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Sample records for plasma scaling laws

  1. Scaling laws in magnetized plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-28

    Interactions of plasma motion with magnetic fields occur in nature and in the laboratory in an impressively broad range of scales, from megaparsecs in astrophysical systems to centimeters in fusion devices. The fact that such an enormous array of phenomena can be effectively studied lies in the existence of fundamental scaling laws in plasma turbulence, which allow one to scale the results of analytic and numerical modeling to the sized of galaxies, velocities of supernovae explosions, or magnetic fields in fusion devices. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provides the simplest framework for describing magnetic plasma turbulence. Recently, a number of new features of MHD turbulence have been discovered and an impressive array of thought-provoking phenomenological theories have been put forward. However, these theories have conflicting predictions, and the currently available numerical simulations are not able to resolve the contradictions. MHD turbulence exhibits a variety of regimes unusual in regular hydrodynamic turbulence. Depending on the strength of the guide magnetic field it can be dominated by weakly interacting Alfv\\'en waves or strongly interacting wave packets. At small scales such turbulence is locally anisotropic and imbalanced (cross-helical). In a stark contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, which tends to ``forget'' global constrains and become uniform and isotropic at small scales, MHD turbulence becomes progressively more anisotropic and unbalanced at small scales. Magnetic field plays a fundamental role in turbulent dynamics. Even when such a field is not imposed by external sources, it is self-consistently generated by the magnetic dynamo action. This project aims at a comprehensive study of universal regimes of magnetic plasma turbulence, combining the modern analytic approaches with the state of the art numerical simulations. The proposed study focuses on the three topics: weak MHD turbulence, which is relevant for laboratory devices

  2. Scaling and laws of DC discharges as pointers for HiPIMS plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Maszl, Christian; von Keudell, Achim; Störi, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Scaling or smiliarity laws of plasmas are of interest if lab size plasma sources are to be scaled for industrial processes. Ideally, the discharge parameters of the scaled plasmas are predictable and the fundamental physical processes are unaltered. Naturally, there are limitations and ranges of validity. Scaling laws for direct current glow discharges are well known. If a well diagnosed discharge is scaled, the field strength in the positive column, the gas amplification and the normal current density can easily be estimated. For non-stationary high power discharges like high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) plasmas, scaling is not as straight forward. Here, one deals with a non-stationary complex system with strong changes in plasma chemistry and symmetry breaks during the pulses. Because of the huge parameter space no good parameters are available to define these kind of discharges unambiguous at the moment. In this contribution we will discuss the scaling laws for DC glow discharges briefly and...

  3. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  4. Exact scaling laws for helical three-dimensional two-fluid turbulent plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andrés, Nahuel; Sahraoui, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    We derive exact scaling laws for a three-dimensional incompressible helical two-fluid plasma, without the assumption of isotropy. For each ideal invariant of the two-fluid model, i.e. the total energy, the electron helicity and the proton helicity, we derive simple scaling laws in terms of two-point increments correlation functions expressed in terms of the velocity field of each species and the magnetic field. These variables are appropriate for comparison with \\textit{in-situ} measurements in the solar wind at different spatial ranges and data from numerical simulations. Finally, with the exact scaling laws and dimensional analysis we predict the magnetic energy and electron helicity spectra for different ranges of scales.

  5. Numerical Experiments on Oxygen Plasma Focus: Scaling Laws of Soft X-Ray Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akel, M.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical experiments have been investigated on UNU/ICTP PFF low energy plasma focus device with oxygen filling gas. In these numerical experiments, the temperature window of 119-260 eV has been used as a suitable temperature range for generating oxygen soft X-rays. The Lee model was applied to characterize the UNU/ICTP PFF plasma focus. The optimum soft X-ray yield (Ysxr) was found to be 0.75 J, with the corresponding efficiency of about 0.03 % at pressure of 2.36 Torr and the end axial speed was va = 5 cm/μs. The practical optimum combination of p0, z0 and `a' for oxygen Ysxr was found to be 0.69 Torr, 4.8 cm and 2.366 cm respectively, with the outer radius b = 3.2 cm. This combination gives Ysxr ~ 5 J, with the corresponding efficiency of about 0.16 %. Thus we expect to increase the oxygen Ysxr of UNU/ICTP PFF, without changing the capacitor bank, merely by changing the electrode configuration and operating pressure. Scaling laws on oxygen soft X-ray yield, in terms of storage energies E0, peak discharge current Ipeak and focus pinch current Ipinch were found over the range from 1 kJ to 1 MJ. It was found that the oxygen soft X-ray yields scale well with and for the low inductance (L0 = 30 nH) (where yields are in J and currents in kA). While the soft X-ray yield scaling laws in terms of storage energies were found to be as (E0 in kJ and Ysxr in J) with the scaling showing gradual deterioration as E0 rises over the range. The oxygen soft X-ray yield emitted from plasma focus is found to be about 8.7 kJ for storage energy of 1 MJ. The optimum efficiency for soft X-ray yield (1.1 %) is with capacitor bank energy of 120 kJ. This indicates that oxygen plasma focus is a good soft X-ray source when properly designed.

  6. Temperature dynamics and velocity scaling laws for interchange driven, warm ion plasma filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jeppe; Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The influence of electron and ion temperature dynamics on the radial convection of isolated structures in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated by means of numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that the maximum radial velocity of these plasma blobs roughly follows the inertial velocity scaling, which is proportional to the ion acoustic speed times the square root of the filament particle density times the sum of the electron and ion temperature perturbations. Only for small blobs the cross field convection does not follow this scaling. The influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the cross-field blob convection is shown not to depend strongly on the dynamical ion temperature field. The blob dynamics of constant finite and dynamical ion temperature blobs is similar. When the blob size is on the order of 10 times the ion Larmor radius the blobs stay coherent and decelerate slowly compared to larger blobs which dissipate faster due to fragmentation and turbulent mixing.

  7. Extended scaling and Paschen law for micro-sized radiofrequency plasma breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Uk; Lee, Jimo; Lee, Jae Koo; Yun, Gunsu S.

    2017-03-01

    The single particle motion analysis and particle-in-cell merged with Monte Carlo collision (PIC/MCC) simulations are compared to explain substantial breakdown voltage reduction for helium microwave discharge above a critical frequency corresponding to the transition from the drift-dominant to the diffusion-dominant electron loss regime. The single particle analysis suggests that the transition frequency is proportional to the product of {p}-{m} and {d}-({m+1)} where p is the neutral gas pressure, d is the gap distance, and m is a numerical parameter, which is confirmed by the PIC simulation. In the low-frequency or drift-dominant regime, i.e., γ - {{r}}{{e}}{{g}}{{i}}{{m}}{{e}}, the secondary electron emission induced by ion drift motion is the key parameter for determining the breakdown voltage. The fluid analysis including the secondary emission coefficient, γ , induces the extended Paschen law that implies the breakdown voltage is determined by pd, f/p, γ , and d/R where f is the frequency of the radio or microwave frequency source, and R is the diameter of electrode. The extended Paschen law reproduces the same scaling law for the transition frequency and is confirmed by the independent PIC and fluid simulations.

  8. Knowing the dense plasma focus - The coming of age (of the PF) with broad-ranging scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2017-03-01

    The dense plasma focus is blessed not only with copious multi-radiations ranging from electron and ion beams, x-rays both soft and hard, fusion neutrons D-D and D-T but also with the property of enhanced compression from radiative collapse leading to HED (high energy density) states. The Lee code has been used in extensive systematic numerical experiments tied to reality through fitting with measured current waveforms and verified through comparison of measured and computed yields and measurements of multi-radiation. The studies have led to establishment of scaling laws with respect to storage energy, discharge current and pinch currents for fusion neutrons, characteristic soft x-rays, all-line radiation and ion beams. These are summarized here together with a first-time presentation of a scaling law of radiatively enhanced compression as a function of atomic number of operational gas. This paper emphasizes that such a broad range of scaling laws signals the coming of age of the DPF and presents a reference platform for planning the many potential applications such as in advanced SXR lithography, materials synthesizing and testing, medical isotopes, imaging and energy and high energy density (HED).

  9. Temperature dynamics and velocity scaling laws for interchange driven, warm ion plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jeppe Miki Busk; Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2016-01-01

    The influence of electron and ion temperature dynamics on the radial convection of isolated structures in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated by means of numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that the maximum radial velocity of these plasma blobs roughly follows the inertial velocit...

  10. Morphological study of polymer surfaces exposed to non-thermal plasma based on contact angle and the use of scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, T.; Cassini, F. A.; Benetoli, L. O. B.; Dotto, M. E. R.; Debacher, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    The experiments presented in this communication have the purpose to elaborate an explanation for the morphological evolution of the growth of polymeric surfaces provided by the treatment of non-thermal plasma. According to the roughness analysis and the model proposed by scaling laws it is possible relate to a predictable or merely random effect. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly(etherether)ketone (PEEK) samples were exposed to a non-thermal plasma discharge and the resulting surfaces roughness were analyzed based on the measurements from contact angle, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy coupled with scaling laws analysis which can help to describe and understand the dynamic of formation of a wide variety of rough surfaces. The roughness, RRMS (RMS- Root Mean Square) values for polymer surface range between 19.8 nm and 110.9 nm. The contact angle and the AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) measurements as a function of the plasma exposure time were in agreement with both polar and dispersive components according to the surface roughness and also with the morphology evaluated described by Wolf-Villain model, with proximate values of α between 0.91(PET) and 0.88(PEEK), β = 0.25(PET) and z = 3,64(PET).

  11. Fundamental Scaling Laws in Nanophotonics

    OpenAIRE

    Ke Liu; Shuai Sun; Arka Majumdar; Volker J. Sorger

    2016-01-01

    The success of information technology has clearly demonstrated that miniaturization often leads to unprecedented performance, and unanticipated applications. This hypothesis of “smaller-is-better” has motivated optical engineers to build various nanophotonic devices, although an understanding leading to fundamental scaling behavior for this new class of devices is missing. Here we analyze scaling laws for optoelectronic devices operating at micro and nanometer length-scale. We show that optoe...

  12. Scaling laws of Rydberg excitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckötter, J.; Freitag, M.; Fröhlich, D.; Aßmann, M.; Bayer, M.; Semina, M. A.; Glazov, M. M.

    2017-09-01

    Rydberg atoms have attracted considerable interest due to their huge interaction among each other and with external fields. They demonstrate characteristic scaling laws in dependence on the principal quantum number n for features such as the magnetic field for level crossing or the electric field of dissociation. Recently, the observation of excitons in highly excited states has allowed studying Rydberg physics in cuprous oxide crystals. Fundamentally different insights may be expected for Rydberg excitons, as the crystal environment and associated symmetry reduction compared to vacuum give not only optical access to many more states within an exciton multiplet but also extend the Hamiltonian for describing the exciton beyond the hydrogen model. Here we study experimentally and theoretically the scaling of several parameters of Rydberg excitons with n , for some of which we indeed find laws different from those of atoms. For others we find identical scaling laws with n , even though their origin may be distinctly different from the atomic case. At zero field the energy splitting of a particular multiplet n scales as n-3 due to crystal-specific terms in the Hamiltonian, e.g., from the valence band structure. From absorption spectra in magnetic field we find for the first crossing of levels with adjacent principal quantum numbers a Br∝n-4 dependence of the resonance field strength, Br, due to the dominant paramagnetic term unlike for atoms for which the diamagnetic contribution is decisive, resulting in a Br∝n-6 dependence. By contrast, the resonance electric field strength shows a scaling as Er∝n-5 as for Rydberg atoms. Also similar to atoms with the exception of hydrogen we observe anticrossings between states belonging to multiplets with different principal quantum numbers at these resonances. The energy splittings at the avoided crossings scale roughly as n-4, again due to crystal specific features in the exciton Hamiltonian. The data also allow us to

  13. Fundamental Scaling Laws in Nanophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Sun, Shuai; Majumdar, Arka; Sorger, Volker J.

    2016-11-01

    The success of information technology has clearly demonstrated that miniaturization often leads to unprecedented performance, and unanticipated applications. This hypothesis of “smaller-is-better” has motivated optical engineers to build various nanophotonic devices, although an understanding leading to fundamental scaling behavior for this new class of devices is missing. Here we analyze scaling laws for optoelectronic devices operating at micro and nanometer length-scale. We show that optoelectronic device performance scales non-monotonically with device length due to the various device tradeoffs, and analyze how both optical and electrical constrains influence device power consumption and operating speed. Specifically, we investigate the direct influence of scaling on the performance of four classes of photonic devices, namely laser sources, electro-optic modulators, photodetectors, and all-optical switches based on three types of optical resonators; microring, Fabry-Perot cavity, and plasmonic metal nanoparticle. Results show that while microrings and Fabry-Perot cavities can outperform plasmonic cavities at larger length-scales, they stop working when the device length drops below 100 nanometers, due to insufficient functionality such as feedback (laser), index-modulation (modulator), absorption (detector) or field density (optical switch). Our results provide a detailed understanding of the limits of nanophotonics, towards establishing an opto-electronics roadmap, akin to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  14. Fundamental Scaling Laws in Nanophotonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Sun, Shuai; Majumdar, Arka; Sorger, Volker J

    2016-11-21

    The success of information technology has clearly demonstrated that miniaturization often leads to unprecedented performance, and unanticipated applications. This hypothesis of "smaller-is-better" has motivated optical engineers to build various nanophotonic devices, although an understanding leading to fundamental scaling behavior for this new class of devices is missing. Here we analyze scaling laws for optoelectronic devices operating at micro and nanometer length-scale. We show that optoelectronic device performance scales non-monotonically with device length due to the various device tradeoffs, and analyze how both optical and electrical constrains influence device power consumption and operating speed. Specifically, we investigate the direct influence of scaling on the performance of four classes of photonic devices, namely laser sources, electro-optic modulators, photodetectors, and all-optical switches based on three types of optical resonators; microring, Fabry-Perot cavity, and plasmonic metal nanoparticle. Results show that while microrings and Fabry-Perot cavities can outperform plasmonic cavities at larger length-scales, they stop working when the device length drops below 100 nanometers, due to insufficient functionality such as feedback (laser), index-modulation (modulator), absorption (detector) or field density (optical switch). Our results provide a detailed understanding of the limits of nanophotonics, towards establishing an opto-electronics roadmap, akin to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  15. Scaling Laws for Mesoscale and Microscale Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spletzer, Barry

    1999-08-23

    The set of laws developed and presented here is by no means exhaustive. Techniques have been present to aid in the development of additional scaling laws and to combine these and other laws to produce additional useful relationships. Some of the relationships produced here have yielded perhaps surprising results. Examples include the fifth order scaling law for electromagnetic motor torque and the zero order scaling law for capacitive motor power. These laws demonstrate important facts about actuators in small-scale systems. The primary intent of this introduction into scaling law analysis is to provide needed tools to examine possible areas of the research in small-scale systems and direct research toward more fruitful areas. Numerous examples have been included to show the validity of developing scaling laws based on first principles and how real world systems tend to obey these laws even when many other variables may potentially come into play. Development of further laws may well serve to provide important high-level direction to the continued development of small-scale systems.

  16. Scaling Laws in Human Language

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Linyuan; Zhou, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Zipf's law on word frequency is observed in English, French, Spanish, Italian, and so on, yet it does not hold for Chinese, Japanese or Korean characters. A model for writing process is proposed to explain the above difference, which takes into account the effects of finite vocabulary size. Experiments, simulations and analytical solution agree well with each other. The results show that the frequency distribution follows a power law with exponent being equal to 1, at which the corresponding Zipf's exponent diverges. Actually, the distribution obeys exponential form in the Zipf's plot. Deviating from the Heaps' law, the number of distinct words grows with the text length in three stages: It grows linearly in the beginning, then turns to a logarithmical form, and eventually saturates. This work refines previous understanding about Zipf's law and Heaps' law in language systems.

  17. Scaling Laws in the Distribution of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, B J T; Saar, E; Trimble, V; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Martinez, Vicent J.; Saar, Enn; Trimble, Virginia

    2004-01-01

    Research done during the previous century established our Standard Cosmological Model. There are many details still to be filled in, but few would seriously doubt the basic premise. Past surveys have revealed that the large-scale distribution of galaxies in the Universe is far from random: it is highly structured over a vast range of scales. To describe cosmic structures, we need to build mathematically quantifiable descriptions of structure. Identifying where scaling laws apply and the nature of those scaling laws is an important part of understanding which physical mechanisms have been responsible for the organization of clusters, superclusters of galaxies and the voids between them. Finding where these scaling laws are broken is equally important since this indicates the transition to different underlying physics. In describing scaling laws we are helped by making analogies with fractals: mathematical constructs that can possess a wide variety of scaling properties. We must beware, however, of saying that ...

  18. Kolmogorov Dissipation scales in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishan, V

    2009-01-01

    In a weakly ionized plasma, the evolution of the magnetic field is described by a "generalized Ohm's law" that includes the Hall effect and the ambipolar diffusion terms. These terms introduce additional spatial and time scales which play a decisive role in the cascading and the dissipation mechanisms in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We determine the Kolmogorov dissipation scales for the viscous, the resistive and the ambipolar dissipation mechanisms. The plasma, depending on its properties and the energy injection rate, may preferentially select one of the these dissipation scales. thus determining the shortest spatial scale of the supposedly self-similar spectral distribution of the magnetic field. The results are illustrated taking the partially ionized part of the solar atmosphere as an example. Thus the shortest spatial scale of the supposedly self-similar spectral distribution of the solar magnetic field is determined by any of the four dissipation scales given by the viscosity, the Spizer resistivity...

  19. Acoustofluidics 10: Scaling laws in acoustophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In Part 10 of the thematic tutorial series “Acoustofluidics – exploiting ultrasonic standing waves forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic systems for cell and particle manipulation”, we present and analyze a number of scaling laws relevant for microsystem acoustophoresis. Such laws...

  20. Predictive Scaling Laws for Spherical Rotating Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Oruba, Ludivine

    2013-01-01

    State of the art numerical models of the Geodynamo are still performed in a parameter regime extremely remote from the values relevant to the physics of the Earth's core. In order to establish a connection between dynamo modeling and the geophysical motivation, scaling laws have been proposed. Such scaling laws establish the dependence of essential quantities (such as the magnetic field strength) on measured or controlled quantities. They allow for a direct confrontation of advanced models with geophysical observations.(...)

  1. Scaling laws predict global microbial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locey, Kenneth J; Lennon, Jay T

    2016-05-24

    Scaling laws underpin unifying theories of biodiversity and are among the most predictively powerful relationships in biology. However, scaling laws developed for plants and animals often go untested or fail to hold for microorganisms. As a result, it is unclear whether scaling laws of biodiversity will span evolutionarily distant domains of life that encompass all modes of metabolism and scales of abundance. Using a global-scale compilation of ∼35,000 sites and ∼5.6⋅10(6) species, including the largest ever inventory of high-throughput molecular data and one of the largest compilations of plant and animal community data, we show similar rates of scaling in commonness and rarity across microorganisms and macroscopic plants and animals. We document a universal dominance scaling law that holds across 30 orders of magnitude, an unprecedented expanse that predicts the abundance of dominant ocean bacteria. In combining this scaling law with the lognormal model of biodiversity, we predict that Earth is home to upward of 1 trillion (10(12)) microbial species. Microbial biodiversity seems greater than ever anticipated yet predictable from the smallest to the largest microbiome.

  2. Neural scaling laws for an uncertain world

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    The Weber-Fechner law describes the form of psychological space in many behavioral experiments involving perception of one-dimensional physical quantities. If the physical quantity is expressed using multiple neural receptors, then placing receptive fields evenly along a logarithmic scale naturally leads to the psychological Weber-Fechner law. In the visual system, the spacing and width of extrafoveal receptive fields are consistent with logarithmic scaling. Other sets of neural "receptors" appear to show the same qualitative properties, suggesting that this form of neural scaling reflects a solution to a very general problem. This paper argues that these neural scaling laws enable the brain to represent information about the world efficiently without making any assumptions about the statistics of the world. This analysis suggests that the organization of neural scales to represent one-dimensional quantities, including more abstract quantities such as numerosity, time, and allocentric space, should have a uni...

  3. Fluctuation scaling, Taylor's law, and crime.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin S Hanley

    Full Text Available Fluctuation scaling relationships have been observed in a wide range of processes ranging from internet router traffic to measles cases. Taylor's law is one such scaling relationship and has been widely applied in ecology to understand communities including trees, birds, human populations, and insects. We show that monthly crime reports in the UK show complex fluctuation scaling which can be approximated by Taylor's law relationships corresponding to local policing neighborhoods and larger regional and countrywide scales. Regression models applied to local scale data from Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire found that different categories of crime exhibited different scaling exponents with no significant difference between the two regions. On this scale, violence reports were close to a Poisson distribution (α = 1.057 ± 0.026 while burglary exhibited a greater exponent (α = 1.292 ± 0.029 indicative of temporal clustering. These two regions exhibited significantly different pre-exponential factors for the categories of anti-social behavior and burglary indicating that local variations in crime reports can be assessed using fluctuation scaling methods. At regional and countrywide scales, all categories exhibited scaling behavior indicative of temporal clustering evidenced by Taylor's law exponents from 1.43 ± 0.12 (Drugs to 2.094 ± 0081 (Other Crimes. Investigating crime behavior via fluctuation scaling gives insight beyond that of raw numbers and is unique in reporting on all processes contributing to the observed variance and is either robust to or exhibits signs of many types of data manipulation.

  4. Exploring scaling laws in surface topography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abedini, M.J. [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada)], E-mail: abedini@shirazu.ac.ir; Shaghaghian, M.R. [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-11-30

    Surface topography affects many soil properties and processes, particularly surface water storage and runoff. Application of fractal analysis helps understand the scaling laws inherent in surface topography at a wide range of spatial scales and climatic regimes. In this research, a high resolution digital elevation model with a 3 mm resolution on one side of the spectrum and large scale DEMs, with a 500 m spatial resolution on the other side were used to explore scaling laws in surface topography. With appropriate exploratory spatial data analysis of both types of data sets, two conventional computational procedures - variogram and Box Counting Methods (BCM) - address scaling laws in surface topography. The results respect scaling laws in surface topography to some extent as neither the plot treatment nor the direction treatment has a significant impact on fractal dimension variability. While in the variogram method, the change in slope in Richardson's plots appears to be the norm rather than the exception; Richardson's plots resulting from box counting implementation lack such mathematical behavior. These breaks in slope might have useful implications for delineating homogeneous hydrologic units and detecting change in trend in hydrologic time series. Furthermore, it is shown that fractal dimension cannot be used to capture anisotropic variabilities both within and among micro-plots. In addition, its numerical value remains insignificant at the 5% level in moving from one direction to another and also from one spatial scale to another while the ordinate intercept could discriminate the surface roughness variability from one spatial scale to another.

  5. Zipf's law from scale-free geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Henry W.; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    The spatial distribution of people exhibits clustering across a wide range of scales, from household (˜10-2km ) to continental (˜104km ) scales. Empirical data indicate simple power-law scalings for the size distribution of cities (known as Zipf's law) and the population density fluctuations as a function of scale. Using techniques from random field theory and statistical physics, we show that these power laws are fundamentally a consequence of the scale-free spatial clustering of human populations and the fact that humans inhabit a two-dimensional surface. In this sense, the symmetries of scale invariance in two spatial dimensions are intimately connected to urban sociology. We test our theory by empirically measuring the power spectrum of population density fluctuations and show that the logarithmic slope α =2.04 ±0.09 , in excellent agreement with our theoretical prediction α =2 . The model enables the analytic computation of many new predictions by importing the mathematical formalism of random fields.

  6. A refinement of scaling laws in wall turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ke; LI Wan-ping

    2009-01-01

    As a universal conclusion of turbulent scale, scaling laws are important to the research on statistic turbulence. We measured two-dimensional instantaneous velocity field in turbulent boundary layers of flat plate with the momentum thickness Reynolds number Reθ=2 167. Scaling laws have different forms in different wall distance and scale. We proposed an expected scaling law and compared it with the She-Leveque (SL) scaling law based on the wavelet analysis and traditional statistical methods. Results show that the closer to the wall, the more the expected scaling law approached to the SL scaling law.

  7. Scaling Laws in Chennai Bus Network

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Atanu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the structural properties of the complex bus network of Chennai. We formulate this extensive network structure by identifying each bus stop as a node, and a bus which stops at any two adjacent bus stops as an edge connecting the nodes. Rigorous statistical analysis of this data shows that the Chennai bus network displays small-world properties and a scale-free degree distribution with the power-law exponent, $\\gamma > 3$.

  8. Scaling law of Wolff cluster surface energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Pai-Yi; Monceau, Pascal

    2003-05-01

    We study the scaling properties of the clusters grown by the Wolff algorithm on seven different Sierpinski-type fractals of Hausdorff dimension 1Wolff cluster follows a power law with respect to the lattice size. Moreover, we investigate the probability density distribution of the surface energy of the Wolff cluster and are able to establish a different scaling relation. It enables us to introduce an exponent that is associated to the surface energy of the Wolff cluster. Finally, this exponent is linked to a dynamical exponent via an inequality.

  9. Scaling law of Wolff cluster surface energy

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao, Pai-Yi; Monceau, Pascal

    2003-01-01

    We study the scaling properties of the clusters grown by the Wolff algorithm on seven different Sierpinski-type fractals of Hausdorff dimension $1 < d_f \\le 3$ in the framework of the Ising model. The mean absolute value of the surface energy of Wolff cluster follows a power law with respect to the lattice size. Moreover, we investigate the probability density distribution of the surface energy of Wolff cluster and are able to establish a new scaling relation. It enables us to introduce a new...

  10. Extracting scaling laws from numerical dynamo models

    CERN Document Server

    Stelzer, Z

    2013-01-01

    Earth's magnetic field is generated by processes in the electrically conducting, liquid outer core, subsumed under the term `geodynamo'. In the last decades, great effort has been put into the numerical simulation of core dynamics following from the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. However, the numerical simulations are far from Earth's core in terms of several control parameters. Different scaling analyses found simple scaling laws for quantities like heat transport, flow velocity, magnetic field strength and magnetic dissipation time. We use an extensive dataset of 116 numerical dynamo models compiled by Christensen and co-workers to analyse these scalings from a rigorous model selection point of view. Our method of choice is leave-one-out cross-validation which rates models according to their predictive abilities. In contrast to earlier results, we find that diffusive processes are not negligible for the flow velocity and magnetic field strength in the numerical dynamos. Also the scaling of the magneti...

  11. Paradoxical Interpretations of Urban Scaling Laws

    CERN Document Server

    Cottineau, Clementine; Arcaute, Elsa; Batty, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Scaling laws are powerful summaries of the variations of urban attributes with city size. However, the validity of their universal meaning for cities is hampered by the observation that different scaling regimes can be encountered for the same territory, time and attribute, depending on the criteria used to delineate cities. The aim of this paper is to present new insights concerning this variation, coupled with a sensitivity analysis of urban scaling in France, for several socio-economic and infrastructural attributes from data collected exhaustively at the local level. The sensitivity analysis considers different aggregations of local units for which data are given by the Population Census. We produce a large variety of definitions of cities (approximatively 5000) by aggregating local Census units corresponding to the systematic combination of three definitional criteria: density, commuting flows and population cutoffs. We then measure the magnitude of scaling estimations and their sensitivity to city defin...

  12. Scaling laws and dynamics of bubble coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Christopher R.; Kamat, Pritish M.; Thete, Sumeet S.; Munro, James P.; Lister, John R.; Harris, Michael T.; Basaran, Osman A.

    2017-08-01

    The coalescence of bubbles and drops plays a central role in nature and industry. During coalescence, two bubbles or drops touch and merge into one as the neck connecting them grows from microscopic to macroscopic scales. The hydrodynamic singularity that arises when two bubbles or drops have just touched and the flows that ensue have been studied thoroughly when two drops coalesce in a dynamically passive outer fluid. In this paper, the coalescence of two identical and initially spherical bubbles, which are idealized as voids that are surrounded by an incompressible Newtonian liquid, is analyzed by numerical simulation. This problem has recently been studied (a) experimentally using high-speed imaging and (b) by asymptotic analysis in which the dynamics is analyzed by determining the growth of a hole in the thin liquid sheet separating the two bubbles. In the latter, advantage is taken of the fact that the flow in the thin sheet of nonconstant thickness is governed by a set of one-dimensional, radial extensional flow equations. While these studies agree on the power law scaling of the variation of the minimum neck radius with time, they disagree with respect to the numerical value of the prefactors in the scaling laws. In order to reconcile these differences and also provide insights into the dynamics that are difficult to probe by either of the aforementioned approaches, simulations are used to access both earlier times than has been possible in the experiments and also later times when asymptotic analysis is no longer applicable. Early times and extremely small length scales are attained in the new simulations through the use of a truncated domain approach. Furthermore, it is shown by direct numerical simulations in which the flow within the bubbles is also determined along with the flow exterior to them that idealizing the bubbles as passive voids has virtually no effect on the scaling laws relating minimum neck radius and time.

  13. Hydrodynamic Scaling Analysis of Nuclear Fusion in Hot Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Sachie

    2011-01-01

    Proton beams generated by ultraintense laser pulse irradiations have potential applications in industry and in medicine. However, the laser pulse parameters are currently not optimized for practical applications. We discuss scaling laws of fusion yields generated by laser-plasma interactions. The yields are found to scale as a function of the laser power. The origin of the scaling law in the laser driven fusion yield is derived in terms of hydrodynamical scaling and it is attributed to the laser power dependence of three terms: the reaction rate, the density of the plasma and the pro- jected range of the plasma particle in the medium. The resulting scaling relations have a powerful predictive power that enables estimating the fusion yield for a nuclear reaction which has not been investigated by means of the laser accelerated ion beams.

  14. Scaling Laws in Spatial Network Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Molkenthin, Nora

    2016-01-01

    Geometric constraints impact the formation of a broad range of spatial networks, from amino acid chains folding to proteins structures to rearranging particle aggregates. How the network of interactions dynamically self-organizes in such systems is far from fully understood. Here, we analyze a class of spatial network formation processes by introducing a mapping from geometric to graph-theoretic constraints. Combining stochastic and mean field analyses yields an algebraic scaling law for the extent (graph diameter) of the resulting networks with system size, in contrast to logarithmic scaling known for networks without constraints. Intriguingly, the exponent falls between that of self-avoiding random walks and that of space filling arrangements, consistent with experimentally observed scaling (of the spatial radius of gyration) for protein tertiary structures.

  15. Scaling laws in (e,3e) processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasaneo, G; Rodriguez, K V [Departamento de Fisica - Universidad Nacional del Sur and CONICET, 8000 BahIa Blanca, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ancarani, L U; Cappello, C Dal [Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, 57078 Metz (France); Charpentier, I [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 7554, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France)

    2009-11-01

    We study the double ionization of helium-like ions by impact of electrons with high incident energy. Within the isoelectronic sequence, an approximate scaling law for (e,3e) differential cross sections is proposed and confirmed by calculations. The latter are performed using 14-parameters Hylleraas-like wave functions to represent the bound electrons in the initial channel, plane waves for the fast incoming and scattered electrons, and a continuum distorted wave approach for the two ejected electrons in the final channel.

  16. The scaling laws of human travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, D.; Hufnagel, L.; Geisel, T.

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic spatial redistribution of individuals is a key driving force of various spatiotemporal phenomena on geographical scales. It can synchronize populations of interacting species, stabilize them, and diversify gene pools. Human travel, for example, is responsible for the geographical spread of human infectious disease. In the light of increasing international trade, intensified human mobility and the imminent threat of an influenza A epidemic, the knowledge of dynamical and statistical properties of human travel is of fundamental importance. Despite its crucial role, a quantitative assessment of these properties on geographical scales remains elusive, and the assumption that humans disperse diffusively still prevails in models. Here we report on a solid and quantitative assessment of human travelling statistics by analysing the circulation of bank notes in the United States. Using a comprehensive data set of over a million individual displacements, we find that dispersal is anomalous in two ways. First, the distribution of travelling distances decays as a power law, indicating that trajectories of bank notes are reminiscent of scale-free random walks known as Lévy flights. Second, the probability of remaining in a small, spatially confined region for a time T is dominated by algebraically long tails that attenuate the superdiffusive spread. We show that human travelling behaviour can be described mathematically on many spatiotemporal scales by a two-parameter continuous-time random walk model to a surprising accuracy, and conclude that human travel on geographical scales is an ambivalent and effectively superdiffusive process.

  17. Autocorrelation and Scaling Laws in Human Mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiang-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Human mobility patterns deeply affect the dynamics of many social systems. In this paper, we empirically analyze the real-world human movements based on the data set of GPS records, and observe rich scaling properties in the temporal-spatial patterns and the abnormal transition in speed-displacement patterns. More interestingly, we notice that the displacements in group level shows significantly positive autocorrelation, indicating a cascading-like nature in human movements. Furthermore, our analysis in individual level finds that the displacement distributions of the users who have stronger autocorrelation on displacements are more close to the power law form, implying a relationship between the positive autocorrelation of the series of displacements and the form of individual's displacement distribution. These findings show a factor directly relevant to the origin of the scaling properties in human mobility from the empirical analysis.

  18. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manz, P. [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Müller, S. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States); Fuchert, G. [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

  19. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, P.; Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Müller, S. H.; Fuchert, G.; Scott, B. D.; Stroth, U.

    2013-10-01

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

  20. Scaling Law of Urban Ride Sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Tachet, Remi; Santi, Paolo; Resta, Giovanni; Szell, Michael; Strogatz, Steven; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Sharing rides could drastically improve the efficiency of car and taxi transportation. Unleashing such potential, however, requires understanding how urban parameters affect the fraction of individual trips that can be shared, a quantity that we call shareability. Using data on millions of taxi trips in New York City, San Francisco, Singapore, and Vienna, we compute the shareability curves for each city, and find that a natural rescaling collapses them onto a single, universal curve. We explain this scaling law theoretically with a simple model that predicts the potential for ride sharing in any city, using a few basic urban quantities and no adjustable parameters. Accurate extrapolations of this type will help planners, transportation companies, and society at large to shape a sustainable path for urban growth.

  1. Scaling Law of Urban Ride Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachet, R.; Sagarra, O.; Santi, P.; Resta, G.; Szell, M.; Strogatz, S. H.; Ratti, C.

    2017-03-01

    Sharing rides could drastically improve the efficiency of car and taxi transportation. Unleashing such potential, however, requires understanding how urban parameters affect the fraction of individual trips that can be shared, a quantity that we call shareability. Using data on millions of taxi trips in New York City, San Francisco, Singapore, and Vienna, we compute the shareability curves for each city, and find that a natural rescaling collapses them onto a single, universal curve. We explain this scaling law theoretically with a simple model that predicts the potential for ride sharing in any city, using a few basic urban quantities and no adjustable parameters. Accurate extrapolations of this type will help planners, transportation companies, and society at large to shape a sustainable path for urban growth.

  2. Multi-scaling of the dense plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus is a copious source of multi-radiations with many potential new applications of special interest such as in advanced SXR lithography, materials synthesizing and testing, medical isotopes and imaging. This paper reviews the series of numerical experiments conducted using the Lee model code to obtain the scaling laws of the multi-radiations.

  3. A Unified Scaling Law in Spiral Galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda; Sofue; Wada

    2000-03-01

    We investigate the origin of a unified scaling relation in spiral galaxies. Observed spiral galaxies are spread on a plane in the three-dimensional logarithmic space of luminosity L, radius R, and rotation velocity V. The plane is expressed as L~&parl0;VR&parr0;alpha in the I passband, where alpha is a constant. On the plane, observed galaxies are distributed in an elongated region which looks like the shape of a surfboard. The well-known scaling relations L-V (Tully-Fisher [TF] relation), V-R (also the TF relation), and R-L (Freeman's law) can be understood as oblique projections of the surfboard-like plane into two-dimensional spaces. This unified interpretation of the known scaling relations should be a clue to understand the physical origin of all the relations consistently. Furthermore, this interpretation can also explain why previous studies could not find any correlation between TF residuals and radius. In order to clarify the origin of this plane, we simulate formation and evolution of spiral galaxies with the N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics method, including cooling, star formation, and stellar feedback. Initial conditions are set to 14 isolated spheres with two free parameters, such as mass and angular momentum. The cold dark matter (h=0.5, Omega0=1) cosmology is considered as a test case. The simulations provide the following two conclusions: (1) The slope of the plane is well reproduced but the zero point is not. This zero-point discrepancy could be solved in a low-density (Omega00.5) cosmology. (2) The surfboard-shaped plane can be explained by the control of galactic mass and angular momentum.

  4. Plasma Jet Simulations Using a Generalized Ohm's Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersohn, Frans; Shebalin, John V.; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma jets are important physical phenomena in astrophysics and plasma propulsion devices. A currently proposed dual jet plasma propulsion device to be used for ISS experiments strongly resembles a coronal loop and further draws a parallel between these physical systems [1]. To study plasma jets we use numerical methods that solve the compressible MHD equations using the generalized Ohm s law [2]. Here, we will discuss the crucial underlying physics of these systems along with the numerical procedures we utilize to study them. Recent results from our numerical experiments will be presented and discussed.

  5. A Unifying Theory for Scaling Laws of Human Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Henry W

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of people exhibits clustering across a wide range of scales, from household (~$10^{-2}$ km) to continental (~$10^4$ km) scales. Empirical data indicates simple power-law scalings for the size distribution of cities (known as Zipf's law), the geographic distribution of friends, and the population density fluctuations as a function of scale. We derive a simple statistical model that explains all of these scaling laws based on a single unifying principle involving the random spatial growth of clusters of people on all scales. The model makes important new predictions for the spread of diseases and other social phenomena.

  6. Scaling Laws for $e^+ e^-$ Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Raubenheimer, T O; Wilson, Ian H

    1999-01-01

    Design studies of a future TeV e+e- Linear Collider (TLC) are presently being made by five major laboratories within the framework of a world-wide collaboration. A figure of merit is defined which enables an objective comparison of these different designs. This figure of merit is shown to depend only on a small number of parameters. General scaling laws for the main beam parameters and linac parameters are derived and prove to be very effective when used as guidelines to optimize the linear collider design. By adopting appropriate parameters for beam stability, the figure of merit becomes nearly independent of accelerating gradient and RF frequency of the accelerating structures. In spite of the strong dependence of the wake-fields with frequency, the single bunch emittance preservation during acceleration along the linac is also shown to be independent of the RF frequency when using equivalent trajectory correction schemes. In this situation, beam acceleration using high frequency structures becomes very adv...

  7. Star Formation on Galactic Scales: Empirical Laws

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2011-01-01

    Empirical star formation laws from the last 20 years are reviewed with a comparison to simulations. The current form in main galaxy disks has a linear relationship between the star formation rate per unit area and the molecular cloud mass per unit area with a timescale for molecular gas conversion of about 2 Gyr. The local ratio of molecular mass to atomic mass scales nearly linearly with pressure, as determined from the weight of the gas layer in the galaxy. In the outer parts of galaxies and in dwarf irregular galaxies, the disk can be dominated by atomic hydrogen and the star formation rate per unit area becomes directly proportional to the total gas mass per unit area, with a consumption time of about 100 Gyr. The importance of a threshold for gravitational instabilities is not clear. Observations suggest such a threshold is not always important, while simulations generally show that it is. The threshold is difficult to evaluate because it is sensitive to magnetic and viscous forces, the presence of spira...

  8. Scaling laws and bulk-boundary decoupling in heat flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pozo, Jesús J; Garrido, Pedro L; Hurtado, Pablo I

    2015-03-01

    When driven out of equilibrium by a temperature gradient, fluids respond by developing a nontrivial, inhomogeneous structure according to the governing macroscopic laws. Here we show that such structure obeys strikingly simple scaling laws arbitrarily far from equilibrium, provided that both macroscopic local equilibrium and Fourier's law hold. Extensive simulations of hard disk fluids confirm the scaling laws even under strong temperature gradients, implying that Fourier's law remains valid in this highly nonlinear regime, with putative corrections absorbed into a nonlinear conductivity functional. In addition, our results show that the scaling laws are robust in the presence of strong finite-size effects, hinting at a subtle bulk-boundary decoupling mechanism which enforces the macroscopic laws on the bulk of the finite-sized fluid. This allows one to measure the marginal anomaly of the heat conductivity predicted for hard disks.

  9. Scaling laws of coronary circulation in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yunlong; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2016-08-16

    The heterogeneity and complexity of coronary vasculature (structure) and myocardial flow (function) have fractal-like characteristics and can be described by scaling laws with remarkable simplicity. In contrast with allometric (interspecific) scaling law, intraspecific scaling laws describe the design rules of vascular trees within a species. This paper provides an overview of intraspecific scaling laws of vascular trees and the physiological and clinical implications thereof. The significance and shortcomings of these scaling laws are discussed in relation to diffuse coronary artery disease, Glagov's positive remodeling in early stages of coronary atherosclerosis, treatment guidelines of complex bifurcation lesions, and for estimation of outlet resistance values for computation of blood flow in epicardial coronary arteries. Finally, we summarize the highlights of scaling relations and suggest some future directions.

  10. Origin of Noncubic Scaling Law in Disordered Granular Packing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Chengjie; Li, Jindong; Kou, Bingquan; Cao, Yixin; Li, Zhifeng; Xiao, Xianghui; Fu, Yanan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Hong, Liang; Zhang, Jie; Kob, Walter; Wang, Yujie

    2017-06-09

    Recent diffraction experiments on metallic glasses have unveiled an unexpected non-cubic scaling law between density and average interatomic distance, which lead to the speculations on the presence of fractal glass order. Using X-ray tomography we identify here a similar non-cubic scaling law in disordered granular packing of spherical particles. We find that the scaling law is directly related to the contact neighbors within first nearest neighbor shell, and therefore is closely connected to the phenomenon of jamming. The seemingly universal scaling exponent around 2.5 arises due to the isostatic condition with contact number around 6, and we argue that the exponent should not be universal.

  11. Power-law distributions based on exponential distributions: Latent scaling, spurious Zipf's law, and fractal rabbits

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanguang

    2013-01-01

    The different between the inverse power function and the negative exponential function is significant. The former suggests a complex distribution, while the latter indicates a simple distribution. However, the association of the power-law distribution with the exponential distribution has been seldom researched. Using mathematical derivation and numerical experiments, I reveal that a power-law distribution can be created through averaging an exponential distribution. For the distributions defined in a 1-dimension space, the scaling exponent is 1; while for those defined in a 2-dimension space, the scaling exponent is 2. The findings of this study are as follows. First, the exponential distributions suggest a hidden scaling, but the scaling exponents suggest a Euclidean dimension. Second, special power-law distributions can be derived from exponential distributions, but they differ from the typical power-law distribution. Third, it is the real power-law distribution that can be related with fractal dimension. ...

  12. Scale Law of the High Power Free Electron Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The scale law and design procedure of the high power FEL are discussed. It is pointed out that theextraction efficiency, which is the critical factor of the output power besides the power of the electron

  13. Aeroelastic scaling laws for gust load alleviation control system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Bo; Wu Zhigang; Yang Chao

    2016-01-01

    Gust load alleviation (GLA) tests are widely conducted to study the effectiveness of the control laws and methods. The physical parameters of models in these tests are aeroelastic scaled, while the scaling of GLA control system is always unreached. This paper concentrates on studying the scaling laws of GLA control system. Through theoretical demonstration, the scaling criterion of a classical PID control system has been come up and a scaling methodology is provided and veri-fied. By adopting the scaling laws in this paper, gust response of the scaled model could be directly related to the full-scale aircraft theoretically under both open-loop and closed-loop conditions. Also, the influences of different scaling choices of an important non-dimensional parameter, the Froude number, have been studied in this paper. Furthermore for practical application, a compen-sating method is given when the theoretical scaled actuators or sensors cannot be obtained. Also, the scaling laws of some non-linear elements in control system such as the rate and amplitude sat-urations in actuator have been studied and examined by a numerical simulation.

  14. Aeroelastic scaling laws for gust load alleviation control system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Bo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gust load alleviation (GLA tests are widely conducted to study the effectiveness of the control laws and methods. The physical parameters of models in these tests are aeroelastic scaled, while the scaling of GLA control system is always unreached. This paper concentrates on studying the scaling laws of GLA control system. Through theoretical demonstration, the scaling criterion of a classical PID control system has been come up and a scaling methodology is provided and verified. By adopting the scaling laws in this paper, gust response of the scaled model could be directly related to the full-scale aircraft theoretically under both open-loop and closed-loop conditions. Also, the influences of different scaling choices of an important non-dimensional parameter, the Froude number, have been studied in this paper. Furthermore for practical application, a compensating method is given when the theoretical scaled actuators or sensors cannot be obtained. Also, the scaling laws of some non-linear elements in control system such as the rate and amplitude saturations in actuator have been studied and examined by a numerical simulation.

  15. Origin of the scaling laws of sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we discover the origin of the scaling laws of sediment transport under turbulent flow over a sediment bed, for the first time, from the perspective of the phenomenological theory of turbulence. The results reveal that for the incipient motion of sediment particles, the densimetric Froude number obeys the `(1 + σ)/4' scaling law with the relative roughness (ratio of particle diameter to approach flow depth), where σ is the spectral exponent of turbulent energy spectrum. However, for the bedforms, the densimetric Froude number obeys a `(1 + σ)/6' scaling law with the relative roughness in the enstrophy inertial range and the energy inertial range. For the bedload flux, the bedload transport intensity obeys the `3/2' and `(1 + σ)/4' scaling laws with the transport stage parameter and the relative roughness, respectively. For the suspended load flux, the non-dimensional suspended sediment concentration obeys the `-Z ' scaling law with the non-dimensional vertical distance within the wall shear layer, where Z is the Rouse number. For the scour in contracted streams, the non-dimensional scour depth obeys the `4/(3 - σ)', `-4/(3 - σ)' and `-(1 + σ)/(3 - σ)' scaling laws with the densimetric Froude number, the channel contraction ratio (ratio of contracted channel width to approach channel width) and the relative roughness, respectively.

  16. Scaling laws in the distribution of galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, BJT; Martinez, VJ; Saar, E; Trimble, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Past surveys have revealed that the large-scale distribution of galaxies in the universe is far from random: it is highly structured over a vast range of scales. Surveys being currently undertaken and being planned for the next decades will provide a wealth of information about this structure. The u

  17. Newton's Third Law on a Scale Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Huntula, Jiradawan

    2009-01-01

    We propose a series of experiments involving balance readings of an object naturally floating or forced to be partially or fully immersed in water contained in a beaker sitting on an electronic scale balance. Students were asked to predict, observe and explain each case. The teacher facilitated the learning by asking probing questions, giving…

  18. Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 1017 cm-3 has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

  19. Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

  20. Band gap scaling laws in group IV nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chongze; Fu, Xiaonan; Guo, Yangyang; Guo, Zhengxiao; Xia, Congxin; Jia, Yu

    2017-03-01

    By using the first-principles calculations, the band gap properties of nanotubes formed by group IV elements have been investigated systemically. Our results reveal that for armchair nanotubes, the energy gaps at K points in the Brillouin zone decrease as 1/r scaling law with the radii (r) increasing, while they are scaled by ‑1/r 2 + C at Γ points, here, C is a constant. Further studies show that such scaling law of K points is independent of both the chiral vector and the type of elements. Therefore, the band gaps of nanotubes for a given radius can be determined by these scaling laws easily. Interestingly, we also predict the existence of indirect band gap for both germanium and tin nanotubes. Our new findings provide an efficient way to determine the band gaps of group IV element nanotubes by knowing the radii, as well as to facilitate the design of functional nanodevices.

  1. Scaling laws in phytoplankton nutrient uptake affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eLindemann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient uptake affinity affects the competitive ability of microbial organisms at low nutrient concentrations. From the theory of diffusion limitation it follows that uptake affinity scales linearly with the cell radius. This is in conflict with some observations suggesting that uptake affinity scales to a quantity that is closer to the square of the radius, i.e. to cell surface area. We show that this apparent conflict can be resolved by nutrient uptake theory. Pure diffusion limitation assumes that the cell is a perfect sink which means that it is able to absorb all encountered nutrients instantaneously. Here we provide empirical evidence that the perfect sink strategy is not common in phytoplankton. Although small cells are indeed favored by a large surface to volume ratio, we show that they are punished by higher relative investment cost in order to fully benefit from the larger surface to volume ratio. We show that there are two reasons for this. First, because the small cells need a higher transporter density in order to maximize their affinity, and second because the relative cost of a transporter is higher for a small than for a large cell. We suggest that this might explain why observed uptake affinities do not scale linearly with the cell radius.

  2. Human learning: Power laws or multiple characteristic time scales?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried Mayer-Kress

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The central proposal of A. Newell and Rosenbloom (1981 was that the power law is the ubiquitous law of learning. This proposition is discussed in the context of the key factors that led to the acceptance of the power law as the function of learning. We then outline the principles of an epigenetic landscape framework for considering the role of the characteristic time scales of learning and an approach to system identification of the processes of performance dynamics. In this view, the change of performance over time is the product of a superposition of characteristic exponential time scales that reflect the influence of different processes. This theoretical approach can reproduce the traditional power law of practice – within the experimental resolution of performance data sets - but we hypothesize that this function may prove to be a special and perhaps idealized case of learning.

  3. Scaling laws of associative memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Sandro; Pinkoviezky, Itai; Rubin, Alon; Tsodyks, Misha

    2013-10-01

    Most people have great difficulty in recalling unrelated items. For example, in free recall experiments, lists of more than a few randomly selected words cannot be accurately repeated. Here we introduce a phenomenological model of memory retrieval inspired by theories of neuronal population coding of information. The model predicts nontrivial scaling behaviors for the mean and standard deviation of the number of recalled words for lists of increasing length. Our results suggest that associative information retrieval is a dominating factor that limits the number of recalled items.

  4. Scaling laws in phytoplankton nutrient uptake affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemann, Christian; Fiksen, Øyvind; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2016-01-01

    instantaneously. Here we provide empirical evidence that the perfect sink strategy is not common in phytoplankton. Although small cells are indeed favored by a large surface to volume ratio, we show that they are punished by higher relative investment cost in order to fully benefit from the larger surface......Nutrient uptake affinity affects the competitive ability of microbial organisms at low nutrient concentrations. From the theory of diffusion limitation it follows that uptake affinity scales linearly with the cell radius. This is in conflict with some observations suggesting that uptake affinity...... to volume ratio. We show that there are two reasons for this. First, because the small cells need a higher transporter density in order to maximize their affinity, and second because the relative cost of a transporter is higher for a small than for a large cell. We suggest that this might explain why...

  5. Scaling range of power laws that originate from fluctuation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Dariusz; Mazur, Zygmunt

    2013-05-01

    We extend our previous study of scaling range properties performed for detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) [Physica A 392, 2384 (2013)] to other techniques of fluctuation analysis (FA). The new technique, called modified detrended moving average analysis (MDMA), is introduced, and its scaling range properties are examined and compared with those of detrended moving average analysis (DMA) and DFA. It is shown that contrary to DFA, DMA and MDMA techniques exhibit power law dependence of the scaling range with respect to the length of the searched signal and with respect to the accuracy R^{2} of the fit to the considered scaling law imposed by DMA or MDMA methods. This power law dependence is satisfied for both uncorrelated and autocorrelated data. We find also a simple generalization of this power law relation for series with a different level of autocorrelations measured in terms of the Hurst exponent. Basic relations between scaling ranges for different techniques are also discussed. Our findings should be particularly useful for local FA in, e.g., econophysics, finances, or physiology, where the huge number of short time series has to be examined at once and wherever the preliminary check of the scaling range regime for each of the series separately is neither effective nor possible.

  6. Old and New Scaling Laws in Quantum Quench

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Sumit R

    2016-01-01

    The response of a many body system to a time dependent coupling which passes through or approaches a critical point displays universal scaling behavior. In some regimes, scaling laws have been known since the 1970's. Recently holographic techniques have been used to understand the origins of such scaling. Along the way, new scaling behaviors in other regimes have been found in holographic models, which have later been shown to hold in a generic field theory regardless of holography. This contribution summarizes recent work on these various scaling regimes.

  7. Scaling laws and fluctuations in the statistics of word frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Martin; Altmann, Eduardo G.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we combine statistical analysis of written texts and simple stochastic models to explain the appearance of scaling laws in the statistics of word frequencies. The average vocabulary of an ensemble of fixed-length texts is known to scale sublinearly with the total number of words (Heaps’ law). Analyzing the fluctuations around this average in three large databases (Google-ngram, English Wikipedia, and a collection of scientific articles), we find that the standard deviation scales linearly with the average (Taylor's law), in contrast to the prediction of decaying fluctuations obtained using simple sampling arguments. We explain both scaling laws (Heaps’ and Taylor) by modeling the usage of words using a Poisson process with a fat-tailed distribution of word frequencies (Zipf's law) and topic-dependent frequencies of individual words (as in topic models). Considering topical variations lead to quenched averages, turn the vocabulary size a non-self-averaging quantity, and explain the empirical observations. For the numerous practical applications relying on estimations of vocabulary size, our results show that uncertainties remain large even for long texts. We show how to account for these uncertainties in measurements of lexical richness of texts with different lengths.

  8. Scaling laws and properties of compositional data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccianti, Antonella; Albanese, Stefano; Lima, AnnaMaria; Minolfi, Giulia; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2016-04-01

    Many random processes occur in geochemistry. Accurate predictions of the manner in which elements or chemical species interact each other are needed to construct models able to treat presence of random components. Geochemical variables actually observed are the consequence of several events, some of which may be poorly defined or imperfectly understood. Variables tend to change with time/space but, despite their complexity, may share specific common traits and it is possible to model them stochastically. Description of the frequency distribution of the geochemical abundances has been an important target of research, attracting attention for at least 100 years, starting with CLARKE (1889) and continued by GOLDSCHMIDT (1933) and WEDEPOHL (1955). However, it was AHRENS (1954a,b) who focussed on the effect of skewness distributions, for example the log-normal distribution, regarded by him as a fundamental law of geochemistry. Although modeling of frequency distributions with some probabilistic models (for example Gaussian, log-normal, Pareto) has been well discussed in several fields of application, little attention has been devoted to the features of compositional data. When compositional nature of data is taken into account, the most typical distribution models for compositions are the Dirichlet and the additive logistic normal (or normal on the simplex) (AITCHISON et al. 2003; MATEU-FIGUERAS et al. 2005; MATEU-FIGUERAS and PAWLOWSKY-GLAHN 2008; MATEU-FIGUERAS et al. 2013). As an alternative, because compositional data have to be transformed from simplex space to real space, coordinates obtained by the ilr transformation or by application of the concept of balance can be analyzed by classical methods (EGOZCUE et al. 2003). In this contribution an approach coherent with the properties of compositional information is proposed and used to investigate the shape of the frequency distribution of compositional data. The purpose is to understand data-generation processes

  9. Memory Effects and Scaling Laws in Slowly Driven Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Berglund, N

    1999-01-01

    This article deals with dynamical systems depending on a slowly varying parameter. We present several physical examples illustrating memory effects, such as metastability and hysteresis, which frequently appear in these systems. A mathematical theory is outlined, which allows to show existence of hysteresis cycles, and determine related scaling laws.

  10. A Systematic Study on Scaling Law of Spiral Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShufengBAI; QiOUYANG

    1999-01-01

    The study of spiral waves in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction has generated fruitful results since the invention of the open spatial reactor.However,some theories are only unsubstantiated and need additional verifications.Our experimental results give a new scaling law of simple and quasi-periodic spiral waves,providing corroborations for some theories and challenge some others.

  11. Scaling laws for density correlations and fluctuations in multiparticle dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, E.A. de [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Wilrijk (Belgium). Dept. of Physics]|[Interuniversity Inst. for High Energies, Brussels (Belgium); Dremin, I.M. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Moscow (Russian Federation). Fizicheskij Inst.; Kittel, W. [Nationaal Inst. voor Kernfysica en Hoge-Energiefysica (NIKHEF), Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    1996-05-01

    Experimental data on particle correlations and fluctuations in various high-energy multiparticle collisions are presented, with special emphasis on evidence for scaling-law evolution in small phase-space domains. The notions of intermittency and fractality as related to the above findings are described. Phenomenological and theoretical work on the subject is reviewed. (orig.).

  12. Power law cosmology model comparison with CMB scale information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutusaus, Isaac; Lamine, Brahim; Blanchard, Alain; Dupays, Arnaud; Zolnierowski, Yves; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Ealet, Anne; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Ilić, Stéphane; Pisani, Alice; Plaszczynski, Stéphane; Sakr, Ziad; Salvatelli, Valentina; Schücker, Thomas; Tilquin, André; Virey, Jean-Marc

    2016-11-01

    Despite the ability of the cosmological concordance model (Λ CDM ) to describe the cosmological observations exceedingly well, power law expansion of the Universe scale radius, R (t )∝tn, has been proposed as an alternative framework. We examine here these models, analyzing their ability to fit cosmological data using robust model comparison criteria. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) and acoustic scale information from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have been used. We find that SNIa data either alone or combined with BAO can be well reproduced by both Λ CDM and power law expansion models with n ˜1.5 , while the constant expansion rate model (n =1 ) is clearly disfavored. Allowing for some redshift evolution in the SNIa luminosity essentially removes any clear preference for a specific model. The CMB data are well known to provide the most stringent constraints on standard cosmological models, in particular, through the position of the first peak of the temperature angular power spectrum, corresponding to the sound horizon at recombination, a scale physically related to the BAO scale. Models with n ≥1 lead to a divergence of the sound horizon and do not naturally provide the relevant scales for the BAO and the CMB. We retain an empirical footing to overcome this issue: we let the data choose the preferred values for these scales, while we recompute the ionization history in power law models, to obtain the distance to the CMB. In doing so, we find that the scale coming from the BAO data is not consistent with the observed position of the first peak of the CMB temperature angular power spectrum for any power law cosmology. Therefore, we conclude that when the three standard probes (SNIa, BAO, and CMB) are combined, the Λ CDM model is very strongly favored over any of these alternative models, which are then essentially ruled out.

  13. Scale relativity theory and integrative systems biology: 1. Founding principles and scale laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffray, Charles; Nottale, Laurent

    2008-05-01

    In these two companion papers, we provide an overview and a brief history of the multiple roots, current developments and recent advances of integrative systems biology and identify multiscale integration as its grand challenge. Then we introduce the fundamental principles and the successive steps that have been followed in the construction of the scale relativity theory, and discuss how scale laws of increasing complexity can be used to model and understand the behaviour of complex biological systems. In scale relativity theory, the geometry of space is considered to be continuous but non-differentiable, therefore fractal (i.e., explicitly scale-dependent). One writes the equations of motion in such a space as geodesics equations, under the constraint of the principle of relativity of all scales in nature. To this purpose, covariant derivatives are constructed that implement the various effects of the non-differentiable and fractal geometry. In this first review paper, the scale laws that describe the new dependence on resolutions of physical quantities are obtained as solutions of differential equations acting in the scale space. This leads to several possible levels of description for these laws, from the simplest scale invariant laws to generalized laws with variable fractal dimensions. Initial applications of these laws to the study of species evolution, embryogenesis and cell confinement are discussed.

