WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma science studies

  1. Plasma Science Committee (PLSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    The Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) is a standing committee under the auspices of the Board on Physics and Astronomy, Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications of the National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council. Plasma sciences represent a broad and diverse field. The PLSC has accepted the responsibility of monitoring the continuing development and assessing the general health of the field as whole. Although select advisory bodies have been created to address specific issues that affect plasma science, such as the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC), the PLSC provides a focus for the plasma science community that is unique and essential. The membership of the PLSC is drawn from research laboratories in universities, industry, and government. Areas of expertise on the committee include accelerators and beams, space physics, astrophysics, computational physics and applied mathematics, fusion plasmas, fundamental experiments and theory, radiation sources, low temperature plasmas, and plasma-surface interactions. The PLSC is well prepared to respond to requests for studies on specific issues.

  2. A DOE/Fusion Energy Sciences Research/Education Program at PVAMU Study of Rotamak Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Tian-Sen [Prairie View A& M Univ., Prairie View, TX (United States); Saganti, Premkumar [Prairie View A& M Univ., Prairie View, TX (United States)

    2017-02-17

    . Apart from scientific staff members, several students (more than ten undergraduate students and two graduate students from several engineering and science disciplines) were supported and worked on the equipment and experiments during the award period. We also anticipate that these opportunities with current expansions may result in a graduate program in plasma science and propulsion engineering disciplines. *Corresponding Author – Dr. Saganti, Regents Professor and Professor of Physics – pbsaganti@pvamu.edu

  3. Increasing the Number of Women and Underrepresented Minorities in the Plasma Science-A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Pamela R.; Post-Zwicker, Andrew

    2000-10-01

    The number of women and underrepresented minorities in plasma science is woefully small.The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), for example, consists of 2% women and underrepresented minorities. The historical reasons for this specific case as well as the overall circumstances involving pipeline inclusion are beyond the scope of this paper. The answer, however, is clearly NOT a lack of qualified women and minorities as evidenced by the numbers in other SEM disciplines such as computer science where women earn 27% of the doctoral degrees, African Americans 10% and Hispanics 5%. Over the past five years the number of underrepresented minorities earning degrees in physics and engineering has risen. Since 1995, in an effort to reach this population, PPPL has actively recruited women and underrepresented minority students to its various undergraduate research programs, in particular the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program (NUF) and the Energy Research Undergraduate Laboratory Fellowship (ERULF). The results are encouraging. The details of our efforts, our future plans, and ways of introducing our methods to other laboratories will be discussed.

  4. Comparative study of non-thermal atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas for life science applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Kazunori; Katayama, Ryu; Sarinont, Thapanut; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Attri, Pankaj; Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Tanaka, Akiyo; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-09-01

    We are comparing several non-thermal atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas for life science applications. Here we measured discharge period dependence of pH value and 750 nm absorbance of KI-starch solution of deionized water after plasma irradiation with two discharge devices; a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet device and a scalable DBD device. The pH and the absorbance of KI-starch solution are useful indicator of their oxidizability. We have obtained a map of the absorbance and proton concentration [H+] which is deduced from pH value. For the scalable DBD, the range of the absorbance is between 0.7 and 1.3 and that of [H+] is between 10-7 and 10-5 mol/L. For the DBD jet, the range of the absorbance and [H+] are 2.0-3.2 and 10-4-10-3 mol/L, respectively. Measured data for both devices shows same tendency in the map, while the range of values for the scalable DBD is smaller than that for the DBD jet. The results indicate the oxidazability for the scalable DBD is much weaker than that for the DBD jet.

  5. 20. AINSE plasma science and technology conference. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The 20th AINSE plasma science and technology conference was held at Flinders University of South Australia on 13-14 February 1995. Topics under discussion included plasma physics studies, current status of rotamak devices, plasma processing and material studies. The handbook contains the conference program, 54 abstracts and a list of participants.

  6. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap: Low temperature plasma science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics published the first Plasma Roadmap in 2012 consisting of the individual perspectives of 16 leading experts in the various sub-fields of low temperature plasma science and technology. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap is the first update of a planned series of periodic upd...

  7. Plasma Science and Applications at the Intel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Lee

    2006-10-01

    The Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS) has established a plasma prize at the annual Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). The 2006 prize was awarded for a project that investigated the correlation of GPS errors with various measures of near-earth plasma activity. The CPS is a broadly-based group of institutions and individuals whose goal is to increase the understanding of plasmas for non-technical audiences. In addition to the ISEF plasma award, CPS activities include maintaining a website, http://www.plasmacoalition.org; developing educational literature; organizing educational luncheon presentations for Members of Congress and their staffs; and responding to questions about plasmas. In addition, the CPS has begun as effort to examine the plasma content of state education standards with the goal of promoting the adoption of standards with appropriate plasma conten; e.g. are there three or four states of matter. The success of this and other activities depend on the voluntary labor of CPS members and associates. Please send an e-mail to the CPS at CPS@plasmacoalition.org for information if you would like to become involved in spreading the good word about plasmas.

  8. High Energy Density Plasmas (HEDP) for studies of basic nuclear science relevant to Stellar and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenje, Johan

    2014-06-01

    Thermonuclear reaction rates and nuclear processes have been explored traditionally by means of conventional accelerator experiments, which are difficult to execute at conditions relevant to stellar nucleosynthesis. Thus, nuclear reactions at stellar energies are often studied through extrapolations from higher-energy data or in low-background underground experiments. Even when measurements are possible using accelerators at relevant energies, thermonuclear reaction rates in stars are inherently different from those in accelerator experiments. The fusing nuclei are surrounded by bound electrons in accelerator experiments, whereas electrons occupy mainly continuum states in a stellar environment. Nuclear astrophysics research will therefore benefit from an enlarged toolkit for studies of nuclear reactions. In this presentation, we report on the first use of High Energy Density Plasmas for studies of nuclear reactions relevant to basic nuclear science, stellar and Big Bang nucleosynthesis. These experiments were carried out at the OMEGA laser facility at University of Rochester and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in which spherical capsules were irradiated with powerful lasers to compress and heat the fuel to high enough temperatures and densities for nuclear reactions to occur. Four experiments will be highlighted in this presentation. In the first experiment, the differential cross section for the elastic neutron-triton (n-T) scattering at 14.1 MeV was measured with significantly higher accuracy than achieved in accelerator experiments. In the second experiment, the T(t,2n)4He reaction, a mirror reaction to the 3He(3He,2p)4He reaction that plays an important role in the proton-proton chain that transforms hydrogen into ordinary 4He in stars like our Sun, was studied at energies in the range 15-40 keV. In the third experiment, the 3He+3He solar fusion reaction was studied directly, and in the fourth experiment, we

  9. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap: Low temperature plasma science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovich, I.; Baalrud, S. D.; Bogaerts, A.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Cappelli, M.; Colombo, V.; Czarnetzki, U.; Ebert, U.; Eden, J. G.; Favia, P.; Graves, D. B.; Hamaguchi, S.; Hieftje, G.; Hori, M.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Kortshagen, U.; Kushner, M. J.; Mason, N. J.; Mazouffre, S.; Mededovic Thagard, S.; Metelmann, H.-R.; Mizuno, A.; Moreau, E.; Murphy, A. B.; Niemira, B. A.; Oehrlein, G. S.; Petrovic, Z. Lj; Pitchford, L. C.; Pu, Y.-K.; Rauf, S.; Sakai, O.; Samukawa, S.; Starikovskaia, S.; Tennyson, J.; Terashima, K.; Turner, M. M.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Vardelle, A.

    2017-08-01

    Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics published the first Plasma Roadmap in 2012 consisting of the individual perspectives of 16 leading experts in the various sub-fields of low temperature plasma science and technology. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap is the first update of a planned series of periodic updates of the Plasma Roadmap. The continuously growing interdisciplinary nature of the low temperature plasma field and its equally broad range of applications are making it increasingly difficult to identify major challenges that encompass all of the many sub-fields and applications. This intellectual diversity is ultimately a strength of the field. The current state of the art for the 19 sub-fields addressed in this roadmap demonstrates the enviable track record of the low temperature plasma field in the development of plasmas as an enabling technology for a vast range of technologies that underpin our modern society. At the same time, the many important scientific and technological challenges shared in this roadmap show that the path forward is not only scientifically rich but has the potential to make wide and far reaching contributions to many societal challenges.

  10. Research briefing on contemporary problems in plasma science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of the broad perspective of all plasma science. Detailed discussions are given of scientific opportunities in various subdisciplines of plasma science. The first subdiscipline to be discussed is the area where the contemporary applications of plasma science are the most widespread, low temperature plasma science. Opportunities for new research and technology development that have emerged as byproducts of research in magnetic and inertial fusion are then highlighted. Then follows a discussion of new opportunities in ultrafast plasma science opened up by recent developments in laser and particle beam technology. Next, research that uses smaller scale facilities is discussed, first discussing non-neutral plasmas, and then the area of basic plasma experiments. Discussions of analytic theory and computational plasma physics and of space and astrophysical plasma physics are then presented.

  11. Town Meeting on Plasma Physics at the National Science Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We invite you to the Town Meeting on the role of the National Science Foundation (NSF) in supporting basic and applied research in Plasma Physics in the U.S. The overarching goal of NSF is to promote the progress of science and to enable training of the next generation of scientists and engineers at US colleges and universities. In this context, the role of the NSF Physics Division in leading the nearly 20 year old NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering serves as an example of the long history of NSF support for basic plasma physics research. Yet, the NSF interest in maintaining a healthy university research base in plasma sciences extends across the Foundation. A total of five NSF Divisions are participating in the most recent Partnership solicitation, and a host of other multi-disciplinary and core programs provide opportunities for scientists to perform research on applications of plasma physics to Space & Solar Physics, Astrophysics, Accelerator Science, Material Science, Plasma Medicine, and many sub-disciplines within Engineering. This Town Meeting will provide a chance to discuss the full range of relevant NSF funding opportunities, and to begin a conversation on the present and future role of NSF in stewarding basic plasma science and engineering research at US colleges and universities. We would like to particularly encourage early career scientists and graduate students to participate in this Town Meeting, though everyone is invited to join what we hope to be a lively discussion.

  12. Space Plasma Science as a Motivator for Education & Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, Paul

    1999-11-01

    Education and public outreach (EPO) continue to play an important role in how science is funded by the federal government. The plasma science community has a responsibility to share their exciting science with the American public. Bruce Alberts, president of the National Academy of Sciences, and Neal Lane, former head of NSF, are on record as strong advocates of scientists becoming more actively and effectively engaged in K-12 science education reform. In addition, research directorates of funding agencies like NASA and NSF are increasingly encouraging (and in some cases requiring) the integration of science and education and greater scientist involvement in EPO. How does plasma science and scientists fit into this broader political and social landscape? How well does the public understand our science and technology? Are there ways to effectively engage the public that provide good visibility for plasma science? These questions and more will be addressed in this talk. The Space Science Institute (SSI), a nonprofit organization in Colorado, provides national leadership in developing innovative ways to translate the activities and resources of space and earth science research into exciting and effective K-12 and museum education programs. SSI’s mission is to link its space science research enterprise with its education programs. SSI has active programs in curriculum and exhibit development and professional development for both scientists about education and for educators about science. I will share with you one exhibit project and one curriculum project whose goals are to raise public understanding of space plasmas and by extension all of plasma science.

  13. s perception of mathematics science plasma lessons in ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Key words: education, plasma TV, mathematics, science, high school. *: Biology dept. AAU ... age-old teacher centered approach into .... qualitative through open ended questions .... federal ministry for classroom teachers use of lesson ...

  14. Advances and Challenges in Computational Plasma Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.M. Tang; V.S. Chan

    2005-01-03

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically-confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper with illustrative examples chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and other topics. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology.

  15. Laboratory Plasma Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-30

    arrVanemat is electron beam loses an amount of energy corresponding to shown in frig. 1. The VERA pulseline accelerato (V-0.6- the capacitive voltage drop...the finite transverse disk, similar to that studied in Subsection 4.&. Over the size, how well is the diffractionless property preserved . same distance...Boeing Aerospace Lean. VA, USA. Company (RAC) is alo shown. Elsevier Science Publishers B.V. (North-Holland) IlL THEORY 9 478 C. . Rob R . Haf•z / Electron

  16. Educational Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivenberg, Paul; Thomas, Paul

    2006-10-01

    At the MIT PSFC, student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion science and plasma technology. Seeking to generate excitement in young people about science and engineering, the PSFC hosts a number of educational outreach activities throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days. The PSFC also has an in-school science demonstration program on the theme of magnetism. The Mr. Magnet Program, headed by Mr. Paul Thomas, has been bringing lively demonstrations on magnetism into local elementary and middle schools for 15 years. This year Mr. Magnet presented the program to nearly 30,000 students at over 67 schools and other events, reaching kindergartners through college freshmen. In addition to his program on magnetism, he is offering an interactive lecture about plasma to high schools. The "Traveling Plasma Lab" encourages students to learn more about plasma science while having fun investigating plasma properties using actual laboratory techniques and equipment. Beyond the classroom, Paul Thomas has provided technical training for Boston Museum of Science staff in preparation for the opening of a Star Wars exhibit. His hands-on demos have also been filmed by the History Channel for a one-hour program about Magnetism, which aired in June 2006.

  17. Basic Studies in Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    close to a Maxwellian parametrized by a temperature T and mean velocity u which satisfy certain non -linear equations, which are the macroscopic equations...Simulations with Particle-to-Grid Methods 17 E. Microscopic-Shock Profiles: Exact Solution of a Non -Equilibrium System 18 IV. List of Publications...Investigator ABSTRACT An improved understanding of equilibrium and non -equilibrium properties of plasmas is central to many areas of basic science as

  18. The Future of Boundary Plasma and Material Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Dennis

    2012-03-01

    The boundary of magnetic confinement devices, from the pedestal through to the surrounding surfaces, encompasses an enormous range of plasma and material physics, and their integrated coupling. It is becoming clear that due to fundamental limits of plasma stability and material response the boundary will largely define the viability of an MFE reactor. However we face an enormous knowledge deficit in stepping from present devices and ITER towards a demonstration power plant. We outline the future of boundary research required to address this deficit. The boundary should be considered a multi-scale system of coupled plasma and material science regulated through the non-linear interface of the sheath. Measurement, theory and modeling across these scales are assessed. Dimensionless parameters, often used to organized core plasma transport on similarity arguments, can be extended to the boundary plasma, plasma-surface interactions and material response. This methodology suggests an intriguing way forward to prescribe and understand the boundary issues of an eventual reactor in intermediate devices. A particularly critical issue is that the physical chemistry of the material, which is mostly determined by the material temperature, has been too neglected; pointing to the requirement for boundary plasma experiments at appropriate material temperatures. Finally the boundary plasma requirements for quiescent heat exhaust and control of transient events, such as ELMs, will be examined.

  19. The HelCat basic plasma science device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Desjardins, T. R.; Zhang, Y.; Watts, C.; Hsu, S. C.; Betts, S.; Kelly, R.; Schamiloglu, E.

    2015-01-01

    The Helicon-Cathode(HelCat) device is a medium-size linear experiment suitable for a wide range of basic plasma science experiments in areas such as electrostatic turbulence and transport, magnetic relaxation, and high power microwave (HPM)-plasma interactions. The HelCat device is based on dual plasma sources located at opposite ends of the 4 m long vacuum chamber - an RF helicon source at one end and a thermionic cathode at the other. Thirteen coils provide an axial magnetic field B >= 0.220 T that can be configured individually to give various magnetic configurations (e.g. solenoid, mirror, cusp). Additional plasma sources, such as a compact coaxial plasma gun, are also utilized in some experiments, and can be located either along the chamber for perpendicular (to the background magnetic field) plasma injection, or at one of the ends for parallel injection. Using the multiple plasma sources, a wide range of plasma parameters can be obtained. Here, the HelCat device is described in detail and some examples of results from previous and ongoing experiments are given. Additionally, examples of planned experiments and device modifications are also discussed.

  20. Experimental studies of collisional plasma shocks and plasma interpenetration via merging supersonic plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.

    2015-11-01

    Over the past 4 years on the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL, we have studied obliquely and head-on-merging supersonic plasma jets of an argon/impurity or hydrogen/impurity mixture. The jets are formed/launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. In successive experimental campaigns, we characterized the (a) evolution of plasma parameters of a single plasma jet as it propagated up to ~ 1 m away from the railgun nozzle, (b) density profiles and 2D morphology of the stagnation layer and oblique shocks that formed between obliquely merging jets, and (c) collisionless interpenetration transitioning to collisional stagnation between head-on-merging jets. Key plasma diagnostics included a fast-framing CCD camera, an 8-chord visible interferometer, a survey spectrometer, and a photodiode array. This talk summarizes the primary results mentioned above, and highlights analyses of inferred post-shock temperatures based on observations of density gradients that we attribute to shock-layer thickness. We also briefly describe more recent PLX experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor-instability evolution with magnetic and viscous effects, and potential future collisionless shock experiments enabled by low-impurity, higher-velocity plasma jets formed by contoured-gap coaxial guns. Supported by DOE Fusion Energy Sciences and LANL LDRD.

  1. Radio and Plasma Waves Synergistic Science Opportunities with EJSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, Baptiste; André, Nicolas; Bougeret, Jean-Louis

    2010-05-01

    The radio and plasma wave (RPW) diagnostics provide a unique access to critical parameters of space plasma, in particular in planetary and satellite environments. Concerning giant planets, this has been demonstrated by major results obtained by the radio investigation on the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft, but also during the Ulysses, Voyager, and Pioneer flybys of Jupiter. Several other missions, past or in flight, demonstrate the uniqueness and relevance of RPW diagnostics to basic problems of astrophysics. The EJSM mission consists of two platforms operating in the Jupiter environment: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO will execute a choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. The EJSM mission architecture hence offers unique opportunities for synergistic and complementary observations that significantly enhance the overall science return of the mission. In this paper, we will first review new and unique science aspects of the Jupiter system that may benefit from different capabilities of RPW investigations onboard JGO and/or JEO: spectral and polarization information, mapping of radio sources, measurements of in situ plasma waves, currents, thermal noise, dust and nano-particle detection and characterization. We will then illustrate unique synergistic and complementary science opportunities offered by RPW investigations onboard JGO and/or JEO, both in terms of Satellite science and in terms of Magnetospheric Science.

  2. FOREWORD: 23rd National Symposium on Plasma Science & Technology (PLASMA-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    The Twentieth Century has been a defining period for Plasma Science and Technology. The state of ionized matter, so named by Irving Langmuir in the early part of twentieth century, has now evolved in to a multidisciplinary area with scientists and engineers from various specializations working together to exploit the unique properties of the plasma medium. There have been great improvements in the basic understanding of plasmas as a many body system bound by complex collective Coulomb interactions of charges, atoms, molecules, free radicals and photons. Simultaneously, many advanced plasma based technologies are increasingly being implemented for industrial and societal use. The emergence of the multination collaborative project International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project has provided the much needed boost to the researchers working on thermonuclear fusion plasmas. In addition, the other plasma applications like MHD converters, hydrogen generation, advanced materials (synthesis, processing and surface modification), environment (waste beneficiation, air and water pollution management), nanotechnology (synthesis, deposition and etching), light production, heating etc are actively being pursued in governmental and industrial sectors. For India, plasma science and technology has traditionally remained an important area of research. It was nearly a century earlier that the Saha ionization relation pioneered the way to interpret experimental data from a vast range of near equilibrium plasmas. Today, Indian research contributions and technology demonstration capabilities encompass thermonuclear fusion devices, nonlinear plasma phenomena, plasma accelerators, beam plasma interactions, dusty and nonneutral plasmas, industrial plasmas and plasma processing of materials, nano synthesis and structuring, astrophysical and space plasmas etc. India's participation in the ITER programme is now reflected in increased interest in the research and development

  3. Plasma Science and Applications at the Intel Science Fair: A Retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Lee

    2009-11-01

    For the past five years, the Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS) has presented an award for a plasma project at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). Eligible projects have ranged from grape-based plasma production in a microwave oven to observation of the effects of viscosity in a fluid model of quark-gluon plasma. Most projects have been aimed at applications, including fusion, thrusters, lighting, materials processing, and GPS improvements. However diagnostics (spectroscopy), technology (magnets), and theory (quark-gluon plasmas) have also been represented. All of the CPS award-winning projects so far have been based on experiments, with two awards going to women students and three to men. Since the award was initiated, both the number and quality of plasma projects has increased. The CPS expects this trend to continue, and looks forward to continuing its work with students who are excited about the possibilities of plasma. You too can share this excitement by judging at the 2010 fair in San Jose on May 11-12.

  4. Plasma Science and Applications at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Lee

    2005-10-01

    The Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS) has established a plasma prize at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). This year's prize was awarded for projects in simulated ball lightning and plasma thrusters. The CPS is a broadly-based group of institutions and individuals whose goal is to increase the understanding of plasmas for non-technical audiences. In addition to the ISEF plasma award, CPS activities include maintaining a website, http://www.plasmacoalition.org; developing educational literature; organizing educational luncheon presentations for Members of Congress and their staffs; and responding to questions about plasmas that are received by the CPS e-mail or toll-free number. The success of these activities depend on the voluntary labor of CPS members and associates. These volunteers include the ISEF judges, whom the APS/DPP and the IEEE/PSAC helped identify. Please send an e-mail to the CPS at CPS@plasmacoalition.org for information if you would like to become involved in spreading the good word about plasmas.

  5. Internet and web projects for fusion plasma science and education. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastman, Timothy E. [Senior Research Associate, Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    1999-08-30

    The plasma web site at http://www.plasmas.org provides comprehensive coverage of all plasma science and technology with site links worldwide. Prepared to serve the general public, students, educators, researchers, and decision-makers, the site covers basic plasma physics, fusion energy, magnetic confinement fusion, high energy density physics include ICF, space physics and astrophysics, pulsed-power, lighting, waste treatment, plasma technology, plasma theory, simulations and modeling.

  6. Science studies up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compared with 1982, high school students in the United States are taking more basic and advanced science courses and the level of science achievement has increased, according to "The Condition of Education, 1995," the annual report of the Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics. The 518-page document reports on educational trends since the publication of, "A Nation at Risk," the 1982 report on the status of education in America. The 1995 report states that over the last 12 years, high school graduates have begun taking more courses over all, particularly academic courses. More students are taking algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus as well as advanced science courses, including chemistry and physics. The proportion of students completing the recommended core courses has increased, as has the percentage of students taking Advanced Placement courses.

  7. Tritium Plasma Experiment Upgrade and Improvement of Surface Diagnostic Capabilities at STAR Facility for Enhancing Tritium and Nuclear PMI Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, M.; Taylor, C. N.; Pawelko, R. J.; Cadwallader, L. C.; Merrill, B. J.

    2016-04-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) is a unique high-flux linear plasma device that can handle beryllium, tritium, and neutron-irradiated plasma facing materials, and is the only existing device dedicated to directly study tritium retention and permeation in neutron-irradiated materials with tritium [M. Shimada et.al., Rev. Sci. Instru. 82 (2011) 083503 and and M. Shimada, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 013008]. The plasma-material-interaction (PMI) determines a boundary condition for diffusing tritium into bulk PFCs, and the tritium PMI is crucial for enhancing fundamental sciences that dictate tritium fuel cycles and safety and are high importance to an FNSF and DEMO. Recently the TPE has undergone major upgrades in its electrical and control systems. New DC power supplies and a new control center enable remote plasma operations from outside of the contamination area for tritium, minimizing the possible exposure risk with tritium and beryllium. We discuss the electrical upgrade, enhanced operational safety, improved plasma performance, and development of optical spectrometer system. This upgrade not only improves operational safety of the worker, but also enhances plasma performance to better simulate extreme plasma-material conditions expected in ITER, Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), and Demonstration reactor (DEMO). This work was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under the DOE Idaho Field Office contract number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  8. The contribution of Nikola Tesla to plasma physics and current status of plasmas that he studied

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Zoran Lj.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main Interests in science of Nikola Tesla were gas discharges plasmas, their application in lighting and in production of ozone as well as their role in conduction of electricity through the atmosphere. In particular Tesla is well known as the first person to produce rf plasmas. Such plasmas in the present day constitute the main technology required to produce integrated circuits (IC and have been essential in the revolution that resulted from IC technologies. In addition Tesla participated in studies of arcs especially arcs used as a source of light, corona discharges required to induce plasma chemical reactions and produce ozone and was involved in various aspects of gas breakdown and gaseous dielectrics. His ideas, level of his understanding and current status of these fields are discussed in this review.

  9. Case Studies in Science Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Karen

    2010-03-01

    Everyone in science should have ethics education training. I have seen graduate students taken advantage of by their mentors. Many of us have seen misconduct...but what should we do about it? Young scientists are often unaware of the rules in science and make mistakes because of their ignorance of the rules in that particular field of study. Then there are an increasing number of cases in the news of overt cases of misrepresentation in science. All are welcome to attend this discussion of case studies. A case study on topics such as: how to treat data properly, how our values in science affect our work, who gets authorship on scientific papers, who is first author on a paper, what you should do if you uncover misconduct or plagiarism in your university, and we will discuss the scientist's role in society. This will be a painless, non-confrontational small group, then large group discussion of each case

  10. The study of helicon plasma source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ting-Ting; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Liu, Zhan-Wen; Shang, Yong; Sun, Liang-Ting; Zhang, Xue-Zhen; Zhao, Huan-Yu

    2010-02-01

    Helicon plasma source is known as efficient generator of uniform and high density plasma. A helicon plasma source was developed for investigation of plasma neutralization and plasma lens in the Institute of Modern Physics in China. In this paper, the characteristics of helicon plasma have been studied by using Langmuir four-probe and a high argon plasma density up to 3.9x10(13) cm(-3) have been achieved with the Nagoya type III antenna at the conditions of the magnetic intensity of 200 G, working gas pressure of 2.8x10(-3) Pa, and rf power of 1200 W with a frequency of 27.12 MHz. In the experiment, the important phenomena have been found: for a given magnetic induction intensity, the plasma density became greater with the increase in rf power and tended to saturation, and the helicon mode appeared at the rf power between 200 and 400 W.

  11. Study of Coupling between a Plasma Source and Plasma Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Jorge; Chu, Feng; Hood, Ryan; Mattingly, Sean; Rogers, Anthony; Skiff, Fred

    2014-10-01

    An experimental study on the coupling between a plasma source and plasma fluctuations in a cylindrical, magnetized, singly-ionized Argon inductively-coupled gas discharge plasma that is weakly collisional is presented. Typical plasma conditions are n ~1010 cm-3 Te ~ 3 eV and B ~ 1 kG. Amplitude Modulation (AM) of the inductively-coupled RF plasma source is produced near the fundamental-mode ion-acoustic wave frequency (~1 kHz) to study the effects of the source-wave interaction and plasma production. Density fluctuation measurements are implemented using Laser-Induced Fluorescence techniques and Langmuir probes. We apply coherent detection with respect to the wave frequency to obtain the perturbed ion distribution function associated with the waves. Measurements of fluctuating I-V traces from a Langmuir probe array and antenna current load are also used to show the effects of the interaction. We would like to acknowledge DOE DE-FG02-99ER54543 for their financial support throughout this research.

  12. Organization by Gordon Research Conferences of the 2012 Plasma Processing Science Conference 22-27 July 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jane

    2012-07-27

    The 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Plasma Processing Science will feature a comprehensive program that will highlight the most cutting edge scientific advances in plasma science and technology as well as explore the applications of this nonequilibrium medium in possible approaches relative to many grand societal challenges. Fundamental science sessions will focus on plasma kinetics and chemistry, plasma surface interactions, and recent trends in plasma generation and multi-phase plasmas. Application sessions will explore the impact of plasma technology in renewable energy, the production of fuels from renewable feedstocks and carbon dioxide neutral solar fuels (from carbon dioxide and water), and plasma-enabled medicine and sterilization.

  13. Innovative research of plasma physics for life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyawan, D.

    2017-06-01

    In medicine, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) for the medical treatment is a new field in plasma application, called plasma medicine. CAP contains mix of excited atoms and molecules, UV photons, charged particles as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Typical species in air-CAPs are O3, OH, NxOx, and HNOx. The current developments in this field have fuelled the hope that CAP could be an interesting new therapeutic approach in the treatment of cancer. CAP apparently demonstrated effect on cancer cell apoptosis which did not induce cell necrosis or disruption. Moreover, CAP seemed to be selective for cancer cells since it was more effective in tumor cells than in normal non-neoplastic cells. In bioscience, dentistry and veterinary medicine : Since CAP, is delivered at room temperature, which results in less damaging effects on living tissue, while still has the efficiency in disinfection and sterilization. Recent studies proved that it is able to inactivate gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, fungi, virus, spore, various parasites, and foreign organisms or pathogens without harming tissue. Moreover, cold plasma has been used effectively in medical field such as dental use, inducing apoptosis of malignant cells, stopping bleeding, promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration. Sericin hydrolysates, originating from silkworm is found support cell proliferation, expand cell adhesion and increase cell yield. The covalent linkage between a bioactive protein molecule and polystyrene dish surface via a carbon intermediate layer can slow down the release rate of protein compound into the phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution. We found that a-C films and a-C:N2 films show good attachment of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). All of carbon modified-Polystyrene(PS) dishes revealed the less release rate of sericin molecules into PBS solution than PS control.

  14. Plasma chemistry study of PLAD processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin Shu; Brumfield, Kyle; Liu, Lequn Jennifer; Hu, Yongjun Jeff; McTeer, Allen; Hsu, Wei Hui; Wang Maoying [Nanya Technology Inc., Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Micron Technology Inc., Boise, ID 83707 (United States)

    2012-11-06

    Plasma doping (PLAD) shows very different impurity profiles compared to the conventional beam-line-based ion implantations due to its non-mass separation property and plasma environment. There is no simulation for PLAD process so far due to a lack of a dopant profile model. Several factors determine impurity profiles of PLAD process. The most significant factors are: plasma chemistry and deposition/etching characteristics of multi-ion species plasmas. In this paper, we present plasma chemistry and deposition/etching characteristics of PLAD processes versus co-gas dilutions. Four dopant plasmas including B{sub 2}H{sub 6}, BF{sub 3}, AsH{sub 3}, and PH{sub 3}, and two non-dopant plasmas including CH{sub 4} and GeH{sub 4} are studied and demonstrated.

  15. Spectroscopic Studies of Laser Produced Plasma Metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon Quinones, Roberto; Underwood, Thomas; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    In this presentation, we describe the spatial and temporal plasma characteristics of the dense plasma kernels that are used to construct a laser produced plasma metasurface (PM) that is intended to serve as a tunable THz reflector. The PM is an n x n array of plasmas generated by focusing the light from a 2 J/p Q-switched Nd:YAG laser through a multi-lens array (MLA) and into a gas of varying pressure. A gated CCD camera coupled to a high-resolution spectrometer is used to obtain chord-averaged H α broadening data for the cross section of a single plasma element at the lens focal point. The data is then Abel inverted to derive the radial plasma density distribution. Measurements are repeated for a range of pressures, laser energies, and lens f-number, with a time resolution of 100 ns and a gate width of 20 ns. Results are presented for the variation of plasma density and size over these different conditions. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). R. Colon Quinones and T. Underwood acknowledge the support of the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  16. Teaching Science with the Social Studies of Science for Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Muriel

    Integrating the social studies of science into science education would make explicit the cultures of science, which have been revealed by historians, philosophers, sociologists, and feminist science scholars. These cultures include the institutions of science, the interaction of science and the society in which it is practiced, and the internal culture of science. This pedagogy may be a route to increasing equity in science, by giving women and members of other under-represented groups an appreciation of the factors causing their alienation from the enterprise and the tools to change science for social justice. In this article, I present the theoretical basis of this position, along with the implementation strategies and preliminary assessment for a sophomore level biology course based on this perspective.

  17. Plasmas, Dielectrics and the Ultrafast: First Science and Operational Experience at FACET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, C.I.; Adli, E.; Corde, S.; Decker, F.J.; England, R.J.; Erickson, R.; Fisher, A.; Gessner, S.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Li, S.Z.; Lipkowitz, N.; Litos, M.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seeman, J.; Sheppard, J.C.; Tudosa, I.; White, G.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Wu, Z.; /SLAC /UCLA

    2012-09-14

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests) is an accelerator R&D test facility that has been recently constructed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The facility provides 20 GeV, 3 nC electron beams, short (20 {micro}m) bunches and small (20 {micro}m wide) spot sizes, producing uniquely high power beams. FACET supports studies from many fields but in particular those of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration. FACET is also a source of THz radiation for material studies. We present the FACET design, initial operating experience and first science from the facility.

  18. PREFACE: 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) and 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Kaneko, Toshio; Sekine, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasunori

    2013-06-01

    The 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) was held in Kyoto, Japan on 2-5 October 2012 with the 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25). SPSM has been held annually since 1988 under the sponsorship of The 153rd Committee on Plasma Materials Science, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This symposium is one of the major activities of the Committee, which is organized by researchers in academia and industry for the purpose of advancing intersectional scientific information exchange and discussion of science and technology of plasma materials processing. APCPST and SPSM are jointly held biennially to survey the current status of low temperature and thermal plasma physics and chemistry for industrial applications. The whole area of plasma processing was covered from fundamentals to applications. Previous meetings were held in China, Japan, Korea, and Australia, attended by scientists from the Asia-Pacific and other countries. The joint conference was organized in plenary lectures, invited, contributed oral presentations and poster sessions. At this meeting, we had 386 participants from 10 countries and 398 presentations, including 26 invited presentations. This year, we arranged special topical sessions that covered green innovation, life innovation, and technical reports from industry. This conference seeks to bring the plasma community together and to create a forum for discussing the latest developments and issues, the challenges ahead in the field of plasma research and applications among engineers and scientists in Asia, the Pacific Rim, as well as Europe. This volume presents 44 papers that were selected via a strict peer-review process from full papers submitted for the proceedings of the conference. The topics range from the basic physics and chemistry of plasma processing to a broad variety of materials processing and environmental applications. This volume offers an overview of recent

  19. Experimental study of plasma window

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Liang, Shi; Kun, Zhu; Yuan-Rong, Lu

    2013-01-01

    Plasma window is an advanced apparatus which can work as the interface between vacuum and high pressure region. It can be used in many applications which need atmosphere-vacuum interface, such as gas target, electron beam welding, synchrotron radiation and spallation neutron source. A test bench of plasma window is constructed in Peking University. A series of experiments and corresponding parameter measurements have been presented in this article. The experiment result indicates the feasibility of such a facility acting as an interface between vacuum and high pressure region.

  20. Introduction to Plasma Technology Science, Engineering and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Harry, John Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Written by a university lecturer with more than forty years experience in plasma technology, this book adopts a didactic approach in its coverage of the theory, engineering and applications of technological plasmas. The theory is developed in a unified way to enable brevity and clarity, providing readers with the necessary background to assess the factors that affect the behavior of plasmas under different operating conditions. The major part of the book is devoted to the applications of plasma technology and their accompanying engineering aspects, classified by the various pressure and densit

  1. Capillary plasma jet: A low volume plasma source for life science applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topala, I., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Faculty of Physics, Iasi Plasma Advanced Research Center (IPARC), Bd. Carol I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Nagatsu, M., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)

    2015-02-02

    In this letter, we present results from multispectroscopic analysis of protein films, after exposure to a peculiar plasma source, i.e., the capillary plasma jet. This plasma source is able to generate very small pulsed plasma volumes, in kilohertz range, with characteristic dimensions smaller than 1 mm. This leads to specific microscale generation and transport of all plasma species. Plasma diagnosis was realized using general electrical and optical methods. Depending on power level and exposure duration, this miniature plasma jet can induce controllable modifications to soft matter targets. Detailed discussions on protein film oxidation and chemical etching are supported by results from absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and microscopy techniques. Further exploitation of principles presented here may consolidate research interests involving plasmas in biotechnologies and plasma medicine, especially in patterning technologies, modified biomolecule arrays, and local chemical functionalization.

  2. PREFACE: 26th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-26)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    26th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-26) Takayuki Watanabe The 26th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-26) was held in Fukuoka, Japan on September 23-24, 2013. SPSM has been held annually since 1988 under the sponsorship of The 153rd Committee on Plasma Materials Science, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This symposium is one of the major activities of the Committee, which is organized by researchers in academia and industry for the purpose of advancing intersectional scientific information exchange and discussion of science and technology of plasma materials processing. Plasma processing have attracted extensive attention due to their unique advantages, and it is expected to be utilized for a number of innovative industrial applications such as synthesis of high-quality and high-performance nanomaterials. The advantages of plasmas including high chemical reactivity in accordance with required chemical reactions are beneficial for innovative processing. In recent years, plasma materials processing with reactive plasmas has been extensively employed in the fields of environmental issues and biotechnology. This conference seeks to bring different scientific communities together to create a forum for discussing the latest developments and issues. The conference provides a platform for the exploration of both fundamental topics and new applications of plasmas by the contacts between science, technology, and industry. The conference was organized in plenary lectures, invited, contributed oral presentations, and poster sessions. At this meeting, we had 142 participants from 10 countries and 104 presentations, including 11 invited presentations. This year, we arranged special topical sessions that cover Plasma Medicine and Biotechnologies, Business and Academia Cooperation, Plasma with Liquids, Plasma Processes for Nanomaterials, together with Basic, Electronics, and Thermal Plasma sessions. This special issue presents 28

  3. Plasma fibrinogen in NIDDM - The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Missov, RM; Stolk, RP; vanderBom, JG; Hofman, A; Bots, ML; Pols, HAP; Grobbee, DE

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - To compare plasma fibrinogen levels across groups of subjects with and without NIDDM with respect to diabetes therapy and to evaluate the influence of metabolic control and other selected factors. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - In a cross-sectional study, plasma fibrinogen was measured in

  4. Bodies in flowing plasmas - Laboratory studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review of early rudimentary laboratory studies of bodies in flowing, rarefied plasmas is presented (e.g., Birkeland, 1908), along with a discussion of more recent parametric studies conducted in steady plasma wind tunnels, which includes the study by Hall et al. (1964), in which a strong ion density enhancement in the center of the ion void created downstream from the body was observed. Good agreement was found between the experimental results and theoretical calculations which omit ion thermal motion. Examples in which in situ data on the interaction between satellites and the ionospheric plasma have been elucidated by the laboratory results are presented, and include evidence for a midwake axial ion peak, and ion current density in the near-wake region. The application of the ionospheric laboratory to basic space plasma physics is discussed, and its application to some types of solar system plasma phenomena is illustrated.

  5. Will Allis Prize for the Study of Ionized Gases Talk: Controlling the Properties of Low Temperature Plasmas: The Role of Modeling in Investigating the Science and Developing the Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Mark

    2010-03-01

    The use of low temperature plasmas (LTPs) in society benefiting technologies has long been the motivation for improving the predictive capabilities of computer models of these systems. The intrinsic non-equilibrium and chemically active nature of LTPs, and their interaction with their boundaries, have required broad inclusive modeling approaches which address electron kinetics at one extreme and plasma surface interactions at the other. One measure of success in addressing this diversity is the increasing adoption of models in development of plasma utilizing technologies. In this talk, a review of one computational approach to this diversity, hybrid models (HMs), will be presented. HMs combine kinetic simulations with hydrodynamic techniques to capture the sometimes subtle roles of electron energy distributions, f(ɛ), in the production and transport of reactive species. Two examples of HMs from the extremes of applications of LTPs will be discussed. The first addresses controlling f(ɛ) in low pressure inductively and capacitively excited plasmas, as used in materials processing, through frequency, pulse power format, secondary emission and static magnetic fields. These techniques leverage the non-local transport of electrons and the anomalous nature of electromagnetic skin depths to customize f(ɛ). The second example addresses the contributions of modeling to the understanding and optimization of plasmas in treating living tissue for therapy and sterilization. Atmospheric pressure plasmas interact with tissue by generating fluxes of radicals, ions and photons onto cell surfaces, the intracellular generation of electric fields and the possible production of plasmas within biological fluids. The current status and challenges for HMs in helping to understand plasma medicine will be reviewed. The critically important past and future role of the DAMOP community in developing the fundamental knowledge base required for these studies will be discussed.

  6. Studies of HED Plasmas with Self-Generated Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvedev, Mikhail [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    2016-02-08

    High-amplitude sub-Larmor-scale electromagnetic turbulence is ubiquitous in high-energy density environments, such as laboratory plasmas produced by high-intensity lasers, e.g., NIF, Omega-EP, Trident, and others, and in astrophysical and space plasmas, e.g., at high-Mach-number collisionless shocks in weakly magnetized plasmas upstream regions of quasi-parallel shocks, sites of magnetic reconnection and others. Studies of plasmas and turbulence in these environments are important for fusion energy sciences and the inertial confinement concept, in particular, as well as to numerous astrophysical systems such as gamma-ray bursts, supernovae blast waves, jets of quasars and active galactic nuclei, shocks in the interplanetary medium, solar flares and many more. Such turbulence can be of various origin and thus have rather different properties, from being purely magnetic (Weibel) turbulence to various types of electromagnetic turbulence (for example, whistler wave turbulence or turbulence produced by filamentation or Weibel-type streaming instability), to purely electrostatic Langmuir turbulence. In this project we use analytical and numerical tools to study the transport, radiative, and magneto-optical properties of plasmas with sub-Larmor-scale turbulence. We discovered the connection of transport/diffusion properties to certain spectral benchmark features of (jitter) radiation produced by the plasma and radiation propagation through it. All regimes, from the relativistic to non-relativistic, were thoroughly investigated and predictions were made for laboratory plasmas and astrophysical plasmas. Thus, all the tasks outlined in the proposal were fully and successfully accomplished.

  7. Surface science in hernioplasty: The role of plasma treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, Roberto; Magnacca, Giuliana; Martorana, Selanna

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this review is to clarify the importance of surface modifications induced in biomaterials for hernia-repair application. Starting from the pioneering experiences involving proto-materials as ancient prosthesis, a historical excursus between the biomaterials used in hernioplasty was realized. Subsequently, after the revolutionary discovery of stereoregular polymerization followed by the PP application in the biomedical field performed by the surgeon F. Usher, a comparative study on different hernia-repair meshes available was realized in order to better understand all the outstanding problems and possible future developments. Furthermore, since many unsolved problems on prosthetic devices implantation are linked to phenomena occurring at the interface between the biomaterials surface and the body fluids, the importance of surface science in hernioplasty was highlighted and case studies of new surface-modified generations of prosthesis presented. The results discussed in the following evidence how the surface study are becoming increasingly important for a proper knowledge of issues related to the interaction between the living matter and the artificial prostheses.

  8. Case studies in conservation science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisulca, Christina

    The research presented in this dissertation covers three separate topics of conservation as defined by the National Science Foundation: 1) Materials Stabilization, Strengthening, Monitoring, and Repair; 2. Understanding Material Degradation and Aging; and 3) Materials and Structural Characterization of Cultural Heritage Objects (the 'technical study'). The first topic is addressed through a study to assess the consolidant tetraethoxysilane for the stabilization of alum treated wood. Falling under materials degradation studies is a study published in American Museum Novitates to understand how environmental conditions affect the aging of fossil resins from five different deposits. Two separate studies are included in technical study of cultural heritage objects which comprises the third research area of materials characterization. The first is a survey of red dyes used in Chinese paintings from the Ming Dynasty to the Early Republic (1364-1911). The second is a study of the pigments, dyes and binders used in Hawaiian barkcloth (kapa) from the 19th century.

  9. Studying astrophysical particle acceleration with laser-driven plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The acceleration of non-thermal particles in plasmas is critical for our understanding of explosive astrophysical phenomena, from solar flares to gamma ray bursts. Particle acceleration is thought to be mediated by collisionless shocks and magnetic reconnection. The microphysics underlying these processes and their ability to efficiently convert flow and magnetic energy into non-thermal particles, however, is not yet fully understood. By performing for the first time ab initio 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of both magnetized and unmagnetized laser-driven plasmas, it is now possible to identify the optimal parameters for the study of particle acceleration in the laboratory relevant to astrophysical scenarios. It is predicted for the Omega and NIF laser conditions that significant non-thermal acceleration can occur during magnetic reconnection of laser-driven magnetized plasmas. Electrons are accelerated by the electric field near the X-points and trapped in contracting magnetic islands. This leads to a power-law tail extending to nearly a hundred times the thermal energy of the plasma and that contains a large fraction of the magnetic energy. The study of unmagnetized interpenetrating plasmas also reveals the possibility of forming collisionless shocks mediated by the Weibel instability on NIF. Under such conditions, both electrons and ions can be energized by scattering out of the Weibel-mediated turbulence. This also leads to power-law spectra that can be detected experimentally. The resulting experimental requirements to probe the microphysics of plasma particle acceleration will be discussed, paving the way for the first experiments of these important processes in the laboratory. As a result of these simulations and theoretical analysis, there are new experiments being planned on the Omega, NIF, and LCLS laser facilities to test these theoretical predictions. This work was supported by the SLAC LDRD program and DOE Office of Science, Fusion

  10. Surface studies of plasma processed Nb samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Puneet V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Doleans, Marc [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Hannah, Brian S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Afanador, Ralph [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Stewart, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Mammosser, John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Howell, Matthew P [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Saunders, Jeffrey W [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Degraff, Brian D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Kim, Sang-Ho [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    2015-01-01

    Contaminants present at top surface of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities can act as field emitters and restrict the cavity accelerating gradient. A room temperature in-situ plasma processing technology for SRF cavities aiming to clean hydrocarbons from inner surface of cavities has been recently developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Surface studies of the plasma-processed Nb samples by Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Scanning Kelvin Probe (SKP) showed that the NeO2 plasma processing is very effective to remove carbonaceous contaminants from top surface and improves the surface work function by 0.5 to 1.0 eV.

  11. PARTICIPANT SUPPORT FOR THE 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE ON PLASMA PROCESSING SCIENCE (JULY 11-16,2010)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uwe Kortshagen

    2011-06-14

    The 2010 Gordon Research Conference on Plasma Processing Science will feature a comprehensive program that will highlight the most cutting edge scientific advances in low temperature plasma science and will explore the applications of low temperature plasma technology relative to many grand societal challenges. Fundamental science sessions will focus on plasma kinetics, plasma surface interactions, and recent trends in plasma generation and multi-phase plasmas. Application sessions will explore the impact of plasma technology in renewable energy and the production of fuels from renewable feedstocks, plasma-enabled medicine and sterilization, and environmental remediation and waste treatment. The conference will bring together in an informal atmosphere leaders in the field with junior investigators and graduate students. The special format of the Gordon Conferences, with programmed discussion sessions and ample time for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, will provide for a fertile atmosphere of brainstorming and creative thinking among the attendees.

  12. Proceeding of 1998-workshop on MHD computations. Study on numerical methods related to plasma confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kako, T.; Watanabe, T. [eds.

    1999-04-01

    This is the proceeding of 'Study on Numerical Methods Related to Plasma Confinement' held in National Institute for Fusion Science. In this workshop, theoretical and numerical analyses of possible plasma equilibria with their stability properties are presented. These are also various talks on mathematical as well as numerical analyses related to the computational methods for fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The 14 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  13. Finding Science in the School Body: Reflections on Transgressing the Boundaries of Science Education and the Social Studies of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the framings that the fields of the social studies of science and science education use for each other. It is shown that the social studies of science frames science education as passive and timeless. Science education frames science studies as a set of representations to better capture how science works. The paper then…

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation study of plasma jets and plasma-surface contact in coaxial plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2017-06-01

    Recent experiments by Loebner et al. [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 44, 1534 (2016)] studied the effect of a hypervelocity jet emanating from a coaxial plasma accelerator incident on target surfaces in an effort to mimic the transient loading created during edge localized mode disruption events in fusion plasmas. In this paper, we present a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical model to simulate plasma jet formation and plasma-surface contact in this coaxial plasma accelerator experiment. The MHD system of equations is spatially discretized using a cell-centered finite volume formulation. The temporal discretization is performed using a fully implicit backward Euler scheme and the resultant stiff system of nonlinear equations is solved using the Newton method. The numerical model is employed to obtain some key insights into the physical processes responsible for the generation of extreme stagnation conditions on the target surfaces. Simulations of the plume (without the target plate) are performed to isolate and study phenomena such as the magnetic pinch effect that is responsible for launching pressure pulses into the jet free stream. The simulations also yield insights into the incipient conditions responsible for producing the pinch, such as the formation of conductive channels. The jet-target impact studies indicate the existence of two distinct stages involved in the plasma-surface interaction. A fast transient stage characterized by a thin normal shock transitions into a pseudo-steady stage that exhibits an extended oblique shock structure. A quadratic scaling of the pinch and stagnation conditions with the total current discharged between the electrodes is in qualitative agreement with the results obtained in the experiments. This also illustrates the dominant contribution of the magnetic pressure term in determining the magnitude of the quantities of interest.

  15. Theoretical Study of a Spherical Plasma Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Yasar

    A theoretical model is developed for two concentric electrodes spherical plasma focus device in order to investigate the plasma sheath dynamics, radiative emission, and the ion properties. The work focuses on the model development of the plasma sheath dynamics and its validation, followed by studying of the radiation effects and the beam-ion properties in such unique geometry as a pulsed source for neutrons, soft and hard x-rays, and electron and ion beams. Chapter 1 is an introduction on fusion systems including plasma focus. Chapter 2 is an extensive literature survey on plasma focus modeling and experiments including the various radiations and their mechanism. Chapter 3 details modeling and validation of the plasma sheath dynamics model with comparison between hydrogen, deuterium, tritium and deuterium-tritium mixture for the production of pulsed neutrons. Chapter 4 is a study of the radiative phase, in which neutron yield is investigated, as well as the predicted beam-ion properties. Chapter 5 summarizes and discusses the results. Chapter 6 provides concluding remarks and proposed future works. The phases of the developed model are the rundown phase I, rundown phase II, the reflected phase and a radiative phase. The rundown phase I starts immediately after the completion of the gas breakdown and ends when the current sheath reaches the equator point of the spherical shape. Then immediately followed by rundown phase II to start and it ends when the shock front hits the axis, which is the beginning of the reflected shock phase. Reflected shock front moves towards the incoming current sheath and meets it which is both the end of the reflected shock phase and the beginning of the radiative phase. After the reflected shock front and the current sheath meet, the current sheath continues to move radially inward by compressing the produced plasma column until it reaches the axis. Since the discharge current contains important information about the plasma dynamic

  16. Research in space science and technology. [including X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Progress in various space flight research programs is reported. Emphasis is placed on X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics. Topics covered include: infrared astronomy, long base line interferometry, geological spectroscopy, space life science experiments, atmospheric physics, and space based materials and structures research. Analysis of galactic and extra-galactic X-ray data from the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-3) and HEAO-A and interplanetary plasma data for Mariner 10, Explorers 47 and 50, and Solrad is discussed.

  17. Politicizing science: conceptions of politics in science and technology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mark B

    2015-02-01

    This essay examines five ideal-typical conceptions of politics in science and technology studies. Rather than evaluating these conceptions with reference to a single standard, the essay shows how different conceptions of politics serve distinct purposes: normative critique, two approaches to empirical description, and two views of democracy. I discuss each conception of politics with respect to how well it fulfills its apparent primary purpose, as well as its implications for the purpose of studying a key issue in contemporary democratic societies: the politicization of science. In this respect, the essay goes beyond classifying different conceptions of politics and also recommends the fifth conception as especially conducive to understanding and shaping the processes whereby science becomes a site or object of political activity. The essay also employs several analytical distinctions to help clarify the differences among conceptions of politics: between science as 'political' (adjective) and science as a site of 'politics' (noun), between spatial-conceptions and activity-conceptions of politics, between latent conflicts and actual conflicts, and between politics and power. The essay also makes the methodological argument that the politics of science and technology is best studied with concepts and methods that facilitate dialogue between actors and analysts. The main goal, however, is not to defend a particular view of politics, but to promote conversation on the conceptions of politics that animate research in social studies of science and technology.

  18. Science Anxiety, Science Attitudes, and Constructivism: A Binational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Fred B.; Kastrup, Helge; Udo, Maria; Hislop, Nelda; Shefner, Rachel; Mallow, Jeffry

    2013-08-01

    Students' attitudes and anxieties about science were measured by responses to two self-report questionnaires. The cohorts were Danish and American students at the upper secondary- and university-levels. Relationships between and among science attitudes, science anxiety, gender, and nationality were examined. Particular attention was paid to constructivist attitudes about science. These fell into at least three broad conceptual categories: Negativity of Science Toward the Individual, Subjective Construction of Knowledge, and Inherent Bias Against Women. Multigroup confirmatory factor analyses revealed that these dimensions of constructivist attitudes were equally applicable and had the same meaning in both cultures. Gender differences in mean levels of constructivist attitudes were found; these varied across the two cultures. Constructivist beliefs were associated with science anxiety, but in different ways for females and males, and for Danes and Americans. In agreement with earlier studies, females in both the US and Danish cohorts were significantly more science anxious than males, and the gender differences for the Americans were larger than those for the Danes. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for reducing science anxiety by changing constructivist beliefs.

