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Sample records for plasma sheet observed

  1. Survey of Galileo Plasma Observations in Jupiter's Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, Fran; Wilson, Robert J.; Siler, Scott; Paterson, William R.; Kurth, William S.

    2016-01-01

    The plasma science (PLS) Instrument on the Galileo spacecraft (orbiting Jupiter from December 1995 to September 2003) measured properties of the ions that were trapped in the magnetic field. The PLS data provide a survey of the plasma properties between approx. 5 and 30 Jupiter radii [R(sub J)] in the equatorial region. We present plasma properties derived via two analysis methods: numerical moments and forward modeling. We find that the density decreases with radial distance by nearly 5 orders of magnitude from approx. 2 to 3000 cm(exp.-3) at 6R(sub j) to approx. 0.05cm(sub -3) at 30 R(sub j). The density profile did not show major changes from orbit to orbit, suggesting that the plasma production and transport remained constant within about a factor of 2. The radial profile of ion temperature increased with distance which implied that contrary to the concept of adiabatic cooling on expansion, the plasma heats up as it expands out from Io's orbit (where TI is approx.60-80 eV) at approx. 6R(sub j) to a few keV at 30R(sub j).There does not seem to be a long-term, systematic variation in ion temperature with either local time or longitude. This latter finding differs from earlier analysis of Galileo PLS data from a selection of orbits. Further examination of all data from all Galileo orbits suggests that System Ill variations are transitory on timescales of weeks, consistent with the modeling of Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph observations. The plasma flow is dominated by azimuthal flow that is between 80% and 100% of corotation out to 25 R(sub j).

  2. Cluster multi-point observations of the magnetotail plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Paul David

    This thesis presents observations of the terrestrial magnetotail plasma sheet made by the European Space Agency Cluster mission. The Cluster mission is composed of four identical spacecraft, the first such multi-spacecraft mission, and enables, for the first time, the disambiguation of time versus space phenomena. Using the data from 2003, when the spacecraft were at their smallest average separation to date, many small-scale processes, both microphysical and macrophysical, are investigated. In the first study presented, two small flux ropes, a possible signature of multiple X-line reconnection, are investigated. By the development and utilisation of various multi-spacecraft methods, the currents and magnetic forces internal and external to the flux ropes, as well as the internal structure of the flux ropes, are investigated. In addition, a theory of their early evolution is suggested. In the second study presented, various terms of the generalised Ohm's law for a plasma are determined, including, for the first time, the divergence of the full electron pressure tensor, during the passage past the spacecraft of an active reconnection X-line. It is found that the electric field contribution from the divergence of the electron pressure tensor is anti-correlated with the contribution from the Hall term in the direction normal to the neutral sheet. In addition, further signatures of reconnection are quantified, such as parallel electric field generation and Hall quadrupolar magnetic field and current systems. In the final study presented, the anti-correlation between the divergence of the electron pressure tensor and Hall terms is investigated further. It is found that the anti-correlation is general, appearing in the direction normal to the neutral sheet because of a cross tail current. In a simple magnetohydrostatic treatment, a force balance argument leads to the conclusion that the gradient of the anti-correlation is a function of the ratio of the electron to ion

  3. Central Plasma Sheet Ion Properties as Inferred from Ionospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Simon; Newell, Patrick T.

    1998-01-01

    A method of inferring central plasma sheet (CPS) temperature, density, and pressure from ionospheric observations is developed. The advantage of this method over in situ measurements is that the CPS can be studied in its entirely, rather than only in fragments. As a result, for the first time, comprehensive two-dimensional equatorial maps of CPS pressure, density, and temperature within the isotropic plasma sheet are produced. These particle properties are calculated from data taken by the Special Sensor for Precipitating Particles, version 4 (SSJ4) particle instruments onboard DMSP F8, F9, F10, and F11 satellites during the entire year of 1992. Ion spectra occurring in conjunction with electron acceleration events are specifically excluded. Because of the variability of magnetotail stretching, the mapping to the plasma sheet is done using a modified Tsyganenko [1989] magnetic field model (T89) adjusted to agree with the actual magnetotail stretch at observation time. The latter is inferred with a high degree of accuracy (correlation coefficient -0.9) from the latitude of the DMSP b2i boundary (equivalent to the ion isotropy boundary). The results show that temperature, pressure, and density all exhibit dawn-dusk asymmetries unresolved with previous measurements. The ion temperature peaks near the midnight meridian. This peak, which has been associated with bursty bulk flow events, widens in the Y direction with increased activity. The temperature is higher at dusk than at dawn, and this asymmetry increases with decreasing distance from the Earth. In contrast, the density is higher at dawn than at dusk, and there appears to be a density enhancement in the low-latitude boundary layer regions which increases with decreasing magnetic activity. In the near-Earth regions, the pressure is higher at dusk than at dawn, but this asymmetry weakens with increasing distance from the Earth and may even reverse so that at distances X less than approx. 10 to -12 R(sub E

  4. Magnetic configuration of the distant plasma sheet - ISEE 3 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.; Daly, P. W.; Sanderson, T. R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Lepping, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of the IMF orientation and magnitude and substorm activity on the magnetic configuration of the central plasma sheet at 20-240 earth radii down the geomagnetic tail is investigated on the basis of ISEE-3 data. The results are presented graphically, and high-speed antisolar bulk flows threaded by southward magnetic fields are shown to be present in the distant plasma sheet after periods of substorm activity and southward IMF Bz. The effective dayside reconnection efficiency is estimated as 25 + or - 4 percent, in good agreement with theoretical models.

  5. Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Here, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in the Earth's plasma sheet. In total we have studied 151 ECRs within 660 h of plasma sheet data from the summer and fall of 2001 when Cluster was close to apogee at an altitude of about 15–20 RE. Cluster offers appropriate conditions for the investigation of energy conversion by the evaluation of the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J the current density. From the sign of the power density, we have identified more than three times as many Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs as Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. We also note that the CLRs appear to be stronger. To our knowledge, these are the first in situ observations confirming the general notion of the plasma sheet, on the average, behaving as a load. At the same time the plasma sheet appears to be highly structured, with energy conversion occurring in both directions between the fields and the particles. From our data we also find that the CLRs appear to be located closer to the neutral sheet, while CGRs prefer locations towards the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL. For both CLRs and CGRs, E and J in the GSM y (cross-tail direction dominate the total power density, even though the z contribution occasionally can be significant. The prevalence of the y-direction seems to be weaker for the CGRs, possibly related to a higher fluctuation level near the PSBL.

  6. In Situ Observations of Ion Scale Current Sheets and Associated Electron Heating in Turbulent Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, A.; Retino, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Greco, A.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Sundkvist, D. J.; Canu, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present a statistical study of ion-scale current sheets in turbulent space plasma. The study was performed using in situ measurements from the Earth's magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock. Intermittent structures were identified using the Partial Variance of Increments method. We studied the distribution of the identified structures as a function of their magnetic shear angle, the PVI index and the electron heating. The properties of the observed current sheets were different for high (>3) and low (3) structures that accounted for ~20% of the total. Those current sheets have high magnetic shear (>90 degrees) and were observed mostly in close proximity to the bow shock with their numbers reducing towards the magnetopause. Enhancement of the estimated electron temperature within these current sheets suggest that they are important for local electron heating and energy dissipation.

  7. Geotail observations of temperature anisotropy of the two-component protons in the dusk plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Nishino

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In search for clues towards the understanding of the cold plasma sheet formation under northward IMF, we study the temperature anisotropy of the two-component protons in the plasma sheet near the dusk low-latitude boundary observed by the Geotail spacecraft. The two-component protons result from mixing of the cold component from the solar wind and the hot component of the magnetospheric origin, and may be the most eloquent evidence for the transport process across the magnetopause. The cold component occasionally has a strong anisotropy in the dusk flank, and the sense of the anisotropy depends on the observed locations: the parallel temperature is enhanced in the tail flank while the perpendicular temperature is enhanced on the dayside. The hot component is nearly isotropic in the tail while the perpendicular temperature is enhanced on the dayside. We discuss possible mechanism that can lead to the observed temperature anisotropies.

  8. Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in Earth's plasma sheet. From more than 80 Cluster plasma sheet crossings (660 h data at the altitude of about 15–20 RE in the summer and fall of 2001, we have identified 116 Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and 35 Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have estimated typical values of the scale size and life time of the CLRs and the CGRs. We find that a majority of the observed ECRs are rather stationary in space, but varying in time. Assuming that the ECRs are cylindrically shaped and equal in size, we conclude that the typical scale size of the ECRs is 2 RE≲ΔSECR≲5 RE. The ECRs hence occupy a significant portion of the mid altitude plasma sheet. Moreover, the CLRs appear to be somewhat larger than the CGRs. The life time of the ECRs are of the order of 1–10 min, consistent with the large scale magnetotail MHD simulations of Birn and Hesse (2005. The life time of the CGRs is somewhat shorter than for the CLRs. On time scales of 1–10 min, we believe that ECRs rise and vanish in significant regions of the plasma sheet, possibly oscillating between load and generator character. It is probable that at least some of the observed ECRs oscillate energy back and forth in the plasma sheet instead of channeling it to the ionosphere.

  9. Cluster and TC-1 observation of magnetic holes in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Sun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic holes with relatively small scale sizes, detected by Cluster and TC-1 in the magnetotail plasma sheet, are studied in this paper. It is found that these magnetic holes are spatial structures and they are not magnetic depressions generated by the flapping movement of the magnetotail current sheet. Most of the magnetic holes (93% were observed during intervals with Bz larger than Bx, i.e. they are more likely to occur in a dipolarized magnetic field topology. Our results also suggest that the occurrence of these magnetic holes might have a close relationship with the dipolarization process. The magnetic holes typically have a scale size comparable to the local proton Larmor radius and are accompanied by an electron energy flux enhancement at a 90° pitch angle, which is quite different from the previously observed isotropic electron distributions inside magnetic holes in the plasma sheet. It is also shown that most of the magnetic holes occur in marginally mirror-stable environments. Whether the plasma sheet magnetic holes are generated by the mirror instability related to ions or not, however, is unknown. Comparison of ratios, scale sizes and propagation direction of magnetic holes detected by Cluster and TC-1, suggests that magnetic holes observed in the vicinity of the TC-1 orbit (~7–12 RE are likely to be further developed than those observed by Cluster (~7–18 RE.

  10. Multiple harmonic ULF waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer observed by Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Kahlstorf, C. R. G.; Posch, J. L.; Keiling, A.; Walsh, A. P.; Denton, R. E.; Broughton, M. C.; Owen, C. J.; FornaçOn, K.-H.; RèMe, H.

    2010-12-01

    The passage of the Cluster satellites in a polar orbit through Earth's magnetotail has provided numerous observations of harmonically related Pc 1-2 ULF wave events, with the fundamental near the local proton cyclotron frequency Ωcp. Broughton et al. (2008) reported observations by Cluster of three such events in the plasma sheet boundary layer, and used the wave telescope technique to determine that their wave vectors k were nearly perpendicular to B. This paper reports the results of a search for such waves throughout the 2003 Cluster tail passage. During the 4 month period of July-October 2003, 35 multiple-harmonic wave events were observed, all in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). From the first observed event (22 July) to the last (28 October), 13 of Cluster's 42 tail passes had at least one event. The wave events were rather evenly distributed from XGSE = -7 RE out to the Cluster apogee distance of -18 RE, with one event observed at -4 RE. ZGSE for these events ranged from -10 to -3 RE and +3 to +7 RE (i.e., there were no events for ∣Z∣ elevated fluxes of counterstreaming ions with energies ranging from ˜3 to 30 keV, and elevated fluxes of electrons with energies ranging from 0.25 to ˜5 keV. Analysis of plasma parameters suggests that although waves occurred only when the ion beta exceeded 0.1 (somewhat larger than typical for the PSBL), ion particle pressure may be of more physical importance in controlling wave occurrence. Electron distributions were more isotropic in pitch angles than the ion distributions, but some evidence of counterstreaming electrons was detected in 83% of the events. The ions also showed clear signatures of shell-like or ring-like distributions; i.e., with reduced fluxes below the energy of maximum flux. The suprathermal ion fluxes were asymmetric in all events studied, with more ions streaming earthward (for events both north and south of the central plasma sheet). Good agreement between the observed frequency of the

  11. Plasma sheet stretching accompanied by field aligned energetic ion fluxes observed by the MUADU instrument aboard TC-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Li; S.MCKENNA-LAWLOR; S.BARABASH; LIU ZhenXing; CAO JinBin; J.BALAZ; K.KUDELA; T.L.ZHANG; C.M.CARR

    2007-01-01

    The NUADU(NeUtral Atom Detector Unit)instrument aboard TC-2 recorded 4π solid angle images of charged particles(E>180 keV)spiraling around the magnetic field lines in the near-Earth plasma sheet (at~-7 RE,equatorial dawn-to-night side)during a geomagnetic storm(Dst=-219 nT)on August 24,2005.Energetic ion beam events characterized by symmetrical,ring-like,solid angle distributions around ambient magnetic field lines were observed during a 34-minute traversal of the plasma sheet by the TC-2 spacecraft.Also,observations during these multiple crossings of the plasma sheet were monitored by the magnetometer experiment(FGM)aboard the same spacecraft.During each crossing,a whistler-mode chorus enhancement was observed in the anisotropic area by the TC-2 low frequency electromagnetic wave detector(LFEW/TC-2)at a frequency just above that of the local lower hybrid wave.A comparison of the ion pitch angle distribution(PAD)map with the ambient magnetic field shows that an enhancement in the field aligned energetic ion flux was accompanied by tailward stretching of the magnetic field lines in the plasma sheet.In contrast,the perpendicular ion-flux enhancement was accompanied by a signature indicating the corresponding shrinkage of the magnetic field lines in the plasma sheet.Since both parallel ion-flux and perpendicular ion-flux enhancements occurred intermittently,the data were interpreted to imply a dynamical,oscillatory process of the magnetic field line(stretching and shrinking)in the near-Earth plasma sheet,which might have acted to help establish an interaction region in this area which would support continuous aurora-substorm triggering during the ongoing magnetic storm.The whistler-mode chorus may have been produced due to ion gyro-resonance during particle pitch angle diffusion after the plasma sheet compression.

  12. ISEE-3 observations of a viscously-driven plasma sheet: magnetosheath mass and/or momentum transfer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Mist

    Full Text Available A statistical analysis of data from the ISEE-3 distant tail campaign is presented. We investigate the mechanism driving slow, tailward flows observed in the plasma sheet. The possibility that these slow flows are driven by mass and/or momentum transfer across the distant tail magnetopause is explored. We establish that 40% of these flows could be driven by the transfer of approximately 4% of the magnetosheath momentum flux into the magnetotail. Current understanding of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability suggests that this figure is consistent with the amount of momentum flux transfer produced by this mechanism. We also consider the possibility that these flows are solely driven by transferring magnetosheath plasma across the magnetopause. We find that there is sufficient mass observed on these field lines for this to be the sole driving mechanism for only 27% of the observed slow flows.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetotail boundary layers; plasma convection; plasma sheet

  13. Field-aligned currents observed by MMS in the near-Earth plasma sheet during large-scale substorm dipolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Rumi; Nagai, Tsugunobu; Giles, Barbara; Le Contel, Olivier; Stawarz, Julia; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Artemyev, Anton

    2017-04-01

    During substorms significant energy conversion has been reported to take place at the sharp dipolarization front in the flow braking region where the probability of observing bursty bulk flows (BBFs) significantly drops. On 10 August 2016, MMS traversed the pre-midnight near-Earth plasma sheet when dipolarization disturbances were detected in an extended nightside local time region by Cluster, Geotail, GOES 13, 14 and 15, and the Van Allen Probes. In an expanding plasma sheet during the dipolarization, MMS detected sub-ion scale field-aligned current layers that are propagating both Earthward (equatorward) as well as tailward (outward). These multi-scale multi-point observations enable a unique investigation of both the meso-scale evolution of the disturbances and the detailed kinetic structures of the fronts and boundaries relevant to the dipolarizations.

  14. ISEE-3 observations of a viscously-driven plasma sheet: magnetosheath mass and/or momentum transfer?

    OpenAIRE

    Mist, R. T.; Owen, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    A statistical analysis of data from the ISEE-3 distant tail campaign is presented. We investigate the mechanism driving slow, tailward flows observed in the plasma sheet. The possibility that these slow flows are driven by mass and/or momentum transfer across the distant tail magnetopause is explored. We establish that 40% of these flows could be driven by the transfer of approximately 4% of the magnetosheath momentum flux into the magnetotail. Current understanding of the Kelvin-Helmholtz in...

  15. ISEE-3 observations of a viscously-driven plasma sheet: magnetosheath mass and/or momentum transfer?

    OpenAIRE

    Mist, R. T.; Owen, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    A statistical analysis of data from the ISEE-3 distant tail campaign is presented. We investigate the mechanism driving slow, tailward flows observed in the plasma sheet. The possibility that these slow flows are driven by mass and/or momentum transfer across the distant tail magnetopause is explored. We establish that 40% of these flows could be driven by the transfer of approximately 4% of the magnetosheath momentum flux into the magnetotail. Current understanding of the Kelvin-Helmh...

  16. Observations of energetic electrons /E no less than about 200 keV/ in the earth's magnetotail - Plasma sheet and fireball observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Stone, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    An earlier paper by the authors (1976) has reported on energetic electron anisotropies observed in conjunction with the acceleration regions identified by Frank et al., (1976). The present paper gives more detailed analyses of observations in the distant plasma sheet, including specific features of intensities, energy spectra, and pitch angle distributions of the very energetic electrons associated with intense plasma particle events, with energies ranging between 50 eV and 45 keV, detected with an electron/isotope spectrometer aboard the earth-orbiting spacecraft Imp 8. Two domains are considered: the plasma sheet and the regions near and within the localized magnetotail acceleration regions known as the fireball regions. The instrumentation used offered a number of observational advantages over many previous studies, including inherently low background, large geometric factors, excellent species identification, good angular distribution measurement capability, and availability of high resolution of differential intensities.

  17. Sheet Plasma Produced by Hollow Cathode Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张龙; 张厚先; 杨宣宗; 冯春华; 乔宾; 王龙

    2003-01-01

    A sheet plasma is produced by a hollow cathode discharge under an axial magnetic field.The plasma is about 40cm in length,4 cm in width and 1cm in thickness.The electron density is about 108cm-3.The hollow cathode is made to be shallow with a large opening,which is different from the ordinary deep hollow cathode.A Langmuir probe is used to detect the plasma.The electron density and the spatial distribution of the plasma change when voltage,pressure and the magnetic field vary.A peak and a data fluctuation at about 200 G-300 G are observed in the variation of electron density(or thickness of the sheet plasma)with the magnetic field.Our work will be helpful in characterizing the sheet plasma and will make the production of dense sheet plasma more controllable.

  18. ISEE-3 observations of a viscously-driven plasma sheet: magnetosheath mass and/or momentum transfer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mist, R. T.; Owen, C. J.

    2002-05-01

    A statistical analysis of data from the ISEE-3 distant tail campaign is presented. We investigate the mechanism driving slow, tailward flows observed in the plasma sheet. The possibility that these slow flows are driven by mass and/or momentum transfer across the distant tail magnetopause is explored. We establish that 40% of these flows could be driven by the transfer of approximately 4% of the magnetosheath momentum flux into the magnetotail. Current understanding of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability suggests that this figure is consistent with the amount of momentum flux transfer produced by this mechanism. We also consider the possibility that these flows are solely driven by transferring magnetosheath plasma across the magnetopause. We find that there is sufficient mass observed on these field lines for this to be the sole driving mechanism for only 27% of the observed slow flows.

  19. Multi-instrument observations of the ionospheric counterpart of a bursty bulk flow in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grocott

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available On 07 September 2001 the Cluster spacecraft observed a "bursty bulk flow" event in the near-Earth central plasma sheet. This paper presents a detailed study of the coincident ground-based observations and attempts to place them within a simple physical framework. The event in question occurs at ~22:30 UT, some 10min after a southward turning of the IMF. IMAGE and SAMNET magnetometer measurements of the ground magnetic field reveal perturbations of a few tens of nT and small amplitude Pi2 pulsations. CUTLASS radar observations of ionospheric plasma convection show enhanced flows out of the polar cap near midnight, accompanied by an elevated transpolar voltage. Optical data from the IMAGE satellite also show that there is a transient, localised ~1 kR brightening in the UV aurora. These observations are consistent with the earthward transport of plasma in the tail, but also indicate the absence of a typical "large-scale" substorm current wedge. An analysis of the field-aligned current system implied by the radar measurements does suggest the existence of a small-scale current "wedgelet", but one which lacks the global scale and high conductivities observed during substorm expansions.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionospheremagnetosphere interactions; plasma convection

  20. Tail reconnection region versus auroral activity inferred from conjugate ARTEMIS plasma sheet flow and auroral observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.; Xing, X.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E. F.; Mende, S. B.; Bonnell, J. W.; Auster, U.

    2013-09-01

    sheet flow bursts have been suggested to correspond to different types of auroral activity, such as poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs), ensuing auroral streamers, and substorms. The flow-aurora association leads to the important question of identifying the magnetotail source region for the flow bursts and how this region depends on magnetic activity. The present study uses the ARTEMIS spacecraft coordinated with conjugate ground-based auroral imager observations to identify flow bursts beyond 45 RE downtail and corresponding auroral forms. We find that quiet-time flows are directed dominantly earthward with a one-to-one correspondence with PBIs. Flow bursts during the substorm recovery phase and during steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) periods are also directed earthward, and these flows are associated with a series of PBIs/streamers lasting for tens of minutes with similar durations to that of the series of earthward flows. Presubstorm onset flows are also earthward and associated with PBIs/streamers. The earthward flows during those magnetic conditions suggest that the flow bursts, which lead to PBIs and streamers, originate from further downtail of ARTEMIS, possibly from the distant-tail neutral line (DNL) or tailward-retreated near-Earth neutral line (NENL) rather than from the nominal NENL location in the midtail. We find that tailward flows are limited primarily to the substorm expansion phase. They continue throughout the period of auroral poleward expansion, indicating that the expansion-phase flows originate from the NENL and that NENL activity is closely related to the auroral expansion of the substorm expansion phase.

  1. O+ ion conic and plasma sheet dynamics observed by Van Allen Probe satellites during the 1 June 2013 magnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, W. J.; Erickson, P. J.; Yang, J.; Foster, J.; Wygant, J.; Reeves, G.; Kletzing, C.

    2016-05-01

    The Van Allen Probe satellites were near apogee in the late evening local time sector during the 1 June 2013 magnetic storm's main phase. About an hour after crossing the ring current's "nose structure" into the plasma sheet, the satellites encountered a quasiperiodic sequence of 0.08-3 keV O+ ions. Pitch angle distributions of this population consistently peaked nearly antiparallel to the local magnetic field. We interpret this population as O+ conics originating in the northern ionosphere. Sequences began as fairly steady state conic fluxes with energies in the ~ 80 to 100 eV range. Over about a half hour buildup phase, O+ energies peaked near 1 keV. During subsequent release phases lasting ~ 20 min, O+ energies returned to low-energy starting points. We argue these observations reflect repeated formations and dissolutions of downward, magnetically aligned electric fields (ɛ||) layers trapping O+ conics between mirror points within heating layers below and electrostatic barriers above. Nearly identical variations were observed at the locations of both satellites during 9 of these 13 conic cycles. Phase differences between cycles were observed at both spacecraft during the remaining events. Most "buildup" to "release" phase transitions coincided with AL index minima. However, in situ magnetometer measurements indicate only weak dipolarizations of tail-like magnetic fields. The lack of field-aligned reflected O+ and tail-like magnetic fields suggest that both ionospheres may be active. However, Southern Hemisphere origin conics cannot be observed since they would be isotropized and accelerated during neutral sheet crossings.

  2. pTC-1 observation of ion high-speed flow reversal in the near-Earth plasma sheet during substorm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.; RME; I.; DANDOURAS; C.; M.; CARR

    2008-01-01

    Based on measurements of FGM and HIA on board TC-1 at its apogee on Septem-ber 14, 2004, we analyzed the ion high-speed flows in the near-Earth plasma sheet observed during the substorm expansion phase. Strong tailward high-speed flows (Vx ~ -350 km/s) were first seen at about X ~ -13.2 RE in near-Earth magnetotail, one minute later the flows reversed from tailward to earthward. The reversal process occurred quickly after the substorm expansion onset. The near-Earth magnetotail plasma sheet was one of key regions for substorm onset. Our analysis showed that the ion flow reversal from tailward to earthward was likely to be in close relation with the substorm expansion initiation and might play an important role in trigger-ing the substorm expansion onset.

  3. Observation of a planetward ion beam in the plasma sheet boundary layer at Saturn following tail reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, C. M.

    2014-04-01

    We present an interval of data from 2006 when the Cassini spacecraft was located 32 RS (1 RS = 60268km) downtail, at a local time of 22:00 hrs and a latitude of 13.8°. The interval in question displayed a range of dynamic behaviour, including a southward turning of the tail magnetic field, indicative of a dipolarization, and an energetic, fast, planetward beam of ions. Preliminary interpretation of this event suggests that it represents a reconnection-driven ion beam in Saturn's magnetotail plasma sheet boundary layer. This event is explored using several of the Cassini instruments to build up a picture of the reconfiguration of the tail in terms of local and global effects.

  4. Observation of an Extremely Large-Density Heliospheric Plasma Sheet Compressed by an Interplanetary Shock at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Liou, Kan; Lepping, R. P.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Plunkett, Simon; Socker, Dennis; Wu, S. T.

    2017-08-01

    At 11:46 UT on 9 September 2011, the Wind spacecraft encountered an interplanetary (IP) fast-forward shock. The shock was followed almost immediately by a short-duration (˜ 35 minutes) extremely dense pulse (with a peak ˜ 94 cm-3). The pulse induced an extremely large positive impulse (SYM-H = 74 nT and Dst = 48 nT) on the ground. A close examination of other in situ parameters from Wind shows that the density pulse was associated with i) a spike in the plasma β (ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure), ii) multiple sign changes in the azimuthal component of the magnetic field (B_{φ}), iii) a depressed magnetic field magnitude, iv) a small radial component of the magnetic field, and v) a large (> 90°) change in the suprathermal (˜ 255 eV) electron pitch angle across the density pulse. We conclude that the density pulse is associated with the heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS). The thickness of the HPS is estimated to be {˜} 8.2×105 km. The HPS density peak is about five times the value of a medium-sized density peak inside the HPS (˜ 18 cm-3) at 1 AU. Our global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation results (Wu et al. in J. Geophys. Res. 212, 1839, 2016) suggest that the extremely large density pulse may be the result of the compression of the HPS by an IP shock crossing or an interaction between an interplanetary shock and a corotating interaction region.

  5. ISEE 3 observations during a plasma sheet encounter at 140 earth radii - Evidence for enhancement of reconnection at the distant neutral line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholer, M.; Terasawa, T.; Baker, D. N.; Zwickl, R. D.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    A plasma sheet encounter of the ISEE-3 spacecraft in the distant tail at 140 earth radii on March 20, 1983 is studied using magnetic field, energetic particle, and plasma electron data sets. The H-component magnetograms from auroral magnetometer stations, intensity-time profiles, high resolution magnetic field measurements, and electron and proton angular distributions are analyzed. The dynamics of the plasma sheet displayed by the strong tailward and earthward directed ion beams, large northward and southward magnetic fields excursions, and short tailward and earthward plasma flows are described.

  6. Ice sheet hydrology from observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Peter (Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ-, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    The hydrological systems of ice sheets are complex. Our view of the system is split, largely due to the complexity of observing the systems. Our basic knowledge of processes have been obtained from smaller glaciers and although applicable in general to the larger scales of the ice sheets, ice sheets contain features not observable on smaller glaciers due to their size. The generation of water on the ice sheet surface is well understood and can be satisfactorily modeled. The routing of water from the surface down through the ice is not complicated in terms of procat has been problematic is the way in which the couplings between surface and bed has been accomplished through a kilometer of cold ice, but with the studies on crack propagation and lake drainage on Greenland we are beginning to understand also this process and we know water can be routed through thick cold ice. Water generation at the bed is also well understood but the main problem preventing realistic estimates of water generation is lack of detailed information about geothermal heat fluxes and their geographical distribution beneath the ice. Although some average value for geothermal heat flux may suffice, for many purposes it is important that such values are not applied to sub-regions of significantly higher fluxes. Water generated by geothermal heat constitutes a constant supply and will likely maintain a steady system beneath the ice sheet. Such a system may include subglacial lakes as steady features and reconfiguration of the system is tied to time scales on which the ice sheet geometry changes so as to change pressure gradients in the basal system itself. Large scale re-organization of subglacial drainage systems have been observed beneath ice streams. The stability of an entirely subglacially fed drainage system may hence be perturbed by rapid ice flow. In the case of Antarctic ice streams where such behavior has been observed, the ice streams are underlain by deformable sediments. It is

  7. Thermomechanical processing of plasma sprayed intermetallic sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Scorey, Clive (Cheshire, CT); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  8. Gyrophase bunched ions in the plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhai, Hao; Gao, Zhuxiu; Huang, Chaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Gyrophase bunched ions were first detected in the upstream region of the Earth's bow shock in the early 1980s which is formed by the microphysical process associated with reflected solar wind ions at the bow shock. Inside the magnetosphere, the results of computer simulations demonstrated that nonlinear wave-particle interaction can also result in the gyrophase bunching of particles. However, to date direct observations barely exist regarding this issue occurred inside the magnetosphere. In this paper, we report for the first time an event of gyrophase bunched ions observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet. The nongyrotropic distributions of ions were closely accompanied with the electromagnetic waves at the oxygen cyclotron frequency. The phase of bunched ions and the phase of waves mainly have very narrow phase differences (helicity with respect to the propagation direction, which agrees with the characteristic of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. The observation of O+ ions composition suggests that the oxygen band waves are excited due to the enhancements of the O+ ion density. This study suggests that the gyrophase bunching is a significant nonlinear effect that exists not only in the bow shock but also in the inner magnetosphere.

  9. Energetic electron spectra in Saturn's plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbary, J. F.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.

    2011-07-01

    The differential spectra of energetic electrons (27-400 keV) in Saturn's plasma sheet can be characterized by power law or kappa distributions. Using all available fluxes from 2005 to 2010, fits to these distributions reveal a striking and consistent pattern of radial dependence in Saturn's plasma sheet (∣z∣ constant throughout the Cassini mission. Inward of about 10 RS, the presence of the electron radiation belts and losses of lower-energy electrons to the gas and grain environment give rise to the very hard spectra in the inner magnetosphere, while the hard spectra in the outer magnetosphere may derive from auroral acceleration at high latitudes. The gradual softening of the spectra from 20 to 10 RS is explained by inward radial diffusion.

  10. Magnetic turbulence in the plasma sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Vörös, Z; Nakamura, R; Runov, A; Zhang, T L; Eichelberger, H U; Treumann, R A; Georgescu, E; Balogh, A; Klecker, B; R`eme, H

    2004-01-01

    Small-scale magnetic turbulence observed by the Cluster spacecraft in the plasma sheet is investigated by means of a wavelet estimator suitable for detecting distinct scaling characteristics even in noisy measurements. The spectral estimators used for this purpose are affected by a frequency dependent bias. The variances of the wavelet coefficients, however, match the power-law shaped spectra, which makes the wavelet estimator essentially unbiased. These scaling characteristics of the magnetic field data appear to be essentially non-steady and intermittent. The scaling properties of bursty bulk flow (BBF) and non-BBF associated magnetic fluctuations are analysed with the aim of understanding processes of energy transfer between scales. Small-scale ($\\sim 0.08-0.3$ s) magnetic fluctuations having the same scaling index $\\alpha \\sim 2.6$ as the large-scale ($\\sim 0.7-5$ s) magnetic fluctuations occur during BBF-associated periods. During non-BBF associated periods the energy transfer to small scales is absent, ...

  11. 3-D Magnetospheric Field and Plasma Containing Thin Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharia, S.; Cheng, C. Z.; Maezawa, K.; Wing, S.

    2002-05-01

    In this study we present fully-3D self-consistent solutions of the magnetosphere by using observation-based plasma pressure distributions and computational boundary conditions based on the T96 magnetospheric field model. The pressure profiles we use are either taken directly from observations (GEOTAIL pressure data in the plasma sheet and DMSP ionospheric pressure) or empirical (Spence-Kivelson formula for pressure on the midnight equatorial line). The 3-D solutions involve solving 2 coupled elliptic equations in a flux coordinate systems, with the magnetic field expressed by two Euler potentials and using appropriate boundary conditions for both the closed- and open-field regions derived from the empirical field model. We look into how the self-consistent magnetic field and current structures change under different external conditions, and we discuss the appearance of thin cross-tail current sheets during disturbed magnetospheric times.

  12. Plasma Relaxation Dynamics Moderated by Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Robert; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Yoshida, Zensho

    2014-10-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamics (IMHD) is strongly constrained by an infinite number of microscopic constraints expressing mass, entropy and magnetic flux conservation in each infinitesimal fluid element, the latter preventing magnetic reconnection. By contrast, in the Taylor-relaxed equilibrium model all these constraints are relaxed save for global magnetic flux and helicity. A Lagrangian is presented that leads to a new variational formulation of magnetized fluid dynamics, relaxed MHD (RxMHD), all static solutions of which are Taylor equilibrium states. By postulating that some long-lived macroscopic current sheets can act as barriers to relaxation, separating the plasma into multiple relaxation regions, a further generalization, multi-relaxed MHD (MRxMHD), is developed. These concepts are illustrated using a simple two-region slab model similar to that proposed by Hahm and Kulsrud--the formation of an initial shielding current sheet after perturbation by boundary rippling is calculated using MRxMHD and the final island state, after the current sheet has relaxed through a reconnection sequence, is calculated using RxMHD. Australian Research Council Grant DP110102881.

  13. On the nature of the plasma sheet boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hones, E.W. Jr. (Mission Research Corp., Los Alamos, NM (USA) Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The regions of the plasma sheet adjacent to the north and south lobes of the magnetotail have been described by many experimenters as locations of beams of energetic ions and fast-moving plasma directed primarily earthward and tailward along magnetic field lines. Measurements taken as satellites passed through one or the other of these boundary layers have frequently revealed near-earth mirroring of ions and a vertical segregation of velocities of both earthward-moving and mirroring ions with the fastest ions being found nearest the lobe-plasma sheet interface. These are features expected for particles from a distant tail source {bar E} {times} {bar B} drifting in a dawn-to-dusk electric field and are consistent with the source being a magnetic reconnection region. The plasma sheet boundary layers are thus understood as separatrix layers, bounded at their lobeward surfaces by the separatrices from the distant neutral line. This paper will review the observations that support this interpretation. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Current sheets with inhomogeneous plasma temperature: Effects of polarization electric field and 2D solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catapano, F., E-mail: menacata3@gmail.com; Zimbardo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Artemyev, A. V., E-mail: ante0226@gmail.com; Vasko, I. Y. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    We develop current sheet models which allow to regulate the level of plasma temperature and density inhomogeneities across the sheet. These models generalize the classical Harris model via including two current-carrying plasma populations with different temperature and the background plasma not contributing to the current density. The parameters of these plasma populations allow regulating contributions of plasma density and temperature to the pressure balance. A brief comparison with spacecraft observations demonstrates the model applicability for describing the Earth magnetotail current sheet. We also develop a two dimensional (2D) generalization of the proposed model. The interesting effect found for 2D models is the nonmonotonous profile (along the current sheet) of the magnetic field component perpendicular to the current sheet. Possible applications of the model are discussed.

  15. High-beta plasma blobs in the morningside plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Haerendel

    Full Text Available Equator-S frequently encountered, i.e. on 30% of the orbits between 1 March and 17 April 1998, strong variations of the magnetic field strength of typically 5–15-min duration outside about 9RE during the late-night/early-morning hours. Very high-plasma beta values were found, varying between 1 and 10 or more. Close conjunctions between Equator-S and Geotail revealed the spatial structure of these "plasma blobs" and their lifetime. They are typically 5–10° wide in longitude and have an antisymmetric plasma or magnetic pressure distribution with respect to the equator, while being altogether low-latitude phenomena 
    (≤ 15°. They drift slowly sunward, exchange plasma across the equator and have a lifetime of at least 15–30 min. While their spatial structure may be due to some sort of mirror instability, little is known about the origin of the high-beta plasma. It is speculated that the morningside boundary layer somewhat further tailward may be the source of this plasma. This would be consistent with the preference of the plasma blobs to occur during quiet conditions, although they are also found during substorm periods. The relation to auroral phenomena in the morningside oval is uncertain. The energy deposition may be mostly too weak to generate a visible signature. However, patchy aurora remains a candidate for more disturbed periods.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma convection; plasma sheet; plasma waves and instabilities

  16. Thin current sheets in collisionless plasma: Equilibrium structure, plasma instabilities, and particle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenyi, L. M.; Malova, H. V.; Artemyev, A. V.; Popov, V. Yu.; Petrukovich, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-15

    The review is devoted to plasma structures with an extremely small transverse size, namely, thin current sheets that have been discovered and investigated by spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetotail in the last few decades. The formation of current sheets is attributed to complicated dynamic processes occurring in a collisionless space plasma during geomagnetic perturbations and near the magnetic reconnection regions. The models that describe thin current structures in the Earth's magnetotail are reviewed. They are based on the assumption of the quasi-adiabatic ion dynamics in a relatively weak magnetic field of the magnetotail neutral sheet, where the ions can become unmagnetized. It is shown that the ion distribution can be represented as a function of the integrals of particle motion-the total energy and quasi-adiabatic invariant. Various modifications of the initial equilibrium are considered that are obtained with allowance for the currents of magnetized electrons, the contribution of oxygen ions, the asymmetry of plasma sources, and the effects related to the non-Maxwellian particle distributions. The theoretical results are compared with the observational data from the Cluster spacecraft mission. Various plasma instabilities developing in thin current sheets are investigated. The evolution of the tearing mode is analyzed, and the parameter range in which the mode can grow are determined. The paradox of complete stabilization of the tearing mode in current sheets with a nonzero normal magnetic field component is thereby resolved based on the quasi-adiabatic model. It is shown that, over a wide range of current sheet parameters and the propagation directions of large-scale unstable waves, various modified drift instabilities-kink and sausage modes-can develop in the system. Based on the concept of a turbulent electromagnetic field excited as a result of the development and saturation of unstable waves, a mechanism for charged particle

  17. The Dynamical Generation of Current Sheets in Astrophysical Plasma Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Howes, Gregory G

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence profoundly affects particle transport and plasma heating in many astrophysical plasma environments, from galaxy clusters to the solar corona and solar wind to Earth's magnetosphere. Both fluid and kinetic simulations of plasma turbulence ubiquitously generate coherent structures, in the form of current sheets, at small scales, and the locations of these current sheets appear to be associated with enhanced rates of dissipation of the turbulent energy. Therefore, illuminating the origin and nature of these current sheets is critical to identifying the dominant physical mechanisms of dissipation, a primary aim at the forefront of plasma turbulence research. Here we present evidence from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations that strong nonlinear interactions between counterpropagating Alfven waves, or strong Alfven wave collisions, are a natural mechanism for the generation of current sheets in plasma turbulence. Furthermore, we conceptually explain this current sheet development in terms of the nonlinear...

  18. New aspects of plasma sheet dynamics - MHD and kinetic theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wiechen

    Full Text Available Magnetic reconnection is a process of fundamental importance for the dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet. In this context, the development of thin current sheets in the near-Earth plasma sheet is a topic of special interest because they could be a possible cause of microscopic fluctuations acting as collective non-idealness from a macroscopic point of view. Simulations of the near-Earth plasma sheet including boundary perturbations due to localized inflow through the northern (or southern plasma sheet boundary show developing thin current sheets in the near-Earth plasma sheet about 810 RE tailwards of the Earth. This location is largely independent from the localization of the perturbation. The second part of the paper deals with the problem of the macroscopic non-ideal consequences of microscopic fluctuations. A new model is presented that allows the quantitative calculation of macroscopic non-idealness without considering details of microscopic instabilities or turbulence. This model is only based on the assumption of a strongly fluctuating, mixing dynamics on microscopic scales in phase space. The result of this approach is an expression for anomalous non-idealness formally similar to the Krook resistivity but now describing the macroscopic consequences of collective microscopic fluctuations, not of collisions.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma sheet · Space plasma physics (kinetic and MHD theory; magnetic reconnection

  19. The statistical studies of the inner boundary of plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Cao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The penetration of plasma sheet ions into the inner magnetosphere is very important to the inner magnetospheric dynamics since plasma sheet ions are one of the major particle sources of ring current during storm times. However, the direct observations of the inner boundary of the plasma sheet are fairly rare due to the limited number of satellites in near equatorial orbits outside 6.6 RE. In this paper, we used the ion data recorded by TC-1 from 2004 to 2006 to study the distribution of inner boundary of ion plasma sheet (IBIPS and for the first time show the observational distribution of IBIPS in the equatorial plane. The IBIPS has a dawn-dusk asymmetry, being farthest to the Earth in the 06:00 08:00 LT bin and closest to the Earth in the 18:00–20:00 LT bin. Besides, the IBIPS has also a day-night asymmetry, which may be due to the fact that the ions on the dayside are exposed more time to loss mechanisms on their drift paths. The radial distance of IBIPS decrease generally with the increase of Kp index. The mean radial distance of IBIPS is basically larger than 6.6 RE during quiet times and smaller than 6.6 RE during active times. When the strength of convection electric field increases, the inward shift of IBIPS is most significant on the night side (22:00–02:00 LT. For Kp ≤ 0+, only 16% of IBIPSs penetrate inside the geosynchronous orbit. For 2 ≤ Kp < 3+, however, 70% of IBIPSs penetrate inside the geosynchronous orbit. The IBIPS has weak correlations with the AE and Dst indexes. The average correlation coefficient between Ri and Kp is −0.58 while the correlation coefficient between Ri and AE/Dst is only −0.29/0.17. The correlation coefficients are local time dependent. Particularly, Ri and Kp are highly correlated (r=−0.72 in the night sector, meaning that the radial distance of IBIPS

  20. Thickness of Heliospheric Current and Plasma Sheets: Dependence on Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Smith, E. J.; Winterhalter, D.; McComas, D. J.; Skoug, R. M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Smith, C. W.

    2005-05-01

    Heliospheric current sheets (HCS) are well defined structures that separate the interplanetary magnetic fields with inverse polarities. Surrounded by heliospheric plasma sheets (HPS), the current sheets stretch throughout the heliosphere. Interesting questions that still remain unanswered include how the thickness of these structures will change along the distance? And what determines the thickness of these structures? To answer these fundamental questions, we have carried out a study of the HCS and HPS using recent Ulysses data near 5 AU. When the results were compared with earlier studies at 1 AU using ISEE-3 data, they were surprising and unexplained. Although the plasma sheet grew thicker, the embedded current sheet grew thinner! Using data under the same (or very similar) circumstances, we have extended the analysis in two ways. First, the same current-plasma sheets studied at 5 AU have been identified at 1 AU using ACE data. Second, data obtained while Ulysses was en-route to Jupiter near 3 AU have been analyzed. This three-point investigation reveals the thickness variation along the distance and enables the examination of the controller of this variation.

  1. Local structure of the magnetotail current sheet: 2001 Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Runov

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Thirty rapid crossings of the magnetotail current sheet by the Cluster spacecraft during July-October 2001 at a geocentric distance of 19 RE are examined in detail to address the structure of the current sheet. We use four-point magnetic field measurements to estimate electric current density; the current sheet spatial scale is estimated by integration of the translation velocity calculated from the magnetic field temporal and spatial derivatives. The local normal-related coordinate system for each case is defined by the combining Minimum Variance Analysis (MVA and the curlometer technique. Numerical parameters characterizing the plasma sheet conditions for these crossings are provided to facilitate future comparisons with theoretical models. Three types of current sheet distributions are distinguished: center-peaked (type I, bifurcated (type II and asymmetric (type III sheets. Comparison to plasma parameter distributions show that practically all cases display non-Harris-type behavior, i.e. interior current peaks are embedded into a thicker plasma sheet. The asymmetric sheets with an off-equatorial current density peak most likely have a transient nature. The ion contribution to the electric current rarely agrees with the current computed using the curlometer technique, indicating that either the electron contribution to the current is strong and variable, or the current density is spatially or temporally structured.

  2. A Modified Porous Titanium Sheet Prepared by Plasma-Activated Sintering for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukimichi Tamaki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a contamination-free porous titanium scaffold by a plasma-activated sintering within an originally developed TiN-coated graphite mold. The surface of porous titanium sheet with or without a coated graphite mold was characterized. The cell adhesion property of porous titanium sheet was also evaluated in this study. The peak of TiC was detected on the titanium sheet processed with the graphite mold without a TiN coating. Since the titanium fiber elements were directly in contact with the carbon graphite mold during processing, surface contamination was unavoidable event in this condition. The TiC peak was not detectable on the titanium sheet processed within the TiN-coated carbon graphite mold. This modified plasma-activated sintering with the TiN-coated graphite mold would be useful to fabricate a contamination-free titanium sheet. The number of adherent cells on the modified titanium sheet was greater than that of the bare titanium plate. Stress fiber formation and the extension of the cells were observed on the titanium sheets. This modified titanium sheet is expected to be a new tissue engineering material in orthopedic bone repair.

  3. Physics and Dynamics of Current Sheets in Pulsed Plasma Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    pulsed plasma thruster. A simple experiment would involve measuring the impulse bit of a coaxial gas-fed pulsed plasma thruster operated in both positive...Princeton, NJ, 2002. [2] J. Marshal. Performance of a hydromagnetic plasma gun . The Physics of Fluids, 3(1):134–135, January-February 1960. [3] R.G. Jahn...Jahn and K.E. Clark. A large dielecteic vacuum facility. AIAA Jour- nal, 1966. [16] L.C. Burkhardt and R.H. Lovberg. Current sheet in a coaxial plasma

  4. Plasma-Jet Forming of Sheet Metal Shapes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma-jet forming is a newly proposed flexible sheet metal forming process. A non-transferred arc plasma torch is used as a controllable heat source to produce internal stress in sheet metals, causing plastic deformation without the necessity of hard tooling. This method has potential for rapid prototyping of sheet metal parts by reducing development costs and lead times. A robotic system has been used to perform simple linear bends in several different alloys. In order to develop a controllable process and to improve the forming accuracy, the effects of various process parameters on the obtained shape changes and on the resulting structure and properties have been studied. The overall goal is to understand the roles of the forming parameters and their inter-relationship in optimizing the forming procedure-a high forming speed without damage to the material structure or properties.

  5. Geomagnetic activity effects on plasma sheet energy conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we use three years (2001, 2002, and 2004 of Cluster plasma sheet data to investigate what happens to localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in the plasma sheet during times of high magnetospheric activity. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have studied the influence on Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs from variations in the geomagnetic disturbance level as expressed by the Kp, the AE, and the Dst indices. We find that the ECR occurrence frequency increases during higher magnetospheric activities, and that the ECRs become stronger. This is true both for CLRs and for CGRs, and the localized energy conversion therefore concerns energy conversion in both directions between the particles and the fields in the plasma sheet. A higher geomagnetic activity hence increases the general level of energy conversion in the plasma sheet. Moreover, we have shown that CLRs live longer during magnetically disturbed times, hence converting more electromagnetic energy. The CGR lifetime, on the other hand, seems to be unaffected by the geomagnetic activity level. The evidence for increased energy conversion during geomagnetically disturbed times is most clear for Kp and for AE, but there are also some indications that energy conversion increases during large negative Dst. This is consistent with the plasma sheet magnetically mapping to the auroral zone, and therefore being more tightly coupled to auroral activities and variations in the AE and Kp indices, than to variations in the ring current region as described by the Dst index.

  6. A Statistical study of plasma sheet oscillations with kinetic ballooning/interchange instability signatures using THEMIS spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurisic, Mirjana; Panov, Evgeny; Nakamura, Rumi; Baumjohann, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We use THEMIS data from 2010-2012 tail seasons to collect observations of plasma sheet oscillations with kinetic ballooning/interchange instability (BICI) signatures. Over seventy observations with closely located THEMIS probes P3-P5 reveal that BICI-like plasma sheet oscillations may appear at different magnetic local time. For these, we derive background plasma sheet parameters such as BZ, δBZ/δx and plasma beta, and investigate solar wind conditions. We also estimate the proper parameters of BICI-like oscillations such as frequency and amplitude. Based on this, we search for a relation between the background plasma sheet parameters and the proper parameters of BICI-like oscillations.

  7. Comparison of plasma sheet ion composition with the IMF and solar wind plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, W.

    Plasma sheet energetic ion data (0.1- to 16 keV/e) obtained by the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE-1 between 10 and 23 earth radii are compared with concurrent IMF and solar wind plasma data. The densities of H(+) and He(++) ions in the plasma sheet are found to be the highest, and the most nearly proportional to the solar wind density, when the IMF B(z) is not northward. The density of terrestrial O(+) ions increases strongly with increasing magnitude of the IMF, in apparent agreement with the notion that the IMF plays a fundamental role in the electric coupling between the solar wind and the ionosphere.

  8. Ion Beams in the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.; Runov, A.; Zhou, X.

    2015-12-01

    We explore characteristics of energetic particles in the plasma sheet boundary layer associated with dipolarization events, based on simulations and observations. The simulations use the electromagnetic fields of an MHD simulation of magnetotail reconnection and flow bursts as basis for test particle tracing. They are complemented by self-consistent fully electrodynamic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The test particle simulations confirm that crescent shaped earthward flowing ion velocity distributions with strong perpendicular anisotropy can be generated as a consequence of near tail reconnection, associated with earthward flows and propagating magnetic field dipolarization fronts. Both PIC and test particle simulations show that the ion distribution in the outflow region close to the reconnection site also consist of a beam superposed on an undisturbed population; this beam, however, does not show strong perpendicular anisotropy. This suggests that the crescent shape is created by quasi-adiabatic deformation from ion motion along the magnetic field toward higher field strength. The simulation results compare favorably with ``Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms" (THEMIS) observations.

  9. Singular Sheet Etching of Graphene with Oxygen Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haider Al-Mumen; Fubo Rao; Wen Li; Lixin Dong

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a simple and controllable post-synthesis method for engineering the number of graphene layers based on oxygen plasma etching. Singular sheet etching (SSE) of graphene was achieved with the optimum process duration of 38 seconds. As a demonstration of this SSE process, monolayer graphene films were produced from bilayer graphenes. Experimental investigations verified that the oxygen plasma etching removes a single layer graphene sheet in an anisotropic fashion rather than anisotropic mode. In addition, etching via the oxygen plasma at the ground electrodes introduced fewer defects to the bottom graphene layer compared with the conventional oxygen reactive ion etching using the powered electrodes. Such defects can further be reduced with an effective annealing treatment in an argon environment at 900-1000◦C. These results demonstrate that our developed SSE method has enabled a microelectronics manufacturing compatible way for single sheet precision subtraction of graphene layers and a potential technique for producing large size graphenes with high yield from multilayer graphite materials.

  10. Analysis of radiation performances of plasma sheet antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bo; Zhang, Zu-Fan; Wang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    A novel concept of plasma sheet antennas is presented in this paper, and the radiation performances of plasma sheet antennas are investigated in detail. Firstly, a model of planar plasma antenna (PPA) fed by a microstrip line is developed, and its reflection coefficient is computed by the JE convolution finite-difference time-domain method and compared with that of the metallic patch antenna. It is found that the design of PPA can learn from the theory of the metallic patch antenna, and the impedance matching and reconstruction of resonant frequency can be expediently realized by adjusting the parameters of plasma. Then the PPA is mounted on a metallic cylindrical surface, and the reflection coefficient of the conformal plasma antenna (CPA) is also computed. At the same time, the influence of conformal cylinder radius on the reflection coefficient is also analyzed. Finally, the radiation pattern of a CPA is given, the results show that the pattern agrees well with the one of PPA in the main radiation direction, but its side lobe level has deteriorated significantly.

  11. Thin current sheets caused by plasma flow gradients in space plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickeler, D.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2011-12-01

    To understand complex space plasma systems like the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling, we need to have a good knowledge of the slowly evolving equilibrium state. The slow change of external constraints on the system (for example boundary conditions or other external parameters) lead in many cases to the formation of current sheets. These current sheets can trigger micro-instabilities, which cause resistivity on fluid scales. Consequently resistive instabilities like magnetic reconnection can occur and the systems evolves dynamically. Therefore such a picture of quasi-magneto-hydro-static changes can explain the quasy-static phase of many space plasma before an eruption occurs. Within this work we extend the theory by the inclusion of a nonlinear stationary plasma flows. Our analysis shows that stationary plasma flows with strong flow gradients (for example the solar wind magnetosphere coupling) can be responsible for the existence or generation of current sheets.

  12. Plasma in the near Venus tail: Venus Express observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Zhang, T. L.; Woch, J.; Wei, Y.; Fedorov, A.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.

    2013-12-01

    Although Venus has no global intrinsic magnetic fields, it possesses a long magnetotail of induced origin. The topology of the tail is determined by the interplanetary magnetic field orientation. We present recent plasma and magnetic field observations in the near Venus tail (X≥-3RV) made by the Venus Express spacecraft. We show that ion acceleration in the Venus plasma sheet is produced by the slingshot effect of the draping magnetic field lines, though some features as differential streaming of different ion species point to the existence of other forces. We explain a bell shape of ion spectrograms while the spacecraft crosses the current sheet. The absence of a balance between the lobe magnetic pressure and thermal pressure of plasma in the plasma sheet indicates a dynamic rather than a static equilibrium in the Venus magnetotail. A strong asymmetry of the plasma sheet is controlled by the direction of the motional electric field in the upstream solar wind. In the hemisphere pointed in the direction of the motional electric field, the j×B force accelerates plasma tailward supplying the plasma sheet, while in the opposite hemisphere, the flow pattern occurs less regularly with smaller speeds but higher number densities.

  13. Low frequency eigenmodes of thin anisotropic current sheets and Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Zelenyi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The eigenmodes of low frequency perturbations of thin anisotropic current sheets with a finite value of the normal magnetic field, are investigated in this paper. It is shown that two possible polarizations of symmetric and asymmetric modes (sausage and kink exist where the growth rate of instabilities is positive. In addition, we demonstrate that a tearing instability might have a positive growth rate in thin anisotropic current sheets. The class of relatively fast wavy flapping oscillations observed by Cluster is described. The main direction of wave motion coincides with the direction of the current and the typical velocity of this motion is comparable with the plasma drift velocity in the current sheet. The comparison of these characteristics with theoretical predictions of the model of anisotropic thin current sheets, demonstrates that, in principle, the theory adequately describes the observations.

  14. IMF dependence of energetic oxygen and hydrogen ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao; Kronberg, Elena; Nykyri, Katariina; Daly, Patrick; Chen, Gengxiong; Du, Aimin; Ge, Yasong

    2017-04-01

    Energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet can provide important information for understanding the entry of ions into the magnetosphere, and their transportation, acceleration, and losses in the near-Earth region. In this study, 11 years of energetic proton and oxygen observations (> 100 keV) from Cluster/RAPID were used to statistically study the energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth region. The dawn-dusk asymmetries of the distributions in three different regions (dayside magnetosphere, near-Earth nightside plasma sheet, and tail plasma sheet) are examined in northern and southern hemispheres. The results show that the energetic ion distributions are influenced by the dawn-dusk IMF direction. The enhancement of intensity largely correlates with the location of the magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause and the consequent formation of a diamagnetic cavity in the same quadrant of the magnetosphere. The results imply that substorm-related processes in the magnetotail are not the only source of energetic ions in the dayside and the near-Earth plasma sheet. We propose that large-scale cusp diamagnetic cavities can be an additional source and can thus significantly affect the energetic ion population in the magnetosphere. We also believe that the influence of the dawn-dusk IMF direction should not be neglected in models of the particle population in the magnetosphere.

  15. Structure and evolution of the current sheet by multi-spacecraft observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.Y. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Geophysics; Russell, C.T. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics; Gosling, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    On April 22, 1979, from 0840 to 1018 UT, ISEE 1, ISEE 2 and IMP 8 were all in or near the magnetotail current sheet at 17 Re, 16 Re and 35 Re respectively while ISEE 3 monitored the solar wind 206 Re upstream of the Earth. A global perspective of the four spacecraft observations and of the ground magnetic records is presented in this paper. The hyperbolic tangent current sheet model of Harris has been used to calculate the current sheet thickness and to analyze the plasma distribution in the vertical direction. It is found that during this event the current sheet thickness varied from 2.5 Re to 1.5 Re for northward IMF but thinned abruptly to 0.5 Re when the IMF turned southward.

  16. On the 3-dimensional structure of plasmoids. [in near-earth plasma sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, W. J.; Sibeck, D. G.

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that the IMF penetrates plasmoids causing them to be three- rather than two-dimensional is tested by comparing observations of By within plasmoids and related tail structures to upstream IMF By data. The magnetic topologies that result from the mergings of closed plasma sheet flux tubes and open tail lobe flux tubes at a near-earth neutral line, and merging near the tail flanks are described and studied. The particle signals and isotropic electron distributions are examined. It is observed that the IMF By penetrates plasmoids and that their structure is three-dimensional. In the three-dimensional model of plasmoids the reconnected plasma sheet field lines form a magnetic flux-ropelike structure. The three-dimensional model is utilized to analyze stagnant, slowly moving and earthward moving structures.

  17. In situ observations of ion scale current sheet and associated electron heating in Earth's magnetosheath turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, Alexandros; Retinò, Alessandro; Sahraoui, Fouad; Greco, Antonella; Vaivads, Andris; Sundkvist, David; Canu, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic reconnection occurs in thin current sheets that form in turbulent plasmas. Numerical simulations indicate that turbulent reconnection contributes to the dissipation of magnetic field energy and results in particle heating and non-thermal acceleration. Yet in situ measurements are required to determine its importance as a dissipation mechanism at those scales. The Earth's magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock is a turbulent near-Earth environment that offers a privileged environment for such a study. Here we present a study of the properties of thin current sheets by using Cluster data. We studied the distribution of the current sheets as a function of their magnetic shear angle, the PVI index and the electron heating. The properties of the observed current sheets were different for high shear (θ > 90 degrees) and low shear current sheets (θ < 90 degrees). These high-shear current sheets account for about ˜ 20% of the total and have an average thickness comparable to the ion inertial length. Enhancement of electron temperature within these current sheets suggest that they are important for local electron heating and energy dissipation.

  18. Responses of properties in the plasma sheet and at the geosynchronous orbit to interplanetary shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Li; LIU ZhenXing; ZUO PingBing; ZHANG LingQian; DUAN SuPing

    2009-01-01

    On July 22,2004,the WIND spacecraft detected a typical interplanetary shock. There was sustaining weak southward magnetic field in the preshock region and the southward field was suddenly enhanced across the shock front (i.e.,southward turning). When the shock impinged on the magnetosphere,the magnetospheric plasma convection was abruptly enhanced in the central plasma sheet,which was directly observed by both the TC-1 and Cluster spacecraft located in different regions. Simultaneously,the Cluster spacecraft observed that the dawn-to-dusk electric field was abruptly enhanced. The variations of the magnetic field observed by TC-1,Cluster,GOES-10 and GOES-12 that were distributed in different regions in the plasma sheet and at the geosynchronous orbit are obviously distinct. TC-1 observations showed that the magnetic intensity kept almost unchanged and the elevation angle decreased,but the Cluster spacecraft,which was also in the plasma sheet and was further from the equator,observed that the magnetic field was obviously enhanced. Simultaneously,GOES-12 located near the midnight observed that the magnetic intensity sharply increased and the elevation angle decreased,but GOES-10 located in the dawn side observed that the magnetic field was merely compressed with its three components all sharply increasing. Furthermore,the energetic proton and electron fluxes at nearly all channels observed by five LANL satellites located at different magnetic local times (MLTs) all showed impulsive enhancements due to the compression of the shock. The responses of the energetic particles were much evident on the dayside than those on the nightside. Especially the responses near the midnight were rather weak. In this paper,the possible reasonable physical explanation to above observations is also discussed. All the shock-induced responses are the joint effects of the solar wind dynamic pressure pulse and the magnetic field southward turning.

  19. Effects of auroral potential drops on plasma sheet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Sheng; Lotko, William; Zhang, Binzheng; Wiltberger, Michael; Lyon, John

    2016-11-01

    The reaction of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to dynamic auroral potential drops is investigated using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global model including, for the first time in a global simulation, the dissipative load of field-aligned potential drops in the low-altitude boundary condition. This extra load reduces the field-aligned current (j||) supplied by nightside reconnection dynamos. The system adapts by forcing the nightside X line closer to Earth, with a corresponding reduction in current lensing (j||/B = constant) at the ionosphere and additional contraction of the plasma sheet during substorm recovery and steady magnetospheric convection. For steady and moderate solar wind driving and with constant ionospheric conductance, the cross polar cap potential and hemispheric field-aligned current are lower by approximately the ratio of the peak field-aligned potential drop to the cross polar cap potential (10-15%) when potential drops are included. Hemispheric ionospheric Joule dissipation is less by 8%, while the area-integrated, average work done on the fluid by the reconnecting magnetotail field increases by 50% within |y| < 8 RE. Effects on the nightside plasma sheet include (1) an average X line 4 RE closer to Earth; (2) a 12% higher mean reconnection rate; and (3) dawn-dusk asymmetry in reconnection with a 17% higher rate in the premidnight sector.

  20. Casimir effects for a flat plasma sheet: I. Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, G [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    We study a fluid model of an infinitesimally thin plasma sheet occupying the xy plane, loosely imitating a single base plane from graphite. In terms of the fluid charge e/a{sup 2} and mass m/a{sup 2} per unit area, the crucial parameters are q nsce 2{pi}e{sup 2}/mc{sup 2}a{sup 2}, a Debye-type cutoff K{identical_to}{radical}(4{pi})/a on surface-parallel normal-mode wavenumbers k, and X nsce K/q. The cohesive energy {beta} per unit area is determined from the zero-point energies of the exact normal modes of the plasma coupled to the Maxwell field, namely TE and TM photon modes, plus bound modes decaying exponentially with vertical bar zvertical bar. Odd-parity modes (with E{sub x,y}(z = 0) = 0) are unaffected by the sheet except for their overall phases, and are irrelevant to {beta}, although the following paper shows that they are essential to the fields (e.g. to their vacuum expectation values), and to the stresses on the sheet. Realistically one has X >> 1, the result {beta} {approx} {Dirac_h}cq{sup 1/2}K{sup 5/2} is nonrelativistic, and it comes from the surface modes. By contrast, X << 1 (nearing the limit of perfect reflection) would entail {beta} {approx} -{Dirac_h}cqK{sup 2}log(1/X): contrary to folklore, the surface energy of perfect reflectors is divergent rather than zero. An appendix spells out the relation, for given k, between bound modes and photon phase-shifts. It is very different from Levinson's theorem for 1D potential theory: cursory analogies between TM and potential scattering are apt to mislead.

  1. Alfven Waves in a Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer Associated with Near-Tail Magnetic Reconnection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Zhi-Gang; DENG Xiao-Hua; PANG Ye; LI Shi-You; WANG Jing-Fang

    2007-01-01

    We report observations from Geotail satellite showing that large Poynting fluxes associated with Alfven waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer(PSBL) occur in the vicinity of the near-tail reconnection region on 10 December 1996.During the period of large Poynting fluxex,Geotail also observed strong tailward plasma flws.These observations demonstrate the importance of near-tail reconnection process as the energy source of Alfven waves in the PSBL.Strong tailward(Earthward)plasma flows ought to be an important candidate in generating Alfven waves.Furthermore,the strong pertutbations not only of the magnetic field but also of the electric field observed in the PSBL indicate that the PSBL plays an important role in the generation and propagation of the energy flux associated with Alfven waves.

  2. Thin current sheets caused by plasma flow gradients in space and astrophysical plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Nickeler

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Strong gradients in plasma flows play a major role in space and astrophysical plasmas. A typical situation is that a static plasma equilibrium is surrounded by a plasma flow, which can lead to strong plasma flow gradients at the separatrices between field lines with different magnetic topologies, e.g., planetary magnetospheres, helmet streamers in the solar corona, or at the boundary between the heliosphere and interstellar medium. Within this work we make a first step to understand the influence of these flows towards the occurrence of current sheets in a stationary state situation. We concentrate here on incompressible plasma flows and 2-D equilibria, which allow us to find analytic solutions of the stationary magnetohydrodynamics equations (SMHD. First we solve the magnetohydrostatic (MHS equations with the help of a Grad-Shafranov equation and then we transform these static equilibria into a stationary state with plasma flow. We are in particular interested to study SMHD-equilibria with strong plasma flow gradients perpendicular to separatrices. We find that induced thin current sheets occur naturally in such situations. The strength of the induced currents depend on the Alfvén Mach number and its gradient, and on the magnetic field.