  14. A scaling law of radial gas distribution in disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong

    1990-01-01

    Based on the idea that local conditions within a galactic disk largely determine the region's evolution time scale, researchers built a theoretical model to take into account molecular cloud and star formations in the disk evolution process. Despite some variations that may be caused by spiral arms and central bulge masses, they found that many late-type galaxies show consistency with the model in their radial atomic and molecular gas profiles. In particular, researchers propose that a scaling law be used to generalize the gas distribution characteristics. This scaling law may be useful in helping to understand the observed gas contents in many galaxies. Their model assumes an exponential mass distribution with disk radius. Most of the mass are in atomic gas state at the beginning of the evolution. Molecular clouds form through a modified Schmidt Law which takes into account gravitational instabilities in a possible three-phase structure of diffuse interstellar medium (McKee and Ostriker, 1977; Balbus and Cowie, 1985); whereas star formation proceeds presumably unaffected by the environmental conditions outside of molecular clouds (Young, 1987). In such a model both atomic and molecular gas profiles in a typical galactic disk (as a result of the evolution) can be fitted simultaneously by adjusting the efficiency constants. Galaxies of different sizes and masses, on the other hand, can be compared with the model by simply scaling their characteristic length scales and shifting their radial ranges to match the assumed disk total mass profile sigma tot(r).

  15. DNS and scaling law analysis of compressible turbulent channel flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fully developed compressible turbulent channel flow (Ma=0.8,Re=3300) is numerically simulated, and the data base of turbulence is established. The s tatistics such as density_weighted mean velocity and RMS velocity fluctuations i n semi_local coordinates agree well with those from other DNS data. High order s tatistics (skewness and flatness factors) of velocity fluctuations of compressib le turbulence are reported for the first time. Compressibility effects are also discussed. Pressure_dilatation absorbs part of the kinetic energy and makes the streaks of compressible channel flow more smooth. The scaling laws of compressible channel flow are also discussed. The conclusi ons are: (a) Scaling law is found in the center area of the channel. (b) In this area, ESS is also found. (c) When Mach number is not ve ry high, compressibility has little effect on scaling exponents.

  16. Scaling laws of gelatin hydrogels for steady dynamic friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinit; Singh, Arun K.

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we use population balance based dynamic friction model for steady sliding to develop scaling laws in the terms of mesh size of gelatin hydrogels. First of all, it is observed in the sliding experiments that shear modulus of gelatin hydrogels depends on sliding velocity. This dependence is more evident in the case of low sliding velocity. Moreover, relaxation time constant of a dangling chain at the sliding interface scales with the same exponent as its stiffness. The scaling law is also developed for chain density and viscous retardation at the sliding interface. It is also established that the Hookean-based dynamic friction model is sufficient to study frictional behaviour of hydrogels. The reason for this observation is attributed to the weak bonding between a gelatin hydrogel and glass interface.

  17. Energy Efficiency Scaling Law for MIMO Broadcasting Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jie

    2012-01-01

    This letter investigates the energy efficiency (EE) scaling law for the broadcasting channels (BC) with many users, in which the non-ideal transmit independent power consumption is taken into account. We first consider the single antenna case with $K$ users, and derive that the EE scales as $\\frac{{\\log_2 \\ln K}}{\\alpha}$ when $\\alpha > 0$ and $\\log_2 K$ when $\\alpha = 0$, where $\\alpha$ is the normalized transmit independent power. After that, we extend it to the general MIMO BC case with a $M$-antenna transmitter and $K$ users each with $N$ antennas. The scaling law becomes $\\frac{{M \\log_2 \\ln NK}}{\\alpha}$ when $\\alpha > 0$ and $ \\log_2 NK$ when $\\alpha = 0$.

  18. Generalizing Microdischarge Breakdown Scaling Laws for Pressure and Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Amanda; Garner, Allen

    2016-10-01

    Shrinking device dimensions for micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems necessitates accurate breakdown voltage predictions for reliable operation. Additionally, one must accurately predict breakdown voltage to optimize system geometry for applications in microplasmas and micropropulsion. Traditional approaches use Paschen's law (PL) to predict breakdown, but PL fails at small gap distances ( 15 μm) where field emission dominates. Subsequent work derived scaling laws and analytic expressions for breakdown voltage in argon at atmospheric pressure. Applications at high (e.g. combustion) and low (e.g. vacuum nanoelectronics) pressures for various gases motivate the generalization of these models for pressure and gas. This work addresses these concerns by deriving scaling laws generalized for gap distance, pressure, and gas, while also specifically incorporating and exploring the impact of field enhancement and work function. We compare these analytic scaling laws to experimental data and particle-in-cell simulations. Funded by a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Education Program Faculty Development Grant Program at Purdue University.

  19. Unified scaling law for earthquakes in Crimea and Northern Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasova, A. K.; Kossobokov, V. G.

    2016-10-01

    This study continues detailed investigations on the construction of regional charts of the parameters of the generalized Guttenberg-Richter Law, which takes into account the properties of the spatiotemporal seismic energy scaling. We analyzed the parameters of the law in the vicinity of the intersections of morphostructural lineaments in Crimea and Greater Caucasus. It was shown that ignoring the fractal character of the spatial distribution of earthquakes in the southern part of the Russian Federation can lead to significant underestimation of the seismic hazard in the largest cities of the region.

  20. Structures and scaling laws of turbulent Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlack, Martin; Avsarkisov, Victor; Hoyas, Sergio; Rosteck, Andreas; Garcia-Galache, Jose P.; Frank, Andy

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a set of large scale DNS of turbulent Couette flow with the two key objectives: (i) to better understand large scale coherent structures and (ii) to validate new Lie symmetry based turbulent scaling laws for the mean velocity and higher order moments. Though frequently reported in the literature large scale structures pose a serious constraint on our ability to conduct DNS of turbulent Couette flow as the largest structures grow with increasing Re#, while at the same time Kolmogorov scale decreases. Other than for the turbulent Poiseuille flow a too small box is immediately visible in low order statistics such as the mean and limited our DNS to Reτ = 550 . At the same time we observed that scaling of the mean is peculiar as it involves a certain statistical symmetry which has never been observed for any other parallel wall-bounded turbulent shear flow. Symmetries such as Galilean group lie at the heart of fluid dynamics, while for turbulence statistics due to the multi-point correlation equations (MPCE) additional statistical symmetries are admitted. Most important, symmetries are the essential to construct exact solutions to the MPCE, which with the new above-mentioned special statistical symmetry led to a new turbulent scaling law for the Couette flow. DFG Grant No; KH 257/2-1.

  1. Wafer scale oblique angle plasma etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Jarecki, Jr., Robert L.; Finnegan, Patrick Sean

    2017-05-23

    Wafer scale oblique angle etching of a semiconductor substrate is performed in a conventional plasma etch chamber by using a fixture that supports a multiple number of separate Faraday cages. Each cage is formed to include an angled grid surface and is positioned such that it will be positioned over a separate one of the die locations on the wafer surface when the fixture is placed over the wafer. The presence of the Faraday cages influences the local electric field surrounding each wafer die, re-shaping the local field to be disposed in alignment with the angled grid surface. The re-shaped plasma causes the reactive ions to follow a linear trajectory through the plasma sheath and angled grid surface, ultimately impinging the wafer surface at an angle. The selected geometry of the Faraday cage angled grid surface thus determines the angle at with the reactive ions will impinge the wafer.

  2. Multi-Scale Modeling of Plasma Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishchev, Oleg

    2004-11-01

    Plasma thrusters are characterized with multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are due to the intrinsic physical processes such as gas ionization, wall effects and plasma acceleration. Characteristic times for hot plasma and cold gas are differing by 6-7 orders of magnitude. The typical collisional mean-free-paths vary by 3-5 orders along the devices. These make questionable a true self-consistent modeling of the thrusters. The latter is vital to the understanding of complex physics, non-linear dynamics and optimization of the performance. To overcome this problem we propose the following approach. All processes are divided into two groups: fast and slow. The slow ones include gas evolution with known sources and ionization sink. The ionization rate, transport coefficients, energy sources are defined during "fast step". Both processes are linked through external iterations. Multiple spatial scales are handled using moving adaptive mesh. Development and application of this method to the VASIMR helicon plasma source and other thrusters will be discussed. Supported by NASA.

  3. Scaling laws for implicit viscosities in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierwisch, Claas; Polfer, Pit

    2017-06-01

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a particle-based method which solves continuum equations such as the Navier-Stokes equations. A periodic fluidic system under homogeneous shear is studied using SPH in the present work. The total pressure of the system and the shear stress contributions from the SPH interaction terms for pressure and viscosity as well as the contribution caused by velocity fluctuations are analyzed. It is found that the pressure and the shear stress contributions obey certain scaling laws depending on physical properties of the system such as compressibility, viscosity and shear rate as well as the spatial resolution. Some of the identified relations resemble scaling laws for the rheology of dense granular flows. These findings render an assessment of the convergence with respect to the spatial resolution of SPH simulations possible. Furthermore, the similarities between numerical SPH particles and physical grains in dense flow provide a deeper understanding of the nature of the SPH method.

  4. Scaling laws for near barrier Coulomb and Nuclear Breakup

    CERN Document Server

    Hussein, M S; Lubian, J; Otomar, D R; Canto, L F

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the nuclear and the Coulomb contributions to the breakup cross sections of $^6$Li in collisions with targets in different mass ranges. Comparing cross sections for different targets at collision energies corresponding to the same $E/V_{\\mathrm{\\scriptscriptstyle B}}$, we obtain interesting scaling laws. First, we derive an approximate linear expression for the nuclear breakup cross section as a function of $A_{\\mathrm{% \\scriptscriptstyle T}}^{1/3}$. We then confirm the validity of this expression performing CDCC calculations. Scaling laws for the Coulomb breakup cross section are also investigated. In this case, our CDCC calculations indicate that this cross section has a linear dependence on the atomic number of the target. This behavior is explained by qualitative arguments. Our findings, which are consistent with previously obtained results for higher energies, are important when planning for experiments involving exotic weakly bound nuclei.

  5. Power law cosmology model comparison with CMB scale information

    CERN Document Server

    Tutusaus, Isaac; Blanchard, Alain; Dupays, Arnaud; Zolnierowski, Yves; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Ealet, Anne; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Fèvre, Olivier Le; Ilić, Stéphane; Piazza, Federico; Pisani, Alice; Plaszczynski, Stéphane; Sakr, Ziad; Salvatelli, Valentina; Schücker, Thomas; Tilquin, André; Virey, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ability of the cosmological concordance model ($\\Lambda$CDM) to describe the cosmological observations exceedingly well, power law expansion of the Universe scale radius has been proposed as an alternative framework. We examine here these models, analyzing their ability to fit cosmological data using robust model comparison criteria. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) and acoustic scale information from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have been used. We find that SNIa data either alone or combined with BAO, can be well reproduced by both $\\Lambda$CDM and power law expansion models with $n \\sim 1.5$, while the constant expansion rate model ($n = 1$) is clearly disfavored. Allowing for some redshift evolution in the SNIa luminosity essentially removes any clear preference for a specific model. The CMB data is well known to provide the most stringent constraints on standard cosmological models, in particular through the position of the first peak of the temperature ...

  6. Magnetic Scaling Laws for the Atmospheres of Hot Giant Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Menou, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    We present scaling laws for advection, radiation, magnetic drag and ohmic dissipation in the atmospheres of hot giant exoplanets. In the limit of weak thermal ionization, ohmic dissipation increases with the planetary equilibrium temperature (T_eq >~ 1000 K) faster than the insolation power does, eventually reaching values >~ 1% of the insolation power, which may be sufficient to inflate the radii of hot Jupiters. At higher T_eq values still, magnetic drag rapidly brakes the atmospheric winds, which reduces the associated ohmic dissipation power. For example, for a planetary field strength B=10G, the fiducial scaling laws indicate that ohmic dissipation exceeds 1% of the insolation power over the equilibrium temperature range T_eq ~ 1300-2000 K, with a peak contribution at T_eq ~ 1600 K. Evidence for magnetically dragged winds at the planetary thermal photosphere could emerge in the form of reduced longitudinal offsets for the dayside infrared hotspot. This suggests the possibility of an anticorrelation betwe...

  7. Power Laws, Scale-Free Networks and Genome Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Koonin, Eugene V; Karev, Georgy P

    2006-01-01

    Power Laws, Scale-free Networks and Genome Biology deals with crucial aspects of the theoretical foundations of systems biology, namely power law distributions and scale-free networks which have emerged as the hallmarks of biological organization in the post-genomic era. The chapters in the book not only describe the interesting mathematical properties of biological networks but moves beyond phenomenology, toward models of evolution capable of explaining the emergence of these features. The collection of chapters, contributed by both physicists and biologists, strives to address the problems in this field in a rigorous but not excessively mathematical manner and to represent different viewpoints, which is crucial in this emerging discipline. Each chapter includes, in addition to technical descriptions of properties of biological networks and evolutionary models, a more general and accessible introduction to the respective problems. Most chapters emphasize the potential of theoretical systems biology for disco...

  8. Dynamical scaling laws – A few unanswered questions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Mazumder

    2008-11-01

    behaviour, and , the dimensionality of the system. It is important to note that the scaling hypothesis has not been proved conclusively except for some model systems. The Fourier transform of (, ), the structure factor or scattering function (, ) for a dimensional Euclidean system, obeys simple scaling ansatz at later times, $$(, ) = () d (())$$. Based on some of our recent observations on phase separation of a multicomponent alloy involving hydration of cementitious material, it is proposed to discuss some unanswered questions pertinent to the validity of dynamical scaling laws addressing some issues like (i) uniqueness of characteristic length (), (ii) the extent of validity of the scaling laws for new phase formation in the case of non-Euclidean fractal systems, (iii) the extent of validity of the scaling laws for multicomponent systems. The need for investigations examining the extent and the nature of the validity of the scaling laws for confined systems and for systems subjected to random field will also be discussed.

  9. Dust-acoustic waves and stability in the permeating dust plasma: II. Power-law distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Jingyu; Du, Jiulin

    2012-01-01

    The dust-acoustic waves and their stability driven by a flowing dust plasma when it cross through a static (target) dust plasma (the so-called permeating dust plasma) are investigated when the components of the dust plasma obey the power-law q-distributions in nonextensive statistics. The frequency, the growth rate and the stability condition of the dust-acoustic waves are derived under this physical situation, which express the effects of the nonextensivity as well as the flowing dust plasma velocity on the dust-acoustic waves in this dust plasma. The numerical results illustrate some new characteristics of the dust-acoustic waves, which are different from those in the permeating dust plasma when the plasma components are the Maxwellian distribution. In addition, we show that the flowing dust plasma velocity has a significant effect on the dust-acoustic waves in the permeating dust plasma with the power-law q-distribution.

  10. Catastrophic Failure and Critical Scaling Laws of Fiber Bundle Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengwang Hao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a spring-fiber bundle model used to describe the failure process induced by energy release in heterogeneous materials. The conditions that induce catastrophic failure are determined by geometric conditions and energy equilibrium. It is revealed that the relative rates of deformation of, and damage to the fiber bundle with respect to the boundary controlling displacement ε0 exhibit universal power law behavior near the catastrophic point, with a critical exponent of −1/2. The proportion of the rate of response with respect to acceleration exhibits a linear relationship with increasing displacement in the vicinity of the catastrophic point. This allows for the prediction of catastrophic failure immediately prior to failure by extrapolating the trajectory of this relationship as it asymptotes to zero. Monte Carlo simulations are completed and these two critical scaling laws are confirmed.

  11. Emergence of double scaling law in complex system

    CERN Document Server

    Han, D D; Ma, Y G

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a stochastic model to explain a double power-law distribution which exhibits two different Paretian behaviors in the upper and the lower tail and widely exists in social and economic systems. The model incorporates fitness consideration and noise fluctuation. We find that if the number of variables (e.g. the degree of nodes in complex networks or people's incomes) grows exponentially, normal distributed fitness coupled with exponentially increasing variable is responsible for the emergence of the double power-law distribution. Fluctuations do not change the result qualitatively but contribute to the second-part scaling exponent. The evolution of Chinese airline network is taken as an example to show a nice agreement with our stochastic model.

  12. Emergence of double scaling law in complex systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D. D.; Qian, J. H.; Ma, Y. G.

    2011-04-01

    We introduce a stochastic model to explain a double power-law distribution which exhibits two different Paretian behaviors in the upper and the lower tail and widely exists in social and economic systems. The model incorporates fitness consideration and noise fluctuation. We find that if the number of variables (e.g. the degree of nodes in complex networks or people's incomes) grows exponentially, the normal distributed fitness coupled with exponentially increasing variable is responsible for the emergence of the double power-law distribution. Fluctuations do not change the result qualitatively but contribute to the second-part scaling exponent. The evolution of the Chinese airline network is taken as an example to show a nice agreement with our stochastic model.

  13. City boundaries and the universality of scaling laws

    CERN Document Server

    Arcaute, Elsa; Ferguson, Peter; Youn, Hyejin; Johansson, Anders; Batty, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the universality and robustness of scaling laws for urban systems, according to the work by Bettencourt, Lobo and West among others, using England and Wales as a case study. Initial results employing the demarcations for cities from the European Statistical Commission digress from the expected patterns. We therefore develop a method for producing multiple city definitions based on both morphological and functional characteristics, determined by population density and commuting to work journeys. For each of these realisations of cities, we construct urban attributes by aggregating high resolution census data. The approach produces a set of more than twenty thousand possible definitions of urban systems for England and Wales. We use these as a laboratory to explore the behaviour of the scaling exponent for each configuration. The analysis of a large set of urban indicators for the full range of system realisations shows that the scaling exponent is notably sensitive to boundary change, p...

  14. Empirical scaling law connecting persistence and severity of global terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianbo; Fang, Peng; Liu, Feiyan

    2017-09-01

    Terrorism and counterterrorism have both been evolving rapidly. From time to time, there have been debates on whether the new terrorism is evolutionary or revolutionary. Such debate often becomes more heated after major terrorist activities, such as the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 and the November 13, 2015 coordinated Paris terror attack. Using country-wide terrorism data since 1970, we show that there exist scaling laws governing the continuity and persistence of world-wide terrorism, with the long-term scaling parameter for each country closely related to its yearly global terrorism index. This suggests that the new terrorism is more accurately considered evolutionary. It is further shown that the imbalance in the seesaw of terrorism and counterterrorism is not only responsible for the scaling behavior found here, but also provides new means of quantifying the severity of the global terrorism.

  15. Universal scaling law in long gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Tsutsui, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelming diversity of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), discovered after the launch of {\\it Swift} satellite, is a major obstacle to LGRB studies. Recently, it is shown that the prompt emission of LGRBs is classified into three subclasses: Type I, Type II LGRBs populating separate fundamental planes in a 3D space defined by the peak luminosity, the duration, and the spectral peak energy, and outliers not belonging to either of the planes. Here we show that Type I LGRBs (LGRBs I) exhibit different shapes of light curves from Type II LGRBs (LGRBs II). Furthermore, we demonstrate that this classification has uncovered a new scaling law in the light curves of LGRBs II spanning 8 orders of magnitude from the prompt to late X-ray afterglow emission. The scaled light curve has four distinct phases. The first phase has a characteristic time scale while the subsequent three phases exhibit power law behaviors with different exponents. We discuss its possible interpretation in terms of the emission from an optically th...

  16. Scaling Laws and Occurrence Conditions of Nuclear Halo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘祖华; 张锡珍; 张焕乔

    2003-01-01

    Available data regarding the nuclear halo candidates are systematically analysed in terms of the asymptotic normalization coefficients measured experimentally. On the other hand, we have put forth conditions for nuclear halo formation, and compared with the experimental data. Based on the analytical expressions of the expectation value for the operator r2 in a finite square well potential, we have presented the improved scaling laws for the dimensionless quantity / R2 of nuclear halo, which seem to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  17. From Single-Cell Dynamics to Scaling Laws in Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chignola, Roberto; Sega, Michela; Stella, Sabrina; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav; Milotti, Edoardo

    We are developing a biophysical model of tumor biology. We follow a strictly quantitative approach where each step of model development is validated by comparing simulation outputs with experimental data. While this strategy may slow down our advancements, at the same time it provides an invaluable reward: we can trust simulation outputs and use the model to explore territories of cancer biology where current experimental techniques fail. Here, we review our multi-scale biophysical modeling approach and show how a description of cancer at the cellular level has led us to general laws obeyed by both in vitro and in vivo tumors.

  18. Multi-scale percolation and scaling laws for anisotropic turbulent diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakunin, O.G.; Schep, T.J

    2004-02-23

    This Letter deals with scaling laws that describe transport and correlation effects in anisotropic media. The method of multi-scale continuum percolation is used. Multi-scale continuum percolation in 2D random flows is based upon a description in terms of a hierarchy of spatial scales {lambda}. In that theory the correlation function of the velocity scales as {lambda}{sup -{alpha}}. On the other hand, fractal theory leads to the scaling with time {lambda}{proportional_to}t{sup H}, where H is the Hurst factor. A closer examination of fractal and percolation concepts allows us to obtain not only the value of the exponents but also the relationship between them. It is shown that super-diffusive, 1/2scaling law obtained from percolation theory. The model of double diffusion (H=1/4) and the one of Dreizin-Dykhne (H=3/4) are treated as examples. The connection between these scaling laws and the order of the fractional time derivative in the transport equation is pointed out.

  19. Scaling Laws and Critical Properties for fcc and hcp Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgranges, Caroline; Widhalm, Leanna; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2016-06-16

    The determination of the critical parameters of metals has remained particularly challenging both experimentally, because of the very large temperatures involved, and theoretically, because of the many-body interactions that take place in metals. Moreover, experiments have shown that these systems exhibit an unusually strong asymmetry of their binodal. Recent theoretical work has led to new similarity laws, based on the calculation of the Zeno line and of the underlying Boyle parameters, which provided results for the critical properties of atomic and molecular systems in excellent agreement with experiments. Using the recently developed expanded Wang-Landau (EWL) simulation method, we evaluate the grand-canonical partition function, over a wide range of conditions, for 11 fcc and hcp metals (Ag, Al, Au, Be, Cu, Ir, Ni, Pb, Pd, Pt, and Rh), modeled with a many-body interaction potential. This allows us to calculate the binodal, Zeno line, and Boyle parameters and, in turn, obtain the critical properties for these systems. We also propose two scaling laws for the enthalpy and entropy of vaporization, and identify critical exponents of 0.4 and 1.22 for these two laws, respectively.

  20. Exponential decay and scaling laws in noisy chaotic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seoane, Jesus M. [Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos Group, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jesus.seoane@urjc.es; Sanjuan, Miguel A.F. [Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos Group, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: miguel.sanjuan@urjc.es

    2008-01-07

    In this Letter we present a numerical study of the effect of noise on a chaotic scattering problem in open Hamiltonian systems. We use the second order Heun method for stochastic differential equations in order to integrate the equations of motion of a two-dimensional flow with additive white Gaussian noise. We use as a prototype model the paradigmatic Henon-Heiles Hamiltonian with weak dissipation which is a well-known example of a system with escapes. We study the behavior of the scattering particles in the scattering region, finding an abrupt change of the decay law from algebraic to exponential due to the effects of noise. Moreover, we find a linear scaling law between the coefficient of the exponential law and the intensity of noise. These results are of a general nature in the sense that the same behavior appears when we choose as a model a two-dimensional discrete map with uniform noise (bounded in a particular interval and zero otherwise), showing the validity of the algorithm used. We believe the results of this work be useful for a better understanding of chaotic scattering in more realistic situations, where noise is presented.

  1. Scaling laws for magnetic fields on the quiet Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Stenflo, Jan O

    2012-01-01

    The Sun's magnetic field is structured over a range of scales that span approximately seven orders of magnitudes, four of which lie beyond the resolving power of current telescopes. Here we have used a Hinode SOT/SP deep mode data set for the quiet-sun disk center in combination with constraints from the Hanle effect to derive scaling laws that describe how the magnetic structuring varies from the resolved scales down to the magnetic diffusion limit, where the field ceases to be frozen-in. The focus of the analysis is a derivation of the magnetic energy spectrum, but we also discuss the scale dependence of the probability density function (PDF) for the flux densities and the role of the cancellation function for the average unsigned flux density. Analysis of the Hinode data set with the line-ratio method reveals a collapsed flux population in the form of flux tubes with a size distribution that is peaked in the 10-100 km range. Magnetic energy is injected into this scale range by the instability mechanism of ...

  2. Scaling laws in decaying helical 3D magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Christensson, M; Brandenburg, A; Christensson, Mattias; Hindmarsh, Mark; Brandenburg, Axel

    2002-01-01

    We study the evolution of growth and decay laws for the magnetic field coherence length xi, energy E_M and magnetic helicity H in freely decaying 3D MHD turbulence. We show that with certain assumptions, self-similarity of the magnetic power spectrum alone implies that xi ~ t^{1/2}. This in turn implies that magnetic helicity decays as H ~ t^{-2s}, where s=(xi_diff/xi_H)^2, in terms of xi_diff, the diffusion length scale, and xi_H, a length scale defined from the helicity power spectrum. The relative magnetic helicity remains constant, implying that the magnetic energy decays as E_M ~ t^{-0.5-2s}. At late times s is constant and inversely proportional to the magnetic Reynolds number Re_M.

  3. Gompertz mortality law and scaling behavior of the Penna model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, J. B.; Mao, Y.

    2005-11-01

    The Penna model is a model of evolutionary ageing through mutation accumulation where traditionally time and the age of an organism are treated as discrete variables and an organism’s genome is represented by a binary bit string. We reformulate the asexual Penna model and show that a universal scale invariance emerges as we increase the number of discrete genome bits to the limit of a continuum. The continuum model, introduced by Almeida and Thomas [Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 11, 1209 (2000)] can be recovered from the discrete model in the limit of infinite bits coupled with a vanishing mutation rate per bit. Finally, we show that scale invariant properties may lead to the ubiquitous Gompertz law for mortality rates for early ages, which is generally regarded as being empirical.

  4. Scaling laws in the dynamics of crime growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Luiz G. A.; Ribeiro, Haroldo V.; Mendes, Renio S.

    2013-06-01

    The increasing number of crimes in areas with large concentrations of people have made cities one of the main sources of violence. Understanding characteristics of how crime rate expands and its relations with the cities size goes beyond an academic question, being a central issue for contemporary society. Here, we characterize and analyze quantitative aspects of murders in the period from 1980 to 2009 in Brazilian cities. We find that the distribution of the annual, biannual and triannual logarithmic homicide growth rates exhibit the same functional form for distinct scales, that is, a scale invariant behavior. We also identify asymptotic power-law decay relations between the standard deviations of these three growth rates and the initial size. Further, we discuss similarities with complex organizations.

  5. Scaling laws in the dynamics of crime growth rate

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, Luiz Gustavo de Andrade; Mendes, Renio dos Santos

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of crimes in areas with large concentrations of people have made cities one of the main source of violence. Understanding characteristics of how crime rate expands and its relations with the cities size goes beyond an academic question, being a central issue for the contemporary society. Here, we characterize and analyze quantitative aspects of murders in the period from 1980 to 2009 in Brazilian cities. We find that the distribution of the annual, biannual and triannual logarithmic homicide growth rates exhibit the same functional form for distinct scales, that is, a scale invariant behaviour. We also identify asymptotic power-law decay relations between the standard deviations of these three growth rates and the initial size. Further, we discuss similarities with complex organizations.

  6. Scaling laws and universality in the choice of election candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Mantovani, M C; Moro, M V; Picoli, S; Mendes, R S

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays there is an increasing interest of physicists in finding regularities related to social phenomena. This interest is clearly motivated by applications that a statistical mechanical description of the human behavior may have in our society. By using this framework, we address this work to cover an open question related to elections: the choice of elections candidates (candidature process). Our analysis reveals that, apart from the social motivations, this system displays features of traditional out-of-equilibrium physical phenomena such as scale-free statistics and universality. Basically, we found a non-linear (power law) mean correspondence between the number of candidates and the size of the electorate (number of voters), and also that this choice has a multiplicative underlying process (lognormal behavior). The universality of our findings is supported by data from 16 elections from 5 countries. In addition, we show that aspects of network scale-free can be connected to this universal behavior.

  7. Event-scale power law recession analysis: quantifying methodological uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dralle, David N.; Karst, Nathaniel J.; Charalampous, Kyriakos; Veenstra, Andrew; Thompson, Sally E.

    2017-01-01

    The study of single streamflow recession events is receiving increasing attention following the presentation of novel theoretical explanations for the emergence of power law forms of the recession relationship, and drivers of its variability. Individually characterizing streamflow recessions often involves describing the similarities and differences between model parameters fitted to each recession time series. Significant methodological sensitivity has been identified in the fitting and parameterization of models that describe populations of many recessions, but the dependence of estimated model parameters on methodological choices has not been evaluated for event-by-event forms of analysis. Here, we use daily streamflow data from 16 catchments in northern California and southern Oregon to investigate how combinations of commonly used streamflow recession definitions and fitting techniques impact parameter estimates of a widely used power law recession model. Results are relevant to watersheds that are relatively steep, forested, and rain-dominated. The highly seasonal mediterranean climate of northern California and southern Oregon ensures study catchments explore a wide range of recession behaviors and wetness states, ideal for a sensitivity analysis. In such catchments, we show the following: (i) methodological decisions, including ones that have received little attention in the literature, can impact parameter value estimates and model goodness of fit; (ii) the central tendencies of event-scale recession parameter probability distributions are largely robust to methodological choices, in the sense that differing methods rank catchments similarly according to the medians of these distributions; (iii) recession parameter distributions are method-dependent, but roughly catchment-independent, such that changing the choices made about a particular method affects a given parameter in similar ways across most catchments; and (iv) the observed correlative relationship

  8. The scaling laws of human travel - A message from George

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Dirk

    2006-03-01

    In the light of increasing international trade, intensified human mobility and an imminent influenza A epidemic the knowledge of dynamical and statistical properties of human travel is of fundamental importance. Despite its crucial role, a quantitative assessment of these properties on geographical scales remains elusive and the assumption that humans disperse diffusively still prevails in models. I will report on a solid and quantitative assessment of human travelling statistics by analysing the circulation of bank notes in the United States. Based on a comprehensive dataset of over a million individual displacements we find that dispersal is anomalous in two ways. First, the distribution of travelling distances decays as a power law, indicating that trajectories of bank notes are reminiscent of scale free random walks known as L'evy flights. Secondly, the probability of remaining in a small, spatially confined region for a time T is dominated by algebraic tails which attenuate the superdiffusive spread. We show that human travel can be described mathematically on many spatiotemporal scales by a two parameter continuous time random walk model to a surprising accuracy and conclude that human travel on geographical scales is an ambivalent effectively superdiffusive process.

  9. Extreme Scale Computing for First-Principles Plasma Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Choogn-Seock [Princeton University

    2011-10-12

    World superpowers are in the middle of the “Computnik” race. US Department of Energy (and National Nuclear Security Administration) wishes to launch exascale computer systems into the scientific (and national security) world by 2018. The objective is to solve important scientific problems and to predict the outcomes using the most fundamental scientific laws, which would not be possible otherwise. Being chosen into the next “frontier” group can be of great benefit to a scientific discipline. An extreme scale computer system requires different types of algorithms and programming philosophy from those we have been accustomed to. Only a handful of scientific codes are blessed to be capable of scalable usage of today’s largest computers in operation at petascale (using more than 100,000 cores concurrently). Fortunately, a few magnetic fusion codes are competing well in this race using the “first principles” gyrokinetic equations.These codes are beginning to study the fusion plasma dynamics in full-scale realistic diverted device geometry in natural nonlinear multiscale, including the large scale neoclassical and small scale turbulence physics, but excluding some ultra fast dynamics. In this talk, most of the above mentioned topics will be introduced at executive level. Representative properties of the extreme scale computers, modern programming exercises to take advantage of them, and different philosophies in the data flows and analyses will be presented. Examples of the multi-scale multi-physics scientific discoveries made possible by solving the gyrokinetic equations on extreme scale computers will be described. Future directions into “virtual tokamak experiments” will also be discussed.

  10. Amplitude scaling for interchange motions of plasma filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Kube, R; Garcia, O E

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the interchange motion of seeded plasma blobs in a reduced two-field fluid model. If we neglect the compression of the electric drift in the model, the maximal radial center-of-mass velocity V of the filament follows the familiar square-root scaling V ~ (\\Delta n/N)^1/2, where \\Delta n is the blob amplitude and N is the background density. When including compression of the electric drift to account for an inhomogeneous magnetic field, the numerical simulations reveal that the maximal blob velocity depends linearly on its initial amplitude, V ~ \\Delta n/N. When the relative initial amplitude of the filament exceeds approximately unity we recover the square root velocity scaling. We explain the observed scaling laws in t erms of the conserved energy integrals of the model equations. The compression term leads to a constraint on the maximum kinetic energy of the blob, which is not present if the drift compression is ignored. If the compression term is included, only approximately half of the...

  11. Determining scaling laws from geodynamic simulations using adjoint gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, Georg; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Whereas significant progress has been made in modelling of lithospheric and crustal scale processes in recent years, it often remains a challenge to understand which of the many model parameters is of key importance for a particular simulation. Determining this is usually done by manually changing the model input parameters and performing new simulations. For a few cases, such as for crustal-scale folding instabilities (with viscous rheologies, e.g. [1]) or for Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, one can use existing scaling laws to obtain such insights. Yet, for a more general case, it is not straightforward to do this (apart from running many simulations). Here, we test a different approach which computes gradients of the model parameters using adjoint based methods, which has the advantage that we can test the influence of an independent number of parameters on the system by computing and analysing the covariance matrix and the gradient of the parameter space. This method might give us the chance to get insights on which parameters affect for example subduction processes and how strong the system depends on their influence. [1] Fernandez, N., & Kaus, B. J. (2014). Fold interaction and wavelength selection in 3D models of multilayer detachment folding. Tectonophysics, 632, 199-217.

  12. Species survival and scaling laws in hostile and disordered environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Rodrigo P; Figueiredo, Wagner; Suweis, Samir; Maritan, Amos

    2016-10-01

    In this work we study the likelihood of survival of single-species in the context of hostile and disordered environments. Population dynamics in this environment, as modeled by the Fisher equation, is characterized by negative average growth rate, except in some random spatially distributed patches that may support life. In particular, we are interested in the phase diagram of the survival probability and in the critical size problem, i.e., the minimum patch size required for surviving in the long-time dynamics. We propose a measure for the critical patch size as being proportional to the participation ratio of the eigenvector corresponding to the largest eigenvalue of the linearized Fisher dynamics. We obtain the (extinction-survival) phase diagram and the probability distribution function (PDF) of the critical patch sizes for two topologies, namely, the one-dimensional system and the fractal Peano basin. We show that both topologies share the same qualitative features, but the fractal topology requires higher spatial fluctuations to guarantee species survival. We perform a finite-size scaling and we obtain the associated scaling exponents. In addition, we show that the PDF of the critical patch sizes has an universal shape for the 1D case in terms of the model parameters (diffusion, growth rate, etc.). In contrast, the diffusion coefficient has a drastic effect on the PDF of the critical patch sizes of the fractal Peano basin, and it does not obey the same scaling law of the 1D case.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Resolving Scaling Laws of Polyethylene Melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuaki Z. Takahashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations were performed to estimate the actual physical nature of a united-atom model of polyethylene (PE. Several scaling laws for representative polymer properties are compared to theoretical predictions. Internal structure results indicate a clear departure from theoretical predictions that assume ideal chain statics. Chain motion deviates from predictions that assume ideal motion of short chains. With regard to linear viscoelasticity, the presence or absence of entanglements strongly affects the duration of the theoretical behavior. Overall, the results indicate that Gaussian statics and dynamics are not necessarily established for real atomistic models of PE. Moreover, the actual physical nature should be carefully considered when using atomistic models for applications that expect typical polymer behaviors.

  14. Scaling law of resistance fluctuations in stationary random resistor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennetta; Trefan; Reggiani

    2000-12-11

    In a random resistor network we consider the simultaneous evolution of two competing random processes consisting in breaking and recovering the elementary resistors with probabilities W(D) and W(R). The condition W(R)>W(D)/(1+W(D)) leads to a stationary state, while in the opposite case, the broken resistor fraction reaches the percolation threshold p(c). We study the resistance noise of this system under stationary conditions by Monte Carlo simulations. The variance of resistance fluctuations is found to follow a scaling law |p-p(c)|(-kappa(0)) with kappa(0) = 5.5. The proposed model relates quantitatively the defectiveness of a disordered media with its electrical and excess-noise characteristics.

  15. The Physical Origin of Galaxy Morphologies and Scaling Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Matthias; Navarro, Julio F.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a numerical study designed to interpret the origin and evolution of galaxy properties revealed by space- and ground-based imaging and spectroscopical surveys. Our aim is to unravel the physical processes responsible for the development of different galaxy morphologies and for the establishment of scaling laws such as the Tully-Fisher relation for spirals and the Fundamental Plane of ellipticals. In particular, we plan to address the following major topics: (1) The morphology and observability of protogalaxies, and in particular the relationship between primordial galaxies and the z approximately 3 'Ly-break' systems identified in the Hubble Deep Field and in ground-based searches; (2) The origin of the disk and spheroidal components in galaxies, the timing and mode of their assembly, the corresponding evolution in galaxy morphologies and its sensitivity to cosmological parameters; (3) The origin and redshift evolution of the scaling laws that link the mass, luminosity size, stellar content, and metal abundances of galaxies of different morphological types. This investigation will use state-of-the-art N-body/gasdynamical codes to provide a spatially resolved description of the galaxy formation process in hierarchically clustering universes. Coupled with population synthesis techniques. our models can be used to provide synthetic 'observations' that can be compared directly with observations of galaxies both nearby and at cosmologically significant distances. This study will thus provide insight into the nature of protogalaxies and into the formation process of galaxies like our own Milky Way. It will also help us to assess the cosmological significance of these observations within the context of hierarchical theories of galaxy formation and will supply a theoretical context within which current and future observations can be interpreted.

  16. Optical Accelerator: Scaling Laws and Figures of Merit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schachter, L.; /Technion; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Appl. Mech. Dept.; Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    Indications that solid-state lasers will reach wall-plug to light efficiencies of 30% or more make a laser-driven vacuum-accelerator increasingly appealing. Since at the wavelength of relevant lasers, dielectrics may sustain significantly higher electric field and transmit power with reduced loss comparing to metals, the basic assumption is that laser accelerator structures will be dielectrics. For structures that have typical dimensions of a few microns, present manufacturing constraints entail planar structures that in turn, require re-evaluation of many of the scaling laws that were developed for azimuthally symmetric structures. Moreover, structures that operate at a wavelength of a few centimeters are machined today with an accuracy of microns. In future it will not be possible to maintain 4-5 orders of magnitude difference between operating wavelength and achievable tolerance. An additional difference is, that contrary to present accelerators where the number of electrons in a micro-bunch is of the order of a 10{sup 10}, in an optical structure this number drops to a few thousands. Consequently, the relative impact of individual electrons may be significantly larger. Acceleration structures with higher degree of symmetry, similar to optical fibers, have also some inherent advantages however thermal gradients as well as heat dissipation may become critical impediments. The impact of all these factors on the performance of a laser accelerator structure needs to be determined. Efficiency, wakes and emittance scaling laws that have been developed recently will be presented. It will be shown that there are some inherent advantages in combining the accelerator structure and the laser cavity in one system.

  17. Diversity of individual mobility patterns and emergence of aggregated scaling laws

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yan, Xiao-Yong; Han, Xiao-Pu; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zhou, Tao

    2013-01-01

    ... follows a power law with an exponential cutoff. Given the constraint on total travelling cost, this aggregated scaling law can be analytically predicted by the mixture nature of human travel under the principle of maximum entropy...

  18. Scaling Laws for Inter-droplet Ice Bridging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Saurabh; Ahmadi, Farzad; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study the dynamics of an ice bridge growing from a frozen droplet towards its neighboring supercooled liquid droplet. Experiments were done on a Peltier stage inside a humidity chamber with deposited or condensed droplets where the substrate temperature and ambient humidity could be controlled. Following a quasi-steady diffusion-driven model, we develop scaling laws to show how the growth rate depends on the substrate temperature, droplet sizes and inter-droplet distances over and above other environmental parameters such as air temperature and humidity. The growth rate as well as the success or failure of an ice bridge to connect to its neighboring liquid droplet depend on a nondimensional number called the separation parameter S*, defined as the ratio of the initial inter-droplet spacing to the diameter of the evaporating liquid droplet. It is shown that the maximum value of S* for connection scales as 1 as long as frozen drop is larger than the liquid droplet. For the converse case of a larger water drop, there are at least three separate regimes of critical S*, depending on whether the water drop is a puddle, a spherical cap or if the frozen drop is a puddle.

  19. The scaling law of human travel - A message from George

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Dirk; Hufnagel, Lars

    The dispersal of individuals of a species is the key driving force of various spatiotemporal phenomena which occur on geographical scales. It can synchronize populations of interacting species, stabilize them, and diversify gene pools.1-3 The geographic spread of human infectious diseases such as influenza, measles and the recent severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is essentially promoted by human travel which occurs on many length scales and is sustained by a variety of means of trans-portation4-8. In the light of increasing international trade, intensified human traffic, and an imminent influenza A pandemic the knowledge of dynamical and statistical properties of human dispersal is of fundamental importance and acute. 7,9,10 A quantitative statistical theory for human travel and concomitant reliable forecasts would substantially improve and extend existing prevention strategies. Despite its crucial role, a quantitative assessment of human dispersal remains elusive and the opinion that humans disperse diffusively still prevails in many models. 11 In this chapter we will report on a recently developed technique which permits a solid and quantitative assessment of human dispersal on geographical scales.12 The key idea is to infer the statistical properties of human travel by analysing the geographic circulation of individual bank notes for which comprehensive datasets are collected at online bill-tracking websites. The analysis shows that the distribution of traveling distances decays as a power law, indicating that the movement of bank notes is reminiscent of superdiffusive, scale free random walks known as Lévy flights.13 Secondly, the probability of remaining in a small, spatially confined region for a time T is dominated by heavy tails which attenuate superdiffusive dispersal. We will show that the dispersal of bank notes can be described on many spatiotemporal scales by a two parameter continuous time random walk (CTRW) model to a surprising accuracy. We

  20. Scaling laws in functional genome content across prokaryotic clades and lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Nacho; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2009-06-01

    For high-level functional categories that are represented in almost all prokaryotic genomes, the numbers of genes in these categories scale as power-laws in the total number of genes. We present a comprehensive analysis of the variation in these scaling laws across prokaryotic clades and lifestyles. For the large majority of functional categories, including transcription regulators, the inferred scaling laws are statistically indistinguishable across clades and lifestyles, supporting the simple hypothesis that these scaling laws are universally shared by all prokaryotes.

  1. The rank-size scaling law and entropy-maximizing principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanguang

    2012-02-01

    The rank-size regularity known as Zipf's law is one of the scaling laws and is frequently observed in the natural living world and social institutions. Many scientists have tried to derive the rank-size scaling relation through entropy-maximizing methods, but they have not been entirely successful. By introducing a pivotal constraint condition, I present here a set of new derivations based on the self-similar hierarchy of cities. First, I derive a pair of exponent laws by postulating local entropy maximizing. From the two exponential laws follows a general hierarchical scaling law, which implies the general form of Zipf's law. Second, I derive a special hierarchical scaling law with the exponent equal to 1 by postulating global entropy maximizing, and this implies the pure form of Zipf's law. The rank-size scaling law has proven to be one of the special cases of the hierarchical scaling law, and the derivation suggests a certain scaling range with the first or the last data point as an outlier. The entropy maximization of social systems differs from the notion of entropy increase in thermodynamics. For urban systems, entropy maximizing suggests the greatest equilibrium between equity for parts/individuals and efficiency of the whole.

  2. Scaling laws for magnetic reconnection, set by regulation of the electron pressure anisotropy to the firehose threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohia, O.; Egedal, J.; Lukin, V. S.; Daughton, W.; Le, A.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection in a weakly collisional plasma, such as in the Earth's magnetosphere, is known to be accompanied by electron pressure anisotropy. For reconnection scenarios including moderate guide magnetic field, electrons are magnetized throughout the reconnection region, and the anisotropy drives extended electron current layers. Along these layers, the anisotropy nears the firehose threshold. We describe how the anisotropy stagnates at this threshold by a mechanism that does not involve pitch-angle mixing. Using previously established anisotropic equations of state and by imposing the marginal firehose condition, scaling laws are obtained for quantities along the current layers as functions of plasma parameters upstream of the reconnection region. The predicted reconnection region quantities include the magnetic field strength, plasma density, and the parallel and perpendicular electron pressures, allowing for a characterization of electron energization solely as a function of the upstream plasma conditions. This characterization is in agreement with simulations and spacecraft observations.

  3. Scaling laws for e sup + /e sup - linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Raubenheimer, T O; Wilson, Ian H

    1999-01-01

    Design studies of a future TeV e sup + e sup - Linear Collider (TLC) are presently being made by five major laboratories within the framework of a world-wide collaboration. A figure of merit is defined which enables an objective comparison of these different designs. This figure of merit is shown to depend only on a small number of parameters. General scaling laws for the main beam parameters and linac parameters are derived and prove to be very effective when used as guidelines to optimize the linear collider design. By adopting appropriate parameters for beam stability, the figure of merit becomes nearly independent of accelerating gradient and RF frequency of the accelerating structures. In spite of the strong dependence of the wake fields with frequency, the single-bunch emittance blow-up during acceleration along the linac is also shown to be independent of the RF frequency when using equivalent trajectory correction schemes. In this situation, beam acceleration using high-frequency structures becomes ve...

  4. Scaling Laws for Normal Conducting $e^{\\pm}$ Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Raubenheimer, T O; Wilson, Ian H

    1998-01-01

    Design studies of a future TeV e± Linear Collider (TLC) are presently being made by five major laboratories within the framework of a world-wide collaboration. A figure of merit is defined which enabl es an objective comparison of these different designs. This figure of merit is shown to depend only on a small number of parameters. General scaling laws for the main beam parameters and linac paramet ers are derived and prove to be very effective when used as guidelines to optimize the linear collider design. By adopting appropriate parameters for beam stability, the figure of merit becomes nearly independent of accelerating gradient and RF frequency of the accelerating structures. In spite of the strong dependence of the wake-fields with frequency, the single bunch emittance preservation durin g acceleration along the linac is also shown to be independent of the RF frequency when using equivalent trajectory correction schemes. In this situation, beam acceleration using high frequency struct ures becomes very ...

  5. Scaling Laws for van der Waals Interactions in Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobre, Vivekanand; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2014-03-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces originate from interactions between fluctuating multipoles in matter and play a significant role in the structure and stability of nanostructured materials. Many models used to describe vdW interactions in nanomaterials are based on a simple pairwise-additive approximation, neglecting the strong electrodynamic response effects caused by long-range fluctuations in matter. We develop and utilize an efficient microscopic method to demonstrate that vdW interactions in nanomaterials act at distances greater than typically assumed, and can be characterized by different scaling laws depending on the dimensionality and size of the system. Specifically, we study the behaviour of vdW interactions in single-layer and multilayer graphene, fullerenes of varying size, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons. As a function of nanostructure size, the van der Waals coefficients follow unusual trends for all of the considered systems, and deviate significantly from the conventionally employed pairwise-additive picture. We propose that the peculiar van der Waals interactions in nanostructured materials could be exploited to control their self-assembly.

  6. Observation of Mammalian Similarity Through Allometric Scaling Laws

    CERN Document Server

    Kokshenev, V B

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the problem of observation of natural similarity in skeletal evolution of terrestrial mammals. Analysis is given by means of testing of the power scaling laws established in long bone allometry, which describe development of bones (of length $L$ and diameter $D$) with body mass in terms of the growth exponents, \\QTR{it}{e.g.} $\\lambda =d\\log L/d\\log D$ . The bone-size evolution scenario given three decades ago by McMahon was quiet explicit on the geometrical-shape and mechanical-force constraints that predicted $\\lambda =2/3$. This remains too far from the mammalian allometric exponent $\\lambda ^{(\\exp)}=0.80\\pm 0.2$, recently revised by Christiansen, that is a chief puzzle in long bone allometry. We give therefore new insights into McMagon's constraints and report on the first observation of the critical-elastic-force, bending-deformation, muscle-induced mechanism found with $\\lambda =0.80\\pm 0.3$. This mechanism governs the bone-size evolution with avoiding skeletal fracture caused by muscle-indu...

  7. Connectivity of Confined Dense Networks: Boundary Effects and Scaling Laws

    CERN Document Server

    Coon, Justin P; Georgiou, Orestis

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the probability that a dense network confined within a given geometry is fully connected. We employ a cluster expansion approach often used in statistical physics to analyze the effects that the boundaries of the geometry have on connectivity. To maximize practicality and applicability, we adopt four important point-to-point link models based on outage probability in our analysis: single-input single-output (SISO), single-input multiple-output (SIMO), multiple-input single-output (MISO), and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO). Furthermore, we derive diversity and power scaling laws that dictate how boundary effects can be mitigated (to leading order) in confined dense networks for each of these models. Finally, in order to demonstrate the versatility of our theory, we analyze boundary effects for dense networks comprising MIMO point-to-point links confined within a right prism, a polyhedron that accurately models many geometries that can be found in practice. We provide numerical re...

  8. Large-Scale Structure of Magnetospheric Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. E.; Delcourt, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigations of magnetospheric plasma structure are summarized under the broad categories of empirical models, transport across boundaries, formation, and dynamics of the plasma sheet. This report reviews work in these areas during the period 1991 to 1993. Fully three-dimensional empirical models and simulations have become important contributors to our understanding of the magnetospheric system. Some new structural concepts have appeared in the literature: the 'entry boundary' and 'geo-pause', the plasma sheet 'region 1 vortices', the 'low-energy layer', the 'adia-baticity boundary' or 'wall region', and a region in the tail to which we refer as the 'injection port'. Traditional structural concepts have also been the subject of recent study, notably the plasmapause, the magnetopause, and the plasma sheet. Significant progress has been made in understanding the nature of plasma sheet formation and dynamics, but the acceleration of electrons to high energy remains somewhat mysterious.

  9. The Rank-Size Scaling Law and Entropy-Maximizing Principle

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanguang

    2011-01-01

    The rank-size regularity known as Zipf's law is one of scaling laws and frequently observed within the natural living world and in social institutions. Many scientists tried to derive the rank-size scaling relation by entropy-maximizing methods, but the problem failed to be resolved thoroughly. By introducing a pivotal constraint condition, I present here a set of new derivations based on the self-similar hierarchy of cities. First, I derive a pair of exponent laws by postulating local entropy maximizing. From the two exponential laws follows a general hierarchical scaling law, which implies general Zipf's law. Second, I derive a special hierarchical scaling law with exponent equal to 1 by postulating global entropy maximizing, and this implies the strong form of Zipf's law. The rank-size scaling law proved to be one of the special cases of the hierarchical law, and the derivation suggests a certain scaling range with the first or last data point as an outlier. The entropy maximization of social systems diffe...

  10. Multi-Scale Investigation of Sheared Flows In Magnetized Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward, Jr., Thomas [Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL (United States)

    2014-09-19

    Flows parallel and perpendicular to magnetic fields in a plasma are important phenomena in many areas of plasma science research. The presence of these spatially inhomogeneous flows is often associated with the stability of the plasma. In fusion plasmas, these sheared flows can be stabilizing while in space plasmas, these sheared flows can be destabilizing. Because of this, there is broad interest in understanding the coupling between plasma stability and plasma flows. This research project has engaged in a study of the plasma response to spatially inhomogeneous plasma flows using three different experimental devices: the Auburn Linear Experiment for Instability Studies (ALEXIS) and the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) stellarator devices at Auburn University, and the Space Plasma Simulation Chamber (SPSC) at the Naval Research Laboratory. This work has shown that there is a commonality of the plasma response to sheared flows across a wide range of plasma parameters and magnetic field geometries. The goal of this multi-device, multi-scale project is to understand how sheared flows established by the same underlying physical mechanisms lead to different plasma responses in fusion, laboratory, and space plasmas.

  11. Phenomenological scaling laws relating the observed galactic dimensions to Planck action constant

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, S; De Siena, S; Illuminati, F; Capozziello, Salvatore; Martino, Salvatore De; Siena, Silvio De; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that the characteristic observed radius, velocity, and temperature of a typical galaxy can be inferred from Planck action constant through a phenomenological scaling law on all cosmological scales.

  12. Nanometer scale vacuum lithography using plasma polymerization and plasma etching

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S O

    1998-01-01

    Thin films of plasma polymerization were fabricated through plasma polymerization of interelectrode capacitively coupled gas flow system. After delineating the pattern with an accelerating voltage of 30kV, ranging the dose of 1 approx 500 mu C/cm sup 2 , the pattern was developed with a dry type and formed by plasma etching. By analyzing the molecule structure using FT-IR ( Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectrometry), it was confirmed that the thin films of PPMST (Plasma Polymerized Methylmethacrylate+Styrene+Tetramethyltin) contained the functional radicals of the MST (Methylmethacrylate sub S tyrene+Tetramethyltin) monomer. The Thin films of PPMST had a highly cross-linked structure resulting in a higher molecule weight than the conventional resist. The deposition rate of the PPMST thin films was 230 approx 600 A/min as a function of 50 approx 200 W power and 200 approx 60 A/min as a function 0.1 approx 0.7 Torr pressure. The etching rate of the thin films of PPMST was 875 approx 3520 A/min as a function of 50...

  13. MicroScale - Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran, Mohan [Case Western Reserve University

    2012-01-25

    Low-temperature plasmas play an essential role in the manufacturing of integrated circuits which are ubiquitous in modern society. In recent years, these top-down approaches to materials processing have reached a physical limit. As a result, alternative approaches to materials processing are being developed that will allow the fabrication of nanoscale materials from the bottom up. The aim of our research is to develop a new class of plasmas, termed “microplasmas” for nanomaterials synthesis. Microplasmas are a special class of plasmas formed in geometries where at least one dimension is less than 1 mm. Plasma confinement leads to several unique properties including high-pressure stability and non-equilibrium that make microplasams suitable for nanomaterials synthesis. Vapor-phase precursors can be dissociated to homogeneously nucleate nanometer-sized metal and alloyed nanoparticles. Alternatively, metal salts dispersed in liquids or polymer films can be electrochemically reduced to form metal nanoparticles. In this talk, I will discuss these topics in detail, highlighting the advantages of microplasma-based systems for the synthesis of well-defined nanomaterials.

  14. Large-scale analysis of Zipf's law in English texts

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno-Sánchez, Isabel; Corral, Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    Despite being a paradigm of quantitative linguistics, Zipf's law for words suffers from three main problems: its formulation is ambiguous, its validity has not been tested rigorously from a statistical point of view, and it has not been confronted to a representatively large number of texts. So, we can summarize the current support of Zipf's law in texts as anecdotic. We try to solve these issues by studying three different versions of Zipf's law and fitting them to all available English texts in the Project Gutenberg database (consisting of more than 30000 texts). To do so we use state-of-the art tools in fitting and goodness-of-fit tests, carefully tailored to the peculiarities of text statistics. Remarkably, one of the three versions of Zipf's law, consisting of a pure power-law form in the complementary cumulative distribution function of word frequencies, is able to fit more than 40% of the texts in the database (at the 0.05 significance level), for the whole domain of frequencies (from 1 to the maximum ...

  15. Large-Scale Analysis of Zipf's Law in English Texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Sánchez, Isabel; Font-Clos, Francesc; Corral, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a paradigm of quantitative linguistics, Zipf's law for words suffers from three main problems: its formulation is ambiguous, its validity has not been tested rigorously from a statistical point of view, and it has not been confronted to a representatively large number of texts. So, we can summarize the current support of Zipf's law in texts as anecdotic. We try to solve these issues by studying three different versions of Zipf's law and fitting them to all available English texts in the Project Gutenberg database (consisting of more than 30 000 texts). To do so we use state-of-the art tools in fitting and goodness-of-fit tests, carefully tailored to the peculiarities of text statistics. Remarkably, one of the three versions of Zipf's law, consisting of a pure power-law form in the complementary cumulative distribution function of word frequencies, is able to fit more than 40% of the texts in the database (at the 0.05 significance level), for the whole domain of frequencies (from 1 to the maximum value), and with only one free parameter (the exponent).

  16. Plasma scale-length effects on electron energy spectra in high-irradiance laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culfa, O.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Wagenaars, E.; Ridgers, C. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Brown, C. D. R.; James, S. F.; Hoarty, D. J.; Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Lancaster, K. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Kampfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of an electron spectrometer used to characterize fast electrons generated by ultraintense (1020W cm-2 ) laser interaction with a preformed plasma of scale length measured by shadowgraphy is presented. The effects of fringing magnetic fields on the electron spectral measurements and the accuracy of density scale-length measurements are evaluated. 2D EPOCH PIC code simulations are found to be in agreement with measurements of the electron energy spectra showing that laser filamentation in plasma preformed by a prepulse is important with longer plasma scale lengths (>8 μ m ).

  17. Plasma graviton production in TeV-scale gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Melkumova, E Yu

    2010-01-01

    We develop the theory of interaction of classical plasma with Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons in the ADD model of TeV-scale gravity. Plasma is described within the kinetic approach as the system of charged particles and Maxwell field both confined on the brane. Interaction with multidimensional gravity living in the bulk with $n$ compact extra dimensions is introduced within the linearized theory. The KK gravitons emission rates are computed taking into account plasma collective effects through the two-point correlation functions of the fluctuations of the plasma energy-momentum tensor. Apart from known mechanisms (such as bremsstrahlung and gravi-Primakoff effect) we find essentially collective channels such as the coalescence of plasma waves into gravitons which may be manifest in turbulent plasmas. Our results indicate that commonly used rates of the KK gravitons production in stars and supernovae may be underestimated.

  18. On the scaling range of power-laws originated from fluctuation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Dariusz, Grech

    2012-01-01

    We extend our previous study of scaling range properties done for detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) \\cite{former_paper} to other techniques of fluctuation analysis (FA). The new technique called Modified Detrended Moving Average Analysis (MDMA) is introduced and its scaling range properties are examined and compared with those of detrended moving average analysis (DMA) and DFA. It is shown that contrary to DFA, DMA and MDMA techniques exhibit power law dependence of the scaling range with respect to the length of the searched signal and with respect to the accuracy $R^2$ of the fit to the considered scaling law imposed by DMA or MDMA schemes. This power law dependence is satisfied for both uncorrelated and autocorrelated data. We find also a simple generalization of this power law relation for series with different level of autocorrelations measured in terms of the Hurst exponent. Basic relations between scaling ranges for different techniques are also discussed. Our findings should be particularly useful ...

  19. Radius-mass scaling laws for celestial bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Muradian, R.; S. Carneiro; Marques, R.

    1999-01-01

    In this letter we establish a connection between two-exponent radius-mass power laws for cosmic objects and previously proposed two-exponent Regge-like spin-mass relations. A new, simplest method for establishing the coordinates of Chandrasekhar and Eddington points is proposed.

  20. Non-power law scaling for access to the H-mode in tokamaks via symbolic regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Lupelli, I.; Gelfusa, M.; Gaudio, P.

    2013-04-01

    The power threshold (PThresh) to access the H-mode in tokamaks remains a subject of active research, because up to now no theoretical relation has proved to be general enough to reliably interpret the L-H transition. Over the last few decades, much effort has therefore been devoted to deriving empirical scalings, assuming ‘a priori’ a power-law model structure. In this paper, an empirical scaling of PThresh without any a priori assumption about the model structure, i.e. about the functional form, is derived. Symbolic regression via genetic programming is applied to the latest version multi-machine International Tokamak Physics Activity International Global Power Threshold Data Base of validated ITER-like discharges. The derived model structure of the scaling for the global database is not in a power law form and includes a term that indicates saturation of PThresh with the strength of the toroidal field, plasma density and elongation. Furthermore, the single machine analysis of the database for the most representative machines of the international fusion scientific program demonstrates that the model structures are similar but the model parameters are different. The better extrapolation capability of the identified model structures with the proposed methodology is verified with a specific analysis of JET data at two different current regimes. The PThresh values extrapolated to ITER using the derived empirical model structures are a factor of two lower than those of traditional scaling laws and are predicted with a significantly better confidence.

