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Sample records for plasma scaling laws

  1. Scaling laws for TEXT plasma profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCool, S.C.; Bravenec, R.V.; Chen, J.Y.; Foster, M.S.; Li, W.L.; Ouroura, A.; Phillips, P.E.; Richards, B.; Wenzel, K.W.; Zhang, Z.M.

    1994-01-01

    Regression analysis has been performed on a number of measured profiles including temperature and density vs. nominal macroscopic operating parameters for TEXT tokamak (pre-upgrade) ohmic plasmas. The resulting simple empirical model has enabled the authors to quickly approximate profiles of electron temperature and density, ion temperature, and soft x-ray brightness, as well as the scalar quantities: total radiated power, q=1 radius, sawtooth period and amplitude, and energy confinement time as a power law of toroidal field, plasma current, chord average density, and fueling gas atomic weight. The model profiles are only applicable to the plasma interior, i.e. within the limiter radius. In most cases the predicted model profiles are within the experimental error bars of measured profiles and are more accurate at predicting profile variation for small operating parameter changes than the measured profiles

  2. Scaling laws for steady-state fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husseiny, A A [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA)

    1975-12-01

    Experimental and semi-theoretical scaling laws are extrapolated to include the effect of fusion burn on the lifetime of plasma ions. Fractional burnups are also reconsidered on the same basis. The actual lifetime of fusion plasma ions and the estimated time necessary for feasible reactors, provide a correlation between the laboratory data and the hypothesis of reactor feasibility conditions. Based on these correlations criteria for the realization of self-heated plasmas are established.

  3. Scaling laws of design parameters for plasma wakefield accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Nam, In H.; Suk, Hyyong

    2012-01-01

    Simple scaling laws for the design parameters of plasma wakefield accelerators were obtained using a theoretical model, which were confirmed via particle simulation studies. It was found that the acceleration length was given by Δx=0.804λ p /(1−β g ), where λ p is the plasma wavelength and β g c the propagation velocity of the ion cavity. The acceleration energy can also be given by ΔE=(γ m −1)mc 2 =2.645mc 2 /(1−β g ), where m is the electron rest mass. As expected, the acceleration length and energy increase drastically as β g approached unity. These simple scaling laws can be very instrumental in the design of better-performing plasma wakefield accelerators. -- Highlights: ► Simple scaling laws for the design parameters of laser wakefield accelerators were obtained using a theoretical model. ► The scaling laws for acceleration length and acceleration energy were compared with particle-in-cell simulation results. ► The acceleration length and the energy increase drastically as β g approaches unity. ► These simple scaling laws can be very instrumental in the design of laser wakefield accelerators.

  4. Similitude observations and scaling laws for the plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeppeler, H.J.

    It has been attempted to give a coherent explanation of the most important physical processes concerning a model theory of the plasma focus of the Mather type. For this purpose the compression process, the stable dense phase and the subsequent neutron-producing instable phase were described. With the assumption that I 0 2 /rho 0 R 0 2 = const and t 0 /t/sub c/ = const a theoretical explanation is given for the already experimentally determined dependence of the neutron production on the fourth power of the maximum current. A few other conclusions based on these scaling laws are being discussed

  5. Interaction of ion clusters with fusion plasmas: Scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arista, N.R.; Bringa, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    The interaction between large ion clusters or very intense ion beams with fusion plasma is studied using the dielectric function formalism with appropriate quantum corrections. The contributions from individual and collective modes to the energy loss are calculated. The general properties of the interference effects are characterized in terms of the relevant parameters, and simple scaling laws are obtained. In particular, the conditions for a maximum enhancement in the energy deposition are derived. The study provides a unified view and a general formulation of collective effects in the energy loss for low and high velocities of the beam particles. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  6. Scaling laws for particle growth in plasma reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemons, D.S.; Keinigs, R.K.; Winske, D.; Jones, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    We quantify a model which incorporates observed features of contaminant particle growth in plasma processing reactors. According to the model, large open-quote open-quote predator close-quote close-quote particles grow by adsorbing smaller, typically neutral, open-quote open-quote prey close-quote close-quote protoparticles. The latter are supplied by an assumed constant mass injection of contaminant material. Scaling laws and quantitative predictions compare favorably with published experimental results. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  7. Maxwell Prize Talk: Scaling Laws for the Dynamical Plasma Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryutov, Livermore, Ca 94550, Usa, D. D.