  19. The Science and Technology Challenges of the Plasma-Material Interface for Magnetic Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Dennis

    2013-09-01

    The boundary plasma and plasma-material interactions of magnetic fusion devices are reviewed. The boundary of magnetic confinement devices, from the high-temperature, collisionless pedestal through to the surrounding surfaces and the nearby cold high-density collisional plasmas, encompasses an enormous range of plasma and material physics, and their integrated coupling. Due to fundamental limits of material response the boundary will largely define the viability of future large MFE experiments (ITER) and reactors (e.g. ARIES designs). The fusion community faces an enormous knowledge deficit in stepping from present devices, and even ITER, towards fusion devices typical of that required for efficient energy production. This deficit will be bridged by improving our fundamental science understanding of this complex interface region. The research activities and gaps are reviewed and organized to three major axes of challenges: power density, plasma duration, and material temperature. The boundary can also be considered a multi-scale system of coupled plasma and material science regulated through the non-linear interface of the sheath. Measurement, theory and modeling across these scales are reviewed, with a particular emphasis on establishing the use dimensionless parameters to understand this complex system. Proposed technology and science innovations towards solving the PMI/boundary challenges will be examined. Supported by US DOE award DE-SC00-02060 and cooperative agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  20. Developing the Science and Technology for the Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Juergen; Biewer, Theodore; Bigelow, Timothy; Caughman, John; Goulding, Richard; Lumsdaine, Arnold; MPEX Team Team

    2016-10-01

    The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) is a device planned to address scientific and technological gaps for the development of viable plasma facing components for fusion reactor conditions (FNSF, DEMO). MPEX is designed to deliver those plasma conditions with a novel Radio Frequency plasma source able to produce high density plasmas and heat electron and ions separately with Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) heating and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) with a total installed power of 800 kW. The science and technology for this source system is currently being tested on Proto-MPEX. This is a linear device utilizing 12 water-cooled copper coils able to achieve peak magnetic fields of 1.6T. The currently total installed heating power (for helicon, EBW and ICRH) is 330kW. An overview of the status of this development program is given with an outlook to the next steps.

  1. Perturbative Transport Studies in Fusion Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, N. J. L.

    1995-01-01

    Studies of transport in fusion plasmas using perturbations of an equilibrium state reviewed. Essential differences between steady-state and perturbative transport studies are pointed out. Important transport issues that can be addressed with perturbative experiments are identified as: (i) Are the tr

  2. Theoretical Studies of Long Lived Plasma Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    We construct the model of a long lived plasma structure based on spherically symmetric oscillations of electrons in plasma. Oscillations of electrons are studied in frames of both classical and quantum approaches. We obtain the density profile of electrons and the dispersion relations for these oscillations. The differences between classical and quantum approaches are discussed. Then we study the interaction between electrons participating in spherically symmetric oscillations. We find that this interaction can be attractive and electrons can form bound states. The applications of the obtained results to the theory of natural plasmoids are considered.

  3. Science Studies from Archived Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Manweiler, J. W.; Patterson, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Goals for spaceflight investigations include the discovery and characterization of physical features of the in- situ and remote environment. Abundant successes of flight investigations are easily documented. Prudent scientific practice dictates that to the maximum extent possible, observations should be well-characterized, reliably catalogued, and knowledgeably interpreted. This is especially true of data sets used in the publication of results in the reviewed literature. Typical scientific standards include making primary data numbers available to other investigators for replicated study. While NASA's contracts with investigators have required that data be submitted to agency official archives, the details, completeness (especially of ancillary and metadata) and forms differ from investigation to investigation and project to project. After several generations of improvements and refinements, modern computing and communications technology makes it possible to link multiple data sets at multiple locations through a unified data model. Virtual Observatories provide the overall organizational structures and SPASE-compliant XML defines the data granules that can be located. Proofs of the feasibility and value of this latest approach remain to be seen, but its ultimate goal of improving archival research using flight-derived data sets appears to depend on user acceptance and efficient use of the VxO resources. Criteria based on the authors experience in science derived from archival sources follow: 1. Interfaces and tools must be easy to learn, easy to use, and reliable. 2. Data numbers must be promptly downloadable in plain text. 3. Data must be available in or readily converted to physical units using calibrations and algorithms easily traceable as part of the search. Knowledge about (or heritage of) specific data items present in the science literature must be associated with the search for that item. 4. Data items must be trustworthy, having quoted uncertainties and

  4. Study on the RF power necessary to ignite plasma for the ICP test facility at HUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Haikun [School of Electronic Information and Communications, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Li, Dong; Wang, Chenre; Li, Xiaofei; Chen, Dezhi; Liu, Kaifeng; Zhou, Chi; Pan, Ruimin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2015-10-15

    An Radio-Frequency (RF) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) ion source test facility has been successfully developed at Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). As part of a study on hydrogen plasma, the influence of three main operation parameters on the RF power necessary to ignite plasma was investigated. At 6 Pa, the RF power necessary to ignite plasma influenced little by the filament heating current from 5 A to 9 A. The RF power necessary to ignite plasma increased rapidly with the operation pressure decreasing from 8 Pa to 4 Pa. The RF power necessary to ignite plasma decreased with the number of coil turns from 6 to 10. During the experiments, plasma was produced with the electron density of the order of 10{sup 16}m{sup -3} and the electron temperature of around 4 eV. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. An Overview of Science Education and Outreach Activities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. DeLooper; A. DeMeo; P. Lucas; A. Post-Zwicker; C. Phillips; C. Ritter; J. Morgan; P. Wieser; A. Percival; E. Starkman; G. Czechowicz

    2000-11-07

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has an energetic science education program and outreach effort. This overview describes the components of the programs and evaluates the changes that have occurred in this effort during the last several years. Efforts have been expanded to reach more students, as well as the public in general. The primary goal is to inform the public regarding the fusion and plasma research at PPPL and to excite students so that they can appreciate science and technology. A student's interest in science can be raised by tours, summer research experiences, in-classroom presentations, plasma expos, teacher workshops and web-based materials. The ultimate result of this effort is a better-informed public, as well as an increase in the number of women and minorities who choose science as a vocation. Measuring the results is difficult, but current metrics are reviewed. The science education and outreach programs are supported by a de dicated core group of individuals and supplemented by other members of the PPPL staff and consultants who perform various outreach and educational activities.

  6. Computational Center for Studies of Plasma Microturbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Dorland

    2006-10-11

    The Maryland Computational Center for Studies of Microturbulence (CCSM) was one component of a larger, multi-institutional Plasma Microturbulence Project, funded through what eventually became DOE's Scientific Discovery Through Advanced Computing Program. The primary focus of research in CCSM was to develop, deploy, maintain, and utilize kinetic simulation techniques, especially the gyrokinetic code called GS2.

  7. Laboratory study of avalanches in a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Compernolle, Bart

    2015-11-01

    Results of a basic heat transport experiment [] involving an off-axis heat source are presented. Experiments are performed in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. A ring-shaped electron beam source injects low energy electrons (below ionization energy) along a strong magnetic field into a preexisting, large and cold plasma. The injected electrons are thermalized by Coulomb collisions within a short distance and provide an off-axis heat source that results in a long, hollow, cylindrical region of elevated electron temperature embedded in a colder plasma, and far from the machine walls. It is demonstrated that this heating configuration provides an ideal environment to study avalanche phenomena under controlled conditions. The avalanches are identified as sudden rearrangements of the pressure profile following the growth of fluctuations from ambient noise. The intermittent collapses of the plasma pressure profile are associated with unstable drift-Alfvén waves and exhibit both radial and azimuthal dynamics. After each collapse the plasma enters a quiescent phase in which the pressure profile slowly recovers and steepens until a threshold is exceeded, and the process repeats. The use of reference probes as time markers allows for the visualization of the 2D spatio-temporal evolution of the avalanche events. Avalanches are only observed for a limited combination of heating powers and magnetic fields. At higher heating powers the system transitions from the avalanche regime into a regime dominated by sustained drift-Alfvén wave activity. The pressure profile then transitions to a near steady-state in which anomalous transport balances the external pressure source. Performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA, supported jointly by DOE and NSF.

  8. A study of science leadership and science standards in exemplary standards-based science programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Wendy Renae

    The purpose for conducting this qualitative study was to explore best practices of exemplary standards-based science programs and instructional leadership practices in a charter high school and in a traditional high school. The focus of this study included how twelve participants aligned practices to National Science Education Standards to describe their science programs and science instructional practices. This study used a multi-site case study qualitative design. Data were obtained through a review of literature, interviews, observations, review of educational documents, and researcher's notes collected in a field log. The methodology used was a multi-site case study because of the potential, through cross analysis, for providing greater explanation of the findings in the study (Merriam, 1988). This study discovered six characteristics about the two high school's science programs that enhance the literature found in the National Science Education Standards; (a) Culture of expectations for learning-In exemplary science programs teachers are familiar with a wide range of curricula. They have the ability to examine critically and select activities to use with their students to promote the understanding of science; (b) Culture of varied experiences-In exemplary science programs students are provided different paths to learning, which help students, take in information and make sense of concepts and skills that are set forth by the standards; (c) Culture of continuous feedback-In exemplary science programs teachers and students work together to engage students in ongoing assessments of their work and that of others as prescribed in the standards; (d) Culture of Observations-In exemplary science programs students, teachers, and principals reflect on classroom instructional practices; teachers receive ongoing evaluations about their teaching and apply feedback towards improving practices as outlined in the standards; (e) Culture of continuous learning-In exemplary

  9. The plasma focus as a tool for plasma-wall-interaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, G.; Martinez, M.; Herrera, J. J. E.; Castillo, F.

    2015-03-01

    The study of the interaction of magnetized plasmas with candidate materials for fusion reactors, as for example tungsten, is a main topic in fusion research. Many studies simulate the plasma wall interaction using ion beams, while only a few use plasma simulators. Plasma foci can produce dense magnetized plasmas of deuterium and helium among other species. We used the plasma focus Fuego-Nuevo II, to expose tungsten samples to deuterium and helium plasmas. The samples were analysed by means of SEM, RBS and NRA, evidencing surface erosion, surface melting and retention of deuterium in a shallow surface layer of 250 nm amounting 6.5·1016 D/cm2. The plasma temperature has been measured at the position of the samples using a triple Langmuir probe and compared to calculations of a snowplow model. The modelling of the electrode to reach desired plasma parameters is discussed.

  10. Spectroscopic studies of microwave plasmas containing hexamethyldisiloxane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, A. S. C.; Mitschker, F.; Awakowicz, P.; Röpcke, J.

    2016-10-01

    Low-pressure microwave discharges containing hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) with admixtures of oxygen and nitrogen, used for the deposition of silicon containing films, have been studied spectroscopically. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the visible spectral range has been combined with infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (IRLAS). The experiments were carried out in order to analyze the dependence of plasma chemical phenomena on power and gas mixture at relatively low pressures, up to 50 Pa, and power values, up to 2 kW. The evolution of the concentration of the methyl radical, CH3, and of seven stable molecules, HMDSO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CO and CO2, was monitored in the plasma processes by in situ IRLAS using tunable lead salt diode lasers (TDL) and external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL) as radiation sources. To achieve reliable values for the gas temperature inside and outside the plasma bulk as well as for the temperature in the plasma hot and colder zones, which are of great importance for calculation of species concentrations, three different methods based on emission and absorption spectroscopy data of N2, CH3 and CO have been used. In this approach line profile analysis has been combined with spectral simulation methods. The concentrations of the various species, which were found to be in the range between 1011 to 1015 cm-3, are in the focus of interest. The influence of the discharge parameters power, pressure and gas mixture on the molecular concentrations has been studied. To achieve further insight into general plasma chemical aspects the dissociation of the HMDSO precursor gas including its fragmentation and conversion to the reaction products was analyzed in detail.

  11. Numerical Study of Suspension Plasma Spraying

    CERN Document Server

    Farrokhpanah, Amirsaman; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    A numerical study of suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is presented in the current work. The liquid suspension jet is replaced with a train of droplets containing the suspension particles injected into the plasma flow. Atomization, evaporation, and melting of different components are considered for particles as they travel towards the substrate. Effect of different parameters on particle conditions during flight and upon impact on the substrate are investigated. Initially, influence of the torch operating conditions such as inlet flow rate and power are studied. Additionally, effect of injector parameters like injection location, flow rate, and angle are examined. The model used in current study takes high temperature gradients and non-continuum effects into account. Moreover, the important effect of change in physical properties of suspension droplets as a result of evaporation is included in the model. These mainly include variations in heat transfer properties and viscosity. Utilizing this improved model, s...

  12. Cohort studies in health sciences librarianship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Question: What are the key characteristics of the cohort study design and its varied applications, and how can this research design be utilized in health sciences librarianship? Data Sources: The health, social, behavioral, biological, library, earth, and management sciences literatures were used as sources. Study Selection: All fields except for health sciences librarianship were scanned topically for either well-known or diverse applications of the cohort design. The health sciences library literature available to the author principally for the years 1990 to 2000, supplemented by papers or posters presented at annual meetings of the Medical Library Association. Data Extraction: A narrative review for the health, social, behavioral, biological, earth, and management sciences literatures and a systematic review for health sciences librarianship literature for the years 1990 to 2000, with three exceptions, were conducted. The author conducted principally a manual search of the health sciences librarianship literature for the years 1990 to 2000 as part of this systematic review. Main Results: The cohort design has been applied to answer a wide array of theoretical or practical research questions in the health, social, behavioral, biological, and management sciences. Health sciences librarianship also offers several major applications of the cohort design. Conclusion: The cohort design has great potential for answering research questions in the field of health sciences librarianship, particularly evidence-based librarianship (EBL), although that potential has not been fully explored. PMID:12398244

  13. Fundamental studies of fusion plasmas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aamodt, R.E.

    1998-01-30

    Lodestar has carried out a vigorous research program in the areas of rf, edge plasma and divertor physics, with emphasis largely geared towards improving the understanding and performance of ion-cyclotron heating and current drive (ICRF) systems. Additionally, a research program in the field of edge plasma and divertor modeling was initiated. Theoretical work on high power rf sheath formation for multi-strap rf arrays was developed and benchmarked against recent experimental data from the new JET A2 antennas. Sophisticated modeling tools were employed to understand the sheath formation taking into account realistic three-dimensional antenna geometry. A novel physics explanation of an observed anomaly in the low power loading of antennas was applied to qualitatively interpret data on DIII-D in terms of rf sheaths, and potential applications of the idea to develop a near-field sheath diagnostic were explored. Other rf-wave related topics were also investigated. Full wave ICRF modeling studies were carried out in support of ongoing and planned tokamaks experiments, including the investigation of low frequency plasma heating and current drive regimes for IGNITOR. In a cross-disciplinary study involving both MHD and ICRF physics, ponderomotive feedback stabilization by rf was investigated as a potential means of controlling external kink mode disruptions. In another study, the instability of the ion hybrid wave (IHW) in the presence of fusion alpha particles was studied. In the field of edge plasma and divertor modeling studies, Lodestar began the development of a theory of generalized ballooning and sheath instabilities in the scrape off layer (SOL) of divertor tokamaks. A detailed summary of the technical progress in these areas during the contract period is included, as well as where references to published work can be found. A separate listing of publications, meeting abstracts, and other presentations is also given at the end of this final report.

  14. Nature of Science Contextualized: Studying Nature of Science with Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tala, Suvi; Vesterinen, Veli-Matti

    2015-05-01

    Understanding nature of science (NOS) is widely considered an important educational objective and views of NOS are closely linked to science teaching and learning. Thus there is a lively discussion about what understanding NOS means and how it is reached. As a result of analyses in educational, philosophical, sociological and historical research, a worldwide consensus about the content of NOS teaching is said to be reached. This consensus content is listed as a general statement of science, which students are supposed to understand during their education. Unfortunately, decades of research has demonstrated that teachers and students alike do not possess an appropriate understanding of NOS, at least as far as it is defined at the general level. One reason for such failure might be that formal statements about the NOS and scientific knowledge can really be understood after having been contextualized in the actual cases. Typically NOS is studied as contextualized in the reconstructed historical case stories. When the objective is to educate scientifically and technologically literate citizens, as well as scientists of the near future, studying NOS in the contexts of contemporary science is encouraged. Such contextualizations call for revision of the characterization of NOS and the goals of teaching about NOS. As a consequence, this article gives two examples for studying NOS in the contexts of scientific practices with practicing scientists: an interview study with nanomodellers considering NOS in the context of their actual practices and a course on nature of scientific modelling for science teachers employing the same interview method as a studying method. Such scrutinization opens rarely discussed areas and viewpoints to NOS as well as aspects that practising scientists consider as important.

  15. Different Traditions in the Study of Disciplinarity in Science--Science and Technology Studies, Library and Information Science and Scientometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojevic, Staša

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Disciplinarity and other forms of differentiation in science have long been studied in the fields of science and technology studies, information science and scientometrics. However, it is not obvious whether these fields are building on each other's findings. Methods: An analysis is made of 609 articles on disciplinarity…

  16. STUDY ON THE PRESSURE IN PLASMA ARC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The axial pressure in plasma arc is measured under different conditions. The effects of the parameters, such as welding current, plasma gas flow rate, electrode setback and arc length, on the pressure in plasma arc are investigated and quantitative analyzed to explain the relationship between the quality of weld and the matching of parameters in plasma arc welding process.

  17. Dismantling boundaries in science and technology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear, Peter; Jasanoff, Sheila

    2010-12-01

    The boundaries between the history of science and science and technology studies (STS) can be misleadingly drawn, to the detriment of both fields. This essay stresses their commonalities and potential for valuable synergy. The evolution of the two fields has been characterized by lively interchange and boundary crossing, with leading scholars functioning easily on both sides of the past/present divide. Disciplines, it is argued, are best regarded as training grounds for asking particular kinds of questions, using particular clusters of methods. Viewed in this way, history of science and STS are notable for their shared approaches to disciplining. The essay concludes with a concrete example--regulatory science--showing how a topic such as this can be productively studied with methods that contradict any alleged disciplinary divide between historical and contemporary studies of science.

  18. Deepening Kindergarteners' Science Vocabulary: A Design Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Allison Ward; Bryant, Camille Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Early, effective instruction to introduce both science vocabulary and general academic language may help children build a strong conceptual and linguistic foundation for later instruction. In this study, a design research intervention was employed to expose children to a variety of interrelated science content words to increase both the breadth…

  19. Study Guide for TCT in Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Gene

    This study guide was developed for individuals preparing to take the Georgia Teacher Certification Test (TCT) in science. Content objectives of the test are listed and encompass: (1) scientific processes, research, and classification; (2) earth sciences; (3) characteristics and properties of matter, energy, and chemical change; (4) biology of life…

  20. Graded Course of Study, Science (K-12).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euclid City Schools, OH.

    This course of study specifies the science skills and concepts that are to be taught in the various grades of the Euclid (Ohio) City Schools. Included are instructional objectives for the life, physical, and earth sciences for grades K to 6, suggested field trips and planetarium schedules (by elementary grade levels), and scope and sequence charts…

  1. The CPS Plasma Award at the Intel Science and Engineering Fair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Lee

    2012-10-01

    For the past eight years, the Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS) has presented an award for a plasma project at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). We reported on the first five years of this award at the 2009 DPP Symposium. Pulsed neutron-producing experiments are a recurring topic, with the efforts now turning to applications. The most recent award at the Pittsburgh ISEF this past May was given for analysis of data from Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The effort had the goal of understanding the fluid properties of the quark-gluon plasma. All of the CPS award-winning projects so far have been based on experiments, with four awards going to women students and four to men. In 2009 we noted that the number and quality of projects was improving. Since then, as we we predicted (hoped for), that trend has continued. The CPS looks forward to continuing its work with students who are excited about the possibilities of plasma. You too can share this excitement by judging at the 2013 fair in Phoenix on May 12-17. Information may be obtained by emailing cps@plasmacoalition.org.

  2. Computational Support for Alternative Confinement Concepts Basic Plasma Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton D. Schnack

    2002-12-09

    This is the final report for contract DE-FG03-99ER54528, ''Computational Support for Alternative Confinement Concepts''. Progress was made in the following areas of investigation: (1) Extensive studies of the confinement properties of conventional Reversed-field Pinch (RFP) configurations (i.e., without current profile control) were performed in collaboration with the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, Sweden. These studies were carried out using the full 3-dimensional, finite-{beta}, resistive MHD model in the DEBS code, including ohmic heating and anisotropic heat conduction, and thus for the first time included the self-consistent effects of the dynamo magnetic fluctuations on the confinement properties of the RFP. By using multi-variant regression analysis of these results, scaling laws for various properties characterizing the conventional RFP were obtained. In particular, it was found that the, for constant ratio of I/N (where I is the current and N = na{sup 2} is the line density), and over a range of Lundquist numbers S that approaches 10{sup 6}, the fluctuations scale as {delta}B/B {approx} S{sup -0.14}, the temperature scales as T {approx} I{sup 0.56}, the poloidal beta scales as {beta}{sub {theta}} {approx} I{sup -0.4}, and the energy confinement time scales as {tau}{sub E} {approx} I{sup 0.34}. The degradation of poloidal beta with current is a result of the weak scaling of the fluctuation level with the Lundquist number, and leads to the unfavorable scaling laws for temperature and energy confinement time. These results compare reasonably well with experimental data, and emphasize the need for external control of the dynamo fluctuations in the RFP. (2) Studies of feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in the RFP were performed with the DEBS code in collaboration with the CNR/RFX group in Padua, Italy. The ideal growth rates are ''passively'' reduced by the presence of a resistive wall

  3. Numerical Study of Suspension Plasma Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhpanah, Amirsaman; Coyle, Thomas W.; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2017-01-01

    A numerical study of suspension plasma spraying is presented in the current work. The liquid suspension jet is replaced with a train of droplets containing the suspension particles injected into the plasma flow. Atomization, evaporation, and melting of different components are considered for droplets and particles as they travel toward the substrate. Effect of different parameters on particle conditions during flight and upon impact on the substrate is investigated. Initially, influence of the torch operating conditions such as inlet flow rate and power is studied. Additionally, effect of injector parameters like injection location, flow rate, and angle is examined. The model used in the current study takes high-temperature gradients and non-continuum effects into account. Moreover, the important effect of change in physical properties of suspension droplets as a result of evaporation is included in the model. These mainly include variations in heat transfer properties and viscosity. Utilizing this improved model, several test cases have been considered to better evaluate the effect of different parameters on the quality of particles during flight and upon impact on the substrate.

  4. Studies of Particle Wake Potentials in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ian; Graziani, Frank; Glosli, James; Strozzi, David; Surh, Michael; Richards, David; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren

    2011-10-01

    Fast Ignition studies require a detailed understanding of electron scattering, stopping, and energy deposition in plasmas with variable values for the number of particles within a Debye sphere. Presently there is disagreement in the literature concerning the proper description of these processes. Developing and validating proper descriptions requires studying the processes using first-principle electrostatic simulations and possibly including magnetic fields. We are using the particle-particle particle-mesh (PPPM) code ddcMD and the particle-in-cell (PIC) code BEPS to perform these simulations. As a starting point in our study, we examine the wake of a particle passing through a plasma in 3D electrostatic simulations performed with ddcMD and with BEPS using various cell sizes. In this poster, we compare the wakes we observe in these simulations with each other and predictions from Vlasov theory. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by UCLA under Grant DE-FG52-09NA29552.

  5. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  6. Near Real Time Tools for ISS Plasma Science and Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Parker, Linda Neergaard; Shim, Ja Soon; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Pulkkinen, Antti, A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program utilizes a plasma environment forecast for estimating electrical charging hazards for crews during extravehicular activity (EVA). The process uses ionospheric electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) measurements from the ISS Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) instrument suite with the assumption that the plasma conditions will remain constant for one to fourteen days with a low probability for a space weather event which would significantly change the environment before an EVA. FPMU data is typically not available during EVA's, therefore, the most recent FPMU data available for characterizing the state of the ionosphere during EVA is typically a day or two before the start of an EVA or after the EVA has been completed. Three near real time space weather tools under development for ISS applications are described here including: (a) Ne from ground based ionosonde measurements of foF2 (b) Ne from near real time satellite radio occultation measurements of electron density profiles (c) Ne, Te from a physics based ionosphere model These applications are used to characterize the ISS space plasma environment during EVA periods when FPMU data is not available, monitor for large changes in ionosphere density that could render the ionosphere forecast and plasma hazard assessment invalid, and validate the "persistence of conditions" forecast assumption. In addition, the tools are useful for providing space environment input to science payloads on ISS and anomaly investigations during periods the FPMU is not operating.

  7. 2-D studies of Relativistic electron beam plasma instabilities in an inhomogeneous plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, Chandrashekhar; Patel, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    Relativistic electron beam propagation in plasma is fraught with several micro instabilities like two stream, filamentation etc., in plasma. This results in severe limitation of the electron transport through a plasma medium. Recently, however, there has been an experimental demonstration of improved transport of Mega Ampere of electron currents (generated by the interaction of intense laser with solid target) in a carbon nanotube structured solid target [Phys. Rev Letts. 108, 235005 (2012)]. This then suggests that the inhomogeneous plasma (created by the ionization of carbon nano tube structured target) helps in containing the growth of the beam plasma instabilities. This manuscript addresses this issue with the help of a detailed analytical study and simulations with the help of 2-D Particle - In - Cell code. The study conclusively demonstrates that the growth rate of the dominant instability in the 2-D geometry decreases when the plasma density is chosen to be inhomogeneous, provided the scale length 1/ks...

  8. A 1D (radial) Plasma Jet Propagation Study for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. R.; Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.; Welch, D. R.; Thoma, C.; Golovkin, I.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Case, A.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Cassibry, J. T.; Awe, T. J.; Hsu, S. C.

    2011-10-01

    The Plasma Liner Experiment will explore the formation of imploding spherical ``plasma liners'' that reach peak pressures of 0.1 Mbar upon stagnation. The liners will be formed through the merging of dense, high velocity plasma jets (n ~1017 cm-3, T ~3 eV, v ~50 km/s) in a spherically convergent geometry. The focus of this 1D (radial) study is argon plasma jet evolution during propagation from the rail gun source to the jet merging radius. The study utilizes the Large Scale Plasma (LSP) PIC code with atomic physics included through the use of a non-Local Thermal Equilibrium (NLTE) Equation of State (EOS) table. We will present scenarios for expected 1D (radial) plasma jet evolution, from upon exiting the PLX rail gun to reaching the jet merging radius. The importance of radiation cooling early in the simulation is highlighted. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-05ER54835.

  9. Science Anxiety, Science Attitudes, and Constructivism: A Binational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Fred B.; Kastrup, Helge; Udo, Maria; Hislop, Nelda; Shefner, Rachel; Mallow, Jeffry

    2013-01-01

    Students' attitudes and anxieties about science were measured by responses to two self-report questionnaires. The cohorts were Danish and American students at the upper secondary- and university-levels. Relationships between and among science attitudes, science anxiety, gender, and nationality were examined. Particular attention was paid to…

  10. Plasma-Assisted Combustion Studies at AFRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-04

    important for lean, gas-turbine ( powerplant ) operation Might one also mitigate/influence acoustic fluctuations? Potential for uniform performance with...Thermometry with pulsed -W Source No -W Pulsed -W Direct coupled plasma torch: flame OH vs. - wave power: Plasma-assisted Ignition Cathey, Gundersen, Wang...Determine physical mechanism, primarily for transient plasma ignition  What is role of humidity: XH2O affects detonation wave speed in PDE but not

  11. Study on Ceramic Cutting by Plasma Arc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Engineering ceramics are typical difficult-to-machine materials because of high hardness and brittleness. PAC (Plasma Arc Cutting) is a very important thermal cutting process and has been successfully used in cutting stainless steel and other difficult-to-machine alloys. PAC's application in cutting ceramics, however, is still limited because the most ceramics are not good electronic conducts, and transferred plasma arc cannot be produced between cathode and work-piece. So we presented a method of plasma ...

  12. Collaborative Research. Fundamental Science of Low Temperature Plasma-Biological Material Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David Barry [Univ. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Oehrlein, Gottlieb [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    atmospheric pressure using several types of low temperature plasma sources, for which radical induced interactions generally dominate due to short mean free paths of ions and VUV photons. For these conditions we demonstrated the importance of environmental interactions when atmospheric pressure plasma sources are used to modify biomolecules. This is evident from both gas phase characterization data and in-situ surface characterization of treated biomolecules. Environmental interactions can produce unexpected outcomes due to the complexity of reactions of reactive species with the atmosphere which determines the composition of reactive fluxes and atomistic changes of biomolecules. Overall, this work clarified a richer spectrum of scientific opportunities and challenges for the field of low temperature plasma-biomolecule surface interactions than initially anticipated, in particular for plasma sources operating at atmospheric pressure. The insights produced in this work, e.g. demonstration of the importance of environmental interactions, are generally important for applications of APP to materials modifications. Thus one major contributions of this research has been the establishment of methodologies to more systematically study the interaction of plasma with bio-molecules. In particular, our studies of atmospheric pressure plasma sources using very well-defined experimental conditions enabled to combine atomistic surface modifications of biomolecules with changes in their biological function. The clarification of the role of ions, VUV photons and radicals in deactivation of biomolecules during low pressure and atmospheric pressure plasma-biomolecule interaction has broad implications, e.g. for the emerging field of plasma medicine. The development of methods to detect the effects of plasma treatment on immune-active biomolecules will be helpful in many future studies.

  13. Brain-Science Based Cohort Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a number of human cohort studies based on the concept of brain-science and education. These studies assess the potential effects of new technologies on babies, children and adolescents, and test hypotheses drawn from animal and genetic case studies to see if they apply to people. A flood of information, virtual media,…

  14. Brain-Science Based Cohort Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a number of human cohort studies based on the concept of brain-science and education. These studies assess the potential effects of new technologies on babies, children and adolescents, and test hypotheses drawn from animal and genetic case studies to see if they apply to people. A flood of information, virtual media,…

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements on plasma science experiments at PPPL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, Mark

    2011-12-20

    Collaborative research between WVU and PPPL was carried out at WVU for the purpose of incorporating the sophisticated diagnostic technique known as laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in the Paul-Trap Simulation Experiment (PTSX) at PPPL. WVU assembled a LIF system at WVU, transported it to PPPL, helped make LIF experiments on the PTSX device, participated in PTSX science, and trained PPPL staff in LIF techniques. In summary, WVU refurbished a non-operational LIF system being loaned from University of Maryland to PPPL and, by doing so, provided PPPL with additional diagnostic capability for its PTSX device and other General Plasma Science experiments. WVU students, staff, and faculty will visit PPPL to collaborate on PTSX experiments in the future.

  16. Theoretical and Numerical Study of Anomalous Turbulent Transport in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-05

    1983). CONFERENCE RECORD - ABSTRACTS 1067 IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PLASMA SCIENCE June 1-3, 1987 Aifington, Virginia 2X5 Real Space Difusion ...disuibution. The effect of aon-GaussWa tubulent fields on dte pautile difusion coeffickat is discussed in deaiL To examine the long behavior of th

  17. High speed cine film studies of plasma behaviour and plasma surface interactions in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodall, D.H.J. (Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon (UK). Culham Lab.)

    High speed cine photography is a useful diagnostic aid for studying plasma behaviour and plasma surface interactions. Several workers have filmed discharges in tokamaks including ASDEX, DITE, DIVA, ISX, JFT2, TFR and PLT. These films are discussed and examples given of the observed phenomena which include plasma limiter interactions, diverted discharges, disruptions, magnetic islands and moving glowing objects often known as 'UFOs'. Examples of plasma structures in ASDEX and DITE not previously published are also given. The paper also reports experiments in DITE to determine the origin of UFOs.

  18. Fundamental Study of Nuclear Pumped Laser Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-23

    rate of up to 2pps. The plasma cell/gas- handling system obtains base pressures of 5xlO 8 Torr prior to high purity gas fill. The plasma cell is...synchronization problems, etc.). Due to the exceptional reproducibility of e-beam characteristics, todate , only prefire has caused data rejection. IV. Recent

  19. Transport studies in fusion plasmas: Perturbative experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, N. L.

    1998-01-01

    By inducing in a small temperature perturbation in a plasma in a steady state one can determine the conductive and convective components of the heat flux, and the associated thermal diffusivity and convection velocity. The same can be done for the density, and in principle also other plasma paramete

  20. Study of the Active Screen Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Cheng; C. X. Li; H. Dong; T. Bell

    2004-01-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a novel nitriding process, which overcomes many of the practical problems associated with the conventional DC plasma nitriding (DCPN). Experimental results showed that the metallurgical characteristics and hardening effect of 722M24 steel nitrided by ASPN at both floating potential and anodic (zero) potential were similar to those nitrided by DCPN. XRD and high-resolution SEM analysis indicated that iron nitride particles with sizes in sub-micron scale were deposited on the specimen surface in AS plasma nitriding. These indicate that the neutral iron nitride particles, which are sputtered from the active screen and transferred through plasma to specimen surface, are considered to be the dominant nitrogen carder in ASPN. The OES results show that NH could not be a critical species in plasma nitriding.

  1. Study on plasma parameters and dust charging in an electrostatically plugged multicusp plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of the electrostatic confinement potential on the charging of dust grains and its relationship with the plasma parameters has been studied in an electrostatically plugged multicusp dusty plasma device. Electrostatic plugging is implemented by biasing the electrically isolated magnetic multicusp channel walls. The experimental results show that voltage applied to the channel walls can be a controlling parameter for dust charging.

  2. The technology and science of steady-state operation in magnetically confined plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bécoulet, A.; Hoang, G. T.

    2008-12-01

    The steady-state operation of magnetically confined fusion plasmas is considered as one of the 'grand challenges' of future decades, if not the ultimate goal of the research and development activities towards a new source of energy. Reaching such a goal requires the high-level integration of both science and technology aspects of magnetic fusion into self-consistent plasma regimes in fusion-grade devices. On the physics side, the first constraint addresses the magnetic confinement itself which must be made persistent. This means to either rely on intrinsically steady-state configurations, like the stellarator one, or turn the inductively driven tokamak configuration into a fully non-inductive one, through a mix of additional current sources. The low efficiency of the external current drive methods and the necessity to minimize the re-circulating power claim for a current mix strongly weighted by the internal 'pressure driven' bootstrap current, itself strongly sensitive to the heat and particle transport properties of the plasma. A virtuous circle may form as the heat and particle transport properties are themselves sensitive to the current profile conditions. Note that several other factors, e.g. plasma rotation profile, magneto-hydro-dynamics activity, also influence the equilibrium state. In the present tokamak devices, several examples of such 'advanced tokamak' physics research demonstrate the feasibility of steady-state regimes, though with a number of open questions still under investigation. The modelling activity also progresses quite fast in this domain and supports understanding and extrapolation. This high level of physics sophistication of the plasma scenario however needs to be combined with steady-state technological constraints. The technology constraints for steady-state operation are basically twofold: the specific technologies required to reach the steady-state plasma conditions and the generic technologies linked to the long pulse operation of a

  3. Studies of Wettability of Medical PVC by Remote Nitrogen Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ru; Chen, Jierong

    2006-05-01

    The effects of remote nitrogen plasma and nitrogen plasma on medical PVC's surface modification are studied. The surface properties are characterized by the contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that the remote nitrogen plasma treatments modify the PVC surface in both morphology and composition and the treatment by the remote nitrogen plasma in PVC surface modification is more effective than that by the nitrogen plasma. Remote nitrogen plasma can modify the surface more uniformly. After the PVC surface is treated for 2 min by remote nitrogen plasma, the [w(O)+ w(N)]/w(C)] value increases from 0.13 to 0.51 and the water contact angle decreases from 89o to 18o.

  4. Collisionless expansion of pulsed radio frequency plasmas. II. Parameter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, T.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.; Boswell, R. W.; Charles, C.

    2016-01-01

    The plasma parameter dependencies of the dynamics during the expansion of plasma are studied with the use of a versatile particle-in-cell simulation tailored to a plasma expansion experiment [Schröder et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 47, 055207 (2014); Schröder et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 013511 (2016)]. The plasma expansion into a low-density ambient plasma features a propagating ion front that is preceding a density plateau. It has been shown that the front formation is entangled with a wave-breaking mechanism, i.e., an ion collapse [Sack and Schamel, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 717 (1985); Sack and Schamel, Phys. Lett. A 110, 206 (1985)], and the launch of an ion burst [Schröder et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 013511 (2016)]. The systematic parameter study presented in this paper focuses on the influence on this mechanism its effect on the maximum velocity of the ion front and burst. It is shown that, apart from the well known dependency of the front propagation on the ion sound velocity, it also depends sensitively on the density ratio between main and ambient plasma density. The maximum ion velocity depends further on the initial potential gradient, being mostly influenced by the plasma density ratio in the source and expansion regions. The results of the study are compared with independent numerical studies.

  5. From Science to e-Science to Semantic e-Science: A Heliosphysics Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narock, Thomas; Fox, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed unparalleled efforts to make scientific data web accessible. The Semantic Web has proven invaluable in this effort; however, much of the literature is devoted to system design, ontology creation, and trials and tribulations of current technologies. In order to fully develop the nascent field of Semantic e-Science we must also evaluate systems in real-world settings. We describe a case study within the field of Heliophysics and provide a comparison of the evolutionary stages of data discovery, from manual to semantically enable. We describe the socio-technical implications of moving toward automated and intelligent data discovery. In doing so, we highlight how this process enhances what is currently being done manually in various scientific disciplines. Our case study illustrates that Semantic e-Science is more than just semantic search. The integration of search with web services, relational databases, and other cyberinfrastructure is a central tenet of our case study and one that we believe has applicability as a generalized research area within Semantic e-Science. This case study illustrates a specific example of the benefits, and limitations, of semantically replicating data discovery. We show examples of significant reductions in time and effort enable by Semantic e-Science; yet, we argue that a "complete" solution requires integrating semantic search with other research areas such as data provenance and web services.

  6. Nature of Science Contextualized: Studying Nature of Science with Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tala, Suvi; Vesterinen, Veli-Matti

    2015-01-01

    Understanding nature of science (NOS) is widely considered an important educational objective and views of NOS are closely linked to science teaching and learning. Thus there is a lively discussion about what understanding NOS means and how it is reached. As a result of analyses in educational, philosophical, sociological and historical research,…

  7. Nature of Science Contextualized: Studying Nature of Science with Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tala, Suvi; Vesterinen, Veli-Matti

    2015-01-01

    Understanding nature of science (NOS) is widely considered an important educational objective and views of NOS are closely linked to science teaching and learning. Thus there is a lively discussion about what understanding NOS means and how it is reached. As a result of analyses in educational, philosophical, sociological and historical research,…

  8. Numerical studies of wall-plasma interactions and ionization phenomena in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Zeng, Guangshang; Tang, Haibin; Huang, Yuping; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    Wall-plasma interactions excited by ablation controlled arcs are very critical physical processes in pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs). Their effects on the ionization processes of ablated vapor into discharge plasma directly determine PPT performances. To reveal the physics governing the ionization phenomena in PPT discharge, a modified model taking into account the pyrolysis effect of heated polytetrafluoroethylene propellant on the wall-plasma interactions was developed. The feasibility of the modified model was analyzed by creating a one-dimensional simulation of a rectangular ablative PPT. The wall-plasma interaction results based on this modified model were found to be more realistic than for the unmodified model; this reflects the dynamic changes of the inflow parameters during discharge in our model. Furthermore, the temporal and spatial variations of the different plasma species in the discharge chamber were numerically studied. The numerical studies showed that polytetrafluoroethylene plasma was mainly composed of monovalent ions; carbon and fluorine ions were concentrated in the upstream and downstream discharge chamber, respectively. The results based on this modified model were in good agreement with the experimental formation times of the various plasma species. A large number of short-lived and highly ionized carbon and fluorine species (divalent and trivalent ions) were created during initial discharge. These highly ionized species reached their peak density earlier than the singly ionized species.

  9. Numerical studies of wall–plasma interactions and ionization phenomena in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lei [Beijing Research Institute of Precise Mechatronic Controls, Beijing 100076 (China); School of Astronautics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zeng, Guangshang; Huang, Yuping [Beijing Research Institute of Precise Mechatronic Controls, Beijing 100076 (China); Tang, Haibin [School of Astronautics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Xiangyang [School of Aerospace Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Wall–plasma interactions excited by ablation controlled arcs are very critical physical processes in pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs). Their effects on the ionization processes of ablated vapor into discharge plasma directly determine PPT performances. To reveal the physics governing the ionization phenomena in PPT discharge, a modified model taking into account the pyrolysis effect of heated polytetrafluoroethylene propellant on the wall–plasma interactions was developed. The feasibility of the modified model was analyzed by creating a one-dimensional simulation of a rectangular ablative PPT. The wall–plasma interaction results based on this modified model were found to be more realistic than for the unmodified model; this reflects the dynamic changes of the inflow parameters during discharge in our model. Furthermore, the temporal and spatial variations of the different plasma species in the discharge chamber were numerically studied. The numerical studies showed that polytetrafluoroethylene plasma was mainly composed of monovalent ions; carbon and fluorine ions were concentrated in the upstream and downstream discharge chamber, respectively. The results based on this modified model were in good agreement with the experimental formation times of the various plasma species. A large number of short-lived and highly ionized carbon and fluorine species (divalent and trivalent ions) were created during initial discharge. These highly ionized species reached their peak density earlier than the singly ionized species.

  10. Two-dimensional studies of relativistic electron beam plasma instabilities in an inhomogeneous plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita, E-mail: amita@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Patel, Kartik [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Relativistic electron beam propagation in plasma is fraught with several micro instabilities like two stream, filamentation, etc., in plasma. This results in severe limitation of the electron transport through a plasma medium. Recently, however, there has been an experimental demonstration of improved transport of Mega Ampere of electron currents (generated by the interaction of intense laser with solid target) in a carbon nanotube structured solid target [G. Chatterjee et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 235005 (2012)]. This then suggests that the inhomogeneous plasma (created by the ionization of carbon nanotube structured target) helps in containing the growth of the beam plasma instabilities. This manuscript addresses this issue with the help of a detailed analytical study and 2-D Particle-In-Cell simulations. The study conclusively demonstrates that the growth rate of the dominant instability in the 2-D geometry decreases when the plasma density is chosen to be inhomogeneous, provided the scale length 1/k{sub s} of the inhomogeneous plasma is less than the typical plasma skin depth (c/ω{sub 0}) scale. At such small scale lengths channelization of currents is also observed in simulation.

  11. X-ray Studies of Flaring Plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. Sylwester; J. Sylwester; K. J. H. Phillips

    2008-03-01

    We present some methods of X-ray data analysis employed in our laboratory for deducing the physical parameters of flaring plasma. For example, we have used a flare well observed with Polish instrument RESIK aboard Russian CORONAS-F satellite. Based on a careful instrument calibration, the absolute fluxes in a number of individual spectral lines have been obtained. The analysis of these lines allows us to follow the evolution of important thermodynamic parameters characterizing the emitting plasma throughout this flare evolution.

  12. Study on Performance Parameters of the Plasma Source for a Short-Conduction-Time Plasma Opening Switch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Weixi; ZENG Zhengzhong; WANG Liangping; LEI Tianshi; HU Yixiang; HUANG Tao; SUN Tieping

    2012-01-01

    Plasma source performance parameters, including plasma ejection density and velocity, greatly affect the operation of a short-conduction-time plasma opening switch (POS). In this paper, the plasma source used in the POS of Qiangguang I generator is chosen as the study object. At first the POS working process is analyzed. The result shows that the opening performance of the POS can be improved by increasing the plasma ejection velocity and decreasing the plasma density. The influence of the cable plasma gun structure and number on the plasma ejection parameters is experimentally investigated with two charge collectors. Finally a semi-empirical model is proposed to describe the experimental phenomenon.

  13. Studies on Nitrogen Oxides Removal Using Plasma Assisted Catalytic Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. Ravi; Young Sun Mok; B. S. Rajanikanth; Ho-Chul Kang

    2003-01-01

    An electric discharge plasma reactor combined with a catalytic reactor was studied for removing nitrogen oxides. To understand the combined process thoroughly, discharge plasma and catalytic process were separately studied first, and then the two processes were combined for the study. The plasma reactor was able to oxidize NO to NO2 well although the oxidation rate decreased with temperature. The plasma reactor alone did not reduce the NOx (NO+NO2)level effectively, but the increase in the ratio of NO2 to NO as a result of plasma discharge led to the enhancement of NOx removal efficiency even at lower temperatures over the catalyst surface (V2O5-WOa/TiO2). At a gas temperature of 100℃, the NOx removal efficiency obtained using the combined plasma catalytic process was 88% for an energy input of 36 eV/molecule or 30 J/1.

  14. Technical issues in the conduct of large space platform experiments in plasma physics and geoplasma sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuszczewicz, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    Large, permanently-manned space platforms can provide exciting opportunities for discoveries in basic plasma and geoplasma sciences. The potential for these discoveries will depend very critically on the properties of the platform, its subsystems, and their abilities to fulfill a spectrum of scientific requirements. With this in mind, the planning of space station research initiatives and the development of attendant platform engineering should allow for the identification of critical science and technology issues that must be clarified far in advance of space station program implementation. An attempt is made to contribute to that process, with a perspective that looks to the development of the space station as a permanently-manned Spaceborne Ionospheric Weather Station. The development of this concept requires a synergism of science and technology which leads to several critical design issues. To explore the identification of these issues, the development of the concept of an Ionospheric Weather Station will necessarily touch upon a number of diverse areas. These areas are discussed.

  15. Electron cyclotron resonance breakdown studies in a linear plasma system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vipin K Yadav; K Sathyanarayana; D Bora

    2008-03-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma breakdown is studied in a small linear cylindrical system with four different gases - hydrogen, helium, argon and nitrogen. Microwave power in the experimental system is delivered by a magnetron at 2.45 ± 0.02 GHz in TE10 mode and launched radially to have extra-ordinary (X) wave in plasma. The axial magnetic field required for ECR in the system is such that the fundamental ECR surface ( = 875.0 G) resides at the geometrical centre of the plasma system. ECR breakdown parameters such as plasma delay time and plasma decay time from plasma density measurements are carried out at the centre using a Langmuir probe. The operating parameters such as working gas pressure (1 × 10-5 -1 × 10-2 mbar) and input microwave power (160{800 W) are varied and the corresponding effect on the breakdown parameters is studied. The experimental results obtained are presented in this paper.

  16. The upgraded Large Plasma Device, a machine for studying frontier basic plasma physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, W; Pribyl, P; Lucky, Z; Drandell, M; Leneman, D; Maggs, J; Vincena, S; Van Compernolle, B; Tripathi, S K P; Morales, G; Carter, T A; Wang, Y; DeHaas, T

    2016-02-01

    In 1991 a manuscript describing an instrument for studying magnetized plasmas was published in this journal. The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) was upgraded in 2001 and has become a national user facility for the study of basic plasma physics. The upgrade as well as diagnostics introduced since then has significantly changed the capabilities of the device. All references to the machine still quote the original RSI paper, which at this time is not appropriate. In this work, the properties of the updated LAPD are presented. The strategy of the machine construction, the available diagnostics, the parameters available for experiments, as well as illustrations of several experiments are presented here.

  17. The elementary level science methods course: Breeding ground of an apprehension toward science? a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duschl, Richard A.

    Ethnographic research methodologies were used to examine the training of elementary education majors in science in an attempt to gain insight on whether or not their training in science contributes to the apprehension elementary teachers have toward science. The field study consisted of 14 weeks of weekly observations in the elementary education majors science methods class. Interviews with the students and the instructors as well as survey instruments to assess students' preparation in science were used. Two different approaches to the study of science, one content oriented, the other process oriented, may contribute to the students' confusion, insecurity, and avoidance of science. The students' perception that science is learning content, an objective of introductory level science courses, and the science methods class's objectives of teaching science as a process sets up an antagonistic dilemma between the two. Such antagonistic dilemma may be manifest in the lack of instructional time accorded to science by elementary educators. The type of science experiences an individual encounters influences their perceptions. To offset student perceptions developed in science courses which stress principally content, the students need science experiences which truly represent science as inquiry. New strategies for the training of elementary education majors in science need to be examined.

  18. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samulyak, Roman V. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Parks, Paul [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  19. Simulation study of the plasma brake effect

    CERN Document Server

    Janhunen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The plasma brake is a thin negatively biased tether which has been proposed as an efficient concept for deorbiting satellites and debris objects from low Earth orbit. We simulate the interaction with the ionospheric plasma ram flow with the plasma brake tether by a high performance electrostatic particle in cell code to evaluate the thrust. The tether is assumed to be perpendicular to the flow. We perform runs for different tether voltage, magnetic field orientation and plasma ion mass. We show that a simple analytical thrust formula reproduces most of the simulation results well. The interaction with the tether and the plasma flow is laminar when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the tether and the flow. If the magnetic field is parallel to the tether, the behaviour is unstable and thrust is reduced by a modest factor. The case when the magnetic field is aligned with the flow can also be unstable, but does not result in notable thrust reduction. We also fix an error in an earlier reference. According to...

  20. Plasma characterization studies for materials processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    New applications for plasma processing of materials require a more detailed understanding of the fundamental processes occurring in the processing reactors. We have developed reactors offering specific advantages for materials processing, and we are using modeling and diagnostic techniques for the characterization of these reactors. The emphasis is in part set by the interest shown by industry pursuing specific plasma processing applications. In this paper we report on the modeling of radio frequency plasma reactors for use in materials synthesis, and on the characterization of the high rate diamond deposition process using liquid precursors. In the radio frequency plasma torch model, the influence of specific design changes such as the location of the excitation coil on the enthalpy flow distribution is investigated for oxygen and air as plasma gases. The diamond deposition with liquid precursors has identified the efficient mass transport in form of liquid droplets into the boundary layer as responsible for high growth, and the chemical properties of the liquid for the film morphology.

  1. Laboratory study of collisionless coupling between explosive debris plasma and magnetized ambient plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, A. S.; Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Clark, S. E.; Lee, B. R.; Constantin, C. G.; Vincena, S.; Van Compernolle, B.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Winske, D.; Niemann, C.

    2017-08-01

    The explosive expansion of a localized plasma cloud into a relatively tenuous, magnetized, ambient plasma characterizes a variety of astrophysical and space phenomena. In these rarified environments, collisionless electromagnetic processes rather than Coulomb collisions typically mediate the transfer of momentum and energy from the expanding "debris" plasma to the surrounding ambient plasma. In an effort to better understand the detailed physics of collisionless coupling mechanisms, compliment in situ measurements of space phenomena, and provide validation of previous computational and theoretical work, the present research jointly utilizes the Large Plasma Device and the Raptor laser facility at the University of California, Los Angeles to study the super-Alfvénic, quasi-perpendicular expansion of laser-produced carbon (C) and hydrogen (H) debris plasma through preformed, magnetized helium (He) ambient plasma via a variety of diagnostics, including emission spectroscopy, wavelength-filtered imaging, and a magnetic flux probe. Doppler shifts detected in a He1+ ion spectral line indicate that the ambient ions initially accelerate transverse to both the debris plasma flow and the background magnetic field. A qualitative analysis in the framework of a "hybrid" plasma model (kinetic ions and inertia-less fluid electrons) demonstrates that the ambient ion trajectories are consistent with the large-scale laminar electric field expected to develop due to the expanding debris. In particular, the transverse ambient ion motion provides direct evidence of Larmor coupling, a collisionless momentum exchange mechanism that has received extensive theoretical and numerical investigation. In order to quantitatively evaluate the observed Doppler shifts, a custom simulation utilizing a detailed model of the laser-produced debris plasma evolution calculates the laminar electric field and computes the initial response of a distribution of ambient test ions. A synthetic Doppler

  2. Experimental study of the plasma window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ben-Liang; Huang, Sheng; Zhu, Kun; Lu, Yuan-Rong

    2014-01-01

    The plasma window is an advanced apparatus that can work as the interface between a vacuum and a high pressure region. It can be used in many applications that need atmosphere-vacuum interface, such as a gas target, electron beam welding, synchrotron radiation and a spallation neutron source. A test bench of the plasma window is constructed in Peking University. A series of experiments and the corresponding parameter measurements have been presented in this article. The experiment result indicates the feasibility of such a facility acting as an interface between a vacuum and a high pressure region.