  1. Cross-Scale: Multi-Scale Coupling in Space Plasma, Assessment Study Report

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Steve; Fujimoto, Masaki; Hellinger, Petr; Kessel, Mona; Le, Guan; Liu, William; Louarn, Philippe; Mann, Ian; Nakamura, Rumi; Owen, Chris; Pinçon, Jean-Louis; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Vaivads, Andris; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    Driven by the support and interest of the international space plasma community to examine simultaneous physical plasma scales and their interactions, the Cross-Scale Mission concept was submitted and accepted as an ESA Cosmic Vision M-class candidate mission. This report presents an overview of the assessment study phase of the 7 ESA spacecraft Cross-Scale mission. Where appropriate, discussion of the benefit of international collaboration with the SCOPE mission, as well as other interested parties, is included.

  2. Anomalous scaling law for noise variance and spatial resolution in differential phase contrast computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Qi, Zhihua; Bevins, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    In conventional absorption based x-ray computed tomography (CT), the noise variance in reconstructed CT images scales with spatial resolution following an inverse cubic relationship. Without reconstruction, in x-ray absorption radiography, the noise variance scales as an inverse square with spatial resolution. In this letter we report that while the inverse square relationship holds for differential phase contrast projection imaging, there exists an anomalous scaling law in differential phase contrast CT, where the noise variance scales with spatial resolution following an inverse linear relationship. The anomalous scaling law is theoretically derived and subsequently validated with phantom results from an experimental Talbot-Lau interferometer system.

  3. Cross-scale energy transport in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. W.; Nykyri, K.; Dimmock, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    The solar wind is a supersonic magnetized plasma streaming far into the heliosphere. Although cooling as it flows, it is rapidly heated upon encountering planetary obstacles. At Earth, this interaction forms the magnetosphere and its sub-regions. The present paper focuses on particle heating across the boundary separating the shocked solar wind and magnetospheric plasma, which is driven by mechanisms operating on fluid, ion and electron scales. The cross-scale energy transport between these scales is a compelling and fundamental problem of plasma physics. Here, we present evidence of the energy transport between fluid and ion scales: free energy is provided in terms of a velocity shear generating fluid-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. We show the unambiguous observation of an ion-scale magnetosonic wave packet, inside a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex, with sufficient energy to account for observed ion heating. The present finding has universal consequences in understanding cross-scale energy transport, applicable to environments experiencing velocity shears during comparable plasma regimes.

  4. Distance to the scaling law: a useful approach for unveiling relationships between crime and urban metrics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz G A Alves

    Full Text Available We report on a quantitative analysis of relationships between the number of homicides, population size and ten other urban metrics. By using data from Brazilian cities, we show that well-defined average scaling laws with the population size emerge when investigating the relations between population and number of homicides as well as population and urban metrics. We also show that the fluctuations around the scaling laws are log-normally distributed, which enabled us to model these scaling laws by a stochastic-like equation driven by a multiplicative and log-normally distributed noise. Because of the scaling laws, we argue that it is better to employ logarithms in order to describe the number of homicides in function of the urban metrics via regression analysis. In addition to the regression analysis, we propose an approach to correlate crime and urban metrics via the evaluation of the distance between the actual value of the number of homicides (as well as the value of the urban metrics and the value that is expected by the scaling law with the population size. This approach has proved to be robust and useful for unveiling relationships/behaviors that were not properly carried out by the regression analysis, such as [Formula: see text] the non-explanatory potential of the elderly population when the number of homicides is much above or much below the scaling law, [Formula: see text] the fact that unemployment has explanatory potential only when the number of homicides is considerably larger than the expected by the power law, and [Formula: see text] a gender difference in number of homicides, where cities with female population below the scaling law are characterized by a number of homicides above the power law.

  5. Firms Growth Dynamics, Competition and Power Law Scaling

    OpenAIRE

    Hari M. Gupta; Campanha, Jose R.

    2002-01-01

    We study the growth dynamics of the size of manufacturing firms considering competition and normal distribution of competency. We start with the fact that all components of the system struggle with each other for growth as happened in real competitive bussiness world. The detailed quantitative agreement of the theory with empirical results of firms growth based on a large economic database spanning over 20 years is good .Further we find that this basic law of competition leads approximately a...

  6. The extent of power-law energy spectra in collisionless relativistic magnetic reconnection in pair plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, G R; Cerutti, B; Nalewajko, K; Begelman, M C

    2014-01-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we characterize the energy spectra of particles accelerated by relativistic magnetic reconnection (without guide field) in collisionless electron-positron plasmas, for a wide range of upstream magnetizations $\\sigma$ and system sizes $L$. The particle spectra are well-represented by a power law $\\gamma^{-\\alpha}$, with a combination of exponential and super-exponential high-energy cutoffs, proportional to $\\sigma$ and $L$, respectively. For large $L$ and $\\sigma$, the power-law index $\\alpha$ approaches about 1.2.

  7. A Scaling Law of Photoelectron Angular Distributions in One-Cycle Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Li-Hua; ZHANG Jing-Tao; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2005-01-01

    @@ The photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) from above-threshold ionization of atoms irradiated by one-cycle laser pulses satisfy a scaling law.The scaling law denotes that the main features of the PADs are determined by four dimensionless parameters: (1) the ponderomotive number up = Up/hω, the ponderomotive energy Up in units of laser photon energy; (2) the binding number εb = Eb/hω, the atomic binding energy Eb in units of laser photon energy; (3) the number of absorbed photons q; (4) the carrier-envelope phase Φ0, the phase of the carrier wave with respect to the envelope.We verify the scaling law by theoretical analysis and numerical calculation,compared to that in long-pulse case.A possible experimental test to verify the scaling law is suggested.

  8. Knowledge of laws regulating issues related to HIV and AIDS: development of the HIV/AIDS and the law scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, F A; Black, S A; O'Boyle, M; Jones, P

    1999-06-01

    42 middle-aged and older adults, ranging in age from 51 to 85 years, completed 10 items dealing with the assessment of knowledge regarding laws regulating issues related to HIV and AIDS. Participants also completed 40 items involving knowledge of risks for HIV infection. The Cronbach coefficient alpha and test-retest reliability coefficient on the HIV/AIDS and the Law Scale were .74 and .83, respectively. Over-all, the grand mean for correct answers was 46.9%, whereas the grand means for incorrect answers and "don't know" responses were 13.6% and 39.5%, suggesting substantial lack of knowledge of laws regulating issues related to HIV and AIDS. Women (50%) and younger participants (51 to 66 years old; 48.2%) showed more of this knowledge (50%) than men (43.0%) and older participants (46.2%). The sample reported a substantial amount of knowledge regarding HIV transmission assessed with factual (92.2% correct) and misconception (87.5% correct) items. The correlation between this knowledge and knowledge of laws regulating issues related to HIV and AIDS was .42 (p young adults as well as the utility of the scale in areas of clinical, legal, and policy development are discussed.

  9. submitter Unified Scaling Law for flux pinning in practical superconductors: II. Parameter testing, scaling constants, and the Extrapolative Scaling Expression

    CERN Document Server

    Ekin, Jack W; Goodrich, Loren; Splett, Jolene; Bordini, Bernardo; Richter, David

    2016-01-01

    A scaling study of several thousand Nb3Sn critical-current $(I_c)$ measurements is used to derive the Extrapolative Scaling Expression (ESE), a relation that can quickly and accurately extrapolate limited datasets to obtain full three-dimensional dependences of I c on magnetic field (B), temperature (T), and mechanical strain (ε). The relation has the advantage of being easy to implement, and offers significant savings in sample characterization time and a useful tool for magnet design. Thorough data-based analysis of the general parameterization of the Unified Scaling Law (USL) shows the existence of three universal scaling constants for practical Nb3Sn conductors. The study also identifies the scaling parameters that are conductor specific and need to be fitted to each conductor. This investigation includes two new, rare, and very large I c(B,T,ε) datasets (each with nearly a thousand I c measurements spanning magnetic fields from 1 to 16 T, temperatures from ~2.26 to 14 K, and intrinsic strains from –...

  10. Lie group analysis for multi-scale plasma dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalev, Vladimir F

    2011-01-01

    An application of approximate transformation groups to study dynamics of a system with distinct time scales is discussed. The utilization of the Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky method of averaging to find solutions of the Lie equations is considered. Physical illustrations from the plasma kinetic theory demonstrate the potentialities of the suggested approach. Several examples of invariant solutions for the system of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations for the two-component (electron-ion) plasma are presented.

  11. Global scale-invariant dissipation in collisionless plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyani, K H; Chapman, S C; Khotyaintsev, Yu V; Dunlop, M W; Sahraoui, F

    2009-08-14

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of the dissipation range of collisionless plasma turbulence is presented using in situ high-frequency magnetic field measurements from the Cluster spacecraft in a stationary interval of fast ambient solar wind. The observations, spanning five decades in temporal scales, show a crossover from multifractal intermittent turbulence in the inertial range to non-Gaussian monoscaling in the dissipation range. This presents a strong observational constraint on theories of dissipation mechanisms in turbulent collisionless plasmas.

  12. Can power-law scaling and neuronal avalanches arise from stochastic dynamics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Touboul

    Full Text Available The presence of self-organized criticality in biology is often evidenced by a power-law scaling of event size distributions, which can be measured by linear regression on logarithmic axes. We show here that such a procedure does not necessarily mean that the system exhibits self-organized criticality. We first provide an analysis of multisite local field potential (LFP recordings of brain activity and show that event size distributions defined as negative LFP peaks can be close to power-law distributions. However, this result is not robust to change in detection threshold, or when tested using more rigorous statistical analyses such as the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Similar power-law scaling is observed for surrogate signals, suggesting that power-law scaling may be a generic property of thresholded stochastic processes. We next investigate this problem analytically, and show that, indeed, stochastic processes can produce spurious power-law scaling without the presence of underlying self-organized criticality. However, this power-law is only apparent in logarithmic representations, and does not survive more rigorous analysis such as the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The same analysis was also performed on an artificial network known to display self-organized criticality. In this case, both the graphical representations and the rigorous statistical analysis reveal with no ambiguity that the avalanche size is distributed as a power-law. We conclude that logarithmic representations can lead to spurious power-law scaling induced by the stochastic nature of the phenomenon. This apparent power-law scaling does not constitute a proof of self-organized criticality, which should be demonstrated by more stringent statistical tests.

  13. Onset of power-law scaling behavior in idiotypic random and scale-free networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claudino, Elder S.; Lyra, M.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-970 Maceió, AL (Brazil); Gleria, Iram, E-mail: iram@fis.ufal.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-970 Maceió, AL (Brazil); Campos, Paulo R.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 52171-900 Recife, PE (Brazil); Bertrand, Delvis [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-970 Maceió, AL (Brazil)

    2012-10-01

    We numerically study the dynamics of model immune networks with random and scale-free topologies. We observe that a memory state is reached when the antigen is attached to the most connected sites of the network, whereas a percolation state may occur when the antigen attaches to the less connected sites. For increasing values of the connectivity of the antibody directly binded to the antigen, its population converges exponentially to the asymptotic value of the memory state. On the other hand, the next-nearest populations evolve slowly as power-laws towards the virgin-like state. -- Highlights: ► We investigate the outcome of a model for B-cell clonal dynamics. ► The model follows Jerne's idiotypic theory. ► The response of the immune system to different network topologies is addressed. ► Complex scaling behavior is observed in the idiotypic network. ► We analyze the possibility of local versus spread out (possibly autoimmune) response of the immune system.

  14. An Atmospheric Large-Scale Cold Plasma Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕晓桂; 任春生; 马腾才; 冯岩; 王德真

    2012-01-01

    This letter reports on the generation and characteristics of a large-scale dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. With appropriate parameters, diffuse plasma with a 50×5 mm2 cross-sectional area is obtained. The characteristics of the discharges are diag- nosed by using electrical and optical methods. In addition to being generated in helium, plasma is also generated in a mixed gas of helium and oxygen. The oxygen atomic radiant intensity (3p5P→ 3s5S, 3p3P→3s3S transition) is not proportional to the proportion of oxygen in the gas mixture, as shown by the experimental results.

  15. Scaling symmetries, conservation laws and action principles in one-dimensional gas dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G M; Zank, G P [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)], E-mail: gary.webb@uah.edu

    2009-11-27

    Scaling symmetries of the planar, one-dimensional gas dynamic equations with adiabatic index {gamma} are used to obtain Lagrangian and Eulerian conservation laws associated with the symmetries. The known Eulerian symmetry operators for the scaling symmetries are converted to the Lagrangian form, in which the Eulerian spatial position of the fluid element is given in terms of the Lagrangian fluid labels. Conditions for a linear combination of the three scaling symmetries to be a divergence or variational symmetry of the action are established. The corresponding Lagrangian and Eulerian form of the conservation laws are determined by application of Noether's theorem. A nonlocal conservation law associated with the scaling symmetries is obtained by applying a nonlocal symmetry operator to the scaling symmetry-conserved vector. An action principle incorporating known conservation laws using Lagrangian constraints is developed. Noether's theorem for the constrained action principle gives the same formulas for the conserved vector as the classical Noether theorem, except that the Lie symmetry vector field now includes the effects of nonlocal potentials. Noether's theorem for the constrained action principle is used to obtain nonlocal conservation laws. The scaling symmetry conservation laws only apply for special forms of the entropy of the gas.

  16. Scaling mechanisms of vapour/plasma shielding from laser-produced plasmas to magnetic fusion regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizyuk, Tatyana; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-02-01

    The plasma shielding effect is a well-known mechanism in laser-produced plasmas (LPPs) reducing laser photon transmission to the target and, as a result, significantly reducing target heating and erosion. The shielding effect is less pronounced at low laser intensities, when low evaporation rate together with vapour/plasma expansion processes prevent establishment of a dense plasma layer above the surface. Plasma shielding also loses its effectiveness at high laser intensities when the formed hot dense plasma plume causes extensive target erosion due to radiation fluxes back to the surface. The magnitude of emitted radiation fluxes from such a plasma is similar to or slightly higher than the laser photon flux in the low shielding regime. Thus, shielding efficiency in LPPs has a peak that depends on the laser beam parameters and the target material. A similar tendency is also expected in other plasma-operating devices such as tokamaks of magnetic fusion energy (MFE) reactors during transient plasma operation and disruptions on chamber walls when deposition of the high-energy transient plasma can cause severe erosion and damage to the plasma-facing and nearby components. A detailed analysis of these abnormal events and their consequences in future power reactors is limited in current tokamak reactors. Predictions for high-power future tokamaks are possible only through comprehensive, time-consuming and rigorous modelling. We developed scaling mechanisms, based on modelling of LPP devices with their typical temporal and spatial scales, to simulate tokamak abnormal operating regimes to study wall erosion, plasma shielding and radiation under MFE reactor conditions. We found an analogy in regimes and results of carbon and tungsten erosion of the divertor surface in ITER-like reactors with erosion due to laser irradiation. Such an approach will allow utilizing validated modelling combined with well-designed and well-diagnosed LPP experimental studies for predicting

  17. Mobile user forecast and power-law acceleration invariance of scale-free networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Jin-Li; Guo Zhao-Hua; Liu Xue-Jiao

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies and predicts the number growth of China's mobile users by using the power-law regression.We find that the number growth of the mobile users follows a power law.Motivated by the data on the evolution of the mobile users,we consider scenarios of self-organization of accelerating growth networks into scale-free structures and propose a directed network model,in which the nodes grow following a power-law acceleration.The expressions for the transient and the stationary average degree distributions are obtained by using the Poisson process.This result shows that the model generates appropriate power-law connectivity distributions.Therefore,we find a power-law acceleration invariance of the scale-free networks.The numerical simulations of the models agree with the analytical results well.

  18. Scaling laws of free magnetic energy stored in a solar emerging flux region

    CERN Document Server

    Magara, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    This Letter reports scaling laws of free magnetic energy stored in a solar emerging flux region which is a key to understanding the energetics of solar active phenomena such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections. By performing 3-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations that reproduce several emerging flux regions of different magnetic configurations, we derive power law relationships among emerged magnetic flux, free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity in these emerging flux regions. Since magnetic flux is an observable quantity, the scaling law between magnetic flux and free magnetic energy may give a way to estimate invisible free magnetic energy responsible for solar active phenomena.

  19. Laws of the oxidation of carbon isotopes in plasma processes under magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myshkin, V. F.; Bespala, E. V.; Khan, V. A.; Makarevich, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    From law of quantum mechanics it follows that spin precession phase of unpaired electron in external magnetic field cannot be determined. It uncertainty necessary take into account in different physical and chemical processes. The expression of the rate constant of a chemical reaction based on the number of discrete spin states was obtained. The equations of chemical kinetics of plasma oxidation of carbon isotopes in the magnetic field were given.

  20. Nonlinear Analysis and Scaling Laws for Noncircular Composite Structures Subjected to Combined Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Results from an analytical study of the response of a built-up, multi-cell noncircular composite structure subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads are presented. Nondimensional parameters and scaling laws based on a first-order shear-deformation plate theory are derived for this noncircular composite structure. The scaling laws are used to design sub-scale structural models for predicting the structural response of a full-scale structure representative of a portion of a blended-wing-body transport aircraft. Because of the complexity of the full-scale structure, some of the similitude conditions are relaxed for the sub-scale structural models. Results from a systematic parametric study are used to determine the effects of relaxing selected similitude conditions on the sensitivity of the effectiveness of using the sub-scale structural model response characteristics for predicting the full-scale structure response characteristics.

  1. Application of Scaling-Law and CFD Modeling to Hydrodynamics of Circulating Biomass Fluidized Bed Gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazda Biglari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two modeling approaches, the scaling-law and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics approaches, are presented in this paper. To save on experimental cost of the pilot plant, the scaling-law approach as a low-computational-cost method was adopted and a small scale column operating under ambient temperature and pressure was built. A series of laboratory tests and computer simulations were carried out to evaluate the hydrodynamic characteristics of a pilot fluidized-bed biomass gasifier. In the small scale column solids were fluidized. The pressure and other hydrodynamic properties were monitored for the validation of the scaling-law application. In addition to the scaling-law modeling method, the CFD approach was presented to simulate the gas-particle system in the small column. 2D CFD models were developed to simulate the hydrodynamic regime. The simulation results were validated with the experimental data from the small column. It was proved that the CFD model was able to accurately predict the hydrodynamics of the small column. The outcomes of this research present both the scaling law with the lower computational cost and the CFD modeling as a more robust method to suit various needs for the design of fluidized-bed gasifiers.

  2. Law machines: scale models, forensic materiality and the making of modern patent law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottage, Alain

    2011-10-01

    Early US patent law was machine made. Before the Patent Office took on the function of examining patent applications in 1836, questions of novelty and priority were determined in court, within the forum of the infringement action. And at all levels of litigation, from the circuit courts up to the Supreme Court, working models were the media through which doctrine, evidence and argument were made legible, communicated and interpreted. A model could be set on a table, pointed at, picked up, rotated or upended so as to display a point of interest to a particular audience within the courtroom, and, crucially, set in motion to reveal the 'mode of operation' of a machine. The immediate object of demonstration was to distinguish the intangible invention from its tangible embodiment, but models also'machined' patent law itself. Demonstrations of patent claims with models articulated and resolved a set of conceptual tensions that still make the definition and apprehension of the invention difficult, even today, but they resolved these tensions in the register of materiality, performativity and visibility, rather than the register of conceptuality. The story of models tells us something about how inventions emerge and subsist within the context of patent litigation and patent doctrine, and it offers a starting point for renewed reflection on the question of how technology becomes property.

  3. A scaling law for random walks on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Theodore J.; Foxall, Eric; Glass, Leon; Edwards, Roderick

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of many natural and artificial systems are well described as random walks on a network: the stochastic behaviour of molecules, traffic patterns on the internet, fluctuations in stock prices and so on. The vast literature on random walks provides many tools for computing properties such as steady-state probabilities or expected hitting times. Previously, however, there has been no general theory describing the distribution of possible paths followed by a random walk. Here, we show that for any random walk on a finite network, there are precisely three mutually exclusive possibilities for the form of the path distribution: finite, stretched exponential and power law. The form of the distribution depends only on the structure of the network, while the stepping probabilities control the parameters of the distribution. We use our theory to explain path distributions in domains such as sports, music, nonlinear dynamics and stochastic chemical kinetics.

  4. Geometrical Studies of Complex Geological Media Using Scaling Laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huseby, O.K. [Institutt for Energiteknikk, Kjeller (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis applies scaling concepts to characterize the morphology of geological porous media and fracture networks and relates scaling exponents to the sample`s physical properties. The first part of the thesis applies multifractal scaling (MS) to the study of the morphology of random porous media. MS is used to characterize scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of chalk samples from the North Sea, and dipmeter micro resistivity signals from several wells in different North Sea reservoirs. The second part of the thesis develops and characterizes a model of a stochastic fracture network. Here, the application of the scaling concept differs from that in the first part, since the scaling concept is applied to percolation structures and not used as a characterization tool based on MS. Several methods and concepts must be introduced to characterize geological data and to understand the fracture model and some of them are described in four enclosed research papers. Paper 1, on the SEM images, suggests that pore space of sedimentary chalk is multifractal. Papers 2 and 3, on the dipmeter signals from reservoir wells, present a new method for extracting information about geological formations from a micro resistivity log. The main conclusion of Paper 4 on fracture networks, is that the influence of fracture shapes on percolation thresholds, block densities and topology could be explained using the concept of excluded volume. 114 refs., 48 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Scaling law and fractality concepts in models of turbulent diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakunin, O G [Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute' , Nuclear Fusion Institute, Kurchatova Sq., Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); FOM Instituut voor Plasmafysica ' Rijnhuizen' , Associate Euroatom-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2003-10-01

    A large variety of plasma instabilities lead to the development of different types of plasma turbulences. This paper discusses the Dreizin-Dykhne model of random flows, the Kadomtsev-Pogutse approach to describe 'braided' magnetic field and transport estimates in systems with convective cells. The important role of correlation effects and anisotropy is shown. The variety of forms require not only special description methods, but also an analysis of the general mechanisms for different turbulence types. One such mechanism is the percolation transport. Its description is based on the idea of long-range correlations, taken from the theory of phase transitions and the percolation theory. This approach is based on fractality ideas. This paper discusses several different models of the percolation transport. The similar characters of used approaches are pointed out. The detailed analysis of the more important results obtained in this domain is presented in this paper. The aim of this paper is to make these results clear and not only for theoreticians.

  6. Coulomb and Nuclear Breakup at Low Energies: Scaling Laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on a recent work on the low-energy behavior of the breakup cross section in so far as it has important role in the fusion of weakly bound and halo nuclei at near-barrier energies. We assess the way the nuclear component of this cross section scales with the target mass. In complete accord with previous finding at higher energies we verify that the low energy behavior of the breakup cross section for a given projectile and relative center of mass energy with respect to the Coulomb barrier height scales as the cubic root of the mass number of the target. Surprisingly we find that the Coulomb component of the breakup cross section at these low energies also obeys scaling, but with a linear dependence on the target charge. Our findings are important when planning for experiments involving these exotic nuclei.

  7. A generalized power-law scaling law for a two-phase imbibition in a porous medium

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2013-11-01

    Dimensionless time is a universal parameter that may be used to predict real field behavior from scaled laboratory experiments in relation to imbibition processes in porous media. Researchers work to nondimensionalize the time has been through the use of parameters that are inherited to the properties of the moving fluids and the porous matrix, which may be applicable to spontaneous imbibition. However, in forced imbibition, the dynamics of the process depends, in addition, on injection velocity. Therefore, we propose the use of scaling velocity in the form of a combination of two velocities, the first of which (the characteristic velocity) is defined by the fluid and the porous medium parameters and the second is the injection velocity, which is a characteristic of the process. A power-law formula is suggested for the scaling velocity such that it may be used as a parameter to nondimensionalize time. This may reduce the complexities in characterizing two-phase imbibition through porous media and works well in both the cases of spontaneous and forced imbibition. The proposed scaling-law is tested against some oil recovery experimental data from the literature. In addition, the governing partial differential equations are nondimensionalized so that the governing dimensionless groups are manifested. An example of a one-dimensional countercurrent imbibition is considered numerically. The calculations are carried out for a wide range of Ca and Da to illustrate their influences on water saturation as well as relative water/oil permeabilities. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  8. The diffusion of charged particles in the weakly ionized plasma with power-law kappa-distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Du, Jiulin

    2017-10-01

    We study the diffusion of charged particles in the weakly ionized plasma with the power-law κ-distributions and without the magnetic field. The electrons and ions have different κ-parameters. We obtain the expressions of both diffusion and mobility coefficients of electrons and ions respectively in the plasma. We find that these new transport coefficient formulae depend strongly on the κ-parameters in the power-law distributed plasma. When we take κ→∞, these formulae reduce to the classical forms in the weakly ionized plasma with a Maxwellian distribution.

  9. Holographic Brownian motion and time scales in strongly coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atmaja, Ardian Nata [Research Center for Physics, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Kompleks PUSPITEK Serpong, Tangerang 15310 (Indonesia); Indonesia Center for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics (ICTMP), Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Boer, Jan de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Shigemori, Masaki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics (YITP), Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hakubi Center, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Ushinomiyacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    We study Brownian motion of a heavy quark in field theory plasma in the AdS/CFT setup and discuss the time scales characterizing the interaction between the Brownian particle and plasma constituents. Based on a simple kinetic theory, we first argue that the mean-free-path time is related to the connected 4-point function of the random force felt by the Brownian particle. Then, by holographically computing the 4-point function and regularizing the IR divergence appearing in the computation, we write down a general formula for the mean-free-path time, and apply it to the STU black hole which corresponds to plasma charged under three U(1)R-charges. The result indicates that the Brownian particle collides with many plasma constituents simultaneously.

  10. Power law relation between particle concentrations and their sizes in the blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, M. N.; Chaikov, L. L.; Zaritskii, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of sizes and concentrations of particles in blood plasma by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Blood plasma contains many different proteins and their aggregates, microparticles and vesicles. Their sizes, concentrations and shapes can give information about donor's health. Our DLS study of blood plasma reveals unexpected dependence: with increasing of the particle sizes r (from 1 nm up to 1 μm), their concentrations decrease as r-4 (almost by 12 orders). We found also that such dependence was repeated for model solution of fibrinogen and thrombin with power coefficient is -3,6. We believe that this relation is a fundamental law of nature that shows interaction of proteins (and other substances) in biological liquids.

  11. Scaling laws of coronal loops compared to a 3D MHD model of an Active Region

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdin, Philippe-A; Peter, Hardi

    2016-01-01

    Context. The structure and heating of coronal loops are investigated since decades. Established scaling laws relate fundamental quantities like the loop apex temperature, pressure, length, and the coronal heating. Aims. We test such scaling laws against a large-scale 3D MHD model of the Solar corona, which became feasible with nowadays high-performance computing. Methods. We drive an active region simulation a with photospheric observations and found strong similarities to the observed coronal loops in X-rays and EUV wavelength. A 3D reconstruction of stereoscopic observations showed that our model loops have a realistic spatial structure. We compare scaling laws to our model data extracted along an ensemble of field lines. Finally, we fit a new scaling law that represents well hot loops and also cooler structures, which was not possible before only based on observations. Results. Our model data gives some support for scaling laws that were established for hot and EUV-emissive coronal loops. For the RTV scali...

  12. Scaled Laboratory Collisionless Shock Experiments in the Large Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S. E.; Schaeffer, D.; Everson, E.; Bondarenko, A.; Winske, D.; Constantin, C.; Niemann, C.

    2013-12-01

    Collisionless shocks in space plasmas have been investigated since the fifties and are typically studied via in-situ satellite observations, which are limited due to the large structure of collisionless shocks in space environments relative to the satellite observation platform. Scaled, repeatable experiments in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA provide a test bed for studying collisionless shocks in the laboratory, where questions of ion and electron heating and acceleration can be addressed and examined in detail. The experiments are performed by ablating a graphite or plastic target using the Raptor kilojoule-class laser facility at UCLA. The laser provides an on-target energy in the range of 100-500 J that drives a super-Alfvénic (MA > 1) debris plasma across a background magnetic field (200-800 G) into the ambient, magnetized LAPD plasma. Typical plasma parameters in the LAPD consist of a H+ or He+ ambient plasma with a core column (diameter > 20 cm ) density ni ~ 1013 cm-3 and electron temperature Te ~ 10 eV embedded in a larger plasma discharge (diameter ~ 80 cm) of density ni ~ 1012 cm-3 and Te ~ 5 eV. The ambient ion temperature is Ti ~ 1 eV. Experimental results from the latest collisionless shock campaign will be presented and compared with two dimensional hybrid simulations of the experiment. Fielded diagnostics include Thomson scattering, ion spectroscopy, magnetic flux probes, Langmuir probes, and microwave reflectometry.

  13. The three-state antiferromagnetic Potts model: scaling laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlob, A.P. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany); Hasenbusch, M. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics (DAMTP)

    1995-04-01

    We present the results of a Monte Carlo study of the three-dimensional anti-ferromagnetic three-state Potts model. We computed the correlation length, the magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat for various coupling parameters in the high temperature phase of the model. From the scaling behaviour of these quantities we determine estimates for the critical temperature and critical exponents. ((orig.)).

  14. Symbolic regression via genetic programming for data driven derivation of confinement scaling laws without any assumption on their mathematical form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Peluso, E.; Gelfusa, M.; Lupelli, I.; Lungaroni, M.; Gaudio, P.

    2015-01-01

    Many measurements are required to control thermonuclear plasmas and to fully exploit them scientifically. In the last years JET has shown the potential to generate about 50 GB of data per shot. These amounts of data require more sophisticated data analysis methodologies to perform correct inference and various techniques have been recently developed in this respect. The present paper covers a new methodology to extract mathematical models directly from the data without any a priori assumption about their expression. The approach, based on symbolic regression via genetic programming, is exemplified using the data of the International Tokamak Physics Activity database for the energy confinement time. The best obtained scaling laws are not in power law form and suggest a revisiting of the extrapolation to ITER. Indeed the best non-power law scalings predict confinement times in ITER approximately between 2 and 3 s. On the other hand, more comprehensive and better databases are required to fully profit from the power of these new methods and to discriminate between the hundreds of thousands of models that they can generate.

  15. On a Possible Unified Scaling Law for Volcanic Eruption Durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavò, Flavio; Nunnari, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    Volcanoes constitute dissipative systems with many degrees of freedom. Their eruptions are the result of complex processes that involve interacting chemical-physical systems. At present, due to the complexity of involved phenomena and to the lack of precise measurements, both analytical and numerical models are unable to simultaneously include the main processes involved in eruptions thus making forecasts of volcanic dynamics rather unreliable. On the other hand, accurate forecasts of some eruption parameters, such as the duration, could be a key factor in natural hazard estimation and mitigation. Analyzing a large database with most of all the known volcanic eruptions, we have determined that the duration of eruptions seems to be described by a universal distribution which characterizes eruption duration dynamics. In particular, this paper presents a plausible global power-law distribution of durations of volcanic eruptions that holds worldwide for different volcanic environments. We also introduce a new, simple and realistic pipe model that can follow the same found empirical distribution. Since the proposed model belongs to the family of the self-organized systems it may support the hypothesis that simple mechanisms can lead naturally to the emergent complexity in volcanic behaviour.

  16. Local Law of Addition of Random Matrices on Optimal Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhigang; Erdős, László; Schnelli, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    The eigenvalue distribution of the sum of two large Hermitian matrices, when one of them is conjugated by a Haar distributed unitary matrix, is asymptotically given by the free convolution of their spectral distributions. We prove that this convergence also holds locally in the bulk of the spectrum, down to the optimal scales larger than the eigenvalue spacing. The corresponding eigenvectors are fully delocalized. Similar results hold for the sum of two real symmetric matrices, when one is conjugated by Haar orthogonal matrix.

  17. Scaling law for bubbles rising near vertical walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, Sadegh; Bhuvankar, Pramod

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines the rising motion of a layer of gas bubbles next to a vertical wall in a liquid in the presence of an upward flow parallel to the wall to help with the understanding of the fluid dynamics in a bubbly upflow in vertical channels. Only the region near the wall is simulated with an average pressure gradient applied to the domain that balances the weight of the liquid phase. The upward flow is created by the rising motion of the bubbles. The bubbles are kept near the wall by the lateral lift force acting on them as a result of rising in the shear layer near the wall. The rise velocity of the bubbles sliding on the wall and the average rise velocity of the liquid depend on three dimensionless parameters, Archimedes number, Ar, Eötvös number, Eo, and the average volume fraction of bubbles on the wall. In the limit of small Eo, bubbles are nearly spherical and the dependency on Eo becomes negligible. In this limit, the scaling of the liquid Reynolds number with Archimedes number and the void fraction is presented. A scaling argument is presented based on viscous dissipation analysis that matches the numerical findings. Viscous dissipation rates are found to be high in a thin film region between the bubble and the wall. A scaling of the viscous dissipation and steady state film thickness between the bubble and the wall with Archimedes number is presented.

  18. Intraspecific scaling laws are preserved in ventricular hypertrophy but not in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanjun; Feng, Yundi; Chen, Xudong; Tan, Wenchang; Huo, Yunlong; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2016-11-01

    It is scientifically and clinically important to understand the structure-function scaling of coronary arterial trees in compensatory (e.g., left and right ventricular hypertrophy, LVH and RVH) and decompensatory vascular remodeling (e.g., congestive heart failure, CHF). This study hypothesizes that intraspecific scaling power laws of vascular trees are preserved in hypertrophic hearts but not in CHF swine hearts. To test the hypothesis, we carried out the scaling analysis based on morphometry and hemodynamics of coronary arterial trees in moderate LVH, severe RVH, and CHF compared with age-matched respective control hearts. The scaling exponents of volume-diameter, length-volume, and flow-diameter power laws in control hearts were consistent with the theoretical predictions (i.e., 3, 7/9, and 7/3, respectively), which remained unchanged in LVH and RVH hearts. The scaling exponents were also preserved with an increase of body weight during normal growth of control animals. In contrast, CHF increased the exponents of volume-diameter and flow-diameter scaling laws to 4.25 ± 1.50 and 3.15 ± 1.49, respectively, in the epicardial arterial trees. This study validates the predictive utility of the scaling laws to diagnose vascular structure and function in CHF hearts to identify the borderline between compensatory and decompensatory remodeling.

  19. High-resolution hybrid simulations of kinetic plasma turbulence at proton scales

    CERN Document Server

    Franci, Luca; Matteini, Lorenzo; Verdini, Andrea; Hellinger, Petr

    2015-01-01

    We investigate properties of plasma turbulence from magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) to sub-ion scales by means of two-dimensional, high-resolution hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field, perpendicular to the simulation box, and we add a spectrum of large-scale magnetic and kinetic fluctuations, with energy equipartition and vanishing correlation. Once the turbulence is fully developed, we observe a MHD inertial range, where the spectra of the perpendicular magnetic field and the perpendicular proton bulk velocity fluctuations exhibit power-law scaling with spectral indices of -5/3 and -3/2, respectively. This behavior is extended over a full decade in wavevectors and is very stable in time. A transition is observed around proton scales. At sub-ion scales, both spectra steepen, with the former still following a power law with a spectral index of ~-3. A -2.8 slope is observed in the density and parallel magnetic fluctuations, highlighting the presence of compressive effects ...

  20. From Black Hole quantization to universal scaling laws

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, Salvatore; De Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Luongo, Orlando

    2012-01-01

    Significative developments on the primordial black hole quantization seem to indicate that the structure formation in the universe behaves under a unified scheme. This leads to the existence of scaling relations, whose validity could offer insights on the process of unification between quantum mechanics and gravity. Encouraging results have been obtained in order to recover the observed magnitudes of angular momenta, peculiar radii and virialized times for large and small structures. In the cosmological regime, we show that it seems possible to infer the magnitude of the cosmological constant in terms of the matter density, in agreement with the observed values.

  1. Scaling laws In PZT/Si(001) Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Juan; Cortes, Alexander; Lopera, Wilson; Gómez, Maria Elena; Prieto, Pedro

    2006-03-01

    Self-affine scaling behavior of ferroelectric Pb(Zr1-xTix)O3 (PZT) thin films grown on Si(001) substrates has been investigated by AFM Atomic Force Microscope. PZT thin films were grown via Rf-sputtering technique at high oxygen pressures and at substrate temperatures 600 ^oC varying the deposition time and keeping all parameters. growth constant. The α-global rough-exponent was founded close to 0.7 indicating a correlated growth. Anomalous scaling behavior was founded in all PZT/Si surfaces. A value of 0.5.for the α-local value was founded. The local value of the roughness exponent is associated to the diffusional process on the first stage growth. Saturation roughness showed oscillation dependence with the PZT-thickness. This dependence can be explained by the mismatch between Si substrate and PZT thin film. These results are corroborated calculating the grain size for all samples. This work was supported by COLCIENCIAS under the Excellence Center for Novel Materials Contract no 0043-2005.

  2. Analytic base of geodynamo-like scaling laws in the planets, geomagnetic periodicities and inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starchenko, S. V.

    2014-11-01

    Scaling laws for hydromagnetic dynamo in planets initially express the characteristic strength of the magnetic field through the primary values, such as the size of the conductive core of the planet, the angular rotation rate, electrical conductivity and energy flows. Most of the earlier proposed scaling laws based only on observations and assumptions about force balances. Recent and my new approaches to fully take into account the energy and induction balance has additionally expressed here in terms of primary values such important characteristics as forces, magnitudes, energies, scales and orientations of hydromagnetic fields. The direct numerical simulation of the hydromagnetic dynamo and modeling ability in a fairly wide range of parameters for the first time allowed direct test such laws. The obtained numerical geodynamo-like results for the Earth, Jupiter and partially Saturn postulated previously not identified analytically simplest law that predicts the field strength is only depended on the specific energy density of convection and the size of the dynamo area. This simplest and already widely used law was original way analytically grounded here along with other previously known and new laws. This analytic identifies the physics determining geomagnetic periodicities for jerk, secular variations and inversions. Mean period between the inversions is found to be roughly proportional to the intensity of the geomagnetic field that is confirmed by some paleomagnetic researches. Possible dynamos in Mercury, Ganymede, Uranus and Neptune are also discussed.

  3. Power law scaling in synchronization of brain signals depends on cognitive load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Jesse; Velazquez, Jose Luis Perez

    2014-01-01

    As it has several features that optimize information processing, it has been proposed that criticality governs the dynamics of nervous system activity. Indications of such dynamics have been reported for a variety of in vitro and in vivo recordings, ranging from in vitro slice electrophysiology to human functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, there still remains considerable debate as to whether the brain actually operates close to criticality or in another governing state such as stochastic or oscillatory dynamics. A tool used to investigate the criticality of nervous system data is the inspection of power-law distributions. Although the findings are controversial, such power-law scaling has been found in different types of recordings. Here, we studied whether there is a power law scaling in the distribution of the phase synchronization derived from magnetoencephalographic recordings during executive function tasks performed by children with and without autism. Characterizing the brain dynamics that is different between autistic and non-autistic individuals is important in order to find differences that could either aid diagnosis or provide insights as to possible therapeutic interventions in autism. We report in this study that power law scaling in the distributions of a phase synchrony index is not very common and its frequency of occurrence is similar in the control and the autism group. In addition, power law scaling tends to diminish with increased cognitive load (difficulty or engagement in the task). There were indications of changes in the probability distribution functions for the phase synchrony that were associated with a transition from power law scaling to lack of power law (or vice versa), which suggests the presence of phenomenological bifurcations in brain dynamics associated with cognitive load. Hence, brain dynamics may fluctuate between criticality and other regimes depending upon context and behaviors.

  4. Power law scaling in synchronization of brain signals depends on cognitive load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis ePerez Velazquez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As it has several features that optimize information processing, it has been proposed that criticality governs the dynamics of nervous system activity. Indications of such dynamics have been reported for a variety of in vitro and in vivo recordings, ranging from in vitro slice electrophysiology to human functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, there still remains considerable debate as to whether the brain actually operates close to criticality or in another governing state such as stochastic or oscillatory dynamics. A tool used to investigate the criticality of nervous system data is the inspection of power-law distributions. Although the findings are controversial, such power-law scaling has been found in different types of recordings. Here, we studied whether there is a power law scaling in the distribution of the phase synchronization derived from magnetoencephalographic recordings during executive function tasks performed by children with and without autism. Characterizing the brain dynamics that is different between autistic and non-autistic individuals is important in order to find differences that could either aid diagnosis or provide insights as to possible therapeutic interventions in autism. We report in this study that power law scaling in the distributions of a phase synchrony index is not very common and its frequency of occurrence is similar in the control and the autism group. In addition, power law scaling tends to diminish with increased cognitive load (difficulty or engagement in the task. There were indications of changes in the probability distribution functions for the phase synchrony that were associated with a transition from power law scaling to lack of power law (or vice versa, which suggests the presence of phenomenological bifurcations in brain dynamics associated with cognitive load. Hence, brain dynamics may fluctuate between criticality and other regimes depending upon context and behaviours.

  5. On universality of scaling law describing roughness of triple line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Musin, Albina; Whyman, Gene; Barkay, Zahava; Zinigrad, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The fine structure of the three-phase (triple) line was studied for different liquids, various topographies of micro-rough substrates and various wetting regimes. Wetting of porous and pillar-based micro-scaled polymer surfaces was investigated. The triple line was visualized with the environmental scanning electron microscope and scanning electron microscope for the "frozen" triple lines. The value of the roughness exponent ζ for water (ice)/rough polymer systems was located within 0.55-0.63. For epoxy glue/rough polymer systems somewhat lower values of the exponent, 0.42 switch of the exponent, when the roughness size approaches to the correlation length of the defects, is also universal.

  6. Likert scales, levels of measurement and the "laws" of statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Geoff

    2010-12-01

    Reviewers of research reports frequently criticize the choice of statistical methods. While some of these criticisms are well-founded, frequently the use of various parametric methods such as analysis of variance, regression, correlation are faulted because: (a) the sample size is too small, (b) the data may not be normally distributed, or (c) The data are from Likert scales, which are ordinal, so parametric statistics cannot be used. In this paper, I dissect these arguments, and show that many studies, dating back to the 1930s consistently show that parametric statistics are robust with respect to violations of these assumptions. Hence, challenges like those above are unfounded, and parametric methods can be utilized without concern for "getting the wrong answer".

  7. A Scaling Law for the Snapback in Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L; Bauer, P; Haverkamp, M; Pieloni, T; Sanfilippo, S; Velev, G

    2005-01-01

    The decay of the sextupole component in the bending dipoles during injection and the subsequent snapback at the start of beam acceleration are issues of common concern for all superconducting colliders built or in construction. Recent studies performed on LHC and Tevatron dipole magnets revealed many similarities in the snapback characteristics. Some are expected, e.g. the effect of operational history. One particular similarity, however, is striking and is the subject of this paper. It appears that there is a simple linear relation between the amount of sextupole drift during the decay and the magnet current (or field) change during the ramp required to resolve the snapback. It is surprising that the linear correlation between snapback amplitude and snapback field holds very well for all magnets of the same family (e.g. Tevatron or LHC dipoles). In this paper we present the data collected to date and discuss a simple theory that explains the scaling found.

  8. Leidenfrost effect: Accurate drop shape modeling and refined scaling laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobac, B; Rednikov, A; Dorbolo, S; Colinet, P

    2014-11-01

    We here present a simple fitting-parameter-free theory of the Leidenfrost effect (droplet levitation above a superheated plate) covering the full range of stable shapes, i.e., from small quasispherical droplets to larger puddles floating on a pocketlike vapor film. The geometry of this film is found to be in excellent quantitative agreement with the interferometric measurements of Burton et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 074301 (2012)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.109.074301]. We also obtain new scalings generalizing classical ones derived by Biance et al. [Phys. Fluids 15, 1632 (2003)PHFLE61070-663110.1063/1.1572161] as far as the effect of plate superheat is concerned and highlight the relative role of evaporation, gravity, and capillarity in the vapor film. To further substantiate these findings, a treatment of the problem by matched asymptotic expansions is also presented.

  9. Tornado outbreak variability follows Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling and increases dramatically with severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippett, Michael K; Cohen, Joel E

    2016-02-29

    Tornadoes cause loss of life and damage to property each year in the United States and around the world. The largest impacts come from 'outbreaks' consisting of multiple tornadoes closely spaced in time. Here we find an upward trend in the annual mean number of tornadoes per US tornado outbreak for the period 1954-2014. Moreover, the variance of this quantity is increasing more than four times as fast as the mean. The mean and variance of the number of tornadoes per outbreak vary according to Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling (TL), with parameters that are consistent with multiplicative growth. Tornado-related atmospheric proxies show similar power-law scaling and multiplicative growth. Path-length-integrated tornado outbreak intensity also follows TL, but with parameters consistent with sampling variability. The observed TL power-law scaling of outbreak severity means that extreme outbreaks are more frequent than would be expected if mean and variance were independent or linearly related.

  10. Power-law statistics and universal scaling in the absence of criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touboul, Jonathan; Destexhe, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Critical states are sometimes identified experimentally through power-law statistics or universal scaling functions. We show here that such features naturally emerge from networks in self-sustained irregular regimes away from criticality. In these regimes, statistical physics theory of large interacting systems predict a regime where the nodes have independent and identically distributed dynamics. We thus investigated the statistics of a system in which units are replaced by independent stochastic surrogates and found the same power-law statistics, indicating that these are not sufficient to establish criticality. We rather suggest that these are universal features of large-scale networks when considered macroscopically. These results put caution on the interpretation of scaling laws found in nature.

  11. A phase-field study of the scaling law in free-standing ferroelectric thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Binglun; Mao, Huina; Qu, Shaoxing

    2015-12-18

    The scaling law for ferroelectric stripe domains is investigated in free-standing BaTiO3 and PbTiO3 thin films via phase-field simulations. The results agree with the Kittel law, where the square of the domain width is found to be proportional to the thin film thickness. After being rescaled by the corresponding domain wall thickness, the generalized scaling law is also demonstrated, with the dimensionless scaling constant M estimated to be ∼3.3 in two ferroelectric materials. Moreover, we predict the effect of the exchange constant which is incorporated in Ginzburg-Landau theory on the equilibrium domain width and the critical thickness of the ferroelectric thin films.

  12. A phase-field study of the scaling law in free-standing ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Binglun; Mao, Huina; Qu, Shaoxing

    2015-12-01

    The scaling law for ferroelectric stripe domains is investigated in free-standing BaTiO3 and PbTiO3 thin films via phase-field simulations. The results agree with the Kittel law, where the square of the domain width is found to be proportional to the thin film thickness. After being rescaled by the corresponding domain wall thickness, the generalized scaling law is also demonstrated, with the dimensionless scaling constant M estimated to be ˜3.3 in two ferroelectric materials. Moreover, we predict the effect of the exchange constant which is incorporated in Ginzburg-Landau theory on the equilibrium domain width and the critical thickness of the ferroelectric thin films.

  13. A psychometric appraisal of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy using law students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams B

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Brett Williams,1 Adiva Sifris,2 Marty Lynch1 1Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, 2Faculty of Law, Monash University, Frankston, VIC, Australia Background: A growing body of literature indicates that empathic behaviors are positively linked, in several ways, with the professional performance and mental well-being of lawyers and law students. It is therefore important to assess empathy levels among law students using psychometrically sound tools that are suitable for this cohort.Participants and methods: The 20-item Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Health Profession Students Version was adapted for a law context (eg, the word “health care” became “legal”, and the new Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Law Students (JSE-L-S version was completed by 275 students at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Data were subjected to principal component analysis.Results: Four factors emerged from the principal component analysis (“understanding the client’s perspective”, “responding to clients’ experiences and emotions”, “responding to clients’ cues and behaviors”, and “standing in clients’ shoes”, which accounted for 46.7% of the total variance. The reliability of the factors varied, but the overall 18-item JSE-L-S yielded a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.80. Several patterns among the item loadings were similar to those reported in studies using other versions of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy.Conclusion: The JSE-L-S appears to be a reliable measure of empathy among undergraduate law students, which could help provide insights into law student welfare and future performance as legal practitioners. Additional evaluation of the JSE-L-S is required to disambiguate some of the minor findings explored. Adjustments may improve the psychometric properties. Keywords: empathy, law, student, Jefferson, sympathy

  14. Scaling laws for gas-solid riser flow through two-fluid model simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.R. Naren; Vivek. V. Ranade

    2011-01-01

    Scale up of gas-solid circulating fluidized bed (CFB) risers poses many challenges to researchers. In this paper, CFD investigation of hydrodynamic scaling laws for gas-solid riser flow was attempted on the basis of two-fluid model simulations, in particular, the recently developed empirical scaling law of Qi, Zhu,and Huang (2008). A 3D computational model with periodic boundaries was used to perform numerical experiments and to study the effect of various system and operating parameters in hydrodynamic scaling of riser flow. The Qi scaling ratio was found to ensure similarity in global parameters like overall crosssectional average solid holdup or pressure drop gradient. However, similarity in local flow profiles was not observed for all the test cases. The present work also highlighted the significance of error bars in reporting experimental values.

  15. Achievable Rates and Scaling Laws for Cognitive Radio Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Devroye

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive radios have the potential to vastly improve communication over wireless channels. We outline recent information theoretic results on the limits of primary and cognitive user communication in single and multiple cognitive user scenarios. We first examine the achievable rate and capacity regions of single user cognitive channels. Results indicate that at medium SNR (0–20 dB, the use of cognition improves rates significantly compared to the currently suggested spectral gap-filling methods of secondary spectrum access. We then study another information theoretic measure, the multiplexing gain. This measure captures the number of point-to-point Gaussian channels contained in a cognitive channel as the SNR tends to infinity. Next, we consider a cognitive network with a single primary user and multiple cognitive users. We show that with single-hop transmission, the sum capacity of the cognitive users scales linearly with the number of users. We further introduce and analyze the primary exclusive radius, inside of which primary receivers are guaranteed a desired outage performance. These results provide guidelines when designing a network with secondary spectrum users.

  16. Achievable Rates and Scaling Laws for Cognitive Radio Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devroye Natasha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cognitive radios have the potential to vastly improve communication over wireless channels. We outline recent information theoretic results on the limits of primary and cognitive user communication in single and multiple cognitive user scenarios. We first examine the achievable rate and capacity regions of single user cognitive channels. Results indicate that at medium SNR (0–20 dB, the use of cognition improves rates significantly compared to the currently suggested spectral gap-filling methods of secondary spectrum access. We then study another information theoretic measure, the multiplexing gain. This measure captures the number of point-to-point Gaussian channels contained in a cognitive channel as the SNR tends to infinity. Next, we consider a cognitive network with a single primary user and multiple cognitive users. We show that with single-hop transmission, the sum capacity of the cognitive users scales linearly with the number of users. We further introduce and analyze the primary exclusive radius, inside of which primary receivers are guaranteed a desired outage performance. These results provide guidelines when designing a network with secondary spectrum users.

  17. Compact Star Matter: EoS with New Scaling Law

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyungmin; Lee, Jaehyun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple discussion on the properties of compact stars using an EoS obtained in effective field theory anchored on scale and hidden-local symmetric Lagrangian endowed with topology change and a unequivocal prediction on the deformation of the compact star, that could be measured in gravitational waves. The objective is not to offer a superior or improved EoS for compact stars but to confront with a forthcoming astrophysical observable the given model formulated in what is considered to be consistent with the premise of QCD. The model so obtained is found to satisfactorily describe the observation of a 2-solar mass neutron star with a minimum number of parameters. Specifically the observable we are considering in this paper is the tidal deformability parameter (equivalently the Love number k_2), which affects gravitational wave forms at the late period of inspiral stage. The forthcoming aLIGO and aVirgo observations of gravitational waves from binary neutron star system will provide a ...

  18. General scaling laws of chaotic escape in dissipative multistable systems subjected to autoresonant excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon, Ricardo, E-mail: rchacon@unex.e [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Escuela de IngenierIas Industriales, Universidad de Extremadura, Apartado Postal 382, E-06071 Badajoz (Spain)

    2010-06-04

    Theory concerning the emergence and control of chaotic escape from a potential well by means of autoresonant excitations is presented in the context of generic, dissipative and multistable systems. General scaling laws relating both the onset and lifetime of transient chaos to the parameters of autoresonant excitations are derived theoretically using vibrational mechanics, Melnikov analysis and energy-based autoresonance theory. Numerical experiments show that these scaling laws are robust against both the presence of noise and driving re-shaping. (fast track communication)

  19. Nonlinear Scaling Laws for Parametric Receiving Arrays. Part II. Numerical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-30

    8217" " .’Ml’.1 ’.■■’: ■ ’ ^ t- Nonlinear Scaling Laws for Parametric Receiving Arrays Part II Numerical Analysis » - m • o prepared ...8217 ’ ■ — Nonlinear Scaling Laws for Parametric Receiving Arrays » z Part II. Numerical Analysis prepared under: A ——^ N0ÖJ339- 7 5 - C -J02 59, //V-ARPA Order...IF ’IP ,6T, 10 .HNO. IR .I_E. £0> riELTI = LiELTrJ IF ’IP .GT. 3 0 .HMD. IP .LE. 3 0;. [ IELT I = IiELT3 IF

  20. Scaling Law for Photon Transmission through Optically Turbid Slabs Based on Random Walk Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Past work has demonstrated the value of a random walk theory (RWT to solve multiple-scattering problems arising in numerous contexts. This paper’s goal is to investigate the application range of the RWT using Monte Carlo simulations and extending it to anisotropic media using scaling laws. Meanwhile, this paper also reiterates rules for converting RWT formulas to real physical dimensions, and corrects some errors which appear in an earlier publication. The RWT theory, validated by the Monte Carlo simulations and combined with the scaling law, is expected to be useful to study multiple scattering and to greatly reduce the computation cost.

  1. Unified Scaling Law for flux pinning in practical superconductors: II. Parameter testing, scaling constants, and the Extrapolative Scaling Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekin, Jack W.; Cheggour, Najib; Goodrich, Loren; Splett, Jolene; Bordini, Bernardo; Richter, David

    2016-12-01

    A scaling study of several thousand Nb3Sn critical-current (I c) measurements is used to derive the Extrapolative Scaling Expression (ESE), a relation that can quickly and accurately extrapolate limited datasets to obtain full three-dimensional dependences of I c on magnetic field (B), temperature (T), and mechanical strain (ɛ). The relation has the advantage of being easy to implement, and offers significant savings in sample characterization time and a useful tool for magnet design. Thorough data-based analysis of the general parameterization of the Unified Scaling Law (USL) shows the existence of three universal scaling constants for practical Nb3Sn conductors. The study also identifies the scaling parameters that are conductor specific and need to be fitted to each conductor. This investigation includes two new, rare, and very large I c(B,T,ɛ) datasets (each with nearly a thousand I c measurements spanning magnetic fields from 1 to 16 T, temperatures from ˜2.26 to 14 K, and intrinsic strains from -1.1% to +0.3%). The results are summarized in terms of the general USL parameters given in table 3 of Part 1 (Ekin J W 2010 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 23 083001) of this series of articles. The scaling constants determined for practical Nb3Sn conductors are: the upper-critical-field temperature parameter v = 1.50 ± 0.04 the cross-link parameter w = 3.0 ± 0.3 and the strain curvature parameter u = 1.7 ± 0.1 (from equation (29) for b c2(ɛ) in Part 1). These constants and required fitting parameters result in the ESE relation, given by I c ( B , T , ɛ ) B = C [ b c 2 ( ɛ ) ] s ( 1 - t 1.5 ) η - μ ( 1 - t 2 ) μ b p ( 1 - b ) q with reduced magnetic field b ≡ B/B c2*(T,ɛ) and reduced temperature t ≡ T/T c*(ɛ), where: B c 2 * ( T , ɛ ) = B c 2 * ( 0 , 0 ) ( 1 - t 1.5 ) b c 2 ( ɛ ) T c * ( ɛ ) = T c * ( 0 ) [ b c 2 ( ɛ ) ] 1/3 and fitting parameters: C, B c2*(0,0), T c*(0), s, either η or μ (but not both), plus the parameters in the strain function b c2

  2. Scaling of Magnetic Reconnection in Relativistic Collisionless Pair Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Guo, Fan; Daughton, William; Li, Hui; Hesse, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we study the scaling of the inflow speed of collisionless magnetic reconnection in electron-positron plasmas from the non-relativistic to ultra-relativistic limit. In the anti-parallel configuration, the inflow speed increases with the upstream magnetization parameter sigma and approaches the speed of light when sigma is greater than O(100), leading to an enhanced reconnection rate. In all regimes, the divergence of the pressure tensor is the dominant term responsible for breaking the frozen-in condition at the x-line. The observed scaling agrees well with a simple model that accounts for the Lorentz contraction of the plasma passing through the diffusion region. The results demonstrate that the aspect ratio of the diffusion region, modified by the compression factor of proper density, remains approximately 0.1 in both the non-relativistic and relativistic limits.

  3. Modeling of the effects of die scale features on bulk plasma conditions in plasma etching equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grapperhaus, M.J.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The patterning of the wafer during microelectronics fabrication can have a significant effect on bulk plasma properties as well as producing local pattern dependent etch rates. Sputtering of photoresist, loading effects, and other surface interactions couple the chemistry at the wafer surface to the bulk plasma chemistry. A model has been developed which uses a Monte Carlo simulation to model quasi-steady state die scale surface chemistry in plasma etching reactors. This model is integrated within the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM) which resolves two-dimensional reactor scale plasma conditions. The HPEM consists of an electromagnetics, electron Monte Carlo simulation, and a fluid plasma modules. The surface Monte Carlo simulation is used to modify the flux boundary condition at the wafer surface within the HPEM. Species which react on the surface, or which are created at the surface are tracked on and near the wafer surface.this gives a quasi-steady state surface chemistry reaction mechanism resolved in two dimensions on the die scale. An inductively coupled etching reactor is used to demonstrate the effect of surface chemistry on bulk plasma conditions over a range of pressures from 10 to 100 mtorr, 100`s w of inductively coupled power and 10`s to 100`s V rf applied substrate voltage. Under high etch rate conditions, macroloading effects are shown. As pressure is varied from 10 to 100 mtorr and the effect of local photoresist sputter and redeposit on nearby exposed etch area is shown to increase which leads to different etch rates near the boundaries of etching regions versus unexposed regions.

  4. Taylor’s Law of Temporal Fluctuation Scaling in Stock Illiquidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qing; Xu, Hai-Chuan; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2016-08-01

    Taylor’s law of temporal fluctuation scaling, variance ˜ a(mean)b, is ubiquitous in natural and social sciences. We report for the first time convincing evidence of a solid temporal fluctuation scaling law in stock illiquidity by investigating the mean-variance relationship of the high-frequency illiquidity of almost all stocks traded on the Shanghai Stock Exchange (SHSE) and the Shenzhen Stock Exchange (SZSE) during the period from 1999 to 2011. Taylor’s law holds for A-share markets (SZSE Main Board, SZSE Small & Mediate Enterprise Board, SZSE Second Board, and SHSE Main Board) and B-share markets (SZSE B-share and SHSE B-share). We find that the scaling exponent b is greater than 2 for the A-share markets and less than 2 for the B-share markets. We further unveil that Taylor’s law holds for stocks in 17 industry categories, in 28 industrial sectors and in 31 provinces and direct-controlled municipalities with the majority of scaling exponents b ∈ (2, 3). We also investigate the Δt-min illiquidity and find that the scaling exponent b(Δt) increases logarithmically for small Δt values and decreases fast to a stable level.

