear character of their coherent structures, which in the stationary, weak amplitude limit are described by a continuum of cnoidal electron and ion hole modes governed by a multiparametric nonlinear dispersion relation. The well-known discrete structure of undamped linear plasma modes is seamlessly embedded in this nonlinear continuum as the microscopic texture of plasma begins to reveal itself in the high temperature collisionless plasma limit. This transforms the linear-threshold-based operating mechanism of plasma turbulence into a fundamental nonlinear, multifaceted one. Based on a comprehensive three-level description of increasing profundity, a proof of this novel dictum is presented, which makes use of the joint properties of such structures, their coherency and stationarity, and uses in succession a fluid, linear Vlasov and a full Vlasov description. It unifies discrete and continuum limits by resolving the inevitable resonant region and shows that coherent electrostatic equilibria are generally controlled by kinetic particle trapping and are hence fundamentally nonlinear. By forging a link between damped and growing wave solutions, these modes render plasma stability complex and difficult to evaluate due to the entangled pattern of the stability boundary in function and parameter space, respectively. A direct consequence is the existence of negative energy modes of arbitrarily small amplitudes in the subcritical region of the two-stream instability as well as the failure of linear Landau (Vlasov, van Kampen) theory, whenever resonant particles are involved, in addressing the onset of instability in a current-carrying plasma. Responsible for this subtle phase space behavior is hence the thresholdless omnipresence of the trapping nonlinearity originating from coherency. A high resolution, exact-mass-ratio, multispecies, and collisionless plasma simulation is employed to illustrate

  1. Carotid plaque age is a feature of plaque stability inversely related to levels of plasma insulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Hägg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The stability of atherosclerotic plaques determines the risk for rupture, which may lead to thrombus formation and potentially severe clinical complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Although the rate of plaque formation may be important for plaque stability, this process is not well understood. We took advantage of the atmospheric (14C-declination curve (a result of the atomic bomb tests in the 1950s and 1960s to determine the average biological age of carotid plaques. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: The cores of carotid plaques were dissected from 29 well-characterized, symptomatic patients with carotid stenosis and analyzed for (14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry. The average plaque age (i.e. formation time was 9.6±3.3 years. All but two plaques had formed within 5-15 years before surgery. Plaque age was not associated with the chronological ages of the patients but was inversely related to plasma insulin levels (p = 0.0014. Most plaques were echo-lucent rather than echo-rich (2.24±0.97, range 1-5. However, plaques in the lowest tercile of plaque age (most recently formed were characterized by further instability with a higher content of lipids and macrophages (67.8±12.4 vs. 50.4±6.2, p = 0.00005; 57.6±26.1 vs. 39.8±25.7, p<0.0005, respectively, less collagen (45.3±6.1 vs. 51.1±9.8, p<0.05, and fewer smooth muscle cells (130±31 vs. 141±21, p<0.05 than plaques in the highest tercile. Microarray analysis of plaques in the lowest tercile also showed increased activity of genes involved in immune responses and oxidative phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show, for the first time, that plaque age, as judge by relative incorporation of (14C, can improve our understanding of carotid plaque stability and therefore risk for clinical complications. Our results also suggest that levels of plasma insulin might be involved in determining carotid plaque age.

  2. Langmuir probe diagnostics of an atmospheric pressure, vortex-stabilized nitrogen plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B. R. [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ingenieria Electromecanica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, (2600) Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe (Argentina); Kelly, H. [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ingenieria Electromecanica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, (2600) Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe (Argentina) and Instituto de Fisica del Plasma (CONICET), Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales UBA Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-09-15

    Langmuir probe measurements in an atmospheric pressure direct current (dc) plasma jet are reported. Sweeping probes were used. The experiment was carried out using a dc non-transferred arc torch with a rod-type cathode and an anode of 5 mm diameter. The torch was operated at a nominal power level of 15 kW with a nitrogen flow rate of 25 Nl min{sup -1}. A flat ion saturation region was found in the current-voltage curve of the probe. The ion saturation current to a cylindrical probe in a high-pressure non local thermal equilibrium (LTE) plasma was modeled. Thermal effects and ionization/recombination processes inside the probe perturbed region were taken into account. Averaged radial profiles of the electron and heavy particle temperatures as well as the electron density were obtained. An electron temperature around 11 000 K, a heavy particle temperature around 9500 K and an electron density of about 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} m{sup -3}, were found at the jet centre at 3.5 mm downstream from the torch exit. Large deviations from kinetic equilibrium were found throughout the plasma jet. The electron and heavy particle temperature profiles showed good agreement with those reported in the literature by using spectroscopic techniques. It was also found that the temperature radial profile based on LTE was very close to that of the electrons. The calculations have shown that this method is particularly useful for studying spraying-type plasma jets characterized by electron temperatures in the range 9000-14 000 K.

  3. Data processing of absorption spectra from photoionized plasma experiments at Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, I. M.; Durmaz, T.; Mancini, R. C. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    We discuss the processing of x-ray absorption spectra from photoionized plasma experiments at Z. The data was recorded with an imaging spectrometer equipped with two elliptically bent potassium acid phthalate (KAP) crystals. Both time-integrated and time-resolved data were recorded. In both cases, the goal is to obtain the transmission spectra for quantitative analysis of plasma conditions.

  4. High temperature UF6 RF plasma experiments applicable to uranium plasma core reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using a 1.2 MW RF induction heater facility to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor. Pure, high temperature uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon fluid mechanically confined, steady state, RF heated plasma while employing different exhaust systems and diagnostic techniques to simulate and investigate some potential characteristics of uranium plasma core nuclear reactors. The development of techniques and equipment for fluid mechanical confinement of RF heated uranium plasmas with a high density of uranium vapor within the plasma, while simultaneously minimizing deposition of uranium and uranium compounds on the test chamber peripheral wall, endwall surfaces, and primary exhaust ducts, is discussed. The material tests and handling techniques suitable for use with high temperature, high pressure, gaseous UF6 are described and the development of complementary diagnostic instrumentation and measurement techniques to characterize the uranium plasma, effluent exhaust gases, and residue deposited on the test chamber and exhaust system components is reported.

  5. Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for complex plasma experiments with flow

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, S; Sen, A

    2015-01-01

    A versatile table-top dusty plasma experimental device (DPEx) to study flow induced excitations of linear and nonlinear waves/structures in a complex plasma is presented. In this $\\Pi$-shaped apparatus a DC glow discharge plasma is produced between a disc shaped anode and a grounded long cathode tray by applying a high voltage DC in the background of a neutral gas and subsequently a dusty plasma is created by introducing micron sized dust particles that get charged and levitated in the sheath region. A flow of the dust particles is induced in a controlled manner by adjusting the pumping speed and the gas flow rate into the device. A full characterisation of the plasma, using Langmuir and emissive probe data, and that of the dusty plasma using particle tracking data with the help of an idl based (super) Particle Identification and Tracking (sPIT) code is reported. Experimental results on the variation of the dust flow velocity as a function of the neutral pressure and the gas flow rate are given. The potential...

  6. Experiments with an rf dusty plasma and an external plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticoş, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    A plasma jet produced in a coaxial plasma gun was aimed at a cloud of dust particles levitated in the sheath of a radio-frequency (rf) plasma produced between two parallel-plate electrodes. A high-speed camera with a side-view on the dust cloud was used to track the dust particles. Several cases of dust motion could be observed. When the jet was parallel with the horizontal electrodes of the rf plasma the dust particles were either pushed out of the trapping region by the plasma jet or were only perturbed from their equilibrium position, oscillating with a frequency of the order of a few kHz. In the first case the trajectory of the dust particles followed the curvature of the sheath. In the second case, when the jet was fired at a small angle with the horizontal electrodes the dust particles hit the bottom electrode and ricocheted back into the sheath. Finally, another situation was observed when the jet perturbed the rf plasma and its sheath and the whole dust crystal fell to the electrode.

  7. Global stability of plasmas with helical boundary deformation and net toroidal current against n=1,2 external modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardela, A.; Cooper, W.A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1996-09-01

    In this paper we resume a numerical study of the global stability of plasma with helical boundary deformation and non null net toroidal current. The aim was to see whether external modes with n=1,2 (n toroidal mode number) can be stabilized at values of {beta} inaccessible to the tokamak. L=2,3 configurations with several aspect ratios and different numbers of equilibrium field periods are considered. A large variety of toroidal current densities and different pressure profiles are taken into account. Mercier stability is also investigated. (author) 4 figs., 6 refs.

  8. Slowing of Magnetic Reconnection Concurrent with Weakening Plasma Inflows and Increasing Collisionality in Strongly Driven Laser-Plasma Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M J; Li, C K; Fox, W; Zylstra, A B; Stoeckl, C; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Petrasso, R D

    2015-05-22

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly driven, β≲20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvénic electron jets (V_{jet}∼20V_{A}) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early in time. The absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly driven regime.

  9. Theory, Computation and Experiment on Criticality and Stability of Vortices Separating from Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-15

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0313 Theory, computation and experiment on criticality and stability of vortices separating from edges Ashok Gopalarathnam...computation and experiment on criticality and stability of vortices separating from edges 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER - 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-13-1-0179...leading-edge suction on a finite wing reaches a critical value, LEV initiation takes place. The critical value is the same as that for the corresponding

  10. Experiments in chondrule formation: simulations of gas-grain collisions using plasma arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Morlock, Andreas; Sutton, Yvonne; Braithwaite, Nicholas St.J.; Grady, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the formation of chondrules in gas-grain collisions, we conducted experiments where mineral mixtures were melted in plasma arcs. First results already show silicate-rich spheres quite similar to chondrules.

  11. A Laboratory Plasma Experiment for Studying Magnetic Dynamics of Accretion Discs and Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, S C

    2002-01-01

    This work describes a laboratory plasma experiment and initial results which should give insight into the magnetic dynamics of accretion discs and jets. A high-speed multiple-frame CCD camera reveals images of the formation and helical instability of a collimated plasma, similar to MHD models of disc jets, and also plasma detachment associated with spheromak formation, which may have relevance to disc winds and flares. The plasmas are produced by a planar magnetized coaxial gun. The resulting magnetic topology is dependent on the details of magnetic helicity injection, namely the force-free state eigenvalue alpha_gun imposed by the coaxial gun.

  12. Experiment study of edge localized mode with plasma vertical jogging in HL-2A tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, N.; Chen, S. Y.; Song, X. M.; Mou, M. L.; Huang, J.; Wang, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Song, X.; Xia, F.; Jiang, M.; HL-2A Team

    2017-09-01

    The effect of plasma vertical jogging on edge localized modes (ELMs) is investigated in HL-2A tokamak. During the experiment, plasma jogging with a period of about 75 ms is performed, and the results show that both the ELM amplitude and period decrease when the plasma moves upward, which are qualitatively explained by the simulation based on the theory of peeling-ballooning mode including the resistivity effect. The upward movement of plasma causes a change in pedestal parameters, and then the dominant toroidal mode shifts to a relatively high-n mode with the effects of resistivity and diamagnetic, which lead to smaller ELM amplitudes.

  13. An enhancement of plasma density by neutral gas injection observed in SEPAC Spacelab-1 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Obayashi, T.; Kubota, S.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Williamson, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    An enhancement of plasma density observed during a neutral gas injection in Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators by the Space Shuttle/Spacelab-1 is presented. When a plume of nitrogen gas was injected from the orbiter into space, a large amount of plasma was detected by an onboard plasma probe. The observed density often increased beyond the background plasma density and was strongly dependent on the attitude of the orbiter with respect to the velocity vector. This effect has been explained by a collisional interaction between the injected gas molecules and the ionospheric ions relatively drifting at the orbital speed.

  14. Early results of microwave transmission experiments through an overly dense rectangular plasma sheet with microparticle injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Eric D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2014-06-01

    These experiments utilize a linear hollow cathode to create a dense, rectangular plasma sheet to simulate the plasma layer surrounding vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities within the Earth's atmosphere. Injection of fine dielectric microparticles significantly reduces the electron density and therefore lowers the electron plasma frequency by binding a significant portion of the bulk free electrons to the relatively massive microparticles. Measurements show that microwave transmission through this previously overly dense, impenetrable plasma layer increases with the injection of alumina microparticles approximately 60 μm in diameter. This method of electron depletion is a potential means of mitigating the radio communications blackout experienced by hypersonic vehicles.

  15. Digital holographic interferometry employing Fresnel transform reconstruction for the study of flow shear stabilized Z-pinch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M. P.; Shumlak, U.

    2016-10-01

    The ZaP-HD flow Z-pinch project provides a platform to explore how shear flow stabilized Z-pinches could scale to high-energy-density plasma (plasma with pressures exceeding 1 Mbar) and fusion reactor conditions. The Z-pinch is a linear plasma confinement geometry in which the plasma carries axial electric current and is confined by its self-induced magnetic field. ZaP-HD generates shear stabilized, axisymmetric Z-pinches with stable lifetimes approaching 60 μs. The goal of the project is to increase the plasma density and temperature compared to the previous ZaP project by compressing the plasma to smaller radii (≈1 mm). Radial and axial plasma electron density structure is measured using digital holographic interferometry (DHI), which provides the necessary fine spatial resolution. ZaP-HD's DHI system uses a 2 ns Nd:YAG laser pulse with a second harmonic generator (λ = 532 nm) to produce holograms recorded by a Nikon D3200 digital camera. The holograms are numerically reconstructed with the Fresnel transform reconstruction method to obtain the phase shift caused by the interaction of the laser beam with the plasma. This provides a two-dimensional map of line-integrated electron density, which can be Abel inverted to determine the local number density. The DHI resolves line-integrated densities down to 3 × 1020 m-2 with spatial resolution near 10 μm. This paper presents the first application of Fresnel transform reconstruction as an analysis technique for a plasma diagnostic, and it analyzes the method's accuracy through study of synthetic data. It then presents an Abel inversion procedure that utilizes data on both sides of a Z-pinch local number density profile to maximize profile symmetry. Error estimation and Abel inversion are applied to the measured data.

  16. Performance of water and hybrid stabilized electric arcs: the impact of dependence of radiation losses and plasma density on pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeništa, J.; Bartlová, M.; Aubrecht, V.

    2006-10-01

    Processes in the worldwide unique type of thermal plasma generator with water vortex stabilization and combined stabilization of arc by argon flow and water vortex have been numerically studied. Two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical model assumes laminar and compressible plasma flow in the state of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The calculation domain includes the arc discharge area between the near-cathode region and the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch. Radiation losses from the arc are calculated by the partial characteristics method for atmospheric pressure water and argon-water discharges. Thermal, electrical and fluid-dynamic characteristics of such arcs have been studied for the range of currents 150÷600 A under the assumption that radiation losses and plasma density depend linearly on pressure. It was proved that, taking this dependence into account, plasma velocity decrease while power losses from the arc by radiation and radial conduction increase with current. Outlet plasma temperature as well as electric potential drop remain practically unchanged.

  17. Overview of C-2 field-reversed configuration experiment plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gota, H., E-mail: hgota@trialphaenergy.com; Thompson, M. C.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M. W. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A comprehensive diagnostic suite for field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas has been developed and installed on the C-2 device at Tri Alpha Energy to investigate the dynamics of FRC formation as well as to understand key FRC physics properties, e.g., confinement and stability, throughout a discharge. C-2 is a unique, large compact-toroid merging device that produces FRC plasmas partially sustained for up to ∼5 ms by neutral-beam (NB) injection and end-on plasma-guns for stability control. Fundamental C-2 FRC properties are diagnosed by magnetics, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, and NB-related fast-ion/neutral diagnostics. These diagnostics (totaling >50 systems) are essential to support the primary goal of developing a deep understanding of NB-driven FRCs.

  18. Overview of C-2 field-reversed configuration experiment plasma diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, H; Thompson, M C; Tuszewski, M; Binderbauer, M W

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive diagnostic suite for field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas has been developed and installed on the C-2 device at Tri Alpha Energy to investigate the dynamics of FRC formation as well as to understand key FRC physics properties, e.g., confinement and stability, throughout a discharge. C-2 is a unique, large compact-toroid merging device that produces FRC plasmas partially sustained for up to ∼5 ms by neutral-beam (NB) injection and end-on plasma-guns for stability control. Fundamental C-2 FRC properties are diagnosed by magnetics, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, and NB-related fast-ion/neutral diagnostics. These diagnostics (totaling >50 systems) are essential to support the primary goal of developing a deep understanding of NB-driven FRCs.

  19. Star formation from dark filamentary clouds: Gravitational stability of a cylindrical plasma with an azimuthal and axial magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    McLeman, James A; Bingham, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The precise process by which dark filamentary clouds collapse to form stars is a subject of intense debate. In this paper we consider a cylindrical distribution of plasma with both axial and azimuthal magnetic field and examine the resulting gravitational stability. The azimuthal magnetic field is created from an electric current in the plasma and is found to be dictated by Ampere's law. We model this system by using the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equation to derive a new virial theorem. We can reduce it to the virial theorem due to Chandrasekhar and Fermi (1953) if we remove the azimuthal magnetic field, as this will represent the case which they have considered. This new virial theorem gives us a fresh insight into the stability of the system. We also derive from this new virial theorem the case where there is only an azimuthal magnetic field. Our generalised stability condition allows for a possible electric current within realistic astronomical values.

  20. Quantification of fumarate and investigation of endogenous and exogenous fumarate stability in rat plasma by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yao; Tse, Susanna; Rago, Brian; Yapa, Udeni; Li, Fumin; Fast, Douglas M

    2016-04-01

    Fumaric acid is a commonly used excipient in pharmaceutical products. It is not known if its presence may lead to fluctuation of endogenous fumarate levels. An LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated to quantify fumarate in support of a toxicokinetics study. Stability evaluation showed that endogenous fumarate was stable for 6 h at room temperature, while exogenously added fumaric acid was converted to malate within 1 h due to the presence of fumarase. Citric acid, a fumarase inhibitor, prevented the conversion of added fumaric acid in rat plasma. The method was validated in citric acid stabilized rat plasma using a surrogate matrix approach. A discrepancy in stability was observed between endogenous fumarate and exogenously added fumaric acid.

  1. ECH/EBW Plasma Coupling and Heating Experiments on the Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Tim; Caughman, John; Caneses, Juan; Diem, Stephanie; Goulding, Richard; Kafle, Nischal; Rapp, Juergen

    2016-10-01

    ECH and EBW have been under development on the Proto-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment device (Proto-MPEX) to provide additional plasma electron heating. Proto-MPEX has a linear magnetic field configuration and a helicon plasma source that forms a high-density medium-temperature central core plasma of typically 0.08m diameter. A plasma density of up to 6x1019m-3 is generated which is >6 times over-dense for 28 GHz microwave power available from the experiment's gyrotron system. Modeling using Genray-C code has indicated that some heating of the plasma core should be possible at this frequency using the optimum O-X-EBW coupling scheme. Several improvements to the waveguide system have been made to increase the reliable operating power level and launch beam quality. To improve the plasma heating efficiency, work is underway to optimize the beam launch by adding a remotely adjustable launch angle, adding a polarization rotating miter bend, moving the launch point closer to the plasma edge and providing some beam focusing. Preliminary heating experiments have indicated some over-dense heating has been achieved. A launch power of 75 kW has been achieved out of a possible 150 kW. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  2. High power microwave source for a plasma wakefield experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafir, G.; Shlapakovski, A.; Siman-Tov, M.; Bliokh, Yu.; Leopold, J. G.; Gleizer, S.; Gad, R.; Rostov, V. V.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2017-01-01

    The results of the generation of a high-power microwave (˜550 MW, 0.5 ns, ˜9.6 GHz) beam and feasibility of wakefield-excitation with this beam in under-dense plasma are presented. The microwave beam is generated by a backward wave oscillator (BWO) operating in the superradiance regime. The BWO is driven by a high-current electron beam (˜250 keV, ˜1.5 kA, ˜5 ns) propagating through a slow-wave structure in a guiding magnetic field of 2.5 T. The microwave beam is focused at the desired location by a dielectric lens. Experimentally obtained parameters of the microwave beam at its waist are used for numerical simulations, the results of which demonstrate the formation of a bubble in the plasma that has almost 100% electron density modulation and longitudinal and transverse electric fields of several kV/cm.

  3. Drift waves and chaos in a LAPTAG plasma physics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Birge-Lee, Henry; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Wolman, Ben; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Patankar, Vedang; Bridges, Gabriel; Buckley-Bonanno, Samuel; Buckley, Susan; Ge, Andrew; Thomas, Sam

    2016-02-01

    In a project involving an alliance between universities and high schools, a magnetized plasma column with a steep pressure gradient was established in an experimental device. A two-dimensional probe measured fluctuations in the plasma column in a plane transverse to the background magnetic field. Correlation techniques determined that the fluctuations were that of electrostatic drift waves. The time series data were used to generate the Bandt-Pompe entropy and Jensen-Shannon complexity for the data. These quantities, when plotted against one another, revealed that a combination of drift waves and other background fluctuations were a deterministically chaotic system. Our analysis can be used to tell the difference between deterministic chaos and random noise, making it a potentially useful technique in nonlinear dynamics.

  4. High Magnetic field generation for laser-plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, B B; Froula, D H; Davis, P F; Ross, J S; Fulkerson, S; Bower, J; Satariano, J; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2006-05-01

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the effect of magnetic fields on electron thermal transport in laser plasmas. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system suppling 30 kJ, achieves magnetic fields of 13 T. The field strength was measured on the solenoid axis with a magnetic probe and optical Zeeman splitting. The measurements agree well with analytical estimates. A method for optimizing the solenoid design to achieve magnetic fields exceeding 20 T is presented.

  5. Plasma Flows within the Context of Biasing Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Tendler

    2004-01-01

    The understanding and reduction of turbulent transport in magnetic confinement devices is not only an academic task, but also the matter of practical interest, since high confinement is chosen as the regime for ITER and possible future reactors it reduces both the size and the cost. Since the pioneering work on CCT a lot of work has been devoted to the effect of electric field biasing carried out on many tokamaks, which in general leads to a strongly varying radial electric fields as a function of radius and a resulting sheared E ×B flow, giving rise to improved confinement properties.The issue of plasma flows is utterly fundamental for understanding of tokamaks aimed at the achievement of fusion energy. This appears in the well known neoclassical theory as the most accomplished and self-consistent basis for understanding of fusion plasmas. It pertains to the novel concept of "zonal flows" emerging from the recent development of gyro-kinetic transport codes. The poloidal and toroidal flows are also crucial for the concept of the electric field shear suppression of plasma turbulence in tokamaks. Yet, this timely and topical issue has remained largely unaddressed experimentally because of great difficulties of measuring flows in plasmas.Recently, the team of scientists from all over the world developed innovative configuration of probes yielding the flow velocity locally. This timely and topical diagnostics has been successfully applied on many tokamaks ranging from the huge JET through medium TEXTOR to a small CASTOR due to the excellent collaboration and coordination between research teams. Results caused large interest of fusion community born out by numerous invited talks delivered at the major international meetings.

  6. The effect of artificial gravity on plasma and tissue lipids in rats: The Cosmos 936 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlers, I.; Praslička, M.; Tigranyan, R. A.

    Plasma and tissue lipids in male SPF Wistar rats flown for 18.5 days aboard the Cosmos 936 biosatellite were analyzed. One group of rats was subjected to artificial gravity by use of a centrifuge during the flight. An experiment simulating known space flight factors other than weightlessness was done on Earth. An increase of total cholesterol in plasma, of nonesterified fatty acids in plasma and brown adipose tissue, of triacylglycerols in plasma, liver, thymus and bone marrow was noted several hours after biosatellite landing. Smaller changes were observed in the terrestrial control experiment. With the exception of triacylglycerol accumulation in bone marrow, these increases disappeared 25 days after biosatellite landing. Exposing the rats aboard the biosatellite to artificial gravity was beneficial in the sense that such exposure inhibited the phospholipid and triacylglycerol increase in plasma and inhibited the increase of triacylglycerol in liver and especially in bone marrow.

  7. Registration of ELF waves in rocket-satellite experiment with plasma injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobeinikov, V. G.; Oraevskii, V. N.; Ruzhin, Iu. Ia.; Sobolev, Ia. P.; Skomarovskii, V. S.; Chmyrev, V. M.; Namazov, C. A.; Pokhunkov, A. A.; Nesmeianov, V. I.

    1992-12-01

    Two rocket KOMBI-SAMA experiments with plasma injection at height 100-240 km were performed in August 1987 in the region of Brazilian magnetic anomaly (L = 1.25). The launching time of the rocket was determined so that plasma injection was at the time when COSMOS 1809 satellite passed as close as possible to magnetic tube of injection. Caesium plasma jet was produced during not less than 300 s by an electric plasma generator separated from the payload. When the satellite passed the geomagnetic tube intersecting the injection region an enhancement of ELF emission at 140 Hz, 450 Hz by a factor of 2 was registered on board the satellite. An enhancement of energetic particle flux by a factor of 4-5 was registered on board the rocket. Observed ELF emission below 100 Hz is interpreted as the generation of oblique electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves due to drift plasma instability at the front of the plasma jet.

  8. Divertor plasma physics experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdavi, M.A.; Allen, S.L.; Evans, T.E. [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the results and conclusions of our most recent divertor physics and development work. Using an array of new divertor diagnostics we have measured the plasma parameters over the entire divertor volume and gained new insights into several divertor physics issues. We present direct experimental evidence for momentum loss along the field lines, large heat convection, and copious volume recombination during detachment. These observations are supported by improved UEDGE modeling incorporating impurity radiation. We have demonstrated divertor exhaust enrichment of neon and argon by action of a forced scrape off layer (SOL) flow and demonstrated divertor pumping as a substitute for conventional wall conditioning. We have observed a divertor radiation zone with a parallel extent that is an order of magnitude larger than that estimated from a 1-D conduction limited model of plasma at coronal equilibrium. Using density profile control by divertor pumping and pellet injection we have attained H-mode confinement at densities above the Greenwald limit. Erosion rates of several candidate ITER plasma facing materials are measured and compared with predictions of a numerical model.

  9. CO2 Laser Beat-Wave Experiment in an Unmagnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Hwang, David; Horton, Robert; Hong, Sean; Evans, Russell

    2012-10-01

    The ability to remotely generate plasma current in dense plasmas is a basic yet important investigation in experimental plasma physics and fusion energy research. It is even more advantageous if the wave penetration is independent of the electron acceleration process. Plasma current can be generated through beat-wave mixing process by launching two intense electromagnetic waves (φ>>φpe) into plasma. The beat wave formation process can be efficient if the difference frequency of the two pump waves is matched to a local resonant frequency of the medium, i.e. in this case the local plasma frequency. Beat wave can accelerate plasma electrons via quasi-linear Landau process, which has been demonstrated in a low-density plasma using microwaves.footnotetextRogers, J. H. and Hwang, D. Q., Phys. Rev. Lett. v68 p3877 (1992). The CO2 lasers provide the high tunability for the wave-particle interaction experiment at a variety of plasma densities with plasma frequency in THz range. Two sections of Lumonics TEA CO2 lasers have been modified to serve as the two pump wave sources with peak power over 100MW. The development of the tunable CO2 lasers, a high-density plasma target source and diagnostics system will be presented. The initial results of unbalanced beat-wave experiment using one high-power pulsed and one low-power CW CO2 lasers will be presented and discussed using the independent plasma source to control the φpe of the interaction region. This work is supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-FG02-10ER55083.

  10. Direct measurements of the damping of Alfven eigenmodes for an assessment of their stability limits in Tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panis, T.

    2010-12-15

    Direct damping rate measurements of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) are obtained using the active MHD spectroscopy system installed on the JET tokamak. The system was recently equipped with new antennas, designed to study especially the modes of intermediate toroidal mode number n, ¦n¦ = 3 -- 15, as the AEs of this range are most prone to destabilization by the fast particles in JET and in future burning plasma experiments such as ITER. The broad n-spectrum that is driven by the new antennas and the more localized structure of intermediate-n AEs has important implications for the ability to measure damping rates of intermediate n. To obtain an extended database of high accuracy individual-n measurements, experimental work on technical and engineering aspects was indispensable both on the excitation side and on the detection side. On the excitation side, the electrical model of the AE exciter has been constructed during this thesis. The model is used to determine the operational capabilities of the exciter with the new antennas, to optimize the antenna currents and to design the relevant impedance matching circuits. On the detection side, the excitation of multiple-n, degenerate AEs at close frequencies prompted for a sophisticated method to correctly estimate the n-spectrum of the plasma response. To this end, a sparse spectrum representation method was adapted to deal with the complex and real-time data produced by the active MHD spectroscopy system. The n-decomposition of the plasma response requires an accurate relative calibration of the magnetic pick-up coils. An in situ method was developed and applied for the calibration of the coils using the direct coupling to the new AE antennas. A large collection of damping rate measurements of, mainly, toroidal AEs (TAEs) was obtained during the 2008/2009 JET experimental campaigns following the technical optimization of the antenna system. Selected measurements of ¦n¦ = 3, 4 and ¦n¦ = 7 TAEs are compared to the plasma

  11. Plasma Spraying and Characterization of Tungsten Carbide-Cobalt Coatings by the Water-Stabilized System WSP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Ctibor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide-cobalt powders (WC-17wt% Co were plasma sprayed by a water-stabilized system WSP. Experiments with variable feeding distances and spray distances were carried out. Thinner coatings were deposited on carbon steel substrates and thicker coatings on stainless steel substrates to compare different cooling conditions. Basic characterization of coatings was done by XRD, SEM, and light microscopy plus image analysis. Microhardness was measured on polished cross-sections. The main focus of investigation was resistance against wear in dry as well as wet conditions. The appropriate tests were performed with set-ups based on ASTM G65 and G75, respectively. The influence of spray parameters onto coating wear performance was observed. The results of mechanical tests were discussed in connection with changes of phase composition and with the quality of the coating's microstructure. The results show that for obtaining the best possible WC-17Co coating with WSP process, from the viewpoint of wear resistance, the desired parameters combination is long feeding distance combined with short spray distance.

  12. Role of external magnetic field and current closure in the force balance mechanism of a magnetically stabilized plasma torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    G, Ravi; Goyal, Vidhi

    2012-10-01

    Experimental investigations on the role of applied external magnetic field and return current closure in the force balance mechanism of a plasma torch are reported. The plasma torch is of low power and has wall, gas and magnetic stabilization mechanisms incorporated in it. Gas flow is divided into two parts: axial-central and peripheral-shroud, applied magnetic field is axial and return current is co-axial. Results indicate that application of large external magnetic field gives rise to not only J x B force but also, coupled with gas flow, to a new drag-cum-centrifugal force that acts on the plasma arc root and column. The magnetic field also plays a role in the return current closure dynamics and thus in the overall force balance mechanism. This in turn affects the electro-thermal efficiency of the plasma torch. Detailed experimental results, analytical calculations and physical model representing the processes will be presented and discussed.