  3. Plasma wakefield acceleration studies using the quasi-static code WAKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Neeraj [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Palastro, John [Icarus Research Inc., P.O. Box 30780, Bethesda, Maryland 20824-0780 (United States); Antonsen, T. M. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Mori, Warren B.; An, Weiming [University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The quasi-static code WAKE [P. Mora and T. Antonsen, Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)] is upgraded to model the propagation of an ultra-relativistic charged particle beam through a warm background plasma in plasma wakefield acceleration. The upgraded code is benchmarked against the full particle-in-cell code OSIRIS [Hemker et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top. Accel. Beams 3, 061301 (2000)] and the quasi-static code QuickPIC [Huang et al., J. Comput. Phys. 217, 658 (2006)]. The effect of non-zero plasma temperature on the peak accelerating electric field is studied for a two bunch electron beam driver with parameters corresponding to the plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams. It is shown that plasma temperature does not affect the energy gain and spread of the accelerated particles despite suppressing the peak accelerating electric field. The role of plasma temperature in improving the numerical convergence of the electric field with the grid resolution is discussed.

  4. Numerical studies on divertor plasmas in helical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Noriaki (Mitsubishi Atomic Power Industries, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)); Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae

    1989-12-01

    Scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas in helical systems are studied by using the two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation code. Unified edge divertor analysis code (UEDA code) is applied to the straight helical model of torsatron/helical heliotron configurations. 2D profiles of plasma parameter, neutrals and impurities are obtained. Erosion rate and neutral back flow rate to the core plasma are also evaluated. Various shapes of the buffle plate are examined from the view point of the establishment of 'dense-cold divertor plasma' by which we can avoid the damage of the target plate. (author).

  5. A Study of the Science Production in Dentistry Using Web of Science Database (2000-2009)

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Science production in medical fields such as dentistry is of great significance. Science production can be appropriately directed through recognition of the most effective investigations, the most active institutions and countries in science production domain and also determining the status of specialists. Purpose: The aim of this survey was to study the rate of dental science production indexed in the Web of Science (WOS) database by Iranian and other countries' special...

  6. Computational studies of plasma lipoprotein lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lurong; Segrest, Jere P

    2016-10-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are macromolecular assemblies of proteins and lipids found in the blood. The lipid components of lipoproteins are amphipathic lipids such as phospholipids (PLs), and unesterified cholesterols (UCs) and hydrophobic lipids such as cholesteryl esters (CEs) and triglycerides (TGs). Since lipoproteins are soft matter supramolecular assemblies easily deformable by thermal fluctuations and they also exist in varying densities and protein/lipid components, a detailed understanding of their structure/function is experimentally difficult. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has emerged as a particularly promising way to explore the structure and dynamics of lipoproteins. The purpose of this review is to survey the current status of computational studies of the lipid components of the lipoproteins. Computational studies aim to explore three levels of complexity for the 3-dimensional structural dynamics of lipoproteins at various metabolic stages: (i) lipoprotein particles consist of protein with minimal lipid; (ii) lipoprotein particles consist of PL-rich discoidal bilayer-like lipid particles; (iii) mature circulating lipoprotein particles consist of CE-rich or TG-rich spheroidal lipid-droplet-like particles. Due to energy barriers involved in conversion between these species, other biomolecules also participate in lipoprotein biological assembly. For example: (i) lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) interacts with ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) to produce nascent discoidal high density lipoprotein (dHDL) particles; (ii) lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) mediates the conversion of UC to CE in dHDL, driving spheroidal HDL (sHDL) formation; (iii) transfer proteins, cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), transfer both CE and TG and PL, respectively, between lipoprotein particles. Computational studies have the potential to explore different lipoprotein particles at each metabolic stage in

  7. Experimental Study of Plasma/Propellant Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    silica windows from ESCO Products (one is 1/16” thick, whereas the other is 3/16” thick); this window material is very pure and allows transmission...0.92 at 200 nm to 0.94 at 700 nm (data from ESCO Products). Hence, the effect of the direction of the radiant energy emitted by the plasma on the

  8. Transport Studies in Fusion Plasmas - Perturbative Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, N. J. L.

    1994-01-01

    By subjecting a plasma in steady state to small perturbations and measuring the response, it is possible to determine elements of the matrix of transport coefficients. Experimentally this is difficult, and results are mainly limited to tranpsport driven by the pressure and temperature gradients. Imp

  9. Transport studies in fusion plasmas: Perturbative experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, N. J. L.

    1996-01-01

    By subjecting a plasma in steady state to small perturbations and measuring the response, it is possible to determine elements of the matrix of transport coefficients. Experimentally this is difficult, and results are mainly limited to tranpsport driven by the pressure and temperature gradients. Imp

  10. Computational Plasma Physics at the Bleeding Edge: Simulating Kinetic Turbulence Dynamics in Fusion Energy Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, William

    2013-04-01

    Advanced computing is generally recognized to be an increasingly vital tool for accelerating progress in scientific research in the 21st Century. The imperative is to translate the combination of the rapid advances in super-computing power together with the emergence of effective new algorithms and computational methodologies to help enable corresponding increases in the physics fidelity and the performance of the scientific codes used to model complex physical systems. If properly validated against experimental measurements and verified with mathematical tests and computational benchmarks, these codes can provide more reliable predictive capability for the behavior of complex systems, including fusion energy relevant high temperature plasmas. The magnetic fusion energy research community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale very well with the number of processors on massively parallel supercomputers. A good example is the effective usage of the full power of modern leadership class computational platforms from the terascale to the petascale and beyond to produce nonlinear particle-in-cell simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of plasma turbulence in magnetically-confined high temperature plasmas. Illustrative results provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics in extreme-scale computing campaigns to enable predictive simulations with unprecedented physics fidelity. Some illustrative examples will be presented of the algorithmic progress from the magnetic fusion energy sciences area in dealing with low memory per core extreme scale computing challenges for the current top 3 supercomputers worldwide. These include advanced CPU systems (such as the IBM-Blue-Gene-Q system and the Fujitsu K Machine) as well as the GPU-CPU hybrid system (Titan).

  11. Studying surface glow discharge for application in plasma aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshonok, D. V.

    2014-02-01

    Surface glow discharge in nitrogen between two infinite planar electrodes occurring on the same plane has been studied in the framework of a diffusion-drift model. Based on the results of numerical simulations, the plasma structure of this discharge is analyzed and the possibility of using it in plasma aerodynamics is considered.

  12. Numerical Studies of High-Z Plasma in the HyperV Plasma Guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Linchun; Messer, Sarah; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Welch, Dale; Thoma, Carsten; Phillips, Mike; Bogatu, I. Nick; Galkin, Sergei; Macfarlane, Joe; Golovkin, Igor

    2010-11-01

    Numerical studies of railguns and coaxial guns at HyperV Technologies Corp. include simulations of hypervelocity plasma transport in the gun, plasma expansion out of the nozzle, and two or more jets merging in vacuum. Plasma detachment, merging jets temperature and charge state evolution are examined in these processes. High-Z materials, such as argon and xenon, are used throughout these simulations. The plasma moves with an initial velocity of 0-10 km/s (80-100 km/s for jet merging), the initial number density ranges from 10^15cm-3 to 10^18cm-3, and the merging jets are several centimeters in radius. The LSP code is used to perform the simulations using improved fluid algorithms and equation-of-state models from Voss and atomic data from Prism.

  13. Study of positive and negative plasma catalytic oxidation of ethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wesenbeeck, K; Hauchecorne, B; Lenaerts, S

    2017-06-01

    The effect of introducing a photocatalytically active coating inside a plasma unit is investigated. This technique combines the advantages of high product selectivity from catalysis and the fast start-up from plasma technology. In this study, a preselected TiO2 coating is applied on the collector electrode of a DC corona discharge unit as non-thermal plasma reactor, in order to study the oxidation of ethylene. For both positive and negative polarities an enhanced mineralization is observed while the formation of by-products drastically decreases. The plasma catalytic unit gave the best results when using negative polarity at a voltage of 15 kV. This shows the potential of plasma catalysis as indoor air purification technology.

  14. Do compulsory secondary science courses change students’ attitude towards studying science?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lærke Elisabeth; Petersen, Morten Rask

    Subject course. The distribution included all levels (K10-K12) and all study lines. Student answers were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U-test using SPSS statistics 22 as analytical tool. Comparisons for this study were made across study lines (natural science vs. human science & social science...... science courses and non-science students argue that they would rather not have NSS since they already chose another direction of their study. Students’ responses to our questions seem to go in different directions. Our results show that the students find the compulsory science course relevant...... recruitment to STEM education has been a compulsory course in the Gymnasium called Natural Science Subject (NSS). This is an interdisciplinary, introductory course with the intention that students shall “ … realize the importance of knowing and understanding natural science thinking” (Authors translation...

  15. Do compulsory secondary science courses change students’ attitude towards studying science?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lærke Elisabeth; Petersen, Morten Rask

    2015-01-01

    Subject course. The distribution included all levels (K10-K12) and all study lines. Student answers were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U-test using SPSS statistics 22 as analytical tool. Comparisons for this study were made across study lines (natural science vs. human science & social science...... science courses and non-science students argue that they would rather not have NSS since they already chose another direction of their study. Students’ responses to our questions seem to go in different directions. Our results show that the students find the compulsory science course relevant...... recruitment to STEM education has been a compulsory course in the Gymnasium called Natural Science Subject (NSS). This is an interdisciplinary, introductory course with the intention that students shall “ … realize the importance of knowing and understanding natural science thinking” (Authors translation...

  16. A comparative study of six decades of general science textbooks: Evaluating the evolution of science content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Anna

    This study examined science textbooks over time to better understand the science content expectations that the U.S. educational system deems appropriate for 8th and 9th grade science students. The study attempted to answer the questions: (1) What specific science content has been presented via the textbook from 1952 to 2008? (2) Within which areas and in what way does the science content change? (3) Are new scientific findings reflected in 8th and 9th grade U.S. general science textbooks? Twenty-six themes were identified which reflect five areas in science: Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science, Biology, and Process of Science. Trends in science content in U.S. 8th and 9th grade general science textbooks, as revealed by this data sample, indicated no statistically significant change in depth of coverage in Physics and Process of Science over the past 60 years, no significant change in depth of coverage in Earth Science and Biology in the last 40 years, and no significant change in coverage in Chemistry over the last 30 years. Additionally, a total of sixteen new discoveries were found in the textbook sample. For classroom teachers this information may alert them to the necessity of going beyond the textbook in preparing students for life in a global society. In educational practice, this research supports and reinforces the need for inquiry learning and socioscientific curricula. It may also influence educators to challenge assumptions regarding the value and selection of the traditional classic science content.

  17. Study of MHD activities in the plasma of SST-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhongde, Jasraj; Bhandarkar, Manisha; Pradhan, Subrata, E-mail: pradhan@ipr.res.in; Kumar, Sameer

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • An account of MHD activity in the plasma of SST-1 • Observation of MHD instabilities with mode m = 2, n = 1 in SST-1 plasma. • MHD instabilities study of characteristic growth time, growth rate of island and island width etc. in SST-1 plasma. - Abstract: Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) is a medium size Tokamak in operation at the Institute for Plasma Research, India. SST-1 has been consistently producing plasma currents in excess of 60 kA, with plasma durations above 400 ms and a central magnetic field of 1.5 T over last few experimental campaigns of 2014. Investigation of these experimental data suggests the presence of MHD activity in the SST-1 plasma. Further analysis clearly explains the behavior of MHD instabilities observed (i.e. tearing modes with m = 2, n = 1), estimating the growth rate and the island width in the SST-1 plasma. Poloidal magnetic field and Toroidal magnetic field fluctuations in SST-1 are observed using Mirnov coils. Onsets of disruptions in connection with MHD activities have been correlated with other diagnostics such as ECE, Density and Hα etc. The observations have been cross compared with the theoretical calculations and are found to be in good agreement.

  18. Guest investigator program study: Physics of equatorial plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Roland T.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma bubbles are large-scale (10 to 100 km) depletions in plasma density found in the night-time equatorial ionosphere. Their formation has been found to entail the upward transport of plasma over hundreds of kilometers in altitude, suggesting that bubbles play significant roles in the physics of many of the diverse and unique features found in the low-latitude ionosphere. In the simplest scenario, plasma bubbles appear first as perturbations in the bottomside F layer, which is linearly unstable to the gravitationally driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Once initiated, bubbles develop upward through the peak of the F layer into its topside (sometimes to altitudes in excess of 1000 km), a behavior predicted by the nonlinear form of the same instability. While good general agreement has been found between theory and observations, little is known about the detailed physics associated with plasma bubbles. Our research activity centered around two topics: the shape of plasma bubbles and associated electric fields, and the day-to-day variability in the occurrence of plasma bubbles. The first topic was pursued because of a divergence in view regarding the nonlinear physics associated with plasma bubble development. While the development of perturbations in isodensity contours in the bottomside F layer into plasma bubbles is well accepted, some believed bubbles to be cylinder-like closed regions of depleted plasma density that floated upward leaving a turbulent wake behind them (e.g., Woodman and LaHoz, 1976; Ott, 1978; Kelley and Ott, 1978). Our results, summarized in a paper submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research, consisted of incoherent scatter radar measurements that showed unambiguously that the depleted region is wedgelike and not cylinderlike, and a case study and modeling of SM-D electric field instrument (EFI) measurements that showed that the absence of electric-field perturbations outside the plasma-depleted region is a distinct signature of wedge

  19. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  20. The Danish Association for Science and Technology Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A presentation of the Danish Association for Science and Technology Studies (DASTS). Organization, experiences, challenges and future developments.......A presentation of the Danish Association for Science and Technology Studies (DASTS). Organization, experiences, challenges and future developments....

  1. Theoretical study of plasma confinement by magnetic multicusp field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Forest, Cary

    2014-10-01

    Plasma confinement in a magnetic multicusp field is studied numerically using both collisional particle-in-cell and isothermal two-fluid MHD codes and tested against the empirical model. The simulation domain is two-dimensional, periodic in one direction and bounded by absorbing boundaries with multicups field in other direction. First, we study the dependence of plasma loss width on plasma parameters and field strength and compare the results with the well-known empirical formula w = 2√{ρeρi } (two hybrid gyro-radius). Our results show that the loss width has the same scaling with magnetic field w ~ 1 / B , but dependence on other plasma parameters does not agree with this formula. Second, we study the plasma flow drive in the cusp region due to electric field applied by discrete electrodes. The electrode positions are optimized for achieving the highest plasma flow. Comparison with available experimental data from Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) is made. The work is supported by NSF and DoE.

  2. Transition of the BELLA PW laser system towards a collaborative research facility in laser plasma science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Csaba; Evans, Dave; Gonsalves, Anthony J.; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Magana, Art; Mannino, Greg; Mao, Hann-Shin; Nakamura, Kei; Riley, Joe R.; Steinke, Sven; Sipla, Tyler; Syversrud, Don; Ybarrolaza, Nathan; Leemans, Wim P.

    2017-03-01

    The advancement of Laser-Plasma Accelerators (LPA) requires systematic studies with ever increasing precision and reproducibility. A key component of such a research endeavor is a facility that provides reliable, well characterized laser sources, flexible target systems, and comprehensive diagnostics of the laser pulses, the interaction region, and the produced electron beams. The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA), a PW laser facility, now routinely provides high quality focused laser pulses for high precision experiments. A description of the commissioning process, the layout of the laser systems, the major components of the laser and radiation protection systems, and a summary of early results are given. Further scientific plans and highlights of operational experience that serve as the basis for transition to a collaborative research facility in high-peak power laser-plasma interaction research are reviewed.

  3. Doing Science Their Way: An Ethnographic Study of Sixth Grade Girls' Engagement with School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuriceo, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the experiences and perspectives of sixth grade girls in a moderately-sized East Coast city as they construct meaning through active engagement in a science classroom and analyzes the ways in which girls change roles and incorporate social interaction during science activities to create their own unique engagement in science.…

  4. Reel Science: An Ethnographic Study of Girls' Science Identity Development in and through Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Rachel L.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation study contributes to the research on filmmaking and identity development by exploring the ways that film production provided unique opportunities for a team of four girls to engage in science, to develop identities in science, and to see and understand science differently. Using social practice, identity, and feminist theory and…

  5. Doing Science Their Way: An Ethnographic Study of Sixth Grade Girls' Engagement with School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuriceo, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the experiences and perspectives of sixth grade girls in a moderately-sized East Coast city as they construct meaning through active engagement in a science classroom and analyzes the ways in which girls change roles and incorporate social interaction during science activities to create their own unique engagement in science.…

  6. Bourdieu and Science Studies: Toward a Reflexive Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Two of Bourdieu's fundamental contributions to science studies--the reflexive analysis of the social and human sciences and the concept of an intellectual field--are used to frame a reflexive study of the history and social studies of science and technology as an intellectual field in the United States. The universe of large, Ph.D.-granting…

  7. Low Temperature Plasma Science: Not Only the Fourth State of Matter but All of Them. Report of the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Workshop on Low Temperature Plasmas, March 25-57, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-09-01

    Low temperature plasma science (LTPS) is a field on the verge of an intellectual revolution. Partially ionized plasmas (often referred to as gas discharges) are used for an enormous range of practical applications, from light sources and lasers to surgery and making computer chips, among many others. The commercial and technical value of low temperature plasmas (LTPs) is well established. Modern society would simply be less advanced in the absence of LTPs. Much of this benefit has resulted from empirical development. As the technology becomes more complex and addresses new fields, such as energy and biotechnology, empiricism rapidly becomes inadequate to advance the state of the art. The focus of this report is that which is less well understood about LTPs - namely, that LTPS is a field rich in intellectually exciting scientific challenges and that addressing these challenges will result in even greater societal benefit by placing the development of plasma technologies on a solid science foundation. LTPs are unique environments in many ways. Their nonequilibrium and chemically active behavior deviate strongly from fully ionized plasmas, such as those found in magnetically confined fusion or high energy density plasmas. LTPs are strongly affected by the presence of neutral species-chemistry adds enormous complexity to the plasma environment. A weakly to partially ionized gas is often characterized by strong nonequilibrium in the velocity and energy distributions of its neutral and charged constituents. In nonequilibrium LTP, electrons are generally hot (many to tens of electron volts), whereas ions and neutrals are cool to warm (room temperature to a few tenths of an electron volt). Ions and neutrals in thermal LTP can approach or exceed an electron volt in temperature. At the same time, ions may be accelerated across thin sheath boundary layers to impact surfaces, with impact energies ranging up to thousands of electron volts. These moderately energetic electrons

  8. Reel Science: An Ethnographic Study of Girls' Science Identity Development In and Through Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Rachel L.

    This dissertation study contributes to the research on filmmaking and identity development by exploring the ways that film production provided unique opportunities for a team of four girls to engage in science, to develop identities in science, and to see and understand science differently. Using social practice, identity, and feminist theory and New Literacies Studies as a theoretical lens and grounded theory and multimodality as analytic frameworks, I present findings that suggest that girls in this study authored identities and communicated and represented science in and through film in ways that drew on their social, cultural, and embodied resources and the material resources of the after-school science club. Findings from this study highlight the affordances of filmmaking as a venue for engaging in the disciplinary practices of science and for accessing and authoring identities in science.

  9. Proceeding of 1999-workshop on MHD computations 'study on numerical methods related to plasma confinement'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kako, T.; Watanabe, T. [eds.

    2000-06-01

    This is the proceeding of 'study on numerical methods related to plasma confinement' held in National Institute for Fusion Science. In this workshop, theoretical and numerical analyses of possible plasma equilibria with their stability properties are presented. There are also various lectures on mathematical as well as numerical analyses related to the computational methods for fluid dynamics and plasma physics. Separate abstracts were presented for 13 of the papers in this report. The remaining 6 were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (J.P.N.)

  10. Megagauss field generation for high-energy-density plasma science experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovang, Dean Curtis; Struve, Kenneth William; Porter, John Larry Jr.

    2008-10-01

    There is a need to generate magnetic fields both above and below 1 megagauss (100 T) with compact generators for laser-plasma experiments in the Beamlet and Petawatt test chambers for focused research on fundamental properties of high energy density magnetic plasmas. Some of the important topics that could be addressed with such a capability are magnetic field diffusion, particle confinement, plasma instabilities, spectroscopic diagnostic development, material properties, flux compression, and alternate confinement schemes, all of which could directly support experiments on Z. This report summarizes a two-month study to develop preliminary designs of magnetic field generators for three design regimes. These are, (1) a design for a relatively low-field (10 to 50 T), compact generator for modest volumes (1 to 10 cm3), (2) a high-field (50 to 200 T) design for smaller volumes (10 to 100 mm3), and (3) an extreme field (greater than 600 T) design that uses flux compression. These designs rely on existing Sandia pulsed-power expertise and equipment, and address issues of magnetic field scaling with capacitor bank design and field inductance, vacuum interface, and trade-offs between inductance and coil designs.

  11. Studying Science and Engineering Learning in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penuel, William R.

    2016-01-01

    A key goal of science and engineering education is to provide opportunities for people to access, interpret, and make use of science and engineering to address practical human needs. Most education research, however, focuses on how best to prepare students in schools to participate in forms of science and engineering practices that resemble those…

  12. Surface science studies of metal hexaborides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenary, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Over 30 years of surface science research on metal hexaborides are reviewed. Of this class of compounds, lanthanum hexaboride has been the subject of the majority of the studies because of its outstanding properties as a thermionic emitter. The use of LaB6 cathodes as an electron source stems from the unusually low work function of ~2.5 eV for the (100) surface combined with a low evaporation rate at high temperatures. Of particular interest has been the determination of the surface geometric and electronic structure responsible for the low work function and how the work function is affected by various adsorbates. The low-index faces of single crystals of LaB6 and other hexaborides have been studied with a variety of ultrahigh vacuum surface science methods to gain a better understanding of the structure and properties of the clean surfaces as well as their interactions with gases such as O2, H2O and CO.

  13. Surface science studies of metal hexaborides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Trenary

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 30 years of surface science research on metal hexaborides are reviewed. Of this class of compounds, lanthanum hexaboride has been the subject of the majority of the studies because of its outstanding properties as a thermionic emitter. The use of LaB6 cathodes as an electron source stems from the unusually low work function of ~2.5 eV for the (100 surface combined with a low evaporation rate at high temperatures. Of particular interest has been the determination of the surface geometric and electronic structure responsible for the low work function and how the work function is affected by various adsorbates. The low-index faces of single crystals of LaB6 and other hexaborides have been studied with a variety of ultrahigh vacuum surface science methods to gain a better understanding of the structure and properties of the clean surfaces as well as their interactions with gases such as O2, H2O and CO.

  14. Final technical report on studies of plasma transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Neil, T.M.; Driscoll, C.F.; Malmberg, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    This document gives an overview of the scientific results obtained under the DOE grant, and references the journal articles which give more complete descriptions of the various topics. Recently, the research has been focused on 2-dimensional vortices and turbulence: experiments using a new camera-diagnosed electron plasma apparatus have given surprising results which both clarify and challenge theories. Here, the crossfield E x B flow of the electron plasma is directly analogous to the 2-d flow of an ideal fluid such as water, and may also give insight into more complicated poloidal flows exhibited in toroidal plasmas. The shear-flow instabilities, turbulence, and vortices can be accurately observed, and the free relaxation of this turbulence has been characterized. The physical processes underlying the complicated turbulent evolution can also be studied in more controlled near-linear regimes. The original experimental focus of this program was on radial particle transport from applied external field asymmetries. Here, this research program clearly identified the importance of the collective response of the plasma, giving smaller fields from shielding, or enhanced fields from resonant modes. Experiments and theory work have also elucidated the flow of a plasma along the magnetic field. Finally, some theory was pursued for direct application to fusion plasmas, and to gravitating gas clouds in astrophysics. This program was highly successful in clarifying basic plasma transport processes.

  15. Surface Plasma Arc by Radio-Frequency Control Study (SPARCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzic, David N. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2013-04-29

    This paper is to summarize the work carried out between April 2012 and April 2013 for development of an experimental device to simulate interactions of o -normal detrimental events in a tokamak and ICRF antenna. The work was mainly focused on development of a pulsed plasma source using theta pinch and coaxial plasma gun. This device, once completed, will have a possible application as a test stand for high voltage breakdown of an ICRF antenna in extreme events in a tokamak such as edge-localized modes or disruption. Currently, DEVeX does not produce plasma with high temperature enough to requirement for an ELM simulator. However, theta pinch is a good way to produce high temperature ions. The unique characteristic of plasma heating by a theta pinch is advantageous for an ELM simulator due to its effective ion heating. The objective of the proposed work, therefore, is to build a test facility using the existing theta pinch facility in addition to a coaxial plasma gun. It is expected to produce a similar pulsed-plasma heat load to the extreme events in tokamaks and to be applied for studying interactions of hot plasma and ICRF antennas.

  16. Plasma opening switch studies of an applied Bz ion diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struckman, C. K.; Kusse, B. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Rondeau, G.

    1989-05-01

    The light ion accelerator (1.5 MV, 4 ohms) at Cornell University is being used to study the characteristics of an applied Bz, or 'barrel', diode. The results of a series of experiments utilizing a plasma opening switch are reported. With a magnetically insulated ion diode load, the peak diode voltage increase from 1.5 to 1.8 MV and the ion power increased from 50 to 80 GW when a plasma opening switch was used.

  17. Heat transfer in earth science studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Chu, T.Y. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1990-01-01

    Earth scientists have long recognized that quantitative models of heat and mass transfer are fundamental to understanding many geophysical phenomena. Transport models have been used to simulate a wide range of earth processes from the crystallization of rock melts to those global mechanisms responsible for driving lithospheric plates and the geodynamo. Since the elegant conductive cooling models of igneous instrusions by Lovering and Jaeger in the 1930's and 1940's, calculations have evolved in their sophistication with the realization of the importance of convective transport and the advent of new methods and supercomputers. Many of the modeling techniques currently used by geoscientists have been adapted from techniques that were originally developed to solve engineering problems. Processes, such as those involving magma transport in volcanic systems, may often be understood by establishing their dynamical similarity with a well-studied engineering application. This book contains a series of papers regarding heat transfer and earth science studies.

  18. Social Studies of Science: Society Crosses Disciplinary Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, John

    1977-01-01

    Topics of discussion at the third annual meeting of the Society of Social Studies of Science are presented. Differences in viewpoints and opinions between sociologists, science philosophers who comprise the organization are discussed. (CP)

  19. African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences. ... in Mathematics and Sciences (AJESMS) is an international publication for works of ... the world with the goings-on in research endeavours and original thoughts in these ...

  20. Laser-plasmas in the relativistic-transparency regime: Science and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Juan C.; Cort Gautier, D.; Huang, Chengkung; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; Albright, Brian J.; Bang, Woosuk; Dyer, Gilliss; Favalli, Andrea; Hunter, James F.; Mendez, Jacob; Roth, Markus; Swinhoe, Martyn; Bradley, Paul A.; Deppert, Oliver; Espy, Michelle; Falk, Katerina; Guler, Nevzat; Hamilton, Christopher; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, Randall P.; Kleinschmidt, Annika; Losko, Adrian S.; McCary, Edward; Mocko, Michal; Nelson, Ronald O.; Roycroft, Rebecca; Santiago Cordoba, Miguel A.; Schanz, Victor A.; Schaumann, Gabriel; Schmidt, Derek W.; Sefkow, Adam; Shimada, Tsutomu; Taddeucci, Terry N.; Tebartz, Alexandra; Vogel, Sven C.; Vold, Erik; Wurden, Glen A.; Yin, Lin

    2017-05-01

    Laser-plasma interactions in the novel regime of relativistically induced transparency (RIT) have been harnessed to generate intense ion beams efficiently with average energies exceeding 10 MeV/nucleon (>100 MeV for protons) at "table-top" scales in experiments at the LANL Trident Laser. By further optimization of the laser and target, the RIT regime has been extended into a self-organized plasma mode. This mode yields an ion beam with much narrower energy spread while maintaining high ion energy and conversion efficiency. This mode involves self-generation of persistent high magnetic fields (˜104 T, according to particle-in-cell simulations of the experiments) at the rear-side of the plasma. These magnetic fields trap the laser-heated multi-MeV electrons, which generate a high localized electrostatic field (˜0.1 T V/m). After the laser exits the plasma, this electric field acts on a highly structured ion-beam distribution in phase space to reduce the energy spread, thus separating acceleration and energy-spread reduction. Thus, ion beams with narrow energy peaks at up to 18 MeV/nucleon are generated reproducibly with high efficiency (≈5%). The experimental demonstration has been done with 0.12 PW, high-contrast, 0.6 ps Gaussian 1.053 μm laser pulses irradiating planar foils up to 250 nm thick at 2-8 × 1020 W/cm2. These ion beams with co-propagating electrons have been used on Trident for uniform volumetric isochoric heating to generate and study warm-dense matter at high densities. These beam plasmas have been directed also at a thick Ta disk to generate a directed, intense point-like Bremsstrahlung source of photons peaked at ˜2 MeV and used it for point projection radiography of thick high density objects. In addition, prior work on the intense neutron beam driven by an intense deuterium beam generated in the RIT regime has been extended. Neutron spectral control by means of a flexible converter-disk design has been demonstrated, and the neutron beam has

  1. An Experimental Study of Microwave Transmission through a Decaying Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    pulse capable of plasma reionization is applied across the plasma column at varying times in the plasma’s decay phase (the plasma after- glow). We have...lorf) An rf pulse capable of plasma reionization is applied across the plasma column at varying times in the plasma’s decay phase (the plasma...CHAPTER 1. THEORETICAL DISCUSSION ................................ 9 1.1 PLASMA IONIZATION ................................. 9 1.2 PLASMA REIONIZATION

  2. Science comics as tools for science education and communication: a brief, exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tatalovic

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Comics are a popular art form especially among children and as such provide a potential medium for science education and communication. In an attempt to present science comics in a museum exhibit I found many science themed comics and graphic books. Here I attempt to provide an overview of already available comics that communicate science, the genre of ‘science comics’. I also provide a quick literature review for evidence that comics can indeed be efficiently used for promoting scientific literacy via education and communication. I address the issue of lack of studies about science comics and their readers and suggest some possible reasons for this as well as some questions that could be addressed in future studies on the effect these comics may have on science communication.

  3. New concepts of science and medicine in science and technology studies and their relevance to science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiu-Yun; Stocker, Joel F; Fu, Daiwie

    2012-02-01

    Science education often adopts a narrow view of science that assumes the lay public is ignorant, which seemingly justifies a science education limited to a promotional narrative of progress in the form of scientific knowledge void of meaningful social context. We propose that to prepare students as future concerned citizens of a technoscientific society, science education should be informed by science, technology, and society (STS) perspectives. An STS-informed science education, in our view, will include the following curricular elements: science controversy education, gender issues, historical perspective, and a move away from a Eurocentric view by looking into the distinctive patterns of other regional (in this case of Taiwan, East Asian) approaches to science, technology, and medicine. This article outlines the significance of some major STS studies as a means of illustrating the ways in which STS perspectives can, if incorporated into science education, enhance our understanding of science and technology and their relationships with society. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Raman spectroscopic study of plasma-treated salmon DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Geon Joon; Kim, Yong Hee; Choi, Eun Ha [Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young-Wan [Department of Chemistry, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-14

    In this research, we studied the effect of plasma treatment on the optical/structural properties of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from salmon sperm. DNA-cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) films were obtained by complexation of DNA with CTMA. Circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectra indicated that DNA retained its double helical structure in the solid film. The Raman spectra exhibited several vibration modes corresponding to the nuclear bases and the deoxyribose-phosphate backbones of the DNA, as well as the alkylchains of CTMA. Dielectric-barrier-discharge (DBD) plasma treatment induced structural modification and damage to the DNA, as observed by changes in the ultraviolet-visible absorption, CD, and Raman spectra. The optical emission spectra of the DBD plasma confirmed that DNA modification was induced by plasma ions such as reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species.

  5. Study on electrolytic plasma discharging behavior and its influence on the plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Riyad Omran

    In this study, aluminum oxide was deposited on a pure aluminum substrate to produce hard ceramic coatings using a Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) process. The process utilized DC, unipolar pulsed DC in the frequency range (0.2 KHz -- 20 KHz) and bipolar pulsed DC current modes. The effects of process parameters (i.e., electrolyte concentration, current density and treatment time) on the plasma discharge behavior during the PEO treatment were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the visible and near ultraviolet (NUV) band (285 nm -- 900 nm). The emission spectra were recorded and plasma temperature profile versus processing time was constructed using the line intensity ratios method. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS) was used to study the coating microstructure. It was found that the plasma discharge behavior significantly influenced the microstructure and the morphology of the oxide coatings. The main effect came from the strongest discharges which were initiated at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Through manipulation of process parameters to control or reduce the strongest discharge, the density and quality of the coating layers could be modified. This work demonstrated that by adjusting the ratio of the positive to negative pulse currents as well as their timing in order to eliminate the strongest discharges, the quality of the coatings was considerably improved.

  6. Comparing Science Process Skills of Prospective Science Teachers: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsakoglu, Omer Faruk; Sahin, Cigdem; Karsli, Fethiye

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted with the purpose of examining how Prospective Science Teachers' (PST) Science Process Skills (SPS) develop according to different grades. In this study, a cross-sectional research approach in the form of a case study was used. The sample group consisted of a total number of 102 undergraduate students who were selected from…

  7. Study on the ignition process of a segmented plasma torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiuquan; Yu, Deping; Xiang, Yong; Li, Chao; Jiang, Hui; Yao, Jin

    2017-07-01

    Direct current plasma torches have been applied to generate unique sources of thermal energy in many industrial applications. Nevertheless, the successful ignition of a plasma torch is the key process to generate the unique source (plasma jet). However, there has been little study on the underlying mechanism of this key process. A thorough understanding of the ignition process of a plasma torch will be helpful for optimizing the design of the plasma torch structure and selection of the ignition parameters to prolong the service life of the ignition module. Thus, in this paper, the ignition process of a segmented plasma torch (SPT) is theoretically and experimentally modeled and analyzed. Corresponding electrical models of different stages of the ignition process are set up and used to derive the electrical parameters, e.g. the variations of the arc voltage and arc current between the cathode and anode. In addition, the experiments with different ignition parameters on a home-made SPT have been conducted. At the same time, the variations of the arc voltage and arc current have been measured, and used to verify the ones derived in theory and to determine the optimal ignition parameters for a particular SPT.

  8. An experimental study of icing control using DBD plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jinsheng; Tian, Yongqiang; Meng, Xuanshi; Han, Xuzhao; Zhang, Duo; Hu, Haiyang

    2017-08-01

    Ice accretion on aircraft or wind turbine has been widely recognized as a big safety threat in the past decades. This study aims to develop a new approach for icing control using an AC-DBD plasma actuator. The experiments of icing control (i.e., anti-/de-icing) on a cylinder model were conducted in an icing wind tunnel with controlled wind speed (i.e., 15 m/s) and temperature (i.e., -10°C). A digital camera was used to record the dynamic processes of plasma anti-icing and de-icing whilst an infrared imaging system was utilized to map the surface temperature variations during the anti-/de-icing processes. It was found that the AC-DBD plasma actuator is very effective in both anti-icing and de-icing operations. While no ice formation was observed when the plasma actuator served as an anti-icing device, a complete removal of the ice layer with a thickness of 5 mm was achieved by activating the plasma actuator for ˜150 s. Such information demonstrated the feasibility of plasma anti-/de-icing, which could potentially provide more effective and safer icing mitigation strategies.

  9. Skin and plasma autofluorescence during hemodialysis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graaff, Reindert; Arsov, Stefan; Ramsauer, Bernd; Koetsier, Marten; Sundvall, Nils; Engels, Gerwin E; Sikole, Aleksandar; Lundberg, Lennart; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Stegmayr, Bernd

    2014-06-01

    Skin autofluorescence (AF) is related to the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and is one of the strongest prognostic markers of mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether changes in skin AF appear after a single HD session and if they might be related to changes in plasma AF. Skin and plasma AF were measured before and after HD in 35 patients on maintenance HD therapy (nine women and 26 men, median age 68 years, range 33-83). Median dialysis time was 4 h (range 3-5.5). Skin AF was measured noninvasively with an AGE Reader, and plasma AF was measured before and after HD at 460 nm after excitation at 370 nm. The HD patients had on average a 65% higher skin AF value than age-matched healthy persons (P < 0.001). Plasma AF was reduced by 14% (P < 0.001), whereas skin AF was not changed after a single HD treatment. No significant influence of the reduced plasma AF on skin AF levels was found. This suggests that the measurement of skin AF can be performed during the whole dialysis period and is not directly influenced by the changes in plasma AF during HD.

  10. International, prospective haemovigilance study on methylene blue-treated plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noens, L; Vilariño, Ma D; Megalou, A; Qureshi, H

    2017-05-01

    Methylene blue is a phenothiazine dye, which in combination with visible light has virucidal and bactericidal properties, disrupting the replication of a broad range of enveloped viruses and some non-enveloped viruses. The study objective was to collect data on adverse reactions occurring with methylene blue plasma administered in a routine clinical practice environment and document their characteristics and severity. This was an open label, multicentre, non-controlled, non-randomized, non-interventional study. Patients who receive a methylene blue plasma transfusion were observed for any signs and symptoms (adverse reactions) within 24 h safter the start of the transfusion, in different hospitals for a study duration of at least 1 year. A total of 19 315 methylene blue plasma units were transfused. There were eight patients with adverse reactions recorded during the study, one of them serious. Two had more than one reaction (two and four, respectively). Three patients had previous transfusions with methylene blue plasma only. Methylene blue plasma has a very acceptable safety profile with a rate of serious adverse reactions of 0·5/10 000 units. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  11. Universal Access to Science Study via Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Edward A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Internet learning opportunities via the National Science Foundation-supported New Jersey Networking Infrastructure in Education project are described. Their data-centered approach to science and math skills instruction is illustrated by two examples from each of the three styles of activities: (1) collaboration; (2) using public domain databases;…

  12. Incorporating formative assessment and science content into elementary science methods---A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Derek John

    Just as elementary students enter the science classroom with prior knowledge and experiences, so do preservice elementary teachers who enter the science methods classroom. Elementary science methods instructors recognize the challenges associated with preparing teachers for the science classroom. Two of these challenges include overcoming limited science content understanding and a low science teaching efficacy. Based upon research in science misconceptions, conceptual change theory, formative assessment, and science teaching efficacy, this design experiment explored the use of formative assessment in an authentic learning environment to address some of these challenges. As a case study, the goal was to identify two specific topics in science which the preservice teachers did not understand and to model consistent use of formative assessment to guide instruction in those science topics for six weeks. The research questions for this study sought to explore the design of the class while also exploring students' understanding of the science content and their understanding of formative assessment. One specific question was whether the formative data could differentiate between deeply held student misconceptions in science and incomplete science understanding. In addition, data was collected to measure changes in science teaching efficacy as well as preservice teachers' desire to use formative assessment in their own future classrooms. Based upon student interviews and a final content quiz, the participants in this study did show improved science content understanding in the areas of plant food/energy and plate tectonics. The course design implemented a variety of formative assessment tools including formative assessment probes, student science notebooks, student concept maps, a non-graded quiz, and more. The STEBI-B survey identified improved science teaching efficacy among the participants. Student final essays indicated improved understanding of formative assessment

  13. A study on plasma parameters in Ar/SF6 inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung-Ju; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas or Ar/SF6 mixing gas is widely used in plasma processes. However, there are a little experimental studies with various external parameters such as gas pressure and mixing ratio. In this work, a study of the plasma parameters by changing the gas mixing ratio was done in an Ar/SF6 inductively coupled plasma from the measurement of the electron energy distribution function. At a low gas pressure, as the mixing ratio of SF6 gas increased at a fixed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) power, the electron density decreased and the electron temperature increased, while they were not changed drastically. At a high gas pressure, a remarkable increase in the electron temperature was observed with the decrease in the electron density. These variations are due to the electron loss reactions such as the electron attachment. It was also found that at a fixed ICP power, the negative ion creation with the diluted SF6 gas can change the discharge mode transition from an inductive mode to a capacitive mode at the high gas pressure. The electron attachment reactions remove the low energy electrons and change the mean electron energy towards higher energies with diluting SF6 gas at high pressure. The measured results were compared with the simplified global model, and the global model is in relatively good agreement with the measured plasma parameters except for the result in the case of the large portion of SF6 gas at the high pressure and the capacitive mode, which causes strong negative ion formation by the electron attachment reactions.

  14. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, S., E-mail: hamann@inp-greifswald.de; Röpcke, J. [INP-Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Materials Engineering, Gustav-Zeuner-Str. 5, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Strämke, M.; Strämke, S. [ELTRO GmbH, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Ring 3, 52499 Baesweiler (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  15. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: a facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, C M; Brookhart, M; Clark, M; Collins, C; Ding, W X; Flanagan, K; Khalzov, I; Li, Y; Milhone, J; Nornberg, M; Nonn, P; Weisberg, D; Whyte, D G; Zweibel, E; Forest, C B

    2013-01-01

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and other high-$\\beta$ phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains $\\sim$14 m$^{3}$ of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized $(>50\\%)$. At present, up to 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB$_6$) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB$_6$ cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through ${\\bf J}\\times{\\bf B}$ torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies...

  16. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  17. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: A facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C. M.; Wallace, J.; Brookhart, M.; Clark, M.; Collins, C.; Ding, W. X.; Flanagan, K.; Khalzov, I.; Li, Y.; Milhone, J.; Nornberg, M.; Nonn, P.; Weisberg, D.; Whyte, D. G.; Zweibel, E.; Forest, C. B.

    2014-01-01

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and other high-β phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets, which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains ˜14 m3 of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized (>50%). At present, 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB6 cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through J × B torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies on MPDX require a high magnetic Reynolds number Rm > 1000, and an adjustable fluid Reynolds number 10 1). Initial results from MPDX are presented along with a 0-dimensional power and particle balance model to predict the viscosity and resistivity to achieve dynamo action.

  18. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S; Börner, K; Burlacov, I; Spies, H-J; Strämke, M; Strämke, S; Röpcke, J

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  19. Using Case Studies as a Tool for Teaching Science Policy within the Atmospheric and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, G.; Hooke, W.

    2006-12-01

    Earth system science is a field where policy, societal, & economic aspects are becoming increasingly important as our society becomes more dependent on activities and technologies that affect and are affected by the Earth system. It is important that present and future scientists are prepared to fully participate in the challenging opportunities that lie ahead, including communicating to policy makers, making public policy decisions, & communicating science to the public. One way of providing a better foundation is to integrate policy and science at universities. Therefore, the American Meteorological Society Policy Program (APP) is developing materials for university science policy curricula and the AMS Summer Policy Colloquium. In providing policy education activities and promoting policy research, the APP hopes to encourage more people to enter the field of science policy, contribute to and enhance the current policy dialogue, and create a clearinghouse for science policy case studies. Case studies are an excellent method to study policy issues in the atmospheric and space sciences for the following reasons: issues are too complex to be handled by any single factor (economic, social, or political science); purpose is to identify and analyze the impacts rather than test theoretical hypotheses; problems involve large number of participants (government at various levels, industries, and researchers); and study requires giving alternatives and consequence analysis for policy makers. Lessons learned will be presented on implementation of science policy case studies at the AMS Summer Policy Colloquium and George Mason University.

  20. Studies to Improve the Science in the GAIM - Full Physics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    coupling at high latitudes (Zhu et al, 1993, 2000, 2005). The model is based on a numerical solution of the MHD transport equations and Ohm’s Law, with...title]Studies to Improve the Science in the GAIM - Full Physics Model [awardnumberl]N00014-09-l-0292 [awardnumber2] [awardnumbermore] [keywords...Ionospheric Dynamics and ElectroDynamics Data Assimilation (IDED-DA) model discovered new ionosphere phenomena, including a terminator current, plasma

  1. Runaway electrons and mitigation studies in MST tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, J. A.; Chapman, B. E.; Almagri, A. F.; Cornille, B. S.; Dubois, A.; McCollam, K. J.; Munaretto, S.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2016-10-01

    Studies of runaway electrons generated in low-density MST tokamak plasmas are being undertaken. The plasmas have Bt resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP's). An m = 3 RMP strongly suppresses the runaway electrons and initial NIMROD modeling shows that this may be due to degradation of flux surfaces. The RMP is produced by a poloidal array of 32 saddle coils at the narrow vertical insulated cut in MST's thick conducting shell, with each RMP having a single m but a broad n spectrum. While a sufficiently strong m = 3 RMP suppresses the runaway electrons, an RMP with m = 1 and comparable amplitude has little effect. The impact of the RMP's on the magnetic topology of these plasmas is being studied with the nonlinear MHD code NIMROD. With an m = 3 RMP, stochasticity is introduced in the outer third of the plasma but no such flux surface degradation is observed with an m = 1 RMP. NIMROD also predicts regularly occurring MHD activity similar to that observed in the experiment. These studies have also been done in q (a) = 2.7 plasmas and analysis and modeling is ongoing. This work supported by USDoE.

  2. The Influence of Disciplines on the Knowledge of Science: A Study of the Nature of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Akarsu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available At least four factors affect pupils’ understanding of the nature of science: teachers’ specialization in different science areas (physics, chemistry, and biology, gender issues, teaching experience in elementary school environments, and the perspectives of acquiring necessary knowledge. This study is the introduction part of a research project which will be initiated soon. Four elementary science teachers participated in the study. The results reveal that participants’ views of the aspects of nature of science are not solely diverged, based on their major disciplines, but there exist significant distinctions according to gender differences.

  3. Do compulsory secondary science courses change students’ attitude towards studying science?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lærke Elisabeth; Petersen, Morten Rask

    recruitment to STEM education has been a compulsory course in the Gymnasium called Natural Science Subject (NSS). This is an interdisciplinary, introductory course with the intention that students shall “ … realize the importance of knowing and understanding natural science thinking” (Authors translation...... of a comparison of the groups using Mann-Whitney U-test for the 7 items. It shows that the only item that the groups agree on is item 20, where both groups answers in an equally degree of positive attitude towards having NSS before other science subjects. The open coding of the comments resulted in 6 categories...... towards studying science. So the impact of the specific compulsory course seems to be minimal. A review study on attitudes towards science (Osborne, Simon & Collins, 2003) shows that gender is the most influent factor on attitudes towards science; boys being more positive than girls. This effect...

  4. Cell Attachment and Viability Study of PCL Nano-fiber Modified by Cold Atmospheric Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atyabi, Seyed Mohammad; Sharifi, Fereshteh; Irani, Shiva; Zandi, Mojgan; Mivehchi, Houri; Nagheh, Zahra

    2016-06-01

    The field of tissue engineering is an emerging discipline which applies the basic principles of life sciences and engineering to repair and restore living tissues and organs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cold and non-thermal plasma surface modification of poly (ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds on fibroblast cell behavior. Nano-fiber PCL was fabricated through electrospinning technique, and some fibers were then treated by cold and non-thermal plasma. The cell-biomaterial interactions were studied by culturing the fibroblast cells on nano-fiber PCL. Scaffold biocompatibility test was assessed using an inverted microscope. The growth and proliferation of fibroblast cells on nano-fiber PCL were analyzed by MTT viability assay. Cellular attachment on the nano-fiber and their morphology were evaluated using scanning electron microscope. The result of cell culture showed that nano-fiber could support the cellular growth and proliferation by developing three-dimensional topography. The present study demonstrated that the nano-fiber surface modification with cold plasma sharply enhanced the fibroblast cell attachment. Thus, cold plasma surface modification greatly raised the bioactivity of scaffolds.

  5. Case study of science teaching in an elementary school: Characteristics of an exemplary science teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Huey-Lien

    Improving the quality of science teaching is one of the greatest concerns in recent science education reform efforts. Many science educators suggest that case studies of exemplary science teachers may provide guidance for these reform efforts. For this reason, the characteristics of exemplary science teaching practices have been identified in recent years. However, the literature lacks research exploring exemplary teacher beliefs about the nature of science and science pedagogy, the relationships between their beliefs and practices, or how outstanding teachers overcome difficulties in order to facilitate their students' science learning. In this study, Sam-Yu, an identified exemplary science teacher who teaches in an elementary school in Pintung, Taiwan, was the subject. An interpretative research design (Erickson, 1986) based on principles of naturalistic inquiry (Lincoln & Guba, 1985) was used. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were employed in this case study. The qualitative method involved conducting interviews with the teacher and students, observing classroom activities and analyzing the structure of the learning materials. The quantitative methods involved using the Learning Climate Inventory (LCI) (Lin, 1997) instrument to assess the learning environment of the exemplary science classroom. This study found that Sam-Yu had a blend of views on the nature of science and a varied knowledge about science pedagogy. Personal preferences, past experiences, and the national science curriculum all played important roles in the development and refinement of Sam-Yu's beliefs about science and pedagogy. Regarding his teaching practices, Sam-Yu provided the best learning experiences, as evidenced in both classroom observations and the survey results, for his students by using a variety of strategies. In addition, his classroom behaviors were highly associated with his beliefs about science and pedagogy. However, due to school-based and socio-cultural constraints

  6. TEBPP: Theoretical and Experimental study of Beam-Plasma-Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H. R.; Bernstein, W.; Linson, L. M.; Papadopoulos, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.; Hallinan, T. J.; Leinbach, H.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction of an electron beam (0 to 10 keV, 0 to 1.5 Amp) with the plasma and neutral atmospheres at 200 to 400 km altitude is studied with emphasis on applications to near Earth and cosmical plasmas. The interaction occurs in four space time regions: (1) near electron gun, beam coming into equilibrium with medium; (2) equilibrium propagation in ionosphere; (3) ahead of beam pulse, temporal and spatial precursors; (4) behind a beam pulse. While region 2 is of the greatest interest, it is essential to study Region 1 because it determines the characteristics of the beam as it enters 2 through 4.

  7. Plasma boundaries at Mars: a 3-D simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bößwetter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the solar wind with the ionosphere of planet Mars is studied using a three-dimensional hybrid model. Mars has only a weak intrinsic magnetic field, and consequently its ionosphere is directly affected by the solar wind. The gyroradii of the solar wind protons are in the range of several hundred kilometers and therefore comparable with the characteristic scales of the interaction region. Different boundaries emerge from the interaction of the solar wind with the continuously produced ionospheric heavy-ion plasma, which could be identified as a bow shock (BS, ion composition boundary (ICB and magnetic pile up boundary (MPB, where the latter both turn out to coincide. The simulation results regarding the shape and position of these boundaries are in good agreement with the measurements made by Phobos-2 and MGS spacecraft. It is shown that the positions of these boundaries depend essentially on the ionospheric production rate, the solar wind ram pressure, and the often unconsidered electron temperature of the ionospheric heavy ion plasma. Other consequences are rays of planetary plasma in the tail and heavy ion plasma clouds, which are stripped off from the dayside ICB region by some instability.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (solar wind interactions with unmagnetized bodies – Space plasma physics (discontinuities; numerical simulation studies

  8. Chemical reaction and dust formation studies in laboratory hydrocarbon plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippler, Rainer; Majumdar, Abhijit; Thejaswini, H. C.

    Plasma chemical reaction studies with relevance to, e.g., Titan's atmosphere have been per-formed in various laboratory plasmas [1,2]. Chemical reactions in a dielectric barrier discharge at medium pressure of 250-300 mbar have been studied in CH4 /N2 and CH4 /Ar gas mixtures by means of mass spectrometry. The main reaction scheme is production of H2 by fragmenta-tion of CH4 , but also production of larger hydrocarbons like Cn Hm with n up to 10 including formation of different functional CN groups is observed. [1] A. Majumdar and R. Hippler, Development of dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing apparatus for mass spectrometry and thin film deposition, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 075103 (2007) [2] H.T. Do, G. Thieme, M. Frühlich, H. Kersten, and R. Hippler, Ion Molecule and Dust Particle Formation in Ar/CH4 , Ar/C2 H2 and Ar/C3 H6 Radio-frequency Plasmas, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 45, No. 5-6, 378-384 (2005)

  9. Modeling science teaching on science practice? Painting a more accurate picture through an ethnographic lab study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Cory A.

    2001-04-01

    This article reports an ethnographic study of a molecular biology research laboratory, Sally's Lab. By studying the daily practices of the lab members, and interpreting these observations through an anthropological lens grounded in practice theory, I portray the social and cultural construction of a scientific community. Findings include an examination of how good science practice was operationalized, status in the lab was constructed, members gained or lost interest in continuing on in careers in research science, and individual members conformed to and resisted localized norms of scientific practice. These issues have direct relevance to our work as science educators, in terms of how we present science practice to our students. For example, when K-16 science students engage in activities based on authentic science practice, upon whose experiences are these simulations based? The current study shows that there is not just one acceptable way to do science, nor one set of experiences that pertain to all members within a given community of science practice. Likewise, there should not be just one way that science is presented in school, nor one set of experiences we expect all our students to take from our classes.