  5. Gyrokinetic simulation of isotope scaling in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Santoro, R.A. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-07-01

    A three-dimensional global gyrokinetic particle code in toroidal geometry has been used for investigating the transport properties of ion temperature gradient (ITG) drift instabilities in tokamak plasmas. Using the isotopes of hydrogen (H{sup +}), deuterium (D{sup +}) and tritium (T{sup +}), we have found that, under otherwise identical conditions, there exists a favorable isotope scaling for the ion thermal diffusivity, i.e., Xi decreases with mass. Such a scaling, which exists both at the saturation of the instability and also at the nonlinear steady state, can be understood from the resulting wavenumber and frequency spectra.

  6. Plasma suppression of large scale structure formation in the universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pisin; Lai, Kwang-Chang

    2007-12-07

    We point out that during the reionization epoch of the cosmic history, the plasma collective effect among the ordinary matter would suppress the large scale structure formation. The imperfect Debye shielding at finite temperature would induce an electrostatic pressure which, working together with the thermal pressure, would counter the gravitational collapse. As a result, the effective Jeans length, lambda[over ]_{J} is increased by a factor lambda[over ]_{J}/lambda_{J}=sqrt[8/5], relative to the conventional one. For scales smaller than the effective Jeans scale the plasma would oscillate at the ion-acoustic frequency. The modes that would be influenced by this effect lie roughly in the range 0.5h Mpc;{-1}plasma suppression of the matter power spectrum would approach 1-(Omega_{dm}/Omega_{m});{2} approximately 1-(5/6);{2} approximately 30%.

  7. The second law of thermodynamics can never be violated for all time- and space-scales

    CERN Document Server

    Arulsamy, Andrew Das

    2012-01-01

    Maxwell's demon was created with abilities to violate the second law of thermodynamics. But the demon always fell short of doing so because of the imposed restrictive condition that reads, the demon needs to do "work". Therefore, you can always preserve the second law by default. Here, we encounter the supernatural demon (without the above restriction) right at the melting point, and unambiguously expose why the demon is still doomed to fail for all time- and space-scales. This means that the second law of thermodynamics can never be violated. We develop an analytic strategy (based on Newton's third law) to properly analyze the entropy in a chemical system with respect to forward and reverse trajectories. We also explain the physico-chemical processes that are responsible at very short timescales.

  8. Scaling Laws of Passive-Scalar Diffusion in the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Colbrook, Matthew J; Hopkins, Philip F; Squire, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Passive scalar mixing (metals, molecules, etc.) in the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM) is critical for abundance patterns of stars and clusters, galaxy and star formation, and cooling from the circumgalactic medium. However, the fundamental scaling laws remain poorly understood (and usually unresolved in numerical simulations) in the highly supersonic, magnetized, shearing regime relevant for the ISM.We therefore study the full scaling laws governing passive-scalar transport in idealized simulations of supersonic MHD turbulence, including shear. Using simple phenomenological arguments for the variation of diffusivity with scale based on Richardson diffusion, we propose a simple fractional diffusion equation to describe the turbulent advection of an initial passive scalar distribution. These predictions agree well with the measurements from simulations, and vary with turbulent Mach number in the expected manner, remaining valid even in the presence of a large-scale shear flow (e.g. rotation in a galactic d...

  9. Scaling laws for file dissemination in P2P networks with random contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Núñez-Queija, R.; Prabhu, B.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we obtain the scaling law for the mean broadcast time of a file in a P2P network with an initial population of N nodes. In the model, at Poisson rate lambda a node initiates a contact with another node chosen uniformly at random. This contact is said to be successful if the contacted n

  10. Distance to the scaling law: a useful approach for unveiling relationships between crime and urban metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, Luiz G A; Lenzi, Ervin K; Mendes, Renio S

    2013-01-01

    We report on a quantitative analysis of relationships between the number of homicides, population size and other ten urban metrics. By using data from Brazilian cities, we show that well defined average scaling laws with the population size emerge when investigating the relations between population and number of homicides as well as population and urban metrics. We also show that the fluctuations around the scaling laws are log-normally distributed, which enabled us to model these scaling laws by a stochastic-like equation driven by a multiplicative and log-normally distributed noise. Because of the scaling laws, we argue that it is better to employ logarithms in order to describe the number of homicides in function of the urban metrics via regression analysis. In addition to the regression analysis, we propose an approach to correlate crime and urban metrics via the evaluation of the distance between the actual value of the number of homicides (as well as the value of the urban metrics) and the value that is...

  11. Scaling laws for file dissemination in P2P networks with random contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Núñez-Queija, R.; Prabhu, B.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we obtain the scaling law for the mean broadcast time of a file in a P2P network with an initial population of N nodes. In the model, at Poisson rate lambda a node initiates a contact with another node chosen uniformly at random. This contact is said to be successful if the contacted n

  12. Elementary scaling laws for the design of low and high power hall effect thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenmayer, K.; Mazouffre, S.

    2011-10-01

    An advanced set of scaling laws for Hall effect thrusters running with Xenon as propellant is established on the basis of the existence of an optimum atom number density that warrants a high efficiency thruster operation. A set of general relationships between macroscopic quantities, like thrust and input power, dimensions, including the channel length, the channel width and the channel mean diameter, and magnetic field strength are inferred from the main physical processes at work in a Hall thruster discharge. The "atom density constraint" of which the nature is here critically interpreted allows simplifying those relationships as it leads to a linear dependency between the channel length and mean diameter. Scaling laws which represent an essential tool for sizing up and down Hall thrusters are eventually obtained after proportionnality coefficients are determined. This last step is realized by means of a vast database that presently encompasses 33 single-stage Hall thrusters. In order to illustrate the usefulness of this new set of scaling laws, two practical applications are given and discussed. The scaling laws are first employed to calculate the dimensions and the operating parameters for a 20-kilowatt Hall thruster capable of producing 1 N of thrust. Such an electrical engine would permit orbit transfer of large communication satellites. Finally, the geometry of a Hall thruster is determined for tolerating 100 kW, an interesting power level for interplanetary trips.

  13. Scaling laws for file dissemination in P2P networks with random contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunez-Queija, R.; Prabhu, B.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we obtain the scaling law for the mean broadcast time of a file in a P2P network with an initial population of N nodes. In the model, at Poisson rate λ a node initiates a contact with another node chosen uniformly at random. This contact is said to be successful if the contacted node p

  14. Scaling laws for file dissemination in P2P networks with random contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Núñez-Queija, R.; Prabhu, B.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we obtain the scaling law for the mean broadcast time of a file in a P2P network with an initial population of N nodes. In the model, at Poisson rate lambda a node initiates a contact with another node chosen uniformly at random. This contact is said to be successful if the contacted

  15. An animal-to-human scaling law for blast-induced traumatic brain injury risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Aurélie; Nyein, Michelle K; Zheng, James Q; Moore, David F; Joannopoulos, John D; Radovitzky, Raúl

    2014-10-28

    Despite recent efforts to understand blast effects on the human brain, there are still no widely accepted injury criteria for humans. Recent animal studies have resulted in important advances in the understanding of brain injury due to intense dynamic loads. However, the applicability of animal brain injury results to humans remains uncertain. Here, we use advanced computational models to derive a scaling law relating blast wave intensity to the mechanical response of brain tissue across species. Detailed simulations of blast effects on the brain are conducted for different mammals using image-based biofidelic models. The intensity of the stress waves computed for different external blast conditions is compared across species. It is found that mass scaling, which successfully estimates blast tolerance of the thorax, fails to capture the brain mechanical response to blast across mammals. Instead, we show that an appropriate scaling variable must account for the mass of protective tissues relative to the brain, as well as their acoustic impedance. Peak stresses transmitted to the brain tissue by the blast are then shown to be a power function of the scaling parameter for a range of blast conditions relevant to TBI. In particular, it is found that human brain vulnerability to blast is higher than for any other mammalian species, which is in distinct contrast to previously proposed scaling laws based on body or brain mass. An application of the scaling law to recent experiments on rabbits furnishes the first physics-based injury estimate for blast-induced TBI in humans.

  16. Dynamic properties of small-scale solar wind plasma fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazantseva, M O; Budaev, V P; Zelenyi, L M; Zastenker, G N; Pavlos, G P; Safrankova, J; Nemecek, Z; Prech, L; Nemec, F

    2015-05-13

    The paper presents the latest results of the studies of small-scale fluctuations in a turbulent flow of solar wind (SW) using measurements with extremely high temporal resolution (up to 0.03 s) of the bright monitor of SW (BMSW) plasma spectrometer operating on astrophysical SPECTR-R spacecraft at distances up to 350,000 km from the Earth. The spectra of SW ion flux fluctuations in the range of scales between 0.03 and 100 s are systematically analysed. The difference of slopes in low- and high-frequency parts of spectra and the frequency of the break point between these two characteristic slopes was analysed for different conditions in the SW. The statistical properties of the SW ion flux fluctuations were thoroughly analysed on scales less than 10 s. A high level of intermittency is demonstrated. The extended self-similarity of SW ion flux turbulent flow is constantly observed. The approximation of non-Gaussian probability distribution function of ion flux fluctuations by the Tsallis statistics shows the non-extensive character of SW fluctuations. Statistical characteristics of ion flux fluctuations are compared with the predictions of a log-Poisson model. The log-Poisson parametrization of the structure function scaling has shown that well-defined filament-like plasma structures are, as a rule, observed in the turbulent SW flows.

  17. Laser-plasma interactions in NIF-scale plasmas (HLP5 and HLP6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacGowan, B.; Berger, R.; Fernandez, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The understanding of laser-plasma interactions in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraum targets is important for the success of the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). The success of an indirect-drive ICF ignition experiment depends on the ability to predict and control the history and spatial distribution of the x-radiation produced by the laser beams that are absorbed by the inside of the hohlraum wall. Only by controlling the symmetry of this x-ray drive is it possible to obtain the implosion symmetry in the fusion pellet necessary for ignition. The larger hohlraums and longer time scales required for ignition-scale targets result in the presence of several millimeters of plasma (electron density n{sub e} {approximately} 0.1 n{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup 21} cm{sup {minus}3}), through which the 3{omega} (351-nm) laser beams must propagate before they are absorbed at the hohlraum wall. Hydrodynamic simulations show this plasma to be very uniform [density-gradient scalelength L{sub n} = n{sub e}(dn{sub e}/dx){sup {minus}1}{approximately} 2mm] and to exhibit low velocity gradients [velocity-gradient scale-length L{sub v} = c{sub s}(dv/dx){sup {minus}1} > 6 mm].

  18. Taylor's power law and fluctuation scaling explained by a central-limit-like convergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendal, Wayne S.; Jørgensen, Bent

    2011-06-01

    A power function relationship observed between the variance and the mean of many types of biological and physical systems has generated much debate as to its origins. This Taylor's law (or fluctuation scaling) has been recently hypothesized to result from the second law of thermodynamics and the behavior of the density of states. This hypothesis is predicated on physical quantities like free energy and an external field; the correspondence of these quantities with biological systems, though, remains unproven. Questions can be posed as to the applicability of this hypothesis to the diversity of observed phenomena as well as the range of spatial and temporal scales observed with Taylor's law. We note that the cumulant generating functions derived from this thermodynamic model correspond to those derived over a quarter century earlier for a class of probabilistic models known as the Tweedie exponential dispersion models. These latter models are characterized by variance-to-mean power functions; their phenomenological basis rests with a central-limit-theorem-like property that causes many statistical systems to converge mathematically toward a Tweedie form. We review evaluations of the Tweedie Poisson-gamma model for Taylor's law and provide three further cases to test: the clustering of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the horse chromosome 1, the clustering of genes within human chromosome 8, and the Mertens function. This latter case is a number theoretic function for which a thermodynamic model cannot explain Taylor's law, but where Tweedie convergence remains applicable. The Tweedie models are applicable to diverse biological, physical, and mathematical phenomena that express power variance functions over a wide range of measurement scales; they provide a probabilistic description for Taylor's law that allows mechanistic insight into complex systems without the assumption of a thermodynamic mechanism.

  19. Taylor's power law and fluctuation scaling explained by a central-limit-like convergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendal, Wayne S; Jørgensen, Bent

    2011-06-01

    A power function relationship observed between the variance and the mean of many types of biological and physical systems has generated much debate as to its origins. This Taylor's law (or fluctuation scaling) has been recently hypothesized to result from the second law of thermodynamics and the behavior of the density of states. This hypothesis is predicated on physical quantities like free energy and an external field; the correspondence of these quantities with biological systems, though, remains unproven. Questions can be posed as to the applicability of this hypothesis to the diversity of observed phenomena as well as the range of spatial and temporal scales observed with Taylor's law. We note that the cumulant generating functions derived from this thermodynamic model correspond to those derived over a quarter century earlier for a class of probabilistic models known as the Tweedie exponential dispersion models. These latter models are characterized by variance-to-mean power functions; their phenomenological basis rests with a central-limit-theorem-like property that causes many statistical systems to converge mathematically toward a Tweedie form. We review evaluations of the Tweedie Poisson-gamma model for Taylor's law and provide three further cases to test: the clustering of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the horse chromosome 1, the clustering of genes within human chromosome 8, and the Mertens function. This latter case is a number theoretic function for which a thermodynamic model cannot explain Taylor's law, but where Tweedie convergence remains applicable. The Tweedie models are applicable to diverse biological, physical, and mathematical phenomena that express power variance functions over a wide range of measurement scales; they provide a probabilistic description for Taylor's law that allows mechanistic insight into complex systems without the assumption of a thermodynamic mechanism.

  20. Deviations from uniform power-law scaling due to exposure to high altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posiewnik, A.

    2002-12-01

    A major challenge in biological physics is the analysis of time series that are typically highly nonstationary. Viswanathan et al. (Phys. Rev. E 55 (1) (1997) 845-899) using techniques based on the Fano factor and the Allan factor functions, as well as on detrended fluctuation analysis showed that the scaling properties of the dynamics of healthy physiological systems in normal conditions are more stable than those of pathological systems-there is underlying loss of uniform power-law scaling in disease. Here we test, using the same techniques as Viswanathan et al. (1997), the hypothesis that deviations from uniform power-law scaling, similar to those seen in heart failure and deep apnea syndrome occur also for healthy subjects under pathological conditions (hypoxaemic stress during exposure to high altitude, over 6000 m).

  1. Missing data in aftershock sequences: explaining the deviations from scaling laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartz, Sabine; Bunde, Armin; Turcotte, Donald L

    2008-10-01

    In this paper we extend the branching aftershock sequence model to study the role of missing data at short times and small amplitudes after a mainshock. We apply this model, which contains three parameters characterizing the missing data, to the magnitude and temporal statistics of four aftershock sequences in California. We find that the observed time-dependent deviations of the frequency-magnitude scaling from the Gutenberg-Richter power law dependency can be described quantitatively by the model. We also show that, for the same set of parameters, the model is able to explain quantitatively the observed magnitude-dependent deviations of the temporal decay of aftershocks from Omori's law. In addition, we show that the same sets of data can also reproduce quite well the various functional forms of the probability density functions of the return times between consecutive events with magnitudes above a prescribed threshold, as well as the violation of scaling at short and intermediate time scales.

  2. Scaling Laws for Convection with Temperature-dependent Viscosity and Grain-damage

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Bradford J

    2014-01-01

    Numerical experiments of convection with grain-damage are used to develop scaling laws for convective heat flow, mantle velocity, and plate velocity across the stagnant lid and plate-tectonic regimes. Three main cases are presented in order of increasing complexity: a simple case wherein viscosity is only dependent on grainsize, a case where viscosity depends on temperature and grainsize, and finally a case where viscosity is temperature and grainsize sensitive, and the grain-growth (or healing) is also temperature sensitive. In all cases, convection with grain-damage scales differently than Newtonian convection due to the effects of grain-damage. For the fully realistic case, numerical results show stagnant lid convection, fully mobilized convection that resembles the temperature-independent viscosity case, and partially mobile or transitional convection, depending on damage to healing ratio, Rayleigh number, and the activation energies for viscosity and healing. Applying our scaling laws for the fully reali...

  3. Spectral scaling laws of solar wind fluctuations at 1 AU: Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podesta, John J. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2013-06-13

    In-situ measurements of solar wind fluctuations at 1 AU show that the reduced energy spectrum, equal to the sum of the reduced kinetic plus magnetic energy spectra, is characterized by a power-law scaling k{sup -{alpha}} in the inertial range with an average spectral exponent {alpha} Asymptotically-Equal-To 3/2, a result confirmed by independent analyses using data from different spacecraft. Magnetic field and electron density spectra at kinetic scales {rho}{sup -1}{sub i} < k < {rho}{sup -1}{sub e} both have a spectral index of approximately 2.7. These and other recent observations of spectral scaling laws in the solar wind using single spacecraft measurements are briefly reviewed. The first part of this review, Part 1, is contained in a separate paper in these proceedings.

  4. Universal Scaling Law for Atomic Diffusion and Viscosity in Liquid Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guang-Xu; LIU Chang-Song; ZHU Zhen-Gang

    2004-01-01

    @@ The recently proposed scaling law relating the diffusion coefficient and the excess entropy of liquid[Samanta A et al. 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 145901; Dzugutov M 1996 Nature 381 137], and a quasi-universal relationship between the transport coefficients and excess entropy of dense fluids [Rosenfeld Y 1977 Phys. Rev. A 15 2545],are tested for diverse liquid metals using molecular dynamics simulations. Interatomic potentials derived from the glue potential and second-moment approximation of tight-binding scheme are used to study liquid metals.Our simulation results give sound support to the above-mentioned universal scaling laws. Following Dzugutov,we have also reached a new universal scaling relationship between the viscosity coefficient and excess entropy. The simulation results suggest that the reduced transport coefficients can be expressed approximately in terms of the corresponding packing density.

  5. Extended power-law scaling of heavy-tailed random fields or processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guadagnini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the scaling behaviors of two log permeability data sets showing heavy-tailed frequency distributions in three and two spatial dimensions, respectively. One set consists of 1-m scale pneumatic packer test data from six vertical and inclined boreholes spanning a decameters scale block of unsaturated fractured tuffs near Superior, Arizona, the other of pneumatic minipermeameter data measured at a spacing of 15 cm along two horizontal transects on a 21 m long outcrop of lower-shoreface bioturbated sandstone near Escalante, Utah. Order q sample structure functions of each data set scale as a power ξ (q of separation scale or lag, s, over limited ranges of s. A procedure known as Extended Self-Similarity (ESS extends this range to all lags and yields a nonlinear (concave functional relationship between ξ (q and q. Whereas the literature tends to associate extended and nonlinear power-law scaling with multifractals or fractional Laplace motions, we have shown elsewhere that (a ESS of data having a normal frequency distribution is theoretically consistent with (Gaussian truncated (additive, self-affine, monofractal fractional Brownian motion (tfBm, the latter being unique in predicting a breakdown in power-law scaling at small and large lags, and (b nonlinear power-law scaling of data having either normal or heavy-tailed frequency distributions is consistent with samples from sub-Gaussian random fields or processes subordinated to tfBm, stemming from lack of ergodicity which causes sample moments to scale differently than do their ensemble counterparts. Here we (i demonstrate that the above two data sets are consistent with sub-Gaussian random fields subordinated to tfBm and (ii provide maximum likelihood estimates of parameters characterizing the corresponding Lévy stable subordinators and tfBm functions.

  6. PLASMA TURBULENCE AND KINETIC INSTABILITIES AT ION SCALES IN THE EXPANDING SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávnícek, Pavel M. [Astronomical Institute, CAS, Bocni II/1401, CZ-14100 Prague (Czech Republic); Matteini, Lorenzo [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Landi, Simone; Verdini, Andrea; Franci, Luca, E-mail: petr.hellinger@asu.cas.cz [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Firenze Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between a decaying strong turbulence and kinetic instabilities in a slowly expanding plasma is investigated using two-dimensional (2D) hybrid expanding box simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box, and we start with a spectrum of large-scale, linearly polarized, random-phase Alfvénic fluctuations that have energy equipartition between kinetic and magnetic fluctuations and vanishing correlation between the two fields. A turbulent cascade rapidly develops; magnetic field fluctuations exhibit a power-law spectrum at large scales and a steeper spectrum at ion scales. The turbulent cascade leads to an overall anisotropic proton heating, protons are heated in the perpendicular direction, and, initially, also in the parallel direction. The imposed expansion leads to generation of a large parallel proton temperature anisotropy which is at later stages partly reduced by turbulence. The turbulent heating is not sufficient to overcome the expansion-driven perpendicular cooling and the system eventually drives the oblique firehose instability in a form of localized nonlinear wave packets which efficiently reduce the parallel temperature anisotropy. This work demonstrates that kinetic instabilities may coexist with strong plasma turbulence even in a constrained 2D regime.

  7. Scaling Approach to the Growth Equation with a Generalized Conservation Law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐刚; 张丽萍; 吴玉喜; 夏辉; 郝大鹏; 陈华

    2003-01-01

    The Flory-type scaling approach proposed by Hentschel and Family [Phys.Rev.Lett.66(1991)1982] is generalized to the analysis of the growth equation with a generalized conservation law,which contains the KardarParisi-Zhang,Sun-Guo-Grant,and molecular-beam epitaxy growth equations as special cases and allows for a unified investigation of growth equations.The scaling exponents obtained here can be in agreement well with the corresponding results derived by the dynamic renormalization group theory and the previous scaling analyses.

  8. Transition in multiple-scale-lengths turbulence in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Sanae-I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    Statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is extended to the state where fluctuations with different scale lengths, micro and semi-micro modes, coexist. Their nonlinear interactions give several states of turbulence: in one state, the micro mode is excited while the semi-micro mode is quenched; in another state, the latter is excited while the micro mode is suppressed. A new turbulence transition with a hard bifurcation was obtained. A phase diagram was obtained. A new insight is given for the physics of internal transport barrier. (author)

  9. On the dispersion law of low-frequency electron whistler waves in a multi-ion plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Lundin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A new and simple dispersion law for extra-low-frequency electron whistler waves in a multi-ion plasma is derived. It is valid in a plasma with finite ratio ωcpe of electron gyro-to-plasma frequency and is suitable for wave frequencies much less than ωpe but well above the gyrofrequencies of most heavy ions. The resultant contribution of the ions to the dispersion law is expressed by means of the lower hybrid resonance frequency, the highest ion cutoff frequency and the relative content of the lightest ion. In a frequency domain well above the ions' gyrofrequencies, this new dispersion law merges with the "modified electron whistler dispersion law" determined in previous works by the authors. It is shown that it fits well to the total cold plasma electron whistler dispersion law, for different orientations of the wave vectors and different ion constituents, including negative ions or negatively charged dust grains.

  10. Engagement in the electoral processes: scaling laws and the role of the political positions

    CERN Document Server

    Mantovani, M C; Lenzi, E K; Picoli, S; Mendes, R S

    2013-01-01

    We report on a statistical analysis of the engagement in the electoral processes of all Brazilian cities by considering the number of party memberships and the number of candidates for mayor and councillor. By investigating the relationships between the number of party members and the population of voters, we have found that the functional form of these relationships are well described by sub-linear power laws (allometric scaling) surrounded by a multiplicative log-normal noise. We have observed that this pattern is quite similar to those previously-reported for the relationships between the number candidates (mayor and councillor) and population of voters [EPL 96, 48001 (2011)], suggesting that similar universal laws may be ruling the engagement in the electoral processes. We also note that the power law exponents display a clear hierarchy, where the more influential is the political position the smaller is the value of the exponent. We have also investigated the probability distributions of the number of ca...

  11. Global coseismic deformations, GNSS time series analysis, and earthquake scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métivier, Laurent; Collilieux, Xavier; Lercier, Daphné; Altamimi, Zuheir; Beauducel, François

    2014-12-01

    We investigate how two decades of coseismic deformations affect time series of GPS station coordinates (Global Navigation Satellite System) and what constraints geodetic observations give on earthquake scaling laws. We developed a simple but rapid model for coseismic deformations, assuming different earthquake scaling relations, that we systematically applied on earthquakes with magnitude larger than 4. We found that coseismic displacements accumulated during the last two decades can be larger than 10 m locally and that the cumulative displacement is not only due to large earthquakes but also to the accumulation of many small motions induced by smaller earthquakes. Then, investigating a global network of GPS stations, we demonstrate that a systematic global modeling of coseismic deformations helps greatly to detect discontinuities in GPS coordinate time series, which are still today one of the major sources of error in terrestrial reference frame construction (e.g., the International Terrestrial Reference Frame). We show that numerous discontinuities induced by earthquakes are too small to be visually detected because of seasonal variations and GPS noise that disturb their identification. However, not taking these discontinuities into account has a large impact on the station velocity estimation, considering today's precision requirements. Finally, six groups of earthquake scaling laws were tested. Comparisons with our GPS time series analysis on dedicated earthquakes give insights on the consistency of these scaling laws with geodetic observations and Okada coseismic approach.

  12. A new class of indicators for the model selection of scaling laws in nuclear fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupelli, I., E-mail: Ivan.Lupelli@ccfe.ac.uk [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA – University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Roma (Italy); EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA – University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Roma (Italy); Mazon, D. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA Cadarache DSM/IRFM, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vega, J. [Asociación EURATOM-CIEMAT para Fusión, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► A new model selection indicator, based on the Model Falsification Criterion, has been applied to the problem of choosing the scaling laws for power threshold scaling to access the H-mode in tokamaks. ► The indicators have at least the same selection power of the classic indicators for databases of low dimensionality. ► For the high dimensionality dataset the indicator outperforms the traditional criteria. ► The indicator preserves its advantages up to a noise of 20% of the signal level. -- Abstract: The development of computationally efficient model selection strategies represents an important problem facing the analysis of nuclear fusion experimental data, in particular in the field of scaling laws for the extrapolation to future machines, and image processing. In this paper, a new model selection indicator, named Model Falsification Criterion (MFC), will be presented and applied to the problem of choosing the most generalizable scaling laws for the power threshold (P{sub Thresh}) to access the H-mode of confinement in tokamaks. The proposed indicator is based on the properties of the model residuals, their entropy and an implementation of the data falsification principle. The model selection ability of the proposed criterion will be demonstrated in comparison with the most widely used frequentist (Akaike information criterion) and bayesian (Bayesian information criterion) indicators.

  13. Fractionaly Integrated Flux model and Scaling Laws in Weather and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertzer, Daniel; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2013-04-01

    The Fractionaly Integrated Flux model (FIF) has been extensively used to model intermittent observables, like the velocity field, by defining them with the help of a fractional integration of a conservative (i.e. strictly scale invariant) flux, such as the turbulent energy flux. It indeed corresponds to a well-defined modelling that yields the observed scaling laws. Generalised Scale Invariance (GSI) enables FIF to deal with anisotropic fractional integrations and has been rather successful to define and model a unique regime of scaling anisotropic turbulence up to planetary scales. This turbulence has an effective dimension of 23/9=2.55... instead of the classical hypothesised 2D and 3D turbulent regimes, respectively for large and small spatial scales. It therefore theoretically eliminates a non plausible "dimension transition" between these two regimes and the resulting requirement of a turbulent energy "mesoscale gap", whose empirical evidence has been brought more and more into question. More recently, GSI-FIF was used to analyse climate, therefore at much larger time scales. Indeed, the 23/9-dimensional regime necessarily breaks up at the outer spatial scales. The corresponding transition range, which can be called "macroweather", seems to have many interesting properties, e.g. it rather corresponds to a fractional differentiation in time with a roughly flat frequency spectrum. Furthermore, this transition yields the possibility to have at much larger time scales scaling space-time climate fluctuations with a much stronger scaling anisotropy between time and space. Lovejoy, S. and D. Schertzer (2013). The Weather and Climate: Emergent Laws and Multifractal Cascades. Cambridge Press (in press). Schertzer, D. et al. (1997). Fractals 5(3): 427-471. Schertzer, D. and S. Lovejoy (2011). International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos 21(12): 3417-3456.

  14. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  15. Simulating the magnetized liner inertial fusion plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments [Simulating the MagLIF plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cuneo, M. E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herrmann, M. C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sinars, D. B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Slutz, S. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-06-20

    The recently proposed magnetized liner inertial fusion approach to a Z-pinch driven fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 056303 (2010)] is based on the use of an axial magnetic field to provide plasma thermal insulation from the walls of the imploding liner. The characteristic plasma transport regimes in the proposed approach cover parameter domains that have not been studied yet in either magnetic confinement or inertial confinement experiments. In this article, an analysis is presented of the scalability of the key physical processes that determine the plasma confinement. The dimensionless scaling parameters are identified and conclusion is drawn that the plasma behavior in scaled-down experiments can correctly represent the full-scale plasma, provided these parameters are approximately the same in two systems. Furthermore, this observation is important in that smaller-scale experiments typically have better diagnostic access and more experiments per year are possible.

  16. Development of scaling laws on thermal-hydraulic effect test facility for CANDU-6 moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. Y.; Jung, Y. S.; Kim, N. S. [Handong University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M. W.; Kim, H. J. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The scaling laws on thermal-hydraulic effect test facility for CANDU-6 moderator (HGU-KINS) have been investigated and manufactured. The basic laws are the satisfaction of energy conservation and dimensionless number, Ar and Re, for the similarities of thermal-hydraulic properties. And then the thermal-hydraulic scaling analyses of test facilities, SPEL(1/10 scale) and STERN(1/4 scale), have been identified by the present method. As a result, in the case of SPEL, the energy conservation is confirmed, but the similarities of Ar and the heat density are not considered. In the case of STERN, the energy conservation and the characteristics of Ar were well defined. But the similarity of the heat density is unsatisfied, either. Therefore the present method was applied with 1/8 length scale. For the performance test, CFD analysis has been accomplished by CFX5. The results of flow pattern certifications and variation of axial properties with CANDU show that the present scaling method is acceptable.

  17. Anisotropy and nonuniversality in scaling laws of the large-scale energy spectrum in rotating turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Amrik; Mininni, Pablo D; Rosenberg, Duane; Pouquet, Annick

    2012-09-01

    Rapidly rotating turbulent flow is characterized by the emergence of columnar structures that are representative of quasi-two-dimensional behavior of the flow. It is known that when energy is injected into the fluid at an intermediate scale Lf, it cascades towards smaller as well as larger scales. In this paper we analyze the flow in the inverse cascade range at a small but fixed Rossby number, Rof≈0.05. Several numerical simulations with helical and nonhelical forcing functions are considered in periodic boxes with unit aspect ratio. In order to resolve the inverse cascade range with reasonably large Reynolds number, the analysis is based on large eddy simulations which include the effect of helicity on eddy viscosity and eddy noise. Thus, we model the small scales and resolve explicitly the large scales. We show that the large-scale energy spectrum has at least two solutions: one that is consistent with Kolmogorov-Kraichnan-Batchelor-Leith phenomenology for the inverse cascade of energy in two-dimensional (2D) turbulence with a ∼k⊥-5/3 scaling, and the other that corresponds to a steeper ∼k⊥-3 spectrum in which the three-dimensional (3D) modes release a substantial fraction of their energy per unit time to the 2D modes. The spectrum that emerges depends on the anisotropy of the forcing function, the former solution prevailing for forcings in which more energy is injected into the 2D modes while the latter prevails for isotropic forcing. In the case of anisotropic forcing, whence the energy goes from the 2D to the 3D modes at low wave numbers, large-scale shear is created, resulting in a time scale τsh, associated with shear, thereby producing a ∼k-1 spectrum for the total energy with the horizontal energy of the 2D modes still following a ∼k⊥-5/3 scaling.

  18. Scaling Laws for Thin Films near the Superconducting-to-Insulating Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yong

    2016-03-01

    We propose a Lagrangian function, which combines Landau-Ginzburg term and Chern-Simons term, for describing the competition between disorder and superconductivity. To describe the normal-to-superconducting transition in the thin superconducting films, we apply Wilson’s renormalization group methods into this Lagrangian function. Finally, we obtain a scaling law between critical temperature (Tc), film thickness (d), sheet resistance of the film at the normal state (Rs), and number density of the electrons at the normal state (N). Such a scaling law is in agreement with recent experimental investigations [Ivry, Y. et al., Physical Review B 90, 214515 (2014)]. Our finding may have potential benefits for improving transition temperature Tc.

  19. Scaling laws for Bénard-Marangoni convection using automatic background field generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Andrew; Pershin, Anton; Fantuzzi, Giovanni

    2016-11-01

    We consider scaling laws for Bénard-Marangoni convection and, in particular, study the question of obtaining an upper bound on the Nusselt number Nu in terms of the flow's forcing parameter, the Marangoni number Ma . It has recently been proven using the background field method that in the case of infinite Prandtl number, these fundamental quantities are related by the scaling law Nu optimal background field which numerically improves this bound. The constructed background profiles have boundary layers at both the upper and lower domain boundaries, which is in contrast to those used in previous work. Analysis will be presented explaining how both boundary layers interact (in the context of the optimization problem associated with the background field method) to improve the Nusselt number bound within the background profile method.

  20. A new class of indicators for the model selection of scaling laws in nuclear fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Lupelli, I; Gaudio, P; Gelfusa, M; Mazon, D; Vega, J

    2013-01-01

    The development of computationally efficient model selection strategies represents an important problem facing the analysis of Nuclear Fusion experimental data, in particular in the field of scaling laws for the extrapolation to future machines, and image processing. In this paper, a new model selection indicator, named Model Falsification Criterion (MFC), will be presented and applied to the problem of choosing the most generalizable scaling laws for the power threshold to access the H-mode of confinement in Tokamaks. The proposed indicator is based on the properties of the model residuals, their entropy and an implementation of the data falsification principle. The model selection ability of the proposed criterion will be demonstrated in comparison with the most widely used frequentist (Akaike Information Criterion) and bayesian (Bayesian Information Criterion) indicators.

  1. General scaling law in the saddle-node bifurcation: a complex phase space study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontich, Ernest [Departament de Matematica Aplicada i Analisi, Universitat de Barcelona, Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes 585, 08007 Barcelona (Spain); Sardanyes, Josep [Complex Systems Lab (ICREA-UPF), Barcelona Biomedical Research Park (PRBB-GRIB), Dr Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-01-11

    Saddle-node bifurcations have been described in a multitude of nonlinear dynamical systems modeling physical, chemical, as well as biological systems. Typically, this type of bifurcation involves the transition of a given set of fixed points from the real to the complex phase space. After the bifurcation, a saddle remnant can continue influencing the flows and generically, for non-degenerate saddle-node bifurcations, the time the flows spend in the bottleneck region of the ghost follows the inverse square root scaling law. Here we analytically derive this scaling law for a general one-dimensional, analytical, autonomous dynamical system undergoing a not necessarily non-degenerate saddle-node bifurcation, in terms of the degree of degeneracy by using complex variable techniques. We then compare the analytic calculations with a one-dimensional equation modeling the dynamics of an autocatalytic replicator. The numerical results are in agreement with the analytical solution.

  2. Thermodynamic scaling law for the diffusion coefficient in hard-sphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomont, Jean-Marc; Bretonnet, Jean-Louis

    2015-02-01

    Two scaling laws are investigated, which are devoted to link the diffusion coefficient to the thermodynamic properties for the athermal hard-sphere system, over the wide range of packing fraction covering the stable and metastable regimes. It is found that the most relevant control parameter is not the excess entropy, but the compressibility factor, i.e. the logarithm derivative of the excess entropy with respect to the packing fraction.

  3. NEW METHOD TO ESTIMATE SCALING OF POWER-LAW DEGREE DISTRIBUTION AND HIERARCHICAL NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Bo; DUAN Wen-qi; CHEN Zhong

    2006-01-01

    A new method and corresponding numerical procedure are introduced to estimate scaling exponents of power-law degree distribution and hierarchical clustering func tion for complex networks. This method can overcome the biased and inaccurate faults of graphical linear fitting methods commonly used in current network research. Furthermore, it is verified to have higher goodness-of-fit than graphical methods by comparing the KS (Kolmogorov-Smirnov) test statistics for 10 CNN (Connecting Nearest-Neighbor)networks.

  4. Model of the Dynamic Construction Process of Texts and Scaling Laws of Words Organization in Language Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Lin, Ruokuang; Bian, Chunhua; Ma, Qianli D. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Scaling laws characterize diverse complex systems in a broad range of fields, including physics, biology, finance, and social science. The human language is another example of a complex system of words organization. Studies on written texts have shown that scaling laws characterize the occurrence frequency of words, words rank, and the growth of distinct words with increasing text length. However, these studies have mainly concentrated on the western linguistic systems, and the laws that govern the lexical organization, structure and dynamics of the Chinese language remain not well understood. Here we study a database of Chinese and English language books. We report that three distinct scaling laws characterize words organization in the Chinese language. We find that these scaling laws have different exponents and crossover behaviors compared to English texts, indicating different words organization and dynamics of words in the process of text growth. We propose a stochastic feedback model of words organization and text growth, which successfully accounts for the empirically observed scaling laws with their corresponding scaling exponents and characteristic crossover regimes. Further, by varying key model parameters, we reproduce differences in the organization and scaling laws of words between the Chinese and English language. We also identify functional relationships between model parameters and the empirically observed scaling exponents, thus providing new insights into the words organization and growth dynamics in the Chinese and English language. PMID:28006026

  5. Transport coefficients and entropy-scaling law in liquid iron up to Earth-core pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qi-Long; Wang, Pan-Pan; Huang, Duo-Hui; Yang, Jun-Sheng; Wan, Ming-Jie; Wang, Fan-Hou

    2014-03-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations were applied to study the structural and transport properties, including the pair distribution function, the structure factor, the pair correlation entropy, self-diffusion coefficient, and viscosity, of liquid iron under high temperature and high pressure conditions. Our calculated results reproduced experimentally determined structure factors of liquid iron, and the calculated self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity agree well with previous simulation results. We show that there is a moderate increase of self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity along the melting curve up to the Earth-core pressure. Furthermore, the temperature dependencies of the pair correlation entropy, self-diffusion, and viscosity under high pressure condition have been investigated. Our results suggest that the temperature dependence of the pair correlation entropy is well described by T(-1) scaling, while the Arrhenius law well describes the temperature dependencies of self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity under high pressure. In particular, we find that the entropy-scaling laws, proposed by Rosenfeld [Phys. Rev. A 15, 2545 (1977)] and Dzugutov [Nature (London) 381, 137 (1996)] for self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity in liquid metals under ambient pressure, still hold well for liquid iron under high temperature and high pressure conditions. Using the entropy-scaling laws, we can obtain transport properties from structural properties under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The results provide a useful ingredient in understanding transport properties of planet's cores.

  6. Network-state modulation of power-law frequency-scaling in visual cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Boustani, Sami; Marre, Olivier; Béhuret, Sébastien; Baudot, Pierre; Yger, Pierre; Bal, Thierry; Destexhe, Alain; Frégnac, Yves

    2009-09-01

    Various types of neural-based signals, such as EEG, local field potentials and intracellular synaptic potentials, integrate multiple sources of activity distributed across large assemblies. They have in common a power-law frequency-scaling structure at high frequencies, but it is still unclear whether this scaling property is dominated by intrinsic neuronal properties or by network activity. The latter case is particularly interesting because if frequency-scaling reflects the network state it could be used to characterize the functional impact of the connectivity. In intracellularly recorded neurons of cat primary visual cortex in vivo, the power spectral density of V(m) activity displays a power-law structure at high frequencies with a fractional scaling exponent. We show that this exponent is not constant, but depends on the visual statistics used to drive the network. To investigate the determinants of this frequency-scaling, we considered a generic recurrent model of cortex receiving a retinotopically organized external input. Similarly to the in vivo case, our in computo simulations show that the scaling exponent reflects the correlation level imposed in the input. This systematic dependence was also replicated at the single cell level, by controlling independently, in a parametric way, the strength and the temporal decay of the pairwise correlation between presynaptic inputs. This last model was implemented in vitro by imposing the correlation control in artificial presynaptic spike trains through dynamic-clamp techniques. These in vitro manipulations induced a modulation of the scaling exponent, similar to that observed in vivo and predicted in computo. We conclude that the frequency-scaling exponent of the V(m) reflects stimulus-driven correlations in the cortical network activity. Therefore, we propose that the scaling exponent could be used to read-out the "effective" connectivity responsible for the dynamical signature of the population signals measured

  7. Network-state modulation of power-law frequency-scaling in visual cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami El Boustani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Various types of neural-based signals, such as EEG, local field potentials and intracellular synaptic potentials, integrate multiple sources of activity distributed across large assemblies. They have in common a power-law frequency-scaling structure at high frequencies, but it is still unclear whether this scaling property is dominated by intrinsic neuronal properties or by network activity. The latter case is particularly interesting because if frequency-scaling reflects the network state it could be used to characterize the functional impact of the connectivity. In intracellularly recorded neurons of cat primary visual cortex in vivo, the power spectral density of V(m activity displays a power-law structure at high frequencies with a fractional scaling exponent. We show that this exponent is not constant, but depends on the visual statistics used to drive the network. To investigate the determinants of this frequency-scaling, we considered a generic recurrent model of cortex receiving a retinotopically organized external input. Similarly to the in vivo case, our in computo simulations show that the scaling exponent reflects the correlation level imposed in the input. This systematic dependence was also replicated at the single cell level, by controlling independently, in a parametric way, the strength and the temporal decay of the pairwise correlation between presynaptic inputs. This last model was implemented in vitro by imposing the correlation control in artificial presynaptic spike trains through dynamic-clamp techniques. These in vitro manipulations induced a modulation of the scaling exponent, similar to that observed in vivo and predicted in computo. We conclude that the frequency-scaling exponent of the V(m reflects stimulus-driven correlations in the cortical network activity. Therefore, we propose that the scaling exponent could be used to read-out the "effective" connectivity responsible for the dynamical signature of the population

  8. On the Scaling Law for Broadband Shock Noise Intensity in Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanudula, Max

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model for the scaling of broadband shock noise intensity in supersonic jets was formulated on the basis of linear shock-shear wave interaction. An hypothesis has been postulated that the peak angle of incidence (closer to the critical angle) for the shear wave primarily governs the generation of sound in the interaction process rather than the noise generation contribution from off-peak incident angles. The proposed theory satisfactorily explains the well-known scaling law for the broadband shock -associated noise in supersonic jets.

  9. Absolute scaling law for temperature data in Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Qiang

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the hierarchical-structure (H-S) model, this paper further explores the most intensive in-With respect to the discovery and by means of the scale, both of Bolgiano, there are two regions of the structure holding the absolute scaling law given by Ching's paper. Through theoretic analysis of data, this paper indicates that the regions act as two local intensive intermittent structures, by which the statistical absolute scaling performance of region is induced, rather than the statistical result of the entire time series in belief since 1941. In terms of statistical theory, the local structure in fluid, therefore, is the essence governing the absolute scaling performance of region, especially in high intensity.

  10. Absolute scaling law for temperature data in Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the hierarchical-structure (H-S) model, this paper further explores the most intensive intermittent structure of Rayleigh-Bénard convection at the high Ra numbers proportional to temperature. With respect to the discovery and by means of the scale, both of Bolgiano, there are two regions of the structure holding the absolute scaling law given by Ching’s paper. Through theoretic analysis of data, this paper indicates that the regions act as two local intensive intermittent structures, by which the statistical absolute scaling performance of region is induced, rather than the statistical result of the entire time series in belief since 1941. In terms of statistical theory, the local structure in fluid, therefore, is the essence governing the absolute scaling performance of region, especially in high intensity.

  11. Radiation Temperature Scaling Law for Gold Hohlraum Heated with Lasers at 0.35 mm Wavelength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Shao-En; SUN Ke-Xu; DING Yong-Kun; HUANG Tian-Xuan; CUI Yan-Li; CHEN Jiu-Sen

    2005-01-01

    @@ We have carried out the hohlraum experiments about radiation temperature scaling on the Shenguang-Ⅱ(SG-Ⅱ) laser facility with eight laser beams of 0.35μm, pulse duration of about 1.0ns and total energy of 2000J.The reradiated x-ray flux through the laser entrance hole was measured using a soft x-ray spectrometer. The measured peak radiation temperature was 170eV for the standard hohlraum and 150eV for the 1.5-scaled one.We have derived the radiation temperature scaling law, in which the laser hohlraum coupling efficiency is included.With an appropriate coupling efficiency, the coincidences between experimental and scaling hohlraum radiation temperatures are rather good.

  12. Development of a Renormalization Group Approach to Multi-Scale Plasma Physics Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    with important kinetic non - Maxwellian particle distributions. These plasmas exhibit a range of length and time scales, making accurate simulation a...the plasmas ’ phase space for accurate reproduction of natural phenomena. These four goals offer an interlocking plan of attack to reach a full...anisotropic bimodal intermittent turbulence in space plasmas ” Phys. Plasmas . 11 (2004) 1287-1299.] to describe phenomena such as the scaling of the

  13. Deposition of Nano-Scaled Coatings Using Inductively Coupled Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D H Jung; B Park; J J Lee

    2004-01-01

    Nano-scaled Ti-B-N coatings could be produced by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) assisted magnetron spurtering. The properties and microstructure of the coating can be changed drastically by applying ICP to conventional magnetron sputtering. In this work, an internal type rf ICP process is used. The core of this technology is the efficient production and control of self-depositing ions and reactive gas ions by an induced electric field. Ti-B-N coatings were prepared by using a TiB2 target and a gas mixture of N2 and Ar at 200 ℃ and a pressure of 60 mTorr. In addition to ICP, the effect of the substrate bias voltage on the structure and properties of the coating was investigated. By applying ICP and a bias voltage to the substrate the hardness of the Ti-B-N coating is increased by more than 75 GPa, as a result of enhanced ionization in the plasma. The Ti-B-N coating, which has the highest hardness, shows the best surface uniformity and a very dense structure with a grain size of 3 nm. This sample also shows a high crystallinity compared to the coating prepared using other deposition parameters.

  14. Contact area of rough spheres: Large scale simulations and simple scaling laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastewka, Lars, E-mail: lars.pastewka@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials & MicroTribology Center muTC, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Engelbert-Arnold-Straße 4, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Robbins, Mark O., E-mail: mr@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2016-05-30

    We use molecular simulations to study the nonadhesive and adhesive atomic-scale contact of rough spheres with radii ranging from nanometers to micrometers over more than ten orders of magnitude in applied normal load. At the lowest loads, the interfacial mechanics is governed by the contact mechanics of the first asperity that touches. The dependence of contact area on normal force becomes linear at intermediate loads and crosses over to Hertzian at the largest loads. By combining theories for the limiting cases of nominally flat rough surfaces and smooth spheres, we provide parameter-free analytical expressions for contact area over the whole range of loads. Our results establish a range of validity for common approximations that neglect curvature or roughness in modeling objects on scales from atomic force microscope tips to ball bearings.

  15. Power-law scaling in daily rainfall patterns and consequences in urban stream discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeryang; Krueger, Elisabeth H.; Kim, Dongkyun; Rao, Suresh C.

    2016-04-01

    Poissonian rainfall has been frequently used for modelling stream discharge in a catchment at the daily scale. Generally, it is assumed that the daily rainfall depth is described by memoryless exponential distribution which is transformed to stream discharge, resulting in an analytical pdf for discharge [Gamma distribution]. While it is true that catchment hydrological filtering processes (censored by constant rate ET losses, and first-order recession) increases "memory", reflected in 1/f noise in discharge time series. Here, we show that for urban watersheds in South Korea: (1) the observation of daily rainfall depths follow power-law pdfs, and spectral slopes range between 0.2 ~ 0.4; and (2) the stream discharge pdfs have power-law tails. These observation results suggest that multiple hydro-climatic factors (e.g., non-stationarity of rainfall patterns) and hydrologic filtering (increasing impervious area; more complex urban drainage networks) influence the catchment hydrologic responses. We test the role of such factors using a parsimonious model, using different types of daily rainfall patterns (e.g., power-law distributed rainfall depth with Poisson distribution in its frequency) and urban settings to reproduce patterns similar to those observed in empirical records. Our results indicate that fractality in temporally up-scaled rainfall, and the consequences of large extreme events are preserved as high discharge events in urbanizing catchments. Implications of these results to modeling urban hydrologic responses and impacts on receiving waters are discussed.

  16. Fatigue crack growth due to overloads in plain concrete using scaling laws

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sonalisa Ray; J M Chandra Kishen

    2012-02-01

    Scaling laws are represented in power law form and can be utilized to extract the characteristic properties of a new phenomenon with the help of self-similar solutions. In this work, an attempt has been made to propose a scaling law analytically, for plain concrete when subjected to variable amplitude loading. Due to the application of overload on concrete structures, acceleration in the crack growth process takes place. A closed form expression has been developed to capture the acceleration in crack growth rate in conjunction with the principles of dimensional analysis and self-similarity. The proposed model accounts for parameters such as, the tensile strength, fracture toughness, overload effect and the structural size. Knowing the governed and the governing parameters of the physical problem and by using the concepts of self-similarity, a relationship is obtained between the different parameters involved. The predicted results are compared with experimental crack growth data for variable amplitude loading and are found to capture the overload effect with sufficient accuracy. Through a sensitivity analysis, fracture toughness is found to be the most dominant parameter in accelerating the crack length due to application of overload.

  17. Scaling laws of impact induced shock pressure and particle velocity in planetary mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteux, J.; Arkani-Hamed, J.

    2016-01-01

    While major impacting bodies during accretion of a Mars type planet have very low velocities (propagation and, hence, the derived scaling laws are poorly known for these low velocity impacts. Here, we use iSALE-2D hydrocode simulations to calculate shock pressure and particle velocity in a Mars type body for impact velocities ranging from 4 to 10 km/s. Large impactors of 100-400 km in diameter, comparable to those impacted on Mars and created giant impact basins, are examined. To better represent the power law distribution of shock pressure and particle velocity as functions of distance from the impact site at the surface, we propose three distinct regions in the mantle: a near field regime, which extends to 1-3 times the projectile radius into the target, where the peak shock pressure and particle velocity decay very slowly with increasing distance, a mid field region, which extends to ∼4.5 times the impactor radius, where the pressure and particle velocity decay exponentially but moderately, and a more distant far field region where the pressure and particle velocity decay strongly with distance. These scaling laws are useful to determine impact heating of a growing proto-planet by numerous accreting bodies.

  18. Scaling laws of diffusion and time intermittency generated by coherent structures in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, P.; Cesari, R.; Donateo, A.; Contini, D.; Allegrini, P.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the time intermittency of turbulent transport associated with the birth-death of self-organized coherent structures in the atmospheric boundary layer. We apply a threshold analysis on the increments of turbulent fluctuations to extract sequences of rapid acceleration events, which is a marker of the transition between self-organized structures. The inter-event time distributions show a power-law decay ψ(τ) ~ 1/τμ, with a strong dependence of the power-law index μ on the threshold. A recently developed method based on the application of event-driven walking rules to generate different diffusion processes is applied to the experimental event sequences. At variance with the power-law index μ estimated from the inter-event time distributions, the diffusion scaling H, defined by ⟨ X2⟩ ~ t2H, is independent from the threshold. From the analysis of the diffusion scaling it can also be inferred the presence of different kind of events, i.e. genuinely transition events and spurious events, which all contribute to the diffusion process but over different time scales. The great advantage of event-driven diffusion lies in the ability of separating different regimes of the scaling H. In fact, the greatest H, corresponding to the most anomalous diffusion process, emerges in the long time range, whereas the smallest H can be seen in the short time range if the time resolution of the data is sufficiently accurate. The estimated diffusion scaling is also robust under the change of the definition of turbulent fluctuations and, under the assumption of statistically independent events, it corresponds to a self-similar point process with a well-defined power-law index μD ~ 2.1, where D denotes that μD is derived from the diffusion scaling. We argue that this renewal point process can be associated to birth and death of coherent structures and to turbulent transport near the ground, where the contribution of turbulent coherent structures becomes dominant.

  19. Does environmental policy affect scaling laws between population and pollution? Evidence from American metropolitan areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Nicholas Z; Jha, Akshaya

    2017-01-01

    Modern cities are engines of production, innovation, and growth. However, urbanization also increases both local and global pollution from household consumption and firms' production. Do emissions change proportionately to city size or does pollution tend to outpace or lag urbanization? Do emissions scale differently with population versus economic growth or are emissions, population, and economic growth inextricably linked? How are the scaling relationships between emissions, population, and economic growth affected by environmental regulation? This paper examines the link between urbanization, economic growth and pollution using data from Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) in the United States between 1999 and 2011. We find that the emissions of local air pollution in these MSAs scale according to a ¾ power law with both population size and gross domestic product (GDP). However, the monetary damages from these local emissions scale linearly with both population and GDP. Counties that have previously been out of attainment with the local air quality standards set by the Clean Air Act show an entirely different relationship: local emissions scale according to the square root of population, while the monetary damages from local air pollution follow a 2/3rds power law with population. Counties out of attainment are subject to more stringent emission controls; we argue based on this that enforcement of the Clean Air Act induces sublinear scaling between emissions, damages, and city size. In contrast, we find that metropolitan GDP scales super-linearly with population in all MSAs regardless of attainment status. Summarizing, our findings suggest that environmental policy limits the adverse effects of urbanization without interfering with the productivity benefits that manifest in cities.

  20. Scale invariance and scaling law of Thomson backscatter spectra by electron moving in laser-magnetic resonance regime

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Yi-Jia; Wan, Feng; Sang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Bai-Song

    2016-01-01

    The Thomson scattering spectra by an electron moving in the laser-magnetic resonance acceleration regime are computed numerically and analytically. The dependence of fundamental frequency on the laser intensity and magnetic resonance parameter is examined carefully. By calculating the emission of a single electron in a circularly polarized plane-wave laser field and constant external magnetic field, the scale invariance of the radiation spectra is evident in terms of harmonic orders. The scaling law of backscattered spectra are exhibited remarkably for the laser intensity as well for the initial axial momentum of the electron when the cyclotron frequency of the electron approaches the laser frequency. The results indicate that the magnetic resonance parameter plays an important role on the strength of emission. And the rich features of scattering spectra found may be applicable to the radiation source tunability.

  1. Scaling law characterizing the dynamics of the transition of HIV-1 to error catastrophe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul; Dixit, Narendra M.

    2015-10-01

    Increasing the mutation rate, μ , of viruses above a threshold, {μ }c, has been predicted to trigger a catastrophic loss of viral genetic information and is being explored as a novel intervention strategy. Here, we examine the dynamics of this transition using stochastic simulations mimicking within-host HIV-1 evolution. We find a scaling law governing the characteristic time of the transition: τ ≈ 0.6/≤ft(μ -{μ }c\\right). The law is robust to variations in underlying evolutionary forces and presents guidelines for treatment of HIV-1 infection with mutagens. We estimate that many years of treatment would be required before HIV-1 can suffer an error catastrophe.

  2. Growth patterns and scaling laws governing AIDS epidemic in Brazilian cities

    CERN Document Server

    Antonio, F J; Teixeira, J J V; Mendes, R S

    2014-01-01

    Brazil holds approximately 1/3 of population living infected with AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) in Central and South Americas, and it was also the first developing country to implement a large-scale control and intervention program against AIDS epidemic. In this scenario, we investigate the temporal evolution and current status of the AIDS epidemic in Brazil. Specifically, we analyze records of annual absolute frequency of cases for more than 5000 cities for the first 33 years of the infection in Brazil. We found that (i) the annual absolute frequencies exhibit a logistic-type growth with an exponential regime in the first few years of the AIDS spreading; (ii) the actual reproduction number decaying as a power law; (iii) the distribution of the annual absolute frequencies among cities decays with a power law behavior; (iv) the annual absolute frequencies and the number of inhabitants have an allometric relationship; (v) the temporal evolution of the annual absolute frequencies have different profi...

  3. Swept shock/boundary-layer interactions: Scaling laws, flowfield structure, and experimental methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, Gary S.

    1993-01-01

    A general review is given of several decades of research on the scaling laws and flowfield structures of swept shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions. Attention is further restricted to the experimental study and physical understanding of the steady-state aspects of these flows. The interaction produced by a sharp, upright fin mounted on a flat plate is taken as an archetype. An overall framework of quasiconical symmetry describing such interactions is first developed. Boundary-layer separation, the interaction footprint, Mach number scaling, and Reynolds number scaling are then considered, followed by a discussion of the quasiconical similarity of interactions produced by geometrically-dissimilar shock generators. The detailed structure of these interaction flowfields is next reviewed, and is illustrated by both qualitative visualizations and quantitative flow images in the quasiconical framework. Finally, the experimental techniques used to investigate such flows are reviewed, with emphasis on modern non-intrusive optical flow diagnostics.

  4. The predator-prey power law: Biomass scaling across terrestrial and aquatic biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Ian A; McCann, Kevin S; Fryxell, John M; Davies, T Jonathan; Smerlak, Matteo; Sinclair, Anthony R E; Loreau, Michel

    2015-09-04

    Ecosystems exhibit surprising regularities in structure and function across terrestrial and aquatic biomes worldwide. We assembled a global data set for 2260 communities of large mammals, invertebrates, plants, and plankton. We find that predator and prey biomass follow a general scaling law with exponents consistently near ¾. This pervasive pattern implies that the structure of the biomass pyramid becomes increasingly bottom-heavy at higher biomass. Similar exponents are obtained for community production-biomass relations, suggesting conserved links between ecosystem structure and function. These exponents are similar to many body mass allometries, and yet ecosystem scaling emerges independently from individual-level scaling, which is not fully understood. These patterns suggest a greater degree of ecosystem-level organization than previously recognized and a more predictive approach to ecological theory. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Investigation of the Validity of the Universal Scaling Law on Linear Chains of Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Alsawafta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the wide range of variation in the plasmonic characteristics of the metallic nanoparticles arranged in linear arrays, the optical spectra of these arrays provide a powerful platform for spectroscopic studies and biosensing applications. Due to the coupling effect between the interacting nanoparticles, the excited resonance mode is shifted with the interparticle separation. The change in the resonance energy of the coupled mode is expressed by the fractional plasmon shift which would normally follow a universal scaling behavior. Such a universal law has been successfully applied on a system of dimers under parallel polarization. It has been found that the plasmon shift decays exponentially over interparticle spacing. The decay length is independent of both the nanoparticle and dielectric properties of the surrounding medium. In this paper, the discrete dipole approximation (DDA is used to examine the validity of extending the universal scaling law to linear chains of several interacting nanoparticles embedded in various host media for both parallel and perpendicular polarizations. Our calculations reveal that the decay length of both the coupled longitudinal mode (LM and transverse modes (TM is strongly dependent on the refractive index of the surrounding medium nm. The decay constant of the LM is linearly proportional to nm while the corresponding constant of the TM decays exponentially with nm. Upon changing the nanoparticle size, the change in the peak position of the LM decreases exponentially with the interparticle separation and hence, it obeys the universal law. The sensitivity of coupled LM to the nanoparticle size is more pronounced at both smaller nanoparticle sizes and separations. The sensitivity of the coupled TM to the nanoparticle size on the other hand changes linearly with the separation and therefore, the universal law does not apply in the case of the excited TM.