  3. Distribution of energetic oxygen and hydrogen in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Kronberg, E A; Haaland, S E; Daly, P W; Delcourt, D C; Luo, H; Kistler, L M; Dandouras, I

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distributions of different ion species are useful indicators for plasma sheet dynamics. In this statistical study based on 7 years of Cluster observations, we establish the spatial distributions of oxygen ions and protons at energies from 274 to 955 keV, depending on geomagnetic and solar wind (SW) conditions. Compared with protons, the distribution of energetic oxygen has stronger dawn-dusk asymmetry in response to changes in the geomagnetic activity. When the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is directed southward, the oxygen ions show significant acceleration in the tail plasma sheet. Changes in the SW dynamic pressure ($\\mathit{P}_{dyn}$) affect the oxygen and proton intensities in the same way. The energetic protons show significant intensity increases at the near-Earth duskside during disturbed geomagnetic conditions, enhanced SW $\\mathit{P}_{dyn}$, and southward IMF, implying there location of effective inductive acceleration mechanisms and a strong duskward drift due to the increase of t...

  4. THEMIS multispacecraft observations of a reconnecting magnetosheath current sheet with symmetric boundary conditions and a large guide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øieroset, M.; Phan, T. D.; Shay, M. A.; Haggerty, C. C.; Fujimoto, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Eastwood, J. P.; Mozer, F. S.

    2017-08-01

    We report three spacecraft observations of a reconnecting magnetosheath current sheet with a guide field of unity, with THEMIS D (THD) and THEMIS E (THE)/THEMIS A (THA) observing oppositely directed reconnection exhausts, indicating the presence of an X line between the spacecraft. The near-constant convective speed of the magnetosheath current sheet allowed the direct translation of the observed time series into spatial profiles. THD observed asymmetries in the plasma density and temperature profiles across the exhaust, characteristics of symmetric reconnection with a guide field. The exhausts at THE and THA, on the other hand, were not the expected mirror image of the THD exhaust in terms of the plasma and field profiles. They consisted of a main outflow at the center of the current sheet, flanked by oppositely directed flows at the two edges of the current sheet, suggesting the presence of a second X line, whose outflow wraps around the outflow from the first X line.

  5. On the problem of Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer identification from plasma moments in Earth's magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Grigorenko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of identification of the interface region between the lobe and the Plasma Sheet (PS – the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer (PSBL – using ion moments and magnetic field data often arises in works devoted to statistical studies of various PSBL phenomena. Our experience in the identification of this region based on the analysis of ion velocity distribution functions demonstrated that plasma parameters, such as the ion density and bulk velocity, the plasma beta or the dynamic pressure vary widely depending on the state of magnetotail activity. For example, while field-aligned beams of accelerated ions are often observed propagating along the lobeward edge of the PSBL there are times when no signatures of these beams could be observed. In the last case, a spacecraft moving from the lobe region to the PS registers almost isotropic PS-like ion velocity distribution. Such events may be classified as observations of the outer PS region. In this paper, we attempt to identify ion parameter ranges or their combinations that result in a clear distinction between the lobe, the PSBL and the adjacent PS or the outer PS regions. For this we used 100 crossings of the lobe-PSBL-PS regions by Cluster spacecraft (s/c made in different periods of magnetotail activity. By eye inspection of the ion distribution functions we first identify and separate the lobe, the PSBL and the adjacent PS or outer PS regions and then perform a statistical study of plasma and magnetic field parameters in these regions. We found that the best results in the identification of the lobe-PSBL boundary are reached when one uses plasma moments, namely the ion bulk velocity and density calculated not for the entire energy range, but for the energies higher than 2 keV. In addition, we demonstrate that in many cases the plasma beta fails to correctly identify and separate the PSBL and the adjacent PS or the outer PS regions.

  6. The Martian Plasma Environment: Model Calculations and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenegger, H. I. M.; Dubinin, E.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.

    Based on a modified version of the model of an induced martian magnetosphere developed by Luhmann (1990), the dynamics and spatial distribution of different planetary ion species is examined. Three main regions are identified: A cloud of ions travelling along cycloidal trajectories, a plasma mantle and a plasma sheet. The latter predominantly consists of oxygen ions of ionospheric origin with minor portions of light particles. Comparison of model results with Phobos-2 observations shows reasonable agreement.

  7. The evaluation of surface and adhesive bonding properties for cold rolled steel sheet for automotive treated by Ar/O{sub 2} atmospheric pressure plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Joo; Lee, Sang Kon; Kim Byung Min [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Keun Whan [Sungwoo Hitech Technical Institute, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Cold rolled steel sheet for automotive was treated by Ar/O{sub 2} atmospheric pressure plasma to improve the adhesive bonding strength. Through the contact angle test and calculation of surface free energy for cold rolled steel sheet, the changes of surface properties were investigated before and after plasma treatment. The contact angle was decreased and surface free energy was increased after plasma treatment. And the change of surface roughness and morphology were observed by AFM(Atomic Force Microscope). The surface roughness of steel sheet was slightly changed. Based on Taguchi method, single lap shear test was performed to investigate the effect of experimental parameter such as plasma power, treatment time and flow rate of O{sub 2} gas. Results shows that the bonding strength of steel sheet treated in Ar/O{sub 2} atmospheric pressure plasma was improved about 20% compared with untreated sheet.

  8. Observational Study on Current Sheet of Magnetic Reconnection in Two Solar Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang-wei, Cai; Ning, Wu; Jun, Lin

    2016-07-01

    The coronal magnetic configuration behind coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can commonly be stretched severely, thus to push the magnetic fields with opposite polarities to approach each other, and to form a current sheet of magnetic reconnection. The current sheet in solar eruptions is not only an important region to convert the magnetic free energy into thermal energy, plasma kinetic energy, and energetic particle beams, but also plays a role to connect CMEs and flares. In the CME events of 2003 January 3 and 2003 November 4, the development of current sheet has been observed in both cases. We have investigated the dynamic features and physical properties of current sheet in the two events, based on the data of LASCO (Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph) and UVCS (Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer) on board of SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory), and the Hα data from BBSO (Big Bear Solar Observatory) and YNAO (Yunnan Astronomical Observatory). The existence of ions with a high degree of ionization, such as Fe+17 and Si+11, indicates a high temperature up to 3×106 ∼5×106 K in the region of current sheet. A direct measurement shows that the thickness of current sheet varies between 1.3×104 and 1.1×105 km, which increases first and then decreases with time. Using the CHIANTI code (v.7.1), we have further calculated the average values of electron temperature and corresponding emission measure (EM) respectively to be 3.86×106 K and 6.1×1024 cm-5 in the current sheet of the 2003 January 3 event. We also find that the current sheet twisted forth and back quasi-periodically during the eruption event on 2003 November 4 by analyzing the observational data from SOHO/UVCS.

  9. Experimental investigation of a 1 kA/cm² sheet beam plasma cathode electron gun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Niraj; Pal, Udit Narayan; Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Prajesh, Rahul; Prakash, Ram

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a cold cathode based sheet-beam plasma cathode electron gun is reported with achieved sheet-beam current density ∼1 kA/cm(2) from pseudospark based argon plasma for pulse length of ∼200 ns in a single shot experiment. For the qualitative assessment of the sheet-beam, an arrangement of three isolated metallic-sheets is proposed. The actual shape and size of the sheet-electron-beam are obtained through a non-conventional method by proposing a dielectric charging technique and scanning electron microscope based imaging. As distinct from the earlier developed sheet beam sources, the generated sheet-beam has been propagated more than 190 mm distance in a drift space region maintaining sheet structure without assistance of any external magnetic field.

  10. Formation and evolution of flapping and ballooning waves in magnetospheric plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J. Z. G.; Hirose, A.

    2016-05-01

    By adopting Lembége & Pellat's 2D plasma-sheet model, we investigate the flankward flapping motion and Sunward ballooning propagation driven by an external source (e.g., magnetic reconnection) produced initially at the sheet center. Within the ideal MHD framework, we adopt the WKB approximation to obtain the Taylor-Goldstein equation of magnetic perturbations. Fourier spectral method and Runge-Kutta method are employed in numerical simulations, respectively, under the flapping and ballooning conditions. Studies expose that the magnetic shears in the sheet are responsible for the flapping waves, while the magnetic curvature and the plasma gradient are responsible for the ballooning waves. In addition, the flapping motion has three phases in its temporal development: fast damping phase, slow recovery phase, and quasi-stabilized phase; it is also characterized by two patterns in space: propagating wave pattern and standing wave pattern. Moreover, the ballooning modes are gradually damped toward the Earth, with a wavelength in a scale size of magnetic curvature or plasma inhomogeneity, only 1-7% of the flapping one; the envelops of the ballooning waves are similar to that of the observed bursty bulk flows moving toward the Earth.

  11. Continuous broadband seismic observation on the Greenland Ice Sheet under Greenland Ice Sheet monitoring Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Seiji; Kanao, Masaki; Tono, Yoko; Himeno, Tetsuto; Toyokuni, Genti; Childs, Dean; Dahl-Jensen, Trine; anderson, Kent

    2013-04-01

    We have installed the ice sheet broadband seismograph station, called ICE-S (DK.ICESG) in June 2011, in collaboration with IRIS Polar Services under the GreenLand Ice Sheet monitoring Network (GLISN), which is a new, international, broadband seismic capability for Greenland being implemented through the collaboration between Denmark, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Norway, Poland, Switzerland, and the USA. The primary purpose of GLISN project is to define the fine structure and detailed mechanisms of glacial earthquakes within the Greenland Ice Sheet. These glacial earthquakes in the magnitude range 4.6-5.1 may be modeled as a large glacial ice mass sliding downhill several meters on its basal surface over duration of 30 to 60 seconds. Glacial earthquakes have been observed at seismic stations within Greenland (Larsen et al, 2006), but the coverage was very sparse and a broadband, real-time seismic network was needed to be installed throughout Greenland's Ice Sheet and perimeter. The National Institute for Polar Research and Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology are members of GLISN project and we have started to operate ICESG station since 2011. The station is equipped with a CMG-3T broadband seismometer and a Quanterra Q330 data logger. We have visited the station again in May, 2012 and successfully retrieved one year of continuous records from the broadband seismometer and updated the telemetry system to eventually allow real time monitoring of the station. ICESG station is now daily sending 1 Hz continuous data over the iridium satellite system using RUDICS. The observed three component seismograms demonstrate that the quality of this ice sheet station is good enough to record not only local earthquakes around Greeland but also teleseismic earthquakes. We could record three component broadband seismograms for April 11, 2012 Off the west coast of Northern Sumatra earthquake (Mw8.6). These seismograms show high signal to noise ratio

  12. Spatial variation of eddy-diffusion coefficients in the turbulent plasma sheet during substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stepanova

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Study of the plasma turbulence in the central plasma sheet was performed using the Interball-Tail satellite data. Fluctuations of the plasma bulk velocity in the plasma sheet were deduced from the measurements taken by the Corall instrument for different levels of geomagnetic activity and different locations inside the plasma sheet. The events that satisfied the following criteria were selected for analysis: number density 0.1–10 cm−3, ion temperature T≥0.3 keV, and average bulk velocity ≤100 km/s. It was found that the plasma sheet flow generally appears to be strongly turbulent, i.e. is dominated by fluctuations that are unpredictable. Corresponding eddy-diffusion coefficients in Y- and Z-direction in the GSM coordinate system were derived using the autocorrelation time and rms velocity. Statistical studies of variation of the eddy-diffusion coefficients with the location inside the plasma sheet showed a significant increase in these coefficients in the tailward direction. During substorms this dependence shows strong increase of eddy-diffusion in the central part of the plasma sheet at the distances of 10–30 Earth's radii. This effect is much stronger for Y-components of the eddy-diffusion coefficient, which could be related to the geometry of the plasma sheet, allowing more room for development of eddies in this direction.

  13. A statistical study on the correlations between plasma sheet and solar wind based on DSP explorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Q. Yan

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available By using the data of two spacecraft, TC-1 and ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer, a statistical study on the correlations between plasma sheet and solar wind has been carried out. The results obtained show that the plasma sheet at geocentric distances of about 9~13.4 Re has an apparent driving relationship with the solar wind. It is found that (1 there is a positive correlation between the duskward component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF and the duskward component of the geomagnetic field in the plasma sheet, with a proportionality constant of about 1.09. It indicates that the duskward component of the IMF can effectively penetrate into the near-Earth plasma sheet, and can be amplified by sunward convection in the corresponding region at geocentric distances of about 9~13.4 Re; (2 the increase in the density or the dynamic pressure of the solar wind will generally lead to the increase in the density of the plasma sheet; (3 the ion thermal pressure in the near-Earth plasma sheet is significantly controlled by the dynamic pressure of solar wind; (4 under the northward IMF condition, the ion temperature and ion thermal pressure in the plasma sheet decrease as the solar wind speed increases. This feature indicates that plasmas in the near-Earth plasma sheet can come from the magnetosheath through the LLBL. Northward IMF is one important condition for the transport of the cold plasmas of the magnetosheath into the plasma sheet through the LLBL, and fast solar wind will enhance such a transport process.

  14. THIN CURRENT SHEETS AND ASSOCIATED ELECTRON HEATING IN TURBULENT SPACE PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chasapis, A.; Retinò, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Canu, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, F-91128 (France); Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden); Sundkvist, D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Greco, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria (Italy); Sorriso-Valvo, L., E-mail: alexandros.chasapis@lpp.polytechnique.fr [IMIP-CNR, U.O.S. LICRYL di Cosenza (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Intermittent structures, such as thin current sheets, are abundant in turbulent plasmas. Numerical simulations indicate that such current sheets are important sites of energy dissipation and particle heating occurring at kinetic scales. However, direct evidence of dissipation and associated heating within current sheets is scarce. Here, we show a new statistical study of local electron heating within proton-scale current sheets by using high-resolution spacecraft data. Current sheets are detected using the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) method which identifies regions of strong intermittency. We find that strong electron heating occurs in high PVI (>3) current sheets while no significant heating occurs in low PVI cases (<3), indicating that the former are dominant for energy dissipation. Current sheets corresponding to very high PVI (>5) show the strongest heating and most of the time are consistent with ongoing magnetic reconnection. This suggests that reconnection is important for electron heating and dissipation at kinetic scales in turbulent plasmas.

  15. A study of the formation and dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet using ion composition data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1994-01-01

    Over two years of data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft, covering ion energies between 100 eV/e and about 16 keV/e, have been analyzed in an attempt to extract new information about three geophysical issues: (1) solar wind penetration of the Earth's magnetic tail; (2) relationship between plasma sheet and tail lobe ion composition; and (3) possible effects of heavy terrestrial ions on plasma sheet stability.

  16. Plasma-filled rippled wall rectangular backward wave oscillator driven by sheet electron beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Hadap; J Mondal; K C Mittal; K P Maheshwari

    2011-03-01

    Performance of the backward wave oscillator (BWO) is greatly enhanced with the introduction of plasma. Linear theory of the dispersion relation and the growth rate have been derived and analysed numerically for plasma-filled rippled wall rectangular waveguide driven by sheet electron beam. To see the effect of plasma on the TM01 cold wave structure mode and on the generated frequency, the parameters used are: relativistic factor = 1.5 (i.e. / = 0.741), average waveguide height 0 = 1.445 cm, axial corrugation period 0 = 1.67 cm, and corrugation amplitude = 0.225 cm. The plasma density is varied from zero to 2 × 1012 cm-3. The presence of plasma tends to raise the TM01 mode cut-off frequency (14 GH at 2 × 1012 cm-3 plasma density) relative to the vacuum cut-off frequency (5 GH) which also causes a decrease in the group velocity everywhere, resulting in a flattening of the dispersion relation. With the introduction of plasma, an enhancement in absolute instability was observed.

  17. Three-dimensional particle simulation of plasma instabilities and collisionless reconnection in a current sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Ritoku; Sato, Tetsuya [Theory and Computer Simulation Center, National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Generation of anomalous resistivity and dynamical development of collisionless reconnection in the vicinity of a magnetically neutral sheet are investigated by means of a three-dimensional particle simulation. For no external driving source, two different types of plasma instabilities are excited in the current layer. The lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) is observed to grow in the periphery of current layer in an early period, while a drift kink instability (DKI) is triggered at the neutral sheet in a late period as a result of the nonlinear deformation of the current sheet by the LHDI. A reconnection electric field grows at the neutral sheet in accordance with the excitation of the DKI. When an external driving field exists, the convective electric field penetrates into the current layer through the particle kinetic effect and collisionless reconnection is triggered by the convective electric field earlier than the DKI is excited. It is also found that the anisotropic ion distribution is formed through the anomalous ion heating by the DKI. (author)

  18. Modeling the effect of doping on the catalyst-assisted growth and field emission properties of plasma-grown graphene sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Neha; Sharma, Suresh C.; Sharma, Rinku [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University (DTU), Shahbad Daulatpur, Bawana Road, Delhi-110042 (India)

    2016-08-15

    A theoretical model describing the effect of doping on the plasma-assisted catalytic growth of graphene sheet has been developed. The model accounts the charging rate of the graphene sheet, kinetics of all the plasma species, including the doping species, and the growth rate of graphene nuclei and graphene sheet due to surface diffusion, and accretion of ions on the catalyst nanoparticle. Using the model, it is observed that nitrogen and boron doping can strongly influence the growth and field emission properties of the graphene sheet. The results of the present investigation indicate that nitrogen doping results in reduced thickness and shortened height of the graphene sheet; however, boron doping increases the thickness and height of the graphene sheet. The time evolutions of the charge on the graphene sheet and hydrocarbon number density for nitrogen and boron doped graphene sheet have also been examined. The field emission properties of the graphene sheet have been proposed on the basis of the results obtained. It is concluded that nitrogen doped graphene sheet exhibits better field emission characteristics as compared to undoped and boron doped graphene sheet. The results of the present investigation are consistent with the existing experimental observations.

  19. Catapult current sheet relaxation model confirmed by THEMIS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nose, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we show the result of superposed epoch analysis on the THEMIS probe data during the period from November, 2007 to April, 2009 by setting the origin of time axis to the substorm onset determined by Nishimura with THEMIS all sky imager (THEMS/ASI) data (http://www.atmos.ucla.edu/~toshi/files/paper/Toshi_THEMIS_GBO_list_distribution.xls). We confirmed the presence of earthward flows which can be associated with north-south auroral streamers during the substorm growth phase. At around X = -12 Earth radii (Re), the northward magnetic field and its elevation angle decreased markedly approximately 4 min before substorm onset. A northward magnetic-field increase associated with pre-onset earthward flows was found at around X = -17Re. This variation indicates the occurrence of the local depolarization. Interestingly, in the region earthwards of X = -18Re, earthward flows in the central plasma sheet (CPS) reduced significantly about 3min before substorm onset. However, the earthward flows enhanced again at t = -60 sec in the region around X = -14 Re, and they moved toward the Earth. At t = 0, the dipolarization of the magnetic field started at X ~ -10 Re, and simultaneously the magnetic reconnection started at X ~ -20 Re. Synthesizing these results, we can confirm the validity of our catapult current sheet relaxation model.

  20. Thin Current Sheets and Associated Electron Heating in Turbulent Space Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, A.; Retinò, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Sundkvist, D.; Greco, A.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Canu, P.

    2015-05-01

    Intermittent structures, such as thin current sheets, are abundant in turbulent plasmas. Numerical simulations indicate that such current sheets are important sites of energy dissipation and particle heating occurring at kinetic scales. However, direct evidence of dissipation and associated heating within current sheets is scarce. Here, we show a new statistical study of local electron heating within proton-scale current sheets by using high-resolution spacecraft data. Current sheets are detected using the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) method which identifies regions of strong intermittency. We find that strong electron heating occurs in high PVI (>3) current sheets while no significant heating occurs in low PVI cases (5) show the strongest heating and most of the time are consistent with ongoing magnetic reconnection. This suggests that reconnection is important for electron heating and dissipation at kinetic scales in turbulent plasmas.

  1. Survey of 0.1- to 16-keV/e plasma sheet ion composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, W.; Shelley, E. G.

    1986-03-01

    An analysis is performed of all plasma sheet data collected in 1978-79 in order to discern statistical trends in the data. Attention is focused on the bulk parameters of 0.1-16 keV/e plasma sheet ions detected by the Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE 1 satellite. The data were collected at 10-23 earth radii, and are averaged for various levels of activity in the AE index. Solar H(+) and He(2+) ions dominate during quiet periods and possess energies similar to those of the solar wind when the quiet period lasts several hours. Increasing AE index values eventually lead to a replacement of the solar ions with terrestrial ions, particularly O(+), which can have an average energy density of 3-4 keV/e at every activity level. The solar ions, however, increase in energy as their density decreases. The O(+) density is highest near the local midnight and becomes the most numerous during highly disturbed conditions. Finally, the O(+) density was observed to increase by a factor of three over the monitoring period, possibly due to enhanced solar EUV radiation.

  2. Cluster view of the plasma sheet boundary layer and bursty bulk flow connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. W. Lennartsson

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The high-latitude boundaries of the plasma sheet (PSBL are dynamic latitude zones of recurring and transient (minutes to tens of minutes earthward and magnetic field-aligned bursts of plasma, each being more or less confined in longitude as well, whose ionic component is dominated by protons with flux, energies and density that are consistent with a central plasma sheet (CPS source at varying distance (varying rates of energy time dispersion, sometimes as close as the ~19 RE Cluster apogees, or closer still. The arguably most plausible source consists of so called "bursty bulk flows" (BBFs, i.e. proton bulk flow events with large, positive and bursty GSE vx. Known mainly from CPS observations made at GSE x>−30 RE, the BBF type events probably take place much further downtail as well. What makes the BBFs an especially plausible source are (1 their earthward bulk flow, which helps explain the lack of distinctive latitudinal PSBL energy dispersion, and (2 their association with a transient strong increase of the local tail Bz component ("local dipolarization". The enhanced Bz provides intermittent access to higher latitudes for the CPS plasma, resulting in local density reductions in the tail midplane, as illustrated here by proton data from the Cluster CIS CODIF instruments. Another sign of kinship between the PSBL bursts and the BBFs is their similar spatial fine structure. The PSBL bursts have prominent filaments aligned along the magnetic field with transverse flux gradients that are often characterized by local ~10 keV proton gyroradii scale size (or even smaller, as evidenced by Cluster measurements. The same kind of fine structure is also found during Cluster near-apogee traversals of the tail midplane, as illustrated here and implied by recently published statistics on BBFs obtained with Cluster multipoint observations at varying satellite

  3. Thinning and functionalization of few-layer graphene sheets by CF4 plasma treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2012-05-24

    Structural changes of few-layer graphene sheets induced by CF4 plasma treatment are studied by optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, together with theoretical simulation. Experimental results suggest a thickness reduction of few-layer graphene sheets subjected to prolonged CF4 plasma treatment while plasma treatment with short time only leads to fluorine functionalization on the surface layer by formation of covalent bonds. Raman spectra reveal an increase in disorder by physical disruption of the graphene lattice as well as functionalization during the plasma treatment. The F/CF3 adsorption and the lattice distortion produced are proved by theoretical simulation using density functional theory, which also predicts p-type doping and Dirac cone splitting in CF4 plasma-treated graphene sheets that may have potential in future graphene-based micro/nanodevices.

  4. Bi-directional electrons in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shiokawa

    Full Text Available We have studied the occurrence characteristics of bi-directional electron pitch angle anisotropy (enhanced flux in field-aligned directions, F^ /F|| > 1.5 at energies of 0.1–30 keV using plasma and magnetic field data from the AMPTE/IRM satellite in the near-Earth plasma sheet. The occurrence rate increases in the tailward direction from XGSM = - 9 RE to - 19 RE . The occurrence rate is also enhanced in the midnight sector, and furthermore, whenever the elevation angle of the magnetic field is large while the magnetic field intensity is small, B ~ 15 nT. From these facts, we conclude that the bi-directional electrons in the central plasma sheet are produced mainly in the vicinity of the neutral sheet and that the contribution from ionospheric electrons is minor. A high occurrence is also found after earthward high-speed ion flows, suggesting Fermi-type field-aligned electron acceleration in the neutral sheet. Occurrence characteristics of bi-directional electrons in the plasma sheet boundary layer are also discussed.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; magnetotail; plasma sheet

  5. Study of the turbulence in the central plasma sheet using the CLUSTER satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, M.; Arancibia Riveros, K.; Bosqued, J.; Antonova, E.

    2008-05-01

    Recent studies are shown that the turbulent processes in the space plasmas are very important. It includes the behavior of the plasma sheet plasma during geomagnetic substorms and storms. Study of the plasma turbulence in the central plasma sheet was made using the CLUSTER satellite mission data. For this studies we used the Cluster Ion Spectrometry experiment (CIS), and fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) data for studying fluctuations of the plasma bulk velocity and geomagnetic field fluctuations for different levels of geomagnetic activity and different locations inside the plasma sheet. Case studies for the orbits during quiet geomagnetic conditions, different phases of geomagnetic substroms and storms showed that the properties of plasma turbulence inside the sheet differ significantly for all afore mentioned cases. Variations in the probability distribution functions, flatness factors, local intermittency measure parameters, and eddy diffusion coefficients indicate that the turbulence increases significantly during substorm growth and expansion phases and decreases slowly to the initial level during the recovery phase. It became even stronger during the storm main phase.

  6. Origin of low proton-to-electron temperature ratio in the Earth's plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, E. E.; Kronberg, E. A.; Daly, P. W.; Ganushkina, N. Yu.; Lavraud, B.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2016-10-01

    We study the proton-to-electron temperature ratio (Tp/Te) in the plasma sheet (PS) of the Earth's magnetotail using 5 years of Cluster observations (2001-2005). The PS intervals are searched within a region defined with -19 GSM) under the condition |BX| ≤ 10 nT. One hundred sixty PS crossings are identified. We find an average value of 6.0. However, in many PS intervals Tp/Te varies over a wide range from a few units to several tens of units. In 86 PS intervals the Tp/Te decreases below 3.5. Generally, the decreases of Tp/Te are due to some increase of Te while Tp either decreases or remains unchanged. In the majority of these intervals the Tp/Te drops are observed during magnetotail dipolarizations. A superposed epoch analysis applied to these events shows that the minimum value of Tp/Te is observed after the dipolarization onset during the "turbulent phase" of dipolarization, when a number of transient BZ pulses are reduced, but the value of BZ is still large and an intensification of wave activity is observed. The Tp/Te drops, and associated increases of Te often coincide either with bursts of broadband electrostatic emissions, which may include electron cyclotron harmonics, or with broadband electromagnetic emission in a frequency range from proton plasma frequency (fpp) up to the electron gyrofrequency (fce). These findings show that the wave activity developing in the current sheet after dipolarization onset may play a role in the additional electron heating and the associated Tp/Te decrease.

  7. Multiple harmonic ULF waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer: Instability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, R. E.; Engebretson, M. J.; Keiling, A.; Walsh, A. P.; Gary, S. P.; DéCréAu, P. M. E.; Cattell, C. A.; RèMe, H.

    2010-12-01

    Multiple-harmonic electromagnetic waves in the ULF band have occasionally been observed in Earth's magnetosphere, both near the magnetic equator in the outer plasmasphere and in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) in Earth's magnetotail. Observations by the Cluster spacecraft of multiple-harmonic electromagnetic waves with fundamental frequency near the local proton cyclotron frequency, Ωcp, were recently reported in the plasma sheet boundary layer by Broughton et al. (2008). A companion paper surveys the entire magnetotail passage of Cluster during 2003, and reports 35 such events, all in the PSBL, and all associated with elevated fluxes of counterstreaming ions and electrons. In this study we use observed pitch angle distributions of ions and electrons during a wave event observed by Cluster on 9 September 2003 to perform an instability analysis. We use a semiautomatic procedure for developing model distributions composed of bi-Maxwellian components that minimizes the difference between modeled and observed distribution functions. Analysis of wave instability using the WHAMP electromagnetic plasma wave dispersion code and these model distributions reveals an instability near Ωcp and its harmonics. The observed and model ion distributions exhibit both beam-like and ring-like features which might lead to instability. Further instability analysis with simple beam-like and ring-like model distribution functions indicates that the instability is due to the ring-like feature. Our analysis indicates that this instability persists over an enormous range in the effective ion beta (based on a best fit for the observed distribution function using a single Maxwellian distribution), β', but that the character of the instability changes with β'. For β' of order unity (for instance, the observed case with β' ˜ 0.4), the instability is predominantly electromagnetic; the fluctuating magnetic field has components in both the perpendicular and parallel directions, but the

  8. Evolution and structure of the plasma of current sheets forming in two-dimensional magnetic fields with a null line at low initial gas ionization and their interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskaya, G. V.; Frank, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    An analysis of the experimental data obtained by holographic interferometry in our work [1] makes it possible to explain most of the observed specific features of the structure and evolution of the plasma sheets developing in a two-dimensional magnetic field with a null line in a plasma with a low initial degree of ionization (≈10-4). The following two processes are shown to play a key role here: additional gas ionization in an electric field and the peculiarities of plasma dynamics in a current sheet expanding in time.

  9. Thermal Structure and Dynamics in Supra-arcade Downflows and Flare Plasma Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, K.; Hanneman, W.; Freed, M.; McKenzie, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    During a long duration solar flare, a hot plasma sheet is commonly formed above the flare loops. Often produced within this sheet are down-flowing voids referred to as supra-arcade downflows, thought to be the products of a patchy reconnection process. Models differ on the question of whether the downflows should be hotter than the surrounding plasma or not. We use imaging data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA to determine the thermal structure of the plasma sheet and downflows. We find that the temperatures of the plasma within the downflows are either roughly the same as or lower than the surrounding fan plasma. This result implies that a mechanism for forming the voids that involves a sunward directed hydrodynamic shock pattern combined with perpendicular magnetic shock is unlikely. Additionally, we use the high cadence AIA data to trace the velocity fields in these regions through the use of a local correlation tracking algorithm. Through these measurements, we can determine areas of diverging velocity fields, as well as velocity shear fields and correlate them with temperature changes in order to understand the heating mechanisms in the plasma sheet. This work is supported by under contract SP02H1701R from Lockheed-Martin to SAO, contract NNM07AB07C from NASA to SAO and NASA grant numbers NNX13AG54G and NNX14AD43G

  10. Anisotropic Equilibrium and Ballooning Mode Analysis in the Tail Plasma Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Young

    This thesis is a theoretical study about the Earth's tail plasma sheet with regard to two aspects: the equilibrium structure for the anisotropic pressure, and the ideal-MHD ballooning stability. By adopting a stretched magnetotail model where ion motions are generally nonadiabatic, and assuming that the anisotropy resides only in the electron pressure tensor, it is shown that the magnetic field lines with rm p_| > p_| are less stretched than the isotropic cases. As the parallel pressure p_| exceeds the perpendicular pressure p_| approaching the conventional marginal firehose limit, rm p_| = p{_ |} + B^2/ mu_0, the magnetic field lines are more and more stretched. It is also shown that the current density is highly enhanced at the same limit, a situation that might be subject to a microscopic instability. However, we also emphasize that such an enhancement in the current density is heavily localized near the z = 0 plane, and thus it is unclear if such a microscopic instability can significantly alter the global configuration of the tail. It is further argued, in terms of the radius of the field curvature versus the particle's gyroradius, that the conventional adiabatic description of electrons may become questionable, very close to the conventional marginal firehose limit. To study the ideal-MHD ballooning mode, we first adopt a hard ionospheric boundary condition where the perturbation is required to vanish at the ionospheric foot points. For such a hard boundary condition, an "untypical" magnetic field configuration is found to be unstable to a ballooning mode that is antisymmetric about the equatorial plane while most of the "typical" tail plasma-sheet configurations are stable against the ideal-MHD ballooning mode. The unstable magnetic field model, however, does not look like the average observation-based model, but rather resembles some of the characteristics of the steady-state magnetic field models by Hau (1989, 1991). In addition, a physical argument is

  11. The Sentinel-1 Mission: New Opportunities for Ice Sheet Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Nagler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Sentinel satellite constellation series, developed by the European Space Agency, represents the dedicated space component of the European Copernicus program, committed to long-term operational services in a wide range of application domains. Here, we address the potential of the Sentinel-1 mission for mapping and monitoring the surface velocity of glaciers and ice sheets. We present an ice velocity map of Greenland, derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR data acquired in winter 2015 by Sentinel-1A, the first satellite of the Copernicus program in orbit. The map is assembled from about 900 SAR scenes acquired in Interferometric Wide swath (IW mode, applying the offset tracking technique. We discuss special features of IW mode data, describe the procedures for producing ice velocity maps, and assess the uncertainty of the ice motion product. We compare the Sentinel-1 ice motion product with velocity maps derived from high resolution SAR data of the TerraSAR-X mission and from PALSAR data. Beyond supporting operational services, the Sentinel-1 mission offers enhanced capabilities for comprehensive and long-term observation of key climate variables, such as the motion of ice masses.

  12. Survey of 0. 1- to 16-keV/e plasma sheet ion composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennartsson, W.; Shelley, E.G.

    1986-03-01

    A large statistical survey of the 0.1- to 16-keV/e plasma sheet ion composition has been carried out using data obtained by the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE 1 between 10 and 23 R/sub E/ during 1978 and 1979. This survey includes more than 10 times the quantity of data used in earlier studies of the same topic and makes it possible to investigate in finer detail the relationship between the ion composition and the substorm activity. The larger data base also makes it possible for the first time to study the spatial distribution of the principal ion species. As found in previous studies, the ion composition has a large variance at any given value of the AE index, but a number of distinct trends emerge when the data are averaged at each activity level. During quiet conditions the plasma sheet is dominated by ions of solar origin (H/sup +/ and He/sup + +/), as found in earlier studies, and these ions are most numerous during extended periods of very low activity (AE< or approx. =30 ..gamma..). The quiet time density of these ions is particularly large in the flanks of the plasma sheet (GSM Yapprox. +- 10 R/sub E/), where it is about twice as large as it is near the central axis of the plasma sheet (Y = Z = 0). In contrast, the energy of these ions peaks near the central axis.

  13. Early results of microwave transmission experiments through an overly dense rectangular plasma sheet with microparticle injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Eric D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2014-06-01

    These experiments utilize a linear hollow cathode to create a dense, rectangular plasma sheet to simulate the plasma layer surrounding vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities within the Earth's atmosphere. Injection of fine dielectric microparticles significantly reduces the electron density and therefore lowers the electron plasma frequency by binding a significant portion of the bulk free electrons to the relatively massive microparticles. Measurements show that microwave transmission through this previously overly dense, impenetrable plasma layer increases with the injection of alumina microparticles approximately 60 μm in diameter. This method of electron depletion is a potential means of mitigating the radio communications blackout experienced by hypersonic vehicles.

  14. Oxygen plasma-treated thermoresponsive polymer surfaces for cell sheet engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazunori; Fujita, Hideaki; Nagamori, Eiji

    2010-06-01

    Although cell sheet tissue engineering is a potent and promising method for tissue engineering, an increase of mechanical strength of a cell sheet is needed for easy manipulation of it during transplantation or 3D tissue fabrication. Previously, we developed a cell sheet-polymer film complex that had enough mechanical strength that can be manipulated even by tweezers (Fujita et al., 2009. Biotechnol Bioeng 103(2): 370-377). We confirmed the polymer film involving a temperature sensitive polymer and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins could be removed by lowering temperature after transplantation, and its potential use in regenerative medicine was demonstrated. However, the use of ECM proteins conflicted with high stability in long-term storage and low cost. In the present study, to overcome these drawbacks, we employed the oxygen plasma treatment instead of using the ECM proteins. A cast and dried film of thermoresponsive poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAAm) was fabricated and treated with high-intensity oxygen plasma. The cells became possible to adhere to the oxygen plasma-treated PNIPAAm surface, whereas could not to the inherent surface of bulk PNIPAAm without treatment. Characterizations of the treated surface revealed the surface had high stability. The surface roughness, wettability, and composition were changed, depending on the plasma intensity. Interestingly, although bulk PNIPAAm layer had thermoresponsiveness and dissolved below lower critical solution temperature (LCST), it was found that the oxygen plasma-treated PNIPAAm surface lost its thermoresponsiveness and remained insoluble in water below LCST as a thin layer. Skeletal muscle C2C12 cells could be cultured on the oxygen plasma-treated PNIPAAm surface, a skeletal muscle cell sheet with the insoluble thin layer could be released in the medium, and thus the possibility of use of the cell sheet for transplantation was demonstrated.

  15. Long-term variations in the plasma sheet ion composition and substorm occurrence over 23 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosé, Masahito

    2016-12-01

    The Geotail satellite has been operating for almost two solar cycles (~23 years) since its launch in July 1992. The satellite carries the energetic particle and ion composition (EPIC) instrument that measures the energetic ion flux (9.4-212 keV/e) and enables the investigation of long-term variations of the ion composition in the plasma sheet for solar cycles 22-24. From the statistical analysis of the EPIC data, we find that (1) the plasma ion mass ( M) is approximately 1.1 amu during the solar minimum, whereas it increases to 1.5-2.7 amu during the solar maximum; (2) the increases in M seem to have two components: a raising of the baseline levels (~1.5 amu) and a large transient enhancement (~1.8-2.7 amu); (3) the baseline level change of M correlates well with the Mg II index, which is a good proxy for the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) or far ultraviolet (FUV) irradiance; and (4) the large transient enhancement of M is caused by strong magnetic storms. We also study the long-term variations of substorm occurrences in 1992-2015 that are evaluated with the number of Pi2 pulsations detected at the Kakioka observatory. The results suggest no clear correlation between the substorm occurrence and the Mg II index. Instead, when the substorms are classified into externally triggered events and non-triggered events, the number of the non-triggered events and the Mg II index are negatively correlated. We interpret these results that the increase in the solar EUV/FUV radiation enhances the supply of ionospheric ions (He+ and O+ ions) into the plasma sheet to increase M, and the large M may suppress spontaneous plasma instabilities initiating substorms and decrease the number of the non-triggered substorms. The present analysis using the unprecedentedly long-term dataset covering ~23 years provides additional observational evidence that heavy ions work to prevent the occurrence of substorms.

  16. Role of magnetic field fluctuations in the Evolution of the kappa Distribution Functions in the Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Cristobal; Antonova, Elizaveta; Stepanova, Marina; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The evolution with the distance to Earth of ion and electron distribution functions in the plasma sheet, approximated by kappa distributions, was studied by Stepanova and Antonova (2015, JGRA 120). Using THEMIS data for 5 events of satellite alignments along the tail, covering between 5 and 30 Earth radii, they found that the kappa parameter increases tailwards, for both ions and electrons. In this work we analyse the magnetic fluctuations present in THEMIS data for the same 5 events. The aim is to explore the hypothesis proposed by Navarro et al. (2014, PRL 112), for solar wind plasmas, that the observed magnetic fluctuations could be closely related to spontaneous fluctuations in the plasma, if this can be described by stable distributions. Here we present our first results on the correlation between the spectral properties of the magnetic fluctuations and the observed parameters of the kappa distributions for different distances from Earth.

  17. Plasma Sheet Actuator Driven by Repetitive Nanosecond Pulses with a Negative DC Component

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋慧敏; 张乔根; 李应红; 贾敏; 吴云; 梁华

    2012-01-01

    A type of electrical discharge called sliding discharge was developed to generate plasma aerodynamic actuation for flow control. A three-electrode plasma sheet actuator driven by repetitive nanosecond pulses with a negative DC component was used to generate sliding discharge, which can be called nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge. The phenomenology and behaviour of the plasma sheet actuator were investigated experimentally. Discharge morphology shows that the formation of nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge is dependent on the peak value of the repetitive nanosecond pulses and negative DC component applied on the plasma sheet actuator. Compared to dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), the extension of plasma in nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge is quasi-diffusive, stable, longer and more intensive. Test results of particle image velocimetry demonstrate that the negative DC component applied to a third electrode could significantly modify the topology of the flow induced by nanosecond-pulse DBD. Body force induced by the nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge can be approximately in the order of mN. Both the maximum velocity and the body force induced by sliding discharge increase significantly as compared to single DBD. Therefore, nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge is a preferable plasma aerodynamic actuation generation mode, which is very promising in the field of aerodynamics.

  18. Plasmoid ejection and secondary current sheet generation from magnetic reconnection in laser-plasma interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Quan-Li; Wang, Shou-Jun; Lu, Quan-Ming; Huang, Can; Yuan, Da-Wei; Liu, Xun; Lin, Xiao-Xuan; Li, Yu-Tong; Wei, Hui-Gang; Zhong, Jia-Yong; Shi, Jian-Rong; Jiang, Shao-En; Ding, Yong-Kun; Jiang, Bo-Bin; Du, Kai; He, Xian-Tu; Yu, M Y; Liu, C S; Wang, Shui; Tang, Yong-Jian; Zhu, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Gang; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2012-05-25

    Reconnection of the self-generated magnetic fields in laser-plasma interaction was first investigated experimentally by Nilson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 255001 (2006)] by shining two laser pulses a distance apart on a solid target layer. An elongated current sheet (CS) was observed in the plasma between the two laser spots. In order to more closely model magnetotail reconnection, here two side-by-side thin target layers, instead of a single one, are used. It is found that at one end of the elongated CS a fanlike electron outflow region including three well-collimated electron jets appears. The (>1 MeV) tail of the jet energy distribution exhibits a power-law scaling. The enhanced electron acceleration is attributed to the intense inductive electric field in the narrow electron dominated reconnection region, as well as additional acceleration as they are trapped inside the rapidly moving plasmoid formed in and ejected from the CS. The ejection also induces a secondary CS.

  19. Fractal Structure of the Heliospheric Plasma Sheet at the Earth's Orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. V. Eselevich; V. G. Eselevich

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the data from the Wind and IMP-8 spacecraft revealed that a slow solar wind,flowing in the heliospheric plasma sheet, represents a set of magnetic tubes with plasma of increased density(N > 10cm-3 at the Earth's orbit). They have a fine structure at several spatial scales (fractality), from2°-3° (at the Earth's orbit, it is equivalent to 3.6-5.4 h, or(5.4-8.0) × 106 km) to the minimum about0.025°, i.e. the angular siz.e of the nested tubes is changed nearly by two orders of magnitude. The magnetic tubes at each observed spatial scale are diamagnetic, i.e. their surface sustains a flow of diamagnetic (or drift)current that decreases the magnetic field within the tube itself and increases it outside the tube. Furthermore,the value of β = 8π[N(Te + Tp)]/B2 within the tube exceeds the value of β outside the tube. In many cases total pressure P = N(Te + Tp) + B2/8π is almost constant within and outside the tubes at any one of the aforementioned scales.

  20. Cluster observes formation of high-beta plasma blobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Haerendel

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Late in a sequence of four moderate substorms on 26 July 2001, Cluster observed periods of a few minutes durations of high-beta plasma events (B<10nT, β=2-30, connected with dipolarizations of the magnetic field. Cluster was located near 02:45 MLT, at R=19RE and at about 5°N GSM. These events began late in the recovery phase of the second and about 5min before onset of the third substorm and lasted for three hours, way beyond the recovery phase of the fourth substorm. The most remarkable observation is that the onset coincided with the arrival of energetic (E~7keV O+ ions and energetic electrons obviously from the ionosphere, which tended to dominate the plasma composition throughout the remaining time. The magnetic flux and plasma transport is continuously directed equatorward and earthward, with oscillatory east-west movements superposed. Periods of the order of 5-10min and strong correlations between the magnetic elevation angle and log β (correlation coefficient 0.78 are highly reminiscent of the high-beta plasma blobs discovered with Equator-S and Geotail between 9 and 11RE in the late night/early morning sector (Haerendel et al., 1999.

    We conclude that Cluster observed the plasma blob formation in the tail plasma sheet, which seems to occur predominantly in the recovery and post-recovery phases of substorms. This is consistent with the finding of Equator-S and Geotail. The origin is a pulsed earthward plasma transport with velocity amplitudes of only several tens of km/s.

  1. On the plasma-based growth of ‘flowing’ graphene sheets at atmospheric pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganov, D.; Bundaleska, N.; Tatarova, E.; Dias, A.; Henriques, J.; Rego, A.; Ferraria, A.; Abrashev, M. V.; Dias, F. M.; Luhrs, C. C.; Phillips, J.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical and experimental study on atmospheric pressure microwave plasma-based assembly of free standing graphene sheets is presented. The synthesis method is based on introducing a carbon-containing precursor (C2H5OH) through a microwave (2.45 GHz) argon plasma environment, where decomposition of ethanol molecules takes place and carbon atoms and molecules are created and then converted into solid carbon nuclei in the ‘colder’ nucleation zones. A theoretical model previously developed has been further updated and refined to map the particle and thermal fluxes in the plasma reactor. Considering the nucleation process as a delicate interplay between thermodynamic and kinetic factors, the model is based on a set of non-linear differential equations describing plasma thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. The model predictions were validated by experimental results. Optical emission spectroscopy was applied to detect the plasma emission related to carbon species from the ‘hot’ plasma zone. Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques have been applied to analyze the synthesized nanostructures. The microstructural features of the solid carbon nuclei collected from the colder zones of plasma reactor vary according to their location. A part of the solid carbon was deposited on the discharge tube wall. The solid assembled from the main stream, which was gradually withdrawn from the hot plasma region in the outlet plasma stream directed to a filter, was composed by ‘flowing’ graphene sheets. The influence of additional hydrogen, Ar flow rate and microwave power on the concentration of obtained stable species and carbon-dicarbon was evaluated. The ratio of sp3/sp2 carbons in graphene sheets is presented. A correlation between changes in C2 and C number densities and sp3/sp2 ratio was found.

  2. Kink-like mode of a double gradient instability in a compressible plasma current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovinskiy, D.B.; Ivanova, V.V.; Erkaev, N.V.; Semenov, V.S.; Ivanov, I.B.; Biernat, H.K.; Zellinger, M.

    2011-01-01

    A linear MHD instability of the electric current sheet, characterized by a small normal magnetic field component, varying along the sheet, is investigated. The tangential magnetic field component is modeled by a hyperbolic function, describing Harris-like variations of the field across the sheet. For this problem, which is formulated in a 3D domain, the conventional compressible ideal MHD equations are applied. By assuming Fourier harmonics along the electric current, the linearized 3D equations are reduced to 2D ones. A finite difference numerical scheme is applied to examine the time evolution of small initial perturbations of the plasma parameters. This work is an extended numerical study of the so called “double gradient instability”, – a possible candidate for the explanation of flapping oscillations in the magnetotail current sheet, which has been analyzed previously in the framework of a simplified analytical approach for an incompressible plasma. The dispersion curve is obtained for the kink-like mode of the instability. It is shown that this curve demonstrates a quantitative agreement with the previous analytical result. The development of the instability is investigated also for various enhanced values of the normal magnetic field component. It is found that the characteristic values of the growth rate of the instability shows a linear dependence on the square root of the parameter, which scales uniformly the normal component of the magnetic field in the current sheet. PMID:22053125

  3. A study of the formation and dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet using ion composition data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennartsson, O.W.

    1994-04-01

    Over two years of data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft, covering ion energies between 100 eV/e and about 16 keV/e, have been analyzed in an attempt to extract new information about three geophysical issues: (1) solar wind penetration of the Earth's magnetic tail; (2) relationship between plasma sheet and tail lobe ion composition; and (3) possible effects of heavy terrestrial ions on plasma sheet stability.

  4. Observations of Magnetic Reconnection and Plasma Dynamics in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBraccio, Gina A.

    Mercury's magnetosphere is formed as a result of the supersonic solar wind interacting with the planet's intrinsic magnetic field. The combination of the weak planetary dipole moment and intense solar wind forcing of the inner heliosphere creates a unique space environment, which can teach us about planetary magnetospheres. In this work, we analyze the first in situ orbital observations at Mercury, provided by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. Magnetic reconnection and the transport of plasma and magnetic flux are investigated using MESSENGER Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer measurements. Here, we report our results on the effect of magnetic reconnection and plasma dynamics on Mercury's space environment: (1) Mercury's magnetosphere is driven by frequent, intense magnetic reconnection observed in the form of magnetic field components normal to the magnetopause, BN, and as helical bundles of flux, called magnetic flux ropes, in the cross-tail current sheet. The high reconnection rates are determined to be a direct consequence of the low plasma beta, the ratio of plasma to magnetic pressure, in the inner heliosphere. (2) As upstream solar wind conditions vary, we find that reconnection occurs at Mercury's magnetopause for all orientations of the interplanetary magnetic field, independent of shear angle. During the most extreme solar wind forcing events, the influence of induction fields generated within Mercury's highly conducting core are negated by erosion due to persistent magnetopause reconnection. (3) We present the first observations of Mercury's plasma mantle, which forms as a result of magnetopause reconnection and allows solar wind plasma to enter into the high-latitude magnetotail through the dayside cusps. The energy dispersion observed in the plasma mantle protons is used to infer the cross-magnetosphere electric field, providing a direct measurement of solar wind momentum

  5. Observation of multilayer graphene sheets using terahertz phase contrast microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ZHIKUN LIU; YANAN XIE; LI GENG; DENGKE PAN; PAN SONG

    2017-01-01

    Although it is important for the study of graphene, identifying and characterizing the number of graphene layers is challenging. In this paper, we calculate graphene’s transmission.The result shows that the phase change is more sensitive than the intensity change when light passes through graphene in some THz frequencies. Based on this fact, a simple route is presented for identifying the single or few layers of graphene sheets by using terahertz phase contrast microscopy (TPCM). The route is fast, and easy to be carried out.

  6. Effect of the initial plasma parameters on the structure of the current sheets developing in two-dimensional magnetic fields with a null line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskaya, G. V.; Frank, A. G.; Bogdanov, S. Yu.

    2010-07-01

    The effect of the initial plasma parameters on the structure of the plasma of the current sheets that form in two-dimensional magnetic fields with a null line is studied by holographic interferometry. The evolution of the plasma sheets that develop in an initial low-density plasma, where a gas is mainly ionized by a pulse current passing through the plasma and initiating the formation of a current sheet, has been comprehensively studied for the first time. At the early stage of evolution, the spatial structure of such a plasma sheet differs substantially from the classic current sheets forming in a dense plasma. Nevertheless, extended plasma sheets with similar parameters form eventually irrespective of the initial plasma density.

  7. Plasma sheet ion composition at various levels of geomagnetic and solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, W.

    1987-08-01

    The data obtained in the earth's plasma sheet by the Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE-1 spacecraft are briefly reexamined. The data are shown in the form of statistically averaged bulk parameters for the four major ions H(+), He(2+), He(+), and O(+) to illustrate the apparent mixture of solar and terrestrial ions, a mixture that varies with geomagnetic and other conditions. Some major differences in the statistical properties of different ions, which may have a bearing on the physics of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction, are highlighted.

  8. Sounding of the plasma sheet in the deep geomagnetic tail using energetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, P.W.; Wenzel, K.; Sanderson, T.R.

    1984-10-01

    Energetic ions (E>35 keV) at 90/sup 0/ to the magnetic field line are measured on ISEE-3 in the distant geomagnetic tail and are used as tracers of the particle density during two encounters with the plasma sheet at 210 and 128 earth radii from the earth. Because of the finite gyroradius (2400 km) of these (assumed) protons, different orientation about the magnetic field measure the intensity of different locations, allowing a separation of spatial from temporal variations. Density contour maps of the plasma hseet are constructed, demonstrating the wavy nature of this regime, as well as the existence of density layers within it.

  9. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry and Current Sheet Trajectory of a Conical Theta Pinch Pulsed Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Bonds, Kevin W.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented demonstrating the e ect of inductive coil geometry and current sheet trajectory on the exhaust velocity of propellant in conical theta pinch pulsed induc- tive plasma accelerators. The electromagnetic coupling between the inductive coil of the accelerator and a plasma current sheet is simulated, substituting a conical copper frustum for the plasma. The variation of system inductance as a function of plasma position is obtained by displacing the simulated current sheet from the coil while measuring the total inductance of the coil. Four coils of differing geometries were employed, and the total inductance of each coil was measured as a function of the axial displacement of two sep- arate copper frusta both having the same cone angle and length as the coil but with one compressed to a smaller size relative to the coil. The measured relationship between total coil inductance and current sheet position closes a dynamical circuit model that is used to calculate the resulting current sheet velocity for various coil and current sheet con gura- tions. The results of this model, which neglects the pinching contribution to thrust, radial propellant con nement, and plume divergence, indicate that in a conical theta pinch ge- ometry current sheet pinching is detrimental to thruster performance, reducing the kinetic energy of the exhausting propellant by up to 50% (at the upper bound for the parameter range of the study). The decrease in exhaust velocity was larger for coils and simulated current sheets of smaller half cone angles. An upper bound for the pinching contribution to thrust is estimated for typical operating parameters. Measurements of coil inductance for three di erent current sheet pinching conditions are used to estimate the magnetic pressure as a function of current sheet radial compression. The gas-dynamic contribution to axial acceleration is also estimated and shown to not compensate for the decrease in axial electromagnetic acceleration

  10. Multifluid MHD simulation of Saturn's magnetosphere: Dynamics of mass- and momentum-loading, and seasonal variation of the plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendar, A.; Paty, C. S.; Arridge, C. S.; Jackman, C. M.; Smith, H. T.

    2013-12-01

    on the production of new plasma, the resulting radial outflow, and corotation lag profiles. The simulation has produced well-defined interchange fingers, regions of cold inner-magnetosphere plasma that lag corotation and move radially outwards, which are balanced by the inward flow of hot tenuous plasma from the outer magnetosphere. We quantify the rate of interchange finger production, and from these calculate the net outward rate of plasma flow. We then compare simulation output with observational data from the Cassini spacecraft to validate the new physics that we have incorporated. In addition to internal mass production and corotation, we also investigate external driver effects, in particular the seasonal variation of curvature of the plasma sheet.

  11. Relative contributions of terrestrial and solar wind ions in the plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, W.; Sharp, R. D.

    A major uncertainty concerning the origins of plasma sheet ions is due to the fact that terrestrial H(+) can have similar fluxes and energies as H(+) from the solar wind. The situation is especially ambiguous during magnetically quiet conditions (AE less than 60 gamma) when H(+) typically contributes more than 90 percent of the plasma sheet ion population. In this study that problem is examined using a large data set obtained by the ISEE-1 Plasma Composition Experiment. The data suggest that one component of the H(+) increases in energy with increasing activity, roughly in proportion to 1/4 the energy of the He(++), whereas the other H(+) component has about the same energy at all activity levels, as do the O(+) and the He(+). If it is assumed that the H(+) of solar wind origin on the average has about the same energy-per-nucleon as the He(++), which is presumably almost entirely from the solar wind, then the data imply that as much as 20-30 percent of the H(+) can be of terrestrial origin even during quiet conditions.

  12. Relative contributions of terrestrial and solar wind ions in the plasma sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennartsson, W.; Sharp, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    A major uncertainty concerning the origins of plasma sheet ions is due to the fact that terrestrial H(+) can have similar fluxes and energies as H(+) from the solar wind. The situation is especially ambiguous during magnetically quiet conditions (AE less than 60 gamma) when H(+) typically contributes more than 90 percent of the plasma sheet ion population. In this study that problem is examined using a large data set obtained by the ISEE-1 Plasma Composition Experiment. The data suggest that one component of the H(+) increases in energy with increasing activity, roughly in proportion to 1/4 the energy of the He(++), whereas the other H(+) component has about the same energy at all activity levels, as do the O(+) and the He(+). If it is assumed that the H(+) of solar wind origin on the average has about the same energy-per-nucleon as the He(++), which is presumably almost entirely from the solar wind, then the data imply that as much as 20-30 percent of the H(+) can be of terrestrial origin even during quiet conditions.

  13. Observations of the Formation, Development, and Structure of a Current Sheet in an Eruptive Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Seaton, Daniel B; Darnel, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    We present AIA observations of a structure we interpret as a current sheet associated with an X4.9 flare and coronal mass ejection that occurred on 2014~February~25 in NOAA Active Region 11990. We characterize the properties of the current sheet, finding that the sheet remains on the order of a few thousand km thick for much of the duration of the event and that its temperature generally ranged between $8-10\\,\\mathrm{MK}$. We also note the presence of other phenomena believed to be associated with magnetic reconnection in current sheets, including supra-arcade downflows and shrinking loops. We estimate that the rate of reconnection during the event was $M_{A} \\approx 0.004-0.007$, a value consistent with model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this event for reconnection-based eruption models.

  14. Observations of the Formation, Development, and Structure of a Current Sheet in an Eruptive Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, Daniel B.; Bartz, Allison E.; Darnel, Jonathan M.

    2017-02-01

    We present Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of a structure we interpret as a current sheet associated with an X4.9 flare and coronal mass ejection that occurred on 2014 February 25 in NOAA Active Region 11990. We characterize the properties of the current sheet, finding that the sheet remains on the order of a few thousand kilometers thick for much of the duration of the event and that its temperature generally ranged between 8 and 10 MK. We also note the presence of other phenomena believed to be associated with magnetic reconnection in current sheets, including supra-arcade downflows and shrinking loops. We estimate that the rate of reconnection during the event was MA ≈ 0.004–0.007, a value consistent with model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this event for reconnection-based eruption models.

  15. A model of the western Laurentide Ice Sheet, using observations of glacial isostatic adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowan, Evan J.; Tregoning, Paul; Purcell, Anthony; Montillet, Jean-Philippe; McClusky, Simon

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a new numerical model of the late glacial western Laurentide Ice Sheet, constrained by observations of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), including relative sea level indicators, uplift rates from permanent GPS stations, contemporary differential lake level change, and postglacial tilt of glacial lake level indicators. The later two datasets have been underutilized in previous GIA based ice sheet reconstructions. The ice sheet model, called NAICE, is constructed using simple ice physics on the basis of changing margin location and basal shear stress conditions in order to produce ice volumes required to match GIA. The model matches the majority of the observations, while maintaining a relatively realistic ice sheet geometry. Our model has a peak volume at 18,000 yr BP, with a dome located just east of Great Slave Lake with peak thickness of 4000 m, and surface elevation of 3500 m. The modelled ice volume loss between 16,000 and 14,000 yr BP amounts to about 7.5 m of sea level equivalent, which is consistent with the hypothesis that a large portion of Meltwater Pulse 1A was sourced from this part of the ice sheet. The southern part of the ice sheet was thin and had a low elevation profile. This model provides an accurate representation of ice thickness and paleo-topography, and can be used to assess present day uplift and infer past climate.

  16. Relationship between FAC at plasma sheet boundary layers and AE index during storms from August to October,2001

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUNLOP; M

    2008-01-01

    Unlike the previous single (dual) satellite observation, the four ClusterII satellites make it possible to directly compute the continuous field-aligned current (FAC) density according to the magnetic data from them and to enable the investigation of the relationship between the FAC and geomagnetic activity. This paper analyzes the observation data when the Cluster satellites crossed the plasma sheet bound- ary layer (PSBL) in the magnetotail during the two magnetic storms in August to October 2001. According to the data, during the magnetic storms the relationship between the variations of FAC and AE index turned out to be: 1) FAC was obviously increasing during the storms; 2) FAC density was approximately negatively corre- lated with AE index from the sudden commencement to the early main phase of the storm; 3) they were approximately positively correlated during the late main phase and early recovery phase; 4) they were no apparent correlation during the late re- covery phase.

  17. Piezoresistive Effect in Plasma-Doping of Graphene Sheet for High-Performance Flexible Pressure Sensing Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniff, M A S M; Hafiz, S M; Huang, N M; Rahman, S A; Wahid, K A A; Syono, M I; Azid, I A

    2017-05-03

    This paper presents a straightforward plasma treatment modification of graphene with an enhanced piezoresistive effect for the realization of a high-performance pressure sensor. The changes in the graphene in terms of its morphology, structure, chemical composition, and electrical properties after the NH3/Ar plasma treatment were investigated in detail. Through a sufficient plasma treatment condition, our studies demonstrated that plasma-treated graphene sheet exhibits a significant increase in sensitivity by one order of magnitude compared to that of the unmodified graphene sheet. The plasma-doping introduced nitrogen (N) atoms inside the graphene structure and was found to play a significant role in enhancing the pressure sensing performance due to the tunneling behavior from the localized defects. The high sensitivity and good robustness demonstrated by the plasma-treated graphene sensor suggest a promising route for simple, low-cost, and ultrahigh resolution flexible sensors.

  18. A Theoretical Model of Pinching Current Sheet in Low-beta Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Takeshige, Satoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important physical process in various explosive phenomena in the universe. In the previous studies, it was found that fast re- connection takes place when the thickness of a current sheet becomes on the order of a microscopic length such as the ion larmor radius or the ion inertial length. In this study, we investigated the pinching process of a current sheet by the Lorentz force in a low-{\\beta} plasma using one-dimensional magnetohydrodynam- ics (MHD) simulations. It is known that there is an exact self-similar solution for this problem that neglects gas pressure. We compared the non-linear MHD dynamics with the analytic self-similar solution. From the MHD simulations, we found that with the gas pressure included the implosion process deviates from the analytic self-similar solution as t {\\rightarrow} t 0, where t 0 is the explosion time when the thickness of a current sheet of the analytic solution becomes 0. We also found a pair of MHD fast-mode shocks are generated and propaga...

  19. An exact collisionless equilibrium for the Force-Free Harris Sheet with low plasma beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allanson, O., E-mail: oliver.allanson@st-andrews.ac.uk; Neukirch, T., E-mail: tn3@st-andrews.ac.uk; Wilson, F., E-mail: fw237@st-andrews.ac.uk; Troscheit, S., E-mail: s.troscheit@st-andrews.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    We present a first discussion and analysis of the physical properties of a new exact collisionless equilibrium for a one-dimensional nonlinear force-free magnetic field, namely, the force-free Harris sheet. The solution allows any value of the plasma beta, and crucially below unity, which previous nonlinear force-free collisionless equilibria could not. The distribution function involves infinite series of Hermite polynomials in the canonical momenta, of which the important mathematical properties of convergence and non-negativity have recently been proven. Plots of the distribution function are presented for the plasma beta modestly below unity, and we compare the shape of the distribution function in two of the velocity directions to a Maxwellian distribution.

  20. An exact collisionless equilibrium for the Force-Free Harris Sheet with low plasma beta

    CERN Document Server

    Allanson, O; Wilson, F; Troscheit, S

    2015-01-01

    We present a first discussion and analysis of the physical properties of a new exact collisionless equilibrium for a one-dimensional nonlinear force-free magnetic field, namely the Force-Free Harris Sheet. The solution allows any value of the plasma beta, and crucially below unity, which previous nonlinear force-free collisionless equilibria could not. The distribution function involves infinite series of Hermite Polynomials in the canonical momenta, of which the important mathematical properties of convergence and non-negativity have recently been proven. Plots of the distribution function are presented for the plasma beta modestly below unity, and we compare the shape of the distribution function in two of the velocity directions to a Maxwellian distribution.

  1. Greenland surface mass-balance observations from the ice-sheet ablation area and local glaciers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machguth, Horst; Thomsen, Henrik H.; Weidick, Anker

    2016-01-01

    in glacier melt independently from model output. Here, we present a comprehensive database of Greenland glacier surface mass-balance observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. The database spans the 123 a from 1892 to 2015, contains a total of similar to 3000 measurements from......Glacier surface mass-balance measurements on Greenland started more than a century ago, but no compilation exists of the observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. Such data could be used in the evaluation of modelled surface mass balance, or to document changes...

  2. Greenland surface mass-balance observations from the ice-sheet ablation area and local glaciers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machguth, Horst; Thomsen, Henrik H.; Weidick, Anker;

    2016-01-01

    Glacier surface mass-balance measurements on Greenland started more than a century ago, but no compilation exists of the observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. Such data could be used in the evaluation of modelled surface mass balance, or to document changes...... in glacier melt independently from model output. Here, we present a comprehensive database of Greenland glacier surface mass-balance observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. The database spans the 123 a from 1892 to 2015, contains a total of similar to 3000 measurements from...

  3. Observations on Mode I ductile tearing in sheet metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Naaman, Salim Abdallah; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2013-01-01

    testing and comparison with published results. A series of crack propagation tests have been carried out, where cracks are driven many plate thicknesses under global Mode I loading. The current study employs both the edge crack specimen (ECS) loaded in combined in-plane bending and extension......, and the double edge notched tension (DENT) specimen loaded in extension. Clear evidence of the alternating slant failure is observed for a normal strength steel and details on the phenomenon are brought out by grinding and polishing cross-sections in successive steps along the crack growth direction. Moreover...... of void growth (thus severe thinning in the process zone), whereas slanting is typical in high strength materials that rapidly nucleate large populations of smaller voids. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved....