  10. Study of Volumetrically Heated Ultra-High Energy Density Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, Jorge J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2016-10-27

    Heating dense matter to millions of degrees is important for applications, but requires complex and expensive methods. The major goal of the project was to demonstrate using a compact laser the creation of a new ultra-high energy density plasma regime characterized by simultaneous extremely high temperature and high density, and to study it combining experimental measurements and advanced simulations. We have demonstrated that trapping of intense femtosecond laser pulses deep within ordered nanowire arrays can heat near solid density matter into a new ultra hot plasma regime. Extreme electron densities, and temperatures of several tens of million degrees were achieved using laser pulses of only 0.5 J energy from a compact laser. Our x-ray spectra and simulations showed that extremely highly ionized plasma volumes several micrometers in depth are generated by irradiation of gold and Nickel nanowire arrays with femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities. We obtained extraordinarily high degrees of ionization (e.g. we peeled 52 electrons from gold atoms, and up to 26 electrons from nickel atoms). In the process we generated Gigabar pressures only exceeded in the central hot spot of highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas.. The plasma created after the dissolved wires expand, collide, and thermalize, is computed to have a thermal energy density of 0.3 GJ cm-3 and a pressure of 1-2 Gigabar. These are pressures only exceeded in highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas. Scaling these results to higher laser intensities promises to create plasmas with temperatures and pressures exceeding those in the center of the sun.

  11. New Groups Study Science's Effect on Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Dermot A.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the chief aims of the Council for Science and Society in London and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Vienna. Indicates that both groups are planning to function as a multinational interdisciplinary organization. (CC)

  12. Combination of cold atmospheric plasma and iron nanoparticles in breast cancer: gene expression and apoptosis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalili A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Azam Jalili,1 Shiva Irani,1 Reza Mirfakhraie2 1Department of Biology, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, 2Department of Medical Genetics, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Background: Current cancer treatments have unexpected side effects of which the death of normal cells is one. In some cancers, iron nanoparticles (NPs can be subjected to diagnosis and passive targeting treatment. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP has a proven induction of selective cell death ability. In this study, we have attempted to analyze the synergy between CAP and iron NPs in human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7.Materials and methods: In vitro cytotoxicity of CAP treatment and NPs in cells measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and cell death was shown by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and annexin V staining. Fluctuations in BAX and BCL-2 gene expression were investigated by means of real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results: MTT assay results showed that combination of plasma and iron NPs decreased the viability of cancer cells significantly (P<0.05. Real-time analysis showed that the combination therapy induced shifting the BAX/BCL-2 ratio in favor of apoptosis.Conclusion: Our data indicate that synergy between CAP and iron NPs can be applied in breast cancer treatment selectively. Keywords: breast cancer, cold atmospheric plasma, iron nanoparticles, BAX, BCL-2

  13. Comparative study of NO removal in surface-plasma and volume-plasma reactors based on pulsed corona discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Muhammad Arif; Kolb, Juergen F; Sun, Yaohong; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2011-12-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) conversion has been studied for two different types of atmospheric-pressure pulsed-corona discharges, one generates a surface-plasma and the other provides a volume-plasma. For both types of discharges the energy cost for NO removal increases with decreasing oxygen concentration and initial concentration of NO. However, the energy cost for volume plasmas for 50% NO removal, EC(50), from air was found to be 120 eV/molecule, whereas for the surface plasma, it was only 70 eV/molecule. A smaller difference in energy cost, but a higher efficiency for removal of NO was obtained in a pure nitrogen atmosphere, where NO formation is restricted due to the lack of oxygen. For the volume plasma, EC(50) in this case was measured at 50 eV/molecule, and for the surface plasma it was 40 eV/molecule. Besides the higher NO removal efficiency of surface plasmas compared to volume plasmas, the energy efficiency of surface-plasmas was found to be almost independent of the amount of electrical energy deposited in the discharge, whereas the efficiency for volume plasmas decreases considerably with increasing energy. This indicates the possibility of operating surface plasma discharges at high energy densities and in more compact reactors than conventional volume discharges.

  14. Comparative study of NO removal in surface-plasma and volume-plasma reactors based on pulsed corona discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Muhammad Arif, E-mail: MArifMalik@gmail.com [Frank Reidy Research Center for Bioelectrics, Old Dominion University, 4211 Monarch Way, Suite 300, Norfolk, VA 23508 (United States); Kolb, Juergen F.; Sun, Yaohong; Schoenbach, Karl H. [Frank Reidy Research Center for Bioelectrics, Old Dominion University, 4211 Monarch Way, Suite 300, Norfolk, VA 23508 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) conversion has been studied for two different types of atmospheric-pressure pulsed-corona discharges, one generates a surface-plasma and the other provides a volume-plasma. For both types of discharges the energy cost for NO removal increases with decreasing oxygen concentration and initial concentration of NO. However, the energy cost for volume plasmas for 50% NO removal, EC{sub 50}, from air was found to be 120 eV/molecule, whereas for the surface plasma, it was only 70 eV/molecule. A smaller difference in energy cost, but a higher efficiency for removal of NO was obtained in a pure nitrogen atmosphere, where NO formation is restricted due to the lack of oxygen. For the volume plasma, EC{sub 50} in this case was measured at 50 eV/molecule, and for the surface plasma it was 40 eV/molecule. Besides the higher NO removal efficiency of surface plasmas compared to volume plasmas, the energy efficiency of surface-plasmas was found to be almost independent of the amount of electrical energy deposited in the discharge, whereas the efficiency for volume plasmas decreases considerably with increasing energy. This indicates the possibility of operating surface plasma discharges at high energy densities and in more compact reactors than conventional volume discharges.

  15. Science Fairs: A Qualitative Study of Their Impact on Student Science Inquiry Learning and Attitudes toward STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kathleen M.; Kelter, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of science fair participation on student science inquiry learning. Furthermore, there is only a small research base relating to science fair participation and student attitudes toward science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers and coursework. In this study, 41 seventh-grade science fair…

  16. Girls Doing Science: A Case Study of Science Literacy in All-Female Middle Grade Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Susan Elisabeth

    In the face of low adolescent literacy rates (NCES, 2012), concerns about the nation's prospects of remaining competitive in science and technology (Hill, Corbett, & St. Rose, 2010), a persistent gender gap in science (NCES, 2012; Reilly, 2012), and the continued rollout of college- and career-ready standards, there is a need to focus on adolescent girls' science literacy. Such science literacy involves not only general knowledge about science, but also the ability to engage in the advanced reading and writing practices fundamental to doing science (Norris & Phillips, 2003). In this thesis, I present three articles with findings that respond to this need. They are the results of a multiple-case embedded (Yin, 2009) study that I conducted over the course of 7 months in four science classrooms (grades 5 through 8; 50 students) taught by a single teacher in a small all-female middle school. I collected in-depth data focused on science literacy from multiple sources, including (a) fieldnotes (Emerson, Fretz & Shaw, 2011), (b) videorecorded classroom observations (102 classes, 113 hours, recorded on 29 days), (c) a survey of all students, (d) semi-structured interviews with the subsample of 12 focal students (ranging from 18 to 37 minutes) and (e) photographs of classroom artifacts and student work. In the first article, I provide a window into standard literacy practices in science classrooms by examining the reading and writing genres to which students are exposed. In the second article, I examine how a teacher's language and instructional practices within her classrooms, and popular images of science from the world beyond their classrooms might shape adolescent girls' science identities. Finally, in the third article, I explore different aspects of science identity using the words of three case study students. Taken together, these studies fill gaps in the literature by investigating science literacy in an understudied context, all-female classrooms. In addition

  17. Antenna coupling study for ICWC plasma characterization in TEXTOR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manash Kumar Paul; A Lyssoivan; R Koch; G Van Wassenhove; M Vervier; G Bertschinger; R Laengner; B Unterberg; G Sergienko; V Philipps; T Wauters; the TEXTOR Team

    2013-01-01

    Ion cyclotron wall conditioning (ICWC) discharges, in pulsed-mode operation, were carried out in the limiter tokamak TEXTOR to explore safe operational regimes for the experimental parameters for possible ICWC-discharge cleaning in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) at half field. Antenna coupling properties obtained during the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) wall conditioning experiments performed in helium–hydrogen mixture in TEXTOR were analysed in relation to the obtained ICWC-plasma characterization results. Satisfactory antenna coupling in the mode conversion scenario along with reproducible generation of ICRF plasmas for wall conditioning, were achieved by coupling radio frequency (RF) power from one or two ICRF antennas. The plasma breakdown results obtained in the TEXTOR tokamak have been compared with the predictions of a zero-dimensional RF plasma production model. The present study of ICWC emphasizes the beneficial effect of application of an additional (along with toroidal magnetic field) stationary vertical ($B_{V} \\ll B_{T}$) or oscillating poloidal magnetic field ($B_{P} \\ll B_{T}$) on antenna coupling and relevant plasma parameters.

  18. Transport studies in high-performance field reversed configuration plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Barnes, D. C.; Dettrick, S. A.; Trask, E.; Tuszewski, M.; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Hubbard, K.; Korepanov, S.; Thompson, M. C.; Zhai, K.; Tajima, T.

    2016-05-01

    A significant improvement of field reversed configuration (FRC) lifetime and plasma confinement times in the C-2 plasma, called High Performance FRC regime, has been observed with neutral beam injection (NBI), improved edge stability, and better wall conditioning [Binderbauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 056110 (2015)]. A Quasi-1D (Q1D) fluid transport code has been developed and employed to carry out transport analysis of such C-2 plasma conditions. The Q1D code is coupled to a Monte-Carlo code to incorporate the effect of fast ions, due to NBI, on the background FRC plasma. Numerically, the Q1D transport behavior with enhanced transport coefficients (but with otherwise classical parametric dependencies) such as 5 times classical resistive diffusion, classical thermal ion conductivity, 20 times classical electron thermal conductivity, and classical fast ion behavior fit with the experimentally measured time evolution of the excluded flux radius, line-integrated density, and electron/ion temperature. The numerical study shows near sustainment of poloidal flux for nearly 1 ms in the presence of NBI.

  19. Study of coal conversion in an arc plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, K.C.; Lu, Y.K.; Tian, Y.J.; Wang, D.Z. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China)

    2002-12-01

    Coal conversion in arc plasma with an initial temperature of 3700 K is complex; a new conversion mechanism is put forward in this article. The functions of pyrolysis and the interaction of active species containing plasma jets are the main factors for coal conversion under these conditions. This study indicates that when the coal feed rate is lower than 2.0 g/s, both pyrolysis and active species have evident contribution to coal conversion; the pyrolysis controls the coal conversion and the function of active species is very weak. It is also found that the coal feed rate has a large influence on coal conversion and the production of gas components.

  20. The study of UHMWPEF surface modification with plasma- induced polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Fang; Jia, Qing-Xiu; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Pei-Ran

    2015-07-01

    In order to improve the surface activity levels of the ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene fiber (UHMWPEF), as well as enhancing the interface strength of the UHMWPEF based composite materials, the method of plasma-induced polymerization was applied to modify the UHMWPEF surface. In this study, the plasma's power, time, pressure and the grafting monomer concentration were introduced. Also, through a well-conducted comparison and analysis of the grafting rate, fabric surface functional groups and the microcosmic morphology, the most suitable plasma modification process was discovered and determined. The mechanics performance of hybrid composites with the modified UHMWPEF and unidirectional carbon fiber cloth (CF) was tested to reveal that, compared with the unmodified composites, the tensile strength and the laminar shear strength could be improved.

  1. Diagnostic studies of ion beam formation in inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Jenee L. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation describes a variety of studies focused on the plasma and the ion beam in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The ability to use ICP-MS for measurements of trace elements in samples requires the analytes to be efficiently ionized. Updated ionization efficiency tables are discussed for ionization temperatures of 6500 K and 7000 K with an electron density of 1 x 1015 cm-3. These values are reflective of the current operating parameters of ICP-MS instruments. Calculations are also discussed for doubly charged (M2+) ion formation, neutral metal oxide (MO) ionization, and metal oxide (MO+) ion dissociation for similar plasma temperature values. Ionization efficiency results for neutral MO molecules in the ICP have not been reported previously.

  2. Study on low temperature plasma driven permeation of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takizawa, Masayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    It is one of the most important problem in PWI of fusion devices from the point of view of tritium leakage that hydrogen diffuses in the wall of the device and permeates through it, which results in hydrogen being released to the coolant side. In this study, plasma driven permeation experiments were carried out with several kinds of metal membranes in the low temperature plasma where ionic and atomic hydrogen as well as electron existed in order to survey PDP mechanism from the many view points. In addition, incident flux rate from the plasma to the membrane surface was evaluated by calculation analysis. As a result the mechanism of low temperature PDP was found out and described as PDP models. The simulation of the membrane pump system was executed and the system performance was estimated with the models. (author). 135 refs.

  3. Contamination Study of Micro Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Micro propulsion vacuum facility ...................................................... 26 Figure 16. Oil Diffusion pump of the vacuum facility...increasing interest in the so-called micro - and nano -satellites, which are highly maneuverable and have lower cost. These small satellites are aimed to...option to create very small impulse bits for micro - and nano -satellites. Numerous researchers have studied PPTs but µPPTs are a new technology and need a

  4. NMR Studies of Some Plasma Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Mark P.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The work reported in this thesis consists of a study of the solution structure of a domain of protein structure found in some of the enzymes involved in blood coagulation. These domains, known as kringles, are of between 78 and 82 residues and contain three conserved disulphide bridges in their primary sequence. The study attempts to elucidate the nature of the lysine-binding site of the fourth kringle of human plasminogen to probe its physiological action, and a theory is developed to explain the overall fold of the protein in terms of its physiological role. The protein structure is found to contain only one small region of secondary structure, an antiparallel beta-sheet of about 8 residues, which provides the support for the binding site. The binding site itself consists of a hydrophobic channel provided by the aromatic residues at positions 61, 63, 71 and 73 in the beta-sheet and a negatively charged site at one end of this channel provided by the aspartic acid residues at positions 54 and 56. The beta-sheet appears to become more tightly defined on binding the kringle with alpha,omega -amino acids which are analogues of lysine and exhibit known anti-fibrinolytic properties. The rest of the solution structure appears to be less clearly defined and relies mainly on the three disulphide bridges and some rather isolated hydrogen bonding for maintenance of the fold. An explanation for this structure with a rigid binding site and a more flexible region for the remainder of the domain is proposed. Shorter studies are reported on the second kringle of bovine prothrombin and the first of human plasminogen which suggest strongly that the kringle fold is conserved.

  5. A simulation study of a controlled tokamak plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, N.; Niwa, Y.

    1980-03-01

    A tokamak circuit theory, including results of numerical simulation studies, is applied to a control system synthesized for a Joule heated tokamak plasma. The treatment is similar to that of Ogata and Ninomiya (1979) except that in this case a quadrupole field coil current is considered coexisting with image induced on a vacuum chamber.

  6. Influence of microwave driver coupling design on plasma density at Testbench for Ion sources Plasma Studies, a 2.45 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megía-Macías, A.; Vizcaíno-de-Julián, A. [E.S.S. Bilbao, Edificio Cosimet, Landabarri 2, 48940-Leioa, Vizcaya (Spain); Cortázar, O. D., E-mail: dcortazar@essbilbao.org [E.S.S. Bilbao, Edificio Cosimet, Landabarri 2, 48940-Leioa, Vizcaya (Spain); Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, ETSII, C.J. Cela s/n, 13170 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-03-15

    A comparative study of two microwave driver systems (preliminary and optimized) for a 2.45 GHz hydrogen Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma generator has been conducted. The influence on plasma behavior and parameters of stationary electric field distribution in vacuum, i.e., just before breakdown, along all the microwave excitation system is analyzed. 3D simulations of resonant stationary electric field distributions, 2D simulations of external magnetic field mapping, experimental measurements of incoming and reflected power, and electron temperature and density along the plasma chamber axis have been carried out. By using these tools, an optimized set of plasma chamber and microwave coupler has been designed paying special attention to the optimization of stationary electric field value in the center of the plasma chamber. This system shows a strong stability on plasma behavior allowing a wider range of operational parameters and even sustaining low density plasma formation without external magnetic field. In addition, the optimized system shows the capability to produce values of plasma density four times higher than the preliminary as a consequence of a deeper penetration of the magnetic resonance surface in relative high electric field zone by keeping plasma stability. The increment of the amount of resonance surface embedded in the plasma under high electric field is suggested as a key factor.

  7. IMPEx - a web-based distributed research environment for planetary plasma science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topf, Florian; Khodachenko, Maxim; Kallio, Esa; Génot, Vincent; Al-Ubaidi, Tarek; Modolo, Ronan; Hess, Sébastien; Schmidt, Walter; Scherf, Manuel; Alexeev, Igor; Gangloff, Michel; Budnik, Elena; Bouchemit, Myriam; Renard, Benjamin; Bourrel, Natacha; Penou, Emmanuel; André, Nicolas; Belenkaya, Elena

    2014-05-01

    The FP7-SPACE project IMPEx (http://impex-fp7.oeaw.ac.at/) was established to provide a web-based infrastructure to facilitate the inter-comparison of spacecraft in-situ measurements and computational models in the fields of planetary plasma science. Within this project several observational (CDAWeb, AMDA, CLWeb), as well as numerical simulation (FMI, LATMOS, SINP) databases provide datasets, which can be combined for further joint analysis and scientific investigation. The major goal of this project consists in providing an environment for the connection and joint operation of the different types of numerical and observational data sources in order to validate numerical simulations with spacecraft observations and vice versa. As an important milestone of IMPEx a common metadata standard was developed for the description of the currently integrated simulation models and the archived datasets. This standard is based on the SPASE data model (DM), which originates from the Heliospheric physics community. This DM was developed for the description of observational data, and that is why it was chosen as a basis within the scope of IMPEx. A considerable part of the project effort is dedicated to the development of standardized (web service-) interfaces and protocols using the SPASE DM as an elaborated IMPEx DM for the communication between the different tools and databases of the IMPEx research infrastructure. For the visualization and analysis of the archived datasets available within IMPEx and beyond, several tools (AMDA, 3DView, ClWeb) were upgraded to be able to work with the newly developed metadata standards and protocols. A practical example will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and potentials of the achievements of IMPEx by using these tools. Furthermore the IMPEx DM has by now also been successfully applied outside the project's core infrastructure: A prototype for UCLA MHD description can be seen at LatHyS. Besides that IRAP is currently working on a

  8. Plasma microRNA profiles distinguish lethal injury in acetaminophen toxicity: A research study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeanine Ward; Shashi Bala; Jan Petrasek; Gyongyi Szabo

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate plasma microRNA (miRNA) profiles indicative of hepatotoxicity in the setting of lethal acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in mice.METHODS:Using plasma from APAP poisoned mice,either lethally (500 mg/kg) or sublethally (150 mg/kg) dosed,we screened commercially available murine microRNA libraries (SABiosciences,Qiagen Sciences,MD) to evaluate for unique miRNA profiles between these two dosing parameters.RESULTS:We distinguished numerous,unique plasma miRNAs both up- and downregulated in lethally compared to sublethally dosed mice.Of note,many of the greatest up- and downregulated miRNAs,namely 574-5p,466g,466f-3p,375,29c,and 148a,have been shown to be associated with asthma in prior studies.Interestingly,a relationship between APAP and asthma has been previously well described in the literature,with an as yet unknown mechanism of pathology.There was a statistically significant increase in alanine aminotransferase levels in the lethal compared to sublethal APAP dosing groups at the 12 h time point (P <0.001).There was 90% mortality in the lethally compared to sublethally dosed mice at the 48 h time point (P =0.011).CONCLUSION:We identified unique plasma miRNAs both up- and downregulated in APAP poisoning which are correlated to asthma development.

  9. Numerical studies from quantum to macroscopic scales of carbon nanoparticules in hydrogen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Guillaume; Ngandjong, Alain; Mezei, Zsolt; Mougenot, Jonathan; Michau, Armelle; Hassouni, Khaled; Seydou, Mahamadou; Maurel, François

    2016-09-01

    Dusty plasmas take part in large scientific domains from Universe Science to nanomaterial synthesis processes. They are often generated by growth from molecular precursor. This growth leads to the formation of larger clusters which induce solid germs nucleation. Particle formed are described by an aerosol dynamic taking into account coagulation, molecular deposition and transport processes. These processes are controlled by the elementary particle. So there is a strong coupling between particle dynamics and plasma discharge equilibrium. This study is focused on the development of a multiscale physic and numeric model of hydrogen plasmas and carbon particles around three essential coupled axes to describe the various physical phenomena: (i) Macro/mesoscopic fluid modeling describing in an auto-coherent way, characteristics of the plasma, molecular clusters and aerosol behavior; (ii) the classic molecular dynamics offering a description to the scale molecular of the chains of chemical reactions and the phenomena of aggregation; (iii) the quantum chemistry to establish the activation barriers of the different processes driving the nanopoarticule formation.

  10. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopic Study on Reaction between Self-Assembled Monolayers and Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Shinohara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma is becoming increasingly adopted in bioapplications such as plasma medicine and agriculture. This study investigates the interaction between plasma and molecules in living tissues, focusing on plasma-protein interactions. To this end, the reaction of air-pressure air plasma with NH2-terminated self-assembled monolayer is investigated by infrared spectroscopy in multiple internal reflection geometry. The atmospheric-pressure plasma decomposed the NH2 components, the characteristic units of proteins. The decomposition is attributed to water clusters generated in the plasma, indicating that protein decomposition by plasma requires humid air.

  11. Family science: An ethnographic case study of the ordinary science and literacy experiences of one family

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Glenda M.

    Despite the copious research available on science learning, little is known about ways in which the public engages in free-choice science learning and even fewer studies have focused on how families engage in science to learn about the world around them. The same was true about studies of literacy development in the home until the 1980s when researchers (e.g. Bissex, 1980; Heath, 1983; Taylor, 1983) began documenting the literacy happenings and practices of young children in natural settings. Findings from intensive emergent literacy research studies have challenged traditional approaches to the teaching and learning of literacy, especially drawing attention to the active role children take in their own learning. Drawing upon those early literacy studies, this research project uses ethnographic case study methods along with a naturalistic inquiry approach, to document the daily explorations of one science-oriented family. Over a three year span, I have followed my own family, in our natural setting, through our day-to-day experiences with science and literacy as we seek to mediate and understand the world around us. In doing so, I have explored the ways we have shared knowledge and constructed learning through science books and read alouds, self-initiated inquiry learning, and communication. Throughout the three year research period, I have collected data and documented my own young children's understanding of the nature of science by observing their engagement with world around them.

  12. Science Study Aids 5: Tannin - Nature's Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeschen, John; Randall, John M.

    This publication is the fifth in a series of seven supplementary investigative materials for use in secondary science classes providing up-to-date research-related investigations. This unit is structured for grade levels 9 through 12. It is concerned with the removal of heavy divalent metals from water with the use of tannin-containing…

  13. Science Study Aids 2: Mushrooms - Nature's Recyclers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Bill; Kurtzman, Ralph H., Jr.

    This publication is the second of a series of seven supplementary investigative materials for use in secondary science classes providing up-to-date research-related investigations. This unit is structured for grade levels 7 through 9. It is concerned with food value of liquified cellulosic agricultural wastes: paper, straw, corn cobs, sawdust and…

  14. The Symbiotic Relationship between Liberal Studies and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unah, Jim I.

    2008-01-01

    The Artistic and Humanistic studies (liberal studies) and the science and technology disciplines (science) constitute the two dominant cultures in a modern university. Subsumed in these cultures are the professional disciplines of law, architecture, engineering, medicine, accounting, administration and a few others. Essentially, the university…

  15. Study of Turkish Preschool Teachers' Attitudes toward Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erden, Feyza T.; Sonmez, Sema

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to explore preschool teachers' attitudes toward science teaching and its impact on classroom practices through the frequency of science activities provided in the classroom. In addition, the study investigates if their attitudes are related to factors such as educational level, years of teaching experience, and the school type they…

  16. Study of energetic particle dynamics in Harbin Dipole eXperiment (HDX) on Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhibin, W.; Xiao, Q.; Wang, X.; Xiao, C.; Zheng, J.; E, P.; Ji, H.; Ding, W.; Lu, Q.; Ren, Y.; Mao, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zhibin Wang1, Qingmei Xiao1, Xiaogang Wang1, Chijie Xiao2, Jinxing Zheng3, Peng E1, Hantao Ji1,5, Weixing Ding4, Quaming Lu6, Y. Ren1,5, Aohua Mao11 Laboratory for Space Environment and Physical Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China 150001 2 State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics & Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, China 100871 3ASIPP, Hefei, China, 230031 4University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 90095 5Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 6University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China, 230026 A new terrella device for laboratory studies of space physics relevant to the inner magnetospheric plasmas, Harbin Dipole eXperiment (HDX), is scheduled to be built at Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT), China. HDX is one of two essential parts of Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF), which is a major national research facility for space physics studies. HDX is designed to provide a laboratory experimental platform to reproduce the earth's magnetospheric structure for investigations on the mechanism of acceleration/loss and wave-particle interaction of energetic particles in radiation belt, and on the influence of magnetic storms on the inner magnetosphere. It can be operated together with Harbin Reconnection eXperiment (HRX), which is another part of SPERF, to study the fundamental processes during interactions between solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere. In this presentation, the scientific goals and experimental plans for HDX, together with the means applied to generate the plasma with desired parameters, including multiple plasma sources and different kinds of coils with specific functions, as well as advanced diagnostics designed to be equipped to the facility for multi-functions, are reviewed. Three typical scenarios of HDX with operations of various coils and plasma sources to study specific physical processes in space plasmas will also be

  17. Plasma environment of Titan: a 3-D hybrid simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Simon

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Titan possesses a dense atmosphere, consisting mainly of molecular nitrogen. Titan's orbit is located within the Saturnian magnetosphere most of the time, where the corotating plasma flow is super-Alfvénic, yet subsonic and submagnetosonic. Since Titan does not possess a significant intrinsic magnetic field, the incident plasma interacts directly with the atmosphere and ionosphere. Due to the characteristic length scales of the interaction region being comparable to the ion gyroradii in the vicinity of Titan, magnetohydrodynamic models can only offer a rough description of Titan's interaction with the corotating magnetospheric plasma flow. For this reason, Titan's plasma environment has been studied by using a 3-D hybrid simulation code, treating the electrons as a massless, charge-neutralizing fluid, whereas a completely kinetic approach is used to cover ion dynamics. The calculations are performed on a curvilinear simulation grid which is adapted to the spherical geometry of the obstacle. In the model, Titan's dayside ionosphere is mainly generated by solar UV radiation; hence, the local ion production rate depends on the solar zenith angle. Because the Titan interaction features the possibility of having the densest ionosphere located on a face not aligned with the ram flow of the magnetospheric plasma, a variety of different scenarios can be studied. The simulations show the formation of a strong magnetic draping pattern and an extended pick-up region, being highly asymmetric with respect to the direction of the convective electric field. In general, the mechanism giving rise to these structures exhibits similarities to the interaction of the ionospheres of Mars and Venus with the supersonic solar wind. The simulation results are in agreement with data from recent Cassini flybys.

  18. Plasma engineering studies for Tennessee Tokamak (TENTOK) fusion power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, K.E.; Lacatski, J.T.; Miller, J.B.; Bryan, W.E.; King, P.W.; Santoro, R.T.; Uckan, N.A.; Shannon, T.E.

    1984-02-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the plasma engineering and systems analysis studies for the Tennessee Tokamak (TENTOK) fusion power reactor. TENTOK is a 3000-MW(t) central station power plant that uses deuterium-tritium fuel in a D-shaped tokamak plasma configuration with a double-null poloidal divertor. The major parameters are R/sub 0/ = 6.4 m, a = 1.6 m, sigma (elongation) = 1.65, (n) = 1.5 x 10/sup 20/ m/sup -3/, (T) = 15 keV, (..beta..) = 6%, B/sub T/ (on-axis) = 5.6 T, I/sub p/ = 8.5 MA, and wall loading = 3 MW/m/sup 2/. Detailed analyses are performed in the areas of (1) transport simulation using the one-and-one-half-dimensional (1-1/2-D) WHIST transport code, (2) equilibrium/poloidal field coil systems, (3) neutral beam and radiofrequency (rf) heating, and (4) pellet fueling. In addition, impurity control systems, diagnostics and controls, and possible microwave plasma preheating and steady-state current drive options are also considered. Some of the major features of TENTOK include rf heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies, superconducting equilibrium field coils outside the superconducting toroidal field coils, a double-null poloidal divertor for impurity control and alpha ash removal, and rf-assisted plasma preheating and current startup.

  19. Spacelab 1 - Scientific objectives, life sciences, space plasma physics, astronomy and solar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    A general overview of the accomplishments of the Spacelab 1 complement to the Shuttle mission of Nov. 28, 1983, is presented. Consideration is given to scientific results in the fields of life sciences, materials sciences, atmospheric physics, and earth observations. A table is given which lists the scientific objectives and the percentage of objectives accomplished in each field.

  20. Molecular Dynamic Studies of Particle Wake Potentials in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ian; Graziani, Frank; Glosli, James; Strozzi, David; Surh, Michael; Richards, David; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren

    2010-11-01

    Fast Ignition studies require a detailed understanding of electron scattering, stopping, and energy deposition in plasmas with variable values for the number of particles within a Debye sphere. Presently there is disagreement in the literature concerning the proper description of these processes. Developing and validating proper descriptions requires studying the processes using first-principle electrostatic simulations and possibly including magnetic fields. We are using the particle-particle particle-mesh (P^3M) code ddcMD to perform these simulations. As a starting point in our study, we examined the wake of a particle passing through a plasma. In this poster, we compare the wake observed in 3D ddcMD simulations with that predicted by Vlasov theory and those observed in the electrostatic PIC code BEPS where the cell size was reduced to .03λD.

  1. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Scattering of a Plane Wave by an Inhomogeneous Plasma Sphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Fa-Lun; CAO Jin-Xiang; WANG Ge; WANG Yan; ZHU Ying; ZHU Jian; WANG Liang; NIU Tian-Ye

    2006-01-01

    @@ Scattering of electromagnetic waves by an inhomogeneous plasma sphere has been studied theoretically and experimentally. The offset angles of electromagnetic waves caused by the plasma sphere have been observed experimentally. The effects of the electromagnetic wave frequency and plasma density on the offset angle are discussed. The plasma density is estimated with the offset angle.

  2. Electroacoustic Process Study of Plasma Sparker Under Different Water Depth

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yifan

    2015-01-05

    The plasma sparker has been applied in oceanic high-resolution seismic exploration for decades. Normally it is towed on the water surface. This is suitable for shallow water, but if the water depth is great, the resolution will decrease dramatically, especially in the horizontal direction. This paper proposes the concept of a deep-towed plasma sparker and presents an experimental study of plasma sparker performance in terms of electric parameters, bubble behavior, and acoustic characteristics. The results show that hydrostatic pressure at a source depth ranging from 1 to 2000 m has a negligible influence on the electric parameters but a strong influence on bubble behavior, wherein both the maximum bubble radius and oscillation period are decreased. The collapse pulse vanishes when the source depth reaches 1000 m or deeper, and no bubble oscillation can be distinguished. The source level (evaluated by the expansion pulse) is also decreased as the source depth increases; moreover, the greater the discharge energy, the smaller the source level loss. The discharge energy per electrode should be greater than 20 J for the deep-towed plasma sparker, which can make the source level loss induced by hydrostatic pressure smaller than the transmission loss. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) results show that the dominant energy is around 20 kHz, which is mainly induced by the expansion pulse and its oscillation. According to the simulation results, the fundamental frequency of the acoustic waveform increases with source depth in accord with a log linear trend, and also reaches tens of kilohertz in deep water. So, before the development of deep-towed plasma sparker, a new technical solution will need to be developed to solve this problem. © 1976-2012 IEEE.

  3. Review of Burning Plasma Physics. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, Herb [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Betti, Riccardo [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Dahlburg, Jill [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Freidberg, Jeff [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hopper, Bick [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meade, Dale [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Navritil, Jerry [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Nevins, Bill [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ono, Masa [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Perkins, Rip [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Prager, Stewart [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Schoenburg, Kurt [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Taylor, Tony [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Uckan, Nermin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2001-09-01

    The next frontier in the quest for magnetic fusion energy is the development of a basic understanding of plasma behavior in the regime of strong self-heating, the so called “burning plasma” regime. The general consensus in the fusion community is that the exploration of this frontier requires a new, relatively large experimental facility - a burning plasma experiment. The motivation, justification, and steps required to build such a facility are the primary focus of our report. The specific goals of the report are as follows. First, the report describes the critical scientific and engineering phenomena that are expected to arise for the first time, or else in a strongly modified form, in a burning plasma. Second, the report shows that the capabilities of existing experiments are inadequate to investigate these phenomena, thereby providing a major justification for a new facility. Third, the report compares the features and predicted performance of the three major next generation burning plasma experiments under current consideration (ITER-FEAT, FIRE, and IGNITOR), which are aimed at addressing these problems. Deliberately, no selection of the best option is made or attempted since such a decision involves complex scientific and cost issues that are beyond the scope of the present panel report. Fourth, the report makes specific recommendations regarding a process to move the burning plasma program forward, including a procedure for choosing the best option and the future activities of the Next Step Option (NSO) program. Fifth, the report attempts to provide a proper perspective for the role of burning plasmas with respect to the overall U.S. fusion program. The introduction provides the basic background information required for understanding the context in which the U.S. fusion community thinks about burning plasma issues. It “sets the stage” for the remainder of the report.

  4. Influence of field study on learning and attitudes toward science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackney, David L.

    In an effort to improve attitudes toward science and academic achievement among college students who are non-science majors, an informal science educational experience in the form of a natural science field study course was created. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a field study experience on student science attitudes and achievement. Outcomes from the field study groups were compared to students who enrolled in a traditional lecture/lab course. Academic achievement was measured via pre and posttest measures of geologic knowledge. Attitudes toward science were measured with a Science Attitudes Survey that utilized Likert-scale type items in the instrument. To explore student impressions and reactions to participating in the field study experience, interviews were conducted with open-ended questions. Patterns of responses were identified to explore common themes. Field study participants were found to have significantly higher gains from pre to posttest scores compared with the gains made by students who participated in a formal Earth Science course. There was no significant difference found in overall attitudes toward science and technology as measured with this attitudes survey between students who participated in the two formats of courses over the last five years. However, comments shared by participants in the field study through interviews suggest that their attitudes toward science had in fact been affected in positive ways. Other patterns of responses indicate positive impacts made on students on a number of fronts including affective, cognitive, and social interactions. All students interviewed rated the field study experience as valuable educationally or extremely valuable educationally.

  5. 77 FR 21977 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    .... Purpose: Hear the preliminary findings of the Strategic Directions for Army Science and Technology and vote on adoption. Proposed Agenda: Open Session, the ASB will hear preliminary findings of the Strategic Directions for Army Science & Technology study and vote on adoption. FOR FURTHER...

  6. Developing "Butterfly Warriors": A Case Study of Science for Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junjun; Cowie, Bronwen

    2013-01-01

    Given worldwide concern about a decline in student engagement in school science and an increasing call for science for citizenship in New Zealand Curriculum, this study focused on a butterfly unit that investigated how students in a year-4 primary classroom learnt about New Zealand butterflies through thinking, talking, and acting as citizen…

  7. 76 FR 43993 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: August 10, 2011. Time(s) of Meeting: 0800-1200. Location: Newport News Marriott at City Center, 740 Town Center...

  8. Developing "Butterfly Warriors": A Case Study of Science for Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junjun; Cowie, Bronwen

    2013-01-01

    Given worldwide concern about a decline in student engagement in school science and an increasing call for science for citizenship in New Zealand Curriculum, this study focused on a butterfly unit that investigated how students in a year-4 primary classroom learnt about New Zealand butterflies through thinking, talking, and acting as citizen…

  9. Breathing Life into Engineering: A Lesson Study Life Science Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Maria; Yang, Li-Ling; Briggs, May; Hession, Alicia; Koussa, Anita; Wagoner, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    A fifth grade life science lesson was implemented through a lesson study approach in two fifth grade classrooms. The research lesson was designed by a team of four elementary school teachers with the goal of emphasizing engineering practices consistent with the "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS) (Achieve Inc. 2013). The fifth…

  10. Breathing Life into Engineering: A Lesson Study Life Science Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Maria; Yang, Li-Ling; Briggs, May; Hession, Alicia; Koussa, Anita; Wagoner, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    A fifth grade life science lesson was implemented through a lesson study approach in two fifth grade classrooms. The research lesson was designed by a team of four elementary school teachers with the goal of emphasizing engineering practices consistent with the "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS) (Achieve Inc. 2013). The fifth…

  11. How Can We Motivate High School Students to Study Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The main goals of this study were to find why some students in the 10th grade do not choose to major in any of the science disciplines, and how to arouse their interest in science. The assumption was that the way students perceive and evaluate their acquaintance with any kind of knowledge was very important in their learning process. If students…

  12. Comprehensive Study of Plasma-Wall Sheath Transport Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    temperature is always well below that expected for significant thermionic emission from LaB6, and the heat flux from the plasma is also low given the order...measurements from HET materials is their low electrical conductivity. In a typical electron emission study, a primary electron beam is focused onto to...Transition Controlled by Secondary Electron Emission at Low Gas Pressure,” 67th Annual Gaseous Electronics Conference, Raleigh, NC, November 2-7, 2014

  13. Kinetic simulation study of one dimensional collisional bounded plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent kinetic simulation study ofone dimensional collisional bounded plasma is presented.The formation of stable sheath potential is investigated.It is found that mass ratio of electron and ion not onlyaffects the level of sheath potential, but also affectsthe ion temperature of system. It is clarified that the effects of secondaryemission electron on both the total potential dropand the temperature are not important.

  14. Net current measurements and secondary electron emission characteristics of the Voyager plasma science experiment and their impact on data interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnutt, Ralph L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Voyager Plasma Science (PLS) instrument is capable of returning integral (DC) current measurements, similar in some respects to measurements made with a Langmuir probe or a retarding potential analyzer, although there are significant differences. The integral measurements were made during a calibration sequence in the solar wind, during Cruise Science Maneuvers, and within the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn by Voyager 1. After the failure of the PLS experiment following the Saturn encounter, that instrument was placed in the DC return mode returning possibly usable data from early 1981 through early 1985. The DC return measurements are difficult to interpret and are above threshold values only for relatively large fluxes; the determination of the measured current level is dependent on the operating temperature of the preamplifiers which further complicates the interpretation. Nevertheless, these measurements can be used to determine the efficiency of the suppressor grid at preventing the loss of secondary electrons off the collector plate. Some DC return measurements have been invaluable in aiding in the interpretation of some electron plasma measurements not previously understood. It is found that electron spectra can be significantly modified by the presence of second generation secondary electrons produced by either first generation secondaries or photoelectrons on the support ring of the negative high voltage modulator grid within the instrument housing.

  15. Studies on attitude toward teaching science and anxiety about teaching science in preservice elementary teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerback, Mary E.

    These studies examined attitude toward teaching science (ATTS) using an adaptation of the Bratt Attitude Test (M-BAT); anxiety about teaching science (ANX-TS), as measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI A-State); and selected demographic variables in preservice elementary teachers for the 1977-1978 and 1978-1979 academic years and a follow-up of those students who completed their student teaching in May 1979. The M-BAT and STAI were administered in September at the beginning of Science 6 (earth science and biology course), in December on the next to last day of Science 6, in May on the next to the last day of Science 5 (physical science), and in May 1979 after student teaching. In the two academic years, both ATTS and ANX-TS became more positive during the sequence Science 6-5. Both changes in ATTS and ANX-TS continued to change in a positive direction after completion of Science 6-5, after student teaching. There were differences in the times that the greatest changes in ATTS and ANX-TS occurred. In both studies, the greatest change in ATTS took place between September and December, during Science 6. The greatest change in ANX-TS, however, took place during Science 5 between December and May in the 1977-1978 study. In the 1978-1979 study, the greatest changes in ANX-TS occurred in Science 6, between September and December. The delayed reduction of ANX-TS in the 1977-1978 study may be explained by differences in teaching patterns. In 1977-1978, two teachers taught only their academic specialty, biology or earth science, to students who switched teachers midsemester. In 1978-1979, the same two instructors taught both biology and earth science to the same students. Correlation coefficients for successive and corresponding administrations of both the M-BAT and STAI suggest these variables are related. Students with more positive ATTS tended to have reduced ANX-TS. Neither the number of high school or college science and math courses completed nor the level

  16. Science Education at Riverside Middle School A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, Bettie Ann Pickens

    For more than thirty years the gender gap in science and related careers has been a key concern of researchers, teachers, professional organizations, and policy makers. Despite indicators of progress for women and girls on some measures of achievement, course enrollment patterns, and employment, fewer women than men pursue college degrees and careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. According to the results of national assessments, the gender gap in science achievement begins to be evident in the middle school years. Gender and school science achievement involve a complex set of factors associated with schools and child/family systems that may include school leadership, institutional practices, curriculum content, teacher training programs, teacher expectations, student interests, parental involvement, and cultural values. This ethnographic case study was designed to explore the context for science education reform and the participation of middle school girls. The study analyzed and compared teaching strategies and female student engagement in sixth, seventh, and eighth grade science classrooms. The setting was a middle school situated in a district that was well-known for its achievement in reading, math, and technology. Findings from the study indicated that while classroom instruction was predominantly organized around traditional school science, the girls were more disciplined and outperformed the boys. The size of the classrooms, time to prepare for hands-on activities, and obtaining resources were identified as barriers to teaching science in ways that aligned with recent national science reform initiatives. Parents who participated in the study were very supportive of their daughters' academic progress and career goals. A few of the parents suggested that the school's science program include more hands-on activities; instruction designed for the advanced learner; and information related to future careers. Overall the teachers and

  17. Study on the electromagnetic waves propagation characteristics in partially ionized plasma slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Bin Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Propagation characteristics of electromagnetic (EM waves in partially ionized plasma slabs are studied in this paper. Such features are significant to applications in plasma antennas, blackout of re-entry flying vehicles, wave energy injection to plasmas, and etc. We in this paper developed a theoretical model of EM wave propagation perpendicular to a plasma slab with a one-dimensional density inhomogeneity along propagation direction to investigate essential characteristics of EM wave propagation in nonuniform plasmas. Particularly, the EM wave propagation in sub-wavelength plasma slabs, where the geometric optics approximation fails, is studied and in comparison with thicker slabs where the geometric optics approximation applies. The influences of both plasma and collisional frequencies, as well as the width of the plasma slab, on the EM wave propagation characteristics are discussed. The results can help the further understanding of propagation behaviours of EM waves in nonuniform plasma, and applications of the interactions between EM waves and plasmas.

  18. Valeriu Bologa's studies on the history of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bârsu, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    History of science is a vast and complex domain, comprising many sub-domains, such as: the history of medicine, history of chemistry, history of physics etc. Different specialists in these sub-domains, trying to reach the general and integrative understanding of the history of science, succeeded only after they acquired a rich scientific experience in their fields of activity. One of the scientists who had interesting papers on the history of science was Valeriu Bologa (1892-1971). He was the first Romanian professor of history of medicine. Our paper presents some milestones regarding his preoccupations on the history of science. The aim of our study is to prove that, although he was primarily a historian of medicine, he surpassed this framework, proving to be a skillful historian of science. The topics of his works on the history of science included: the value of the unity of science, the ethical aspects of science during centuries, the interferences between the history of science and the history of medicine etc.

  19. Valeriu Bologa’s studies on the history of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    BÂRSU, CRISTIAN

    2016-01-01

    History of science is a vast and complex domain, comprising many sub-domains, such as: the history of medicine, history of chemistry, history of physics etc. Different specialists in these sub-domains, trying to reach the general and integrative understanding of the history of science, succeeded only after they acquired a rich scientific experience in their fields of activity. One of the scientists who had interesting papers on the history of science was Valeriu Bologa (1892–1971). He was the first Romanian professor of history of medicine. Our paper presents some milestones regarding his preoccupations on the history of science. The aim of our study is to prove that, although he was primarily a historian of medicine, he surpassed this framework, proving to be a skillful historian of science. The topics of his works on the history of science included: the value of the unity of science, the ethical aspects of science during centuries, the interferences between the history of science and the history of medicine etc. PMID:27547069

  20. Students’ ability in science: Results from a test development study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Akkanat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Student’s ability to use and manipulate scientific concepts has been widely explored; however there is still a need to define the characteristics and nature of science ability. Also, the tests and performance scales that require minimal conceptual knowledge to measure this ability are relatively less common. The aim of this study was to develop an objective measure of science ability of gifted middle school students. In order to assess this ability, Science Ability Test Battery was developed by the researchers. The test battery was divided into two sub scales containing; a multiple choice questions achievement test (Science Ability Test and a performance assessment (Science Performance Test. The initial Science Ability Test consisted of 23 multiple choice items with one correct answer that required students to use science process skills and reasoning. In the study, stratified sampling was used. The test was administered to 280 middle school students in Turkey and the missing data from 26 students were excluded. In order to obtain a proof of content validity, the researchers elicited feedback from five experts in the field of science education and gifted education and necessary corrections were made in accordance of their views and suggestions. This study will be followed by another research to further analyse validity and reliability of the test.

  1. Tungsten Data for Current and Future Uses in Fusion and Plasma Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Beiersdorfer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We give a brief overview of our recent experimental and theoretical work involving highly charged tungsten ions in high-temperature magnetically confined plasmas. Our work includes X-ray and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy, state-of-the-art structure calculations, the generation of dielectronic recombination rate coefficients, collisional-radiative spectral modeling and assessments of the atomic data need for X-ray diagnostics monitoring of the parameters of the core plasma of future tokamaks, such as ITER. We give examples of our recent results in these areas.

  2. Fundamental Study of Interactions Between High-Density Pulsed Plasmas and Materials for Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    interactions studies (plasma too cold and too “dirty.”) We have built and tested a new, gas -fed, non- ablative, rep-rated capillary plasma source for our...those encountered in space propulsion devices including Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT), Magneto-Plasma Dynamic (MPD) thrusters and capillary plasma...based thrusters . The ongoing research work brings together a team of researchers from the University of Texas at Austin (UT) and the University of

  3. Study of MRI in Stratified Viscous Plasma Configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Carlevaro, Nakia; Renzi, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the morphology of the Magneto-rotational Instability (MRI) for a stratified viscous plasma disk configuration in differential rotation, taking into account the so-called corotation theorem for the background profile. In order to select the intrinsic Alfv\\'enic nature of MRI, we deal with an incompressible plasma and we adopt a formulation of the perturbation analysis based on the use of the magnetic flux function as a dynamical variable. Our study outlines, as consequence of the corotation condition, a marked asymmetry of the MRI with respect to the equatorial plane, particularly evident in a complete damping of the instability over a positive critical height on the equatorial plane. We also emphasize how such a feature is already present (although less pronounced) even in the ideal case, restoring a dependence of the MRI on the stratified morphology of the gravitational field.

  4. Experimental Study on Plasma Surface Treatment of Capacitors Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Dai; Ting, Yin; Fuchang, Lin; Fei, Yan

    Plasma surface treatment is an optional way to change the electrical performance of the film capacitors used widely in pulse power application. This paper presents the experimental study of glow discharge plasma treatment to polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) film. By using infrared spectra and scanning electron microscope (SEM), the chemical component and microstructure of material surface has detected to be changed with different treatment strength and various discharge gas. After treatment, the film surface tends to be rougher and some sorts of polar radicals or groups found to be introduced. But there is no obvious change of the electrical strength of the film. At last, theoretical analysis has been carried out with polypropylene film experimental treatment results in author's former work.

  5. Study on hydrophilicity of polymer surfaces improved by plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jiangnan; Sunderland, Bob; Xue, Jianming; Yan, Sha; Zhao, Weijiang; Folkard, Melvyn; Michael, Barry D.; Wang, Yugang

    2006-03-01

    Surface properties of polycarbonate (PC), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) samples treated by microwave-induced argon plasma have been studied with contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanned electron microscopy (SEM). It is found that plasma treatment modified the surfaces both in composition and roughness. Modification of composition makes polymer surfaces tend to be highly hydrophilic, which mainly depended on the increase of ratio of oxygen-containing group as same as other papers reported. And this experiment further revealed that C dbnd O bond is the key factor to the improvement of the hydrophilicity of polymer surfaces. Our SEM observation on PET shown that the roughness of the surface has also been improved in micron scale and it has influence on the surface hydrophilicity.

  6. Study on hydrophilicity of polymer surfaces improved by plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai Jiangnan [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, MOE, Beijing (China); Sunderland, Bob [Gray Cancer Institute, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Xue Jianming [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, MOE, Beijing (China); Yan, Sha [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, MOE, Beijing (China); Zhao Weijiang [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, MOE, Beijing (China); Folkard, Melvyn [Gray Cancer Institute, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Michael, Barry D. [Gray Cancer Institute, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Wang Yugang [Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, MOE, Beijing (China)]. E-mail: ygwang@pku.edu.cn

    2006-03-15

    Surface properties of polycarbonate (PC), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) samples treated by microwave-induced argon plasma have been studied with contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanned electron microscopy (SEM). It is found that plasma treatment modified the surfaces both in composition and roughness. Modification of composition makes polymer surfaces tend to be highly hydrophilic, which mainly depended on the increase of ratio of oxygen-containing group as same as other papers reported. And this experiment further revealed that C=O bond is Key factor to the improvement of the hydrophilicity of polymer surfaces. Our SEM observation on PET shown that the roughness of the surface has also been improved in micron scale and it has influence on the surface hydrophilicity.

  7. Negative ion studies on the RF plasma device MAGPIE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Hannah; Santoso, Jesse; Corr, Cormac; Gibson, Kieran

    2016-10-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) systems provide both heating and current drive in tokamak fusion reactors. High energy (> 1 MeV) neutral beams are produced by neutralising accelerated ions, for which negative ions are used; the neutralisation cross section for positive ions becomes negligible at these energies. This requires very high throughput negative ion sources. Currently this is achieved using inductively coupled plasma sources, which incorporate caesium to improve the production rate. It has been proposed that helicon plasma sources could provide a more efficient, higher throughput method of producing negative ions for NBI, possibly even removing the need for caesium. We report on studies of the negative hydrogen ion population in the MAGPIE helicon device (Australian National University) under a variety of operating conditions. The probe-based laser photodetachment method and Langmuir probes are employed to estimate the negative hydrogen ion density throughout the device. Initial results support the viability of helicon-based negative ion sources.

  8. ESR STUDY OF PLASMA-TREATED POLYTETRAFLUOROETHYLENE FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Maotang; WANG Shicai; LIU Guizhen; CHEN Jie

    1990-01-01

    The plasma treatment of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) films was carried out in a capacitively coupled reactor with external electrodes. The free radicals generated in the process of treatment were detected by ESR techniques. The ESR spectra tended to indicate that the free radicals of the plasma-treated PTFE film sample were turned into peroxy radicals on exposure to air. The extrema separation (W) of the ESR spectrum of the peroxy radical increased with the lowering temperature and underwent a sudden change within the temperature range of 170 to 190K. The ESR spectrum observed at 77K was quite different from that observed at room temperature. Finally, the effects of treatment time, input power and system pressure on radical concentration of the treated samples were studied. The attenuation of the peroxy radical at room temperature was also investigated.

  9. Innovations in plasma sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gershman, Daniel J.

    2016-04-01

    During the history of space exploration, ever improving instruments have continued to enable new measurements and discoveries. Focusing on plasma sensors, we examine the processes by which such new instrument innovations have occurred over the past decades. Due to risk intolerance prevalent in many NASA space missions, innovations in plasma instrumentation occur primarily when heritage systems fail to meet science requirements, functional requirements as part of its space platform, or design constraints. We will review such innovation triggers in the context of the design literature and with the help of two case studies, the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer on MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and the Fast Plasma Investigation on Magnetosphere Multiscale. We will then discuss the anticipated needs for new plasma instrument innovations to enable the science program of the next decade.