  13. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Final experiment design, monitoring results and observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Christer [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Eng, Anders [Acuo Engineering AB, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2005-12-15

    The field part of the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) was finished in 2004. The experiment was designed to induce and monitor the process of brittle failure, spalling, in a fractured rock mass under controlled conditions. The field part was successfully conducted and a large data set was obtained. This report presents the final design of the experiment, the results of the monitoring, and the observations made during the spalling process and when the spalled rock was removed. When heating of the rock was initiated the rock responded quickly. After only a few days the spalling process was activated in the notch, as indicated by the acoustic emission system, and shortly thereafter displacement readings were recorded. Contraction (radial expansion) of the rock was recorded by several instruments before the notch reached the instrument levels. This contraction is probably the result of a 3D re-distribution of the stresses. The temperature increase in the system was both slower and reached a steady state much earlier than predicted by the numerical models. The propagation of the notch was therefore halted after approximately one month of heating. The power to the electrical heaters was therefore doubled. Spalling then started up again, and in one month's time it had propagated to a depth of approximately five metres in the hole. A second steady state was now reached, but this time the heater power was kept constant for a while to let the rock settle before the confinement pressure was reduced from 700 kPa to 0 in decrements of 50 kPa. The rock mass response to the pressure drop was very limited until the pressure was lowered to approximately 200 kPa (the atmospheric pressure is not included in the given pressure values). Large displacements and a high acoustic emission hit frequency were then measured in the open hole. After the de-pressurization of the confined hole, the heaters were left on for approximately one week

  14. Advanced oxidation protein products in plasma: stability during storage and correlation with other clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, E; Biasci, E; Giampietro, O

    2001-12-01

    Proteins are susceptible to free radical damage. We measured advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) in the plasma of 56 hospitalised patients. Concentrations of AOPP were expressed as chloramine-T equivalents by measuring absorbance in acidic conditions at 340 nm in the presence of potassium iodide. We also determined erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), circulating urea, creatinine, glucose, uric acid, electrolytes, lipids, total proteins and fractions and fibrinogen. Twenty-four samples were processed both immediately and after 7, 15, 30, 90, 180 and 438 days of storage at both at -20 degrees C and -80 degrees C (aliquots were frozen and thawed only once) to evaluate AOPP stability. The remaining 32 samples were also processed for thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substances (TBARS). Mean AOPP concentration in all 56 patients was 48.3+/-37.2 microM. Mean basal concentration of AOPP in the 24 plasma samples (55.0+/-47.1 microM) showed no significant change at each intermediate determination, yet significantly increased after 438 days of storage both at -80 degrees C (96.6+/-83.2, p<0.01) and, markedly, at -20 degrees C (171.3+/-94.6, p<0.001). TBARS concentration was 1.59+/-0.65 micromol/l. Multiple regression analysis evidenced that AOPP concentration was positively correlated (multiple r=0.62, p<0.001) with serum urea and triglycerides, but negatively correlated with patient age (indeed, serum albumin and total proteins decreased with increasing age, r=0.3, p<0.05). TBARS concentration was associated with ESR and serum glucose (multiple r=0.73, p<0.001), yet positively with AOPP (r=0.39, simple p<0.05). We conclude that AOPP remain stable during sample storage both at -20 degrees C and -80 degrees C for 6 months. Renal failure and hypertriglyceridemia probably enhance the in vivo process of AOPP formation. Oxidative damage as measured by TBARS may be increased because of exposure to hyperglycemia causing nonenzymatic glycation of plasma proteins.

  15. Experiments on Plasma Turbulence Created by Supersonic Plasma Flows with Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    afterglow the primaries are absent and the secondaries have a Maxwellian distribution. Probes are usually used to measure the energy distribution, but...floating potential and ion current are non -perturbing. But for a positive probe bias the probe raises the plasma potential when it is the only electron

  16. Pre-conceptual design activities for the materials plasma exposure experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsdaine, Arnold, E-mail: lumsdainea@ornl.gov; Rapp, Juergen; Varma, Venugopal; Bjorholm, Thomas; Bradley, Craig; Caughman, John; Duckworth, Robert; Goulding, Richard; Graves, Van; Giuliano, Dominic; Lessard, Timothy; McGinnis, Dean; Meitner, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The development of long-pulse nuclear fusion devices requires testing plasma facing components at reactor relevant conditions. • The pre-conceptual design of a proposed linear plasma facility is presented. • Engineering considerations for multiple systems—plasma source and heating, magnet, vacuum, water cooling, and target, are presented. - Abstract: The development of next step fusion facilities such as DEMO or a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) requires first closing technology gaps in some critical areas. Understanding the material-plasma interface is necessary to enable the development of divertors for long-pulse plasma facilities. A pre-conceptual design for a proposed steady-state linear plasma device, the Materials Plasma Exposure Experiment (MPEX), is underway. A helicon plasma source along with ion cyclotron and electron Bernstein wave heating systems will produce ITER divertor relevant plasma conditions with steady-state parallel heat fluxes of up to 40 MW/m{sup 2} with ion fluxes up to 10{sup 24}/m{sup 2} s on target. Current plans are for the device to use superconducting magnets to produce 1–2 T fields. As a steady-state device, active cooling will be required for components that interact with the plasma (targets, limiters, etc.), as well as for other plasma facing components (transport regions, vacuum tanks, diagnostic ports). Design concepts for the vacuum system, the cooling system, and the plasma heating systems have been completed. The device will include the capability for handling samples that have been neutron irradiated in order to consider the multivariate effects of neutrons, plasma, and high heat-flux on the microstructure of divertor candidate materials. A vacuum cask, which can be disconnected from the high field environment in order to perform in-vacuo diagnosis of the surface evolution is also planned for the facility.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF YTTRIA AND MAGNESIA PARTIALLY STABILIZED ZIRCONIA BIOCOMPATIBLE COATINGS DEPOSITED BY PLASMA SPRAYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roşu R. A.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia (ZrO2 is a biocompatible ceramic material which is successfully used in medicine to cover the metallic implants by various methods. In order to avoid the inconvenients related to structural changes which may appear because of the temperature treatment while depositing the zirconia layer over the metallic implant, certain oxides are added, the most used being Y2O3, MgO and CaO. This paper presents the experimental results regarding the deposition of yttria (Y2O3 and magnesia (MgO partially stabilized zirconia layers onto titanium alloy substrate by plasma spraying method. X ray diffraction investigations carried out both on the initial powders and the coatings evidenced the fact that during the thermal spraying process the structure has not been significantly modified, consisting primarily of zirconium oxide with tetragonal structure. Electronic microscopy analyses show that the coatings are dense, uniform and cracks-free. Adherence tests performed on samples whose thickness ranges between 160 and 220 μm showed that the highest value (23.5 MPa was obtained for the coating of ZrO2 - 8 wt. % Y2O3 with 160 μm thickness. The roughness values present an increasing tendency with increasing the coatings thickness.

  18. Dynamics and stability of divertor detachment in H-mode plasmas on JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, A. R.; Balboa, I.; Drewelow, P.; Flanagan, J.; Guillemaut, C.; Harrison, J. R.; Huber, A.; Huber, V.; Lipschultz, B.; Matthews, G.; Meigs, A.; Schmitz, J.; Stamp, M.; Walkden, N.; contributors, JET

    2017-09-01

    The dynamics and stability of divertor detachment in {{{N}}}2 seeded, type-I, ELMy H-mode plasmas with dominant NBI heating in the JET ITER-like wall device is studied by means of an integrated analysis of diagnostic data from several systems, classifying data relative to the ELM times. It is thereby possible to study the response of the detachment evolution to the control parameters (SOL input power, upstream density and impurity fraction) prevailing during the inter-ELM periods and the effect of ELMs on the detached divertor. A relatively comprehensive overview is achieved, including the interaction with the targets at various stages of the ELM cycle, the role of ELMs in affecting the detachment process and the overall performance of the scenario. The results are consistent with previous studies in devices with an ITER-like, metal wall, with the important advance of distinguishing data from intra- and inter-ELM periods. Operation without significant degradation of the core confinement can be sustained in the presence of strong radiation from the x-point region (MARFE).

  19. Experiments on the transportation of a magnetized plasma stream in the GOL-3 facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postupaev, V. V.; Batkin, V. I.; Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kuklin, K. N.; Mekler, K. I.; Rovenskikh, A. F.

    2016-04-01

    The program of the deep upgrade of the GOL-3 multiple-mirror trap is presented. The upgrade is aimed at creating a new GOL-NB open trap located at the GOL-3 site and intended to directly demonstrate the efficiency of using multiple-mirror magnetic cells to improve longitudinal plasma confinement in a gasdynamic open trap. The GOL-NB device will consist of a new central trap, adjoint cells with a multiple-mirror magnetic field, and end tanks (magnetic flux expanders). Plasma in the central trap will be heated by neutral beam injection with a power of up to 1.5 MW and duration of 1 ms. At present, physical experiments directed at developing plasma technologies that are novel for this facility are being carried out using the 6-m-long autonomous part of the GOL-3 solenoid. The aim of this work was to develop a method for filling the central trap with a low-temperature start plasma. Transportation of a plasma stream from an arc source over a distance of 3 m in a uniform magnetic field with an induction of 0.5-4.5 T is demonstrated. In these experiments, the axial plasma density was (1-4) × 1020 m-3 and the mirror ratio varied from 5 to 60. In general, the experiments confirmed the correctness of the adopted decisions for the start plasma source of the GOL-NB device.

  20. Washer-Gun Plasma Source for Magnetic Reconnection Experiments on VTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrublevskis, A.; Egedal, J.; Fox, W.; Katz, N.; Le, A.; Porkolab, M.

    2009-11-01

    We present a recently built electrostatic washer-gun plasma source for the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF). The source produces plasmas with estimated densities of ˜10^19 m^- 3 and electron temperatures of ˜5-20 eV. The present plasma source for VTF is microwave-induced electron cyclotron resonant breakdown and requires a strong toroidal magnetic field, which acts as a guide field in reconnection experiments. The gun will allow reconnection experiments with no guide field. The source is based on the design developed by Sterling Scientific [1, 2]. To operate, gas is injected into a channel formed by a stack of alternating molybdenum and boron nitride washers with a molybdenum electrode washer at each end. A capacitor bank is discharged through these electrodes and the gas. The resulting plasma escapes the channel into the main chamber of the experiment. If available, we will present data on argon plasma produced by the gun inside the VTF. [1ex] [1] G. Fiksel, et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol., 5, 78 (1996)[0ex] [2] D. Hartog et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol., 6, 492 (1997)

  1. PKE-Nefedov: plasma crystal experiments on the International Space Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefedov, Anatoli P [Institute for High Energy Densities, Russian Academy of Sciences, 127412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Morfill, Gregor E [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Fortov, Vladimir E [Institute for High Energy Densities, Russian Academy of Sciences, 127412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Thomas, Hubertus M [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Rothermel, Hermann [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Hagl, Tanja [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Ivlev, Alexei V [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Zuzic, Milenko [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Klumov, Boris A [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Lipaev, Andrey M [Institute for High Energy Densities, Russian Academy of Sciences, 127412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Molotkov, Vladimir I [Institute for High Energy Densities, Russian Academy of Sciences, 127412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Petrov, Oleg F [Institute for High Energy Densities, Russian Academy of Sciences, 127412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gidzenko, Yuri P [Y Gagarin Cosmonauts Training Centre, 141160 Star City, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Krikalev, Sergey K [SP Korolev RSC Energia, Korolev 141070, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Shepherd, William [Expedition 1 Crew, International Space Station (ISS) (Country Unknown)] [and others

    2003-04-01

    The plasma crystal experiment PKE-Nefedov, the first basic science experiment on the International Space Station (ISS), was installed in February 2001 by the first permanent crew. It is designed for long-term investigations of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions. 'Complex plasmas' contain ions, electrons, neutrals and small solid particles - normally in the micrometre range. These microparticles obtain thousands of elementary charges and interact with each other via a 'screened' Coulomb potential. Complex plasmas are of special interest, because they can form liquid and crystalline states (Thomas et al 1994 Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 652-5, Chu and I 1994 Phys. Rev. Lett. 72 4009-12) and are observable at the kinetic level. In experiments on Earth the microparticles are usually suspended against gravity in strong electric fields. This creates asymmetries, stresses and pseudo-equilibrium states with sufficient free energy to readily become unstable. Under microgravity conditions the microparticles move into the bulk of the plasma (Morfill et al 1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 1598), experiencing much weaker volume forces than on Earth. This allows investigations of the thermodynamics of strongly coupled plasma states under substantially stress-free conditions. In this first paper we report our results on plasma crystals, in particular the first experimental observations of bcc lattice structures.

  2. Effect of low temperature plasma treatment on dimensional stability of wool fabrics. Yomo orimono no sunpo fuanteisei ni oyobosu teion plasma shori no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, T.; Wakita, T. (Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering and Design); Hosotani, T. (Unitika Research Laboratories Inc., Osaka (Japan))

    1991-07-10

    This report describes the effect of low temperature plasma treatment, which has been developed for fabric processing, on wool fabrics. In the experiment, wool fabrics were treated by low temperature plasma using O{sub 2}, Ar, CH{sub 4}, CHF{sub 3}, and CF{sub 4}. Low temperature plasma treatment did not influence moisture regain of wool fabrics, but influenced hygral expansion. There was no difference in the area of low humidity, however, dimensional change was restricted by half in the area of high humidity. Low temperature plasma treatment also improved felt shrinkage caused by home laundering. Moreover, it was found that friction coefficient of wool fabrics increased remarkably after low temperature plasma treatment. Therefore, the subsequent reactive silicone elastmer softening agent was used for finishing process after low temperature plasma treatment. As a result, wool fabrics hardened by low temperature plasma treatment regained their soft condition and washing resistant shrinkage percentage was also improved. Thus this treatment was proved to be used practically. 15 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Stabilization of a premixed methane-air flame with a high repetition nanosecond laser-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Li, Xiaohui; An, Xiaokang; Yu, Xin; Fan, Rongwei; Chen, Deying; Sun, Rui

    2017-07-01

    Laser-induced plasma ignition has been applied in various combustion systems, however, work on flame stabilization with repetitive laser-induced plasma (LIP) is rather limited. In this paper, stabilization of a premixed methane-air flame with a high repetition nanosecond LIP is reported. The plasma energy coupling and the temporal evolution of the flame kernels generated by the LIPs are investigated with different laser repetition rates, i.e., 1 Hz, 100 Hz and 250 Hz, respectively. The plasma energy coupling is not affected in the air flow and in the premixed methane-air flow with the applied laser repetition rates. Continuous combustion flame stabilization has been achieved with LIPs of 100 Hz and 250 Hz, in terms of catch-up and merging of the consecutive flame kernels. The flame kernel formed by the last LIP does not affect the evolution of the newly formed flame kernel by the next LIP. The catch-up distance, defined as the distance from the LIP initiation site to the flame kernel catch-up position, is estimated for different laser repetition rates based on the temporal evolution of the flame kernels. A higher laser repetition rate will lead to a shorter catch-up distance which is beneficial for flame stabilization. The up limit for the laser repetition rate to realize effective flame stabilization is determined from the critical inter-pulse delay defined from the onset of the LIP to the return of the initially contraflow propagating lower front to the LIP initiation site. The up limit is 377 Hz under the flow conditions of this work (equivalence ratio of 1, flow speed of 2 m/s, and Reynolds number of 1316).

  4. Laboratory Experiments on Propagating Plasma Bubbles into Vacuum, Vacuum Magnetic Field, and Background Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Alan G.; Zhang, Yue; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the dynamics of plasma ``bubbles'' as they propagate through a variety of background media. These bubbles are formed by a pulsed coaxial gun with an externally applied magnetic field. Bubble parameters are typically ne ~1020 m-3, Te ~ 5 - 10 eV, and Ti ~ 10 - 15 eV. The structure of the bubbles can range from unmagnetized jet-like structures to spheromak-like structures with complex magnetic flux surfaces. Some of the background media the bubbles interact with are vacuum, vacuum with magnetic field, and other magnetized plasmas. These bubbles exhibit different qualitative behavior depending on coaxial gun parameters such as gas species, gun current, and gun bias magnetic field. Their behavior also depends on the parameters of the background they propagate through. Multi-frame fast camera imaging and magnetic probe data are used to characterize the bubble evolution under various conditions.

  5. Letter of Intent for a Demonstration Experiment in Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Assmann, R; Bingham, R; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Delerue, N; Dias, F M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Elsen, E; Fartoukh, S; Ferreira, C M; Fonseca, R A; Geschonke, G; Goddard, B; Gruelke, O; Hessler, C; Hillenbrand, S; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jarozinsky, D; Jolly, S; Joshi, C; Kumar, N; Lu, W; Lopes, N; Kaur, M; Lotov, K; Malka, V; Meddahi, M; Mete, O; Mori, W B; Mueller, A; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Norreys, P; Osterhoff, J; Pozimski, J; Pukhov, A; Reimann, O; Roesler, S; Ruhl, H; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, B; Schmitt, H v d; Schoening, A; Seryi, A; Simon, F; Silva, L O; Tajima, T; Trines, R; Tueckmantel, T; Upadhyay, A; Vieira, J; Willi, O; Wing, M; Xia, G; Yakimenko, V; Yan, X; Zimmermann, F; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2011-01-01

    We propose an experiment on proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PDPWA) which could lead to a future TeV-scale e+- collider of much reduced length compared to conventional designs. Proton bunches are ideal drivers for high energy lepton accelerators, with the potential of reducing drastically the number of required driver stages. By using a plasma to modulate a long proton bunch, a strong plasma wave can be generated by a series of ‘micro-bunches’, so that an experimental program can start today with the existing proton beams. In this letter of intent, we propose a demonstration experiment using the existing CERN SPS beam. This project would be the first beam-driven wakefield acceleration experiment in Europe, and the first proton-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration experiment worldwide. We have set as an initial goal the demonstration of 1 GeV energy gain for electrons in 10 m of plasma. A proposal for reaching 100 GeV within 100 m of plasma will be developed using results from the initial roun...

  6. Theory and experiments characterizing hypervelocity impact plasmas on biased spacecraft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nicolas; Close, Sigrid; Goel, Ashish; Lauben, David; Linscott, Ivan; Johnson, Theresa; Strauss, David; Bugiel, Sebastian; Mocker, Anna; Srama, Ralf

    2013-03-01

    Space weather including solar activity and background plasma sets up spacecraft conditions that can magnify the threat from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity impactors include both meteoroids, traveling between 11 and 72 km/s, and orbital debris, with typical impact speeds of 10 km/s. When an impactor encounters a spacecraft, its kinetic energy is converted over a very short timescale into energy of vaporization and ionization, resulting in a small, dense plasma. This plasma can produce radio frequency (RF) emission, causing electrical anomalies within the spacecraft. In order to study this phenomenon, we conducted ground-based experiments to study hypervelocity impact plasmas using a Van de Graaff dust accelerator. Iron projectiles ranging from 10-16 g to 10-11 g were fired at speeds of up to 70 km/s into a variety of target materials under a range of surface charging conditions representative of space weather effects. Impact plasmas associated with bare metal targets as well as spacecraft materials were studied. Plasma expansion models were developed to determine the composition and temperature of the impact plasma, shedding light on the plasma dynamics that can lead to spacecraft electrical anomalies. The dependence of these plasma properties on target material, impact speed, and surface charge was analyzed. Our work includes three major results. First, the initial temperature of the impact plasma is at least an order of magnitude lower than previously reported, providing conditions more favorable for sustained RF emission. Second, the composition of impact plasmas from glass targets, unlike that of impact plasmas from tungsten, has low dependence on impact speed, indicating a charge production mechanism that is significant down to orbital debris speeds. Finally, negative ion formation has a strong dependence on target material. These new results can inform the design and operation of spacecraft in order to mitigate future impact-related space weather

  7. A large-scale forest fragmentation experiment: the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems Project

    OpenAIRE

    Ewers, Robert M.; Didham, Raphael K.; Fahrig, Lenore; Ferraz, Gonçalo; Hector, Andy; Holt, Robert D; Kapos, Valerie; Reynolds, Glen; Sinun, Waidi; Snaddon, Jake L.; Turner, Edgar C.

    2011-01-01

    Opportunities to conduct large-scale field experiments are rare, but provide a unique opportunity to reveal the complex processes that operate within natural ecosystems. Here, we review the design of existing, large-scale forest fragmentation experiments. Based on this review, we develop a design for the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) Project, a new forest fragmentation experiment to be located in the lowland tropical forests of Borneo (Sabah, Malaysia). The SAFE Project repres...

  8. Instantaneous charge state of Uranium projectiles in fully ionized plasmas from energy loss experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Morales, Roberto; Casas, David

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous charge state of uranium ions traveling through a fully ionized hydrogen plasma has been theoretically studied and compared with one of the first energy loss experiments in plasmas, carried out at GSI-Darmstadt by Hoffmann \\textit{et al.} in the 90's. For this purpose, two different methods to estimate the instantaneous charge state of the projectile have been employed: (1) rate equations using ionization and recombination cross sections, and (2) equilibrium charge state formulas for plasmas. Also, the equilibrium charge state has been obtained using these ionization and recombination cross sections, and compared with the former equilibrium formulas. The equilibrium charge state of projectiles in plasmas is not always reached, it depends mainly on the projectile velocity and the plasma density. Therefore, a non-equilibrium or an instantaneous description of the projectile charge is necessary. The charge state of projectile ions cannot be measured, except after exiting the target, and experime...

  9. Flow dynamics and magnetic induction in the von-Karman plasma experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Plihon, Nicolas; Palermo, Francesco; Morales, Jorge A; Bos, Wouter; Godeferd, Fabien S; Bourgoin, Mickaël; Pinton, Jean-François; Moulin, M; Aanesland, Ane

    2014-01-01

    The von-Karman plasma experiment is a novel versatile experimental device designed to explore the dynamics of basic magnetic induction processes and the dynamics of flows driven in weakly magnetized plasmas. A high-density plasma column (10^16 - 10^19 particles.m^-3) is created by two radio-frequency plasma sources located at each end of a 1 m long linear device. Flows are driven through JxB azimuthal torques created from independently controlled emissive cathodes. The device has been designed such that magnetic induction processes and turbulent plasma dynamics can be studied from a variety of time-averaged axisymmetric flows in a cylinder. MHD simulations implementing volume-penalization support the experimental development to design the most efficient flow-driving schemes and understand the flow dynamics. Preliminary experimental results show that a rotating motion of up to nearly 1 km/s is controlled by the JxB azimuthal torque.

  10. Developing the Science and Technology for the Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Juergen; Biewer, Theodore; Bigelow, Timothy; Caughman, John; Goulding, Richard; Lumsdaine, Arnold; MPEX Team Team

    2016-10-01

    The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) is a device planned to address scientific and technological gaps for the development of viable plasma facing components for fusion reactor conditions (FNSF, DEMO). MPEX is designed to deliver those plasma conditions with a novel Radio Frequency plasma source able to produce high density plasmas and heat electron and ions separately with Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) heating and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) with a total installed power of 800 kW. The science and technology for this source system is currently being tested on Proto-MPEX. This is a linear device utilizing 12 water-cooled copper coils able to achieve peak magnetic fields of 1.6T. The currently total installed heating power (for helicon, EBW and ICRH) is 330kW. An overview of the status of this development program is given with an outlook to the next steps.

  11. 2D simulations of hohlraum targets for laser-plasma experiments and ion stopping measurement in hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basko, M.M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany). ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI; Maruhn, J.; Tauschwitz, Anna [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Novikov, V.G.; Grushin, A.S. [Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    An attractive way to create uniform plasma states at high temperatures and densities is by using hohlraums - cavities with heavy-metal walls that are either directly or indirectly heated by intense laser pulses to x-ray temperatures of tens and hundreds electron volts. A sample material, whose plasma state is to be studied, can be placed inside such a hohlraum (usually in the form of a low-density foam) and uniformly heated to a high temperature. In this case a high-Z hohlraum enclosure serves a double purpose: it prevents the hot plasma from rapid disassembly due to hydrodynamic expansion and, at the same time, suppresses its rapid radiative cooling by providing high diffusive resistivity for X-rays. Of course, both the inertial and the thermal confinement of high-temperature plasmas can be achieved only for a limited period of time - on the order of nanoseconds for millimeter-scale hohlraums. Some time ago such hohlraum targets were proposed for measurements of the stopping power of hot dense plasmas for fast ions at GSI (Darmstadt). Theoretical modeling of hohlraum targets has always been a challenging task for computational physics because it should combine multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations with the solution of the spectral transfer equation for thermal radiation. In this work we report on our latest progress in this direction, namely, we present the results of 2D (two-dimensional) simulations with a newly developed radiation-hydrodynamics code RALEF-2D of two types of the hohlraum targets proposed for experiments on the PHELIX laser at GSI. The first configuration is a simple spherical hohlraum with gold walls and empty interior, which has two holes - one for laser beam entrance, and the other for diagnostics. The hohlraums of this type have already been used in several experimental sessions with the NHELIX and PHELIX lasers at GSI. The second type is a two-chamber cylindrical hohlraum with a characteristic {omega}-shaped cross-section of the enclosure

  12. Computational Methods in Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Jardin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Assuming no prior knowledge of plasma physics or numerical methods, Computational Methods in Plasma Physics covers the computational mathematics and techniques needed to simulate magnetically confined plasmas in modern magnetic fusion experiments and future magnetic fusion reactors. Largely self-contained, the text presents the basic concepts necessary for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. Along with discussing numerical stability and accuracy, the author explores many of the algorithms used today in enough depth so that readers can analyze their stability, efficiency,

  13. Plasma-Jet-Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF): Physics and Design for a Plasma Liner Formation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Scott; Cassibry, Jason; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2014-10-01

    Spherically imploding plasma liners are a potential standoff compression driver for magneto-inertial fusion, which is a hybrid of and operates in an intermediate density between those of magnetic and inertial fusion. We propose to use an array of merging supersonic plasma jets to form a spherically imploding plasma liner. The jets are to be formed by pulsed coaxial guns with contoured electrodes that are placed sufficiently far from the location of target compression such that no hardware is repetitively destroyed. As such, the repetition rate can be higher (e.g., 1 Hz) and ultimately the power-plant economics can be more attractive than most other MIF approaches. During the R&D phase, a high experimental shot rate at reasonably low cost (e.g., gun plasma-liner-formation experiment, which will provide experimental data on: (i) scaling of peak liner ram pressure versus initial jet parameters, (ii) liner non-uniformity characterization and control, and (iii) control of liner profiles for eventual gain optimization.

  14. Plasma diagnostic techniques in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, E.H.; Clauser, J.F.; Carter, M.R.; Failor, B.H.; Foote, J.H.; Hornady, R.S.; James, R.A.; Lasnier, C.J.; Perkins, D.E.

    1986-08-29

    We review two classes of plasma diagnostic techniques used in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments. The emphasis of the first class is to study mirror-trapped electrons at the thermal-barrier location. The focus of the second class is to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the plasma space potential at various axial locations. The design and operation of the instruments in these two categories are discussed and data that are representative of their performance is presented.

  15. Observation of Rayleigh-Taylor-Instability Evolution in a Plasma Regime Expected to Provide Magnetic and Viscous Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Colin S; Hsu, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    We present time-resolved observations of Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth at the interface between an unmagnetized plasma jet colliding with a stagnated, magnetized plasma. The observed instability growth time ($\\sim 10$ $\\mu$s) is consistent with the estimated linear Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate calculated using experimentally inferred values of density ($\\sim 10^{14}$ cm$^{-3}$) and acceleration ($10^9$ m/s$^2$). The observed instability wavelengths ($\\gtrsim 1$ cm) are consistent with stabilization of short wavelengths by a magnetic field of the experimentally measured magnitude ($\\sim 15$ G) and direction. Comparisons of data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization.

  16. Rethermalization of a field-reversed configuration plasma in translation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himura, Haruhiko; Okada, Shigefumi; Sugimoto, Satoshi; Goto, Seiichi

    1995-01-01

    A translation experiment of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma is performed on the FIX machine [Shiokawa and Goto, Phys. Fluids B 5, 534 (1993)]. The translated FRC bounces between magnetic mirror fields at both ends of a confinement region. The plasma loses some of its axial kinetic energy when it is reflected by the magnetic mirror field, and eventually settles down in the confinement region. In this reflection process, the plasma temperature rises significantly. Such plasma rethermalization has been observed in OCT-L1 experiments [Ito et al., Phys. Fluids 30, 168 (1987)], but rarely in FRX-C/T experiments [Rej et al., Phys. Fluids 29, 852 (1986)]. It is found that the rethermalization depends on the relation between the plasma temperature and the translation velocity. The rethermalization occurs only in the case where the translation velocity exceeds the sound velocity. This result implies the rethermalization is caused by a shock wave induced within the FRC when the plasma is reflected by the magnetic mirror field.

  17. Development of plasma sources for ICRF heating experiment in KMAX mirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuan; Liu, Ming; Yi, Hongshen; Lin, Munan; Shi, Peiyun

    2016-10-01

    KMAX, Keda Mirror with AXisymmeticity, is a tandem mirror machine with a length of 10 meters and diameters of 1.2 meters in the central cell and 0.3 meters in the mirror throat. In the past experiments, the plasma was generated by helicon wave launched from the west end. We obtained the blue core mode in argon discharge, however, it cannot provide sufficient plasma for hydrogen discharge, which is at least 1012 cm-3 required for effective ICRF heating. Several attempts have thus been tried or under design to increase the central cell's plasma density: (1) a washer gun with aperture of 1cm has been successfully tested, and a plasma density of 1013 cm-3 was achieved in the west cell near the gun, however, the plasma is only 1011 cm-3 in the central cell possible due to the mirror trapping and/or neutral quenching effect (2) a larger washer gun with aperture of 2.5 cm and a higher power capacitor bank are being assembled in order to generate more plasmas. In addition, how to mitigate the neutrals is under consideration (3) A hot cathode is been designed and will be tested in combination with plasma gun or alone. Preliminary results from those plasma sources will be presented and discussed.

  18. Effects of local application of platelet-rich plasma and guided tissue regeneration on stability of implants

    OpenAIRE

    Duka Miloš; Lazić Z.; Bubalo Marija; Tatić Z.; Đurđević D.; Matić Smiljana

    2010-01-01

    Osseointegration is a result of cellular migration, differentiation, bone formation, and bone remodelling on the surface of an implant. Each of these processes depends on platelets and blood coagulum. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is used to improve osseointegration and stability of implants. It is a blood fraction produced in a centrifuge which contains a high concentration of platelets. Platelets contain numerous growth factors which influence tissue reactions. The aim of the research is to te...

  19. Effect of conductive screens on the stabilization of plasma channels with currents of hundreds kAmps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkov, V. D.; Bochkov, D. V.; Krivosheev, S. I.; Adamian, Yu. E.

    2016-12-01

    Based on experimental data, we analyzed the results of the influence of external conductive shield on stabilization of plasma channels in high-power pseudospark switches—thyratrons TDI-type. Both no-ferrous and ferrous shields are tested. The research is a part of a work on improvement of switching capabilities of thyratrons capable of transferring currents up to hundreds kA with switching energy more than 50 kJ.