  4. Microfabrication of through holes in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sheets using a laser plasma EUV source (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makimura, Tetsuya; Urai, Hikari; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a material used for cell culture substrates / bio-chips and micro total analysis systems / lab-on-chips due to its flexibility, chemical / thermo-dynamic stability, bio-compatibility, transparency and moldability. For further development, it is inevitable to develop a technique to fabricate precise three dimensional structures on micrometer-scale at high aspect ratio. In the previous works, we reported a technique for high-quality micromachining of PDMS without chemical modification, by means of photo direct machining using laser plasma EUV sources. In the present work, we have investigated fabrication of through holes. The EUV radiations around 10 nm were generated by irradiation of Ta targets with Nd:YAG laser light (10 ns, 500 mJ/pulse). The generated EUV radiations were focused using an ellipsoidal mirror. It has a narrower incident angle than those in the previous works in order to form a EUV beam with higher directivity, so that higher aspect structures can be fabricated. The focused EUV beam was incident on PDMS sheets with a thickness of 15 micrometers, through holes in a contact mask placed on top of them. Using a contact mask with holes with a diameter of three micrometers, complete through holes with a diameter of two micrometers are fabricated in the PDMS sheet. Using a contact mask with two micrometer holes, however, ablation holes almost reaches to the back side of the PDMS sheet. The fabricated structures can be explained in terms of geometrical optics. Thus, we have developed a technique for micromachining of PDMS sheets at high aspect ratios.

  5. Collective dynamics of bursty particle precipitation initiating in the inner and outer plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Donovan, E.; Klimas, A. J.; Spanswick, E.

    2009-02-01

    Using multiscale spatiotemporal analysis of bursty precipitation events in the nighttime aurora as seen by the POLAR UVI instrument, we report a set of new statistical signatures of high- and low-latitude auroral activity, signaling a strongly non-uniform distribution of dissipation mechanism in the plasma sheet. We show that small-scale electron emission events that initiate in the equatorward portion of the nighttime auroral oval (scaling mode A1) have systematically steeper power-law slopes of energy, power, area, and lifetime probability distributions compared to the events that initiate at higher latitudes (mode B). The low-latitude group of events also contain a small but energetically important subpopulation of substorm-scale disturbances (mode A2) described by anomalously low distribution exponents characteristic of barely stable thermodynamic systems that are prone to large-scale sporadic reorganization. The high latitude events (mode organized critical (SOC) behavior. The low- and high latitude events have distinct inter-trigger time statistics, and are characterized by significantly different MLT distributions. Based on these results we conjecture that the inner and outer portions of the plasma sheet are associated with two (or more) mechanisms of collective dynamics that may represent an interplay between current disruption and magnetic reconnection scenarios of bursty energy conversion in the magnetotail.

  6. Restructured graphene sheets embedded carbon film by oxygen plasma etching and its tribological properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Meiling [Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor-Bearing System, School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Diao, Dongfeng, E-mail: dfdiao@szu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Yang, Lei [Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor-Bearing System, School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Fan, Xue [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxygen plasma etching was developed to improve tribological properties of GSEC film. • Etching restructured 3 nm top layer with smaller crystallite size and higher sp{sup 3} fraction. • The etched film had smoother surface, enhanced mechanical properties, longer wear life. • High electrical conductivity and strong magnetism were retained after etching. - Abstract: An oxygen plasma etching technique was introduced for improving the tribological properties of the graphene sheets embedded carbon (GSEC) film in electron cyclotron resonance plasma processing system. The nanostructural changing in the film caused by oxygen plasma etching was examined by transmission electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, showing that the 3 nm thick top surface layer was restructured with smaller graphene nanocrystallite size as well as higher sp{sup 3} bond fraction. The surface roughness, mechanical behavior and tribological properties of the original GSEC and oxygen plasma treated GSEC films were compared. The results indicated that after the oxygen plasma treatment, the average roughness decreased from 20.8 ± 1.1 nm to 1.9 ± 0.1 nm, the hardness increased from 2.3 ± 0.1 GPa to 2.9 ± 0.1 GPa, the nanoscratch depth decreased from 64.5 ± 5.4 nm to 9.9 ± 0.9 nm, and the wear life increased from 930 ± 390 cycles to more than 15,000 frictional cycles. The origin of the improved tribological behavior was ascribed to the 3 nm thick graphene nanocrystallite film. This finding can be expected for wide applications in nanoscale surface engineering.

  7. Cassini observations of ionospheric plasma in Saturn's magnetotail lobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, M; Arridge, C S; Coates, A J; Badman, S V; Dougherty, M K; Jackman, C M; Kurth, W S; Melin, H; Mitchell, D G; Reisenfeld, D B; Sergis, N

    2016-01-01

    Studies of Saturn's magnetosphere with the Cassini mission have established the importance of Enceladus as the dominant mass source for Saturn's magnetosphere. It is well known that the ionosphere is an important mass source at Earth during periods of intense geomagnetic activity, but lesser attention has been dedicated to study the ionospheric mass source at Saturn. In this paper we describe a case study of data from Saturn's magnetotail, when Cassini was located at ≃ 2200 h Saturn local time at 36 RS from Saturn. During several entries into the magnetotail lobe, tailward flowing cold electrons and a cold ion beam were observed directly adjacent to the plasma sheet and extending deeper into the lobe. The electrons and ions appear to be dispersed, dropping to lower energies with time. The composition of both the plasma sheet and lobe ions show very low fluxes (sometimes zero within measurement error) of water group ions. The magnetic field has a swept-forward configuration which is atypical for this region, and the total magnetic field strength is larger than expected at this distance from the planet. Ultraviolet auroral observations show a dawn brightening, and upstream heliospheric models suggest that the magnetosphere is being compressed by a region of high solar wind ram pressure. We interpret this event as the observation of ionospheric outflow in Saturn's magnetotail. We estimate a number flux between (2.95 ± 0.43) × 10(9) and (1.43 ± 0.21) × 10(10) cm(-2) s(-1), 1 or about 2 orders of magnitude larger than suggested by steady state MHD models, with a mass source between 1.4 ×10(2) and 1.1 ×10(3) kg/s. After considering several configurations for the active atmospheric regions, we consider as most probable the main auroral oval, with associated mass source between 49.7 ±13.4 and 239.8 ±64.8 kg/s for an average auroral oval, and 10 ±4 and 49 ±23 kg/s for the specific auroral oval morphology found during this event. It is not clear how

  8. Cassini observations of ionospheric plasma in Saturn's magnetotail lobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, M.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Badman, S. V.; Dougherty, M. K.; Jackman, C. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Melin, H.; Mitchell, D. G.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Sergis, N.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of Saturn's magnetosphere with the Cassini mission have established the importance of Enceladus as the dominant mass source for Saturn's magnetosphere. It is well known that the ionosphere is an important mass source at Earth during periods of intense geomagnetic activity, but lesser attention has been dedicated to study the ionospheric mass source at Saturn. In this paper we describe a case study of data from Saturn's magnetotail, when Cassini was located at ≃ 2200 h Saturn local time at 36 RS from Saturn. During several entries into the magnetotail lobe, tailward flowing cold electrons and a cold ion beam were observed directly adjacent to the plasma sheet and extending deeper into the lobe. The electrons and ions appear to be dispersed, dropping to lower energies with time. The composition of both the plasma sheet and lobe ions show very low fluxes (sometimes zero within measurement error) of water group ions. The magnetic field has a swept-forward configuration which is atypical for this region, and the total magnetic field strength is larger than expected at this distance from the planet. Ultraviolet auroral observations show a dawn brightening, and upstream heliospheric models suggest that the magnetosphere is being compressed by a region of high solar wind ram pressure. We interpret this event as the observation of ionospheric outflow in Saturn's magnetotail. We estimate a number flux between (2.95 ± 0.43) × 109 and (1.43 ± 0.21) × 1010 cm-2 s-1, 1 or about 2 orders of magnitude larger than suggested by steady state MHD models, with a mass source between 1.4 ×102 and 1.1 ×103 kg/s. After considering several configurations for the active atmospheric regions, we consider as most probable the main auroral oval, with associated mass source between 49.7 ±13.4 and 239.8 ±64.8 kg/s for an average auroral oval, and 10 ±4 and 49 ±23 kg/s for the specific auroral oval morphology found during this event. It is not clear how much of this mass is

  9. Greenland surface mass-balance observations from the ice-sheet ablation area and local glaciers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machguth, Horst; Thomsen, Henrik H.; Weidick, Anker; Ahlstrøm, Andreas P.; Abermann, Jakob; Andersen, Morten L.; Andersen, Signe B.; Bjørk, Anders A.; Box, Jason E.; Braithwaite, Roger J.; Bøggild, Carl E.; Citterio, Michele; Clement, Poul; Colgan, William; Fausto, Robert S.; Gleie, Karin; Gubler, Stefanie; Hasholt, Bent; Hynek, Bernhard; Knudsen, Niels T.; Larsen, Signe H.; Mernild, Sebastian H.; Oerlemans, Johannes; Oerter, Hans; Olesen, Ole B.; Smeets, C. J P Paul; Steffen, Konrad; Stober, Manfred; Sugiyama, Shin; Van As, Dirk; Van Den Broeke, Michiel R.; Van De Wal, Roderik S W

    2016-01-01

    Glacier surface mass-balance measurements on Greenland started more than a century ago, but no compilation exists of the observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. Such data could be used in the evaluation of modelled surface mass balance, or to document changes in glac

  10. Greenland surface mass-balance observations from the ice-sheet ablation area and local glaciers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machguth, Horst; Thomsen, Henrik; Weidick, Anker;

    2016-01-01

    Glacier surface mass-balance measurements on Greenland started more than a century ago, but no compilation exists of the observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. Such data could be used in the evaluation of modelled surface mass balance, or to document changes in g...

  11. Optimized H{sup -} extraction in an argon-magnesium seeded magnetized sheet plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguera, Virginia R. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines)], E-mail: virginia.noguera@gmail.com; Blantocas, Gene Q. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); West Visayas State University, Lapaz, Iloilo City 5000 (Philippines); Ramos, Henry J. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines)

    2008-06-15

    The enhancement and optimization of H{sup -} extraction through argon and magnesium seeding of hydrogen discharges in a magnetized sheet plasma source are reported. The paper first presents the modification of the production chamber into a hexapole multicusp configuration resulting in decreased power requirements, improved plasma confinement and longer filament lifetime. By this, a wider choice of discharge currents for sustained quiescent plasmas is made possible. Second, the method of adding argon to the hydrogen plasma similar to the scheme in Abate and Ramos [Y. Abate, H. Ramos, Rev. Sci. Instr. 71 (10) (2000) 3689] was performed to find the optimum conditions for H{sup -} formation and extraction. Using an E x B probe, H{sup -} yields were investigated at varied argon-hydrogen admixtures, different discharge currents and spatial points relative to the core plasma. The optimum H{sup -} current density extracted at 3.0 cm from the plasma core using 3.0 A plasma current with 10% argon seeding increased by a factor of 2.42 (0.63 A/m{sup 2}) compared to the measurement of Abate and Ramos [Y. Abate, H. Ramos, Rev. Sci. Instr. 71 (10) (2000) 3689]. Third, the argon-hydrogen plasma at the extraction chamber is seeded with magnesium. Mg disk with an effective area of 22 cm{sup 2} is placed at the extraction region's anode biased 175 V with respect to the cathode. With Mg seeding, the optimum H{sup -} current density at the same site and discharge conditions increased by 4.9 times (3.09 A/m{sup 2}). The enhancement effects were analyzed vis-a-vis information gathered from the usual Langmuir probe (electron temperature and density), electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and the ensuing dissociative attachment (DA) reaction rates at different spatial points for various plasma discharges and gas ratios. Investigations on the changes in the effective electron temperature and electron density indicate that the enhancement is due to increased density of low

  12. Miocene to recent ice elevation variations from the interior of the West Antarctic ice sheet: Constraints from geologic observations, cosmogenic nuclides and ice sheet modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Ackert, Robert P.; Pope, Allen E.; Pollard, David; DeConto, Robert M.

    2012-07-01

    Observations of long-term West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) behavior can be used to test and constrain dynamic ice sheet models. Long-term observational constraints are however, rare. Here we present the first constraints on long-term (Miocene-Holocene) WAIS elevation from the interior of the ice sheet near the WAIS divide. We use geologic observations and measurements of cosmogenic 21Ne and 10Be in bedrock surfaces to constrain WAIS elevation variations to WAIS elevations to have been similar to, or lower than present, since the beginning of the Pliocene warm period. We use a continental ice sheet model to simulate the history of ice cover at our sampling sites and thereby compute the expected concentration of the cosmogenic nuclides. The ice sheet model indicates that during the past 5 Ma interior WAIS elevations of >65 m above present-day ice levels at the Ohio Range occur only rarely during brief ice sheet highstands, consistent with the observed cosmogenic nuclide data. Furthermore, the model's prediction that highstand elevations have increased on average since the Pliocene is in good agreement with the cosmogenic nuclide data that indicate the highest ice elevation over the past 5 Ma was reached during the highstand at 11 ka. Since the simulated cosmogenic nuclide concentrations derived from the model's ice elevation history are in good agreement with our measurements, we suggest that the model's prediction of more frequent collapsed-WAIS states and smaller WAIS volumes during the Pliocene are also correct.

  13. Initial thermal plasma observations from ISEE-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugher, C. R.; Chappell, C. R.; Horwitz, J. L.; Shelley, E. G.; Young, D. T.

    1980-09-01

    The initial measurements of magnetospheric thermal ions by the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE-1 are presented to demonstrate the surprising variety in this plasma population. The data provide evidence that the adiabatic mapping of the high latitude ionosphere to the equatorial plasma trough provides an insufficient description of the origin, transport, and accumulation processes which supply low energy ions to the outer plasmasphere and plasma trough.

  14. Influence of the initial parameters of the magnetic field and plasma on the spatial structure of the electric current and electron density in current sheets formed in helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrovskaya, G. V., E-mail: galya-ostr@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Markov, V. S.; Frank, A. G., E-mail: annfrank@fpl.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The influence of the initial parameters of the magnetic field and plasma on the spatial structure of the electric current and electron density in current sheets formed in helium plasma in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations with X-type singular lines is studied by the methods of holographic interferometry and magnetic measurements. Significant differences in the structures of plasma and current sheets formed at close parameters of the initial plasma and similar configurations of the initial magnetic fields are revealed.

  15. A computational model for He{sup +} ions in a magnetized sheet plasma: comparative analysis between model and experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blantocas, Gene Q. [West Visayas State Univ., Lapaz, Iloilo City (Philippines); Ramos, Henry J. [Univ. of the Phillippines, College of Science, National Inst. of Physics, Deliman Quezon City (Philippines); Wada, Motoi [Doshisha Univ., Dept. of Engineering, Kyoto (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    An E x B probe was used to extract He{sup +} ions from a magnetized steady sheet plasma. Plasma parameters T{sub e}, n{sub e} and extracted He{sup +} ion current were analyzed vis-a-vis a modified Saha population density equation of the collisional-radiative model. Numerical calculations show that at low discharge currents and in the hot electron region of the sheet plasma, relative densities of He{sup +} ions show some degree of correlation with ion current profiles established experimentally using the E x B probe. Both experimental and computational results indicate a division of the plasma into two distinct regions each with different formation mechanisms of He{sup +} ions. (author)

  16. Substorm effects on the plasma sheet on composition on March 22, 1979 (CDAW 6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennartsson, W.; Sharp, R.D.; Zwickl, R.D.

    1985-02-01

    Data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISSE 1, covering the energy range 0.1--16 keV/e, show that a dramatic change took place in the plasma sheet ion composition in conjunction with the magnetic substorm activity on March 22, 1979. Beginning about 1124 UT the ion population at the ISEE 1 location changed from what appeared to be predominantly ions from the solar wind to a mixture of comparable numbers of solar wind and terrestrial ions. ISEE 1 was inbound in the predawn sector during this time, and the plasma composition experiment provided data from Rapprox. =21 R/sub E/ and LTapprox. =0130, down to Rapprox. =3 R/sub E/ and LTapprox. =0530. Prior to the substorm activity about 90--95% of the ion density was due to H/sup +/ and He/sup + +/ ions, which appeared to be mostly of solar wind origin. The H/sup +/ and He/sup + +/ components, each approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, had a temperature ratio T(He/sup + +/)/T(H/sup +/)approx. =4 and a density ratio n(He/sup + +/)/n(H/sup +/)approx. =1.5--3%. Both values are consistent with measurements made concurrently in the solar wind by the plasma experiment on ISSE 3. The remaining 5--10% of the density was due mainly to O/sup +/ and He/sup +/ ions of ionospheric origin. All four ion populations had broad energy spectra with mean energies of several keV/e.

  17. Comparisons of Simulated and Observed Stormtime Magnetic Intensities and Ion Plasma Parameters in the Ring Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. W.; Guild, T. B.; Lemon, C.; Roeder, J. L.; Le, G.; Schulz, M.

    2009-12-01

    Recent progress in ring current and plasma sheet modeling has shown the importance of a self-consistent treatment of particle transport and magnetic and electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. Models with and without self-consistency can lead to significantly different magnitudes and spatial distributions of plasma pressure and magnetic intensity during disturbed times. In this study we compare simulated and observed stormtime magnetic intensities (GOES and Polar/MFE) and ion densities (LANL/MPA and Polar/CAMMICE) to test how well self-consistent simulations can simultaneously reproduce these quantities. We simulate the ring current and plasma sheet for conditions corresponding to the 11 August 2000 storm using the self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a constant magnetopause location. Using the empirical IMF-dependent model of Tsyganenko and Mukai [JGR, 2003], we specify the plasma sheet pressure and density at 10 RE as the plasma boundary location in the RCM-E. The simulated ion densities at different magnetic local times agree fairly well with those from the re-analysis model of LANL/MPA densities of O’Brien and Lemon [Space Weather, 2007]. We compare the simulated magnetic intensity with the magnetic intensity measured by magnetometers on the GOES satellites at geosynchronous altitude (6.6 RE) and on the Polar satellite. Agreement between the simulated and observed magnetic intensities tends to agree better on the nightside than on the dayside in the inner magnetosphere. In particular, the model cannot account for observed drops in the dayside magnetic intensity during decreases in the solar wind pressure. We will modify the RCM-E to include a time-varying magnetopause location to simulate compressions and expansions associated with variations in the solar wind pressure. We investigate whether this will lead to improved agreement between the simulated and model magnetic intensities.

  18. CO2 laser-micro plasma arc hybrid welding for galvanized steel sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. H. KIM; Y. N. AHN; J. H. KIM

    2011-01-01

    A laser lap welding process for zinc-coated steel has a well-known unsolved problem-porosity formation. The boiling temperature of coated zinc is lower than the melting temperature of the base metal. which is steel. In the autogenous laser welding,the zinc vapor generates from the lapped surfaces expels the molten pool and the expulsion causes numerous weld defects, such as spatters and blow holes on the weld surface and porosity inside the welds. The laser-arc hybrid welding was suggested as an alternative method for the laser lap welding because the arc can preheat or post-heat the weldment according to the arrangement of the laser beam and the arc. CO2 laser-micro plasma hybrid welding was applied to the lap welding of zinc-coated steel with zero-gap.The relationships among the weld quality and process parameters of the laser-arc arrangement, and the laser-arc interspacing distance and arc current were investigated using a full-factorial experimental design. The effect of laser-arc arrangement is dominant because the leading plasma arc partially melts the upper steel sheets and vaporizes or oxidizes the coated zinc on the lapped surfaces.Compared with the result from the laser-TIG hybrid welding, the heat input from arc can be reduced by 40%.

  19. The Greenland ice sheet during LGM – a model based on field observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Svend Visby; Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Kjær, Kurt H.;

    The issue is complicated by the circumstance that during LGM (Last glacial maximum) the ice sheet margins around the whole perimeter stood on the shelf and “classical” evidence, such as large moraine belts, extensive sandurs and major drainage diversions do not apply. The first estimates were therefore...... based on observations on land, such as weathering limits on coastal mountains, major moraine belts, and altitudes of marine limits. Extrapolation from this gave estimates of LGM ice cover on the shelf ranging from inner to outer shelf, often under the assumption that it had to be either or...... combine this new evidence with the older observations. This model is conservative because it is, as far as possible, based on tangible evidence minimising the amount of speculation. The LGM ice sheet in this model covered c. 2.7 mio km2, 65% more than the present. Two thirds of this excess relative...

  20. Ion shell distributions as free energy source for plasma waves on auroral field lines mapping to plasma sheet boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olsson

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ion shell distributions are hollow spherical shells in velocity space that can be formed by many processes and occur in several regions of geospace. They are interesting because they have free energy that can, in principle, be transmitted to ions and electrons. Recently, a technique has been developed to estimate the original free energy available in shell distributions from in-situ data, where some of the energy has already been lost (or consumed. We report a systematic survey of three years of data from the Polar satellite. We present an estimate of the free energy available from ion shell distributions on auroral field lines sampled by the Polar satellite below 6 RE geocentric radius. At these altitudes the type of ion shells that we are especially interested in is most common on auroral field lines close to the polar cap (i.e. field lines mapping to the plasma sheet boundary layer, PSBL. Our analysis shows that ion shell distributions that have lost some of their free energy are commonly found not only in the PSBL, but also on auroral field lines mapping to the boundary plasma sheet (BPS, especially in the evening sector auroral field lines. We suggest that the PSBL ion shell distributions are formed during the so-called Velocity Dispersed Ion Signatures (VDIS events. Furthermore, we find that the partly consumed shells often occur in association with enhanced wave activity and middle-energy electron anisotropies. The maximum downward ion energy flux associated with a shell distribution is often 10mWm-2 and sometimes exceeds 40mWm-2 when mapped to the ionosphere and thus may be enough to power many auroral processes. Earlier simulation studies have shown that ion shell distributions can excite ion Bernstein waves which, in turn, energise electrons in the parallel direction. It is possible that ion shell distributions are the link between the X-line and the auroral wave activity and electron

  1. Controllable formation of graphene and graphene oxide sheets using photo-catalytic reduction and oxygen plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostovari, Fatemeh; Abdi, Yaser; Ghasemi, Foad

    2012-12-01

    Au/SiO2/Si interdigital electrodes with thickness of 1 μm were created on silicon substrate. Graphene oxide (GO) sheets hanging from these electrodes were obtained by spin coating of chemically synthesized GO dispersed in water. We used UV-light-induced photo-catalytic activity of titanium oxide nanoparticles to reduce the GO layer. Effects of the photo-induced chemical reduction on the conductivity of the GO were investigated. Also, low power DC plasma was used for oxidation of the sheets. Oxygen bombardment leads to sheets with low electrical conductivity. Measurements show that graphene and GO sheets with the controlled electrical conductivity were obtained by these processes. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy were used to study the morphology of the TiO2/GO and graphene structures. X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering analysis were used to verify the structural characteristics of the prepared sheets. Analysis showed a gradual increase in the number of C-O bonds on the surface of the graphene layer as a result of increasing the time of plasma bombardment. Based on the Raman spectroscopy, the photo-catalytic activity of TiO2 nanoparticles resulted in a decrease in the number of C-O bonds.

  2. Observations at the planet Mercury by the plasma electron experiment, Mariner 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.; Vasyliunas, V. M.; Hartle, R. E.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Plasma electron observations made onboard Mariner 10 are reported. Three encounters with the planet Mercury show that the planet interacts with the solar wind to form a bow shock and a permanent magnetosphere. The observations provide a determination of the dimensions and properties of the magnetosphere, independently of and in general agreement with magnetometer observations. The magnetosphere of Mercury appears to be similar in shape to that of the Earth but much smaller in relation to the size of the planet. Electron populations similar to those found in the Earth's magnetotail, within the plasma sheet and adjacent regions, were observed at Mercury; both their spatial location and the electron energy spectra within them bear qualitative and quantitative resemblance to corresponding observations at the Earth. The magnetosphere of Mercury resembles to a marked degree a reduced version of that of the Earth, with no significant differences of structure.

  3. New types of coating systems for steel sheets by high-rate evaporation in combination with plasma processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffel, B.; Metzner, C. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Elektronenstrahl und Plasmatechnik (FEP), Dresden (Germany); Ehlers, K.D. [Salzgitter AG Stahl und Technologie (Germany); Schuhmacher, B. [Dortmunder Oberflaechencentrum GmbH, Dortmund (Germany); Flossdorf, F.J.; Steinbeck, G. [Verein Deutscher Eisenhuettenleute (VDEh), Duesseldorf (Germany); Steffen, R. [Stahlwerke Bremen GmbH (Germany); Hagler, J. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, Linz (Austria)

    2002-03-01

    High-rate evaporation in combination with plasma processes is a promising approach to obtain new types of steel sheet coating with improved corrosion resistance and application properties. To estimate the potential for the application of PVD-coatings (physical vapour deposition) different coating systems for steel sheet as well as for hot-dip or electro-galvanized steel sheet were designed. The samples were produced on a laboratory scale using PVD processes with very high deposition rates (in the order of 1 {mu}m s{sup -1}) as well as high-power plasma processes for the pre-treatment. The relationship between the composition, microstructure and properties of the coating systems, in particular concerning corrosion protection, abrasion during forming, phosphating and paint adhesion, were studied. It was found that the corrosion resistance of galvanized steel sheets can be considerably improved by vapour deposition of metal or inorganic films with a thickness of several hundred nanometers. Investigations on vapour deposition of titanium and stainless steel coatings on steel sheets, for applications in a severely corrosive environment, showed that the corrosion resistance in relation to the coating thickness can be significantly enhanced by means of plasma activation during the vapour deposition process. Finally, an outlook on possible industrial applications including an estimation of the process costs will be presented. For certain coating systems the results look promising. Consequently, these particular coating systems will be investigated in more detail by means of using a large-scale in-line deposition plant for metallic strips and sheets. (orig.)

  4. Observations of Thin Current Sheets in the Solar Wind and Their Role in Magnetic Energy Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, S.; Goldstein, M. L.; Dorelli, J.; Sahraoui, F.; Gurgiolo, C. A.; Karimabadi, H.; Mozer, F.; Wendel, D. E.; TenBarge, J.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2013-12-01

    A recent analysis of 450 vec/s resolution data from the STAFF search-coil magnetometer on board Cluster has revealed, for the first time, the presence of thin current sheets and discontinuities from the proton Larmor scale down to the electron Larmor scale in the solar wind. This is in the range of scales where a cascade of energy consistent with highly oblique kinetic Alfvénic fluctuations (KAW), eventually dissipated by electron Landau damping, has been detected. The current sheets have been found to have a size between 20-200 km, indicating that they are very localized. We will compare the observations with results coming from 2D Hall MHD, Gyrokinetic, and full Particle-in-Cell turbulence simulations. Preliminary work has highlighted promising qualitative agreement between the properties of the structures observed in the Cluster data and the current sheets generated in the simulations. With the aim of investigating the role played by those structures in dissipating the magnetic energy in the solar wind, E●J has been computed within each magnetic discontinuity. This has been made possible via a combined analysis of both STAFF-SC magnetic field data and the electric field data from the Electric Fields and Wave instrument (EFW). We describe procedures used to reduce the noise in the EFW data. The results obtained represent an effort to clarify the processes involved in the dissipation of magnetic energy in the solar wind.

  5. Monitoring and phenomena observation during YAG laser lap welding of Zn-coated steel sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seiji Katayama; Masami Mizutani; Taishi Tarui; Kiyokazu Mori

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed with the objectives of understanding lap welding phenomena of Zn-coated steels with a Nd:YAG laser as well as obtaining a fundamental knowledge of monitoring signals for the formation judgment of sound or bad weld beads.The behavior of a molten pool and a reflected beam was simultaneously observed through a high-speed video together with the monitoring of reflected beam intensity.The effect of a gap between sheets on porosity formation and bead appearances was confirmed,and characteristic monitoring signals were obtained according to the gaps.In the case of no gap,spatters were frequently generated,and a reflected beam was fluctuated intensively at low frequencies.On the other hand,in welding sheets with a wide gap,lap welds were not produced and the high frequency signals of a reflected beam were detected.Moreover,sound welds were produced in the sheets with a proper gap,and a moderate reflected beam was monitored.From these results,it was found that monitoring of a reflected beam was beneficial to the judgment of sound,under-filled or incomplete lap welds.

  6. Spectroscopic observations of evolving flare ribbon substructure suggesting origin in current sheet waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Sean R.; Longcope, Dana; Qiu, Jiong

    2015-04-01

    A flare ribbon is the chromospheric image of reconnection at a coronal current sheet. The dynamics and structure of the ribbon can thus reveal properties of the current sheet, including motion of the reconnecting flare loops. We present imaging and spectroscopic observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the evolution of a flare ribbon at high spatial resolution and time cadence. These reveal small-scale substructure in the ribbon, which manifest as oscillations in both position and Doppler velocities. We consider various alternative explanations for these oscillations, including modulation of chromospheric evaporation flows. Among these we find the best support for some form of elliptical wave localized to the coronal current sheet, such as a tearing mode or Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.IRIS is a NASA Small Explorer mission developed and operated by Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory. This work is supported by contract 8100002702 from Lockheed Martin to Montana State University, a Montana Space Grant Consortium fellowship, and by NASA through HSR.

  7. Modeling the Self-organized Critical Behavior of the Plasma Sheet Reconnection Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Alex; Uritsky, Vadim; Baker, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Analyses of Polar UVI auroral image data reviewed in our other presentation at this meeting (V. Uritsky, A. Klimas) show that bright night-side high-latitude UV emissions exhibit so many of the key properties of systems in self-organized criticality (SOC) that an alternate interpretation has become virtually impossible. It is now necessary to find and model the source of this behavior. We note that the most common models of self-organized criticality are numerical sandpiles. These are, at root, models that govern the transport of some quantity from a region where it is loaded to another where it is unloaded. Transport is enabled by the excitation of a local threshold instability; it is intermittent and bursty, and it exhibits a number of scale-free statistical properties. Searching for a system in the magnetosphere that is analogous and that, in addition, is known to produce auroral signatures, we focus on the reconnection dynamics of the plasma sheet. In our previous work, a driven reconnection model has been constructed and has been under study. The transport of electromagnetic (primarily magnetic) energy carried by the Poynting flux into the reconnection region of the model has been examined. All of the analysis techniques, and more, that have been applied to the auroral image data have also been applied to this Poynting flux. Here, we report new results showing that this model also exhibits so many of the key properties of systems in self-organized criticality that an alternate interpretation is implausible. Further, we find a strong correlation between these key properties of the model and those of the auroral UV emissions. We suggest that, in general, the driven reconnection model is an important step toward a realistic plasma physical model of self-organized criticality and we conclude, more specifically, that it is also a step in the right direction toward modeling the multiscale reconnection dynamics of the magnetotail.

  8. Modeling the Self-organized Critical Behavior of Earth's Plasma Sheet Reconnection Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Alexander J.

    2006-01-01

    Analyses of Polar UVI auroral image data show that bright night-side high-latitude W emissions exhibit so many of the key properties of systems in self-organized criticality that an alternate interpretation has become virtually impossible. These analyses will be reviewed. It is now necessary to find and model the source of this behavior. We note that the most common models of self-organized criticality are numerical sandpiles. These are, at root, models that govern the transport of some quantity from a region where it is loaded to another where it is unloaded. Transport is enabled by the excitation of a local threshold instability; it is intermittent and bursty, and it exhibits a number of scale-free statistical properties. Searching for a system in the magnetosphere that is analogous and that, in addition, is known to produce auroral signatures, we focus on the reconnection dynamics of the magnetotail plasma sheet. In our previous work, a driven reconnection model has been constructed and has been under study. The transport of electromagnetic (primarily magnetic) energy carried by the Poynting flux into the reconnection region of the model has been examined. All of the analysis techniques (and more) that have been applied to the auroral image data have also been applied to this Poynting flux. New results will be presented showing that this model also exhibits so many of the key properties of systems in self-organized criticality that an alternate interpretation is implausible. A strong correlation between these key properties of the model and those of the auroral UV emissions will be demonstrated. We suggest that, in general, the driven reconnection model is an important step toward a realistic plasma physical model of self-organized criticality and we conclude, more specifically, that it is also a step in the right direction toward modeling the multiscale reconnection dynamics of the magnetotail.

  9. Shock wave interaction with a thermal layer produced by a plasma sheet actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroteeva, E.; Znamenskaya, I.; Orlov, D.; Sysoev, N.

    2017-03-01

    This paper explores the phenomena associated with pulsed discharge energy deposition in the near-surface gas layer in front of a shock wave from the flow control perspective. The energy is deposited in 200 ns by a high-current distributed sliding discharge of a ‘plasma sheet’ type. The discharge, covering an area of 100× 30 mm2, is mounted on the top or bottom wall of a shock tube channel. In order to analyse the time scales of the pulsed discharge effect on an unsteady supersonic flow, we consider the propagation of a planar shock wave along the discharge surface area 50–500 μs after the discharge pulse. The processes in the discharge chamber are visualized experimentally using the shadowgraph method and modelled numerically using 2D/3D CFD simulations. The interaction between the planar shock wave and the discharge-induced thermal layer results in the formation of a lambda-shock configuration and the generation of vorticity in the flow behind the shock front. We determine the amount and spatial distribution of the electric energy rapidly transforming into heat by comparing the calculated flow patterns and the experimental shadow images. It is shown that the uniformity of the discharge energy distribution strongly affects the resulting flow dynamics. Regions of turbulent mixing in the near-surface gas are detected when the discharge energy is deposited non-uniformly along the plasma sheet. They account for the increase in the cooling rate of the discharge-induced thermal layer and significantly influence its interaction with an incident shock wave.

  10. Mercury's Plasma Mantle – a survey of MESSENGER observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Jamie Matthew; Slavin, James A.; Raines, Jim; DiBraccio, Gina

    2016-10-01

    The plasma mantle is a region of solar wind plasma entry into the nightside high-latitude magnetosphere. We present a survey of plasma mantles identified in particle and magnetic field measurements from four years of MESSENGER spacecraft observations of Mercury's magnetosphere. The two common observational signatures of this region are ion energy latitude dispersions as well as diamagnetic depressions. From these observations we estimate the contribution of plasma from the solar wind via the mantle and infer magnitude and variability in the cross-magnetospheric electric fields present at Mercury's dynamic magnetosphere.

  11. A feature of negative hydrogen ion production in the Uramoto-type sheet plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimbo, Kouichi [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Atomic Energy

    1997-02-01

    It seems that negative hydrogen ions H{sup -} are formed directly from atomic hydrogens H. When the chamber was biased more negative against the anode potential at constant are power, forming a much deeper electrostatic well in the Uramoto-type sheet plasma negative ion source, more negative hydrogen ion currents were extracted. The chamber potential V{sub B} was biased down to -100V in the 150V discharge. The negative ion current J{sup -} was evaluated by the JAERI-probe measurement. J{sup -} increases linearly with the chamber current I{sub B}. The largest J{sup -} value was obtained at absolute value of |V{sub prob,f}|=15V and absolute value of |V{sub B}|=100V; the discharge was not operated for absolute value of |V{sub B}|>100V. We speculate the following collisional (three-body) electron attachment to H as a possible production process for H{sup -}; e+e+H{yields}e+H{sup -}. This process may explain the linear increase of J{sup -} with absolute value of |V{sub prob,f}|. (S.Y.)

  12. Study of kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) in plasma - sheet-boundary- layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Nidhi; Varma, P; Tiwari, M S, E-mail: tiwarims@rediffmail.co, E-mail: poornimavarma@yahoo.co, E-mail: nidhiphy.shukla@gmail.co [Department of Physics and Electronics, Dr. H. S. Gour University, Sagar (M.P.), 470003 (India)

    2010-02-01

    The effect of parallel electric field with general loss-cone distribution function on the dispersion relation and damping rate/growth rate of the kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) is evaluated by kinetic approach. The generation of KAW by the combined effect of parallel electric field and loss-cone distribution indices (J) at a particular range of k{sub p}erpendicular{rho}{sub i} (k{sub p}erpendicular{rho}{sub i} <1 and k{sub p}erpendicular{rho}{sub i} >1) is noticed, where k{sub p}erpendicular is perpendicular wave number and {rho}{sub i} is the ion-gyro radius. Thus the propagation of KAW and loss of the Poynting flux from plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) to the ionosphere can be explained on the basis of present investigation. It is found that the present study also shows that the loss-cone distribution index is an important parameter to study KAW in the PSBL.

  13. Experimental study of nonlinear interaction of plasma flow with charged thin current sheets: 1. Boundary structure and motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Amata

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study plasma transport at a thin magnetopause (MP, described hereafter as a thin current sheet (TCS, observed by Cluster at the southern cusp on 13 February 2001 around 20:01 UT. The Cluster observations generally agree with the predictions of the Gas Dynamic Convection Field (GDCF model in the magnetosheath (MSH up to the MSH boundary layer, where significant differences are seen. We find for the MP a normal roughly along the GSE x-axis, which implies a clear departure from the local average MP normal, a ~90 km thickness and an outward speed of 35 km/s. Two populations are identified in the MSH boundary layer: the first one roughly perpendicular to the MSH magnetic field, which we interpret as the "incident" MSH plasma, the second one mostly parallel to B. Just after the MP crossing a velocity jet is observed with a peak speed of 240 km/s, perpendicular to B, with MA=3 and β>10 (peak value 23. The magnetic field clock angle rotates by 70° across the MP. Ex is the main electric field component on both sides of the MP, displaying a bipolar signature, positive on the MSH side and negative on the opposite side, corresponding to a ~300 V electric potential jump across the TCS. The E×B velocity generally coincides with the perpendicular velocity measured by CIS; however, in the speed jet a difference between the two is observed, which suggests the need for an extra flow source. We propose that the MP TCS can act locally as an obstacle for low-energy ions (<350 eV, being transparent for ions with larger gyroradius. As a result, the penetration of plasma by finite gyroradius is considered as a possible source for the jet. The role of reconnection is briefly discussed. The electrodynamics of the TCS along with mass and momentum transfer across it are further discussed in the companion paper by Savin et al. (2006.

  14. Modeling of Firn Compaction for Estimating Ice-Sheet Mass Change from Observed Ice-Sheet Elevation Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zwally, H. Jay

    2011-01-01

    Changes in ice-sheet surface elevation are caused by a combination of ice-dynamic imbalance, ablation, temporal variations in accumulation rate, firn compaction and underlying bedrock motion. Thus, deriving the rate of ice-sheet mass change from measured surface elevation change requires information on the rate of firn compaction and bedrock motion, which do not involve changes in mass, and requires an appropriate firn density to associate with elevation changes induced by recent accumulation rate variability. We use a 25 year record of surface temperature and a parameterization for accumulation change as a function of temperature to drive a firn compaction model. We apply this formulation to ICESat measurements of surface elevation change at three locations on the Greenland ice sheet in order to separate the accumulation-driven changes from the ice-dynamic/ablation-driven changes, and thus to derive the corresponding mass change. Our calculated densities for the accumulation-driven changes range from 410 to 610 kg/cu m, which along with 900 kg/cu m for the dynamic/ablation-driven changes gives average densities ranging from 680 to 790 kg/cu m. We show that using an average (or "effective") density to convert elevation change to mass change is not valid where the accumulation and the dynamic elevation changes are of opposite sign.

  15. Plasma arc brazing - a low energy joining technology for steel sheets; Plasmalichtbogenloeten - eine energiearme Fuegetechnik fuer Feinblechwerkstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouaifi, B.; Draugelates, U.; Helmich, A.; Ouaissa, B. [TU Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Mild and high strength steel sheets are comparatively difficult to weld. The heat input in the case of conventional welding processes is too high, so that plasma brazing is an attractive alternative and complementary joining process. One characteristic of the process is the independent input of energy and filler material. In addition, the process is practically spatter-free. Plasma brazing reduces joint and panel distortion and is tolerant to surface contamination and metallic surface coatings. The brazed seams are aesthetic in appearance and clear good mechanical properties. (orig.)

  16. LASCO White-Light Observations of Eruptive Current Sheets Trailing CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, David F.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2016-12-01

    Many models of eruptive flares or coronal mass ejections (CMEs) involve formation of a current sheet connecting the ejecting CME flux rope with a magnetic loop arcade. However, there is very limited observational information on the properties and evolution of these structures, hindering progress in understanding eruptive activity from the Sun. In white-light images, narrow coaxial rays trailing the outward-moving CME have been interpreted as current sheets. Here, we undertake the most comprehensive statistical study of CME-rays to date. We use SOHO/LASCO data, which have a higher cadence, larger field of view, and better sensitivity than any previous coronagraph. We compare our results to a previous study of Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) CMEs, in 1984 - 1989, having candidate magnetic disconnection features at the CME base, about half of which were followed by coaxial bright rays. We examine all LASCO CMEs during two periods of minimum and maximum activity in Solar Cycle 23, resulting in many more events, ˜130 CME-rays, than during SMM. Important results include: The occurrence rate of the rays is ˜11 % of all CMEs during solar minimum, but decreases to ˜7 % at solar maximum; this is most likely related to the more complex coronal background. The rays appear on average 3 - 4 hours after the CME core, and are typically visible for three-fourths of a day. The mean observed current sheet length over the ray lifetime is ˜12 R_{⊙}, with the longest current sheet of 18.5 R_{⊙}. The mean CS growth rates are 188 km s^{-1} at minimum and 324 km s^{-1} at maximum. Outward-moving blobs within several rays, which are indicative of reconnection outflows, have average velocities of ˜350 km s^{-1} with small positive accelerations. A pre-existing streamer is blown out in most of the CME-ray events, but half of these are observed to reform within ˜1 day. The long lifetime and long lengths of the CME-rays challenge our current understanding of the evolution of the magnetic

  17. Dynamics of Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets using the borehole, radio sounding and space observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Markov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on data of measurements in deep ice boreholes, as well as of radar and space geodetic observations in Antarctica and Greenland, a number of new features of the ice mass transport had been revealed. Note that these features do not correspond to the traditional but still hypothetical notions (ideas of the monotonous and uniform spatial changes in the ice sheet dynamics. Using results of the long-term monitoring of the borehole coordinate axes at the Vostok station (down to 1920 m, east profile Vostok – Vostok 1 – Pionerskaya – Mirny (1409 km, down to the depth of 450 m, and analysis of radar sections, Russian specialists revealed the following: a the Antarctic ice sheet has stratified changes in speed and a fan-like change in the flow direction along the depth; b plastic firn layer has individual parameters of dynamics and actually flows down from more monolithic body of the ice sheet (the flow directions differ by 30–80°; c in some places inside the sheet, the underlying ice masses flow faster than the upper ones. Researchers from the United States and Denmark registered on the radar sections of the lowest third of the ice domes in the central regions of the Antarctica (AGAP and Greenland (NEEM some folded structures, which were not typical of ice sheets (vertical amplitude of the folds is about 400 m, inclination of the wings is about 45 degrees or more. The tectonic analysis we have performed allows making a conclusion that a genesis of these ice structures is identical to the diapir folds and to diapirs which are formed at a displacement of lower plastic ice masses by the upper monolithic ones, or to echelon folds of crumpling of lower ice layers at their faster flow along original bed as compared with the overlying ice mass. This makes possible to suggest that a turbulent ice flow can occur in the spacious near-bottom and the most plastic area, and a model of the ice sheet dynamics is considered as extruding of

  18. A statistical study of the THEMIS satellite data for plasma sheet electrons carrying auroral upward field-aligned currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Shiokawa, K.; McFadden, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    The magnetospheric electron precipitation along the upward field-aligned currents without the potential difference causes diffuse aurora, and the magnetospheric electrons accelerated by a field-aligned potential difference cause the intense and bright type of aurora, namely discrete aurora. In this study, we are trying to find out when and where the aurora can be caused with or without electron acceleration. We statistically investigate electron density, temperature, thermal current, and conductivity in the plasma sheet using the data from the electrostatic analyzer (ESA) onboard the THEMIS-D satellite launched in 2007. According to Knight (Planet. Space Sci., 1973) and Lyons (JGR, 1980), the thermal current, jth(∝ nT^(1/2) where n is electron density and T is electron temperature in the plasma sheet), represents the upper limit to field aligned current that can be carried by magnetospheric electrons without field-aligned potential difference. The conductivity, K(∝ nT^(-1/2)), represents the efficiency of the upward field-aligned current (j) that the field-aligned potential difference (V) can produce (j=KV). Therefore, estimating jth and K in the plasma sheet is important in understanding the ability of plasma sheet electrons to carry the field-aligned current which is driven by various magnetospheric processes such as flow shear and azimuthal pressure gradient. Similar study was done by Shiokawa et al. (2000) based on the auroral electron data obtained by the DMSP satellites above the auroral oval and the AMPTE/IRM satellite in the near Earth plasma sheet at 10-18 Re on February-June 1985 and March-June 1986 during the solar minimum. The purpose of our study is to examine auroral electrons with pitch angle information inside 12 Re where Shiokawa et al. (2000) did not investigate well. For preliminary result, we found that in the dawn side inner magnetosphere (source of the region 2 current), electrons can make sufficient thermal current without field

  19. Cascading water underneath Wilkes Land, East Antarctic Ice Sheet, observed using altimetry and digital elevation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Flament

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a major subglacial lake drainage close to the ice divide in Wilkes Land, East Antarctica, and the subsequent cascading of water underneath the ice sheet toward the coast. To analyze the event, we combined altimetry data from several sources and bedrock data. We estimated the total volume of water that drained from Lake CookE2 by differencing digital elevation models (DEM derived from ASTER and SPOT5 stereo-imagery. With 5.2 ± 0.5 km3, this is the largest single subglacial drainage event reported so far in Antarctica. Elevation differences between ICESat laser altimetry and the SPOT5 DEM indicate that the discharge lasted approximately 2 yr. A 13-m uplift of the surface, corresponding to a refilling of about 0.64 ± 0.32 km3, was observed between the end of the discharge in October 2008 and February 2012. Using Envisat radar altimetry, with its high 35-day temporal resolution, we monitored the subsequent filling and drainage of connected subglacial lakes located downstream. In particular, a transient temporal signal can be detected within the theoretical 500-km long flow paths computed with the BEDMAP2 data set. The volume of water traveling in this wave is in agreement with the volume that drained from Lake CookE2. These observations contribute to a better understanding of the water transport beneath the East Antarctic ice sheet.

  20. Direct observations of evolving subglacial drainage beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lauren C; Catania, Ginny A; Hoffman, Matthew J; Gulley, Jason D; Lüthi, Martin P; Ryser, Claudia; Hawley, Robert L; Neumann, Thomas A

    2014-10-02

    Seasonal acceleration of the Greenland Ice Sheet is influenced by the dynamic response of the subglacial hydrologic system to variability in meltwater delivery to the bed via crevasses and moulins (vertical conduits connecting supraglacial water to the bed of the ice sheet). As the melt season progresses, the subglacial hydrologic system drains supraglacial meltwater more efficiently, decreasing basal water pressure and moderating the ice velocity response to surface melting. However, limited direct observations of subglacial water pressure mean that the spatiotemporal evolution of the subglacial hydrologic system remains poorly understood. Here we show that ice velocity is well correlated with moulin hydraulic head but is out of phase with that of nearby (0.3-2 kilometres away) boreholes, indicating that moulins connect to an efficient, channelized component of the subglacial hydrologic system, which exerts the primary control on diurnal and multi-day changes in ice velocity. Our simultaneous measurements of moulin and borehole hydraulic head and ice velocity in the Paakitsoq region of western Greenland show that decreasing trends in ice velocity during the latter part of the melt season cannot be explained by changes in the ability of moulin-connected channels to convey supraglacial melt. Instead, these observations suggest that decreasing late-season ice velocity may be caused by changes in connectivity in unchannelized regions of the subglacial hydrologic system. Understanding this spatiotemporal variability in subglacial pressures is increasingly important because melt-season dynamics affect ice velocity beyond the conclusion of the melt season.

  1. In situ observations of reconnection and associated particle energization in turbulent plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retinò, A.; Sundkvist, D.; Vaivads, A.; Sahraoui, F.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection occurs in turbulent plasma within a large number of volume-filling thin current sheets. Such reconnection efficiently dissipates the magnetic energy of turbulent plasma, resulting in substantial particle heating. Turbulent reconnection is also considered to play an important role for the acceleration of supra-thermal particles. Yet the details of energy dissipation and particle energization during turbulent reconnection, as well their dependence on turbulence properties, are not completely understood from an experimental point of view due to the scarcity of in situ observations. Here we present recent Cluster spacecraft observations of reconnection in different near-Earth turbulent regions (solar wind, magnetosheath, magnetotail) and we discuss the properties of particle energization therein.

  2. Energetic electron bursts in the plasma sheet and their relation with BBFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, A. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Dunlop, M.; Wang, Z. Q.

    2014-11-01

    We studied energetic electron bursts (EEBs) (40-250 keV) in the plasma sheet (PS) and their relation to bursty bulk flows (BBFs) using the data recorded by Cluster from 2001 to 2009. The EEBs in the PS can be classified into four types. Three types of EEBs are dispersionless, including EEBs accompanied with BBFs (V > 250 km/s) but without dipolarization front (DF); EEBs accompanied with both dipolarization front (DF) and BBF; and EEBs accompanied with DF and fast flow with V EEB, i.e., EEBs not accompanied with BBFs and DFs, is dispersed. The energetic electrons (40-130 keV) can be easily transported earthward by BBFs due to the strong dawn-dusk electric field embedded in BBFs. The DFs in BBFs can produce energetic electrons (40 to 250 keV). For the EEBs with DF and BBFs, the superposed epoch analyses show that the increase of energetic electron flux has two phases: gradual increase phase before DF and rapid increase phase concurrent with DF. In the PS around x = -18 RE, 60%-70% of EEBs are accompanied with BBFs, indicating that although hitherto there have been various acceleration mechanisms of energetic electrons, most of the energetic electrons in the PS are related with magnetic reconnection, and they are produced either directly by magnetic reconnection or indirectly by the DFs within BBFs. In the BBF's braking region of -12 RE EEBs are accompanied with BBFs. The corresponding ratio between EEBs and BBFs shows a dawn-dusk asymmetry.

  3. Observation of spatio-temporal pattern in magnetised rf plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, P; Konopka, U; Morfill, G

    2016-01-01

    We address an experimental observation of pattern formation in a magnetised rf plasma. The experiments are carried out in a electrically grounded aluminium chamber which is housed inside a rotatable superconducting magnetic coil. The plasma is formed by applying a rf voltage in parallel plate electrodes in push-pull mode under the background of argon gas. The time evolution of plasma intensity shows that a homogeneous plasma breaks into several concentric radial spatiotemoral bright and dark rings. These rings propagate radially at considerably low pressure and a constant magnetic field. These patterns are observed to trap small dust particles/grains in their potential. Exploiting this property of the patterns, a novel technique to measure the electric field associated with the patterns is described. The resulting estimates of the corresponding field intensity are presented. At other specific discharge parameters the plasma shows a range of special type of characteristic structures observed in certain other c...

  4. Observations of pronounced Greenland ice sheet firn warming and implications for runoff production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polashenski, Chris; Courville, Zoe; Benson, Carl; Wagner, Anna; Chen, Justin; Wong, Gifford; Hawley, Robert; Hall, Dorothy

    2014-06-01

    Field measurements of shallow borehole temperatures in firn across the northern Greenland ice sheet are collected during May 2013. Sites first measured in 1952-1955 are revisited, showing long-term trends in firn temperature. Results indicate a pattern of substantial firn warming (up to +5.7°C) at midlevel elevations (1400-2500 m) and little temperature change at high elevations (>2500 m). We find that latent heat transport into the firn due to meltwater percolation drives the observed warming. Modeling shows that heat is stored at depth for several years, and energy delivered from consecutive melt events accumulates in the firn. The observed warming is likely not yet in equilibrium with recent melt production rates but captures the progression of sites in the percolation facies toward net runoff production.

  5. Observations of Pronounced Greenland Ice Sheet Firn Warming and Implications for Runoff Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polashenski, Chris; Courville, Zoe; Benson, Carl; Wagner, Anna; Chen, Justin; Wong, Gifford; Hawley, Robert; Hall, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    Field measurements of shallow borehole temperatures in firn across the northern Greenland ice sheet are collected during May 2013. Sites first measured in 19521955 are revisited, showing long-term trends in firn temperature. Results indicate a pattern of substantial firn warming (up to +5.7C) at midlevel elevations (1400-2500 m) and little temperature change at high elevations (2500 m). We find that latent heat transport into the firn due to meltwater percolation drives the observed warming. Modeling shows that heat is stored at depth for several years, and energy delivered from consecutive melt events accumulates in the firn. The observed warming is likely not yet in equilibrium with recent melt production rates but captures the progression of sites in the percolation facies toward net runoff production.

  6. Observations of Pronounced Greenland Ice Sheet Firn Warming and Implications for Runoff Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polashenski, Chris; Courville, Zoe; Benson, Carl; Wagner, Anna; Chen, Justin; Wong, Gifford; Hawley, Robert; Hall, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    Field measurements of shallow borehole temperatures in firn across the northern Greenland ice sheet are collected during May 2013. Sites first measured in 19521955 are revisited, showing long-term trends in firn temperature. Results indicate a pattern of substantial firn warming (up to +5.7C) at midlevel elevations (1400-2500 m) and little temperature change at high elevations (2500 m). We find that latent heat transport into the firn due to meltwater percolation drives the observed warming. Modeling shows that heat is stored at depth for several years, and energy delivered from consecutive melt events accumulates in the firn. The observed warming is likely not yet in equilibrium with recent melt production rates but captures the progression of sites in the percolation facies toward net runoff production.

  7. Plasma Distribution in Mercury's Magnetosphere Derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2014-01-01

    We assess the statistical spatial distribution of plasma in Mercury's magnetosphere from observations of magnetic pressure deficits and plasma characteristics by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. The statistical distributions of proton flux and pressure were derived from 10months of Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) observations obtained during the orbital phase of the MESSENGER mission. The Magnetometer-derived pressure distributions compare favorably with those deduced from the FIPS observations at locations where depressions in the magnetic field associated with the presence of enhanced plasma pressures are discernible in the Magnetometer data. The magnitudes of the magnetic pressure deficit and the plasma pressure agree on average, although the two measures of plasma pressure may deviate for individual events by as much as a factor of approximately 3. The FIPS distributions provide better statistics in regions where the plasma is more tenuous and reveal an enhanced plasma population near the magnetopause flanks resulting from direct entry of magnetosheath plasma into the low-latitude boundary layer of the magnetosphere. The plasma observations also exhibit a pronounced north-south asymmetry on the nightside, with markedly lower fluxes at low altitudes in the northern hemisphere than at higher altitudes in the south on the same field line. This asymmetry is consistent with particle loss to the southern hemisphere surface during bounce motion in Mercury's offset dipole magnetic field.

  8. Greenland ice sheet melt area, volume, and runoff from satellite and in situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van As, D.; Box, J. E.; Fausto, R. S.; Petersen, D.; Citterio, M.; Ahlstrom, A. P.; Andersen, S. B.; Steffen, K.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing provides surface melt area and regional mass change. In situ automatic weather station (AWS) data provide a relatively precise, but very local surface mass budget. Combining the two methods allows melt quantification for the entire Greenland ice sheet. We use interpolated near-surface air temperature from the GC-Net and PROMICE AWS networks, and remotely-sensed MODIS surface albedo to calculate melt with a temperature/albedo-index melt model. The calculations make use of albedo, combined with top-of-the-atmosphere solar radiation and cloud cover, to take into account absorbed shortwave radiation, the dominant melt parameter. In so doing the darkening due to the melt-albedo feedback is accounted. Calculated ablation is calibrated using AWS data. Assuming that surface albedo is a first-order indicator of the firn's available pore space and cold content, refreezing is parameterized as a function of it. Meltwater runoff for selected catchments is validated with river discharge data. The product: observation-based daily maps of near-surface air temperature, melt (extent and volume), and runoff for the Greenland ice sheet.

  9. Multipoint observations of plasma phenomena made in space by Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Escoubet, P.; Hwang, K.-Joo; Wendel, D. E.; Viñas, A.-F.; Fung, S. F.; Perri, S.; Servidio, S.; Pickett, J. S.; Parks, G. K.; Sahraoui, F.; Gurgiolo, C.; Matthaeus, W.; Weygand, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Plasmas are ubiquitous in nature, surround our local geospace environment, and permeate the universe. Plasma phenomena in space give rise to energetic particles, the aurora, solar flares and coronal mass ejections, as well as many energetic phenomena in interstellar space. Although plasmas can be studied in laboratory settings, it is often difficult, if not impossible, to replicate the conditions (density, temperature, magnetic and electric fields, etc.) of space. Single-point space missions too numerous to list have described many properties of near-Earth and heliospheric plasmas as measured both in situ and remotely (see http://www.nasa.gov/missions/#.U1mcVmeweRY for a list of NASA-related missions). However, a full description of our plasma environment requires three-dimensional spatial measurements. Cluster is the first, and until data begin flowing from the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS), the only mission designed to describe the three-dimensional spatial structure of plasma phenomena in geospace. In this paper, we concentrate on some of the many plasma phenomena that have been studied using data from Cluster. To date, there have been more than 2000 refereed papers published using Cluster data but in this paper we will, of necessity, refer to only a small fraction of the published work. We have focused on a few basic plasma phenomena, but, for example, have not dealt with most of the vast body of work describing dynamical phenomena in Earth's magnetosphere, including the dynamics of current sheets in Earth's magnetotail and the morphology of the dayside high latitude cusp. Several review articles and special publications are available that describe aspects of that research in detail and interested readers are referred to them (see for example, Escoubet et al. 2005 Multiscale Coupling of Sun-Earth Processes, p. 459, Keith et al. 2005 Sur. Geophys. 26, 307-339, Paschmann et al. 2005 Outer Magnetospheric Boundaries: Cluster Results, Space Sciences Series

  10. Observation of Vortex Patterns in a Magnetized Dusty Plasma System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Feng; YE Maofu; WANG Long; LIU Yanhong

    2007-01-01

    Vortex patterns of dust particles have been observed in a magnetized dusty plasma system. The formation mechanism of two-dimensional (2D) vortex patterns has been investigated by analysing the forces acting on dust particles and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in a 2D confined magnetized dusty plasma. It has been found that with a weak confining electric field and a strong magnetic field, the particles' trajectories will form a vortex shape. The simulation results agree with our experimental observations. In our experiments, vortex patterns can be induced via circular rotation of particles by changing the rf (radio-frequency) power in a magnetized dusty plasma.

  11. Drift modes of a quasi-two-dimensional current sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Malova, Kh. V.; Popov, V. Yu.; Zelenyi, L. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15

    Stability of a plasma configuration consisting of a thin one-dimensional current sheet embedded into a two-dimensional background current sheet is studied. Drift modes developing in plasma as unstable waves along the current direction are considered. Dispersion relations for kink and sausage perturbation modes are obtained depending on the ratio of parameters of thin and background current sheets. It is shown that the existence of the background sheet results in a decrease in the instability growth rates and a significant increase in the perturbation wavelengths. The role of drift modes in the excitation of oscillations observed in the current sheet of the Earth's magnetotail is discussed.

  12. 太阳爆发过程中的大尺度磁重联电流片:理论和观测%Large-Scale Reconnecting Current Sheets in Solar Eruptions: Theories and Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴宁; 李燕; 沈呈彩; 林隽

    2012-01-01

    从理论和观测两个方面来介绍和讨论出现在太阳爆发过程中的磁重联电流片及其物理本质和动力学特征.首先介绍在理论研究和理论模型中,磁重联电流片是如何在爆发磁结构当中形成并发展的,对观测研究有什么指导意义.然后介绍观测工作是从哪几个方面对理论模型预测的电流片进行证认和研究的.第三,将介绍观测研究给出了哪些过去所没有能够预期的结果,这些结果对深入研究耀斑-CME电流片以及其中的磁重联过程的理论工作有什么重要的、挑战性的意义.第四,讨论最新的与此有关的理论研究和数值实验.最后,对未来的研究方向和重要课题进行综述和展望.%Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process with a rich variety of aspects and applications in astrophysical, space, and laboratory plasmas. It is at the core of many dynamic phenomena in the universe, including solar eruptions, geomagnetic substorms, and tokamak disruption. Most of the universe is in the form of a plasma threaded by a magnetic field. When twisted or sheared, the field lines may reconnect rapidly, converting magnetic energy into heat and kinetic energy. Because these phenomena often occur in environments of very high electric conductivity, the process of energy conversion is usually confined to a small local region, such as an X-type neutral point, a current sheet, or a quasi-separatrix layer. It is traditionally expected that the current sheet is too thin to be observable since its thickness is believed to be roughly the proton Larmor radius, which is about tens of meters in the coronal environment. This view is based on magnetic reconnection on small scales in the laboratory or on quasi-static process in space (with timescale of tens of hours or even a few days). This could be true as well in the solar eruption in the case that the classical Spitzer resistivity dominates the diffusion process. However, CME/fiare current

  13. Mirror mode structures ahead of dipolarization front near the neutral sheet observed by Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G. Q.; Zhang, T. L.; Volwerk, M.; Schmid, D.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Pan, Z. H.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic compressional structures ahead of a dipolarization front (DF) on 30 August 2002 are investigated by using Cluster data. Our findings are as follows: (1) the structures, observed near the neutral sheet, are mainly compressional and dominant in BZ; (2) they are almost nonpropagating relative to the local ion bulk flow and their lengths are several local proton gyroradius; (3) the ion density increases when BT decreases; (4) ions are partially trapped by the structures with parallel and perpendicular velocities varying in antiphase; and (5) local conditions are favorable for excitation of the mirror instability, and we suggest that these structures are mirror mode-like. Our findings also suggest that local conditions ahead of the DF are viable for exciting the mirror instability to generate mirror mode waves or structures.

  14. Plasma Heating Suring a Coronal Mass Ejection Observed by SOHO

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, N A; Korreck, K E

    2011-01-01

    We perform a time-dependent ionization analysis to constrain plasma heating requirements during a fast partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME) observed on 2000 June 28 by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). We use two methods to derive densities from the UVCS measurements, including a density sensitive O V line ratio at 1213.85 and 1218.35 Angstroms, and radiative pumping of the O VI 1032,1038 doublet by chromospheric emission lines. The most strongly constrained feature shows cumulative plasma heating comparable to or greater than the kinetic energy, while features observed earlier during the event show cumulative plasma heating comparable to or less than the kinetic energy. SOHO Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) observations are used to estimate the active region magnetic energy. We consider candidate plasma heating mechanisms and provide constraints when possible. Because this CME was associated with a relatively weak flare, the contribution b...

  15. IMP 8 observations of a poleward plasma circulation: Evidence of entry into the plasma mantle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpak, M. A.; Paularena, K. I.; Richardson, J. D.; Siscoe, G. L.

    Plasma data from IMP 8 are used to map the spatial structure of plasma flow in Earth's magnetosheath. Plasma and magnetic field data from instruments on ISEE-3 and WIND are used to normalize the IMP 8 magnetosheath data to upstream solar wind conditions. For the majority of the data, the magnitude and direction of plasma flow inside the magnetosheath agree well with gas-dynamic models. About 8% of the ISEE-3-normalized velocity vectors and 3% of the WIND-normalized velocity vectors exhibit a poleward circulation in the YZ plane. The observed circulation is consistent with predictions for flow within the plasma mantle. The occurrence frequency of these poleward flows increases further down the tail, consistent with predictions that the mantle width increases tailward. Densities are lower where this flow is observed, consistent with expectations for the plasma mantle, but temperatures are higher and the magnetic field magnitudes lower, the opposite of theoretical expectations.

  16. Development and verification of child observation sheet for 5-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Keiko; Nagai, Toshisaburo; Okazaki, Shin; Kawajiri, Mie; Tomiwa, Kiyotaka

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a newly devised child observation sheet (COS-5) as a scoring sheet, based on the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), for use in the developmental evaluation of 5-year-old children, especially focusing on children with autistic features, and to verify its validity. Seventy-six children were studied. The children were recruited among participants of the Japan Children's Cohort Study, a research program implemented by the Research Institute of Science and Technology for Society (RISTEX) from 2004 to 2009. The developmental evaluation procedure was performed by doctors, clinical psychologists, and public health nurses. The COS-5 was also partly based on the Kyoto Scale of Psychological Development 2001 (Kyoto Scale 2001). Further, the Developmental Disorders Screening Questionnaire for 5-Years-Olds, PDD-Autism Society Japan Rating Scale (PARS), doctor interview questions and neurological examination for 5-year-old children, and the Draw-a-Man Test (DAM) were used as evaluation scales. Eighteen (25.4%) children were rated as Suspected, including Suspected PDD, Suspected ADHD and Suspected MR. The COS-5 was suggested to be valid with favorable reliability (α=0.89) and correlation with other evaluation scales. The COS-5 may be useful, with the following advantages: it can be performed within a shorter time frame; it facilitates the maintenance of observation quality; it facilitates sharing information with other professions; and it is reliable to identify the autistic features of 5-year-old children. In order to verify its wider applications including the screening of infants (18months to 3years old) by adjusting the items of younger age, additional study is needed.