  10. Study of the Deburring Process for Low Carbon Steel by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongtao; Kan, Jinfeng; Jiang, Bailing; Liu, Yanjie; Liu, Zheng

    2016-08-01

    In an appropriate electrochemical environment, the discrete thermal electron emission could be induced in the micro area due to the uneven distribution of electron flux on the anode surface. Thus an oxygen molecule could be ionized at the liquid-solid interface after collision, and then oxygen plasma with distribution characteristics would be formed. The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) could happen at the liquid-solid interface. In this work, the low carbon steel was used to study the deburring process by PEO at a high frequency (70000 Hz) pulse DC mode. Its burr height H from 3.23 mm to 0.04 mm was removed to form a smooth surface within 6 min. The values of corrosion potential and current density for the untreated sample were -0.667 V and 6.735×10-5 A/cm2, respectively. But for the treated sample, the corrosion potential and current density were relatively lower, -0.354 V and 1.19×10-7 A/cm2. Therefore, PEO was expected to be a new deburring method of carbon steel for the material processing field. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51571114) and Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (No. BK20130935)

  11. Taxonomy and why history of science matters for science: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Andrew; Wheeler, Quentin D

    2008-06-01

    The history of science often has difficulty connecting with science at the lab-bench level, raising questions about the value of history of science for science. This essay offers a case study from taxonomy in which lessons learned about particular failings of numerical taxonomy (phenetics) in the second half of the twentieth century bear on the new movement toward DNA barcoding. In particular, it argues that an unwillingness to deal with messy theoretical questions in both cases leads to important problems in the theory and practice of identifying taxa. This argument makes use of scientific and historical considerations in a way that the authors hope leads to convincing conclusions about the history of taxonomy as well as about its present practice.

  12. Chemical Science and Technology II. A Study Guide of the Science and Engineering Technician Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Jack T.; Wolf, Lawrence J.

    This study guide is part of a program of studies entitled the Science and Engineering Technician (SET) Curriculum developed to provide a framework for training technicians in the use of electronic instruments and their applications. This interdisciplinary course of study integrates elements from the disciplines of chemistry, physics, mathematics,…

  13. PRP Treatment Efficacy for Tendinopathy: A Review of Basic Science Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqin Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP has been widely used in orthopaedic surgery and sport medicine to treat tendon injuries. However, the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy is controversial. This paper focuses on reviewing the basic science studies on PRP performed under well-controlled conditions. Both in vitro and in vivo studies describe PRP’s anabolic and anti-inflammatory effects on tendons. While some clinical trials support these findings, others refute them. In this review, we discuss the effectiveness of PRP to treat tendon injuries with evidence presented in basic science studies and the potential reasons for the controversial results in clinical trials. Finally, we comment on the approaches that may be required to improve the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy.

  14. Girls and science: A qualitative study on factors related to success and failure in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paula Denise

    This qualitative study sought to determine how girls perceived factors that contribute to their success in science programs designed to maximize their achievement. The sample consisted of 20 students in 9th and 12th grades attending a school of choice. Respondents were interviewed using a structured interview protocol. The National Council for Research on Women study (Thom, 2001) found that girls are more successful in math and science programs that incorporate a cooperative, hands-on approach than in programs that stress competition and individual learning. This finding was supported by this study among 20 high school girls in a school whose mission is to improve the access of girls who study and choose careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines. Related studies on the subject of the underrepresentation of girls and women in science and related disciplines raise the question why so few girls choose STEM careers. Qualitative inductive analysis was used to discover critical themes that emerged from the data. The initial results were presented within the context of the following five themes: (1) learning styles, (2) long-term goals, (3) subject matter, (4) classroom climate/environment, and (5) evaluation. After further analysis, the researcher found that factors cited by the girls as contributing to their success in science programs specifically designed to maximize their achievement were: (a) cooperative learning, (b) a custom-tailored curriculum, and (c) positive influences of mentors.

  15. Study of negative ion transport phenomena in a plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riz, D.; Pamela, J. [Departement de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee C. E., Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    1996-07-01

    NIETZSCHE (Negative Ions Extraction and Transport ZSimulation Code for HydrogEn species) is a negative ion (NI) transport code developed at Cadarache. This code calculates NI trajectories using a 3D Monte-Carlo technique, taking into account the main destruction processes, as well as elastic collisions (H{sup {minus}}/H{sup +}) and charge exchanges (H{sup {minus}}/H{sup 0}). It determines the extraction probability of a NI created at a given position. According to the simulations, we have seen that in the case of volume production, only NI produced close to the plasma grid (PG) can be extracted. Concerning the surface production, we have studied how NI produced on the PG and accelerated by the plasma sheath backward into the source could be extracted. We demonstrate that elastic collisions and charge exchanges play an important role, which in some conditions dominates the magnetic filter effect, which acts as a magnetic mirror. NI transport in various conditions will be discussed: volume/surface production, high/low plasmas density, tent filter/transverse filter. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Plasma-induced field emission study of carbon nanotube cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Shen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on the plasma-induced field emission (PFE properties of a large area carbon nanotube (CNT cathode on a 2 MeV linear induction accelerator injector is presented. Experimental results show that the cathode is able to emit intense electron beams. Intense electron beams of 14.9–127.8  A/cm^{2} are obtained from the cathode. The CNT cathode desorbs gases from the CNTs during the PFE process. The fast cathode plasma expansion affects the diode perveance. The amount of outgassing is estimated to be 0.06–0.49  Pa·L, and the ratio of outgassing and electron are roughly calculated to be within the range of 170–350 atoms per electron. The effect of the outgassing is analyzed, and the outgassing mass spectrum of the CNT cathode has been studied during the PFE. There is a significant desorption of CO_{2}, N_{2}(CO, and H_{2} gases, which plays an important role during the PFE process. All the experiments demonstrate that the outgassing plays an important role in the formation of the cathode plasma. Moreover, the characteristic turn-on time of the CNT cathode was measured to be 39 ns.

  17. Kinetic Study of Nonequilibrium Plasma-Assisted Methane Steam Reforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop a detailed reaction mechanism for plasma-assisted methane steam reforming, a comprehensive numerical and experimental study of effect laws on methane conversion and products yield is performed at different steam to methane molar ratio (S/C, residence time s, and reaction temperatures. A CHEMKIN-PRO software with sensitivity analysis module and path flux analysis module was used for simulations. A set of comparisons show that the developed reaction mechanism can accurately predict methane conversion and the trend of products yield in different operating conditions. Using the developed reaction mechanism in plasma-assisted kinetic model, the reaction path flux analysis was carried out. The result shows that CH3 recombination is the limiting reaction for CO production and O is the critical species for CO production. Adding 40 wt.% Ni/SiO2 in discharge region has significantly promoted the yield of H2, CO, or CO2 in dielectric packed bed (DPB reactor. Plasma catalytic hybrid reforming experiment verifies the reaction path flux analysis tentatively.

  18. Plasma interpenetration study on the Omega laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pape, Sebastien; Divol, Laurent; Ross, Steven; Wilks, Scott; Amendt, Peter; Berzak Hopkins, Laura; Huser, Gael; Moody, John; MacKinnon, Andy; Meezan, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    The Near Vacuum Campaign on the National Ignition Facility has sparked an interest on the nature of the gold/carbon interface at high velocity, high electron temperature, low-electron density. Indeed radiation-hydrodynamic simulations have been unable to accurately reproduce the experimental shape of the hot spot resulting from implosion driven in Near Vacuum Holhraum. The experimental data are suggesting that the inner beams are freely propagating to the waist of the hohlraum when simulations predict that a density ridge at the gold/carbon interface blocks the inner beams. The discrepancy between experimental data and simulation might be explained by the fluid description of the plasma interface in a rad-hydro code which is probably not valid in when two plasma at high velocity, high temperature are meeting. To test our assumption, we went to the Omega laser facility to study gold/carbon interface in the relevant regime. Time resolved images of the self-emission as well as Thomson scattering data will be presented. For the first time, a transition from a multifluid to a single fluid is observed as plasmas are interacting. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Study of Ag and PE interface after plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackova, A.; Malinsky, P. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkinje University, Ceske mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Bocan, J. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 7, 11519 Praha 1 (Czech Republic); Svorcik, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Pavlik, J.; Stryhal, Z. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkinje University, Ceske mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Sajdl, P. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5,166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2008-07-01

    In this study, the effect of simultaneous plasma treatment and thermal annealing on the diffusion of Ag in low and high-density polyethylene (LDPE and HDPE) and on intermixing at the metal/polymer interface is examined. Metal layers were deposited onto 50 {mu}m thick LDPE and HDPE foils using diode sputtering. Concentration profiles of Ag were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Ag diffusion coefficients in LDPE and HDPE were extracted from measured Ag depth profiles. Diffusion coefficients 5.05 x 10{sup -14}-6.78 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1} and 2.44 x 10{sup -14}-4.66 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1} were found for Ag in HDPE and Ag in LDPE, respectively. Morphology changes after the plasma treatment were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and from RBS measurements as well. Surface fraction of Ag and plasma induced surface chemistry modification was investigated using XPS analysis. The signal of Ag bonded on polymer structure was identified and degradation of polymer substrate was observed in XPS spectra. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Study of negative ion transport phenomena in a plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riz, D.; Paméla, J.

    1996-07-01

    NIETZSCHE (Negative Ions Extraction and Transport ZSimulation Code for HydrogEn species) is a negative ion (NI) transport code developed at Cadarache. This code calculates NI trajectories using a 3D Monte-Carlo technique, taking into account the main destruction processes, as well as elastic collisions (H-/H+) and charge exchanges (H-/H0). It determines the extraction probability of a NI created at a given position. According to the simulations, we have seen that in the case of volume production, only NI produced close to the plasma grid (PG) can be extracted. Concerning the surface production, we have studied how NI produced on the PG and accelerated by the plasma sheath backward into the source could be extracted. We demonstrate that elastic collisions and charge exchanges play an important role, which in some conditions dominates the magnetic filter effect, which acts as a magnetic mirror. NI transport in various conditions will be discussed: volume/surface production, high/low plasmas density, tent filter/transverse filter.

  1. Experimental Study on Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuator with Different Encapsulated Electrode Widths for Airflow Control at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaohua; Yang, Liang; Yan, Huijie; Jin, Ying; Hua, Yue; Ren, Chunsheng

    2016-10-01

    The surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuator has shown great promise as an aerodynamic flow control device. In this paper, the encapsulated electrode width of a SDBD actuator is changed to study the airflow acceleration behavior. The effects of encapsulated electrode width on the actuator performance are experimentally investigated by measuring the dielectric layer surface potential, time-averaged ionic wind velocity and thrust force. Experimental results show that the airflow velocity and thrust force increase with the encapsulated electrode width. The results can be attributed to the distinct plasma distribution at different encapsulated electrode widths. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175037), National Natural Science Foundation for Young Scientists of China (No. 11305017) and Special Fund for Theoretical Physics (No. 11247239)

  2. Constructive Science and Technology Studies: On the Path to Being?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Carol J.

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that science and technology studies (STS) is ready to reconsider an approach based on Heideggerian phenomenology. Argues that STS is facing a confrontation with the inadequacies of constructivism's founding assumptions. (CCM)

  3. African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences - Vol 9, No 1 (2011) ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... Effects of constructivist teaching strategies and traditional lecture method on students' learning outcomes in ...

  4. The Presence of Iranian Information Science and Library Science Articles in Social Media: An Altmetric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadamin Erfanmanesh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main objective of the paper is to study the presence of Iranian Information Science & Library Science articles in social media websites and tools. Articles with the highest altmetric scores will be identified and the association between altmetric and citation indicators will be investigated. Methodology: This study is an applied research using altmetric data. A total of 563 articles in the area of Information Science & Library Science which specified Iran as their affiliated country and indexed by the Thomson Reuters until the end of 2014, were selected as the population of study. The altmetric bookmarklet, a service provided by Altmetric Institute was used for data collection. Statistical analysis and visualization was conducted using R statistical computing software. Results: Out of 563 Iranian IS & LS articles, 72 papers (12.8% were mentioned at least once in different social media. Twitter (80.55% stands out as the most promising altmetric source for Iranian IS & LS papers, followed by Mendeley (77.77% and CiteULike (22.22%. Studying the share of IS & LS papers with altmetric indicators across publication years show that papers published in 2014 have the highest proportion (30%. The results of running a Spearman correlation test revealed statistically significant but moderate relationships between Mendeley and CiteULike readership counts and number of citations in Web of Science. Conclusion: Altmetric indicators, indices based on activity in social media environments, have the potential to measure scientific impact of researchers beside other scientometric indicators.

  5. A Study of the Science Production in Dentistry Using Web of Science Database (2000-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serati Shirazi M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Science production in medical fields such as dentistry is of great significance. Science production can be appropriately directed through recognition of the most effective investigations, the most active institutions and countries in science production domain and also determining the status of specialists. Purpose: The aim of this survey was to study the rate of dental science production indexed in the Web of Science (WOS database by Iranian and other countries' specialists.Materials and Method: Using Web of Science, science production in dentistry in 2000-2009 was estimated; revealing 5005 records for scientists around the world and 32 for Iranian specialists. Then, analyses were done using HistCite software.Results: The findings showed that the growth rate of scientific production in dentistry was 64.53% in 2000-2009. USA was in the first rank among other countries; British Dental Journal, Sao Paolo University, and Kokich Vare were the top journal, institution and author, respectively.Data related to Iran showed that Tehran and Shiraz Universities were the first and second top institutions, each with 6 articles. M.H.Fathi with 44 TGCS was the most prolific author in WOS and H.R.Pakshir with 4 TLCS was the most highly published author in WOS in this collection. Conclusion: The findings showed that USA and UK were the first and second top countries in this regard. Iran had only 0.63% of the scientific production of dentistry in the Web of Science database, which is considered low in spite of the importance of this field.

  6. A Study by the Chinese Academy of Sciences on the Benefits of Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoxuan, Li

    2004-01-01

    This article reports on a study by the Chinese Academy of Sciences relating to the benefits of study abroad. The Chinese Academy of Sciences, as a national-level research entity, has the mission of developing China's science and technology, and the primary objective of its studies abroad work is to carry forward and promote the advance of China's…

  7. CTR plasma engineering studies. Progress report, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miley, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Plasma engineering studies at the Fusion Studies Laboratory of the University of Illinois, Urbana IL are described that deal with: fusion-product transport in plasmas and associated effects in tokamaks, neutral-beam injection and plasma build-up in mirrors, and studies of aspects of alternate confinement concepts including field-reversed mirrors, field-reversed pinches, and twin-beam mirrors.

  8. The Development of Plasma Thrusters and Its Importance for Space Technology and Science Education at University of Brasilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Calvoso, Lui; Gessini, Paolo; Ferreira, Ivan

    Helicon Double Layer Thruster based on plasma expiation along diverging magnetic field lines within similar conditons that can be met in auroral plasma formation. HDLT is sometimes called an Auroral thruster because during the plasma expiation in the cusped magnetic field a current free double layer is formed accelerating ions and a supersonic ion beam. The development fo this type of thruster are been made in several laboratories around the world and tis application for high specific impulce space mission in the solar system is foreseen. Since the beginning of this project we have about 20 undergraduate students working at the laboratory as junior scientist with CNPq schollarships for Scientific Initiation Program called PIBIC. More than 10 graduate students were involved in master and doctoral thesis work related to space science and technology problems concerning the application of plasma space propulsion for satellite and spacecrafts for solar system missions.

  9. Studies in Mathematics, Volume 22. Studies in Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Seymour V., Ed.

    The nine articles in this collection were selected because they represent concerns central to computer science, emphasize topics of particular interest to mathematicians, and underscore the wide range of areas deeply and continually affected by computer science. The contents consist of: "Introduction" (S. V. Pollack), "The…

  10. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)and its application in life sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has made much progress since its birth in the late 1990s. This paper will give a rather systematic overview on the use of this technique in new devices and technologies related to plasma source, sample-introducing device and detecting spectrometer etc. In this overview, an emphasis will be put on the evaluation of the ICPMS technique in combination with a series of physical, chemical and biological techniques, such as laser ablation (LA), capillary electrophoresis (CE) and high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC), along with their representative high accuracy and high sensitivity. Finally, comprehensive and fruitful applications of the ICP-MS and its combinative techniques in the detection of trace metallic elements and isotopes in complex biological and environmental samples will be revealed.

  11. Simulation study of scalings in scrape-off layer plasma by two-dimensional transport code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Ueda, Noriaki; Itoh, Kimitaka (National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan))

    1990-07-01

    Scrape-off Layer (SOL) plasma and divertor plasma in Tokamaks were numerically analyzed using a two-dimensional time-dependent transport code (UEDA code). Plasma transport in the SOL and the divertor region was studied for given particle and heat sources from the main plasma. A scaling study of the density, the temperature and their fall-off lengths was carried out for the JFT-2M Tokamak. The results show the inter-relations between the divertor plasma parameters and core plasma confinement. The operational conditions of the core necessary to guarantee the divertor performance are discussed. (author).

  12. Chemical Science and Technology I. A Study Guide of the Science and Engineering Technician Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Jack T.; Wolf, Lawrence J.

    This study guide is part of an interdisciplinary program of studies entitled the Science and Engineering Technician (SET) Curriculum. This curriculum integrates elements from the disciplines of chemistry, physics, mathematics, mechanical technology, and electronic technology with the objective of training technicians in the use of electronic…

  13. PREFACE: First International Workshop on Nonequilibrium Processes in Plasma Physics and Studies of Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Z. Lj; Malović, G.; Tasić, M.; Nikitović, Ž.

    2007-06-01

    This volume is a collection of papers associated with a series of invited lectures presented at the First Workshop on Nonequilibrium processes in Plasma Physics and studies of Environment that was held at Mt Kopaonik in August 2006. The workshop originated as a part of the FP6 COE 026328 which had the basic aim of promoting centers of excellence in Western Balkan countries, to facilitate dissemination of their results and to help them establish themselves in the broader arena of European and international science. So the best way to achieve all those goals was to prepare a workshop associated with the local conference SPIG (Symposium on Physics of Ionized Gases) where the participants could attend sessions in which the host Laboratory presented progress reports and papers and thereby gain a full perspective of our results. At the same time this allowed participants in the COE the opportunity to compare their results with the results of external speakers and to gain new perspectives and knowledge. The program of the workshop was augmented by inviting some of our colleagues who visited the COE in recent years or have an active collaboration with a participating member. In that respect this volume is not only a proceedings of the workshop but a collection of papers related to the topic of the workshop: Non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas and in the science of our environment. The idea is to offer review articles either summarizing a broader area of published or about to be published work or to give overviews showing preliminary results of the works in progress. The refereeing of the papers consisted of two parts, first in selection of the invitees and second in checking the submitted manuscripts. The papers were refereed to the standard of the Journal. As the program of the COE covers a wide area of topics from application of plasmas in nano- electronics to monitoring and removal of pollutants in the atmosphere, so the program of the workshop covered an even broader

  14. An exome array study of the plasma metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Eugene P.; Yang, Qiong; Yu, Bing; Liu, Xuan; Cheng, Susan; Deik, Amy; Pierce, Kerry A.; Bullock, Kevin; Ho, Jennifer E.; Levy, Daniel; Florez, Jose C.; Kathiresan, Sek; Larson, Martin G.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Clish, Clary B.; Wang, Thomas J.; Boerwinkle, Eric; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Gerszten, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    The study of rare variants may enhance our understanding of the genetic determinants of the metabolome. Here, we analyze the association between 217 plasma metabolites and exome variants on the Illumina HumanExome Beadchip in 2,076 participants in the Framingham Heart Study, with replication in 1,528 participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. We identify an association between GMPS and xanthosine using single variant analysis and associations between HAL and histidine, PAH and phenylalanine, and UPB1 and ureidopropionate using gene-based tests (P<5 × 10−8 in meta-analysis), highlighting novel coding variants that may underlie inborn errors of metabolism. Further, we show how an examination of variants across the spectrum of allele frequency highlights independent association signals at select loci and generates a more integrated view of metabolite heritability. These studies build on prior metabolomics genome wide association studies to provide a more complete picture of the genetic architecture of the plasma metabolome. PMID:27453504

  15. Plasma Therapy: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Diwan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Definition: Plasma, the fourth state of matter, is a collection of charged particles (electrons, ions, neutral atoms. Recent demonstration of plasma technology in treatment of living cells, tissue and organs are creating a new field at the intersection of plasma science and technology with biology and medicine known as plasma medicine. Plasma medicine is one of the newest fields of modem applied plasma chemistry. It appeared several years ago and comprises studies concerning the direct action of low-temperature, one atmosphere air plasma (cold plasma/nonthermal plasmalnonequilibrium on body tissues for various noninvasive therapeutic treatments or diagnostics purpose. The study of plasma holds promise for a myriad of applications ranging from lasers and electronics, hazardous decontamination, sterilization and disinfection of foods, soil, water, instruments, to medical uses in wound healing and treating certain types of tumors and cancers. Plasma represents a new state-of-the-art sterilization and disinfection treatment for certain oral and environmental pathogens, heat-sensitive materials, hard and soft surfaces, and may assist health care facilities in the management of various health concerns. The role that low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma (LTAPP could play in the inactivation of pathogenic microorganisms might prove to be a new, faster, more economical alternative.

  16. Planning Bepicolombo MPO Science Operations to study Mercury Interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Fuente, Sara; Carasa, Angela; Ortiz, Iñaki; Rodriguez, Pedro; Casale, Mauro; Benkhoff, Johannes; Zender, Joe

    2017-04-01

    BepiColombo is an Interdisciplinary Cornerstone ESA-JAXA Mission to Mercury, with two orbiters, the ESA Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and the JAXA Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) dedicated to study of the planet and its magnetosphere. The MPO, is a three-axis-stabilized, nadir-pointing spacecraft which will be placed in a polar orbit, providing excellent spatial resolution over the entire planet surface. The MPO's scientific payload comprises 11 instrument packages, including laser altimeter, cameras and the radio science experiment that will be dedicated to the study of Mercury's interior: structure, composition, formation and evolution. The planning of the science operations to be carried out by the Mercury's interior scientific instruments will be done by the SGS located at the European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC), in conjunction with the scientific instrument teams. The process will always consider the complete nominal mission duration, such that the contribution of the scheduled science operations to the science objectives, the total data volume generated, and the seasonal interdependency, can be tracked. The heart of the science operations planning process is the Observations Catalogue (OC), a web-accessed database to collect and analyse all science operations requests. From the OC, the SGS will first determine all science opportunity windows compatible with the spacecraft operational constraints. Secondly, only those compatible with the resources (power and data volume) and pointing constraints will be chosen, including slew feasibility.

  17. A Case Study Investigating Secondary Science Teachers' Perceptions of Science Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Phyllis Ann

    This project study addressed the lack of inclusion of discipline literacy pedagogy in secondary classrooms in a rural school district in eastern North Carolina. Discipline literacy practices are recommended in the Common Core Standards for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. The district had implemented content area reading strategies across content areas, yet no significant progress in secondary students' reading abilities had been demonstrated in statewide or national assessments. The conceptual framework that drove this study was disciplinary literacy, founded by the literacy research of Shanahan, Shanahan, and Zygouris-Coe. Within a qualitative case study method, this investigation of 8 secondary science teachers' experiences teaching literacy during content instruction focused on practices of embedding science-specific reading strategies into lessons and factors that influence teachers' decisions to participate in professional development to advance their learning of discipline-specific literacy methods. Data were collected and triangulated using a focus group and 8 individual interviews. Data from both methods were analyzed into codes and categories that developed into emergent themes. Findings from the focus group and individual interviews revealed that the science teachers possessed limited knowledge of science-specific reading strategies; used random, general literacy practices; and had completed inadequate professional development on science-related topics. Positive change may occur if district leaders support teachers in expanding their knowledge and application of discipline literacy strategies through participation in discipline literacy-focused professional development. The study may provide educators and researchers a deeper understanding of disciplinary literacy and increase research on the topic.

  18. M3D project for simulation studies of plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Strauss, H.R. [New York Univ., NY (United States); Sugiyama, L.E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The M3D (Multi-level 3D) project carries out simulation studies of plasmas of various regimes using multi-levels of physics, geometry, and mesh schemes in one code package. This paper and papers by Strauss, Sugiyama, and Belova in this workshop describe the project, and present examples of current applications. The currently available physics models of the M3D project are MHD, two-fluids, gyrokinetic hot particle/MHD hybrid, and gyrokinetic particle ion/two-fluid hybrid models. The code can be run with both structured and unstructured meshes.

  19. Stability study for matching in laser driven plasma acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, A.R., E-mail: andrea.rossi@mi.infn.it [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Anania, M.P. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Bacci, A. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Belleveglia, M.; Bisesto, F.G.; Chiadroni, E. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [Tor Vergata University, Physics Department, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Curcio, A.; Gallo, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Marocchino, A.; Massimo, F. [La Sapienza University, SBAI Department, via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); Mostacci, A. [La Sapienza University, SBAI Department, via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Petrarca, M. [La Sapienza University, SBAI Department, via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); Pompili, R. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Serafini, L. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Tomassini, P. [University of Milan, Physics Department, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Vaccarezza, C. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); and others

    2016-09-01

    In a recent paper [14], a scheme for inserting and extracting high brightness electron beams to/from a plasma based acceleration stage was presented and proved to be effective with an ideal bi-Gaussian beam, as could be delivered by a conventional photo-injector. In this paper, we extend that study, assessing the method stability against some jitters in the properties of the injected beam. We find that the effects of jitters in Twiss parameters are not symmetric in results; we find a promising configuration that yields better performances than the setting proposed in [14]. Moreover we show and interpret what happens when the beam charge profiles are modified.

  20. The NGST Yardstick Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, M. A.; NGST ISIM Team

    1999-05-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) is a distributed system consisting of a cryogenic instrument module that is integrated with the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) and science processors, software, and other electronics located in the Space Support Module (SSM). The ISIM system provides structure, environment, and data handling for several modular science instruments as well as several components of the OTA optics train. An ISIM baseline design and feasibility study is ongoing at GSFC. This pre-Phase A design was developed for integration with the Yardstick NGST architecture and packaging in a 5 m class EELV fairing. The goals of this study are to: [1] demonstrate mission science feasibility, [2] assess ISIM engineering and cost feasibility, [3] identify ISIM technology challenge areas,and [4] enable smart customer procurement of the NGST. In depth results from this work beyond those displayed here can be found at: http://www701.gsfc.nasa.gov/isim/isim.htm The flight ISIM will be developed by a GSFC led IPT that includes members from the STScI and, during Phase A/B, will grow to include the NGST Prime Contractor, and science instrument development teams from European, Canadian , and US science communities. Science instruments will be competitively procured from the science community, and will be integrated into the ISIM by GSFC. The flight qualified ISIM will then be delivered by GSFC to the NGST Prime Contractor for observatory level integration. At the start of NGST Phase A (Spring 1999), two competing prime contractors will begin development of separate NGST architectures, and the ISIM IPT will develop two ISIM designs corresponding to these architectures. Down selection to a single design will occur during mid 2001. The ISIM team welcomes science community feedback. Contact the IPT lead: Matt Greenhouse: matt@stars.gsfc.nasa.gov.

  1. Theoretical study of nonlinear waves and shock-like phenomena in hot plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, B. D.; Banos, A., Jr.; Kennel, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    Summaries are presented of research in basic plasma physics. Nonlinear waves and shock-like phenomena were studied which are pertinent to space physics applications, and include specific problems of magnetospheric and solar wind plasma physics.

  2. Exploring inductive risk case studies of values in science

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Ted

    2017-01-01

    Science is the most reliable means available for understanding the world around us and our place in it. But, since science draws conclusions based on limited empirical evidence, there is always a chance that a scientific inference will be incorrect. That chance, known as inductive risk, is endemic to science. Though inductive risk has always been present in scientific practice, the role of values in responding to it has only recently gained extensive attention from philosophers, scientists, and policy-makers. Exploring Inductive Risk brings together a set of eleven concrete case studies with the goals of illustrating the pervasiveness of inductive risk, assisting scientists and policymakers in responding to it, and moving theoretical discussions of this phenomenon forward. The case studies range over a wide variety of scientific contexts, including the drug approval process, high energy particle physics, dual-use research, climate science, research on gender disparities in employment, clinical trials, and to...

  3. What ideas-about-science should be taught in school science? A Delphi study of the expert community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Jonathan; Collins, Sue; Ratcliffe, Mary; Millar, Robin; Duschl, Rick

    2003-09-01

    Recent arguments in science education have proposed that school science should pay more attention to teaching the nature of science and its social practices. However, unlike the content of science, for which there is well-established consensus, there would appear to be much less unanimity within the academic community about which ideas-about-science are essential elements that should be included in the contemporary school science curriculum. Hence, this study sought to determine empirically the extent of any consensus using a three stage Delphi questionnaire with 23 participants drawn from the communities of leading and acknowledged international experts of science educators; scientists; historians, philosophers, and sociologists of science; experts engaged in work to improve the public understanding of science; and expert science teachers. The outcome of the research was a set of nine themes encapsulating key ideas about the nature of science for which there was consensus and which were considered to be an essential component of school science curriculum. Together with extensive comments provided by the participants, these data give some measure of the existing level of agreement in the community engaged in science education and science communication about the salient features of a vulgarized account of the nature of science. Although some of the themes are already a feature of existing school science curricula, many others are not. The findings of this research, therefore, challenge (a) whether the picture of science represented in the school science curriculum is sufficiently comprehensive, and (b) whether there balance in the curriculum between teaching about the content of science and the nature of science is appropriate.

  4. Studies on plasma production in a large volume system using multiple compact ECR plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarey, R. D.; Ganguli, A.; Sahu, D.; Narayanan, R.; Arora, N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a scheme for large volume plasma production using multiple highly portable compact ECR plasma sources (CEPS) (Ganguli et al 2016 Plasma Source Sci. Technol. 25 025026). The large volume plasma system (LVPS) described in the paper is a scalable, cylindrical vessel of diameter  ≈1 m, consisting of source and spacer sections with multiple CEPS mounted symmetrically on the periphery of the source sections. Scaling is achieved by altering the number of source sections/the number of sources in a source section or changing the number of spacer sections for adjusting the spacing between the source sections. A series of plasma characterization experiments using argon gas were conducted on the LVPS under different configurations of CEPS, source and spacer sections, for an operating pressure in the range 0.5-20 mTorr, and a microwave power level in the range 400-500 W per source. Using Langmuir probes (LP), it was possible to show that the plasma density (~1  -  2  ×  1011 cm-3) remains fairly uniform inside the system and decreases marginally close to the chamber wall, and this uniformity increases with an increase in the number of sources. It was seen that a warm electron population (60-80 eV) is always present and is about 0.1% of the bulk plasma density. The mechanism of plasma production is discussed in light of the results obtained for a single CEPS (Ganguli et al 2016 Plasma Source Sci. Technol. 25 025026).

  5. Discursive Contextures of Science: Euro/West-Centrism and Science and Technology Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Prasad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Science and Technology Studies (STS by the very act of showing the multiplicity, contingency, and context-dependence of scientific knowledge and practice, provincialized modern science. Postcolonial interventions within STS have pursued this goal even further. Nevertheless, Euro/West-centrism continues to inflect not only scientific practices and lay imaginaries, but also sociological and historical analyses of sciences. In this article, drawing on my own training within STS – first under J.P.S. Uberoi, who was concerned with structuralist analysis of modernity and science, and thereafter under Andy Pickering, when we focused on material agency and temporal emergence and extensively engaged with Actor Network Theory - I emphasize the continuing role of Euro/West-centric discourses in defining the “self” and the “other” and in impacting epistemological and ontological interventions. More broadly, building on a concept of Michael Lynch’s, I call for excavation and analysis of discursive contextures of sciences. In the second section of the article, through a brief analysis of embryonic stem cell therapy in a clinic in Delhi, I show how with shifting transnational landscape of technoscience certain discursive contextures are being “deterritorialized” and left “stuttering.”

  6. Engaged, embedded, enjoined: science and technology studies in the National Science Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Edward J; Rhoten, Diana R

    2011-12-01

    Engaged scholarship is an intellectual movement sweeping across higher education, not only in the social and behavioral sciences but also in fields of natural science and engineering. It is predicated on the idea that major advances in knowledge will transpire when scholars, while pursuing their research interests, also consider addressing the core problems confronting society. For a workable engaged agenda in science and technology studies, one that informs scholarship as well as shapes practice and policy, the traditional terms of engagement must be renegotiated to be more open and mutual than has historically characterized the nature of inquiry in this field. At the same time, it is essential to protect individual privacy and preserve government confidentiality. Yet there is a scientific possibility for and benefit to introducing more collaborative and deliberative research approaches between scholar and subject in ways that will not violate these first-order ethics. To make the case, this article discusses the possibilities and perils of engaged science and technology scholarship by drawing on our own recent experiences to conduct and apply STS research while embedded in the National Science Foundation. Brief accounts of these experiences reveal the opportunities as well as the challenges of engaged scholarship. They also provide lessons for those fellow travelers who might follow the authors to this or other like host organizations with ambitions of increasing fundamental knowledge about and applying research to the policies, programs, and decisions of the scientific enterprise.

  7. Kinetic study of ion-acoustic plasma vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S. A. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Aman-ur-Rehman, E-mail: amansadiq@gmail.com [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Mendonca, J. T. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Téchnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-09-15

    The kinetic theory of electron plasma waves with finite orbital angular momentum has recently been introduced by Mendonca. This model shows possibility of new kind of plasma waves and instabilities. We have extended the theory to ion-acoustic plasma vortices carrying orbital angular momentum. The dispersion equation is derived under paraxial approximation which exhibits a kind of linear vortices and their Landau damping. The numerical solutions are obtained and compared with analytical results which are in good agreement. The physical interpretation of the ion-acoustic plasma vortices and their Landau resonance conditions are given for typical case of Maxwellian plasmas.

  8. Investigation of Inquiry-Based Science Pedagogy among Middle Level Science Teachers: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Sunny Minelli

    2012-01-01

    This study implemented a qualitative approach to examine the phenomenon of "inquiry-based science pedagogy or inquiry instruction" as it has been experienced by individuals. Data was collected through online open-ended surveys, focus groups, and teacher reported self-reflections to answer the research questions: 1) How do middle level…

  9. Science for Survival: The Modern Synthesis of Evolution and the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lisa Anne

    2012-01-01

    In this historical dissertation, I examined the process of curriculum development in the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) in the United States during the period 1959-1963. The presentation of evolution in the high school texts was based on a more robust form of Darwinian evolution which developed during the 1930s and 1940s called…

  10. Science for Survival: The Modern Synthesis of Evolution and the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lisa Anne

    2012-01-01

    In this historical dissertation, I examined the process of curriculum development in the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) in the United States during the period 1959-1963. The presentation of evolution in the high school texts was based on a more robust form of Darwinian evolution which developed during the 1930s and 1940s called…

  11. Biomedical Engineering and Cognitive Science Secondary Science Curriculum Development: A Three Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stacy S.; Sherwood, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    This study reports on a multi-year effort to create and evaluate cognitive-based curricular materials for secondary school science classrooms. A team of secondary teachers, educational researchers, and academic biomedical engineers developed a series of curriculum units that are based in biomedical engineering for secondary level students in…

  12. Optical Emission Spectroscopic Studies of ICP Ar Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xuelian; REN Chunsheng; ZHANG Jian; MA Tengcai

    2007-01-01

    The ion line of 434.8 nm and atom line of 419.8 nm of Ar plasma produced by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) were measured by optical emission spectroscopy and the influences from the working gas pressure, radio-frequency (RF) power and different positions in the discharge chamber on the line intensities were investigated in this study. It was found that the intensity of Ar atom line increased firstly and then saturated with the increase of the pressure. The line intensity of Ar+, on the other hand, reached a maximum value and then decreased along with the pressure. The intensity of the line in an RF discharge also demonstrated a jumping mode and a hysteresis phenomenon with the RF power. When the RF power increased to 400 W, the discharge jumped from the E-mode to the H-mode where the line intensity of Ar atom demonstrated a sudden increase, while the intensity of Ar+ ion only changed slightly. If the RF power decreased from a high value, e.g., 1000 W, the discharge would jump from the H-mode back to the E-mode at a power of 300 W. At this time the intensities of Ar and Ar+ lines would also decrease sharply. It was also noticed in this paper that the intensity of the ion line depended on the detective location in the chamber, namely at the bottom of the chamber the line was more intense than that in the middle of the chamber, but less intense than at the top, which is considered to be related to the capacitance coupling ability of the ICP plasma in different discharge areas.

  13. The basic science of platelet-rich plasma (PRP): what clinicians need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoczky, Steven P; Sheibani-Rad, Shahin; Shebani-Rad, Shahin

    2013-12-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been advocated for the biological augmentation of tissue healing and regeneration through the local introduction of increased levels (above baseline) of platelets and their associated bioactive molecules. In theory, the increased levels of autologous growth factors and secretory proteins provided by the concentrated platelets may enhance the wound healing process, especially in degenerative tissues or biologically compromised individuals. Although PRP has been increasingly utilized in the treatment of a variety of sports-related injuries, improvements in healing and clinical outcomes have not been universally reported. One reason for this may be the fact that all PRP preparations are not the same. Variations in the volume of whole blood taken, the platelet recovery efficacy, the final volume of plasma in which the platelets are suspended, and the presence or absence of white blood cells, and the addition of exogenous thrombin to activate the platelets or calcium chloride to induce fibrin formation, can all affect the character and potential efficacy of the final PRP product. This article will review the basic principles involved in creating PRP and examine the potential basic scientific significance of the individual blood components contained in the various forms of PRP currently used in sports medicine.

  14. A study of the Teachers` Academy for Mathematics and Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett, B.; Scheirer, M.A.; Raizen, S.

    1994-09-15

    The Teachers` Academy for Mathematics and Science in Chicago (TAMS) is a freestanding institution founded in 1989 by scientists and a variety of other stakeholders, to advance the systemic reform of mathematics and science education in Chicago`s public schools. It focuses on the ``re-tooling`` of its elementary level teachers. The TAMS program, which has been funded in part by the DOE, contributes to strategic goals two through five of the Office of University and Science Education (OUSE). This evaluation of TAMS by the National Center for Improving Science Education is primarily a qualitative study that summarizes the history and current status of the organization and its programs. Data was obtained through extensive interviews, observations, and document review, using a framework of templates to guide data collection and analyses. The findings are organized around a series of lessons learned from the first three years of TAMS and conclusions about its current status.

  15. Preparing tomorrow's health sciences librarians: feasibility and marketing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, B B; Jenkins, C G; Friedman, C P; Lipscomb, C E; Gollop, C J; Moore, M E; Morrison, M L; Tibbo, H R; Wildemuth, B M

    1996-10-01

    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is devising and evaluating five curricular models designed to improve education for health sciences librarianship. These models fit into a continual learning process from the initial professional preparation to lifelong learning opportunities. Three of them enhance existing degree and certificate programs in the School of Information and Library Science (SILS) with a health sciences specialization, and two are new programs for working information professionals. The approaches involve partnerships among SILS, the Health Sciences Library, and the program in Medical Informatics. The planning process will study the feasibility of the proposed programs, test the marketability of the models to potential students and employers, and make recommendations about implementation.

  16. Science supervisors' conceptions of biology and the field of science: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jean Radcliff

    1999-12-01

    This study examined the nature, source and formation of science supervisors' cognitive frameworks for biology and for the field of science and the impact of these frameworks on their work in school divisions. The design for this qualitative study was an emergent case study using ethnographic methods. The purposeful sample consisted of five science supervisors selected from different school divisions in three geographic regions of a middle-Atlantic state. Each participant had a background in biology, classroom teaching and full-time supervisory experience. To collect data for this study, an open-ended questionnaire was used to gain an understanding of the nature of the supervisors' conceptions of biology and for the field of science. Two semi-structured interviews, each lasting 1--2 hours in length, were designed to explore the source and formation of the supervisors' conceptual frameworks, and the impact of these frameworks on their work in school divisions. Data were inductively analyzed using a constant comparative approach. The major findings of this study were: (1) All of the supervisors in this study were remarkably cognizant of possessing a framework for biology and for the field of science. (2) The supervisors' frameworks were well-formed, relatively highly complex and showed a variety of organizational patterns. (3) All of the supervisors' diagrams showed evidence of coherent, integrated themes with emphasis on the importance of connections and interrelationships. (4) The supervisors were able to readily articulate sound rationales for construction of their diagrams. (5) Instead of seeing biology as an isolated discipline, the supervisors view biology in the context of science. Overall, the supervisors no longer see their frameworks as biology-content related, but as science-related. (6) Major influences on the source and formation of the supervisors' conceptual frameworks were a result of selected work-related experiences. (7) The supervisors' conceptual

  17. [Study of ignition characteristic of DC voltage plasma ignitor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; He, Li-Ming; Lan, Yu-Dan; Du, Hong-Liang

    2011-09-01

    The changing law between interelectrode current, discharge characteristic and jet characteristic of plasma ignitor under different inlet Ar pressure and working current was researched by adopting self-made plasma ignitor. Still, four channels CCD spectrometer was adopted to measure the spectrum characteristic at the exit of ignitor and electron temperature of plasma was calculated according to the spectrum characteristic. The results show that the interelectrode current gradually reduced with rising inlet Ar pressure; The jet length of plasma ignitor firstly increased then reduced with rising inlet Ar flowrate, and also increased with rising working current; The working current of plasma ignitor reduced with rising inlet Ar flowrate, and increased with rising source output current; the electron temperature of plasma ignitor jet increased with rising working current and reduced with rising Ar flowrate. The research results are of certain guidance meanings and reference values for the practical application of plasma ignition system in aeroengine.

  18. Study on spatial distribution of plasma parameters in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Hee-Woon; Lee, Woohyun; Kim, Ji-Won; Whang, Ki-Woong, E-mail: kwhang@snu.ac.kr [Plasma Laboratory, Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyuk [Samsung Electronics Co., Banwol-dong, Hwaseong 445-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Wanjae [Tokyo Electron Miyagi Ltd., Taiwa-cho, Kurokawa-gun, Miyagi 981-3629 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Spatial distributions of various plasma parameters such as plasma density, electron temperature, and radical density in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and a magnetized inductively coupled plasma (M-ICP) were investigated and compared. Electron temperature in between the rf window and the substrate holder of M-ICP was higher than that of ICP, whereas the one just above the substrate holder of M-ICP was similar to that of ICP when a weak (<8 G) magnetic field was employed. As a result, radical densities in M-ICP were higher than those in ICP and the etch rate of oxide in M-ICP was faster than that in ICP without severe electron charging in 90 nm high aspect ratio contact hole etch.

  19. Study of photoconductor polymers synthesized by plasma; Estudio de polimeros fotoconductores sintetizados por plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez P, M.A

    2007-07-01

    In this work the photoconductivity in poly thiophene (PTh), poly pyrrole (PPy) and doped poly pyrrole with iodine (PPy/I) is studied, whose structures depend of the intensity of the electric field applied during the synthesis by plasma. The conjugated organic polymers possess double alternated bonds in its chemical structure that its allow the one movement of {pi} electrons through the polymeric chains. The plasma is produced by means of splendor discharges to 13.5 MHz, resistive coupling, at one pressure that oscillates in the interval from 2 to 3x10{sup -1} mbar, 180 min and powers of 10, 24, 40, {sup 60}, 80 and 100 W. Its were used heteroaromatic polymers like PTh and PPy/I, due to their potential applications in optoelectronics. The influence of the iodine is evaluated as dopant in PPy and it is compared with their similar one without doping in the light absorption/emission processes. The polymers synthesized by plasma can ramify or to intersect due to the energy applied during the synthesis. However, if the polymer intersects, the aromaticity can continue through the polymeric chains. The absorptions obtained by infrared spectroscopy, suggest that the polymer conserves the aromatic structure of the monomer fundamentally with substitutions that indicate inter crossing and partial fragmentation. The structure of most of the polymers spreads to be amorphous because they don't possess any classification. However, the PPy/I and PTh synthesized by this technique present crystalline segments whose intensity diminishes with the power of the discharge. In PTh, the average crystallinity diminishes from 19.8% to 9.9%, and in PPy/I of 15.9% to 13.3% in the interval of 10 to 100 W of power. In this work, however, its were crystalline arrangements in all the studied powers. The classification of the polymeric structure favors the formation of trajectories of transfer of electric loads among the chains, that which influences in the global electric conductivity of the

  20. Innovative HPC architectures for the study of planetary plasma environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Jorge; Wolf, Anna; Lembège, Bertrand; Zitz, Anke; Alvarez, Damian; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    DEEP-ER is an European Commission founded project that develops a new type of High Performance Computer architecture. The revolutionary system is currently used by KU Leuven to study the effects of the solar wind on the global environments of the Earth and Mercury. The new architecture combines the versatility of Intel Xeon computing nodes with the power of the upcoming Intel Xeon Phi accelerators. Contrary to classical heterogeneous HPC architectures, where it is customary to find CPU and accelerators in the same computing nodes, in the DEEP-ER system CPU nodes are grouped together (Cluster) and independently from the accelerator nodes (Booster). The system is equipped with a state of the art interconnection network, a highly scalable and fast I/O and a fail recovery resiliency system. The final objective of the project is to introduce a scalable system that can be used to create the next generation of exascale supercomputers. The code iPic3D from KU Leuven is being adapted to this new architecture. This particle-in-cell code can now perform the computation of the electromagnetic fields in the Cluster while the particles are moved in the Booster side. Using fast and scalable Xeon Phi accelerators in the Booster we can introduce many more particles per cell in the simulation than what is possible in the current generation of HPC systems, allowing to calculate fully kinetic plasmas with very low interpolation noise. The system will be used to perform fully kinetic, low noise, 3D simulations of the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere of the Earth and Mercury. Preliminary simulations have been performed in other HPC centers in order to compare the results in different systems. In this presentation we show the complexity of the plasma flow around the planets, including the development of hydrodynamic instabilities at the flanks, the presence of the collision-less shock, the magnetosheath, the magnetopause, reconnection zones, the formation of the

  1. The statistical studies of the inner boundary of plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Cao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The penetration of plasma sheet ions into the inner magnetosphere is very important to the inner magnetospheric dynamics since plasma sheet ions are one of the major particle sources of ring current during storm times. However, the direct observations of the inner boundary of the plasma sheet are fairly rare due to the limited number of satellites in near equatorial orbits outside 6.6 RE. In this paper, we used the ion data recorded by TC-1 from 2004 to 2006 to study the distribution of inner boundary of ion plasma sheet (IBIPS and for the first time show the observational distribution of IBIPS in the equatorial plane. The IBIPS has a dawn-dusk asymmetry, being farthest to the Earth in the 06:00 08:00 LT bin and closest to the Earth in the 18:00–20:00 LT bin. Besides, the IBIPS has also a day-night asymmetry, which may be due to the fact that the ions on the dayside are exposed more time to loss mechanisms on their drift paths. The radial distance of IBIPS decrease generally with the increase of Kp index. The mean radial distance of IBIPS is basically larger than 6.6 RE during quiet times and smaller than 6.6 RE during active times. When the strength of convection electric field increases, the inward shift of IBIPS is most significant on the night side (22:00–02:00 LT. For Kp ≤ 0+, only 16% of IBIPSs penetrate inside the geosynchronous orbit. For 2 ≤ Kp < 3+, however, 70% of IBIPSs penetrate inside the geosynchronous orbit. The IBIPS has weak correlations with the AE and Dst indexes. The average correlation coefficient between Ri and Kp is −0.58 while the correlation coefficient between Ri and AE/Dst is only −0.29/0.17. The correlation coefficients are local time dependent. Particularly, Ri and Kp are highly correlated (r=−0.72 in the night sector, meaning that the radial distance of IBIPS

  2. Experimental beam system studies of plasma-polymer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nest, Dustin George

    Since the invention of the integrated circuit, the semiconductor industry has relied on the shrinking of device dimensions to increase device performance and decrease manufacturing costs. However, the high degree of roughening observed during plasma etching of current generation photoresist (PR) polymers can result in poor pattern transfer and ultimately decreased device performance or failure. Plasma-surface interactions are inherently difficult to study due to the highly coupled nature of the plasma enviroment. To better understand these interactions, a beam system approach is employed where polymers are exposed to beams of ions and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons. Through the use of the beam system approach, simultaneous VUV radiation, ion bombardment, and moderate substrate heating have been identified as key elements, acting synergistically, as being responsible for roughening of current generation 193 nm PR during plasma processing. Sequential exposure is not adequate for the development of surface roughness, as observed through AFM and SEM. Ion bombardment results in the formation of a graphitized near-surface region with a depth of a few nanometers, the expected ion penetration depth of 150 eV argon ions. In contrast, VUV radiation results in the loss of carbon-oxygen bonds in the bulk PR as observed through Transmission FTIR. Based on the differing penetration depth of either ions or photons, their resulting chemical modifications, and the temperature dependence of the observed roughening, a mechanism is proposed based on stress relaxation resulting in surface buckling. The surface roughness of poly(4-methyl styrene) (P4MS) and poly(alpha-methyl styrene) (PalphaMS) have also been investigated under exposure to ions and VUV photons. PaMS degrades during VUV radiation above its ceiling temperature of ˜60°C. Despite having the same chemical composition as PalphaMS, P4MS does not degrade during VUV exposure at 70°C due to its relatively high ceiling

  3. Scienceography: the study of how science is written

    CERN Document Server

    Cormode, Graham; Yun, Jinyun

    2012-01-01

    Scientific literature has itself been the subject of much scientific study, for a variety of reasons: understanding how results are communicated, how ideas spread, and assessing the influence of areas or individuals. However, most prior work has focused on extracting and analyzing citation and stylistic patterns. In this work, we introduce the notion of 'scienceography', which focuses on the writing of science. We provide a first large scale study using data derived from the arXiv e-print repository. Crucially, our data includes the "source code" of scientific papers-the LTEX source-which enables us to study features not present in the "final product", such as the tools used and private comments between authors. Our study identifies broad patterns and trends in two example areas-computer science and mathematics-as well as highlighting key differences in the way that science is written in these fields. Finally, we outline future directions to extend the new topic of scienceography.

  4. Experimental study into plasma-assisted PM removal for diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Creyghton, Y.; Gulijk, C. van; Oonk, H; Maisuls, S.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma-assisted PM removal is examined in a packed-bed plasma system. This study focuses on the effect of plasma power, space velocity and exhaust gas composition on PM filtration. Experiments are done on an engine dynamometer with a VW 1.2l TDI engine. During these experiments, the airflow is throt

  5. Numerical and experimental studies of the carbon etching in EUV-induced plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astakhov, Dmitry; Goedheer, W.J.; Lee, Christopher James; Ivanov, V.V.; Krivtsun, V.M.; Yakushev, O.; Koshelev, K.N.; Lopaev, D.V.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    We have used a combination of numerical modeling and experiments to study carbon etching in the presence of a hydrogen plasma. We model the evolution of a low density EUV-induced plasma during and after the EUV pulse to obtain the energy resolved ion fluxes from the plasma to the surface. By

  6. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: I. Experimental study in hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Astakhov, D. I.; Goedheer, W. J.; Lee, C. J.; Ivanov, V. V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Koshelev, K. N.; Lopaev, D. V.; Bijkerk, F.; Banine, V.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmas induced by EUV radiation are unique since they are created without the need of any discharge. Moreover, it is essential to characterize these plasmas to understand and predict their long term impact on highly delicate optics in EUV lithography tools. In this paper we study plasmas induced by

  7. Experimental study into plasma-assisted PM removal for diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Creyghton, Y.; Gulijk, C. van; Oonk, H; Maisuls, S.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma-assisted PM removal is examined in a packed-bed plasma system. This study focuses on the effect of plasma power, space velocity and exhaust gas composition on PM filtration. Experiments are done on an engine dynamometer with a VW 1.2l TDI engine. During these experiments, the airflow is

  8. New numerical tools to study waves and instabilities of flowing plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beliën, A.J.C.; Botchev, M.A.; Goedbloed, J.P.; Holst, van der B.; Keppens, R.

    2002-01-01

    Studying plasma waves and instabilities is an indispensable part of present thermonuclear fusion and astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Up till recently, spectral analysis was mostly restricted to static plasmas. However, the assumption of a static plasma is unrealistic not only for astrophys

  9. Numerical studies of a plasma diode with external forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekaa, V. L.; Pécseli, H. L.; Trulsen, J. K.

    2012-08-01

    With reference to laboratory Q-machine studies we analyze the dynamics of a plasma diode under external forcing. Assuming a strong axial magnetic field, the problem is analyzed in one spatial dimension by a particle-in-cell code. The cathode is assumed to be operated in electron rich conditions, supplying an abundance of electrons. We compare different forcing schemes with the results obtained by solving the van der Pol equation. In one method of forcing we apply an oscillation in addition to the DC end plate bias and consider both amplitude and frequency variations. An alternative method of perturbation consists of modelling an absorbing grid at some internal position. Also in this case we can have a constant frequency with varying amplitude or alternatively an oscillation with chirped frequency but constant amplitude. We find that the overall features of the forced van der Pol equation are recovered, but the details in the plasma response need more attention to the harmonic responses, requiring extensions of the model equation. The analysis is extended by introducing collisional effects, where we emphasize charge exchange collisions of ions, since these processes usually have the largest cross sections and give significant modifications of the diode performance. In particular we find a reduction in oscillator frequency, although a linear scaling of the oscillation time with the system length remains also in this case.