  6. EMAPS: An Efficient Multiscale Approach to Plasma Systems with Non-MHD Scale Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omelchenko, Yuri A. [Trinum Research, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-08-08

    we have developed a novel Event-driven Multiscale Asynchronous Parallel Simulation (EMAPS) technology that replaces time stepping with self-adaptive update events. Local calculations are carried out only on an “as needed basis”. EMAPS (i) guarantees accurate and stable processing of physical variables in time accurate simulations, and (ii) eliminates unnecessary computation. Applying EMAPS to the hybrid model has resulted in the development of a unique parallel code, dimension-independent (compile-time-configurable) HYPERS (Hybrid Parallel Event-Resolved Simulator) that scales to hundreds of thousands of parallel processors. HYPERS advances electromagnetic fields and particles asynchronously on time scales determined by local physical laws and mesh properties. To achieve high computational accuracy in complex device geometries, HYPERS employs high-fidelity Cartesian grids with masked conductive cells. The HYPERS model includes multiple ion species, energy and momentum conserving ion-ion collisions, and provides a number of approximations for plasma resistivity and vacuum regions. Both local and periodic boundary conditions are allowed. The HYPERS solver preserves zero divergence of magnetic field. The project has demonstrated HYPERS capabilities on a number of applications of interest to fusion and astrophysical plasma physics applications listed below. 1. Theta-pinch formation of FRCs The formation, spontaneous spin-up, and stability of theta-pinch formed field-reversed configurations have been studied self-consistently in 3D. The end-to-end hybrid simulations reveal poloidal profiles of implosion-driven fast toroidal plasma rotation and demonstrate three discharge regimes as a function of experimental parameters: the decaying stable configuration, the tilt unstable configuration, and the nonlinear evolution of a fast growing tearing mode. 2. FRC collisions with magnetic mirrors Interactions of fast plasma streams and objects with magnetic obstacles (dipoles

  7. A mass-length scaling law for modeling muscle strength in the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Tomas A; Pandy, Marcus G

    2011-11-10

    Musculoskeletal computer models are often used to study muscle function in children with and without impaired mobility. Calculations of muscle forces depend in part on the assumed strength of each muscle, represented by the peak isometric force parameter, which is usually based on measurements obtained from cadavers of adult donors. The aim of the present study was twofold: first, to develop a method for scaling lower-limb peak isometric muscle forces in typically-developing children; and second, to determine the effect of this scaling method on model calculations of muscle forces obtained for normal gait. Muscle volumes were determined from magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained from ten children aged from 7 to 13yr. A new mass-length scaling law was developed based on the assumption that muscle volume and body mass are linearly related, which was confirmed by the obtained volume and body mass data. Two musculoskeletal models were developed for each subject: one in which peak isometric muscle forces were estimated using the mass-length scaling law; and another in which these parameters were determined directly from the MR-derived muscle volumes. Musculoskeletal modeling and quantitative gait analysis were then used to calculate lower-limb muscle forces in normal walking. The patterns of muscle forces predicted by the model with scaled peak isometric force values were similar to those predicted by the MR-based model, implying that assessments of muscle function obtained from these two methods are practically equivalent. These results support the use of mass-length scaling in the development of subject-specific musculoskeletal models of children.

  8. Scaling laws and deformation mechanisms of nanoporous copper under adiabatic uniaxial strain compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuping Yuan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the scaling laws and the related atomistic deformation mechanisms of Cu monocrystal samples containing randomly placed nanovoids under adiabatic uniaxial strain compression. At onset of yielding, plastic deformation is accommodated by dislocations emitted from void surfaces as shear loops. The collapse of voids are observed by continuous emissions of dislocations from void surfaces and their interactions with further plastic deformation. The simulation results also suggest that the effect modulus, the yield stress and the energy aborption density of samples under uniaxial strain are linearly proportional to the relative density ρ. Moreover, the yield stress, the average flow stress and the energy aborption density of samples with the same relative density show a strong dependence on the void diameter d, expressed by exponential relations with decay coefficients much higher than -1/2. The corresponding atomistic mechanisms for scaling laws of the relative density and the void diameter were also presented. The present results should provide insights for understanding deformation mechanisms of nanoporous metals under extreme conditions.

  9. Scaling laws and deformation mechanisms of nanoporous copper under adiabatic uniaxial strain compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fuping; Wu, Xiaolei

    2014-12-01

    A series of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the scaling laws and the related atomistic deformation mechanisms of Cu monocrystal samples containing randomly placed nanovoids under adiabatic uniaxial strain compression. At onset of yielding, plastic deformation is accommodated by dislocations emitted from void surfaces as shear loops. The collapse of voids are observed by continuous emissions of dislocations from void surfaces and their interactions with further plastic deformation. The simulation results also suggest that the effect modulus, the yield stress and the energy aborption density of samples under uniaxial strain are linearly proportional to the relative density ρ. Moreover, the yield stress, the average flow stress and the energy aborption density of samples with the same relative density show a strong dependence on the void diameter d, expressed by exponential relations with decay coefficients much higher than -1/2. The corresponding atomistic mechanisms for scaling laws of the relative density and the void diameter were also presented. The present results should provide insights for understanding deformation mechanisms of nanoporous metals under extreme conditions.

  10. Scaling laws for perturbations in the ocean–atmosphere system following large CO2 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Towles

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scaling relationships are found for perturbations to atmosphere and ocean variables from large transient CO2 emissions. Using the Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir (LOSCAR model (Zeebe et al., 2009; Zeebe, 2012b, we calculate perturbations to atmosphere temperature, total carbon, ocean temperature, total ocean carbon, pH, alkalinity, marine-sediment carbon, and carbon-13 isotope anomalies in the ocean and atmosphere resulting from idealized CO2 emission events. The peak perturbations in the atmosphere and ocean variables are then fit to power law functions of the form of γ DαEβ, where D is the event duration, E is its total carbon emission, and γ is a coefficient. Good power law fits are obtained for most system variables for E up to 50 000 PgC and D up to 100 kyr. Although all of the peak perturbations increase with emission rate E/D, we find no evidence of emission-rate-only scaling, α + β = 0. Instead, our scaling yields α + β ≃ 1 for total ocean and atmosphere carbon and 0 < α + β < 1 for most of the other system variables.

  11. Police Districts, Law Enforcement jurisdiction boundaries, Published in 2008, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Dickinson County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Police Districts dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2008. It is described as 'Law...

  12. Fire and EMS Districts, law enforcement, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Fire and EMS Districts dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as 'law...

  13. Fire and EMS Districts, Law Enforcement, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Fire and EMS Districts dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as 'Law...

  14. Air-chemistry "turbulence": power-law scaling and statistical regularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-m. Hsu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available With the intent to gain further knowledge on the spectral structures and statistical regularities of surface atmospheric chemistry, the chemical gases (NO, NO2, NOx, CO, SO2, and O3 and aerosol (PM10 measured at 74 air quality monitoring stations over the island of Taiwan are analyzed for the year of 2004 at hourly resolution. They represent a range of surface air quality with a mixed combination of geographic settings, and include urban/rural, coastal/inland, plain/hill, and industrial/agricultural locations. In addition to the well-known semi-diurnal and diurnal oscillations, weekly, and intermediate (20 ~ 30 days peaks are also identified with the continuous wavelet transform (CWT. The spectra indicate power-law scaling regions for the frequencies higher than the diurnal and those lower than the diurnal with the average exponents of −5/3 and −1, respectively. These dual-exponents are corroborated with those with the detrended fluctuation analysis in the corresponding time-lag regions. These exponents are mostly independent of the averages and standard deviations of time series measured at various geographic settings, i.e., the spatial inhomogeneities. In other words, they possess dominant universal structures. After spectral coefficients from the CWT decomposition are grouped according to the spectral bands, and inverted separately, the PDFs of the reconstructed time series for the high-frequency band demonstrate the interesting statistical regularity, −3 power-law scaling for the heavy tails, consistently. Such spectral peaks, dual-exponent structures, and power-law scaling in heavy tails are important structural information, but their relations to turbulence and mesoscale variability require further investigations. This could lead to a better understanding of the processes controlling air quality.

  15. Large Scale Modelling of Glow Discharges or Non - Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Sadasivan

    The Electron Velocity Distribution Function (EVDF) in the cathode fall of a DC helium glow discharge was evaluated from a numerical solution of the Boltzmann Transport Equation(BTE). The numerical technique was based on a Petrov-Galerkin technique and a unique combination of streamline upwinding with self -consistent feedback-based shock-capturing. EVDF for the cathode fall was solved at 1 Torr, as a function of position x, axial velocity v_{rm x}, radial velocity v_{rm r}, and time t. The electron-neutral collisions consisted of elastic, excitation, and ionization processes. The algorithm was optimized and vectorized to speed execution by more than a factor of 10 on CRAY-XMP. Efficient storage schemes were used to save the memory allocation required by the algorithm. The analysis of the solution of BTE was done in terms of the 8-moments that were evaluated. Higher moments were found necessary to study the momentum and energy fluxes. The time and length scales were estimated and used as a basis for the characterization of DC glow discharges. Based on an exhaustive study of Knudsen numbers, it was observed that the electrons in the cathode fall were in the transition or Boltzmann regime. The shortest relaxation time was the momentum relaxation and the longest times were the ionization and energy relaxation times. The other times in the processes were that for plasma reaction, diffusion, convection, transit, entropy relaxation, and that for mean free flight between the collisions. Different models were classified based on the moments, time scales, and length scales in their applicability to glow discharges. These consisted of BTE with different number af phase and configuration dimensions, Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation, moment equations (e.g. Drift-Diffusion, Drift-Diffusion-Inertia), and spherical harmonic expansions.

  16. Apparent Power Law Scaling of Variable Range Hopping Conduction in Carbonized Polymer Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Ho; Lara-Avila, Samuel; Kang, Hojin; He, Hans; Eklӧf, Johnas; Hong, Sung Ju; Park, Min; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Matsushita, Satoshi; Akagi, Kazuo; Kubatkin, Sergey; Park, Yung Woo

    2016-11-01

    We induce dramatic changes in the structure of conducting polymer nanofibers by carbonization at 800 °C and compare charge transport properties between carbonized and pristine nanofibers. Despite the profound structural differences, both types of systems display power law dependence of current with voltage and temperature, and all measurements can be scaled into a single universal curve. We analyze our experimental data in the framework of variable range hopping and argue that this mechanism can explain transport properties of pristine polymer nanofibers as well.

  17. Scaling laws for positron production in laser-electron-beam collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, T. G.; Ilderton, A.; Murphy, C. D.; Marklund, M.

    2017-08-01

    Showers of γ rays and positrons are produced when a high-energy electron beam collides with a superintense laser pulse. We present scaling laws for the electron-beam energy loss, the γ -ray spectrum, and the positron yield and energy that are valid in the nonlinear, radiation-reaction-dominated regime. As an application we demonstrate that by employing the collision of a >GeV electron beam with a laser pulse of intensity >5 ×1021W cm-2 , today's high-intensity laser facilities are capable of producing O (104) positrons per shot via light-by-light scattering.

  18. Lateral resolution in focused electron beam-induced deposition: scaling laws for pulsed and static exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szkudlarek, Aleksandra [Empa, Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Thun (Switzerland); AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Szmyt, Wojciech; Kapusta, Czeslaw [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Utke, Ivo [Empa, Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Thun (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, we review the single-adsorbate time-dependent continuum model for focused electron beam-induced deposition (FEBID). The differential equation for the adsorption rate will be expressed by dimensionless parameters describing the contributions of adsorption, desorption, dissociation, and the surface diffusion of the precursor adsorbates. The contributions are individually presented in order to elucidate their influence during variations in the electron beam exposure time. The findings are condensed into three new scaling laws for pulsed exposure FEBID (or FEB-induced etching) relating the lateral resolution of deposits or etch pits to surface diffusion and electron beam exposure dwell time for a given adsorbate depletion state. (orig.)

  19. Scaling laws of strategic behavior and size heterogeneity in agent dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaglica, Gabriella; Lillo, Fabrizio; Moro, Esteban; Mantegna, Rosario N.

    2008-03-01

    We consider the financial market as a model system and study empirically how agents strategically adjust the properties of large orders in order to meet their preference and minimize their impact. We quantify this strategic behavior by detecting scaling relations between the variables characterizing the trading activity of different institutions. We also observe power-law distributions in the investment time horizon, in the number of transactions needed to execute a large order, and in the traded value exchanged by large institutions, and we show that heterogeneity of agents is a key ingredient for the emergence of some aggregate properties characterizing this complex system.

  20. Scaling Laws for the Response of Nonlinear Elastic Media with Implications for Cell Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokef, Yair; Safran, Samuel A.

    2012-04-01

    We show how strain stiffening affects the elastic response to internal forces, caused either by material defects and inhomogeneities or by active forces that molecular motors generate in living cells. For a spherical force dipole in a material with a strongly nonlinear strain energy density, strains change sign with distance, indicating that, even around a contractile inclusion or molecular motor, there is radial compression; it is only at a long distance that one recovers the linear response in which the medium is radially stretched. Scaling laws with irrational exponents relate the far-field renormalized strain to the near-field strain applied by the inclusion or active force.

  1. Machine learning for the identification of scaling laws and dynamical systems directly from data in fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murari, A., E-mail: andrea.murari@igi.cnr.i [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Vega, J. [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT para Fusion, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Mazon, D. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Patane, D.; Vagliasindi, G.; Arena, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica e dei Sistemi-Universita degli Studi di Catania, 95125 Catania (Italy); Martin, N.; Martin, N.F. [Arts et Metiers Paris Tech Engineering College (ENSAM) 13100 Aix-en-Provence (France); Ratta, G. [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT para Fusion, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Caloone, V. [Arts et Metiers Paris Tech Engineering College (ENSAM) 13100 Aix-en-Provence (France)

    2010-11-11

    Original methods to extract equations directly from experimental signals are presented. These techniques have been applied first to the determination of scaling laws for the threshold between the L and H mode of confinement in Tokamaks. The required equations can be extracted from the weights of neural networks and the separating hyperplane of Support Vector Machines. More powerful tools are required for the identification of differential equations directly from the time series of the signals. To this end, recurrent neural networks have proved to be very effective to properly identify ordinary differential equations and have been applied to the coupling between sawteeth and ELMs.

  2. The Evolution of the Social Criminal Law on an International Wide Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Radu Razvan Popescu

    2009-01-01

    Brought to maturity, the labor criminal law represents a real branch of the criminal law, as well as the business criminal law, fiscal criminal law or the environment criminal law. Notwithstanding labor criminal law cannot be considered merely as an accessory part of the corporate criminal law, but having an essential part such as an exhibit test, in order to determine new legal mechanisms, such as the ones regarding criminal liability of the legal persons. In the Romanian legislation, the la...

  3. Engagement in the electoral processes: Scaling laws and the role of political positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, M. C.; Ribeiro, H. V.; Lenzi, E. K.; Picoli, S., Jr.; Mendes, R. S.

    2013-08-01

    We report on a statistical analysis of the engagement in the electoral processes of all Brazilian cities by considering the number of party memberships and the number of candidates for mayor and councillor. By investigating the relationships between the number of party members and the population of voters, we have found that the functional forms of these relationships are well described by sublinear power laws (allometric scaling) surrounded by a multiplicative log-normal noise. We have observed that this pattern is quite similar to those we previously reported for the relationships between the number of candidates (mayor and councillor) and population of voters [Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/96/48001 96, 48001 (2011)], suggesting that similar universal laws may be ruling the engagement in the electoral processes. We also note that the power-law exponents display a clear hierarchy, where the more influential is the political position the smaller is the value of the exponent. We have also investigated the probability distributions of the number of candidates (mayor and councillor), party memberships, and voters. The results indicate that the most influential positions are characterized by distributions with very short tails, while less influential positions display an intermediate power-law decay before showing an exponential-like cutoff. We discuss the possibility that, in addition to the political power of the position, limitations in the number of available seats can also be connected with this changing of behavior. We further believe that our empirical findings point out to an under-representation effect, where the larger the city is, the larger are the obstacles for more individuals to become directly engaged in the electoral process.

  4. Theoretical analysis for scaling law of thermal blooming based on optical phase deference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yunqiang; Huang, Zhilong; Ren, Zebin; Chen, Zhiqiang; Guo, Longde; Xi, Fengjie

    2016-10-01

    In order to explore the laser propagation influence of thermal blooming effect of pipe flow and to analysis the influencing factors, scaling law theoretical analysis of the thermal blooming effects in pipe flow are carry out in detail based on the optical path difference caused by thermal blooming effects in pipe flow. Firstly, by solving the energy coupling equation of laser beam propagation, the temperature of the flow is obtained, and then the optical path difference caused by the thermal blooming is deduced. Through the analysis of the influence of pipe size, flow field and laser parameters on the optical path difference, energy scaling parameters Ne=nTαLPR2/(ρɛCpπR02) and geometric scaling parameters Nc=νR2/(ɛL) of thermal blooming for the pipe flow are derived. Secondly, for the direct solution method, the energy coupled equations have analytic solutions only for the straight tube with Gauss beam. Considering the limitation of directly solving the coupled equations, the dimensionless analysis method is adopted, the analysis is also based on the change of optical path difference, same scaling parameters for the pipe flow thermal blooming are derived, which makes energy scaling parameters Ne and geometric scaling parameters Nc have good universality. The research results indicate that when the laser power and the laser beam diameter are changed, thermal blooming effects of the pipeline axial flow caused by optical path difference will not change, as long as you keep energy scaling parameters constant. When diameter or length of the pipe changes, just keep the geometric scaling parameters constant, the pipeline axial flow gas thermal blooming effects caused by optical path difference distribution will not change. That is to say, when the pipe size and laser parameters change, if keeping two scaling parameters with constant, the pipeline axial flow thermal blooming effects caused by the optical path difference will not change. Therefore, the energy scaling

  5. Comparison of scaling laws with PIC simulations for proton acceleration with long wavelength pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchetti, G., E-mail: turchetti@bo.infn.i [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Bologna, INFN Sezione di Bologna (Italy); Sgattoni, A.; Benedetti, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Bologna, INFN Sezione di Bologna (Italy); Londrillo, P. [INFN Sezione di Bologna (Italy); Di Lucchio, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Bologna, INFN Sezione di Bologna (Italy)

    2010-08-01

    We have performed a survey of proton acceleration induced by long wavelength pulses to explore their peak energy dependence on the pulse intensity, target thickness and density. The simulations carried out with the PIC code ALADYN for a circularly polarized pulse have been compared with the scaling laws for radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) in the thick target and thin target regimes known as hole boring (HB) and relativistic mirror (RM) respectively. Since the critical density scales as {lambda}{sup -2}, longer wavelength pulses allow to work with low density targets several microns thick and with moderate laser power. Under these conditions is possible to enter the RM region, where the key parameter is the ratio {alpha} between twice laser energy and the mirror rest energy; the corresponding acceleration efficiency is given by {alpha}/(1+{alpha}). For a fixed intensity the minimum thickness of the target, and consequently the highest acceleration, is determined by the threshold of self induced transparency. In this case the number of accelerated particles scales with {lambda} whereas the total energy does not depend on it. The agreement of PIC simulations with RPA and RM scalings, including the transition regions, suggests that these scalings can safely be used as the first step in the parametric scans also for large wavelength pulses such as CO{sub 2} lasers, to explore possible alternatives to short wavelength very high power Ti:Sa lasers for proton acceleration.

  6. Universal scaling laws for homogeneous dislocation nucleation during nano-indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Akanksha; Maloney, Craig E.

    2016-10-01

    We perform atomistic simulations to study the mechanism of homogeneous dislocation nucleation in two dimensional (2D) hexagonal crystals during nanoindentation with a circular indenter of radius R. We study both a realistic embedded atom method (EAM) potential for Al in addition to simple pair-wise potentials: Lennard-Jones, Morse, and Hookean springs. The nucleation process is governed by the vanishing of the energy associated with a single energy eigenmode. The critical eigenmode, or dislocation embryo, is found to be localized along a line (or plane in 3D) of atoms with a lateral extent, ξ, at some depth, Y*, below the surface. For all interatomic potentials, the scaled critical load, Fc / R, and scaled critical contact length, Cc / R, decrease to R-independent values in the limit of large R. However, ξ / R and Y* / R display non-trivial scaling with R despite the R independence of Fc / R and Cc / R. We show that although both the interaction potential and the orientation of the lattice affect the prefactors in the scaling relations, all the scaling laws are robust. Furthermore, we show that a stability criterion proposed by Van Vliet et al. based on the minimum eigenvalue, Λ, of the local acoustic tensor predicts the location, orientation, and polarization of the dislocation embryo with a high degree of accuracy for all potentials and crystallographic orientations. However, we also show that, for all crystallographic orientations and interaction potentials, Λ erroneously indicates instability before the true instability occurs.

  7. Universal Scaling Laws for Dense Particle Suspensions in Turbulent Wall-Bounded Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Pedro; Brandt, Luca; Breugem, Wim-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The macroscopic behavior of dense suspensions of neutrally-buoyant spheres in turbulent plane channel flow is examined. We show that particles larger than the smallest turbulence scales cause the suspension to deviate from the continuum limit in which its dynamics is well described by an effective suspension viscosity. This deviation is caused by the formation of a particle layer close to the wall with significant slip velocity. By assuming two distinct transport mechanisms in the near-wall layer and the turbulence in the bulk, we define an effective wall location such that the flow in the bulk can still be accurately described by an effective suspension viscosity. We thus propose scaling laws for the mean velocity profile of the suspension flow, together with a master equation able to predict the increase in drag as function of the particle size and volume fraction.

  8. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells

    CERN Document Server

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple ($\\approx$1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a ...

  9. Optimal scaling laws for ductile fracture derived from strain-gradient microplasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokoua, Landry; Conti, Sergio; Ortiz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We perform an optimal-scaling analysis of ductile fracture in metals. We specifically consider the deformation up to failure of a slab of finite thickness subject to monotonically increasing normal opening displacements on its surfaces. We show that ductile fracture emerges as the net outcome of two competing effects: the sublinear growth characteristic of the hardening of metals and strain-gradient plasticity. We also put forth physical arguments that identify the intrinsic length of strain-gradient plasticity and the critical opening displacement for fracture. We show that, when Jc is renormalized in a manner suggested by the optimal scaling laws, the experimental data tends to cluster—with allowances made for experimental scatter—within bounds dependent on the hardening exponent but otherwise material independent.

  10. Conceptual design based on scale laws and algorithms for sub-critical transmutation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Gu; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    In order to conduct the effective integration of computer-aided conceptual design for integrated nuclear power reactor, not only is a smooth information flow required, but also decision making for both conceptual design and construction process design must be synthesized. In addition to the aboves, the relations between the one step and another step and the methodologies to optimize the decision variables are verified, in this paper especially, that is, scaling laws and scaling criteria. In the respect with the running of the system, the integrated optimization process is proposed in which decisions concerning both conceptual design are simultaneously made. According to the proposed reactor types and power levels, an integrated optimization problems are formulated. This optimization is expressed as a multi-objective optimization problem. The algorithm for solving the problem is also presented. The proposed method is applied to designing a integrated sub-critical reactors. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  11. Scaling laws to quantify tidal dissipation in star-planet systems

    CERN Document Server

    Auclair-Desrotour, Pierre; Poncin-Lafitte, Christophe Le

    2015-01-01

    Planetary systems evolve over secular time scales. One of the key mechanisms that drive this evolution is tidal dissipation. Submitted to tides, stellar and planetary fluid layers do not behave like rocky ones. Indeed, they are the place of resonant gravito-inertial waves. Therefore, tidal dissipation in fluid bodies strongly depends on the excitation frequency while this dependence is smooth in solid ones. Thus, the impact of the internal structure of celestial bodies must be taken into account when studying tidal dynamics. The purpose of this work is to present a local model of tidal gravito-inertial waves allowing us to quantify analytically the internal dissipation due to viscous friction and thermal diffusion, and to study the properties of the resonant frequency spectrum of the dissipated energy. We derive from this model scaling laws characterizing tidal dissipation as a function of fluid parameters (rotation, stratification, diffusivities) and discuss them in the context of star-planet systems.

  12. Analysis of Scaling Law and Figure of Merit of Fiber-Based Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Teng Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a normalized transmitted signal (NTS of a fiber-based sensor using gold nanorods as the plasmon excitation medium of the evanescent wave. The NTS and the refractive index (RI sensitivity is calculated as a function of the gold aspect ratio (R, the RI of the sensing medium, and a scaling parameter given by the ratio of the fiber length and its diameter. Finally, the optimal value of gold aspect ratio is calculated to be R = (3.0–4.0 for maximum figure of merits (FOMs defined by the ratio of the refractive index sensitivity and the full width at half maximum. The scaling laws and the FOM presented in this paper may serve as the guidelines for optimal designs in fiber-based nanosensors.

  13. Pore scale simulations for the extension of the Darcy-Forchheimer law to shear thinning fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Tiziana; Marchisio, Daniele; Lince, Federica; Boccardo, Gianluca; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-05-01

    Flow of non-Newtonian fluids through porous media at high Reynolds numbers is often encountered in chemical, pharmaceutical and food as well as petroleum and groundwater engineering and in many other industrial applications (1 - 2). In particular, the use of shear thinning polymeric solutions has been recently proposed to improve colloidal stability of micro- and nanoscale zerovalent iron particles (MZVI and NZVI) for groundwater remediation. In all abovementioned applications, it is of paramount importance to correctly predict the pressure drop resulting from non-Newtonian fluid flow through the porous medium. For small Reynolds numbers, usually up to 1, typical of laboratory column tests, the extended Darcy law is known to be applicable also to non Newtonian fluids, provided that all non-Newtonian effects are lumped together into a proper viscosity parameter (1,3). For higher Reynolds numbers (eg. close to the injection wells) non linearities between pressure drop and flow rate arise, and the Darcy-Forchheimer law holds for Newtonian fluids, while for non-Newtonian fluids, it has been demonstrated that, at least for simple rheological models (eg. power law fluids) a generalized Forchheimer law can be applied, even if the determination of the flow parameters (permeability K, inertial coefficient β, and equivalent viscosity) is not straightforward. This work (co-funded by European Union project AQUAREHAB FP7 - Grant Agreement Nr. 226565) aims at proposing an extended formulation of the Darcy-Forchheimer law also for shear-thinning fluids, and validating it against results of pore-scale simulations via computational fluid dynamics (4). Flow simulations were performed using Fluent 12.0 on four different 2D porous domains for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids (Cross, Ellis and Carreau models). The micro-scale flow simulation results are analyzed in terms of 'macroscale' pressure drop between inlet and outlet of the model domain as a function of flow rate. The

  14. Stokes-Einstein relation and excess entropy scaling law in liquid Copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pasturel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an ab initio study of structural and dynamic properties of liquid copper as a function of temperature. In particular, we have evaluated the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient from the velocity autocorrelation function as well the temperature dependence of the viscosity from the transverse current correlation function. We show that LDA based results are in close agreement with experimental data for both the self-diffusion coefficient and the viscosity over the temperature range investigated. Our findings are then used to test empirical approaches like the Stokes-Einstein relation and the excess entropy scaling law widely used in the literature. We show that the Stokes-Einstein relation is valid for the liquid phase and that the excess entropy scaling law proposed by Dzugutov is legitimate only if a self-consistent method for determining the packing fraction of the hard sphere reference liquid is used within the Carnahan-Starling approach to express the excess entropy.

  15. Scaling laws describe memories of host-pathogen riposte in the HIV population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, John P; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K

    2015-02-17

    The enormous genetic diversity and mutability of HIV has prevented effective control of this virus by natural immune responses or vaccination. Evolution of the circulating HIV population has thus occurred in response to diverse, ultimately ineffective, immune selection pressures that randomly change from host to host. We show that the interplay between the diversity of human immune responses and the ways that HIV mutates to evade them results in distinct sets of sequences defined by similar collectively coupled mutations. Scaling laws that relate these sets of sequences resemble those observed in linguistics and other branches of inquiry, and dynamics reminiscent of neural networks are observed. Like neural networks that store memories of past stimulation, the circulating HIV population stores memories of host-pathogen combat won by the virus. We describe an exactly solvable model that captures the main qualitative features of the sets of sequences and a simple mechanistic model for the origin of the observed scaling laws. Our results define collective mutational pathways used by HIV to evade human immune responses, which could guide vaccine design.

  16. Scaling Law for Cross-stream Diffusion in Microchannels under Combined Electroosmotic and Pressure Driven Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the cross-stream diffusion of an analyte in a rectangular microchannel under combined electroosmotic flow (EOF) and pressure driven flow to investigate the heterogeneous transport behavior and spatially-dependent diffusion scaling law. An analytical model capable of accurately describing 3D steady-state convection-diffusion in microchannels with arbitrary aspect ratios is developed based on the assumption of the thin Electric Double Layer (EDL). The model is verified against high-fidelity numerical simulation in terms of flow velocity and analyte concentration profiles with excellent agreement (parametric analysis is then undertaken to interrogate the effect of the combined flow velocity field on the transport behavior in both the positive pressure gradient (PPG) and negative pressure gradient (NPG) cases. For the first time, the evolution from the spindle-shaped concentration profile in the PPG case, via the stripe-shaped profile (pure EOF), and finally to the butterfly-shaped profile in the PPG case is obtained using the analytical model along with a quantitative depiction of the spatially-dependent diffusion layer thickness and scaling law across a wide range of the parameter space.

  17. Scaling Laws for Overlaid Wireless Networks: A Cognitive Radio Network vs. a Primary Network

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Changchuan; Cui, Shuguang

    2008-01-01

    We study the scaling laws for the throughputs and delays of two coexisting wireless networks that operate in the same geographic region. The primary network consists of Poisson distributed legacy users of density n, and the secondary network consists of Poisson distributed cognitive users of density m, with m>n. The primary users have a higher priority to access the spectrum without particular considerations for the secondary users, while the secondary users have to act conservatively in order to limit the interference to the primary users. With a practical assumption that the secondary users only know the locations of the primary transmitters (not the primary receivers), we first show that both networks can achieve the same throughput scaling law as what Gupta and Kumar [1] established for a stand-alone wireless network if proper transmission schemes are deployed, where a certain throughput is achievable for each individual secondary user (i.e., zero outage) with high probability. By using a fluid model, we ...

  18. Spherule layers, crater scaling laws, and the population of ancient terrestrial impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brandon C.; Collins, Gareth S.; Minton, David A.; Bowling, Timothy J.; Simonson, Bruce M.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2016-06-01

    Ancient layers of impact spherules provide a record of Earth's early bombardment history. Here, we compare different bombardment histories to the spherule layer record and show that 3.2-3.5 Ga the flux of large impactors (10-100 km in diameter) was likely 20-40 times higher than today. The E-belt model of early Solar System dynamics suggests that an increased impactor flux during the Archean is the result of the destabilization of an inward extension of the main asteroid belt (Bottke et al., 2012). Here, we find that the nominal flux predicted by the E-belt model is 7-19 times too low to explain the spherule layer record. Moreover, rather than making most lunar basins younger than 4.1 Gyr old, the nominal E-belt model, coupled with a corrected crater diameter scaling law, only produces two lunar basins larger than 300 km in diameter. We also show that the spherule layer record when coupled with the lunar cratering record and careful consideration of crater scaling laws can constrain the size distribution of ancient terrestrial impactors. The preferred population is main-belt-like up to ∼50 km in diameter transitioning to a steep distribution going to larger sizes.

  19. Constraints on plate tectonics initiation from scaling laws for single-cell convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Teresa; Solomatov, Viatcheslav S.

    2016-08-01

    The Earth is the only planet known to have plate tectonics, while other planets are covered with a stagnant lid. On the Earth, the initiation of subduction, which is thought to be the fundamental process for plate tectonics initiation, is caused not only by the negative buoyancy of the lithosphere but also by the forces from plate motions. However, for planets which do not have plate tectonics, the very first episode of lithospheric failure has to be caused by forces other than plate motions. Sublithospheric convection has been proposed as a possible mechanism that provides lithospheric instability through inducing stresses in the lithosphere, and lithospheric failure can occur when the yield stress is below a critical value. We test the applicability of scaling laws for the critical yield stress obtained in single-cell convection simulations to strongly time-dependent multi-cell systems. We show that with an appropriate choice of characteristic aspect ratio for the convective system, the scaling laws from single-cell simulations can be used to evaluate the conditions on the terrestrial planets in the inner Solar System for plate tectonics to exist. In agreement with previous studies, the estimated values for critical yield stress and coefficient of friction are much lower than the expected values for the Earth's lithosphere.

  20. Anomalous dynamic back-action in interferometers: beyond the scaling law

    CERN Document Server

    Tarabrin, Sergey P; Kaufer, Henning; Schnabel, Roman; Hammerer, Klemens

    2013-01-01

    We analyze dynamic optomechanical back-action effects in signal-recycled Michelson and Michelson-Sagnac interferometers that are operated off dark port. Up to now, their optomechanics has been studied under dark port condition only. For the dark port case and in the context of gravitational wave detectors, the `scaling law' assured that all back-action effects can be understood on the basis of the much simpler topology of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Off dark port, our theoretical and experimental analysis reveals certain `anomalous' features as compared to the ones of `canonical' back-action, obtained within the scope of scaling law. In particular, optical damping as a function of detuning acquires a non-zero value on cavity resonance, and several stability/instability regions on either side of the cavity resonance appear. We report on the experimental observation of these instabilities on both sides of the cavity resonance in a Michelson-Sagnac interferometer with a micromechanical membrane. For a certain ...

  1. a Scaling Law for Amplitude-Squared Squeezing in Kerr Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Hari; Kumar, Pankaj

    We study amplitude-squared squeezing in interaction of coherent light with a nonlinear Kerr medium modelled as an anharmonic oscillator with interaction Hamiltonian H = ½ λ a+2 a2, where λ is proportional to χ(3) of the nonlinear medium and a is annihilation operator for the interacting field. We find the squeezing parameter S ( τ, r) in terms of a dimensionless interaction time τ = λ t and Kerr parameter r, which is product of, τ and the average number of photons and obtain almost complete amplitude-squared squeezing (i.e., S ≈ 0) for very small interaction time and very large intensity of the interacting light. We optimize squeezing parameter S ( τ, r) by an analytic estimation assuming high intensity of the interacting light and realistic values of Kerr nonlinearity following J.Bajer et al. [Czech. J. Phy. 52, 1313 (2002)] and obtain a scaling law for optimal amplitude-squared squeezing with minimum value Smin, at r = rmin for a given τ. The validity of the scaling law is checked numerically and analytically in the region of realistic values of Kerr nonlinearity and intensity of the interacting light.

  2. Allometric Relations and Scaling Laws for the Cardiovascular System of Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H. Dawson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of the cardiovascular system of mammals is discussed within the framework of governing allometric relations and related scaling laws for mammals. An earlier theory of the writer for resting-state cardiovascular function is reviewed and standard solutions discussed for reciprocal quarter-power relations for heart rate and cardiac output per unit body mass. Variation in the basic cardiac process controlling heart beat is considered and shown to allow alternate governing relations. Results have potential application in explaining deviations from the noted quarter-power relations. The work thus indicates that the cardiovascular systems of all mammals are designed according to the same general theory and, accordingly, that it provides a quantitative means to extrapolate measurements of cardiovascular form and function from small mammals to the human. Various illustrations are included. Work described here also indicates that the basic scaling laws from the theory apply to children and adults, with important applications such as the extrapolation of therapeutic drug dosage requirements from adults to children.

  3. DNS of turbulent Couette flow with transpiration - spectra and symmetry induced scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyas, Sergio; Kraheberger, Stefanie; Oberlack, Martin

    2016-11-01

    We present DNS results of turbulent plane Couette flow with constant wall-normal transpiration for Reynolds numbers of Reτ = 250 , 500 , 1000 and several transpiration Reynolds numbers Retr =V0 /Uw . To obtain the DNS data, a pseudo-spectral code, which originally was developed at UP Madrid, see (Hoyas and Jiménez 2006), is used for the simulations. Due to the lack of experimental and DNS data, the convergence of every simulation has been validated using the total shear stress equation and the relation between the friction velocities at the lower and upper wall. Examining the spectra we found that the large and wide structures, which appear in pure Couette flow, see (Avsarkisov et al. 2014), are destroyed as soon as transpiration velocity is different from zero. This and the presence of anomalous spectra near the blowing wall indicates the strong influence of suction on the whole flow, which was observed in (Antonia et al. 1988) as well. As classical scaling laws are not valid due to transpiration, new scaling laws of the mean velocity are derived using Lie symmetry methods. Additionally, suction creates a comparably larger uτ which, in turn, causes a flat and long region in the indicator function for the largest transpiration rate. SH was partially funded by ENE2015-71333-R. SK was funded by DFG under Grant No. OB96/39-1. Computer resources have been provided by LRZ Munich under Grant pr92la.

  4. The stochastic background: scaling laws and time to detection for pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Siemens, Xavier; Jenet, Fredrick; Romano, Joseph D

    2013-01-01

    We derive scaling laws for the signal-to-noise ratio of the optimal cross-correlation statistic, and show that the large power-law increase of the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of the the observation time $T$ that is usually assumed holds only at early times. After enough time has elapsed, pulsar timing arrays enter a new regime where the signal to noise only scales as $\\sqrt{T}$. In addition, in this regime the quality of the pulsar timing data and the cadence become relatively un-important. This occurs because the lowest frequencies of the pulsar timing residuals become gravitational-wave dominated. Pulsar timing arrays enter this regime more quickly than one might naively suspect. For T=10 yr observations and typical stochastic background amplitudes, pulsars with residual RMSs of less than about $1\\,\\mu$s are already in that regime. The best strategy to increase the detectability of the background in this regime is to increase the number of pulsars in the array. We also perform realistic simulations ...

  5. Suppressed ion-scale turbulence in a hot high-β plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, L.; Fulton, D. P.; Ruskov, E.; Lau, C.; Deng, B. H.; Tajima, T.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Holod, I.; Lin, Z.; Gota, H.; Tuszewski, M.; Dettrick, S. A.; Steinhauer, L. C.

    2016-12-01

    An economic magnetic fusion reactor favours a high ratio of plasma kinetic pressure to magnetic pressure in a well-confined, hot plasma with low thermal losses across the confining magnetic field. Field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas are potentially attractive as a reactor concept, achieving high plasma pressure in a simple axisymmetric geometry. Here, we show that FRC plasmas have unique, beneficial microstability properties that differ from typical regimes in toroidal confinement devices. Ion-scale fluctuations are found to be absent or strongly suppressed in the plasma core, mainly due to the large FRC ion orbits, resulting in near-classical thermal ion confinement. In the surrounding boundary layer plasma, ion- and electron-scale turbulence is observed once a critical pressure gradient is exceeded. The critical gradient increases in the presence of sheared plasma flow induced via electrostatic biasing, opening the prospect of active boundary and transport control in view of reactor requirements.

  6. Experimental determination of gap scaling in a plasma opening switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, D. C.; Commisso, R. J.; Ottinger, P. F.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.

    2000-09-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the coupling between a ˜0.5 μs conduction-time, ˜0.5 MA conduction-current plasma opening switch (POS), and an electron-beam (e-beam) diode. Electrical diagnostics provided measurements of the voltage at the oil-vacuum insulator and at the diode as well as anode and cathode currents on the generator and load sides of the POS. These measurements were combined with a flow impedance model to determine the POS gap over a range of conduction times and e-beam diode impedances, and for two POS-to-load distances. A comparison of the inferred POS gap at peak power with the critical gap for magnetic insulation indicates that the POS gap is always saturated in both switch-limited and load-limited regimes. This POS gap-size scaling with load impedance is consistent with an opening mechanism dominated by erosion and not J×B forces.

  7. Simulation study of scalings in scrape-off layer plasma by two-dimensional transport code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Ueda, Noriaki; Itoh, Kimitaka (National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan))

    1990-07-01

    Scrape-off Layer (SOL) plasma and divertor plasma in Tokamaks were numerically analyzed using a two-dimensional time-dependent transport code (UEDA code). Plasma transport in the SOL and the divertor region was studied for given particle and heat sources from the main plasma. A scaling study of the density, the temperature and their fall-off lengths was carried out for the JFT-2M Tokamak. The results show the inter-relations between the divertor plasma parameters and core plasma confinement. The operational conditions of the core necessary to guarantee the divertor performance are discussed. (author).

  8. The statistics of urban scaling and their connection to Zipf's law.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Gomez-Lievano

    Full Text Available Urban scaling relations characterizing how diverse properties of cities vary on average with their population size have recently been shown to be a general quantitative property of many urban systems around the world. However, in previous studies the statistics of urban indicators were not analyzed in detail, raising important questions about the full characterization of urban properties and how scaling relations may emerge in these larger contexts. Here, we build a self-consistent statistical framework that characterizes the joint probability distributions of urban indicators and city population sizes across an urban system. To develop this framework empirically we use one of the most granular and stochastic urban indicators available, specifically measuring homicides in cities of Brazil, Colombia and Mexico, three nations with high and fast changing rates of violent crime. We use these data to derive the conditional probability of the number of homicides per year given the population size of a city. To do this we use Bayes' rule together with the estimated conditional probability of city size given their number of homicides and the distribution of total homicides. We then show that scaling laws emerge as expectation values of these conditional statistics. Knowledge of these distributions implies, in turn, a relationship between scaling and population size distribution exponents that can be used to predict Zipf's exponent from urban indicator statistics. Our results also suggest how a general statistical theory of urban indicators may be constructed from the stochastic dynamics of social interaction processes in cities.

  9. The Evolution of the Social Criminal Law on an International Wide Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Razvan Popescu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Brought to maturity, the labor criminal law represents a real branch of the criminal law, as well as the business criminal law, fiscal criminal law or the environment criminal law. Notwithstanding labor criminal law cannot be considered merely as an accessory part of the corporate criminal law, but having an essential part such as an exhibit test, in order to determine new legal mechanisms, such as the ones regarding criminal liability of the legal persons. In the Romanian legislation, the labor criminal law, as an interference zone between the criminal law and labor law, has to be regarded from the internal social realities governing the labor aspects, as well from the comparative law's point of view.

  10. Extreme robustness of scaling in sample space reducing processes explains Zipf’s law in diffusion on directed networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    It has been shown recently that a specific class of path-dependent stochastic processes, which reduce their sample space as they unfold, lead to exact scaling laws in frequency and rank distributions. Such sample space reducing processes offer an alternative new mechanism to understand the emergence of scaling in countless processes. The corresponding power law exponents were shown to be related to noise levels in the process. Here we show that the emergence of scaling is not limited to the simplest SSRPs, but holds for a huge domain of stochastic processes that are characterised by non-uniform prior distributions. We demonstrate mathematically that in the absence of noise the scaling exponents converge to -1 (Zipf’s law) for almost all prior distributions. As a consequence it becomes possible to fully understand targeted diffusion on weighted directed networks and its associated scaling laws in node visit distributions. The presence of cycles can be properly interpreted as playing the same role as noise in SSRPs and, accordingly, determine the scaling exponents. The result that Zipf’s law emerges as a generic feature of diffusion on networks, regardless of its details, and that the exponent of visiting times is related to the amount of cycles in a network could be relevant for a series of applications in traffic-, transport- and supply chain management.

  11. A Unified Gas Kinetic Scheme for Multi-scale Plasma Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    A unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for multi-scale and multi-component plasma transport is constructed. The current scheme is a direct modeling method, where the time evolution solutions from the Vlasov-BGK equations for both electron and ion, and the Maxwell equations are used to construct the scale-dependent plasma simulation. As a result, based on the modeling scales of mesh size and time step, the discretized governing equations for the whole plasma regimes are obtained. The UGKS takes into account the electron inertia, full electromagnetic field equations, and separate electron and ion evolution. The physics recovered in UGKS ranges from the kinetic Vlasov equation to the hydrodynamic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, with a unified treatment in all scales from the collisionless particle transport to the hydrodynamic wave interactions. The UGKS presents a plasma description which is more general than the Vlasov equation in the kinetic scale and all kinds of MHD equations in the hydrodynamic scale, su...

  12. Power Spectra, Power Law Exponents, and Anisotropy of Solar Wind Turbulence at Small Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, J. J.; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2006-01-01

    The Wind spacecraft provides simultaneous solar wind velocity and magnetic field measurements with 3- second time resolution, roughly an order of magnitude faster than previous measurements, enabling the small scale features of solar wind turbulence to be studied in unprecedented detail. Almost the entire inertial range can now be explored (the inertial range extends from approximately 1 to 10(exp 3) seconds in the spacecraft frame) although the dissipation range of the velocity fluctuations is still out of reach. Improved measurements of solar wind turbulence spectra at 1 AU in the ecliptic plane are presented including spectra of the energy and cross-helicity, the magnetic and kinetic energies, the Alfven ratio, the normalized cross-helicity, and the Elsasser ratio. Some recent observations and theoretical challenges are discussed including the observation that the velocity and magnetic field spectra often show different power law exponents with values close to 3/2 and 5/3, respectively; the energy (kinetic plus magnetic) and cross-helicity often have approximately equal power law exponents with values intermediate between 3/2 and 5/3; and the Alfven ratio, the ratio of the kinetic to magnetic energy spectra, is often a slowly increasing function of frequency increasing from around 0.4 to 1 for frequencies in the inertial range. Differences between high- and low-speed wind are also discussed. Comparisons with phenomenological turbulence theories show that important aspects of the physics are yet unexplained.

  13. Power law scaling and ``Dragon-Kings'' in distributions of intraday financial drawdowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonov, Vladimir; Sornette, Didier

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the distributions of epsilon-drawdowns and epsilon-drawups of the most liquid futures financial contracts of the world at time scales of 30 seconds. The epsilon-drawdowns (resp. epsilon- drawups) generalise the notion of runs of negative (resp. positive) returns so as to capture the risks to which investors are arguably the most concerned with. Similarly to the distribution of returns, we find that the distributions of epsilon-drawdowns and epsilon-drawups exhibit power law tails, albeit with exponents significantly larger than those for the return distributions. This paradoxical result can be attributed to (i) the existence of significant transient dependence between returns and (ii) the presence of large outliers (dragon-kings) characterizing the extreme tail of the drawdown/drawup distributions deviating from the power law. The study of the tail dependence between the sizes, speeds and durations of drawdown/drawup indicates a clear relationship between size and speed but none between size and duration. This implies that the most extreme drawdown/drawup tend to occur fast and are dominated by a few very large returns. We discuss both the endogenous and exogenous origins of these extreme events.

  14. The US business cycle: power law scaling for interacting units with complex internal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormerod, Paul

    2002-11-01

    In the social sciences, there is increasing evidence of the existence of power law distributions. The distribution of recessions in capitalist economies has recently been shown to follow such a distribution. The preferred explanation for this is self-organised criticality. Gene Stanley and colleagues propose an alternative, namely that power law scaling can arise from the interplay between random multiplicative growth and the complex structure of the units composing the system. This paper offers a parsimonious model of the US business cycle based on similar principles. The business cycle, along with long-term growth, is one of the two features which distinguishes capitalism from all previously existing societies. Yet, economics lacks a satisfactory theory of the cycle. The source of cycles is posited in economic theory to be a series of random shocks which are external to the system. In this model, the cycle is an internal feature of the system, arising from the level of industrial concentration of the agents and the interactions between them. The model-in contrast to existing economic theories of the cycle-accounts for the key features of output growth in the US business cycle in the 20th century.

  15. Scaling Laws and Design Principles for Multi-Cellular Wireless OFDMA Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Rohit; Schniter, Philip

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the downlink of large-scale multi-cellular OFDMA-based networks and study performance bounds of the system as a function of the number of users $K$, the number of base-stations $B$, and the number of resource-blocks $N$. Here, a resource block is a collection of subcarriers such that all such collections, that are disjoint have associated independently fading channels. We derive novel upper and lower bounds on the sum-utility for a general spatial geometry of base stations, a truncated path loss model, and a variety of fading models (Rayleigh, Nakagami-$m$, Weibull, and LogNormal). We also establish the associated scaling laws and show that, in the special case of fixed number of resource blocks, a grid-based network of base stations, and Rayleigh-fading channels, the sum information capacity of the system scales as $\\Theta(B \\log\\log K/B)$ for extended networks, and as $O(B \\log\\log K)$ and $\\Omega(\\log \\log K)$ for dense networks. Interpreting these results, we develop some design...

  16. Emergence of power-law scalings in shock-driven mixing transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobieff, Peter; Wayne, Patrick; Olmstead, Dell; Simons, Dylan; Truman, C. Randall; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    We present an experimental study of transition to turbulence due to shock-driven instability evolving on an initially cylindrical, diffuse density interface between air and a mixture of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and acetone. The plane of the shock is at an initial angle θ with the axis of the heavy-gas cylinder. We present the cases of planar normal (θ = 0) and oblique (θ =20°) shock interaction with the initial conditions. Flow is visualized in two perpendicular planes with planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) triggered in acetone with a pulsed ultraviolet laser. Statistics of the flow are characterized in terms of the second-order structure function of the PLIF intensity. As instabilities in the flow evolve, the structure functions begin to develop power-law scalings, at late times manifesting over a range of scales spanning more than two orders of magnitude. We discuss the effects of the initial conditions on the emergence of these scalings, comparing the fully three-dimensional case (oblique shock interaction) with the quasi-two-dimensional case (planar normal shock interaction). We also discuss the flow anisotropy apparent in statistical differences in data from the two visualization planes. This work is funded by NNSA Grant DE-NA0002913.

  17. Spatiotemporal dynamics of prairie wetland networks: power-law scaling and implications for conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Christopher K

    2010-07-01

    Although habitat networks show promise for conservation planning at regional scales, their spatiotemporal dynamics have not been well studied, especially in climate-sensitive landscapes. Here I use satellite remote sensing to compile wetland habitat networks from the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America. An ensemble of networks assembled across a hydrologic gradient from deluge to drought and a range of representative dispersal distances exhibits power-law scaling of important topological parameters. Prairie wetland networks are "meso-worlds" with mean topological distance increasing faster with network size than small-world networks, but slower than a regular lattice (or "large world"). This scaling implies rapid dispersal through wetland networks without some of the risks associated with "small worlds" (e.g., extremely rapid propagation of disease or disturbance). Retrospective analysis of wetland networks establishes a climatic envelope for landscape connectivity in the PPR, where I show that a changing climate might severely impact metapopulation viability and restrict long-distance dispersal and range shifts. More generally, this study demonstrates an efficient approach to conservation planning at a level of abstraction addressing key drivers of the global biodiversity crisis: habitat fragmentation and climatic change.

  18. Does movement planning follow Fitts' law? Scaling anticipatory postural adjustments with movement speed and accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucco, M; Cesari, P

    2010-11-24

    We wanted to determine whether movement planning followed Fitts' law by investigating the relationship between movement planning and movement performance in experienced dancers executing a typical classical ballet step in which the big toe was pointed to targets at different distances and of different widths so as to obtain several indices of difficulty (ID). Movement time, velocity and variability at the target were the variables of movement performance kinematics; movement planning was evaluated by analysis of anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) to assess their modulation at different IDs. Movement time and peak of velocity were found to scale with the ID only when individual movement distance across target widths was entered into the analysis. APA magnitude and duration both scaled according to movement parameters but not in the same way. APA magnitude scaled with movement velocity, while APA duration was sensitive to the amplitude-to-accuracy ratio following the ID for movements performed in the shortest time interval when on-line feedback control is probably not available. Here we show that timing of muscle activation acts as an independent central command that triggers fine-tuning for speed-accuracy trade-off.

  19. Phase boundaries of power-law Anderson and Kondo models: A poor man's scaling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mengxing; Chowdhury, Tathagata; Mohammed, Aaron; Ingersent, Kevin

    2017-07-01

    We use the poor man's scaling approach to study the phase boundaries of a pair of quantum impurity models featuring a power-law density of states ρ (ɛ ) ∝|ɛ| r , either vanishing (for r >0 ) or diverging (for r 0 ), we find the phase boundary for (a) 0 1 , where the phases are separated by first-order quantum phase transitions that are accessible only for broken p-h symmetry. For the p-h-symmetric Kondo model with easy-axis or easy-plane anisotropy of the impurity-band spin exchange, the phase boundary and scaling trajectories are obtained for both r >0 and r <0 . Throughout the regime of weak-to-moderate impurity-band coupling in which poor man's scaling is expected to be valid, the approach predicts phase boundaries in excellent qualitative and good quantitative agreement with the nonperturbative numerical renormalization group, while also establishing the functional relations between model parameters along these boundaries.

  20. Dynamics and universal scaling law in geometrically-controlled sessile drop evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz, P J; Wray, A W; Che, Z; Matar, O K; Valluri, P; Kim, J; Sefiane, K

    2017-03-15

    The evaporation of a liquid drop on a solid substrate is a remarkably common phenomenon. Yet, the complexity of the underlying mechanisms has constrained previous studies to spherically symmetric configurations. Here we investigate well-defined, non-spherical evaporating drops of pure liquids and binary mixtures. We deduce a universal scaling law for the evaporation rate valid for any shape and demonstrate that more curved regions lead to preferential localized depositions in particle-laden drops. Furthermore, geometry induces well-defined flow structures within the drop that change according to the driving mechanism. In the case of binary mixtures, geometry dictates the spatial segregation of the more volatile component as it is depleted. Our results suggest that the drop geometry can be exploited to prescribe the particle deposition and evaporative dynamics of pure drops and the mixing characteristics of multicomponent drops, which may be of interest to a wide range of industrial and scientific applications.

  1. Scaling laws to understand tidal dissipation in fluid planetary layers and stars

    CERN Document Server

    Auclair-Desrotour, P; Poncin-Lafitte, C Le

    2014-01-01

    Tidal dissipation is known as one of the main drivers of the secular evolution of planetary systems. It directly results from dissipative mechanisms that occur in planets and stars' interiors and strongly depends on the structure and dynamics of the bodies. This work focuses on the mechanism of viscous friction in stars and planetary layers. A local model is used to study tidal dissipation. It provides general scaling laws that give a qualitative overview of the different possible behaviors of fluid tidal waves. Furthermore, it highlights the sensitivity of dissipation to the tidal frequency and the roles played by the internal parameters of the fluid such as rotation, stratification, viscosity and thermal diffusivity that will impact the spins/orbital architecture in planetary systems.

  2. Confinement loss scaling law analysis in tube lattice fibers for terahertz applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masruri, M.; Vincetti, L.; Molardi, C.; Coscelli, E.; Cucinotta, A.; Selleri, S.

    2014-03-01

    The development of low loss, small size and flexible waveguides is one of the most challenging issues of THz research due to the poor characteristics of both metal and dielectrics in this frequency range. Hollow core tube lattice fibers (HCTLFs) have been recently proposed and experimentally demonstrated to overcome this problem. However, they require very large hollow core size leading to big and hardly flexible fibers. Scaling law analysis plays an important role in determining the best trade-off between low loss and small fiber diameter. The dependence of the confinement on frequency and core radius are here numerically investigated. Results show that confinement loss exhibits a stronger dependence on core size and frequency with respect to other hollow core fibers proposed for THz waveguiding, such as Bragg, Tube, and Kagome fibers.

  3. Scaling laws of the cavity enhancement for NV centers in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Kaupp, Hanno; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Reichel, Jakob; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2013-01-01

    We employ a fiber-based optical microcavity with high Finesse to study the enhancement of fluorescence emission of NV centers in nanodiamonds. Harnessing the full tunability and open access of the resonator, we explicitly demonstrate the scaling laws of the Purcell enhancement by varying both the mode volume and the quality factor over a large range. While changes in the emission lifetime remain small in the regime of a broadband emitter, we observe an ideal Purcell factor of up to 450. Our results show a way for the realization of wavelength-tunable, narrow-band single-photon sources and demonstrate a system that has the potential to reach the strong coupling regime.

  4. Revisiting the Nelson-Morfey scaling law for flow noise from duct constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kårekull, Oscar; Efraimsson, Gunilla; Åbom, Mats

    2015-11-01

    The semi-empirical scaling law by Nelson and Morfey [1] predicts the noise generation from constrictions in ducts with low Mach number flows. The results presented here demonstrate that the original model loses accuracy for constrictions of high pressure loss. A generalization based on a momentum flux assumption of the dipole forces is suggested and is evaluated against measurement results for orifice geometries of higher pressure loss than earlier evaluated. A prediction model including constrictions at flow duct terminations is also suggested. Improved accuracy for the predictions of the new model is found for orifice geometries of high pressure loss inside and at the end of ducts. The extended model is finally evaluated by measurements on a regular ventilation air terminal device.

  5. Correlation length, universality classes, and scaling laws associated with topological phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Legner, Markus; Rüegg, Andreas; Sigrist, Manfred

    2017-02-01

    The correlation functions related to topological phase transitions in inversion-symmetric lattice models described by 2 ×2 Dirac Hamiltonians are discussed. In one dimension, the correlation function measures the charge-polarization correlation between Wannier states at different positions, while in two dimensions it measures the itinerant-circulation correlation between Wannier states. The correlation function is nonzero in both the topologically trivial and nontrivial states, and allows us to extract a correlation length that diverges at topological phase transitions. The correlation length and the curvature function that defines the topological invariants are shown to have universal critical exponents, allowing the notion of universality classes to be introduced. Particularly in two dimensions, the universality class is determined by the orbital symmetry of the Dirac model. The scaling laws that constrain the critical exponents are revealed, and are predicted to be satisfied even in interacting systems, as demonstrated in an interacting topological Kondo insulator.

  6. Stiffer EoS for Compact Star with New Scaling Law

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyungmin; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Lee, Jaehyun; Rho, Mannque

    2014-01-01

    The observation of a 2-solar mass neutron star hints that the equation of state(EoS) for compact stars needs to be sufficiently stiffer to accommodate the mass larger than 1.5-solar mass. We discuss the physical properties of a new stiffer EoS, which has been proposed recently using a new scaling law (called new-BR/ BLPR) in medium . The mass and radius of compact stars are calculated under the condition of weak equilibrium of neutron, proton, electron and muon. We address the deformation of the compact star with the stiffer EoS and make an unequivocal prediction for the tidal deformability parameter $\\lambda$ (equivalently the Love number $k_2$) that could be readily confirmed or falsified by forth-coming aLIGO and aVirgo gravity-wave observations.

  7. Magnetized and collimated millimeter scale plasma jets with astrophysical relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Parrish C.; Quevedo, Hernan J. [Texas Center for High Intensity Laser Science, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Valanju, Prashant M. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1060 (United States); Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, Todd [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Magnetized collimated plasma jets are created in the laboratory to extend our understanding of plasma jet acceleration and collimation mechanisms with particular connection to astrophysical jets. In this study, plasma collimated jets are formed from supersonic unmagnetized flows, mimicking a stellar wind, subject to currents and magnetohydrodynamic forces. It is found that an external poloidal magnetic field, like the ones found anchored to accretion disks, is essential to stabilize the jets against current-driven instabilities. The maximum jet length before instabilities develop is proportional to the field strength and the length threshold agrees well with Kruskal-Shafranov theory. The plasma evolution is modeled qualitatively using MHD theory of current-carrying flux tubes showing that jet acceleration and collimation arise as a result of electromagnetic forces.

  8. A model of urban scaling laws based on distance dependent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Fabiano L.; Meirelles, Joao; Ferreira, Fernando F.