  17. An Overview of Observations by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kaiser, M. L.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Roux, A.; Canu, P.; Zarka, P.; Tokarev, Y.

    2001-01-01

    On August 18, 1999, the Cassini spacecraft flew by Earth at an altitude of 1186 km on its way to Saturn. Although the flyby was performed exclusively to provide the spacecraft with sufficient velocity to get to Saturn, the radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) instrument, along with several others, was operated to gain valuable calibration data and to validate the operation of a number of capabilities. In addition, an opportunity to study the terrestrial radio and plasma wave environment with a highly capable instrument on a swift fly-through of the magnetosphere was afforded by the encounter. This paper provides an overview of the RPWS observations, at Earth, including the identification of a number of magnetospheric plasma wave modes, an accurate measurement of the plasma density over a significant portion of the trajectory using the natural wave spectrum in addition to a relaxation sounder and Langmuir probe, the detection of natural and human-produced radio emissions, and the validation of the capability to measure the wave normal angle and Poynting flux of whistler-mode chorus emissions. The results include the observation of a double-banded structure at closest' approach including a band of Cerenkov emission bounded by electron plasma and upper hybrid frequencies and an electron cyclotron harmonic band just above the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. In the near-Earth plasma sheet, evidence for electron phase space holes is observed, similar to those first reported by Geotail in the magnetotail. The wave normal analysis confirms the Polar result that chorus is generated very close to the magnetic equator and propagates to higher latitudes. The integrated power flux of auroral kilometric radiation is also used to identify a series of substorms observed during the outbound passage through the magnetotail.

  18. Low sheet resistance titanium nitride films by low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition using design of experiments methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Micheal, E-mail: micheal.burke@tyndall.ie; Blake, Alan; Povey, Ian M.; Schmidt, Michael; Petkov, Nikolay; Carolan, Patrick; Quinn, Aidan J., E-mail: aidan.quinn@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2014-05-15

    A design of experiments methodology was used to optimize the sheet resistance of titanium nitride (TiN) films produced by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) using a tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium precursor in a N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} plasma at low temperature (250 °C). At fixed chamber pressure (300 mTorr) and plasma power (300 W), the plasma duration and N{sub 2} flow rate were the most significant factors. The lowest sheet resistance values (163 Ω/sq. for a 20 nm TiN film) were obtained using plasma durations ∼40 s, N{sub 2} flow rates >60 standard cubic centimeters per minute, and purge times ∼60 s. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy data revealed reduced levels of carbon contaminants in the TiN films with lowest sheet resistance (163 Ω/sq.), compared to films with higher sheet resistance (400–600 Ω/sq.) while transmission electron microscopy data showed a higher density of nanocrystallites in the low-resistance films. Further significant reductions in sheet resistance, from 163 Ω/sq. to 70 Ω/sq. for a 20 nm TiN film (corresponding resistivity ∼145 μΩ·cm), were achieved by addition of a postcycle Ar/N{sub 2} plasma step in the PE-ALD process.

  19. Resonant scattering of plasma sheet electrons leading to diffuse auroral precipitation: 1. Evaluation for electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Binbin; Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Chen, Lunjin; Li, Wen

    2011-04-01

    Using statistical wave power spectral profiles obtained from CRRES and the latitudinal distributions of wave propagation modeled by the HOTRAY code, a quantitative analysis has been performed on the scattering of plasma sheet electrons into the diffuse auroral zone by multiband electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) emissions near L = 6 within the 0000-0600 MLT sector. The results show that ECH wave scattering of plasma sheet electrons varies from near the strong diffusion rate (timescale of an hour or less) during active times with peak wave amplitudes of an order of 1 mV/m to very weak scattering (on the timescale of >1 day) during quiet conditions with typical wave amplitudes of tenths of mV/m. However, for the low-energy (˜100 eV to below 2 keV) electron population mainly associated with the diffuse auroral emission, ECH waves are only responsible for rapid pitch angle diffusion (occasionally near the limit of strong diffusion) for a small portion of the electron population with pitch angles αeq 70°. Computations of the bounce-averaged coefficients of momentum diffusion and (pitch angle, momentum) mixed diffusion indicate that both mixed diffusion and energy diffusion of plasma sheet electrons due to ECH waves are very small compared to pitch angle diffusion and that ECH waves have little effect on local electron acceleration. Consequently, the multiple harmonic ECH emissions cannot play a dominant role in the occurrence of diffuse auroral precipitation near L = 6, and other wave-particle interaction mechanisms, such as whistler mode chorus-driven resonant scattering, are required to explain the global distribution of diffuse auroral precipitation and the formation of the pancake distribution in the inner magnetosphere.

  20. In situ observations of interstellar plasma with Voyager 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S; Burlaga, L F; Ness, N F

    2013-09-27

    Launched over 35 years ago, Voyagers 1 and 2 are on an epic journey outward from the Sun to reach the boundary between the solar plasma and the much cooler interstellar medium. The boundary, called the heliopause, is expected to be marked by a large increase in plasma density, from about 0.002 per cubic centimeter (cm(-3)) in the outer heliosphere, to about 0.1 cm(-3) in the interstellar medium. On 9 April 2013, the Voyager 1 plasma wave instrument began detecting locally generated electron plasma oscillations at a frequency of about 2.6 kilohertz. This oscillation frequency corresponds to an electron density of about 0.08 cm(-3), very close to the value expected in the interstellar medium. These and other observations provide strong evidence that Voyager 1 has crossed the heliopause into the nearby interstellar plasma.

  1. Analysis of plasma waves observed in the inner Saturn magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Menietti

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasma waves observed in the Saturn magnetosphere provide an indication of the plasma population present in the rotationally dominated inner magnetosphere. Electrostatic cyclotron emissions often with harmonics and whistler mode emission are a common feature of Saturn's inner magnetosphere. The electron observations for a region near 5 RS outside and near a plasma injection region indicate a cooler low-energy (<100 eV, nearly isotropic plasma, and a much warmer (E>1000 eV more pancake or butterfly distribution. We model the electron plasma distributions to conduct a linear dispersion analysis of the wave modes. The results suggest that the electrostatic electron cyclotron emissions can be generated by phase space density gradients associated with a loss cone that may be up to 20° wide. This loss cone is sometimes, but not always, observed because the field of view of the electron detectors does not include the magnetic field line at the time of the observations. The whistler mode emission can be generated by the pancake-like distribution and temperature anisotropy (T/T||>1 of the warmer plasma population.

  2. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Surface Characteristics on the Greenland Ice Sheet as Derived from Passive Microwave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark; Rowe, Clinton; Kuivinen, Karl; Mote, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    The primary goals of this research were to identify and begin to comprehend the spatial and temporal variations in surface characteristics of the Greenland ice sheet using passive microwave observations, physically-based models of the snowpack and field observations of snowpack and firn properties.

  3. Statistical research on the motion properties of the magnetotail current sheet:Cluster observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.REME; E.LUCEK

    2010-01-01

    The origin of the flapping motion of the earth’s magnetotail current sheet is one of the most important problems in the magnetotail dynamics.Using Cluster data,we make a statistical research on the motion properties of the magnetotail current sheet of 2001 and 2003.We calculate the velocities of the magnetotail current sheet using new methods and obtain the distribution of the magnetotail current sheet velocities in the X-Y plane in GSE coordinate system.Our results show that although most of the current sheets were propagating toward the tail flanks and those of the exceptions lay in dusk side,which is consistent with previous studies,the proportions of the current sheet which were propagating toward midnight (where |YGSE|=0) were higher than those in previous studies.Motions of the current sheet in the middle area (|YGSE|<8 Re) of the magnetotail are investigated.Relatively high value of the Z component of the velocity further confirms that the middle area of the magnetotail might be a source region for the motion of the current sheets which were propagating towards the tail flanks.According to our case studies,the way the current sheets propagated toward midnight area differs significantly from that toward dusk and dawn side,from which we infer that there might be two different kinds of current sheet motions originated from different sources.The statistical results of this paper may give some clues for further studies on the origin of the flapping motion of the magnetotail current sheet.

  4. Latitude-energy structure of multiple ion beamlets in Polar/TIMAS data in plasma sheet boundary layer and boundary plasma sheet below 6 RE radial distance: basic properties and statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. K. Peterson

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Velocity dispersed ion signatures (VDIS occurring at the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL are a well reported feature. Theory has, however, predicted the existence of multiple ion beamlets, similar to VDIS, in the boundary plasma sheet (BPS, i.e. at latitudes below the PSBL. In this study we show evidence for the multiple ion beamlets in Polar/TIMAS ion data and basic properties of the ion beamlets will be presented. Statistics of the occurrence frequency of ion multiple beamlets show that they are most common in the midnight MLT sector and for altitudes above 4 RE, while at low altitude (≤3 RE, single beamlets at PSBL (VDIS are more common. Distribution functions of ion beamlets in velocity space have recently been shown to correspond to 3-dimensional hollow spheres, containing a large amount of free energy. We also study correlation with ~100 Hz waves and electron anisotropies and consider the possibility that ion beamlets correspond to stable auroral arcs.

  5. Fine structure of charge exchange lines observed in laboratory plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, K.; Nishimura, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Kondo, K.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the fine structure of charge exchange lines appears only at the plasma edge or in the recombining phase where the ion temperature is low enough. The observed spectra in Li III and C VI are consistent with the sum of fine-structure components populated by statistical weights (assuming complete l-mixing) not by direct charge exchange cross sections. Some discrepancy was observed in the intensity ratio of fine-structure components between the observation and calculation for C VI in the recombining phase. The fine-structure of charge exchange lines gives an apparent Doppler shift in plasma rotation velocity measurement using charge exchange spectroscopy. (author)

  6. Cluster and Double Star multipoint observations of a plasma bubble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Walsh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Depleted flux tubes, or plasma bubbles, are one possible explanation of bursty bulk flows, which are transient high speed flows thought to be responsible for a large proportion of flux transport in the magnetotail. Here we report observations of one such plasma bubble, made by the four Cluster spacecraft and Double Star TC-2 around 14:00 UT on 21 September 2005, during a period of southward, but BY-dominated IMF. In particular the first direct observations of return flows around the edges of a plasma bubble, and the first observations of plasma bubble features within 8 RE of the Earth, consistent with MHD simulations (Birn et al., 2004 are presented. The implications of the presence of a strong BY in the IMF and magnetotail on the propagation of the plasma bubble and development of the associated current systems in the magnetotail and ionosphere are discussed. It is suggested that a strong BY can rotate the field aligned current systems at the edges of the plasma bubble away from its duskward and dawnward flanks.

  7. Experimental study of nonlinear interaction of plasma flow with charged thin current sheets: 2. Hall dynamics, mass and momentum transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Savin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Proceeding with the analysis of Amata et al. (2005, we suggest that the general feature for the local transport at a thin magnetopause (MP consists of the penetration of ions from the magnetosheath with gyroradius larger than the MP width, and that, in crossing it, the transverse potential difference at the thin current sheet (TCS is acquired by these ions, providing a field-particle energy exchange without parallel electric fields. It is suggested that a part of the surface charge is self-consistently produced by deflection of ions in the course of inertial drift in the non-uniform electric field at MP. Consideration of the partial moments of ions with different energies demonstrates that the protons having gyroradii of roughly the same size or larger than the MP width carry fluxes normal to MP that are about 20% of the total flow in the plasma jet under MP. This is close to the excess of the ion transverse velocity over the cross-field drift speed in the plasma flow just inside MP (Amata et al., 2005, which conforms to the contribution of the finite-gyroradius inflow across MP. A linkage through the TCS between different plasmas results from the momentum conservation of the higher-energy ions. If the finite-gyroradius penetration occurs along the MP over ~1.5 RE from the observation site, then it can completely account for the formation of the jet under the MP. To provide the downstream acceleration of the flow near the MP via the cross-field drift, the weak magnetic field is suggested to rotate from its nearly parallel direction to the unperturbed flow toward being almost perpendicular to the accelerated flow near the MP. We discuss a deceleration of the higher-energy ions in the MP normal direction due to the interaction with finite-scale electric field bursts in the magnetosheath flow frame, equivalent to collisions, providing a charge separation. These effective collisions, with a nonlinear frequency proxy of the order of the proton

  8. Resonant scattering of central plasma sheet protons by multiband EMIC waves and resultant proton loss timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xing; Ni, Binbin; Liang, Jun; Xiang, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Shi, Run; Gu, Xudong; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu; Fu, Song; Liu, Jiang

    2016-02-01

    This is a companion study to Liang et al. (2014) which reported a "reversed" energy-latitude dispersion pattern of ion precipitation in that the lower energy ion precipitation extends to lower latitudes than the higher-energy ion precipitation. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the central plasma sheet (CPS) have been suggested to account for this reversed-type ion precipitation. To further investigate the association, we perform a comprehensive study of pitch angle diffusion rates induced by EMIC wave and the resultant proton loss timescales at L = 8-12 around the midnight. Comparing the proton scattering rates in the Earth's dipole field and a more realistic quiet time geomagnetic field constructed from the Tsyganenko 2001 (T01) model, we find that use of a realistic, nondipolar magnetic field model not only decreases the minimum resonant energies of CPS protons but also considerably decreases the limit of strong diffusion and changes the proton pitch angle diffusion rates. Adoption of the T01 model increases EMIC wave diffusion rates at > ~ 60° equatorial pitch angles but decreases them at small equatorial pitch angles. Pitch angle scattering coefficients of 1-10 keV protons due to H+ band EMIC waves can exceed the strong diffusion rate for both geomagnetic field models. While He+ and O+ band EMIC waves can only scatter tens of keV protons efficiently to cause a fully filled loss cone at L > 10, in the T01 magnetic field they can also cause efficient scattering of ~ keV protons in the strong diffusion limit at L > 10. The resultant proton loss timescales by EMIC waves with a nominal amplitude of 0.2 nT vary from a few hours to several days, depending on the wave band and L shell. Overall, the results demonstrate that H+ band EMIC waves, once present, can act as a major contributor to the scattering loss of a few keV protons at lower L shells in the CPS, accounting for the reversed energy-latitude dispersion pattern of proton precipitation at low

  9. Effects of solar wind ultralow-frequency fluctuations on plasma sheet electron temperature: Regression analysis with support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Ping; Kim, Hee-Jeong; Yue, Chao; Weygand, James M.; Hsu, Tung-Shin; Chu, Xiangning

    2017-04-01

    To investigate whether ultralow-frequency (ULF) fluctuations from 0.5 to 8.3 mHz in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) can affect the plasma sheet electron temperature (Te) near geosynchronous distances, we use a support vector regression machine technique to decouple the effects from different solar wind parameters and their ULF fluctuation power. Te in this region varies from 0.1 to 10 keV with a median of 1.3 keV. We find that when the solar wind ULF power is weak, Te increases with increasing southward IMF Bz and solar wind speed, while it varies weakly with solar wind density. As the ULF power becomes stronger during weak IMF Bz ( 0) or northward IMF, Te becomes significantly enhanced, by a factor of up to 10. We also find that mesoscale disturbances in a time scale of a few to tens of minutes as indicated by AE during substorm expansion and recovery phases are more enhanced when the ULF power is stronger. The effect of ULF powers may be explained by stronger inward radial diffusion resulting from stronger mesoscale disturbances under higher ULF powers, which can bring high-energy plasma sheet electrons further toward geosynchronous distance. This effect of ULF powers is particularly important during weak southward IMF or northward IMF when convection electric drift is weak.

  10. EISCAT observations of plasma patches at sub-auroral cusp latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moen

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A sequence of 3 patches of high-density (1012 m−3 cold plasma on a horizontal scale-size of 300–700 km was observed near magnetic noon by the EISCAT VHF radar above Svalbard on 17 December 2001. The patches followed a trajectory towards the cusp inflow region. The combination of radar and all-sky observations demonstrates that the patches must have been segmented equatorward of the cusp/cleft auroral display, and hence their properties had not yet been influenced by cusp particle showers and electrodynamics on open flux tubes. The last patch in the sequence was intersected by radio tomography observations, and was found to be located adjacent to a broader region of the same high electron density further south. The patches occurred under moderately active conditions (Kp=3 and the total electron content (TEC of the high-density plasma was 45 TEC units. The train of patches appeared as a segmentation of the tongue of ionization. The sequence of patches occurred in association with a sequence of flow bursts in the dusk cell return flow. It is proposed that reconnection driven pulsed convection is able to create sub-auroral patches in the region where high density mid-latitude plasma is diverted poleward toward the cusp. It is the downward Birkeland current sheet located at the equatorward boundary of the flow disturbance that represents the actual cutting mechanism.

  11. Characterizing supraglacial meltwater channel hydraulics on the Greenland Ice Sheet from in situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Colin J.; Smith, Laurence C.; Chu, Vena W.; Legleiter, Carl; Pitcher, Lincoln H.; Overstreet, Brandon T.; Rennermalm, Asa K.; Forster, Richard R.; Yang, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Supraglacial rivers on the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) transport large volumes of surface meltwater toward the ocean, yet have received relatively little direct research. This study presents field observations of channel width, depth, velocity, and water surface slope for nine supraglacial channels on the southwestern GrIS collected between 23 July and 20 August, 2012. Field sites are located up to 74 km inland and span 494-1485 m elevation, and contain measured discharges larger than any previous in situ study: from 0.006 to 23.12 m3/s in channels 0.20 to 20.62 m wide. All channels were deeply incised with near vertical banks, and hydraulic geometry results indicate that supraglacial channels primarily accommodate greater discharges by increasing velocity. Smaller streams had steeper water surface slopes (0.74-8.83%) than typical in terrestrial settings, yielding correspondingly high velocities (0.40-2.60 m/s) and Froude numbers (0.45-3.11) with supercritical flow observed in 54% of measurements. Derived Manning's n values were larger and more variable than anticipated from channels of uniform substrate, ranging from 0.009 to 0.154 with a mean value of 0.035 +/- 0.027 despite the absence of sediment, debris, or other roughness elements. Ubiquitous micro-depressions in shallow sections of the channel bed may explain some of these roughness values. However, we find that other, unobserved sources of flow resistance likely contributed to these elevated n values: future work should explicitly consider additional sources of flow resistance beyond bed roughness in supraglacial channels. We conclude that hydraulic modelling for these channels must allow for both sub- and supercritical flow, and most importantly must refrain from assuming that all ice-substrate channels exhibit similar hydraulic behavior, especially for Froude numbers and Manning's n. Finally, this study highlights that further theoretical and empirical work on supraglacial channel hydraulics is

  12. Plasma density fluctuations observed during Space Shuttle Orbiter water releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, J. S.; D'Angelo, N.; Kurth, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Observations by the Langmuir probe on the Plasma Diagnostics Package flown as part of the Spacelab 2 mission in the summer of 1985 show a strong increase in the level of turbulence near the Shuttle Orbiter during operations in which liquid water is released. The spectrum of the plasma density fluctuations peaks at the lowest frequencies measured (a few Hz) and extends up to a few kHz, near the lower hybrid frequency. Two potential mechanisms for generating the plasma turbulence are suggested which are both based on the production of water ions as a result of charge exchange with the ambient oxygen ions in the ionosphere. The first mechanism proposed is the ion-plasma instability which arises from the drift of the contaminant with respect to the ambient oxygen ions. The other mechanism proposed is the Ott-Farley instability, which is a result of the ring distribution formed by the 'pick-up' water ions.

  13. Observation of plasma motion in a coaxial plasma opening switch with a chordal laser interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teramoto, Y.; Urakami, H.; Akiyama, H. [Kumamoto Univ., Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto (Japan); Kohno, S. [Ariake National College of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Fukuoka (Japan); Katsuki, S. [Kumamoto Univ., Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Electron densities in a coaxial plasma opening switch were measured at many lines-of-slight. In the present experiment, electron density was measured by a He-Ne laser interferometer with chordal lines-of sight. In order to observe the motion of the POS plasma, the electron density contours during the conduction, opening and post-opening phases were drawn by combining the results of interferometer experiments. The radial and axial motion of POS plasma was investigated from the density contours. As conduction time progressed, the POS plasma moved toward downstream. At 800 ns, which corresponds to the time of opening in the current waveform, low-density region less than 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} is seen at 10 mm from the cathode. After the opening was completed, the low-density gap disappeared and the shape of the corn-shape-like plasma was distorted. (author)

  14. Experimental observation of precursor solitons in a flowing complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Surabhi; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-04-01

    The excitation of precursor solitons ahead of a rapidly moving object in a fluid, a spectacular phenomenon in hydrodynamics that has often been observed ahead of moving ships, has surprisingly not been investigated in plasmas where the fluid model holds good for low frequency excitations such as ion acoustic waves. In this Rapid Communication we report an experimental observation of precursor solitons in a flowing dusty plasma. The nonlinear solitary dust acoustic waves (DAWs) are excited by a supersonic mass flow of the dust particles over an electrostatic potential hill. In a frame where the fluid is stationary and the hill is moving the solitons propagate in the upstream direction as precursors while wake structures consisting of linear DAWs are seen to propagate in the downstream region. A theoretical explanation of these excitations based on the forced Korteweg-deVries model equation is provided and their practical implications in situations involving a charged object moving in a plasma are discussed.

  15. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  16. Observation of plasma jets in a table top plasma focus discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo, E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, CCHEN, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile); Pedreros, José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, CCHEN, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Tarifeño-Saldivia, Ariel [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, CCHEN, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile)

    2015-04-15

    In the last years, medium size Z-pinch experiments operating at tens of kJ are being used to create supersonic plasma jets. Those experiments are produced with wire arrays and radial foils, and they are conducted in generators based on water-filled transmission lines. Also plasma jets have been observed in small X-pinch experiments operating at 1 kJ. In this work, observations of plasma jets produced in a table top plasma focus device by means of optical and digital interferometry are shown. The device was operated at only ∼70 J, achieving 50 kA in 150 ns. The plasma jets were observed after the pinch, in the region close and on the anode, along the axis. The electron density measured from the jets is in the range 10{sup 24}–10{sup 25 }m{sup −3}. From two consecutive plasma images separated 18 ns, the axial jet velocity was measured in the order of 4 × 10{sup 4 }m/s.

  17. Plasma heating in a post eruption Current Sheet: a case study based on ultraviolet, soft, and hard X-ray data

    CERN Document Server

    Susino, Roberto; Krucker, Säm

    2013-01-01

    Off-limb observations of the solar corona after Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) often show strong, compact, and persistent UV sources behind the eruption. They are primarily observed by the SOHO/UVCS instrument in the "hot" Fe XVIII {\\lambda}974 {\\AA} line and are usually interpreted as a signature of plasma heating due to magnetic reconnection in the post-CME Current Sheet (CS). Nevertheless, the physical process itself and the altitude of the main energy release are currently not fully understood. In this work, we studied the evolution of plasma heating after the CME of 2004 July 28 by comparing UV spectra acquired by UVCS with soft X-ray (SXR) and hard X-ray (HXR)images of the post-flare loops taken by GOES/SXI and RHESSI. The X-ray data show a long-lasting extended source that is rising upwards, toward the high-temperature source detected by UVCS. UVCS data show the presence of significant non-thermal broadening in the CS (signature of turbulent motions) and a strong density gradient across the CS region. T...

  18. Predawn plasma bubble cluster observed in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watthanasangmechai, Kornyanat; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Saito, Akinori; Tsunoda, Roland; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Supnithi, Pornchai; Ishii, Mamoru; Yatini, Clara

    2016-06-01

    Predawn plasma bubble was detected as deep plasma depletion by GNU Radio Beacon Receiver (GRBR) network and in situ measurement onboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program F15 (DMSPF15) satellite and was confirmed by sparse GPS network in Southeast Asia. In addition to the deep depletion, the GPS network revealed the coexisting submesoscale irregularities. A deep depletion is regarded as a primary bubble. Submesoscale irregularities are regarded as secondary bubbles. Primary bubble and secondary bubbles appeared together as a cluster with zonal wavelength of 50 km. An altitude of secondary bubbles happened to be lower than that of the primary bubble in the same cluster. The observed pattern of plasma bubble cluster is consistent with the simulation result of the recent high-resolution bubble (HIRB) model. This event is only a single event out of 76 satellite passes at nighttime during 3-25 March 2012 that significantly shows plasma depletion at plasma bubble wall. The inside structure of the primary bubble was clearly revealed from the in situ density data of DMSPF15 satellite and the ground-based GRBR total electron content.

  19. Study of Anti-Hydrogen and Plasma Physics 4.Observation of Antiproton Beams and Nonneutral Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Fujiwara, Makoto; Kuroda, Naofumi

    2004-01-01

    Diagnostics of antiproton beams and nonneutral plasmas are described in this chapter. Parallel plate secondary electron emission detectors are used to non-destructively observe the beam position and intensity without loss. Plastic scintillation tracking detectors are useful in determining the position of annihilations of antiprotons in the trap. Three-dimensional imaging of antiprotons in a Penning trap is discussed. The unique capability of antimatter particle imaging has allowed the observation of the spatial distribution of particle loss in a trap. Radial loss is localized to small spots, strongly breaking the azimuthal symmetry expected for an ideal trap. By observing electrostatic eigen-modes of nonneutral plasmas trapped in the Multi-ring electrode trap, the non-destructive measurement of plasma parameters is performed.

  20. Observation of ice sheet formation on methane and ethane gas hydrates using a scanning confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, J.; Shimomura, N.; Ebinuma, T.; Narita, H. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Toyohira, Sapporo (Japan). Methane Hydrate Research Lab.

    2008-07-01

    Interest in gas hydrates has increased in recent years due to the discovery of large deposits under the ocean floor and in permafrost regions. Natural gas hydrates, including methane, is expected to become a new energy source and a medium for energy storage and transportation. Gas hydrates consist of an open network of water molecules that are hydrogen-bonded in a similar manner to ice. Gas molecules are interstitially engaged under high pressures and low temperatures. Although the dissociation temperature of methane hydrate under atmospheric pressure is about 193 K, studies have shown that methane hydrate can be stored at atmospheric pressure and 267 K for 2 years. Because of this phenomenon, known as self-preservation, transportation and storage of methane hydrate can occur at temperature conditions milder than those for liquefied methane gas at atmospheric pressure. This study examined the surface changes of methane and ethane hydrates during dissociation using an optical microscope and confocal scanning microscope (CSM). This paper reported on the results when the atmospheric gas pressure was decreased. Ice sheets formed on the surfaces of methane and ethane gas hydrates due to depressurizing dissociation of methane and ethane hydrates when the methane and ethane gas pressures were decreased at designated temperatures. The dissociation of methane gas hydrate below below 237 K resulted in the generation of small ice particles on the hydrate surface. A transparent ice sheet formed on the hydrate surface above 242 K. The thickness of the ice sheet on the methane hydrate surface showed the maximum of ca. 30 {mu}m at 253 K. In the case of ethane hydrates, ice particles and ice sheets formed below 262 and 267 respectively. Since the ice particles and ice sheets were formed by water molecules generated during the gas hydrate dissociation, the mechanism of ice sheet formation depends on the dissociation rate of hydrate, ice particle sintering rate, and water molecule

  1. Glacial isostatic adjustment at the Laurentide ice sheet margin: Models and observations in the Great Lakes region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Alexander; Kuo, Chung-Yen; Shum, C. K.; Wu, Patrick; van der Wal, Wouter; Fotopoulos, Georgia

    2008-10-01

    Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) modelling in North America relies on relative sea level information which is primarily obtained from areas far away from the uplift region. The lack of accurate geodetic observations in the Great Lakes region, which is located in the transition zone between uplift and subsidence due to the deglaciation of the Laurentide ice sheet, has prevented more detailed studies of this former margin of the ice sheet. Recently, observations of vertical crustal motion from improved GPS network solutions and combined tide gauge and satellite altimetry solutions have become available. This study compares these vertical motion observations with predictions obtained from 70 different GIA models. The ice sheet margin is distinct from the centre and far field of the uplift because the sensitivity of the GIA process towards Earth parameters such as mantle viscosity is very different. Specifically, the margin area is most sensitive to the uppermost mantle viscosity and allows for better constraints of this parameter. The 70 GIA models compared herein have different ice loading histories (ICE-3/4/5G) and Earth parameters including lateral heterogeneities. The root-mean-square differences between the 6 best models and the two sets of observations (tide gauge/altimetry and GPS) are 0.66 and 1.57 mm/yr, respectively. Both sets of independent observations are highly correlated and show a very similar fit to the models, which indicates their consistent quality. Therefore, both data sets can be considered as a means for constraining and assessing the quality of GIA models in the Great Lakes region and the former margin of the Laurentide ice sheet.

  2. Observations of nonthermal plasmas at different aspect angles

    OpenAIRE

    Winser, K. J.; Lockwood, Mike; G. O. L. Jones; Suvanto, K.

    1989-01-01

    Data are presented from the EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter (Facility)) CP-3-E experiment which show large increases in the auroral zone convection velocities (>2 km s−1) over a wide range of latitudes. These are larger than the estimated neutral thermal speed and allow a study of the plasma in a nonthermal state over a range of observing angles. Spectra are presented which show a well-defined central peak, consistent with an ion velocity distribution function which significantly departs ...

  3. Nanoshaping field emitters from glassy carbon sheets: a new functionality induced by H-plasma etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, S; Orlanducci, S; Passeri, D; Rossi, M; Terranova, M L

    2016-09-14

    This paper reports on the morphological and electrical characterization at the nanometer scale and the investigation of the field emission characteristics of glassy carbon (GC) plates which underwent H-induced physical/chemical processes occurring in a dual-mode MW-RF plasma reactor. Plasma treatment produced on the GC surface arrays of vertically aligned conically shaped nanostructures, with density and height depending on the plasma characteristics. Two kinds of samples obtained under two different bias regimes have been deeply analyzed using an AFM apparatus equipped with tools for electric forces and surface potential measurements. The features of electron emission via the Field Emission (FE) mechanism have been correlated with the morphology and the structure at the nanoscale of the treated glassy carbon samples. The measured current density and the characteristics of the emission, which follow the Fowler-Nordheim law, indicate that the plasma-based methodology utilized for the engineering of the GC surfaces is able to turn conventional GC plates into efficient emission devices. The outstanding properties of GC suggest the use of such nanostructured materials for the assembling of cold cathodes to be used in a harsh environment and under extreme P/T conditions.

  4. Current Sheet Structures Observed by the TESIS EUV Telescope during a Flux Rope Eruption on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    We use the TESIS EUV telescope to study the current sheet signatures observed during flux rope eruption. The special feature of the TESIS telescope was its ability to image the solar corona up to a distance of 2 {R}⊙ from the Sun’s center in the Fe 171 Å line. The Fe 171 Å line emission illuminates the magnetic field lines, and the TESIS images reveal the coronal magnetic structure at high altitudes. The analyzed coronal mass ejection (CME) had a core with a spiral—flux rope—structure. The spiral shape indicates that the flux rope radius varied along its length. The flux rope had a complex temperature structure: cold legs (70,000 K, observed in He 304 Å line) and a hotter core (0.7 MK, observed in Fe 171 Å line). Such a structure contradicts the common assumption that the CME core is a cold prominence. When the CME impulsively accelerated, a dark double Y-structure appeared below the flux rope. The Y-structure timing, location, and morphology agree with the previously performed MHD simulations of the current sheet. We interpreted the Y-structure as a hot envelope of the current sheet and hot reconnection outflows. The Y-structure had a thickness of 6.0 Mm. Its length increased over time from 79 Mm to more than 411 Mm.

  5. Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Ceccni, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    Results are presented from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first few orbits around Saturn. During the approach the intensity modulation of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) showed that the radio rotation period of Saturn has increased to 10 hr 45 min plus or minus 36 sec, about 6 min longer than measured by Voyager in 1980-81. Also, many intense impulsive radio signals called Saturn Electrostatic Discharges (SEDs) were detected from saturnian lightning, starting as far as 1.08 AU from Saturn, much farther than terrestrial lightning can be detected from Earth. Some of the SED episodes have been linked to cloud systems observed in Saturn s atmosphere by the Cassini imaging system. Within the magnetosphere plasma wave emissions have been used to construct an electron density profile through the inner region of the magnetosphere. With decreasing radial distance the electron density increases gradually to a peak of about 100 per cubic centimeter near the outer edge of the A ring, and then drops precipitously to values as low as .03 per cubic centimeter over the rings. Numerous nearly monochromatic whistler-mode emissions were observed as the spacecraft passed over the rings that are believed to be produced by meteoroid impacts on the rings. Whistlermode emissions, similar to terrestrial auroral hiss were also observed over the rings, indicating that an electrodynamic interaction, similar to auroral particle acceleration, may be occurring in or near the rings. During the Titan flybys Langmuir probe and plasma wave measurements provided observations of the density and temperature in Titan's ionosphere.

  6. Comparing predicted and observed spatial boundaries of geologic phenomena: Automated Proximity and Conformity Analysis applied to ice sheet reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napieralski, Jacob; Li, Yingkui; Harbor, Jon

    2006-02-01

    Comparing predicted with observed geologic data is a central element of many aspects of research in the geosciences, e.g., comparing numerical ice sheet models with geomorphic data to test ice sheet model parameters and accuracy. However, the ability to verify predictions using empirical data has been limited by the lack of objective techniques that provide systematic comparison and statistical assessment of the goodness of correspondence between predictions of spatial and temporal patterns of geologic phenomena and the field evidence. Much of this problem arises from the inability to quantify the level of agreement between straight or curvilinear features, such as between the modeled extent of some geologic phenomenon and the field evidence for the extent of the phenomenon. Automated Proximity and Conformity Analysis (APCA) addresses this challenge using a system of Geographic Information System-based buffering that determines the general proximity and parallel conformity between linear features. APCA results indicate which modeled output fits empirical data, based on the distance and angle between features. As a result, various model outputs can be sorted according to overall level of agreement by comparison with one or multiple features from field evidence, based on proximity and conformity values. In an example application drawn from glacial geomorphology, APCA is integrated into an overall model verification process that includes matching modeled ice sheets to known marginal positions and ice flow directions, among other parameters. APCA is not limited to ice sheet or glacier models, but can be applied to many geoscience areas where the extent or geometry of modeled results need to be compared against field observations, such as debris flows, tsunami run-out, lava flows, or flood extents.

  7. Heliosheath Magnetic Field and Plasma Observed by Voyager 2 during 2012 in the Rising Phase of Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Richardson, J. D.; Decker, R. B.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss magnetic field and plasma observations of the heliosheath made by Voyager 2 (V2) during 2012, when V2 was observing the effects of increasing solar activity following the solar minimum in 2009. The average magnetic field strength B was 0.14 nT and B reached 0.29 nT on day 249. V2 was in a unipolar region in which the magnetic polarity was directed away from the Sun along the Parker spiral 88% of the time, indicating that V2 was poleward of the heliospheric current sheet throughout most of 2012. The magnetic flux at V2 during 2012 was constant. A merged interaction region (MIR) was observed, and the flow speed increased as the MIR moved past V2. The MIR caused a decrease in the >70 MeV nuc-1 cosmic-ray intensity. The increments of B can be described by a q-Gaussian distribution with q = 1.2 ± 0.1 for daily averages and q = 1.82 ± 0.03 for hour averages. Eight isolated current sheets (“PBLs”) and four closely spaced pairs of current sheets were observed. The average change of B across the current sheets was a factor of ≈2, and B increased or decreased with equal probability. Magnetic holes and magnetic humps were also observed. The characteristic size of the PBLs was ≈6 RL, where RL is the Larmor radius of protons, and the characteristic sizes of the magnetic holes and humps were ≈38 RL and ≈11 RL, respectively.

  8. HELIOSHEATH MAGNETIC FIELD AND PLASMA OBSERVED BY VOYAGER 2 DURING 2012 IN THE RISING PHASE OF SOLAR CYCLE 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlaga, L. F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States); Ness, N. F. [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Richardson, J. D. [Kavli Center for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Decker, R. B.; Krimigis, S. M. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland (United States)

    2016-02-20

    We discuss magnetic field and plasma observations of the heliosheath made by Voyager 2 (V2) during 2012, when V2 was observing the effects of increasing solar activity following the solar minimum in 2009. The average magnetic field strength B was 0.14 nT and B reached 0.29 nT on day 249. V2 was in a unipolar region in which the magnetic polarity was directed away from the Sun along the Parker spiral 88% of the time, indicating that V2 was poleward of the heliospheric current sheet throughout most of 2012. The magnetic flux at V2 during 2012 was constant. A merged interaction region (MIR) was observed, and the flow speed increased as the MIR moved past V2. The MIR caused a decrease in the >70 MeV nuc{sup −1} cosmic-ray intensity. The increments of B can be described by a q-Gaussian distribution with q = 1.2 ± 0.1 for daily averages and q = 1.82 ± 0.03 for hour averages. Eight isolated current sheets (“PBLs”) and four closely spaced pairs of current sheets were observed. The average change of B across the current sheets was a factor of ≈2, and B increased or decreased with equal probability. Magnetic holes and magnetic humps were also observed. The characteristic size of the PBLs was ≈6 R{sub L}, where R{sub L} is the Larmor radius of protons, and the characteristic sizes of the magnetic holes and humps were ≈38 R{sub L} and ≈11 R{sub L}, respectively.

  9. Plasma Turbulence in Earth's Magnetosheath Observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission over the First Sub-Solar Apogee Pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackler, D. A.; Avanov, L. A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C.; Smith, S. E.; Uritsky, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection, a process in which the magnetic topology undergoes multi-scale changes, is a significant mechanism for particle energization as well as energy dissipation. Reconnection is observed to occur in thin current sheets generated between two regions of magnetized plasma merging with a non-zero shear angle. Within a thinning current sheet, the dominant scale size approaches first the ion and then electron kinetic scale. The plasma becomes demagnetized, field lines transform, then once again the plasma becomes frozen-in. The reconnection process accelerates particles, leading to heated jets of plasma. Turbulence is another fundamental process in collisionless plasmas. Despite decades of turbulence studies, an essential science question remains as to how turbulent energy dissipates at small scales by heating and accelerating particles. Turbulence in both plasmas and fluids has a fundamental property in that it follows an energy cascade into smaller scales. Energy introduced into a fluid or plasma can cause large scale motion, introducing vorticity, which merge and interact to make increasingly smaller eddies. It has been hypothesized that turbulent energy in magnetized plasmas may be dissipated by magnetic reconnection, just as viscosity dissipates energy in neutral fluid turbulence. The focus of this study is to use the new high temporal resolution suite of instruments on board the Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission to explore this hypothesis. An observable feature of the energy cascade in a turbulent magnetized plasma is its similarity to classical hydrodynamics in that the Power Spectral Density (PSD) of turbulent fluctuations follows a Kolmogorov-like power law (f -5/3). We use highly accurate (0.1 nT) Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM) data to derive the PSD as a function of frequency in the magnetic fluctuations. Given that we are able to confirm the turbulent nature of the flow field; we apply the method of Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) to

  10. Plasma motion observations in a very small plasma focus in the limit of low energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, L.; Silva, P.; Moreno, J. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Casilla 188-D Santiago, (Chile); Altamirano, L. [Dicontek, Pasaje Galicia 11365, La Florida, Santiago (Chile); Clausse, A. [PLADEMA, UNCPBA Tandil and Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)

    2003-07-01

    A very small plasma focus device has been designed and constructed. The plasma focus operates in the limit of low energy (160 n F capacitor bank, 65 n H, 20 - 40 kV, {approx} 32 - 100 J). The design of the electrode was assisted by a simple model of a Mather plasma focus. A neutron yield of 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} is expected when the discharge is operated with deuterium. Experiments in H{sub 2} has been performed at pressures over the range 0.1 to 2 mbar. The diagnostics used in the experiments include current derivative, voltage monitor, and plasma image using a ICCD camera gated at 5 ns. The umbrella-like current sheath running over the end of the coaxial electrodes and the pinch after the radial collapse can be clearly observed in the photographs. The velocity of the radial collapse is of the order of 10{sup 5} m/s. The observations are similar to the results obtained with devices operating at energies several order of magnitude higher. (Author)

  11. Evidence for a current sheet forming in the wake of a Coronal Mass Ejection from multi-viewpoint coronagraph observations

    OpenAIRE

    Patsourakos, S.; Vourlidas, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ray-like features observed by coronagraphs in the wake of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are sometimes interpreted as the white light counterparts of current sheets (CSs) produced by the eruption. The 3D geometry of these ray-like features is largely unknown and its knowledge should clarify their association to the CS and place constraints on CME physics and coronal conditions. With this study we test these important implications for the first time. An example of such a post-CME ray was observ...

  12. Mapping the Plasma Structure of the Central Magnetotail Using Artemis Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencturk Akay, Iklim; Sibeck, David; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Kaymaz, Zerefsan

    2016-07-01

    Since 2011, ARTEMIS spacecraft 1 and 2 take observations from the dayside solar wind, nightside magnetopause and the magnetotail interior while they orbit around the Earth, as well as the Moon. With the state-of-the-art instruments, ARTEMIS probes perform the first systematic, two-point observations of the mid-to-distant tail and allow us to determine how the tail dynamics work and controlled at lunar distances, around -60 Re. In this study, we use magnetic field and plasma parameters of ARTEMIS probes to investigate the physical and dynamical processes that determine the structure of the tail and its variations in response to the changes in IMF and solar wind. We use approximately 2 years data from the ARTEMIS spacecraft to create the vector maps of the plasma flow. After several coordinate transformations, vector maps were constructed on different planes, xy-, xz-, and yz, in aberrated solar wind corrected GSM (aSWGSM) coordinates, and a relatively good orbital coverage of the central magnetotail was obtained. Flow vectors in YZ-plane are generally toward the center of the plasma sheet; being southward/northward in the northern/southern hemisphere. Vector maps of the flow in xy- and xz-planes show that the dominant flow is tailward. The percentage of tailward flows is about 62%-72% percentages and the speed of the flow ranges from a few tens of a km/sec to over 400km/sec. Vector maps were separated with respect to the IMF orientation. Magnetic field patterns complimentary to the flow patterns were also performed and revealed the expected distorted dipolar field topology at -60 Re. We discuss our findings from the magnetotail dynamics point of view and comparisons will be made with those obtained from earlier spacecraft missions.

  13. Predicting Plasma Glucose From Interstitial Glucose Observations Using Bayesian Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Alexander Hildenbrand; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Juhl, Rune

    2014-01-01

    One way of constructing a control algorithm for an artificial pancreas is to identify a model capable of predicting plasma glucose (PG) from interstitial glucose (IG) observations. Stochastic differential equations (SDEs) make it possible to account both for the unknown influence of the continuous...... glucose monitor (CGM) and for unknown physiological influences. Combined with prior knowledge about the measurement devices, this approach can be used to obtain a robust predictive model. A stochastic-differential-equation-based gray box (SDE-GB) model is formulated on the basis of an identifiable...

  14. Simultaneous Mars Express / MGS observations of plasma near Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, D.; Luhmann, J.; Halekas, J.; Frahm, R.; Winningham, D.; Barabash, S.

    2006-12-01

    Since late 2003, Mars Express (MEX) and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) have been making complementary in situ measurements (in terms of both instrument and orbit) of the Martian plasma environment. Study of MGS and MEX data in tandem provides an opportunity to mitigate the shortcomings of each dataset and increase our overall understanding of the Martian solar wind interaction and atmospheric escape. Close passes of spacecraft (conjunctions) are one particularly powerful means of increasing the utility of measurements, as evidenced by the Cluster mission at Earth. At Mars, conjunctions might be used to obtain more complete simultaneous and/or co-located plasma measurements, which can be used to study a variety of phenomena, including measurements of auroral-like particle acceleration near crustal fields and the three-dimensional motion and shape of plasma boundaries. We will present an analysis of approximately forty conjunctions (instances with instantaneous spacecraft separation smaller than 400 km) of MEX and MGS identified between January 2004 and February 2006. The closest pass was ~40~km, near the South Pole. Conjunctions occur both at mid-latitudes (when the surface-projected orbit tracks of the two spacecraft nearly overlap), and at the poles. We will present comparisons of MEX Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-3) data with MGS Magnetometer and Electron Reflectometer (MAG/ER) data for these events. Our case studies include intercomparison of MEX and MGS electron data, the addition of MGS magnetic field and MEX ion data, and the inclusion of solar wind proxy information to establish context. In addition to these close conjunctions, we will present the preliminary results of a search for times when MEX and MGS pass through the same region of space separated by a delay (for time evolution of plasma populations in certain regions), and times when they occupy the same flux tube (for spatial evolution of particle distributions). Continued study of

  15. Tensile failure of thin aluminium sheet observed by in-situ EBSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, S.; Peng, R. L.; Johansson, S.

    2015-04-01

    Tensile tests on two similar 75-μm-thick aluminium sheet materials were carried out inside a scanning electron microscope equipped with an electron backscatter detector. The materials were subjected to simulated brazing prior to the test because this type of material is used for fins in automotive heat exchangers. Grain sizes were large relative to sheet thickness and ND-rotated cube and P texture components dominated the recrystallization textures; their volume fractions differed strongly in the two different materials, though. Strains over the microscope image fields were determined from positions of constituent particles or from grain sizes; the two methods gave consistent results. Grains with high Schmid factors accumulated significantly more deformation than grains with low Schmid factors. Cracks nucleated in high-Schmid factor grains, or in groups of such grains, at the specimen edges. When only low-Schmid factor grains were present at the specimen edges, the crack nucleated inside the specimen. The subsequent crack growth was intragranular and occurred at approximately 90° relative to the load direction.

  16. Experimental observations of driven and intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental observations of driven and intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas are reviewed. For momentum sources, there is direct drive from neutral beam injection, lower hybrid and ion cyclotron range of frequencies waves (including mode conversion flow drive), as well as indirect \\mathbf{j}× \\mathbf{B} forces from fast ion and electron orbit shifts, and toroidal magnetic field ripple loss. Counteracting rotation drive are sinks, such as from neutral drag and toroidal viscosity. Many of these observations are in agreement with the predictions of neo-classical theory while others are not, and some cases of intrinsic rotation remain puzzling. In contrast to particle and heat fluxes which depend on the relevant diffusivity and convection, there is an additional term in the momentum flux, the residual stress, which can act as the momentum source for intrinsic rotation. This term is independent of the velocity or its gradient, and its divergence constitutes an intrinsic torque. The residual stress, which ultimately responds to the underlying turbulence, depends on the confinement regime and is a complicated function of collisionality, plasma shape, and profiles of density, temperature, pressure and current density. This leads to the rich intrinsic rotation phenomenology. Future areas of study include integration of these many effects, advancement of quantitative explanations for intrinsic rotation and development of strategies for velocity profile control.

  17. Cassini in Titan's tail: CAPS observations of plasma escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Lewis, G. R.; Arridge, C. S.; Crary, F. J.; Young, D. T.; Thomsen, M. F.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Johnson, R. E.; Szego, K.; Bebesi, Z.; Jones, G. H.

    2012-05-01

    We present observations of CAPS electron and ion spectra during Titan distant tail crossings at 5,000-10,000 km altitude by the Cassini spacecraft. In common with closer tail encounters, we identify ionospheric plasma in the tail. Some of the electron spectra indicate a direct magnetic connection to Titan's dayside ionosphere due to the presence of ionospheric photoelectrons. Ion observations reveal heavy (m/q˜ 16 and 28) and light (m/q = 1-2) ion populations streaming into the tail. Using the distant tail encounters T9, T75 and T63, we estimate total plasma loss rates from Titan via this process of (4.2, 0.96 and 2.3) × 1024 ions s-1 respectively for the three encounters, values which are in agreement with some simulations but slightly lower than earlier estimates based on non-differential techniques. Using the mass-separated data, this corresponds to mass loss rates of (8.9, 1.6, 4.0) × 1025 amu s-1 for T9, T75 and T63 respectively, an average loss rate of ˜7 tonnes per Earth day. Remarkably, all of the tail encounters studied here indicate a split tail feature, indicating that this may be a common feature in Titan's interaction with Saturn's magnetosphere.

  18. Direct observational evidence for the merging of equatorial plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, V. L.; Gurubaran, S.; Shiokawa, K.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we present direct ground-based observational evidence for the merging of individual equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) obtained through the imaging of OI 630.0 nm airglow. Three potential mechanisms have been identified: (1) One of the EPBs tilts and reaches location of the adjacent growing EPB finally merging with it. (2) Some of the branches of an EPB arising from secondary instabilities reach out to adjacent EPB and merge with it. (3) The eastward zonal drift of the EPB on the eastern side slows down while the adjacent EPB on the western side drifts relatively faster and catches up. In one of the cases, a branch of an EPB was observed to get interchanged with another EPB as a result of merging and consequent pinching off from the parent EPB.

  19. Comparative analysis of the processing accuracy of high strength metal sheets by AWJ, laser and plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, M. C.; Schnakovszky, C.; Herghelegiu, E.; Tampu, N. C.; Zichil, V.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental tests were carried out on two high-strength steel materials (Ramor 400 and Ramor 550). Quantification of the dimensional accuracy was achieved by measuring the deviations from some geometric parameters of part (two lengths and two radii). It was found that in case of Ramor 400 steel, at the jet inlet, the deviations from the part radii are quite small for all the three analysed processes. Instead for the linear dimensions, the deviations are small only in case of laser cutting. At the jet outlet, the deviations raised in small amount compared to those obtained at the jet inlet for both materials as well as for all the three processes. Related to Ramor 550 steel, at the jet inlet the deviations from the part radii are very small in case of AWJ and laser cutting but larger in case of plasma cutting. At the jet outlet, the deviations from the part radii are very small for all processes; in case of linear dimensions, there was obtained very small deviations only in the case of laser processing, the other two processes leading to very large deviations.

  20. Using PEACE Data from the four CLUSTER Spacecraft to Measure Compressibility, Vorticity, and the Taylor Microscale in the Magnetosheath and Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Parks, George; Gurgiolo, C.; Fazakerley, Andrew N.

    2008-01-01

    We present determinations of compressibility and vorticity in the magnetosheath and plasma sheet using moments from the four PEACE thermal electron instruments on CLUSTER. The methodology used assumes a linear variation of the moments throughout the volume defined by the four satellites, which allows spatially independent estimates of the divergence, curl, and gradient. Once the vorticity has been computed, it is possible to estimate directly the Taylor microscale. We have shown previously that the technique works well in the solar wind. Because the background flow speed in the magnetosheath and plasma sheet is usually less than the Alfven speed, the Taylor frozen-in-flow approximation cannot be used. Consequently, this four spacecraft approach is the only viable method for obtaining the wave number properties of the ambient fluctuations. Our results using electron velocity moments will be compared with previous work using magnetometer data from the FGM experiment on Cluster.

  1. Current Sheet Structures Observed by the TESIS EUV Telescope During A Flux Rope Eruption on the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Reva, Anton; Kuzin, Ssergey

    2016-01-01

    We use the TESIS EUV telescope to study the current sheet signatures observed during flux rope eruption. The special feature of the TESIS telescope was its ability to image the solar corona up to a distance of 2 $R_\\odot$ from the Sun's center in the Fe 171 \\AA\\ line. The Fe 171 \\AA\\ line emission illuminates the magnetic field lines, and the TESIS images reveal the coronal magnetic structure at high altitudes. The analyzed CME had a core with a spiral-flux rope-structure. The spiral shape indicates that the flux rope radius varied along its length. The flux rope had a complex temperature structure: cold legs (70 000 K, observed in He 304 \\AA\\ line) and a hotter core (0.7 MK, observed in Fe 171 \\AA\\ line). Such structure contradicts the common assumption that the CME core is a cold prominence. When the CME impulsively accelerated, a dark double Y-structure appeared below the flux rope. The Y-structure timing, location, and morphology agree with the previously performed MHD simulations of the current sheet. We...

  2. Uncertainty in Observed and Modelled Cloud Fraction Over Greenland and its Impact on the Ice Sheet Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, J.; Bamber, J.

    2006-12-01

    Clouds have an important controlling influence on the radiative balance, and as a consequence ablation rates, over the Greenland ice sheet. In addition, to derive reliable estimates of surface albedo, temperature and radiative fluxes from satellite data, it is necessary to adequately identify clouds in imagery. Energy balance models (EBM) for the ice sheet have been developed that use both parameterizations for cloud cover and numerical weather prediction re-analysis data. Little is known, however, about the true cloud cover characteristics over Greenland to assess the quality of these EBM inputs. Here, we attempt to address this knowledge gap by examining cloud characteristics, as determined by three different satellites sensors: AVHRR, ATSR-2 and MODIS. The first provides a multi-decadal time series of clouds, albedo and surface temperature and is available as a homogeneous, consistent data set from 1982. AVHRR data, however, is also the most challenging to cloud clear over snow-covered terrain, due to the limited spectral capabilities of the instrument, while ATSR-2 permits identification and classification using stereo- photogrammetric techniques and MODIS has enhanced spectral sampling in the visible. We compare spatial and seasonal cloud fractions from the three sensors against each other and with synoptic coastal and automatic weather station data. We then assess the cloud fractions, and inferred patterns of accumulation, from the two most commonly used re-analysis data sets: NCEP/NCAR and ERA-40. We find poor agreement between the two re-analysis data sets. In addition, they bear little similarity to the observed cloud fractions derived from the satellite observations. This implies that they likely produce poor accumulation estimates over the ice sheet, but also poor estimates of radiation balance. Using the re-analysis data to force an EBM, without appropriate downscaling and correction for the substantial biases present, would, therefore, produce serious

  3. Phenomenological review on Quark-Gluon Plasma: concepts vs observations

    CERN Document Server

    Pasechnik, Roman

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we present an up-to-date phenomenological summary of research developments in physics of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). A short historical perspective and theoretical motivation for this rapidly developing field of contemporary Particle Physics is provided. In addition, we introduce and discuss the role of the QCD ground state, non-perturbative and lattice QCD results on the QGP properties as well as the transport models used to make a connection between theory and experiment. The experimental part presents the selected results on bulk observables, hard and penetrating probes obtained in the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion experiments carried out at BNL RHIC, CERN SPS and LHC accelerators. We also give a brief overview of new developments related to the ongoing searches of the QCD critical point and to the collectivity in small ($p+p$ and $p+A$) systems.

  4. Recent progress in astrophysical plasma turbulence from solar wind observations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarises some of the recent progress that has been made in understanding astrophysical plasma turbulence in the solar wind, from in situ spacecraft observations. At large scales, where the turbulence is predominantly Alfvenic, measurements of critical balance, residual energy, and 3D structure are discussed, along with comparison to recent models of strong Alfvenic turbulence. At these scales, a few percent of the energy is also in compressive fluctuations, and their nature, anisotropy, and relation to the Alfvenic component is described. In the small scale kinetic range, below the ion gyroscale, the turbulence becomes predominantly kinetic Alfven in nature, and measurements of the spectra, anisotropy, and intermittency of this turbulence are discussed with respect to recent cascade models. One of the major remaining questions is how the turbulent energy is dissipated, and some recent work on this question, in addition to future space missions which will help to answer it, are briefly discussed.

  5. Observations of Microwave Continuum Emission from Air Shower Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Gorham, P W; Varner, G S; Beatty, J J; Connolly, A; Chen, P; Conde, M E; Gai, W; Hast, C; Hebert, C L; Miki, C; Konecny, R; Kowalski, J; Ng, J; Power, J G; Reil, K; Saltzberg, D; Stokes, B T; Walz, D

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a possible new technique for microwave measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) extensive air showers which relies on detection of expected continuum radiation in the microwave range, caused by free-electron collisions with neutrals in the tenuous plasma left after the passage of the shower. We performed an initial experiment at the AWA (Argonne Wakefield Accelerator) laboratory in 2003 and measured broadband microwave emission from air ionized via high energy electrons and photons. A follow-up experiment at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) in summer of 2004 confirmed the major features of the previous AWA observations with better precision and made additional measurements relevant to the calorimetric capabilities of the method. Prompted by these results we built a prototype detector using satellite television technology, and have made measurements indicating possible detection of cosmic ray extensive air showers. The method, if confirmed by experiments now in progress, cou...

  6. Plasma phenomena observed in the MAP-WINE campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, M.

    The wealth of plasma data gathered in the MAP-WINE campaign allows insight into the generation and morphology of electron densities on a large scale, and the nature of the ions on a small scale. The associated measurements of winds and charged particles help to understand the morphology of the mid-latitude ionisation which turns out to correlate poorly with geomagnetic activity, but at least slightly with the prevailing winds. A somewhat clearer connection seems to exist between stratospheric warmings and radio wave absorption minima. On the local scale the interpretation of the rocket measurements of positive ions was helped by simultaneous observations of temperatures and atomic oxygen. The relevance of the description ``winter anomaly'' for high latitude electron density profiles will be examined.

  7. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed in the plasma depletion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Murr, D.

    1991-01-01

    Observations from AMPTE/CCE in the earth's magnetosheath on October 5, 1984 are presented to illustrate 0.1 - 4.0 Hz magnetic field pulsations in the subsolar plasma depletion layer (PDL) for northward sheath field during a magnetospheric compression. The PDL is unambiguously identified by comparing CCE data with data from IRM in the upstream solar wind. Pulsations in the PDL are dominated by transverse waves with F/F(H+) 1.0 or less and a slot in spectral power at F/F(H+) = 0.5. The upper branch is left hand polarized while the lower branch is linearly polarized. In the sheath the proton temperature anisotropy is about 0.6 but it is about 1.7 in the PDL during wave occurrence. The properties and correlation of waves with increased anisotropy indicate that they are electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  8. Studying the Important Relationship Between Earth's Plasma Sheet and the Outer Radiation Belt Electrons Using Newly Calibrated and Corrected Themis-Sst Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruce, P. R.; Turner, D. L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Larson, D. E.; Shprits, Y.; Huang, C.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Most recently, the solid-state telescope (SST) data from the THEMIS mission, which consisted of 5 spacecraft in highly elliptic, equatorial orbits that have traversed the outer radiation belt and sampled the plasma sheet for more than 4 years, have been characterized, calibrated, and decontaminated. Here, we present a brief introduction on this corrected dataset and go into detail on the valuable resource it provides to address science questions concerning the important relationship between ~1 keV-10's keV electrons in the plasma sheet and 100's keV-MeV electrons in Earth's outer radiation belt. We demonstrate this by presenting preliminary results on: studying phase space density (PSD) radial gradients for fixed first and second adiabatic invariants from the radiation belt into the plasma sheet, examining pitch angle distributions near the boundary between these two regions, and studying the boundary region itself around the last closed drift shell and the role of magnetopause shadowing losses. We examine the dependence of PSD radial gradients on the first and second invariants to test previous results [e.g., Turner et al., GRL, 2008; Kim et al., JGR, 2010] that reveal mostly positive radial gradients for lower energy electrons (10's - couple hundred keV) but negative gradients for relativistic electrons beyond geosynchronous orbit. This directly relates to the current theory that lower energy electrons have a source in the plasma sheet and are introduced to the ring current and radiation belt via substorm injections and enhanced convection, and these particles then generate the waves necessary to accelerate a fraction of this seed population to relativistic energies, providing a source of the outer radiation belt. Next, we take advantage of the pitch angle resolved differential energy fluxes to examine variations in pitch angle distributions to establish the role that Shabansky drift orbits, which break electrons' second adiabatic invariant, play on outer belt

  9. Field-aligned current associated with low-latitude plasma blobs as observed by the CHAMP satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Park

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we give two examples of low-latitude plasma blobs accompanied by linearly polarized perpendicular magnetic deflections which imply that associated field-aligned currents (FACs have a 2-D sheet structure located at the blob walls. The estimated FAC density is of the order of 0.1 μA/m2. The direction of magnetic deflections points westward of the magnetic meridian and there is a linear correlation between perpendicular and parallel variations. All these properties are similar to those of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs. According to CHAMP observations from August 2000 to July 2004, blobs show except for these two good examples no clear signatures of 2-D FAC sheets at the walls. Generally, perpendicular magnetic deflections inside blobs are weaker than inside EPBs on average. Our results are consistent with existing theories: if a blob exists, (1 a significant part of EPB FAC will be closed through it, exhibiting similar perpendicular magnetic deflection inside EPBs and blobs, (2 the FAC closure through blobs leads to smaller perpendicular magnetic deflection at its poleward/downward side, and (3 superposition of different FAC elements might result in a complex magnetic signature around blobs.

  10. Airborne observations of changes of ice sheet and sea ice in the Arctic using CryoVEx campaign data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidegaard, Sine Munk; Skourup, Henriette; Forsberg, René

    DTU Space have collected surface elevation observations of the Arctic sea ice and land ice since 1998 using laser scanning and radar altimetry from a small fixed‐wing Twin‐Otter aircraft. The observations provide unique datasets for studying ongoing changes, and support the analysis of satellite......‐launch validation studies, with several aircraft and international in‐situ ground teams participating, both in Greenland, Arctic Canada, and Svalbard. The methods and campaigns are outlined together with examples of results.The campaigns focused on five main validation sites: Devon ice cap (Canada), Austfonna ice...... measurements of ice sheet changes. The majority of the campaigns have been sponsored by the European Space Agency, ESA, as part of the CryoSat Validation Experiments – CryoVEx. These have been internationally coordinated efforts to collect coincident space‐borne, airborne, and in‐situ data for pre‐ and post...

  11. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY, AND ASTROPHYSICS: Cluster Observation of Electrostatic Solitary Waves around Magnetic Null Point in Thin Current Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-You; Deng, Xiao-Hua; Zhou, Meng; Yuan, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Jing-Fang; Lin, Xi; Lin, Min-Hui; Fu, Song

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) are observed in the vicinity of the magnetic null of the widely studied magnetic reconnection taking place at the near-earth tail when current sheet becomes dramatic thinning during substorm time on 1 October 2001. We use the Imada method for the 2-D reconnection model and study the characteristics of ESWs near the X-line region and the magnetic null points. The result shows that the amplitude of the observed ESWs in the vicinity of X-line region ranges from 0.1 mV/m to 5 mV/m, and the amplitude is larger near the magnetic null points. The generation mechanism and the role of ESWs associated with magnetic reconnection are also discussed.

  12. Observations of runoff and sediment and dissolved loads from the Greenland Ice Sheet at Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland, 2007 to 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Bent; Mikkelsen, Andreas Peter Bech; Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard

    2012-01-01

    Observations from 2007 to 2010 of runoff, sediment and solute delivery from a segment of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) and the proglacial landscape draining into the fjord at Kangerlussuaq are presented. The observations include at least three jökulhlaups and extreme recordings from 2010...... previously published for 2007 and 2008. The average effective erosion from the catchment was 0.28 mm (min. 0.18 and max. 0.45 mm). The erosion is larger than indicated from most other locations along the GrIS, but in the same order of magnitude as erosion in other glaciated areas at the same latitude, e.......g. Norway. The sandur in the proglacial area acts as a sediment sink for a lot of the sediments from the GrIS....

  13. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunov, O., E-mail: lunov@fzu.cz; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K. [St. Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Syková, E. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Kubinová, Š. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic)

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  14. Solar system plasma Turbulence: Observations, inteRmittency and Multifractals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echim, Marius M.

    2016-04-01

    The FP7 project STORM is funded by the European Commission to "add value to existing data bases through a more comprehensive interpretation". STORM targets plasma and magnetic field databases collected in the solar wind (Ulysses and also some planetary missions), planetary magnetospheres (Venus Express, Cluster, a few orbits from Cassini), cometary magnetosheaths (e.g. Haley from Giotto observations). The project applies the same package of analysis methods on geomagnetic field observations from ground and on derived indices (e.g. AE, AL, AU, SYM-H). The analysis strategy adopted in STORM is built on the principle of increasing complexity, from lower (like, e.g., the Power Spectral Density - PSD) to higher order analyses (the Probability Distribution Functions - PDFs, Structure Functions - SFs, Fractals and Multifractals - MFs). Therefore STORM targets not only the spectral behavior of turbulent fluctuations but also their topology and scale behavior inferred from advanced mathematical algorithms and geometrical-like analogs. STORM started in January 2013 and ended in December 2015. We will report on a selection of scientific and technical achievements and will highlight: (1) the radial evolution of solar wind turbulence and intermittency based on Ulysses data with some contributions from Venus Express and Cluster; (2) comparative study of fast and slow wind turbulence and intermittency at solar minimum; (3) comparative study of the planetary response (Venus and Earth magnetosheaths) to turbulent solar wind; (4) the critical behavior of geomagnetic fluctuations and indices; (5) an integrated library for non-linear analysis of time series that includes all the approaches adopted in STORM to investigate solar system plasma turbulence. STORM delivers an unprecedented volume of analysed data for turbulence. The project made indeed a systematic survey, orbit by orbit, of data available from ESA repositories and Principal Investigators and provides results ordered as a

  15. Satellite observation of winter season subsurface liquid melt water retention on the Greenland ice sheet using spectroradiometer and scatterometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. Z.; Forster, R. R.; Long, D. G.; Brewer, S.