  10. Nuclear science research with dynamic high energy density plasmas at NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, D. A.; Gharibyan, N.; Moody, K. J.; Despotopulos, J. D.; Grant, P. M.; Yeamans, C. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Cerjan, C. J.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Faye, S.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear reaction measurements are performed at the National Ignition Facility in a high energy density plasma environment by adding target materials to the outside of the hohlraum thermo-mechanical package on an indirect-drive exploding pusher shot. Materials are activated with 14.1-MeV neutrons and the post-shot debris is collected via the Solid Radiochemistry diagnostic, which consists of metal discs fielded 50 cm from target chamber center. The discs are removed post-shot and analyzed via radiation counting and mass spectrometry. Results from a shot using Nd and Tm foils as targets are presented, which indicate enhanced collection of the debris in the line of sight of a given collector. The capsule performance was not diminished due to the extra material. This provides a platform for future measurements of nuclear reaction data through the use of experimental packages mounted external to the hohlraum.

  11. Nature of Science Lessons, Argumentation and Scientific Discussions among Students in Science Classes: A Case Study in a Successful School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Elif; Ucus, Sukran

    2015-01-01

    Argumentation is highlighted as one of the most important activities of science education by many researchers. The main aim of this research is to examine primary school students' nature of science classes and argumentation skills in terms of their academic success in primary science classes. Thus, the main interest of the study is centered on the…

  12. Nature of Science Lessons, Argumentation and Scientific Discussions among Students in Science Class: A Case Study in a Successful School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Elif; Ucus, Sukran

    2015-01-01

    Argumentation is highlighted as one of the most important activities of science education by many researchers. The main aim of this research is to examine primary school students' nature of science classes and argumentation skills in terms of their academic success in primary science classes. Thus, the main interest of the study is centered on the…

  13. Integrating Science and Technology: Using Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge as a Framework to Study the Practices of Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Rose M.; Dawson, Kara; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined how teachers involved in a yearlong technology integration initiative planned to enact technological, pedagogical, and content practices in science lessons. These science teachers, engaged in an initiative to integrate educational technology in inquiry-based science lessons, provided a total of 525 lesson plans for this…

  14. Study for Teaching Behavioral Sciences in Schools of Medicine, Volume III: Behavioral Science Perspectives in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Sociological Association, Washington, DC. Medical Sociology Council.

    Volume III of a study of teaching behavioral sciences in medical school presents perspectives on medical behavioral science from the viewpoints of the several behavioral disciplines (anthropology, psychology, sociology, political science, economics, behavioral biology and medical education). In addition, there is a discussion of translating…

  15. Understanding the Influence of Learners' Forethought on Their Use of Science Study Strategies in Postsecondary Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Karee E.; Lo, Wen-Juo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding self-regulation in science learning is important for theorists and practitioners alike. However, very little has been done to explore and understand students' self-regulatory processes in postsecondary science courses. In this study, the influence of science efficacy, learning value, and goal orientation on the perceived use of…

  16. Achieving Equity through Critical Science Agency: An Ethnographic Study of African American Students in a Health Science Career Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun-Frank, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential of a High School Health Science Career Academy to support African American students' science career trajectories. I used three key theoretical tools---critical science agency (Basu, 2007; Calabrese Barton & Tan, 2008), power (Nespor, 1994), and cultural production (Carlone, 2004; Eisenhart &…

  17. A numerical study of plasma detachment conditions in JET divertor plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonini, R.; Corrigan, G.; Radford, G.; Spence, J.; Taroni, A.; Weber, S. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    Simulation results obtained with the EDGE2D/U code confirm that for a given particle inventory in the SOL (including the divertor), the main parameter determining whether or not particle, momentum and energy detachment occurs, is the residual power P - P{sub lost}, where P is the total power entering the SOL and P{sub lost} is the power lost by transport to walls and by volume losses in the SOL outside the region where detachment takes place. For particle contents leading to reasonable values of the separatrix mid-plane density, detachment is found if the residual power is low enough. Typically the residual power must be inferior to 3 MW for good detachment, with the exact value depending on the geometry of the divertor, the transport assumptions and the neutral recirculation scheme. The results show that divertor plasma conditions relevant for the study of power exhaust and impurity control problems are possible in JET. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. A case study exploring science competence and science confidence of middle school girls from marginalized backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Yeni Violeta

    The inclusion of learners from underrepresented background in biology field research experiences has not been widely explored in the literature. Increased access and equity to experiences for groups historically underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) has been identified as a priority for many, yet little is known about the components these experiences should have and what types of transformations participants undergo as a result of these experiences. This dissertation explored the systemic creation of an intervention purposely designed to serve middle school girls from underrepresented backgrounds, the implementation of such intervention, and effect on the girls' science competence and science confidence. El Espejo, Spanish for "The Mirror," was an ongoing field ecology research program for middle schools girls founded in 2009 at a local interdisciplinary learning center. Girls from all walks of life had the opportunity to be apprentice researchers and to work with scientists and science educators from the local community. All activities were strategically designed to promote student-led inquiry, career awareness, cultural awareness, and opportunities for research and mentorship for girls from underrepresented backgrounds. An increased understanding of if, how, and why this experience was perceived by the girls to be life changing was of importance to add to the conversations that seek ways to inspire and prepare this generation of students to be the next generation of scientists. The study built on systems theory, and on theories that were embedded in the participants' system: critical race theory, identity theory, and experiential learning theory, grounded in the context of the lived experiences of girls from underrepresented backgrounds. The girls' experiences were captured through journals, observer participant notes, photo-documentation, artifacts (posters, videos) created by the girls, and by using science perception

  19. Administrative support of novice science teachers: A multiple case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacuone, Leann

    Novice science teachers leave the confines of colleges and universities to embark on a new adventure in education where they aim to influence young minds, make a difference in the world, and share their love for their content. They have learned their pedagogical skills with the support and assistance of fellow classmates, a supporting professor, and a cooperating teacher. These teachers enter their new place of employment and are met with many unexpected challenges, such as a lack of resources, no one to ask questions of, and a busy staff with already established relationships, causing them to feel an overall lack of support and resulting in many new teachers rethinking their career choice and leaving the field of education within 5 years of entering. This multiple-case study investigated the administrative support 4 novice science teachers received during an academic year and the novice teachers' perceptions of the support they received to answer the following research question: How do novice science teachers who have consistent interactions with administrators develop during their first year? To answer this question, semistructured interviews, reflection journals, observations, resumes, long-range plans, and student discipline referrals were collected. The findings from this study show novice science teachers who had incidents occur in the classroom requiring administrative assistance and guidance felt more confident in enforcing their classroom management policies and procedures as the year progressed to change student behavior. The novice science teachers perceived administrators who provided resources including technology, office supplies, science supplies, and the guidance of a mentor as supportive. Novice science teachers who engaged in dialogue after administrative observations, were provided the opportunity to attend professional development outside the district, and had a mentor who taught the same discipline made more changes to their instructional

  20. Autonomous Sciencecraft Constellation science study report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A.

    2001-01-01

    The image processing and scientific analysis techniques described in this study report are not confined to radar date of Earth. The techniques have widespread applications, theoretically to any instrument at any wavelength (such as visible and infrared imagers). We illustrate how the same techniques demonstrated by ASC can be used to search for change, and identify features, on Mars and the Jovian satelites, Europa and IO.

  1. Studies on anxiety about teaching science in preservice elementary teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerback, Mary E.

    During a sequence of science content courses designed for elementary teachers, anxiety about teaching science as measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was reduced. Each study: 1977-; 1978, 1978-; 1979, 1979-; 1980, and 1980-; 1981, was a separate descriptive study. The overall patterns were similar in all four years. Initial anxiety about teaching science was high and changed in a positive direction in all studies. Variations from year to year were attributed to staffing arrangements, grading practices and course sequences. Both the X and Y forms of the STAI were used. There appears to be a high degree of relationship between them, but the Y form was preferable because it is more reflective of anxiety than depression and has better psychometric properties.

  2. 77 FR 40030 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... and Technology and Small Unit Data to Decisions. Proposed Agenda: Thursday 26 July 2012: 1530-1630--The study results for Strategic Direction for Army Science and Technology and Small Unit Data to Decisions studies are presented to the ASB. The ASB will deliberate and vote upon adoption of the...

  3. Experiences of Computer Science Curriculum Design: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Arthur; Bowe, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative study of 12 computer science lecturers' experiences of curriculum design of several degree programmes during a time of transition from year-long to semesterised courses, due to institutional policy change. The background to the study is outlined, as are the reasons for choosing the research methodology. The main…

  4. Design science research as research approach in doctoral studies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kotzé, P

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the use of design science research (DSR) gained momentum as a research approach in information systems (IS), the adoption of a DSR approach in postgraduate studies became more acceptable. This paper reflects on a study to investigate how a...

  5. Experiences of Computer Science Curriculum Design: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Arthur; Bowe, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative study of 12 computer science lecturers' experiences of curriculum design of several degree programmes during a time of transition from year-long to semesterised courses, due to institutional policy change. The background to the study is outlined, as are the reasons for choosing the research methodology. The main…

  6. Plasma pharmacological study on Da Huang Zhe Chong capsule on platelet aggregation of normal person

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dong-sheng; CHEN Fang-ping; XIAO Chang-jiang; HE Shi-lin; FU Bin; LI Xin; CAO Xing-yu; CHEN Yan; XIE Qin-zhi

    2005-01-01

    Objective To develop a plasma pharmacological method evaluates the effect of Da Huang Zhe Chong capsule on platelet aggregation and its mechanism, which is a representative Traditional Chinese Medicine Patent Prescription Promoting blood circulation by removing blood stasis. Methods Platelets specimens from healthy volunteers made serum and plasma with medicine, while platelet PRP were separated, which were divided into 8groups,i.e. auto-serum, allo-serum, serum with Da Huang Zhe Chong capsule , serum with aspirin, auto-plasma, plasma with Da Huang Zhe Chong capsule, plasma with aspirin, every group added to serum and plasma to hatch. After ADP and adrenalin were added into the specimens and hatched, the effects of specimens on platelet aggregation were observed. Results After ADP adrenalin were added, all the serum groups did not present platelet aggregation,while all the plasma group presented platelet aggregation. P1, P5, Pmax, t and TM have no significant difference (P>0. 05) between auto-plasma group and allo-plasma group induced by ADP and adrenalin. P1, P5, t and Pmax have significant differences (P<0. 01) and TM decreased significantly (P<0. 05) comparing plasma group with Da Huang Zhe Chong capsule and plasma group of aspirin to allo-plasma group. P1, t and Pmax have significant difference (P<0.05), and P5 and TM are simulate comparing plasma group with Da Huang Zhe Chong capsule to plasma group of aspirin. P1, P5, t and Pmax have significant differences (P<0. 01), P1, TM have also significant(P<0. 05), comparing plasma group of Da Huang Zhe Chong capsule with plasma of aspirin to allo-plasma group induced by adrenalin. P1 ,P5 and Pmax have significant differences (P<0.05), and t and Pmax are simulate comparing plasma group with Da Huang Zhe Chong capsule with plasma group of aspirin. Conclusion The serum pharmacological study is inappropriate to study platelet aggregation in vitro. The plasma pharmacological study is inappropriate to study

  7. What science are you singing? A study of the science image in the mainstream music of Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Ju; Allgaier, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Previous research showed that pop music bands in the Western world have sometimes included science imagery in their lyrics. Their songs could potentially be helpful facilitators for science communication and public engagement purposes. However, so far no systematic research has been conducted for investigating science in popular music in Eastern cultures. This study explores whether science has been regarded as an element in the creation of popular mainstream music, and examines the content and quantity of distribution through an analysis of mainstream music lyrics, to reflect on the conditions of the absorption of science into popular culture. The results indicate that expressions related to astronomy and space science feature very prominently. Most of the lyrics are connected to emotional states and mood expressions and they are only very rarely related to actual issues of science. The implications for science communication and further research are discussed in the final section.

  8. The Science Manager's Guide to Case Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branch, Kristi M.; Peffers, Melissa S.; Ruegg, Rosalie T.; Vallario, Robert W.

    2001-09-24

    This guide takes the science manager through the steps of planning, implementing, validating, communicating, and using case studies. It outlines the major methods of analysis, describing their relative merits and applicability while providing relevant examples and sources of additional information. Well-designed case studies can provide a combination of rich qualitative and quantitative information, offering valuable insights into the nature, outputs, and longer-term impacts of the research. An objective, systematic, and credible approach to the evaluation of U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science programs adds value to the research process and is the subject of this guide.

  9. Improving science teaching in multicultural settings: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Judith; Kean, Elizabeth

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes a qualitative study of a collaboration between the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the administration and science teachers of the Omaha (Nebraska) Public Schools to improve the learning environment in multicultural science classrooms. The study of the summer workshops and follow-up interactions is described, along with a description of the changes in teacher attitudes and beliefs toward culturally diverse students. The three major themes of the workshops (multicultural understanding, cooperative learning, and problem solving as a source of content) are presented. Qualitative data sources are used to describe and interpret the changes in teacher interactions with minority students that were observed during a three-year period.

  10. Microwave-plasma interactions studied via mode diagnostics in ALPHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, T.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    The goal of the ALPHA experiment is the production, trapping and spectroscopy of antihydrogen. A direct comparison of the ground state hyperfine spectra in hydrogen and antihydrogen has the potential to be a high-precision test of CPT symmetry. We present a novel method for measuring the strength of a microwave field for hyperfine spectroscopy in a Penning trap. This method incorporates a non-destructive plasma diagnostic system based on electrostatic modes within an electron plasma. We also show how this technique can be used to measure the cyclotron resonance of the electron plasma, which can potentially serve as a non-destructive measurement of plasma temperature.

  11. Study of Multi-Function Micro-Plasma Spraying Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liuying; WANG Hangong; HUA Shaochun; CAO Xiaoping

    2007-01-01

    A multi-functional micro-arc plasma spraying system was developed according to aerodynamics and plasma spray theory. The soft switch IGBT (Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor) invert technique, micro-computer control technique, convergent-divergent nozzle structure and axial powder feeding techniques have been adopted in the design of the micro-arc plasma spraying system. It is not only characterized by a small volume, a light weight, highly accurate control, high deposition efficiency and high reliability, but also has multi-functions in plasma spraying, welding and quenching. The experimental results showed that the system can produce a supersonic flame at a low power, spray Al2O3 particles at an average speed up to 430 m/s, and make nanostructured AT13 coatings with an average bonding strength of 42.7 MPa. Compared to conventional 9M plasma spraying with a higher power, the coatings with almost the same properties as those by conventional plasma spray can be deposited by multi-functional micro-arc plasma spraying with a lower power plasma arc due to an improved power supply design, spray gun structure and powder feeding method. Moreover, this system is suitable for working with thin parts and undertaking on site repairs, and as a result, the application of plasma spraying will be greatly extended.

  12. Study of the characteristics of reconfigurable plasma antenna array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alias, Nur Salihah; Dagang, Ahmad Nazri [School of Ocean Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21030 Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu (Malaysia); Ali, Mohd Tarmizi [Microwave Technology Centre, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Mara Shah Alam 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    This paper presents a design and simulation of a reconfigurable array of plasma antenna. The plasma column is used as radiating elements instead of metal to create an antenna. The advantages of the plasma antenna over the conventional antenna are its possible to change the operating parameters, such as the working pressure, input power, radius of the discharge tube, resonant frequency, and length of the plasma column. In addition, plasma antenna can be reconfigurable with respect to shape, frequency and radiation parameters in a very short time. The plasma discharge tube was designed with a length of 200 mm, the radius of the plasma column was 2.5 mm and the coupling sleeve was connected to the SMA as the ground. This simulation was performed by using the simulation software Computer Simulation Technology (CST). The frequency is set in the range of 1 GHz to 10 GHz. The performance of the designed antenna was analyzed in term of return loss, gain and radiation pattern. For reconfigurable plasma antenna array, it shows that the gain is increase when the number of antenna element is increase. The combination of the discharge tube and metal rod as an antenna array has been done, and the result shows that an array with the plasma element can achieve higher gain.

  13. The Plasma Archipelago: Plasma Physics in the 1960s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Gary J.

    2017-09-01

    With the foundation of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society in April 1959, plasma physics was presented as the general study of ionized gases. This paper investigates the degree to which plasma physics, during its first decade, established a community of interrelated specialties, one that brought together work in gaseous electronics, astrophysics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, space science, and aerospace engineering. It finds that, in some regards, the plasma community was indeed greater than the sum of its parts and that its larger identity was sometimes glimpsed in inter-specialty work and studies of fundamental plasma behaviors. Nevertheless, the plasma specialties usually worked separately for two inter-related reasons: prejudices about what constituted "basic physics," both in the general physics community and within the plasma community itself; and a compartmentalized funding structure, in which each funding agency served different missions.

  14. Studies in Low-Energy Nuclear Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, Carl R; Grimes, Steven M

    2006-03-30

    This report presents a summary of research projects in the area of low energy nuclear reactions and structure, carried out between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2005 and supported by U.S. DOE grant number DE-FG03-03NA00074. Cross sections measured with high resolution have been subjected to an Ericson theory analysis to infer information about the nuclear level density. Other measurements were made of the spectral shape of particles produced in evaporation processes; these also yield level density information. A major project was the development of a new Hauser-Feshbach code for analyzing such spectra. Other measurements produced information on the spectra of gamma rays emitted in reactions on heavy nuclei and gave a means of refining our understanding of gamma-ray strength functions. Finally,reactions on light nuclei were studied and subjected to an R-matrix analysis. Cross sections fora network of nuclear reactions proceedingthrough a given compound nucleus shouldgreatly constrain the family of allowed parameters. Modifications to the formalism andcomputer code are also discussed.

  15. Multicapillary optics for materials science studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scardi, P.; Setti, S.; Leoni, M. [Trento Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali

    2000-07-01

    XRD patterns from a standard polycrystalline gold film, collected by a parallel beam goniometer equipped with a conventional cross-slits collimator were compared with those obtained by replacing the incident beam optics with a multicapillary collimator. Considerable improvements can be achieved by using the new optics: (a) a much higher fraction of the X-ray beam produced by a conventional sealed tube can be used to build the diffracted signal, provided that a sufficiently wide sample area is available for measurement (diameter > 1 mm); (b) the limited beam divergence ({approx}0.3 ) gives a good stability and precision, in terms of negligible systematic errors in peak position due to sample {psi}- and {omega}-tilting; (c) instrumental profiles are much narrower than those obtained by the conventional cross-slits collimator; (d) width and shape of the instrumental profile are almost unaffected by sample tilting. The considerable interest in this device is increased by considering that features (b), (c) and (d) were verified also for relatively low 2{theta} angles (30-40 ): this is of great importance for thin film studies, where most of the available information comes from low diffraction order profiles; in addition, the increased signal intensity greatly helps to reduce measurement time (or to improve statistics). Advantages and drawbacks of the new optics are described in this paper, together with some practical examples of use. (orig.)

  16. Finite Element Thermal Study of the Linac4 Plasma Generatora

    CERN Document Server

    Faircloth, D; Kuchler, D; Lettry, L; Scrivens, R; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2010-01-01

    The temperature distribution and heat flow at equilibrium of the plasma generator of the RF-powered non-cesiated Linac4 H- ion source have been studied with a finite element model. It is shown that the equilibrium temperatures obtained in the Linac4 nominal operation mode (100 kW RF power, 2 Hz, 0.4 ms pulse duration) are within material specifications except for the magnet cage, where a redesign may be necessary. To assess the upgrade of the Linac4 source for operation in the high-power operation mode of SPL, an extrapolation of the heat load towards 100 kW RF power, 50 Hz repetition rate and 0.4 ms pulse duration has been performed. The results indicate that a significant improvement of the source cooling is required to allow for operation in HP-SPL.

  17. Study of Plume Characteristics of a Stationary Plasma Thruster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Zhong; WANG Pingyang; DU Zhaohui; KANG Xiaolu

    2008-01-01

    Electron density and temperature of the plume are measured by a double Langmuir probe in an experimental chamber.A numerical model based on both particle-in-cell scheme and direct simulation Monte Carlo hybrid method is developed to simulate the flow field of plume.The equation for plasma potential is solved by alternative direction implicit technique. The simulation is verified by comparing the computational results with the measured data.The study indicates that the electron temperature of flow field is about 2 eV and the electron density is about 2.5 × 1016 ~ 5 × 1015 m-3 at the central line with a distance of 0.3 ~ 1.0 m downstream of the thruster exit.The model can well predict the flow field parameters of the steady plume.The efforts of this paper are referable for further investigation.

  18. Study of Anti-Hydrogen and Plasma Physics 4.Observation of Antiproton Beams and Nonneutral Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Fujiwara, Makoto; Kuroda, Naofumi

    2004-01-01

    Diagnostics of antiproton beams and nonneutral plasmas are described in this chapter. Parallel plate secondary electron emission detectors are used to non-destructively observe the beam position and intensity without loss. Plastic scintillation tracking detectors are useful in determining the position of annihilations of antiprotons in the trap. Three-dimensional imaging of antiprotons in a Penning trap is discussed. The unique capability of antimatter particle imaging has allowed the observation of the spatial distribution of particle loss in a trap. Radial loss is localized to small spots, strongly breaking the azimuthal symmetry expected for an ideal trap. By observing electrostatic eigen-modes of nonneutral plasmas trapped in the Multi-ring electrode trap, the non-destructive measurement of plasma parameters is performed.

  19. Feasibility and marketing studies of health sciences librarianship education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, C E; Moran, B B; Jenkins, C G; Cogdill, K W; Friedman, C P; Gollop, C J; Moore, M E; Morrison, M L; Tibbo, H R; Wildemuth, B M

    1999-01-01

    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill evaluated five curricular models designed to improve education for health sciences librarianship. Three of the models enhanced existing degree and certificate programs, and two were new programs for working information professionals. Models were developed with input from experts and a Delphi study; the marketability of the models was tested through surveys of potential students and employers; and recommendations were made as a guide to implementation. The results demonstrated a demand for more specialized curricula and for retraining opportunities. Marketing data showed a strong interest from potential students in a specialized master's degree, and mid-career professionals indicated an interest in postmaster's programs that provided the ability to maintain employment. The study pointed to the opportunity for a center of excellence in health sciences information education to enable health sciences librarians to respond to their evolving roles.

  20. A study of teacher cognition in planning elementary science lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing-Mui So, Winnie

    1997-03-01

    Advances in cognitive psychology and in research techniques have led to an increase in the acceptance of the conception of teaching as a “thoughtful” profession. The interest and enthusiasm of researches in aspects of teacher cognition demonstrate a shift from an emphasis on observable teacher behaviours to a focus on a teacher's unobservable thinking process. In this study, a qualitative approach was used to uncover a teacher's thinking process during lesson planning, to depict a more holistic view of the structural complexity of teacher cognition during lesson planning. Specialised science teachers and general teachers who had different levels of subject expertise were studied. The teachers were interviewed on how they planned an elementary science lesson. Interview protocols were analysed using a taxonomy which assessed the cognitive complexity of teacher thinking. Differences were found between specialised science teachers and general teachers in the levels of structural complexity in their thinking process.

  1. Study of oxygen plasma pre-treatment of polyester fabric for improved polypyrrole adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehmood, Tariq [School of Engineering, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Kaynak, Akif, E-mail: akaynak@deakin.edu.au [School of Engineering, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Dai, Xiujuan J. [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Kouzani, Abbas [School of Engineering, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Magniez, Kevin; Rubin de Celis, David; Hurren, Christopher J. [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Plessis, Johan du [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia)

    2014-01-15

    In this work, we have systematically studied the improvement of binding of polypyrrole with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) thin films and fabrics using low pressure oxygen plasma. A range of plasma treatment times were employed to investigate plasma induced effects on surface roughness, surface chemistry and hydrophilicity. Modifications of PET films were studied with respect to surface morphology by means of atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. Chemical effects of plasma treatment were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results showed that both the increase in surface functionalisation by carboxylic groups and formation of nano size roughness contributed to improved adhesion and conductivity. - Highlights: • Improved adhesion between polypyrrole and polyester due to oxygen plasma treatment. • Formation of additional C–O and O–C=O groups due to plasma reactions. • Plasma induced increase in surface energy and roughness.

  2. Asian Studies/Global Studies: Transcending Area Studies and Social Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Lie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The post–World War II growth of area studies, and Asian studies in particular, posed a serious challenge to the mainstream social sciences. Yet the epistemic and institutional foundations of area studies were never well articulated or justified, and the post–Cold War years brought a pervasive sense of crisis to its intellectual mission and justification. In particular, the author focuses on the tensions, if not contradictions, between social science disciplines and area studies. In advocating a more integrated human science, which depends more on mobile networks of scholars than on fixed fields of discipline-bound professors, the author suggests global studies as a fitting field of inquiry in the age of globalization.

  3. Study of the plasma-neutral relaxation in Tore-Supra edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koubiti, M.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Felts, B.; Marandet, Y.; Stamm, R.; Touati, K. [Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moleculaires, PIIM-UMR 6633, CNRSAix-Marseille-1, Centre de Saint-Jerome, F-13397 Marseille (France); Capes, H.; De Michelis, C.; Escarguel, A.; Guirlet, R. [Departement de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, EURATOM-CEA, CEA, Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance cedex (France)

    2002-07-01

    Passive spectroscopy of the D{alpha} line emission is used for the investigation of the Tore-Supra edge plasma in front of a neutralizer plate of the Ergodic Divertor. Two kinds of spectra are observed: symmetric and asymmetric. Symmetric spectra are fitted considering two isotropic populations of deuterium representing the main neutral production mechanisms. The fit of the asymmetric spectra, requires the addition of an anisotropic population resulting from the reflection of ions as neutrals on the V-shaped notches of the neutralizer plate and the inclusion of the relaxation of the deuterium populations through elastic collisions with the plasma ions. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Laboratory studies of stagnating plasma flows with applications to inner solar system and stellar bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T. E.; Smith, R. J.; Hsu, S. C.

    2016-10-01

    Supercritical magnetized collisionless shocks are thought to play a dominant role in the overall partition of energy throughout the universe by converting flow kinetic energy to other forms such as thermal and supra-thermal populations, magnetic field enhancement, turbulence, and energetic particles. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) at LANL creates conditions similar to those of inner solar system and stellar bow shocks by accelerating hot (100s of eV during translation) dense (1022 - 1023 m-3) Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoids to 100s of km/s; resulting in β 1, collisionless plasma flows with Msonic and MAlfvén 10. The drifting FRC can be made to impinge upon a variety of static obstacles including: a strong mirror or cusp magnetic field (mimicking magnetically excited shocks such as the Earth's bow shock), plasma pileup from a solid obstacle (similar to the bow shocks of Mercury and the Moon), and a neural gas puff (bow shocks of Venus or the comets). Characteristic shock length and time scales that are both large enough to observe yet small enough to fit within the experiment, enabling study of the complex interplay of kinetic and fluid processes that mediate cosmic shocks and can generate non-thermal distributions, produce density and magnetic field enhancements much greater than predicted by fluid theory, and accelerate particles. An overview of the experimental program will be presented, including recent results. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25369.

  5. A NATIONAL COLLABORATORY TO ADVANCE THE SCIENCE OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA PHYSICS FOR MAGNETIC FUSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen R. Sanderson; Christopher R. Johnson

    2006-08-01

    This report summarizes the work of the University of Utah, which was a member of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it the NFC built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was itself a collaboration, itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, and Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. The complete finial report is attached as an addendum. The In the collaboration, the primary technical responsibility of the University of Utah in the collaboration was to develop and deploy an advanced scientific visualization service. To achieve this goal, the SCIRun Problem Solving Environment (PSE) is used on FusionGrid for an advanced scientific visualization service. SCIRun is open source software that gives the user the ability to create complex 3D visualizations and 2D graphics. This capability allows for the exploration of complex simulation results and the comparison of simulation and experimental data. SCIRun on FusionGrid gives the scientist a no-license-cost visualization capability that rivals present day commercial visualization packages. To accelerate the usage of SCIRun within the fusion community, a stand-alone application built on top of SCIRun was developed and deployed. This application, FusionViewer, allows users who are unfamiliar with SCIRun to quickly create

  6. Pathway Study on Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Conversion of Hexane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agiral, Anil; Boyadjian, Cassia; Seshan, K.; Lefferts, Leon; Gardeniers, J.G.E. (Han)

    2010-01-01

    A plasma reactor based on dielectric barrier discharge has been developed for oxidative cracking of hexane to yield olefins at atmospheric pressure. Dissociation of hexane in the presence of oxygen with nonequilibrium plasma state represents complex chemistry, and both conversion and product selecti

  7. Can remote sensing help citizen-science based phenological studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbart, Nicolas; Elisabeth, Beaubien; Laurent, Kergoat; Thuy, Le Toan

    2017-04-01

    Citizen science networks and remote sensing are both efficient to collect massive data related to phenology. However both differ in their advantages and drawbacks for this purpose. Contrarily to remote sensing, citizen science allows distinguishing species-specific phenological responses to climate variability. On the other hand, large portions of territory of a country like Canada are not covered by citizen science networks, and the time series are often incomplete. The main mode of interaction between both types of data consists in validating the maps showing the ecosystem foliage transition times, such as the green-up date, obtained from remote sensing data with field observations, and in particular those collected by citizen scientists. Thus the citizen science phenology data bring confidence to remote sensing based studies. However, one can merely find studies in which remote sensing is used to improve in any way citizen science based study. Here we present bi-directional interactions between both types of data. We first use phenological data from the PlantWatch citizen science network to show that one remote sensing method green-up date relates to the leaf-out date of woody species but also to the whole plant community phenology at the regional level, including flowering phenology. Second we use a remote sensing time series to constrain the analysis of citizen data to overcome the main drawbacks that is the incompleteness of time series. In particular we analyze the interspecies differences in phenology at the scale of so-called "pheno-regions" delineated using remote sensing green-up maps.

  8. A comprehensive study of different gases in inductively coupled plasma torch operating at one atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punjabi, Sangeeta B. [Electrical Engineering Department, V. J.T.I, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 (India); Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Kalina, Santacruz(E) 400098 (India); Joshi, N. K. [Faculty of Engineering and technology, MITS, lakshmangarh, (Sikar), Rajasthan 332311 (India); Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Lande, B. K. [Electrical Engineering Department, V. J.T.I, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 (India); Das, A. K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kothari, D. C. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Kalina, Santacruz(E) 400098 (India)

    2012-01-15

    A numerical study is done to understand the possible operating regimes of RF-ICP torch (3 MHz, 50 kW) using different gases for plasma formation at atmospheric pressure. A two dimensional numerical simulation of RF-ICP torch using argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and air as plasma gas has been investigated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software fluent{sup (c)}. The operating parameters varied here are central gas flow, sheath gas flow, RF-power dissipated in plasma, and plasma gas. The temperature contours, flow field, axial, and radial velocity profiles were investigated under different operating conditions. The plasma resistance, inductance of the torch, and the heat distribution for various plasma gases have also been investigated. The plasma impedance of ICP torch varies with different operating parameters and plays an important role for RF oscillator design and power coupling. These studies will be useful to decide the design criteria for ICP torches required for different material processing applications.

  9. Study on Fe-Based Coating Produced by Plasma Surface Metallurgy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui-qi; LIU Bang-wu; LI Hui-dong; ZHANG Li-min; LI Min; SUN Yu-zong

    2004-01-01

    In the paper, plasma surface metallurgy was performed using Fe-based powder on steel substrate. The microstructure and microhardness of the coating have been analyzed. On the base of orthogonal comparison tests,influences of many factors on the cracking sensibility of plasma metallurgy coating have also been studied. The results indicate that substrate and its surface condition, processing parameters and components of plasma metallurgy coating have great effects on cracking sensibility of plasma metallurgy coating. Through changing these factors, it is possible to reduce cracks and promote the applications of this technology.Key Words: plasma surface metallurgy, microstructure, microhardness, cracking sensibility

  10. Signs of taste for science: a methodology for studying the constitution of interest in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderhag, P.; Wickman, P.-O.; Hamza, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present a methodological approach for analyzing the transformation of interest in science through classroom talk and action. To this end, we use the construct of taste for science as a social and communicative operationalization, or proxy, to the more psychologically oriented construct of interest. To gain a taste for science as part of school science activities means developing habits of performing and valuing certain distinctions about ways to talk, act and be that are jointly construed as belonging in the school science classroom. In this view, to learn science is not only about learning the curriculum content, but also about learning a normative and aesthetic content in terms of habits of distinguishing and valuing. The approach thus complements previous studies on students' interest in science, by making it possible to analyze how taste for science is constituted, moment-by-moment, through talk and action in the science classroom. In developing the method, we supplement theoretical constructs coming from pragmatism and Pierre Bourdieu with empirical data from a lower secondary science classroom. The application of the method to this classroom demonstrates the potential that the approach has for analyzing how conceptual, normative, and aesthetic distinctions within the science classroom interact in the constitution of taste for, and thereby potentially also in the development of interest in science among students.

  11. Plasma harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    Preface; Why plasma harmonics? A very brief introduction Early stage of plasma harmonic studies - hopes and frustrations New developments in plasma harmonics studies: first successes Improvements of plasma harmonics; Theoretical basics of plasma harmonics; Basics of HHG Harmonic generation in fullerenes using few-cycle pulsesVarious approaches for description of observed peculiarities of resonant enhancement of a single harmonic in laser plasmaTwo-colour pump resonance-induced enhancement of odd and even harmonics from a tin plasmaCalculations of single harmonic generation from Mn plasma;Low-o

  12. A study of the long term impact of an inquiry-based science program on student's attitudes towards science and interest in science careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Helen Lussier

    One reason science enrichment programs were created was to address the underrepresentation of women and minorities in science. These programs were designed to increase underrepresented groups' interest in science and science careers. One attempt to increase students' interest in science was the Summer Science Exploration Program (SSEP). The SSEP was a two week, inquiry-based summer science camp offered by Hampshire College for students entering grades seven and eight. Students who participated were from three neighboring school districts in Western Massachusetts. The goal of the program was to stimulate greater interest in science and scientific careers among middle school students, in particular among females and students of color. A review of the literature of inquiry-based science programs revealed that the effect of inquiry-based programs on students' attitudes towards science is typically investigated shortly after the end of the treatment period. The findings from this study contribute to our understanding of the long-term impact of inquiry-based science enrichment programs on students' attitude towards science and their interest in science careers. The data collected consisted of quantitative survey data as well as qualitative data through case studies of selected participants from the sample population. This study was guided by the following questions: (1) What was the nature and extent of the impact of the Summer Science Exploration Program (SSEP) on students' attitudes towards science and interest in science careers, in particular among females and students of color? (2) What factors, if any, other than participation in SSEP impacted students' attitude towards science and interest in scientific careers? (3) In what other ways, if any, did the participants benefit from the program? Conclusions drawn from the data indicate that SSEP helped participants maintain a high level of interest in science. In contrast, students who applied but were not accepted

  13. Working with "rookies": A case study of science teachers mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Thomas Francis

    To gain insight into the world of mentoring new science teachers it is imperative to examine how a veteran science teacher is influenced through his or her work mentoring a new teacher. The impacts of mentoring new teachers have been extensively researched within the literature, documenting many of the factors that may enhance the teaching abilities of new teachers (Hobson, Ashby, Malderez & Tomlinson, 2008; Ingersoll & Kralik, 2004; Wang & Odell, 2002). A thorough search of the literature reveals an unbalanced representation of research focusing on the many influences mentoring may bring to a new teacher while ignoring the impact on the mentor. It is when the activity of mentoring a new teacher is examined within the theoretical frame work of social cognitive learning, it is apparent that not only are two individuals participating in working together, but also that research needs to investigate both sides of the relationship. Also, since the mentoring relationship is situated within a community of practice, it becomes important to utilize a situated learning theoretical framework in tandem with social cognitive learning to provide the clearest picture of this dynamic social relationship. This case study seeks to share the impacts experienced by mentors through their work with new teachers and provide balance to the other side of research into the social partnership of mentoring. Five science teachers mentoring new teachers online, through the University of Minnesota's Science Engineering, Math Mentoring Program (STEMMP) and Science Teacher Induction Network (TIN), participated in this study that explores their experiences through a phenomenographic lens and follows an interpretive research approach. Four main themes emerged that identified how science teacher mentors were impacted from mentoring which included: (1) impacts to their teaching practice, (2) perceptions influenced from feedback, (3) enhanced reflection, and (4) enhancement of self-efficacy. The

  14. "Two Cultures" Topics for General Studies Science Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.

    1982-01-01

    Theses proposed in C. P. Snow's book "The Two Cultures," including uncommunicative scientific and literary groups, gap between rich and poor, overpopulation, and nuclear war remain viable topics. Discusses the scientific and literary cultural gap and what can be done in general studies science courses to ameliorate the condition. (Author/JN)

  15. Commonwealth Defence Science Organisation (CDSO Food Study Group (FSG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Watts

    1984-04-01

    Full Text Available The Food Study Group (FSG under Commonwealth Defence Science Organisation was established in 1962 to review major items of Defence research programmes and exchange scientific information in the commonwealth countries. This paper gives an insight into the set-up, terms of reference, membership and the way research programmes are conceived and dealt with.

  16. Search: A Research Guide for Science Fairs and Independent Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Connie

    This guide is for the gifted, talented, or creative student in grades 4-9, who wants to do a science project, enter a competitive fair, or who is interested in pursuing an independent study in any subject area. The first part of the book is a teacher's guide. It gives directions, guidelines, suggestions, and tips for assisting students in the…

  17. Social studies of science and us. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, W.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1984-03-15

    The author discusses some social impacts related with nuclear wastes, nuclear energy, nuclear weapons and radioanalytical chemistry. They are based on the talks delivered at the meeting of the Society for the Social Studies of Science (4S) in November 1983. (The first part of the publication does not contain references to nuclear problems).

  18. The Social Sciences and the Comparative Study of Educational Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Joseph, Ed.

    Aiming at the comprehension of schools as social, political, economic, and cultural systems, this book suggests that education does not constitute a separate academic discipline but is dependent upon the social sciences for its elucidation and for its comparative study. The book emphasizes interdisciplinary approaches within four social sciences…

  19. Home media and science performance: A cross-national study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, N.J.W.R.; Kraaykamp, G.L.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the effects of media resources in the parental home on the science performance of 15-year-old students. It employs data from the 2006 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) containing information on 345,967 respondents from 53 countries. Results show that media

  20. Home media and science performance : A cross-national study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, N.; Kraaykamp, G.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the effects of media resources in the parental home on the science performance of 15-year-old students. It employs data from the 2006 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) containing information on 345,967 respondents from 53 countries. Results show that media

  1. Den Ontologiske Vending i Antropologi og Science and Technology Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winthereik, Brit Ross

    2015-01-01

    Formålet med artiklen er at afsøge, hvad videnskabs- og teknologi- studier eller Science and Technology Studies (STS) tilbyder humaniora og samfundsvidenskaberne med det nybrud, der er blevet kaldt den ontologiske vending. Med udgangspunkt i en beskrivelse af den onto- logiske vending i antropologi...

  2. Science Teacher Left behind: A Case Study Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dionne B.; Talbert, Tony L.

    2012-01-01

    We used the single-case study method to develop an in-depth profile of Yajaira's (pseudonym) instruction based on her epistemological beliefs and science education experiences. We selected the participant using criterion based, purposeful sampling. Data collection included semi-structured interviews, direct observations, and the collection of…

  3. "Two Cultures" Topics for General Studies Science Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.

    1982-01-01

    Theses proposed in C. P. Snow's book "The Two Cultures," including uncommunicative scientific and literary groups, gap between rich and poor, overpopulation, and nuclear war remain viable topics. Discusses the scientific and literary cultural gap and what can be done in general studies science courses to ameliorate the condition.…

  4. "Two Cultures" Topics for General Studies Science Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.

    1982-01-01

    Theses proposed in C. P. Snow's book "The Two Cultures," including uncommunicative scientific and literary groups, gap between rich and poor, overpopulation, and nuclear war remain viable topics. Discusses the scientific and literary cultural gap and what can be done in general studies science courses to ameliorate the condition.…

  5. A Comparative Study of Science, Systems Analysis and Futurism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Hector

    1975-01-01

    The proper framework for studying different methods of problem-solving is to recognize that there are different approaches to the analysis of reality. Three approaches--science, systems analysis, and futurism--are considered within the framework of the "theory of knowledge." (Author/IRT)

  6. Marxism in Vygotskian Approaches to Cultural Studies of Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Paulo, Jr.; Ostermann, Fernanda; Rezende, Flavia

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we initially address the main categories of Marxism, illustrating how Vygotsky has appropriated them as mediational meta-theoretical tools for building concepts for his psychological approach. In order to investigate the influence of Marxism in cultural studies of science education, we make an account of how current research,…

  7. Consumer Citizenship Curriculum Guides for Social Studies, English, Science, Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Louise; Smith, Alice

    These four consumer citizenship curriculum guides for social studies, English, science, and mathematics incorporate consumer education into these subject matter areas in grades 8-12. Each guide is organized around 10 main component/goals. They are basic economics in the marketplace, credit, consumer law/protection, banking skills, comparison…

  8. Remote Handling and Plasma Conditions to Enable Fusion Nuclear Science R&D Using a US Component Testing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL; Burgess, Thomas W [ORNL; Carroll, Adam J [ORNL; Neumeyer, C. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Canik, John [ORNL; Cole, Michael J [ORNL; Dorland, W. D. [University of Maryland; Fogarty, P. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Grisham, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hillis, Donald Lee [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Kotschenreuther, M. [University of Texas, Austin; LaHaye, R. [General Atomics, San Diego; Mahajan, S. [University of Texas, Austin; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Nelson, Brad E [ORNL; Patton, Bradley D [ORNL; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL; Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia University; Sontag, Aaron C [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Tsai, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Vanlanju, P. [University of Texas, Austin; Wagner, Jill C [ORNL; Yoder, III, Graydon L [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    The use of a fusion component testing facility to study and establish, during the ITER era, the remaining scientific and technical knowledge needed by fusion Demo is considered and described in this paper. This use aims to lest components in an integrated fusion nuclear environment, for the first time, to discover and understand the underpinning physical properties, and to develop improved components for further testing, in a time-efficient manner. It requires a design with extensive modularization and remote handling of activated components, and flexible hot-cell laboratories. It further requires reliable plasma conditions to avoid disruptions and minimize their impact, and designs to reduce the divertor heat flux to the level of ITER design. As the plasma duration is extended through the planned ITER level (similar to 10(3) s) and beyond, physical properties with increasing time constants, progressively for similar to 10(4) s, similar to 10(5) s, and similar to 10(6) s, would become accessible for testing and R&D. The longest time constants of these are likely to be of the order of a week ( 106 S). Progressive stages of research operation are envisioned in deuterium, deuterium-tritium for the ITER duration, and deuterium-tritium with increasingly longer plasma durations. The fusion neutron fluence and operational duty factor anticipated for this "scientific exploration" phase of a component test facility are estimated to be up to 1 MW-yr/m(2) and up to 10%, respectively.

  9. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Laser Interactions with Atoms, Solids,and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this NATO Advanced Study Institute was to bring together scientists and students working in the field of laser matter interactions in order to review and stimulate developmentoffundamental science with ultra-short pulse lasers. New techniques of pulse compression and colliding-pulse mode-locking have made possible the construction of lasers with pulse lengths in the femtosecond range. Such lasers are now in operation at several research laboratories in Europe and the United States. These laser facilities present a new and exciting research direction with both pure and applied science components. In this ASI the emphasis is on fundamental processes occurring in the interaction of short laser pulses with atoms, molecules, solids, and plasmas. In the case of laser-atom (molecule) interactions, high power lasers provide the first access to extreme high-intensity conditions above 10'8 Watts/em', a new frontier for nonlinear interaction of photons with atoms and molecules. New phenomena observed include ...

  10. Advances in physical study of high enthalpy plasma jets of technological interest: emission spectra and plasma characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belevtsev, A. A.; Chinnov, V. F.; Isakaev, E. Kh.; Markin, A. V.; Tazikova, T. F.; Tereshkin, S. A.

    1998-10-01

    Offers a comprehensive study of the emission spectra and plasma characteristics of high enthalpy atmospheric pressure argon and nitrogen jets produced by a high- current industrially important arc plasmatron with a vortex stabilized channel-anode (I4g/s, jet diameter at a minimum-6mm). The spectra are taken at different distances from the cathode in the 200-950nm region with a spectral resolution=3D0.01nm allowing a fine structure of vibronic bands to be essentially resolved except that due to the dublet (spin) splitting and Λ-doubling. Also derived (through the Abel inversion) are radial distributions of plasma components. The spectra obtained have been used for determining plasma composition, the electron component parameters (by atomic/ionic Stark half-widths and intensities) and the assessment of rotational and vibrational temperatures by simulating molecular bands.

  11. Science/art - art/science: case studies of the development of a professional art product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesko, S.C.; Marchant, M.

    1997-02-24

    Objective was to follow the cognitive and creative processes demonstrated by student research participants as they integrated a developing knowledge of ``big`` science, as practiced at LLNL, into a personal and idiosyncratic visual, graphical, or multimedia product. The participants, all non-scientists, involved in this process, attended a series of design classes, sponsored by LLNL at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena CA. As a result of this study, we have become interested in the possibility of similar characteristics between scientists and artists. We have also become interested in the different processes that can be used to teach science to non-scientists, so that they are able to understand and portray scientific information.

  12. A Case Study on the Use of Blended Learning to Encourage Computer Science Students to Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Marin, Diana; Pascual-Nieto, Ismael

    2012-01-01

    Students tend to procrastinate. In particular, Computer Science students tend to reduce the number of hours devoted to study concepts after class. In this paper, a case study on the use of Blended Learning to encourage Computer Science students to study is described. Furthermore, an experiment in which the reaction of 131 Computer Science…

  13. Science and ecological literacy in undergraduate field studies education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapp, Kim J.

    There is an ever-increasing number of issues that face our world today; from climate change, water and food scarcity, to pollution and resource extraction. Science and ecology play fundamental roles in these problems, and yet the understanding of these fields is limited in our society (Miller, 2002; McBride, Brewer, Berkowitz, and Borrie, 2013). Across the nation students are finishing their undergraduate degrees and are expected to enter the workforce and society with the skills needed to succeed. The deficit of science and ecological literacy in these students has been recognized and a call for reform begun (D'Avanzo, 2003 and NRC, 2009). This mixed-methods study looked at how a field studies course could fill the gap of science and ecological literacy in undergraduates. Using grounded theory, five key themes were data-derived; definitions, systems thinking, human's role in the environment, impetus for change and transference. These themes where then triangulated for validity and reliability through qualitative and quantitative assessments. A sixth theme was also identified, the learning environment. Due to limited data to support this themes' development and reliability it is discussed in Chapter 5 to provide recommendations for further research. Key findings show that this field studies program influenced students' science and ecological literacy through educational theory and practice.

  14. Marxism in Vygotskian approaches to cultural studies of science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Junior, Paulo; Ostermann, Fernanda; Rezende, Flavia

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we initially address the main categories of Marxism, illustrating how Vygotsky has appropriated them as mediational meta-theoretical tools for building concepts for his psychological approach. In order to investigate the influence of Marxism in cultural studies of science education, we make an account of how current research, sustained by Vygotsky's original and successor theories, has been appropriating meta-theoretical categories of dialectical materialism. Once we identified Cultural Studies of Science Education as a journal that would probably concentrate papers that follow these perspectives, we decided to take it as the context of this study. In the process of selecting the corpus to be reviewed from the editions published from 2006 to 2011, we have found that 16 % of the articles that matched keywords denoting frameworks related to the Vygotskian tradition developed and appropriated the categories of dialectical materialism. The quality and originality of contemporary development of CHAT denote that this framework has been playing a very important role in recent expansion of Vygotskian approaches to research in science education. Among the papers that we considered to develop and appropriate Vygotskian frameworks, incompletion in the appropriation of meta-theoretical categories of dialectical materialism and the misusage of dialectics intertwined with dialogism were highlighted. Our findings suggest that overcoming these limitations can enhance political analysis of sociocultural phenomena in the context of science education. It also represents a strengthening of the role of dialectical materialism in expanding sociocultural perspectives toward a better articulation between individual and institutional-centered analyses.

  15. Methodological Studies on Plasma Endotoxin Level and Endotoxin Inactivation Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚国相; 杨乃发; 薛新波; 赵玉沛; 蒋朱明

    2004-01-01

    To establish stable methods for detecting plasma endotoxin level and endotoxin inactivation capacity in a normal population and general surgical patients and evaluate their perioperative changes, 50 healthy people and 50 patients receiving gastrointestinal operation were enrolled, their plasma endotoxin levels and plasma endotoxin inactivation capacity were assayed. Our results showed that plasma endotoxin levels were 0.044±0.009 EU/ml in the normal population and 0.044±0.023 EU/ml in the preoperative patients. Endotoxin level peaked 3 h after the operation (0.223±0.041 EU/ml), and then decreased rapidly on the first day after the operation (0.134±0.164EU/ml). Endotoxin inactivation capacity also had the same time course as endotoxin level. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome and infection induced another elevation in the time course. It is concluded that establishing the endotoxin standard curve by using pyrogenic free water is better than by using plasma. Plasma endotoxin inactivation capacity can be used as an indirect indicator of postoperative immune depression. Plasma endotoxin level and endotoxin inactivation capacity peaked shortly after operation, indicating surgical stress is closely related with the changes.

  16. Morphological study of synthesized chlorinated polyethylene by inductive plasma; Estudio morfologico de polietileno clorado sintetizado por plasmas inductivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olayo, M.G.; Cruz, G.; Carapia, L.; Fernandez, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Morales, J. [UAM-I, A.P. 55-534, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    In this work a morphological study on the synthesis of Chlorinated polyethylene for plasma starting from Trichloroethylene in a polymerization process and ablation simultaneous of metals, where silver atoms and copper are inserted directly during the growth of the polymer from the gas phase to the one solid is presented. (Author)

  17. AINSE Plasma Science and Technology Conference and Elizabeth and Frederick White Workshop on Fundamental Problems in the Physics of Magnetically Confined Plasmas: Conference handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    The handbook contains abstracts of papers and posters presented at the conference. The main topics relate to plasma physics and fusion, plasma processing and uses as well as specific fusion devices and experiments. Eighty-four out of ninety-two presentations were considered to be in the INIS subject scope and have been separately indexed.

  18. What counts as learning to teach science: A developmental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeans, Stephen Leo

    This study is about the development of secondary school science novice teachers during their teacher preparation program. The study incorporates three cases about novices in the same cohort within a two-year program for which admission requires completion of a first degree in science. The cases are grounded systematically in data from on-campus course work and performance in practicum settings spanning a ten-month period. The database includes videotapes of the novices' lessons, recordings of seminars and follow-up discussions about lessons, and written documents such as lesson plans, reflections, and the curriculum that governs the novices' planning. The investigator has drawn theoretical insights from research literature in two areas, teacher development and science education, to be used as "theoretical perspectives" in a conceptual framework that functions as an analytical scheme for interpreting the data. One dimension of the framework comes from the teacher development literature. There is remarkable agreement among researchers to the effect that novices progress predictably, during their student teaching experience, through three stages. These are, respectively, a focus on self-survival, on mastering the tasks of teaching, and on attending to the impact of their actions on pupils. The first dimension of the conceptual framework identifies this progression as Self Mode, Task Mode, and Impact Mode. The second dimension is drawn from literature about three specific challenges in learning to teach science. First, the novices teach from a curriculum that mandates teaching about science-technology-society (STS) in a highly structured way. Second and third, every beginning science teacher has to develop an approach to science teaching and a way to incorporate demonstrations and laboratory work. Clues from the nine components of the conceptual framework, detecting "pedagogical perspectives" about "STS/Science," "Teaching Approach," and "Demonstrations and Labs" in

  19. Experimental approaches for studying non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shashurin, A., E-mail: ashashur@purdue.edu [School of Aeronautics & Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Keidar, M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia 20052 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    This work reviews recent research efforts undertaken in the area non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets with special focus on experimental approaches. Physics of small non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets operating in kHz frequency range at powers around few Watts will be analyzed, including mechanism of breakdown, process of ionization front propagation, electrical coupling of the ionization front with the discharge electrodes, distributions of excited and ionized species, discharge current spreading, transient dynamics of various plasma parameters, etc. Experimental diagnostic approaches utilized in the field will be considered, including Rayleigh microwave scattering, Thomson laser scattering, electrostatic streamer scatterers, optical emission spectroscopy, fast photographing, etc.

  20. An Ongoing Investigation of Science Literacy: Results of a 22-Year Study Probing Students' Knowledge and Attitude Towards Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, C.; Buxner, S.; Antonellis, J.; CATS

    2013-04-01

    This talk presents findings related to our ongoing work investigating students' knowledge and attitudes towards science and technology. We present an overview of research studies and findings including a comparison of the science literacy measures of University of Arizona students compared to national studies, conceptions related to astrology, views of radiation, and students' pseudoscience and religious beliefs. We discuss implications for instructors and researchers interested in improving students' science literacy scores and diagnosing alternative beliefs.