    2017-01-01

    Socio-economic related properties of a city grow faster than a linear relationship with the population, in a log–log plot, the so-called superlinear scaling. Conversely, the larger a city, the more efficient it is in the use of its infrastructure, leading to a sublinear scaling on these variables. In this work, we addressed a simple explanation for those scaling laws in cities based on the interaction range between the citizens and on the fractal properties of the cities. To this purpose, we introduced a measure of social potential which captured the influence of social interaction on the economic performance and the benefits of amenities in the case of infrastructure offered by the city. We assumed that the population density depends on the fractal dimension and on the distance-dependent interactions between individuals. The model suggests that when the city interacts as a whole, and not just as a set of isolated parts, there is improvement of the socio-economic indicators. Moreover, the bigger the interaction range between citizens and amenities, the bigger the improvement of the socio-economic indicators and the lower the infrastructure costs of the city. We addressed how public policies could take advantage of these properties to improve cities development, minimizing negative effects. Furthermore, the model predicts that the sum of the scaling exponents of social-economic and infrastructure variables are 2, as observed in the literature. Simulations with an agent-based model are confronted with the theoretical approach and they are compatible with the empirical evidences.

  9. Diffusion and radiation in magnetized collisionless plasmas with small-scale Whistler turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Brett D.; Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2016-04-01

    > Magnetized high-energy-density plasmas can often have strong electromagnetic fluctuations whose correlation scale is smaller than the electron Larmor radius. Radiation from the electrons in such plasmas - which markedly differs from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation - is tightly related to their energy and pitch-angle diffusion. In this paper, we present a comprehensive theoretical and numerical study of particle transport in cold, `small-scale' Whistler-mode turbulence and its relation to the spectra of radiation simultaneously produced by these particles. We emphasize that this relation is a superb diagnostic tool of laboratory, astrophysical, interplanetary and solar plasmas with a mean magnetic field and strong small-scale turbulence.

  10. Application of symbolic regression to the derivation of scaling laws for tokamak energy confinement time in terms of dimensionless quantities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Peluso, E.; Lungaroni, M.; Gelfusa, M.; Gaudio, P.

    2016-02-01

    In many scientific applications, it is important to investigate how certain properties scale with the parameters of the systems. The experimental studies of scalings have traditionally been addressed with log regression, which limits the results to power laws and to theoretical and not data-driven dimensionless quantities. This has also been the case in nuclear fusion, in which the scaling of the energy confinement time is a crucial aspect in understanding the physics of transport and in the design of future devices. Traditionally two main assumptions are at the basis of the most widely accepted empirical scaling laws for the confinement time: (a) the dimensionless variables used are the ones derived from the symmetries of the Vlasov equation; (b) the final scalings have the mathematical form of power laws. In this paper, it is shown how symbolic regression (SR), implemented with genetic programming (GP) techniques, can be used to test these hypotheses. Neither assumption is confirmed by the available data of the multi-machine International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) of validated tokamak discharges. The statistically soundest expressions are not power laws and cannot be formulated in terms of the traditional dimensionless quantities. The consequences of the data-driven scaling laws obtained are both practical and theoretical: the confinement time for the ITER can be significantly shorter than foreseen by power laws and different dimensionless variables should be considered for theoretical investigations. On the other hand, higher quality databases should be built to reduce the uncertainties in the extrapolations. It is also worth emphasising that the proposed methodology is fully general and therefore can be applied to any field of science.

  11. Energy loss of a high charge bunched electron beam in plasma: Simulations, scaling, and accelerating wakefields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Rosenzweig

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The energy loss and gain of a beam in the nonlinear, “blowout” regime of the plasma wakefield accelerator, which features ultrahigh accelerating fields, linear transverse focusing forces, and nonlinear plasma motion, has been asserted, through previous observations in simulations, to scale linearly with beam charge. Additionally, from a recent analysis by Barov et al., it has been concluded that for an infinitesimally short beam, the energy loss is indeed predicted to scale linearly with beam charge for arbitrarily large beam charge. This scaling is predicted to hold despite the onset of a relativistic, nonlinear response by the plasma, when the number of beam particles occupying a cubic plasma skin depth exceeds that of plasma electrons within the same volume. This paper is intended to explore the deviations from linear energy loss using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that arise in the case of experimentally relevant finite length beams. The peak accelerating field in the plasma wave excited behind the finite-length beam is also examined, with the artifact of wave spiking adding to the apparent persistence of linear scaling of the peak field amplitude into the nonlinear regime. At large enough normalized charge, the linear scaling of both decelerating and accelerating fields collapses, with serious consequences for plasma wave excitation efficiency. Using the results of parametric particle-in-cell studies, the implications of these results for observing severe deviations from linear scaling in present and planned experiments are discussed.

  12. Extreme robustness of scaling in sample space reducing processes explains Zipf's law in diffusion on directed networks

    CERN Document Server

    Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Thurner, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Sample Space Reducing processes (SSRP) offer an alternative new mechanism to understand the emergence of scaling in countless phenomena. We demonstrate that the scaling exponents associated to the dynamics of SSRPs converge to Zipf's law for a large class of systems. We show that Zipf's law emerges as a generic feature of diffusion on directed networks, regardless of its details, and that the exponent of the visiting time distribution is related to the amount of cycles in the network. These results are relevant for a series of applications in traffic, transport, and supply chain management.

  13. Experimental demonstration of violations of the second law of thermodynamics for small systems and short time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G M; Sevick, E M; Mittag, Emil; Searles, Debra J; Evans, Denis J

    2002-07-29

    We experimentally demonstrate the fluctuation theorem, which predicts appreciable and measurable violations of the second law of thermodynamics for small systems over short time scales, by following the trajectory of a colloidal particle captured in an optical trap that is translated relative to surrounding water molecules. From each particle trajectory, we calculate the entropy production/consumption over the duration of the trajectory and determine the fraction of second law-defying trajectories. Our results show entropy consumption can occur over colloidal length and time scales.

  14. Determination of fractional flow reserve (FFR) based on scaling laws: a simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jerry T; Molloi, Sabee [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine-92697, CA (United States)], E-mail: symolloi@uci.edu

    2008-07-21

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) provides an objective physiological evaluation of stenosis severity. A technique that can measure FFR using only angiographic images would be a valuable tool in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. To perform this, the diseased blood flow can be measured with a first pass distribution analysis and the theoretical normal blood flow can be estimated from the total coronary arterial volume based on scaling laws. A computer simulation of the coronary arterial network was used to gain a better understanding of how hemodynamic conditions and coronary artery disease can affect blood flow, arterial volume and FFR estimation. Changes in coronary arterial flow and volume due to coronary stenosis, aortic pressure and venous pressure were examined to evaluate the potential use of flow and volume for FFR determination. This study showed that FFR can be estimated using arterial volume and a scaling coefficient corrected for aortic pressure. However, variations in venous pressure were found to introduce some error in FFR estimation. A relative form of FFR was introduced and was found to cancel out the influence of pressure on coronary flow, arterial volume and FFR estimation. The use of coronary flow and arterial volume for FFR determination appears promising.

  15. Bow Shocks from Neutron Stars Scaling Laws and HST Observations of the Guitar Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, S

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of high-velocity neutron stars with the interstellar medium produces bow shock nebulae, where the relativistic neutron star wind is confined by ram pressure. We present multi-wavelength observations of the Guitar Nebula, including narrow-band H-alpha imaging with HST/WFPC2, which resolves the head of the bow shock. The HST observations are used to fit for the inclination of the pulsar velocity vector to the line of sight, and to determine the combination of spindown energy loss, velocity, and ambient density that sets the scale of the bow shock. We find that the velocity vector is most likely in the plane of the sky. We use the Guitar Nebula and other observed neutron star bow shocks to test scaling laws for their size and H-alpha emission, discuss their prevalence, and present criteria for their detectability in targeted searches. The set of H-alpha bow shocks shows remarkable consistency, in spite of the expected variation in ambient densities and orientations. Together, they support the ass...

  16. Earthquake Hazard and Risk Assessment Based on Unified Scaling Law for Earthquakes: State of Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez, Imtiyaz A.; Nekrasova, Anastasia; Kossobokov, Vladimir

    2017-03-01

    The Gujarat state of India is one of the most seismically active intercontinental regions of the world. Historically, it has experienced many damaging earthquakes including the devastating 1819 Rann of Kachchh and 2001 Bhuj earthquakes. The effect of the later one is grossly underestimated by the Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Program (GSHAP). To assess a more adequate earthquake hazard for the state of Gujarat, we apply Unified Scaling Law for Earthquakes (USLE), which generalizes the Gutenberg-Richter recurrence relation taking into account naturally fractal distribution of earthquake loci. USLE has evident implications since any estimate of seismic hazard depends on the size of the territory considered and, therefore, may differ dramatically from the actual one when scaled down to the proportion of the area of interest (e.g. of a city) from the enveloping area of investigation. We cross-compare the seismic hazard maps compiled for the same standard regular grid 0.2° × 0.2° (1) in terms of design ground acceleration based on the neo-deterministic approach, (2) in terms of probabilistic exceedance of peak ground acceleration by GSHAP, and (3) the one resulted from the USLE application. Finally, we present the maps of seismic risks for the state of Gujarat integrating the obtained seismic hazard, population density based on India's Census 2011 data, and a few model assumptions of vulnerability.

  17. Additive scaling law for structural organization of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iashina, E. G.; Velichko, E. V.; Filatov, M. V.; Bouwman, W. G.; Duif, C. P.; Brulet, A.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2017-07-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) on nuclei of chicken erythrocytes demonstrates the cubic dependence of the scattering intensity Q-3 in the range of momentum transfer Q ∈10-3-10-2nm-1 . Independent spin-echo SANS measurements give the spin-echo function, which is well described by the exponential law in a range of sizes (3 ×102) -(3 ×104) nm. Both experimental dependences reflect the nature of the structural organization of chromatin in the nucleus of a living cell, which corresponds to the correlation function γ (r )=ln(ξ /r ) for r <ξ , where ξ =(3.69 ±0.07 ) ×103 nm, the size of the nucleus. It has the specific scaling property of the logarithmic fractal γ (r /a )=γ (r )+ln(a ), i.e., the scaling down by a gives an additive constant to the correlation function, which distinguishes it from the mass fractal, which is characterized by multiplicative constant.

  18. Flux-canceling electrodynamics maglev suspension. Part 2: Test results and scaling laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, M.T.; Thornton, R.D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Electrodynamic suspension (EDS) are highly undamped and require some form of active control or a secondary suspension to achieve adequate ride quality. This paper reports on efforts to develop a version of EDS that uses controllable magnetic forces to eliminate the need for any secondary suspension. The magnetic forces act directly on the guideway and avoid the need to have unsprung weight and a secondary suspension. It is shown that the energy required to effect this control can be less than 1% of the energy stored in the suspension magnets, so a modest size controller can be used. The same controller can also provide life at very low speeds and thereby eliminate the need for a separate low-speed suspension system. A set of scaling laws is described which is used to size a full-scale high-temperature superconductor (HTSC)-based suspension magnet. The test fixture was also used to verify the use of zero velocity lift, where ac excitation is used in the suspension coils to achieve lift at low train velocity.

  19. A universal scaling law of black hole activity including gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Z. G.

    2017-09-01

    Previous works showed a correlation among radio luminosity, X-ray luminosity and black hole (BH) mass from stellar-mass BHs in X-ray binaries to supermassive BHs in active galactic nuclei, which leads to the so-called Fundamental Plane of BH activity. However, there are two competing explanations for this Fundamental Plane, including the jet-dominated model and the disc-jet model. Thus, the physical origin of this Fundamental Plane remains unknown. In this paper, we show that the X-ray luminosities, radio luminosities and BH masses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and M82 X-1 also show a similar distribution. The universal scaling law among stellar-mass, intermediate and supermassive BH systems, together with the fact that the radio and X-ray emission of GRBs originates from relativistic jets, reveals that the Fundamental Plane of BH activity is controlled by a jet, i.e. the radio and X-ray emission is mainly from the jet. Our work also suggests that the jets are scale-invariant with respect to the BH mass.

  20. Scaling Laws in the Transient Dynamics of Firefly-like Oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubido, N; Cabeza, C; Marti, A [Igua 4225, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Montevideo (Uruguay); Ramirez Avila, G M, E-mail: nrubido@fisica.edu.uy [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany)

    2011-03-01

    Fireflies constitute a paradigm of pulse-coupled oscillators. In order to tackle the problems related to synchronisation transients of pulse-coupled oscillators, a Light-Controlled Oscillator (LCO) model is presented. A single LCO constitutes a one-dimensional relaxation oscillator described by two distinct time-scales meant to mimic fireflies in the sense that: it is capable of emitting light in a pulse-like fashion and detect the emitted by others in order to adjust its oscillation. We present dynamical results for two interacting LCOs in the torus for all possible coupling configurations. Transient times to the synchronous limit cycle are obtained experimentally and numerically as a function of initial conditions and coupling strengths. Scaling laws are found based on dimensional analysis and critical exponents calculated, thus, global dynamic is restricted. Furthermore, an analytical orthogonal transformation that allows to calculate Floquet multipliers directly from the time series is presented. As a consequence, local dynamics is also fully characterized. This transformation can be easily extended to a system with an arbitrary number of interacting LCOs.

  1. Scaling Laws for Impacts into Wet Substrates: Applied to the Bomb Sag at Home Plate, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, S. P.; Manga, M.; Delbridge, B. G.; Patel, A.; Knappe, E.; Dufek, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit imaged a volcanic bomb sag in Gusev crater at Home Plate (Squyres et al., Science 2007). In order to gain a more complete understanding of these types of craters, we perform laboratory experiments to identify controls on the main features of bomb sags. In our previous work (Manga et al., GRL 2012), we were able to identify clear qualitative differences in the crater morphology, which allowed us to determine that the substrate at Home Plate was fully saturated. The current study focuses on further understanding the relationship between the depth of particle penetration, crater radius, impact velocity, impactor radius and substrate grain size for impacts into a fully saturated substrate. The results of these measurements provide a physical understanding to the previous empirical scaling relationships in crater morphology at intermediate impact velocities between 10 m/s and 100 m/s. By gaining insight into the mechanisms of how a saturated granular medium deforms under the load of an impacting sphere we are able to obtain revised scaling laws for the penetration depth of bomb sags with respect to impact velocity for observable bomb sags. With an inferred impact velocity for the case of the Home Plate bomb sag, we can provide a more accurate estimate of a paleo-Mars atmospheric density.

  2. Hybrid Simulations and Scaling Laws for Shock Formation in the UCLA Collisionless Shock Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David; Winske, Dan; Cowee, Misa; Clark, S. Eric; Niemann, Christoph; Brecht, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Two- and three-dimensional simulations are used to compare and contrast the plasma expansion, formation of a magnetic cavity, and generation of an outgoing shock wave for conditions relevant to the laser experiment at UCLA, as a function of the background ion mass. A model of the shock formation process is constructed that yields an expression for the speed of the shock, which we show is in good agreement with the simulations. In addition, the criteria for generating strongly-coupled shocks are derived and simulations are used to examine the velocity scaling obtained via momentum conservation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by DTRA10027-6759.

  3. Atom-Scale Reaction Pathways and Free-Energy Landscapes in Oxygen Plasma Etching of Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Kenichi; Boero, Mauro; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2013-05-16

    We report first-principles molecular dynamics calculations combined with rare events sampling techniques that clarify atom-scale mechanisms of oxygen plasma etching of graphene. The obtained reaction pathways and associated free-energy landscapes show that the etching proceeds near vacancies via a two-step mechanism, formation of precursor lactone structures and the subsequent exclusive CO2 desorption. We find that atomic oxygen among the plasma components is most efficient for etching, providing a guidline in tuning the plasma conditions.

  4. Mechanism and scaling for convection of isolated structures in nonuniformly magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.; Naulin, V.

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale radial advection of isolated structures in nonuniformly magnetized plasmas is investigated. The underlying mechanism considered is due to the nonlinear evolution of interchange motions, without any presumption of plasma sheaths. Theoretical arguments supported by numerical simulations...... of the structures, compares favorably with recent experimental measurements of radially propagating blob structures in the scrape-off layer of magnetically confined plasmas. (C) 2005 American Institute of Physics....

  5. Sheath overlap during very large scale plasma source ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluggish, B. P.; Munson, C. P.

    1998-12-01

    Measurements of plasma source ion implantation have been performed on a large target of complex geometry. The target consists of 1000 aluminum, automotive piston surrogates mounted on four racks; total surface area is over 16 m2. The four racks are positioned parallel to each other, 0.25 m apart, in an 8 m3 vacuum chamber. The racks of pistons are immersed in a capacitive radio frequency plasma, with an argon gas pressure of 20-65 mPa. Langmuir probe measurements indicate that the plasma density profile is highly nonuniform, due to particle losses to the racks of pistons. The plasma ions are implanted into the pistons by pulse biasing the workpiece to negative voltages as low as -18 kV for up to 20 μs. During the voltage pulse, the high-voltage sheaths from adjacent racks of pistons converge towards each other. At plasma densities less than 109 cm-3 the sheaths are observed to overlap. Measurements of the sheath overlap time are compared with standard analytic theory and with simulations run with a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code.

  6. The scaling law of climate change and its relevance to assessing (palaeo)biological responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, Wolfgang; Eichenseer, Kilian

    2014-05-01

    It is often argued that current rates of climate change are unprecedented in the geological past. At the same time, the magnitudes of change were often much greater in deep time than they are in history. The most severe global warming in the Phanerozoic, with dramatic consequences for life, probably occurred across the Permian-Triassic (P-T) boundary when an increase of tropical water temperatures of 15° C has been observed to occur over a timespan 0.8 myr (Sun et al. 2012), whereas global ocean warming over the last 50 years was 0.35° C (Burrows et al. 2011). When transforming these data into rates of change the P-T rate was roughly 370 times smaller than the current rate. We argue that the smaller rates of change inferred from geological proxy records are due to a scaling effect, that is, rates of climate change generally decrease with timespan of observation. We compiled from the published literature data on measured or inferred temperature changes and the timespans over which these changes were assessed. Our compilation currently comprises 120 values and covers timespans from 20 to 107 years. A log-log plot of timespan versus rate of temperature change depicts a highly significant correlation (r2 = 0.95) of a power-law relationship with an exponent of -0.87. Warming trends show a slightly lower exponent (-0.84) than cooling trends (-0.89) but the explained variance is better for the scaling of warming trends. Importantly, the scaled warming trend across the P-T boundary is higher than the current rates of warming. Similar scaling effects are well explored for sediment accumulation rates (Sadler 1981) and evolutionary rates (Gingerich 1993). These have been interpreted as being due to breaks in sedimentation and periods of stasis or transient reversals, respectively. In case of climate change, transient reversals in general trends are the most likely explanation for the scaling relationship. Even relatively rapid intervals of warming, such as the Pleistocene

  7. SCALING LAWS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS IN LATE-TYPE AND DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kormendy, John [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Mail Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Freeman, K. C., E-mail: kormendy@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: kenneth.freeman@anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2016-02-01

    Dark matter (DM) halos of Sc–Im and dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies satisfy scaling laws: halos in lower-luminosity galaxies have smaller core radii, higher central densities, and smaller velocity dispersions. These results are based on maximum-disk rotation curve decompositions for giant galaxies and Jeans equation analysis for dwarfs. (1) We show that spiral, Im, and Sph galaxies with absolute magnitudes M{sub V} > −18 form a sequence of decreasing baryon-to-DM surface density with decreasing luminosity. We suggest that this is a sequence of decreasing baryon retention versus supernova-driven losses or decreasing baryon capture after cosmological reionization. (2) The structural differences between S+Im and Sph galaxies are small. Both are affected mostly by the physics that controls baryon depletion. (3) There is a linear correlation between the maximum rotation velocities of baryonic disks and the outer circular velocities V{sub circ} of test particles in their DM halos. Baryons become unimportant at V{sub circ} = 42 ± 4 km s{sup −1}. Smaller galaxies are dim or dark. (4) We find that, absent baryon “depletion” and with all baryons converted into stars, dSph galaxies would be brighter by ∼4.6 mag and dIm galaxies would be brighter by ∼3.5 mag. Both have DM halos that are massive enough to help to solve the “too big to fail” problem with DM galaxy formation. (5) We suggest that there exist many galaxies that are too dark to be discovered by current techniques, as required by cold DM theory. (6) Central surface densities of DM halos are constant from M{sub B} ∼ −5 to −22. This implies a Faber–Jackson law with halo mass M ∝ (halo dispersion){sup 4}.

  8. The HyperV Full-Scale Contoured-Gap Coaxial Plasma Railgun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockington, Samuel; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Elton, Raymond; Wu, Linchun; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2009-11-01

    HyperV has been developing pulsed plasma injected coaxial railguns with a contoured gap profile designed to mitigate the blowby instability. Previous work using half-scale guns has been successful in launching 150 μg plasmas at 90 km/s [1]. In order to meet the original goal of 200 μg at 200 km/s the full-scale coaxial plasma gun has been constructed, and initial testing is beginning. This new plasma gun consists of two machined aluminum electrodes and a UHMW polyethylene breech insulator. The gun is breech fed by 64 ablative polyethylene capillary discharge units identical to the half-scale gun units. Maximum accelerator energy storage has also been increased 50%. Refractory coatings may be necessary to allow full current (˜800 kA) operation. The outer electrode includes 24 small diagnostic ports for optical and magnetic probe access to the plasma inside the gun to allow direct measurement of the plasma armature dynamics. Initial test data from the full-scale coax gun will be presented along with plans for future testing. Work supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences.[4pt] [1] F. D. Witherspoon, A. Case, S. Messer, R. Bomgardner, M. Phillips, S. Brockington, R. Elton, ``Contoured Gap Coaxial Plasma Gun with Injected Plasma Armature'' Rev. Sci. Instr. submitted (2009)

  9. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    CERN Document Server

    Auluck, S K H

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research is consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and wind pressure resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional drive parameter, is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance.

  10. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-09-01

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and "wind pressure" resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional "drive parameter," is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance.

  11. Plasma Boundaries and Kinetic-Scale Electric Field Structures in the Inner Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David; Larsen, Brian; Ergun, R. E.; Skoug, Ruth; Wygant, John; Reeves, Geoffrey; Jaynes, Allison

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in spacecraft instrumentation have enabled fresh examination of coupling between macro-scale and micro-scale physics in the terrestrial magnetosphere, demonstrating not only that cross-scale interactions are a key component of magnetospheric dynamics, but also that plasma boundaries play a crucial role in mediating cross-scale coupling. We use Van Allen Probe observations to study the cross-scale interaction between inner magnetospheric plasma boundaries (including the plasmapause and injection fronts) and kinetic-scale electric field structures including kinetic Alfven waves, double layers, phase space holes, and nonlinear whistler mode waves. We focus on the spatial distribution of these kinetic structures in the inner magnetosphere and their interaction with plasma boundaries. We demonstrate that both the occurrence probability and amplitude of these structures peak at plasma boundaries. Further, it is found that regions of kinetic-scale electric field structure activity travel with plasma boundaries. These observations imply that kinetic-scale electric field structures are continually generated by instabilities localized to these boundaries, constraining their ability to energize radiation belt particles over large spatial regions.

  12. The Nonlinear Ohm's Law: Plasma Heating by Strong Electric Fields and its Effects on the Ionization Balance in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The MHD of protoplanetary disks crucially depends on the ionization state of the disks. Recent simulations suggest that MHD turbulence in the disks can generate a strong electric field in the local rest frame. Such a strong field can heat up plasmas and thereby change the ionization balance. To study this effect, we construct a charge reaction model that includes plasma heating by electric fields and impact ionization by heated electrons, as well as plasma accretion by dust grains. The resulting Ohm's law is nonlinear in the electric field strength. We find that the gas-phase electron abundance decreases with increasing the electric field strength when plasma accretion onto grains dominates over gas-phase recombination, because electron heating accelerates electron--grain collisions. This leads to an increase in the magnetic resistivity, and possibly to a self-regulation of the MHD turbulence. In some cases, even the electric current decreases with increasing the field strength in a certain field range. The N...

  13. Validation of a Scaling Law for the Coronal Magnetic Field Strengths and Loop Lengths of Solar and Stellar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Namekata, Kosuke; Watanabe, Kyoko; Asai, Ayumi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Shibata & Yokoyama (1999, 2002) proposed a method of estimating the coronal magnetic field strengths ($B$) and magnetic loop lengths ($L$) of solar and stellar flares, on the basis of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetic reconnection model. Using the scaling law provided by Shibata & Yokoyama (1999, 2002), $B$ and $L$ are obtained as functions of the emission measure ($EM=n^2L^3$) and temperature ($T$) at the flare peak. Here, $n$ is the coronal electron density of the flares. This scaling law enables the estimation of $B$ and $L$ for unresolved stellar flares from the observable physical quantities $EM$ and $T$, which is helpful for studying stellar surface activities. To apply this scaling law to stellar flares, we discuss its validity for spatially resolved solar flares. $EM$ and $T$ were calculated from GOES soft X-ray flux data, and $B$ and $L$ are theoretically estimated using the scaling law. For the same flare events, $B$ and $L$ were also observationally estimated with images taken...

  14. The Scaling Relations and Star Formation Laws of Mini-starburst Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Luong, Quang; Nguyen, Hans V. V.; Motte, Fredérique; Schneider, Nicola; Fujii, Michiko; Louvet, Fabien; Hill, Tracey; Sanhueza, Patricio; Chibueze, James O.; Didelon, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The scaling relations and star formation laws for molecular cloud complexes (MCCs) in the Milky Way are investigated. MCCs are mostly large (R > 50 pc), massive (˜106 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ ) gravitationally unbound cloud structures. We compare their masses {M}{gas}, mass surface densities {{{Σ }}}{M{gas}}, radii R, velocity dispersions σ, star formation rates (SFRs), and SFR densities {{{Σ }}}{SFR} with those of structures ranging from cores, clumps, and giant molecular clouds, to MCCs, and galaxies, spanning eight orders of magnitudes in size and 13 orders of magnitudes in mass. This results in the following universal relations:σ ˜ {R}0.5,{M}{gas}˜ {R}2,{{{Σ }}}{SFR}˜ {{{Σ }}}{M{gas}}1.5, {SFR}˜ {{M}{gas}}0.9, {and} {SFR}˜ {σ }2.7. Variations in the slopes and coefficients of these relations are found at individual scales, signifying different physics acting at different scales. Additionally, there are breaks at the MCC scale in the σ {--}R relation and between starburst and normal star-forming objects in the {SFR}{--}{M}{gas} and {{{Σ }}}{SFR}-{{{Σ }}}{{{M}}{gas}} relations. Therefore, we propose to use the Schmidt-Kennicutt diagram to distinguish starburst from normal star-forming structures by applying a {{{Σ }}}{M{gas}} threshold of ˜100 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ pc-2 and a {{{Σ }}}{SFR} threshold of 1 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. Mini-starburst complexes are gravitationally unbound MCCs that have enhanced {{{Σ }}}{SFR} (>1 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ yr-1 kpc-2), probably caused by dynamic events such as radiation pressure, colliding flows, or spiral arm gravitational instability. Because of dynamical evolution, gravitational boundedness does not play a significant role in regulating the star formation activity of MCCs, especially the mini-starburst complexes, which leads to the dynamical formation of massive stars and clusters. We emphasize the importance of understanding mini-starbursts in investigating the physics of starburst galaxies.

  15. Elasticity and yielding of a calcite paste: scaling laws in a dense colloidal suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberto, Teresa; Le Merrer, Marie; Barentin, Catherine; Bellotto, Maurizio; Colombani, Jean

    2017-03-08

    We address the mechanical characterization of a calcite paste as a model system to investigate the relation between the microstructure and macroscopic behavior of colloidal suspensions. The ultimate goal is to achieve control of the elastic and yielding properties of calcite which will prove valuable in several domains, from paper coating to paint manufacture and eventually in the comprehension and control of the mechanical properties of carbonate rocks. Rheological measurements have been performed on calcite suspensions over a wide range of particle concentrations. The calcite paste exhibits a typical colloidal gel behavior, with an elastic regime and a clear yield strain above which it enters a plastic regime. The yield strain shows a minimum when increasing the solid concentration, connected to a change in the power law scaling of the storage modulus. In the framework of the classical fractal elasticity model for colloidal suspensions proposed by Shih et al. [Phys. Rev. A, 1990, 42, 4772], we interpret this behavior as a switch with the concentration from the strong-link regime to the weak-link regime, which had never been observed so far in one well-defined system without external or chemical forcing.

  16. Scaling laws and flow structures of double diffusive convection in the finger regime

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yantao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations are conducted for double diffusive convection (DDC) bounded by two parallel plates, with fluid properties similar to the values of seawater. The DDC flow is driven by an unstable salinity difference and stabilized at the same time by a temperature difference. For these conditions the flow can be in the finger regime. We develop scaling laws for three key response parameters of the system: The non-dimensional salinity flux $Nu_S$ mainly depends on the salinity Rayleigh number $Ra_S$, which measures the strength of the salinity difference, and exhibits a very weak dependence on the density ratio $\\Lambda$, which is the ratio of the buoyancy forces induced by two scalar differences. The non-dimensional flow velocity $Re$ and the non-dimensional heat flux $Nu_T$ are dependent on both $Ra_S$ and $\\Lambda$. However, the rescaled Reynolds number $Re\\Lambda^{\\alpha^{\\rm eff}_u}$ and the rescaled convective heat flux $(Nu_T-1)\\Lambda^{\\alpha^{\\rm eff}_T}$ depend only on $Ra_S$. The two exp...

  17. On the role of thermal boundary conditions in dynamo scaling laws

    CERN Document Server

    Oruba, Ludivine

    2016-01-01

    In dynamo power-based scaling laws, the power $P$ injected by buoyancy forces is measured by a so-called flux-based Rayleigh number, denoted as ${\\rm Ra}_Q^*$ (see Christensen and Aubert, 2006). Whereas it is widely accepted that this parameter is measured (as opposite to controlled) in dynamos driven by differential heating, the literature is much less clear concerning its nature in the case of imposed heat flux. We clarify this issue by highlighting that in that case, the ${\\rm Ra}_{Q}^*$ parameter becomes controlled only in the limit of large Nusselt numbers (${\\rm Nu} \\gg 1$). We then address the issue of the robustness of the original relation between $P$ and ${\\rm Ra}_Q^*$ with the geometry and the thermal boundary conditions. We show that in the cartesian geometry, as in the spherical geometry with a central mass distribution, this relation is purely linear, in both differential and fixed-flux heating. However, we show that in the geometry commonly studied by geophysicists (spherical with uniform mass ...

  18. Preionization Techniques in a kJ-Scale Dense Plasma Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povilus, Alexander; Shaw, Brian; Chapman, Steve; Podpaly, Yuri; Cooper, Christopher; Falabella, Steve; Prasad, Rahul; Schmidt, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) is a type of z-pinch device that uses a high current, coaxial plasma gun with an implosion phase to generate dense plasmas. These devices can accelerate a beam of ions to MeV-scale energies through strong electric fields generated by instabilities during the implosion of the plasma sheath. The formation of these instabilities, however, relies strongly on the history of the plasma sheath in the device, including the evolution of the gas breakdown in the device. In an effort to reduce variability in the performance of the device, we attempt to control the initial gas breakdown in the device by seeding the system with free charges before the main power pulse arrives. We report on the effectiveness of two techniques developed for a kJ-scale DPF at LLNL, a miniature primer spark gap and pulsed, 255nm LED illumination. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Evaluation of Large-scale Data to Detect Irregularity in Payment for Medical Services. An Extended Use of Benford's Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junghyun A; Kim, Minki; Yoon, Seokjoon

    2016-05-17

    Sophisticated anti-fraud systems for the healthcare sector have been built based on several statistical methods. Although existing methods have been developed to detect fraud in the healthcare sector, these algorithms consume considerable time and cost, and lack a theoretical basis to handle large-scale data. Based on mathematical theory, this study proposes a new approach to using Benford's Law in that we closely examined the individual-level data to identify specific fees for in-depth analysis. We extended the mathematical theory to demonstrate the manner in which large-scale data conform to Benford's Law. Then, we empirically tested its applicability using actual large-scale healthcare data from Korea's Health Insurance Review and Assessment (HIRA) National Patient Sample (NPS). For Benford's Law, we considered the mean absolute deviation (MAD) formula to test the large-scale data. We conducted our study on 32 diseases, comprising 25 representative diseases and 7 DRG-regulated diseases. We performed an empirical test on 25 diseases, showing the applicability of Benford's Law to large-scale data in the healthcare industry. For the seven DRG-regulated diseases, we examined the individual-level data to identify specific fees to carry out an in-depth analysis. Among the eight categories of medical costs, we considered the strength of certain irregularities based on the details of each DRG-regulated disease. Using the degree of abnormality, we propose priority action to be taken by government health departments and private insurance institutions to bring unnecessary medical expenses under control. However, when we detect deviations from Benford's Law, relatively high contamination ratios are required at conventional significance levels.

  20. Validation of a scaling law for the coronal magnetic field strength and loop length of solar and stellar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namekata, Kosuke; Sakaue, Takahito; Watanabe, Kyoko; Asai, Ayumi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-02-01

    Shibata and Yokoyama (1999, ApJ, 526, L49; 2002, ApJ, 577, 422) proposed a method of estimating the coronal magnetic field strength (B) and magnetic loop length (L) of solar and stellar flares, on the basis of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetic reconnection model. Using the scaling law provided by Shibata and Yokoyama (1999, ApJ, 526, L49; 2002, ApJ, 577, 422), we obtain B and L as functions of the emission measure (EM = n2L3) and temperature (T) at the flare peak. Here, n is the coronal electron density of the flares. This scaling law enables the estimation of B and L for unresolved stellar flares from the observable physical quantities EM and T, which is helpful for studying stellar surface activities. To apply this scaling law to stellar flares, we discuss its validity for spatially resolved solar flares. Quantities EM and T are calculated from GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) soft X-ray flux data, and B and L are theoretically estimated using the scaling law. For the same flare events, B and L were also observationally estimated with images taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Magnetogram and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 94 Å pass band. As expected, a positive correlation was found between the theoretically and observationally estimated values. We interpret this result as indirect evidence that flares are caused by magnetic reconnection. Moreover, this analysis makes us confident about the validity of applying this scaling law to stellar flares as well as solar flares.

  1. Candidate states of Helicobacter pylori's genome-scale metabolic network upon application of "loop law" thermodynamic constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Nathan D; Thiele, Ines; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2006-06-01

    Constraint-based modeling has proven to be a useful tool in the analysis of biochemical networks. To date, most studies in this field have focused on the use of linear constraints, resulting from mass balance and capacity constraints, which lead to the definition of convex solution spaces. One additional constraint arising out of thermodynamics is known as the "loop law" for reaction fluxes, which states that the net flux around a closed biochemical loop must be zero because no net thermodynamic driving force exists. The imposition of the loop-law can lead to nonconvex solution spaces making the analysis of the consequences of its imposition challenging. A four-step approach is developed here to apply the loop-law to study metabolic network properties: 1), determine linear equality constraints that are necessary (but not necessarily sufficient) for thermodynamic feasibility; 2), tighten V(max) and V(min) constraints to enclose the remaining nonconvex space; 3), uniformly sample the convex space that encloses the nonconvex space using standard Monte Carlo techniques; and 4), eliminate from the resulting set all solutions that violate the loop-law, leaving a subset of steady-state solutions. This subset of solutions represents a uniform random sample of the space that is defined by the additional imposition of the loop-law. This approach is used to evaluate the effect of imposing the loop-law on predicted candidate states of the genome-scale metabolic network of Helicobacter pylori.

  2. A micro-scale plasma spectrometer for space and plasma edge applications (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scime, E. E., E-mail: escime@wvu.edu; Keesee, A. M.; Elliott, D. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Dugas, M.; Ellison, S.; Tersteeg, J.; Wagner, G. [Advanced Research Corporation, White Bear Lake, Minnesota 55110 (United States); Barrie, A.; Rager, A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A plasma spectrometer design based on advances in lithography and microchip stacking technologies is described. A series of curved plate energy analyzers, with an integrated collimator, is etched into a silicon wafer. Tests of spectrometer elements, the energy analyzer and collimator, were performed with a 5 keV electron beam. The measured collimator transmission and energy selectivity were in good agreement with design targets. A single wafer element could be used as a plasma processing or fusion first wall diagnostic.

  3. A micro-scale plasma spectrometer for space and plasma edge applications (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scime, E. E.; Keesee, A. M.; Dugas, M.; Ellison, S.; Tersteeg, J.; Wagner, G.; Barrie, A.; Rager, A.; Elliott, D.

    2016-11-01

    A plasma spectrometer design based on advances in lithography and microchip stacking technologies is described. A series of curved plate energy analyzers, with an integrated collimator, is etched into a silicon wafer. Tests of spectrometer elements, the energy analyzer and collimator, were performed with a 5 keV electron beam. The measured collimator transmission and energy selectivity were in good agreement with design targets. A single wafer element could be used as a plasma processing or fusion first wall diagnostic.

  4. Methods of Generation and Detailed Characterization of Millimeter-Scale Plasmas Using a Gasbag Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志超; 尹强; 朱芳华; 郭亮; 袁鹏; 刘慎业; 丁永坤; 郑坚; 蒋小华; 王哲斌; 杨冬; 章欢; 李三伟; 王峰; 彭晓世

    2011-01-01

    Gasbag targets are useful for the research of laser-plasma interactions in inertial confinement fusion,especial in the laser overlapping regime.We report that on the Shengguang-Ⅱ laser facility,millimeter-scale plasm are successfully generated by four 0.35 μm laser beams using a gasbag target.Multiple diagnostics are applied to characterize the millimeter-scale plasmas in detail.The images from the x-ray pinhole cameras confirm that millimeter-scale plasmas are indeed created.An optical Thomson scattering system diagnoses the electron temperature of the CH filling plasmas by probing the thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations,which indicates that the electron temperature has a 600eV fiat roof in 0.7-1.3ns.Another key parameter,i.e.the electron density of the millimeter-scale plasmas,is inferred by the spectrum of the back stimulated Raman scattering of an addition 0.53 μm laser beam.The inferred electron density keeps stable at 0.1nc in early time consistent with the controlled filling pressure and splits into a higher density in late time,which is attributed to the blast wave entering in the SRS interaction region.%Gasbag targets are useful for the research of laser-plasma interactions in inertial confinement fusion, especially in the laser overlapping regime. We report that on the Shengguang-S laser facility, millimeter-scale plasmas are successfully generated by four 0.35 \\im laser beams using a gasbag target. Multiple diagnostics are applied to characterize the millimeter-scale plasmas in detail. The images from the x-ray pinhole cameras confirm that millimeter-scale plasmas are indeed created. An optical Thomson scattering system diagnoses the electron temperature of the CH filling plasmas by probing the thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations, which indicates that the electron temperature has a 600eV flat roof in 0.7-1.3ns. Another key parameter, I.e. The electron density of the millimeter-scale plasmas, is inferred by the spectrum of the back stimulated Raman

  5. Seismic hazard and risks based on the Unified Scaling Law for Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossobokov, Vladimir; Nekrasova, Anastasia

    2014-05-01

    Losses from natural disasters continue to increase mainly due to poor understanding by majority of scientific community, decision makers and public, the three components of Risk, i.e., Hazard, Exposure, and Vulnerability. Contemporary Science is responsible for not coping with challenging changes of Exposures and their Vulnerability inflicted by growing population, its concentration, etc., which result in a steady increase of Losses from Natural Hazards. Scientists owe to Society for lack of knowledge, education, and communication. In fact, Contemporary Science can do a better job in disclosing Natural Hazards, assessing Risks, and delivering such knowledge in advance catastrophic events. Any kind of risk estimates R(g) at location g results from a convolution of the natural hazard H(g) with the exposed object under consideration O(g) along with its vulnerability V(O(g)). Note that g could be a point, or a line, or a cell on or under the Earth surface and that distribution of hazards, as well as objects of concern and their vulnerability, could be time-dependent. There exist many different risk estimates even if the same object of risk and the same hazard are involved. It may result from the different laws of convolution, as well as from different kinds of vulnerability of an object of risk under specific environments and conditions. Both conceptual issues must be resolved in a multidisciplinary problem oriented research performed by specialists in the fields of hazard, objects of risk, and object vulnerability, i.e. specialists in earthquake engineering, social sciences and economics. To illustrate this general concept, we first construct seismic hazard assessment maps based on the Unified Scaling Law for Earthquakes (USLE). The parameters A, B, and C of USLE, i.e. log N(M,L) = A - B•(M-6) + C•log L, where N(M,L) is the expected annual number of earthquakes of a certain magnitude M within an area of linear size L, are used to estimate the expected maximum

  6. Scaling-law for the energy dependence of anatomic power spectrum in dedicated breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Glick, Stephen J.; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the x-ray photon energy dependence of the anatomic power spectrum of the breast when imaged with dedicated breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: A theoretical framework for scaling the empirically determined anatomic power spectrum at one x-ray photon energy to that at any given x-ray photon energy when imaged with dedicated breast CT was developed. Theory predicted that when the anatomic power spectrum is fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, where k and {beta} are fit coefficients and f is spatial frequency, the exponent {beta} would be independent of x-ray photon energy (E), and the amplitude k scales with the square of the difference in energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues. Twenty mastectomy specimens based numerical phantoms that were previously imaged with a benchtop flat-panel cone-beam CT system were converted to 3D distribution of glandular weight fraction (f{sub g}) and were used to verify the theoretical findings. The 3D power spectrum was computed in terms of f{sub g} and after converting to linear attenuation coefficients at monoenergetic x-ray photon energies of 20-80 keV in 5 keV intervals. The 1D power spectra along the axes were extracted and fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}. The energy dependence of k and {beta} were analyzed. Results: For the 20 mastectomy specimen based numerical phantoms used in the study, the exponent {beta} was found to be in the range of 2.34-2.42, depending on the axis of measurement. Numerical simulations agreed with the theoretical predictions that for a power-law anatomic spectrum of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, {beta} was independent of E and k(E) =k{sub 1}[{mu}{sub g}(E) -{mu}{sub a}(E)]{sup 2}, where k{sub 1} is a constant, and {mu}{sub g}(E) and {mu}{sub a}(E) represent the energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues, respectively. Conclusions: Numerical

  7. Reconnection and electron temperature anisotropy in sub-proton scale plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haynes, C.T.; Burgess, D.; Camporeale, E.

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent behavior at sub-proton scales in magnetized plasmas is important for a full understanding of the energetics of astrophysical flows such as the solar wind. We study the formation of electron temperature anisotropy due to reconnection in the turbulent decay of sub-proton scale fluctuations u

  8. Questioning the Status Quo: Can Stakeholder Participation Improve Implementation of Small-Scale Mining Laws in Ghana?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Osei-Kojo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ghana’s small-scale mining sector faces complex challenges, including environmental degradation and pollution, loss of life and increased health risks, despite several years of implementation of small-scale mining laws. These challenges, generally, are known to have escalated because of illegal small-scale mining, locally known as “galamsey”. Despite the illegal status of this category of miners, this paper examines the extent to which stakeholder participation can improve implementation of mining regulations and also address the marginalization of these miners. This paper about stakeholder participation is timely because news reports in mid-2016 mentioned that the Government of Ghana, despite many years of disengagement, is now planning to engage with galamsey operators, in terms of registration, as part of measures to effectively regulate the activities of small-scale miners. Findings from fieldwork indicate that (1 chiefs are seldom consulted in the granting of mining licenses; (2 illegal miners do not participate in the implementation of small-scale mining laws; and (3 stakeholders, such as officers in district mining offices, feel distant from the implementation process. Against the backdrop of these findings, it remains useful to explore the extent to which effective stakeholder participation could help overcome the status quo—particularly its ramifications for both the implementation of ASM laws and the eradication of other underlying challenges the sector faces.

  9. The Cooling Law and the Search for a Good Temperature Scale, from Newton to Dalton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo

    2011-01-01

    The research on the cooling law began with an article by Newton published in 1701. Later, many studies were performed by other scientists confirming or confuting Newton's law. This paper presents a description and an interpretation of Newton's article, provides a short overview of the research conducted on the topic during the 18th century, and…

  10. Systematic study of intermediate-scale structures of equatorial plasma irregularities in the ionosphere based on CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann eLühr

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Equatorial spread-F ionospheric plasma irregularities on the night-side, commonly called equatorial plasma bubbles (EPB, include electron density variations over a wide range of spatial scales. Here we focus on intermediate-scale structures ranging from 100 m to 10 km, which play an important role in the evolution of EPBs. High-resolution CHAMP magnetic field measurements sampled along north-south track at 50 Hz are interpreted in terms of diamagnetic effect for illustrating the details of electron density variations. We provide the first comprehensive study on intermediate-scale density structures associated with EPBs, covering a whole solar cycle from 2000 to 2010. The large number of detected events, almost 9000, allows us to draw a detailed picture of the plasma fine structure. The occurrence of intermediate-scale events is strongly favoured by high solar flux. During times of F10.7 < 100 sfu practically no events were observed. The longitudinal distribution of our events with respect to season or local time agrees well with that of the EPBs, qualifying the fine structure as a common feature, but the occurrence rates are smaller by a factor of 4 during the period 2000-2005. Largest amplitude electron density variations appear at the poleward boundaries of plasma bubbles. Above the dip-equator recorded amplitudes are small and fall commonly below our resolution. Events can generally be found at local times between 19 and 24 LT, with a peak lasting from 20 to 22 LT. The signal spectrum can be approximated by a power law. Over the frequency range 1 – 25 Hz we observe spectral indices between -1.4 and -2.6 with peak occurrence rates around -1.9. There is a weak dependence observed of the spectral index on local time. Towards later hours the spectrum becomes shallower. Similarly for the latitude dependence, there is a preference of shallower spectra for latitudes poleward of the ionisation anomaly crest. Our data suggest that the generation of

  11. Microseconds-scale magnetic actuators system for plasma feedback stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, K.; Be'ery, I.; Seemann, O.

    2016-10-01

    Many magnetic confinement machines use active feedback stabilization with magnetic actuators. We present a novel magnetic actuators system with a response time much faster than previous ones, making it capable of coping with the fast plasma instabilities. The system achieved a response time of 3 μs with maximal current of 500 A in a coil with inductance of 5.2 μH. The system is based on commercial solid-state switches and FPGA state machine, making it easily scalable to higher currents or higher inductivity.

  12. ROLE OF LAW IN CONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF SMALL SCALE INDUSTRIES THROUGH NORMATIVE PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Sutrisno

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of law has become an absolute prerequisite that must exist in the dynamics of civil society. It is to achieve justice, certainty, and expediency, so the works of it will not be separated from such a noble mission. On the other side, the law is likely inseparable from the fields of meta-juridical, including economics. The expectations of the interference of law into economy, makes the existence of justice for the business players can be realized through the enacted product legislation. Regulations concerning investments and partnerships have the intent to build self-reliance and empowerment for small industry players so as to compete in the era of economic globalization. Laws employed as the instrument of social change to strengthen the capitalization of small industry and business empowerment through the training and development of small industries, as normatively mandated by law.

  13. Seismic hazard assessment based on the Unified Scaling Law for Earthquakes: the Greater Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasova, A.; Kossobokov, V. G.

    2015-12-01

    Losses from natural disasters continue to increase mainly due to poor understanding by majority of scientific community, decision makers and public, the three components of Risk, i.e., Hazard, Exposure, and Vulnerability. Contemporary Science is responsible for not coping with challenging changes of Exposures and their Vulnerability inflicted by growing population, its concentration, etc., which result in a steady increase of Losses from Natural Hazards. Scientists owe to Society for lack of knowledge, education, and communication. In fact, Contemporary Science can do a better job in disclosing Natural Hazards, assessing Risks, and delivering such knowledge in advance catastrophic events. We continue applying the general concept of seismic risk analysis in a number of seismic regions worldwide by constructing regional seismic hazard maps based on the Unified Scaling Law for Earthquakes (USLE), i.e. log N(M,L) = A - B•(M-6) + C•log L, where N(M,L) is the expected annual number of earthquakes of a certain magnitude M within an seismically prone area of linear dimension L. The parameters A, B, and C of USLE are used to estimate, first, the expected maximum magnitude in a time interval at a seismically prone cell of a uniform grid that cover the region of interest, and then the corresponding expected ground shaking parameters including macro-seismic intensity. After a rigorous testing against the available seismic evidences in the past (e.g., the historically reported macro-seismic intensity), such a seismic hazard map is used to generate maps of specific earthquake risks (e.g., those based on the density of exposed population). The methodology of seismic hazard and risks assessment based on USLE is illustrated by application to the seismic region of Greater Caucasus.

  14. Incorrect likelihood methods were used to infer scaling laws of marine predator search behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Edwards

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ecologists are collecting extensive data concerning movements of animals in marine ecosystems. Such data need to be analysed with valid statistical methods to yield meaningful conclusions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate methodological issues in two recent studies that reached similar conclusions concerning movements of marine animals (Nature 451:1098; Science 332:1551. The first study analysed vertical movement data to conclude that diverse marine predators (Atlantic cod, basking sharks, bigeye tuna, leatherback turtles and Magellanic penguins exhibited "Lévy-walk-like behaviour", close to a hypothesised optimal foraging strategy. By reproducing the original results for the bigeye tuna data, we show that the likelihood of tested models was calculated from residuals of regression fits (an incorrect method, rather than from the likelihood equations of the actual probability distributions being tested. This resulted in erroneous Akaike Information Criteria, and the testing of models that do not correspond to valid probability distributions. We demonstrate how this led to overwhelming support for a model that has no biological justification and that is statistically spurious because its probability density function goes negative. Re-analysis of the bigeye tuna data, using standard likelihood methods, overturns the original result and conclusion for that data set. The second study observed Lévy walk movement patterns by mussels. We demonstrate several issues concerning the likelihood calculations (including the aforementioned residuals issue. Re-analysis of the data rejects the original Lévy walk conclusion. CONCLUSIONS: We consequently question the claimed existence of scaling laws of the search behaviour of marine predators and mussels, since such conclusions were reached using incorrect methods. We discourage the suggested potential use of "Lévy-like walks" when modelling consequences of fishing and climate change, and caution

  15. Dynamic evaluation of seismic hazard and risks based on the Unified Scaling Law for Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossobokov, V. G.; Nekrasova, A.

    2016-12-01

    We continue applying the general concept of seismic risk analysis in a number of seismic regions worldwide by constructing seismic hazard maps based on the Unified Scaling Law for Earthquakes (USLE), i.e. log N(M,L) = A + B•(6 - M) + C•log L, where N(M,L) is the expected annual number of earthquakes of a certain magnitude M within an seismically prone area of linear dimension L, A characterizes the average annual rate of strong (M = 6) earthquakes, B determines the balance between magnitude ranges, and C estimates the fractal dimension of seismic locus in projection to the Earth surface. The parameters A, B, and C of USLE are used to assess, first, the expected maximum magnitude in a time interval at a seismically prone cell of a uniform grid that cover the region of interest, and then the corresponding expected ground shaking parameters. After a rigorous testing against the available seismic evidences in the past (e.g., the historically reported macro-seismic intensity or paleo data), such a seismic hazard map is used to generate maps of specific earthquake risks for population, cities, and infrastructures. The hazard maps for a given territory change dramatically, when the methodology is applied to a certain size moving time window, e.g. about a decade long for an intermediate-term regional assessment or exponentially increasing intervals for a daily local strong aftershock forecasting. The of dynamical seismic hazard and risks assessment is illustrated by applications to the territory of Greater Caucasus and Crimea and the two-year series of aftershocks of the 11 October 2008 Kurchaloy, Chechnya earthquake which case-history appears to be encouraging for further systematic testing as potential short-term forecasting tool.

  16. Formation of Close-in Terrestrial Planets by Giant Impacts: The Basic Scaling Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2015-12-01

    The recent exoplanet surveys have shown that small close-in planets are more common than hot Jupiters. Most of them are considered as terrestrial (rocky) planets. Thus it becomes increasingly important to generally understand the formation of terrestrial planets. In the standard scenario of terrestrial planet formation, the final stage is the giant impact stage after the dispersal of a gas disk where protoplanets or planetary embryos collide with one another to complete planets. In the present paper, we investigate the in-situ formation of close-in terrestrial planets including super-Earths by giant impacts using N-body simulations. The goal of this project is to obtain the basic scaling laws of close-in terrestrial planet formation as a function of properties of protoplanet systems. We systematically change the system parameters of initial protoplanet systems and investigate their effects on the final planets. We find that in general non-resonant dynamically cold compact systems are formed. The orbits of planets are less eccentric and inclined and the orbital separations of adjacent planets are smaller, compared with those formed in the outer disk. The masses of all planets are almost comparable. These properties are natural outcomes of giant impacts in the inner disk. In the inner disk the ratio of the physical radius to the Hill radius is large, in other words, gravitational scattering is relatively less effective compared with that in the outer disk. Thus protoplanets are less mobile and accretion proceeds relatively locally, which leads to formation of dynamically cold compact systems. The typical mass of the largest planet increases almost linearly with the total mass of protoplanets, while the number of planets per radial width decreases. On average the system angular momentum deficit increases with the total system mass, while the mean orbital separation of adjacent planets decreases.

  17. Emergence of good conduct, scaling and zipf laws in human behavioral sequences in an online world.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Thurner

    Full Text Available We study behavioral action sequences of players in a massive multiplayer online game. In their virtual life players use eight basic actions which allow them to interact with each other. These actions are communication, trade, establishing or breaking friendships and enmities, attack, and punishment. We measure the probabilities for these actions conditional on previous taken and received actions and find a dramatic increase of negative behavior immediately after receiving negative actions. Similarly, positive behavior is intensified by receiving positive actions. We observe a tendency towards antipersistence in communication sequences. Classifying actions as positive (good and negative (bad allows us to define binary 'world lines' of lives of individuals. Positive and negative actions are persistent and occur in clusters, indicated by large scaling exponents α ~ 0.87 of the mean square displacement of the world lines. For all eight action types we find strong signs for high levels of repetitiveness, especially for negative actions. We partition behavioral sequences into segments of length n (behavioral 'words' and 'motifs' and study their statistical properties. We find two approximate power laws in the word ranking distribution, one with an exponent of κ ~ -1 for the ranks up to 100, and another with a lower exponent for higher ranks. The Shannon n-tuple redundancy yields large values and increases in terms of word length, further underscoring the non-trivial statistical properties of behavioral sequences. On the collective, societal level the timeseries of particular actions per day can be understood by a simple mean-reverting log-normal model.

  18. Wavelength scaling of terahertz radiation in plasma gas targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hang; Huang, Suxia; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Liangliang

    2016-11-01

    In our experiments, terahertz radiation via two-color generated laser plasma gas targets is studied using nitrogen and the noble gases (helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon) as the generation media. Carried out at the infrared beam of the advanced laser light source, we studied the effects of different pump wavelengths (between 1200 nm and 1600 nm) on THz generation. Terahertz pulse energy is measured as functions of input pulse energy, gas species, gas pressure. The experimental results show that the terahertz pulse energy approach a maximum value of 0.0578 μJ per pulse in xenon gas when the input 1600 nm pulse energy is 0.4 mJ per pulse.

  19. On the extent of size range and power law scaling for particles of natural carbonate fault cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billi, Andrea

    2007-09-01

    To determine the size range and both type and extent of the scaling laws for particles of loose natural carbonate fault rocks, six granular fault cores from Mesozoic carbonate strata of central Italy were sampled. Particle size distributions of twelve samples were determined by combining sieving and sedimentation methods. Results show that, regardless of the fault geometry, kinematics, and tectonic history, the size of fault rock particles respects a power law distribution across approximately four orders of magnitude. The fractal dimension ( D) of the particle size distribution in the analysed samples ranges between ˜2.0 and ˜3.5. A lower bound to the power law trend is evident in all samples except in those with the highest D-values; in these samples, the smallest analysed particles (˜0.0005 mm in diameter) were also included in the power law interval, meaning that the lower size limit of the power law distribution decreases for increasing D-values and that smallest particles start to be comminuted with increasing strain (i.e. increasing fault displacement and D-values). For increasing D-values, also the largest particles tends to decrease in number, but this evidence may be affected by a censoring bias connected with the sample size. Stick-slip behaviour is suggested for the studied faults on the basis of the inferred particle size evolutions. Although further analyses are necessary to make the results of this study more generalizable, the preliminary definition of the scaling rules for fault rock particles may serve as a tool for predicting a large scale of fault rock particles once a limited range is known. In particular, data from this study may result useful as input numbers in numerical models addressing the packing of fault rock particles for frictional and hydraulic purposes.

  20. Proposed scaling law for intensity evolution in hadron storage rings based on dynamic aperture variation with time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Giovannozzi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A scaling law for the time dependence of the dynamic aperture, i.e., the region of phase space where stable motion occurs, has been proposed in previous papers [M. Giovannozzi, W. Scandale, E. Todescoand , Part. Accel. 56, 195 (1996PLACBD0031-2460; M. Giovannozzi, W. Scandale, and E. Todesco, in Proceedings of the 1997 Particle Accelerator Conference, edited by M. Comyn, M. K. Craddock, M. Reiser, and J. Thomson (IEEE Service Center, Piscataway, NJ, 1997, p. 1445; M. Giovannozzi, W. Scandale, and E. Todesco, Phys. Rev. E 57, 3432 (1998PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.57.3432]. This law, based on the analysis of numerical simulations data, is not entirely phenomenological, but motivated by some fundamental theorems of the theory of dynamical systems and indicates that the dynamic aperture has a logarithmic dependence on time. This result is used in turn as a basis for deriving a scaling law for the intensity evolution in hadron storage rings. This relationship is presented and discussed in detail in this paper. Furthermore, experimental data were compared to the predictions of this law and showed a remarkable agreement.

  1. Large-scale jets in the magnetosheath and plasma penetration across the magnetopause: THEMIS observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, A V

    2015-01-01

    THEMIS multi-point observation of the plasma and magnetic fields, conducted simultaneously in the dayside magnetosheath and magnetosphere, were used to collect 646 large-scale magnetosheath plasma jets interacting with the magnetopause. The jets were identified as dense and fast streams of the magnetosheath plasma whose energy density is higher than that of the upstream solar wind. The jet interaction with the magnetopause was revealed from sudden inward motion of the magnetopause and an enhancement in the geomagnetic field. The penetration was determined as appearance of the magnetosheath plasma against the background of the hot magnetospheric particle population. We found that almost 60% of the jets penetrated through the magnetopause. Vast majority of the penetrating jets was characterized by high velocities V > 220 km/s and kinetic bk > 1 that corresponded to a combination of finite Larmor radius effect with a mechanisms of impulsive penetration. The average plasma flux in the penetrating jets was found t...