    2013-12-01

    The recently discovered perennial firn aquifer (PFA) represents a new glacier facie and a previously undefined liquid water storage mechanism on the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS). The current hypothesis suggests that at least two geophysical processes control the formation of the PFA: 1) high melt rates that saturate snow and firn layers with liquid water during the melt season, and 2) high snow accumulation rates that subsequently insulate this saturated layer allowing it to be retained in liquid form during the winter season. The PFA is potentially an important component in ice sheet mass and energy budget calculations, however, large-scale observations linking surface melt, subsurface liquid melt water retention, and the PFA currently do not exist. Satellite-borne spectroradiometers and scatterometers are frequently used to detect the presence of liquid water content over the GrIS. The sensor's penetration depth is dependent on the frequency (which determines wavelength) and time-varying geophysical properties (which determine absorption and scattering characteristics). At shorter spectral wavelengths, penetration depths are limited at the interface between the ice sheet surface and the atmosphere. Spectroradiometer-derived retrievals of liquid water content represent an integrated response on the order of a few millimeters. At longer microwave wavelengths (C- and Ku-band), penetration depths are increased. Scatterometer-derived retrievals of liquid water content represent an integrated response on the order of a few centimeters to several meters. We combine spectroradiometer data acquired from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard Terra and Aqua (MODIS) and C- and Ku-band scatterometer data acquired from MetOP-A (ASCAT) and OceanSAT-2 (OSCAT) to investigate the spatiotemporal variability of subsurface liquid water content on the GrIS. Penetration depth differences are exploited to distinguish between the detection of liquid water content

  16. Testing MHD models of prominences and flares with observations of solar plasma electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foukal, Peter V.; Behr, Bradford B.

    1995-02-01

    We present measurements of electric fields in quiescent prominences and in a small flare surge, obtained with CRI electrograph at the NSO/SP 40 cm coronagraph, in 1993 and 1994. Our results on the 9 brightest quiescent prominences enable us to place r.m.s. upper limits of Et less than 2 - 5 V/cm on the component of E transverse to the line of sight. We show that these upper limits may be difficult to reconcile with non-ideal MHD models of quiescent prominences formed in extended neutral sheets, whethere or not the tearing mode instability is present. They do, however, seem consistent with ideal MHD models of prominence support. We point out also that these upper limits are within a factor 4 of the minimum value of anistropic electric field that exists due to motional Stark effect in any thermal plasma permeated by a directed magnetic field. Our data on the flare surge suggest and electric field of intensity E approximately 35 V/cm, oriented approximately parallel to the inferred magnetic field. This detection of Eparallel needs to be verified in other flares. But we note that a detectable Eparallel would not be expected in the current interruption flare mechanism, if only a single double layer is present. We show further that the observed relatively narrow, approximately-Gaussian, and only slightly Doppler-shifted Paschen lines, seem inconsistent with the multiple double layers invoked in other models based on the current interruption mechanism. Our detection of Eparallel does seem consistent with reconnection (including tearing-mode) models of flares, provided the field-aligned electrical conductivity is anomalous over substantial volumes of the plasma circuit joining the reconnecting domain to the photosphere.

  17. Phenomenological Review on Quark–Gluon Plasma: Concepts vs. Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Pasechnik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we present an up-to-date phenomenological summary of research developments in the physics of the Quark–Gluon Plasma (QGP. A short historical perspective and theoretical motivation for this rapidly developing field of contemporary particle physics is provided. In addition, we introduce and discuss the role of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD ground state, non-perturbative and lattice QCD results on the QGP properties, as well as the transport models used to make a connection between theory and experiment. The experimental part presents the selected results on bulk observables, hard and penetrating probes obtained in the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion experiments carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (BNL RHIC and CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS and Large Hadron Collider (LHC accelerators. We also give a brief overview of new developments related to the ongoing searches of the QCD critical point and to the collectivity in small (p + p and p + A systems.

  18. Broadband plasma waves observed in the polar cap boundary layer: Polar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Lakhina, G. S.; Ho, C. M.; Arballo, J. K.; Galvan, C.; Boonsiriseth, A.; Pickett, J. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Peterson, W. K.; Thorne, R. M.

    1998-08-01

    waves near the noon sector. These waves may thus be responsible for ion heating observed near the cusp region. Antisunward convection of these freshly accelerated oxygen ions over the polar cap during intense wave events (occurring during southward Bz events) might lead to enhanced plasma sheet O+ population. For magnetic storm intervals this mechanism would lead to a natural delay between the main phase onset and the appearance of oxygen ions in the ring-current.

  19. Optimization Of Pulsed Current Parameters To Minimize Pitting Corrosion İn Pulsed Current Micro Plasma Arc Welded Aısı 304l Sheets Using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondapalli Siva Prasad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steel sheets have gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of components, which require high temperature resistance and corrosion resistance, such as metal bellows used in expansion joints in aircraft, aerospace and petroleum industry. In case of single pass welding of thinner sections of this alloy, Pulsed Current Micro Plasma Arc Welding (PCMPAW was found beneficial due to its advantages over the conventional continuous current process. This paper highlights the development of empirical mathematical equations using multiple regression analysis, correlating various process parameters to pitting corrosion rates in PCMPAW of AISI 304L sheets in 1 Normal HCl. The experiments were conducted based on a five factor, five level central composite rotatable design matrix. A Genetic Algorithm (GA was developed to optimize the process parameters for minimizing the pitting corrosion rates.

  20. Observations and analysis of FTU plasmas by video cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, R. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla fusione, CP 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Di Matteo, L., E-mail: lucy.dimatteo@enea.i [ENEA Fellow, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy)

    2010-11-11

    The interaction of the FTU plasma with the vessel walls and with the limiters is responsible for the release of hydrogen and impurities through various physical mechanisms (physical and chemical sputtering, desorption, etc.). In the cold plasma periphery, these particles are weakly ionised and emit mainly in the visible spectral range. A good description of plasma periphery can then be obtained by use of video cameras. In FTU small size video cameras, placed close to the plasma edge, give wide-angle images of the plasma at a standard rate of 25 frames/s. Images are stored digitally, allowing their retrieval and analysis. This paper reports some of the most interesting features of the discharges evidenced by the images. As a first example, the accumulation of cold neutral gas in the plasma periphery above a density threshold (a phenomenon known as Marfe) can be seen on the video images as a toroidally symmetric band oscillating poloidally; on the multi-chord spectroscopy or bolometer channels, this appears only as a sudden rise of the signals whose overall behaviour could not be clearly interpreted. A second example is the identification of runaway discharges by the signature of the fast electrons emitting synchrotron radiation in their motion direction; this appears as a bean shaped bright spot on one toroidal side, which reverts according to plasma current direction. A relevant side effect of plasma discharges, as potentially dangerous, is the formation of dust as a consequence of some strong plasma-wall interaction event; video images allow monitoring and possibly estimating numerically the amount of dust, which can be produced in these events. Specialised software can automatically search experimental database identifying relevant events, partly overcoming the difficulties associated with the very large amount of data produced by video techniques.

  1. Thin current sheets in the deep geomagnetic tail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulkkinen, T.I. (Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)); Baker, D.N.; Owen, C.J. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Gosling, J.T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Murphy, N. (Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States))

    1993-11-19

    The ISEE-3 magnetic field and plasma electron data from Jan-March 1983 have been searched to study thin current sheets in the deep tail region. 33 events were selected where the spacecraft crossed through the current sheet from lobe to lobe within 15 minutes. The average thickness of the observed current sheets was 2.45R[sub E], and in 24 cases the current sheet was thinner than 3.0R[sub E]; 6 very thin current sheets (thickness [lambda] < 0.5R[sub E]) were found. The electron data show that the very thin current sheets are associated with considerable temperature anisotropy. On average, the electron gradient current was [approximately]17% of the total current, whereas the current arising from the electron temperature anisotropy varied between 8-45% of the total current determined from the lobe field magnitude. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Theoretical aspects related to plasma flows observed in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somov, Boris

    I review the current state of affairs in the magnetohydrodynamic theories and models for large-scale high-speed plasma flows in solar flares. Main attension is payed to the coronal signatures and their relation to the photosphere and the heliosphere.The large-scale structure and dynamics of coronal plasma flows, as seen in EUV and soft X-rays, can be explained in terms of the three-dimensional reconnection at magnetic separators in the corona. More specifically, this reconnection is determined by the large-scale photospheric flows mainly of two types. First, the shear flows, which are parallel to the photospheric neutral line, increase the length of field lines in the corona an excess of magnetic energy. Second, the converging flows, directed to the neutral line, create the preflare slowly-reconnecting current layers in the corona and provide an excess of energy sufficient to produce a large flare. During the flare, both excesses of energy are released mainly as fast flows of coronal plasma as well as powerful heat fluxes and accelerated particles. The impulsive heating of the upper chromosphere creates a fast expansion of high-temperature plasma upwards into the corona, called the chromospheric `evaporation'. Basic properties of such flows are also reviewed together with draining with cooling. Ref.: Somov B.V., Plasma Astrophysics, Part II, Reconnection and Flares. Second Edition. Springer SBM, New York, 2013.

  3. Elemental Quantitative Distribution and Statistical Analysis on Cross Section of Stainless Steel Sheet by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-hua LUO; Hai-zhou WANG

    2015-01-01

    An innovative application of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) technique in illustrating elemental distributions on stainless steel sheets was presented. The technique proved to be a systematic and accurate ap-proach in producing visual images or maps of elemental distributions at cross-sectional surface of a stainless steel sheet. Two stain-less steel sheets served as research objects: 3 mm×1 300 mm hot-rolled stainless steel plate and 1 mm×1 260 mm cold-rolled plate. The cross-sectional surfaces of the two samples at 1/4 position along the width direction were scanned (raster area-44 mm2 and 11 mm2) with a focused laser beam (wavelength 213 nm, diameter of laser crater 100 μm, and laser power 1.6 mJ) in a laser abla-tion chamber. The laser ablation system was coupled to a quadrupole ICP-MS, which made the detection of ion intensities of27Al+, 44Ca+,47Ti+,55Mn+ and56Fe+ within an area of interest possible. One-dimensional (1D) content line distribution maps and two-dimensional (2D) contour maps for speciifc positions or areas were plotted to indicate the element distribution of a target area with high accuracy. Statistic method was used to analyze the acquired data by calculating median contents, maximum segregation, sta-tistic segregation and content-frequency distribution.

  4. Observations of Solitary Structures in a Magnetized, Plasma Loaded Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynov, Jens-Peter; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans;

    1979-01-01

    Two types of solitary structure were investigated experimentally and numerically in a magnetized, plasma-loaded waveguide. One was identified as an ordinary KdV soliton and its properties were investigated with particular attention to the damping by resonant particles. The other type of pulse...

  5. Observations of strong ion-ion correlations in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T., E-mail: ma8@llnl.gov; Pak, A.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Turnbull, D.; Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fletcher, L.; Galtier, E.; Hastings, J.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Chapman, D. A. [Plasma Physics Group, AWE plc, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Falcone, R. W. [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Fortmann, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Gericke, D. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Gregori, G.; White, T. G. [University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Neumayer, P. [Extreme Matter Institute, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Vorberger, J. [Max Planck Institut für Physik komplexer Systeme, Nötthnizer Straße 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); and others

    2014-05-15

    Using simultaneous spectrally, angularly, and temporally resolved x-ray scattering, we measure the pronounced ion-ion correlation peak in a strongly coupled plasma. Laser-driven shock-compressed aluminum at ∼3× solid density is probed with high-energy photons at 17.9 keV created by molybdenum He-α emission in a laser-driven plasma source. The measured elastic scattering feature shows a well-pronounced correlation peak at a wave vector of k=4Å{sup −1}. The magnitude of this correlation peak cannot be described by standard plasma theories employing a linear screened Coulomb potential. Advanced models, including a strong short-range repulsion due to the inner structure of the aluminum ions are however in good agreement with the scattering data. These studies have demonstrated a new highly accurate diagnostic technique to directly measure the state of compression and the ion-ion correlations. We have since applied this new method in single-shot wave-number resolved S(k) measurements to characterize the physical properties of dense plasmas.

  6. Multi-spacecraft Observations of the Martian Plasma Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, David; Luhmann, J.; Halekas, J.; Frahm, R.; Winningham, J.; Barabash, S.

    2006-09-01

    Two spacecraft with complementary instrumentation and orbits are currently making in situ measurements of the Martian plasma environment. Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) measures electrons and magnetic field from a 400 km circular mapping orbit with fixed local time. Mars Express (MEX) measures ions, electrons, and neutral particles from a precessing elliptical orbit. Each spacecraft's dataset has obvious strengths and shortcomings. Exploration of these two datasets in tandem provides an opportunity to increase our overall understanding of the Martian solar wind interaction and atmospheric escape. Close passes of spacecraft (conjunctions) are one particularly powerful means of increasing the utility of measurements, as evidenced by the Cluster mission. At Mars, conjunctions might be used to obtain more complete simultaneous and/or co-located plasma measurements, which can be used to study a variety of phenomena ranging from the motion and 3D shape of plasma boundaries to particle acceleration near crustal magnetic fields. We have identified 40 conjunctions (instances with spacecraft separation pass was 40 km. Conjunctions occur at mid-latitudes (when the surface-projected orbit tracks of the two spacecraft nearly overlap), and at the poles. We will present comparisons of MGS Magnetometer and Electron Reflectometer (MAG/ER) and MEX Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-3) data for these events, including intercomparison of MGS and MEX electron data, the addition of MGS magnetic field and MES ion data, and the inclusion of solar wind proxy information to establish context. Finally, we will present the results of a search for other useful configurations of MGS and MEX, including times when they are on the same flux tube, times when they pass through the same region of space separated by a delay, and times when they are on opposite sides of plasma boundaries.

  7. Tokamak Plasmas : Observation of floating potential asymmetry in the edge plasma of the SINP tokamak

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishnendu Bhattacharyya; N R Ray

    2000-11-01

    Edge plasma properties in a tokamak is an interesting subject of study from the view point of confinement and stability of tokamak plasma. The edge plasma of SINP-tokamak has been investigated using specially designed Langmuir probes. We have observed a poloidal asymmetry of floating potentials, particularly the top-bottom floating potential differences are quite noticeable, which in turn produces a vertical electric field (v). This v remains throughout the discharge but changes its direction at certain point of time which seems to depend on applied vertical magnetic field v).

  8. Observation of Thomson Scattering off Entropy Waves in a Laser-Produced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jian; BAI Bo; LIU Wan-Dong; YU Chang-Xuan; JIANG Xiao-Hua; YUAN Xiao-Dong; LI Wen-Hong; ZHENG Zhi-Jian

    2001-01-01

    A new feature in the Thomson scattering spectrum is observed from a laser-produced aluminium plasma, which may be the Thomson scattering off entropy waves in the plasma. Such a feature is only observable when the energy of the heater beam is low enough.

  9. Alfvén wave characteristics of equatorial plasma irregularities in the ionosphere derived from CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann eLühr

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We report magnetic field observations of the components transverse to the main field in the frequency range 1-25 Hz from times of equatorial plasma irregularity crossings. These field variations are interpreted as Alfvénic signatures accompanying intermediate-scale (150 m – 4 km plasma density depletions. Data utilized are the high-resolution CHAMP magnetic field measurements sampled at 50 Hz along the north-south satellite track. The recorded signals do not reflect the temporal variation but the spatial distribution of Alfvénic signatures. This is the first comprehensive study of Alfvénic signatures related to equatorial plasma bubbles that covers the whole solar cycle from 2000 to 2010. A detailed picture of the wave characteristics can be drawn due to the large number (almost 9000 of events considered. Some important findings are: Alfvénic features are a common feature of intermediate-scale plasma structures. The zonal and meridional magnetic components are generally well correlated suggesting skewed current sheets. The sheets have an orientation that is on average deflect by about 32° away from magnetic east towards upward or downward depending on the hemisphere. We have estimated the Poynting flux flowing into the E region. Typical values are distributed over the range 10-8 - 10-6 W/m2. Large Poynting fluxes are related to steep spectra of the Alfvénic signal, which imply passages through regularly varying electron density structures. No dependence of the Poynting flux level on solar activity has been found. But below a certain solar flux value (F10.7 < 100 sfu practically no events are detected. There is a clear tendency that large Poynting flux events occur preferably at early hours after sunset (e.g. 20:00 local time. Towards later times the occurrence peak shifts successively towards lower energy levels. Finally we compare our observations with the recently published results of the high-resolution 3-D model simulations by Dao et

  10. Fluctuation dynamics in reconnecting current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stechow, Adrian; Grulke, Olaf; Ji, Hantao; Yamada, Masaaki; Klinger, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    During magnetic reconnection, a highly localized current sheet forms at the boundary between opposed magnetic fields. Its steep perpendicular gradients and fast parallel drifts can give rise to a range of instabilities which can contribute to the overall reconnection dynamics. In two complementary laboratory reconnection experiments, MRX (PPPL, Princeton) and VINETA.II (IPP, Greifswald, Germany), magnetic fluctuations are observed within the current sheet. Despite the large differences in geometries (toroidal vs. linear), plasma parameters (high vs. low beta) and magnetic configuration (low vs. high magnetic guide field), similar broadband fluctuation characteristics are observed in both experiments. These are identified as Whistler-like fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range that propagate along the current sheet in the electron drift direction. They are intrinsic to the localized current sheet and largely independent of the slower reconnection dynamics. This contribution characterizes these magnetic fluctuations within the wide parameter range accessible by both experiments. Specifically, the fluctuation spectra and wave dispersion are characterized with respect to the magnetic topology and plasma parameters of the reconnecting current sheet.

  11. Three-Dimensional Human Cardiac Tissue Engineered by Centrifugation of Stacked Cell Sheets and Cross-Sectional Observation of Its Synchronous Beatings by Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Yuji; Hasegawa, Akiyuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Kobayashi, Mari; Iwana, Shin-Ichi; Kabetani, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissues are engineered by stacking cell sheets, and these tissues have been applied in clinical regenerative therapies. The optimal fabrication technique of 3D human tissues and the real-time observation system for these tissues are important in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, cardiac physiology, and the safety testing of candidate chemicals. In this study, for aiming the clinical application, 3D human cardiac tissues were rapidly fabricated by human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiac cell sheets with centrifugation, and the structures and beatings in the cardiac tissues were observed cross-sectionally and noninvasively by two optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. The fabrication time was reduced to approximately one-quarter by centrifugation. The cross-sectional observation showed that multilayered cardiac cell sheets adhered tightly just after centrifugation. Additionally, the cross-sectional transmissions of beatings within multilayered human cardiac tissues were clearly detected by OCT. The observation showed the synchronous beatings of the thicker 3D human cardiac tissues, which were fabricated rapidly by cell sheet technology and centrifugation. The rapid tissue-fabrication technique and OCT technology will show a powerful potential in cardiac tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery research.

  12. Constraints On Solar Wind Plasma Properties Derived From Coordinated Coronal Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Ruth; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research is to increase the understanding of coroner plasma phenomena by making use of different observational approaches and combine the observations with the necessary theoretical considerations.

  13. Further observations on resonance cones in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, H.; Singh, N.

    1983-01-01

    Results on the angular distribution of the electrostatic potential of a pulsating point charge in a warm magnetized plasma permeated by an electron beam are presented. The theoretical formulation for a finite magnetic field is given, and the solution of the resonance cone dispersion relation is presented. Numerical results on the angular distribution of the potential are shown, and the propagation of waves outside the resonance cones is described. It is demonstrated that with the inclusions of a finite magnetic field, the field patterns of a point charge are qualitatively similar to those obtained for a uniaxial plasma. The Cerenkov radiation occurs at angles much smaller than the cold-cone angle, even with the finite magnetic field. When the beam velocity is well above the thermal velocity of the background electrons, a characteristic wave propagation occurs between the cold-cone angles.

  14. Observations of parametric instabilities in long-scalelength plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, E.M.; Max, C.E.; Phillion, D.W.; Turner, R.E.; Estabrooke, K.; Laskinski, B.; Kruer, W.L.; Mead, W.C.

    1983-03-22

    This paper is organized in the following manner. In the second section we discussed absorption; the dependence of scattered light signatures of parametric instabilities occurring at n/sub e/ less than or equal to n/sub c//4 on corona size is shown in section three; and evidence for suprathermal electron production in these long-scale length plasmas is presented in section four. The results and conclusions are finally summarized in section five.

  15. Data-driven constraints on ice sheet model boundary conditions and comparison to borehole observations in Western Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierbachtol, T. W.; Harper, J. T.; Johnson, J. V.; Humphrey, N. F.; Brinkerhoff, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    The utility of ice sheet models as prognostic tools relies on an accurate assessment of initial conditions. Ice sheet models reaching an initial state using assimilation techniques are inherently sensitive to the description of processes governing behavior at the ice-air and ice-bed boundaries. Propagation of uncertainty in these boundary condition effects exerts a strong control on the ice sheet thermal profile, which in turn impacts the basal thermal regime and partitioning of surface velocity into deformational and sliding components. With this in mind, correct implementation of boundary conditions when simulating ice flow is critical. Here, using the higher order numerical ice sheet model VarGlaS, we investigate the sensitivity of model output to field-based adjustments in surface and basal boundary conditions, using full thickness thermal profiles in the ice sheet ablation zone as a metric for comparison. Our measured temperature profiles provide a unique constraint by permitting evaluation of the integrated effect of necessary model assumptions and boundary conditions over long spatial scales greater than 100 km. We implement the study over a three-dimensional catchment of the Greenland ice sheet extending from the land terminating outlet glacier Isunnguata Sermia, east to the ice sheet divide. An initial reference case is generated from the surface and basal boundary fields of the SeaRise dataset. We then drive surface boundary changes using near-surface temperature measurements spanning 2 years in the ablation zone, and by scaling measurements of firn warming in western Greenland in the accumulation zone. Basal heat flux corrections follow direct measurement in a bedrock borehole adjacent to the study domain. Results show the downstream impact of substantial warming in the accumulation zone is limited by the ice sheet flow field, resulting in small changes to model temperatures in the vicinity of measured profiles.

  16. Mechanisms of liquid sheet breakup and the resulting drop size distributions; Part 2: strand breakup and experimental observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielbauer, T.M.; Aidum, C.K. (Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1992-03-01

    This paper reports that both a wave mechanism and a perforation mechanism have been proposed as the first step in the breakup of fluid sheets. For black liquor sprays, the dominant mechanism is the formation and growth of perforations according to either mechanism, cylindrical strands develop and subsequently break up to form drops. By combining the results of analyzing the breakup of both the sheet and strands, only a discrete number of drop sizes can be predicted from the wave mechanism.

  17. Hinode Observation of the Magnetic Fields in a Sunspot Light Bridge Accompanied by Long-Lasting Chromospheric Plasma Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Toshifumi; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kubo, Masahito; Lites, Bruce W.; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Tsuneta, Saku; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Shine, Richard A.; Tarbell, Theodore D.

    2009-05-01

    We present high-resolution magnetic field measurements of a sunspot light bridge (LB) that produced chromospheric plasma ejections intermittently and recurrently for more than 1 day. The observations were carried out with the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope on 2007 April 29 and 30. The spectro-polarimeter reveals obliquely oriented magnetic fields with vertical electric current density higher than 100 mA m-2 along the LB. The observations suggest that current-carrying highly twisted magnetic flux tubes are trapped below a cusp-shaped magnetic structure along the LB. The presence of trapped current-carrying flux tubes is essential for causing long-lasting chromospheric plasma ejections at the interface with pre-existing vertically oriented umbral fields. A bidirectional jet was clearly detected, suggesting magnetic reconnections occurring at very low altitudes, slightly above the height where the vector magnetic fields are measured. Moreover, we found another strong vertical electric current on the interface between the current-carrying flux tube and pre-existing umbral field, which might be a direct detection of the currents flowing in the current sheet formed at the magnetic reconnection sites.

  18. An enhancement of plasma density by neutral gas injection observed in SEPAC Spacelab-1 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Obayashi, T.; Kubota, S.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Williamson, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    An enhancement of plasma density observed during a neutral gas injection in Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators by the Space Shuttle/Spacelab-1 is presented. When a plume of nitrogen gas was injected from the orbiter into space, a large amount of plasma was detected by an onboard plasma probe. The observed density often increased beyond the background plasma density and was strongly dependent on the attitude of the orbiter with respect to the velocity vector. This effect has been explained by a collisional interaction between the injected gas molecules and the ionospheric ions relatively drifting at the orbital speed.

  19. Modeling Heat Transfer to Explain Observed Temperature Anomalies in Near-Surface Ice, Greenland Ice Sheet Ablation Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, B. H.; Harper, J. T.; Meierbachtol, T. W.; Humphrey, N. F.; Johnson, J. V.

    2016-12-01

    Measured ice temperatures in over 30 boreholes at 6 different field sites within the Greenland Ice Sheet ablation area indicate that the near-surface ice temperature warms toward the margin. The rate of warming is significantly greater than the atmospheric lapse rate, meaning that the mean annual ice temperature is far warmer than the mean annual air temperature near the margin. Theoretically, ice within 15 meters of the surface should oscillate seasonally around the mean air temperature. However, observations of mean ice and air temperatures differ by as much as 5 degrees Celsius. Here we numerically model heat transfer in ice to investigate the physical processes that could drive this discrepancy. Modeling results are compared to measured ice temperatures in the first 20 meters of ice below the surface. First, we model pure conduction to analyze the thermal effect of snow accumulation, a fixed melting temperature, ablation at the ice surface, emergent flow of ice, and long-term changes in the mean air temperature. Next, we consider a secondary process beyond pure conduction with the air - a latent heat flux which adds energy by refreezing meltwater below the surface. While our measurement locations have no open crevasses exposed to the surface, borehole field observations reveal that void spaces exist below the ice surface. These subsurface voids could provide a route for water to move to depth where it then refreezes and adds energy to the surrounding ice, thus warming ice above the mean air temperature. Finally, we use the near-surface results as a boundary condition for heat transfer through the full thickness of the ice column. The subsequent model output is compared to borehole temperature measurements at depth to examine the effect of near-surface heat transfer on the rest of the ice column.

  20. A Review of Nonlinear Low Frequency (LF) Wave Observations in Space Plasmas: On the Development of Plasma Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1995-01-01

    As the lead-off presentation for the topic of nonlinear waves and their evolution, we will illustrate some prominent examples of waves in space plasmas. We will describe recent observations detected within planetary foreshocks, near comets and in interplanetary space. It is believed that the nonlinear LF plasma wave features discussed here are part of and may be basic to the development of plasma turbulence. In this sense, this is one area of space plasma physics that is fundamental, with applications to fusion physics and astrophysics as well. It is hoped that the reader(s) will be stimulated to study nonlinear wave development themselves, if he/she is not already involved.

  1. Reconnection in thin current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenerani, Anna; Velli, Marco; Pucci, Fulvia; Rappazzo, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    It has been widely believed that reconnection is the underlying mechanism of many explosive processes observed both in nature and laboratory, but the question of reconnection speed and initial trigger have remained mysterious. How is fast magnetic energy release triggered in high Lundquist (S) and Reynolds (R) number plasmas?It has been shown that a tearing mode instability can grow on an ideal timescale, i.e., independent from the the Lundquist number, once the current sheet thickness becomes thin enough, or rather the inverse aspect ratio a/L reaches a scale a/L~S-1/3. As such, the latter provides a natural, critical threshold for current sheets that can be formed in nature before they disrupt in a few Alfvén time units. Here we discuss the transition to fast reconnection extended to simple viscous and kinetic models and we propose a possible scenario for the transition to explosive reconnection in high-Lundquist number plasmas, that we support with fully nonlinear numerical MHD simulations of a collapsing current sheet.

  2. Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Ice Sheet Surface Elevation at the Summit of Greenland: Observed and Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Jun, Li; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observed seasonal and interannual variations in the surface elevation over the summit of the Greenland ice sheet are modeled using a new temperature-dependent formulation of firn-densification and observed accumulation variations. The observed elevation variations are derived from ERS (European Remote Sensing)-1 and ERS-2 radar altimeter data for the period between April 1992 and April 1999. A multivariate linear/sine function is fitted to an elevation time series constructed from elevation differences measured by radar altimetry at orbital crossovers. The amplitude of the seasonal elevation cycle is 0.25 m peak-to-peak, with a maximum in winter and a minimum in summer. Inter-annually, the elevation decreases to a minimum in 1995, followed by an increase to 1999, with an overall average increase of 4.2 cm a(exp -1) for 1992 to 1999. Our densification formulation uses an initial field-density profile, the AWS (automatic weather station) surface temperature record, and a temperature-dependent constitutive relation for the densification that is based on laboratory measurements of crystal growth rates. The rate constant and the activation energy commonly used in the Arrhenius-type constitutive relation for firn densification are also temperature dependent, giving a stronger temperature and seasonal amplitudes about 10 times greater than previous densification formulations. Summer temperatures are most important, because of the strong non-linear dependence on temperature. Much of firn densification and consequent surface lowering occurs within about three months of the summer season, followed by a surface build-up from snow accumulation until spring. Modeled interannual changes of the surface elevation, using the AWS measurements of surface temperature and accumulation and results of atmospheric modeling of precipitation variations, are in good agreement with the altimeter observations. In the model, the surface elevation decreases about 20 cm over the seven years due

  3. Observations of the solar plasma using radio scattering and scintillation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewish, A.

    1972-01-01

    Observations of the solar plasma using the interplanetary scintillation technique have been made at radial distances of 0.03 to 1.2 AU. The solar wind is found to be independent of ecliptic latitude and radial distance, except close to the sun where acceleration is observed. Plasma density irregularities on a scale near the proton gyro radius, which modulate the mean density by about 1 percent, are present throughout the observed range of radial distance.

  4. Simultaneous observation of the poleward expansion of substorm electrojet activity and the tailward expansion of current sheet disruption in the near-earth magnetotail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, R.E. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States)); Koskinen, H.E.J.; Pulkkinen, T.I. (Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland)); Boesinger, T. (Univ. of Oulu (Finland)); McEntire, R.W.; Potemra, T.A. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States))

    1993-06-01

    This paper reports on observations of a magnetospheric substorm on June 7, 1985. This event was observed simultaneously by a number of different systems. Particle and magnetic field data were collected by AMPTE/CCE, located near the neutral sheet; magnetic field data was monitored by the EISCAT magnetometer cross; STARE radar data was also collected; and Pi 1 data from Sodankyla. The ground based systems observed the poleward and westward expansion of electrojet activity at the start of the storm. The satellite was able to see the storms onset, and record perturbations in the current sheet at the onset of the substorm, in addition to later perturbations, which the authors argue originates tailward of the satellite. Satellite measurements are shown to occur in conjunction with ground events.

  5. Radiating Current Sheets in the Solar Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    An MHD model of a Hydrogen plasma with flow, an energy equation, NLTE ionization and radiative cooling, and an Ohm's law with anisotropic electrical conduction and thermoelectric effects is used to self-consistently generate atmospheric layers over a $50$ km height range. A subset of these solutions contain current sheets, and have properties similar to those of the lower and middle chromosphere. The magnetic field profiles are found to be close to Harris sheet profiles, with maximum field strengths $\\sim 25-150$ G. The radiative flux $F_R$ emitted by individual sheets is $\\sim 4.9 \\times 10^5 - 4.5 \\times 10^6$ ergs-cm$^{-2}$-s$^{-1}$, to be compared with the observed chromospheric emission rate of $\\sim 10^7$ ergs-cm$^{-2}$-s$^{-1}$. Essentially all emission is from regions with thicknesses $\\sim 0.5 - 13$ km containing the neutral sheet. About half of $F_R$ comes from sub-regions with thicknesses 10 times smaller. A resolution $\\lesssim 5-130$ m is needed to resolve the properties of the sheets. The sheets...

  6. Fish plasma lipoproteins--comparative observations in serranides and sparides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santulli, A; Cusenza, L; Modica, A; Curatolo, A; D'Amelio, V

    1991-01-01

    1. Diet, time from last feeding, temperature, season and sexual stage are some of the factors influencing the lipoprotein pattern. 2. Keeping these factors constant species-specific differences observed among lipoprotein patterns of Sparus aurata, Puntazzo puntazzo, Diplodus sargus, Diplodus vulgaris and Dicentrarchus labrax are discussed. 3. Feeding habits and therefore lipid absorption and the rate of lipoprotein maturation process are the factors determining the observed differences.

  7. Plasma blobs and irregularities concurrently observed by ROCSAT-1 and Equatorial Atmosphere Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Su, Shin-Yi; Fukao, Shoichiro

    2007-05-01

    Plasma density enhancements, or plasma blobs, and radar backscatter plumes in the nighttime equatorial F region, both of which are intriguing phenomena associated with equatorial spread F (ESF), were concurrently observed for the first time on 8 March 2004 along a common magnetic flux tube. The observational results are strong evidence of a close relationship between plasma bubbles and blobs in the equatorial ionosphere. Plasma blobs were detected by Republic of China Scientific Satellite (ROCSAT)-1 at a dip latitude of ˜9°N, while the 47-MHz Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in Sumatra, Indonesia, observed the backscatter plume associated with plasma density depletions, or plasma bubbles, at dip latitudes of as high as 13°S. The plumes grew upward with large Doppler velocity away from the radar late in the premidnight sector, in association with the appearance of the plasma blobs. The zonal structure and upward drift velocity of the blobs correspond to those of the plumes on the common magnetic flux tube. Localized eastward polarization electric fields probably play an important role in the generation of plasma blobs as well as the resurgence of the plumes.

  8. Voyager 2 observations of plasmas and flows out to 104 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, J. D. [Kavli Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Decker, R. B., E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu, E-mail: robert.decker@apljhu.edu [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD (United States)

    2014-09-10

    Voyager 2 has crossed through 20 AU of the heliosheath; assuming the same heliosheath thickness as at Voyager 1, it is now two-thirds of the way to the heliopause. The plasma data are generally of good quality, although the increasing flow angle of the plasma makes analysis more difficult. The average plasma speed has remained constant but the flow angles have increased to almost 60° in the RT plane and to almost 30° in the RN plane. The average density and thermal speed have been constant since a density increase observed in 2011. Comparison of V2 plasma flows derived from plasma science experiment (PLS) data and Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) proton anisotropies give good agreement except when heavy ion contributions or non-convective proton anisotropies are observed in the LECP data.

  9. Structure of the plasmapause from ISEE 1 low-energy ion and plasma wave observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T.; Horwitz, J. L.; Anderson, R. R.; Chappell, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low-energy ion pitch angle distributions are compared with plasma density profiles in the near-earth magnetosphere using ISEE 1 observations. The classical plasmapause determined by the sharp density gradient is not always observed in the dayside region, whereas there almost always exists the ion pitch angle distribution transition from cold, isotropic to warm, bidirectional, field-aligned distributions. In the nightside region the plasmapause density gradient is typically found, and it normally coincides with the ion pitch angle distribution transition. The sunward motion of the plasma is found in the outer part of the 'plasmaspheric' plasma in the dusk bulge region.

  10. WIND observations of plasma waves inside the magnetic cloud boundary layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Fengsi; ZHONG Dingkun; FENG Xueshang; YANG Fang; LIU Rui

    2005-01-01

    Based on the WIND observational data for the plasma waves from thermal noise receptor (TNR) working on the frequency 4―256 kHz and the solar wind and the magnetic fields, we analyze the plasma wave activities in the 60 magnetic cloud's boundary layers (BLs) and find that there are often various plasma wave activities in the BLs, which are different from those in the adjacent solar wind (SW) and the magnetic clouds (MC). The basic characteristics are that: (1) the enhancement of the Langmuir wave near the electronic plasma frequency (fpe) is a dominant wave activity, which occupies 75% investigated samples; (2) the events enhanced both in the langmuir and ion acustic (f < fpe) waves are about 60% of investigated samples; (3) broadband, continuous enhancement events in the plasma wave activities were observed in the whole frequency band of TNR, and about 30% of the 60 samples, however, were not observed in the SW and the MC investigated events; (4) although the ratio of the temperatures between the electon and proton, Te/Tp≤1, the ion caustic wave enhancement activities are still often observed in the BLs, which makes it difficult to ex-plain them by the traditional plasma theory. New results reported in this paper further show that the magnetic cloud's BL is an important dynamic structure, which could provide useful diagnosis for understanding the cloud's BL physics and could expand a space developing space plasma wave theory.

  11. Spatial distribution of Mercury's flux ropes and reconnection fronts: MESSENGER observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W. J.; Fu, S. Y.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; Zong, Q. G.; Poh, G. K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2016-08-01

    We perform a statistical study of flux ropes and reconnection fronts based on MErcury Surface, Space ENviroment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) magnetic field and plasma observations to study the implications for the spatial distribution of reconnection sites in Mercury's near magnetotail. The results show important differences of temporal and spatial distributions as compared to Earth. We have surveyed the plasma sheet crossings between -2 RM and -3 RM downtail from the planet, i.e., the location of Near-Mercury Neutral Line (NMNL). Plasma sheets were defined to be regions with β ≥ 0.5. Using this definition, 39 flux ropes and 86 reconnection fronts were identified in the plasma sheet. At Mercury, the distributions of flux ropes and reconnection fronts show clear dawn-dusk asymmetry with much higher occurrence rate on the dawnside plasma sheet than on the duskside. This suggests that magnetic reconnection in Mercury's magnetotail occurs more frequently in the dawnside than in the duskside plasma sheet, which is different than the observations in Earth's magnetotail showing more reconnection signatures in the duskside plasma sheet. The distribution of plasma sheet thickness shows that plasma sheet near the midnight is the thinnest part and does not show obvious asymmetry. Thus, the reasons that cause magnetic reconnection to preferentially occur on the dawnside of the magnetotail at Mercury may not be the plasma sheet thickness and require further study. The peak occurrence rates of flux ropes and reconnection fronts in Mercury's plasma sheet are ~ 60 times higher than that of Earth's values, which we interpret to be due to the highly variable magnetospheric conditions at Mercury. Such higher occurrence rate of magnetic reconnection would generate more plasma flows in the dawnside plasma sheet than in the duskside. These plasma flows would mostly brake and initiate the substorm dipolarization on the postmidnight sector at Mercury rather than the

  12. Dust particles in controlled fusion devices: morphology, observations in the plasma and influence on the plasma performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubel, M.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Sergienko, G.; Biel, W.; Drake, J. R.; Hedqvist, A.; Huber, A.; Philipps, V.

    2001-08-01

    The formation and release of particle agglomerates, i.e. debris and dusty objects, from plasma facing components and the impact of such materials on plasma operation in controlled fusion devices has been studied in the Extrap T2 reversed field pinch and the TEXTOR tokamak. Several plasma diagnostic techniques, camera observations and surface analysis methods were applied for in situ and ex situ investigation. The results are discussed in terms of processes that are decisive for dust transfer: localized power deposition connected with wall locked modes causing emission of carbon granules, brittle destruction of graphite and detachment of thick flaking co-deposited layers. The consequences for large next step devices are also addressed.

  13. Calibrating a glaciological model of the Greenland ice sheet from the Last Glacial Maximum to present-day using field observations of relative sea level and ice extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Matthew J. R.; Milne, Glenn A.; Huybrechts, Philippe; Long, Antony J.

    2009-08-01

    We constrain a three-dimensional thermomechanical model of Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) evolution from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21 ka BP) to the present-day using, primarily, observations of relative sea level (RSL) as well as field data on past ice extent. Our new model (Huy2) fits a majority of the observations and is characterised by a number of key features: (i) the ice sheet had an excess volume (relative to present) of 4.1 m ice-equivalent sea level at the LGM, which increased to reach a maximum value of 4.6 m at 16.5 ka BP; (ii) retreat from the continental shelf was not continuous around the entire margin, as there was a Younger Dryas readvance in some areas. The final episode of marine retreat was rapid and relatively late (c. 12 ka BP), leaving the ice sheet land based by 10 ka BP; (iii) in response to the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) the ice margin retreated behind its present-day position by up to 80 km in the southwest, 20 km in the south and 80 km in a small area of the northeast. As a result of this retreat the modelled ice sheet reaches a minimum extent between 5 and 4 ka BP, which corresponds to a deficit volume (relative to present) of 0.17 m ice-equivalent sea level. Our results suggest that remaining discrepancies between the model and the observations are likely associated with non-Greenland ice load, differences between modelled and observed present-day ice elevation around the margin, lateral variations in Earth structure and/or the pattern of ice margin retreat.

  14. Plasma Characteristics and Transport in the Near-Lunar Magnetotail: Observations from THEMIS/ARTEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, T. J.; Wang, Y.; Merka, J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-12-01

    The region of the Earth's magnetosphere tailward of ~30 RE remains relatively unexplored. A better characterization of the processes taking place in the mid-to-distant magnetotail is critical to a more complete understanding of the coupling between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere. Similarly, an assessment of the magnetotail plasma encountered by the Moon will be valuable for understanding how the lunar environment is modified during these traversals. The THEMIS/ARTEMIS missions have returned sufficient data from this region of the magnetotail for a large-scale statistical survey to be undertaken with the publicly available data from NASA/CDAWeb. In this study various plasma moments are organized by occurrence frequency and location in the magnetotail. Further sorting is done to identify different regions within the magnetotail, such as the tail lobes and plasma sheet, and the physical processes taking place, such as reconnection. Additional sorting of the ion data has been required in order to identify intervals in the tail lobe where the signal-to-noise is so low that moments are erroneously calculated from just background counts. Initial results indicate that previous studies of the mid-to-distant magnetotail that were limited to using electron moments from the ISEE-3 mission overestimated Alfven Mach numbers. Super-Alfvenic flows, such as those associated with reconnection, are very rare in this region of the magnetotail. This survey is the first step in constructing a comprehensive large-scale picture of the energization, distribution, and transport of plasma in the mid-to-distant magnetotail, as well as characterizing the properties of the plasma environments encountered by the Moon during magnetotail traversals.

  15. Mass and energy of erupting solar plasma observed with the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jin-Yi; Reeves, Katharine K; Moon, Yong-Jae; Kim, Kap-Sung

    2014-01-01

    We investigate seven eruptive plasma observations by Hinode/XRT. Their corresponding EUV and/or white light CME features are visible in some events. Five events are observed in several passbands in X-rays, which allows the determination of the eruptive plasma temperature using a filter ratio method. We find that the isothermal temperatures vary from 1.6 to 10 MK. These temperatures are an average weighted toward higher temperature plasma. We determine the mass constraints of eruptive plasmas by assuming simplified geometrical structures of the plasma with isothermal plasma temperatures. This method provides an upper limit to the masses of the observed eruptive plasmas in X-ray passbands since any clumping causes the overestimation of the mass. For the other two events, we assume the temperatures are at the maximum temperature of the XRT temperature response function, which gives a lower limit of the masses. We find that the masses in XRT, ~3x10 13 - 5x10 14 g, are smaller in their upper limit than total masse...

  16. MASS AND ENERGY OF ERUPTING SOLAR PLASMA OBSERVED WITH THE X-RAY TELESCOPE ON HINODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin-Yi; Moon, Yong-Jae; Kim, Kap-Sung [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Raymond, John C.; Reeves, Katharine K., E-mail: jlee@khu.ac.kr [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    We investigate seven eruptive plasma observations by Hinode/XRT. Their corresponding EUV and/or white light coronal mass ejection features are visible in some events. Five events are observed in several passbands in X-rays, which allows for the determination of the eruptive plasma temperature using a filter ratio method. We find that the isothermal temperatures vary from 1.6 to 10 MK. These temperatures are an average weighted toward higher temperature plasma. We determine the mass constraints of eruptive plasmas by assuming simplified geometrical structures of the plasma with isothermal plasma temperatures. This method provides an upper limit to the masses of the observed eruptive plasmas in X-ray passbands since any clumping causes the overestimation of the mass. For the other two events, we assume the temperatures are at the maximum temperature of the X-ray Telescope (XRT) temperature response function, which gives a lower limit of the masses. We find that the masses in XRT, ∼3 × 10{sup 13}-5 × 10{sup 14} g, are smaller in their upper limit than the total masses obtained by LASCO, ∼1 × 10{sup 15} g. In addition, we estimate the radiative loss, thermal conduction, thermal, and kinetic energies of the eruptive plasma in X-rays. For four events, we find that the thermal conduction timescales are much shorter than the duration of eruption. This result implies that additional heating during the eruption may be required to explain the plasma observations in X-rays for the four events.

  17. Large-scale jets in the magnetosheath and plasma penetration across the magnetopause: THEMIS observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, A V

    2015-01-01

    THEMIS multi-point observation of the plasma and magnetic fields, conducted simultaneously in the dayside magnetosheath and magnetosphere, were used to collect 646 large-scale magnetosheath plasma jets interacting with the magnetopause. The jets were identified as dense and fast streams of the magnetosheath plasma whose energy density is higher than that of the upstream solar wind. The jet interaction with the magnetopause was revealed from sudden inward motion of the magnetopause and an enhancement in the geomagnetic field. The penetration was determined as appearance of the magnetosheath plasma against the background of the hot magnetospheric particle population. We found that almost 60% of the jets penetrated through the magnetopause. Vast majority of the penetrating jets was characterized by high velocities V > 220 km/s and kinetic bk > 1 that corresponded to a combination of finite Larmor radius effect with a mechanisms of impulsive penetration. The average plasma flux in the penetrating jets was found t...

  18. Observations of rotation in JET plasmas with electron heating by ion cyclotron resonance heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T. J.; Van Eester, D.

    2012-01-01

    The rotation of L-mode plasmas in the JET tokamak heated by waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) damped on electrons, is reported. The plasma in the core is found to rotate in the counter-current direction with a high shear and in the outer part of the plasma with an almost...... constant angular rotation. The core rotation is stronger in magnitude than observed for scenarios with dominating ion cyclotron absorption. Two scenarios are considered: the inverted mode conversion scenarios and heating at the second harmonic He-3 cyclotron resonance in H plasmas. In the latter case......, electron absorption of the fast magnetosonic wave by transit time magnetic pumping and electron Landau damping (TTMP/ELD) is the dominating absorption mechanism. Inverted mode conversion is done in (He-3)-H plasmas where the mode converted waves are essentially absorbed by electron Landau damping. Similar...

  19. Experimental observation of electron-temperature-gradient turbulence in a laboratory plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoo, S K; Singh, S K; Awasthi, L M; Singh, R; Kaw, P K

    2012-06-22

    We report the observation of electron-temperature-gradient (ETG) driven turbulence in the laboratory plasma of a large volume plasma device. The removal of unutilized primary ionizing and nonthermal electrons from uniform density plasma and the imposition and control of the gradient in the electron temperature (T[Symbol: see text] T(e)) are all achieved by placing a large (2 m diameter) magnetic electron energy filter in the middle of the device. In the dressed plasma, the observed ETG turbulence in the lower hybrid range of frequencies ν = (1-80 kHz) is characterized by a broadband with a power law. The mean wave number k perpendicular ρ(e) = (0.1-0.2) satisfies the condition k perpendicular ρ(e) ≤ 1, where ρ(e) is the electron Larmor radius.

  20. Theoretical analysis of conditions for observation of plasma oscillations in semiconductors from pulsed terahertz emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reklaitis, Antanas, E-mail: reklaitis@pfi.lt [Semiconductor Physics Institute, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, A. Goshtauto 11, Vilnius 01108 (Lithuania)

    2014-08-28

    Oscillations of electron-hole plasma generated by femtosecond optical pulse in freestanding semiconductor are studied using hydrodynamic model and Monte Carlo simulations. The conditions required for the observation of coherent plasma oscillations in THz emission from semiconductor are determined. It is shown that several conditions have to be fulfilled in order to observe coherent plasma oscillations. First, the intensity of the optical pulse must exceed some threshold value. Second, the optical absorption depth must exceed the thickness of the built-in electric field region. Third, the generation of electron-hole pairs with uniform illumination is required, i.e., the laser beam with the flattop intensity profile has to be used. It is found that the duration of the optical pulse does not play a vital role in the development of plasma oscillations.

  1. Experimental observation and computational analysis of striations in electronegative capacitively coupled radio-frequency plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yong-Xin; Korolov, Ihor; Donko, Zoltan; Wang, You-Nian; Schulze, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Self-organized spatial structures in the light emission from the ion-ion capacitive RF plasma of a strongly electronegative gas (CF4) are observed experimentally for the first time. Their formation is analyzed and understood based on particle-based kinetic simulations. These "striations" are found to be generated by the resonance between the driving radio-frequency and the eigenfrequency of the ion-ion plasma (derived from an analytical model) that establishes a modulation of the electric field, the ion densities, as well as the energy gain and loss processes of electrons in the plasma. The growth of the instability is followed by the numerical simulations.

  2. Observation of Quartz Cathode-Luminescence in a Low Pressure Plasma Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Intense, steady-state cathode-luminescence has been observed from exposure of quartz powder to a low pressure rf-excited argon plasma discharge. The emission spectra (400 to 850 nm) associated with the powder luminescence were documented as a function of bias voltage using a spectrometer. The emission was broad-band, essentially washing out the line spectra features of the argon plasma discharge.

  3. Dynamo-driven plasmoid formation from a current-sheet instability

    CERN Document Server

    Ebrahimi, F

    2016-01-01

    Axisymmetric current-carrying plasmoids are formed in the presence of nonaxisymmetric fluctuations during nonlinear three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations in a global toroidal geometry. We utilize the helicity injection technique to form an initial poloidal flux in the presence of a toroidal guide field. As helicity is injected, two types of current sheets are formed from 1) the oppositely directed field lines in the injector region (primary reconnecting current sheet), and 2) the poloidal flux compression near the plasma edge (edge current sheet). We first find that nonaxisymmetic fluctuations arising from the current-sheet instability isolated near the plasma edge have tearing parity but can nevertheless grow fast (on the poloidal Alfven time scale). These modes saturate by breaking up the current sheet. Second, for the first time a dynamo poloidal flux amplification is observed at the reconnetion site (in the region of the oppositely directed magnetic field). This fluctuation-induced flux amplificatio...

  4. STUDIES ON SURFACE CHARACTERIZATION AND ECOMATERIAL SHEET DEGRADATION OF BASALT FIBERS BY PLASMA TREATMENTS AND WOOD FIBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangjian Wang; Yajie Guo; Deku Shang; linna Hu; Zhenhua Guo; Kailiang Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Plasma surface modification (Argon: Hydrogen =0.6:0.4) of basalt fibers was investigated and the element contents of basalt and wood fibers were determined by X-ray energy dispersion spectroscope (EDS).Configuration of basalt fibers was described by means of confocal Laser Raman microRaman spectrometer and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. And the morphology of fiber surface was studied with scanning electron microscope(SEM). The modified samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). The results showed that the roughness of basalt fibers was increased with the increase of exposure time of plasma. At the same time the wettability and surface characteristics such as active groups of NH2, OH were improved as well. Basaltfibers were of good chemical stability, better mechanism intension and thermo-stability etc. They mainly consist of [SiO4]4-,[Si2O6]4-, [Si2O5]2-. Further experiments demostrated that they were degraded into edaphic matrix after use.Therefore, they were environmentally friendly.

  5. STUDIES ON SURFACE CHARACTERIZATION AND ECOMATERIAL SHEET DEGRADATION OF BASALT FIBERS BY PLASMA TREATMENTS AND WOOD FIBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuangjianWang; YajieGuo; DekuShang; linnaHu; ZhenhuaGuo; KailiangZhang

    2004-01-01

    plasma surtace modification (Argon: Hydrogen=0.6:0.4) of basalt fibers was mvestigated and the element contents of basalt and wood fibers were determined by X-ray energy dispersion spectroscope (EDS). configuration of basalt fibers was described by means of confocal Laser Raman microRaman spectrometer and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. And the morphology of fiber surface was studied with scanning electron microscope (SEM). The modified samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). The results showed that the roughness of basalt fibers was increased with the increase of exposure time of plasma. At the same time the wettability and surface characteristics such as active groups of NH2, OH were improved as well. Basalt fibers were of good chemical stability, better mechanism intension and thermo-stability etc. They mainly consist of [SiO4]4-, [Si2O6]4-,[Si2O5]2-. Further experiments demostrated that they were degraded into edaphic matrix after use. Therefore, they were environmentally friendly.

  6. Large surface meltwater discharge from the Kangerlussuaq sector of the Greenland ice sheet during the record-warm year 2010 explained by detailed energy balance observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. van As

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study uses data from six on-ice weather stations, calibrated MODIS-derived albedo and proglacial river gauging measurements to drive and validate an energy balance model. We aim to quantify the record-setting positive temperature anomaly in 2010 and its effect on mass balance and runoff from the Kangerlussuaq sector of the Greenland ice sheet. In 2010, the average temperature was 4.9 °C (2.7 standard deviations above the 1974–2010 average in Kangerlussuaq. High temperatures were also observed over the ice sheet, with the magnitude of the positive anomaly increasing with altitude, particularly in August. Simultaneously, surface albedo was anomalously low in 2010, predominantly in the upper ablation zone. The low albedo was caused by high ablation, which in turn profited from high temperatures and low winter snowfall. Surface energy balance calculations show that the largest melt excess (∼170% occurred in the upper ablation zone (above 1000 m, where higher temperatures and lower albedo contributed equally to the melt anomaly. At lower elevations the melt excess can be attributed to high atmospheric temperatures alone. In total, we calculate that 6.6 ± 1.0 km3 of surface meltwater ran off the ice sheet in the Kangerlussuaq catchment in 2010, exceeding the reference year 2009 (based on atmospheric temperature measurements by ∼150%. During future warm episodes we can expect a melt response of at least the same magnitude, unless a larger wintertime snow accumulation delays and moderates the melt-albedo feedback. Due to the hypsometry of the ice sheet, yielding an increasing surface area with elevation, meltwater runoff will be further amplified by increases in melt forcings such as atmospheric heat.

  7. Observation of a relaxed plasma state in a quasi-infinite cylinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, T; Brown, M R; Dandurand, D

    2013-02-22

    A helical relaxed plasma state is observed in a long cylindrical volume. The cylinder is long enough so that the predicted minimum energy state is a close approximation to the infinite cylinder solution. The plasma is injected at v ≥ 50 km/s by a coaxial magnetized plasma gun located at one end of the cylindrical volume. The relaxed state is rapidly attained in 1-2 axial Alfvén times after initiation of the plasma. Magnetic data are favorably compared with an analytical model. Magnetic data exhibit broadband fluctuations of the measured axial modes during the formation period. The broadband activity rapidly decays as the energy condenses into the lowest energy mode, which is in agreement with the minimum energy eigenstate of [Symbol: see text] × B = λB.

  8. Further observations of Space Shuttle plasma-electrodynamic effects from OSS-1/STS-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, N. H.; Hwang, K. S.; Wright, K. H., Jr.; Samir, U.; Murphy, G. B.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Recent analyses of ion measurements obtained from the Differential Ion Flux Probe (DIFP) on the deployed Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) during the OSS-1/STS-3 mission have provided an additional insight into the plasma-electrodynamics of the Space Shuttle Orbiter: (1) Measured ion flow directions and energies suggest that the disturbance created in the ionospheric plasma by the Shuttle Orbiter may be confined to an interaction region that extends on the order of 10 m in the forward direction and has a boundary thickness of about 2 m. (2) A correlation between the DIFP and pressure gauge measurements indicates a direct, local proportionality between the neutral gas and ion densities. (3) Preliminary results from a theoretical model of the possible interaction between measured secondary, high inclination ion streams and the ambient plasma indicate the generation of broad-band electrostatic noise such as that observed by wave instruments on the PDP.

  9. Observation of a Relaxed Plasma State in a Quasi-Infinite Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, T.; Brown, M. R.; Dandurand, D.

    2013-02-01

    A helical relaxed plasma state is observed in a long cylindrical volume. The cylinder is long enough so that the predicted minimum energy state is a close approximation to the infinite cylinder solution. The plasma is injected at v≥50km/s by a coaxial magnetized plasma gun located at one end of the cylindrical volume. The relaxed state is rapidly attained in 1-2 axial Alfvén times after initiation of the plasma. Magnetic data are favorably compared with an analytical model. Magnetic data exhibit broadband fluctuations of the measured axial modes during the formation period. The broadband activity rapidly decays as the energy condenses into the lowest energy mode, which is in agreement with the minimum energy eigenstate of ∇×B=λB.

  10. Electron plasma waves in the solar wind - AMPTE/IRM and UKS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treumann, R. A.; Bauer, O. H.; Labelle, J.; Haerendel, G.; Christiansen, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Selected events of plasma wave and electromagnetic emissions in the earth's electron fore-shock region have been studied. Strong emissions are observed in the plasma-wave band when the site of the satellite is magnetically connected to the bow shock. These emissions are generally highly fluctuating. Under certain conditions one observes electromagnetic radiation at the second harmonic produced locally. Electromagnetic emission generated at a position far away from the site of the spacecraft is occasionally detected giving rise to remote sensing of the bow shock. These emissions are related to energetic electron fluxes.

  11. Observation of oscillatory radial electric field relaxation in a helical plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, J A; Calvo, I; Velasco, J L; Perfilov, S; Chmyga, A; Eliseev, L G; Krupnik, L I; Estrada, T; Kleiber, R; McCarthy, K J; Melnikov, A V; Monreal, P; Parra, F I; Zhezhera, A I

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the relaxation of a zonal electrostatic potential perturbation in a non-axisymmetric magnetically confined plasma are presented. A sudden perturbation of the plasma equilibrium is induced by the injection of a cryogenic hydrogen pellet in the TJ-II stellarator, which is observed to be followed by a damped oscillation in the electrostatic potential. The waveform of the relaxation is consistent with theoretical calculations of zonal potential relaxation in a non-axisymmetric magnetic geometry. The turbulent transport properties of a magnetic confinement configuration are expected to depend on the features of the collisionless damping of zonal flows, of which the present letter is the first direct observation.

  12. The role of meltwater variability in modulating diurnal to inter-annual ice-sheet flow: New insights from a ~decade of high-temporal resolution GPS observations on the western Greenland margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, L. A.; Behn, M. D.; Das, S. B.; Joughin, I.; van den Broeke, M.; Herring, T.; McGuire, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Meltwater-driven processes across the ablation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet are controlled by seasonal fluxes as well as shorter-term variability in surface melt. Few high-temporal resolution GPS observations of ice-sheet flow extend for longer than a couple years, limiting multiyear analyses of seasonal variability in ice-sheet flow. Using a small GPS network installed at ~1000-m above sea level (m a.s.l.) operating from 2006-2014, and supplemented with a larger array of 20 GPS stations installed from 2011­-2014, we observe nine years of ice-sheet surface motion on the western margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The GPS array spans a horizontal distance of 30 km across an elevation range of 700-1250 m a.s.l., and captures the ice-sheet's velocity response to the seasonal melt cycle. By combining the GPS array measurements with temperature, precipitation, and runoff estimates from the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO), we examine the relationship between ice-sheet flow and surface melt variability both at the seasonal scale (i.e., during melt onset, summer melt season and melt cessation) as well as during transient high melt periods such as precipitation events, anomalously high melt episodes, and supraglacial lake drainages. We observe varying surface motion following early versus late summer extended melt events, with early-season extended melt events inducing longer sustained speed-up than late summer events. We also examine differences in the timing of melt onset and magnitude, comparing the anomalously high runoff observed across the ice sheet in 2010 and 2012 against the average to low runoff observed in the years comprising the remainder of the record. This nearly decadal record improves our understanding of the role of meltwater variability in modulating ice-sheet flow on diurnal to inter-annual timescales.

  13. Solar wind and substorm excitation of the wavy current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, C.; Lester, M.; Fear, R. C.; Lucek, E.; Dandouras, I.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Singer, H.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2009-06-01

    Following a solar wind pressure pulse on 3 August 2001, GOES 8, GOES 10, Cluster and Polar observed dipolarizations of the magnetic field, accompanied by an eastward expansion of the aurora observed by IMAGE, indicating the occurrence of two substorms. Prior to the first substorm, the motion of the plasma sheet with respect to Cluster was in the ZGSM direction. Observations following the substorms show the occurrence of current sheet waves moving predominantly in the -YGSM direction. Following the second substorm, the current sheet waves caused multiple current sheet crossings of the Cluster spacecraft, previously studied by Zhang et al. (2002). We further this study to show that the velocity of the current sheet waves was similar to the expansion velocity of the substorm aurora and the expansion of the dipolarization regions in the magnetotail. Furthermore, we compare these results with the current sheet wave models of Golovchanskaya and Maltsev (2005) and Erkaev et al. (2008). We find that the Erkaev et al. (2008) model gives the best fit to the observations.

  14. Solar wind and substorm excitation of the wavy current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Forsyth

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Following a solar wind pressure pulse on 3 August 2001, GOES 8, GOES 10, Cluster and Polar observed dipolarizations of the magnetic field, accompanied by an eastward expansion of the aurora observed by IMAGE, indicating the occurrence of two substorms. Prior to the first substorm, the motion of the plasma sheet with respect to Cluster was in the ZGSM direction. Observations following the substorms show the occurrence of current sheet waves moving predominantly in the −YGSM direction. Following the second substorm, the current sheet waves caused multiple current sheet crossings of the Cluster spacecraft, previously studied by Zhang et al. (2002. We further this study to show that the velocity of the current sheet waves was similar to the expansion velocity of the substorm aurora and the expansion of the dipolarization regions in the magnetotail. Furthermore, we compare these results with the current sheet wave models of Golovchanskaya and Maltsev (2005 and Erkaev et al. (2008. We find that the Erkaev et al. (2008 model gives the best fit to the observations.

  15. Microstructural Developments Leading to New Advanced High Strength Sheet Steels: A Historical Assessment of Critical Metallographic Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlock, David K [CSM/ASPPRC; Thomas, Larrin S [CSM/ASPPRC; Taylor, Mark D [CSM/ASPPRC; De Moor, Emmanuel [CSM/ASPPRC; Speer, John G [CSM/ASPPRC

    2015-08-03

    In the past 30+ years significant advancements have been made in the development of higher strength sheet steels with improved combinations of strength and ductility that have enabled important product improvements leading to safer, lighter weight, and more fuel efficient automobiles and in other applications. Properties of the primarily low carbon, low alloy steels are derived through careful control of time-temperature processing histories designed to produce multiphase ferritic based microstructures that include martensite and other constituents including retained austenite. The basis for these developments stems from the early work on dual-phase steels which was the subject of much interest. In response to industry needs, dual-phase steels have evolved as a unique class of advanced high strength sheet steels (AHSS) in which the thermal and mechanical processing histories have been specifically designed to produce constituent combinations for the purpose of simultaneously controlling strength and deformation behavior, i.e. stress-strain curve shapes. Improvements continue as enhanced dual-phase steels have recently been produced with finer microstructures, higher strengths, and better overall formability. Today, dual phase steels are the primary AHSS products used in vehicle manufacture, and several companies have indicated that the steels will remain as important design materials well into the future. In this presentation, fundamental results from the early work on dual-phase steels will be reviewed and assessed in light of recent steel developments. Specific contributions from industry/university cooperative research leading to product improvements will be highlighted. The historical perspective provided in the evolution of dual-phase steels represents a case-study that provides important framework and lessons to be incorporated in next generation AHSS products.

  16. Cassini UVIS Observations of the Io Plasma Torus. IV. Modeling Temporal and Azimuthal Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Steffl, A J; Bagenal, F

    2007-01-01

    In this fourth paper in a series, we present the results of our efforts to model the remarkable temporal and azimuthal variability of the Io plasma torus during the Cassini encounter with Jupiter. The long-term (months) temporal variation in the average torus composition observed by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) can be modeled by supposing a factor of ~4 increase in the amount of material supplied to the extended neutral clouds that are the source of torus plasma, followed by a gradual decay to more "typical" values. On shorter timescales, the observed 10.07-hour torus periodicity and azimuthal variation in plasma composition, including its surprising modulation with System III longitude, is reproduced by our model using the superposition of two azimuthal variations of suprathermal electrons: a primary hot electron variation that slips 12.5 degrees/day relative to the Jovian magnetic field and a secondary variation that remains fixed in System III longitude.