  20. Stability of individual carotenoids, retinol and tocopherols in human plasma during exposure to light and after extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Q; Rowley, K G; O'Dea, K

    1999-06-11

    We have modified gradient HPLC procedures for simultaneous quantification of retinol, gamma-tocopherol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, trans-lycopene, cis-lycopene, alpha-carotene and beta-carotene in 200-microl aliquots of human plasma. The photosensitivity of these analytes in plasma exposed to fluorescent lighting for up to 72 h was investigated and most were stable under these conditions. The stability of these analytes held in darkness at -20 degrees C, 4 degrees C or room temperature for up to 48 h after extraction from plasma was also investigated. Variability in measurement of most analytes was greater at room temperature than at 4 degrees C or -20 degrees C. There were statistically significant variations in the measured concentrations of some analytes in samples kept cold. However, the magnitude of these variations was small and of little biological significance, particularly over the first 24 h.

  1. The AMY experiment: Microwave emission from air shower plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez-Muñiz J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available You The Air Microwave Yield (AMY experiment investigate the molecular bremsstrahlung radiation emitted in the GHz frequency range from an electron beam induced air-shower. The measurements have been performed at the Beam Test Facility (BTF of Frascati INFN National Laboratories with a 510 MeV electron beam in a wide frequency range between 1 and 20 GHz. We present the apparatus and the results of the tests performed.

  2. Electron acceleration mechanisms in the interaction of ultrashort lasers with underdense plasmas: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, J.; Lefebvre, E.; Malka, V.; Marques, J.-R.; Amiranoff, F.; Solodov, A.; Mora, P.

    2002-06-30

    An experiment investigating the production of relativistic electrons from the interaction of ultrashort multi-terawatt laser pulses with an underdense plasma is presented. Electrons were accelerated to tens of MeV and the maximum electron energy increased as the plasma density decreased. Simulations have been performed in order to model the experiment. They show a good agreement with the trends observed in the experiment and the spectra of accelerated electrons could be reproduced successfully. The simulations have been used to study the relative contribution of the different acceleration mechanisms: plasma wave acceleration, direct laser acceleration and stochastic heating. The results show that in low density case (1 percent of the critical density) acceleration by laser is dominant mechanism. The simulations at high density also suggest that direct laser acceleration is more efficient that stochastic heating.

  3. A Proposed Experiment to Study Relaxation Formation of a Spherical Tokamak with a Plasma Center Column

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, S C

    2006-01-01

    A spherical tokamak (ST) with a plasma center column (PCC) can be formed via driven magnetic relaxation of a screw pinch plasma. An ST-PCC could in principle eliminate many problems associated with a material center column, a key weakness of the ST reactor concept. This work summarizes the design space for an ST-PCC in terms of flux amplification, aspect ratio, and elongation, based on the zero-beta Taylor-relaxed analysis of Tang & Boozer [Phys. Plasmas 13, 042514 (2006)]. The paper will discuss (1) equilibrium and stability properties of the ST-PCC, (2) issues for an engineering design, and (3) key differences between the proposed ST-PCC and the ongoing Proto-Sphera effort in Italy.

  4. Proposed Experiment to Study Relaxation Formation of a Spherical Tokamak with a Plasma Center Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S. C.; Tang, X. Z.

    2007-06-01

    A spherical tokamak (ST) with a plasma center column (PCC) can be formed via driven magnetic relaxation of a screw pinch plasma. An ST-PCC could in principle eliminate many problems associated with a material center column, a key weakness of the ST reactor concept. This work summarizes the design space for an ST-PCC in terms of flux amplification, aspect ratio, and elongation, based on the zero-β Taylor-relaxed analysis of Tang & Boozer [Phys. Plasmas 13, 042514 (2006)]. The paper will discuss (1) equilibrium and stability properties of the ST-PCC, (2) issues for an engineering design, and (3) key differences between the proposed ST-PCC and the ongoing Proto-Sphera effort in Italy.

  5. Application of high stability oscillators to radio science experiments using deep space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursinski, Emil R.

    1990-01-01

    The microwave telecommunication links between the earth and deep space probes have long been used to conduct radio science experiments which take advantage of the phase coherency and stability of these links. These experiments measure changes in the phase delay of the signals to infer electrical, magnetic and gravitational properties of the solar system environment and beyond through which the spacecraft and radio signals pass. The precision oscillators, from which the phase of the microwave signals are derived, play a key role in the stability of these links and therefore the sensitivity of these measurements. These experiments have become a driving force behind recent and future improvements in the Deep Space Network and spacecraft oscillators and frequency and time distribution systems. Three such experiments which are key to these improvements are briefly discussed and relationship between their sensitivity and the signal phase stability is described. The first is the remote sensing of planetary atmospheres by occultation in which the radio signal passes through the atmosphere and is refracted causing the signal pathlength to change from which the pressure and the temperature of the atmosphere can be derived. The second experiment is determination of the opacity of planetary rings by passage of the radio signals through the rings. The third experiment is the research for very low frequency gravitational radiation. The fractional frequency variation of the signal is comparable to the spatial strain amplitude the system is capable of detecting. A summary of past results and future possibilities for these experiments are presented.

  6. Application of high stability oscillators to radio science experiments using deep space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursinski, Emil R.

    1990-01-01

    The microwave telecommunication links between the earth and deep space probes have long been used to conduct radio science experiments which take advantage of the phase coherency and stability of these links. These experiments measure changes in the phase delay of the signals to infer electrical, magnetic and gravitational properties of the solar system environment and beyond through which the spacecraft and radio signals pass. The precision oscillators, from which the phase of the microwave signals are derived, play a key role in the stability of these links and therefore the sensitivity of these measurements. These experiments have become a driving force behind recent and future improvements in the Deep Space Network and spacecraft oscillators and frequency and time distribution systems. Three such experiments which are key to these improvements are briefly discussed and relationship between their sensitivity and the signal phase stability is described. The first is the remote sensing of planetary atmospheres by occultation in which the radio signal passes through the atmosphere and is refracted causing the signal pathlength to change from which the pressure and the temperature of the atmosphere can be derived. The second experiment is determination of the opacity of planetary rings by passage of the radio signals through the rings. The third experiment is the research for very low frequency gravitational radiation. The fractional frequency variation of the signal is comparable to the spatial strain amplitude the system is capable of detecting. A summary of past results and future possibilities for these experiments are presented.

  7. Laser-plasma interaction in the context of inertial fusion: experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaune, C.; Lewis, K.; Bandulet, H.; Depierreux, S.; Hüller, S.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Pesme, D.; Loiseau, P.

    2007-08-01

    Many nonlinear processes may affect the laser beam propagation and the laser energy deposition in the underdense plasma surrounding the pellet. These processes, associated with anomalous and nonlinear absorption mechanisms, are fundamental issues in the context of Inertial Confinement Fusion. The work presented in this article refers to laser-plasma interaction experiments which were conducted under well-controlled conditions, and to their theoretical and numerical modeling. Thanks to important diagnostics improvements, the plasma and laser parameters were sufficiently characterized in these experiments to make it possible to carry out numerical simulations modeling the laser plasma interaction in which the hydrodynamics conditions were very close to the experimental ones. Two sets of experiments were carried out with the LULI 2000 and the six beam LULI laser facilities. In the first series of experiments, the interaction between two single hot spots was studied as a function of their distance, intensity and light polarization. In the second series, the intensity distribution of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) inside the plasma was studied by means of a new temporally resolved imaging system. Two-dimensional (2D) simulations were carried out with our code Harmony2D in order to model these experiments. For both series of experiments, the numerical results show a very good agreement with the experimental ones for what concerns the main SBS features, namely the spatial and temporal behavior of the SBS-driven acoustic waves, as well as the average SBS reflectivities. Thus, these well diagnosed experiments, carried out with well defined conditions, make it possible to benchmark our theoretical and numerical modelings and, hence, to improve our predictive capabilities for future experiments.

  8. Rotating plasma disks in dense Z-pinch experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, M. J., E-mail: m.bennett11@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: s.lebedev@imperial.ac.uk; Lebedev, S. V., E-mail: m.bennett11@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: s.lebedev@imperial.ac.uk; Suttle, L.; Burdiak, G.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Hare, J.; Swadling, G.; Patankar, S.; Bocchi, M.; Chittenden, J. P.; Smith, R. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Hall, G. N. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, UK and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Frank, A.; Blackman, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester (United States); Drake, R. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, University of Michigan (United States); Ciardi, A. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Observatiore de Paris (France)

    2014-12-15

    We present data from the first z-pinch experiments aiming to simulate aspects of accretion disk physics in the laboratory. Using off axis ablation flows from a wire array z-pinch we demonstrate the formation of a hollow disk structure that rotates at 60 kms{sup −1} for 150 ns. By analysing the Thomson scattered spectrum we make estimates for the ion and electron temperatures as T{sub i} ∼ 60 eV and ZT{sub e} ∼ 150 to 200 eV.

  9. Comparison of the CREATE-L plasma response model with experiments on TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, P.; Lister, J.B. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP); Villone, F. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA/CREATA, Univ. die Cassino, Cassino (Italy); Albanese, R. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA/CREATA, DIEMA, Univ. di Reggio Calabria, Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    1997-06-01

    Experiments have been performed on the TCV tokamak to evaluate the response of Ohmic, L-Mode, limited and diverted plasmas to changes in the poloidal field coil voltages. The resulting closed loop plasma responses have been compared with the CREATE-L linearized MHD equilibrium model of TCV. The simulated responses show excellent agreement with the experiments in both the time and frequency domains. Tests with models derived using different assumptions indicate that the underlying physical assumptions of the nominal model are appropriate. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  10. Accelerator Studies on a possible Experiment on Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefields at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R W; Fartoukh, S; Geschonke, G; Goddard, B; Hessler, C; Hillenbrand, S; Meddahi, M; Roesler, S; Zimmermann, F; Caldwell, A; Muggli, P; Xia, G

    2011-01-01

    There has been a proposal by Caldwell et al to use proton beams as drivers for high energy linear colliders. An experimental test with CERN’s proton beams is being studied. Such a test requires a transfer line for transporting the beam to the experiment, a focusing section for beam delivery into the plasma, the plasma cell and a downstream diagnostics and dump section. The work done at CERN towards the conceptual layout and design of such a test area is presented. A possible development of such a test area into a CERN test facility for high-gradient acceleration experiments is discussed.

  11. Stability of boundary layers with porous suction strips: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, G. A.; Saric, W. S.; Reed, H. L.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Low turbulence tunnel experiments on the stability and transition of 2 D boundary layers on flat plates with and without suction are described. A number of general suction cases are discussed. Test results showed that the maximum stabilization occurred when the suction was moved toward the Branch I neutral point. An analytical study of the stability of two dimensional, incompressible boundary layer flows over plates with suction through porous strips was performed. The mean flow was calculated using linearized triple deck, closed form solutions. The stability results of the triple deck theory are shown to be in good agreement with those of the interacting boundary layers. An analytical optimization scheme for the suction configuration was developd. Numerical calculations were performed corresponding to the experimental configurations. In each case, the theory correctly predicts the experimental results.

  12. Control-based continuation: Bifurcation and stability analysis for physical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, David A. W.

    2017-02-01

    Control-based continuation is technique for tracking the solutions and bifurcations of nonlinear experiments. The idea is to apply the method of numerical continuation to a feedback-controlled physical experiment such that the control becomes non-invasive. Since in an experiment it is not (generally) possible to set the state of the system directly, the control target becomes a proxy for the state. Control-based continuation enables the systematic investigation of the bifurcation structure of a physical system, much like if it was numerical model. However, stability information (and hence bifurcation detection and classification) is not readily available due to the presence of stabilising feedback control. This paper uses a periodic auto-regressive model with exogenous inputs (ARX) to approximate the time-varying linearisation of the experiment around a particular periodic orbit, thus providing the missing stability information. This method is demonstrated using a physical nonlinear tuned mass damper.

  13. Linear MHD stability analysis of post-disruption plasmas in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleynikova, K.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Aleynikov, P.

    2016-05-01

    Most of the plasma current can be replaced by a runaway electron (RE) current during plasma disruptions in ITER. In this case the post-disruption plasma current profile is likely to be more peaked than the pre-disruption profile. The MHD activity of such plasma will affect the runaway electron generation and confinement and the dynamics of the plasma position evolution (Vertical Displacement Event), limiting the timeframe for runaway electrons and disruption mitigation. In the present paper, we evaluate the influence of the possible RE seed current parameters on the onset of the MHD instabilities. By varying the RE seed current profile, we search for subsequent plasma evolutions with the highest and the lowest MHD activity. This information can be applied to a development of desirable ITER disruption scenario.

  14. Transient Stability Analysis of the SeCRETS Experiment in SULTAN

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L; Marinucci, C

    2002-01-01

    We present here the results of the analysis of the stability experiment SeCRETS, performed on two Nb3Sn cable-in-conduit conductors with the same amount of total copper stabilizer, but different degree of segregation. The model used for the analysis, including superconducting strands, conductor jacket and helium, is solved with the code GandalfTM. We obtain a qualitative agreement of simulation results and experimental values. The simulation results confirm that in the operation regime explored in the experiment the segregated copper is not effective for stability. The details of the current sharing and the approximation taken for the transient heat transfer are shown to be critical for the interpretation.

  15. Glow experiment documentation of OMS/RCS pods and vertical stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Glow experiment documentation of orbital maneuvering system (OMS) reaction control system (RCS) pods and vertical stabilizer shows chemoluminescent effect resulting from atomic oxygen impacting the spacecraft and building to the point that the atomic oxygen atoms combine to form molecules of oxygen. Image intensifier on NIKON 35mm camera used to record glow on vertical tail and OMS pods.

  16. Glow experiment documentation of OMS/RCS pod and vertical stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Glow experiment documentation of one of the orbital maneuvering system (OMS) reaction control system (RCS) pods and a portion of the vertical stabilizer shows chemoluminescent effectresulting from atomic oxygen impacting the spacecraft and building to the point that the atomic oxygen atoms combine to form molecules of oxygen. The Image Intensifier on NIKON 35mm camera was used to record the glow.

  17. Spectrometer Development in Support of Thomson Scattering Investigations for the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Eva; Davies, Richard; Azzari, Phil; Frank, John; Frank, Jackson; James, Royce; Hopson, Jordon; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Paolino, Richard; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Erin; Turk, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    Now that reproducible plasmas have been created on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL), a high-performance spectrometer utilizing volume-phase-holographic (VPH) grating and a charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a range of 380-1090 nm and resolution of 1024x1024 is being assembled. This spectrometer will collect doppler shifted photons created by exciting the plasma with the first harmonic of a 2.5 J Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Direct measurements of the plasma's temperature and density will be determined using HPX's Thomson Scattering (TS) system as a single spatial point diagnostic. TS has the capability of determining plasma properties on short time scales and will be used to create a robust picture of the internal plasma parameters. A prototype spectrometer has been constructed to explore the Andor CCD camera's resolution and sensitivity. Concurrently, through intensive study of the high energy TS system, safety protocols and standard operation procedures (SOP) for the Coast Guard's largest and most powerful Laser have been developed. The current status of the TS SOP, diagnostic development, and the collection optic's spectrometer will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15-16.

  18. Modeling the heating and atomic kinetics of a photoionized neon plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockard, Tom E.

    Motivated by gas cell photoionized plasma experiments performed by our group at the Z facility of Sandia National Laboratories, we discuss in this dissertation a modeling study of the heating and ionization of the plasma for conditions characteristic of these experiments. Photoionized plasmas are non-equilibrium systems driven by a broadband x-ray radiation flux. They are commonly found in astrophysics but rarely seen in the laboratory. Several modeling tools have been employed: (1) a view-factor computer code constrained with side x-ray power and gated monochromatic image measurements of the z-pinch radiation, to model the time-history of the photon-energy resolved x-ray flux driving the photoionized plasma, (2) a Boltzmann self-consistent electron and atomic kinetics model to simulate the electron distribution function and configuration-averaged atomic kinetics, (3) a radiation-hydrodynamics code with inline non-equilibrium atomic kinetics to perform a comprehensive numerical simulation of the experiment and plasma heating, and (4) steady-state and time-dependent collisional-radiative atomic kinetics calculations with fine-structure energy level description to assess transient effects in the ionization and charge state distribution of the plasma. The results indicate that the photon-energy resolved x-ray flux impinging on the front window of the gas cell is very well approximated by a linear combination of three geometrically-diluted Planckian distributions. Knowledge of the spectral details of the x-ray drive turned out to be important for the heating and ionization of the plasma. The free electrons in the plasma thermalize quickly relative to the timescales associated with the time-history of the x-ray drive and the plasma atomic kinetics. Hence, electrons are well described by a Maxwellian energy distribution of a single temperature. This finding is important to support the application of a radiation-hydrodynamic model to simulate the experiment. It is found

  19. Alfven Wave Collisions, The Fundamental Building Block of Plasma Turbulence IV: Laboratory Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, D J; Howes, G G; Kletzing, C A; Skiff, F; Carter, T A; Auerbach, D W

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is a phenomenon found throughout space and astrophysical plasmas. It plays an important role in solar coronal heating, acceleration of the solar wind, and heating of the interstellar medium. Turbulence in these regimes is dominated by Alfven waves. Most turbulence theories have been established using ideal plasma models, such as incompressible MHD. However, there has been no experimental evidence to support the use of such models for weakly to moderately collisional plasmas which are relevant to various space and astrophysical plasma environments. We present the first experiment to measure the nonlinear interaction between two counterpropagating Alfven waves, which is the building block for astrophysical turbulence theories. We present here four distinct tests that demonstrate conclusively that we have indeed measured the daughter Alfven wave generated nonlinearly by a collision between counterpropagating Alfven waves.

  20. Integrated Simulation Studies of Plasma Performances and Fusion Reactions in the Deuterium Experiment of LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Homma, M.; Maeta, S.; Saito, Y.; Fukuyama, A.; Nagaoka, K.; Takahashi, H.; Nakano, H.; Osakabe, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Tanaka, K.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Isobe, M.; Tomita, H.; Ogawa, K.; LHD Exp Group Team

    2016-10-01

    The deuterium experiment project from 2017 is planned in LHD, where the deuterium NBI heating beams with the power more than 30MW are injected into the deuterium plasma. Principal objects of this project are to clarify the isotope effect on the heat and particle transport in the helical plasma and to study energetic particle confinement in a helical magnetic configuration measuring triton burn-up neutrons. We study the deuterium experiment plasma of LHD applying the integrated simulation code, TASK3D [Murakami, PPCF2015], and the 5-D drift kinetic equation solver, GNET [Murakami, NF2006]. (i) More than 20% of ion temperature increment is obtained in the deuterium plasma (nD /nH +nD = 0.8) due to the isotope effect assuming the turbulent transport model based on the H/He plasma experiment of LHD. (ii) The triton burn-up simulation shows the triton slowing down distribution and the strong magnetic configuration dependency of the triton burn-up ratio in LHD. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26420851.

  1. Experiments and PIC simulations on liquid crystal plasma mirrors for pulse contrast enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, G. E.; Poole, P. L.; Krygier, A.; Foster, P. S.; Scott, G. G.; Wilson, L. A.; Bailey, J.; Bourgeois, N.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Heery, R.; Purcell, J.; Neely, D.; Rajeev, P. P.; Freeman, R. R.; Schumacher, D. W.

    2016-10-01

    High pulse contrast is crucial for performing many experiments on high intensity lasers in order to minimize modification of the target surface by pre-pulse. This is often achieved through the use of solid dielectric plasma mirrors which can limit laser shot rates. Liquid crystal films, originally developed as variable thickness ion acceleration targets, have been demonstrated as effective plasma mirrors for pulse cleaning, reaching peak reflectivities over 70%. These films were used as plasma mirrors in an ion acceleration experiment on the Scarlet laser and the resultant increase in peak proton energy and change in acceleration direction will be discussed. Also presented here are novel 2D3V, LSP particle-in-cell simulations of dielectric plasma mirror operation. By including multiphoton ionization and dimensionality corrections, an excellent match to experiment is obtained over 4 decades in intensity. Analysis of pulse shortening and plasma critical surface behavior in these simulations will be discussed. Formation of thin films at 1.5 Hz will also be presented. Performed with support from the DARPA PULSE program through AMRDEC, from NNSA, and from OSC.

  2. Active experiments in geospace plasmas with gigawatts of RF power at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheerin, James

    2016-07-01

    The ionosphere provides a relatively quiescent plasma target, stable on timescales of minutes, for a whole host of active plasma experiments. The largest HF transmitter built to date is the HAARP phased-array HF transmitter near Gakona, Alaska which can deliver up to 3.6 Gigawatts (ERP) of CW RF power in the range of 2.8 - 10 MHz to the ionosphere with millisecond pointing, power modulation, and frequency agility. With an ionospheric background thermal energy in the range of only 0.1 eV, this amount of power gives access to the highest regimes of the nonlinearity (RF intensity to thermal pressure) ratio. HAARP's unique features have enabled the conduct of a number of nonlinear plasma experiments in the inter¬action region of overdense ionospheric plasma including generation of artificial aurorae, artificial ionization layers, VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, parametric instabilities, stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and suprathermal electron acceleration. Diagnostics include the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, spacecraft radio beacons, HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and optics for optical emissions. We report on short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effects, artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the HF-enhanced plasma line, and production of suprathermal electrons. Applications are made to the controlled study of fundamental nonlinear plasma processes of relevance to laboratory plasmas, ionospheric irregularities affecting spacecraft communication and navigation systems, artificial ionization mirrors, wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, active global magnetospheric experiments, and many more.

  3. Temperature and Electron Density Determination on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Plasmas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarian, Maya L.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory is designed for physical chemistry students to gain experience using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in understanding plasma diagnostics. LIBS uses a high-powered laser that is focused on the sample causing a plasma to form. The emission of this plasma is then spectrally resolved and detected. Temperature and electron…

  4. Temperature and Electron Density Determination on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Plasmas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarian, Maya L.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory is designed for physical chemistry students to gain experience using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in understanding plasma diagnostics. LIBS uses a high-powered laser that is focused on the sample causing a plasma to form. The emission of this plasma is then spectrally resolved and detected. Temperature and electron…

  5. Hydrolysis and stability of thin pulsed plasma polymerised maleic anhydride coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drews, Joanna Maria; Launay, Héléne; Hansen, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    were obtained at constant plasma power by adjusting the polymerisation time. The results show that the hydrolysis resistance of the modified layer is determined by the power used in the plasma polymerisation, while changes in the chemistry of the modified layer are insignificant....

  6. Temperature dependence of the cosphi conductance in Josephson tunnel junctions determined from plasma resonance experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, O. H.; Mygind, Jesper

    1978-01-01

    The microwave response at 9 GHz of Sn-O-Sn tunnel-junction current biased at zero dc voltage has been measured just below the critical temperature Tc of the Sn films. The temperature dependence of the cosφ conductance is determined from the resonant response at the junction plasma frequency fp...... of the experiment....

  7. Comparative Analysis of Experiment Treating Benzene and CEES by Pulse Corona Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Xuefeng; Hu Zhen

    2005-01-01

    Based on an experiment treating benzene and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide ( CEES )by pulse corona induced-plasma, the similarities and differences found in the experimental data and analytical results are analyzed in a comparative manner in this paper. The theory applied is also discussed.

  8. Experiments and simulations on non-plasma ignition of semiconductor bridge igniter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Weiqiang; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Jupeng; Li, Yong; Wang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Since semiconductor bridge (SCB) igniter has been invented, it is commonly considered as a plasma generator. However, the plasma ignition mechanism may be affected by the hotspot ignition temperature of the primary explosives that is lower than the melting point of SCB in the igniter. In an effort to investigate the non-plasma ignition performance of SCB igniter, a one-dimensional model was established for temperature distribution analysis under constant current and capacitor discharge excitation. The simulation results featured the progress of heat transfer and the energy level required by non-plasma ignition of SCB was estimated. Furthermore, sensitivity experiments were carried out to test simulation results and to obtain the firing current range of SCB igniter with lead styphnate (LTNR). Experiment results indicated that safety conditions are 1.953 A constant current input lasting 1 ms under constant current excitation and 7.072 V voltage input using 47 µF storage capacitor under capacitor discharge excitation. All-firing conditions of non-plasma ignition are 2.035 A constant current input lasting 1 ms under constant current excitation and 7.647 V voltage input using 47 µF storage capacitor under capacitor discharge excitation.

  9. Empirical modeling of plasma clouds produced by the Metal Oxide Space Clouds experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Todd R.; Caton, Ronald G.; Miller, Daniel; Holmes, Jeffrey M.; Groves, Keith M.; Sutton, Eric

    2017-05-01

    The Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) Long-Range Tracking And Instrumentation Radar (ALTAIR) radar at Kwajalein Atoll was used in incoherent scatter mode to measure plasma densities within two artificial clouds created by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Metal Oxide Space Clouds (MOSC) experiment in May 2013. Optical imager, ionosonde, and ALTAIR measurements were combined to create 3-D empirical descriptions of the plasma clouds as a function of time, which match the radar measurements to within 15%. The plasma clouds closely track the location of the optical clouds, and the best fit plasma cloud widths are generally consistent with isotropic neutral diffusion. Cloud plasma densities decreased as a power of time, with exponents between -0.5 and -1.0, or much more slowly than the -1.5 predicted by diffusion. These exponents and estimates of total ion number from integration through the model volume are consistent with a scenario of slow ionization and a gradually increasing total number of ions with time, reaching a net ionization fraction of 20% after approximately half an hour. These robust representations of the plasma density are being used to study impacts of the artificial clouds on the dynamics of the background ionosphere and on RF propagation.

  10. Internal oscillating current-sustained RF plasmas: Parameters, stability, and potential for surface engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrikov, K.; Tsakadze, E.L.; Tsakadze, Z.L.;

    2005-01-01

    plasma parameters by the optical and Langmuir probes are presented. It is shown that the spatial profiles of the electron density, the effective electron temperature and plasma potential feature a great deal of the radial and axial uniformity compared with conventional sources of inductively coupled......A new source of low-frequency (0.46 MHz) inductively coupled plasmas sustained by the internal planar "unidirectional" RF current driven through a specially designed internal antenna configuration has been developed. The experimental results of the investigation of the optical and global argon...... applications and surface engineering. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  11. [Blood plasma protein adsorption capacity of perfluorocarbon emulsion stabilized by proxanol 268 (in vitro and in vivo studies)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklifas, A N; Zhalimov, V K; Temnov, A A; Kukushkin, N I

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption abilities of the perfluorocarbon emulsion stabilized by Proxanol 268 were investigated in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the saturation point for the blood plasma proteins was nearly reached after five minutes of incubation of the emulsion with human/rabbit blood plasma and was stable for all incubation periods studied. The decrease in volume ratio (emulsion/plasma) was accompanied by the increase in the adsorptive capacity of the emulsion with maximal values at 1/10 (3.2 and 1.5 mg of proteins per 1 ml of the emulsion, for human and rabbit blood plasma, respectively) that was unchanged at lower ratios. In vivo, in rabbits, intravenously injected with the emulsion, the proteins with molecular masses of 12, 25, 32, 44, 55, 70, and 200 kDa were adsorbed by the emulsion (as in vitro) if it was used 6 hours or less before testing. More delayed testing (6 h) revealed elimination of proteins with molecular masses of 25 and 44 kDa and an additional pool of adsorpted new ones of 27, 50, and 150 kDa. Specific adsorptive capacity of the emulsion enhanced gradually after emulsion injection and reached its maximum (3.5-5 mg of proteins per 1 ml of the emulsion) after 24 hours.

  12. Stability Dust-Ion-Acoustic Wave in Dusty Plasmas With Stream -Influence of Charge Fluctuation of Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Atamaniuk, B; Atamaniuk, Barbara; Zuchowski, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    There is a quickly increasing wealth of experimental data on so-called dusty plasmas i. e. ionized gases or usual plasmas that contain micron sized charged particles. Interest in these structures is driven both by their importance in many astrophysical as well as commercial situations. Among them are linear and nonlinear wave phenomena. We consider the influence of dust charge fluctuations on stability of the ion-acoustic waves when the stream of particles is present. It is assumed that all grains of dust have equal masses but charges are not constant in time-they may fluctuate in time. The dust charges are not really independent of the variations of the plasma potentials. All modes will influence the charging mechanism, and feedback will lead to several new interesting and unexpected phenomena. The charging of the grains depends on local plasma characteristics. If the waves disturb these characteristic, then charging of the grains is affected and the grain charge is modified, with a resulting feedback on the...

  13. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    CERN Document Server

    Auluck, S K H

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research is consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and wind pressure resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional drive parameter, is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance.

  14. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-09-01

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and "wind pressure" resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional "drive parameter," is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance.

  15. Low Thermal Conductivity Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings Using the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Eric H.; Jiang, Chen; Roth, Jeffrey; Gell, Maurice

    2014-06-01

    The primary function of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is to insulate the underlying metal from high temperature gases in gas turbine engines. As a consequence, low thermal conductivity and high durability are the primary properties of interest. In this work, the solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process was used to create layered porosity, called inter-pass boundaries, in yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) TBCs. IPBs have been shown to be effective in reducing thermal conductivity. Optimization of the IPB microstructure by the SPPS process produced YSZ TBCs with a thermal conductivity of 0.6 W/mK, an approximately 50% reduction compared to standard air plasma sprayed (APS) coatings. In preliminary tests, SPPS YSZ with IPBs exhibited equal or greater furnace thermal cycles and erosion resistance compared to regular SPPS and commercially made APS YSZ TBCs.

  16. Backreflection diagnostics for ultra-intense laser plasma experiments based on frequency resolved optical gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, F.; Hornung, J.; Schmidt, C.; Eckhardt, M.; Roth, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Bagnoud, V.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the development and implementation of a time resolved backscatter diagnostics for high power laser plasma experiments at the petawatt-class laser facility PHELIX. Pulses that are backscattered or reflected from overcritical plasmas are characterized spectrally and temporally resolved using a specially designed second harmonic generation frequency resolved optical gating system. The diagnostics meets the requirements made by typical experiments, i.e., a spectral bandwidth of more than 30 nm with sub-nanometer resolution and a temporal window of 10 ps with 50 fs temporal resolution. The diagnostics is permanently installed at the PHELIX target area and can be used to study effects such as laser-hole boring or relativistic self-phase-modulation which are important features of laser-driven particle acceleration experiments.

  17. Stabilizing effect of ion pressure gradient on magnetic curvature-driven drift modes located at rational surface of tokamak plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ai-Ke

    2005-01-01

    In the fluid model, we derive a dispersion relation for the toroidal drift modes of tokamak plasmas, including the ion pressure gradient and the magnetic field gradient and curvature. It is shown that the magnetic field gradient and curvature (MFGC) can cause instabilities at the rational surface, which are of toroidicity-induced (TI) modes. On the other hand, it is discovered that the ion pressure gradient can stabilize the present MFGC instabilities. The critical threshold of ion pressure gradient, which makes the growth rate reduced to zero, is obtained both analytically and numerically.