  2. Validación estructural del Wong-Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS: estudio preliminar en adultos / Structural validation of the Wong-Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS: preliminary study in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Merino Soto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: La medición de la inteligencia emocional ha tenido muchas propuestas en formato de autorreporte. Una de estas es el Wong-Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS, creada para el contexto laboral y que evalúa valoración y expresión de las emociones propias, valoración y reconocimiento de las emociones en otros, regulación de las propias emociones y uso de la emoción para facilitar el desempeño. Hay poca evidencia psicométrica sobre el Wong-Law Emotional Intelligence Scale en habla hispana, lo que posiblemente conduce a que sea también poco utilizado en la investigación y práctica profesional. El objetivo del presente estudio es presentar los primeros resultados de la validez de la estructura interna del WLEIS en adultos peruanos. Fueron 120 participantes (72 mujeres entre 17 y 59 años, quienes respondieron al cuestionario mediados por internet. Se analizó la estructura interna mediante metodología de ecuaciones estructurales. Se halló una satisfactoria estructura de 4 factores y elevadas cargas factoriales de los ítems; las correlaciones interfactores fueron altas o moderadamente altas; y la consistencia interna fue buena. Se concluye que los primeros resultados son aceptables para asumir que el modelo de Wong-Law también es aparentemente generalizable. ABSTRACT: The measurement of emotional intelligence has had many proposals in the form of self-report. One of these is the Wong-Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS, created for the job context and which evaluates valuation and the expression of self-emotions; valuation and recognition of emotions in others; regulation of one’s own emotions and the use of emotion to facilitate performance. There is little psychometric evidence regarding the Wong-Law Emotional Intelligence Scale in the Spanish speaking world, which could lead to it also being little used in research and professional practice. The objective of this study is to present the first results of the internal

  3. On the role of ion-scale whistler waves in space and astrophysical plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comişel, Horia; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro; Narita, Yasuhito; Motschmann, Uwe

    2016-11-01

    Competition of linear mode waves is studied numerically to understand the energy cascade mechanism in plasma turbulence on ion-kinetic scales. Hybrid plasma simulations are performed in a text">3-D simulation box by pumping large-scale Alfvén waves on the fluid scale. The result is compared with that from our earlier text">2-D simulations. We find that the whistler mode is persistently present both in the text">2-D and text">3-D simulations irrespective of the initial setup, e.g., the amplitude of the initial pumping waves, while all the other modes are excited and damped such that the energy is efficiently transported to thermal energy over non-whistler mode. The simulation results suggest that the whistler mode could transfer the fluctuation energy smoothly from the fluid scale down to the electron-kinetic scale, and justifies the notion of whistler turbulence.

  4. Micro- and macro-scale self-organization in a dissipative plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoric, M.M.; Sato, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Maluckov, A.; Jovanovic, M.S.

    1998-10-01

    We study a nonlinear three-wave interaction in an open dissipative model of stimulated Raman backscattering in a plasma. A hybrid kinetic-fluid scheme is proposed to include anomalous kinetic dissipation due to electron trapping and plasma wave breaking. We simulate a finite plasma with open boundaries and vary a transport parameter to examine a route to spatio-temporal complexity. An interplay between self-organization at micro (kinetic) and macro (wave/fluid) scales is revealed through quasi-periodic and intermittent evolution of dynamical variables, dissipative structures and related entropy rates. An evidence that entropy rate extrema correspond to structural transitions is found. (author)

  5. Two-parametric scaling law and figures of merit of excited-state absorption of organic dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldunov, Modest F.; Koldunov, Leonid M.

    2017-02-01

    Sequential theoretical analysis of the excited-state absorption of organic dyes is carried out. It is established that the transmission dependence on laser radiation intensity of optical elements activated by organic dyes is described by the scaling law. It contains two parameters (the critical intensity and the contrast parameter) which are figures of merit of the excited state absorption of dye. Requirements to experimental conditions needed for correctly determination of figures of merit of the excited-state absorption efficiency of organic dyes are formulated. It is shown that there is a good agreement between experimental data of the sample transmission dependence on laser radiation intensity with the result of its calculation based on the scaling law. Figures of merit for several organic dyes are obtained.

  6. Diffusion and Radiation in Magnetized Collisionless Plasmas with High-Frequency Small-Scale Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Keenan, Brett D

    2015-01-01

    Magnetized high-energy-density plasmas can often have strong electromagnetic fluctuations whose correlation scale is smaller than the electron Larmor radius. Radiation from the electrons in such plasmas, which markedly differs from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and their energy and pitch-angle diffusion are tightly related. In this paper, we present a comprehensive theoretical and numerical study of the particles' transport in both cold, "small-scale" Langmuir and Whistler-mode turbulence and its relation to the spectra of radiation simultaneously produced by these particles. We emphasize that this relation is a superb diagnostic tool of laboratory, astrophysical, interplanetary, and solar plasmas with a mean magnetic field and strong small-scale turbulence.

  7. A scaling law for the local CHF on the external bottom side of a fully submerged reactor vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.; Liu, Y.C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    A scaling law for estimating the local critical heat flux on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel that is fully submerged in water has been developed from the results of an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model for pool boiling on a downward facing curved heating surface. The scaling law accounts for the effects of the size of the vessel, the level of liquid subcooling, the intrinsic properties of the fluid, and the spatial variation of the local critical heat flux along the heating surface. It is found that for vessels with diameters considerably larger than the characteristic size of the vapor masses, the size effect on the local critical heat flux is limited almost entirely to the effect of subcooling associated with the local liquid head. When the subcooling effect is accounted for separately, the local CHF limit is nearly independent of the vessel size. Based upon the scaling law developed in this work, it is possible to merge, within the experimental uncertainties, all the available local CHF data obtained for various vessel sizes under both saturated and subcooled boiling conditions into a single curve. Applications of the scaling law to commercial-size vessels have been made for various system pressures and water levels above the heated vessel. Over the range of conditions explored in this study, the local CHF limit is found to increase by a factor of two or more from the bottom center to the upper edge of the vessel. Meanwhile, the critical heat flux at a given angular position of the heated vessel is also found to increase appreciably with the system pressure and the water level.

  8. On the scaling features of magnetic field fluctuations at non-MHD scales in turbulent space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolini, G.; Giannattasio, F.; Yordanova, E.; Vörös, Z.; Marcucci, M. F.; Echim, M.; Chang, T.

    2016-11-01

    In several different contexts space plasmas display intermittent turbulence at magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) scales, which manifests in anomalous scaling features of the structure functions of the magnetic field increments. Moving to smaller scales, i.e. below the ion-cyclotron and/or ion inertial length, these scaling features are still observed, even though its is not clear if these scaling features are still anomalous or not. Here, we investigate the nature of scaling properties of magnetic field increments at non-MHD scales for a period of fast solar wind to investigate the occurrence or not of multifractal features and collapsing of probability distribution functions (PDFs) using the novel Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA) method, which is more sensitive than the traditional structure function approach. We find a strong evidence for the occurrence of a near mono-scaling behavior, which suggests that the observed turbulent regime at non-MHD scales mainly displays a mono-fractal nature of magnetic field increments. The results are discussed in terms of a non-compact fractal structure of the dissipation field.

  9. A Scale-Invariant Model of Statistical Mechanics and Modified Forms of the First and the Second Laws of Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrab, Siavash H.; Pitch, Nancy (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A scale-invariant statistical theory of fields is presented that leads to invariant definition of density, velocity, temperature, and pressure, The definition of Boltzmann constant is introduced as k(sub k) = m(sub k)v(sub k)c = 1.381 x 10(exp -23) J x K(exp -1), suggesting that the Kelvin absolute temperature scale is equivalent to a length scale. Two new state variables called the reversible heat Q(sub rev) = TS and the reversible work W(sub rev) = PV are introduced. The modified forms of the first and second law of thermodynamics are presented. The microscopic definition of heat (work) is presented as the kinetic energy due to the random (peculiar) translational, rotational, and pulsational motions. The Gibbs free energy of an element at scale Beta is identified as the total system energy at scale (Beta-1), thus leading to an invariant form of the first law of thermodynamics U(sub Beta) = Q(sub Beta) - W(sub Beta) +N(e3)U(sub Beta-1).

  10. Conservation laws for collisional and turbulent transport processes in toroidal plasmas with large mean flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, H.; Nunami, M.; Nakata, M.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2017-02-01

    A novel gyrokinetic formulation is presented by including collisional effects into the Lagrangian variational principle to yield the governing equations for background and turbulent electromagnetic fields and gyrocenter distribution functions, which can simultaneously describe classical, neoclassical, and turbulent transport processes in toroidal plasmas with large toroidal flows on the order of the ion thermal velocity. Noether's theorem modified for collisional systems and the collision operator given in terms of Poisson brackets are applied to derivation of the particle, energy, and toroidal momentum balance equations in the conservative forms, which are desirable properties for long-time global transport simulation.

  11. Differences between the glycosylation patterns of haptoglobin isolated from skin scales and plasma of psoriatic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardetta Maresca

    Full Text Available Improved diagnosis of psoriasis, by new biomarkers, is required for evaluating the progression rate of the disease and the response to treatment. Haptoglobin (Hpt, a glycoprotein secreted by hepatocytes and other types of cells including keratinocytes, was found with glycan changes in psoriasis and other diseases. We previously reported that Hpt isolated from plasma of psoriatic patients is more fucosylated than Hpt of healthy subjects. The aim of this study was to compare the glycosylation pattern of Hpt isolated from skin scales or plasma of patients with psoriasis with that of Hpt from cornified epidermal layer or plasma of healthy subjects. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of the glycans isolated from the protein backbone revealed that glycan patterns from skin and plasma of patients were similar, and mostly displayed quantitative rather than qualitative differences from normal pattern. Biotin-labeled lectins were used to evaluate quantitative differences in the glycoforms of Hpt from plasma and psoriatic skin scales. Hpt from skin and plasma of patients showed more fucosylated and branched glycans than Hpt from plasma of healthy subjects. Tryptic glycopeptides of Hpt were also analyzed by mass spectrometry, and a decreased amount of sialylated glycan chains was found in glycopeptides of skin Hpt, as compared with Hpt from plasma. High levels of glycans with fucosylated and tetra-antennary chains were detected on the peptide NLFLNHSENATAK from Hpt of psoriatic patients. Our data demonstrate that specific changes in glycan structures of Hpt, such as enhanced glycan branching and fucose content, are associated with psoriasis, and that differences between circulating and skin Hpt do exist. A lower extent of glycan fucosylation and branching was found in Hpt from plasma of patients in disease remission. Altered glycoforms might reflect changes of Hpt function in the skin, and could be used as markers of the disease.

  12. Magnetic reconnection in plasma under inertial confinement fusion conditions driven by heat flux effects in Ohm's law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, A S; Thomas, A G R; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A

    2014-03-14

    In the interaction of high-power laser beams with solid density plasma there are a number of mechanisms that generate strong magnetic fields. Such fields subsequently inhibit or redirect electron flows, but can themselves be advected by heat fluxes, resulting in complex interplay between thermal transport and magnetic fields. We show that for heating by multiple laser spots reconnection of magnetic field lines can occur, mediated by these heat fluxes, using a fully implicit 2D Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code. Under such conditions, the reconnection rate is dictated by heat flows rather than Alfvènic flows. We find that this mechanism is only relevant in a high β plasma. However, the Hall parameter ωcτei can be large so that thermal transport is strongly modified by these magnetic fields, which can impact longer time scale temperature homogeneity and ion dynamics in the system.

  13. Magnetic reconnection in plasma under inertial confinement fusion conditions driven by heat flux effects in Ohm's law

    CERN Document Server

    Joglekar, A S; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-01-01

    In the interaction of high-power laser beams with solid density plasma there are a number of mechanisms that generate strong magnetic fields. Such fields subsequently inhibit or redirect electron flows, but can themselves be advected by heat fluxes, resulting in complex interplay between thermal transport and magnetic fields.We show that for heating by multiple laser spots reconnection of magnetic field lines can occur, mediated by these heat fluxes, using a fully implicit 2D Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code. Under such conditions, the reconnection rate is dictated by heat flows rather than Alfv\\`enic flows. We find that this mechanism is only relevant in a high $\\beta$ plasma. However, the Hall parameter $\\omega_c \\tau_{ei}$ can be large so that thermal transport is strongly modified by these magnetic fields, which can impact longer time scale temperature homogeneity and ion dynamics in the system.

  14. On solute residence time in the storage zones of small streams - experimental study and scaling law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Transient storage has a major influence on solute transport in streams, on biogeochemical cycling, water quality and on the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. The first part of the research reported here focuses on surface transient storage (STS) zones between groins along small streams. Such groins are used to protect banks, but also to increase habitat diversity and are, thus, not restricted to large rivers. Repeated tracer dilution experiments on the Mödlingbach, a small stream in Austria some 30 km south of Vienna, have been analyzed to determine the solute residence time between groins and to characterize the exchange processes between dead zones and main stream. Pairs of related breakthrough curves were measured in main stream and storage zones, resp., and used subsequently to estimate the solute residence time in the surface dead zones under study. Following previous work (Weitbrecht et al., 2008; Jackson et al., 2012) these residence times were, in turn, expressed as T = -W-.hD- k ?u hE (1) with W denoting groin length, u main stream flow velocity, hD mean water depth between the groins and hE depth at the interface dead zone - main stream. Coefficient k, finally, is thought to depend on a type of hydraulic radius, RD = W.L/(W+L), with L denoting the distance between the groins, measured in main flow direction. Using both the Mödlingbach STS zone data and the results of the aforementioned study (Weitbrecht et al., 2008) the following regression equation was derived (hS denotes main stream water depth): k = 0.00282? RD + 0.00802 hS (2) The second part of this research focuses on the dependency of solute residence time on flow rate, which is important for an improved understanding of longitudinal solute transport in streams and for the application of mathematical models. The scaling law proposed here is based on a physics-related theory combined with extensive data sets available form a decade of stream tracer experiments on the Mödlingbach stream

  15. Extended power-law scaling of heavy-tailed random air-permeability fields in fractured and sedimentary rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guadagnini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the scaling behaviors of two field-scale log permeability data sets showing heavy-tailed frequency distributions in three and two spatial dimensions, respectively. One set consists of 1-m scale pneumatic packer test data from six vertical and inclined boreholes spanning a decameters scale block of unsaturated fractured tuffs near Superior, Arizona, the other of pneumatic minipermeameter data measured at a spacing of 15 cm along three horizontal transects on a 21 m long and 6 m high outcrop of the Upper Cretaceous Straight Cliffs Formation, including lower-shoreface bioturbated and cross-bedded sandstone near Escalante, Utah. Order q sample structure functions of each data set scale as a power ξ(q of separation scale or lag, s, over limited ranges of s. A procedure known as extended self-similarity (ESS extends this range to all lags and yields a nonlinear (concave functional relationship between ξ(q and q. Whereas the literature tends to associate extended and nonlinear power-law scaling with multifractals or fractional Laplace motions, we have shown elsewhere that (a ESS of data having a normal frequency distribution is theoretically consistent with (Gaussian truncated (additive, self-affine, monofractal fractional Brownian motion (tfBm, the latter being unique in predicting a breakdown in power-law scaling at small and large lags, and (b nonlinear power-law scaling of data having either normal or heavy-tailed frequency distributions is consistent with samples from sub-Gaussian random fields or processes subordinated to tfBm or truncated fractional Gaussian noise (tfGn, stemming from lack of ergodicity which causes sample moments to scale differently than do their ensemble counterparts. Here we (i demonstrate that the above two data sets are consistent with sub-Gaussian random fields subordinated to tfBm or tfGn and (ii provide maximum likelihood estimates of parameters characterizing the

  16. Universal scaling law for energy and pressure in a shearing fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgranges, Caroline; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2009-05-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation, we study the shear-rate dependence of pressure and potential energy in a liquid metal subjected to shear. We show that both thermodynamic properties vary according to a power law gamma[over ];{beta} of the shear rate gamma[over ] , in which the exponent beta is a simple linear function of temperature and density. Moreover, we establish that the coefficients for this linear law are the same as those previously obtained for a Lennard-Jones fluid by Ge [Phys. Rev. E 67, 061201 (2003)]. This is a strong indication that these coefficients, as well as the linear law for beta , could be applicable to any atomic fluid. It is also an important step toward the determination of a nonequilibrium equation of state, which would predict the value of pressure and energy of a shearing fluid for any state point and any value of the applied shear rate.

  17. Scaling and design of high-energy laser plasma electron acceleration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima; Hyung Taek Kim; Tae Moon Jeong; Chang Hee Nam

    2015-01-01

    Recently there has been great progress in laser-driven plasma-based accelerators by exploiting high-power lasers,where electron beams can be accelerated to multi-GeV energy in a centimeter-scale plasma due to the laser wakefield acceleration mechanism. While, to date, worldwide research on laser plasma accelerators has been focused on the creation of compact particle and radiation sources for basic sciences, medical and industrial applications, there is great interest in applications for high-energy physics and astrophysics, exploring unprecedented high-energy frontier phenomena. In this context, we present an overview of experimental achievements in laser plasma acceleration from the perspective of the production of GeV-level electron beams, and deduce the scaling formulas capable of predicting experimental results self-consistently, taking into account the propagation of a relativistic laser pulse through plasma and the accelerating field reduction due to beam loading. Finally, we present design examples for 10-GeV-level laser plasma acceleration, which is expected in near-term experiments by means of petawatt-class lasers.

  18. The application of J integral to measure cohesive laws under large-scale yielding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutianos, Stergios; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2016-01-01

    A method is developed to obtain the mode I cohesive law of elastic-plastic materials using a Double Cantilever Beam sandwich specimen loaded with pure bending moments. The approach is based on the validity of the J integral for materials having a non-linear stress-strain relationship without...

  19. AN-107 (C) Simulant Bench-Scale LAW Evaporation with Organic Regulatory Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, H.H.

    2001-05-15

    The overall objective of this work is to develop preliminary operating data including expected concentration endpoints using a C waste envelope simulant. The data is to be used for the preliminary Hanford RPP flow sheet development and LAW Melter Feed Evaporator design.

  20. Measuring Black men's police-based discrimination experiences: Development and validation of the Police and Law Enforcement (PLE) Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Devin; Bowleg, Lisa; Del Río-González, Ana Maria; Tschann, Jeanne M; Agans, Robert P; Malebranche, David J

    2017-04-01

    Although social science research has examined police and law enforcement-perpetrated discrimination against Black men using policing statistics and implicit bias studies, there is little quantitative evidence detailing this phenomenon from the perspective of Black men. Consequently, there is a dearth of research detailing how Black men's perspectives on police and law enforcement-related stress predict negative physiological and psychological health outcomes. This study addresses these gaps with the qualitative development and quantitative test of the Police and Law Enforcement (PLE) Scale. In Study 1, we used thematic analysis on transcripts of individual qualitative interviews with 90 Black men to assess key themes and concepts and develop quantitative items. In Study 2, we used 2 focus groups comprised of 5 Black men each (n = 10), intensive cognitive interviewing with a separate sample of Black men (n = 15), and piloting with another sample of Black men (n = 13) to assess the ecological validity of the quantitative items. For Study 3, we analyzed data from a sample of 633 Black men between the ages of 18 and 65 to test the factor structure of the PLE, as we all as its concurrent validity and convergent/discriminant validity. Qualitative analyses and confirmatory factor analyses suggested that a 5-item, 1-factor measure appropriately represented respondents' experiences of police/law enforcement discrimination. As hypothesized, the PLE was positively associated with measures of racial discrimination and depressive symptoms. Preliminary evidence suggests that the PLE is a reliable and valid measure of Black men's experiences of discrimination with police/law enforcement. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G., E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Martin, E., E-mail: martin@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Boscary, J., E-mail: jean.boscary@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Camus, G., E-mail: camus@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Herb, V., E-mail: herb@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Schlosser, J., E-mail: jacques.schlosser@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F., E-mail: frederic.escourbiac@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Missirlian, M., E-mail: marc.missirlian@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2011-10-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  2. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevet, G.; Martin, E.; Boscary, J.; Camus, G.; Herb, V.; Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Missirlian, M.

    2011-10-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  3. Imaging radar observations and nonlocal theory of large-scale plasma waves in the equatorial electrojet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    Full Text Available Large-scale (l ~ 1 km waves in the daytime and night-time equatorial electrojet are studied using coherent scatter radar data from Jicamarca. Images of plasma irregularities within the main beam of the radar are formed using interferometry with multiple baselines. These images are analyzed according to nonlocal gradient drift instability theory and are also compared to nonlinear computer simulations carried out recently by Ronchi et al. (1991 and Hu and Bhattacharjee (1999. In the daytime, the large-scale waves assume a non-steady dynamical equilibrium state characterized by the straining and destruction of the waves by shear and diffusion followed by spontaneous regeneration as predicted by Ronchi et al. (1991. At night, when steep plasma density gradients emerge, slowly propagating large-scale vertically extended waves predominate. Eikonal analysis suggests that these waves are trapped (absolutely unstable or are nearly trapped (convectively unstable and are able to tunnel between altitude regions which are locally unstable. Intermediate-scale waves are mainly transient (convectively stable but can become absolutely unstable in narrow altitude bands determined by the background density profile. These characteristics are mainly consistent with the simulations presented by Hu and Bhattacharjee (1999. A new class of large-scale primary waves is found to occur along bands that sweep westward and downward from high altitudes through the E-region at twilight.

    Key words. Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere; ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities

  4. MMS observations of ion-scale magnetic island in the magnetosheath turbulent plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. Y.; Sahraoui, F.; Retino, A.; Le Contel, O.; Yuan, Z. G.; Chasapis, A.; Aunai, N.; Breuillard, H.; Deng, X. H.; Zhou, M.; Fu, H. S.; Pang, Y.; Wang, D. D.; Torbert, R. B.; Goodrich, K. A.; Ergun, R. E.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Magnes, W.; Bromund, K.; Leinweber, H.; Plaschke, F.; Anderson, B. J.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    In this letter, first observations of ion-scale magnetic island from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission in the magnetosheath turbulent plasma are presented. The magnetic island is characterized by bipolar variation of magnetic fields with magnetic field compression, strong core field, density depletion, and strong currents dominated by the parallel component to the local magnetic field. The estimated size of magnetic island is about 8 di, where di is the ion inertial length. Distinct particle behaviors and wave activities inside and at the edges of the magnetic island are observed: parallel electron beam accompanied with electrostatic solitary waves and strong electromagnetic lower hybrid drift waves inside the magnetic island and bidirectional electron beams, whistler waves, weak electromagnetic lower hybrid drift waves, and strong broadband electrostatic noise at the edges of the magnetic island. Our observations demonstrate that highly dynamical, strong wave activities and electron-scale physics occur within ion-scale magnetic islands in the magnetosheath turbulent plasma.

  5. The application of J integral to measure cohesive laws in materials undergoing large scale yielding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Goutianos, Stergios

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility of determining cohesive laws by the J-integral approach for materials having non-linear stress-strain behaviour (e.g. polymers and composites) by the use of a DCB sandwich specimen, consisting of stiff elastic beams bonded to the non-linear test material, loaded with pure...... bending moments. For a wide range of parameters of the non-linear material, the plastic unloading during crack extension is small, resulting in J integral values (fracture resistance) that deviate maximum 15% from the work of the cohesive traction. Thus the method can be used to extract the cohesive laws...... directly from experiments without any presumption about their shape. Finally, the DCB sandwich specimen was also analysed using the I integral to quantify the overestimation of the steady-state fracture resistance obtained using the J integral based method....

  6. Large-scale plasma bubbles in the low-latitude ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittencourt, J.A.; Sahai, Y.; Fagundes, P.R.; Takahashi, H.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma irregularities in the low-latitude ionospheric F-layer resulting from plasma instability processes have been the subject of intensive experimental and theoretical research in the past few years. The morphology and dynamics of transequatorial ionospheric plasma bubbles and smaller scale plasma irregularities can be monitored through observations of the intensities of the 630.0 nm and 777.4 nm atomic oxygen nightglow emissions arising from ionospheric recombination processes. Simultaneous north-south meridional scanning observations of these OI emissions, using ground-based scanning filter photometers, as well as observations of the OI 630.0 nm emission using an all-sky imaging system, have been made at Cachoeira Paulista (22.7 deg S, 45.0 deg W, dip latitude 15.8 deg S) during both quiet and magnetically disturbed conditions, as well as in the presence of large scale field-aligned ionospheric plasma depletions. Some results of this long series of photometer and all-sky imaging observations are presented and their significant features are analyzed and discussed.

  7. Anisotropy and non-universality in scaling laws of the large scale energy spectrum in rotating turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Amrik; Rosenberg, Duane; pouquet, Annick

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly rotating turbulent flow is characterized by the emergence of columnar structures that are representative of quasi-two dimensional behavior of the flow. It is known that when energy is injected into the fluid at an intermediate scale $L_f$, it cascades towards smaller as well as larger scales. In this paper we analyze the flow in the \\textit{inverse cascade} range at a small but fixed Rossby number, {$\\mathcal{R}o_f \\approx 0.05$}. Several {numerical simulations with} helical and non-helical forcing functions are considered in periodic boxes with unit aspect ratio. In order to resolve the inverse cascade range with {reasonably} large Reynolds number, the analysis is based on large eddy simulations which include the effect of helicity on eddy viscosity and eddy noise. Thus, we model the small scales and resolve explicitly the large scales. We show that the large-scale energy spectrum has at least two solutions: one that is consistent with Kolmogorov-Kraichnan-Batchelor-Leith (KKBL) phenomenology for the...

  8. Plasma beta dependence of the ion-scale spectral break of solar wind turbulence: high-resolution 2D hybrid simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Franci, Luca; Matteini, Lorenzo; Verdini, Andrea; Hellinger, Petr

    2016-01-01

    We investigate properties of the ion-scale spectral break of solar wind turbulence by means of two-dimensional high-resolution hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box and add a spectrum of in-plane, large-scale, magnetic and kinetic fluctuations. We perform a set of simulations with different values of the plasma beta, distributed over three orders of magnitude, from 0.01 to 10. In all the cases, once turbulence is fully developed, we observe a power-law spectrum of the fluctuating magnetic field on large scales (in the inertial range) with a spectral index close to -5/3, while in the sub-ion range we observe another power-law spectrum with a spectral index systematically varying with $\\beta$ (from around -3.6 for small values to around -2.9 for large ones). The two ranges are separated by a spectral break around ion scales. The length scale at which this transition occurs is found to be proportional to the ion inertial length, $d_i$...

  9. Conceptual design for accelerator-driven sodium-cooled sub-critical transmutation reactors using scale laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Gu; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The feasibility study on conceptual design methodology for accelerator-driven sodium-cooled sub-critical transmutation reactors has been conducted to optimize the design parameters from the scale laws and validates the reactor performance with the integrated code system. A 1000 MWth sodium-cooled sub-critical transmutation reactor has been scaled and verified through the methodology in this paper, which is referred to Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). A Pb-Bi target material and a partitioned fuel are the liquid phases, and they are cooled by the circulation of secondary Pb-Bi coolant and by primary sodium coolant, respectively. Overall key design parameters are generated from the scale laws and they are improved and validated by the integrated code system. Integrated Code System (ICS) consists of LAHET, HMCNP, ORIGEN2, and COMMIX codes and some files. Through ICS the target region, the core region, and thermal-hydraulic related regions are analyzed once-through Results of conceptual design are attached in this paper. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  10. Characteristics of Turbulence-driven Plasma Flow and Origin of Experimental Empirical Scalings of Intrinsic Rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W. X.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W. M.; Lee, W. W.; Diamond, P. H.

    2011-03-20

    Toroidal plasma flow driven by turbulent torque associated with nonlinear residual stress generation is shown to recover the observed key features of intrinsic rotation in experiments. Specifically, the turbulence-driven intrinsic rotation scales close to linearly with plasma gradients and the inverse of the plasma current, qualitatively reproducing empirical scalings obtained from a large experimental data base. The effect of magnetic shear on the symmetry breaking in the parallel wavenumber spectrum is identified. The origin of the current scaling is found to be the enhanced kll symmetry breaking induced by increased radial variation of the safety factor as the current decreases. The physics origin for the linear dependence of intrinsic rotation on the pressure gradient comes from the fact that both turbulence intensity and the zonal flow shear, which are two key ingredients for driving the residual stress, are increased with the strength of the turbulence drives, which are R/LTe and R/Lne for the collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM). Highlighted results also include robust radial pinches in toroidal flow, heat and particle transport driven by CTEM turbulence, which emerge "in phase", and are shown to play important roles in determining plasma profiles. Also discussed are experimental tests proposed to validate findings from these gyrokinetic simulations.

  11. Scaling laws for energetic ions from the commissioning of the new Los Alamos National Laboratory 200 TW Trident laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippo, K A; Workman, J; Gautier, D C; Letzring, S; Johnson, R P; Shimada, T

    2008-10-01

    The recent Los Alamos National Laboratory Trident laser enhanced from 30 to 200 TW in power allows more than 100 J to be delivered on target in 500 fs with a spot size smaller than 12 microm at full width at half maximum. 15 microm flat-foil targets have been observed to produce proton beams in excess of 50 MeV at an intensity of only approximately 4x10(19) W/cm(2) with efficiencies approaching 5%. The Trident laser beam characteristics are presented along with the data compared to published scaling laws for proton acceleration.

  12. Axis and velocity determination for quasi two-dimensional plasma/field structures from Faraday's law: A second look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnerup, Bengt U. Ö.; Denton, Richard E.; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Swisdak, M.

    2013-05-01

    We re-examine the basic premises of a single-spacecraft data analysis method, developed by Sonnerup and Hasegawa (2005), for determining the axis orientation and proper frame velocity of quasi two-dimensional, quasi-steady structures of magnetic field and plasma. The method, which is based on Faraday's law, makes use of magnetic and electric field data measured by a single spacecraft traversing the structure, although in many circumstances the convection electric field, - v × B, can serve as a proxy for E. It has been used with success for flux ropes observed at the magnetopause but has usually failed to provide acceptable results when applied to real space data from reconnection events as well as to virtual data from numerical MHD simulations of such events. In the present paper, the reasons for these shortcomings are identified, analyzed, and discussed in detail. Certain basic properties of the method are presented in the form of five theorems, the last of which makes use of singular value decomposition to treat the special case where the magnetic variance matrix is non-invertible. These theorems are illustrated using data from analytical models of flux ropes and also from MHD simulations as well as a 2-D kinetic simulation of reconnection. The results make clear that the method requires the presence of a significant, non-removable electric field distribution in the plane transverse to the invariant direction and that it is sensitive to deviations from strict two-dimensionality and strict time stationarity.

  13. Synergistic cross-scale coupling of turbulence in a tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, N. T., E-mail: nthoward@psfc.mit.edu [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Holland, C. [University of California - San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); White, A. E.; Greenwald, M. [MIT - Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Candy, J. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    For the first time, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations spanning both the ion and electron spatio-temporal scales have been performed with realistic electron mass ratio ((m{sub D}∕m{sub e}){sup 1∕2 }= 60.0), realistic geometry, and all experimental inputs, demonstrating the coexistence and synergy of ion (k{sub θ}ρ{sub s}∼O(1.0)) and electron-scale (k{sub θ}ρ{sub e}∼O(1.0)) turbulence in the core of a tokamak plasma. All multi-scale simulations utilized the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] to study the coupling of ion and electron-scale turbulence in the core (r/a = 0.6) of an Alcator C-Mod L-mode discharge shown previously to exhibit an under-prediction of the electron heat flux when using simulations only including ion-scale turbulence. Electron-scale turbulence is found to play a dominant role in setting the electron heat flux level and radially elongated (k{sub r} ≪ k{sub θ}) “streamers” are found to coexist with ion-scale eddies in experimental plasma conditions. Inclusion of electron-scale turbulence in these simulations is found to increase both ion and electron heat flux levels by enhancing the transport at the ion-scale while also driving electron heat flux at sub-ρ{sub i} scales. The combined increases in the low and high-k driven electron heat flux may explain previously observed discrepancies between simulated and experimental electron heat fluxes and indicates a complex interaction of short and long wavelength turbulence.

  14. Scaling behavior of the earthquake intertime distribution: influence of large shocks and time scales in the Omori law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippiello, Eugenio; Corral, Alvaro; Bottiglieri, Milena; Godano, Cataldo; de Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2012-12-01

    We present a study of the earthquake intertime distribution D(Δt) for a California catalog in temporal periods of short duration T. We compare experimental results with theoretical predictions and analytical approximate solutions. For the majority of intervals, rescaling intertimes by the average rate leads to collapse of the distributions D(Δt) on a universal curve, whose functional form is well fitted by a Gamma distribution. The remaining intervals, exhibiting a more complex D(Δt), are all characterized by the presence of large shocks. These results can be understood in terms of the relevance of the ratio between the characteristic time c in the Omori law and T: Intervals with Gamma-like behavior are indeed characterized by a vanishing c/T. The above features are also investigated by means of numerical simulations of the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. This study shows that collapse of D(Δt) is also observed in numerical catalogs; however, the fit with a Gamma distribution is possible only assuming that c depends on the main-shock magnitude m. This result confirms that the dependence of c on m, previously observed for m>6 main shocks, extends also to small m>2.

  15. Unexpected generation of super-high energetic electrons at relativistic circularly polarized laser-solid interactions in the presence of large scale pre-plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, D; Luan, S X; Yu, W

    2015-01-01

    As a continuation of the previous work "Identifying the source of super-high energetic electrons in the presence of pre-plasma in laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities [arXiv: 1512.02411]", we have investigated the role of circularly polarized (CP) laser pulses while keeping other conditions the same. It is found that in the presence of large scale pre-formed plasmas, super-high energetic electrons can be generated at relativistic CP laser-solid interactions. For laser of intensity 10$^{20}\\ $W$/$cm$^2$ and pre-plasma scale-length 10$\\ \\mu$m, the cut-off energy of electron by CP laser is 120$\\ $MeV compared with 100$\\ $MeV in the case of linearly polarized (LP) laser. The unexpected super-high energetic electron acceleration can also be explained by the two-stage acceleration model, by considering the polarization transition of the reflected laser from CP to elliptically polarized (EP). The polarization state transition is addressed, and a modified scaling law in the presence of EP laser is obt...

  16. Scaling-Laws of Human Broadcast Communication Enable Distinction between Human, Corporate and Robot Twitter Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Gabriela; Faisal, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Human behaviour is highly individual by nature, yet statistical structures are emerging which seem to govern the actions of human beings collectively. Here we search for universal statistical laws dictating the timing of human actions in communication decisions. We focus on the distribution of the time interval between messages in human broadcast communication, as documented in Twitter, and study a collection of over 160,000 tweets for three user categories: personal (controlled by one person), managed (typically PR agency controlled) and bot-controlled (automated system). To test our hypothesis, we investigate whether it is possible to differentiate between user types based on tweet timing behaviour, independently of the content in messages. For this purpose, we developed a system to process a large amount of tweets for reality mining and implemented two simple probabilistic inference algorithms: 1. a naive Bayes classifier, which distinguishes between two and three account categories with classification performance of 84.6% and 75.8%, respectively and 2. a prediction algorithm to estimate the time of a user's next tweet with an . Our results show that we can reliably distinguish between the three user categories as well as predict the distribution of a user's inter-message time with reasonable accuracy. More importantly, we identify a characteristic power-law decrease in the tail of inter-message time distribution by human users which is different from that obtained for managed and automated accounts. This result is evidence of a universal law that permeates the timing of human decisions in broadcast communication and extends the findings of several previous studies of peer-to-peer communication. PMID:23843945

  17. Scaling-laws of human broadcast communication enable distinction between human, corporate and robot Twitter users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Tavares

    Full Text Available Human behaviour is highly individual by nature, yet statistical structures are emerging which seem to govern the actions of human beings collectively. Here we search for universal statistical laws dictating the timing of human actions in communication decisions. We focus on the distribution of the time interval between messages in human broadcast communication, as documented in Twitter, and study a collection of over 160,000 tweets for three user categories: personal (controlled by one person, managed (typically PR agency controlled and bot-controlled (automated system. To test our hypothesis, we investigate whether it is possible to differentiate between user types based on tweet timing behaviour, independently of the content in messages. For this purpose, we developed a system to process a large amount of tweets for reality mining and implemented two simple probabilistic inference algorithms: 1. a naive Bayes classifier, which distinguishes between two and three account categories with classification performance of 84.6% and 75.8%, respectively and 2. a prediction algorithm to estimate the time of a user's next tweet with an R(2 ≈ 0.7. Our results show that we can reliably distinguish between the three user categories as well as predict the distribution of a user's inter-message time with reasonable accuracy. More importantly, we identify a characteristic power-law decrease in the tail of inter-message time distribution by human users which is different from that obtained for managed and automated accounts. This result is evidence of a universal law that permeates the timing of human decisions in broadcast communication and extends the findings of several previous studies of peer-to-peer communication.

  18. Scaling-laws of human broadcast communication enable distinction between human, corporate and robot Twitter users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Gabriela; Faisal, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Human behaviour is highly individual by nature, yet statistical structures are emerging which seem to govern the actions of human beings collectively. Here we search for universal statistical laws dictating the timing of human actions in communication decisions. We focus on the distribution of the time interval between messages in human broadcast communication, as documented in Twitter, and study a collection of over 160,000 tweets for three user categories: personal (controlled by one person), managed (typically PR agency controlled) and bot-controlled (automated system). To test our hypothesis, we investigate whether it is possible to differentiate between user types based on tweet timing behaviour, independently of the content in messages. For this purpose, we developed a system to process a large amount of tweets for reality mining and implemented two simple probabilistic inference algorithms: 1. a naive Bayes classifier, which distinguishes between two and three account categories with classification performance of 84.6% and 75.8%, respectively and 2. a prediction algorithm to estimate the time of a user's next tweet with an R(2) ≈ 0.7. Our results show that we can reliably distinguish between the three user categories as well as predict the distribution of a user's inter-message time with reasonable accuracy. More importantly, we identify a characteristic power-law decrease in the tail of inter-message time distribution by human users which is different from that obtained for managed and automated accounts. This result is evidence of a universal law that permeates the timing of human decisions in broadcast communication and extends the findings of several previous studies of peer-to-peer communication.

  19. Scaling characteristics of one-dimensional fractional diffusion processes in the presence of power-law distributed random noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhadhaghighi, Mohsen Ghasemi

    2017-08-01

    Here, we present results of numerical simulations and the scaling characteristics of one-dimensional random fluctuations with heavy-tailed probability distribution functions. Assuming that the distribution function of the random fluctuations obeys Lévy statistics with a power-law scaling exponent, we investigate the fractional diffusion equation in the presence of μ -stable Lévy noise. We study the scaling properties of the global width and two-point correlation functions and then compare the analytical and numerical results for the growth exponent β and the roughness exponent α . We also investigate the fractional Fokker-Planck equation for heavy-tailed random fluctuations. We show that the fractional diffusion processes in the presence of μ -stable Lévy noise display special scaling properties in the probability distribution function (PDF). Finally, we numerically study the scaling properties of the heavy-tailed random fluctuations by using the diffusion entropy analysis. This method is based on the evaluation of the Shannon entropy of the PDF generated by the random fluctuations, rather than on the measurement of the global width of the process. We apply the diffusion entropy analysis to extract the growth exponent β and to confirm the validity of our numerical analysis.

  20. Universal power-law scaling of water diffusion in human brain defines what we see with MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Veraart, Jelle; Novikov, Dmitry S

    2016-01-01

    Development of successful therapies for neurological disorders depends on our ability to diagnose and monitor the progression of underlying pathologies at the cellular level. Physics and physiology limit the resolution of human MRI to millimeters, three orders of magnitude coarser than the cell dimensions of microns. A promising way to access cellular structure is provided by diffusion-weighted MRI (dMRI), a modality which exploits the sensitivity of the MRI signal to micron-level Brownian motion of water molecules strongly hindered by cell walls. By analyzing diffusion of water molecules in human subjects, here we demonstrate that biophysical modeling has the potential to break the intrinsic MRI resolution limits. The observation of a universal power-law scaling of the dMRI signal identifies the contribution from water specifically confined inside narrow impermeable axons, validating the overarching assumption behind models of diffusion in neuronal tissue. This scaling behavior establishes dMRI as an in vivo...

  1. Lifting the Dusty Veil II: A Large-Scale Study of the Galactic Infrared Extinction Law

    CERN Document Server

    Zasowski, G; Indebetouw, R; Meade, M R; Nidever, D L; Patterson, R J; Babler, B; Skrutskie, M F; Watson, C; Whitney, B A; Churchwell, E

    2009-01-01

    We combine near-infrared (2MASS) and mid-infrared (Spitzer-IRAC) photometry to characterize the IR extinction law (1.2-8 microns) over nearly 150 degrees of contiguous Milky Way midplane longitude. The relative extinctions in 5 passbands across these wavelength and longitude ranges are derived by calculating color excess ratios for G and K giant red clump stars in contiguous midplane regions and deriving the wavelength dependence of extinction in each one. Strong, monotonic variations in the extinction law shape are found as a function of angle from the Galactic center, symmetric on either side of it. These longitudinal variations persist even when dense interstellar regions, known a priori to have a shallower extinction curve, are removed. The increasingly steep extinction curves towards the outer Galaxy indicate a steady decrease in the absolute-to-selective extinction ratio (R_V) and in the mean dust grain size at greater Galactocentric angles. We note an increasing strength of the 8 micron extinction infl...

  2. Nonuniversal power law scaling in the probability distribution of scientific citations

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, G J; Dill, K A; 10.1073/pnas.1010757107

    2010-01-01

    We develop a model for the distribution of scientific citations. The model involves a dual mechanism: in the direct mechanism, the author of a new paper finds an old paper A and cites it. In the indirect mechanism, the author of a new paper finds an old paper A only via the reference list of a newer intermediary paper B, which has previously cited A. By comparison to citation databases, we find that papers having few citations are cited mainly by the direct mechanism. Papers already having many citations (`classics') are cited mainly by the indirect mechanism. The indirect mechanism gives a power-law tail. The `tipping point' at which a paper becomes a classic is about 25 citations for papers published in the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science database in 1981, 31 for Physical Review D papers published from 1975-1994, and 37 for all publications from a list of high h-index chemists assembled in 2007. The power-law exponent is not universal. Individuals who are highly cited have a system...

  3. Nonuniversal power law scaling in the probability distribution of scientific citations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, George J; Pressé, Steve; Dill, Ken A

    2010-09-14

    We develop a model for the distribution of scientific citations. The model involves a dual mechanism: in the direct mechanism, the author of a new paper finds an old paper A and cites it. In the indirect mechanism, the author of a new paper finds an old paper A only via the reference list of a newer intermediary paper B, which has previously cited A. By comparison to citation databases, we find that papers having few citations are cited mainly by the direct mechanism. Papers already having many citations ("classics") are cited mainly by the indirect mechanism. The indirect mechanism gives a power-law tail. The "tipping point" at which a paper becomes a classic is about 25 citations for papers published in the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science database in 1981, 31 for Physical Review D papers published from 1975-1994, and 37 for all publications from a list of high h-index chemists assembled in 2007. The power-law exponent is not universal. Individuals who are highly cited have a systematically smaller exponent than individuals who are less cited.

  4. Power-law scaling for macroscopic entropy and microscopic complexity: Evidence from human movement and posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S. Lee; Bodfish, James W.; Newell, Karl M.

    2006-03-01

    We investigated the relationship between macroscopic entropy and microscopic complexity of the dynamics of body rocking and sitting still across adults with stereotyped movement disorder and mental retardation (profound and severe) against controls matched for age, height, and weight. This analysis was performed through the examination of center of pressure (COP) motion on the mediolateral (side-to-side) and anteroposterior (fore-aft) dimensions and the entropy of the relative phase between the two dimensions of motion. Intentional body rocking and stereotypical body rocking possessed similar slopes for their respective frequency spectra, but differences were revealed during maintenance of sitting postures. The dynamics of sitting in the control group produced lower spectral slopes and higher complexity (approximate entropy). In the controls, the higher complexity found on each dimension of motion was related to a weaker coupling between dimensions. Information entropy of the relative phase between the two dimensions of COP motion and irregularity (complexity) of their respective motions fitted a power-law function, revealing a relationship between macroscopic entropy and microscopic complexity across both groups and behaviors. This power-law relation affords the postulation that the organization of movement and posture dynamics occurs as a fractal process.

  5. Police Districts, Law, Published in 2012, 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, Taylor County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Police Districts dataset, published at 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2012. It is described as...

  6. Small-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation and scattering by cloudy plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Peebles, P J E

    1998-01-01

    If the first stars formed soon after decoupling of baryons from the thermal cosmic background radiation (CBR), the radiation may have been last scattered in a cloudy plasma. We discuss the resulting small-scale anisotropy of the CBR in the limit where the plasma clouds are small compared to the mean distance between clouds along a line of sight. This complements the perturbative analysis valid for mildly nonlinear departures from homogeneity at last scattering. We conclude that reasonable choices for the cloud parameters imply CBR anisotropy consistent with the present experimental limits, in agreement with the perturbative approach. This means the remarkable isotropy of the CBR need not contradict the early small-scale structure formation predicted in some cosmogonies.

  7. Demonstrating universal scaling for dynamics of Yukawa one-component plasmas after an interaction quench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langin, T. K.; Strickler, T.; Maksimovic, N.; McQuillen, P.; Pohl, T.; Vrinceanu, D.; Killian, T. C.

    2016-02-01

    The Yukawa one-component plasma (OCP) model is a paradigm for describing plasmas that contain one component of interest and one or more other components that can be treated as a neutralizing, screening background. In appropriately scaled units, interactions are characterized entirely by a screening parameter, κ . As a result, systems of similar κ show the same dynamics, regardless of the underlying parameters (e.g., density and temperature). We demonstrate this behavior using ultracold neutral plasmas (UNPs) created by photoionizing a cold (T ≤10 mK) gas. The ions in UNP systems are well described by the Yukawa model, with the electrons providing the screening. Creation of the plasma through photoionization can be thought of as a rapid quench of the interaction potential from κ =∞ to a final κ value set by the electron density and temperature. We demonstrate experimentally that the postquench dynamics are universal in κ over a factor of 30 in density and an order of magnitude in temperature. Results are compared with molecular-dynamics simulations. We also demonstrate that features of the postquench kinetic energy evolution, such as disorder-induced heating and kinetic-energy oscillations, can be used to determine the plasma density and the electron temperature.

  8. EMAPS: An Efficient Multiscale Approach to Plasma Systems with Non-MHD Scale Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omelchenko, Yuri A. [SciberQuest, Inc., Del Mar, CA (United States); Karimabadi, Homa [SciberQuest, Inc., Del Mar, CA (United States)

    2014-10-14

    Using Discrete-Event Simulation (DES) as a novel paradigm for time integration of large-scale physics-driven systems, we have achieved significant breakthroughs in simulations of multi-dimensional magnetized plasmas where ion kinetic and finite Larmor radius (FLR) and Hall effects play a crucial role. For these purposes we apply a unique asynchronous simulation tool: a parallel, electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code, HYPERS (Hybrid Particle Event-Resolved Simulator), which treats plasma electrons as a charge neutralizing fluid and solves a self-consistent set of non-radiative Maxwell, electron fluid equations and ion particle equations on a structured computational grid. HYPERS enables adaptive local time steps for particles, fluid elements and electromagnetic fields. This ensures robustness (stability) and efficiency (speed) of highly dynamic and nonlinear simulations of compact plasma systems such spheromaks, FRCs, ion beams and edge plasmas. HYPERS is a unique asynchronous code that has been designed to serve as a test bed for developing multi-physics applications not only for laboratory plasma devices but generally across a number of plasma physics fields, including astrophysics, space physics and electronic devices. We have made significant improvements to the HYPERS core: (1) implemented a new asynchronous magnetic field integration scheme that preserves local divB=0 to within round-off errors; (2) Improved staggered-grid discretizations of electric and magnetic fields. These modifications have significantly enhanced the accuracy and robustness of 3D simulations. We have conducted first-ever end-to-end 3D simulations of merging spheromak plasmas. The preliminary results show: (1) tilt-driven relaxation of a freely expanding spheromak to an m=1 Taylor helix configuration and (2) possibility of formation of a tilt-stable field-reversed configuration via merging and magnetic reconnection of two double-sided spheromaks with opposite helicities.

  9. Anomalous dynamical scaling in anharmonic chains and plasma models with multi-particle collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Di Cintio, Pierfrancesco; Bufferand, Hugo; Ciraolo, Guido; Lepri, Stefano; Straka, Mika J

    2015-01-01

    We study the anomalous dynamical scaling of equilibrium correlations in one dimensional systems. Two different models are compared: the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain with cubic and quartic nonlinearity and a gas of point particles interacting stochastically through the Multi-Particle Collision dynamics. For both models -that admit three conservation laws- by means of detailed numerical simulations we verify the predictions of Nonlinear Fluctuating Hydrodynamics for the structure factors of density and energy fluctuations at equilibrium. Despite of this, violations of the expected scaling in the currents correlation are found in some regimes, hindering the observation of the asymptotic scaling predicted by the theory. In the case of the gas model this crossover is clearly demonstrated upon changing the coupling constant.

  10. Inertial-range dynamics and scaling laws of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the weak-field regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackbourn, Luke A K; Tran, Chuong V

    2014-08-01

    We study inertial-range dynamics and scaling laws in unforced two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the regime of moderately small and small initial magnetic-to-kinetic-energy ratio r(0), with an emphasis on the latter. The regime of small r(0) corresponds to a relatively weak field and strong magnetic stretching, whereby the turbulence is characterized by an intense conversion of kinetic into magnetic energy (dynamo action in the three-dimensional context). This conversion is an inertial-range phenomenon and, upon becoming quasisaturated, deposits the converted energy within the inertial range rather than transferring it to the small scales. As a result, the magnetic-energy spectrum E(b)(k) in the inertial range can become quite shallow and may not be adequately explained or understood in terms of conventional cascade theories. It is demonstrated by numerical simulations at high Reynolds numbers (and unity magnetic Prandtl number) that the energetics and inertial-range scaling depend strongly on r(0). In particular, for fully developed turbulence with r(0) in the range [1/4,1/4096], E(b)(k) is found to scale as k(α), where α≳-1, including α>0. The extent of such a shallow spectrum is limited, becoming broader as r(0) is decreased. The slope α increases as r(0) is decreased, appearing to tend to +1 in the limit of small r(0). This implies equipartition of magnetic energy among the Fourier modes of the inertial range and the scaling k(-1) of the magnetic potential variance, whose flux is direct rather than inverse. This behavior of the potential resembles that of a passive scalar. However, unlike a passive scalar whose variance dissipation rate slowly vanishes in the diffusionless limit, the dissipation rate of the magnetic potential variance scales linearly with the diffusivity in that limit. Meanwhile, the kinetic-energy spectrum is relatively steep, followed by a much shallower tail due to strong antidynamo excitation. This gives rise to a total

  11. Design and fabrication of a glovebox for the Plasma Hearth Process radioactive bench-scale system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlquist, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

    1996-07-01

    This paper presents some of the design considerations and fabrication techniques for building a glovebox for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) radioactive bench-scale system. The PHP radioactive bench-scale system uses a plasma torch to process a variety of radioactive materials into a final vitrified waste form. The processed waste will contain plutonium and trace amounts of other radioactive materials. The glovebox used in this system is located directly below the plasma chamber and is called the Hearth Handling Enclosure (HHE). The HHE is designed to maintain a confinement boundary between the processed waste and the operator. Operations that take place inside the HHE include raising and lowering the hearth using a hydraulic lift table, transporting the hearth within the HHE using an overhead monorail and hoist system, sampling and disassembly of the processed waste and hearth, weighing the hearth, rebuilding a hearth, and sampling HEPA filters. The PHP radioactive bench-scale system is located at the TREAT facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  12. The interplay between helicity and rotation in turbulence: implications for scaling laws and small-scale dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pouquet, A

    2009-01-01

    Invariance properties of physical systems govern their behavior: energy conservation in turbulence drives a wide distribution of energy among modes, observed in geophysical or astrophysical flows. In ideal hydrodynamics, the role of helicity conservation (correlation between velocity and its curl, measuring departures from mirror symmetry) remains unclear since it does not alter the energy spectrum. However, with solid body rotation, significant differences emerge between helical and non-helical flows. We first outline several results, like the energy and helicity spectral distribution and the breaking of strict universality for the individual spectra. Using massive numerical simulations, we then show that small-scale structures and their intermittency properties differ according to whether helicity is present or not, in particular with respect to the emergence of Beltrami-core vortices (BCV) that are laminar helical vertical updrafts. These results point to the discovery of a small parameter besides the Ross...

  13. Recursion relations for graviton scattering amplitudes from Bose symmetry and bonus scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGady, David A.; Rodina, Laurentiu

    2015-05-01

    Modern on-shell S -matrix methods may dramatically improve our understanding of perturbative quantum gravity, but current foundations of on-shell techniques for general relativity still rely on off-shell Feynman diagram analysis. Here, we complete the fully on-shell proof of Schuster and Toro J. High Energy Phys. 06 (2009) 079] that the recursion relations of Britto, Cachazo, Feng, and Witten (BCFW) apply to relativity tree amplitudes. We do so by showing that the surprising requirement of "bonus" z-2 scaling under a BCFW shift directly follows from Bose symmetry. Moreover, we show that amplitudes in generic theories subjected to BCFW deformations of identical particles necessarily scale as zeven. When applied to the color ordered expansions of Yang-Mills, this directly implies the improved behavior under nonadjacent gluon shifts. Using the same analysis, three-dimensional gravity amplitudes scale as z-4, compared to the z-1 behavior for conformal Chern-Simons matter theory.

  14. Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in Earth's plasma sheet. From more than 80 Cluster plasma sheet crossings (660 h data at the altitude of about 15–20 RE in the summer and fall of 2001, we have identified 116 Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and 35 Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have estimated typical values of the scale size and life time of the CLRs and the CGRs. We find that a majority of the observed ECRs are rather stationary in space, but varying in time. Assuming that the ECRs are cylindrically shaped and equal in size, we conclude that the typical scale size of the ECRs is 2 RE≲ΔSECR≲5 RE. The ECRs hence occupy a significant portion of the mid altitude plasma sheet. Moreover, the CLRs appear to be somewhat larger than the CGRs. The life time of the ECRs are of the order of 1–10 min, consistent with the large scale magnetotail MHD simulations of Birn and Hesse (2005. The life time of the CGRs is somewhat shorter than for the CLRs. On time scales of 1–10 min, we believe that ECRs rise and vanish in significant regions of the plasma sheet, possibly oscillating between load and generator character. It is probable that at least some of the observed ECRs oscillate energy back and forth in the plasma sheet instead of channeling it to the ionosphere.

  15. Energy loss as the origin of an universal scaling law of the elliptic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Andrés, Carlota; Pajares, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that the excellent scaling of the elliptic flow found for all centralities, species and energies from RHIC to the LHC for $p_{T}$ less than the saturation momentum is a consequence of the energy lost by a parton interacting with the color field produced in a nucleus-nucleus collision. In particular, the deduced shape of the scaling curve describes correctly all the data. We discuss the possible extensions to higher $p_{T}$, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions as well as higher harmonics.

  16. An allometric scaling law between gray matter and white matter of cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Jihuan [College of Science, Donghua University, Shanghai, 1882 Yan' an Xilu Road, Shanghai 200051 (China)] e-mail: jhhe@dhu.edu.cn

    2006-02-01

    An allometric scaling relationship between cortical white and gray volumes is derived from a general model that describes brain's remarkable efficiency and prodigious communications between brain areas. The model assumes that (1) a cell's metabolic rate depends upon cell's surface; (2) the overall basal metabolic rates of brain areas depend upon their fractal structures; (3) differential brain areas have same basal metabolic rate at slow wave sleep. The obtained allometric exponent scaling white matter to gray matter is 1.2, which is very much close to Zhang and Sejnowski's observation data.

  17. Crystallization of ion clouds in octupole traps: structural transitions, core melting, and scaling laws

    CERN Document Server

    Calvo, Florent; Yurtsever, Ersin

    2009-01-01

    The stable structures and melting properties of ion clouds in isotropic octupole traps are investigated using a combination of semi-analytical and numerical models, with a particular emphasis at finite size scaling effects. Small-size clouds are found to be hollow and arranged in shells corresponding approximately to the solutions of the Thomson problem. The shell structure is lost in clusters containing more than a few thousands of ions, the inner parts of the cloud becoming soft and amorphous. While melting is triggered in the core shells, the melting temperature unexpectedly follows the rule expected for three-dimensional dense particles, with a depression scaling linearly with the inverse radius.

  18. Energy loss as the origin of a universal scaling law of the elliptic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, Carlota; Pajares, Carlos [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias IGFAE, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Braun, Mikhail [Saint Petersburg State University, Department of High-Energy Physics, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    It is shown that the excellent scaling of the elliptic flow found for all centralities, species and energies from RHIC to the LHC for p{sub T} less than the saturation momentum is a consequence of the energy lost by a parton interacting with the color field produced in a nucleus-nucleus collision. In particular, the deduced shape of the scaling curve describes correctly all the data. We discuss the possible extensions to higher p{sub T}, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions as well as higher harmonics. (orig.)

  19. Validation data for models of contaminant dispersal : scaling laws and data needs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hern, Timothy John; Ceccio, Steven Louis (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI)

    2004-09-01

    Contaminant dispersal models for use at scales ranging from meters to miles are widely used for planning sensor locations, first-responder actions for release scenarios, etc. and are constantly being improved. Applications range from urban contaminant dispersal to locating buried targets from an exhaust signature. However, these models need detailed data for model improvement and validation. A small Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program was funded in FY04 to examine the feasibility and usefulness of a scale-model capability for quantitative characterization of flow and contaminant dispersal in complex environments. This report summarizes the work performed in that LDRD. The basics of atmospheric dispersion and dispersion modeling are reviewed. We examine the need for model scale data, and the capability of existing model test methods. Currently, both full-scale and model scale experiments are performed in order to collect validation data for numerical models. Full-scale experiments are expensive, are difficult to repeat, and usually produce relatively sparse data fields. Model scale tests often employ wind tunnels, and the data collected is, in many cases, derived from single point measurements. We review the scaling assumptions and methods that are used to relate model and full scale flows. In particular, we examine how liquid flows may be used to examine the process of atmospheric dispersion. The scaling between liquid and gas flows is presented. Use of liquid as the test fluid has some advantages in terms of achieving fully turbulent Reynolds numbers and in seeding the flow with neutrally buoyant tracer particles. In general, using a liquid flow instead of a gas flow somewhat simplifies the use of full field diagnostics, such as Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Induced Fluorescence. It is also possible to create stratified flows through mixtures of fluids (e.g., water, alcohol, and brine). Lastly, we

  20. Validation data for models of contaminant dispersal : scaling laws and data needs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hern, Timothy John; Ceccio, Steven Louis (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI)

    2004-09-01

    Contaminant dispersal models for use at scales ranging from meters to miles are widely used for planning sensor locations, first-responder actions for release scenarios, etc. and are constantly being improved. Applications range from urban contaminant dispersal to locating buried targets from an exhaust signature. However, these models need detailed data for model improvement and validation. A small Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program was funded in FY04 to examine the feasibility and usefulness of a scale-model capability for quantitative characterization of flow and contaminant dispersal in complex environments. This report summarizes the work performed in that LDRD. The basics of atmospheric dispersion and dispersion modeling are reviewed. We examine the need for model scale data, and the capability of existing model test methods. Currently, both full-scale and model scale experiments are performed in order to collect validation data for numerical models. Full-scale experiments are expensive, are difficult to repeat, and usually produce relatively sparse data fields. Model scale tests often employ wind tunnels, and the data collected is, in many cases, derived from single point measurements. We review the scaling assumptions and methods that are used to relate model and full scale flows. In particular, we examine how liquid flows may be used to examine the process of atmospheric dispersion. The scaling between liquid and gas flows is presented. Use of liquid as the test fluid has some advantages in terms of achieving fully turbulent Reynolds numbers and in seeding the flow with neutrally buoyant tracer particles. In general, using a liquid flow instead of a gas flow somewhat simplifies the use of full field diagnostics, such as Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Induced Fluorescence. It is also possible to create stratified flows through mixtures of fluids (e.g., water, alcohol, and brine). Lastly, we

  1. An enquiry into the method of paired comparison: reliability, scaling, and Thurstone's Law of Comparative Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas C. Brown; George L. Peterson

    2009-01-01

    The method of paired comparisons is used to measure individuals' preference orderings of items presented to them as discrete binary choices. This paper reviews the theory and application of the paired comparison method, describes a new computer program available for eliciting the choices, and presents an analysis of methods for scaling paired choice data to...