  17. Clarification on Polarity of Bipolar Electric Field Solitary Structures in Space Plasmas with Satellite Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. N. S.Qureshi; SHI Jian-Kui; LIU Zhen-Xing; Klaus Torkar

    2011-01-01

    The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric field peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive). We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model. The results show that ii initial electric field E0 > 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be positive/negative; and if E0 < 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be negative/positive. However, for a fixed polarity of the EFS, either positive/negative or negative/positive, if the satellite is located at the positive side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be positive/negative, if the satellite is located at the negative side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be negative/positive. Therefore, we provide a method to clarify the natural polarity of the EFS with observed polarity by satellites. Our results are significant to understand the physical process in space plasma with the satellite observation.%@@ The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric Held peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive).We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model.

  18. The monitoring of ice sheet movement using multiple spaceborne data fusion: A case study of a remote sensing observation over Russell Glacier in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y.; Kim, J.; Lin, S. Y.; Chen, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    The changes of ice sheet in Greenland have been traced through various remote sensing observations. However, it was realised that the uncertainties in the observed change of ice sheet were not fully addressed. Therefore, we devised and tested a scheme employing multiple sensor satellite data and the data fusion to spatially and temporally monitor the migration of glacier with high accuracy. The test area was established in Russell glacier in western Greenland where the change of glacier has been obvious for the last century. Firstly, differential interferometric SAR (D-InSAR) campaigns using ALOS PALSAR pairs were applied to monitor the glacial change. In terms of data fusion aspect, we then employed pixel tracing method by co-registration of ALOS PRISM optical images over target area to compensate for any line-of-sight glacial movement resulted by the D-InSAR analysis. To securely trace individual pixel, high accuracy sub-pixel co-registration algorithm was developed. Meanwhile, PALSAR pairs were also applied to test the amplitude tracking method in the same manner. To address the temporal difference between the acquisition of SAR and optical images, the velocity vectors considering seasonal mean migration were interpolated. At last, the outputs from analyses were incorporated to build an effective 3D movement tracing over Russell glacier. Furthermore, in order to investigate the glacial migration process, the hydrodynamic simulations employing optical stereo pairs and InSAR DTMs over meltwater outflow channels, such as Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua and Qinnguata Kuussua from Russell glacier, were conducted simultaneously with the tracking of the geometric movement of glacier. The overall results were anticipated to be incorporated for the understanding of long term change of Russell glacier. Based on the output of this case study, the proposed method will be extended into a comprehensive scheme to tackle the issues of ice sheet change occurred in the Greenland.

  19. Westward tilt of low-latitude plasma blobs as observed by the Swarm constellation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Jaeheung; Luehr, Hermann; Michaelis, Ingo;

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigate the three-dimensional structure of low-latitude plasma blobs using multi-instrument and multisatellite observations of the Swarm constellation. During the early commissioning phase the Swarm satellites were flying at the same altitude with zonal separation of about 0...

  20. Observing the Plasma-Physical Processes of Pulsar Radio Emission with Arecibo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Joanna M.

    2017-01-01

    With their enormous densities and fields, neutron stars entail some of the most exotic physics in the cosmos. Similarly, the physical mechanisms of pulsar radio emission are no less exotic, and we are only now beginning to understand them. The talk will provide an introduction to the phenomenology of radio pulsar emission and focus on those aspects of the exquisite Arecibo observations that bear on their challenging emission physics.The commonalities of the radio beamforms of most slow pulsars (and some millisecond pulsars) argue strongly that their magnetic fields have a nearly dipolar structure at the height of their radio emission regions. These heights can often be determined by aberration/retardation analyses. Similarly, measurement of the orientation of the polarized radio emission with respect to the emitting magnetic field facilitates identification of the physical(X/O) emission modes and study of the plasma coupling to the electromagnetic radiation.While the physics of primary plasma generation above the pulsar polar cap is only beginning to be understood, it is clear that the radio pulsars we see are able to generate copious amounts of electron-positron plasma in their emission regions. Within the nearly dipolar field structure of these emission regions, the plasma density is near to that of the Goldreich-Julian model, and so the physical conditions in these regions can be accurately estimated.These conditions show that the plasma frequencies in the emission regions are much higher than the frequency of the emitted radiation, such that the plasma couples most easily to the extraordinary mode as observed. Therefore, the only surviving emission mechanism is curvature radiation from charged solitons, produced by the two-stream instability. Such soliton emission has probably been observed directly in the Crab pulsar; however, a physical theory of charged soliton radiation does not yet exist.

  1. Detection of thin current sheets and associated reconnection in the Earth's turbulent magnetosheath using cluster multi-point measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, Alexandros; Retino, Alessandro; Sahraoui, Fouad; Greco, Antonella; Vaivads, Andris; Sundkvist, David; Canu, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection occurs in turbulent plasma within a large number of volume-filling thin current sheets and is one major candidate for energy dissipation of turbulent plasma. Such dissipation results in particle heating and non-thermal particle acceleration. In situ observations are needed to study the detailed properties of thin current sheets and associated reconnection, in order to determine its importance as a dissipation mechanism at small scales. In particular, multi-point measurements are crucial to unambiguously identify spatial scales (e.g current sheet thickness) and estimate key quantities such as E*J. Here we present a study of the properties of thin current sheets detected in the Earths magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock by using Cluster spacecraft data. The current sheets were detected by the rotation of the magnetic field as computed by four-point measurements. We study the distribution of current sheets as a function of the magnetic shear angle θ, their duration and the waiting time between consecutive current sheets. We found that high shear (θ > 90 degrees) current sheets show different properties with respect to low shear current sheets (θ < 90 degrees). These high-shear current sheets account for about ˜ 20% of the total and have an average thickness comparable to the ion inertial length. We also compare our four-point detection method with other single-point methods (e.g. Partial Variance of Increments - PVI) and we discuss the results of such comparison.

  2. Observation of particle pairing in a two-dimensional plasma crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Zhdanov, S K; Nosenko, V; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E

    2013-01-01

    The observation is presented of naturally occurring pairing of particles and their cooperative drift in a two-dimensional plasma crystal. A single layer of plastic microspheres was suspended in the plasma sheath of a capacitively coupled rf discharge in argon at a low pressure of 1 Pa. The particle dynamics were studied by combining the top-view and side-view imaging of the suspension. Cross analysis of the particle trajectories allowed us to identify naturally occurring metastable pairs of particles. The lifetime of pairs was long enough for their reliable identification.

  3. Experimental observation of the longitudinal plasma excitation in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irie, A; Oya, G [Department of Electrical and Electronic Systems Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya 321-8585 (Japan); Shukrinov, Yu M [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow Region, 141980 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: iriea@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp

    2008-10-15

    We have investigated the current-voltage characteristics (IVCs) of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs). Recently, it is predicted that the longitudinal plasma wave can be excited by the parametric resonance in IJJs. Such an excitation induces a singularity called as breakpoint region around switch back region in the IVC. We have succeeded in the observation of the breakpoint region in the IVC of the mesa with 5 IJJs at 4.2 K. Furthermore, it is found that the temperature dependence of the breakpoint current is in agreement with the theoretical prediction. This suggests that the wave number of the excited plasma wave varies with temperature.

  4. Experimental observation of the longitudinal plasma excitation in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, A.; Shukrinov, Yu M.; Oya, G.

    2008-10-01

    We have investigated the current-voltage characteristics (IVCs) of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs). Recently, it is predicted that the longitudinal plasma wave can be excited by the parametric resonance in IJJs. Such an excitation induces a singularity called as breakpoint region around switch back region in the IVC. We have succeeded in the observation of the breakpoint region in the IVC of the mesa with 5 IJJs at 4.2 K. Furthermore, it is found that the temperature dependence of the breakpoint current is in agreement with the theoretical prediction. This suggests that the wave number of the excited plasma wave varies with temperature.

  5. MHD Model Results of Solar Wind Plasma Interaction with Mars and Comparison with MAVEN Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y. J.; Russell, C. T.; Nagy, A. F.; Toth, G.; Halekas, J. S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2015-01-01

    The crustal remnant field on Mars rotates constantly with the planet, varying the magnetic field configuration interacting with the solar wind. It has been found that ion loss rates slowly vary with the subsolar longitude, anticorrelating with the intensity of the dayside crustal field source, with some time delay, using a time-dependent multispecies MHD model. In this study, we investigate in detail how plasma properties are influenced locally by the crustal field and its rotation. Model results will be compared in detail with plasma observations from MAVEN.

  6. Observations and implications of gap closure in plasma opening switch operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyer, John R.; Kortbawi, David

    1994-09-01

    Plasma opening switches are believed to develop voltage through opening and magnetically insulating a gap formed in plasma injected between two conducting electrodes. Data will be presented to show that a relatively simple assumption about the behavior of this gap suffices to describe the overall operation of the switch. Specifically, the observed increase, then decrease, of operational voltage as a function of conduction time can be accounted for by the switch gap linearly decreasing with conduction time, while the conducted current increases. In addition to presentation of data to demonstrate this collapse, analysis is performed to couple the gap history to the voltage predicted for the switch, and to optimize this latter quantity.

  7. Observation of Periodic Multiplication and Chaotic Phenomena in Atmospheric Cold Plasma Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Bing; HUANG Jian-Jun; ZHANG Zhe-Huang; WANG De-Zhen

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the temporal evolution of the current pulses from an ac He cold plasma jet at atmospheric pressure and with driving frequency in the range 14.76-15.30 kHz. The driving frequency is used as the plasma system's bifurcation parameter in analogy with the evolution in which the current pulses undergoes multiplication and chaos. Such time-domain nonlinearity is important for controlling instabilities in atmospheric glow discharges.In addition, the observation can provide some data to support the simulation results reported previously [Appl.Phys. Lett. 90 (2007) 071501].

  8. Multi-instrument observations of nightside plasma patches under conditions of IMF Bz positive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. C. Howells

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented from two multi-instrument case studies showing patches of cold, long-lived plasma in the winter nightside ionosphere during times when the z-component of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF Bz was positive. These enhancements were coincident with the antisunward convective plasma drift, flowing from polar to nightside auroral latitudes. In the first case, on 5 December 2005 with IMF By negative, two regions of enhanced electron density were observed extended in MLT in the magnetic midnight sector separated by lower densities near midnight. It is likely that the earlier enhancement originated on the dayside near magnetic noon and was transported to the nightside sector in the convective flow, whilst the later feature originated in the morning magnetic sector. The lower densities separating the two enhancements were a consequence of a pair of lobe cells essentially blocking the direct antisunward cross polar flow from the dayside. A second case study on 4 February 2006 with IMF By positive revealed a single nightside enhancement likely to have originated in the morning magnetic sector. These multi-instrument investigations, incorporating observations by the EISCAT radar facility, the SuperDARN network and radio tomography, reveal that plasma flowing from the dayside can play a significant role in the nightside ionosphere under conditions of IMF Bz positive. The observations are reinforced by simulations of flux-tube transport and plasma decay.

  9. Using remotely sensed data from AIRS to estimate the vapor flux on the Greenland ice sheet: Comparisons with observations and a regional climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Linette N.; Lee, Jae N.; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Noël, Brice; Broeke, Michiel R.; Nolin, Anne W.

    2017-01-01

    Mass loss from the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) in recent years has been dominated by runoff from surface melt. It is currently being studied extensively, while little interest has been given to the smallest component of surface mass balance (SMB): the vapor flux. Although poorly understood, it is not negligible and could potentially play a larger role in SMB in a warming climate where temperature, relative humidity, and precipitation changes remain uncertain. Here we present an innovative approach to estimate the vapor flux using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) version 6 data and a modified vapor flux model (BMF13) over the GrIS between 2003 and 2014. One modification to the BMF13 model includes a new Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer surface aerodynamic roughness product, which likely produces more accurate estimates of the drag coefficient on the ice sheet. When comparing AIRS data with GC-Net and Programme for Monitoring of the Greenland Ice Sheet automatic weather station observations of skin temperature, near-surface air temperature, and humidity, they agree within 2 K, 2.68 K, and 0.34 g kg-1. Largest differences occur in the ablation zone where there is significant subgrid heterogeneity. Overall, the average vapor flux from the GrIS between 2003 and 2014 was found to be 14.6 ± 3.6 Gt yr-1. No statistically significant trends were found during the data record. This data set is compared to the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO2.3) vapor flux, and BMF13 produced smaller vapor fluxes in the summer ( 0.05 Gt d-1) and slightly more deposition in the winter ( 9.4 × 10-3 Gt d-1). Annually, differences between BMF13 and RACMO2.3 were only 30 ± 15%.

  10. Mercury's Magnetospheric Cusps and Cross-Tail Current Sheet: Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Gang Kai

    Mercury has proven to be a unique natural laboratory for space plasma processes. Mercury's magnetosphere is formed by the interaction between its intrinsic planetary magnetic field and the supersonic solar wind. The structure of Mercury's magnetosphere is very similar to Earth's; yet the results from the MESSENGER mission to Mercury have shown that the spatial and temporal scales of magnetospheric processes are very different at Mercury. In this thesis, we analyze in situ observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft to characterize and understand the dynamic physical plasma processes occurring in Mercury's magnetosphere. We identified and analyzed 345 plasma filaments in Mercury's northern magnetospheric cusp to determine their physical properties. Cusp plasma filaments are magnetic structures that are identified on the basis of their characteristic 2-3 seconds long decrease in magnetic field intensity. Our analysis indicates that these cusp filaments are cylindrical flux tubes filled with plasma, which causes a diamagnetic decrease in the magnetic field inside the flux tube. MESSENGER observations of flux transfer events (FTEs) and cusp filament suggests that cusp filaments properties are the low-altitude extension of FTEs formed at Mercury's dayside magnetopause. We examined 319 central plasma sheet crossings observed by MESSENGER. Using a Harris model, we determined the physical properties of Mercury's cross-tail current sheet. Analysis of BZ in the current sheet indicated that MESSENGER usually crossed the current sheet sunward of the Near Mercury Neutral Line. Magnetohydrodynamics-based analysis using the MESSENGER magnetic field and plasma measurements suggests that heavy planetary ions and/or ion temperature anisotropy may be important in maintaining radial stress balance within Mercury's central plasma sheet. We report the observation of significant dawn-dusk variation in Mercury's cross-tail current sheet with thicker, lower plasma beta dawn side current

  11. Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets are available in both English and Spanish and can be downloaded for free. Currently available ... Antiviral Medications to Treat or Prevent Influenza (the Flu) PDF | Espanol PDF Apremilast (Otezla®) PDF | Espanol PDF ...

  12. Observation of Multiple Reconnections during Self-organization Process of High Temperature Fusion Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. K.; Tobias, B.; Choi, M. J.; Yun, G. S.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Munsat, T.; Donné, A. J. H.; Spakman, G. W.; Textor Team

    2011-10-01

    Images of a high resolution 2-D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic shows evidence of multiple magnetic reconnection processes during the internal disruption of a high temperature tokamak plasmas. The disruption induces magnetic self-organization of the toroidal plasma being accompanied by successive or simultaneous multiple layer reconnection. The degree of asymmetric deformation of the internal magnetic structure (m/n=1/1 mode) prior to temperature crash influences the outcome of the disruptive behavior. The observation is critical for the building block of first principle theoretical modeling of the sawtooth oscillation in current driven toroidal plasmas and the understandings can be applied to the impulsive disruptive behavior in flares of the solar, accretion disk and stellar coronae, Earth magnetospheric storms, and controlled fusion. Work supported by the NRF of Korea, the US DOE, the NWO of the Netherlands, and the EURATOM-FOM association.

  13. MMS observations of ion-scale magnetic island in the magnetosheath turbulent plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. Y.; Sahraoui, F.; Retino, A.; Le Contel, O.; Yuan, Z. G.; Chasapis, A.; Aunai, N.; Breuillard, H.; Deng, X. H.; Zhou, M.; Fu, H. S.; Pang, Y.; Wang, D. D.; Torbert, R. B.; Goodrich, K. A.; Ergun, R. E.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Magnes, W.; Bromund, K.; Leinweber, H.; Plaschke, F.; Anderson, B. J.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    In this letter, first observations of ion-scale magnetic island from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission in the magnetosheath turbulent plasma are presented. The magnetic island is characterized by bipolar variation of magnetic fields with magnetic field compression, strong core field, density depletion, and strong currents dominated by the parallel component to the local magnetic field. The estimated size of magnetic island is about 8 di, where di is the ion inertial length. Distinct particle behaviors and wave activities inside and at the edges of the magnetic island are observed: parallel electron beam accompanied with electrostatic solitary waves and strong electromagnetic lower hybrid drift waves inside the magnetic island and bidirectional electron beams, whistler waves, weak electromagnetic lower hybrid drift waves, and strong broadband electrostatic noise at the edges of the magnetic island. Our observations demonstrate that highly dynamical, strong wave activities and electron-scale physics occur within ion-scale magnetic islands in the magnetosheath turbulent plasma.

  14. Observations of long-lived H-2 and D-2 ions from non-thermal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Guo; Xu, Yong; Zhu, Ai-Min; Liu, Zhong-Wei; Liu, Xin; Yang, Xue-Feng

    2007-03-01

    Strong mass signals of H-2 and D-2 ions have been observed from low-pressure dielectric barrier discharge hydrogen and deuterium plasmas via molecular beam mass spectrometry. The observed H-2/H- and D-2/D- ratios (~0.35-0.4) are over five orders of magnitude higher than those observed by other techniques. The kinetic energy of H-2 and D-2 ions sampled from the plasmas was determined to be widely distributed, from a few eV to >100 eV, giving lifetimes greater than ~40 µs for H-2 and ~55 µs for D-2. The highest vib-rotational excitation of neutral H2 species in the plasma was determined to be about J = 0, v = 5 or J = 19, v = 0 via threshold ionization mass spectrometry. The possible pumping mechanisms for generating H-2 with further high J, required by the current high-rotation model, have been proposed. Similar to the lifetime of D-2 determined recently by another group, the H-2 lifetime observed in this work is about two orders of magnitude longer than that predicted by the current theoretical model. To explain these experimental observations regarding the meta-stability of long-lived H-2 and D-2 ions, the improved current high-rotation model or other new models, including the possible existence of some long-lived electronically excited states of H-2/D-2, need to be developed.

  15. Experimental study of the dynamics of a thin current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, W.; DeHaas, T.; Van Compernolle, B.; Daughton, W.; Pribyl, P.; Vincena, S.; Hong, D.

    2016-05-01

    Many plasmas in natural settings or in laboratory experiments carry currents. In magnetized plasmas the currents can be narrow field-aligned filaments as small as the electron inertial length ≤ft(\\tfrac{c}{{ω }pe}\\right) in the transverse dimension or fill the entire plasma column. Currents can take the form of sheets, again with the transverse dimension the narrow one. Are laminar sheets of electric current in a magnetized plasma stable? This became an important issue in the 1960s when current-carrying plasmas became key in the quest for thermonuclear fusion. The subject is still under study today. The conditions necessary for the onset for tearing are known, the key issue is that of the final state. Is there a final state? One possibility is a collection of stable tubes of current. On the other hand, is the interaction between the current filaments which are the byproduct endless, or does it go on to become chaotic? The subject of three-dimensional current systems is intriguing, rich in a variety of phenomena on multiple scale sizes and frequencies, and relevant to fusion studies, solar physics, space plasmas and astrophysical phenomena. In this study a long (δz = 11 m) and narrow (δx = 1 cm, δy = 20 cm) current sheet is generated in a background magnetoplasma capable of supporting Alfvén waves. The current is observed to rapidly tear into a series of magnetic islands when viewed in a cross-sectional plane, but they are in essence three-dimensional flux ropes. At the onset of the current, magnetic field line reconnection is observed between the flux ropes. The sheet on the whole is kink-unstable, and after kinking exhibits large-scale, low-frequency (f ≪ f ci ) rotation about the background field with an amplitude that grows with distance from the source of the current. Three-dimensional data of the magnetic and electric fields is acquired throughout the duration of the experiment and the parallel resistivity is derived from it. The parallel

  16. Relation between current sheets and vortex sheets in stationary incompressible MHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Nickeler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic configurations with strong localized current concentrations and vortices play an important role in the dissipation of energy in space and astrophysical plasma. Within this work we investigate the relation between current sheets and vortex sheets in incompressible, stationary equilibria. For this approach it is helpful that the similar mathematical structure of magnetohydrostatics and stationary incompressible hydrodynamics allows us to transform static equilibria into stationary ones. The main control function for such a transformation is the profile of the Alfvén-Mach number MA, which is always constant along magnetic field lines, but can change from one field line to another. In the case of a global constant MA, vortices and electric current concentrations are parallel. More interesting is the nonlinear case, where MA varies perpendicular to the field lines. This is a typical situation at boundary layers like the magnetopause, heliopause, the solar wind flowing around helmet streamers and at the boundary of solar coronal holes. The corresponding current and vortex sheets show in some cases also an alignment, but not in every case. For special density distributions in 2-D, it is possible to have current but no vortex sheets. In 2-D, vortex sheets of field aligned-flows can also exist without strong current sheets, taking the limit of small Alfvén Mach numbers into account. The current sheet can vanish if the Alfvén Mach number is (almost constant and the density gradient is large across some boundary layer. It should be emphasized that the used theory is not only valid for small Alfvén Mach numbers MA << 1, but also for MA ≲ 1. Connection to other theoretical approaches and observations and physical effects in space plasmas are presented. Differences in the various aspects of theoretical investigations of current sheets and vortex

  17. Cassini Plasma Spectrometer Ion Observations Close to Enceladus: E3, E5 and E7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, R. L.; Johnson, R. E.; Thomsen, M. F.; Wilson, R. J.; Crary, F. J.; Young, D. T.; Goldstein, R.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Sittler, E. C.; Coates, A. J.; Paty, C. S.; Jia, Y.; Omidi, N.; Russell, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) detected freshly-produced water-group ions (O+, OH+, H2O+, H3O+) and heavier water dimer ions (HxO2)+ very close to Enceladus where the plasma begins to emerge from the south polar plume (1). The data were obtained during two close (52 and 25 km) flybys of Enceladus in 2008 (E3 and E5) and are consistent with measurements from the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS). The ions are observed in CAPS detectors looking in the Cassini ram direction close to the ram kinetic energy, indicative of a nearly stagnant plasma flow in the plume. North of Enceladus the plasma slowing commences about 4 to 6 Enceladus radii away, while south of Enceladus signatures of the plasma interaction with the plume are detected 22 Enceladus radii away. Here we review and contrast these observations including the E7 flyby (anticipated Nov. 2, 2009). E7 is planned for a closest approach ~103 km south of Enceladus and CAPS should detect ions at rest with respect to Enceladus and over a broad range of gyrophase angles. Plasma fluid parameters both upstream and downstream of these encounters are extracted from the CAPS data. In addition, we compare the CAPS ion measurements with both fluid and 3D hybrid simulations. The MHD simulations (BATSRUS) are tuned to agree with Cassini Magnetometer (MAG) observations during the encounters then compared with CAPS observations. For example, for the E3 encounter the CAPS/BATSRUS comparison is striking, with features reproduced such as: the overall spatial scale of the interaction, the slowing of the ion flow within the dust plume to less than 5 km/s with respect to Enceladus, the temperature, flow and density signature of the geometric wake, and the flow perturbation along the magnetic field due to wake expansion. For E5, BATSRUS tuned against MAG suggests a 15 km/s bulk plasma flow toward Saturn during the encounter. We search for signatures of this flow in the CAPS ion data. 1.) Tokar,R.L. et al. Geophys. Res

  18. Io's volcanic influence on the Io plasma torus: HISAKI observation in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, F.; Yoshioka, K.; Kimura, T.; Murakami, G.; Yoneda, M.; Koga, R.; Kagitani, M.; Sakanoi, T.; Kasaba, Y.; Yamazaki, A.; Yoshikawa, I.

    2015-12-01

    The satellite Io which has many active volcanos supplies volcanic gases to the Jovian magnetosphere with typical rate of 1 ton/sec and has been known be a primary source of plasmas in the magnetosphere. Change in the volcanic activity on Io should cause change of the supply rate and could affect structure of the magnetosphere and dynamics occurs in it. However, responses of the magnetosphere to the volcanic activity is still not fully understood; one of the reasons is lack of continuous and long term observations of Io' volcanic gas extended around Io, plasmas in the Io torus, and activity of the magnetosphere. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscope, EXCEED, onboard the HISAKI satellite has capability to measure ion and atomic emission lines in EUV range (55-145nm) and is dedicated to observing solar system planets. The satellite has been successfully launched on Sep. 2013 and 2nd campaign of Io plasma torus and Jovian northern EUV aurora observation has been done from the end of Nov. 2014 to middle of May 2015. On middle of Jan. 2015, HISAKI detected gradual increase in intensity of S+ emission lines and decrease of S3+ ones in the plasma torus. The S+ intensity showed a maximum around the end of Feb. and S++ and S3+ intensities also showed maxima subsequently. Simultaneous ground based observation of the sodium nebula showed increase of the emission intensity from the middle of Jan. to the beginning of Mar. These observations suggest that the volcanic activity began at the middle of Jan. and increase neutral atom and ion densities in the Io torus. The intensities of S+ and S2+ ions returned to the pre-increase level by the middle of May 2015. S3+ had still been in the decay phase at the end of the observation. Change in radial structure of the plasma torus was also found during the volcanic event. The intensity of S+ ion began to increase around the orbit of Io (6 Jovian radii). The brightened region propagated outward and reached at 8.5 Jovian radii from

  19. Energy spectra of plasma sheet ions and electrons from about 50 eV/e to about 1 MeV during plamsa temperature transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, S. P.; Mitchell, D. G.; Williams, D. J.; Frank, L. A.; Huang, C. Y.; Eastman, T. E.

    1988-01-01

    ISEE-1 charged-particle measurements obtained during eight plasma temperature transitions (PTTs) in 1978-1979 are compiled in tables and graphs and analyzed in detail, comparing the ion and electron differential energy spectra with the predictions of theoretical models. PTTs are defined as approximately 1-h periods of low bulk plasma velocity and steadily increasing or decreasing thermal energy. A Maxwellian distribution is found to be inadequate in describing the PTT energy spectra, but velocity-exponential and kappa distributions are both successful, the latter especially at higher energies. The power-law index kappa varies from PTT to PTT, but the high-energy spectral index and overall shape of the distribution remain constant during a PTT; both spatial and temporal effects are observed.

  20. Large-scale drifts observed on electron temperature measurements on JET plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbaud, Thomas; Alper, Barry; Beausang, Kieran; Beurskens, Marc; Flanagan, Joanne; Kempenaars, Mark; Sirinelli, Antoine; Maslov, Mikhail; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Contributors, JET EFDA

    2012-01-01

    Between 1995 and 2009, electron temperature (Te) measurements of more than 15000 plasmas produced in the Joint European Torus (JET) have been carefully reviewed using the two main diagnostics available over this time period: Michelson interferometer and Thomson scattering systems. Long term stability of JET Te is experimentaly observed by defining the ECE TS ratio as the ratio of central Te measured by Michelson and LIDAR. This paper, based on a careful review of Te measurement from 15 years of JET plasmas, concludes that JET Te exhibits a 15-20% effective uncertainty mostly made of large-scale temporal drifts, and an overall uncertainty of 16-22%. Variations of 18 plasma parameters are checked in another data set, made of a "reference data set" made of ohmic pulses as similar as possible between 1998 and 2009. Time drifts of ECE TS ratios appear to be mostly disconnected from the variations observed on these 18 plasma parameters, except for the very low amplitude variations of the field which are well correl...

  1. Characteristic of plasma bubbles observed by DMSP in the topside ionosphere during the year 2005

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Patel; A K Singh

    2010-04-01

    To study the characteristic of plasma bubbles in the topside ionosphere during the solar minima, we have analyzed a large database of post-sunset plasma density measurement acquired during ∼5104 equatorial crossings made by Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F14 in 2005. On 675 of these crossings, equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) events were observed as intervals of depleted and irregular plasma densities that degrade communication and navigation signals. We have analyzed these EPB events to study their distributions with month, season and longitude. To test for possible dependence of EPB occurrence at topside altitudes on the level of magnetic activity, we compared the distributions of one year database with those of Kp index at the time of equatorial crossings by the DMSP satellites. We also examined the response of the evening sector, low-latitude ionosphere during eight magnetic storms with minimum Dst ≤ −100nT. We observed that EPBs occurred regularly during geomagnetic storms, especially in the initial and main phases but can be suppressed sometimes for days, after prolonged activity during recovery phases. These results are discussed according to the other reported results.

  2. Fortuitous Plasma Observations During the Mars Atmospheric "Plume" Event of March-April 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, David; Barabash, Stas; Edberg, Niklas; Gurnett, Donald; Hall, Ben; Holmström, Mats; Lester, Mark; Opgenoorth, Hermann; Ramstad, Robin; Sanchez-Cano, Beatriz; Way, Michael; Witasse, Olivier; Morgan, David

    2016-04-01

    We present initial analysis and conclusions from plasma observations made during the reported `Mars Dust plume event' of March - April 2012.During this period, multiple independent amateur observers detected a localized, high-altitude feature over the Martian terminator [Sanchez-Lavega et al., Nature, 2015, doi:10.1038/nature14162], the explanation for which remains incomplete. The brightness of the feature in visible light is too extreme for auroral emissions to explain, despite its occurrence at a location where these have been previously reported. Likewise, the (projected) altitude of the feature is significantly too high to allow for the local formation of clouds. Fortuitously, the orbit of ESA's Mars Express allowed the measurement of ionospheric plasma density and solar wind parameters over the precise location of the plume sighting at multiple points during this interval. Based on these observations, we tentatively conclude that the formation and/or transport of this plume to the altitudes where it was observed was in part the result of a large Coronal Mass Ejection encountering the Martian system. However, while measurements of ionospheric plasma density at the corresponding altitudes indicate a disturbed structure, this is not a-typical of this location over Mars. Finally, we briefly discuss some possible mechanisms that may lead to the formation of this plume.

  3. Multi-wavelength imaging observations of plasma depletions over Kavalur, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. S. Sinha

    Full Text Available Observations of ionospheric plasma depletions were made over Kavalur (12.56° N, 78.8° E, Mag. Lat 4.6° N, India during March–pril 1998 using an all sky optical imaging system operating at 630 nm, 777.4 nm and 557.7 nm. Out of 14 nights of observations, plasma depletions were seen only on 9 nights. Except for 21 March 1998, which was a magnetically disturbed period, all other nights belonged to a magnetically quiet period. Some of the important results obtained from these observations are: (a After the onset of the equatorial spread F (ESF, plasma depletions take typically about 2 hrs 40 min to come to a fully developed state, (b There are three distinct types of plasma depletions: type 1 have an east-west (e–w extent of 250–350 km with an inter-depletion distance (IDD of 125–300 km; Type 2 have an e–w extent of 100–150 km and IDD of 50–150 km; Type 3 have smallest the e–w extent (40–100 km and IDD of 20–60 km, (c Most of the observed plasma depletions (> 82% had their eastward velocity in the range of 25–125 ms–1. Almost stationary plasma depletions (0–25 ms–1 were observed on one night, which was magnetically disturbed. These very slow moving depletions appear to be the result of a modification of the F-region dynamo field due to direct penetration of the electric field and/or changes in the neutral winds induced by the magnetic disturbance, (d On the night of 21/22 March 1998, which was a magnetically disturbed period, plasma depletions could be seen simultaneously in all three observing wavelengths, i.e. in 630 nm, 777.4 nm and 557.7 nm. It is believed that this simultaneous occurrence was due to neutral density modifications as a result of enhanced magnetic activity. (e Well developed brightness patterns were observed for the first time in 777.4 nm images. Earlier, such brightness patterns were observed only in 630 nm and 557.7 nm images. These brightness patterns initially appear as very

  4. Plasma observations during the Mars atmospheric "plume" event of March-April 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, D J; Edberg, N J T; Gurnett, D A; Hall, B E S; Holmström, M; Lester, M; Morgan, D D; Opgenoorth, H J; Ramstad, R; Sanchez-Cano, B; Way, M; Witasse, O

    2016-01-01

    We present initial analysis and conclusions from plasma observations made during the reported "Mars plume event" of March - April 2012. During this period, multiple independent amateur observers detected a localized, high-altitude "plume" over the Martian dawn terminator [Sanchez-Lavega et al., Nature, 2015, doi:10.1038/nature14162], the cause of which remains to be explained. The estimated brightness of the plume exceeds that expected for auroral emissions, and its projected altitude greatly exceeds that at which clouds are expected to form. We report on in-situ measurements of ionospheric plasma density and solar wind parameters throughout this interval made by Mars Express, obtained over the same surface region, but at the opposing terminator. Measurements in the ionosphere at the corresponding location frequently show a disturbed structure, though this is not atypical for such regions with intense crustal magnetic fields. We tentatively conclude that the formation and/or transport of this plume to the alt...

  5. Observation of heat flux and plasma flow in scrape off layer in QUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onchi, T., E-mail: onchi@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [RIAM, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Mahira, Y. [IGSES, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Nagaoka, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science,322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Tashima, S.; Banerjee, S.; Mishra, K. [IGSES, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Idei, H.; Hanada, K.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Hasegawa, M. [RIAM, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Matsuoka, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science,322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kuzmin, A.; Watanabe, O.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A. [RIAM, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Thermal probe with double function of thermocouples and Langmuir probe has been developed, and the initial data observed in far-SOL in QUEST is obtained. Heat flux of megawatt per square meters related to energetic electrons and sonic plasma flow in far-SOL have been observed in the current rump-up phase although no high power inductive force like ohmic winding is applied. The heat flux and the flow are suppressed after the current is built up. In the quasi-steady state, plasma current starts and keeps sawtooth-like oscillation with 20 Hz frequency. The heat flux and the flow in far-SOL have clear responses to the oscillation.

  6. Temporal and Spatial Turbulent Spectra of MHD Plasma and an Observation of Variance Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffner, D A; Lukin, V S

    2014-01-01

    The nature of MHD turbulence is analyzed through both temporal and spatial magnetic fluctuation spectra. A magnetically turbulent plasma is produced in the MHD wind-tunnel configuration of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). The power of magnetic fluctuations is projected into directions perpendicular and parallel to a local mean field; the ratio of these quantities shows the presence of variance anisotropy which varies as a function of frequency. Comparison amongst magnetic, velocity, and density spectra are also made, demonstrating that the energy of the turbulence observed is primarily seeded by magnetic fields created during plasma production. Direct spatial spectra are constructed using multi-channel diagnostics and are used to compare to frequency spectra converted to spatial scales using the Taylor Hypothesis. Evidence for the observation of dissipation due to ion inertial length scale physics is also discussed as well as the role laboratory experiment can play in understanding turbulence typica...

  7. Observations at the planet Mercury by the plasma electron experiment - Mariner 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.; Vasyliunas, V. M.; Hartle, R. E.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Two nightside encounters with Mercury's magnetosphere by Mariner 10 revealed bow shock and magnetosheath signatures in the plasma electron data that are entirely consistent with the geometry expected for an interaction between a planet-centered magnetic dipole and the solar wind. The geometrically determined distance between the planet's center and the solar wind stagnation point is 1.4 plus or minus 0.1 R sub M. Both diffuse and sharp shock crossings were observed on the two magnetosphere encounters.

  8. Observations at the planet Mercury by the plasma electron experiment - Mariner 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.; Vasyliunas, V. M.; Hartle, R. E.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Two nightside encounters with Mercury's magnetosphere by Mariner 10 revealed bow shock and magnetosheath signatures in the plasma electron data that are entirely consistent with the geometry expected for an interaction between a planet-centered magnetic dipole and the solar wind. The geometrically determined distance between the planet's center and the solar wind stagnation point is 1.4 plus or minus 0.1 R sub M. Both diffuse and sharp shock crossings were observed on the two magnetosphere encounters.

  9. Features of highly structured equatorial plasma irregularities deduced from CHAMP observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, C.; Lühr, H.; Ma, S. Y.; Stolle, C.; Fejer, B. G.

    2012-08-01

    In this study five years of CHAMP (Challenging Mini-satellite Payload) fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) data is used to investigate the characteristics of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs). We filtered the FGM data by using band-passes with four different cut-off periods to get the EPBs with different maximum spatial scale sizes in the meridional plane ranging from 76-608 km. Associated with the EPB observations at about 400 km, the typical altitude of CHAMP during the year 2000-2005, we also investigate the post-sunset equatorial vertical plasma drift data from ROCSAT-1 (Republic of China Satellite 1). Since the height of the F-layer is highly correlated with the vertical plasma drift and solar flux, we sorted the ROCSAT-1 data into different groups by F10.7. From the integrated vertical drift we have estimated the post-sunset uplift of the ionosphere. By comparing the properties of EPB occurrence for different scale sizes with the global distribution of plasma vertical uplift, we have found that EPBs reaching higher altitudes are more structured than those which are sampled by CHAMP near the top side of the depleted fluxtube. Such a result is in accord with 3-D model simulations (Aveiro and Hysell, 2010). Small-scale EPB structures are observed by CHAMP when the irregularities reach apex heights of 800 km and more. Such events are encountered primarily in the Brazilian sector during the months around November, when the post-sunset vertical plasma drift is high.

  10. Features of highly structured equatorial plasma irregularities deduced from CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Xiong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study five years of CHAMP (Challenging Mini-satellite Payload fluxgate magnetometer (FGM data is used to investigate the characteristics of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs. We filtered the FGM data by using band-passes with four different cut-off periods to get the EPBs with different maximum spatial scale sizes in the meridional plane ranging from 76–608 km. Associated with the EPB observations at about 400 km, the typical altitude of CHAMP during the year 2000–2005, we also investigate the post-sunset equatorial vertical plasma drift data from ROCSAT-1 (Republic of China Satellite 1. Since the height of the F-layer is highly correlated with the vertical plasma drift and solar flux, we sorted the ROCSAT-1 data into different groups by F10.7. From the integrated vertical drift we have estimated the post-sunset uplift of the ionosphere. By comparing the properties of EPB occurrence for different scale sizes with the global distribution of plasma vertical uplift, we have found that EPBs reaching higher altitudes are more structured than those which are sampled by CHAMP near the top side of the depleted fluxtube. Such a result is in accord with 3-D model simulations (Aveiro and Hysell, 2010. Small-scale EPB structures are observed by CHAMP when the irregularities reach apex heights of 800 km and more. Such events are encountered primarily in the Brazilian sector during the months around November, when the post-sunset vertical plasma drift is high.

  11. Observations of nightside auroral plasma upflows in the F-region and topside ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Foster

    Full Text Available Observations from the special UK EISCAT program UFIS are presented. UFIS is a joint UHF-VHF experiment, designed to make simultaneous measurements of enhanced vertical plasma flows in the F-region and topside ionospheres. Three distinct intervals of upward ion flow were observed. During the first event, upward ion fluxes in excess of 1013 m–2 s–1 were detected, with vertical ion velocities reaching 300 m s–1 at 800 km. The upflow was associated with the passage of an auroral arc through the radar field of view. In the F-region, an enhanced and sheared convection electric field on the leading edge of the arc resulted in heating of the ions, whilst at higher altitudes, above the precipitation region, strongly enhanced electron temperatures were observed; such features are commonly associated with the generation of plasma upflows. These observations demonstrate some of the acceleration mechanisms which can exist within the small-scale structure of an auroral arc. A later upflow event was associated with enhanced electron temperatures and only a moderate convection electric field, with no indication of significantly elevated ion tem- peratures. There was again some evidence of F-region particle precipitation at the time of the upflow, which exhibited vertical ion velocities of similar magnitude to the earlier upflow, suggesting that the behaviour of the electrons might be the dominant factor in this type of event. A third upflow was detected at altitudes above the observing range of the UHF radar, but which was evident in the VHF data from 600 km upwards. Smaller vertical velocities were observed in this event, which was apparently uncorrelated with any features observed at lower altitudes. Limitations imposed by the experimental conditions inhibit the interpretation of this event, although the upflow was again likely related to topside plasma heating.

  12. Observation of astrophysical Weibel instability in counterstreaming laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, W.; Fiksel, G.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.; Chang, P.-Y.; Hu, S. X.; Nilson, P. M.

    2013-10-01

    Astrophysical shocks are typically collisionless and require collective electromagnetic fields to couple the upstream and downstream plasmas. The Weibel instability has been proposed to be one of such collective mechanism. Here we present laboratory tests of this process through observations of the Weibel instability generated between two counterstreaming, supersonic plasma flows, generated on the OMEGA EP laser facility by irradiating of a pair of opposing parallel CH targets by UV laser pulses (0.351 μm, 1.8 kJ, 2 ns). The Weibel-generated electromagnetic fields were probed with an ultrafast proton beam, generated with a high-intensity laser pulse (1.053 μm, 800 J, 10 ps) focused to >1018 W/cm2 onto a thin Cu disk. Growth of a striated, transverse instability is observed at the midplane as the two plasmas interpenetrate, which is identified as the Weibel instability through agreement with analytic theory and particle-in-cell simulations. These laboratory observations directly demonstrate the existence of this astrophysical process, and pave the way for further detailed laboratory study of this instability and its consequences for particle energization and shock formation. This work was supported by DOE grant DE-SC0007168.

  13. Observation on fundamental and second harmonic mode ECRH assisted plasma startup in SST-1 experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Kirit, E-mail: kirit33@gmail.com; Pradhan, Subrata

    2016-05-15

    In SST-1, successful plasma startup has been achieved at very low loop voltage with the help of ECRH pre-ionization. ECRH is operated in both O mode and X mode for the purpose of pre-ionization at the pre fill pressure of 1 × 10{sup −5} mbar. A delay in breakdown has been observed in case of second harmonic ECRH pre-ionization; where in case of fundamental mode of ECRH pre-ionization, the instant breakdown has been observed. This work has attempted at explaining the non-linear interaction of the seed electrons with the electromagnetic field of the incident ECRH wave that has led to break down of the plasma. The delay in the break down attributes to the time differential between the applications of the ECRH pulse to that of the appearance of the H-alpha signal in SST-1. The observed experimental results have been discussed in this paper from the first principles and numerically solving the electron-ECRH field interactions resulting in energy gains of the electrons leading to plasma break down in SST-1 specific discharge conditions.

  14. Plasma thrombomodulin changes in acute cerebral infarction or hypertension patients An observation for verification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Feng; Hui Zhang; Bingyi Yang; Yonggang Zheng; Jinhui Xie; Ying Wang; Jinchuan Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thrombomodulin concentration greatly increases in plasma when vascular endothelial cells are injured, and it is one of the specific molecular markers for endothelial injury.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the plasma levels of thrombomodulin after cerebral infarction or hypertension, and to compare levels with those from healthy control subjects.DESIGN: A case-controlled observation. SETTING: Yuquan Hospital of Tsinghua University.PARTICIPANTS: Patients with hypertension (n = 37) and acute cerebral infarction (n = 26) were selected from the outpatient and inpatient Department of Neurology, Yuquan Hospital of Tsinghua University from February 2003 to February 2006. The cerebral infarction group consisted of 24 males and 2 females, 36–77 years of age, with a mean age of 62 years. All patients fulfilled the diagnosis criteria for cerebral infarction, according to the diagnostic standards revised by the Second National Academic Meeting for Cerebrovascular Disease, and were confirmed by CT or MRI. The hypertension group consisted of 27 males and 10 females, 36–77 years of age, with a mean age of 56 years. These patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for hypertension set by WHO. In addition, 43 healthy physical examinees were selected as the control group, consisting of 23 males and 20 females, 35–67 years of age.Informed consent was obtained from all participants.METHODS: In the cerebral infarction group, thrombomodulin plasma levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay at days 1, 3, 7, and 14 after attack. Thrombomodulin plasma levels were determined only once in the hypertension group and the control group. The results from the cerebral infarction group were compared with those from the hypertension group and the control group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Level of thrombomodulin in plasma.RESULTS: All 63 patients and 43 healthy volunteers were included in the final analysis of results. ① At 7 days after the attack, the plasma levels of

  15. An Optical Streak Diagnostic for Observing Anode-Cathode Plasmas for Radiographic Source Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droemer, Darryl W. [National Security Technologies, LLC; Crain, Marlon D.; Lare, Gregory A. [National Security Technologies, LLC; Bennett, Nichelle L. [National Security Technologies, LLC; Johnston, Mark D. [Sandia National Laboratories

    2013-06-13

    National Security Technologies, LLC, and Sandia National Laboratories are collaborating in the development of pulsed power–driven flash x-ray radiographic sources that utilize high-intensity electron beam diodes. The RITS 6 (Radiographic Integrated Test Stand) accelerator at Sandia is used to drive a self magnetic pinch diode to produce a Bremsstrahlung x-ray source. The high electric fields and current densities associated with these short A-K gap pinch beam diodes present many challenges in diode development. Plasmas generated at both the anode and cathode affect the diode performance, which is manifested in varying spot (source) sizes, total dose output, and impedance profiles. Understanding the nature of these plasmas including closure rates and densities is important in modeling their behavior and providing insight into their mitigation. In this paper we describe a streak camera–based optical diagnostic that is capable of observing and measuring plasma evolution within the A-K gap. By imaging a region of interest onto the input slit of a streak camera, we are able to produce a time-resolved one-dimensional image of the evolving plasma. Typical data are presented.

  16. Coronal magnetic field and the plasma beta determined from radio and multiple satellite observations

    CERN Document Server

    Iwai, Kazumasa; Nozawa, Satoshi; Takahashi, Takuya; Sawada, Shinpei; Kitagawa, Jun; Miyawaki, Shun; Kashiwagi, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    We derived the coronal magnetic field, plasma density, and temperature from the observation of polarization and intensity of radio thermal free-free emission using the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations. We observed a post-flare loop on the west limb 11 April 2013. The line-of-sight magnetic field was derived from the circularly polarized free-free emission observed by NoRH. The emission measure and temperature were derived from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The derived temperature was used to estimate the emission measure from the NoRH radio free-free emission observations. The derived density from NoRH was larger than that determined using AIA, which can be explained by the fact that the low temperature plasma is not within the temperature coverage of the AIA filters used in this study. We also discuss the other observation of the post-flare loops by the EUV Imager onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (...

  17. Dynamo-driven plasmoid formation from a current-sheet instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, F.

    2016-12-01

    Axisymmetric current-carrying plasmoids are formed in the presence of nonaxisymmetric fluctuations during nonlinear three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations in a global toroidal geometry. We utilize the helicity injection technique to form an initial poloidal flux in the presence of a toroidal guide field. As helicity is injected, two types of current sheets are formed from (1) the oppositely directed field lines in the injector region (primary reconnecting current sheet), and (2) the poloidal flux compression near the plasma edge (edge current sheet). We first find that nonaxisymmetric fluctuations arising from the current-sheet instability isolated near the plasma edge have tearing parity but can nevertheless grow fast (on the poloidal Alfven time scale). These modes saturate by breaking up the current sheet. Second, for the first time, a dynamo poloidal flux amplification is observed at the reconnection site (in the region of the oppositely directed magnetic field). This fluctuation-induced flux amplification increases the local Lundquist number, which then triggers a plasmoid instability and breaks the primary current sheet at the reconnection site. The plasmoids formation driven by large-scale flux amplification, i.e., a large-scale dynamo, observed here has strong implications for astrophysical reconnection as well as fast reconnection events in laboratory plasmas.

  18. Observations of the Magnetic Field and Plasma in the Heliosheath by Voyager 2 from 2007.7 to 2009.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Richardson, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    The density and temperature profiles of the plasma measured by Voyager 2 (V2) behind the termination shock changed abruptly near 2008.6 from relatively large average values and large fluctuations during 2007.7 to 2008.6 (interval A) to relatively low average values and very small-amplitude fluctuations during 2008.6 to 2009.4 (interval B). This paper shows that the change in the magnetic field strength B(t) was less abrupt than the plasma changes, and the fluctuations of the magnetic field strength in interval B were of moderate amplitude, with indications of a quasiperiodic structure in part of the interval. The magnetic field was directed away from the sun (positive polarity) approx. 78% +/- 5% of the time in both interval A and interval B, changing in an irregular way from positive to negative polarities throughout the interval. The polarity distribution indicates that the minimum latitudinal extent of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) was near V2 throughout the interval, consistent with the extrapolated minimum latitudes of the HCS computed from solar magnetic field observations. Thus, V2 was observing magnetic fields from the southern polar coronal hole most of the time. The distribution of B was lognormal in interval A and Gaussian interval B.

  19. DC Electric Fields and Associated Plasma Drifts Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Rowland, D.

    2009-01-01

    Initial DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. We present statistical averages of the vector fields for the first year of operations that include both the zonal and radial components of the resulting E x B plasma flows at low latitudes. Magnetic field data from the VEFI science magnetometer are used to compute the plasma flows. The DC electric field detector reveals zonal and radial electric fields that undergo strong diurnal variations, typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night. There is considerable variation in the large scale DC electric field data, in both the daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures typically observed at night. In general, the measured zonal DC electric field amplitudes include excursions that extend within the 0.4 - 2 m V/m range, corresponding to E x B drifts of the order of 30-150 m/s. The average vertical or radial electric fields may exceed the zonal fields in amplitude by a factor of 1.5 to 2. Although the data compare well, in a general sense, with previous satellite observations and statistical patterns of vertical ion drifts, the E x B drifts we report from C/NOFS rarely show a pronounced pre-reversal enhancement after sunset. We attribute this to a combination of extreme solar minimum conditions and the fact that the C/NOFS orbit of 401 by 867 km carries the probes essentially above the lower altitude regions where the wind-driven dynamo might be expected to create enhanced upwards drifts in the early evening. Evidence for wavenumber 4 tidal effects and other longitudinal signatures have been detected and will be presented. We also discuss off-equatorial electric fields and their relation to the ambient plasma density.

  20. Observation of internal transport barrier in ELMy H-mode plasmas on the EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Gao, X.; Liu, H. Q.; Li, G. Q.; Zhang, T.; Zeng, L.; Liu, Y. K.; Wu, M. Q.; Kong, D. F.; Ming, T. F.; Han, X.; Wang, Y. M.; Zang, Q.; Lyu, B.; Li, Y. Y.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhong, F. B.; Li, K.; Xu, L. Q.; Gong, X. Z.; Sun, Y. W.; Qian, J. P.; Ding, B. J.; Liu, Z. X.; Liu, F. K.; Hu, C. D.; Xiang, N.; Liang, Y. F.; Zhang, X. D.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; Wan, Y. X.; EAST Team

    2017-08-01

    The internal transport barrier (ITB) has been obtained in ELMy H-mode plasmas by neutron beam injection and lower hybrid wave heating on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The ITB structure has been observed in profiles of ion temperature, electron temperature, and electron density within ρ beta, β N, increases from 1.5 to near 2. The fishbone activity observed during the ITB phase suggests the central safety factor q(0) ˜ 1. Transport coefficients are calculated by particle balance and power balance analysis, showing an obvious reduction after the ITB formation.

  1. A Tailward Moving Current Sheet Normal Magnetic Field Front Followed by an Earthward Moving Dipolarization Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Moore, T. E.; Walsh, B. M.; Baishev, D. G.; Moiseyev, A. V.; Shevtsov, B. M.; Yumoto, K.

    2014-01-01

    A case study is presented using measurements from the Cluster spacecraft and ground-based magnetometers that show a substorm onset propagating from the inner to outer plasma sheet. On 3 October 2005, Cluster, traversing an ion-scale current sheet at the near-Earth plasma sheet, detected a sudden enhancement of Bz, which was immediately followed by a series of flux rope structures. Both the local Bz enhancement and flux ropes propagated tailward. Approximately 5 min later, another Bz enhancement, followed by a large density decrease, was observed to rapidly propagate earthward. Between the two Bz enhancements, a significant removal of magnetic flux occurred, possibly resulting from the tailward moving Bz enhancement and flux ropes. In our scenario, this flux removal caused the magnetotail to be globally stretched so that the thinnest sheet formed tailward of Cluster. The thinned current sheet facilitated magnetic reconnection that quickly evolved from plasma sheet to lobe and generated the later earthward moving dipolarization front (DF) followed by a reduction in density and entropy. Ground magnetograms located near the meridian of Cluster's magnetic foot points show two-step bay enhancements. The positive bay associated with the first Bz enhancement indicates that the substorm onset signatures propagated from the inner to the outer plasma sheet, consistent with the Cluster observation. The more intense bay features associated with the later DF are consistent with the earthward motion of the front. The event suggests that current disruption signatures that originated in the near-Earth current sheet propagated tailward, triggering or facilitating midtail reconnection, thereby preconditioning the magnetosphere for a later strong substorm enhancement.

  2. Sources of Sodium in the Lunar Exosphere: Modeling Using Ground-Based Observations of Sodium Emission and Spacecraft Data of the Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarantos, Menelaos; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sharma, A. Surjalal; Slavin, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the equatorial lunar sodium emission are examined to quantify the effect of precipitating ions on source rates for the Moon's exospheric volatile species. Using a model of exospheric sodium transport under lunar gravity forces, the measured emission intensity is normalized to a constant lunar phase angle to minimize the effect of different viewing geometries. Daily averages of the solar Lyman alpha flux and ion flux are used as the input variables for photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) and ion sputtering, respectively, while impact vaporization due to the micrometeoritic influx is assumed constant. Additionally, a proxy term proportional to both the Lyman alpha and to the ion flux is introduced to assess the importance of ion-enhanced diffusion and/or chemical sputtering. The combination of particle transport and constrained regression models demonstrates that, assuming sputtering yields that are typical of protons incident on lunar soils, the primary effect of ion impact on the surface of the Moon is not direct sputtering but rather an enhancement of the PSD efficiency. It is inferred that the ion-induced effects must double the PSD efficiency for flux typical of the solar wind at 1 AU. The enhancement in relative efficiency of PSD due to the bombardment of the lunar surface by the plasma sheet ions during passages through the Earth's magnetotail is shown to be approximately two times higher than when it is due to solar wind ions. This leads to the conclusion that the priming of the surface is more efficiently carried out by the energetic plasma sheet ions.

  3. Airborne observations of changes of ice sheet and sea ice in the Arctic using CryoVEx campaign data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidegaard, Sine Munk; Skourup, Henriette; Forsberg, René

    DTU Space have collected surface elevation observations of the Arctic sea ice and land ice since 1998 using laser scanning and radar altimetry from a small fixed‐wing Twin‐Otter aircraft. The observations provide unique datasets for studying ongoing changes, and support the analysis of satellite......‐launch validation studies, with several aircraft and international in‐situ ground teams participating, both in Greenland, Arctic Canada, and Svalbard. The methods and campaigns are outlined together with examples of results.The campaigns focused on five main validation sites: Devon ice cap (Canada), Austfonna ice...

  4. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Experimental optimisation of the gas-assisted laser cutting of thick steel sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, Anatolii M.; Shulyat'ev, Viktor B.

    2009-06-01

    We report on the experimental optimisation of the oxygen-assisted CO2 laser cutting of low-carbon sheet steel 5 to 25 mm in thickness. It is shown that the cut edge roughness is minimal when the energy input per unit volume of the material removed and the incident beam power per unit sheet thickness remain constant at ~20 J mm-3 and ~200 W mm-1, respectively, over the entire range of sheet thicknesses examined. The corresponding Péclet number is Pe = 0.5. These results can be used to determine the optimal beam power and cutting speed for a particular sheet thickness. At sufficiently large thicknesses, the conditions that ensure the minimum roughness can be written in the form of relations between nondimensional parameters.

  5. Direct observations of plasma upflows and condensation in a catastrophically cooling solar transition region loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orange, N. B.; Chesny, D. L.; Oluseyi, H. M.; Hesterly, K.; Patel, M.; Champey, P. [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Minimal observational evidence exists for fast transition region (TR) upflows in the presence of cool loops. Observations of such occurrences challenge notions of standard solar atmospheric heating models as well as their description of bright TR emission. Using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, we observe fast upflows (v {sub λ} ≤ –10 km s{sup –1}) over multiple TR temperatures (5.8 ≤log T ≤ 6.0) at the footpoint sites of a cool loop (log T ≤ 6.0). Prior to cool loop energizing, asymmetric flows of +5 km s{sup –1} and –60 km s{sup –1} are observed at footpoint sites. These flows, speeds, and patterns occur simultaneously with both magnetic flux cancellation (at the site of upflows only) derived from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic Magnetic Imager's line-of-sight magnetogram images, and a 30% mass influx at coronal heights. The incurred non-equilibrium structure of the cool loop leads to a catastrophic cooling event, with subsequent plasma evaporation indicating that the TR is the heating site. From the magnetic flux evolution, we conclude that magnetic reconnection between the footpoint and background field is responsible for the observed fast TR plasma upflows.

  6. Cassini UVIS observations of the Io plasma torus. II. Radial variations

    CERN Document Server

    Steffl, Andrew J; Stewart, A Ian F; 10.1016/j.icarus.2004.04.016

    2013-01-01

    On January 14, 2001, shortly after the Cassini spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter, the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) made a radial scan through the midnight sector of Io plasma torus. The Io torus has not been previously observed at this local time. The UVIS data consist of 2-D spectrally dispersed images of the Io plasma torus in the wavelength range of 561{\\AA}-1912{\\AA}. We developed a spectral emissions model that incorporates the latest atomic physics data contained in the CHIANTI database in order to derive the composition of the torus plasma as a function of radial distance. Electron temperatures derived from the UVIS torus spectra are generally less than those observed during the Voyager era. We find the torus ion composition derived from the UVIS spectra to be significantly different from the composition during the Voyager era. Notably, the torus contains substantially less oxygen, with a total oxygen-to-sulfur ion ratio of 0.9. The average ion charge state has increased to 1.7. We de...

  7. Energy-dispersed ions in the plasma sheet boundary layer and associated phenomena: Ion heating, electron acceleration, Alfvén waves, broadband waves, perpendicular electric field spikes, and auroral emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Keiling

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent Cluster studies reported properties of multiple energy-dispersed ion structures in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL that showed substructure with several well separated ion beamlets, covering energies from 3 keV up to 100 keV (Keiling et al., 2004a, b. Here we report observations from two PSBL crossings, which show a number of identified one-to-one correlations between this beamlet substructure and several plasma-field characteristics: (a bimodal ion conics (<1 keV, (b field-aligned electron flow (<1 keV, (c perpendicular electric field spikes (~20 mV/m, (d broadband electrostatic ELF wave packets (<12.5 Hz, and (e enhanced broadband electromagnetic waves (<4 kHz. The one-to-one correlations strongly suggest that these phenomena were energetically driven by the ion beamlets, also noting that the energy flux of the ion beamlets was 1–2 orders of magnitude larger than, for example, the energy flux of the ion outflow. In addition, several more loosely associated correspondences were observed within the extended region containing the beamlets: (f electrostatic waves (BEN (up to 4 kHz, (g traveling and standing ULF Alfvén waves, (h field-aligned currents (FAC, and (i auroral emissions on conjugate magnetic field lines. Possible generation scenarios for these phenomena are discussed. In conclusion, it is argued that the free energy of magnetotail ion beamlets drove a variety of phenomena and that the spatial fine structure of the beamlets dictated the locations of where some of these phenomena occurred. This emphasizes the notion that PSBL ion beams are important for magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. However, it is also shown that the dissipation of electromagnetic energy flux (at altitudes below Cluster of the simultaneously occurring Alfvén waves and FAC was larger (FAC being the largest than the dissipation of beam kinetic energy flux, and thus these two energy carriers contributed more to the energy transport on PSBL field lines

  8. Statistical behavior of foreshock Langmuir waves observed by the Cluster wideband data plasma wave receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sigsbee

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the statistics of Langmuir wave amplitudes in the Earth's foreshock using Cluster Wideband Data (WBD Plasma Wave Receiver electric field waveforms from spacecraft 2, 3 and 4 on 26 March 2002. The largest amplitude Langmuir waves were observed by Cluster near the boundary between the foreshock and solar wind, in agreement with earlier studies. The characteristics of the waves were similar for all three spacecraft, suggesting that variations in foreshock structure must occur on scales greater than the 50-100km spacecraft separations. The electric field amplitude probability distributions constructed using waveforms from the Cluster WBD Plasma Wave Receiver generally followed the log-normal statistics predicted by stochastic growth theory for the event studied. Comparison with WBD receiver data from 17 February 2002, when spacecraft 4 was set in a special manual gain mode, suggests non-optimal auto-ranging of the instrument may have had some influence on the statistics.

  9. Observation of longitudinal and transverse self-injections in laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Corde, S; Lifschitz, A; Lambert, G; Phuoc, K Ta; Davoine, X; Lehe, R; Douillet, D; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators can produce high quality electron beams, up to giga-electronvolts in energy, from a centimeter scale device. The properties of the electron beams and the accelerator stability are largely determined by the injection stage of electrons into the accelerator. The simplest mechanism of injection is self-injection, in which the wakefield is strong enough to trap cold plasma electrons into the laser wake. The main drawback of this method is its lack of shot-to-shot stability. Here we present experimental and numerical results that demonstrate the existence of two different self-injection mechanisms. Transverse self-injection is shown to lead to low stability and poor quality electron beams, because of a strong dependence on the intensity profile of the laser pulse. In contrast, longitudinal injection, which is unambiguously observed for the first time, is shown to lead to much more stable acceleration and higher quality electron beams.

  10. Observation of longitudinal and transverse self-injections in laser-plasma accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corde, S; Thaury, C; Lifschitz, A; Lambert, G; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Lehe, R; Douillet, D; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators can produce high-quality electron beams, up to giga electronvolts in energy, from a centimetre scale device. The properties of the electron beams and the accelerator stability are largely determined by the injection stage of electrons into the accelerator. The simplest mechanism of injection is self-injection, in which the wakefield is strong enough to trap cold plasma electrons into the laser wake. The main drawback of this method is its lack of shot-to-shot stability. Here we present experimental and numerical results that demonstrate the existence of two different self-injection mechanisms. Transverse self-injection is shown to lead to low stability and poor-quality electron beams, because of a strong dependence on the intensity profile of the laser pulse. In contrast, longitudinal injection, which is unambiguously observed for the first time, is shown to lead to much more stable acceleration and higher-quality electron beams.

  11. Observation of dust acoustic multi-solitons in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruah, A.; Sharma, S. K.; Nakamura, Y.; Bailung, H.

    2016-09-01

    The excitation and propagation of low frequency dust acoustic multi-solitons are investigated in an unmagnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma. A floating 2D dusty medium is produced in an RF discharge Ar plasma with silica micro-particles. Dust acoustic perturbations are excited by applying a negative sinusoidal pulse of frequency 1-2 Hz and amplitude 4-20 V to an exciter grid. An initial large amplitude dust density compression breaks into a number of solitary pulses which are identified as dust acoustic solitons. The observed multi-soliton evolution is compared with numerical simulations of modified Korteweg de Vries (KdV)-Burger equation. The characteristics of the generated solitons are in good agreement with the theory.

  12. Observation of Electron Energy Pinch in HT-7 ICRF Heated Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Siye; Wan, Baonian; Wang, Lu; Ti, Ang; Zhang, Xinjun; Liu, Zixi; Qian, Jinping; Zhong, Guoqiang; Duan, Yanmin

    2014-09-01

    Inward energy transport (pinch phenomenon) in the electron channel is observed in HT-7 plasmas using off-axis ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating. Experimental results and power balance transport analysis by TRANSP code are presented in this article. With the aids of GLF23 and Chang-Hinton transport models, which predict energy diffusivity in experimental conditions, the estimated electron pinch velocity is obtained by experimental data and is found reasonably comparable to the results in the previous study, such as Song on Tore Supra. Density scanning shows that the energy convective velocity in the electron channel has a close relation to density scale length, which is qualitatively in agreement with Wang's theoretical prediction. The parametric dependence of electron energy convective velocity on plasma current is still ambiguous and is worthy of future research on EAST.

  13. Observations of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes in a reversed field pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnoli, G.; Bergsâker, H.; Tennfors, E.; Zonca, F.; Martines, E.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Cecconello, M.; Antoni, V.; Cavazzana, R.; Malmberg, J.-A.

    2005-04-01

    High frequency peaks in the spectra of magnetic field signals have been detected at the edge of Extrap-T2R [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello, J. R. Drake, R. M. Gravestijn, A. Hedqvist, and J.-A. Malmberg, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion, 43, 1457 (2001)]. The measured fluctuation is found to be mainly polarized along the toroidal direction, with high toroidal periodicity n and Alfvénic scaling (f∝B/√mini ). Calculations for a reversed field pinch plasma predict the existence of an edge resonant, high frequency, high-n number toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmode with the observed frequency scaling. In addition, gas puffing experiments show that edge density fluctuations are responsible for the rapid changes of mode frequency. Finally a coupling with the electron drift turbulence is proposed as drive mechanism for the eigenmode.