  1. Plasma-gas interactions studies in a hybrid plume plasma rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, F. R.; Krueger, W. A.; Yang, T. F.; Fisher, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma-gas interaction was investigated and the basic mechanisms for energy and particle transport. The solution approach assumes cylindrical geometry and includes a multiplicity of atomic reactions, and the presence of a strong magnetic field is described. The principal reactions are electron and ion impact ionization, and charge exchange between hot ions and cold neutrals. Radial particle and energy transport is mainly by diffusion. A modified Bohm diffusion model for plasma in the core of the plume, and classical neutral particle diffusion in the cooler regions of the flow are presented. Neutrals are allowed to free stream in the low density regions, where the collision mean-free-path becomes comparable, or even larger than the characteristic dimensions of the system.

  2. Experimental Study of the Microdischarge Plasma Thruster (MDPT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kc, Utsav; Varghese, Philip; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2008-10-01

    Small satellite propulsion requirements dictate the need for a scaled down propulsion device capable of providing low thrust with small impulse bits. We have designed and studied a simple miniaturized thruster called Microdischarge Plasma Thruster (MDPT). It comprises a tri-layer sandwich structure with a dielectric layer sandwiched between two electrode layers, and a contoured through hollow drilled into the structure. Each layer is 100's microns in thickness and the hole diameter of the same order. Argon is used as the propellant gas with flow rates of ˜ 1 SCCM. The pressure is adequate to produce a stable microdischarge between the electrodes even with modest voltages (˜1000 V). The microdischarge adds heat to the supersonic portion of the flowing gas which is shown to produce additional thrust over the baseline cold gas flow. The studies have also demonstrated that the MDPT exhaust plume is composed of ions albeit at low concentrations, suggesting possibility of MDPT to be operated in a mixed electrothermal/electrostatic mode. We present discussion of multiple discharge operating modes and electrical characteristics of the MDPT. Spectral measurements of the plume are used to determine its composition and calculate its temperature. The momentum thrust of the MDPT is measured with a torsion balance.

  3. Application of nonlinear methods to the study of ionospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshov, A. A.; Mogilevsky, M. M.; Kozelov, B. V.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the processes taking place in the auroral region of Earth's ionosphere are reflected in a variety of dynamic forms of the aurora borealis. In order to study these processes it is necessary to consider temporary and spatial variations of the characteristics of ionospheric plasma. Most traditional methods of classical physics are applicable mainly for stationary or quasi-stationary phenomena, but dynamic regimes, transients, fluctuations, selfsimilar scaling could be considered using the methods of nonlinear dynamics. Special interest is the development of the methods for describing the spatial structure and the temporal dynamics of auroral ionosphere based on the ideas of percolation theory and fractal geometry. The fractal characteristics (the Hausdorff fractal dimension and the index of connectivity) of Hall and Pedersen conductivities are used to the description of fractal patterns in the ionosphere. To obtain the self-consistent estimates of the parameters the Hausdorff fractal dimension and the index of connectivity in the auroral zone, an additional relation describing universal behavior of the fractal geometry of percolation at the critical threshold is applied. Also, it is shown that Tsallis statistics can be used to study auroral ionosphere

  4. Theoretical and experimental studies of space-related plasma wave propagation and resonance phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, F. W.

    1975-01-01

    A ten year summary was given of university research on the nature and characteristics of space related plasma resonance phenomena, whistler propagation in laboratory plasmas, and theoretical and experimental studies of plasma wave propagation. Data are also given on long delayed echoes, low frequency instabilities, ionospheric heating, and backscatter, and pulse propagation. A list is included of all conference papers, publications, and reports resulting from the study.

  5. A Preliminary Study of the Plasma Pyrolysis of Waste Tyres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐兰; 黄海涛; 赵增立; 吴创之

    2003-01-01

    Thermal plasma pyrolysis of waste tyres for recovering energy was performed in a nitrogen plasma reactor. The main gaseous products were identified by chromatography as H2, CO, CH4, C2H2 and so on. From a series of experiments, the effects of the process parameters of thermal plasma pyrolysis were investigated. Under our experimental conditions with steam injection, the total contents of H2 and CO reached up to 38.3% in the gas product, C2H2 up to 4%, and the maximum calorific value of the pyrolysis gas was 8.96 MJ/m3. The results indicate that plasma-assisted thermal decomposition of waste tyre particles may be a useful way for recovering energy and useful chemicals.

  6. Study of parameters of a facility generating compressive plasma flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyvi, A. Ya

    2017-05-01

    The prosperity of plasma technologies stimulates making of a facility generating compressive plasma flows at the South Ural State University. The facility is a compact-geometry magnetoplasma compressor with the following parameters: stored energy up to 15 kJ, voltage of a bank from 3 to 5 kV; nitrogen, air, and other gases can serve as its operating gas. The investigation of parameters of the facility showed the following parameters of compressive plasma flows: impulse duration of up to 120 μs, discharge current of 50-120 kA, speed of plasma flow of 15-30 km/s. By contrast to the available facilities, the parameters of the developed facility can be adjusted in a wide range of voltage from 2 kV to 10 kV, its design permits generating CPF in horizontal and vertical positions.

  7. High school and college introductory science education experiences: A study regarding perceptions of university students persisting in science as a major area of study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, L. Denise

    The focus of this study was to investigate college students' perception of high school and college introductory science learning experiences related to persistence in science as a major area of study in college. The study included students' perceptions of the following areas of science education: (1) teacher interpersonal relationship with students, (2) teacher personality styles, (3) teacher knowledge of the content, (4) instructional methods, and (5) science course content. A survey research design was employed in the investigative study to collect and analyze data. One hundred ninety two students participated in the research study. A survey instrument entitled Science Education Perception Survey was used to collect data. The researcher sought to reject or support three null hypotheses as related to participants' perceptions of high school and college introductory science education experiences. Using binomial regression analysis, this study analyzed differences between students persisting in science and students not persisting in science as a major. The quantitative research indicated that significant differences exist between persistence in science as a major and high school science teacher traits and college introductory science instructional methods. Although these variables were found to be significant predictors, the percent variance was low and should be considered closely before concluded these as strong predictors of persistence. Major findings of the qualitative component indicated that students perceived that: (a) interest in high school science course content and high school science teacher personality and interpersonal relationships had the greatest effect on students' choice of major area of study; (b) interest in college introductory science course content had the greatest effect on students' choice of major area of study; (c) students recalled laboratory activities and overall good teaching as most meaningful to their high school science

  8. Cautionary tales: ethics and case studies in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2014-12-01

    Ethical concerns are normally avoided in science classrooms in spite of the fact that many of our discoveries impinge directly on personal and societal values. We should not leave the ethical problems for another day, but deal with them using realistic case studies that challenge students at their ethical core. In this article we illustrate how case studies can be used to teach STEM students principles of ethics.

  9. Scienceography: the study of how science is written

    OpenAIRE

    Cormode, Graham; Muthukrishnan, S.; Yan, Jinyun

    2012-01-01

    Scientific literature has itself been the subject of much scientific study, for a variety of reasons: understanding how results are communicated, how ideas spread, and assessing the influence of areas or individuals. However, most prior work has focused on extracting and analyzing citation and stylistic patterns. In this work, we introduce the notion of 'scienceography', which focuses on the writing of science. We provide a first large scale study using data derived from the arXiv e-print rep...

  10. Defense Science Board (DSB) Summer Study Report on Strategic Surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    DSB Summer Study Report on Strategic Surprise July 2015 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden...SUBTITLE DSB Summer Study Report on Strategic Surprise 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Defense Science Board ( DSB ),The Pentagon ,OUSD(AT&L

  11. Study on Formation of Plasma Nanobubbles in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takehiko; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki; Miyahara, Takashi; Ochiai, Shiroh; Oizumi, Masanobu; Fujita, Hidemasa; Miyazaki, Takamichi

    2015-12-01

    Nanobubbles of less than 400 nm in diameter were formed by plasma in pure water. Pre-breakdown plasma termed streamer discharges, generated gas channels shaped like fine dendritic coral leading to the formation of small bubbles. Nanobubbles were visualized by an optical microscope and measured by dynamic laser scattering. However, it is necessary to verify that these nanobubbles are gas bubbles, not solid, because contamination such as platinum particles and organic compounds from electrode and residue in ultrapure water were also observed.

  12. Langmuir probe study of plasma expansion in pulsed laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.N.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Langmuir probes were used to monitor the asymptotic expansion of the plasma produced by the laser ablation of a silver target in a vacuum. The measured angular and temporal distributions of the ion flux and electron temperature were found to be in good agreement with the self-similar isentropic...... and adiabatic solution of the gas dynamics equations describing the expansion. The value of the adiabatic index gamma was about 1.25, consistent with the ablation plume being a low temperature plasma....

  13. A plea for neutral comparison studies in computational sciences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Boulesteix

    Full Text Available In computational science literature including, e.g., bioinformatics, computational statistics or machine learning, most published articles are devoted to the development of "new methods", while comparison studies are generally appreciated by readers but surprisingly given poor consideration by many journals. This paper stresses the importance of neutral comparison studies for the objective evaluation of existing methods and the establishment of standards by drawing parallels with clinical research. The goal of the paper is twofold. Firstly, we present a survey of recent computational papers on supervised classification published in seven high-ranking computational science journals. The aim is to provide an up-to-date picture of current scientific practice with respect to the comparison of methods in both articles presenting new methods and articles focusing on the comparison study itself. Secondly, based on the results of our survey we critically discuss the necessity, impact and limitations of neutral comparison studies in computational sciences. We define three reasonable criteria a comparison study has to fulfill in order to be considered as neutral, and explicate general considerations on the individual components of a "tidy neutral comparison study". R codes for completely replicating our statistical analyses and figures are available from the companion website http://www.ibe.med.uni-muenchen.de/organisation/mitarbeiter/020_professuren/boulesteix/plea2013.

  14. Enhancing science education through extracurricular activities: A retrospective study of "Suzy Science and the Whiz Kids(c)"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralina, Linda M.

    Extracurricular activities (ECA) are informal settings offering free-choice experiences that are generally voluntary, open-ended, non-sequential, self-directed, hands-on, and evaluation-free. This mixed methods study investigates participation in a high school science ECA by collecting the memories of former student members for their perceptions of engagement as well as social positioning. First, this study examines the levels in which the science club engaged these members, particularly females, in science and teaching. Second, the study also ascertains how participation in the club allowed members to explore new identities and fostered the development of new skills, actions and behaviors, expanding possible future trajectories of identification, specifically in science- and education-related career fields. Based on a review of the related literature regarding engagement and identity formation and the reconstructed reality from the memories of these students and sponsor, a theoretical framework has been constructed, based on seven essential elements of informal learning for an engaging as well as a socially constructive high school science ECA. The most significant findings are (1) the high correlation between engagement, specifically, cognitive engagement with social positioning, (2) the important role of emotional engagement in science ECA, (3) the major perception roadblocks to science learning that can be overcome, particularly for females in physical science, and (4) the importance of the teacher-student interactions in science ECA. Articulating a theoretical framework to legitimate the power of informal learning structures may help other educators to understand the potential benefits of science ECA and thus, increase opportunities for such experiential activities in order to enhance engagement and expand positioning of their students in science. More engaging, socially constructive science ECA have the potential to enhance science education.

  15. Clinical implications of basic science discoveries: janus resurrected--two faces of B cell and plasma cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodle, E S; Rothstein, D M

    2015-01-01

    B cells play a complex role in the immune response. In addition to giving rise to plasma cells (PCs) and promoting T cell responses via antigen presentation, they perform immunoregulatory functions. This knowledge has created concerns regarding nonspecific B cell depletional therapy because of the potential to paradoxically augment immune responses. Recent studies now indicate that PCs have immune functions beyond immunoglobulin synthesis. Evidence for a new role for PCs as potent regulatory cells (via IL-10 and IL-35 production) is discussed including the implications for PC-targeted therapies currently being developed for clinical transplantation.

  16. Computational Study of Plasma Response to a Variable Electric Multipole Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Nathaniel

    2016-10-01

    A computational study is presented of the behavior of a low temperature, quasi-neutral plasma in a three-dimensional, time-varying electric multipole field. A 3-D particle- in-cell (PIC) plasma code is used to simulate the process. The simulations study the effect of the plasma species' mass difference on the plasma response, with the multipole field frequency being chosen, for example, to interact strongly with light particles but negligibly with heavy ones. The effect of focusing the light species to the center of the multipole structure is examined, with space charge neutralized by the presence of the heavy species. The dependence of plasma density on driving field parameters and geometry (order of multipole, shape of equipotential surfaces) is studied, as well as the behavior of the plasma near gyroresonance in the presence of a background magnetic field. The formation and dependences of the RF plasma sheath are studied, as the sheath responds to variation of the plasma and external field characteristics. The results of the computer modeling study are to inform an initial experimental design and study of the same effects. Supported by NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Physics and Engineering Award PHY-1619615.

  17. Saliva versus Plasma for Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Studies of Fentanyl in Patients with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Sudeep R; Haywood, Alison; Norris, Ross; Good, Phillip; Tapuni, Angela; Lobb, Michael; Hardy, Janet

    2015-11-01

    Fentanyl is widely used to relieve cancer pain. However there is great interpatient variation in the dose required to relieve pain and little knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationship of fentanyl and pain control. Patients with cancer are fragile and there is reluctance on the part of health professionals to take multiple plasma samples for PK/PD studies. The relationship between plasma and saliva fentanyl concentrations was investigated to determine whether saliva could be a valid substitute for plasma in PK/PD studies. One hundred sixty-three paired plasma and saliva samples were collected from 56 patients prescribed transdermal fentanyl (Durogesic, Janssen-Cilag Pty Limited, NSW, Australia) at varying doses (12-200 µg/h). Pain scores were recorded at the time of sampling. Fentanyl and norfentanyl concentrations in plasma and saliva were quantified using HPLC-MS/MS. Saliva concentrations of fentanyl (mean = 4.84 μg/L) were much higher than paired plasma concentrations of fentanyl (mean = 0.877 μg/L). Both plasma and saliva mean concentrations of fentanyl were well correlated with dose with considerable interpatient variation at each dose. The relationship between fentanyl and norfentanyl concentrations was poor in both plasma and saliva. No correlation was observed between fentanyl concentration in plasma and saliva (r(2) = 0.3743) or free fentanyl in plasma and total saliva concentrations (r(2) = 0.1374). Pain scores and fentanyl concentration in either of the matrices were also not correlated. No predictive correlation was observed between plasma and saliva fentanyl concentration. However the detection of higher fentanyl concentrations in saliva than plasma, with a good correlation to dose, may allow saliva to be used as an alternative to plasma in PK/PD studies of fentanyl in patients with cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Developing `Butterfly Warriors': a Case Study of Science for Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junjun; Cowie, Bronwen

    2013-12-01

    Given worldwide concern about a decline in student engagement in school science and an increasing call for science for citizenship in New Zealand Curriculum, this study focused on a butterfly unit that investigated how students in a year-4 primary classroom learnt about New Zealand butterflies through thinking, talking, and acting as citizen scientists. The butterfly unit included five lessons. The researchers observed the lessons and interviewed students and the classroom teacher. The students completed a unit evaluation survey after the unit. Findings indicate that the students enjoyed and were interested in activities such as reading about butterflies, learning and using new vocabulary, drawing butterfly life cycles, as well as hunting, tagging and releasing butterflies and publishing the data they had collected on a dedicated website. Through their participation in the unit, students had opportunities to act locally and globally, and to `see themselves' in science through `being there' experience. Units like this have the potential to develop students' interest for longer-term engagement in science, even those students who may never envision themselves as professional scientists.

  19. Science teachers teaching socioscientific issues (SSI): Four case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunju

    Socioscientific issues (SSI) are a class of issues that represent the social, ethical, and moral aspects of science in society. The need for the inclusion of SSI into science curricula has been generally accepted, but relatively few science teachers have incorporated SSI into their courses. Most science teachers feel that their most important task by far is to teach the principles of science, and any substantive pedagogical changes represent a burden. However, there are some teachers who address SSI out of personal initiatives. This dissertation study investigates four high school science teachers who address SSI out of their own initiative and explores their deeper inspirations, values, philosophies, and personal ideals that lead them to teach SSI. The overall approach is based on essentialist methodology (Witz, Goodwin, Hart, & Thomas, 2001; Witz, 2006a) with its focus on "the participant as ally" and "essentialist portraiture." The primary data source is four to six in-depth interviews with individual teachers (about 40-90 minutes for each interview). The interviews are complemented by extensive classroom observations of individual teachers' teaching SSI and by document analysis (including teaching materials, rubrics, student group projects and journals, etc.). There are two major findings. First, the teachers' deeper values and ideals are a source of larger inspiration that plays a significant role in changing their teaching practice. This inspiration may involve higher aspects (e.g., deep concern for students' development, unselfishness, caring, etc.) and commitment. Their teaching represents an integration of their personal experiences, values, concerns, and worldviews, which forms a larger inspiration for teaching. Teaching SSI is a part of this larger process. Second, the current curriculum reforms (STS, SSI, and NOS) only suggest theoretical ideals and do not effectively touch teachers' deeper values and ideals. Basically, the teachers are doing what they

  20. Experimental and numerical studies of neutral gas depletion in an inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi

    The central theme of this dissertation is to explore the impact of neutral depletion and coupling between plasma and neutral gas in weakly ionized unmagnetized plasma. Since there have been few systematic studies of the mechanism which leads to non-uniform neutral distribution in processing plasmas, this work investigated the spatial profiles of neutral temperature and pressure experimentally, and the mechanism of resulting neutral depletion by simulation. The experimental work is comprised of neutral temperature measurements using high resolution atomic spectroscopy and molecular spectroscopy, and neutral pressure measurements considering thermal transpiration. When thermal transpiration effects are used to correct the gas pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile is also obtained from the measured neutral gas temperature and the corrected pressure measurements. The results show that neutral gas temperature rises close to ˜ 900 [K], and the neutral gas density at the center of plasma chamber has a significant (factor of 2-4x) decrease in the presence of a plasma discharge. In numerical work, neutral and ion transport phenomena were simulated by a hybrid-type direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of one dimensional (1D) electrostatic plasma to identify the mechanism of the neutral gas density depletion in Ar/N2 mixtures. The simulation reveals that the neutral depletion is the result of the interplay between plasma and neutral gas, and a parametric study indicates that neutral depletion occurs mainly due to gas heating and pressure balance for the typical condition of plasma processing. In high density plasma sources (Te ≈ 2-5 eV, ne ≈ 1011-1012 cm-3) where the plasma pressure becomes comparable to neutral pressure, total pressure (neutral pressure and plasma pressure) is conserved before and after the discharge. Therefore

  1. Patterned Platinum Etching Studies in an Argon High Density Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delprat, Sébastien; Chaker, Mohamed; Margot, Joëlle; Pépin, Henri; Tan, Liang; Smy, Tom

    1998-10-01

    A high-density surface-wave Ar plasma operated in the low pressure regime is used to study pure physical etching characteristics of platinum thin films. The platinum samples are RF biased so as to obtain a maximum DC self-bias voltage of 150 V. The sputter-etching characteristics are investigated as a function of the magnetic field intensity, the self-bias voltage and the gas pressure. At 1 mtorr, the etch rate is found to be a unique linear function of both the self-bias voltage and the ion density, independently of the magnetic field intensity value. However, even though the ion density increases, the etch rate is found to decrease with increasing pressure. In the low pressure regime, etch rates as high as 2000 A/min are obtained with a good selectivity over resist. Without any optimization of the etching process, we were able to etch 0.5 micron Pt trenches, 0.6 micron thick yielding fence-free profiles and sidewall angles (75º) that already meets the present industrial requirements of NVRAM technology.

  2. Basic Studies of Non-Diffusive Transport in Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, George J. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Maggs, James E. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-10-25

    The project expanded and developed mathematical descriptions, and corresponding numerical modeling, of non-diffusive transport to incorporate new perspectives derived from basic transport experiments performed in the LAPD device at UCLA, and at fusion devices throughout the world. By non-diffusive it is meant that the transport of fundamental macroscopic parameters of a system, such as temperature and density, does not follow the standard diffusive behavior predicted by a classical Fokker-Planck equation. The appearance of non-diffusive behavior is often related to underlying microscopic processes that cause the value of a system parameter, at one spatial position, to be linked to distant events, i.e., non-locality. In the LAPD experiments the underlying process was traced to large amplitude, coherent drift-waves that give rise to chaotic trajectories. Significant advances were made in this project. The results have lead to a new perspective about the fundamentals of edge transport in magnetically confined plasmas; the insight has important consequences for worldwide studies in fusion devices. Progress was also made in advancing the mathematical techniques used to describe fractional diffusion.

  3. Breakdown transient study of plasma distributions in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortázar, O.D., E-mail: daniel.cortazar@uclm.es [Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, ETSII-INEI, Applied Mechanics and Projects Department, C.J. Cela s/n, 13170 Ciudad Real (Spain); Megía-Macías, A. [ESS Bilbao Consortium, Polígono Ugaldeguren-III Pol. A 7B, 48170-Zamudio, Vizcaya (Spain); Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H. [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Physics, PO Box 35 (YFL), 40500 Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2015-05-01

    Plasma distribution transients associated with the breakdown of a 2.45 GHz hydrogen discharge similar to high current microwave ion sources are studied by means of an ultra-fast frame image acquisition system in visible light range. Eight different plasma distributions have been studied by photographing the 2D projections of the discharge through a transparent plasma electrode. The temporal evolution of images in Balmer-alpha and Fulcher band wavelengths have been recorded associated to atomic and molecular excitation and ionization processes. Some unexpected plasma distributions transient behaviors during breakdown are reported.

  4. Modeling of low-temperature plasmas generated using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: the ChemCam diagnostic tool on the Mars Science Laboratory Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, James

    2016-05-01

    We report on efforts to model the low-temperature plasmas generated using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS is a minimally invasive technique that can quickly and efficiently determine the elemental composition of a target and is employed in an extremely wide range of applications due to its ease of use and fast turnaround. In particular, LIBS is the diagnostic tool used by the ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity. In this talk, we report on the use of the Los Alamos plasma modeling code ATOMIC to simulate LIBS plasmas, which are typically at temperatures of order 1 eV and electron densities of order 10 16 - 17 cm-3. At such conditions, these plasmas are usually in local-thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and normally contain neutral and singly ionized species only, which then requires that modeling must use accurate atomic structure data for the element under investigation. Since LIBS devices are often employed in a very wide range of applications, it is therefore desirable to have accurate data for most of the elements in the periodic table, ideally including actinides. Here, we discuss some recent applications of our modeling using ATOMIC that have explored the plasma physics aspects of LIBS generated plasmas, and in particular discuss the modeling of a plasma formed from a basalt sample used as a ChemCam standard1. We also highlight some of the more general atomic physics challenges that are encountered when attempting to model low-temperature plasmas. The Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC5206NA25396. Work performed in conjunction with D. P. Kilcrease, H. M. Johns, E. J. Judge, J. E. Barefield, R. C. Wiens, S. M. Clegg.

  5. Student science publishing: an exploratory study of undergraduate science research journals and popular science magazines in the US and Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mico Tatalovic

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Science magazines have an important role in disseminating scientific knowledge into the public sphere and in discussing the broader scope affected by scientific research such as technology, ethics and politics. Student-run science magazines afford opportunities for future scientists, communicators, politicians and others to practice communicating science. The ability to translate ‘scientese’ into a jargon-free discussion is rarely easy: it requires practice, and student magazines may provide good practice ground for undergraduate and graduate science students wishing to improve their communication skills.

  6. Introduction. Progress in Earth science and climate studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J Michael T

    2008-12-28

    In this introductory paper, I review the 'visions of the future' articles prepared by top young scientists for the second of the two Christmas 2008 Triennial Issues of Phil. Trans. R. Soc.A, devoted respectively to astronomy and Earth science. Topics covered in the Earth science issue include: trace gases in the atmosphere; dynamics of the Antarctic circumpolar current; a study of the boundary between the Earth's rocky mantle and its iron core; and two studies of volcanoes and their plumes. A final section devoted to ecology and climate covers: the mathematical modelling of plant-soil interactions; the effects of the boreal forests on the Earth's climate; the role of the past palaeoclimate in testing and calibrating today's numerical climate models; and the evaluation of these models including the quantification of their uncertainties.

  7. Midazolam plasma concentration after anesthesia premedication in clinical routine - an observational study : Midazolam plasma concentration after anesthesia premedication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, C; Steurer, M P; Mueller, D; Zueger, M; Dullenkopf, A

    2016-10-24

    Midazolam is commonly used as a pre-anesthesia anxiolytic. It`s elimination may not be fast enough for short procedures. In orally premedicated patients we obtained midazolam plasma concentrations at the end of surgical procedures and compared those to concentrations at anesthesia induction. The study was conducted prospectively with consent of the local ethics committee (Ethikkomission Kanton Thurgau, Switzerland) and carried out with written informed consent of each patient. Female patients aged 20 to 60 years undergoing elective procedures with general anesthesia were included, and were divided in two groups according to the planned surgical time: group S (Midazolam po as premedication. Blood samples were drawn at anesthesia induction, and at the end of surgery. Data were compared with t-test (independent samples; significance level p midazolam was not detectable in any samples. Time of premedication to the 1st blood sample was not statistically different between groups, neither were Midazolam plasma levels at this time point (p = 0.94). None of the patients from group L (n = 24), but five patients in group S (n = 22) did have a higher plasma level of Midazolam at the end of the case compared to the beginning. The elimination half-life of oral Midazolam can lead to higher plasma levels at the end of a short procedure compared to those at induction of anesthesia. German Clinical Trials Register (Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien), DRKS00005429 ; date of registration 3(rd) January 2014.

  8. Understanding understanding in secondary school science: An interpretive study

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Maureen Gail

    This study investigated the teaching of secondary school science with an emphasis on promoting student understanding. In particular, I focused on two research questions: What are the possible meanings of teaching for understanding? And, how might one teach secondary school science for understanding? After semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 secondary school science teachers, grounded theory methodology was used to interpret the data. As a result of the selective coding process, I was able to identify 14 connected components of teaching for understanding (TfU). The process of TfU involves: puzzle-solving, a specific pedagogy and a conscious decision. The teacher must be a reflective practitioner who has some knowledge of the facets of understanding. The teacher comes to a critical incident or crisis in his or her pedagogy and adopts a mindset which highlights TfU as a personal problematic. Teachers operate with student-centred rather than teacher-centred metaphors. TfU requires a firm belief in and passion for the process, a positive attitude and excellent pedagogical content knowledge. It hinges on a performance view of understanding and demands risk-taking in the science classroom. Abstracting these ideas to a theory led me to the notion of Purposive Teaching . In their purposive-driven role as pedagogues, these teachers have placed TfU at the core of their daily practice. Constraints and challenges facing TfU as well as implications of the findings are discussed. Keywords. science teaching, teaching for understanding, purposive teaching, constructivism, understanding, pedagogy, pedagogical content knowledge, memorization, meaningful learning, reflective practice.

  9. Study of the modification of spherical melamine-formaldehyde particles levitating in complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasev, V. Yu.; Polishchyuk, V. A.; Gorbenko, A. P.; Dzlieva, E. S.; Ermolenko, M. A.; Makar, M. M.

    2016-05-01

    The surface modification of spherical melamine-formaldehyde particles during their levitation in a dusty plasma as a part of plasma-dust structures in a trap formed in strata in a neon glow discharge has been investigated using scanning electron microscopy. The dependence of the particle size on the time of plasma exposure has been found and measured, and the modification of the surface structure has been studied. The source of the observed modification has been interpreted.

  10. The theta-pinch - a versatile tool for the generation and study of high temperature plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintz, E. [Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum-Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The more general technical and physical features of theta-pinches are described. Special field of their application are high-ss plasmas. Two examples are analysed and studied in more detail: a high density plasma near thermal equilibrium and a low density plasma far from equilibrium. The latter is of special interest for future investigations. Possibilities of field-reversed configurations are pointed out. (orig.)

  11. Study of plasma formation in CW CO2 laser beam-metal surface interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Vasilchenko, Zh V.; Golubev, Vladimir S.; Gresev, A. N.; Zabelin, Alexandre M.; Chubrik, N. I.; Shimanovich, V. D.

    1994-04-01

    An interaction of the cw CO2 laser beam and a moving metal surface has been studied. The pulsed and thermodynamical parameters of the surface plasma were investigated by optical and spectroscopical methods. The subsonic radiation wave propagation in the erosion plasma torch has been studied.

  12. Managing change : Case study: HAMK University of Applied Sciences, Valkeakoski

    OpenAIRE

    Chau Thi Tra, Mi

    2012-01-01

    In response to changes imposed by the Finnish government on the Univer-sities of Applied Sciences system in the near future, HAMK has proactive-ly adopted several programmes to prepare for future challenges and rein-force the organization’s competitiveness. However, organizational change has never been an easy, straightforward issue and how to manage change effectively has become an interest to the organization. The study aims at providing suggestions for a more successful change im-pleme...

  13. Noise studies during the first Virgo science run and after

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acernese, F; Avino, S; Barone, F [INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Alshourbagy, M; Barsotti, L; Bigotta, S; Birindelli, S [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Amico, P; Bosi, L [INFN, Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Antonucci, F; Astone, P [INFN, Sezione di Roma (Italy); Aoudia, S; Bondu, F [Lab. Artemis, Univ. NSA, Obs. Cote d' Azur, CNRS, BP 4229 06304 Nice, Cedex 4 (France); Arun, K G; Barsuglia, M; Bizouard, M A [LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Orsay (France); Baggio, L [Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), IN2P3/CNRS, Universite de Savoie, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Ballardin, G [European Gravitational Observatory (EGO), Cascina (Italy); Bauer, Th S [National Institute for Subatomic Physics, NL-1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boccara, C [ESPCI, Paris (France)], E-mail: irene.fiori@ego-gw.it (and others)

    2008-09-21

    The first Virgo long science run (VSR1) lasted 136 days, from 18th May 2007. During the run several noise sources were identified and reduced; this significantly improved the detector sensitivity between the start and the end of the run. We describe three noise studies, showing how data monitoring programs and simple analysis tools permitted the first detection of the noise and provided useful information regarding its origin.

  14. Managing change : Case study: HAMK University of Applied Sciences, Valkeakoski

    OpenAIRE

    Chau Thi Tra, Mi

    2012-01-01

    In response to changes imposed by the Finnish government on the Univer-sities of Applied Sciences system in the near future, HAMK has proactive-ly adopted several programmes to prepare for future challenges and rein-force the organization’s competitiveness. However, organizational change has never been an easy, straightforward issue and how to manage change effectively has become an interest to the organization. The study aims at providing suggestions for a more successful change im-pleme...

  15. Study of tungsten surface interaction with plasma streams at DPF-1000U

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladygina Marina S.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this note experimental studies of tungsten (W samples irradiated by intense plasma-ion streams are reported. Measurements were performed using the modified plasma focus device DPF-1000U equipped with an axial gas-puffing system. The main diagnostic tool was a Mechelle®900 optical spectrometer. The electron density of a freely propagating plasma stream (i.e., the plasma stream observed without any target inside the vacuum chamber was estimated on the basis of the half-width of the Dβ spectral line, taking into account the linear Stark effect. For a freely propagating plasma stream the maximum electron density amounted to about 1.3 × 1017 cm−3 and was reached during the maximum plasma compression. The plasma electron density depends on the initial conditions of the experiments. It was thus important to determine first the plasma flow characteristics before attempting any target irradiation. These data were needed for comparison with plasma characteristics after an irradiation of the investigated target. In fact, spectroscopic measurements performed during interactions of plasma streams with the investigated W samples showed many WI and WII spectral lines. The surface erosion was determined from mass losses of the irradiated samples. Changes on the surfaces of the irradiated samples were also investigated with an optical microscope and some sputtering and melting zones were observed.

  16. [Comparative analysis of semiotic shifts, established by LCS of blood plasma from random samples of studied subjects from the zone of the Chernobyl accident, "Ural Radiation Trace", and collaborators from St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternovoĭ, K S; Selezneva, T N; Akleev, A V; Pashkov, I A; Noskin, L A; Klopov, N V; Noskin, V A; Starodub, N F

    1998-01-01

    Using the developed "semiotic" classifier of laser correlation spectra of blood plasma the authors have carried out the verification of organism states of patients from the zone of Chernobyl accident, "Ural radiation trace" and collaborators from Sanct-Petersbourg Institute of Nuclear Physics. An analysis of results obtained using accidental selections which differed as to the character of radiation injury evidences for high informativeness of "semiotic" classifier of laser correlation spectra of blood plasma.

  17. Bulk plasma fragmentation in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma: A hybrid modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-06-01

    A hybrid model is used to investigate the fragmentation of C4F8 inductive discharges. Indeed, the resulting reactive species are crucial for the optimization of the Si-based etching process, since they determine the mechanisms of fluorination, polymerization, and sputtering. In this paper, we present the dissociation degree, the density ratio of F vs. CxFy (i.e., fluorocarbon (fc) neutrals), the neutral vs. positive ion density ratio, details on the neutral and ion components, and fractions of various fc neutrals (or ions) in the total fc neutral (or ion) density in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma source, as well as the effect of pressure and power on these results. To analyze the fragmentation behavior, the electron density and temperature and electron energy probability function (EEPF) are investigated. Moreover, the main electron-impact generation sources for all considered neutrals and ions are determined from the complicated C4F8 reaction set used in the model. The C4F8 plasma fragmentation is explained, taking into account many factors, such as the EEPF characteristics, the dominance of primary and secondary processes, and the thresholds of dissociation and ionization. The simulation results are compared with experiments from literature, and reasonable agreement is obtained. Some discrepancies are observed, which can probably be attributed to the simplified polymer surface kinetics assumed in the model.

  18. The Influence of Early Science Experience in Kindergarten on Children's Immediate and Later Science Achievement: Evidence from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackes, Mesut; Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Bell, Randy L.; O'Connell, Ann A.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the impacts of selected early science experiences in kindergarten (frequency and duration of teachers' teaching of science, availability of sand/water table and science areas, and children's participation in cooking and science equipment activities) on children's science achievement in kindergarten and third grade using data…

  19. Contrastive Study of Metadiscourse in the Conclusion of Academic Pa-pers between Soft Science and Hard Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐伟伟

    2014-01-01

    Academic paper as a genre is communicative. Interactional metadiscourse is one of the linguistic features that can sig-nificantly show the communicative feature of texts. With different research methodologies and characteristics, academic papers of hard and soft science present different degree of communicative features. The corpus of this study consists of 16 academic papers among which 8 are from hard science and 8 from soft science. This article aims to explore the different ways of scholars from soft and hard science to use metadiscourse in the conclusion part of their academic papers to exert lights to the pedagogical develop-ment of academic papers.

  20. Studies on the nature of plasma growth hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S.; Grindeland, R. E.; Reilly, T. J.; Yang, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents further evidence for the existence of two discrete forms of growth hormone in human plasma, one which is detectable by both radioimmunoassay and bioassay and is immunoreactive, and the other, termed 'bioactive', which is detected by tibial bioassay but shows little reactivity with currently available antisera to pituitary growth hormone. The same division of immunoactive and bioactive growth hormone occurs in rats, though with less disparity. Tests on rats indicated that the bioactive hormone is preferentially released into jugular vein plasma and that plasma concentrations of the bioactive hormone can be enhanced by insulin administration. The bioactive hormone was detectable by tibial assays in Cohn fractions IV, IV-1, and IV-4, and could be concentrated about 40-fold by fractionation with (NaPO3)6 and (NH4)2SO4.

  1. Pre-Excitation Studies for Rubidium-Plasma Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Aladi, M; Barna, I.F.; Czitrovszky, Aladar; Djotyan, Gagik; Dombi, Peter; Dzsotjan, David; FöLdes, Istvan; Hamar, Gergo; Ignacz, Peter; Kedves, Miklos; Kerekes, Attila; Levai, Peter; Marton, Istvan; Nagy, Attila; Oszetzky, Daniel; Pocsai, Mihaly; Racz, Peter; Raczkevi, Bela; Szigeti, Janos; Sörlei, Zsuzsa; Szipöcs, Robert; Varga, Dezso; Varga-Umbrich, Karoly; Varro, Sandor; Vamos, Lenard; Vesztergombi, György

    2014-01-01

    The key element in the Proton-Driven-Plasma-Wake-Field-Accelerator (AWAKE) project is the generation of highly uniform plasma from Rubidium vapor. The standard way to achieve full ionization is to use high power laser which can assure the over-barrier-ionization (OBI) along the 10 meters long active region. The Wigner-team in Budapest is investigating an alternative way of uniform plasma generation. The proposed Resonance Enhanced Multi Photon Ionization (REMPI) scheme probably can be realized by much less laser power. In the following the resonant pre-excitations of the Rb atoms are investigated, theoretically and the status report about the preparatory work on the experiment are presented.

  2. Central Computer Science Concepts to Research-Based Teacher Training in Computer Science: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendler, Andreas; Klaudt, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    The significance of computer science for economics and society is undisputed. In particular, computer science is acknowledged to play a key role in schools (e.g., by opening multiple career paths). The provision of effective computer science education in schools is dependent on teachers who are able to properly represent the discipline and whose…

  3. Central Computer Science Concepts to Research-Based Teacher Training in Computer Science: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendler, Andreas; Klaudt, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    The significance of computer science for economics and society is undisputed. In particular, computer science is acknowledged to play a key role in schools (e.g., by opening multiple career paths). The provision of effective computer science education in schools is dependent on teachers who are able to properly represent the discipline and whose…

  4. NATURAL SCIENCE AT SCHOOL: MODERN APPROACHES TO THE DIFFERENTIATED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dechtyarenko S.G.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the possibility of differentiated study natural science at school on the basis of ecological educational process. Natural science is the science about nature as a single unity or totality of the natural sciences, which constituting a single unit. The main aim of the course is to develop student’s natural science competence through integrated mastering system knowledge about nature and man, the basics of environmental knowledge, ways of improving teaching and learning activities, development of value orientations in relation to the nature. There is strong need to review approaches to teaching nature science at schools, taking into account the general trend of greening of the educational process. The aim of the work is to analyze the possibility of practical application of modern approaches to differentiated teaching of the nature science at school greening within the educational process. In our view, the environmental component may be a basis to the formation and differentiated teaching in general. The environmental component of the educational sector has been aimed to the student’s environmental consciousness and compliance with rules of environmentally safe behavior in the environment. The learning of the integrated knowledge about nature and man can be submitted through the prism of action of the environmental factors according classic approach to their classification: abiotic, biotic and anthropogenic factors. In parallel, it is reasonable to raise the issues of practical importance as some natural objects and actions of each of these factors. The new degree of the studying of the environment has been provided by the beginning of the systematization of knowledge about natural objects and structure of the universe, by the formation of primary concepts about the relationship between the world of the living and inanimate nature, between organisms and between human activities and changes that has been occurred in the

  5. Cooperative Science: A National Study of University and Industry Researchers. Case Studies. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elmima C.; And Others

    This report presents nine case studies of Industry/University Cooperative Research (IUCR) projects supported during 1978-1980 by the National Science Foundation. The intent of this document is to provide readers with a qualitative picture of cooperative science as practiced under the IUCR program. The information presented in this report is…

  6. Spectroscopic study of plasma evolution in runaway nanosecond atmospheric-pressure He discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatom, S; Stambulchik, E; Vekselman, V; Krasik, Ya E

    2013-07-01

    Time- and space-resolved visible-emission spectroscopy measurements are applied to study plasma parameters in nanosecond electrical discharges in He gas at pressure of 10(5) Pa, using a 150 kV, 5 ns duration high-voltage pulse. The plasma evolution during the discharge is investigated by applying line-shape analysis of several He I spectral transitions, with the Stark and opacity effects accounted for. The analysis shows that the discharge plasma is not in equilibrium and that significant electric fields of several kV/cm are present in the plasma during the discharge. Regions of plasma with significantly different electron densities are identified and a qualitative model of the plasma formation and evolution is proposed.

  7. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drummond, James E

    2013-01-01

    A historic snapshot of the field of plasma physics, this fifty-year-old volume offers an edited collection of papers by pioneering experts in the field. In addition to assisting students in their understanding of the foundations of classical plasma physics, it provides a source of historic context for modern physicists. Highly successful upon its initial publication, this book was the standard text on plasma physics throughout the 1960s and 70s.Hailed by Science magazine as a ""well executed venture,"" the three-part treatment ranges from basic plasma theory to magnetohydrodynamics and microwa

  8. Study of TAMe (p-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester) esterase activity of bovine plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, J; Black, W D; Gentry, P A

    1978-07-01

    The TAMe (p-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester) esterase activity of mature and immature bovine plasma was studied and compared with the activity of this enzyme in human plasma. Kaolin activation of 2 minutes was required to produce maximal activation in cattle, as compared with 1 minute activation in man. The kaolin-activated TAMe esterase values in bovine plasma were approximately one-half the values found in human plasma. The activity of this enzyme was statistically greater in immature than in mature cattle (P less than 0.05) at kaolin activation times of 1, 2, 15, and 20 minutes.

  9. Study on Fe-Based Coating Produced by Plasma Surface Metallurgy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIHui-qi; LIUBang-wu; LIHui-dong; ZHANGLi-min; LIMin; SUNYu-zong

    2004-01-01

    In the paper, plasma surface metallurgy was performed using Fe-based powder on steel substrate. The microstructure and microhardness of the coating have been analyzed. On the base of orthogonal comparison tests, influences of many factors on the cracking sensibility of plasma metallurgy coating have also been studied. The results indicate that substrate and its surface condition, processing parameters and components of plasma metallurgy coating have great effects on cracking sensibility of plasma metallurgy coating. Through changing these factors, it is possible to reduce cracks and promote the applications of this technology.

  10. Study of periodic band gap structure of the magnetized plasma photonic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-feng; MA Li; LIU Shao-bin

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of the periodic band gaps of the one dimension magnetized plasma photonic crystals are studied with the piecewise linear current density recursive convolution (PLCDRC) finite-differential time-domain (FDTD) method. In fre-quency-domain, the transmission coefficients of electromagnetic Gaussian pulses are computed, and the effects of the periodic structure constant, plasma layer thickness and parameters of plasma on the properties of periodic band gaps of magnetized photonic crystals are analyzed. The results show that the periodic band gaps depend strongly on the plasma parameters.

  11. An Experimental Study of Curved Rectangular Microstrip Antenna in Simulated Plasma Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem Bhushan Mital

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of plasma on the radiation characteristics of curved rectangular microstrip antenna is studied by means of a new plasma simulation technique. Unlike previous techniques [1,2], a relative index of refraction less than unity is obtained by representing free space with a high dielectric constant sodium chloride powder and plasma by a medium of lower dielectric constant (air. A wide range of dielectric constants of simulated plasma could be possible with this technique using solid dielectrics instead of liquids. It is observed that the resonance frequency is not affected by the curvature of the antenna. However radiation patterns are significantly affected.

  12. The unexpected confluence of plasma physics and climate science: On the lives and legacies of Norman Rostoker and Sherry Rowland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, Katherine R. M. [Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor Department of Earth System Science University of California Irvine Irvine 3204 Croul Hall Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2016-03-25

    The Norman Rostoker Memorial Symposium brought together approximately 150 attendees to share their recent work and to reflect on the contributions of Norman Rostoker to the field of plasma physics and the advancement of fusion as a source of renewable clean energy. The field has changed considerably in a few short decades, with theoretical advances and technological innovations evolving in lock step. Over those same decades, our understanding of human induced climate change has also evolved; measurable changes in Earth’s physical, chemical, and biological processes have already been observed, and these will likely intensify in the coming decades. Never before has the need for clean energy been more pronounced, or the need for transformative solutions more pressing. As scientists work with legislators, journalists, and the public to take actions to address the threat of climate change, there is much to be learned from the legacies of innovators like Norman Rostoker, who have tackled complex problems with scientific insight and determination even when the odds were stacked against them. I write this from the perspective on an Earth system scientist who studies photosynthesis and the biogeochemistry of the oceans, and my statements about plasma physics and Norman Rostoker are based on information I gathered from the colloquium and from many enjoyable conversations with his friends and colleagues.

  13. The unexpected confluence of plasma physics and climate science: On the lives and legacies of Norman Rostoker and Sherry Rowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Katherine R. M.

    2016-03-01

    The Norman Rostoker Memorial Symposium brought together approximately 150 attendees to share their recent work and to reflect on the contributions of Norman Rostoker to the field of plasma physics and the advancement of fusion as a source of renewable clean energy. The field has changed considerably in a few short decades, with theoretical advances and technological innovations evolving in lock step. Over those same decades, our understanding of human induced climate change has also evolved; measurable changes in Earth's physical, chemical, and biological processes have already been observed, and these will likely intensify in the coming decades. Never before has the need for clean energy been more pronounced, or the need for transformative solutions more pressing. As scientists work with legislators, journalists, and the public to take actions to address the threat of climate change, there is much to be learned from the legacies of innovators like Norman Rostoker, who have tackled complex problems with scientific insight and determination even when the odds were stacked against them. I write this from the perspective on an Earth system scientist who studies photosynthesis and the biogeochemistry of the oceans, and my statements about plasma physics and Norman Rostoker are based on information I gathered from the colloquium and from many enjoyable conversations with his friends and colleagues.

  14. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cram, L.S.; Stafford, C. [comp.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Life Sciences Division and the biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1994. The technical portion of the report is divided into two parts, (1) selected research highlights and (2) research projects and accomplishments. The research highlights provide a more detailed description of a select set of projects. A technical description of all projects is presented in sufficient detail so that the informed reader will be able to assess the scope and significance of each project. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the group leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  15. Assessing Intrinsic Values of a Lecture-Free High School Science Education for Collegiate Science Work: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorais, Christopher James

    2012-01-01

    This case study examined the efficacy of the individualized instruction teaching methodology as it was applied within high school science classes. Also examined was how individualized instruction at the high school level prepared students to do collegiate science level work. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the…

  16. Study on the effects of physical plasma on in-vitro cultivates cells; Untersuchungen zum Einfluss von physikalischem Plasma auf in vitro kultivierte Zellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strassenburg, Susanne

    2014-03-15

    This study focused on the interactions of non thermal atmospheric pressure plasma on in vitro cultured keratinocytes (HaCaT keratinocytes) and melanoma cells (MV3). Three different plasma sources were used: a plasma jet (kINPen 09), a surface DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) and a volume DBD. For analyzing basic effects of plasma on cells, influence of physical plasma on viability, on DNA and on induction of ROS were investigated. Following assays were used: -- Viability: - neutral red uptake assay, cell counting (number of viable cells, cell integrity) - BrdU assay (proliferation) - Annexin V and propidium iodide staining, flow cytometry (induction of apoptosis), -- DNA: - alkaline comet assay (detection of DNA damage) - staining of DNA with propidium iodide, flow cytometry (cell cycle analysis), -- ROS: - H2DCFDA assay, flow cytometry (detection of ROS-positive cells). In addition to the effects which where induced by the plasma sources, the influence of the plasma treatment regime (direct, indirect and direct with medium exchange), the working gas (argon, air) and the surrounding liquids (cell culture medium: RPMI, IMDM; buffer solutions: HBSS, PBS) on the extent of the plasma cell effects were investigated. All plasma sources induced treatment time-dependent effects in HaCaT keratinocytes and melanoma cells (MV3): - loss of viable cells and reduced proliferation - induction of apoptosis after the longest treatment times - DNA damage 1 h after plasma treatment, 24 h after plasma treatment DNA damage was present only after the longest treatment times, evidence for DNA damage repair - due to accumulation of cells in G2/M phase, cell count in G1 phase (24 h) is lower - increase of ROS-positive cells 1 h and 24 h after plasma treatment. It was shown that cells which were cultured in RPMI showed stronger effects (stronger loss of viability and more DNA damage) than cells which were cultured in IMDM. Also plasma-treated buffer solutions (HBSS, PBS) induced DNA

  17. Study of scattering cross section of a plasma column using Green's function volume integral equation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanmoradi, Elmira; Shokri, Babak

    2017-05-01

    In this article, the electromagnetic wave scattering from plasma columns with inhomogeneous electron density distribution is studied by the Green's function volume integral equation method. Due to the ready production of such plasmas in the laboratories and their practical application in various technological fields, this study tries to find the effects of plasma parameters such as the electron density, radius, and pressure on the scattering cross-section of a plasma column. Moreover, the incident wave frequency influence of the scattering pattern is demonstrated. Furthermore, the scattering cross-section of a plasma column with an inhomogeneous collision frequency profile is calculated and the effect of this inhomogeneity is discussed first in this article. These results are especially used to determine the appropriate conditions for radar cross-section reduction purposes. It is shown that the radar cross-section of a plasma column reduces more for a larger collision frequency, for a relatively lower plasma frequency, and also for a smaller radius. Furthermore, it is found that the effect of the electron density on the scattering cross-section is more obvious in comparison with the effect of other plasma parameters. Also, the plasma column with homogenous collision frequency can be used as a better shielding in contrast to its inhomogeneous counterpart.

  18. History of science in social studies teaching in Turkey: A study of teacher candidates’ situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Laçin Şimşek

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available History of science gives opportunities to comprehend the developments and methods of scientific thinking. It contributes to train questioning and critical individuals. For this reason, history of science took place in 2005 primary social studies curriculum. Its succesment depends to teachers’ sufficiency about history of science. Because of this, social studies teacher candidates’ knowledge level which is needed to implement the gains of social studies curriculum which are about history of science, have been measured. For this aim, 75 social science candidates who were in their last year in social studies teacher department of an University which placed in Anatolia, took part in the study. A measure that has 5 open-ended questions have been used. At the end of the study, it was seen that teacher candidates have inadequate and false knowledge about the contributions of civilizations to humanity, contributions of Turk-Islam scientist to civilization, contributions of geographic discoveries to modern science. Especially, they are in adequate at telling anecdotes about history of science in social studies lessons.

  19. Critical points in the 16-moment approximation. [plasma flow in laboratory and space plasmas study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasseen, F.; Retterer, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The singular points in steady state, field-aligned plasma transport models based on velocity moment theory are examined. In particular, two separate singular points in the equations obtained from the 16-moment approximation are identified. These equations are presented in a form that makes the singularities apparent, and they are solved in a simple illustrative case. The singular points, one occurring at the sonic point and the other at a critical value of the parallel heat flux, give rise to different outflow regimes, characterized generically by different asymptotic behavior. The existence of the different outflow regimes separated by the heat flux critical point has been only hinted at in previous discussions of numerical simulation of the polar wind.

  20. Dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortov, Vladimir E; Khrapak, Aleksei G; Molotkov, Vladimir I; Petrov, Oleg F [Institute for High Energy Densities, Associated Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khrapak, Sergei A [Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany)

    2004-05-31

    The properties of dusty plasmas - low-temperature plasmas containing charged macroparticles - are considered. The most important elementary processes in dusty plasmas and the forces acting on dust particles are investigated. The results of experimental and theoretical investigations of different states of strongly nonideal dusty plasmas - crystal-like, liquid-like, gas-like - are summarized. Waves and oscillations in dusty plasmas, as well as their damping and instability mechanisms, are studied. Some results on dusty plasma investigated under microgravity conditions are presented. New directions of experimental research and potential applications of dusty plasmas are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  1. Study of the turbulence in the central plasma sheet using the CLUSTER satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, M.; Arancibia Riveros, K.; Bosqued, J.; Antonova, E.

    2008-05-01

    Recent studies are shown that the turbulent processes in the space plasmas are very important. It includes the behavior of the plasma sheet plasma during geomagnetic substorms and storms. Study of the plasma turbulence in the central plasma sheet was made using the CLUSTER satellite mission data. For this studies we used the Cluster Ion Spectrometry experiment (CIS), and fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) data for studying fluctuations of the plasma bulk velocity and geomagnetic field fluctuations for different levels of geomagnetic activity and different locations inside the plasma sheet. Case studies for the orbits during quiet geomagnetic conditions, different phases of geomagnetic substroms and storms showed that the properties of plasma turbulence inside the sheet differ significantly for all afore mentioned cases. Variations in the probability distribution functions, flatness factors, local intermittency measure parameters, and eddy diffusion coefficients indicate that the turbulence increases significantly during substorm growth and expansion phases and decreases slowly to the initial level during the recovery phase. It became even stronger during the storm main phase.