  18. Stabilization of the high-temperature phases in ceramic coatings on zirconium alloy produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelfeld, A. V.; Betsofen, S. Y.; Borisov, A. M.; Vladimirov, B. V.; Savushkina, S. V.; Knyazev, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    The composition and structure of ceramic coatings obtained on Zr-1%Nb alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in aqueous electrolyte comprising 2 g/L KOH, 6 g/L NaAlO2 and 2 g/L Na2SiO3 with addition of yttria nanopowder, have been studied. The PEO coatings of thickness ∼⃒20 μm were studied using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis and X-ray phase analysis. Additives in the electrolyte of yttria nanopowder allowed stabilizing the high-temperature tetragonal and cubic zirconia in the coating.

  19. Nike Experiments on Acceleration of Planar Targets Stabilized with a Short Spike Pulse^1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Metzler, N.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Oh, J.; Mostovych, A. N.; Gardner, J. H.

    2005-10-01

    Theoretical work has shown that a low energy spike pulse in front of the drive laser pulse can help mitigate the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities in targets for inertial confinement fusion.[1]^ While other experiments [2] used higher spike pulse energies, this study reports the influence of a lower energy spike and longer spike-main pulse delay on the acceleration of planar CH targets. Time evolution of preimposed sinusoidal ripples on the target surface was observed using a monochromatic x-ray imaging system. Delayed onset and/or suppression of mode growth was found for the spike prepulse shots compared to those with a low intensity foot, in good agreement with predictions from FAST2D simulations. The propagation velocity of the decaying shock wave from the spike pulse was measured with VISAR and was also in good agreement with an analytical prediction.[3] [1] Metzler et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 3283 (1999); 9, 5050 (2002); 10, 1897 (2003);Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 1906 (2003) ;Betti et al., Phys Plamas 12, 042703 (2005) ;[2]Knauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056306 (2005) ; [3]Velikovich et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 3270 (2003). ^1Work supported by U. S. Department of Energy

  20. Influence of chronometry on hydrodynamic stability: design of Direct-Drive experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffite, Stephane; Canaud, Benoit; Masse, Laurent; Larroche, Olivier; Girard, Frederic; Tassin, Veronique; Philippe, Frank; Landoas, Olivier; Caillaud, Tony; CEA Team

    2013-10-01

    We present here the 2D design of future Direct-Drive (DD) experiments which will be carried out in 2014 at the OMEGA facility. Hydrodynamic stability of capsule is a major concern for DD and Indirect-Drive (ID) implosions. Stability can be greatly affected by the chronometry of the drive. The objective of these experiments is to study the impact of chronometry on the stability of the target. Target will be filled with 15 bars of DT or DD-Argon. Diameter will be about 900 microns. Plastic shell thickness will be 25 microns. Target dimensions will be the same for all the shots. Pulse will be varied from a square pulse to 2-steps-pulse and 3-steps-pulses. Hydrodynamic stability decreases with the number of steps: convergence ration increases from Rc = 14 to Rc = 20 whereas adiabat decreases from 3.5 to 1.7. For some shots, low-mode asymmetries will be created by turning off some of the beams.

  1. THE EFFECT OF PLASMA PREPARATION RICH IN GROWTH FACTORS ON PATELLAR STABILITY AFTER MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT REEFING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andonovski Alan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although more than 100 operative procedures have been described for the treatment of patellar instability, there is no single universally successful procedure. For the most patients with lateral patellar instability medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL reefing is recommended. When we perform MPFL reefing we are not aware of the quality and strength of the MPFL tissue. In the presence of recurrent patellar instability,the quality and strength of MPFL tissue is often compromised and it disturbs patellar stability after MPFL reefing. Biomedicine development,recognizing the ligament healing process show us that autologous blood products, particularly PRP can enhance healing in soft tissue injuries. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the potential effect of Plasma preparation rich in growth factorson patellar stability after MPFL reefing. Material and methods: Plasma preparationrich in growth factors was produced from a unit of autologous whole blood using Arthrex ACP double syringe system.Platelet gel was prepared by adding bovine thrombin and 10% solution of calcium chloride.The platelet gel was applied locally into the place where suturing of the MPFL was performed. In this prospective, randomized and double blindstudy12 patients were included:6 patients in the PG group who received platelet gel and 6 patients in the control group who were not treated with platelet gel. Patellar stability was evaluated before surgery and 3 months after surgery with Axial stress radiographs. Results: The calculated 3 month improvement was 12.67 ± 2.51 in the control group and 17.33 ± 1.52 in the PG group, (p=0.064.Although there was greater improvement in patellar stability in PG group comparing to the control group, the difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05.The main reason for this was probably the small number of patients included in the study. Conclusion: Results showed that growth factors from the plasma

  2. Radiofrequency antenna for suppression of parasitic discharges in a helicon plasma thruster experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazunori

    2012-08-01

    A radiofrequency (rf) antenna for helicon plasma thruster experiments is developed and tested using a permanent magnets helicon plasma source immersed in a vacuum chamber. A magnetic nozzle is provided by permanent magnets arrays and an argon plasma is produced by a 13.56 MHz radiofrequency helicon-wave or inductively-coupled discharge. A parasitic discharge outside the source tube is successfully suppressed by covering the rf antenna with a ceramic ring and a grounded shield; a decrease in the ion saturation current of a Langmuir probe located outside the source tube is observed and the ion saturation current on axis increases simultaneously, compared with the case of a standard uncovered rf antenna. It is also demonstrated that the covered antenna can yield stable operation of the source.

  3. Ignition of beam plasma discharge in the electron beam experiment in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1985-01-01

    An ignition of beam plasma discharge (BPD) in space was observed in a neutral gas-electron beam interaction experiment by Space Shuttle/Spacelab-1 in 1983. An electron beam of 8 kV 100 mA was injected into a high dense nitrogen gas cloud of 10 to the 23rd molecules which was released during 100 msec from the Orbiter. The appearance of the beam and its surroundings observed by a low-light-level TV camera showed a local ignition of the beam plasma discharge in the gas cloud. The enhanced plasma production, generation of auroral emission, and associated wave emission were also detected by onboard diagnostic instruments.

  4. On the Observation of Jitter Radiation in Solid-Density Laser-Plasma Laboratory Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Keenan, Brett D

    2015-01-01

    Plasmas created by high-intensity lasers are often subject to the formation of kinetic-streaming instabilities, such as the Weibel instability, which lead to the spontaneous generation of high-amplitude, tangled magnetic fields. These fields typically exist on small spatial scales, i.e. "sub-Larmor scales". Radiation from charged particles moving through small-scale electromagnetic (EM) turbulence, known as jitter radiation, has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and it carries valuable information on the statistical properties of the EM field structure and evolution. Consequently, jitter radiation from laser-produced plasmas may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here we investigate the prospects for, and demonstrate the feasibility of, such direct radiative diagnostics for mildly relativistic, solid-density laser plasmas produced in lab experiments.

  5. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  6. An experiment to measure the electron-ion thermal equilibration rate in a strongly coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taccetti, J M; Shurter, R P; Roberts, J P; Benage, J F; Graden, B; Haberle, B; Murillo, M S; Vigil, B; Wysocki, F J [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2006-04-28

    We present the most recent results from an experiment aimed at obtaining the temperature equilibration rate between ions and electrons in a strongly coupled plasma by directly measuring the temperature of each component. The plasma is formed by heating a sonic gas jet with a 10 ps laser pulse. The electrons are preferentially heated by the short pulse laser (we are aiming for T{sub e} {approx} 100 eV), while the ions, after undergoing very rapid (sub-ps timescale) disorder-induced heating, should only reach a temperature of 10-15 eV. This results in a strongly coupled ion plasma with a {gamma}{sub ii} {approx} 3-5. We plan to measure the electron and ion temperatures of the resulting plasma independently during and after heating, using collective Thomson scattering for electrons and a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for the ions (measuring Doppler-broadened absorption lines). Theory indicates that the equilibration rate could be significantly lower than that given by the usual weakly coupled model (Landau-Spitzer) due to coupled collective modes present in the dense plasma.

  7. An experiment to measure the electron ion thermal equilibration rate in a strongly coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccetti, J. M.; Shurter, R. P.; Roberts, J. P.; Benage, J. F.; Graden, B.; Haberle, B.; Murillo, M. S.; Vigil, B.; Wysocki, F. J.

    2006-04-01

    We present the most recent results from an experiment aimed at obtaining the temperature equilibration rate between ions and electrons in a strongly coupled plasma by directly measuring the temperature of each component. The plasma is formed by heating a sonic gas jet with a 10 ps laser pulse. The electrons are preferentially heated by the short pulse laser (we are aiming for Te ~ 100 eV), while the ions, after undergoing very rapid (sub-ps timescale) disorder-induced heating, should only reach a temperature of 10-15 eV. This results in a strongly coupled ion plasma with a Γii ~ 3-5. We plan to measure the electron and ion temperatures of the resulting plasma independently during and after heating, using collective Thomson scattering for electrons and a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for the ions (measuring Doppler-broadened absorption lines). Theory indicates that the equilibration rate could be significantly lower than that given by the usual weakly coupled model (Landau-Spitzer) due to coupled collective modes present in the dense plasma.

  8. One year's experience using a rotating filter for therapeutic plasma exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, A A; Halley, S E; Reardon, J; Sevigny, J

    1989-01-01

    The authors previously demonstrated the feasibility of using a rotating filter system for therapeutic plasma exchange. They now report on the technical details of a 1 year clinical experience. Seventeen patients underwent 188 treatments. Hemoaccess was provided by antecubital veins (147 Rx), femoral catheters (37 Rx), or an a-v fistula (3 Rx). Blood flows ranged from 75 to 100 ml/min. Net plasma removed per treatment was 3,231 +/- 53 ml (mean +/- SE, n = 188). Mean plasma removal rate per treatment was 40.2 +/- 0.6 ml/min; mean treatment time was 83 +/- 2 min. Platelet counts before and after treatment revealed a 15 +/- 4% decline (n = 46 Rx). Despite filtration fractions up to 86% there was no evidence of significant membrane plugging or hemolysis. For semiselective removal of cholesterol, the rotating filter was used in a cascade system with a secondary filter. Eighty percent of processed plasma was returned to the patient, but the treatment time was prolonged by 37% and the total cholesterol removed was 26% less when compared with the single pass system. The authors conclude that an inexpensive rotating filter can provide a highly efficient plasma exchange. The inherent efficiency of this system must be considered when evaluating its use with secondary filtration techniques.

  9. The effect of seed electrons on the repeatability of atmospheric pressure plasma plume propagation: I. Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, L.; Chang, L.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X.

    2016-09-01

    One of the significant differences between the traditional streamers and the plasma jets is the repeatability of their propagation. In this paper, the effect of the seed electron density on the repeatability of the plasma jets is investigated. The seed electron density plays an essential role in the propagation of plasma plume which is in either repeatable mode or random mode depending on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. By measuring the propagation velocities and the ignition delay time, it is found that the propagation velocities of the plasma plume are independent of the seed electron density. However, the jitter of the ignition delay time strongly depends on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. After detailed analyzing of the experiment results, it is concluded that the minimum seed electron density required for the plasma bullet to propagate in repeatable mode is on the order of 108 cm-3 for gas pressure of 2 × 104 Pa. The minimum required seed electron density for the gas pressure of 4 × 103 Pa is on the order of 107 cm-3. Further analysis shows that, at one atmospheric pressure, the required minimum seed electron density for repeatable mode is on the order of 109 cm-3.

  10. New chamber walls conditioning and cleaning strategies to improve the stability of plasma processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunge, G.; Pelissier, B.; Joubert, O.; Ramos, R.; Maurice, C.

    2005-08-01

    One major challenge in plasma etching processes for integrated circuit fabrication is to achieve a good wafer-to-wafer repeatability. This requires a perfect control of the plasma chamber wall conditions. For silicon etching processes, which deposit SiOyClz layers on the chamber walls, this is achieved by cleaning the interior surfaces of the plasma chamber with an SF6-based plasma after each wafer is etched. However, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the reactor wall surfaces shows that the inner parts of the Al2O3 chamber are strongly fluorinated (formation of Al-F bonds) during the SF6 plasma. At the same time the AlFx layer is sputtered from some parts of the chamber (mostly from the roof, which is bombarded by high energy ions), and AlF redeposition is observed on other parts of the reactor body. Hence, the cleaning process of the reactor leaves AlF residues on the chamber wall on its own. This leads to several issues including flake off of AlxFy particles on the wafer and process drifts (due both to the progressive growth of AlF material on the SiO2 windows and to the release of F atoms from the chamber walls during the etching process). This indicates that a strategy other than dry-cleaning the Al2O3 chamber walls in fluorine-based plasmas should be found. In this paper we have investigated two different strategies. The first one consists of replacing Al2O3 covering the chamber walls by another material for the chamber walls inner coating. In particular, we have investigated the surface modification of several types of organic polymers (Teflon, Parylene and carbon-rich polymers), when exposed to SF6-based plasmas. We show that these materials can be reset to their original condition after exposure to a dry-cleaning process because carbon containing polymers are slowly etched away by the SF6/O2 plasma. This suggests that the replacement of the conventional Al2O3 chamber wall material by a carbon-coated liner should be possible. Alternatively, we

  11. Current-driven plasma acceleration versus current-driven energy dissipation. I - Wave stability theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1990-01-01

    The dominant unstable electrostatic wave modes of an electromagnetically accelerated plasma are investigated. The study is the first part of a three-phase program aimed at characterizing the current-driven turbulent dissipation degrading the efficiency of Lorentz force plasma accelerators such as the MPD thruster. The analysis uses a kinetic theory that includes magnetic and thermal effects as well as those of an electron current transverse to the magnetic field and collisions, thus combining all the features of previous models. Analytical and numerical solutions allow a detailed description of threshold criteria, finite growth behavior, destabilization mechanisms and maximized-growth characteristics of the dominant unstable modes. The lower hybrid current-driven instability is implicated as dominant and was found to preserve its character in the collisional plasma regime.

  12. Refreezing previously thawed fresh-frozen plasma. Stability of coagulation factors V and VIII:C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzik, W H; Riibner, M A; Linehan, S K

    1989-09-01

    With the growth in autologous blood programs and the increased scrutiny of the indications for transfusion of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP), an increase has been seen in the number of occasions on which FFP was requested and thawed but then not transfused. The coagulation properties of FFP units that were refrozen and then rethawed were therefore studied. Fifty-eight units of plasma were studied, with each experimental unit of FFP paired with an identical control unit. Experimental units were frozen, stored at -65 degrees C, thawed, stored at 1 to 6 degrees C for various periods of time up to 24 hours, and then refrozen, stored at -65 degrees C, rethawed, and stored again in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours. Control units were frozen once at the time the experimental units were first frozen and thawed once at the time of the second thaw of the experimental units. Aliquots of plasma were sampled periodically and were later batch-tested for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and factor V and VIII:C activity. The results of coagulation testing of the twice-frozen plasmas were always within the normal range. There was a slight but statistically valid prolongation of the PT and aPTT and a decrease in the factor V and VIII:C levels for twice-frozen plasma compared with control plasma. The greatest decline occurred in the level of factor VIII:C. The measured deterioration in coagulation of twice-frozen FFP is unlikely to be of clinical importance. Refreezing FFP may eventually prove useful for rare donor, autologous, and massive transfusion programs.

  13. Working group report on beam plasmas, electronic propulsion, and active experiments using beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, J. M.; Eastman, T.; Gabriel, S.; Hawkins, J.; Matossian, J.; Raitt, J.; Reeves, G.; Sasaki, S.; Szuszczewicz, E.; Winkler, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The JPL Workshop addressed a number of plasma issues that bear on advanced spaceborne technology for the years 2000 and beyond. Primary interest was on the permanently manned space station with a focus on identifying environmentally related issues requiring early clarification by spaceborne plasma experimentation. The Beams Working Group focused on environmentally related threats that platform operations could have on the conduct and integrity of spaceborne beam experiments and vice versa. Considerations were to include particle beams and plumes. For purposes of definition it was agreed that the term particle beams described a directed flow of charged or neutral particles allowing single-particle trajectories to represent the characteristics of the beam and its propagation. On the other hand, the word plume was adopted to describe a multidimensional flow (or expansion) of a plasma or neutral gas cloud. Within the framework of these definitions, experiment categories included: (1) Neutral- and charged-particle beam propagation, with considerations extending to high powers and currents. (2) Evolution and dynamics of naturally occurring and man-made plasma and neutral gas clouds. In both categories, scientific interest focused on interactions with the ambient geoplasma and the evolution of particle densities, energy distribution functions, waves, and fields.

  14. Radiation-Hydrodynamic Simulation of Experiments With Intense Lasers Generating Collisionless Interpenetrating Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, Michael; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Park, H.; Kugland, N.; Pollaine, S.; Ross, J.; Remington, B.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C.; Meinecke, J.; Reville, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Woolsey, N.

    2012-05-01

    Collisionless shocks, shocks generated by plasma wave interactions in regions where the collisional mean-free-path for ions is long compared to the length scale for instabilities that generate magnetic fields, are found in many astrophysical systems such as supernova remnants and planetary bow shocks. Generating conditions to investigate collisionless shock physics is difficult to achieve in a laboratory setting; however, high-energy-density physics facilities have made this a possibility. Experiments whose goal is to investigate the production and growth of magnetic fields in collisionless shocks in laboratory-scale systems are being carried out on intense lasers, several of which are measuring the plasma properties and magnetic field strength in counter-streaming, collisionless flows generated by laser ablation. This poster reports radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the CRASH code to model the ablative flow of plasma generated in order to assess potential designs, as well as infer properties of collected data from previous experiments. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616, by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548, and by the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0000850.

  15. Native and Reconstituted Plasma Lipoproteins in Nanomedicine: Physicochemical Determinants of Nanoparticle Structure, Stability, and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pownall, Henry J; Rosales, Corina; Gillard, Baiba K; Ferrari, Mauro

    2016-09-01

    Although many acute and chronic diseases are managed via pharmacological means, challenges remain regarding appropriate drug targeting and maintenance of therapeutic levels within target tissues. Advances in nanotechnology will overcome these challenges through the development of lipidic particles, including liposomes, lipoproteins, and reconstituted high-density lipoproteins (rHDL) that are potential carriers of water-soluble, hydrophobic, and amphiphilic molecules. Herein we summarize the properties of human plasma lipoproteins and rHDL, identify the physicochemical determinants of lipid transfer between phospholipid surfaces, and discuss strategies for increasing the plasma half-life of lipoprotein- and liposome-associated molecules.

  16. Drift wave stabilized by an additional streaming ion or plasma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, M F; Vranjes, J

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that the universally unstable kinetic drift wave in an electron-ion plasma can very effectively be suppressed by adding an extra flowing ion (or plasma) population. The effect of the flow of the added ions is essential, their response is of the type (vph-vf0)exp[-(vph-vf0)2], where vf0 is the flow speed and vph is the phase speed parallel to the magnetic field vector. The damping is strong and it is mainly due to this ion exponential term, and this remains so for vf0vph.

  17. Drift wave stabilized by an additional streaming ion or plasma population

    CERN Document Server

    Bashir, M F

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the universally unstable kinetic drift wave in an electron-ion plasma can very effectively be suppressed by adding an extra flowing ion (or plasma) population. The effect of the flow of the added ions is essential, their response is of the type (vph-vf0) exp[-(vph-vf0)^2], where vf0 is the flow speed and vph phase speed parallel to the magnetic field vector. The damping is strong and it is mainly due to this ion exponential term, and this remains so for vf0 < vph.

  18. Experimental and computational characterization of a modified GEC cell for dusty plasma experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Land, Victor; Smith, Bernard; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2009-01-01

    A self-consistent fluid model developed for simulations of micro- gravity dusty plasma experiments has for the first time been used to model asymmetric dusty plasma experiments in a modified GEC reference cell with gravity. The numerical results are directly compared with experimental data and the experimentally determined dependence of global discharge parameters on the applied driving potential and neutral gas pressure is found to be well matched by the model. The local profiles important for dust particle transport are studied and compared with experimentally determined profiles. The radial forces in the midplane are presented for the different discharge settings. The differences between the results obtained in the modified GEC cell and the results first reported for the original GEC reference cell are pointed out.

  19. Stabilization of porous chitosan improves the performance of its association with platelet-rich plasma as a composite scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimojo, A.A.M., E-mail: lshimojo51@gmail.com; Perez, A.G.M.; Galdames, S.E.M.; Brissac, I.C.S.; Santana, M.H.A.

    2016-03-01

    This study offers innovative perspectives for optimizing of scaffolds based on correlation structure–function aimed the regenerative medicine. Thus, we evaluated in vitro performance of stabilized porous chitosan (SPCHTs) associated with activated platelet-rich plasma (aP-PRP) as a composite scaffold for the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (h-AdMSCs). The porous structure of chitosan (PCHT) was prepared similarly to solid sponges by controlled freezing (− 20 °C) and lyophilization of a 3% (w/v) chitosan solution. Stabilization was performed by treating the PCHT with sodium hydroxide (TNaOH), an ethanol series (TEtOH) or by crosslinking with tripolyphosphate (CTPP). The aP-PRP was obtained from the controlled centrifugation of whole blood and activated with autologous serum and calcium. Imaging of the structures showed fibrin networks inside and on the surface of SPCHTs as a consequence of electrostatic interactions. SPCHTs were non-cytotoxic, and the porosity, pore size and Young's modulus were approximately 96%, 145 μm and 1.5 MPa for TNaOH and TEtOH and 94%, 110 μm and 1.8 MPa for CTPP, respectively. Stabilization maintained the integrity of the SPCHTs for at least 10 days of cultivation. SPCHTs showed controlled release of the growth factors TGF-β1 and PDGF-AB. Although generating different patterns, all of the stabilization treatments improved the proliferation of seeded h-AdMSCs on the composite scaffold compared to aP-PRP alone, and differentiation of the composite scaffold treated with TEtOH was significantly higher than for non-stabilized PCHT. We conclude that the composite scaffolds improved the in vitro performance of PRP and have potential in regenerative medicine. - Highlights: • Stabilization maintains the integrity of the chitosan scaffolds for at least 10 days. • Fibrin networks on the chitosan scaffolds were referred to electrostatic interactions. • Stabilized chitosan

  20. Stabilization of sawteeth with third harmonic deuterium ICRF-accelerated beam in JET plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girardo, Jean-Baptiste [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Sharapov, Sergei; Fitzgerald, Michael; Hawkes, Nick; Kiptily, Vasily; Lupelli, Ivan [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Boom, Jurrian [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Dumont, Rémi; Garbet, Xavier; Sarazin, Yanick; Schneider, Mireille [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Eriksson, Jacob [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Mantsinen, Mervi [Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Barcelona Supercomputing Center, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Sawtooth stabilisation by fast ions is investigated in deuterium (D) and D-helium 3 (He3) plasmas of JET heated by deuterium Neutral Beam Injection combined in synergy with Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) applied on-axis at 3rd beam cyclotron harmonic. A very significant increase in the sawtooth period is observed, caused by the ICRH-acceleration of the beam ions born at 100 keV to the MeV energy range. Four representative sawteeth from four different discharges are compared with Porcelli's model. In two discharges, the sawtooth crash appears to be triggered by core-localized Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes inside the q = 1 surface (also called “tornado” modes) which expel the fast ions from within the q = 1 surface, over time scales comparable with the sawtooth period. Two other discharges did not exhibit fast ion-driven instabilities in the plasma core, and no degradation of fast ion confinement was found in both modelling and direct measurements of fast ion profile with the neutron camera. The developed sawtooth scenario without fast ion-driven instabilities in the plasma core is of high interest for the burning plasmas. Possible causes of the sawtooth crashes on JET are discussed.

  1. Effect of dopants on the transparency and stability of the conductivity of plasma polymerised thiophene layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewoud, L.M.H.; Weinbeck, A.E.; Engbers, G.H.M.; Feijen, J.

    2002-01-01

    Iodine is frequently used as dopant for plasma polymerised thiophene (PPT) layers, but suffers from several drawbacks such as the rapidly decaying conductivity upon exposure to air, and the absorption of light by iodine species that are present in the doped PPT layer (i.e., I2, I3− , and I5−). This

  2. Electron Bunch Length Measurements in the E-167 Plasma Wakefield Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenfeld, I.; Auerbach, D.; Berry, M.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, Cheng-Kun; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.; Johnson, D.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.; Kirby, N.; Lu, Wei; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Zacherl, W.; /SLAC /UCLA /Southern California U.

    2007-03-27

    Bunch length is of prime importance to beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments due to its inverse relationship to the amplitude of the accelerating wake. We present here a summary of work done by the E167 collaboration measuring the SLAC ultra-short bunches via autocorrelation of coherent transition radiation. We have studied material transmission properties and improved our autocorrelation traces using materials with better spectral characteristics.

  3. Stabilization of porous chitosan improves the performance of its association with platelet-rich plasma as a composite scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojo, A A M; Perez, A G M; Galdames, S E M; Brissac, I C S; Santana, M H A

    2016-03-01

    This study offers innovative perspectives for optimizing of scaffolds based on correlation structure-function aimed the regenerative medicine. Thus, we evaluated in vitro performance of stabilized porous chitosan (SPCHTs) associated with activated platelet-rich plasma (aP-PRP) as a composite scaffold for the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (h-AdMSCs). The porous structure of chitosan (PCHT) was prepared similarly to solid sponges by controlled freezing (-20 °C) and lyophilization of a 3% (w/v) chitosan solution. Stabilization was performed by treating the PCHT with sodium hydroxide (TNaOH), an ethanol series (TEtOH) or by crosslinking with tripolyphosphate (CTPP). The aP-PRP was obtained from the controlled centrifugation of whole blood and activated with autologous serum and calcium. Imaging of the structures showed fibrin networks inside and on the surface of SPCHTs as a consequence of electrostatic interactions. SPCHTs were non-cytotoxic, and the porosity, pore size and Young's modulus were approximately 96%, 145 μm and 1.5 MPa for TNaOH and TEtOH and 94%, 110 μm and 1.8 MPa for CTPP, respectively. Stabilization maintained the integrity of the SPCHTs for at least 10 days of cultivation. SPCHTs showed controlled release of the growth factors TGF-β1 and PDGF-AB. Although generating different patterns, all of the stabilization treatments improved the proliferation of seeded h-AdMSCs on the composite scaffold compared to aP-PRP alone, and differentiation of the composite scaffold treated with TEtOH was significantly higher than for non-stabilized PCHT. We conclude that the composite scaffolds improved the in vitro performance of PRP and have potential in regenerative medicine.

  4. The Project PLASMONX for Plasma Acceleration Experiments and a Thomson X-Ray Source at SPARC

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, Luca; Alessandria, Franco; Bacci, Alberto; Baldeschi, Walter; Barbini, Alessandro; Bellaveglia, Marco; Bertolucci, Sergio; Biagini, Maria; Boni, Roberto; Bonifacio, Rodolfo; Boscolo, Ilario; Boscolo, Manuela; Bottigli, Ubaldo; Broggi, Francesco; Castellano, Michele; Cecchetti, Carlo A; Cialdi, Simone; Clozza, Alberto; De Martinis, Carlo; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Drago, Alessandro; Esposito, Adolfo; Ferrario, Massimo; Ficcadenti, L; Filippetto, Daniele; Fusco, Valeria; Galimberti, Marco; Gallo, Alessandro; Gatti, Giancarlo; Ghigo, Andrea; Giove, Dario; Giulietti, Antonio; Giulietti, Danilo; Gizzi, Leonida A; Golosio, Bruno; Guiducci, Susanna; Incurvati, Maurizio; Köster, Petra; Labate, Luca; Ligi, Carlo; Marcellini, Fabio; Maroli, Cesare; Mauri, Marco; Migliorati, Mauro; Mostacci, Andrea; Oliva, Pier N; Palumbo, Luigi; Pellegrino, Luigi; Petrillo, Vittoria; Piovella, Nicola; Poggiu, Angela; Pozzoli, Roberto; Preger, Miro; Ricci, Ruggero; Rome, Massimiliano; Rossi, Antonella; Sanelli, Claudio; Serio, Mario; Sgamma, Francesco; Spataro, Bruno; Stecchi, Alessandro; Stella, Angelo; Stumbo, Simone; Tazzioli, Franco; Tommasini, Paolo; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Vescovi, Mario; Vicario, Carlo

    2005-01-01

    We present the status of the activity on the project PLASMONX, which foresees the installation of a multi-TW Ti:Sa laser system at the CNR-ILIL laboratory to conduct plasma acceleration experiments and the construction of an additional beam line at SPARC to develop a Thomson X-ray source at INFN-LNF. After pursuing self-injection experiments at ILIL, when the electron beam at SPARC will be available the SPARC laser system will be upgraded to TW power level in order to conduct either external injection plasma acceleration experiments and ultra-bright X-ray pulse generation with the Thomson source. Results of numerical simulations modeling the interaction of the SPARC electron beam and the counter-propagating laser beam are presented with detailed discussion of the monochromatic X-ray beam spectra generated by Compton backscattering: X-ray energies are tunable in the range 20 to 1000 keV, with pulse duration from 30 fs to 20 ps. Preliminary simulations of plasma acceleration with self-injection are illustrated,...

  5. IMPROVEMENTS FOR THE THIRD GENERATION PLASMA WAKEFIELD EXPERIMENT E-164 AT SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, C

    2004-09-15

    The E-164 experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is the third in a series investigating Plasma Wakefield Acceleration where the wake is driven by electron bunches. A collaboration between SLAC, UCLA and USC, E-164 has up to 2 x 10{sup 10} electrons at 28.5 GeV in 100 micron long bunches. These bunches enter a 30cm long Lithium plasma with density of 6 x 10{sup 15} electrons/cm{sup 3}, where the transfer of energy from the head of the bunch to the tail takes place. In addition to acceleration, strong focusing, refraction of the electron beam and ''betatron X-ray'' production are all investigated. E-164 builds on related prior experiments, and its apparatus has evolved considerably. A third Optical Transition Radiator has been added for real time Twiss Parameter measurements which include the effects of scattering. The plasma cell is moved to the focus of the Final Focus Test Beam facility in order to increase bunch electron density. Spectrometry is extended with an upstream chicane in a dispersive region to produce synchrotron X-rays. Performance of these improvements and status of the experiment are discussed.