  14. Complex Dynamic Flows in Solar Flare Sheet Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, David E.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Savage, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Observations of high-energy emission from solar flares often reveal the presence of large sheet-like structures, sometimes extending over a space comparable to the Sun's radius. Given that these structures are found between a departing coronal mass ejection and the post-eruption flare arcade, it is natural to associate the structure with a current sheet; though the relationship is unclear. Moreover, recent high-resolution observations have begun to reveal that the motions in this region are highly complex, including reconnection outflows, oscillations, and apparent wakes and eddies. We present a detailed first look at the complicated dynamics within this supra-arcade plasma, and consider implications for the interrelationship between the plasma and its embedded magnetic field.

  15. Observation of magnetic field generation via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    CERN Document Server

    Huntington, C M; Ross, J S; Zylstra, A B; Drake, R P; Froula, D H; Gregori, G; Kugland, N L; Kuranz, C C; Levy, M C; Li, C K; Meinecke, J; Morita, T; Petrasso, R; Plechaty, C; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D; Sakawa, Y; Spitkovsky, A; Takabe, H; Park, H -S

    2013-01-01

    As the ejecta from supernovae or other energetic astrophysical events stream through the interstellar media, this plasma is shaped by instabilities that generate electric and magnetic fields. Among these instabilities, the Weibel filamentation instability plays a particularly important role, as it can generate significant magnetic fields in an initially un-magnetized medium. It is theorized that these Weibel fields are responsible for the observed gamma-ray burst light curve, particle acceleration in shock waves, and for providing seed fields for larger-scale cosmological magnetic structures. While the presence of these instability-generated fields has been inferred from astrophysical observation and predicted in simulation, observation in experiments is challenging. Here we report direct observation of well-organized, large-amplitude, filamentary magnetic fields associated with the Weibel instability in a scaled laboratory experiment. The experimental images, captured with proton radiography, are shown to be...

  16. Cluster observations of near-Earth magnetospheric lobe plasma densities – a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Svenes

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The Cluster-mission has enabled a study of the near-Earth magnetospheric lobes throughout the waning part of solar cycle 23. During the first seven years of the mission the satellites crossed this region of space regularly from about July to October. We have obtained new and more accurate plasma densities in this region based on spacecraft potential measurements from the EFW-instrument. The plasma density measurements are found by converting the potential measurements using a functional relationship between these two parameters. Our observations have shown that throughout this period a full two thirds of the measurements were contained in the range 0.007–0.092 cm−3 irrespective of solar wind conditions or geomagnetic activity. In fact, the most probable density encountered was 0.047 cm−3, staying roughly constant throughout the entire observation period. The plasma population in this region seems to reflect an equilibrium situation in which the density is independent of the solar wind condition or geomagnetic activity. However, the high density tail of the population (ne>0.2 cm−3 seemed to decrease with the waning solar cycle. This points to a source region influenced by the diminishing solar UV/EUV-intensity. Noting that the quiet time polar wind has just such a development and that it is magnetically coupled to the lobes, it seems likely to assume that this is a prominent source for the lobe plasma.

  17. Longitudinal variability of equatorial plasma bubbles observed by DMSP and ROCSAT-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, W. J.; Gentile, L. C.; Huang, C. Y.; Valladares, C. E.; Su, S. Y.

    2004-12-01

    We compare observations of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) by polar-orbiting satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) with plasma density measurements from the Republic of China Satellite (ROCSAT-1) in a low-inclination orbit. DMSP data were acquired in the evening sector at low magnetic latitudes between 1989 and 2002. ROCSAT-1 plasma densities were measured in March and April of 2000 and 2002. Observations of individual EPBs detected by both ROCSAT-1 and DMSP were well correlated when satellite orbital paths crossed the same longitude within approximately ±15 min. We compiled a statistical database of ROCSAT-1 EPB occurrence rates sorted by magnetic local time (MLT), magnetic latitude, and geographic longitude. The rate of ROCSAT-1 EPB encounters at topside altitudes rose rapidly after 1930 MLT and peaked between 2000 and 2200 MLT, close to the orbital planes of DMSP F12, F14, and F15. EPB encounter rates have Gaussian distributions centered on the magnetic equator with half widths of ˜8°. Longitudinal distributions observed by ROCSAT-1 and DMSP are qualitatively similar, with both showing significantly fewer occurrences than expected near the west coast of South America. A chain of GPS receivers extending from Colombia to Chile measured a west-to-east gradient in S4 indices that independently confirms the existence of a steep longitudinal gradient in EPB occurrence rates. We suggest that precipitation of energetic particles from the inner radiation belt causes the dearth of EPBs. Enhancements in the postsunset ionospheric conductance near the South Atlantic Anomaly cause a decrease in growth rate for the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Results indicate substantial agreement between ROCSAT-1 and DMSP observations and provide new insights on EPB phenomenology.

  18. Multiwavelength Observations of Supersonic Plasma Blob Triggered by Reconnection Generated Velocity Pulse in AR10808

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, A K; Murawski, K; Kumar, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Using multi-wavelength observations of Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO)/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) 171 \\AA, and H$\\alpha$ from Culgoora Solar Observatory at Narrabri, Australia, we present a unique observational signature of a propagating supersonic plasma blob before an M6.2 class solar flare in AR10808 on 9th September 2005. The blob was observed between 05:27 UT to 05:32 UT with almost a constant shape for the first 2-3 minutes, and thereafter it quickly vanished in the corona. The observed lower bound speed of the blob is estimated as $\\sim$215 km s$^{-1}$ in its dynamical phase. The evidence of the blob with almost similar shape and velocity concurrent in H$\\alpha$ and TRACE 171 \\AA\\ supports its formation by multi-temperature plasma. The energy release by a recurrent 3-D reconnection process via the separator dome below the magnetic null point, between the emerging flux and pre-existing field lines in the lower solar atmosphere, is found to be...

  19. Insecticide-treated plastic sheeting for emergency malaria prevention and shelter among displaced populations: an observational cohort study in a refugee setting in Sierra Leone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burns, M.R.; Rowland, M.; N'Guessan, R.; Carneiro, I.; Beeche, A.; Sesler Ruiz, S.; Kamara, S.; Takken, W.; Carnevale, P.; Allan, R.

    2012-01-01

    A double-blind phase III malaria prevention trial was conducted in two refugee camps using pre-manufactured insecticide-treated plastic sheeting (ITPS) or untreated polyethylene sheeting (UPS) randomly deployed to defined sectors of each camp. In Largo camp the ITPS or UPS was attached to inner wall

  20. Observed changes in phenology across the USA: A regional review for the 2013 National Climate Assessment, Great Plains Regional Information Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Enquist, Carolyn A.F.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2013-01-01

    This is one in a series of eight, geographic region-focused information sheets that summarizes documented changes in plant and animal phenology over the past century across the United States. This summary is based on long-term studies (10 years or more) published in the primary scientific literature since 2001. A forthcoming manuscript synthesizes the findings of the eight regional information sheets.

  1. RHESSI Line and Continuum Observations of Super-hot Flare Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Caspi, A; 10.1088/2041-8205/725/2/L161

    2011-01-01

    We use RHESSI high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy observations from ~5 to 100 keV to characterize the hot thermal plasma during the 2002 July 23 X4.8 flare. These measurements of the steeply falling thermal X-ray continuum are well fit throughout the flare by two distinct isothermal components: a super-hot (T > 30 MK) component that peaks at ~44 MK and a lower-altitude hot (T < 25 MK) component whose temperature and emission measure closely track those derived from GOES measurements. The two components appear to be spatially distinct, and their evolution suggests that the super-hot plasma originates in the corona, while the GOES plasma results from chromospheric evaporation. Throughout the flare, the measured fluxes and ratio of the Fe and Fe-Ni excitation line complexes at ~6.7 and ~8 keV show a close dependence on the super-hot continuum temperature. During the pre-impulsive phase, when the coronal thermal and non-thermal continua overlap both spectrally and spatially, we use this relationship to ob...

  2. Design of an Experiment to Observe Laser-Plasma Interactions on NIKE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, L.; Weaver, J.; Manheimer, W.; Zalesak, S.; Schmitt, A.; Fyfe, D.; Afeyan, B.; Charbonneau-Lefort, M.

    2007-11-01

    Recent proposed designs (Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 13 056320 (2006)) for direct-drive ICF targets for energy applications involve high implosion velocities combined with higher laser irradiances. The use of high irradiances increases the likelihood of deleterious laser plasma instabilities (LPI) that may lead, for example, to the generation of fast electrons. The proposed use of a 248 nm KrF laser to drive these targets is expected to minimize LPI; this is being studied by experiments at NRL's NIKE facility. We used a modification of the FAST code that models laser pulses with arbitrary spatial and temporal profiles to assist in designing these experiments. The goal is to design targets and pulseshapes to create plasma conditions that will produce sufficient growth of LPI to be observable on NIKE. Using, for example, a cryogenic DT target that is heated by a brief pulse and allowed to expand freely before interacting with a second, high-intensity pulse, allows the development of long scalelengths at low electron temperatures and leads to a predicted 20-efold growth in two-plasmon amplitude.

  3. Observation of magnetic field generation via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fiuza, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zylstra, A. B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Drake, R. P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences; Froula, D. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Physics Dept. and Lab. for Laser Energetics; Gregori, G. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kugland, N. L. [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Kuranz, C. C. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences; Levy, M. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Li, C. K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Meinecke, J. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Morita, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Petrasso, R. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Plechaty, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sakawa, Y. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Spitkovsky, A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences; Takabe, H. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Park, H.-S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-19

    Collisionless shocks can be produced as a result of strong magnetic fields in a plasma flow, and therefore are common in many astrophysical systems. The Weibel instability is one candidate mechanism for the generation of su fficiently strong fields to create a collisionless shock. Despite their crucial role in astrophysical systems, observation of the magnetic fields produced by Weibel instabilities in experiments has been challenging. Using a proton probe to directly image electromagnetic fields, we present evidence of Weibel-generated magnetic fields that grow in opposing, initially unmagnetized plasma flows from laser-driven laboratory experiments. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that the instability effi ciently extracts energy from the plasma flows, and that the self-generated magnetic energy reaches a few percent of the total energy in the system. Furthermore, this result demonstrates an experimental platform suitable for the investigation of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock formation in supernova remnants, large-scale magnetic field amplification, and the radiation signature from gamma-ray bursts.

  4. Direct observations of a mini-magnetosphere in the lunar plasma wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yonghui; Wong, Hon-Cheng; Xu, Xiaojun

    2015-04-01

    In this report, we present direct observations of a mini-magnetosphere when ARTEMIS P2 is passing through the lunar wake, where the lunar surface and crustal fields are shielded from the solar wind flows. We find the magnetic field amplification simultaneously with the dropout of plasma density and particle energy fluxes when the orbit of P2 is just over the margin of Imbrium antipode anomaly which is centered at 162o E, 33o S. The observational interval of these characteristic features is merely 95 seconds (from 1413:15 UT to 1414:50 UT on December 9th 2012) and the orbit altitude of P2 is ~226 km. The strength of magnetic field at P2 orbit altitude (~226 km) can reach ~9 nT over the anomaly region compared to the relatively small value of ~6 nT in the neighboring regions. In addition to these, we also detect the moderate ion and electron temperature increase inside the mini-magnetosphere as well as the rotation in the magnetic field direction near the boundary of mini-magnetosphere. These field and plasma parameters demonstrate that the vertical size of the mini-magnetosphere near lunar surface can at least extend to ~230 km in the near-vacuum lunar wake without the interaction with the solar wind. We also try to explain the detailed plasma dynamics performed within this mini-magnetosphere by dipole model or non-dipolar model. This study may open up a new view of studying lunar mini-magnetosphere by spacecraft observations in the lunar wake where magnetic anomaly fields are almost undisturbed.

  5. PROPERTIES OF CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION AND PLASMA DYNAMICS OF A SOLAR FLARE FROM IRIS OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Dominguez, Santiago Vargas; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States); Sharykin, Ivan N.; Struminsky, Alexei B.; Zimovets, Ivan [Space Research Institute (IKI) of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of hot chromospheric plasma of solar flares is a key to understanding the mechanisms of flare energy release and particle acceleration. A moderate M1.0 class flare of 2014 June 12, (SOL2014-06-12T21:12) was simultaneously observed by NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and other spacecraft, and also by the New Solar Telescope at the BBSO. This paper presents the first part of our investigation focused on analysis of the IRIS data. Our analysis of the IRIS data in different spectral lines reveals a strong redshifted jet-like flow with a speed of ∼100 km s{sup −1} of the chromospheric material before the flare. Strong nonthermal emission of the C ii k 1334.5 Å line, formed in the chromosphere–corona transition region, is observed at the beginning of the impulsive phase in several small (with a size of ∼1″) points. It is also found that the C ii k line is redshifted across the flaring region before, during, and after the impulsive phase. A peak of integrated emission of the hot (1.1 · 10{sup 7} K) plasma in the Fe xxi 1354.1 Å line is detected approximately five minutes after the integrated emission peak of the lower temperature C ii k. A strong blueshift of the Fe xxi line across the flaring region corresponds to evaporation flows of the hot chromospheric plasma with a speed of 50 km s{sup −1}. Additional analysis of the RHESSI data supports the idea that the upper chromospheric dynamics observed by IRIS has features of “gentle” evaporation driven by heating of the solar chromosphere by accelerated electrons and by a heat flux from the flare energy release site.

  6. Observation of an Alfv\\'en Wave Parametric Instability in a Laboratory Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Dorfman, S

    2016-01-01

    A shear Alfv\\'en wave parametric instability is observed for the first time in the laboratory. When a single finite $\\omega/\\Omega_i$ kinetic Alfv\\'en wave (KAW) is launched in the Large Plasma Device above a threshold amplitude, three daughter modes are produced. These daughter modes have frequencies and parallel wave numbers that are consistent with copropagating KAW sidebands and a low frequency nonresonant mode. The observed process is parametric in nature, with the frequency of the daughter modes varying as a function of pump wave amplitude. The daughter modes are spatially localized on a gradient of the pump wave magnetic field amplitude in the plane perpendicular to the background field, suggesting that perpendicular nonlinear forces (and therefore $k_{\\perp}$ of the pump wave) play an important role in the instability process. Despite this, modulational instability theory with $k_{\\perp}=0$ has several features in common with the observed nonresonant mode and Alfv\\'en wave sidebands.

  7. 2D PIC modeling of the EUV induced hydrogen plasma and comparison to the observed carbon etching rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astakhov, Dmitry; Goedheer, W.J.; Lopaev, D.; Ivanov, V.; Krivtsun, V.M.; Yakushev, O.; Koshelev, K.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between an EUV driven hydrogen plasma and a carbon covered surface was investigated using 2D PIC modeling and results were compared with experimental observations. The plasma is formed due to ionization of a low pressure hydrogen gas by the EUV photons and the photoelectrons from the

  8. Structured DC Electric Fields With and Without Associated Plasma Density Gradients Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Liebrecht, C.; Roddy, P.; Hunton, D.

    2009-01-01

    DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts gathered with the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite typically reveal considerable variation at large scales (approximately 100's of km), in both daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures usually confined to the nightside. Although such electric field structures are typically associated with plasma density depletions and structures, as observed by the Planar Langmuir Probe on C/NOFS, what is surprising is the number of cases in which large amplitude, structured DC electric fields are observed without a significant plasma density counterpart structure, including their appearance at times when the ambient plasma density appears relatively quiescent. We investigate the relationship of such structured DC electric fields and the ambient plasma density in the C/NOFS satellite measurements observed thus far, taking into account both plasma density depletions and enhancements. We investigate the mapping of the electric fields along magnetic field lines from distant altitudes and latitudes to locations where the density structures, which presumably formed the original seat of the electric fields, are no longer discernible in the observations. In some cases, the electric field structures and spectral characteristics appear to mimic those associated with equatorial spread-F processes, providing important clues to their origins. We examine altitude, seasonal, and longitudinal effects in an effort to establish the origin of such structured DC electric fields observed both with, and without, associated plasma density gradients

  9. CO2 impact ionization-driven plasma instability observed by Pioneer Venus Orbiter at Periapsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, S. A.; Brace, L. H.; Niemann, H. B.; Scarf, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of enhanced ac electric field noise about Pioneer Venus periapsis are shown to be related to spacecraft-generated impact ionization of the ambient CO2. The frequency of the electric field noise is found to peak in the vicinity of the CO2(+) ion plasma frequency and to closely follow the form of the neutral CO2 density profile. When the electric field noise in all channels is normalized by the square root of the CO2 number density, the ratio is constant. Since the impact electron density measured by the Pioneer Venus Langmuir probe, is observed to scale directly with the neutral CO2, the growth of the electric field amplitude is found to be linear in time with a growth rate proportional to the CO2(+) ion plasma frequency. On the basis of these results the impact ionization-driven instability is shown to be the ion acoustic instability. Implications for the lack of observations by Pioneer Venus of reflected-O(+)-driven instabilities, as have been proposed for the space shuttle, are discussed.

  10. First in-situ observations of neutral and plasma density fluctuations within a PMSE layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubken, Franz-Josef; Lehmacher, Gerald; Blix, Tom; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; Thrane, Eivind; Cho, John; Swartz, Wesley

    1993-01-01

    The NLC-91 rocket and radar campaign provided the first opportunity for high resolution neutral and plasma turbulence measurements with simultaneous observations of PMSE (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes). During the flight of the TURBO payload on August 1, 1991, Cornell University Portable Radar Interferometer (CUPRI) and European Incoherent Scattter facility (EISCAT) observed double PMSE layers located at 86 and 88 km altitude, respectively. Strong neutral density fluctuations were observed in the upper layer but not in the lower layer. The fluctuation spectra of the ions and neutrals within the upper layer are consistent with standard turbulence theories. However, we show that there is no neutral turbulence present in the lower layer and that something else must have been operating here to create the plasma fluctuations and hence the radar echoes. Although the in situ measurements of the electron density fluctuations are much stronger in the lower layer, the higher absolute electron density of the upper layer more than compensated for the weaker fluctuations yielding comparable radar echo powers.

  11. Observations of non-collective x-ray scattering in warm dense carbon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihua, Bao; Jiyan, Zhang; Xiaoding, Zhang; Yang, Zhao; Yongkun, Ding

    2012-12-01

    An experiment for observing the spectrally resolved non-collective x-ray scattering in warm dense carbon plasma is presented in this paper. The experiment used Ta M-band x-rays to heat a foamed carbon cylinder sample isochorically and measured the scattering spectrum with a HOPG crystal spectrometer. The spectrum was compared with the calculation results using a Born-Mermin-approximation model. The best fitting was found at an electron temperature of Te=34 eV and an electron density of ne=1.6×1023cm-3.

  12. First observation of quasi-2-day oscillations in ionospheric plasma frequency at fixed heights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Altadill

    Full Text Available The existence and development of the quasi-2-day oscillations in the plasma frequency variations of the F region at northern middle latitudes are investigated. A new approach to study the quasi-2-day oscillations is presented, using a methodology that allows us to do such a study at fixed heights. The hourly values of plasma frequency at fixed heights, from 170 km to 220 km at 10 km step, obtained at the Observatori de l'Ebre station (40.8°N, 0.5°E during 1995 are used for analysis. It is found that quasi-2-day oscillations exist and persisted in the ionospheric plasma frequency variations over the entire year 1995 for all altitudes investigated. The dominant period of oscillation ranges from 42 to 56 h. The amplitude of oscillation is from 0.1 MHz to 1 MHz. The activity of the quasi-2-day oscillation is better expressed during the summer half year when several enhancements, about 15–30 days in duration, were observed. The largest enhancements of the oscillation occurred during early June, July and early August; i. e., near and after the summer solstice when the 2-day wave in the middle neutral atmosphere typically displays its largest activity in the Northern Hemisphere. The results obtained may help us understand better the possible influencing mechanisms between the 2-day wave in the middle neutral atmosphere and the ionospheric quasi-2-day oscillations.

    Key words. Ionosphere (Ionosphere - atmosphere interactions; Mid-latitude ionosphere; Plasma waves and instabilities

  13. DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, and Irregularities Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically < 1 mV/m. Although average drift directions show similarities to those previously reported, eastward/outward during day and westward/downward at night, this pattern varies significantly with longitude and is not always present. Daytime vertical drifts near the magnetic equator are largest after sunrise, with smaller average velocities after noon. Little or no pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drift near sunset is observed, attributable to the solar minimum conditions creating a much reduced neutral dynamo at the satellite altitude. The nighttime ionosphere is characterized by larger amplitude, structured electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. The VEFI data represents a new set of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics

  14. Oxygen ion impurity in the TEXTOR tokamak boundary plasma observed and analysed by Zeeman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hey, J.D.; Chu, C.C. [Plasma Physics Research Institute, University of Natal, Durban (South Africa)]. E-mails: hey@nu.ac.za; chu@nu.ac.za; Brezinsek, S.; Unterberg, B.; Mertens, Ph. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: ph.mertens@fz-juelich.de

    2002-03-28

    Oxygen ion impurity radiation is a potential source of inaccuracy in ion temperature determination with the aid of the commonly used C VI transition n=8{yields}n'=7, produced by charge-exchange recombination (CXR) of C{sup 6+} ions, since the corresponding transition in O VI cannot be resolved under typical plasma conditions in the tokamak. In order to demonstrate the possible importance of oxygen ion impurity radiation, we have selected a convenient spectroscopic 'window' (about 8 A wide) containing the major Zeeman components of two prominent lines in the visible (multiplet 1), one emitted by C{sup 2+} and one by O{sup +}. Observations have been performed in this wavelength range, both tangentially and perpendicularly to the magnetic flux surfaces, in the second case with the aid of a special graphite test limiter. Measurements include the case of special plasma discharges in which oxygen gas was introduced from the test limiter. The temperatures of both species are evaluated from the Doppler broadening of the respective Zeeman components, and compared with the results from a model for collisional heating by impact with hot protons (deuterons) in the plasma edge. The spectra and derived results show that impurity identification in tokamak edge plasmas should not be carried out with the aid of spectral lines from highly excited levels populated by CXR, but using lines corresponding to much more species-specific transitions from lower ionization stages. The identification and quantitative analysis should be performed with the aid of carefully measured and calculated Zeeman-(Paschen-Back-) broadened line profiles, since these have features practically unique to the species under investigation. Some allowance may, however, be required for deviation, from a statistical distribution, of population among fine-structure sublevels. (author)

  15. Morphology observation for surface orange peel and fracture in tension sample of aluminum-alloy sheet and characterization of nano hardness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Mingtu; Mei Huashen; Lu Hongzhou; Yang Hongya; Wu Emei; Zhou Mingbo

    2012-01-01

    The tension property of aluminum-alloy sheet with different microstructures is measured, and the surface and tension fracture morphology of tension sample with and without orange peel are observed by using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Surface roughness and nano hardness of tension sample are measured. The results show that the average elongation of the samples with orange peel is lower than that without orange peel ; especially the r value of per- pendicular to the rolling direction is much lower than that without orange peel. The tension surface of the orange peel samples is very rough; various parameters of surface roughness are higher. Under the observation of SEM, a wider slid- ing band with a micro crack on the surface of orange peel sample can be found. The various parameters of surface rough- ness without orange peel sample are near to zero, the sliding band is narrow and without micro cracks. The dimple width in tensile fracture of orange peel sample is larger than that without orange peel sample, but shear lip is narrower. The nano hardness testing results show that samples with orange peel behave high elastic modulus, high hardness, and high maximum load, but low plastic deformation depth. These mentioned features can completely describe surface and frac- ture morphology of tension samt31es with oranze peel.

  16. ISEE 1 observations of thermal plasma in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during periods of quieting magnetic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Baugher, C. R.; Chappell, C. R.; Shelley, E. G.; Young, D. T.; Anderson, R. R.

    1981-11-01

    An investigation of thermal plasma behavior in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during periods of quieting magnetic activity was conducted by combining thermal ion observations made with the plasma composition experiment on ISEE 1 with plasma density profiles obtained from plasma frequency measurements made with the same satellite's plasma wave experiment. During periods in which the magnetic activity quiets, the two regions characterized by H(+):He(+):O(+) (isotropic) and H(+):O(+):He(+) (field-aligned) ion species distributions (in order of dominance) are separated by a new region in which low-energy H(+) and He(+) are found flowing along the magnetic field lines. At other times, following quieting magnetic activity, distributions having peak fluxes at 90 deg pitch angle are observed in this region.

  17. Survey of ELF-VLF plasma waves in outer radiation belt observed by Cluster STAFF-SA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pokhotelov

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Various types of plasma waves have profound effects on acceleration and scattering of radiation belt particles. For the purposes of radiation belt modeling it is necessary to know statistical distributions of plasma wave parameters. This paper analyzes four years of plasma wave observations in the Earth's outer radiation belt obtained by the STAFF-SA experiment on board Cluster spacecraft. Statistical distributions of spectral density of different plasma waves observed in ELF-VLF range (chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, magnetosonic waves are presented as a function of magnetospheric coordinates and geomagnetic activity indices. Comparison with other spacecraft studies supports some earlier conclusions about the distribution of chorus and hiss waves and helps to remove the long-term controversy regarding the distribution of equatorial magnetosonic waves. This study represents a step towards the development of multi-spacecraft database of plasma wave activity in radiation belts.

  18. Observation of Curie transition during spark plasma sintering of ferromagnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar Mani, Mahesh [Wolfson Centre for Magnetics, Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University (United Kingdom); Viola, Giuseppe [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom); Nanoforce Technology Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Hall, Jeremy P. [Wolfson Centre for Magnetics, Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University (United Kingdom); Grasso, Salvatore; Reece, Mike J. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom); Nanoforce Technology Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    The possibility of employing the ferromagnetic–paramagnetic phase transitions of magnetic materials to calibrate temperature during spark plasma sintering (SPS) was investigated using pure Fe and Fe–50Co alloy. A sharp and repeatable change was observed in the electrical current profile at the Curie temperature (T{sub c}) during both sintering and reheating of the sintered samples. Under a pulsed DC current, an abrupt change in the electrical resistance was observed at T{sub c} due to the sudden changes in the permeability and in turn, the skin depth during heating and cooling. These effects can be used to obtain a more accurate in-situ measurement of the sample temperature than the one provided by the pyrometers that are normally used for SPS processing. The temperature measured using a pyrometer was found to be significantly lower (up to 70 °C) than the actual temperature of the specimen. - Highlights: • Calibration of temperature during spark plasma sintering (SPS) remains a big challenge. • Temperature measured by non-contact pyrometers in SPS is not accurate. • Ferromagnetic materials exhibit abrupt change in permeability at Curie temperature (T{sub c}). • Iron and Fe–Co alloy showed sharp and reproducible changes in SPS electric current profiles at T{sub c}. • Ferromagnetic materials can be successfully used to calibrate pyrometers in SPS.

  19. Observation of the Emission Spectra of an Atmospheric Pressure Radio-frequency Plasma Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using radio-frequency (13.56 MHz)power has been developed to produce homogeneous glow discharge at low temperature. With optical emission spectroscopy, we observed the excited species (atomic helium, atomic oxygen and metastable oxygen) generated in this APPJ and their dependence on gas composition ratio and RF power. O and O2(b1∑g+) are found in the effluent outside the jet by measuring the emission spectra of effluent perpendicular to the jet. An interesting phenomenon is found that there is an abnormal increase of O emission intensity (777.4 nm) between 10 mm and 40 mm away from the nozzle. This observation result is very helpful in practical operation.

  20. Plasma flow channels with ULF waves observed by Cluster and Double Star

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Volwerk

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available On 14 August 2004 a large-scale magnetic structure was observed by Double Star TC-1 in the southern lobe and by Cluster in the northern lobe of the magnetotail. The structure has the signature of a (localized dipolarization, decreasing Bx accompanied by an increasing Bz and a strong earthward flow. The propagation direction of this structure, however, seems to be more in the dawnward direction than earthward. The structure is accompanied by ULF waves with a period of ~5 min, which are simultaneously observed by the ground magnetometer station DIK, at the magnetic footpoints of the spacecraft. We interprete these waves as modes driven by the plasma flow and propagating in the flow channel.

  1. Observation of the double e-fishbone instability in HL-2A ECRH/ECCD plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, M.; Ding, X. T.; Shi, Z. B.; Chen, W.; Yu, L. M.; Dong, J. Q.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Yuan, B. S.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, Y.; Li, Y. G.; Yang, Z. C.; Shi, P. W.; Dong, Y. B.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.

    2017-02-01

    Two m/n = 1/1 kink modes excited by energetic electrons (called double e-fishbone) have been observed near the q = 1 flux surfaces in the HL-2A discharges. The negative magnetic central shear configuration was achieved with localized electron cyclotron resonance heating and electron cyclotron current drive during plasma current ramp-up. The features of the modes have been first shown by advanced 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system. From ECEI, two m/n = 1/1 modes propagating in the opposite directions poloidally have been clearly observed. These modes can be found only in low density discharge, and their frequencies are close to the precessional frequency of the trapped energetic electrons. More interestingly, the thermal energy transfer between the two modes was revealed by this new diagnostic, which is found to be related to the nonlinear interaction of the two modes and local electron thermal transport.

  2. Observation of asymmetrically imploded core plasmas with a two-dimensional sampling image x-ray streak camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Lee, Myongdok; Mahigashi, Norimitsu; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    A shell target with a cone for guiding the heating beam has been proposed for the fast ignition scheme. Implosion of such target is no longer symmetric because of the cone. A fast two-dimensional x-ray imaging technique, two-dimensional (2D) sampling image x-ray streak camera was applied for the first time to observation of the dynamics of implosion and core plasma. X-ray emission image of the plasma was sampled with two-dimensionally distributed image sampling points, streaked with the tube, and the recorded signals were reconstructed as sequential 2D frame images. Shape and movement of the core plasma were clearly observed.

  3. Modeling the Effects of Multi-layer Surface Roughness on 0.5 -2 GHz Passive Microwave Observations of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L.; Wang, T.; Johnson, J.; Jezek, K. C.; Tan, S.

    2015-12-01

    with hundreds or thousands of rough interfaces. Model predictions of brightness temperatures and their variations with observation angle, polarization, and frequency will be shown in the presentation. Implications of these results for future remote sensing studies of ice sheet thermal mission and temperature profile retrieval will also be discussed.

  4. Dynamics of laser-imploded core plasmas observed by ultrafast two-dimensional x-ray imaging with animation display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heya, Manabu; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Kyoko; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Takabe, Hideaki; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko; Mima, Kunioki [Osaka Univ., Inst. of Laser Engineering, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-05-01

    In order to observe time-resolved, two-dimensional (2D) spatial distribution of x rays emitted from core plasmas at the final stage of the implosion, we have developed a multi-imaging x-ray streak camera (MIXS) and a multi-channel MIXS (McMIXS) methods as new ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging techniques. The observed time-resolved 2D x-ray and electron-temperature images of core plasmas, which are sequentially changing with time, have been displayed by using an animation method. Temporal evolutions of nonuniform structures, including shape, size, and movement of core plasmas can be observed instinctively with the animated display. The ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging with the animation display is a new powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of laser-imploded core plasmas. (author)

  5. Spectro-Polarimetric Observations of Interplanetary Hydrogen as a Diagnostic of the Heliopause Plasma Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, W.; Ben-Jaffel, L.; Roesler, F.; Corliss, J.; Dawson, O.; Giersch, L.

    2006-12-01

    Neutral interplanetary hydrogen (IPH) does not originate in the solar system, but is dominated by material in the interstellar medium (ISM) that has penetrated into the solar system. This material is not pristine or thermal in its properties, but contains a record of both the ISM and its passage across the broad mixing- plasma boundary formed by the interaction of the Solar wind and the ionized component of the ISM. This record is provided by charge exchange interactions between hydrogen atoms and protons in the boundary region that effectively translate the characteristics of the plasma interaction and boundary region to the non- interacting neutral population. The primary observational technique used to observe IPH is resonance scattering of solar Ly-alpha emission in the optically thick medium. These data show evidence of line of sight dependent line-broadening and deceleration associated with the boundary crossing. Here we describe a new class of instrument, a spatial-heterodyne spectro-polarimeter (SHSPOL) that offers improved diagnostic capabilities for the study of the IPH. SHSPOL combines the high sensitivity and spectral resolving power of SHS with a novel far ultraviolet polarimeter design. Combined, these technologies permit rapid accumulation of IPH line-shape measurements with the added measurement of the offers a new way to explore the radial properties of the IPH along a given line of sight from the scattering angle dependent polarization of the incoming light. We will discuss the principle of SHSPOL and our development of prototype instrument for observing the IPH from a sounding rocket platform.

  6. Global reconnection topology as inferred from plasma observations inside Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Bavassano Cattaneo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available During a long lasting period of northward interplanetary magnetic field and high solar wind speed (above 700 km/s, the Cluster spacecraft go across a number of very large rolled-up Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH vortices at the dusk magnetopause, close to the terminator. The peculiarity of the present event is a particular sequence of ions and electrons distribution functions observed repeatedly inside each vortex. In particular, whenever Cluster crosses the current layer inside the vortices, multiple field-aligned ion populations appear, suggesting the occurrence of reconnection. In addition, the ion data display a clear velocity filter effect both at the leading and at the trailing edge of each vortex. This effect is not present in the simultaneous electron data. Unlike other KH studies reported in the literature in which reconnection occurs within the vortices, in the present event the observations are not compatible with local reconnection, but are accounted for by lobe reconnection occurring along an extended X-line at the terminator in the Southern Hemisphere. The reconnected field lines "sink" across the magnetopause and then convect tailward-duskward where they become embedded in the vortices. Another observational evidence is the detected presence of solar wind plasma on the magnetospheric side of the vortices, which confirms unambiguously the occurrence of mass transport across the magnetopause already reported in the literature. The proposed reconnection scenario accounts for all the observational aspects, regarding both the transport process and the kinetic signatures.

  7. Exploring reconnection, current sheets, and dissipation in a laboratory MHD turbulence experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) can serve as a testbed for studying MHD turbulence in a controllable laboratory setting, and in particular, explore the phenomena of reconnection, current sheets and dissipation in MHD turbulence. Plasma with turbulently fluctuating magnetic and velocity fields can be generated using a plasma gun source and launched into a flux-conserving cylindrical tunnel. No background magnetic field is applied so internal fields are allowed to evolve dynamically. Point measurements of magnetic and velocity fluctuations yield broadband power-law spectra with a steepening breakpoint indicative of the onset of a dissipation scale. The frequency range at which this steepening occurs can be correlated to the ion inertial scale of the plasma, a length which is characteristic of the size of current sheets in MHD plasmas and suggests a connection to dissipation. Observation of non-Gaussian intermittent jumps in magnetic field magnitude and angle along with measurements of ion temperature bursts suggests the presence of current sheets embedded within the turbulent plasma, and possibly even active reconnection sites. Additionally, structure function analysis coupled with appeals to fractal scaling models support the hypothesis that current sheets are associated with dissipation in this system.

  8. Midazolam plasma concentration after anesthesia premedication in clinical routine - an observational study : Midazolam plasma concentration after anesthesia premedication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, C; Steurer, M P; Mueller, D; Zueger, M; Dullenkopf, A

    2016-10-24

    Midazolam is commonly used as a pre-anesthesia anxiolytic. It`s elimination may not be fast enough for short procedures. In orally premedicated patients we obtained midazolam plasma concentrations at the end of surgical procedures and compared those to concentrations at anesthesia induction. The study was conducted prospectively with consent of the local ethics committee (Ethikkomission Kanton Thurgau, Switzerland) and carried out with written informed consent of each patient. Female patients aged 20 to 60 years undergoing elective procedures with general anesthesia were included, and were divided in two groups according to the planned surgical time: group S (Midazolam po as premedication. Blood samples were drawn at anesthesia induction, and at the end of surgery. Data were compared with t-test (independent samples; significance level p midazolam was not detectable in any samples. Time of premedication to the 1st blood sample was not statistically different between groups, neither were Midazolam plasma levels at this time point (p = 0.94). None of the patients from group L (n = 24), but five patients in group S (n = 22) did have a higher plasma level of Midazolam at the end of the case compared to the beginning. The elimination half-life of oral Midazolam can lead to higher plasma levels at the end of a short procedure compared to those at induction of anesthesia. German Clinical Trials Register (Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien), DRKS00005429 ; date of registration 3(rd) January 2014.

  9. Peristaltic Pumping near Post-CME Supra-Arcade Current Sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Roger B; McKenzie, David E

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of temperature and density near supra-arcade current sheets suggest that plasma on unreconnected field lines may experience some degree of "pre-heating" and "pre-densification" prior to their reconnection. Models of patchy reconnection allow for heating and acceleration of plasma along reconnected field lines but do not offer a mechanism for transport of thermal energy across field lines. Here we present a model in which a reconnected flux tube retracts, deforming the surrounding layer of unreconnected field. The deformation creates constrictions that act as peristaltic pumps, driving plasma flow along affected field lines. Under certain circumstances these flows lead to shocks that can extend far out into the unreconnected field, altering the plasma properties in the affected region. These findings have direct implications for observations in the solar corona, particularly in regard to such phenomena as high temperatures near current sheets in eruptive solar flares and wakes seen in the form of ...

  10. ISEE observations of radiation at twice the solar wind plasma frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacombe, C.; Harvey, C.C.; Hoang, S. and others

    1988-02-01

    Radiation produced in the vicinity of the Earth's bow shock at twice the solar wind electron plasma frequency f/sub p/ is seen by both ISEE-1 and ISEE-3, respectively at about 20 and about 200 R/sub E/ from the Earth. This electromagnetic radiation is due to the presence, in the electron foreshock, of electrons reflected and accelerated at the Earth's bow shock. We show that the source is near the upstream boundary of the foreshock, the surface where the magnetic field lines are tangent to the bow shock. A typical diameter of the source is 120-150 R/sub E/. Emissivity is given. The angular size of the source, seen by ISEE-3, is increased by scattering of the 2f/sub p/ radio waves on the solar wind density fluctuations. We examine whether the bandwidth and directivity predicted by current source models are consistent with our observations.

  11. Evolution of non-local observables in an expanding boost-invariant plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Pedraza, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we compute analytically the late-time behavior of two-point functions, Wilson loops and entanglement entropy in a strongly-coupled $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super-Yang-Mills plasma undergoing a boost-invariant expansion. We take into account the effects of first order dissipative hydrodynamics and investigate the effects of the (time dependent) shear viscosity on the various observables. The two-point functions decay exponentially at late times and are unaffected by the viscosity if the points are separated along the transverse directions. For longitudinal separation we find a much richer structure. In this case the exponential is modulated by a non-monotonic function of the rapidities and a dimensionless combination of the shear viscosity and proper time. Similar results are found for certain Wilson loops and entanglement entropies.

  12. Real time observables for the quark-gluon plasma from the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Christian

    2014-07-01

    found evidence for the emergence of a chromo-Weibel instability. We used a new gauge invariant approach to the spectral decomposition of the chromo-electric field, avoiding numerically costly gauge fixing routines. As for isotropization, we observed similar overall dynamics, when compared to equivalent SU(2) studies. However, computing the isotropization time we have found a significant difference. This suggests that the difference between different colour groups is not negligible when it comes to precise numbers. For the very first time we investigated quantitatively the effect of fermions on the isotropization process using a semi-classical approach to QCD. The observed energy transfer from bosons to fermions can be interpreted as fermion production from highly populated bosonic fields. In comparison to the pure bosonic study, the inclusion of fermions increased the isotropization from 9.3 fm to 13.2 fm using a fluctuation seed of Δ=0.7. This first study suggests that the inclusion of fermions has a non-negligible effect on the isotropization process. Overall, in this thesis we provide extensive studies on real time observables of the quark-gluon plasma. Based on a computation of the transport coefficient κ as well as an investigation of isotropization processes, we demonstrated that selected real time observables relevant in heavy ion collisions are accessible by lattice QCD and thus from first principles. This is particular important to give reliable predictions regarding the study of heavy ion collisions at RHIC, LHC and FAIR.

  13. Observations of rotation in JET plasmas with electron heating by ion cyclotron resonance heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T. J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Lin, Y.; Mayoral, M. L.; Ongena, J.; Calabro, G.; Crombe, K.; Frigione, D.; Giroud, C.; Lennholm, M.; Mantica, P.; Nave, M. F. F.; Naulin, V.; Sozzi, C.; Studholme, W.; Tala, T.; Versloot, T.

    2012-01-01

    The rotation of L-mode plasmas in the JET tokamak heated by waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) damped on electrons, is reported. The plasma in the core is found to rotate in the counter-current direction with a high shear and in the outer part of the plasma with an almost constan

  14. Research Program of International Geophysical Year (Igy-1957 Have Ended In the Millennium Beginning By Discovery of the Theoretical Current Sheets in the Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostapenko V. A.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We declare about the discovery in the Nature of theoretical current sheets by S. I. Syrovatskij. The first “natural” current sheet was discovered in flare spectrum, calculated and researched experimentally. The current sheets (CS are found in chromosphere and downward levels in optical range data. The main problem of physics of solar flares has been solved. Magnetic field energy is a primary source of active processes in solar plasma. Current sheet (CS of S. I. Syrovatskij is the mechanism of magnetic energy transformation into plasma energy. The current sheet is not discovered in a flare, as expected. As a matter of fact, solar flare is in itself a current sheet, its direct observed development in chromosphere plasma. Continuous current sheet radiation is the «black» (BLF and the «white» (WLF flare (like light of Sun photosphere. It is the negative hydrogen ion excitation upon reaching hydrogen plasma density of ˃5 1017 cm -3

  15. Radial variation of sulfur and oxygen ions in the Io plasma torus as deduced from remote observations by Hisaki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, K.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kimura, T.; Kagitani, M.; Murakami, G.; Yamazaki, A.; Kuwabara, M.; Suzuki, F.; Hikida, R.; Yoshikawa, I.; Bagenal, F.; Fujimoto, M.

    2017-03-01

    The Io plasma torus, situated in the Jovian inner magnetosphere (6-8 Jovian radii from the planet) is filled with heavy ions and electrons, a large part of which are derived from Io's volcanos. The torus is the key area connecting the primary source of plasma (Io) with the midmagnetosphere (>10 Jovian radii), where highly dynamic phenomena are taking place. Revealing the plasma behavior of the torus is a key factor in elucidating Jovian magnetospheric dynamics. A global picture of the Io plasma torus can be obtained via spectral diagnosis of remotely sensed ion emissions generated via electron impact excitation. Hisaki, an Earth-orbiting spacecraft equipped with an extreme ultraviolet spectrograph Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics, has observed the torus at moderate spectral resolution. The data have been submitted to spectral analysis and physical chemistry modeling under the assumption of axial symmetry. Results from the investigation are radial profiles of several important parameters including electron density and temperature as well as ion abundances. The inward transport timescale of midmagnetospheric plasma is obtained to be 2-40 h from the derived radial profile for the abundance of suprathermal electrons. The physical chemistry modeling results in a timescale for the outward transport of Io-derived plasma of around 30 days. The ratio between inward and outward plasma speed ( 1%) is consistent with the occurrence rate of depleted flux tubes determined using in situ observations by instruments on the Galileo spacecraft.

  16. Electric Field Observations of Plasma Convection, Shear, Alfven Waves, and other Phenomena Observed on Sounding Rockets in the Cusp and Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    On December 14,2002, a NASA Black Brant X sounding rocket was launched equatorward from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen (79 N) into the dayside cusp and subsequently cut across the open/closed field line boundary, reaching an apogee of771 km. The launch occurred during Bz negative conditions with strong By negative that was changing during the flight. SuperDarn (CUTLASS) radar and subsequent model patterns reveal a strong westward/poleward convection, indicating that the rocket traversed a rotational reversal in the afternoon merging cell. The payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particle, suprathermal electron and ion, and thermal plasma data. We provide an overview of the main observations and focus on the DC electric field results, comparing the measured E x B plasma drifts in detail with the CUTLASS radar observations of plasma drifts gathered simultaneously in the same volume. The in situ DC electric fields reveal steady poleward flows within the cusp with strong shears at the interface of the closed/open field lines and within the boundary layer. We use the observations to discuss ionospheric signatures of the open/closed character of the cusp/low latitude boundary layer as a function of the IMF. The electric field and plasma density data also reveal the presence of very strong plasma irregularities with a large range of scales (10 m to 10 km) that exist within the open field line cusp region yet disappear when the payload was equatorward of the cusp on closed field lines. These intense low frequency wave observations are consistent with strong scintillations observed on the ground at Ny Alesund during the flight. We present detailed wave characteristics and discuss them in terms of Alfven waves and static irregularities that pervade the cusp region at all altitudes.

  17. Structured waves near the plasma frequency observed in three auroral rocket flights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Samara

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of waves at and just above the plasma frequency (fpe from three high frequency electric field experiments on three recent rockets launched to altitudes of 300–900 km in active aurora. The predominant observed HF waves just above fpe are narrowband, short-lived emissions with amplitudes ranging from <1 mV/m to 20 mV/m, often associated with structured electron density. The nature of these HF waves, as determined from frequency-time spectrograms, is highly variable: in some cases, the frequency decreases monotonically with time as in the "HF-chirps" previously reported (McAdams and LaBelle, 1999, but in other cases rising frequencies are observed, or features which alternately rise and fall in frequency. They exhibit two timescales of amplitude variation: a short timescale, typically 50–100 ms, associated with individual discrete features, and a longer timescale associated with the general decrease in the amplitudes of the emissions as the rocket moves away from where the condition f~fpe holds. The latter timescale ranges from 0.6 to 6.0 s, corresponding to distances of 2–7 km, assuming the phenomenon to be stationary and using the rocket velocity to convert time to distance.

  18. Observation of Hot Electrons in Surface-Wave Plasmas Excited by Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Ye-Lin; CHEN Zhao-Quan; LIU Ming-Hai; HONG Ling-Li; LI Ping; ZHENG Xiao-Liang; XIA Guang-Qing; HU Xi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) are studied in the planar-type surface-wave plasma (SWP)caused by resonant excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a single cylindrical probe.Sustained plasma characteristics can be considered as a bi-Maxwellian EEDF,which correspond to a superposition of the bulk low-temperature electron and the high-energy electron beam-like part.The beam component energy is pronounced at about 10eV but the bulk part is lower than 3.5eV.The hot electrons included in the proposed plasmas play a significant role in plasma heating and further affect the discharge chemistry.During the past several years,in the fabrication ofamorphous or crystalline silicon films,diamond film synthesis and carbon nanotube growth,the large-area overdense plasma source has been useful.In electronic device fabrication techniques such as etching,ashing or plasma chemical vapor deposition,overdense electrons and radicals are required,especially hot electrons.Among the various plasma devices,the planar-type surface-wave plasma (SWP) source is an advanced plasma source,which is a type of promising plasma source satisfying the above rigorous requirements for large-area plasma processing.%The electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) are studied in the planar-type surface-wave plasma (SWP) caused by resonant excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a single cylindrical probe. Sustained plasma characteristics can be considered as a bi-Maxwellian EEDF, which correspond to a superposition of the bulk low-temperature electron and the high-energy electron beam-like part. The beam component energy is pronounced at about 10 eV but the bulk part is lower than 3.5 eV. The hot electrons included in the proposed plasmas play a significant role in plasma heating and further affect the discharge chemistry.

  19. Observation of quasi-periodic frequency sweeping in electron cyclotron emission of nonequilibrium mirror-confined plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Viktorov, M E; Mansfeld, D A; Golubev, S V

    2016-01-01

    Chirping frequency patterns have been observed in the electron cyclotron emission from strongly nonequilibrium plasma confined in a table-top mirror magnetic trap. Such patterns are typical for the formation of nonlinear phase space structures in a proximity of the wave-particle resonances of a kinetically unstable plasma, also known as the "holes and clumps" mechanism. Our data provides the first experimental evidence for acting of this mechanism in the electron cyclotron frequency domain.

  20. Properties of Solar Polar Coronal Hole Plasmas Observed above the Limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Laming, J. M.; Schühle, U.; Wilhelm, K.

    2001-01-01

    We determine the line-of-sight emission measure distribution and nonthermal motions as a function of height above the limb in the north and south polar coronal holes. These quantities are derived from extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectra obtained from the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. The SUMER slit was oriented along the north-south direction for all the observations, and the spatial resolution is about 1". The spectra were obtained from a number of different types of observations in 1996. We select a group of emission lines for analysis for which, under the usual assumption of ionization equilibrium, the maximum emissivities span the temperature range from about 3×105 K up to about 1.1×106 K. We compare our results with recently published similar observations of a west limb quiet-Sun streamer region, with other coronal hole results based on SUMER spectra, and with earlier observations of the quiet Sun and coronal holes obtained from Skylab and rocket spectra. We find that the electron temperature in the polar holes increases with height above the limb, that the emission measure distribution of plasma located at line-of-sight heights less than about 60" peaks at a temperature of about 9×105 K, and that nonthermal motions sometimes, but not always, increase slightly with height above the limb. When observed, these increases level off above the limb at about 120". We speculate that the increases with height above the limb may be a manifestation of the fast solar wind. They may also be due to the reduction in transition region structures with increasing limb height. We also discuss wave heating as a cause of the line width increases.

  1. Plasma Antenna

    OpenAIRE

    N M Vijay

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental base of plasma antenna is the use of an ionized medium as a conductor. The plasma antenna is a radiofrequency antenna formed by a plasma columns, Filaments or sheets, which are excited by a surface wave. The relevance of this device is how rapidly it can be turned on and off, only applying an electrical pulse. Besides its wide carrier frequency, the great directivity and controllable antenna shape. Otherwise a disadvantage is that it needs energy to be ionized....

  2. Substrate-free gas-phase synthesis of graphene sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dato, Albert; Radmilovic, Velimir; Lee, Zonghoon; Phillips, Jonathan; Frenklach, Michael

    2008-07-01

    We present a novel method for synthesizing graphene sheets in the gas phase using a substrate-free, atmospheric-pressure microwave plasma reactor. Graphene sheets were synthesized by passing liquid ethanol droplets into an argon plasma. The graphene sheets were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electron diffraction. We prove that graphene can be created without three-dimensional materials or substrates and demonstrate a possible avenue to the large-scale synthesis of graphene.

  3. Simulations and observations of plasma depletion, ion composition, and airglow emissions in two auroral ionospheric depletion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, A. W.; Whalen, B. A.; Harris, F. R.; Gattinger, R. L.; Pongratz, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of plasma depletion, ion composition modification, and airglow emissions in the Waterhole experiments are presented. The detailed ion chemistry and airglow emission processes related to the ionospheric hole formation in the experiment are examined, and observations are compared with computer simulation results. The latter indicate that the overall depletion rates in different parts of the depletion region are governed by different parameters.

  4. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area ​Other Fact Sheets What is structural biology? Structural biology is the study of how biological ...

  5. Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) Technology: Earth Observing-1 PPT Operational and Advanced Components Being Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencil, Eric J.; Benson, Scott W.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Frus, John; Hoskins, W. Andrew; Burton, Rodney

    2003-01-01

    In 2002 the pulsed plasma thruster (PPT) mounted on the Earth Observing-1 spacecraft was operated successfully in orbit. The two-axis thruster system is fully incorporated in the attitude determination and control system and is being used to automatically counteract disturbances in the pitch axis of the spacecraft. The first tests conducted in space demonstrated the full range of PPT operation, followed by calibration of control torques from the PPT in the attitude control system. Then the spacecraft was placed in PPT control mode. To date, it has operated for about 30 hr. The PPT successfully controlled pitch momentum during wheel de-spin, solar array acceleration and deceleration during array rewind, and environmental torques in nominal operating conditions. Images collected with the Advanced Landsat Imager during PPT operation have demonstrated that there was no degradation in comparison to full momentum wheel control. In addition, other experiments have been performed to interrogate the effects of PPT operation on communication packages and light reflection from spacecraft surfaces. Future experiments will investigate the possibility of orbit-raising maneuvers, spacecraft roll, and concurrent operation with the Hyperion imager. Future applications envisioned for pulsed plasma thrusters include longer life, higher precision, multiaxis thruster configurations for three-axis attitude control systems or high-precision, formationflying systems. Advanced components, such as a "dry" mica-foil capacitor, a wear-resistant spark plug, and a multichannel power processing unit have been developed under contract with Unison Industries, General Dynamics, and C.U. Aerospace. Over the last year, evaluation tests have been conducted to determine power processing unit efficiency, atmospheric functionality, vacuum functionality, thruster performance evaluation, thermal performance, and component life.

  6. Heliospheric current sheet and its interaction with solar cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malova, Helmi; Popov, Victor; Grigorenko, Elena; Dunko, Andrey; Petrukovich, Anatoly

    2016-04-01

    We investigated effects resulting from the interaction of solar cosmic rays (SCR) with the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) in the solar wind. Self-consistent kinetic model of the HCS is developed, where ions demonstrate quasi-adiabatic dynamics. HCS is considered as the equilibrium embedded current structure, where the two main kinds of plasma with different temperatures give the main contribution to the current (low-energy background plasma and SCR). It is shown that HCS is a relatively thin multiscale configuration of the current sheet, embedded in a thicker plasma layer. The taking into account of SCR particles in HCS could lead to a change of its structure and to enhancement of its properties such as the embedding and multi-scaling. Parametric family of solutions is considered where the current balance in HCS is provided at different temperatures of SCR and different concentrations of high-energy plasma. Concentrations of SCR are determined which may contribute to the thickening of the HCS that can be observed in satellite studies. The possibility to apply this modeling for the explanation of experimental observations is considered.

  7. Analysis of propagation prop erties of electromagnetic waves through large planar plasma sheets%电磁波在大面积等离子体片中传播特性的分析∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏俊明; 徐跃民; 孙越强; 霍文青; 孙海龙; 白伟华; 柳聪亮; 孟祥广

    2015-01-01

    Large planar plasma sheets, generated by a linear hollow cathode in pulse discharge mode under magnetic con-finement, can be used in the field of plasma antenna, plasma stealth, and simulation of a plasma layer surrounding vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities within the Earth’s atmosphere. Firstly, to investigate the propagation prop-erties of electromagnetic waves at different frequencies and polarization, the transverse field transfer matrix method is introduced. Secondly, the measured electron density temporal and spatial distribution and the transverse field transfer matrix method are utilized to calculate the reflection, transmission and absorption of electromagnetic waves by large planar plasma sheets with different currents. Finally, 1 GHz (less than the critical cut-off frequency) electromagnetic waves and 4 GHz (greater than the critical frequency) electromagnetic waves are chosen to investigate the evolution of propagation properties during the pulsed discharge period. Results show that both the reflection and absorption of the electromagnetic waves are greater for their polarization direction parallel to that of magnetic field, and their frequencies lower than the critical cut-off frequency, and as the discharge currents rise, the reflection increases while the absorption decreases. However both the reflection and absorption of the electromagnetic waves with their polarization direction perpendicular to the magnetic field direction and their frequency greater than the critical cut-off frequency become less, and as the discharge currents rise, both the reflection and absorption will increase. For the electromagnetic waves with their polarization direction perpendicular to the magnetic field direction, there is an upper hybrid resonance absorption band near the upper hybrid resonance frequencies, in which the absorption is significant but the absorption peak value is not affected by the discharge current. The propagation characteristics of the

  8. An ice sheet model validation framework for the Greenland ice sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Price, Stephen F.; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Bonin, Jennifer A.; Howat, Ian M.; Neumann, Thomas; Saba, Jack; Tezaur, Irina; Guerber, Jeffrey; Chambers, Don P.; Evans, Katherine J.; Kennedy, Joseph H.; Lenaerts, Jan; Lipscomb, William H.; Perego, Mauro; Salinger, Andrew G.; Tuminaro, Raymond S.; Van Den Broeke, Michiel R.; Nowicki, Sophie M J

    2017-01-01

    We propose a new ice sheet model validation framework - the Cryospheric Model Comparison Tool (CmCt) - that takes advantage of ice sheet altimetry and gravimetry observations collected over the past several decades and is applied here to modeling of the Greenland ice sheet. We use realistic

  9. Snow and firn density variability on the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets from observations, the MAR regional climate model, and the RACMO firn model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, P. M.; Koenig, L.; Datta, R.; Tedesco, M.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; Ligtenberg, S.; Fettweis, X.; van den Broeke, M.

    2015-12-01

    The density of snow and firn of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets (GrIS and AIS) is an important parameter in ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB). Snow and firn densities are needed to convert satellite- and airborne-derived snow thickness changes into surface mass changes. Moreover, density directly impacts SMB by influencing the amount of liquid water that can be stored in firn and snow at the ice sheet surface. Using recently updated density profiles from the SUMup community dataset, we examine spatial and temporal variations in measured densities over the GrIS and AIS, and evaluate modeled profiles from the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) RCM and the firn model of the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO2). The MAR model tends to underestimate densities in the first meter of the snowpack over both ice sheets, although the biases are spatially variable. We provide results regarding the relationship between modeled biases and parameters such as the time and location of the sample profile, and climatology at the profile location. We also explore whether recent increases in surface air temperature and melting over the Greenland ice have led to changes in simulated density profiles.

  10. Observation of a multiply ionized plasma with index of refraction greater than one

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filevich, J; Rocca, J J; Marconi, M C; Moon, S J; Nilsen, J; Scofield, J H; Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Keenan, R; Hunter, J R; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2004-10-14

    We present clear experimental evidence showing that the contribution of bound electrons can dominate the index of refraction of laser created plasmas at soft x-ray wavelengths. We report anomalous fringe shifts in soft x-ray laser interferograms of Al laser-created plasmas. The comparison of measured and simulated interferograms show that this results from the dominant contribution of low charge ions to the index of refraction. This usually neglected bound electron contribution can a.ect the propagation of soft x-ray radiation in plasmas and the interferometric diagnostics of plasmas for many elements.

  11. Current Sheet Formation in a Conical Theta Pinch Faraday Accelerator with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hallock, Ashley K.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2008-01-01

    Data from an inductive conical theta pinch accelerator are presented to gain insight into the process of inductive current sheet formation in the presence of a preionized background gas produced by a steady-state RF-discharge. The presence of a preionized plasma has been previously shown to allow for current sheet formation at lower discharge voltages and energies than those found in other pulsed inductive accelerator concepts, leading to greater accelerator efficiencies at lower power levels. Time-resolved magnetic probe measurements are obtained for different background pressures and pulse energies to characterize the effects of these parameters on current sheet formation. Indices are defined that describe time-resolved current sheet characteristics, such as the total current owing in the current sheet, the time-integrated total current ('strength'), and current sheet velocity. It is found that for a given electric field strength, maximums in total current, strength, and velocity occur for one particular background pressure. At other pressures, these current sheet indices are considerably smaller. The trends observed in these indices are explained in terms of the principles behind Townsend breakdown that lead to a dependence on the ratio of the electric field to the background pressure. Time-integrated photographic data are also obtained at the same experimental conditions, and qualitatively they compare quite favorably with the time-resolved magnetic field data.

  12. Physician experience and rates of plasma HIV-1 RNA suppression among illicit drug users: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangsari Sassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART, suboptimal treatment outcomes have been observed among HIV-seropositive illicit drug users. As there is an urgent need to improve responses to antiretroviral therapy among this population, we undertook this study to evaluate the role of physician experience on rates of plasma HIV-1 RNA suppression following initiation of ART. Methods Using data from a community-recruited cohort of HIV-positive illicit drug users, we used Cox proportional hazards regression to model the time to plasma viral HIV RNA Results Between May 1996 and December 2008, 267 individuals initiated ART among whom 227 (85% achieved a plasma HIV RNA Conclusions In this setting of universal HIV/AIDS care, illicit drug users with more experienced physicians exhibited faster rates of plasma viral load suppression. These findings argue for specialized services to help optimize HIV treatment outcomes among this population.

  13. Estimation of Plasma Properties and Magnetic Field in a Prominence-like Structure as Observed by SDO/AIA

    CERN Document Server

    Dwivedi, Bhola N; Mohan, Anita

    2013-01-01

    We analyze a prominence-like cool plasma structure as observed by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We perform the Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis using various filters of AIA, and also deduce the temperature and density structure in and around the observed flux-tube. In addition to deducing plasma parameters, we also find an evidence of multiple harmonics of fast magnetoacoustic kink waves in the observed prominence-like magnetic structure. Making use of estimated plasma parameters and observed wave parameters, under the baseline of MHD seismology, we deduce magnetic field in the flux-tube. The wave period ratio P1/P2 = 2.18 is also observed in the flux-tube, which carries the signature of magnetic field divergence where we estimate the tube expansion factor as 1.27. We discuss constraints in the estimation of plasma and magnetic field properties in such a structure in the current observational perspective, which may shed new light on the localized ...

  14. Kinetic model of force-free current sheets with non-uniform temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotkov, D. Y.; Vasko, I. Y.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2015-11-01

    The kinetic model of a one-dimensional force-free current sheet (CS) developed recently by Harrison and Neukirch [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102(13), 135003 (2009)] predicts uniform distributions of the plasma temperature and density across the CS. However, in realistic physical systems, inhomogeneities of these plasma parameters may arise quite naturally due to the boundary conditions or local plasma heating. Moreover, as the CS spatial scale becomes larger than the characteristic kinetic scales (the regime often referred to as the MHD limit), it should be possible to set arbitrary density and temperature profiles. Thus, an advanced model has to allow for inhomogeneities of the macroscopic plasma parameters across the CS, to be consistent with the MHD limit. In this paper, we generalise the kinetic model of a force-free current sheet, taking into account the inhomogeneity of the density and temperature across the CS. In the developed model, the density may either be enhanced or depleted in the CS central region. The temperature profile is prescribed by the density profile, keeping the plasma pressure uniform across the CS. All macroscopic parameters, as well as the distribution functions for the protons and electrons, are determined analytically. Applications of the developed model to current sheets observed in space plasmas are discussed.

  15. AMPTE/CCE observations of the plasma composition below 17 keV during the September 4, 1984 magnetic storm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelley, E.G.; Klumpar, D.M.; Peterson, W.K.; Ghielmetti, A.; Balsiger, H.; Geiss, J.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1985-05-01

    Observations from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment on the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft during the magnetic storm of 4-5 September 1984 reveal that significant injection of ions of terrestrial origin accompanied the storm development. The compression of the magnetosphere at storm sudden commencement carried the magnetopause inside the CCE orbit clearly revealing the shocked solar wind plasma. A build up of suprathermal ions is observed near the plasmapause during the storm main phase and recovery phase. Pitch angle distributions in the ring current during the main phase show differences between H(+) and O(+) that suggest mass dependent injection, transport and/or loss processes. 9 references.

  16. AMPTE/CCE observations of the plasma composition below 17 keV during the September 4, 1984 magnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, E. G.; Klumpar, D. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Ghielmetti, A.; Balsiger, H.; Geiss, J.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1985-05-01

    Observations from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment on the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft during the magnetic storm of 4-5 September 1984 reveal that significant injection of ions of terrestrial origin accompanied the storm development. The compression of the magnetosphere at storm sudden commencement carried the magnetopause inside the CCE orbit clearly revealing the shocked solar wind plasma. A build up of suprathermal ions is observed near the plasmapause during the storm main phase and recovery phase. Pitch angle distributions in the ring current during the main phase show differences between H(+) and O(+) that suggest mass dependent injection, transport and/or loss processes.

  17. Low Energy Plasma in the Outer Magnetosphere as Observed by Interball Tail Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Vaisberg, Oleg L.; Gallagher, Dennis L.; Chandler, Michael O.

    1999-01-01

    The Interball Tail Probe crosses the dayside magnetopause at low latitudes where it frequently measures low energy ion plasma (<100 eV) in the outer magnetosphere. We present the plasma characteristics of this cold component, including it's dependence on solar wind parameters and interaction with PC-5 type waves.

  18. The Ionospheric Bubble Index deduced from magnetic field and plasma observations onboard Swarm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Jaeheung; Noja, Max; Stolle, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    In the post-sunset tropical ionospheric F-region plasma density often exhibits depletions, which are usually called equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs). In this paper we give an overview of the Swarm Level 2 Ionospheric Bubble Index (IBI), which is a standard scientific data of the Swarm mission. Th...

  19. Developments of frequency comb microwave reflectometer for the interchange mode observations in LHD plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, R.; Tokuzawa, T.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Tanaka, K.; Yamada, I.; Inagaki, S.; Kasuya, N.