  2. Study of a Laser-Produced Plasma by Langmuir Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C. T.; Hasimi, M.; Pant, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    The structure, the parameters and the expansion of the plasma produced by focusing a 7 J, 20 ns Nd-glass laser on stainless-steel and glass targets suspended in a high-vacuum chamber were investigated by Langmuir probes. It was observed that the probe signals consisted of a photoelectric...

  3. Feasibility study of ECRH in NSTX-U startup plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, N. A.; Poli, F.; Taylor, G.; Harvey, R.; Petrov, Yu.

    2016-10-01

    A key mission goal of the National Spherical Torus eXperiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) is the demonstration of fully non-inductive startup and operation. In part to accomplish this, a 1MW, 28 GHz ECRH system is presently being developed for implementation on NSTX-U in 2018. Like most spherical tokamaks, NSTX-U operates in the overdense regime (fpe>fce) , which limits traditional ECRH to the early startup phase. An extensive modelling effort of the propagation and absorption of EC waves in the evolving plasma is thus required to define the most effective window of operation, and to optimize the launcher geometry for maximal heating and for current drive during this window. In fact, the ECRH system will play an important role in preparing a target plasma for subsequent injection of IC waves and NBI. Here we assess the feasibility of O1-mode ECRH in NSTX-U startup plasma at full field of 1T through time-dependent simulations performed with the transport solver TRANSP. Linear ray-tracing calculations conducted by GENRAY are coupled into the TRANSP framework, allowing the plasma equilibrium and the temperature profiles to evolve self-consistently in response to the injected microwave power. Furthermore, we investigate additional possibilities of heating and current drive made available through coupling the injected O-mode power to the electrostatic EBW via the slow X-mode as an intermediary.

  4. Space Plasma Studies by In-Situ and Remote Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Awarded by Lenin Prize (highest in USSR). 1962 Plasma experiments aboard KOSMOS 2, evidence of the lack of charged particles thermodynamic equilibrium...ionosphere of Venus. 1970- 1979 Ionospheric experiments aboard COSMOS 378, INTERCOSMOS 8,10,12,14,18,19 and KOSMOS 900. 1970- 1981 Series of in

  5. Bioinformatics in High School Biology Curricula: A Study of State Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefer, Stephen H.; Sheppard, Keith

    2008-01-01

    The proliferation of bioinformatics in modern biology marks a modern revolution in science that promises to influence science education at all levels. This study analyzed secondary school science standards of 49 U.S. states (Iowa has no science framework) and the District of Columbia for content related to bioinformatics. The bioinformatics…

  6. Case Study: Teaching Nature of Science through Scientific Models--The Geocentric vs. Heliocentric Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew; Rogers, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In the nonmajor science classroom, case studies--when used as learning tools--should help students build the necessary framework to understand the nature of science. For most students, the nonmajor science course (in this case, Astronomy 101) may be the last time that they interact with science in a formal learning setting. A National Science…

  7. Introduction: The Comparative Study of Science and the Sociology of Scientific Validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzner, Burkart; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Explores the social and cultural processes involved in the development of a social system of science in non-Western contexts. Proposes a sociology of science validity program for studying science in varying cultural and civilizational settings. Summarizes science development in China, India, Iran, and Japan. (ML)

  8. Bioinformatics in High School Biology Curricula: A Study of State Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefer, Stephen H.; Sheppard, Keith

    2008-01-01

    The proliferation of bioinformatics in modern biology marks a modern revolution in science that promises to influence science education at all levels. This study analyzed secondary school science standards of 49 U.S. states (Iowa has no science framework) and the District of Columbia for content related to bioinformatics. The bioinformatics…

  9. Exploring the Roles and Nature of Science: A Case Study of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeung Chung

    2008-01-01

    The roles of science in society and the nature of science are the focus of many science curricula. Current views about these two aspects of science have largely been informed by the history of scientific development. This article uses the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome--a recent health scare--as a case study to explore the roles of…

  10. A Study of the Competencies Needed of Entry-Level Academic Health Sciences Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbrick, Jodi Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the professional and personal competencies that entry-level academic health sciences librarians should possess from the perspectives of academic health sciences library directors, library and information sciences (LIS) educators who specialize in educating health sciences librarians, and individuals who…

  11. An Exploratory Case Study of Olympiad Students' Attitudes towards and Passion for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Mary; Venville, Grady

    2011-01-01

    Much is known about high school students' attitudes towards science but there is almost no research on what passion for science might look like and how it might be manifested. This exploratory case study took advantage of a unique group of highly gifted science students participating in the Australian Science Olympiad (N = 69) to explore their…

  12. The study of middle school mathematics and science teachers' practices, perceptions, and attitudes related to mathematics and science integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczynski, Eliza

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the nature of mathematics and science connections made by sixth and seventh grade mathematics and science teachers in their classrooms. This study also examined the extent to which these connections represented mathematics and science integration and described the teachers' perceptions of and attitudes about mathematics and science integration. The primary data sources included classroom observations and teacher interviews. Findings suggested that teacher practices in making mathematics and science connections in the classroom incorporated many of the characteristics of integrated instruction presented in the literature. Teacher attitudes toward integration were found to be generally positive and supportive of integrated instruction. Mathematics teachers shared a common perception of integration being two separate lessons taught together in one lesson. In contrast, science teachers perceived integration to be a seamless blend of the two disciplines. The researcher related these perceptions and attitudes to the teachers' past experiences with mathematics and science connections and integration, and also to their practices of mathematics and science connections in the study.

  13. Final Report: Laboratory Studies of Spontaneous Reconnection and Intermittent Plasma Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egedal-Pedersen, Jan [Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Porkolab, Miklos [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-05-31

    The study of the collisionless magnetic reconnection constituted the primary work carried out under this grant. The investigations utilized two magnetic configurations with distinct boundary conditions. Both configurations were based upon the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and the MIT Physics Department. The NSF/DOE award No. 0613734, supported two graduate students (now Drs. W. Fox and N. Katz) and material expenses. The grant enabled these students to operate the VTF basic plasma physics experiment on magnetic reconnection. The first configuration was characterized by open boundary conditions where the magnetic field lines interface directly with the vacuum vessel walls. The reconnection dynamics for this configuration has been methodically characterized and it has been shown that kinetic effects related to trapped electron trajectories are responsible for the high rates of reconnection observed. This type of reconnection has not been investigated before. Nevertheless, the results are directly relevant to observations by the Wind spacecraft of fast reconnection deep in the Earth magnetotail. The second configuration was developed to be relevant to specifically to numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, allowing the magnetic field-lines to be contained inside the device. The configuration is compatible with the presence of large current sheets in the reconnection region and reconnection is observed in fast powerful bursts. These reconnection events facilitate the first experimental investigations of the physics governing the spontaneous onset of fast reconnection. In the Report we review the general motivation of this work and provide an overview of our experimental and theoretical results enabled by the support through the awards.

  14. A method for studies on interactions between a gold-based drug and plasma proteins based on capillary electrophoresis with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tam T T N; Østergaard, Jesper; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    An analytical method based on capillary electrophoresis (CE) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection was developed for studies on the interaction of gold-containing drugs and plasma proteins using auranofin as example. A detection limit of 18 ng/mL of auranofin...... was the major auranofin-interacting protein in plasma. The CE-ICP-MS method is proposed as a novel approach for kinetic studies of the interactions between gold-based drugs and plasma proteins. Graphical Abstract Development of a CE-ICP-MS based method allows for studies on interaction of the gold containing...

  15. Spectroscopic studies of plasma in a carbon arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekselman, Vladislav; Feurer, Matthew; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Stratton, Brentley; Raitses, Yevgeny; LaboratoryPlasma Nanosynthesis Team

    2016-09-01

    An atmospheric pressure arc discharge with graphite electrodes is commonly used for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials such as buckyballs, nanotubes and graphene. In operation, the graphite anode ablates providing a feedstock material for synthesis these carbon nanostructures. Existing models predict that nucleation and growth of these nanomaterials in an arc discharge are governed by spatial distributions of density and temperature of plasma species. Control of these distributions can potentially enable optimization of nanosynthesis processes, to achieve the best combination of synthesis selectivity at the synthesis yield. In this work, we report first detail measurements of spatial distribution of arc plasma parameters obtained with a set of in-situ diagnostics, including optical emission spectroscopy and fast framing imaging. These parameters were measured in low- and high- anode ablation modes. Results of these measurements demonstrate a strong correlation between arc plasma and synthesis processes. This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  16. Contested Domains of Science and Science Learning in Contemporary Native American Communities: Three Case Studies from a National Science Foundation grant titled, "Archaeology Pathways for Native Learners"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Nancy Brossard

    This dissertation provides a critical analysis of three informal science education partnerships that resulted from a 2003-2006 National Science Foundation grant titled, "Archaeology Pathways for Native Learners" (ESI-0307858), hosted by the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center. This dissertation is designed to contribute to understandings of learning processes that occur within and at the intersection of diverse worldviews and knowledge systems, by drawing upon experiences derived from three disparate contexts: 1) The Navajo Nation Museum in Window Rock, Arizona; 2) The A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center on the Zuni Reservation in Zuni, New Mexico; and 3) Science learning camps at the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center for Native youth of southern New England. While informal science education is increasingly moving toward decolonizing and cross-cutting institutional boundaries of learning through critical thinking and real-world applications, the construction of "science" (even within diverse contexts) continues to be framed within a homogenous, predominantly Euro-American perspective. This study analyzes the language of Western science employed in these partnerships, with particular attention to the use of Western/Native binaries that shape perceptions of Native peoples and communities, real or imagined. Connections are drawn to broader nation-state interests in education, science, and the global economy. The role of educational evaluation in these case studies is also critically analyzed, by questioning the ways in which it is constructed, conducted, and evaluated for the purposes of informing future projects and subsequent funding. This study unpacks problems of the dominant language of "expert" knowledge embedded in Western science discourse, and highlights the possibilities of indigenous knowledge systems that can inform Western science frameworks of education and evaluation. Ultimately, this study suggests that research

  17. Practice Theory and Pragmatism in Science & Technology Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Anders

    2015-01-01

    as for example Rouse, Schatzki and Reckwitz refrain from including the pragmatist legacy in their writings. This question would probably either be entirely speculative or maybe even not very interesting? Rather, I want to explore what these two apparently similar ways of theorizing do to the study of science...... to the normative evaluation of action, I show that the two intellectual traditions have much in common when it comes to what they do to STS studies. After this introduction to practice theory, my paper will proceed in the following steps. Firstly, I will briefly survey practice theoretical and pragmatist...

  18. Genome-wide association study identifies loci influencing concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Sehmi, Joban; Li, Xinzhong; Wass, Mark N; Van der Harst, Pim; Holm, Hilma; Sanna, Serena; Kavousi, Maryam; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Coin, Lachlan J; Deng, Guohong; Gieger, Christian; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kühnel, Brigitte; Kumar, Vinod; Lagou, Vasiliki; Liang, Liming; Luan, Jian'an; Vidal, Pedro Marques; Mateo Leach, Irene; O'Reilly, Paul F; Peden, John F; Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Soininen, Pasi; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Yuan, Xin; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Atwood, Larry D; Borecki, Ingrid B; Brown, Morris J; Charoen, Pimphen; Cucca, Francesco; Das, Debashish; de Geus, Eco J C; Dixon, Anna L; Döring, Angela; Ehret, Georg; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I; Farrall, Martin; Forouhi, Nita G; Friedrich, Nele; Goessling, Wolfram; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heath, Simon; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hyppönen, Elina; Janssen, Harry L A; Johnson, Toby; Kangas, Antti J; Kema, Ido P; Kühn, Jens P; Lai, Sandra; Lathrop, Mark; Lerch, Markus M; Li, Yun; Liang, T Jake; Lin, Jing-Ping; Loos, Ruth J F; Martin, Nicholas G; Moffatt, Miriam F; Montgomery, Grant W; Munroe, Patricia B; Musunuru, Kiran; Nakamura, Yusuke; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Olafsson, Isleifur; Penninx, Brenda W; Pouta, Anneli; Prins, Bram P; Prokopenko, Inga; Puls, Ralf; Ruokonen, Aimo; Savolainen, Markku J; Schlessinger, David; Schouten, Jeoffrey N L; Seedorf, Udo; Sen-Chowdhry, Srijita; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Smit, Johannes H; Spector, Timothy D; Tan, Wenting; Teslovich, Tanya M; Tukiainen, Taru; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Van der Klauw, Melanie M; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wallace, Chris; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wichmann, H-Erich; Willemsen, Gonneke; Würtz, Peter; Xu, Chun; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark; Cookson, William O; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Froguel, Philippe; Matsuda, Koichi; McCarthy, Mark I; Meisinger, Christa; Mooser, Vincent; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Schumann, Gunter; Snieder, Harold; Sternberg, Michael J E; Stolk, Ronald P; Thomas, Howard C; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uda, Manuela; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Waterworth, Dawn M; Watkins, Hugh; Whitfield, John B; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Fox, Caroline S; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Stefansson, Kari; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Schadt, Eric E; Scott, James; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma are widely used as indicators of liver disease. We carried out a genome-wide association study in 61,089 individuals, identifying 42 loci associated with concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma, of which 32 are new associations (P = 10(-8) to P = 10(-190))

  19. Numerical study of extreme-ultra-violet generated plasmas in hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astakhov, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we present the development and study a numerical model of EUV-induced plasma. Understanding of behavior of low pressure low density plasmas is of industrial relevance, because of their potential use for on-line removal of different forms of contaminations from multilayer mirrors, whi

  20. Optical Methods For Transient Plasmas Studies By Multichannel TEA Nitrogen Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursu, Ioan; Popescu, Ion M.; Ivascu, M.; Baltog, I.; Mihut, L.; Zambreanu, V.; Zoita, V.

    1989-05-01

    A multichannel TEA nitrogen laser has been realized for some optical diagnostics. The following methods have been applied on the plasma focus device (PFD): interferometry, schlieren, shadowgraphy and a new combination of the last two. The background of these methods and some qualitative and quantitative results obtained in plasma focus (PF) studies are presented.

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies loci influencing concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambers, J.C.; Zhang, W.; Sehmi, J.; Li, X.; Wass, M.N.; Harst, P. van der; Holm, H.; Sanna, S.; Kavousi, M.; Baumeister, S.E.; Coin, L.J.; Deng, G.; Gieger, C.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; Hottenga, J.J.; Kuhnel, B.; Kumar, V.; Lagou, V.; Liang, L.; Luan, J.; Vidal, P.M.; Mateo Leach, I.; O'Reilly, P.F.; Peden, J.F.; Rahmioglu, N.; Soininen, P.; Speliotes, E.K.; Yuan, X.; Thorleifsson, G.; Alizadeh, B.Z.; Atwood, L.D.; Borecki, I.B.; Brown, M.J.; Charoen, P.; Cucca, F.; Das, D.; Geus, E.J. de; Dixon, A.L.; Doring, A.; Ehret, G.; Eyjolfsson, G.I.; Farrall, M.; Forouhi, N.G.; Friedrich, N.; Goessling, W.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Harris, T.B.; Hartikainen, A.L.; Heath, S.; Hirschfield, G.M.; Hofman, A.; Homuth, G.; Hypponen, E.; Janssen, H.L.; Johnson, T.; Kangas, A.J.; Kema, I.P.; Kuhn, J.P.; Lai, S.; Lathrop, M.; Lerch, M.M.; Li, Y.; Liang, T.J.; Lin, J.P.; Loos, R.J.; Martin, N.G.; Moffatt, M.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Munroe, P.B.; Musunuru, K.; Nakamura, Y.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Olafsson, I.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Pouta, A.; Prins, B.P.; Prokopenko, I.; Puls, R.; Ruokonen, A.; Savolainen, M.J.; Schlessinger, D.; Schouten, J.N.; Seedorf, U.; Sen-Chowdhry, S.; Siminovitch, K.A.; Smit, J.H.; Spector, T.D.; Tan, W.; Teslovich, T.M.; Tukiainen, T.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Klauw, M.M. Van der; Vasan, R.S.; Wallace, C.; Wallaschofski, H.; Wichmann, H.E.; Willemsen, G.; Wurtz, P.; Xu, C.; Yerges-Armstrong, L.M.; Abecasis, G.R.; Ahmadi, K.R.; Boomsma, D.I.; Caulfield, M.; Cookson, W.O.; Duijn, C.M. van; Froguel, P.; Matsuda, K.; McCarthy, M.I.; Meisinger, C.; Mooser, V.; Pietilainen, K.H.; Schumann, G.; Snieder, H.; Sternberg, M.J.; Stolk, R.P.; Thomas, H.C.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Uda, M.; Waeber, G.; Wareham, N.J.; Waterworth, D.M.; Watkins, H.; Whitfield, J.B.; Witteman, J.C.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.; Fox, C.S.; Ala-Korpela, M.; Stefansson, K.; Vollenweider, P.; Volzke, H.; Schadt, E.E.; Scott, J.; Jarvelin, M.R.; Elliott, P.; Kooner, J.S.; Heijer, M. den; et al.,

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma are widely used as indicators of liver disease. We carried out a genome-wide association study in 61,089 individuals, identifying 42 loci associated with concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma, of which 32 are new associations (P = 10(-8) to P =

  2. A Comparative Study of the Quality of Teaching Learning Process at Post Graduate Level in the Faculty of Science and Social Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzadi, Uzma; Shaheen, Gulnaz; Shah, Ashfaque Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    The study was intended to compare the quality of teaching learning process in the faculty of social science and science at University of Sargodha. This study was descriptive and quantitative in nature. The objectives of the study were to compare the quality of teaching learning process in the faculty of social science and science at University of…

  3. Plasma Assisted Combustion: Fundamental Studies and Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkowitz, Joseph K.

    Successful and efficient ignition in short residence time environments or ultra-lean mixtures is a key technological challenge for the evolution of advanced combustion devices in terms of both performance and efficiency. To meet this challenge, interest in plasma assisted combustion (PAC) has expanded over the past 20 years. However, understanding of the underlying physical processes of ignition by plasma discharge remains elementary. In order to shed light on the key processes involved, two main thrusts of research were undertaken in this dissertation. First, demonstration of the applicability of plasma discharges in engines and engine-like environments was carried out using a microwave discharge and a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge in an internal combustion engine and a pulsed detonation engine, respectively. Major conclusions include the extension of lean ignition limits for both engines, significant reduction of ignition time for mixtures with large minimum ignition energy, and the discovery of the inter-pulse coupling effect of nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges at high frequency. In order to understand the kinetic processes that led to these improvements, the second thrust of research directly explored the chemical kinetic processes of plasma discharges with hydrocarbon fuels. For this purpose, a low pressure flow reactor with a NRP dielectric barrier discharge cell was assembled. The discharge cell was fitted with a Herriott type multipass mirror arrangement, which allowed quantitative laser absorption spectroscopy to be performed in situ during the plasma discharge. Experiments on methane and ethylene mixtures with oxygen, argon, and helium revealed the importance of low temperature oxidation pathways in PAC. In particular, oxygen addition reactions were shown to be of primary importance in the oxidation of these small hydrocarbons in the temperature range of 300-600 K. Kinetic modeling tools, including both a coupled plasma and

  4. Effective science teachers' professional development: A multiple-case study of district-level science supervisors' perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaben, Chris Jay

    At its heart, science teachers' professional development is about continual growth and improvement (Yager, 2005). Conducting research to understand what constitutes effective professional development is inherently complex (Hewson, 2007). The imperative to link research on professional development to student achievement (Fishman, Marx, Best, & Tal, 2003) increases complexity of research on the topic. These complexities require multiple research approaches and indicate that all stakeholders could provide insights to identify what constitutes effective professional development. District-level science supervisors' voices are missing from the data on effective science teachers' professional development and this provides a potential gap in the literature (Banilower, Heck, & Weiss, 2007; Elmore & Burney, 1999; Shroyer, Miller, Hernandez, & Dunn, 2007). The purpose of this multiple-case study was to gather information from six district-level science supervisors from six different school districts in six different states to gain a deeper understanding of their insights on what constitutes effective professional development. The empirical data examined in this study resulted from interviews, participant drawings, observations, and document review. The major finding was that the district-level science supervisors mostly confirmed what was known in the field. However, this finding could be used in a variety of ways to support future research; such as providing a potential data source to corroborate self-reported teacher survey data. The findings from this study also identified a few nuances to what is known about effective science teachers' professional development research. Specifically, a finding suggests that researchers may need to reconceptualize the amount of time before which science teachers' professional development can impact student achievement. Another nuance identified relates to the, already known, understanding that district-level science supervisors' beliefs

  5. DOE-HEP Final Report for 2013-2016: Studies of plasma wakefields for high repetition-rate plasma collider, and Theoretical study of laser-plasma proton and ion acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsouleas, Thomas C. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Sahai, Aakash A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    2016-08-08

    There were two goals for this funded project: 1. Studies of plasma wakefields for high repetition-rate plasma collider, and 2. Theoretical study of laser-plasma proton and ion acceleration. For goal 1, an analytical model was developed to determine the ion-motion resulting from the interaction of non-linear “blow-out” wakefields excited by beam-plasma and laser-plasma interactions. This is key to understanding the state of the plasma at timescales of 1 picosecond to a few 10s of picoseconds behind the driver-energy pulse. More information can be found in the document. For goal 2, we analytically and computationally analyzed the longitudinal instabilities of the laser-plasma interactions at the critical layer. Specifically, the process of “Doppler-shifted Ponderomotive bunching” is significant to eliminate the very high-energy spread and understand the importance of chirping the laser pulse frequency. We intend to publish the results of the mixing process in 2-D. We intend to publish Chirp-induced transparency. More information can be found in the document.

  6. Langmuir probe study of an inductively coupled magnetic-pole-enhanced helium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younus, Maria; Rehman, N. U.; Shafiq, M.; Naeem, M.; Zaka-ul-Islam, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2017-03-01

    This study reports the effects of RF power and filling gas pressure variation on the plasma parameters, including the electron number density n e , electron temperature T e , plasma potential V p , skin depth δ, and electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) in a low-pressure inductively coupled helium plasma source with magnetic pole enhancement. An RF compensated Langmuir probe is used to measure these plasma parameters. It is observed that the electron number density increases with both the RF power and the filling gas pressure. Conversely, the electron temperature decreases with increasing RF power and gas pressure. It is also noted that, at low RF powers and gas pressures, the EEPFs are non-Maxwellian, while at RF powers of ≥50 W, they evolve into a Maxwellian distribution. The dependences of the skin depth and plasma potential on the RF power are also studied and show a decreasing trend.

  7. A pilot study of muscle plasma protein changes after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlqvist, Julia R; Voss, Line G; Lauridsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin (Mb) do not possess all good qualities as biomarkers of skeletal muscle damage. We investigated the utility of troponin I (TnI) and telethonin (Tcap) as markers and examined their temporal profiles after skeletal muscle damage. METHODS: Plasma...... profiles were measured before and after exercise in 3 groups: subjects affected by either Becker muscular dystrophy or McArdle disease, and healthy subjects. RESULTS: Mb and TnI appeared early in the blood, and the increase of TnI was only observed in patients with muscle disease. The CK increase was more...... delayed in plasma. Tcap was not detectable at any time. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that TnI is a marker of more severe damage signifying sarcomeric damage, and it could therefore be an important supplement to CK and Mb in clinical practice. Tcap is not useful as a marker for skeletal muscle damage....

  8. Determination of actarit from human plasma for bioequivalence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, P; Saraf, M N

    2010-11-01

    An analytical method based on high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (245 nm) was developed for the determination of actarit in human plasma. Coumarin was used as an internal standard. Chromatographic separation was achieved with a C8 column using a mobile phase of methanol: 1% acetic acid (50-50, v/v) with a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min. The calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.1-4.0 μg/ml (r(2) > 0.99) and the lower limit of quantification was 0.1 μg/ml. The method was validated for sensitivity, accuracy, precision, recovery and stability. The method was used to determine the concentration-time profiles of actarit in the plasma following oral administration of 100 mg actarit tablets.

  9. Compound sawtooth study in ohmically heated TFTR plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, H.; McGuire, K.; Colchin, D.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fredrickson, E.; Hill, K.; Kiraly, J.; Pare, V.; Taylor, G.; Sauthoff, N.

    1985-09-01

    Compound sawtooth activity has been observed in ohmically heated, high current, high density TFTR plasmas. Commonly called ''double sawteeth,'' such sequences consist of a repetitive series of subordinate relaxations followed by a main relaxation with a different inversion radius. The period of such compound sawteeth can be as long as 100 msec. In other cases, however, no compound sawteeth or bursts of them can be observed in discharges with essentially the same parameters.

  10. Teaching Mathematical Modelling for Earth Sciences via Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin-She

    2010-05-01

    Mathematical modelling is becoming crucially important for earth sciences because the modelling of complex systems such as geological, geophysical and environmental processes requires mathematical analysis, numerical methods and computer programming. However, a substantial fraction of earth science undergraduates and graduates may not have sufficient skills in mathematical modelling, which is due to either limited mathematical training or lack of appropriate mathematical textbooks for self-study. In this paper, we described a detailed case-study-based approach for teaching mathematical modelling. We illustrate how essential mathematical skills can be developed for students with limited training in secondary mathematics so that they are confident in dealing with real-world mathematical modelling at university level. We have chosen various topics such as Airy isostasy, greenhouse effect, sedimentation and Stokes' flow,free-air and Bouguer gravity, Brownian motion, rain-drop dynamics, impact cratering, heat conduction and cooling of the lithosphere as case studies; and we use these step-by-step case studies to teach exponentials, logarithms, spherical geometry, basic calculus, complex numbers, Fourier transforms, ordinary differential equations, vectors and matrix algebra, partial differential equations, geostatistics and basic numeric methods. Implications for teaching university mathematics for earth scientists for tomorrow's classroom will also be discussed. Refereces 1) D. L. Turcotte and G. Schubert, Geodynamics, 2nd Edition, Cambridge University Press, (2002). 2) X. S. Yang, Introductory Mathematics for Earth Scientists, Dunedin Academic Press, (2009).

  11. 75 FR 79446 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation... (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation Committee will be held on January 13, 2011, at The...

  12. A mechanistic study to increase understanding of titanium dioxide nanoparticles-increased plasma glucose in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hailong; Li, Li; Guo, Qian; Jin, Sanli; Zhou, Ying; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong; Gu, Ning

    2016-09-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO2 NP) is an authorized food additive. Previous studies determined oral administration of TiO2 NPs increases plasma glucose in mice via inducing insulin resistance. An increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been considered the possible mechanism of increasing plasma glucose. However, persistently high plasma glucose is also a mechanism of increasing ROS. This study aims to explore whether TiO2 NPs increase plasma glucose via ROS. We found after oral administration of TiO2 NPs, an increase in ROS preceded an increase in plasma glucose. Subsequently, mice were treated with two antioxidants (resveratrol and vitamin E) at the same time as oral administration of TiO2 NPs. Results showed resveratrol and vitamin E reduced TiO2 NPs-increased ROS. An increase in plasma glucose was also inhibited. Further research showed resveratrol and vitamin E inhibited the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6, and the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK, resulting in improved insulin resistance. These results suggest TiO2 NPs increased ROS levels, and then ROS activated inflammatory cytokines and phosphokinases, and thus induced insulin resistance, resulting in an increase in plasma glucose. Resveratrol and vitamin E can reduce TiO2 NPs-increased ROS and thereby inhibit an increase in plasma glucose in mice.

  13. The kinetic studies of direct methane oxidation to methanol in the plasma process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    INDARTO Antonius; CHOI Jae-Wook; LEE Hwaung; SONG Hyung Keun

    2008-01-01

    The research outlined here includes a study of methanol production from direct methane conversion by means of thermal and plasma method. The kinetic study, derived from thermal-based approach, was carried out to investigate thoroughly the possible intermediate species likely to be presented in the process. A set of plasma experiments was undertaken by using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), classified as non-thermal plasma, done at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Plasma proc-ess yields more methanol than thermal process at the same methane conversion rates and methane to oxygen feed ratios. Oxidation reaction of thermal process resulted CO and CO2 as the most dominant products and the selectivity reached 19% and 68%, respectively. Moreover, more CO and less CO2 were produced in plasma process than in thermal process. The selectivity of CO and CO2 by plasma was 47% and 20%, respectively. Ethane (C2H6) was detected as the only higher hydrocarbon with a signifi-cant concentration. The concentration of ethane reached 9% of the total products in plasma process and 17% in thermal process. The maximum selectivity of methanol, the target material of this research, was 12% obtained by plasma method and less than 5% by thermal process. In some certain points, the kinetic model closely matched with the experimental results.

  14. Semantic e-Science in Space Physics - A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narock, T.; Yoon, V.; Merka, J.; Szabo, A.

    2009-05-01

    Several search and retrieval systems for space physics data are currently under development in NASA's heliophysics data environment. We present a case study of two such systems, and describe our efforts in implementing an ontology to aid in data discovery. In doing so we highlight the various aspects of knowledge representation and show how they led to our ontology design, creation, and implementation. We discuss advantages that scientific reasoning allows, as well as difficulties encountered in current tools and standards. Finally, we present a space physics research project conducted with and without e-Science and contrast the two approaches.

  15. What K-12 Teachers of Earth Science Need from the Earth Science Research Community: Science Teaching and Professional Learning in the Earth Sciences (STAPLES), a Minnesota Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, K. M.; Pound, K. S.; Rosok, K.; Baumtrog, J.

    2009-12-01

    NSF-style Broader Impacts activities in the Earth Sciences take many forms, from long term partnerships between universities and informal science institutions to one-time K-12 classroom visits by scientists. Broader Impacts that include K-12 teachers range from those that convey broad Earth Science concepts to others stressing direct connections to very specific current research methods and results. Design of these programs is often informed by prior successful models and a broad understanding of teacher needs, but is not specifically designed to address needs expressed by teachers themselves. In order to better understand teachers’ perceived needs for connections to Earth Science research, we have formed the Science Teaching and Professional Learning in the Earth Sciences (STAPLES) research team. Our team includes a geology faculty member experienced in undergraduate and professional Earth Science teacher training, two in-service middle school Earth Science teachers, and the Education Director of the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics (NCED), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center. Members of the team have designed, taught and experienced many of these models, from the Andrill ARISE program to NCED’s summer institutes and teacher internship program. We are administering the STAPLES survey to ask Earth Science teachers in our own state (Minnesota) which of many models they use to 1) strengthen their own understanding of current Earth Science research and general Earth Science concepts and 2) deepen their students’ understanding of Earth Science content. Our goal is to share survey results to inform more effective Broader Impacts programs in Minnesota and to stimulate a wider national discussion of effective Broader Impacts programs that includes teachers’ voices.

  16. Information-Seeking Behavior and Use of Social Science Faculty Studying Stateless Nations: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    The information-seeking behavior of social science faculty studying the Kurds was assessed using a questionnaire, citation analysis, and follow-up inquiry. Two specific questions were addressed: how these faculty locate relevant government information and what factors influence their seeking behavior and use of such information. Results show that besides using traditional methods for locating relevant government information, social science faculty studying the Kurds use the World Wide Web and...

  17. Stability studies of plasma modification effects of polylactide and polycaprolactone surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraczewski, Krzysztof; Stepczyńska, Magdalena; Malinowski, Rafał; Rytlewski, Piotr; Jagodziński, Bartłomiej; Żenkiewicz, Marian

    2016-07-01

    The article presents results of research on the stability of oxygen plasma modification effects of polylactide and polycaprolactone surface layers. The modified samples were aged for three, six or nine weeks. The studies were carried out using scanning electron microscopy, goniometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Studies have shown that the plasma modification has significant impact on the geometric structure and chemical composition of the surface, wettability and surface energy of tested polymers. The modification effects are not permanent. It has been observed that over time the effects of plasma modification fade. Studies have shown that modifying effect lasts longer in the case of polycaprolactone.

  18. Plasma test on industrial diamond powder in hydrogen and air for fracture strength study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, Rohit Asuri Sudharshana

    Diamonds are the most precious material all over the world. Ever since their discovery, the desire for natural diamonds has been great; recently, the demand has steeply increased, leading to scarcity. For example, in 2010, diamonds worth $50 billion were marketed. This increased demand has led to discovering alternative sources to replace diamonds. The diamond, being the hardest material on earth, could be replaced with no other material except another diamond. Thus, the industrial or synthetic diamond was invented. Because of extreme hardness is one of diamond's properties, diamonds are used in cutting operations. The fracture strength of diamond is one of the crucial factors that determine its life time as a cutting tool. Glow discharge is one of the techniques used for plasma formation. The glow discharge process is conducted in a vacuum chamber by ionizing gas atoms. Ions penetrate into the atomic structure, ejecting a secondary electron. The objective of this study is to determine the change in fracture strength of industrial diamond powder before and after plasma treatment. This study focuses mainly on the change in crystal defects and crushing strength (CS) of industrial diamond powder after the penetration of hydrogen gas, air and hydrogen-air mixture ions into the sample powder. For this study, an industrial diamond powder sample of 100 carats weight, along with its average fracture strength value was received from Engis Corporation, Illinois. The sample was divided into parts, each weighing 10-12 carats. At the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), a plasma test was conducted on six sample parts for a total of 16 hours on each part. The three gas types mentioned above were used during plasma tests, with the pressure in vacuum chamber between 200 mTorr and 2 Torr. The plasma test on four sample parts was in the presence of hydrogen-air mixture. The first sample had chamber pressures between 200 mTorr and 400 mTorr. The remaining three samples had chamber

  19. A statistical study on the correlations between plasma sheet and solar wind based on DSP explorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Q. Yan

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available By using the data of two spacecraft, TC-1 and ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer, a statistical study on the correlations between plasma sheet and solar wind has been carried out. The results obtained show that the plasma sheet at geocentric distances of about 9~13.4 Re has an apparent driving relationship with the solar wind. It is found that (1 there is a positive correlation between the duskward component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF and the duskward component of the geomagnetic field in the plasma sheet, with a proportionality constant of about 1.09. It indicates that the duskward component of the IMF can effectively penetrate into the near-Earth plasma sheet, and can be amplified by sunward convection in the corresponding region at geocentric distances of about 9~13.4 Re; (2 the increase in the density or the dynamic pressure of the solar wind will generally lead to the increase in the density of the plasma sheet; (3 the ion thermal pressure in the near-Earth plasma sheet is significantly controlled by the dynamic pressure of solar wind; (4 under the northward IMF condition, the ion temperature and ion thermal pressure in the plasma sheet decrease as the solar wind speed increases. This feature indicates that plasmas in the near-Earth plasma sheet can come from the magnetosheath through the LLBL. Northward IMF is one important condition for the transport of the cold plasmas of the magnetosheath into the plasma sheet through the LLBL, and fast solar wind will enhance such a transport process.

  20. Science for Survival: The Modern Synthesis of Evolution and The Biological Sciences Curriculum Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lisa Anne

    In this historical dissertation, I examined the process of curriculum development in the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) in the United States during the period 1959-1963. The presentation of evolution in the high school texts was based on a more robust form of Darwinian evolution which developed during the 1930s and 1940s called "the modern synthesis of evolution." Building primarily on the work of historians Vassiliki Smocovitis and John L. Rudolph, I used the archival papers and published writings of the four architects of the modern synthesis and the four most influential leaders of the BSCS in regards to evolution to investigate how the modern synthetic theory of evolution shaped the BSCS curriculum. The central question was "Why was evolution so important to the BSCS to make it the central theme of the texts?" Important answers to this question had already been offered in the historiography, but it was still not clear why every citizen in the world needed to understand evolution. I found that the emphasis on natural selection in the modern synthesis shifted the focus away from humans as passive participants to the recognition that humans are active agents in their own cultural and biological evolution. This required re-education of the world citizenry, which was accomplished in part by the BSCS textbooks. I also found that BSCS leaders Grobman, Glass, and Muller had serious concerns regarding the effects of nuclear radiation on the human gene pool, and were actively involved in informing th public. Lastly, I found that concerns of 1950s reform eugenicists were addressed in the BSCS textbooks, without mentioning eugenics by name. I suggest that the leaders of the BSCS, especially Bentley Glass and Hermann J. Muller, thought that students needed to understand genetics and evolution to be able to make some of the tough choices they might be called on to make as the dominant species on earth and the next reproductive generation in the nuclear age. This

  1. Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge in Water without Bubbles: A Fundamental Study of Initiation, Propagation and Plasma Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seepersad, Yohan

    The state of plasma is widely known as a gas-phase phenomenon, but plasma in liquids have also received significant attention over the last century. Generating plasma in liquids however is theoretically challenging, and this problem is often overcome via liquid-gas phase transition preceding the actual plasma formation. In this sense, plasma forms in gas bubbles in the liquid. Recent work at the Drexel Plasma Institute has shown that nanosecond pulsed electric fields can initiate plasma in liquids without any initial cavitation phase, at voltages below theoretical direct-ionization thresholds. This unique regime is poorly understood and does not fit into any current descriptive mechanisms. As with all new phenomena, a complete fundamental description is paramount to understanding its usefulness to practical applications. The primary goals of this research were to qualitatively and quantitatively understand the phenomenon of nanosecond pulsed discharge in liquids as a means to characterizing properties that may open up niche application possibilities. Analysis of the plasma was based on experimental results from non-invasive, sub-nanosecond time-resolved optical diagnostics, including direct imaging, transmission imaging (Schlieren and shadow), and optical emission spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of the plasma were studied as a function of variations in the electric field amplitude and polarity, liquid permittivity, and pulse duration. It was found that the plasma size and emission intensity was dependent on the permittivity of the liquid, as well as the voltage polarity, and the structure and dynamics were explained by a 'cold-lightning' mechanism. The under-breakdown dynamics at the liquid-electrode interface were investigated by transmission imaging to provide evidence for a novel mechanism for initiation based on the electrostriction. This mechanism was proposed by collaborators on the project and developed alongside the experimental work in this

  2. Assessment of the Forensic Sciences Profession: A Legal Study Concerning the Forensic Sciences Personnel. Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Oliver, Jr.

    The place and function of forensic sciences personnel in American criminal law and court procedure, and the criteria used by criminal trial judges and lawyers to assess the value of forensic sciences personnel were investigated. Federal, state, Virgin Island, and Puerto Rican laws were examined, and a search of the medical and legal literature…

  3. Science-Relevant Curiosity Expression and Interest in Science: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Megan R.; Hsi, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    In efforts to understand and promote long-term interest in science, much work has focused on measuring students' interest in topics of science, typically with surveys. This approach has challenges, as interest in a topic may not necessarily indicate interest in scientific practices and pursuits. An underexplored and perhaps productive way to…

  4. The Black Cultural Ethos and science teachers' practices: A case study exploring how four high school science teachers meet their African American students' needs in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Samantha L.

    The underachievement of African American students in science has been a persistent problem in science education. The achievement patterns of African American students indicate that researchers must take a closer look at the types of practices that are being used to meet these students' needs in science classrooms. Determining why science teachers decide to employ certain practices in their classrooms begins with a careful examination of teachers' beliefs as well as their instructional approaches. The purpose of this study was to explore four urban high school science teachers' beliefs about their African American students' learning needs and to investigate how these teachers go about addressing students' needs in science classrooms. This research study also explored the extent to which teachers' practices aligned with the nine dimensions of an established cultural instructional theory, namely the Black Cultural Ethos. Qualitative research methods were employed to gather data from the four teachers. Artifact data were collected from the teachers and they were interviewed and observed. Believing that their students had academic-related needs as well as needs tied to their learning preferences, the four science teachers employed a variety of instructional strategies to meet their students where they were in learning. Overall, the instructional strategies that the teachers employed to meet their students' needs aligned with five of the nine tenets of the Black Cultural Ethos theory.

  5. A Meta-Synthesis of Turkish Studies in Science Process Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Murat; Çalik, Muammer; Özmen, Haluk

    2016-01-01

    This study thematically evaluates Turkish studies in science process skills (SPS) from 2000 to 2015. In looking for SPS studies, the authors entered the keywords "process skills, science process skills, science education and Turkey/Turkish" in well-known databases (i.e., Academic Search Complete, Education Research Complete, ERIC, and…

  6. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina, E-mail: sinajahanbakhsh@gmail.com; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bogazici University, Istanbul 34342 (Turkey)

    2016-02-15

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  7. Numerical and experimental study on a pulsed-dc plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X. Y.; Pei, X. K.; Lu, X. P.; Liu, D. W.

    2014-06-01

    A numerical and experimental study of plasma jet propagation in a low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure, helium jet in ambient air is presented. A self-consistent, multi-species, two-dimensional axially symmetric plasma model with detailed finite-rate chemistry of helium-air mixture composition is used to provide insights into the propagation of the plasma jet. The obtained simulation results suggest that the sheath forms near the dielectric tube inner surface and shields the plasma channel from the tube surface. The strong electric field at the edge of the dielectric field enhances the ionization in the air mixing layer; therefore, the streamer head becomes ring-shaped when the streamer runs out of the tube. The avalanche-to-streamer transition is the main mechanism of streamer advancement. Penning ionization dominates the ionization reactions and increases the electrical conductivity of the plasma channel. The simulation results are supported by experimental observations under similar discharge conditions.

  8. Development of a long pulse plasma gun discharge for magnetic turbulence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, David

    2016-10-01

    A long pulse ( 300 μs) plasma gun discharge is in development at the Bryn Mawr College Plasma Laboratory for the production of sustained magnetized plasma injection for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence studies. An array of eight 0.5mF parallel capacitors are used to create a pulse-forming-network (PFN) with a plateaued current output of 50kA for at least 200 of the 300 μs pulse. A 24cm inner diameter plasma gun provides stuffing flux fields at the stuffing threshold in order to allow for the continuous injection of magnetic helicity. Plasma is injected into a 24cm diameter flux-conserving aluminum chamber with a high density port array for fine spatial resolution diagnostic access. Fluctuations of magnetic field and saturation current are measured using pickup probes and Langmuir probes respectively.

  9. Study on Propagation Characteristics of Plasma Surface Wave in Medium Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shiqing; YAN Zelin; LI Wenzhong; LIU Jian; LI Jian; XU Lingfei

    2008-01-01

    Axial propagation characteristics of the axisymmetric surface wave along the plasma in the medium tube were studied. The expressions of electromagnetic field inside and outside the medium tube were deduced. Also, the impacts of several factors, such as plasma density, signal frequency, inner radius of medium tube, collision frequency, etc., on plasma surface wave propa-gation were numerically simulated. The results show that, the properties of plasma with higher density and .lower gas pressure are closer to those of metal conductor. Furthermore, larger radius of medium tube and lower signal frequency are better for surface wave propagation. However, the effect of collision frequency is not obvious. The optimized experimental parameters can be chosen as the plasma density of about 1017 m-3 and the medium radius between 11 mm and 19 mm.

  10. Microwave Diagnostics for Studies of Electromagnetic Scattering by Fluorescent Lamp Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang HE; Jian-ping CHEN; Ying WU; Yu-dong CHEN; Xiao-jun ZENC; Hai-chao QIN; Xiao-wu NI

    2010-01-01

    This gaper reports a related microwave diagnostic method that measures both the electron number density and the electron-neutral collision frequency,which are crucial to understand the behavior of microwave traveling in plasma.Arrays of standard commerci fluorescent lamp placed directly against each other in two rows are used to peoduce a plasma layer.Attenuations of microwave by plasma layer are studied experimentally in the frequencies of 1~8 GHz using a synthesized signal generator and a spectrum analyzer.Two wave-polarizations are under investigation:electric field of the wave is either parallel(E-wave)or perprndicular(H-wave)to the fluorescent lamp axis.The electron number density and the electron-neutral collision frequensy of fluorescent lamp plasma are obtained by microwave diagnstics,for the purpose of analyzing microwave scattering characteristics by plasma.

  11. An interactional ethnographic study of the construction of literate practices of science and writing in a university science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Nuno Afonso De Freitas Lopes De

    An interactional ethnographic study informed by a sociocultural perspective was conducted to examine how a professor and students discursively and interactionally shaped the basis for engaging in the work of a community of geologists. Specifically, the study examined the role the Question of the Day, an interactive writing activity in the lecture, in affording students opportunities for learning the literate practices of science and how to incorporate them in thinking critically. A writing-intensive, introductory oceanography course given in the Geological Sciences Department was chosen because the professor designed it to emphasize writing in the discipline and science literacy within a science inquiry framework. The study was conducted in two phases: a pilot in 2002 and the current study in the Spring Quarter of 2003. Grounded in the view that members in a classroom construct a culture, this study explored the daily construction of the literate practices of science and writing. This view of classrooms was informed by four bodies of research: interactional ethnography, sociolinguistics sociology of science and Writing In the Disciplines. Through participant observation, data were collected in the lecture and laboratory settings in the form of field notes, video, interviews, and artifacts to explore issues of science literacy in discourse, social action, and writing. Examination of participation in the Question of the Day interactive writing activity revealed that it played a key role in initiating and supporting a view of science and inquiry. As the activity permitted collaboration, it encouraged students to engage in the social process to critically explore a discourse of science and key practices with and through their writing. In daily interaction, participants were shown to take up social positions as scientist and engage in science inquiry to explore theory, examine data, and articulately reformulate knowledge in making oral and written scientific arguments

  12. Experimental and numerical studies of microwave-plasma interaction in a MWPECVD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, A.; Velardi, L.; Taccogna, F.; Cicala, G.

    2016-12-01

    This work deals with and proposes a simple and compact diagnostic method able to characterize the interaction between microwave and plasma without the necessity of using an external diagnostic tool. The interaction between 2.45 GHz microwave and plasma, in a typical ASTeX-type reactor, is investigated from experimental and numerical view points. The experiments are performed by considering plasmas of three different gas mixtures: H2, CH4-H2 and CH4-H2-N2. The two latter are used to deposit synthetic undoped and n-doped diamond films. The experimental setup equipped with a matching network enables the measurements of very low reflected power. The reflected powers show ripples due to the mismatching between wave and plasma impedance. Specifically, the three types of plasma exhibit reflected power values related to the variation of electron-neutral collision frequency among the species by changing the gas mixture. The different gas mixtures studied are also useful to test the sensitivity of the reflected power measurements to the change of plasma composition. By means of a numerical model, only the interaction of microwave and H2 plasma is examined allowing the estimation of plasma and matching network impedances and of reflected power that is found about eighteen times higher than that measured.

  13. Experimental and numerical studies of microwave-plasma interaction in a MWPECVD reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Massaro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with and proposes a simple and compact diagnostic method able to characterize the interaction between microwave and plasma without the necessity of using an external diagnostic tool. The interaction between 2.45 GHz microwave and plasma, in a typical ASTeX-type reactor, is investigated from experimental and numerical view points. The experiments are performed by considering plasmas of three different gas mixtures: H2, CH4-H2 and CH4-H2-N2. The two latter are used to deposit synthetic undoped and n-doped diamond films. The experimental setup equipped with a matching network enables the measurements of very low reflected power. The reflected powers show ripples due to the mismatching between wave and plasma impedance. Specifically, the three types of plasma exhibit reflected power values related to the variation of electron-neutral collision frequency among the species by changing the gas mixture. The different gas mixtures studied are also useful to test the sensitivity of the reflected power measurements to the change of plasma composition. By means of a numerical model, only the interaction of microwave and H2 plasma is examined allowing the estimation of plasma and matching network impedances and of reflected power that is found about eighteen times higher than that measured.

  14. Development of a high energy pulsed plasma simulator for the study of liquid lithium trenches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, S., E-mail: jung73@illinois.edu [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana 61801 (United States); Christenson, M.; Curreli, D. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana 61801 (United States); Bryniarski, C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana 61801 (United States); Andruczyk, D.; Ruzic, D.N. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana 61801 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A pulse device for a liquid lithium trench study is developed. • It consists of a coaxial plasma gun, a theta pinch, and guiding magnets. • A large energy enhancement is observed with the use of the plasma gun. • A further increase in energy and velocity is observed with the theta pinch. - Abstract: To simulate detrimental events in a tokamak and provide a test-stand for a liquid-lithium infused trench (LiMIT) device [1], a pulsed plasma source utilizing a theta pinch in conjunction with a coaxial plasma accelerator has been developed. The plasma is characterized using a triple Langmuir probe, optical methods, and a calorimeter. Clear advantages have been observed with the application of a coaxial plasma accelerator as a pre-ionization source. The experimental results of the plasma gun in conjunction with the existing theta pinch show a significant improvement from the previous energy deposition by a factor of 14 or higher, resulting in a maximum energy and heat flux of 0.065 ± 0.002 MJ/m{sup 2} and 0.43 ± 0.01 GW/m{sup 2}. A few ways to further increase the plasma heat flux for LiMIT experiments are discussed.

  15. A Study of Impedance Relationships in Dual Frequency PECVD Process Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Douglas; Augustyniak, Edward; Sakiyama, Yukinori; Pecvd/Ald Team

    2016-09-01

    Commercial plasma process reactors are commonly operated with a very limited suite of on-board plasma diagnostics. However, as process demands advance so has the need for detailed plasma monitoring and diagnosis. The VI probe is one of the few instruments commonly available for this task. We present a study of voltage, current, impedance and phase trends acquired by off-the-shelf VI probes in Dual Frequency (DF) 400 kHz/13.56MHz capacitively-coupled plasma (CCP) as typically used for Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD). These plasmas typically operate at pressures from 1 to 5 Torr and at RF power levels of 3 W/cm2. Interpretation of DF VI probe impedance trends is challenging. Non-linear interactions are known to exist in plasma impedance scaling with low and high frequency RF power. Simple capacitive sheath models typically do not simultaneously reproduce the impedance observed at each drive frequency. This work will compare VI probe observed DF CCP impedance tends with plasma fluid simulation. Also explored is the agreement seen with sheath models presently available in the literature. Prospects for the creation of useful equivalent circuit models is also discussed.

  16. Hispanic Women Overcoming Deterrents to Computer Science: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herling, Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    The products of computer science are important to all aspects of society and are tools in the solution of the world's problems. It is, therefore, troubling that the United States faces a shortage in qualified graduates in computer science. The number of women and minorities in computer science is significantly lower than the percentage of the…

  17. Hispanic Women Overcoming Deterrents to Computer Science: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herling, Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    The products of computer science are important to all aspects of society and are tools in the solution of the world's problems. It is, therefore, troubling that the United States faces a shortage in qualified graduates in computer science. The number of women and minorities in computer science is significantly lower than the percentage of the…

  18. Turbulence in magnetized plasmas and financial markets: comparative study of multifractal statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaev, V. P.

    2004-12-01

    The turbulence in magnetized plasma and financial data of Russian market have been studied in terms of the multifractal formalism revisited with wavelets. The multifractal formalism based on wavelet calculations allows one to study the scaling properties of turbulent fluctuations. It is observed that both plasma edge turbulence in fusion devices and Russian financial markets demonstrate multifractal statistics, i.e., the scaling behaviour of absolute moments is described by a convex function. Multifractality parameter defined in multiplicative cacade model, seems to be of the same magnitude for the plasma and financial time series considered in this paper.

  19. Planetary Science Technology Infusion Study: Findings and Recommendations Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David J.; Sandifer, Carl E., II; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Vento, Daniel M.; Zakrajsek, June F.

    2014-01-01

    The Planetary Science Division (PSD) within the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) Science Mission Directorate (SMD) at NASA Headquarters sought to understand how to better realize a scientific return on spacecraft system technology investments currently being funded. In order to achieve this objective, a team at NASA Glenn Research Center was tasked with surveying the science and mission communities to collect their insight on technology infusion and additionally sought inputs from industry, universities, and other organizations involved with proposing for future PSD missions. This survey was undertaken by issuing a Request for Information (RFI) activity that requested input from the proposing community on present technology infusion efforts. The Technology Infusion Study was initiated in March 2013 with the release of the RFI request. The evaluation team compiled and assessed this input in order to provide PSD with recommendations on how to effectively infuse new spacecraft systems technologies that it develops into future competed missions enabling increased scientific discoveries, lower mission cost, or both. This team is comprised of personnel from the Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program and the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Program staff.The RFI survey covered two aspects of technology infusion: 1) General Insight, including: their assessment of barriers to technology infusion as related to infusion approach; technology readiness; information and documentation products; communication; integration considerations; interaction with technology development areas; cost-capped mission areas; risk considerations; system level impacts and implementation; and mission pull. 2) Specific technologies from the most recent PSD Announcements of Opportunities (AOs): The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), aerocapture and aeroshell hardware technologies, the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, and the

  20. Laser Diagnostics Study of Plasma Assisted Combustion for Scramjet Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    treatment of the fuel or reactants into hydrogen rich syngas prior to thermal oxidation [11-12], enhanced ignition of hydrocarbon fuels [9,13-14...dramatically, and a significant rise of OH in the post combustion gas region is evident. It is 532 nm Power Supply N d: YA G L as er Dye Laser...plasma, ne~1014-1015 cm-3). The power supply is a 2 kW magnetron (2.45 GHz), although no more than 40 W seems to be required for most test conditions due