  6. Generation and pointing stabilization of multi-GeV electron beams from a laser plasma accelerator driven in a pre-formed plasma waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Daniels, J.; Mao, H.-S.; Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Tóth, Cs.; Tilborg, J. van; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Mittelberger, D. E.; Bulanov, S. S.; Leemans, W. P., E-mail: WPLeemans@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Laser pulses with peak power 0.3 PW were used to generate electron beams with energy >4 GeV within a 9 cm-long capillary discharge waveguide operated with a plasma density of ≈7×10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. Simulations showed that the super-Gaussian near-field laser profile that is typical of high-power femtosecond laser systems reduces the efficacy of guiding in parabolic plasma channels compared with the Gaussian laser pulses that are typically simulated. In the experiments, this was mitigated by increasing the plasma density and hence the contribution of self-guiding. This allowed for the generation of multi-GeV electron beams, but these had angular fluctuation ≳2 mrad rms. Mitigation of capillary damage and more accurate alignment allowed for stable beams to be produced with energy 2.7±0.1 GeV. The pointing fluctuation was 0.6 mrad rms, which was less than the beam divergence of ≲1 mrad full-width-half-maximum.

  7. OUR EXPERIENCE WITH MAGERL’S MODIFIED TECHNIQUE FOR STABILIZATION OF SUBAXIAL CERVICAL SPINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haritonov Dimitar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: There are different surgical techniques for massa lateralis screw instrumentation of subaxial cervical spine--those of Roy-Camille, Magerl, Anderson, and An. Each has different starting point and trajectorys of screw implantation.For each technique there is a potential risk to affect vascular and neural structures.In this paper we share our experience in using a modified Magerl's technique for stabilization of subaxial cervical spine. Method:We present a retrospective study and clinical follow-up of 27 patients operated on the occasion of cervical injury that we have used the modified technique of Magerl. In 8 patients was carried and an anterior decompression and stabilization. Results: In these patients was carried posterior or combined -- posterior and anterior stabilization. The posterior fixation was massa lateralis with this modified technique of Magerl with multiaxial screws. With this technique were inserted 160 multiaxial screws and the most common length of the implants were 108 mm (108 from 160 or 67.5%. Conclusion: Based on world literature, experience and analysis of clinical cases, we believe that this modified technique for subaxial cervical fixation is effective (the pull-out strength approach to the strength of pedicle screw instrumentation and is much safer.

  8. Plasma etching of cavities into diamond anvils for experiments at high pressures and high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, S.T.; Cynn, H.; Falabella, S.; Evans, W.J.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.; Farber, D.; Vohra, Y.K. (LLNL); (UAB)

    2012-10-23

    We describe a method for precisely etching small cavities into the culets of diamond anvils for the purpose of providing thermal insulation for samples in experiments at high pressures and high temperatures. The cavities were fabricated using highly directional oxygen plasma to reactively etch into the diamond surface. The lateral extent of the etch was precisely controlled to micron accuracy by etching the diamond through a lithographically fabricated tungsten mask. The performance of the etched cavities in high-temperature experiments in which the samples were either laser heated or electrically heated is discussed.

  9. ELM simulation experiments using transient heat and particle load produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, K.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2011-10-01

    It is considered that thermal transient events such as type I edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions will limit the lifetime of plasma-facing components (PFCs) in ITER. It is predicted that the heat load onto the PFCs during type I ELMs in ITER is 0.2-2MJ/m2 with pulse length of ~0.1-1ms. We have investigated interaction between transient heat and particle load and the PFCs by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) at University of Hyogo. In the experiment, a pulsed plasma with duration of ~0.5ms, incident ion energy of ~30eV, and surface absorbed energy density of ~0.3-0.7MJ/m2 was produced by the MCPG. However, no melting occurred on a tungsten surface exposed to a single plasma pulse of ~0.7MJ/m2, while cracks clearly appeared at the edge part of the W surface. Thus, we have recently started to improve the performance of the MCPG in order to investigate melt layer dynamics of a tungsten surface such as vapor cloud formation. In the modified MCPG, the capacitor bank energy for the plasma discharge is increased from 24.5 kJ to 144 kJ. In the preliminary experiments, the plasmoid with duration of ~0.6 ms, incident ion energy of ~ 40 eV, and the surface absorbed energy density of ~2 MJ/m2 was successfully produced at the gun voltage of 6 kV.

  10. Segregated copper ratio experiment on transient stability (SeCRETS). Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzone, P. [ed.] [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-01-01

    Two Nb{sub 3}Sn, steel jacketed, cable-in-conduit conductors have been manufactured with identical non-Cu cross sections and the stabilizer either included in the Nb{sub 3}Sn composite or partly segregated as copper wires. The two conductors are series connected and wound as a bifilar , single layer solenoid, assembled in the high field bore (11 T) of the SULTAN test facility. The operating current is up to 12 kA (400 A/mm{sup 2}). A transverse pulsed field is applied with {delta}B up to 2.7 T, field rate up to 180 T/s and field integral up to 530 T{sup 2}/s. In the dc test, a good agreement is found between the I{sub c} and the T{sub cs} results, both correctly scaling according to the parameters derived from the strand tests. The n-value from the V-I curve is in the range of 15. The current sharing at the high field section is correlated with a local current re-distribution, observed by arrays of miniature Hall sensors, detecting the self-field around the conductor. The ac losses results in the range of 2 to 9 Hz by gas flow calorimetry indicate coupling currents constant, n{tau}, in the range of 1.5 ms at high field, increasing by a factor of 2 with 12 kA transport current. Loss extrapolation to 0 frequency suggests that the loss curve may be not linear outside the test range, with higher n{tau} at lower field rate. The calorimetric loss estimation at the fast field transient (f=15 Hz) indicates n{tau} {approx_equal} 2 ms. The ITER plasma disruption transients have been reproduced by the pulsed coils. Due to the very low ac losses, no quench could be generated in either conductor even reducing the temperature margin below 0.2-0.3 K. Very large field transients, with integral above 100 T{sup 2}/s, are required to quench the conductors. In that range, the conductor without segregated copper has superior performance. Due to the large interstrand resistance (very low ac losses), the segregated copper has marginal contribution to the stability. No evidence of current

  11. Chemical stability and antimicrobial activity of plasma sprayed bioactive Ca2ZnSi2O7 coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Yu, Jiangming; Xie, Youtao; Huang, Liping; Ye, Xiaojian; Zheng, Xuebin

    2011-12-01

    Calcium silicate ceramic coatings have received considerable attention in recent years due to their excellent bioactivity and bonding strength. However, their high dissolution rates limit their practical applications. In this study, zinc incorporated calcium silicate based ceramic Ca(2)ZnSi(2)O(7) coating was prepared on Ti-6Al-4V substrate via plasma spraying technology aiming to achieve higher chemical stability and additional antibacterial activity. Chemical stability of the coating was assessed by monitoring mass loss and ion release of the coating after immersion in the Tris-HCl buffer solution and examining pH value variation of the solution. Results showed that the chemical stability of zinc incorporated coating was improved significantly. Antimicrobial activity of the Ca(2)ZnSi(2)O(7) coating was evaluated, and it was found that the coating exhibited 93% antibacterial ratio against Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility were confirmed for the Ca(2)ZnSi(2)O(7) coating by simulated body fluid test, MC3T3-E1 cells adhesion investigation and cytotoxicity assay.

  12. Effects of Temperature and Duration of Storage on the Stability of Antioxidant Compounds in Egg Yolk and Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, Rita; Nyiri, Zoltán; Eke, Zsuzsanna; Török, János

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidants help protect tissues from oxidative damage caused by reactive oxygen species. In view of the widespread interest in egg yolk and plasma antioxidants in relation to environmental and life-history variables, there is a need for knowledge on the necessary conditions for sample storage, which is currently lacking. In this study, our purpose was to examine the kinetics of the degradation of lutein, retinol, and tocopherol in egg yolk samples and the total antioxidant capacity in plasma samples stored at three different temperatures (-20°, -50°, and -80°C) for 24 mo. We found that yolk lutein was stable during the study period. Yolk retinol and tocopherol showed a steep early decline and then remained relatively stable, but retinol showed significant losses at the end of the study period too. In contrast to our expectations, there was no difference in the stability of antioxidant compounds of egg yolk samples stored at different temperatures. Plasma OXY level was stable during the first 6 mo, showed a slight decline between 6 and 12 mo, and declined more intensely after 12 mo of storage. We suggest that studies focusing on the analysis of egg yolk retinol or tocopherol concentrations and total plasma antioxidant capacity should analyze the samples in the first 6-7 mo after collection. For the analysis of yolk lutein, samples can be stored for 24 mo without significant degradation. The storage temperature of -20°C seemed to be sufficient, as a lower temperature did not significantly affect the slope of degradation of the samples.

  13. Plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory. [magnetospheric experiments from space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Current work aimed at identifying the active magnetospheric experiments that can be performed from the Space Shuttle, and designing a laboratory to carry out these experiments is described. The laboratory, known as the PPEPL (Plasma Physics and Environmental Perturbation Laboratory) consists of 35-ft pallet of instruments connected to a 25-ft pressurized control module. The systems deployed from the pallet are two 50-m booms, two subsatellites, a high-power transmitter, a multipurpose accelerator, a set of deployable canisters, and a gimbaled instrument platform. Missions are planned to last seven days, during which two scientists will carry out experiments from within the pressurized module. The type of experiments to be performed are outlined.

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements on plasma science experiments at PPPL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, Mark

    2011-12-20

    Collaborative research between WVU and PPPL was carried out at WVU for the purpose of incorporating the sophisticated diagnostic technique known as laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in the Paul-Trap Simulation Experiment (PTSX) at PPPL. WVU assembled a LIF system at WVU, transported it to PPPL, helped make LIF experiments on the PTSX device, participated in PTSX science, and trained PPPL staff in LIF techniques. In summary, WVU refurbished a non-operational LIF system being loaned from University of Maryland to PPPL and, by doing so, provided PPPL with additional diagnostic capability for its PTSX device and other General Plasma Science experiments. WVU students, staff, and faculty will visit PPPL to collaborate on PTSX experiments in the future.

  15. Plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory. [magnetospheric experiments from space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Current work aimed at identifying the active magnetospheric experiments that can be performed from the Space Shuttle, and designing a laboratory to carry out these experiments is described. The laboratory, known as the PPEPL (Plasma Physics and Environmental Perturbation Laboratory) consists of 35-ft pallet of instruments connected to a 25-ft pressurized control module. The systems deployed from the pallet are two 50-m booms, two subsatellites, a high-power transmitter, a multipurpose accelerator, a set of deployable canisters, and a gimbaled instrument platform. Missions are planned to last seven days, during which two scientists will carry out experiments from within the pressurized module. The type of experiments to be performed are outlined.

  16. Reactive Plasma Sprayed TiN Coating and Its Thermal Stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Dong-li; YAN Dian-ran; HE Ji-ning; LI Xiang-zhi; DONG Yan-chun; ZHANG Jian-xin

    2007-01-01

    TiN coating was prepared by reactive plasma spraying in the Ar and N2 containing plasma jet. The results of XRD show that the TiN coating consists of TiN and Ti3O, neither Ti2N nor TiO2 phases. The toughening mechanism was characterized by analyzing the SEM morphologies of the TiN coating's indentation of microhardness and fracture surfaces. The results indicate that the coating possesses a high toughness. The adhesion strength among the TiN layers is 25.88 MPa, which is slightly lower than that of the Ni/Al bonding coating. The oxidation process of the RPS TiN coating is TiN→Ti3O→TiO2.

  17. Evaluation of microRNA stability in plasma and serum from healthy dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enelund, Lars; Nielsen, Lise Nikolic; Cirera, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    . METHODS: The levels of four microRNAs (cfa-let-7a, cfa-miR-16, cfa-miR-23a and cfa-miR-26a) known to be stably expressed from other canine studies, have been measured by real-time quantitative PCR. RESULTS: MicroRNA levels were found sufficiently stable for gene profiling in serum- and plasma stored...

  18. The stability of radio-frequency plasma-treated polydimethylsiloxane surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Jane; Lindner, Ernö

    2007-03-13

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a widely used material for manufacturing lab-on-chip devices. However, the hydrophobic nature of PDMS is a disadvantage in microfluidic systems. To transform the hydrophobic PDMS surface to hydrophilic, it was treated with radio-frequency (RF) air plasma at 150, 300, and 500 mTorr pressures for up to 30 min. Following the surface treatment, the PDMS specimens were stored in air, deionized water, or 0.14 M NaCl solution at 4 degrees C, 20 degrees C, and 70 degrees C. The change in the hydrophilicity (wettability) of the PDMS surfaces was followed by contact angle measurements and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy as a function of time. As an effect of the RF plasma treatment, the contact angles measured on PDMS surfaces dropped from 113 +/- 4 degrees to 9 +/- 3 degrees . The chamber pressure and the treatment time had no or negligible effect on the results. However, the PDMS surface gradually lost its hydrophilic properties in time. The rate of this process is influenced by the difference in the dielectric constants of the PDMS and its ambient environment. It was the smallest at low temperatures in deionized water and largest at high temperatures in air. Apparently, the OH groups generated on the PDMS surface during the plasma treatment tended toward a more hydrophilic/less hydrophobic environment during the relaxation processes. The correlation between the FTIR-ATR spectral information and the contact angle data supports this interpretation.

  19. The target for the new plasma/wall experiment Magnum-PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M.A. van den, E-mail: m.a.vandenberg@rijnhuizen.nl [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Brons, S.; Kruijt, O.G.; Scholten, J.; Pasquet, R.; Smeets, P.H.M. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Schweer, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, IEF-4, Euratom association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); De Temmerman, G. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    The construction of Magnum-PSI is in its final stage. The aim is to provide a controlled and highly accessible linear plasma device to perform the basic plasma-surface interaction research needed for the design of the plasma facing components of future fusion devices. This contribution will focus on the thermal challenges imposed by those extreme conditions on the design of the target holder of Magnum-PSI. The target holder is designed to allow the exposure of large size targets with variable inclination angles with respect to the magnetic field. A test set up was made to test different interlayers (grafoil, soft metal sheets) and improve the thermal contact between the target and the heat sink. In addition, a modular target holder for sequential exposure of smaller size targets has been designed. Finite element modeling using the ANSYS code was used to optimize the cooling geometry and to predict the temperature profiles due to the heat load of the plasma. Experiments were done on the Pilot-PSI linear device to validate the thermal calculations. Calorimetry and infrared thermography were used to experimentally measure the temperature profile on the target and the heat deposition.

  20. New level-resolved collision data for neutral argon, benchmarked against the ALEXIS plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Nicholas; Loch, Stuart; Ballance, Connor; Thomas, Ed

    2016-10-01

    Performing spectroscopic measurements of emission lines in low temperature laboratory plasmas is challenging because the plasma is often neutral-dominated and not in thermal equilibrium. The densities and temperatures are such that coronal models do not apply; meaning that generalized collisional-radiative (GCR) methods must be employed to theoretically analyze atomic processes. However, for most noble gases, detailed, level-resolved atomic data for neutral and low-charge states does not exist in the literature. We report on a new project, where we use existing atomic physics codes to calculate level-resolved atomic data for neutral and low charge states of argon and compare with previously published, term-resolved theoretical results. In addition, we use the Atomic Structure and Data Analysis (ADAS) suite of codes to calculate a GCR model for low temperature neutral argon, which we compare to published measurements of argon optical emission cross sections. Finally, we compare synthetic spectra generated from our data with observations taken from the Auburn Linear Experiment for Instability Studies (ALEXIS) in an attempt to develop new optical plasma diagnostics for electron temperature and plasma density measurements. This project is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. Grant Number: DE-FG02-00ER54476.

  1. Nonlinear plasma experiments in geospace with gigawatts of RF power at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Cohen, Morris B.

    2015-12-01

    The ionosphere is the ionized uppermost layer of our atmosphere (from 70 - 500 km altitude) where free electron densities yield peak critical frequencies in the HF (3 - 30 MHz) range. The ionosphere thus provides a quiescent plasma target, stable on timescales of minutes, for a whole host of active plasma experiments. High power RF experiments on ionospheric plasma conducted in the U.S. have been reported since 1970. The largest HF transmitter built to date is the HAARP phased-array HF transmitter near Gakona, Alaska which can deliver up to 3.6 Gigawatts (ERP) of CW RF power in the range of 2.8 - 10 MHz to the ionosphere with microsecond pointing, power modulation, and frequency agility. With an ionospheric background thermal energy in the range of only 0.1 eV, this amount of power gives access to the highest regimes of the nonlinearity (RF intensity to thermal pressure) ratio. HAARP's unique features have enabled the conduct of a number of unique nonlinear plasma experiments in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma including generation of artificial aurorae, artificial ionization layers, VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, parametric instabilities, stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and suprathermal electron acceleration. Diagnostics include the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, spacecraft radio beacons, HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and telescopes and cameras for optical emissions. We report on short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effects, artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the HF-enhanced plasma line, and production of suprathermal electrons. One of the primary missions of HAARP, has been the generation of ELF (300 - 3000 Hz) and VLF (3 - 30 kHz) radio waves which are guided to global distances in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. We review

  2. Nonlinear plasma experiments in geospace with gigawatts of RF power at HAARP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheerin, J. P., E-mail: jsheerin@emich.edu [Physics and Astronomy, Eastern Michigan Univ., Ypsilanti, MI 48197 (United States); Cohen, Morris B., E-mail: mcohen@gatech.edu [Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA 30332-0250 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    The ionosphere is the ionized uppermost layer of our atmosphere (from 70 – 500 km altitude) where free electron densities yield peak critical frequencies in the HF (3 – 30 MHz) range. The ionosphere thus provides a quiescent plasma target, stable on timescales of minutes, for a whole host of active plasma experiments. High power RF experiments on ionospheric plasma conducted in the U.S. have been reported since 1970. The largest HF transmitter built to date is the HAARP phased-array HF transmitter near Gakona, Alaska which can deliver up to 3.6 Gigawatts (ERP) of CW RF power in the range of 2.8 – 10 MHz to the ionosphere with microsecond pointing, power modulation, and frequency agility. With an ionospheric background thermal energy in the range of only 0.1 eV, this amount of power gives access to the highest regimes of the nonlinearity (RF intensity to thermal pressure) ratio. HAARP’s unique features have enabled the conduct of a number of unique nonlinear plasma experiments in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma including generation of artificial aurorae, artificial ionization layers, VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, parametric instabilities, stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and suprathermal electron acceleration. Diagnostics include the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, spacecraft radio beacons, HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and telescopes and cameras for optical emissions. We report on short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effects, artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the HF-enhanced plasma line, and production of suprathermal electrons. One of the primary missions of HAARP, has been the generation of ELF (300 – 3000 Hz) and VLF (3 – 30 kHz) radio waves which are guided to global distances in the Earth

  3. Generation of Accelerated Stability Experiment Profile of Inertial Platform Based on Finite Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yunxia; HUANG Xiaokai; KANG Rui

    2012-01-01

    The residual stress generated in the manufacturing process of inertial platform causes the drift of inertial platform parameters in long-term storage condition.However,the existing temperature cycling experiment could not meet the increased repeatability technical requirements of inertial platform parameters.In order to solve this problem,in this paper,firstly the Unigraphics (UG) software and the interface compatibility of ANSYS software are used to establish the inertial platform finite element model.Secondly,the residual stress is loaded into finite element model by ANSYS function editor in the form of surface loads to analyze the efficiency.And then,the generation based on ANSYS simulation inertial platform to accelerate the stability of experiment profile is achieved by the application of the analysis method of orthogonal experimental design and ANSYS thermal-structural coupling.The optimum accelerated stability experiment profile is determined finally,which realizes the rapid,effective release of inertial platform residual stress.The research methodology and conclusion of this paper have great theoretical and practical significance to the production technology of inertial platform.

  4. Experiments of Laser Pointing Stability in Air and in Vacuum to Validate Micrometric Positioning Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, G; Piedigrossi, D; Sandomierski, J; Sosin, M; Geiger, A; Guillaume, S

    2014-01-01

    Aligning accelerator components over 200m with 10 μm accuracy is a challenging task within the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study. A solution based on laser beam in vacuum as straight line reference is proposed. The positions of the accelerator’s components are measured with respect to the laser beam by sensors made of camera/shutter assemblies. To validate these sensors, laser pointing stability has to be studied over 200m. We perform experiments in air and in vacuum in order to know how laser pointing stability varies with the distance of propagation and with the environment. The experiments show that the standard deviations of the laser spot coordinates increase with the distance of propagation. They also show that the standard deviations are much smaller in vacuum (8 μm at 35m) than in air (2000 μm at 200m). Our experiment validates the concept of laser beam in vacuum with camera/shutter assembly for micrometric positioning over 35m. It also gives an estimation of the achievable precision.

  5. Investigation of stability and x-ray spectrum in gas-puff z-pinch plasmas diriven by inductive energy storage pulsed power generator with a plasma opening switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, K.; Fukudome, I. [Yatsushiro National College of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Yatsushiro, Kumamoto (Japan); Teramoto, Y.; Katsuki, S.; Akiyama, H. [Kumamoto Univ., Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Gas-puff z-pinch plasmas are driven by an inductive voltage adder - inductive energy storage pulsed power generator ''ASO-X''. ASO-X has the performance of the maximum output voltage and current are 180 kV and 400 kA respectively and can provide a fast rise time current with operating POS. The stability of the plasma column, spectrum radiated from z-pinch plasmas and the spatial distribution of hot spots are investigated in the case with and without operating POS. By driving ASO-X with operating POS the kink instability is restrained and the stability of plasma column is improved about three times in regard to the average dispersion. Furthermore the duration of soft x-ray radiation is increased and the spatial distribution of hot spots is 50% improved with regard to kurtosis of the intensity profile of pinhole photographs compared to those without operating POS. (author)

  6. Laboratory astrophysical collisionless shock experiments with interpenetrating plasma flows on Omega and NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, James; Park, H.-S.; Huntington, C.; Ryutov, D.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D.; Gregori, G.; Levy, M.; Lamb, D.; Fiuza, F.; Petrasso, R.; Li, C.; Zylastra, A.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.

    2015-11-01

    Shock formation from high-Mach number plasma flows is observed in many astrophysical objects such as supernova remnants and gamma ray bursts. These are collisionless shocks as the ion-ion collision mean free path is much larger than the system size. It is believed that seed magnetic fields can be generated on a cosmologically fast timescale via the Weibel instability when such environments are initially unmagnetized. Here we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers whose ultimate goal is to investigate the dynamics of collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Particle-in-cell numerical simulations have confirmed that the strength and structure of the generated magnetic field are consistent with the Weibel mediated electromagnetic nature and that the inferred magnetization level could be as high as ~ 1%. This paper will review recent experimental results from various laser facilities as well as the simulation results and the theoretical understanding of these observations. Taken together, these results imply that electromagnetic instabilities can be significant in both inertial fusion and astrophysical conditions. We will present results from initial NIF experiments, where we observe the neutrons and x-rays generated from the hot plasmas at the center of weakly collisional, counterstreaming flows. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Megagauss field generation for high-energy-density plasma science experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovang, Dean Curtis; Struve, Kenneth William; Porter, John Larry Jr.

    2008-10-01

    There is a need to generate magnetic fields both above and below 1 megagauss (100 T) with compact generators for laser-plasma experiments in the Beamlet and Petawatt test chambers for focused research on fundamental properties of high energy density magnetic plasmas. Some of the important topics that could be addressed with such a capability are magnetic field diffusion, particle confinement, plasma instabilities, spectroscopic diagnostic development, material properties, flux compression, and alternate confinement schemes, all of which could directly support experiments on Z. This report summarizes a two-month study to develop preliminary designs of magnetic field generators for three design regimes. These are, (1) a design for a relatively low-field (10 to 50 T), compact generator for modest volumes (1 to 10 cm3), (2) a high-field (50 to 200 T) design for smaller volumes (10 to 100 mm3), and (3) an extreme field (greater than 600 T) design that uses flux compression. These designs rely on existing Sandia pulsed-power expertise and equipment, and address issues of magnetic field scaling with capacitor bank design and field inductance, vacuum interface, and trade-offs between inductance and coil designs.

  8. Design of an Experiment to Observe Laser-Plasma Interactions on NIKE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, L.; Weaver, J.; Manheimer, W.; Zalesak, S.; Schmitt, A.; Fyfe, D.; Afeyan, B.; Charbonneau-Lefort, M.

    2007-11-01

    Recent proposed designs (Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 13 056320 (2006)) for direct-drive ICF targets for energy applications involve high implosion velocities combined with higher laser irradiances. The use of high irradiances increases the likelihood of deleterious laser plasma instabilities (LPI) that may lead, for example, to the generation of fast electrons. The proposed use of a 248 nm KrF laser to drive these targets is expected to minimize LPI; this is being studied by experiments at NRL's NIKE facility. We used a modification of the FAST code that models laser pulses with arbitrary spatial and temporal profiles to assist in designing these experiments. The goal is to design targets and pulseshapes to create plasma conditions that will produce sufficient growth of LPI to be observable on NIKE. Using, for example, a cryogenic DT target that is heated by a brief pulse and allowed to expand freely before interacting with a second, high-intensity pulse, allows the development of long scalelengths at low electron temperatures and leads to a predicted 20-efold growth in two-plasmon amplitude.

  9. Results from colliding magnetized plasma jet experiments executed at the Trident laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Rasmus, A. M.; Kurnaz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Davis, J. S.; Drake, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Adams, C. S.; Pollock, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of high-velocity plasma flows in a background magnetic field has applications in pulsed-power and fusion schemes, as well as astrophysical environments, such as accretion systems and stellar mass ejections into the magnetosphere. Experiments recently executed at the Trident Laser Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory investigated the effects of an expanding aluminum plasma flow into a uniform 4.5-Tesla magnetic field created using a solenoid designed and manufactured at the University of Michigan. Opposing-target experiments demonstrate interesting collisional behavior between the two magnetized flows. Preliminary interferometry and Faraday rotation measurements will be presented and discussed. This work is funded by the U.S Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840. Support for this work was provided by NASA through Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship grant number PF3-140111 awarded by the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Astrophysical Observatory for NASA under contract NAS8-03060.

  10. Plasma-wall interaction data needs critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-11-01

    The Division of Development and Technology has sponsored a four day US-Japan workshop ''Plasma-Wall Interaction Data Needs Critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)'', held at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California on June 24 to 27, 1985. The workshop, which brought together fifty scientists and engineers from the United States, Japan, Germany, and Canada, considered the plasma-material interaction and high heat flux (PMI/HHF) issues for the next generation of magnetic fusion energy devices, the Burning Core Experiment (BCX). Materials options were ranked, and a strategy for future PMI/HHF research was formulated. The foundation for international collaboration and coordination of this research was also established. This volume contains the last three of the five technical sessions. The first of the three is on plasma materials interaction issues, the second is on research facilities and the third is from smaller working group meetings on graphite, beryllium, advanced materials and future collaborations.

  11. First on-line positron experiments en route to pair-plasma creation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanja, Juliane; Hergenhahn, Uwe; Stenson, Eve V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (Germany); Niemann, Holger; Sunn Pedersen, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (Germany); Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet Greifswald (Germany); Saitoh, Haruhiko [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (Germany); The University of Tokyo (Japan); Stoneking, Matthew R. [Lawrence University (United States); Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Piochacz, Christian [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Schweikhard, Lutz [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet Greifswald (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Electron-positron plasmas are predicted to show a fundamentally different behavior from traditional ion-electron plasmas, because of the equal masses of the two species. Using up to 10{sup 9} positrons per second provided by the NEPOMUC (Neutron-Induced Positron Source Munich) facility, the APEX/PAX team aims to create the first such plasma confined in a toroidal magnetic trap. Positron beam parameters as well as efficient injection and confinement schemes for both species in toroidal geometries are fundamental to the project. In this contribution we present results from first on-line positron experiments. Besides characterizing the NEPOMUC beam we conducted positron injection experiments into a dipole magnetic field configuration. Using static electric fields, a 5-eV positron beam was transported across magnetic field lines into the confinement region. With this method, up to 38% of the incoming particles reach the confinement region and make at least a 180 revolution around the magnet. Under dedicated experimental conditions confinement on the order of 1 ms was realized.

  12. Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada S. Abdelwahab

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work concerns with the development of stability indicating the RP-HPLC method for simultaneous determination of guaifenesin (GUF and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (PSH in the presence of guaifenesin related substance (Guaiacol. GUC, and in the presence of syrup excepients with minimum sample pre-treatment. In the developed RP-HPLC method efficient chromatographic separation was achieved for GUF, PSH, GUC and syrup excepients using ODS column as a stationary phase and methanol: water (50:50, v/v, pH = 4 with orthophosphoric acid as a mobile phase with a flow rate of 1 mL min−1 and UV detection at 210 nm. The chromatographic run time was approximately 10 min. Calibration curves were drawn relating the integrated area under peak to the corresponding concentrations of PSH, GUF and GUC in the range of 1–8, 1–20, 0.4–8 μg mL−1, respectively. The developed method has been validated and met the requirements delineated by ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision, specificity and robustness. The validated method was successfully applied for determination of the studied drugs in triaminic chest congestion® syrup; moreover its results were statistically compared with those obtained by the official method and no significant difference was found between them.

  13. ELM simulation experiments on Pilot-PSI using simultaneous high flux plasma and transient heat/particle source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Temmerman, G.; Zielinski, J. J.; van Diepen, S.; Marot, L.; Price, M.

    2011-01-01

    A new experimental setup has been developed for edge localized mode (ELM) simulation experiments with relevant steady-state plasma conditions and transient heat/particle source. The setup is based on the Pilot-PSI linear plasma device and allows the superimposition of a transient heat/particle pulse

  14. Involvement of the Cdc42 pathway in CFTR post-translational turnover and in its plasma membrane stability in airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Ferru-Clément

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR is a chloride channel that is expressed on the apical plasma membrane (PM of epithelial cells. The most common deleterious allele encodes a trafficking-defective mutant protein undergoing endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD and presenting lower PM stability. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the Cdc42 pathway in CFTR turnover and trafficking in a human bronchiolar epithelial cell line (CFBE41o- expressing wild-type CFTR. Cdc42 is a small GTPase of the Rho family that fulfils numerous cell functions, one of which is endocytosis and recycling process via actin cytoskeleton remodelling. When we treated cells with chemical inhibitors such as ML141 against Cdc42 and wiskostatin against the downstream effector N-WASP, we observed that CFTR channel activity was inhibited, in correlation with a decrease in CFTR amount at the cell surface and an increase in dynamin-dependent CFTR endocytosis. Anchoring of CFTR to the cortical cytoskeleton was then presumably impaired by actin disorganization. When we performed siRNA-mediated depletion of Cdc42, actin polymerization was not impacted, but we observed actin-independent consequences upon CFTR. Total and PM CFTR amounts were increased, resulting in greater activation of CFTR. Pulse-chase experiments showed that while CFTR degradation was slowed, CFTR maturation through the Golgi apparatus remained unaffected. In addition, we observed increased stability of CFTR in PM and reduction of its endocytosis. This study highlights the involvement of the Cdc42 pathway at several levels of CFTR biogenesis and trafficking: (i Cdc42 is implicated in the first steps of CFTR biosynthesis and processing; (ii it contributes to the stability of CFTR in PM via its anchoring to cortical actin; (iii it promotes CFTR endocytosis and presumably its sorting toward lysosomal degradation.