    2016-02-01

    We have upgraded the multi-channel microwave reflectometer system which uses a frequency comb as a source and measure the distribution of the density fluctuation caused by magneto-hydro dynamics instability. The previous multi-channel system was composed of the Ka-band, and the U-band system has been developed. Currently, the U-band system has eight frequency channels, which are 43.0, 45.0, 47.0, 49.0, 51.0, 53.0, 55.0, and 57.0 GHz, in U-band. Before the installation to the Large Helical Device (LHD), several tests for understanding the system characteristics, which are the phase responsibility, the linearity of output signal, and others, have been carried out. The in situ calibration in LHD has been done for the cross reference. In the neutral beam injected plasma experiments, we can observe the density fluctuation of the interchange mode and obtain the radial distribution of fluctuation amplitude.

  20. Identification of natural plasma emissions observed close to the plasmapause by the Cluster-Whisper relaxation sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Canu

    Full Text Available We use the data collected by the Whisper instrument onboard the Cluster spacecraft for a first test of its capabilities in the identification of the natural plasma waves observed in the Earth’s magnetosphere. The main signatures observed at the plasma frequency, upper hybrid frequency, and electron Bernstein modes were often difficult to be reliably recognized on previous missions. We use here the characteristic frequencies provided by the resonances triggered by the relaxation sounder of Whisper to identify with good confidence the various signatures detected in the complex wave spectra collected close to the plasmapause. Coupled with the good sensitivity, frequency and time resolution of Whisper, the resonances detected by the sounder allow one to precisely spot these natural emissions. This first analysis seems to confirm the interpretation of Geos observations: the natural emissions observed in Bernstein modes above the plasma frequency, now widely observed onboard Cluster, are not modeled by a single Maxwellian electrons distribution function. Therefore, multi-temperature electron distribution functions should be considered.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (active perturbation experiments; waves and instabilities; instrument and techniques

  1. Climatology of successive equatorial plasma bubbles observed by GPS ROTI over Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhari, S. M.; Abdullah, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Nishioka, M.; Hasbi, A. M.; Bahari, S. A.; Tsugawa, T.

    2017-02-01

    The occurrence rate of the equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) with season, solar activity, and geomagnetic conditions are investigated using long-term data sets of Malaysia Real-Time Kinematics Network (MyRTKnet) from 2008 to 2013. The rate of TEC (total electron content) change index (ROTI) in 5 min was derived from MyRTKnet data to detect the EPB with scale sizes around tens of kilometers. Then, the daily east-west cross sections of 2-D ROTI maps were used to examine the EPB features over 100°E-119°E longitudes. The EPBs tend to occur successively in one night along the observational coverage of MyRTKnet during equinoxes in high solar activity years. The perturbations in a form of wavelike structures along the observed longitudes might be responsible for the development of successive EPBs due to high growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) process. On the contrary, the occurrence of successive EPBs is infrequent and the occurrence day of EPB remains active during equinoctial months in low solar activity years. The small growth rate of the RTI process during low solar activity years might require a strong seed perturbation to generate the EPB structure. The occurrence probability of the EPB was found to be similar during quiet and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. The results imply that the strong perturbations play an important role in the development of the EPB in low solar activity years. Nonetheless, the high growth rate of the RTI could cause the successive occurrence of the EPB in high solar activity years.

  2. PIC simulations of a three component plasma described by Kappa distribution functions as observed in Saturn's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Marcos; Alves, Maria Virginia; Simões Junior, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    In plasmas out of thermodynamic equilibrium the particle velocity distribution can be described by the so called Kappa distribution. These velocity distribution functions are a generalization of the Maxwellian distribution. Since 1960, Kappa velocity distributions were observed in several regions of interplanetary space and astrophysical plasmas. Using KEMPO1 particle simulation code, modified to introduce Kappa distribution functions as initial conditions for particle velocities, the normal modes of propagation were analyzed in a plasma containing two species of electrons with different temperatures and densities and ions as a third specie.This type of plasma is usually found in magnetospheres such as in Saturn. Numerical solutions for the dispersion relation for such a plasma predict the presence of an electron-acoustic mode, besides the Langmuir and ion-acoustic modes. In the presence of an ambient magnetic field, the perpendicular propagation (Bernstein mode) also changes, as compared to a Maxwellian plasma, due to the Kappa distribution function. Here results for simulations with and without external magnetic field are presented. The parameters for the initial conditions in the simulations were obtained from the Cassini spacecraft data. Simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the dispersion relation obtained in the literature and they are in good agreement.

  3. A technique for generating consistent ice sheet initial conditions for coupled ice-sheet/climate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Fyke

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for generating ice sheet preindustrial 1850 initial conditions for coupled ice-sheet/climate models is developed and demonstrated over the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Community Earth System Model (CESM. Paleoclimate end-member simulations and ice core data are used to derive continuous surface mass balance fields which are used to force a long transient ice sheet model simulation. The procedure accounts for the evolution of climate through the last glacial period and converges to a simulated preindustrial 1850 ice sheet that is geometrically and thermodynamically consistent with the 1850 preindustrial simulated CESM state, yet contains a transient memory of past climate that compares well to observations and independent model studies. This allows future coupled ice-sheet/climate projections of climate change that include ice sheets to integrate the effect of past climate conditions on the state of the Greenland Ice Sheet, while maintaining system-wide continuity between past and future climate simulations.

  4. Estimation of dynamic properties of attractors observed in hollow copper electrode atmospheric pressure arc plasma system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ghorul; S N Sahasrabudhe; P S S Murthy; A K Das; N Venkatramani

    2002-07-01

    Understanding of the basic nature of arc root fluctuation is still one of the unsolved problems in thermal arc plasma physics. It has direct impact on myriads of thermal plasma applications being implemented at present. Recently, chaotic nature of arc root behavior has been reported through the analysis of voltages, acoustic and optical signals which are generated from a hollow copper electrode arc plasma torch. In this paper we present details of computations involved in the estimation process of various dynamic properties and show how they reflect chaotic behavior of arc root in the system.

  5. Arc Root Attachment on the Anode Surface of Arc Plasma Torch Observed with a Novel Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Wen-Xia; LI Teng; MENG Xian; CHEN Xi; WU Cheng-Kang

    2005-01-01

    @@ The arc-root attachment on the anode surface of a dc non-transferred arc plasma torch has been successfullyobserved using a novel approach. A specially designed copper mirror with a boron nitride film coated on itssurface central-region is employed to avoid the effect of intensive light emitted from the arc column upon theobservation of weakly luminous arc root. It is found that the arc-root attachment is diffusive on the anode surfaceof the argon plasma torch, while constricted arc roots often occur when hydrogen or nitrogen is added into argonas the plasma-forming gas.

  6. Use of high frequency radiometer and altimeter on board AMSU-B, AMSR-E and Altika/SARAL for observations of the Antarctic ice sheet surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adodo, Fifi; Picard, Ghislain; Remy, Frederique

    2016-04-01

    Snow surface properties quickly evolved according to local weather conditions, therefore are climate change indicator. These snow surface properties such as grain size, density, accumulation rate etc... are very important for evaluation and monitoring of the impact of global warming on the polar ice sheet. In order to retrieve these snowpack properties, we explore the high frequency microwave radiometer variable( Brightness Temperature (Tb)) on the Antarctic ice sheet on-board AMSU-B , AMSR-E in combination with the ALTIKA altimeter (37GHz) waveform parameters (Backscatter coefficient, Trailing edge Slope(TeS) and Leading edge Width(LeW)). We compare the radiometer brightness temperature to calculations with the DMRT- ML radiative transfer model which simulates brightness temperature in vertical and horizontal polarizations. With some assumptions, this combination allows a good retrieval of snowpack properties. We showed positive trend of the grains size on the Antarctic plateau especially at Dome C during the two last decades. This work will provide a higher accuracy of the estimation of snowpack surfaces properties and contribute to monitoring the ice sheet surface mass balance, well constraining of meteorological and glaciological models.

  7. How robust are in situ observations for validating satellite-derived albedo over the dark zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Hubbard, A.; Irvine-Fynn, T. D.; Doyle, S. H.; Cook, J. M.; Stibal, M.; Box, J. E.

    2017-06-01

    Calibration and validation of satellite-derived ice sheet albedo data require high-quality, in situ measurements commonly acquired by up and down facing pyranometers mounted on automated weather stations (AWS). However, direct comparison between ground and satellite-derived albedo can only be justified when the measured surface is homogeneous at the length-scale of both satellite pixel and in situ footprint. Here we use digital imagery acquired by an unmanned aerial vehicle to evaluate point-to-pixel albedo comparisons across the western, ablating margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Our results reveal that in situ measurements overestimate albedo by up to 0.10 at the end of the melt season because the ground footprints of AWS-mounted pyranometers are insufficient to capture the spatial heterogeneity of the ice surface as it progressively ablates and darkens. Statistical analysis of 21 AWS across the entire Greenland Ice Sheet reveals that almost half suffer from this bias, including some AWS located within the wet snow zone.

  8. Observations of orientation dependence of surface morphology in tungsten implanted by low energy and high flux D plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, H.Y.; Zhang, Y. B.; Yuan, Y.; Fu, B. Q.; Godfrey, A.; De Temmerman, G.; Liu, W.; Huang, X.

    2013-01-01

    Surface modification by formation of blistering and nanostructures with pronounced orientation dependence has been observed on surfaces of rolled tungsten and recrystallized tungsten after exposure to a low energy (38 eV) deuterium (D) plasma with a high flux of 1024 m-2 s -1. The correlation betwee

  9. Relation of zonal plasma drift and wind in the equatorial F region as derived from CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Park

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we estimate zonal plasma drift in the equatorial ionospheric F region without counting on ion drift meters. From June 2001 to June 2004 zonal plasma drift velocity is estimated from electron, neutral, and magnetic field observations of Challenging Mini-satellite Payload (CHAMP in the 09:00–20:00 LT sector. The estimated velocities are validated against ion drift measurements by the Republic of China Satellite-1/Ionospheric Plasma and Electrodynamics Instrument (ROCSAT-1/IPEI during the same period. The correlation between the CHAMP (altitude ~ 400 km estimates and ROCSAT-1 (altitude ~ 600 km observations is reasonably high (R ≈ 0.8. The slope of the linear regression is close to unity. However, the maximum westward drift and the westward-to-eastward reversal occur earlier for CHAMP estimates than for ROCSAT-1 measurements. In the equatorial F region both zonal wind and plasma drift have the same direction. Both generate vertical currents but with opposite signs. The wind effect (F region wind dynamo is generally larger in magnitude than the plasma drift effect (Pedersen current generated by vertical E field, thus determining the direction of the F region vertical current.

  10. Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Irregularities and Plasma Instabilities in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Gathered by the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Robert F.; Freudenreich, H.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the C/NOFS equatorial satellite provides a unique data set which includes detailed measurements of irregularities associated with the equatorial ionosphere and in particular with spread-F depletions. We present vector AC electric field observations gathered on C/NOFS that address a variety of key questions regarding how plasma irregularities, from meter to kilometer scales, are created and evolve. The talk focuses on occasions where the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400 km as solar activity has increased. In particular, during the equinox periods of 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set: The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second result is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is near or below the F-peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field

  11. Observation of Rayleigh-Taylor-Instability Evolution in a Plasma Regime Expected to Provide Magnetic and Viscous Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Colin S; Hsu, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    We present time-resolved observations of Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth at the interface between an unmagnetized plasma jet colliding with a stagnated, magnetized plasma. The observed instability growth time ($\\sim 10$ $\\mu$s) is consistent with the estimated linear Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate calculated using experimentally inferred values of density ($\\sim 10^{14}$ cm$^{-3}$) and acceleration ($10^9$ m/s$^2$). The observed instability wavelengths ($\\gtrsim 1$ cm) are consistent with stabilization of short wavelengths by a magnetic field of the experimentally measured magnitude ($\\sim 15$ G) and direction. Comparisons of data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization.

  12. Observation of ion acceleration and heating during collisionless magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Myers, Clayton E

    2013-05-24

    The ion dynamics in a collisionless magnetic reconnection layer are studied in a laboratory plasma. The measured in-plane plasma potential profile, which is established by electrons accelerated around the electron diffusion region, shows a saddle-shaped structure that is wider and deeper towards the outflow direction. This potential structure ballistically accelerates ions near the separatrices toward the outflow direction. Ions are heated as they travel into the high-pressure downstream region.

  13. Laboratory Investigations of Current Sheets at the Electron Skin Depth Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincena, S.; Gekelman, W.

    2005-12-01

    Laboratory Investigations of Current Sheets at the Electron Skin Depth Scale. Theoretical investigations, in situ spacecraft and rocket missions, and laboratory studies form an essential triad for understanding the variety of current sheet phenomena found in space plasmas. In the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA, the formation dynamics, equilibrium state, and wave-mediated disruptions of current sheets can be studied with great spatial and temporal resolution using a variety of probes as well as non-invasive laser induced fluorescence and other optical diagnostics. The LAPD is aptly suited for studying current sheets flowing in a magnetized background plasma which is capable of supporting Alfvén waves. The cylindrical device is 20m long and one meter in diameter with a solenoidal magnetic field as high as 3000 Gauss. For the parameters in this experiment, the plasma column is ten shear Alfvén wavelengths along the field and 100 electron inertial lengths (δe) (or 200 ρi) in the perpendicular direction. An electron current sheet is created in the plasma by placing a thin copper plate in the plasma column at one end of the device and pulsing this plate positive with respect to the chamber wall. The current sheet extends for the length of the device and has an initial cross-field size of roughly 45 δe by 0.5δe. A parallel flow of ions is observed with similar dimensions and moves in the same direction as the electrons in the current sheet with a velocity of 0.2 times the ion sound speed. A much weaker sheared perpendicular flow is also measured. Cross-sections of the ion flow are measured at several axial locations over a distance of six meters. Second, as the ion flow increases in magnitude, a much broader (8ρi) density depletion (n=0.25nO) develops around the flow. The gradient scale length of the depletion shortens until the spontaneous growth of drift waves occurs. This disrupts the electron current and ion flow, and leads to cross-field transport of

  14. Simultaneous Observation of High Temperature Plasma of Solar Corona By TESIS CORONAS-PHOTON and XRT Hinode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A.; Kuzin, S.; Bogachev, S.; Shestov, S.

    2012-05-01

    The Mg XII spectroheliograph is a part of instrumentation complex TESIS (satellite CORONAS-PHOTON). This instrument builds monochromatic images of hot plasma of the solar corona (λ = 8.42 Å, T>5 MK). The Mg XII spectroheliograph observed hot plasma in the non-flaring active-region NOAA 11019 during nine days. We reconstructed DEM of this active region with the help of genetic algorithm (we used data of the Mg XII spectroheliograph, XRT and EIT). Emission measure of the hot component amounts 1 % of the emission measure of the cool component.

  15. Effect of pulsed current micro plasma arc welding process parameters on fusion zone grain size and ultimate tensile strength of Inconel 625 sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kondapalli Siva Prasad; Chalamalasetti Srinivasa Rao; Damera Nageswara Rao

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on developing mathematical models to predict grain size and ultimate tensile strength of pulsed current micro plasma arc welded Inconel 625 nickel alloy.Four factors,five levels,central composite rotatable design matrix is used to optimize the number of experiments.The mathematical models have been developed by response surface method.The adequacy of the models is checked by analysis of variance technique.By using the developed mathematical models,grain size and ultimate tensile strength of the joints can be predicted with 99%0 confidence level.Contour plots are drawn to study the interaction effect of pulsed current micro plasma arc welding parameters on fusion zone grain size and ultimate tensile strength of Inconel 625 weld ioints.

  16. Traveling magnetopause distortion related to a large-scale magnetosheath plasma jet: THEMIS and ground-based observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, A V; 10.1029/2011JA016861

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present a case study of THEMIS and ground-based observations on the dayside magnetopause, and geomagnetic field perturbations related to the interaction of an interplanetary directional discontinuity (DD), as observed by ACE, within the magnetosphere on 16 June 2007. The interaction resulted in a large-scale local magnetopause distortion of an 'expansion-compression-expansion' (ECE) sequence that lasted for 15 min. The compression was caused by a very dense, cold, and fast high-beta magnetosheath plasma flow, a so-called plasma jet, whose kinetic energy was approximately three times higher than the energy of the incident solar wind. The plasma jet resulted in the effective penetration of the magnetosheath plasma inside the magnetosphere. A strong distortion of the Chapman-Ferraro current in the ECE sequence generated a tripolar magnetic pulse 'decrease-peak-decrease' (DPD) that was observed at low and middle latitudes by the INTERMAGNET network of ground-based magnetometers. The characteristics of th...

  17. Measurement of the speed of sound by observation of the Mach cones in a complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukhovitskii, D. I., E-mail: dmr@ihed.ras.ru; Fortov, V. E.; Molotkov, V. I.; Lipaev, A. M.; Naumkin, V. N. [Joint Institute of High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13, Bd. 2, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Thomas, H. M. [Research Group Complex Plasma, DLR, Oberpfaffenhofen, 82234 Wessling (Germany); Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schwabe, M. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Graves Lab, D75 Tan Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We report the first observation of the Mach cones excited by a larger microparticle (projectile) moving through a cloud of smaller microparticles (dust) in a complex plasma with neon as a buffer gas under microgravity conditions. A collective motion of the dust particles occurs as propagation of the contact discontinuity. The corresponding speed of sound was measured by a special method of the Mach cone visualization. The measurement results are incompatible with the theory of ion acoustic waves. The estimate for the pressure in a strongly coupled Coulomb system and a scaling law for the complex plasma make it possible to derive an evaluation for the speed of sound, which is in a reasonable agreement with the experiments in complex plasmas.

  18. Measurement of the speed of sound by observation of the Mach cones in a complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukhovitskii, D I; Molotkov, V I; Lipaev, A M; Naumkin, V N; Thomas, H M; Ivlev, A V; Schwabe, M; Morfill, G E

    2014-01-01

    We report the first observation of the Mach cones excited by a larger microparticle (projectile) moving through a cloud of smaller microparticles (dust) in a complex plasma with neon as a buffer gas under microgravity conditions. A collective motion of the dust particles occurs as propagation of the contact discontinuity. The corresponding speed of sound was measured by a special method of the Mach cone visualization. The measurement results are fully incompatible with the theory of ion acoustic waves. We explore the analogy between a strongly coupled Coulomb system and a solid. A scaling law for the complex plasma makes it possible to derive a theoretical estimate for the speed of sound, which is in a reasonable agreement with the experiments in strongly coupled complex plasmas.

  19. Observed Coupling Between the International Space Station PCU Plasma and a FPMU Langmuir Probe Facilitated by the Geomagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, William; Koontz, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Electrical charging of the International Space Station (ISS) is a matter of serious concern resulting from the possibility of vehicle arcing and electrical shock hazard to crew during extravehicular activity (EVA). A Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) was developed and integrated into ISS in order to control the ISS floating potential, thereby, minimize vehicle charging and associated hazards. One of the principle factors affecting ISS electrical charging is the ionosphere plasma state (i.e., electron temperature and density). To support ISS electrical charging studies a Floating Potential Monitoring Unit (FPMU) is also integrated into ISS in order to measure the ionosphere properties using Langmuir probes (LP). The FPMU was located on the Starboard side of ISS. The PCU is located near the center of ISS with its plasma exhaust pointed to port. From its integration on ISS in 2006 through November of 2009, the FPMU data exhibited nominal characteristics during PCU operation. On November 21, 2009 the FPMU was relocated from the Starboard location to a new Port location. After relocation significant enhanced noise was observed in both the LP current-voltage sweeps and the derived electron temperature data. The enhanced noise only occurred when the PCU was in discharge and at unique and repeatable locations of the ISS orbit. The cause of this enhanced noise was investigated. It was found that there is coupling occurring between the PCU plasma and the FPMU LP. In this paper we shall 1) present the on-orbit data and the presence of enhanced noise, 2) demonstrate that the coupling of the PCU plasma and the FPMU measurements is geomagnetically organized, 3) show that coupling of the PCU plasma and the FPMU is primarily due to and driven by particle-wave interaction and 4) show that the ionosphere conditions are adequate for Alfven waves to be generated by the PCU plasma.

  20. Observations of plasma density structures in association with the passage of traveling convection vortices and the occurrence of large plasma jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Valladares

    Full Text Available We report important results of the first campaign specially designed to observe the formation and the initial convection of polar cap patches. The principal instrumentation used in the experiments comprised the EISCAT, the Sondrestrom, and the Super DARN network of radars. The experiment was conducted on February 18, 1996 and was complemented with additional sensors such as the Greenland chain of magnetometers and the WIND and IMP-8 satellites. Two different types of events were seen on this day, and in both events the Sondrestrom radar registered the formation and evolution of large-scale density structures. The first event consisted of the passage of traveling convection vortices (TCV. The other event occurred in association with the development of large plasma jets (LPJ embedded in the sunward convection part of the dusk cell. TCVs were measured, principally, with the magnetometers located in Greenland, but were also confirmed by the line-of-sight velocities from the Sondrestrom and SuperDARN radars. We found that when the magnetic perturbations associated with the TCVs were larger than 100 nT, then a section of the high-latitude plasma density was eroded by a factor of 2. We suggest that the number density reduction was caused by an enhancement in the O+ recombination due to an elevated Ti, which was produced by the much higher frictional heating inside the vortex. The large plasma jets had a considerable (>1000 km longitudinal extension and were 200-300 km in width. They were seen principally with the Sondrestrom, and SuperDARN radars. Enhanced ion temperature (Ti was also observed by the Sondrestrom and EISCAT radars. These channels of high Ti were exactly collocated with the LPJs and some of them with regions of eroded plasma number density. We suggest that the LPJs bring less dense plasma from later local times. However, the recent time history of the plasma flow is important to define the

  1. Broad plasma depletions detected in the bottomside of the equatorial F region: Simultaneous ROCSAT-1 and JULIA observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Hyosub; Kwak, Young-Sil; Lee, Woo Kyoung; Oh, Seung-Jun; Milla, Marco; Galkin, Ivan

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the association of broad plasma depletions (BPDs) with plasma bubbles and ionospheric uplift in the equatorial F region using the coincident satellite and radar observations over Jicamarca in Peru. BPDs were detected by the first Republic of China satellite (ROCSAT-1) on the nights of 21 and 22 December 2002 during the period of moderate geomagnetic activity. The observations of the Jicamarca Unattended Long-term Investigations of the Ionosphere and Atmosphere radar and an ionosonde showed that the F peak height was lifted above the ROCSAT-1 altitude (600 km) at the times of the BPD detection. The fraction of NO+ was substantial at the locations of BPDs. These observations support the association of the BPDs with the ionospheric uplift. However, the absence of large backscatter plumes at the times of the BPD detection indicates that the BPDs were not produced by a single large bubble or a merger of bubbles.

  2. The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pompl, Rene; Jamitzky, Ferdinand; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Steffes, Bernd; Bunk, Wolfram; Morfill, Gregor Eugen [Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schmidt, Hans-Ulrich [Institute for Medical Microbiology, Munich Schwabing Hospital, Munich (Germany); Georgi, Matthias; Ramrath, Katrin; Stolz, Wilhelm [Clinic for Dermatology, Allergology and Environmental Medicine, Munich Schwabing Hospital, Munich (Germany); Stark, Robert W [Center for Nanoscience and Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Urayama, Takuya; Fujii, Shuitsu [ADTEC Plasma Technology Co. Ltd, Fukuyama (Japan)], E-mail: tshimizu@mpe.mpg.de

    2009-11-15

    Research on low-temperature atmospheric plasma sources (LTAPS) has grown strongly over the last few years, in part driven by possible medical 'in vivo' applications. LTAPS offer new technology for medicine and biomedical engineering. Important application examples include in situ production of reactive molecules and ions, delivery at the molecular level, contact-free and self-sterilizing devices. An important issue is the efficient bactericidal effect of LTAPS, which has already been studied widely in vitro. In spite of the many investigations, details of the plasma effect on bacteria are still largely unknown. To contribute to a better understanding of the sterilization process, we investigated the morphological changes of bacteria using atomic force microscopy before and after plasma treatment at high resolution. We examined both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria at different plasma exposure times. Additionally, the effect of UV radiation as one agent in the plasma was investigated separately. Our results suggest that several sterilizing mechanisms exist and they proceed at different timescales.

  3. Heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS) impingement onto the magnetosphere as a cause of relativistic electron dropouts (REDs) via coherent EMIC wave scattering with possible consequences for climate change mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Hajra, R.; Tanimori, T.; Takada, A.; Bhanu, R.; Mannucci, A. J.; Lakhina, G. S.; Kozyra, J. U.; Shiokawa, K.; Lee, L. C.; Echer, E.; Reddy, R. V.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    2016-10-01

    A new scenario is presented for the cause of magnetospheric relativistic electron decreases (REDs) and potential effects in the atmosphere and on climate. High-density solar wind heliospheric plasmasheet (HPS) events impinge onto the magnetosphere, compressing it along with remnant noon-sector outer-zone magnetospheric 10-100 keV protons. The betatron accelerated protons generate coherent electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves through a temperature anisotropy (T⊥/T|| > 1) instability. The waves in turn interact with relativistic electrons and cause the rapid loss of these particles to a small region of the atmosphere. A peak total energy deposition of 3 × 1020 ergs is derived for the precipitating electrons. Maximum energy deposition and creation of electron-ion pairs at 30-50 km and at Wilcox et al. (1973) noted a correlation between solar wind heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings and high atmospheric vorticity centers at 300 mb altitude. Tinsley et al. has constructed a global circuit model which depends on particle precipitation into the atmosphere. Other possible scenarios potentially affecting weather/climate change are also discussed.

  4. Metastability of collisionless current sheets. Hannes Alfven Lecture on behalf of Albert Galeev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyi, L.; Galeev, A.

    2009-04-01

    Complicated magnetic configurations containing numerous magnetic field reversals are widespread in nature. Each of such reversals is supported by corresponding current sheet (CS) which could often have very small thickness comparable to ion skin depth. Since the beginning of Space Age "in situ" investigations of current sheets in the Earth's magnetosphere (magnetopause and magnetotail) acquired one of the highest priorities in national space programs and became one of the cornerstones of various international activities, like ISTP, IACG, and ILWS, which appeared to be very effective. Intense theoretical efforts were undertaken by theorists all over the world to develop both equilibrium models of current sheets and analyze its stability and further nonlinear evolution. Lack of collisions and smallness of many characteristic scales in comparison with ion Larmor radius made an application of straightforward MHD approach dramatically questionable. Professor Alfven was one of the first who suggested in 1968 simple but very physical self-consistent particle model of CS. One of the most intriguing features of current sheets in collisionless plasma is their ability to accumulate tremendous amounts of magnetic energy (1015 J for magnetospheric substorms , 1024 J for solar flare associated sheets) and then suddenly sometimes almost explosively release them. We will demonstrate in this talk that such METASTABILITY is a principal intrinsic feature of current sheets in hot plasma. Very intense theoretical debates of 80-ies and late 90-ies resulted in some consensus that current sheets with the small component of magnetic field normal to their plane become overstable for spontaneous reconnection (i.e. versus the development of ion tearing mode). Analysis of INTERBALL and especially 4- point CLUSTER data have shown that real current sheets observed in the Earth's magnetotail very rarely resemble simplistic HARRIS current sheets which have been used for an early stability

  5. On the Observation of Jitter Radiation in Solid-Density Laser-Plasma Laboratory Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Keenan, Brett D

    2015-01-01

    Plasmas created by high-intensity lasers are often subject to the formation of kinetic-streaming instabilities, such as the Weibel instability, which lead to the spontaneous generation of high-amplitude, tangled magnetic fields. These fields typically exist on small spatial scales, i.e. "sub-Larmor scales". Radiation from charged particles moving through small-scale electromagnetic (EM) turbulence, known as jitter radiation, has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and it carries valuable information on the statistical properties of the EM field structure and evolution. Consequently, jitter radiation from laser-produced plasmas may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here we investigate the prospects for, and demonstrate the feasibility of, such direct radiative diagnostics for mildly relativistic, solid-density laser plasmas produced in lab experiments.

  6. Plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Hu, G. [Globalstar LP, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  7. Experimental observation of strong coupling effects on the dispersion of dust acoustic waves in a plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, P; Sen, A; Kaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion properties of low frequency dust acoustic waves in the strong coupling regime are investigated experimentally in an argon plasma embedded with a mixture of kaolin and $MnO_2$ dust particles. The neutral pressure is varied over a wide range to change the collisional properties of the dusty plasma. In the low collisional regime the turnover of the dispersion curve at higher wave numbers and the resultant region of $\\partial\\omega/\\partial k < 0$ are identified as signatures of dust-dust correlations. In the high collisional regime dust neutral collisions produce a similar effect and prevent an unambiguous identification of strong coupling effects.

  8. Does Reactive Thrombocytosis Observed in Iron Deficiency Anemia Affect Plasma Viscosity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selami K. Toprak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The accompanying thrombocytosis is referred to as the major factor associated with thromboembolism in iron deficiency anemia (IDA. Increased viscosity may increase the risk of thrombosis. We hypothesized that increased platelet count -with reactive thrombocytosis- might also affect plasma viscosity. We planned to evaluate the influence of normal and high platelet count on plasma viscosity in IDA patients. METHODS: The patient population consisted of fifty-three newly diagnosed and untreated women aged between 18 and 62 years with IDA. Group 1 consisted of 33 patients, platelet levels below 400 x 109/L. Group 2 consisted of 20 patients, platelet levels above 400 x 109/L. Measurements of plasma viscosity were performed using Brookfield viscometer. RESULTS: Mean plasma viscosity was found as 1.05 ± 0.08 mPa.s. in Group 1, and 1.03 ± 0.06 mPa.s. in Group 2. Mean plasma viscosity was not statistically different. White blood cell count was significantly higher in Group 2. Vitamin B12 levels were significantly higher in Group 2, while folic acid levels were higher in Group 1 (p=0.011 and p=0.033. Plasma viscosity was correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r=0.512 p=0.002 in Group 1 and inversely correlated with vitamin B12 (r=−0.480 p=0.032 in Group 2. CONCLUSION: Despite the significant difference between groups in terms of platelet count, no significant difference was detected in plasma viscosity and this finding could be explained as the following; 1-These platelets were not thrombocythemic platelets; 2-Similar to the theory about leukocytes, higher platelet counts – even non-thrombocythemic – may increase plasma viscosity; 3-Evaluating platelet count alone is not sufficient and the associating red-cell deformability should also be taken into account; and 4-Although other diseases that could affect viscosity are excluded, some definitely proven literature criteria such as fibrinogen, hyperlipidemia, and the inflammatory

  9. Observation of Radial Propagation of Electrostatic Fluctuations in Edge Plasma of the Sino United Spherical Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo-Ping; HE Ye-Xi; WANG Wen-Hao; GAO Zhe; ZENG Li; XIE Li-Feng; FENG Chun-Hua

    2004-01-01

    @@ Radial propagation of electrostatic fluctuations in the edge plasma of Sino-United Spherical Tokamak (SUNIST) has been measured using Langmuir probes. The propagation characteristics of the floating potential fluctuations are analysed by the two-point correlation technique. The results show radially outward propagation of the turbulent fluctuations at all measured radial positions. The power-average wavenumber profile is approximately constant in plasma edge region and suddenly increases to the limiter. These results are in good agreement with the model predictions proposed by Mattor which suggests that the drift wave propagation may be a source of edge turbulence.

  10. Formation of the current sheet in a coronal streamer

    CERN Document Server

    Abbo, Lucia; Lionello, Roberto; Mikić, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2011-01-01

    The present work is on the study of a coronal streamer observed in March 2008 at high spectral and spatial resolution by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) onboard SOHO. On the basis of a spectroscopic analysis of the O VI doublet, the solar wind plasma parameters are inferred in the extended corona. The analysis accounts for the coronal magnetic topology, extrapolated through a 3D magneto-hydrodynamic model. The results of the analysis show indications on the formation of the current sheet, one of the source regions of the slow coronal wind.

  11. Shock wave interactions with liquid sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, H.; Eliasson, V.

    2017-04-01

    Shock wave interactions with a liquid sheet are investigated by impacting planar liquid sheets of varying thicknesses with a planar shock wave. A square frame was designed to hold a rectangular liquid sheet, with a thickness of 5 or 10 mm, using plastic membranes and cotton wires to maintain the planar shape and minimize bulge. The flat liquid sheet, consisting of either water or a cornstarch and water mixture, was suspended in the test section of a shock tube. Incident shock waves with Mach numbers of M_s = 1.34 and 1.46 were considered. A schlieren technique with a high-speed camera was used to visualize the shock wave interaction with the liquid sheets. High-frequency pressure sensors were used to measure wave speed, overpressure, and impulse both upstream and downstream of the liquid sheet. Results showed that no transmitted shock wave could be observed through the liquid sheets, but compression waves induced by the shock-accelerated liquid coalesced into a shock wave farther downstream. A thicker liquid sheet resulted in a lower peak overpressure and impulse, and a cornstarch suspension sheet showed a higher attenuation factor compared to a water sheet.

  12. ISEE 1 observations of thermal plasma in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during periods of quieting magnetic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, J.L.; Baugher, C.R.; Chappell, C.R.; Shelley, E.G.; Young, D.T.; Anderson, R.R.

    1981-11-01

    Thermal (< or approx. =100 electron volts) ion observations made with the plasma composition experiment on ISEE 1 are combined with plasma density profiles obtained from plasma frequency measurements made with the plasma wave experiment to conduct an investigation of thermal plasma behavior in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during periods of quieting magnetic activity. Normally, the principal thermal ion population in the plasmasphere consists of cold (kT< or approx. =1 eV), isotropic distributions with ion species in the order of dominance H/sup +/:He/sup +/:O/sup +/, while outside the plasmapause, the observed E< or approx. =100 eV ion distributions usually are field-aligned in structure, have characteristic energies E< or approx. =10 eV and H/sup +/:O/sup +/He/sup +/ order of dominance in fluxes. During periods in which the magnetic activity quiets, the above two regions are separated by a new region in which, at times, low-energy (approx.1-2 eV) H/sup +/ and He/sup +/ are found flowing along the magnetic field lines. On other occasions following quieting magnetic activity, pancake distributions (peak fluxes at 90/sup 0/ pitch angle) are observed in this region. Other complex distributions have been seen, and these complexities and the limitations of the data coverage preclude a satisfactory simple interpretation. It seems plausible to identify this region as the site of plasmasphere refilling. However, the data presumably also contain evidence of the quiet time rotation of the plasmasphere bulge region into the morning sector.

  13. Insecticide-treated plastic sheeting for emergency malaria prevention and shelter among displaced populations: an observational cohort study in a refugee setting in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Matthew; Rowland, Mark; N'guessan, Raphael; Carneiro, Ilona; Beeche, Arlyne; Ruiz, Stefani Sesler; Kamara, Sarian; Takken, Willem; Carnevale, Pierre; Allan, Richard

    2012-08-01

    A double-blind phase III malaria prevention trial was conducted in two refugee camps using pre-manufactured insecticide-treated plastic sheeting (ITPS) or untreated polyethylene sheeting (UPS) randomly deployed to defined sectors of each camp. In Largo camp the ITPS or UPS was attached to inner walls and ceilings of shelters, whereas in Tobanda the ITPS or UPS was used to line only the ceiling and roof. In Largo the Plasmodium falciparum incidence rate in children up to 3 years of age who were cleared of parasites and monitored for 8 months was 163/100 person-years under UPS and 63 under ITPS (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.33-0.47). In Tobanda incidence was 157/100 person-years under UPS and 134 under ITPS (AOR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.75-0.95). Protective efficacy was 61% under fully lined ITPS and 15% under roof lined ITPS. Anemia rates improved under ITPS in both camps. This novel tool proved to be a convenient, safe, and long-lasting method of malaria control when used as a full shelter lining in an emergency setting.

  14. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATION OF RECONNECTION INFLOW AND OUTFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH THE 2010 AUGUST 18 SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Asai, Ayumi; Isobe, Hiroaki, E-mail: takasao@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2012-01-20

    We report the simultaneous extreme-ultraviolet observation of magnetic reconnection inflow and outflow in a flare on 2010 August 18 observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We found that during the rise phase of the flare, some plasma blobs appeared in the sheet structure above the hot loops. The plasma blobs were ejected bidirectionally along the sheet structure (outflow), at the same time as the threads visible in extreme-ultraviolet images moved toward the sheet structure (inflow). The upward and downward ejection velocities are 220-460 km s{sup -1} and 250-280 km s{sup -1}, respectively. The inflow speed changed from 90 km s{sup -1} to 12 km s{sup -1} in 5 minutes. By using these velocities, we estimated the nondimensional reconnection rate, which we found to vary during this period from 0.20 to 0.055. We also found that the plasma blobs in the sheet structure collided or merged with each other before they were ejected from the sheet structure. We hypothesize that the sheet structure is the current sheet and that these plasma blobs are plasmoids or magnetic islands, which could be important for understanding the dynamics of the reconnection region.

  15. LGM-extent of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet offshore from the Hobbs Coast, based on paleo-ice stream bed observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klages, J.; Kuhn, G.; Hillenbrand, C.; Graham, A. G.; Smith, J.; Larter, R. D.; Gohl, K.

    2012-12-01

    Paleo-ice stream beds that are exposed today on the West Antarctic continental shelf provide unique archives of conditions at the base of the past ice sheet, that are difficult to assess beneath its modern, extant counterpart. During the last decade, several of these paleo-ice stream beds have been studied in detail to reconstruct the extent of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the patterns of ice drainage, and the timing of grounding-line retreat during the last deglaciation. However, despite significant advances, such information still remains poorly constrained in numerous drainage sectors of the WAIS. In particular, the maximum extent of ice at the LGM remains ambiguous for key drainage basins of the ice sheet. Whether the WAIS extended to the shelf break around the continent, or advanced only partially across its sea bed, is a crucial piece of information required for reconstructing and modeling patterns of ice-sheet change from past to present. Here we present marine geological and geophysical data that we collected on R/V "Polarstern" expedition ANT-XXVI/3 in early 2010 to investigate the extent, flow, and retreat of the WAIS, from an especially poorly studied part of the West Antarctic shelf, offshore from the Hobbs Coast in the western Amundsen Sea. Here, a landward deepening paleo-ice stream trough is incised into the shelf. The seafloor within the western-central part of the trough is characterized by a large trough-wide grounding zone wedge, ~70 m thick and ~17 km long, which overlies a high of seaward dipping sedimentary strata. The back-slope of the GZW is characterized by highly elongate streamlined bedforms suggesting fast paleo-ice flow towards NW. The crest of the wedge has been cross-cutted by iceberg keels. In contrast, the outer shelf seafloor offshore the GZW is predominantly smooth and featureless, although there is some evidence locally for iceberg scouring. A radiocarbon age from calcareous microfossils

  16. Kinetic Model of Auroral Plasma Formation II: Simultaneous Multi-Satellite Ion Observations and Interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-30

    survey particle spec- trogram of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) plasma instrument on SCATHA e.g., Olsen, 1981], shown on Figure 4. In...Perraut, J.-A. Sauvaud, J.-M. Bosqued, A. Pedersen, and B. Aparicio , Drift boundary and ULF wave generation near noon at geostationary orbit, Geophys

  17. Assimilative Modeling of Observed Postmidnight Equatorial Plasma Depletions in June 2008 (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy Working Group V‐MOD, 2010]. The global model of the PBMOD does not calculate self‐consistent fields of plasma...2006GL026161. International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy Working Group V‐MOD (2010), International Geomagnetic Reference Field: The eleventh

  18. Observation of Blobs and Holes in the Boundary Plasma of EAST Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Ning; Xu, Guosheng; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Intermittent convective transport at the edge and in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of EAST was investigated by using fast reciprocating Langmuir probe. Holes, as part of plasma structures, were detected for the first time inside the shear layer. The amplitude probability distribution function...

  19. Features of highly structured equatorial plasma irregularities deduced from CHAMP observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, C.; Luhr, H.; Ma, S. Y.;

    2012-01-01

    for different scale sizes with the global distribution of plasma vertical uplift, we have found that EPBs reaching higher altitudes are more structured than those which are sampled by CHAMP near the top side of the depleted fluxtube. Such a result is in accord with 3-D model simulations (Aveiro and Hysell, 2010...

  20. Simultaneous observation of keyhole and weld pool in plasma arc welding with a single cost-effective sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国凯; 武传松; 刘新锋; 张晨

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic behaviors ofthe keyhole and weld pool are coupled together in plasma arc welding,and the geometric variations ofboth the keyhole and the weld pool determine the weld quality.It is ofgreat significance to simultaneously sense and monitor the keyhole and the weld pool behaviors by using a single low-cost vision sensor in plasma arc welding process.In this study,the keyhole and weld pool were observed and measured under different levels ofwelding current by using the near infrared sensing technology and the charge coupled device (CCD)sensing system.The shapes and relative position ofweld pool and keyhole under different conditions were compared and analyzed.The observation results lay solid foundation for controlling weld quality and understanding the underlying process mechanisms.

  1. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Zika virus Fact sheet Updated 6 September 2016 Key ... and last for 2-7 days. Complications of Zika virus disease Based on a systematic review of ...

  2. Trauma Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > Physical Trauma Fact Sheet Physical Trauma Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area ... of physical trauma. Credit: iStock. What is physical trauma? Physical trauma is a serious injury to the ...

  3. Diabetes Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes by losing weight. Related information Fitness and nutrition Heart disease and stroke Obesity and weight loss fact sheet Physical activity fact sheet Pregnancy The javascript used in this widget is not ...

  4. Observations of day-to-day variability in precursor signatures to equatorial F-region plasma depletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Fagundes

    Full Text Available In December 1995, a campaign was carried out to study the day-to-day variability in precursor signatures to large-scale ionospheric F-region plasma irregularities, using optical diagnostic techniques, near the magnetic equator in the Brazilian sector. Three instruments were operated simultaneously: (a an all-sky (180° field of view imaging system for observing the OI 630 nm nightglow emission at Alcântara (2.5°S, 44.4°W; (b a digisonde (256-Lowell at São Luis (2.6°S, 44.2°W; and (c a multi-channel tilting filter-type zenith photometer for observing the OI 630 nm and mesospheric nightglow emissions at Fortaleza (3.9°S, 38.4°W. During the period December 14-18, 1995 (summer in the southern hemisphere, a good sequence of the OI 630 nm imaging observations on five consecutive nights were obtained, which are presented and discussed in this study. The observing period was geomagnetically quiet to moderate 
    (Kp = 0+ to 5+; Dst = 18 nT to -37 nT. On four nights, out of the five observation nights, the OI 630 nm imaging pictures showed formations of transequatorial north-south aligned intensity depletions, which are the optical signatures of large-scale ionospheric F-region plasma bubbles. However, considerable day-to-day variability in the onset and development of the plasma depleted bands was observed. On one of the nights it appears that the rapid uplifting of the F-layer in the post-sunset period, in conjunction with gravity wave activity at mesospheric heights, resulted in generation of very strong plasma bubble irregularities. One of the nights showed an unusual formation of north-south depleted band in the western sector of the imaging system field of view, but the structure did not show any eastward movement, which is a normal characteristic of plasma bubbles. This type of irregularity structure, which probably can be observed only by wide-angle imaging system, needs more investigations for a better understanding of

  5. Deep Chandra Observations of NGC 1404: Cluster Plasma Physics Revealed by an Infalling Early-type Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Kraft, Ralph P.; Roediger, Elke; Nulsen, Paul; Forman, William R.; Churazov, Eugene; Randall, Scott W.; Jones, Christine; Machacek, Marie E.

    2017-01-01

    The intracluster medium (ICM), as a magnetized and highly ionized fluid, provides an ideal laboratory to study plasma physics under extreme conditions that cannot be achieved on Earth. NGC 1404 is a bright elliptical galaxy that is being gas stripped as it falls through the ICM of the Fornax Cluster. We use the new Chandra X-ray observations of NGC 1404 to study ICM microphysics. The interstellar medium of NGC 1404 is characterized by a sharp leading edge, 8 kpc from the Galaxy center, and a short downstream gaseous tail. Contact discontinuities are resolved on unprecedented spatial scales (0.″5 = 45 pc) due to the combination of the proximity of NGC 1404, the superb spatial resolution of Chandra, and the very deep (670 ks) exposure. At the leading edge, we observe sub-kiloparsec-scale eddies generated by Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI) and put an upper limit of 5% Spitzer on the isotropic viscosity of the hot cluster plasma. We also observe mixing between the hot cluster gas and the cooler galaxy gas in the downstream stripped tail, which provides further evidence of a low viscosity plasma. The assumed ordered magnetic fields in the ICM ought to be smaller than 5 μG to allow KHI to develop. The lack of an evident magnetic draping layer just outside the contact edge is consistent with such an upper limit.

  6. Statistical description of low-latitude plasma blobs as observed by DMSP F15 and KOMPSAT-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Min, K. W.; Kim, V. P.; Kil, H.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, J. J.; Lee, E.; Kim, S. J.; Lee, D. Y.; Hairston, M.

    The global distribution of low-latitude plasma blobs was investigated by in-situ plasma density measurements from the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-1 (KOMPSAT-1) and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F15. In the observations, blobs occurred in the longitude sector where the activity of the equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) was appreciable, and additional blobs were found at the lower (KOMPSAT-1) altitude as in the EPBs. However, several notable differences exist between the distributions of EPBs and blobs. First, KOMPSAT-1 found few blobs around 0°E in March and June, as did DMSP F15 from 30°W to 120°E for every season. Second, the overall occurrences in December and March at the DMSP F15 (840 km) altitude were somewhat lower than expected from those of the EBPs. Third, at the DMSP F15 altitude, the occurrence probability of plasma blobs was less controlled by yearly variations in the solar activity. These results imply that topside ionospheric conditions as well as the existence of EPBs control further development of blobs. Additionally, it was found that the blob latitudes became higher as the yearly solar activity increased. Moreover, most of the blobs were encountered in the winter hemisphere, possibly due to the low ambient density.

  7. Plasma pressure in the environment of Jupiter, inferred from Voyager 1 magnetometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudal, G.; Connerney, J. E. P.

    1989-11-01

    A model combining the internal magnetic field with a self-consistent model of the Jovian magnetodisc was fitted to the Voyager 1 Jovian magnetic field data by means of a generalized inverse technique. The model parameters included the internal field spherical harmonic coefficients as well as with parameters describing the plasma distribution in the magnetosphere. Assuming that the pressure in the middle and outer magnetosphere is related to the unit flux tube volume V through PV exp gamma = const, the model fit yielded a value of 0.88 for gamma. If the hot (30 keV) plasma is transported adiabatically inward under the interchange instability triggered by centrifugal force of the heavy torus ions, losses are not sufficient to account for such a low value of gamma beyond L = 10. Closer to the planet, as the outer edge of the Io plasma torus is approached, PV exp gamma is found to decrease inward, as expected from the particle measurements, which identified an inner boundary of the particle fluxes in that region. With the present stage of the development of magnetodisc models, secular variations of the internal field still remain difficult to estimate.

  8. Imaging radar observations and nonlocal theory of large-scale plasma waves in the equatorial electrojet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    Full Text Available Large-scale (l ~ 1 km waves in the daytime and night-time equatorial electrojet are studied using coherent scatter radar data from Jicamarca. Images of plasma irregularities within the main beam of the radar are formed using interferometry with multiple baselines. These images are analyzed according to nonlocal gradient drift instability theory and are also compared to nonlinear computer simulations carried out recently by Ronchi et al. (1991 and Hu and Bhattacharjee (1999. In the daytime, the large-scale waves assume a non-steady dynamical equilibrium state characterized by the straining and destruction of the waves by shear and diffusion followed by spontaneous regeneration as predicted by Ronchi et al. (1991. At night, when steep plasma density gradients emerge, slowly propagating large-scale vertically extended waves predominate. Eikonal analysis suggests that these waves are trapped (absolutely unstable or are nearly trapped (convectively unstable and are able to tunnel between altitude regions which are locally unstable. Intermediate-scale waves are mainly transient (convectively stable but can become absolutely unstable in narrow altitude bands determined by the background density profile. These characteristics are mainly consistent with the simulations presented by Hu and Bhattacharjee (1999. A new class of large-scale primary waves is found to occur along bands that sweep westward and downward from high altitudes through the E-region at twilight.

    Key words. Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere; ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities

  9. "Ideally" unstable current sheets and the triggering of fast magnetic reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Tenerani, Anna; Pucci, Fulvia; Landi, Simone; Rappazzo, Antonio Franco

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the dynamical mechanism underlying many explosive phenomena observed both in space and in the laboratory, though the question of how fast magnetic reconnection is triggered in such high Lundquist ($S$) number plasmas has remained elusive. It has been well established that reconnection can develop over timescales faster than those predicted traditionally once kinetic scales are reached. It has also been shown that, within the framework of resistive Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), fast reconnection is achieved for thin enough sheets via the onset of the so-called plasmoid instability. The latter was discovered in studies specifically devoted to the Sweet-Parker current sheet, either as an initial condition or an apparent transient state developing in nonlinear studies. On the other hand, a fast tearing instability can grow on an ideal, i.e., $S$-independent, timescale (dubbed "ideal" tearing) within current sheets whose aspect ratio scales with the macroscopic Lundquist number...

  10. Synthesis of carbon fibers with branched nanographene sheets for electrochemical double layer capacitor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Masahiro; Kalita, Golap; Kato, Kimitoshi; Noda, Mikio; Uchida, Hideo; Wakita, Koichi; Umeno, Masayoshi; Tanemura, Masaki

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate a one step technique to synthesis the carbon fibers (CNFs) with branched nanographene sheets by the pulsed discharge (PD) plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Highly crystalline branched nanographene sheets were directly grown from the surface of the carbon fibers to obtain a three dimensional (3D) nanostructure. The growth process can be explained from the catalyst support growth of the CNFs, and subsequently nucleation and growth of the nanographene sheets from the crystalline surface of the CNF. The deposited nanostructured films with different pulse discharge were used as an electrode for electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLC). It is observed that the capacitance is dependent on the morphology of the electrode materials and an optimum capacitance is obtained with the branched nanographene on CNFs.

  11. Observation of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode conversion plasma flow drive on Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Rice, J. E.; Wukitch, S. J.; Greenwald, M. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Ince-Cushman, A.; Lin, L.; Marmar, E. S.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Tsujii, N.; Wright, J. C.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2009-05-01

    At modest H3e levels (n3He/ne˜8%-12%), in relatively low density D(H3e) plasmas, n¯e≤1.3×1020 m-3, heated with 50 MHz rf power at Bt0˜5.1 T, strong (up to 90 km/s) toroidal rotation (Vϕ) in the cocurrent direction has been observed by high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy on Alcator C-Mod. The change in central Vϕ scales with the applied rf power (≤30 km s-1 MW-1), and is generally at least a factor of 2 higher than the empirically determined intrinsic plasma rotation scaling. The rotation in the inner plasma (r /a≤0.3) responds to the rf power more quickly than that of the outer region (r /a≥0.7), and the rotation profile is broadly peaked for r /a≤0.5. Localized poloidal rotation (0.3≤r/a≤0.6) in the ion diamagnetic drift direction (˜2 km/s at 3 MW) is also observed, and similarly increases with rf power. Changing the toroidal phase of the antenna does not affect the rotation direction, and it only weakly affects the rotation magnitude. The mode converted ion cyclotron wave (MC ICW) has been detected by a phase contrast imaging system and the MC process is confirmed by two-dimensional full wave TORIC simulations. The simulations also show that the MC ICW is strongly damped on H3e ions in the vicinity of the MC layer, approximately on the same flux surfaces where the rf driven flow is observed. The flow shear in our experiment is marginally sufficient for plasma confinement enhancement based on the comparison of the E ×B shearing rate and gyrokinetic linear stability analysis.

  12. Morphology and Density Structure of Post-CME Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrsnak, B.; Poletto, G.; Vujic, E.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is believed to drag and open the coronal magnetic field, presumably leading to the formation of a large-scale current sheet and field relaxation by magnetic reconnection. This paper analyzes the physical characteristics of ray-like coronal features formed in the aftermath of CMEs, to confirm whether interpreting such phenomena in terms of a reconnecting current sheet is consistent with observations. Methods: The study focuses on UVCS/SOHO and LASCO/SOHO measurements of the ray width, density excess, and coronal velocity field as a function of the radial distance. The morphology of the rays implies that they are produced by Petschek-like reconnection in the large-scale current sheet formed in the wake of CME. The hypothesis is supported by the flow pattern, often showing outflows along the ray, and sometimes also inflows into the ray. The inferred inflow velocities range from 3 to 30 km/s, and are consistent with the narrow opening-angle of rays, which add up to a few degrees. The density of rays is an order of magnitude higher than in the ambient corona. The model results are consistent with the observations, revealing that the main cause of the density excess in rays is a transport of the dense plasma from lower to higher heights by the reconnection outflow.

  13. Spatial Offsets in Flare-CME Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.; Giordano, Silvio; Ciaravella, Angela

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection plays an integral part in nearly all models of solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The reconnection heats and accelerates the plasma, produces energetic electrons and ions, and changes the magnetic topology to form magnetic flux ropes and to allow CMEs to escape. Structures that appear between flare loops and CME cores in optical, UV, EUV, and X-ray observations have been identified as current sheets and have been interpreted in terms of the nature of the reconnection process and the energetics of the events. Many of these studies have used UV spectral observations of high temperature emission features in the [Fe xviii] and Si xii lines. In this paper, we discuss several surprising cases in which the [Fe xviii] and Si xii emission peaks are spatially offset from each other. We discuss interpretations based on asymmetric reconnection, on a thin reconnection region within a broader streamer-like structure, and on projection effects. Some events seem to be easily interpreted as the projection of a sheet that is extended along the line of sight that is viewed an angle, but a physical interpretation in terms of asymmetric reconnection is also plausible. Other events favor an interpretation as a thin current sheet embedded in a streamer-like structure.

  14. Properties of current sheet thinning at x ˜- 10 to -12 RE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.; Petrokovich, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    We report on Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations of current sheet thinning in Earth's magnetotail at around x =- 10 to -12 Earth radii. The THEMIS spacecraft configuration in October-December 2015 allows us to construct both gradients that contribute to the cross-tail current density jy=μ0-1(∂Bx/∂z-∂Bz/∂x) (GSM coordinates). For 17 events when the spacecraft observed a gradual Bz decrease and jy increase, we find the following average scaling relations: for the current density jy˜Bz-7/4, for the lobe magnetic field BL˜Bz-1/4, and for the plasma density ni˜Bz-3/4. We show that the temperature of ions and electrons decreases and the plasma pressure gradient ∂p/∂x rapidly increases during current sheet thinning. The scale Lx=(∂lnp/∂x)-1 decreases a few thousand kilometers. We also consider current carriers in thinning current sheets: both ion and electron current-dominated current sheets, preferentially located near dusk and midnight, respectively, are found.

  15. Main Cause of the Poloidal Plasma Motion Inside a Magnetic Cloud Inferred from Multiple-Spacecraft Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ake; Wang, Yuming; Chi, Yutian; Liu, Jiajia; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Rui

    2017-04-01

    Although the dynamical evolution of magnetic clouds (MCs) has been one of the foci of interplanetary physics for decades, only few studies focus on the internal properties of large-scale MCs. Recent work by Wang et al. ( J. Geophys. Res. 120, 1543, 2015) suggested the existence of the poloidal plasma motion in MCs. However, the main cause of this motion is not clear. In order to find it, we identify and reconstruct the MC observed by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)-A, Wind, and STEREO-B spacecraft during 19 - 20 November 2007 with the aid of the velocity-modified cylindrical force-free flux-rope model. We analyze the plasma velocity in the plane perpendicular to the MC axis. It is found that there was evident poloidal motion at Wind and STEREO-B, but this was not clear at STEREO-A, which suggests a local cause rather than a global cause for the poloidal plasma motion inside the MC. The rotational directions of the solar wind and MC plasma at the two sides of the MC boundary are found to be consistent, and the values of the rotational speeds of the solar wind and MC plasma at the three spacecraft show a rough correlation. All of these results illustrate that the interaction with ambient solar wind through viscosity might be one of the local causes of the poloidal motion. Additionally, we propose another possible local cause: the existence of a pressure gradient in the MC. The significant difference in the total pressure at the three spacecraft suggests that this speculation is perhaps correct.

  16. Observation of a helium ion energy threshold for retention in tungsten exposed to hydrogen/helium mixture plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M.; Deslandes, A.; Morgan, T. W.; Elliman, R. G.; De Temmerman, G.; Kluth, P.; Riley, D.; Corr, C. S.

    2016-10-01

    Helium retention is measured in tungsten samples exposed to mixed H/He plasma in the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device. It is observed that there is very little He retention below helium ion impact energies of 9.0+/- 1.4 eV, indicating the existence of a potential barrier which must be overcome for implantation to occur. The helium retention in samples exposed to plasma at temperatures  >1000 K is strongly correlated with nano-bubble formation measured using grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering. The diameters of nano-bubbles were not found to increase with increasing helium concentration, indicating that additional helium must be accommodated by increasing the bubble concentration or an increase in bubble pressure. For some samples pre-irradiation with heavy ions of 2.0 MeV energy is investigated to simulate the effects of neutron damage. It is observed that nano-bubble sizes are comparable between samples pre-irradiated with heavy-ions, and those without heavy-ion pre-irradiation.

  17. The Origin of Solar Filament Plasma Inferred from In Situ Observations of Elemental Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. Q.; Chen, Y.; Li, B.; Li, L. P.; Zhao, L.; He, J. S.; Duan, D.; Cheng, X.; Zhang, J.

    2017-02-01

    Solar filaments/prominences are one of the most common features in the corona, which may lead to energetic coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and flares when they erupt. Filaments are about 100 times cooler and denser than the coronal material, and physical understanding of their material origin remains controversial. Two types of scenarios have been proposed: one argues that the filament plasma is brought into the corona from photosphere or chromosphere through a siphon or evaporation/injection process, while the other suggests that the material condenses from the surrounding coronal plasma due to thermal instability. The elemental abundance analysis is a reasonable clue to constrain the models, as the siphon or evaporation/injection model would predict that the filament material abundances are close to the photospheric or chromospheric ones, while the condensation model should have coronal abundances. In this Letter, we analyze the elemental abundances of a magnetic cloud that contains the ejected filament material. The corresponding filament eruption occurred on 1998 April 29, accompanying an M6.8 class soft X-ray flare located at the heliographic coordinates S18E20 (NOAA 08210) and a fast halo CME with the linear velocity of 1374 km s‑1 near the Sun. We find that the abundance ratios of elements with low and high first ionization potential such as Fe/O, Mg/O, and Si/O are 0.150, 0.050, and 0.070, respectively, approaching their corresponding photospheric values 0.065, 0.081, and 0.066, which does not support the coronal origin of the filament plasma.

  18. Observation of a Long-Wavelength Hosing Modulation of a High-Intensity Laser Pulse in Underdense Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluza, M. C.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Najmudin, Z.; Dangor, A. E.; Murphy, C. D.; Collier, J. L.; Divall, E. J.; Foster, P. S.; Hooker, C. J.; Langley, A. J.; Smith, J.; Krushelnick, K.

    2010-08-01

    We report the first experimental observation of a long-wavelength hosing modulation of a high-intensity laser pulse. Side-view images of the scattered optical radiation at the fundamental wavelength of the laser reveal a transverse oscillation of the laser pulse during its propagation through underdense plasma. The wavelength of the oscillation λhosing depends on the background plasma density ne and scales as λhosing˜ne-3/2. Comparisons with an analytical model and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that this laser hosing can be induced by a spatiotemporal asymmetry of the intensity distribution in the laser focus which can be caused by a misalignment of the parabolic focusing mirror or of the diffraction gratings in the pulse compressor.

  19. Theory and Observations of Plasma Waves Excited Space Shuttle OMS Burns in the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Pfaff, R. F.; Schuck, P. W.; Hunton, D. E.; Hairston, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of artificial plasma turbulence were obtained during two Shuttle Exhaust Ionospheric Turbulence Experiments (SEITE) conducted during the flights of the Space Shuttle (STS-127 and STS-129). Based on computer modeling at the NRL PPD and Laboratory for Computational Physics & Fluid Dynamics (LCP), two dedicated burns of the Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuver Subsystem (OMS) engines were scheduled to produce 200 to 240 kg exhaust clouds that passed over the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Communications, Navigation, and Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite. This operation required the coordination by the DoD Space Test Program (STP), the NASA Flight Dynamics Officer (FDO), the C/NOFS payload operations, and the C/NOFS instrument principal investigators. The first SEITE mission used exhaust from a 12 Second OMS burn to deposit 1 Giga-Joules of energy into the upper atmosphere at a range of 230 km from C/NOFS. The burn was timed so C/NOFS could fly though the center of the exhaust cloud at a range of 87 km above the orbit of the Space Shuttle. The first SEITE experiment is important because is provided plume detection by ionospheric plasma and electric field probes for direct sampling of irregularities that can scatter radar signals. Three types of waves were detected by C/NOFS during and after the first SEITE burn. With the ignition and termination of the pair of OMS engines, whistler mode signals were recorded at C/NOFS. Six seconds after ignition, a large amplitude electromagnetic pulse reached the satellite. This has been identified as a fast magnetosonic wave propagating across magnetic field lines to reach the electric field (VEFI) sensors on the satellite. Thirty seconds after the burn, the exhaust cloud reach C/NOFS and engulfed the satellite providing very strong electric field turbulence along with enhancements in electron and ion densities. Kinetic modeling has been used to track the electric field turbulence to an unstable velocity

  20. Electron density and plasma waves in mid-latitude sporadic-E layer observed during the SEEK-2 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mori

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The SEEK-2 campaign was carried out over Kyushu Island in Japan on 3 August 2002, by using the two sounding rockets of S310-31 and S310-32. This campaign was planned to elucidate generation mechanisms of Quasi-Periodic Echoes (QPEs associated with mid-latitude sporadic-E (Es layers. Electron number densities were successfully measured in the Es layers by using the impedance probe on board two rockets. The plasma waves in the VLF and ELF ranges were also observed on board the S310-32 rocket. Results of electron density measurement showed that there were one or two major peaks in the Es layers along the rockets' trajectories near the altitude of about 10km. There were some smaller peaks associated with the main Es layers in the altitude range from 90 to 120 km. These density peaks were distributed in a very large extent during the SEEK-2 campaign. The Es layer structure is also measured by using the Fixed Bias Probe (FBP, which has a high spatial resolution of several meters (the impedance probe has an altitude resolution of about 400 m. The comparison with the total electron content (TEC measured by the Dual Band Beacon revealed that the Es layer was also modulated in the horizontal direction with the scale size of 30–40 km. It was shown that the QP echoes observed by the ground-based coherent radar come from the major density peak of the Es layer. The plasma wave instrument detected the enhancement of VLF and ELF plasma waves associated with the operation of the TMA release, and also with the passage of the Es layers. Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionospheric irregularities; Midlatitude ionosphere; Plasma temeperature and density

  1. Simultaneous observations of equatorial F-region plasma depletions over Brazil during the Spread-F Experiment (SpreadFEx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-D. Pautet

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available From September to November 2005, the NASA Living with a Star program supported the Spread-F Experiment campaign (SpreadFEx in Brazil to study the effects of convectively generated gravity waves on the ionosphere and their role in seeding Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, and associated equatorial plasma bubbles. Several US and Brazilian institutes deployed a broad range of instruments (all-sky imagers, digisondes, photometers, meteor/VHF radars, GPS receivers covering a large area of Brazil. The campaign was divided in two observational phases centered on the September and October new moon periods. During these periods, an Utah State University (USU all-sky CCD imager operated at São João d'Aliança (14.8° S, 47.6° W, near Brasilia, and a Brazilian all-sky CCD imager located at Cariri (7.4° S, 36° W, observed simultaneously the evolution of the ionospheric bubbles in the OI (630 nm emission and the mesospheric gravity wave field. The two sites had approximately the same magnetic latitude (9–10° S but were separated in longitude by ~1500 km.

    Plasma bubbles were observed on every clear night (17 from Brasilia and 19 from Cariri, with 8 coincident nights. These joint datasets provided important information for characterizing the ionospheric depletions during the campaign and to perform a novel longitudinal investigation of their variability. Measurements of the drift velocities at both sites are in good agreement with previous studies, however, the overlapping fields of view revealed significant differences in the occurrence and structure of the plasma bubbles, providing new evidence for localized generation. This paper summarizes the observed bubble characteristics important for related investigations of their seeding mechanisms associated with gravity wave activity.

  2. Systematic study of intermediate-scale structures of equatorial plasma irregularities in the ionosphere based on CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann eLühr

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Equatorial spread-F ionospheric plasma irregularities on the night-side, commonly called equatorial plasma bubbles (EPB, include electron density va