  2. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. VII. Elliptical galaxy scaling laws from direct observational mass measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolton, Adam S.; Treu, Tommaso; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Gavazzi, Raphael; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Burles, Scott; Schlegel, David J.; Wayth, Randall

    2008-01-01

    We use a sample of 53 massive early-type strong gravitational lens galaxies with well-measured redshifts (ranging from z = 0.06 to 0.36) and stellar velocity dispersions (between 175 and 400 km s(-1)) from the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey to derive numerous empirical scaling relations. The ratio be

  3. Comparison between scaling law and nonparametric Bayesian estimate for the recurrence time of strong earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondi, R.

    2009-04-01

    According to the unified scaling theory the probability distribution function of the recurrence time T is a scaled version of a base function and the average value of T can be used as a scale parameter for the distribution. The base function must belong to the scale family of distributions: tested on different catalogues and for different scale levels, for Corral (2005) the (truncated) generalized gamma distribution is the best model, for German (2006) the Weibull distribution. The scaling approach should overcome the difficulty of estimating distribution functions over small areas but theorical limitations and partial instability of the estimated distributions have been pointed out in the literature. Our aim is to analyze the recurrence time of strong earthquakes that occurred in the Italian territory. To satisfy the hypotheses of independence and identical distribution we have evaluated the times between events that occurred in each area of the Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources and then we have gathered them by eight tectonically coherent regions, each of them dominated by a well characterized geodynamic process. To solve problems like: paucity of data, presence of outliers and uncertainty in the choice of the functional expression for the distribution of t, we have followed a nonparametric approach (Rotondi (2009)) in which: (a) the maximum flexibility is obtained by assuming that the probability distribution is a random function belonging to a large function space, distributed as a stochastic process; (b) nonparametric estimation method is robust when the data contain outliers; (c) Bayesian methodology allows to exploit different information sources so that the model fitting may be good also to scarce samples. We have compared the hazard rates evaluated through the parametric and nonparametric approach. References Corral A. (2005). Mixing of rescaled data and Bayesian inference for earthquake recurrence times, Nonlin. Proces. Geophys., 12, 89

  4. Growing Random Geometric Graph Models of Super-linear Scaling Law

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Recent researches on complex systems highlighted the so-called super-linear growth phenomenon. As the system size $P$ measured as population in cities or active users in online communities increases, the total activities $X$ measured as GDP or number of new patents, crimes in cities generated by these people also increases but in a faster rate. This accelerating growth phenomenon can be well described by a super-linear power law $X \\propto P^{\\gamma}$($\\gamma>1$). However, the explanation on this phenomenon is still lack. In this paper, we propose a modeling framework called growing random geometric models to explain the super-linear relationship. A growing network is constructed on an abstract geometric space. The new coming node can only survive if it just locates on an appropriate place in the space where other nodes exist, then new edges are connected with the adjacent nodes whose number is determined by the density of existing nodes. Thus the total number of edges can grow with the number of nodes in a f...

  5. Stability Margin Scaling Laws for Distributed Formation Control as a Function of Network Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Hao, He; Mehta, Prashant G

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of distributed formation control of a large number of vehicles. An individual vehicle in the formation is assumed to be a fully actuated point mass. A distributed control law is examined: the control action on an individual vehicle depends on (i) its own velocity and (ii) the relative position measurements with a small subset of vehicles (neighbors) in the formation. The neighbors are defined according to an information graph. In this paper we describe a methodology for modeling, analysis, and distributed control design of such vehicular formations whose information graph is a D-dimensional lattice. The modeling relies on an approximation based on a partial differential equation (PDE) that describes the spatio-temporal evolution of position errors in the formation. The analysis and control design is based on the PDE model. We deduce asymptotic formulae for the closed-loop stability margin (absolute value of the real part of the least stable eigenvalue) of the controlled formation. The ...

  6. Power-law scaling for the adiabatic algorithm for search-engine ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frees, Adam; Gamble, John King; Rudinger, Kenneth; Bach, Eric; Friesen, Mark; Joynt, Robert; Coppersmith, S. N.

    2013-09-01

    An important method for search engine result ranking works by finding the principal eigenvector of the “Google matrix.” Recently, a quantum algorithm for generating this eigenvector as a quantum state was presented, with evidence of an exponential speedup of this process for some scale-free networks. Here we show that the run time depends on features of the graphs other than the degree distribution, and can be altered sufficiently to rule out a general exponential speedup. According to our simulations, for a sample of graphs with degree distributions that are scale-free, with parameters thought to closely resemble the Web, the proposed algorithm for eigenvector preparation does not appear to run exponentially faster than the classical case.

  7. Improved Multibody Dynamics for Investigating Energy Dissipation in Train Collisions Based on Scaling Laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Shao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate energy dissipation in train collisions. A 1/8 scaled train model, about one-dimensional in longitudinal direction, was used to carry out a scaled train collision test. Corresponding multibody dynamic simulations were conducted using traditional and improved method model (IMM in ADAMS. In IMM, the connection between two adjacent cars was expressed by a nonlinear spring and energy absorbing structures were equivalently represented by separate forces, instead of one force. IMM was able to simulate the motion of each car and displayed the deformation of structures at both ends of the cars. IMM showed larger deformations and energy absorption of structures in moving cars than those in stationary cars. Moreover, the asymmetry in deformation proportion in main energy absorbing structures decreased with increasing collision speed. The asymmetry decreased from 11.69% to 3.60% when the collision speed increased from 10 km/h to 36 km/h.

  8. Physics-based Scaling Laws for Confined and Unconfined Transverse Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    x direction is equal in magnitude to the rate at which y-momentum is introduced through the jet orifice . Thus BDJ is a length scale associated with...Mungal (2001) both find that the entrainment coefficient is a function of x/DJ that originates near zero (weak entrainment near the orifice ) and...operating condition, the mixture fraction is higher on the opposite side of the pipe relative to the injection location, suggesting the jet flow has

  9. Police Stations, Law Enforcement Locations in Rhode Island. Any location where sworn officers of a law enforcement agency are regularly based or stationed. Law enforcement agencies "are publicly funded and employ at least one full-time or part-time sworn officer with ge, Published in 2010, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Police Stations dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2010. It is described as 'Law...

  10. Fabrication and testing of gas-filled targets for large-scale plasma experiments on nova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, G.F.; Rivers, C.J.; Spragge, M.R.; Wallace, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    The proposed next-generation ICF facility, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to produce energy gain from x-ray heated {open_quotes}indirect-drive{close_quotes} fuel capsules. For indirect-drive targets, laser light heats the inside of the Au hohlraum wall and produces x rays which in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Unlike Nova targets, in NIF-scale targets laser light will propagate through several millimeters of gas, producing a plasma, before impinging upon the Au hohlraum wall. The purpose of the gas-produced plasma is to provide sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively into the hohlraum cavity. Excessive expansion of the Au wall interacts with the laser pulse and degrades the drive symmetry of the capsule implosion. The authors have begun an experimental campaign on the Nova laser to study the effect of hohlraum gas on both laser-plasma interaction and implosion symmetry. In their current NIF target design, the calculated plasma electron temperature is T{sub e} {approx} 3 keV and the electron density is N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}.

  11. Demonstrating Universal Scaling in Quench Dynamics of a Yukawa One-Component Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Langin, T K; Maksimovic, N; McQuillen, P; Pohl, T; Vrinceanu, D; Killian, T C

    2015-01-01

    The Yukawa one-component plasma (OCP) is a paradigm model for describing plasmas that contain one component of interest and one or more other components that can be treated as a neutralizing, screening background. In appropriately scaled units, interactions are characterized entirely by a screening parameter, $\\kappa$. As a result, systems of similar $\\kappa$ show the same dynamics, regardless of the underlying parameters (e.g., density and temperature). We demonstrate this behavior using ultracold neutral plasmas (UNP) created by photoionizing a cold ($T\\le10$ mK) gas. The ions in UNP systems are well described by the Yukawa model, with the electrons providing the screening. Creation of the plasma through photoionization can be thought of as a rapid quench from $\\kappa_{0}=\\infty$ to a final $\\kappa$ value set by the electron density and temperature. We demonstrate experimentally that the post-quench dynamics are universal in $\\kappa$ over a factor of 30 in density and an order of magnitude in temperature. R...

  12. Large-scale drifts observed on electron temperature measurements on JET plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbaud, Thomas; Alper, Barry; Beausang, Kieran; Beurskens, Marc; Flanagan, Joanne; Kempenaars, Mark; Sirinelli, Antoine; Maslov, Mikhail; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Contributors, JET EFDA

    2012-01-01

    Between 1995 and 2009, electron temperature (Te) measurements of more than 15000 plasmas produced in the Joint European Torus (JET) have been carefully reviewed using the two main diagnostics available over this time period: Michelson interferometer and Thomson scattering systems. Long term stability of JET Te is experimentaly observed by defining the ECE TS ratio as the ratio of central Te measured by Michelson and LIDAR. This paper, based on a careful review of Te measurement from 15 years of JET plasmas, concludes that JET Te exhibits a 15-20% effective uncertainty mostly made of large-scale temporal drifts, and an overall uncertainty of 16-22%. Variations of 18 plasma parameters are checked in another data set, made of a "reference data set" made of ohmic pulses as similar as possible between 1998 and 2009. Time drifts of ECE TS ratios appear to be mostly disconnected from the variations observed on these 18 plasma parameters, except for the very low amplitude variations of the field which are well correl...

  13. Numerical studies from quantum to macroscopic scales of carbon nanoparticules in hydrogen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Guillaume; Ngandjong, Alain; Mezei, Zsolt; Mougenot, Jonathan; Michau, Armelle; Hassouni, Khaled; Seydou, Mahamadou; Maurel, François

    2016-09-01

    Dusty plasmas take part in large scientific domains from Universe Science to nanomaterial synthesis processes. They are often generated by growth from molecular precursor. This growth leads to the formation of larger clusters which induce solid germs nucleation. Particle formed are described by an aerosol dynamic taking into account coagulation, molecular deposition and transport processes. These processes are controlled by the elementary particle. So there is a strong coupling between particle dynamics and plasma discharge equilibrium. This study is focused on the development of a multiscale physic and numeric model of hydrogen plasmas and carbon particles around three essential coupled axes to describe the various physical phenomena: (i) Macro/mesoscopic fluid modeling describing in an auto-coherent way, characteristics of the plasma, molecular clusters and aerosol behavior; (ii) the classic molecular dynamics offering a description to the scale molecular of the chains of chemical reactions and the phenomena of aggregation; (iii) the quantum chemistry to establish the activation barriers of the different processes driving the nanopoarticule formation.

  14. Plasma-field Coupling at Small Length Scales in Solar Wind Near 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livadiotis, G.; Desai, M. I.

    2016-10-01

    In collisionless plasmas such as the solar wind, the coupling between plasma constituents and the embedded magnetic field occurs on various temporal and spatial scales, and is primarily responsible for the transfer of energy between waves and particles. Recently, it was shown that the transfer of energy between solar wind plasma particles and waves is governed by a new and unique relationship: the ratio between the magnetosonic energy and the plasma frequency is constant, E ms/ω pl ˜ ℏ*. This paper examines the variability and substantial departure of this ratio from ℏ* observed at ˜1 au, which is caused by a dispersion of fast magnetosonic (FMS) waves. In contrast to the efficiently transferred energy in the fast solar wind, the lower efficiency of the slow solar wind can be caused by this dispersion, whose relation and characteristics are derived and studied. In summary, we show that (i) the ratio E ms/ω pl transitions continuously from the slow to the fast solar wind, tending toward the constant ℏ* (ii) the transition is more efficient for larger thermal, Alfvén, or FMS speeds; (iii) the fast solar wind is almost dispersionless, characterized by quasi-constant values of the FMS speed, while the slow wind is subject to dispersion that is less effective for larger wind or magnetosonic speeds; and (iv) the constant ℏ* is estimated with the best known precision, ℏ* ≈ (1.160 ± 0.083) × 10-22 Js.

  15. HRP facility for fabrication of ITER vertical target divertor full scale plasma facing units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visca, Eliseo, E-mail: eliseo.visca@enea.it [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Roccella, S. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Candura, D.; Palermo, M. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16152 Genova (Italy); Rossi, P.; Pizzuto, A. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Sanguinetti, G.P. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16152 Genova (Italy); Mancini, A.; Verdini, L.; Cacciotti, E.; Cerri, V.; Mugnaini, G.; Reale, A.; Giacomi, G. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • R&D activities for the manufacturing of ITER divertor high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC). • ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components. • ENEA and ANSALDO NUCLEARE jointly participate to the European program for the qualification of the manufacturing technology for the ITER divertor IVT. • Successful manufacturing by HRP (Hot Radial Pressing) of first full-scale full-W armored IVT qualification prototype. - Abstract: ENEA and Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A. (ANN) have being deeply involved in the European development activities for the manufacturing of the ITER Divertor Inner Vertical Target (IVT) plasma-facing components. During normal operation the heat flux deposited on the bottom segment of divertor is 5–10 MW/m{sup 2} but the capability to remove up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} during transient events of 10 s must also be demonstrated. In order to fulfill ITER requirements, ENEA has set up and widely tested a manufacturing process, named Hot Radial Pressing (HRP). The last challenge is now to fabricate full-scale prototypes of the IVT, aimed to be qualified for the next step, i.e. the series production. On the basis of the experience of manufacturing hundreds of small mock-ups, ENEA designed and installed a new suitable HRP facility. The objective of getting a final shaped plasma facing unit (PFU) that satisfies these requirements is an ambitious target because tolerances set by ITER/F4E are very tight. The setting-up of the equipment started with the fabrication of full scale and representative ‘dummies’ in which stainless steel instead of CFC or W was used for monoblocks. The results confirmed that dimensions were compliant with the required tolerances. The paper reports a brief description of the innovative HRP equipment and the dimensional check results after HRP of the first full-scale full-W PFU.

  16. Entropy Stress and Scaling of Vital Organs over Life Span Based on Allometric Laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Past theories on total lifetime energy expenditures and entropy generation in biological systems (BS dealt with whole systems, but the recent literature suggests that the total metabolic rate of a BS,q̇body (W is a sum of product of specific metabolic rate q̇k,m (W/kg of organ k of each vital life organ, k {k = brain, heart, kidney and liver, or abbreviated as BHKL, and rest of the organ mass (R} and mass of each organ k (mk. Using this hypothesis, Kleiber’s law on metabolic rate of BS (q̇body for animals of different sizes was validated. In this work, a similar procedure is adopted in estimating total entropy generation rate of whole human body (σ̇body, W/K as a sum of product of specific entropy generation rate for each organ, σ̇k,m (W/{K kg of organ k·} and the organ mass at any given age (t. Further integrating over life span for each organ (tlife, the lifetime specific entropy generated by organ k, σk,m,life (J of organ k/ {K kg organ k} is calculated. Then lifetime entropy generation of unit body mass, σbody,M,life (J/{K kg body mass·} is calculated as a sum of the corresponding values contributed by all vital organs to unit body mass and verified with previously published literature. The higher the σk,m,life , the higher the entropy stress level (which is a measure of energy released by unit organ mass of k as heat and the irreversibility within the organ, resulting in faster degradation of organ and the consequent health problems for the whole BS. In order to estimate σ̇k (W/K of organ k, data on energy release rate (q̇ is needed over lifetime for each organ. While the Adequate Macronutrients Distribution Range (AMDR/Adequate Intake (AI publication can be used in estimating the energy intake of whole body vs. age for the human body, the energy expenditure data is not available at organ level. Hence the σk,m,life was computed using existing allometric laws developed for the metabolism of the organs, the

  17. Delay-limited Source and Channel Coding of Quasi-Stationary Sources over Block Fading Channels: Design and Scaling Laws

    CERN Document Server

    Joda, Roghayeh

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, delay-limited transmission of quasi-stationary sources over block fading channels are considered. Considering distortion outage probability as the performance measure, two source and channel coding schemes with power adaptive transmission are presented. The first one is optimized for fixed rate transmission, and hence enjoys simplicity of implementation. The second one is a high performance scheme, which also benefits from optimized rate adaptation with respect to source and channel states. In high SNR regime, the performance scaling laws in terms of outage distortion exponent and asymptotic outage distortion gain are derived, where two schemes with fixed transmission power and adaptive or optimized fixed rates are considered as benchmarks for comparisons. Various analytical and numerical results are provided which demonstrate a superior performance for source and channel optimized rate and power adaptive scheme. It is also observed that from a distortion outage perspective, the fixed rate adap...

  18. Scaling law and flux pinning in polycrystalline La1.85Sr0.15CuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampshire, D. P.; Ikeda, J. A. S.; Chiang, Y.-M.

    1989-11-01

    The transport critical current density (Jct) of two hot-pressed bulk polycrystalline La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 superconducting samples has been measured over the temperature range 2 K to Tc in magnetic fields up to 27 T. It is demonstrated that these data have a separable variable form Fp=JctB=α(D)B2.4c2 (T)b [where α(D) is a constant and b=B/Bc2(T)], in agreement with the Fietz-Webb scaling law. This is strong evidence that in high magnetic fields, flux pinning is the mechanism that determines the critical current density. The authors suggest that the dissipative state is described by flux flow along the regions of weak flux pinning at the grain boundaries.

  19. Supermassive black hole binary environments: Effects on the scaling laws and time to detection for the stochastic background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigeland, S. J.; Siemens, X.

    2016-12-01

    One of the primary gravitational wave (GW) sources for pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) is the stochastic background formed by supermassive black holes binaries (SMBHBs). In this paper, we investigate how the environments of SMBHBs effect the sensitivity of PTAs by deriving scaling laws for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the optimal cross-correlation statistic. The presence of gas and stars around SMBHBs accelerates the merger at large distances, depleting the GW stochastic background at low frequencies. We show that environmental interactions may delay detection by a few years or more, depending on the PTA configuration and the frequency at which the dynamical evolution transitions from being dominated by environmental effects to GW dominated.

  20. Supermassive Black Hole Binary Environments: Effects on the Scaling Laws and Time to Detection for the Stochastic Background

    CERN Document Server

    Vigeland, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary gravitational wave (GW) sources for pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) is the stochastic background formed by supermassive black holes binaries (SMBHBs). In this paper, we investigate how the environments of SMBHBs will effect the sensitivity of PTAs by deriving scaling laws for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the optimal cross-correlation statistic. The presence of gas and stars around SMBHBs will accelerate the merger at large distances, depleting the GW stochastic background at low frequencies. We show that environmental interactions may delay detection by a few years or more, depending on the PTA configuration and the frequency at which the dynamical evolution transitions from being dominated by environmental effects to GW-dominated.

  1. 壁湍流标度律的实验研究%Experimental research of scaling law in wall turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜楠; 王玉春; 黄章峰

    2001-01-01

    A turbulent boundary layer along a flat plate with zero pressure gradients has been explored in a wind tunnel. Longitudinal velocity measurement at different vertical location has been carried out using hot wire anemometer. The scaling law of the nth order structure function of the velocity increment has been analyzed.%对风洞中零压力梯度平板湍流边界层进行了实验研究,用热线风速仪测量了不同法向位置的脉动速度,研究了平板湍流边界层不同法向位置速度结构函数的标度律。

  2. Comprehensive investigation of sequential plasma activated Si/Si bonded interfaces for nano-integration on the wafer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibria, M G; Zhang, F; Lee, T H; Kim, M J; Howlader, M M R

    2010-04-02

    The sequentially plasma activated bonding of silicon wafers has been investigated to facilitate the development of chemical free, room temperature and spontaneous bonding required for nanostructure integration on the wafer scale. The contact angle of the surface and the electrical and nanostructural behavior of the interface have been studied. The contact angle measurements show that the sequentially plasma (reactive ion etching plasma followed by microwave radicals) treated surfaces offer highly reactive and hydrophilic surfaces. These highly reactive surfaces allow spontaneous integration at the nanometer scale without any chemicals, external pressure or heating. Electrical characteristics show that the current transportation across the nanobonded interface is dependent on the plasma parameters. High resolution transmission electron microscopy results confirm nanometer scale bonding which is needed for the integration of nanostructures. The findings can be applied in spontaneous integration of nanostructures such as nanowires/nanotubes/quantum dots on the wafer scale.

  3. Experimental scaling law for the subcritical transition to turbulence in plane Poiseuille flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoult, Grégoire; Aider, Jean-Luc; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2012-02-01

    We present an experimental study of the transition to turbulence in a plane Poiseuille flow. Using a well-controlled perturbation, we analyze the flow by using extensive particle image velocimetry and flow visualization (using laser-induced fluorescence) measurements, and use the deformation of the mean velocity profile as a criterion to characterize the state of the flow. From a large parametric study, four different states are defined, depending on the values of the Reynolds number and the amplitude of the perturbation. We discuss the role of coherent structures, such as hairpin vortices, in the transition. We find that the minimal amplitude of the perturbation triggering transition scales asymptotically as Re(-1).

  4. Power law scaling for the adiabatic algorithm for search engine ranking

    CERN Document Server

    Frees, Adam; Rudinger, Kenneth; Bach, Eric; Friesen, Mark; Joynt, Robert; Coppersmith, S N

    2012-01-01

    An important method for search engine result ranking works by finding the principal eigenvector of the "Google matrix." Recently, a quantum algorithm for this problem and evidence of an exponential speedup for some scale-free networks were presented. Here, we show that the run-time depends on features of the graphs other than the degree distribution, and can be altered sufficiently to rule out a general exponential speedup. For a sample of graphs with degree distributions that more closely resemble the Web than in previous work, the proposed algorithm does not appear to run exponentially faster than the classical case.

  5. Nano-scale electron bunching in laser-triggered ionization injection in plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, X L; Li, F; Wan, Y; Wu, Y P; Hua, J F; Pai, C -H; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2015-01-01

    Ionization injection is attractive as a controllable injection scheme for generating high quality electron beams using plasma-based wakefield acceleration. Due to the phase dependent tunneling ionization rate and the trapping dynamics within a nonlinear wake, the discrete injection of electrons within the wake is nonlinearly mapped to discrete final phase space structure of the beam at the location where the electrons are trapped. This phenomenon is theoretically analyzed and examined by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations which show that three dimensional effects limit the wave number of the modulation to between $> 2k_0$ and about $5k_0$, where $k_0$ is the wavenumber of the injection laser. Such a nano-scale bunched beam can be diagnosed through coherent transition radiation upon its exit from the plasma and may find use in generating high-power ultraviolet radiation upon passage through a resonant undulator.

  6. Multi-scale physics mechanisms and spontaneous edge transport bifurcations in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, C.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Silva, C.; Carralero, D.; Ascasibar, E.; Carreras, B. A.; Estrada, T.; Tabarés, F.; Tafalla, D.; Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.; López-Fraguas, A.; van Milligen, B.; Ochando, M. A.

    2009-09-01

    The magnitude of radial transport in magnetic confinement devices for controlled nuclear fusion suffers spontaneous bifurcations when specific system parameter values are exceeded. Here we show, for the first time, that the correlation length of the plasma potential becomes of the order of the machine size during the edge bifurcation itself, quite unlike the density fluctuations. The mechanism governing the development of this bifurcation, leading to the establishment of an edge transport barrier, is still one of the main scientific conundrums facing the magnetic fusion community after more than twenty years of intense research. The results presented here show the dominant role of long-range correlations when approaching the Low to High confinement edge transition in fusion plasmas. This is in line with the expectation that multi-scale interactions are a crucial ingredient of complex dynamics in many non-equilibrium systems.

  7. LPI Thresholds in Longer Scale Length Plasmas Driven by the Nike Laser*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J.; Oh, J.; Phillips, L.; Afeyan, B.; Seely, J.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Feldman, U.; Holland, G.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E.; Manka, C.

    2010-11-01

    The Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) laser is an attractive driver for inertial confinement fusion due to its short wavelength (248nm), large bandwidth (1-3 THz), and beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence. Experiments with the Nike KrF laser have demonstrated intensity thresholds for laser plasma instabilities (LPI) higher than reported for other high power lasers operating at longer wavelengths (>=351 nm). The previous Nike experiments used short pulses (350 ps FWHM) and small spots (<260 μm FWHM) that created short density scale length plasmas (Ln˜50-70 μm) from planar CH targets and demonstrated the onset of two-plasmon decay (2φp) at laser intensities ˜2x10^15 W/cm^2. This talk will present an overview of the current campaign that uses longer pulses (0.5-4.0 ns) to achieve greater density scale lengths (Ln˜100-200 μm). X-rays, emission near ^1/2φo and ^3/2φo harmonics, and reflected laser light have been monitored for onset of 2φp. The longer density scale lengths will allow better comparison to results from other laser facilities. *Work supported by DoE/NNSA and ONR.

  8. Ionospheric plasma flow over large high-voltage space platforms. I - Ion-plasma-time scale interactions of a plate at zero angle of attack. II - The formation and structure of plasma wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Hastings, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the theory and particle simulation results for the ionospheric plasma flow over a large high-voltage space platform at a zero angle of attack and at a large angle of attack. Emphasis is placed on the structures in the large, high-voltage regime and the transient plasma response on the ion-plasma time scale. Special consideration is given to the transient formation of the space-charge wake and its steady-state structure.

  9. Power law scaling for the adiabatic algorithm for search engine ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frees, Adam; King Gamble, John; Rudinger, Kenneth; Bach, Eric; Friesen, Mark; Joynt, Robert; Coppersmith, S. N.

    2013-03-01

    An important method for search engine result ranking works by finding the principal eigenvector of the ``Google matrix.'' Recently, a quantum algorithm for this problem and evidence of an exponential speedup for some scale-free networks were presented. Here, we show that the run-time depends on features of the graphs other than the degree distribution, and can be altered sufficiently to rule out a general exponential speedup. For a sample of graphs with degree distributions that more closely resemble the Web than in the previous work, the proposed algorithm does not appear to run exponentially faster than the classical one. This work was supported in part by ARO, DOD (W911NF-09-1-0439) and NSF (CCR-0635355, DMR 0906951). A.F. acknowledges support from the NSF REU program (PHY-PIF-1104660)

  10. Investigation of scaling laws by critical neutron scattering from beta-brass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1969-01-01

    Using a Cu65-Zn β-brass crystal, the critical scattering of neutrons has been studied, both above and below T c. The staggered susceptibilities χ vary as C+(T/Tc-1)-γ and C-(1-T/Tc)-γ ', respectively. It is found that γ=γ' within an accuracy of 3%, in agreement with the scaling hypothesis of static...... critical phenomena; and that C+/C-=5.46±0.05, in excellent agreement with the recent parametric representation theory of Schofield and in fair agreement with the results of series expansions by Essam and Hunter. For fixed q, a flat maximum is observed in the wave-vector-dependent susceptibility χ(q, T...

  11. Emergence of good conduct, scaling and Zipf laws in human behavioral sequences in an online world

    CERN Document Server

    Thurner, Stefan; Sinatra, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    We study behavioral action sequences of players in a massive multiplayer online game. In their virtual life players use eight basic actions which allow them to interact with each other. These actions are communication, trade, establishing or breaking friendships and enmities, attack, and punishment. We measure the probabilities for these actions conditional on previous taken and received actions and find a dramatic increase of negative behavior immediately after receiving negative actions. Similarly, positive behavior is intensified by receiving positive actions. We observe a tendency towards anti-persistence in communication sequences. Classifying actions as positive (good) and negative (bad) allows us to define binary 'world lines' of lives of individuals. Positive and negative actions are persistent and occur in clusters, indicated by large scaling exponents alpha~0.87 of the mean square displacement of the world lines. For all eight action types we find strong signs for high levels of repetitiveness, espe...

  12. Regimes of Axisymmetric Flow and Scaling Laws in a Rotating Annulus with Local Convective Forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Wright

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical study of axisymmetric flow in a rotating annulus in which local thermal forcing, via a heated annular ring on the outside of the base and a cooled circular disk in the centre of the top surface, drives convection. This new configuration is a variant of the classical thermally-driven annulus, where uniform heating and cooling are applied through the outer and inner sidewalls respectively. The annulus provides an analogue to a planetary circulation and the new configuration, with its more relaxed vertical thermal boundary conditions, is expected to better emulate vigorous convection in the tropics and polar regions as well as baroclinic instability in the mid-latitude baroclinic zone. Using the Met Office/Oxford Rotating Annulus Laboratory (MORALS code, we have investigated a series of equilibrated, two dimensional axisymmetric flows across a large region of parameter space. These are characterized in terms of their velocity and temperature fields. When rotation is applied several distinct flow regimes may be identified for different rotation rates and strengths of differential heating. These regimes are defined as a function of the ratio of the horizontal Ekman layer thickness to the non-rotating thermal boundary layer thickness and are found to be similar to those identified in previous annulus experiments. Convection without rotation is also considered and the scaling of the heat transport with Rayleigh number is calculated. This is then compared with existing work on the classical annulus as well as horizontal and Rayleigh-Bénard convection. As with previous studies on both rotating and non-rotating convection the system’s behaviour is found to be aspect ratio dependent. This dependence is seen in the scaling of the non-rotating Nusselt number and in transitions between regimes in the rotating case although further investigation is required to fully explain these observations.

  13. Scale-free behavior of a 2D complex plasma during rapid cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapek, C A; Durniak, C; Samsonov, D; Morfill, G E

    2013-01-18

    Experimental evidence is presented for a scale-free transition from an unordered to an ordered state in a 2D complex plasma that differs from the KTHNY theory of phase transitions in 2D systems. The transition is characterized by the formation and growth of ordered domains. A fractal relationship is found between the domain areas and domain boundary lengths, which can be explained by a recent theoretical model. The experimental findings are supported by a molecular dynamics simulation of a 2D particle system.

  14. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. VII. Elliptical Galaxy Scaling Laws from Direct Observational Mass Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bolton, Adam S; Koopmans, Leon V E; Gavazzi, Raphael; Moustakas, Leonidas A; Burles, Scott; Schlegel, David J; Wayth, Randall

    2008-01-01

    We use a sample of 53 massive early-type strong gravitational lens galaxies with well-measured redshifts (ranging from z=0.06 to 0.36) and stellar velocity dispersions (between 175 and 400 km/s) from the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey to derive numerous empirical scaling relations. The ratio between central stellar velocity dispersion and isothermal lens-model velocity dispersion is nearly unity within errors. The SLACS lenses define a fundamental plane (FP) that is consistent with the FP of the general population of early-type galaxies. We measure the relationship between strong-lensing mass M_lens within one-half effective radius (R_e/2) and the dimensional mass variable M_dim = G^-1 sigma_e2^2 R_e/2 to be log_10 [M_lens/10^11 M_Sun] = (1.03 +/- 0.04) log_10 [M_dim/10^11 M_Sun] + (0.54 +/- 0.02) (where sigma_e2 is the projected stellar velocity dispersion within R_e/2). The near-unity slope indicates that the mass-dynamical structure of massive elliptical galaxies is independent of mass, and that the "tilt" ...

  15. Unified Scaling Law for flux pinning in practical superconductors: III. Minimum datasets, core parameters, and application of the Extrapolative Scaling Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekin, Jack W.; Cheggour, Najib; Goodrich, Loren; Splett, Jolene

    2017-03-01

    In Part 2 of these articles, an extensive analysis of pinning-force curves and raw scaling data was used to derive the Extrapolative Scaling Expression (ESE). This is a parameterization of the Unified Scaling Law (USL) that has the extrapolation capability of fundamental unified scaling, coupled with the application ease of a simple fitting equation. Here in Part 3, the accuracy of the ESE relation to interpolate and extrapolate limited critical-current data to obtain complete I c(B,T,ε) datasets is evaluated and compared with present fitting equations. Accuracy is analyzed in terms of root mean square (RMS) error and fractional deviation statistics. Highlights from 92 test cases are condensed and summarized, covering most fitting protocols and proposed parameterizations of the USL. The results show that ESE reliably extrapolates critical currents at fields B, temperatures T, and strains ε that are remarkably different from the fitted minimum dataset. Depending on whether the conductor is moderate-J c or high-J c, effective RMS extrapolation errors for ESE are in the range 2–5 A at 12 T, which approaches the I c measurement error (1–2%). The minimum dataset for extrapolating full I c(B,T,ε) characteristics is also determined from raw scaling data. It consists of one set of I c(B,ε) data at a fixed temperature (e.g., liquid helium temperature), and one set of I c(B,T) data at a fixed strain (e.g., zero applied strain). Error analysis of extrapolations from the minimum dataset with different fitting equations shows that ESE reduces the percentage extrapolation errors at individual data points at high fields, temperatures, and compressive strains down to 1/10th to 1/40th the size of those for extrapolations with present fitting equations. Depending on the conductor, percentage fitting errors for interpolations are also reduced to as little as 1/15th the size. The extrapolation accuracy of the ESE relation offers the prospect of straightforward implementation

  16. Three-dimensional dynamics of collisionless magnetic reconnection in large-scale pair plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L; Daughton, W; Karimabadi, H; Albright, B J; Bowers, Kevin J; Margulies, J

    2008-09-19

    Using the largest three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to date, collisionless magnetic reconnection in large-scale electron-positron plasmas without a guide field is shown to involve complex interaction of tearing and kink modes. The reconnection onset is patchy and occurs at multiple sites which self-organize to form a single, large diffusion region. The diffusion region tends to elongate in the outflow direction and become unstable to secondary kinking and formation of "plasmoid-rope" structures with finite extent in the current direction. The secondary kink folds the reconnection current layer, while plasmoid ropes at times follow the folding of the current layer. The interplay between these secondary instabilities plays a key role in controlling the time-dependent reconnection rate in large-scale systems.

  17. (Quasi-)collisional Magneto-optic Effects in Collisionless Plasmas with sub-Larmor-scale Electromagnetic Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Keenan, Brett D; Medvedev, Mikhail V

    2015-01-01

    High-amplitude, chaotic/turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations are ubiquitous in high-energy-density laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, where they can be excited by various kinetic-streaming and/or anisotropy-driven instabilities, such as the Weibel instability. These fields typically exist on "sub-Larmor scales" -- scales smaller than the electron Larmor radius. Electrons moving through such magnetic fields undergo small-angle stochastic deflections of their pitch-angles, thus establishing diffusive transport on long time-scales. We show that this behavior, under certain conditions, is equivalent to Coulomb collisions in collisional plasmas. The magnetic pitch-angle diffusion coefficient, which acts as an effective "collision" frequency, may be substantial in these, otherwise, collisionless environments. We show that this effect, colloquially referred to as the plasma "quasicollisionality", may radically alter the expected radiative transport properties of candidate plasmas. We argue that the modified mag...

  18. Scaling of surface-plasma reactors with a significantly increased energy density for NO conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Muhammad Arif; Xiao, Shu; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2012-03-30

    Comparative studies revealed that surface plasmas developing along a solid-gas interface are significantly more effective and energy efficient for remediation of toxic pollutants in air than conventional plasmas propagating in air. Scaling of the surface plasma reactors to large volumes by operating them in parallel suffers from a serious problem of adverse effects of the space charges generated at the dielectric surfaces of the neighboring discharge chambers. This study revealed that a conductive foil on the cathode potential placed between the dielectric plates as a shield not only decoupled the discharges, but also increased the electrical power deposited in the reactor by a factor of about forty over the electrical power level obtained without shielding and without loss of efficiency for NO removal. The shield had no negative effect on efficiency, which is verified by the fact that the energy costs for 50% NO removal were about 60 eV/molecule and the energy constant, k(E), was about 0.02 L/J in both the shielded and unshielded cases.

  19. Electron-scale dissipative electrostatic solitons in multi-species plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sultana, S., E-mail: basharminbu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka-1342 (Bangladesh); Kourakis, I., E-mail: i.kourakis@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Plasma Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    The linear and nonlinear properties of small-amplitude electron-acoustic solitary waves are investigated via the fluid dynamical approach. A three-component plasma is considered, composed of hot electrons, cold electrons, and ions (considered stationary at the scale of interest). A dissipative (wave damping) effect is assumed due to electron-neutral collisions. The background (hot) electrons are characterized by an energetic (excessively superthermal) population and are thus modeled via a κ-type nonthermal distribution. The linear characteristics of electron-acoustic excitations are discussed, for different values of the plasma parameters (superthermality index κ and cold versus hot electron population concentration β). Large wavelengths (beyond a threshold value) are shown to be overdamped. The reductive perturbation technique is used to derive a dissipative Korteweg de-Vries (KdV) equation for small-amplitude electrostatic potential disturbances. These are expressed by exact solutions in the form of dissipative solitary waves, whose dynamics is investigated analytically and numerically. Our results should be useful in elucidating the behavior of space and experimental plasmas characterized by a coexistence of electron populations at different temperatures, where electron-neutral collisions are of relevance.

  20. Electron-scale dissipative electrostatic solitons in multi-species plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, S.; Kourakis, I.

    2015-10-01

    The linear and nonlinear properties of small-amplitude electron-acoustic solitary waves are investigated via the fluid dynamical approach. A three-component plasma is considered, composed of hot electrons, cold electrons, and ions (considered stationary at the scale of interest). A dissipative (wave damping) effect is assumed due to electron-neutral collisions. The background (hot) electrons are characterized by an energetic (excessively superthermal) population and are thus modeled via a κ-type nonthermal distribution. The linear characteristics of electron-acoustic excitations are discussed, for different values of the plasma parameters (superthermality index κ and cold versus hot electron population concentration β). Large wavelengths (beyond a threshold value) are shown to be overdamped. The reductive perturbation technique is used to derive a dissipative Korteweg de-Vries (KdV) equation for small-amplitude electrostatic potential disturbances. These are expressed by exact solutions in the form of dissipative solitary waves, whose dynamics is investigated analytically and numerically. Our results should be useful in elucidating the behavior of space and experimental plasmas characterized by a coexistence of electron populations at different temperatures, where electron-neutral collisions are of relevance.

  1. Particle-in-cell modeling for MJ scale dense plasma focus with varied anode shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, A., E-mail: link6@llnl.gov; Halvorson, C., E-mail: link6@llnl.gov; Schmidt, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, Las Vegas, NV 89030 (United States); Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R. [Voss Scientific LLC, Albuquerque NM 87108 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Megajoule scale dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinches with deuterium gas fill are compact devices capable of producing 10{sup 12} neutrons per shot but past predictive models of large-scale DPF have not included kinetic effects such as ion beam formation or anomalous resistivity. We report on progress of developing a predictive DPF model by extending our 2D axisymmetric collisional kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations from the 4 kJ, 200 kA LLNL DPF to 1 MJ, 2 MA Gemini DPF using the PIC code LSP. These new simulations incorporate electrodes, an external pulsed-power driver circuit, and model the plasma from insulator lift-off through the pinch phase. To accommodate the vast range of relevant spatial and temporal scales involved in the Gemini DPF within the available computational resources, the simulations were performed using a new hybrid fluid-to-kinetic model. This new approach allows single simulations to begin in an electron/ion fluid mode from insulator lift-off through the 5-6 μs run-down of the 50+ cm anode, then transition to a fully kinetic PIC description during the run-in phase, when the current sheath is 2-3 mm from the central axis of the anode. Simulations are advanced through the final pinch phase using an adaptive variable time-step to capture the fs and sub-mm scales of the kinetic instabilities involved in the ion beam formation and neutron production. Validation assessments are being performed using a variety of different anode shapes, comparing against experimental measurements of neutron yield, neutron anisotropy and ion beam production.

  2. A statistical methodology to derive the scaling law for the H-mode power threshold using a large multi-machine database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Lupelli, I.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Vega, J.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, a refined set of statistical techniques is developed and then applied to the problem of deriving the scaling law for the threshold power to access the H-mode of confinement in tokamaks. This statistical methodology is applied to the 2010 version of the ITPA International Global Threshold Data Base v6b(IGDBTHv6b). To increase the engineering and operative relevance of the results, only macroscopic physical quantities, measured in the vast majority of experiments, have been considered as candidate variables in the models. Different principled methods, such as agglomerative hierarchical variables clustering, without assumption about the functional form of the scaling, and nonlinear regression, are implemented to select the best subset of candidate independent variables and to improve the regression model accuracy. Two independent model selection criteria, based on the classical (Akaike information criterion) and Bayesian formalism (Bayesian information criterion), are then used to identify the most efficient scaling law from candidate models. The results derived from the full multi-machine database confirm the results of previous analysis but emphasize the importance of shaping quantities, elongation and triangularity. On the other hand, the scaling laws for the different machines and at different currents are different from each other at the level of confidence well above 95%, suggesting caution in the use of the global scaling laws for both interpretation and extrapolation purposes.

  3. Universal artifacts affect the branching of phylogenetic trees, not universal scaling laws.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian R Altaba

    and basal paraphyletic taxa. This artifactual imbalance accounts for tree shape convergence of large trees. SIGNIFICANCE: There is no evidence for any universal scaling in the tree of life. Instead, there is a need for improved methods of tree analysis that can be used to discriminate the noise due to outgroups from the phylogenetic signal within the taxon of interest, and to evaluate realistic models of evolution, correcting the retrospective perspective and explicitly recognizing extinction as a driving force. Artifacts are pervasive, and can only be overcome through understanding the structure and biological meaning of phylogenetic trees. Catalan Abstract in Translation S1.

  4. Axial magnetic field and toroidally streaming fast ions in the dense plasma focus are natural consequences of conservation laws in the curved axisymmetric geometry of the current sheath

    CERN Document Server

    Auluck, S K H

    2014-01-01

    Direct measurement of axial magnetic field in the PF-1000 dense plasma focus (DPF), and its reported correlation with neutron emission, call for a fresh look at previous reports of existence of axial magnetic field component in the DPF from other laboratories, and associated data suggesting toroidal directionality of fast ions participating in fusion reactions, with a view to understand the underlying physics. In this context, recent work dealing with application of the hyperbolic conservation law formalism to the DPF is extended in this paper to a curvilinear coordinate system, which reflects the shape of the DPF current sheath. Locally-unidirectional shock propagation in this coordinate system enables construction of a system of 7 one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation law equations with geometric source terms, taking into account all the components of magnetic field and flow velocity. Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for this system lead to expressions for the axial magnetic field and three components of ...

  5. Solar Atmospheric Magnetic Energy Coupling: Broad Plasma Conditions and Temperature Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Orange, N Brice; Gendre, Bruce; Morris, David C; Oluseyi, Hakeem M

    2016-01-01

    Solar variability investigations that include its magnetic energy coupling are paramount to solving many key solar/stellar physics problems. Particularly understanding the temporal variability of magnetic energy redistribution and heating processes. Using three years of observations from the {\\it Solar Dynamics Observatory's} Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Heliosemic Magnetic Imager, radiative and magnetic fluxes were measured from coronal hole, quiet Sun, active regions, active region cores (i.e., inter moss), and at full-disk scales, respectively. We present, and mathematically describe, their coupling of radiative fluxes, across broad temperature gradients, to the available photospheric magnetic energy. A comparison of the common linear relationship of radiative to magnetic coupling is performed against our extended broken power-law description, which reveals a potential entanglement of thermodynamic and magnetic energy contributions in existing literature. As such, our work provides an improved approach...

  6. Large-scale and small-scale plasma motions in the upper ionosphere according to data of the Intercosmos-Bolgaria-1300 satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinin, E.M.; Nikolaeva, N.S.; Podgornyi, I.M.; Balebanov, V.M.; Bankov, L.; Bankov, N.; Kutiev, I.; Marinov, P.; Serafimov, K.; Todorieva, L.

    1983-09-01

    The pattern of large-scale motions at a height of about 900 km, including a two-tier picture of magnetospheric convection, is determined on the basis of plasma-velocity measurements made with the ID-1 instrument on Intercosmos-Bolgaria-1300. The high time and space resolution of the instrument made it possible to detect small-scale structures (1-10 km) in which the plasma attains a velocity of 4.5 km/s. Simultaneous measurements of density with the same instrument indicate the appearance of local troughs accompanying 'jumps' of ion drift velocity. 31 references.

  7. New: Variational principle-exact solutions and conservation laws for modified ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers with electron degenerate in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Kalaawy, O. H.

    2017-03-01

    The nonlinear propagation of modified ion acoustic shock waves and double layers in a relativistic degenerate plasma is considered. This plasma system is proposed for containing inertial viscous positive and negative ion fluids, relativistic electron fluids, and negatively charged immobile heavy ions. The basic set of fluid equations is reduced to modified Burgers (MB) and further modified Burgers (FMB) or (Gardner) or Mamun and Zobaer (M-Z) equations by using the reductive perturbation method. The basic features of these shocks obtained from this analysis are observed to be significantly different from those obtained from the standard Burgers equation. By introducing two special functions and He's semi-inverse method, a variational principle and conservation laws for the Gardner (FmB) equation are obtained. A set of new exact solutions for the Gardner (FmB) equation are obtained by the auto-Bäcklund transformations. Finally, we will study the physical meanings of solutions.

  8. Multi-machine scaling of the main SOL parallel heat flux width in tokamak limiter plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horacek, J.; Pitts, R. A.; Adamek, J.; Arnoux, G.; Bak, J.-G.; Brezinsek, S.; Dimitrova, M.; Goldston, R. J.; Gunn, J. P.; Havlicek, J.; Hong, S.-H.; Janky, F.; LaBombard, B.; Marsen, S.; Maddaluno, G.; Nie, L.; Pericoli, V.; Popov, Tsv; Panek, R.; Rudakov, D.; Seidl, J.; Seo, D. S.; Shimada, M.; Silva, C.; Stangeby, P. C.; Viola, B.; Vondracek, P.; Wang, H.; Xu, G. S.; Xu, Y.; Contributors, JET

    2016-07-01

    As in many of today’s tokamaks, plasma start-up in ITER will be performed in limiter configuration on either the inner or outer midplane first wall (FW). The massive, beryllium armored ITER FW panels are toroidally shaped to protect panel-to-panel misalignments, increasing the deposited power flux density compared with a purely cylindrical surface. The chosen shaping should thus be optimized for a given radial profile of parallel heat flux, {{q}||} in the scrape-off layer (SOL) to ensure optimal power spreading. For plasmas limited on the outer wall in tokamaks, this profile is commonly observed to decay exponentially as {{q}||}={{q}0}\\text{exp} ~≤ft(-r/λ q\\text{omp}\\right) , or, for inner wall limiter plasmas with the double exponential decay comprising a sharp near-SOL feature and a broader main SOL width, λ q\\text{omp} . The initial choice of λ q\\text{omp} , which is critical in ensuring that current ramp-up or down will be possible as planned in the ITER scenario design, was made on the basis of an extremely restricted L-mode divertor dataset, using infra-red thermography measurements on the outer divertor target to extrapolate to a heat flux width at the main plasma midplane. This unsatisfactory situation has now been significantly improved by a dedicated multi-machine ohmic and L-mode limiter plasma study, conducted under the auspices of the International Tokamak Physics Activity, involving 11 tokamaks covering a wide parameter range with R=\\text{0}\\text{.4--2}\\text{.8} \\text{m}, {{B}0}=\\text{1}\\text{.2--7}\\text{.5} \\text{T}, {{I}\\text{p}}=\\text{9--2500} \\text{kA}. Measurements of λ q\\text{omp} in the database are made exclusively on all devices using a variety of fast reciprocating Langmuir probes entering the plasma at a variety of poloidal locations, but with the majority being on the low field side. Statistical analysis of the database reveals nine reasonable engineering and dimensionless scalings. All yield, however, similar

  9. Power-Law Scaling of the Impact Crater Size-Frequency Distribution on Pluto: A Preliminary Analysis Based on First Images from New Horizons' Flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholkmann F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent (14 th July 2015 flyby of NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft of the dwarf planet Pluto resulted in the first high-resolution images of the geological surface- features of Pluto. Since previous studies showed that the impact crater size-frequency distribution (SFD of different celestial objects of our solar system follows power-laws, the aim of the present analysis was to determine, for the first time, the power-law scaling behavior for Pluto’s crater SFD based on the first images available in mid-September 2015. The analysis was based on a high-resolution image covering parts of Pluto’s re- gions Sputnik Planum , Al-Idrisi Montes and Voyager Terra . 83 impact craters could be identified in these regions and their diameter ( D was determined. The analysis re- vealed that the crater diameter SFD shows a statistically significant power-law scaling ( α = 2.4926±0.3309 in the interval of D values ranging from 3.75±1.14 km to the largest determined D value in this data set of 37.77 km. The value obtained for the scaling coefficient α is similar to the coefficient determined for the power-law scaling of the crater SFDs from the other celestial objects in our solar system. Further analysis of Pluto’s crater SFD is warranted as soon as new images are received from the spacecraft.

  10. Absolute fragmentation cross sections in atom-molecule collisions : Scaling laws for non-statistical fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.; Alexander, J. D.; Zhang, Y.; Rousseau, P.; Domaracka, A.; Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Adoui, L.; Huber, B. A.; Schlathölter, T.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H.

    2014-01-01

    We present scaling laws for absolute cross sections for non-statistical fragmentation in collisions between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH/PAH+) and hydrogen or helium atoms with kinetic energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 keV. Further, we calculate the total fragmentation cross sections

  11. Thin power law film flow down an inclined plane: consistent shallow water models and stability under large scale perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we derive consistent shallow water equations for thin films of power law fluids down an incline. These models account for the streamwise diffusion of momentum which is important to describe accurately the full dynamic of the thin film flows when instabilities like roll-waves arise. These models are validated through a comparison with Orr Sommerfeld equations for large scale perturbations. We only consider laminar flow for which the boundary layer issued from the interaction of the flow with the bottom surface has an influence all over the transverse direction to the flow. In this case the concept itself of thin film and its relation with long wave asymptotic leads naturally to flow conditions around a uniform free surface Poiseuille flow. The apparent viscosity diverges at the free surface which, in turn, introduces a singularity in the formulation of the Orr-Sommerfeld equations and in the derivation of shallow water models. We remove this singularity by introducing a weaker formulation of Cauc...

  12. Early Warning Signals of Financial Crises with Multi-Scale Quantile Regressions of Log-Periodic Power Law Singularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Zhang, Qunzhi; Sornette, Didier

    2016-01-01

    We augment the existing literature using the Log-Periodic Power Law Singular (LPPLS) structures in the log-price dynamics to diagnose financial bubbles by providing three main innovations. First, we introduce the quantile regression to the LPPLS detection problem. This allows us to disentangle (at least partially) the genuine LPPLS signal and the a priori unknown complicated residuals. Second, we propose to combine the many quantile regressions with a multi-scale analysis, which aggregates and consolidates the obtained ensembles of scenarios. Third, we define and implement the so-called DS LPPLS Confidence™ and Trust™ indicators that enrich considerably the diagnostic of bubbles. Using a detailed study of the "S&P 500 1987" bubble and presenting analyses of 16 historical bubbles, we show that the quantile regression of LPPLS signals contributes useful early warning signals. The comparison between the constructed signals and the price development in these 16 historical bubbles demonstrates their significant predictive ability around the real critical time when the burst/rally occurs.

  13. Towards scaling laws for subduction initiation on terrestrial planets: constraints from two-dimensional steady-state convection simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Teresa; Solomatov, Viatcheslav S.

    2015-12-01

    The strongly temperature-dependent viscosity of rocks leads to the formation of nearly rigid lithospheric plates. Previous studies showed that a very low yield stress might be necessary to weaken and mobilize the plates, for example, due to water. However, the magnitude of the yield stress remains poorly understood. While the convective stresses below the lithosphere are relatively small, sublithospheric convection can induce large stresses in the lithosphere indirectly, through thermal thinning of the lithosphere. The magnitude of the thermal thinning, the stresses associated with it, and the critical yield stress to initiate subduction depend on several factors including the viscosity law, the Rayleigh number, and the aspect ratio of the convective cells. We conduct a systematic numerical analysis of lithospheric stresses and other convective parameters for single steady-state convection cells. Such cells can be considered as part of a multi-cell, time-dependent convective system. This allows us a better control of convective solutions and a relatively simple scaling analysis. We find that subduction initiation depends much stronger on the aspect ratio than in previous studies and speculate that plate tectonics initiation may not necessarily require significant weakening and can, at least in principle, start if a sufficiently long cell develops during planetary evolution.

  14. Mathematical formulation to predict the harmonics of the superconducting Large Hadron Collider magnets. II. Dynamic field changes and scaling laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Sammut

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A superconducting particle accelerator like the LHC (Large Hadron Collider at CERN, can only be controlled well if the effects of the magnetic field multipoles on the beam are compensated. The demands on a control system solely based on beam feedback may be too high for the requirements to be reached at the specified bandwidth and accuracy. Therefore, we designed a suitable field description for the LHC (FIDEL as part of the machine control baseline to act as a feed-forward magnetic field prediction system. FIDEL consists of a physical and empirical parametric field model based on magnetic measurements at warm and in cryogenic conditions. The performance of FIDEL is particularly critical at injection when the field decays, and in the initial part of the acceleration when the field snaps back. These dynamic components are both current and time dependent and are not reproducible from cycle to cycle since they also depend on the magnet powering history. In this paper a qualitative and quantitative description of the dynamic field behavior substantiated by a set of scaling laws is presented.

  15. Mean-field theory of strongly nonlinear random composites: Strong power-law nonlinearity and scaling behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, W. M. V.; Lee, H. C.; Hui, P. M.; Yu, K. W.

    1996-08-01

    The effective response of random media consisting of two different kinds of strongly nonlinear materials with strong power-law nonlinearity is studied. Each component satisfies current density and electric-field relation of the form J=χ\\|E\\|βE. A simple self-consistent mean-field theory, which leads to a simple way in determining the average local electric field in each constituent, is introduced. Each component is assumed to have a conductivity depending on the averaged local electric field. The averaged local electric field is then determined self-consistently. Numerical simulations of the system are carried out on random nonlinear resistor networks. Theoretical results are compared with simulation data, and excellent agreements are found. Results are also compared with the Hashin-Shtrikman lower bound proposed by Ponte Castaneda et al. [Phys. Rev. B 46, 4387 (1992)]. It is found that the present theory, at small contrasts of χ between the two components, gives a result identical to that of Ponte Castaneda et al. up to second order of the contrast. The crossover and scaling behavior of the effective response near the percolation threshold as suggested by the present theory are discussed and demonstrated.

  16. Re-appraisal and extension of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus - III: Scaling theory for high pressure operation and its implications

    CERN Document Server

    Auluck, S K H

    2016-01-01

    Recent work on the revised Gratton-Vargas model has demonstrated that there are some aspects of Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) which are not sensitive to details of plasma dynamics and are well captured in an oversimplified model assumption which contains very little plasma physics. A hyperbolic conservation law formulation of DPF physics reveals the existence of a velocity threshold related to specific energy of dissociation and ionization, above which, the work done during shock propagation is adequate to ensure dissociation and ionization of the gas being ingested. These developments are utilized to formulate an algorithmic definition of DPF optimization that is valid in a wide range of applications, not limited to neutron emission. A universal scaling theory of DPF design optimization is proposed and illustrated for designing devices working at one or two orders higher pressure of deuterium than the current practice of designs optimized at pressures less than 10 mbar of deuterium. These examples show that the u...

  17. Numerical Simulation of the Time Evolution of Small-Scale Irregularities in the F-Layer Ionospheric Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Mingalev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of magnetic field-aligned small-scale irregularities in the electron concentration, existing in the F-layer ionospheric plasma, is investigated with the help of a mathematical model. The plasma is assumed to be a rarefied compound consisting of electrons and positive ions and being in a strong, external magnetic field. In the applied model, kinetic processes in the plasma are simulated by using the Vlasov-Poisson system of equations. The system of equations is numerically solved applying a macroparticle method. The time evolution of a plasma irregularity, having initial cross-section dimension commensurable with a Debye length, is simulated during the period sufficient for the irregularity to decay completely. The results of simulation indicate that the small-scale irregularity, created initially in the F-region ionosphere, decays accomplishing periodic damped vibrations, with the process being collisionless.

  18. Scaling of X-ray emission and ion velocity in laser produced Cu plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Y. B. S. R.; Senecha, V. K.; Pant, H. C.; Kamath, M. P.; Solanki, G. S.; Tripathi, P. K.; Kulkarni, A. P.; Gupta, S.; Pareek, R.; Joshi, A. S.; Sreedhar, N.; Nigam, Sameer; Navathe, C. P.

    2000-11-01

    The x-ray emission from slab targets of copper irradiated by Nd:glass laser (1.054 m m, 5 and 15 ns) at intensities between 1012 and 1014 W/cm2 has been studied. The x-ray emissions were monitored with the help of high quantum efficiency x-ray silicon photo diodes and vacuum photo diodes, all covered with aluminium filters of different thickness. The x-ray intensity vs the laser intensity has a scaling factor of (1.2--1.92). The relative x-ray conversion efficiency follows an empirical relationship which is in close agreement with the one reported by Babonneau et al. The ion velocities were monitored using Langmuir probes placed at different angles and radial distances from the target position. The variation of the ion velocity with the laser intensity follows a scaling of the form Fb where b ~ 0.22 which is in good agreement with the reported scaling factor values. The results on the x-ray emission from Cu plasma are reported.

  19. Scaling of x-ray emission and ion velocity in laser produced Cu plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y B S R Prasad; V K Senecha; H C Pant; M P Kamath; G S Solanki; P K Tripathi; A P Kulkarni; S Gupta; R Pareek; A S Joshi; N Sreedhar; Sameer Nigam; C P Navathe

    2000-11-01

    The x-ray emission from slab targets of copper irradiated by Nd:glass laser (1.054 m, 5 and 15 ns) at intensities between 1012 and 1014W/cm2 has been studied. The x-ray emissions were monitored with the help of high quantum efficiency x-ray silicon photo diodes and vacuum photo diodes, all covered with aluminium filters of different thickness. The x-ray intensity vs the laser intensity has a scaling factor of (1.2–1.92). The relative x-ray conversion efficiency follows an empirical relationship which is in close agreement with the one reported by Babonneau et al. The ion velocities were monitored using Langmuir probes placed at different angles and radial distances from the target position. The variation of the ion velocity with the laser intensity follows a scaling of the form where ∼ 0.22 which is in good agreement with the reported scaling factor values. The results on the x-ray emission from Cu plasma are reported.

  20. Do fault-related folds follow the same scaling law as their associated faults? A study using 3D seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Eleanor; Imber, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Fractal distributions are largely agreed to follow a power-law distribution. Power-law scaling relationships describe the size distribution of fault lengths or displacements. Being able to identify these scaling properties provides a powerful tool for predicting the numbers of geological structures, such as small-scale faults in sedimentary basins that are below the resolution of seismic reflection data. The aim of this study is to determine whether fault-related folds follow the same power law scaling properties, or if they follow a different scaling law. We use TrapTester to interpret a 3D seismic volume from the Gulf of Mexico to construct fault planes and cut-off lines along selected horizons in the vicinity of fault upper tip lines. Fault-related folds are particularly well developed above steeply plunging tip lines, but are discontinuous along the strike of the fault plane. Folding is less well developed on horizons that intersect, or lie close to, the locus of maximum throw (bullseye) of the fault plane. We then measured fold amplitudes and fault throws across these same horizons using a one-dimensional multi-line sampling approach. Graphs of fault throw and fold amplitude vs. distance parallel to fault strike show that folds occur where there is no resolvable fault throw, and that fault throw and fold amplitudes show an approximately inverse relationship. Close to the locus of maximum throw, there is largely just faulting, whilst at the upper tip line folding predominates. By plotting cumulative frequency against throw for the fault and fold data we can investigate whether the data follow a power law, log normal or exponential distribution. Plotting the data on log vs. log (power law), linear vs. log (log normal) and log vs. linear (exponential) axes allow us to establish which displays the best "straight-line fit". We observed that the fault throw data satisfied a straight-line on a log vs. log graph - implying a power law distribution - and also returned