  15. Involvement of the Cdc42 pathway in CFTR post-translational turnover and in its plasma membrane stability in airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferru-Clément, Romain; Fresquet, Fleur; Norez, Caroline; Métayé, Thierry; Becq, Frédéric; Kitzis, Alain; Thoreau, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that is expressed on the apical plasma membrane (PM) of epithelial cells. The most common deleterious allele encodes a trafficking-defective mutant protein undergoing endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) and presenting lower PM stability. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the Cdc42 pathway in CFTR turnover and trafficking in a human bronchiolar epithelial cell line (CFBE41o-) expressing wild-type CFTR. Cdc42 is a small GTPase of the Rho family that fulfils numerous cell functions, one of which is endocytosis and recycling process via actin cytoskeleton remodelling. When we treated cells with chemical inhibitors such as ML141 against Cdc42 and wiskostatin against the downstream effector N-WASP, we observed that CFTR channel activity was inhibited, in correlation with a decrease in CFTR amount at the cell surface and an increase in dynamin-dependent CFTR endocytosis. Anchoring of CFTR to the cortical cytoskeleton was then presumably impaired by actin disorganization. When we performed siRNA-mediated depletion of Cdc42, actin polymerization was not impacted, but we observed actin-independent consequences upon CFTR. Total and PM CFTR amounts were increased, resulting in greater activation of CFTR. Pulse-chase experiments showed that while CFTR degradation was slowed, CFTR maturation through the Golgi apparatus remained unaffected. In addition, we observed increased stability of CFTR in PM and reduction of its endocytosis. This study highlights the involvement of the Cdc42 pathway at several levels of CFTR biogenesis and trafficking: (i) Cdc42 is implicated in the first steps of CFTR biosynthesis and processing; (ii) it contributes to the stability of CFTR in PM via its anchoring to cortical actin; (iii) it promotes CFTR endocytosis and presumably its sorting toward lysosomal degradation.

  16. Involvement of the Cdc42 Pathway in CFTR Post-Translational Turnover and in Its Plasma Membrane Stability in Airway Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferru-Clément, Romain; Fresquet, Fleur; Norez, Caroline; Métayé, Thierry; Becq, Frédéric; Kitzis, Alain; Thoreau, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that is expressed on the apical plasma membrane (PM) of epithelial cells. The most common deleterious allele encodes a trafficking-defective mutant protein undergoing endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) and presenting lower PM stability. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the Cdc42 pathway in CFTR turnover and trafficking in a human bronchiolar epithelial cell line (CFBE41o-) expressing wild-type CFTR. Cdc42 is a small GTPase of the Rho family that fulfils numerous cell functions, one of which is endocytosis and recycling process via actin cytoskeleton remodelling. When we treated cells with chemical inhibitors such as ML141 against Cdc42 and wiskostatin against the downstream effector N-WASP, we observed that CFTR channel activity was inhibited, in correlation with a decrease in CFTR amount at the cell surface and an increase in dynamin-dependent CFTR endocytosis. Anchoring of CFTR to the cortical cytoskeleton was then presumably impaired by actin disorganization. When we performed siRNA-mediated depletion of Cdc42, actin polymerization was not impacted, but we observed actin-independent consequences upon CFTR. Total and PM CFTR amounts were increased, resulting in greater activation of CFTR. Pulse-chase experiments showed that while CFTR degradation was slowed, CFTR maturation through the Golgi apparatus remained unaffected. In addition, we observed increased stability of CFTR in PM and reduction of its endocytosis. This study highlights the involvement of the Cdc42 pathway at several levels of CFTR biogenesis and trafficking: (i) Cdc42 is implicated in the first steps of CFTR biosynthesis and processing; (ii) it contributes to the stability of CFTR in PM via its anchoring to cortical actin; (iii) it promotes CFTR endocytosis and presumably its sorting toward lysosomal degradation. PMID:25768293

  17. Analysis and modelling of the magnetic and plasma profiles during PPCD experiments in RFX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiatti, M. E.; Cappello, S.; Lorenzini, R.; Martini, S.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Sattin, F.; Terranova, D.; Bolzonella, T.; Buffa, A.; Canton, A.; Carraro, L.; Escande, D. F.; Garzotti, L.; Innocente, P.; Marrelli, L.; Martines, E.; Scarin, P.; Spizzo, G.; Valisa, M.; Zanca, P.; Antoni, V.; Apolloni, L.; Bagatin, M.; Baker, W.; Barana, O.; Bettella, D.; Bettini, P.; Cavazzana, R.; Cavinato, M.; Chitarin, G.; Cravotta, A.; D'Angelo, F.; Dal Bello, S.; DeLorenzi, A.; Desideri, D.; Fiorentin, P.; Franz, P.; Frassinetti, L.; Gaio, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Grando, L.; Guo, S. C.; Luchetta, A.; Malesani, G.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Martin, P.; Masiello, A.; Milani, F.; Moresco, M.; Murari, A.; Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pégourie, B.; Peruzzo, S.; Piovan, R.; Piovesan, P.; Pomaro, N.; Preti, G.; Regnoli, G.; Rostagni, G.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Telesca, G.; Toigo, V.; Vianello, N.; Zaccaria, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zilli, E.; Zollino, G.; Zuin, M.

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we analyse the main features of the pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) technique, used in the reversed field pinch configuration to achieve improved confinement conditions. In the RFX experiment, PPCD corresponds to a decrease of the magnetic fluctuations, to a peaking of the temperature profile, and to a reduced transport and plasma-wall interaction. A three-dimensional MHD nonlinear code and one-dimensional time-dependent transport models have been applied to study the effect of PPCD on the magnetic and plasma profiles. The three-dimensional MHD simulations show that the external inductive drive pinches and peaks the current profile driving the configuration through a transient phase, where the spontaneous turbulent dynamo action is quenched. The one-dimensional transport codes indicate that the experimental profile modifications associated with PPCD are consistent with a reduction of the stochastic transport.

  18. Beam Transfer Line Design for a Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Brethoux, D; Clerc, V; Goddard, B; Gschwendtner, E; Jensen, L K; Kosmicki, A; Le Godec, G; Meddahi, M; Muggli, P; Mutin, C; Osborne, O; Papastergiou, K; Pardons, A; Velotti, F M; Vincke, H

    2013-01-01

    The world’s first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment (AWAKE) is presently being studied at CERN. The experimentwill use a high energy proton beam extracted from the SPS as driver. Two possible locations for installing the AWAKE facility were considered: the West Area and the CNGS beam line. The previous transfer line from the SPS to the West Area was completely dismantled in 2005 and would need to be fully re-designed and re-built. For this option, geometric constraints for radiation protection reasons would limit the maximum proton beam energy to 300 GeV. The existing CNGS line could be used by applying only minor changes to the lattice for the final focusing and the interface between the proton beam and the laser, required for plasma ionisation and bunch-modulation seeding. The beam line design studies performed for the two options are presented.

  19. A 7 T Pulsed Magnetic Field Generator for Magnetized Laser Plasma Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangyue; Liang, Yihan; Song, Falun; Yuan, Peng; Wang, Yulin; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A pulsed magnetic field generator was developed to study the effect of a magnetic field on the evolution of a laser-generated plasma. A 40 kV pulsed power system delivered a fast (~230 ns), 55 kA current pulse into a single-turn coil surrounding the laser target, using a capacitor bank of 200 nF, a laser-triggered switch and a low-impedance strip transmission line. A one-dimensional uniform 7 T pulsed magnetic field was created using a Helmholtz coil pair with a 6 mm diameter. The pulsed magnetic field was controlled to take effect synchronously with a nanosecond heating laser beam, a femtosecond probing laser beam and an optical Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) detector. The preliminary experiments demonstrate bifurcation and focusing of plasma expansion in a transverse magnetic field.

  20. Plasma wakefields in the quasi-nonlinear regime: Experiments at ATF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Andonian, G.; Barber, S.; Ferrario, M.; Muggli, P.; O'Shea, B.; Sakai, Y.; Valloni, A.; Williams, O.; Xi, Y.; Yakimenko, V.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we present details of planned experiments to investigate certain aspects of the quasi non linear regime (QNL) of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). In the QNL regime it is, in principal, possible to combine the benefits of both nonlinear and linear PWFA. That is, beams of high quality can be maintained through acceleration due to the complete ejection of plasma electrons from beam occupied region, while large energy gains can be achieved through use of transformer ratio increasing schemes, such as ramped bunch trains. With the addition of an short focal length PMQ triplet capable of focusing beams to the few micron scale and the ability to generate tunable bunch trains, the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Lab offers the unique capabilities to probe these characteristics of the QNL regime.

  1. Operational experience with a variety of plasma facing tile assemblies at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, P. E-mail: paul.edwards@jet.uk; Altmann, H.; Loving, A.; Pedrick, L.; Tait, J.; Way, M

    2001-10-01

    During the June 1999 JET shutdown, 3000 plasma facing Tile Assemblies were found to be loose and had to be re-torqued remotely using the Mascot force reflecting manipulator. Whilst the integrity of these Tile Assemblies has been monitored during previous man access shutdowns, with the introduction of tritium to the machine in May 1996, the majority had not been checked since March 1996. This paper reviews typical plasma facing Tile Assembly designs within the JET torus and summarises the experience gained for use in future machine applications. This includes loosening processes/mechanisms and their prevention, applications of surface coatings to avoid seizing of un-lubricated assemblies, and the use of vibration resistant thread profiles. The design of attachments to minimise combined mechanical and thermal stresses in the tiles, material selection and other engineering aspects are also discussed.

  2. Non-axisymmetric ideal equilibrium and stability of ITER plasmas with rotating RMPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, C. J.; Cramp, R. G. J.; Gibson, S.; Lazerson, S. A.; Chapman, I. T.; Kirk, A.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetic perturbations produced by the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) coils will be rotated in ITER so that the spiral patterns due to strike point splitting which are locked to the RMP also rotate. This is to ensure even power deposition on the divertor plates. VMEC equilibria are calculated for different phases of the RMP rotation. It is demonstrated that the off harmonics rotate in the opposite direction to the main harmonic. This is an important topic for future research to control and optimize ITER appropriately. High confinement mode (H-mode) is favourable for the economics of a potential fusion power plant and its use is planned in ITER. However, the high pressure gradient at the edge of the plasma can trigger periodic eruptions called edge localized modes (ELMs). ELMs have the potential to shorten the life of the divertor in ITER (Loarte et al 2003 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 45 1549) and so methods for mitigating or suppressing ELMs in ITER will be important. Non-axisymmetric RMP coils will be installed in ITER for ELM control. Sampling theory is used to show that there will be significant a {{n}\\text{coils}}-{{n}\\text{rmp}} harmonic sideband. There are nine coils toroidally in ITER so {{n}\\text{coils}}=9 . This results in a significant n  =  6 component to the {{n}\\text{rmp}}=3 applied field and a significant n  =  5 component to the {{n}\\text{rmp}}=4 applied field. Although the vacuum field has similar amplitudes of these harmonics the plasma response to the various harmonics dictates the final equilibrium. Magnetic perturbations with toroidal mode number n  =  3 and n  =  4 are applied to a 15 MA, {{q}95}≈ 3 burning ITER plasma. We use a three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic model (VMEC) to calculate ITER equilibria with applied RMPs and to determine growth rates of infinite n ballooning modes (COBRA). The {{n}\\text{rmp}}=4 case shows little change in ballooning mode growth rate as the RMP is

  3. Cryogenic Considerations for Superconducting Magnet Design for the Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL; Demko, Dr. Jonathan A [LeTourneau University, Texas; Lumsdaine, Arnold [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL; McGinnis, William Dean [ORNL; Bjorholm, Thomas P [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine long term performance of plasma facing components such as diverters and first walls for fusion devices, next generation plasma generators are needed. A Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) has been proposed to address this need through the generation of plasmas in front of the target with electron temperatures of 1-15 eV and electron densities of 1020 to 1021 m-3. Heat fluxes on target diverters could reach 20 MW/m2. In order generate this plasma, a unique radio frequency helicon source and heating of electrons and ions through Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) has been proposed. MPEX requires a series of magnets with non-uniform central fields up to 2 T over a 5m length in the heating and transport region and 1 T uniform central field over a 1-m length on a diameter of 1.3 m. Given the field requirements, superconducting magnets are under consideration for MPEX. In order to determine the best construction method for the magnets, the cryogenic refrigeration has been analyzed with respect to cooldown and operational performance criteria for open-cycle and closed-cycle systems, capital and operating costs of these system, and maturity of supporting technology such as cryocoolers. These systems will be compared within the context of commercially available magnet constructions to determine the most economical method for MPEX operation. The current state of the MPEX magnet design including details on possible superconducting magnet configurations will be presented.

  4. A large-scale forest fragmentation experiment: the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Robert M; Didham, Raphael K; Fahrig, Lenore; Ferraz, Gonçalo; Hector, Andy; Holt, Robert D; Kapos, Valerie; Reynolds, Glen; Sinun, Waidi; Snaddon, Jake L; Turner, Edgar C

    2011-11-27

    Opportunities to conduct large-scale field experiments are rare, but provide a unique opportunity to reveal the complex processes that operate within natural ecosystems. Here, we review the design of existing, large-scale forest fragmentation experiments. Based on this review, we develop a design for the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) Project, a new forest fragmentation experiment to be located in the lowland tropical forests of Borneo (Sabah, Malaysia). The SAFE Project represents an advance on existing experiments in that it: (i) allows discrimination of the effects of landscape-level forest cover from patch-level processes; (ii) is designed to facilitate the unification of a wide range of data types on ecological patterns and processes that operate over a wide range of spatial scales; (iii) has greater replication than existing experiments; (iv) incorporates an experimental manipulation of riparian corridors; and (v) embeds the experimentally fragmented landscape within a wider gradient of land-use intensity than do existing projects. The SAFE Project represents an opportunity for ecologists across disciplines to participate in a large initiative designed to generate a broad understanding of the ecological impacts of tropical forest modification.

  5. Is there Complex Trauma Experience typology for Australian's experiencing extreme social disadvantage and low housing stability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Carol A; Magee, Christopher A; Kelly, Peter J

    2016-11-01

    Traumatic childhood experiences predict many adverse outcomes in adulthood including Complex-PTSD. Understanding complex trauma within socially disadvantaged populations has important implications for policy development and intervention implementation. This paper examined the nature of complex trauma experienced by disadvantaged individuals using a latent class analysis (LCA) approach. Data were collected through the large-scale Journeys Home Study (N=1682), utilising a representative sample of individuals experiencing low housing stability. Data on adverse childhood experiences, adulthood interpersonal trauma and relevant covariates were collected through interviews at baseline (Wave 1). Latent class analysis (LCA) was conducted to identify distinct classes of childhood trauma history, which included physical assault, neglect, and sexual abuse. Multinomial logistic regression investigated childhood relevant factors associated with class membership such as biological relationship of primary carer at age 14 years and number of times in foster care. Of the total sample (N=1682), 99% reported traumatic adverse childhood experiences. The most common included witnessing of violence, threat/experience of physical abuse, and sexual assault. LCA identified six distinct childhood trauma history classes including high violence and multiple traumas. Significant covariate differences between classes included: gender, biological relationship of primary carer at age 14 years, and time in foster care. Identification of six distinct childhood trauma history profiles suggests there might be unique treatment implications for individuals living in extreme social disadvantage. Further research is required to examine the relationship between these classes of experience, consequent impact on adulthood engagement, and future transitions though homelessness.

  6. High Temperature Thermal Properties of Columnar Yttria Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coating Performed by Suspension Plasma Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, B.; Schick, V.; Remy, B.; Quet, A.; Bianchi, L.

    2016-09-01

    Performance enhancement of gas turbines is a main issue for the aircraft industry. Over many years, a large part of the effort has been focused on the development of more insulating Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs). In this study, Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) columnar structures are processed by Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS). These structures have already demonstrated abilities to get improved thermal lifetime, similarly to standard YSZ TBCs performed by EB-PVD. Thermal diffusivity measurements coupled with differential scanning calorimetry analysis are performed from room temperature up to 1100 °C, first, on HastelloyX substrates and then, on bilayers including a SPS YSZ coating. Results show an effective thermal conductivity for YSZ performed by SPS lower than 1 W.m-1K-1 whereas EB- PVD YSZ coatings exhibit a value of 1.5 W.m-1K-1.

  7. Laboratory experiments investigating magnetic field production via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Channing; Fiuza, Frederico; Ross, James Steven; Zylstra, Alex; Pollock, Brad; Drake, R. Paul; Froula, Dustin; Gregori, Gianluca; Kugland, Nathan; Kuranz, Carolyn; Levy, Matthew; Li, Chikang; Meinecke, Jena; Petrasso, Richard; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Sakawa, Youichi; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Takabe, Hideke; Turnbull, David; Park, Hye-Sook

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are often associated with the presence of strong magnetic fields in a plasma flow. The magnetic fields required for shock formation may either be initially present, for example in supernova remnants or young galaxies, or they may be self-generated in systems such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In the case of GRB outflows, the intense magnetic fields are greater than those seeded by the GRB progenitor or produced by misaligned density and temperature gradients in the plasma flow (the Biermann-battery effect). The Weibel instability is one candidate mechanism for the generation of sufficiently strong fields to create a collisionless shock. Despite their crucial role in astrophysical systems, observation of the magnetic fields produced by Weibel instabilities in experiments has been challenging. Using a proton probe to directly image electromagnetic fields, we present evidence of Weibel-generated magnetic fields that grow in opposing, initially unmagnetized plasma flows from laser-driven laboratory experiments. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that the instability efficiently extracts energy from the plasma flows, and that the self-generated magnetic energy reaches a few percent of the total energy in the system. This result demonstrates an experimental platform suitable for the investigation of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock formation in supernova remnants, large-scale magnetic field amplification, and the radiation signature from gamma-ray bursts.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Experiment of Laser Pointing Stability on Different Surfaces to validate Micrometric Positioning Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)721924; Mainaud Durand, Helene; Piedigrossi, Didier; Sandomierski, Jacek; Sosin, Mateusz; Geiger, Alain; Guillaume, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    CLIC requires 10 μm precision and accuracy over 200m for the pre-alignment of beam related components. A solution based on laser beam as straight line reference is being studied at CERN. It involves camera/shutter assemblies as micrometric positioning sensors. To validate the sensors, it is necessary to determine an appropriate material for the shutter in terms of laser pointing stability. Experiments are carried out with paper, metal and ceramic surfaces. This paper presents the standard deviations of the laser spot coordinates obtained on the different surfaces, as well as the measurement error. Our experiments validate the choice of paper and ceramic for the shutter of the micrometric positioning sensor. It also provides an estimate of the achievable precision and accuracy of the determination of the laser spot centre with respect to the shutter coordinate system defined by reference targets.

  9. Control and stabilization: making Millikan's oil drop experiment work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Hill, Christoph [Physics Education/History and Philosophy of Science, Institute of Physics, Carl-von-Ossietzky Universitaet, 26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Heering, Peter, E-mail: christoph.mueller.hill@mail.uni-oldenburg.de, E-mail: peter.heering@uni-flensburg.de [Institut fuer Physik und Chemie und ihre Didaktik, Universitaet Flensburg, 27356 Flensburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Educational versions of Millikan's oil-drop experiment have frequently been criticized; suggestions for improvement either focus on technical innovations of the setup or on replacing the experiment by other approaches of familiarization, such as computer simulations. In our approach, we have analysed experimental procedures. In doing so, we were able to identify several sources of error and took measures to minimize their influence. At the same time, we attempted to minimize the standard deviation of each individual series of measurements. Our paper describes how we developed criteria which helped to stabilize the data produced in the following series of measurements. The final series of measurements results in data which demonstrate the atomic structure of electricity and enable a demonstration of the elementary charge.

  10. Intravenous delivery of hydrophobin-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles: stability, plasma protein adsorption and biodistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarparanta, Mirkka; Bimbo, Luis M; Rytkönen, Jussi; Mäkilä, Ermei; Laaksonen, Timo J; Laaksonen, Päivi; Nyman, Markus; Salonen, Jarno; Linder, Markus B; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A; Airaksinen, Anu J

    2012-03-01

    Rapid immune recognition and subsequent elimination from the circulation hampers the use of many nanomaterials as carriers to targeted drug delivery and controlled release in the intravenous route. Here, we report the effect of a functional self-assembled protein coating on the intravenous biodistribution of (18)F-labeled thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (THCPSi) nanoparticles in rats. (18)F-Radiolabeling enables the sensitive and easy quantification of nanoparticles in tissues using radiometric methods and allows imaging of the nanoparticle biodistribution with positron emission tomography. Coating with Trichoderma reesei HFBII altered the hydrophobicity of (18)F-THCPSi nanoparticles and resulted in a pronounced change in the degree of plasma protein adsorption to the nanoparticle surface in vitro. The HFBII-THCPSi nanoparticles were biocompatible in RAW 264.7 macrophages and HepG2 liver cells making their intravenous administration feasible. In vivo, the distribution of the nanoparticles between the liver and spleen, the major mononuclear phagocyte system organs in the body, was altered compared to that of uncoated (18)F-THCPSi. Identification of the adsorbed proteins revealed that certain opsonins and apolipoproteins are enriched in HFBII-functionalized nanoparticles, whereas the adsorption of abundant plasma components such as serum albumin and fibrinogen is decreased.

  11. Analysis of Pilot-Induced-Oscillation and Pilot Vehicle System Stability Using UAS Flight Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay K. Mandal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a Pilot-Induced Oscillation (PIO and human pilot control characterization study performed using flight data collected with a Remotely Controlled (R/C unmanned research aircraft. The study was carried out on the longitudinal axis of the aircraft. Several existing Category 1 and Category 2 PIO criteria developed for manned aircraft are first surveyed and their effectiveness for predicting the PIO susceptibility for the R/C unmanned aircraft is evaluated using several flight experiments. It was found that the Bandwidth/Pitch rate overshoot and open loop onset point (OLOP criteria prediction results matched flight test observations. However, other criteria failed to provide accurate prediction results. To further characterize the human pilot control behavior during these experiments, a quasi-linear pilot model is used. The parameters of the pilot model estimated using data obtained from flight tests are then used to obtain information about the stability of the Pilot Vehicle System (PVS for Category 1 PIOs occurred during straight and level flights. The batch estimation technique used to estimate the parameters of the quasi-linear pilot model failed to completely capture the compatibility nature of the human pilot. The estimation results however provided valuable insights into the frequency characteristics of the human pilot commands. Additionally, stability analysis of the Category 2 PIOs for elevator actuator rate limiting is carried out using simulations and the results are compared with actual flight results.

  12. Nonlinear stability of cylindrical shells subjected to axial flow: Theory and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiozis, K. N.; Païdoussis, M. P.; Amabili, M.; Misra, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper, is concerned with the nonlinear dynamics and stability of thin circular cylindrical shells clamped at both ends and subjected to axial fluid flow. In particular, it describes the development of a nonlinear theoretical model and presents theoretical results displaying the nonlinear behaviour of the clamped shell subjected to flowing fluid. The theoretical model employs the Donnell nonlinear shallow shell equations to describe the geometrically nonlinear structure. The clamped beam eigenfunctions are used to describe the axial variations of the shell deformation, automatically satisfying the boundary conditions and the circumferential continuity condition exactly. The fluid is assumed to be incompressible and inviscid, and the fluid-structure interaction is described by linear potential flow theory. The partial differential equation of motion is discretized using the Galerkin method and the final set of ordinary differential equations are integrated numerically using a pseudo-arclength continuation and collocation techniques and the Gear backward differentiation formula. A theoretical model for shells with simply supported ends is presented as well. Experiments are also described for (i) elastomer shells subjected to annular (external) air-flow and (ii) aluminium and plastic shells with internal water flow. The experimental results along with the theoretical ones indicate loss of stability by divergence with a subcritical nonlinear behaviour. Finally, theory and experiments are compared, showing good qualitative and reasonable quantitative agreement.

  13. Stability of the lower hybrid instability excited by longitudinal currents in a collisional, multi-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopal, Chandu [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadarshini Hills, Kottayam-686 560, Kerala (India); Kurian, M J [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadarshini Hills, Kottayam-686 560, Kerala (India); Antony, S [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadarshini Hills, Kottayam-686 560, Kerala (India); Anilkumar, C P [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Tirunelveli-627 011, Tamil Nadu (India); Renuka, G [Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Thiruvananthapuram-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2007-05-15

    We have investigated the stability of the lower hybrid wave in a collisional plasma containing hydrogen and positively and negatively charged oxygen ions. The collisions of all the species in the plasma have been considered. The electrons, streaming parallel to the magnetic field, can excite the instability if their drift velocity exceeds the parallel phase velocity of the wave. This is true for both the weakly as well as the strongly collisional cases. If the ion collisions are neglected, the growth/damping rate depends on the electron collision frequency and is modified by a factor dependent directly on the number densities and square of the charges on the oxygen ions and inversely on the masses of these ions. Ion collisions, however only damp the wave; this damping being dependent also on the ion collision frequencies, in addition to the above dependencies. We find that the dispersion relation in the low collisional limit can account for lower hybrid waves in the observed frequency range.

  14. Effects of pressure anisotropy on the stability of the guiding center plasma. Progress report, September 15, 1976--December 14, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, G.

    1977-01-01

    The stability analysis of nearly cylindrical magnetically confined plasma is generalized to include effects of pressure anisotropy in the guiding center model of Grad. The equilibrium and normal mode equations for helically symmetric plasmas are found and it is shown that these equations reduce to all previous diffuse profile bumpy theta pinch and helical calculations (in the appropriate limits). The equations presented are valid for arbitrary helical wave number k, arbitrary degree of helicity L and O(1) pressure anisotropy. It is shown that the ''new'' and ''old'' Scyllac orderings can be unified in a single calculation. Drift orbit diffusion induced by turbulence acting on trapped electrons is shown to reduce and broaden the magnetic drift resonance and produce the dominant nonlinear saturation mechanism for the dissipative trapped electron instability. The fluctuation level obtained is consistent with present experimental observations. Analytic FCT equilibria have been found in cylindrical geometry. Ideal 3D incompressible MHD turbulence in cylindrical geometry shows that mean square turbulent velocity fields (v vector/sup 2/) not equal to 0 for virtually all initial conditions (including qiescent ones), except for a state of extremal helicity. A conjecture, based on the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, is put forward to explain J.B. Taylor's hypothesis for reversed field pinches.

  15. Alfven eigenmode stability and fast ion loss in DIII-D and ITER reversed magnetic shear plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Zeeland, Michael [General Atomics; Gorelenkov, Nikolai [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Heidbrink, W. [University of California, Irvine; Kramer, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Austin, M. E. [University of Texas, Austin; Fisher, R K [General Atomics, San Diego; Munoz, M G [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching, Germany; Gorelenkova, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Luhmann, N.C. [University of California, Davis; Murakami, Masanori [ORNL; Nazikian, Raffi [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Park, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tobias, Ben [University of California, Davis; White, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

    2012-01-01

    Neutral beam injection into reversed-magnetic shear DIII-D plasmas produces a variety of Alfvenic activity including toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) and reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes (RSAEs). With measured equilibrium profiles as inputs, the ideal MHD code NOVA is used to calculate eigenmodes of these plasmas. The postprocessor code NOVA-K is then used to perturbatively calculate the actual stability of the modes, including finite orbit width and finite Larmor radius effects, and reasonable agreement with the spectrum of observed modes is found. Using experimentally measured mode amplitudes, fast ion orbit following simulations have been carried out in the presence of the NOVA calculated eigenmodes and are found to reproduce the dominant energy, pitch and temporal evolution of the losses measured using a large bandwidth scintillator diagnostic. The same analysis techniques applied to a DT 8 MA ITER steady-state plasma scenario with reversed-magnetic shear and both beam ion and alpha populations show Alfven eigenmode instability. Both RSAEs and TAEs are found to be unstable with maximum growth rates occurring for toroidal mode number n = 6 and the majority of the drive coming from fast ions injected by the 1MeV negative ion beams. AE instability due to beam ion drive is confirmed by the non-perturbative code TAEFL. Initial fast ion orbit following simulations using the unstable modes with a range of amplitudes (delta B/B = 10(-5)-10(-3)) have been carried out and show negligible fast ion loss. The lack of fast ion loss is a result of loss boundaries being limited to large radii and significantly removed from the actual modes themselves.

  16. Two Contemporary Problems in Magnetized Plasmas: the ion-ion hybrid resonator and MHD stability in a snowflake divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, William Anthony [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The rst part of the dissertation investigates the e ects of multiple-ions on the propagation of shear Alfv en waves. It is shown that the presence of a second ion-species allows for the formation of an ion-ion hybrid resonator in the presence of a magnetic well. A fullwave description is shown to explain the measured eigenfrequencies and spatial form of the resonator modes identi ed in experiments in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. However, it is determined that neither electron collisions or radial convection of the mode due to coupling to either the compressional or ion-Bernstein wave can explain the observed dissipation.

  17. CRRES (Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite) SPACERAD plasma wave experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Roger R.; Gurnett, Donald A.

    1988-10-01

    This document discusses the Main Electronics Package, two Electric Field Preamps and Search Coil Magnetometer for the AFGL 701 SPACERAD instrumentation on the CRRES (Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite) project. This document discusses the scientific objectives and the importance of the Plasma Wave Experiment in the CRRES SPACERAD mission and describes the instrument design rational and the instrument development philosophy. This document also discusses the testing and operations of the experiment and contains a schematic drawing of the instrumentation electronics and lists of the schematics, drawings, and wiring diagrams that describe the as-built configuration of the Plasma Wave Experiment instrumentation. Problems encountered during the construction and testing of the instrument and their resolutions are discussed. Test results from already completed environmental and EMC/RFI tests have already been submitted to AFGL and to the Air Force Headquarters Space Division Space Test Program. The recertification of the calibration of the instrument is recommended in the near future under a new contract covering the re-delivery (necessitated due to the removal during the launch-delay storage period), pre-launch, and launch operations.

  18. Tribological and thermal stability study of nanoporous amorphous boron carbide films prepared by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liza, Shahira; Ohtake, Naoto; Akasaka, Hiroki; Munoz-Guijosa, Juan M.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the thermal stability and the oxidation and tribological behavior of nanoporous a-BC:H films are studied and compared with those in conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. a-BC:H films were deposited by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition using B(CH3)3 gas as the boron source. A DLC interlayer was used to prevent the a-BC:H film delamination produced by oxidation. Thermal stability of a-BC:H films, with no delamination signs after annealing at 500 °C for 1 h, is better than that of the DLC films, which completely disappeared under the same conditions. Tribological test results indicate that the a-BC:H films, even with lower nanoindentation hardness than the DLC films, show an excellent boundary oil lubricated behavior, with lower friction coefficient and reduce the wear rate of counter materials than those on the DLC film. The good materials properties such as low modulus of elasticity and the formation of micropores from the original nanopores during boundary regimes explain this better performance. Results show that porous a-BC:H films may be an alternative for segmented DLC films in applications where severe tribological conditions and complex shapes exist, so surface patterning is unfeasible.

  19. Double-Layer Gadolinium Zirconate/Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen; Jordan, Eric H.; Harris, Alan B.; Gell, Maurice; Roth, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with lower thermal conductivity, increased resistance to calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS), and improved high-temperature capability, compared to traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) TBCs, are essential to higher efficiency in next generation gas turbine engines. Double-layer rare-earth zirconate/YSZ TBCs are a promising solution. From a processing perspective, solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process with its unique and beneficial microstructural features can be an effective approach to obtaining the double-layer microstructure. Previously durable low-thermal-conductivity YSZ TBCs with optimized layered porosity, called the inter-pass boundaries (IPBs) were produced using the SPPS process. In this study, an SPPS gadolinium zirconate (GZO) protective surface layer was successfully added. These SPPS double-layer TBCs not only retained good cyclic durability and low thermal conductivity, but also demonstrated favorable phase stability and increased surface temperature capabilities. The CMAS resistance was evaluated with both accumulative and single applications of simulated CMAS in isothermal furnaces. The double-layer YSZ/GZO exhibited dramatic improvement in the single application, but not in the continuous one. In addition, to explore their potential application in integrated gasification combined cycle environments, double-layer TBCs were tested under high-temperature humidity and encouraging performance was recorded.

  20. Geometrical effects on drift wave stability in low shear stellarator plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasim, M H; Rafiq, T; Persson, M [Department of Electromagnetics and Euratom/VR Association, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    Modern stellarators are designed with neoclassical transport in mind, potentially leading to anomalous transport originating from drift wave turbulence as the primary cause of energy and particle losses. It is therefore of interest to consider the influence of details of geometry on drift wave stability. In this paper the eigenvalue drift wave equation is therefore solved numerically in fully three-dimensional stellarator geometries using the ballooning mode formalism. The correlation between the details of the configurations such as local magnetic shear (LMS), normal curvature, geodesic curvature and magnetic field strength and the drift wave spectrum is discussed for two different stellarator configurations. A detailed discussion of the localization of the most unstable modes is presented and analysed. It is found that the most unstable modes are localized where the stabilizing effect of integrated LMS is minimum or where the coupling between the integrated LMS and geodesic curvature is strong. Since the more the modes are localized the stronger they will be influenced by the local geometrical effects, the most unstable modes are also highly localized.

  1. Design and construction of Keda Space Plasma Experiment (KSPEX) for the investigation of the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Zhongkai; Lei, Jiuhou; Cao, Jinxiang; Yu, Pengcheng; Zhang, Xiao; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Yaodong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the design and construction of the Keda Space Plasma EXperiment (KSPEX), which aims to study the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions, are described in detail. The device is composed of three stainless-steel sections: two source chambers at both ends and an experimental chamber in the center. KSPEX is a steady state experimental device, in which hot filament arrays are used to produce plasmas in the two sources. A Macor-mesh design is adopted to adjust the plasma density and potential difference between the two plasmas, which creates a boundary layer with a controllable electron density gradient and inhomogeneous radial electric field. In addition, attachment chemicals can be released into the plasmas through a tailor-made needle valve which leads to the generation of negative ions plasmas. Ionospheric depletions can be modeled and simulated using KSPEX, and many micro-physical processes of the formation and evolution of an ionospheric depletion can be experimentally studied.

  2. Design and construction of Keda Space Plasma Experiment (KSPEX) for the investigation of the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Zhongkai; Lei, Jiuhou; Cao, Jinxiang; Yu, Pengcheng; Zhang, Xiao; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Yaodong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the design and construction of the Keda Space Plasma EXperiment (KSPEX), which aims to study the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions, are described in detail. The device is composed of three stainless-steel sections: two source chambers at both ends and an experimental chamber in the center. KSPEX is a steady state experimental device, in which hot filament arrays are used to produce plasmas in the two sources. A Macor-mesh design is adopted to adjust the plasma density and potential difference between the two plasmas, which creates a boundary layer with a controllable electron density gradient and inhomogeneous radial electric field. In addition, attachment chemicals can be released into the plasmas through a tailor-made needle valve which leads to the generation of negative ions plasmas. Ionospheric depletions can be modeled and simulated using KSPEX, and many micro-physical processes of the formation and evolution of an ionospheric depletion can be experimentally studied.

  3. Stability and evolution of wave packets in strongly coupled degenerate plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, A P

    2011-01-01

    We study the nonlinear propagation of electrostatic wave packets in a collisional plasma composed of strongly coupled ions and relativistically degenerate electrons. The equilibrium of ions is maintained by an effective temperature associated with their strong coupling, whereas that of electrons is provided by the relativistic degeneracy pressure. Using a multiple scale technique, a (3+1)-dimensional coupled set of nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equations with nonlocal nonlinearity is derived from a generalized viscoelastic hydrodynamic model. These coupled equations, which govern the dynamics of wave packets, are used to study the oblique modulational instability of a Stoke's wave train to a small plane wave perturbation. We show that the wave packets, though stable to the parallel modulation, becomes unstable against oblique modulations. In contrast to the long-wavelength carrier modes, the wave packets with short-wavelengths are shown to be stable in the weakly relativistic case, whereas they can be stable...

  4. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    CERN Document Server

    Brust, M; Thiebaud, M; Flormann, D; Verdier, C; Kaestner, L; Laschke, M W; Selmi, H; Benyoussef, A; Podgorski, T; Coupier, G; Misbah, C; Wagner, C

    2014-01-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These pers...

  5. Electrostatic Structures in Space Plasmas: Stability of Two-dimensional Magnetic Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, C S; Yasin, E

    2011-01-01

    Electrostatic structures have been observed in many regions of space plasmas, including the solar wind, the magnetosphere, the auroral acceleration region, and in association with shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection. Due to potentially large amplitude of electric fields within these structures, their effects on particle heating, scattering, or acceleration can be important. One possible theoretical description of some of these structures is the concept of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) modes, which are exact nonlinear solutions of the Vlasov-Poisson system of equations in collisionless kinetic theory. BGK modes have been studied extensively for many decades, predominately in one dimension (1D), although there have been observations showing that some of these structures have clear 3D features. While there have been approximate solutions of higher dimensional BGK modes, an exact 3D BGK mode solution in a finite magnetic field has not been found yet. Recently we have constructed exact solutions of 2D B...

  6. Oscillatory thermocapillary convection in liquid bridges with highly deformed free surfaces: Experiments and energy-stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, L. B. S.; Neitzel, G. P.; Fontaine, J.-P.; Dell'Aversana, P.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory experimentation, numerical simulation, and energy-stability theory are used to examine the effect of interface deformation on the onset of oscillatory thermocapillary convection in half zones. Experiments are performed to map the stability boundaries marking the onset of oscillatory flow, modifying the free-surface deformation by adjusting the volume of liquid in the bridge. The stability results presented here along with those of other researchers [Monti et al., Proceedings of the 43rd Cong. Int. Artro. Fed. (1992); Hu et al., J. Cryst. Growth 142, 379 (1994)] show that free-surface curvature can have a pronounced influence on flow stability. Steady, axisymmetric flow simulations are computed using the commercial code FIDAP to model the conditions of the experiments, and reveal that flow structure near the stability boundary is sensitive to several parameters. Energy theory is applied to these simulations to determine sufficient conditions for stability. Comparisons between the theoretical and experimental results show nonconservative energy limits falling above the experimentally determined stability boundaries for bridges of various liquid volumes. While the trend of the experimental data is predicted for zones of large volume ratio (bulging zones), the same cannot be said for those with small volume ratio (necked-down zones). In addition, energy-stability limits for some undeformed-free-surface cases were determined which are above the linear-stability limits determined by other researchers, in clear contradiction of the roles of the respective theories.

  7. Plasmas, Dielectrics and the Ultrafast: First Science and Operational Experience at FACET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, C.I.; Adli, E.; Corde, S.; Decker, F.J.; England, R.J.; Erickson, R.; Fisher, A.; Gessner, S.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Li, S.Z.; Lipkowitz, N.; Litos, M.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seeman, J.; Sheppard, J.C.; Tudosa, I.; White, G.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Wu, Z.; /SLAC /UCLA

    2012-09-14

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests) is an accelerator R&D test facility that has been recently constructed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The facility provides 20 GeV, 3 nC electron beams, short (20 {micro}m) bunches and small (20 {micro}m wide) spot sizes, producing uniquely high power beams. FACET supports studies from many fields but in particular those of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration. FACET is also a source of THz radiation for material studies. We present the FACET design, initial operating experience and first science from the facility.

  8. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulaei, A.; Moody, J.; Berti, N.; Kasparian, J.; Mirzanejhad, S.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  9. Numerical simulations of a nonequilibrium argon plasma in a shock-tube experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1991-01-01

    A code developed for the numerical modeling of nonequilibrium radiative plasmas is applied to the simulation of the propagation of strong ionizing shock waves in argon gas. The simulations attempt to reproduce a series of shock-tube experiments which will be used to validate the numerical models and procedures. The ability to perform unsteady simulations makes it possible to observe some fluctuations in the shock propagation, coupled to the kinetic processes. A coupling mechanism by pressure waves, reminiscent of oscillation mechanisms observed in detonation waves, is described. The effect of upper atomic levels is also briefly discussed.

  10. Quark Gluon Plasma an Color Glass Condensate at RHIC? The perspective from the BRAHMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Arsene, I; Beavis, D; Besliu, C; Budick, B; Bøggild, H; Chasman, C; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Cibor, J; Debbe, R; Enger, E; Gaardhøje, J J; Germinario, M; Hansen, O; Holm, A; Holme, A K; Hagel, K; Ito, H; Jakobsen, E; Jipa, A; Jundt, F; Jordre, J I; Jorgensen, C E; Karabowicz, R; Kim, E J; Kozik, T; Larsen, T M; Lee, J H; Lee, Y K; Lindahl, S; Løvhøiden, G; Majka, Z; Makeev, A; Mikelsen, M; Murray, M J; Natowitz, J B; Neumann, B; Nielsen, B S; Ouerdane, D; Planeta, R; Rami, F; Ristea, C; Ristea, O; Röhrich, D; Samset, B H; Sandberg, D; Sanders, S J; Scheetz, R A; Staszel, P; Tveter, T S; Videbaek, F; Wada, R; Yin, Z; Zgura, I S

    2004-01-01

    We review the main results obtained by the BRAHMS collaboration on the properties of hot and dense hadronic and partonic matter produced in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC. A particular focus of this paper is to discuss to what extent the results collected so far by BRAHMS, and by the other three experiments at RHIC, can be taken as evidence for the formation of a state of deconfined partonic matter, the so called quark-gluon-plasma (QGP). We also discuss evidence for a possible precursor state to the QGP, i.e. the proposed Color Glass Condensate.

  11. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Joulaei, Atefeh; Berti, Nicolas; Kasparian, Jerome; Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Muggli, Patric

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  12. Characterization of the plasma current quench during disruptions in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, S.P., Menard, J.E., and the NSTX Research Team

    2008-12-17

    A detailed analysis of the plasma current quench in the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M.Ono, et al Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] is presented. The fastest current quenches are fit better by a linear waveform than an exponential one. Area-normalized current quench times down to .4 msec/m2 have been observed, compared to the minimum of 1.7 msec/m2 recommendation based on conventional aspect ratio tokamaks; as noted in previous ITPA studies, the difference can be explained by the reduced self-inductance at low aspect ratio and high-elongation. The maximum instantaneous dIp/dt is often many times larger than the mean quench rate, and the plasma current before the disruption is often substantially less than the flat-top value. The poloidal field time-derivative during the disruption, which is directly responsible for driving eddy currents, has been recorded at various locations around the vessel. The Ip quench rate, plasma motion, and magnetic geometry all play important roles in determining the rate of poloidal field change.

  13. Plasma isotopic change over experiments in JET under Carbon and ITER-Like Wall conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loarer, T., E-mail: thierry.loarer@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Brezinsek, S.; Philipps, V. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung Plasmaphysik, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Romanelli-Gruenhagen, S. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Alves, D.; Carvalho, I. [IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, IST Lisboa (Portugal); Douai, D. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Esser, H.G. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung Plasmaphysik, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Felton, R. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Frigione, D. [ENEA sulla Fusione, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Kruezi, U. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Reux, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Smith, R.; Stamp, M.F. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Vartanian, S. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    Starting with a wall loaded by H{sub 2}, change over experiments from H{sub 2} to D{sub 2} have been carried out in JET-ILW. A series of 13 repetitive pulses (cumulating 215 s in divertor configuration) have been performed under conditions of: I{sub p} = 2.0 MA, B{sub T} = 2.4 T, 〈n{sub e}〉 = 4.5 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3} with a constant gas injection of 3.0 × 10{sup 21} D s{sup −1} and 0.5 MW of auxiliary heating by ICRH in L-mode. Gas balance analysis shows that the total amount of H removed from the wall is in the range of 3 × 10{sup 22} D compared to 2 × 10{sup 23} D for JET-C. This is consistent with the faster decay of the H plasma concentration and the drop of the retention also by a similar factor when removing all the carbon components. Isotopic plasma wall changeover is also demonstrated to allow for removal of some D/T from the device. However, since plasma change over also contributes to long-term retention by codeposition, in ITER, change over in between each discharge might not be effective to reduce the fuel retention on the long-term.

  14. Chemical release experiments to induce F region ionospheric plasma irregularities at the magnetic equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Peter Jared

    1994-01-01

    The largest-scale plasma instability that occurs naturally in the Earth's ionosphere is a turbulent upwelling of the equatorial F region known as equatorial spread-F (ESF). During an ESF event, high plasma density magnetic fluxtubes at the bottomside of the F region are thought to change places with lower plasma density flux-tubes from below in a Rayleigh-Taylor type (heavy fluid over light fluid) instability. This interchange creates a large-scale (10's of km) density perturbation locally, which rapidly penetrates through to the topside of the F region, creating a plume of cascading smaller-scale (meter to centimeter scale) irregularities from the sharp density gradients at the edges of the rising plasma 'bubble'. In a theoretical test of this overall scenario for ESF, a linear instability growth rate is derived following the magnetic fluxtube formalism of Haerendel. Using realistic atmospheric and ionospheric density model inputs, growth rates are calculated for a range of geophysical conditions. Time/altitude domains having positive growth rates are found to coincide with observed time/altitude patterns of ESF occurrence, thus supporting the fluxtube model. The physics also are tested experimentally by the deliberate creation of plasma bubbles in ambient ionospheres that the fluxtube model predicts are susceptible to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Two such artificial seed perturbations were generated during the 1990 NASA/Boston University CRRES-at-Kwajalein campaign, when clouds of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) were released by sounding rockets to initiate plasma recombinations near the bottomside of the equatorial ionosphere. Multiple diagnostics (incoherent scatter radar, high frequency radar, optics, and satellite polarimeters at several sites) were used to monitor the prelaunch status of the ionosphere and the electron depleted regions that resulted from the chemical releases. Small ESF plumes were observed to form in the region of the artificial perturbation

  15. Laser surface treatment of plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto, M. A.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Un equipo láser continuo de CO2, con potencia nominal de 1 kW, se utilizó para sellar la superficie revestida con ZrO2 8 % Y2O3 por proyección por plasma sobre un substrato de acero AISI 1045. Se investigaron los efectos del tratamiento de fusión con láser sobre la microestrutura y la resistencia a la corrosión del recubrimiento. La resistencia a la corrosión se analizó por medidas electroquímicas en una solución de NaCl al 3 %. Las micrografias mostraron que la superficie del revestimiento presentó varias grietas pequeñas, sin embargo, no fueron observados poros. La microestructura de la capa sellada presentó una estructura en forma de columnas con crecimiento perpendicular a la superficie libre. El sellado a láser mejora la resistencia a la corrosión de los recubrimientos y aumenta la microdureza.

    Un equipo láser continuo de CO2, con potencia nominal de 1 kW, se utilizó para sellar la superficie revestida con ZrO2 8 % Y2O3 por proyección por plasma sobre un substrato de acero AISI 1045. Se investigaron los efectos del tratamiento de fusión con láser sobre la microestrutura y la resistencia a la corrosión del recubrimiento. La resistencia a la corrosión se analizó por medidas electroquímicas en una solución de NaCl al 3 %. Las micrografias mostraron que la superficie del revestimiento presentó varias grietas pequeñas, sin embargo, no fueron observados poros. La microestructura de la capa sellada presentó una estructura en forma de columnas con crecimiento perpendicular a la superficie libre. El sellado a láser mejora la resistencia a la corrosión de los recubrimientos y aumenta la microdureza.

  16. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Final coupled 3D thermo-mechanical modeling. Preliminary particle mechanical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanne, Toivo; Johansson, Erik; Potyondy, David [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2004-02-01

    SKB is planning to perform a large-scale pillar stability experiment called APSE (Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment) at Aespoe HRL. The study is focused on understanding and control of progressive rock failure in hard crystalline rock and damage caused by high stresses. The elastic thermo-mechanical modeling was carried out in three dimensions because of the complex test geometry and in-situ stress tensor by using a finite-difference modeling software FLAC3D. Cracking and damage formation were modeled in the area of interest (pillar between two large scale holes) in two dimensions by using the Particle Flow Code (PFC), which is based on particle mechanics. FLAC and PFC were coupled to minimize the computer resources and the computing time. According to the modeling the initial temperature rises from 15 deg C to about 65 deg C in the pillar area during the heating period of 120 days. The rising temperature due to thermal expansion induces stresses in the pillar area and after 120 days heating the stresses have increased about 33% from the excavation induced maximum stress of 150 MPa to 200 MPa in the end of the heating period. The results from FLAC3D model showed that only regions where the crack initiation stress has exceeded were identified and they extended to about two meters down the hole wall. These could be considered the areas where damage may occur during the in-situ test. When the other hole is pressurized with a 0.8 MPa confining pressure it yields that 5 MPa more stress is needed to damage the rock than without confining pressure. This makes the damaged area in some degree smaller. High compressive stresses in addition to some tensile stresses might induce some AE (acoustic emission) activity in the upper part of the hole from the very beginning of the test and are thus potential areas where AE activities may be detected. Monitoring like acoustic emissions will be measured during the test execution. The 2D coupled PFC-FLAC modeling indicated that

  17. Distinguishing Cause from Correlation in Tokamak Experiments to Trigger Edge Localised Plasma Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Webster, A J

    2014-01-01

    The generic question is considered: How can we determine the probability of an otherwise quasirandom event, having been triggered by an external influence? A specific problem is the quantification of the success of techniques to trigger, and hence control, edge-localised plasma instabilities (ELMs) in magnetically confined fusion (MCF) experiments. The development of such techniques is essential to ensure tolerable heat loads on components in large MCF fusion devices, and is necessary for their development into economically successful power plants. Bayesian probability theory is used to rigorously formulate the problem and to provide a formal solution. Accurate but pragmatic methods are developed to estimate triggering probabilities, and are illustrated with experimental data. These allow results from experiments to be quantitatively assessed, and rigorously quantified conclusions to be formed.

  18. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brust, M.; Aouane, O.; Thiébaud, M.; Flormann, D.; Verdier, C.; Kaestner, L.; Laschke, M. W.; Selmi, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Misbah, C.; Wagner, C.

    2014-03-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects.

  19. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, L. M.; Zenobia, S. J.; Egle, B. J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.

    2016-08-01

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA-500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 1014 ions/(cm2 s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  20. Simulations with Conventional and Gas Puff Plasma Focus Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bing; Liu, Mahe; Lee, Paul; Lee, Sing

    2000-10-01

    An energy consistent plasma focus model is improved by considering the plasma ionization states based on the corona equilibrium. This provides the model with the capability of calculating the plasma dynamics and states for different gases in plasma focus. The model is employed to simulate the behavior of the NX2 plasma focus, with both neon and argon gases. The results show that much lower pressure is required to work with argon for x-ray. The model has also been modified to describe a gas-puff plasma focus based on a measured pressure distribution profile. The simulation result reveals that the gas-puff scheme is more efficient in plasma heating and can improve the stability of the plasma column. By comparing with the published results, agreements have been obtained between the computations and experiments of both machines in the major points regarding plasma dynamics, plasma column stability and appearances, plasma temperatures, and x-ray radiation properties.

  1. The role of fluid pressure in frictional stability and earthquake triggering: insights from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Scuderi, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Fluid overpressure has been proposed as one of the primary mechanisms that facilitate earthquake slip along faults. However, elastic dislocation theory combined with friction laws suggests that fluid overpressure may inhibit the dynamic instabilities that result in earthquakes, by controlling the critical fault stiffness (kc). This controversy poses a serious problem in our understanding of earthquake physics, with severe implications for both natural and human-induced seismic hazard. Nevertheless, currently, there are no systematic studies on the role of fluid pressure under controlled, laboratory conditions for which the evolution of friction parameters and slip stability can be measured. We have used a state-of-the-art biaxial rock deformation apparatus within a pressure vessel, in order to allow a true triaxial stress field, in a double direct shear configuration. We tested carbonate fault gouge, Carrara marble, sieved to a grain size of 125 μm. Normal stresses and confining pressure were held constant throughout the experiment at values of 5 to 40 MPa, and the pore fluid pressure was varied from hydrostatic up to near lithostatic values. Shear stress was induced by a constant displacement rate and sliding velocities varied from 0.1-1000 μm/s, in order to evaluate slip stability via rate- and state- dependent frictional parameters, such as (a-b), Dc and kc. Our data show that sliding velocity controls the values of friction parameters. In addition we observe a general increase of (a-b) and a decrease of Dc with increasing fluid pressure. Our observations suggest that fluid overpressure does not only facilitate fault reactivation but it also influences frictional parameters with important implications for fault stability and earthquake triggering.

  2. Rossby vortices, spiral structures, solitons astrophysics and plasma physics in shallow water experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nezlin, Mikhail V

    1993-01-01

    This book can be looked upon in more ways than one. On the one hand, it describes strikingly interesting and lucid hydrodynamic experiments done in the style of the "good old days" when the physicist needed little more than a piece of string and some sealing wax. On the other hand, it demonstrates how a profound physical analogy can help to get a synoptic view on a broad range of nonlinear phenomena involving self-organization of vortical structures in planetary atmo­ spheres and oceans, in galaxies and in plasmas. In particular, this approach has elucidated the nature and the mechanism of such grand phenomena as the Great of galaxies. A number of our Red Spot vortex on Jupiter and the spiral arms predictions concerning the dynamics of spiral galaxies are now being confirmed by astronomical observations stimulated by our experiments. This book is based on the material most of which was accumulated during 1981-88 in close cooperation with our colleagues, experimenters from the Plasma Physics Department of the...

  3. Debye-scale solitary structures measured in a beam-plasma laboratory experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lefebvre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solitary electrostatic pulses have been observed in numerous places of the magnetosphere such as the vicinity of reconnection current sheets, shocks or auroral current systems, and are often thought to be generated by energetic electron beams. We present results of a series of experiments conducted at the UCLA large plasma device (LAPD where a suprathermal electron beam was injected parallel to a static magnetic field. Micro-probes with tips smaller than a Debye length enabled the detection of solitary pulses with positive electric potential and half-widths 4–25 Debye lengths (λDe, over a set of experiments with various beam energies, plasma densities and magnetic field strengths. The shape, scales and amplitudes of the structures are similar to those observed in space, and consistent with electron holes. The dependance of these properties on the experimental parameters is shown. The velocities of the solitary structures (1–3 background electron thermal velocities are found to be much lower than the beam velocities, suggesting an excitation mechanism driven by parallel currents associated to the electron beam.

  4. Ion probe beam experiments and kinetic modeling in a dense plasma focus Z-pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Ellsworth, J., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Falabella, S., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Link, A., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; McLean, H., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Rusnak, B., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Sears, J., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Tang, V., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore CA 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, 418 Washington St SE, Albuquerque NM 87108 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The Z-pinch phase of a dense plasma focus (DPF) emits multiple-MeV ions in a ∼cm length. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood. We are exploring the origins of these large gradients using measurements of an ion probe beam injected into a DPF during the pinch phase and the first kinetic simulations of a DPF Z-pinch. To probe the accelerating fields in our table top experiment, we inject a 4 MeV deuteron beam along the z-axis and then sample the beam energy distribution after it passes through the pinch region. Using this technique, we have directly measured for the first time the acceleration of an injected ion beam. Our particle-in-cell simulations have been benchmarked on both a kJ-scale DPF and a MJ-scale DPF. They have reproduced experimentally measured neutron yields as well as ion beams and EM oscillations which fluid simulations do not exhibit. Direct comparisons between the experiment and simulations enhance our understanding of these plasmas and provide predictive design capability for accelerator and neutron source applications.

  5. A numerical experiment on the equilibrium and stability of a rotating galactic bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. H.; Vandervoort, P. O.; Welty, D. E.; Smith, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    A self-consistent, three-dimensional numerical experiment is performed on an N-body system whose initial state is a realization of a certain theoretical model of a rotating triaxial galaxy. The model is a stellar-dynamical counterpart of a uniformly rotating polytrope of index equal to 0.5. The aim of the experiment is to study the equilibrium of the system and, in particular, to test its stability. The experimental system behaves in the mean like a realization of the theoretical model for at least seven crossing times. The principal departure of the system from equilibrium is an oscillation which is identified as a radial pulsation. There is no indication in its behavior that the system is unstable with respect to anu mode with an e-folding time shorter than or of the order of two crossing times. Certain changes that occur in the state of the system are interpreted, with the aid of the theoretical model, as secular changes which result from a slight failure of our numerical methods to conserve the mass, energy, and angular momentum of the system; these effects are small enough that they do not vitiate the experiment on a dynamical time scale.

  6. THELMA code electromagnetic model of ITER superconducting cables and application to the ENEA stability experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciotti, M.; Nijhuis, A.; Ribani, P. L.; Savoldi Richard, L.; Zanino, R.

    2006-10-01

    The new THELMA code, including a thermal-hydraulic (TH) and an electro-magnetic (EM) model of a cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC), has been developed. The TH model is at this stage relatively conventional, with two fluid components (He flowing in the annular cable region and He flowing in the central channel) being particular to the CICC of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), and two solid components (superconducting strands and jacket/conduit). In contrast, the EM model is novel and will be presented here in full detail. The results obtained from this first version of the code are compared with experimental results from pulsed tests of the ENEA stability experiment (ESE), showing good agreement between computed and measured deposited energy and subsequent temperature increase.

  7. [The first experience in using the stabilized hyaluronic acid preparation to correct lagophthalmos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusha, Ia O; Ismailova, D S; Ivanchenko, Iu F; Agafonova, E I

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the results of the first experience in using the stabilized hyaluronic acid preparation in patients with lagopthalmos in the presence of facial nerve palsy and thyroid eye disease and resultant keratopathy of varying degrees. The study included 21 patients, including 15 patients with facial nerve palsy and 6 with endocrine ophthalmopathy. The gel was injected externally to the levator aponeurosis and/or intramuscular, and/or under the pretarsal portion of the orbicularis oculi muscle, and/or subcutaneously. The use of this method led to a significant reduction of lagophthalmos and to a considerable corneal improvement. That of this procedure permitted avoidance of surgical intervention in some patients. The mean follow-up period after injection was 11.2 months (range 6-24 months).

  8. Influence of storage conditions on in vitro stability of atrial natriuretic peptide and of anesthesia on plasma atrial natriuretic peptide concentration in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heishima, Yasuhiro; Hori, Yasutomo; Chikazawa, Seishiro; Kanai, Kazutaka; Hoshi, Fumio; Itoh, Naoyuki

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the in vitro stability of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in plasma samples under various storage conditions and the influence of anesthesia on plasma ANP concentration in cats. ANIMALS 1 cat with congestive heart failure and 5 healthy adult mixed-breed cats. PROCEDURES A plasma sample from the cat with heart failure was serially diluted, and dilutional parallelism of ANP concentration was evaluated. Plasma samples containing aprotinin or serum samples from the 5 healthy cats were kept at room temperature (27°C) for ≤ 12 hours. Plasma samples from the same healthy cats were stored at -70°, -20°, or 4°C for ≤ 14 days. Plasma samples were obtained from the healthy cats before and during isoflurane anesthesia. Plasma ANP concentrations were measured at a commercial laboratory by use of a human ANP chemiluminescence assay. RESULTS Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 1.5% and 2.5%, respectively, and dilutional parallelism was established. Although ANP concentration decreased by 82.4 ± 13.6% (mean ± SD) after sample storage for 12 hours at room temperature, this decrease was prevented by aprotinin. Plasma ANP concentrations were stable for 7 days at -20°C and for 14 days at -70°C. However, concentrations decreased markedly to 57.6 ± 6.9% at -20°C and to 18.0 ± 3.0% at 4°C after 14 days. Plasma ANP concentration decreased significantly in cats during anesthesia and was correlated with blood pressure. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that aprotinin should be added routinely in preparation of plasma samples from cats for measurement of ANP concentration, and those samples, if stored, should be frozen immediately at ≤ -20°C. General anesthesia or systemic blood pressure may affect plasma ANP concentration in cats.

  9. High Stability Electron Field Emitters Synthesized via the Combination of Carbon Nanotubes and N₂-Plasma Grown Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ting-Hsun; Hsieh, Ping-Yen; Kunuku, Srinivasu; Lou, Shiu-Cheng; Manoharan, Divinah; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I-Nan; Tai, Nyan-Hwa

    2015-12-16

    An electron field emitter with superior electron field emission (EFE) properties and improved lifetime stability is being demonstrated via the combination of carbon nanotubes and the CH4/N2 plasma grown ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) films. The resistance of the carbon nanotubes to plasma ion bombardment is improved by the formation of carbon nanocones on the side walls of the carbon nanotubes, thus forming strengthened carbon nanotubes (s-CNTs). The N-UNCD films can thus be grown on s-CNTs, forming N-UNCD/s-CNTs carbon nanocomposite materials. The N-UNCD/s-CNTs films possess good conductivity of σ = 237 S/cm and marvelous EFE properties, such as low turn-on field of (E0) = 3.58 V/μm with large EFE current density of (J(e)) = 1.86 mA/cm(2) at an applied field of 6.0 V/μm. Moreover, the EFE emitters can be operated under 0.19 mA/cm(2) for more than 350 min without showing any sign of degradation. Such a superior EFE property along with high robustness characteristic of these combination of materials are not attainable with neither N-UNCD films nor s-CNTs films alone. Transmission electron microscopic investigations indicated that the N-UNCD films contain needle-like diamond grains encased in a few layers of nanographitic phase, which enhanced markedly the transport of electrons in the N-UNCD films. Moreover, the needle-like diamond grains were nucleated from the s-CNTs without the necessity of forming the interlayer that facilitate the transport of electrons crossing the diamond-to-Si interface. Both these factors contributed to the enhanced EFE behavior of the N-UNCD/s-CNTs films.

  10. Progress towards high performance plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S. M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Bernabei, S; Bialek, J.; Biewer, T.; Blanchard, W.; Boedo, J.; Bush, C.; Carter, M. D.; Choe, W.; Crocker, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Davis, W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diem, S.; Ferron, J.; Field, A.; Foley, J.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gates, D. A.; Gibney, T.; Harvey, R.; Hatcher, R. E.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K.; Hosea, J. C.; Jarboe, T. R.; Johnson, D. W.; Kaita, R.; Kessel, C.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H. W.; Lawson, J.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lee, K. C.; Levinton, F.; Maingi, R.; Manickam, J.; Maqueda, R.; Marsala, R.; Mastrovito, D.; Mau, T. K.; Medley, S. S.; Menard, J.; Meyer, H.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mueller, D.; Munsat, T.; Nelson, B. A.; Neumeyer, C.; Nishino, N.; Ono, M.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Paul, S.; Peebles, T.; Peng, M.; Phillips, C.; Pigarov, A.; Pinsker, R.; Ram, A.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Raman, R.; Rasmussen, D.; Redi, M.; Rensink, M.; Rewoldt, G; Robinson, J.; Roney, P.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E; Ryan, P.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Schneider, H.; Skinner, C. H.; Smith, D. R.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stevenson, T.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D.; Synakowski, E.; Takase, Y.; Taylor, G.; Tritz, K.; Halle, A. von; Wade, M.; White, R.; Wilgen, J.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Zhu, W.; Zweben, S. J.; Akers, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Betti, R.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Bonoli, P.; Bourdelle, C.; Chang, C. S.; Chrzanowski, J.; Domier, C.; Dudek, L.; Efthimion, P. C.; Finkenthal, M.; Fredd, E.; Fu, G. Y.; Glasser, A.; Goldston, R. J.; Greenough, N. L.; Grisham, L. R.; Gorelenkov, N.; Guazzotto, L.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Hogan, J.; Houlberg, W.; Humphreys, D.; Jaeger, F.; Kalish, M.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Lao, L. L.; Lawrence, J.; Leuer, J.; Liu, D.; Luhmann, N. C.; Mazzucato, E.; Oliaro, G.; Pacella, D.; Parsells, R.; Schaffer, M.; Semenov, I.; Shaing, K. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Shinohara, K.; Sichta, P.; Tang, X.; Vero, R.; Walker, D.; Wampler, W.

    2005-10-01

    The major objective of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is to understand basic toroidal confinement physics at low aspect ratio and high βT in order to advance the spherical torus (ST) concept. In order to do this, NSTX utilizes up to 7.5 MW of neutral beam injection, up to 6 MW of high harmonic fast waves (HHFWs), and it operates with plasma currents up to 1.5 MA and elongations of up to 2.6 at a toroidal field up to 0.45 T. New facility, and diagnostic and modeling capabilities developed over the past two years have enabled the NSTX research team to make significant progress towards establishing this physics basis for future ST devices. Improvements in plasma control have led to more routine operation at high elongation and high βT (up to ~40%) lasting for many energy confinement times. βT can be limited by either internal or external modes. The installation of an active error field (EF) correction coil pair has expanded the operating regime at low density and has allowed for initial resonant EF amplification experiments. The determination of the confinement and transport properties of NSTX plasmas has benefited greatly from the implementation of higher spatial resolution kinetic diagnostics. The parametric variation of confinement is similar to that at conventional aspect ratio but with values enhanced relative to those determined from conventional aspect ratio scalings and with a βT dependence. The transport is highly dependent on details of both the flow and magnetic shear. Core turbulence was measured for the first time in an ST through correlation reflectometry. Non-inductive start-up has been explored using PF-only and transient co-axial helicity injection techniques, resulting in up to 140 kA of toroidal current generated by the latter technique. Calculated bootstrap and beam-driven currents have sustained up to 60% of the flat-top plasma current in NBI discharges. Studies of HHFW absorption

  11. Numerical Experiments on Oxygen Plasma Focus: Scaling Laws of Soft X-Ray Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akel, M.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical experiments have been investigated on UNU/ICTP PFF low energy plasma focus device with oxygen filling gas. In these numerical experiments, the temperature window of 119-260 eV has been used as a suitable temperature range for generating oxygen soft X-rays. The Lee model was applied to characterize the UNU/ICTP PFF plasma focus. The optimum soft X-ray yield (Ysxr) was found to be 0.75 J, with the corresponding efficiency of about 0.03 % at pressure of 2.36 Torr and the end axial speed was va = 5 cm/μs. The practical optimum combination of p0, z0 and `a' for oxygen Ysxr was found to be 0.69 Torr, 4.8 cm and 2.366 cm respectively, with the outer radius b = 3.2 cm. This combination gives Ysxr ~ 5 J, with the corresponding efficiency of about 0.16 %. Thus we expect to increase the oxygen Ysxr of UNU/ICTP PFF, without changing the capacitor bank, merely by changing the electrode configuration and operating pressure. Scaling laws on oxygen soft X-ray yield, in terms of storage energies E0, peak discharge current Ipeak and focus pinch current Ipinch were found over the range from 1 kJ to 1 MJ. It was found that the oxygen soft X-ray yields scale well with and for the low inductance (L0 = 30 nH) (where yields are in J and currents in kA). While the soft X-ray yield scaling laws in terms of storage energies were found to be as (E0 in kJ and Ysxr in J) with the scaling showing gradual deterioration as E0 rises over the range. The oxygen soft X-ray yield emitted from plasma focus is found to be about 8.7 kJ for storage energy of 1 MJ. The optimum efficiency for soft X-ray yield (1.1 %) is with capacitor bank energy of 120 kJ. This indicates that oxygen plasma focus is a good soft X-ray source when properly designed.

  12. Simulations and observations of plasma depletion, ion composition, and airglow emissions in two auroral ionospheric depletion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, A. W.; Whalen, B. A.; Harris, F. R.; Gattinger, R. L.; Pongratz, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of plasma depletion, ion composition modification, and airglow emissions in the Waterhole experiments are presented. The detailed ion chemistry and airglow emission processes related to the ionospheric hole formation in the experiment are examined, and observations are compared with computer simulation results. The latter indicate that the overall depletion rates in different parts of the depletion region are governed by different parameters.

  13. Stereolithography based method of creating custom gas density profile targets for high intensity laser-plasma experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, S W; He, Z; McGuffey, C; Schumaker, W; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R

    2012-07-01

    Laser based stereolithography methods are shown to be useful for production of gas targets for high intensity laser-plasma interaction experiments. A cylindrically symmetric nozzle with an opening of approximately 100 μm and a periodic attachment of variable periodicity are outlined in detail with associated density profile characterization. Both components are durable within the limits of relevant experiments.

  14. Phase transformations in air plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián D. Osorio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo, las transformaciones de fase en Recubrimientos de Barrera Térmica (TBC constituidos por ZrO 2 – 8 wt.% Y2O3 (zirconia - 8 wt.% ytrria fueron estudiados a través de Difracción de Rayos X (XRD y refinamiento Rietveld. Las muestras de TBC fueron depositadas mediante aspersión por plasma atmosférico sobre un sustrato tipo Inconel 625 y fueron tratadas térmicamente con dos condiciones diferentes: en la primera se utilizó una temperatura de 1100oC con tiempos de exposición entre 1 hora y 1000 horas; en la segunda las muestras fueron sometidas a temperaturas entre 700oC y 1100o durante 50 horas. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos mediante refinamiento Rietveld el contenido de fase cúbica en el recubrimiento (TC se incrementa con el tiempo y la temperatura, desde 7.3 wt.% hasta 15.7 wt.% después de 1000 horas a 1100oC. La fase cúbica en grandes cantidades es indeseable debido a que presenta inferiores propiedades mecánicas cuando se compara con la fase tetragonal. Después de 800 horas de exposición a alta temperatura, el contenido de Y2O3 en la fase tetragonal se reduce hasta 6.6 wt.% y una fracción de la fase tetragonal transforma a monoclínica durante el enfriamiento. La fase monoclínica alcanza 18.0 wt.% después de 1000 horas. Esta fase es también indeseable porque además de tener una mayor conductividad térmica, la transformación de tetragonal a monoclínica viene acompañada de un cambio volumétrico de alrededor de 5% que promueve la formación y propagación de grietas, las cuales comprometen la integridad del recubrimiento.

  15. Theory and experiments on RF plasma heating, current drive and profile control in TORE SUPRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the main experimental and theoretical achievements related to the study of RF heating and non-inductive current drive and particularly phenomena related to the current density profile control and the potentiality of producing stationary enhanced performance regimes: description of the Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonant Frequency (ICRF) systems; long pulse coupling performance of the RF systems; observation of the transition to the so-called ``stationary LHEP regime`` in which the (flat) central current density and (peaked) electron temperature profiles are fully decoupled; experiments on ICRF sawtooth stabilization with the combined effect of LHCD modifying the current density profile; diffusion of fast electrons generated by LH waves; ramp-up experiments in which the LH power provided a significant part of the resistive poloidal flux and flux consumption scaling; theory of spectral wave diffusion and multipass absorption; fast wave current drive modelling with the Alcyon full wave code; a reflector LH antenna concept. 18 figs., 48 refs.

  16. Survey of ELF-VLF plasma waves in outer radiation belt observed by Cluster STAFF-SA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pokhotelov

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Various types of plasma waves have profound effects on acceleration and scattering of radiation belt particles. For the purposes of radiation belt modeling it is necessary to know statistical distributions of plasma wave parameters. This paper analyzes four years of plasma wave observations in the Earth's outer radiation belt obtained by the STAFF-SA experiment on board Cluster spacecraft. Statistical distributions of spectral density of different plasma waves observed in ELF-VLF range (chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, magnetosonic waves are presented as a function of magnetospheric coordinates and geomagnetic activity indices. Comparison with other spacecraft studies supports some earlier conclusions about the distribution of chorus and hiss waves and helps to remove the long-term controversy regarding the distribution of equatorial magnetosonic waves. This study represents a step towards the development of multi-spacecraft database of plasma wave activity in radiation belts.

  17. Improvement of the thermal stability of nickel silicide using a ruthenium interlayer deposited via remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Inhye [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, South Korea and System LSI Manufacturing Operation Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd, Gyeonggi-do 17113 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jingyu; Jeon, Heeyoung; Kim, Hyunjung; Shin, Changhee [Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Seokyoon; Lee, Kunyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyeongtag, E-mail: hjeon@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, South Korea and Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the effects of a thin Ru interlayer on the thermal and morphological stability of NiSi have been investigated. Ru and Ni thin films were deposited sequentially to form a Ni/Ru/Si bilayered structure, without breaking the vacuum, by remote plasma atomic layer deposition (RPALD) on a p-type Si wafer. After annealing at various temperatures, the thermal stabilities of the Ni/Ru/Si and Ni/Si structures were investigated by various analysis techniques. The results showed that the sheet resistance of the Ni/Ru/Si sample was consistently lower compared to the Ni/Si sample over the entire temperature range. Although both samples exhibited the formation of NiSi{sub 2} phases at an annealing temperature of 800 °C, as seen with glancing angle x-ray diffraction, the peaks of the Ni/Ru/Si sample were observed to have much weaker intensities than those obtained for the Ni/Si sample. Moreover, the NiSi film with a Ru interlayer exhibited a better interface and improved surface morphologies compared to the NiSi film without a Ru interlayer. These results show that the phase transformation of NiSi to NiSi{sub 2} was retarded and that the smooth NiSi/Si interface was retained due to the activation energy increment for NiSi{sub 2} nucleation that is caused by adding a Ru interlayer. Hence, it can be said that the Ru interlayer deposited by RPALD can be used to control the phase transformation and physical properties of nickel silicide phases.

  18. Chemical stability and osteogenic activity of plasma-sprayed boron-modified calcium silicate-based coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiang; Li, Kai; Xie, Youtao; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, CaSiO3 bio-ceramic coatings have attracted great attention because of their good bioactivity. However, their high degradation rates in physiological environment restrict their practical applications. In this work, boron-modified CaSiO3 ceramic (Ca11Si4B2O22, B-CS) coating was developed on Ti substrates by plasma-spraying technique attempting to obtain enhanced chemical stability and osteogenic activity. The B-CS coating possessed significantly increased chemical stability due to the introduction of boron and consequently the modified crystal structure, while maintaining good bioactivity. Scanning electron microscope and immunofluorescence studies showed that better cellular adhesion and extinctive filopodia-like processes were observed on the B-CS coating. Compared with the pure CaSiO3 (CS) coating, the B-CS coating promoted MC3T3-E1 cells attachment and proliferation. In addition, enhanced collagen I (COL-I) secretion, alkaline phosphatase activity, and extracellular matrix mineralization levels were detected from the B-CS coating. According to RT-PCR results, notable up-regulation expressions of mineralized tissue-related genes, such as runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin, and bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) were observed on the B-CS coating compared with the CS coating. The above results suggested that Ca11Si4B2O22 coatings possess excellent osteogenic activity and might be a promising candidate for orthopedic applications.

  19. Diagnostic suite of the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M. C.; Gota, H.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M.

    2016-11-01

    The C-2U experiment at Tri Alpha Energy studies the evolution of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas sustained by neutral beam injection. Data on the FRC plasma performance are provided by a comprehensive suite of diagnostics that includes magnetic sensors, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, neutral particle analyzers, and fusion product detectors. While many of these diagnostic systems were inherited from the preceding experiment C-2, C-2U has a variety of new and upgraded diagnostic systems: multi-chord far-infrared polarimetry, multiple fast imaging cameras with selectable atomic line filters, proton detector arrays, and 100 channel bolometer units capable of observing multiple regions of the spectrum simultaneously. In addition, extensive ongoing work focuses on advanced methods of measuring separatrix shape and plasma current profile that will facilitate equilibrium reconstruction and active control of the FRC plasma.

  20. Diagnostic suite of the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, M. C., E-mail: mthompson@trialphaenergy.com; Gota, H.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The C-2U experiment at Tri Alpha Energy studies the evolution of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas sustained by neutral beam injection. Data on the FRC plasma performance are provided by a comprehensive suite of diagnostics that includes magnetic sensors, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, neutral particle analyzers, and fusion product detectors. While many of these diagnostic systems were inherited from the preceding experiment C-2, C-2U has a variety of new and upgraded diagnostic systems: multi-chord far-infrared polarimetry, multiple fast imaging cameras with selectable atomic line filters, proton detector arrays, and 100 channel bolometer units capable of observing multiple regions of the spectrum simultaneously. In addition, extensive ongoing work focuses on advanced methods of measuring separatrix shape and plasma current profile that will facilitate equilibrium reconstruction and active control of the FRC plasma.

  1. H-mode plasmas at very low aspect ratio on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, K. E.; Bongard, M. W.; Barr, J. L.; Bodner, G. M.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Kriete, D. M.; Perry, J. M.; Reusch, J. A.; Schlossberg, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    H-mode is obtained at A˜ 1.2 in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment via Ohmic heating, high-field-side fueling, and low edge recycling in both limited and diverted magnetic topologies. These H-mode plasmas show the formation of edge current and pressure pedestals and a doubling of the energy confinement time to {{H}98y,2}˜ 1 . The L-H power threshold {{P}\\text{LH}} increases with density, and there is no {{P}\\text{LH}} minimum observed in the attainable density space. The power threshold is equivalent in limited and diverted plasmas, consistent with the FM3 model. However, the measured {{P}\\text{LH}} is ˜ 15 × higher than that predicted by conventional International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) scalings, and {{P}\\text{LH}}/{{P}\\text{ITPA08}} increases as A\\to 1 . Small ELMs are present at low input power {{P}\\text{IN}}˜ {{P}\\text{LH}} , with toroidal mode number n≤slant 4 . At {{P}\\text{IN}}\\gg {{P}\\text{LH}} , they transition to large ELMs with intermediate 5. The dominant-n component of a large ELM grows exponentially, while other components evolve nonlinearly and can damp prior to the crash. Direct measurements of the current profile in the pedestal region show that both ELM types exhibit a generation of a current-hole, followed by a pedestal recovery. Large ELMs are shown to further expel a current-carrying filament. Small ELM suppression via injection of low levels of helical current into the edge plasma region is also indicated.

  2. Observation of nonlinear wave decay processes in the solar wind by the AMPTE IRM plasma wave experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koons, H. C.; Roeder, J. L.; Bauer, O. H.; Haerendel, G.; Treumann, R.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear wave decay processes have been detected in the solar wind by the plasma wave experiment aboard the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) IRM spacecraft. The main process is the generation of ultralow-frequency ion acoustic waves from the decay of Langmuir waves near the electron plasma frequency. Frequently, this is accompanied by an enhancement of emissions near twice the plasma frequency. This enhancement is most likely due to the generation of electromagnetic waves from the coalescence of two Langmuir waves. These processes occur within the electron foreshock in front of the earth's bow shock.

  3. Administration of flutamide alters sperm ultrastructure, sperm plasma membrane integrity and its stability, and sperm mitochondrial oxidative capability in the boar: in vivo and in vitro approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydka, M; Piasecka, M; Gaczarzewicz, D; Koziorowski, M; Bilinska, B

    2012-08-01

    Our previous work has shown that an anti-androgen flutamide administered pre- and post-natally induced adverse effects on the epididymal morphology and function of adult boars. The present investigation is aimed to understand the effect of flutamide and its metabolite on changes in sperm plasma membrane integrity and its stability, changes in mitochondrial oxidative capability and frequency of abnormal sperm. In vivo effects of flutamide (50 mg/kg b.w.) on sperm ultrastructure were examined by electron microscopic observations. In vitro effects of 5, 50 and 100 μg/ml hydroxyflutamide, administered for 2 and 24 h, on sperm plasma membrane integrity were measured by LIVE/DEAD Sperm Vitality kit, while those on sperm membrane stability and mitochondrial oxidoreductive activity were investigated using Merocyanine 540 and NADH tests, respectively. The incidence of abnormal spermatozoa increased significantly (p boars compared with controls. In an in vitro approach, low dose of hydroxyflutamide in 2-h incubations appeared less effective in altering the sperm plasma membrane integrity and its stability than two higher doses used (p sperm membrane destabilization and mitochondrial oxidoreductive activity was strengthened after 24 h of hydroxyflutamide administration (p sperm parameters with regard to oxidative capability of mitochondria, plasma membrane changes and sperm ultrastructure provides novel data on the boar sperm sensitivity to anti-androgen action. Results indicate high sensitivity of boar spermatozoa to androgen withdrawal.

  4. Hard X-Ray Burst Detected From Caltech Plasma Jet Experiment Magnetic Reconnection Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Ryan S.; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-10-01

    In the Caltech plasma jet experiment a 100 kA MHD driven jet becomes kink unstable leading to a Rayleigh-Taylor instability that quickly causes a magnetic reconnection event. Movies show that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is simultaneous with voltage spikes across the electrodes that provide the current that drives the jet. Hard x-rays between 4 keV and 9 keV have now been observed using an x-ray scintillator detector mounted just outside of a kapton window on the vacuum chamber. Preliminary results indicate that the timing of the x-ray burst coincides with a voltage spike on the electrodes occurring in association with the Rayleigh-Taylor event. The x-ray signal accompanies the voltage spike and Rayleigh-Taylor event in approximately 50% of the shots. A possible explanation for why the x-ray signal is sometimes missing is that the magnetic reconnection event may be localized to a specific region of the plasma outside the line of sight of the scintillator. The x-ray signal has also been seen accompanying the voltage spike when no Rayleigh-Taylor is observed. This may be due to the interframe timing on the camera being longer than the very short duration of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  5. Global Simulations of Dynamo and Magnetorotational Instability in Madison Plasma Experiments and Astrophysical Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, Fatima [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2014-07-31

    Large-scale magnetic fields have been observed in widely different types of astrophysical objects. These magnetic fields are believed to be caused by the so-called dynamo effect. Could a large-scale magnetic field grow out of turbulence (i.e. the alpha dynamo effect)? How could the topological properties and the complexity of magnetic field as a global quantity, the so called magnetic helicity, be important in the dynamo effect? In addition to understanding the dynamo mechanism in astrophysical accretion disks, anomalous angular momentum transport has also been a longstanding problem in accretion disks and laboratory plasmas. To investigate both dynamo and momentum transport, we have performed both numerical modeling of laboratory experiments that are intended to simulate nature and modeling of configurations with direct relevance to astrophysical disks. Our simulations use fluid approximations (Magnetohydrodynamics - MHD model), where plasma is treated as a single fluid, or two fluids, in the presence of electromagnetic forces. Our major physics objective is to study the possibility of magnetic field generation (so called MRI small-scale and large-scale dynamos) and its role in Magneto-rotational Instability (MRI) saturation through nonlinear simulations in both MHD and Hall regimes.

  6. Thermal Design of a Bitter-Type Electromagnet for Dusty Plasma Experiments: Prototype Design and Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, W. J.; Bates, E. M.; Romero-Talamás, Carlos; Rivera, W. F.

    2015-11-01

    For the purpose of analyzing magnetized dusty plasma at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) Dusty Plasma Laboratory, we are designing a resistive water cooled Bitter-Type electromagnet. When completed, the magnet will be programmable to generate fields of up to 10 T for at least 10 seconds and up to several minutes. An analytic thermal design method was developed for establishing the location of elongated axial cooling passages. Comparisons with finite element analysis (FEA) data reveals that the thermal design method was capable of generating cooling channel patterns which establish manageable temperature profiles within the magnet. With our analytic method, cooling hole patterns can be generated in seconds instead of hours with FEA software. To further validate our thermal analysis as well as manufacturing techniques of our magnet design, we are now constructing a prototype electromagnet. The prototype is designed to operate continuously at 1 T with a current of 750 A, and has four diagnostic ports that can accommodate thermocouples and optical access to the water flow. A 1.25 inch diameter bore allows for axial field measurements and provides space for small scale experiments. Thermal analysis and specifics of the electromagnet design are presented.

  7. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joulaei, A. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); University of Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moody, J. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Berti, N.; Kasparian, J. [University of Geneva (Switzerland); Mirzanejhad, S. [University of Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Muggli, P. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment. - Highlights: • Discussion the AWAKE plasma source based on photoionization of rubidium vapor with a TW/cm^2 Intensity laser with a spectrum across valence ground state transition resonances. • Examines the propagation of the AWAKE ionization laser through rubidium vapor at design density on a small scale and reduced intensity with a linear numerical model compared to experimental results. • Discusses physics of pulse propagation through the vapor at high intensity regime where strong ionization occurs within the laser pulse.

  8. Tritium Plasma Experiment Upgrade and Improvement of Surface Diagnostic Capabilities at STAR Facility for Enhancing Tritium and Nuclear PMI Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, M.; Taylor, C. N.; Pawelko, R. J.; Cadwallader, L. C.; Merrill, B. J.

    2016-04-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) is a unique high-flux linear plasma device that can handle beryllium, tritium, and neutron-irradiated plasma facing materials, and is the only existing device dedicated to directly study tritium retention and permeation in neutron-irradiated materials with tritium [M. Shimada et.al., Rev. Sci. Instru. 82 (2011) 083503 and and M. Shimada, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 013008]. The plasma-material-interaction (PMI) determines a boundary condition for diffusing tritium into bulk PFCs, and the tritium PMI is crucial for enhancing fundamental sciences that dictate tritium fuel cycles and safety and are high importance to an FNSF and DEMO. Recently the TPE has undergone major upgrades in its electrical and control systems. New DC power supplies and a new control center enable remote plasma operations from outside of the contamination area for tritium, minimizing the possible exposure risk with tritium and beryllium. We discuss the electrical upgrade, enhanced operational safety, improved plasma performance, and development of optical spectrometer system. This upgrade not only improves operational safety of the worker, but also enhances plasma performance to better simulate extreme plasma-material conditions expected in ITER, Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), and Demonstration reactor (DEMO). This work was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under the DOE Idaho Field Office contract number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  9. Yttria-stabilized zirkonia / gadolinium zirconate double-layer plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakan, Emine

    2015-07-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) research and development is driven by the desirability of further increasing the maximum inlet temperature in a gas turbine engine. A number of new top coat ceramic materials have been proposed during the last decades due to limited temperature capability (1200 C) of the state-of-the-art yttria-stabilized zirconia (7 wt. % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}, YSZ) at long term operation. Zirconate pyrochlores of the large lanthanides((Gd → La){sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}) have been particularly attractive due to their higher temperature phase stability than that of the YSZ. Nonetheless, the issues related with the implementation of pyrochlores such as low fracture toughness and formation of deleterious interphases with thermally grown oxide (TGO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were reported. The implication was the requirement of an interlayer between the pyrochlores and TGO, which introduced double-layer systems to the TBC literature. Furthermore, processability issues of pyrochlores associated with the different evaporation rates of lanthanide oxides and zirconia resulting in unfavorable composition variations in the coatings were addressed in different studies. After all, although the material properties are available, there is a paucity of data in the literature concerning the properties of the coatings made of pyrochlores. From the processability point of view the most reported pyrochlore is La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Hence, the goal of this research was to investigate plasma-sprayed Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (GZO) coatings and YSZ/GZO double-layer TBC systems. Three main topics were examined based on processing, performance and properties: (i) the plasma spray processing of the GZO and its impact on the microstructural and compositional properties of the GZO coatings; (ii) the cycling lifetime of the YSZ/GZO double-layer systems under thermal gradient at a surface temperature of 1400 C; (iii) the properties of the GZO and YSZ coatings such as

  10. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N [PPPL

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  11. Achievements of the plasma composition experiment on ISEE-1 during the IMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, W.; Sharp, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The ISEE-1 spacecraft measured energetic ion composition over a wide radial range in the near-equatorial magnetosphere, from close to the Earth to a distance of 23 RE. The Plasma Composition Experiment covers energies from 0 eV/e to 17 keV/e. Results for energetic O+ ions of terrestrial origin show that these ions are found in every region of the magnetosphere reached by the spacecraft and can have energy and pitch-angle distributions very similar to those of H+ ions. The O+ ions are the most numerous ions in the 0.1 to 17 keV/e energy range at L 5 and are often a substantial part of the ion population at larger distances as well, especially during geomagnetically disturbed conditions.

  12. Achievements of the plasma composition experiment on ISEE-1 during the IMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, W.; Sharp, R. D.

    1984-09-01

    The ISEE-1 spacecraft measured energetic ion composition over a wide radial range in the near-equatorial magnetosphere, from close to the Earth to a distance of 23 RE. The Plasma Composition Experiment covers energies from 0 eV/e to 17 keV/e. Results for energetic O+ ions of terrestrial origin show that these ions are found in every region of the magnetosphere reached by the spacecraft and can have energy and pitch-angle distributions very similar to those of H+ ions. The O+ ions are the most numerous ions in the 0.1 to 17 keV/e energy range at L 5 and are often a substantial part of the ion population at larger distances as well, especially during geomagnetically disturbed conditions.

  13. Parameterization experiments performed via synthetic mass movements prototypes generated by 3D slope stability simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Antonio C.

    2010-05-01

    The central purpose of this work is to perform a reverse procedure in the mass movement conventional parameterization approach. The idea is to generate a number of synthetic mass movements by means of the "slope stability simulator" (Colangelo, 2007), and compeer their morphological and physical properties with "real" conditions of effective mass movements. This device is an integrated part of "relief unity emulator" (rue), that permits generate synthetic mass movements in a synthetic slope environment. The "rue" was build upon fundamental geomorphological concepts. These devices operate with an integrated set of mechanical, geomorphic and hydrological models. The "slope stability simulator" device (sss) permits to perform a detailed slope stability analysis in a theoretical three dimensional space, by means of evaluation the spatial behavior of critical depths, gradients and saturation levels in the "potential rupture surfaces" inferred along a set of slope profiles, that compounds a synthetic slope unity. It's a meta-stable 4-dimensional object generated by means of "rue", that represents a sequence evolution of a generator profile applied here, was adapted the infinite slope model for slope. Any slope profiles were sliced by means of finite element solution like in Bishop method. For the synthetic slope systems generated, we assume that the potential rupture surface occurs at soil-regolith or soil-rock boundary in slope material. Sixteen variables were included in the "rue-sss" device that operates in an integrated manner. For each cell, the factor of safety was calculated considering the value of shear strength (cohesion and friction) of material, soil-regolith boundary depth, soil moisture level content, potential rupture surface gradient, slope surface gradient, top of subsurface flow gradient, apparent soil bulk density and vegetation surcharge. The slope soil was considered as cohesive material. The 16 variables incorporated in the models were analyzed for

  14. The Titan Haze Simulation Experiment: Latest Laboratory Results and Dedicated Plasma Chemistry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Raymond, Alexander; Mazur, Eric; Salama, Farid

    2017-06-01

    In Titan’s atmosphere, a complex organic chemistry occurs between its main constituents, N2 and CH4, and leads to the production of larger molecules and solid aerosols.Here, we present the latest results on the gas and solid phase analyses in the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, developed on the NASA Ames COSmIC simulation chamber. The THS is a unique experimental platform that allows us to simulate Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at Titan-like temperature (200K) by cooling down N2-CH4-based mixtures in a supersonic expansion before inducing the chemistry by plasma. Because of the accelerated gas flow in the expansion, the residence time of the gas in the active plasma region is less than 3 µs. This results in a truncated chemistry that enables us to monitor the first and intermediate steps of the chemistry as well as specific chemical pathways when adding, in the initial gas mixture, heavier molecules that have been detected as trace elements on Titan[1].We discuss the results of recent Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy[2] and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectroscopy studies of THS Titan tholins produced in different gas mixtures (with and without acetylene and benzene). Both studies have shown the presence of nitrogen chemistry, and differences in the level and nature of the nitrogen incorporation depending on the initial gas mixture. A comparison of THS MIR spectra to VIMS data has shown that the THS aerosols produced in simpler mixtures, i.e., that contain more nitrogen and where the N-incorporation is in isocyanide-type molecules instead of nitriles, are more representative of Titan’s aerosols.In addition, a new model has been developed to simulate the plasma chemistry in the THS. Electron impact and chemical kinetics equations for more than 120 species are followed. The calculated mass spectra are in good agreement with the experimental THS mass spectra[1], confirming that the short residence time in the plasma cavity limits the growth of

  15. Four-color laser irradiation system for laser-plasma interaction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, D.M.; Henesian, M.A.; Wilcox, R.B. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Since 1986, optical smoothing of the laser irradiance on targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has gained increasing attention. Optical smoothing can significantly reduce wavefront aberrations that produce nonuniformities in the energy distribution of the focal spot. Hot spots in the laser irradiance can induce local self focusing of the light, producing filamentation of the plasma. Filamentation can have detrimental consequences on the hydrodynamics of an ICF plasma, and can affect the growth of parametric instabilities, as well as add to the complexity of the study of such instabilities as stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). As experiments approach and exceed breakeven (i.e., where driver energy = fusion yield), the likelihood of significant excitation of these processes increases. As a result, the authors are including a scheme for implementing optical-beam smoothing for target experiments in the baseline design for the proposed next-generation ICF facility--the National Ignition Facility (NIF). T