    2017-10-01

    The scaling and similarity technique is a powerful tool for developing and testing reduced models of complex phenomena, including plasma phenomena. The technique has been successfully used in identifying appropriate simplified models of transport in quasistationary plasmas. In this talk, the similarity and scaling arguments will be applied to highly dynamical systems, in which temporal evolution of the plasma leads to a significant change of plasma dimensions, shapes, densities, and other parameters with respect to initial state. The scaling and similarity techniques for dynamical plasma systems will be presented as a set of case studies of problems from various domains of the plasma physics, beginning with collisonless plasmas, through intermediate collisionalities, to highly collisional plasmas describable by the single-fluid MHD. Basic concepts of the similarity theory will be introduced along the way. Among the results discussed are: self-similarity of Langmuir turbulence driven by a hot electron cloud expanding into a cold background plasma; generation of particle beams in disrupting pinches; interference between collisionless and collisional phenomena in the shock physics; similarity for liner-imploded plasmas; MHD similarities with an emphasis on the effect of small-scale (turbulent) structures on global dynamics. Relations between astrophysical phenomena and scaled laboratory experiments will be discussed.

  8. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  9. Global and local confinement scaling laws of NBI-heated gas-puffing plasmas on LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Miyazawa, J.; Sakakibara, S.; Yamada, H.; Narihara, K.; Tanaka, K.; Osakabe, M.

    2003-01-01

    The relation between global confinement scaling laws and local transport characteristics is evaluated on the Large Helical Device (LHD). Previous 'new LHD' global scaling laws are revised using the precise plasma edge definition and the recent LHD data of 4th, 5th and 6th experimental campaigns. Strong Gyro-Bohm-like feature of global confinement is reconfirmed. The magnetic field dependence and geometrical scale dependence are stronger than the conventional scaling laws. Using same database of LHD data, the radial profiles of transport coefficients are evaluated, and it is reconfirmed that the local transport in the core is Gyro-Bohm-like, and that near the boundary is strong Gyro-Bohm-like. The global confinement property is consistent with effective transport coefficient near the edge. (author)

  10. Plasma performance and scaling laws in the RFX-mod reversed-field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innocente, P.; Alfier, A.; Canton, A.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2009-01-01

    The large range of plasma currents (I p = 0.2-1.6 MA) and feedback-controlled magnetic boundary conditions of the RFX-mod experiment make it well suited to performing scaling studies. The assessment of such scaling, in particular those on temperature and energy confinement, is crucial both for improving the operating reversed-field pinch (RFP) devices and for validating the RFP configuration as a candidate for the future fusion reactors. For such a purpose scaling laws for magnetic fluctuations, temperature and energy confinement have been evaluated in stationary operation. RFX-mod scaling laws have been compared with those obtained from other RFP devices and numerical simulations. The role of the magnetic boundary has been analysed, comparing discharges performed with different active control schemes of the edge radial magnetic field.

  11. Transport coefficients for the plasma thermal energy and empirical scaling ''laws''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppi, B.

    1989-01-01

    A set of transport coefficients has been identified for the electron and nuclei thermal energy of plasmas with temperatures in the multi-keV range, taking into account the available experimental information including the temperature spatial profiles and the inferred scaling ''laws'' for the measured energy replacement times. The specific form of these coefficients is suggested by the theory of a mode, so-called ''ubiquitous,'' that can be excited when a significant fraction of the electron population has magnetically trapped orbits. (author)

  12. Particle simulation of pedestal buildup and study of pedestal scaling law in a quiescent plasma edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.S.; Ku, S.; Weitzner, H.; Groebner, R.; Osborne, T.

    2005-01-01

    A discrete guiding-center particle code XGC (X-point included Guiding Center code) is used to study pedestal buildup and sheared E r formation in a quiescent plasma edge of a diverted tokamak. A neoclassical pedestal scaling law has been deduced, which shows that the density pedestal width is proportional to T i 1/2 M 1/2 /B t where T i is the ion temperature, M is ion mass and B t is the toroidal magnetic field. Dependence on the pedestal density or the poloidal magnetic field is found to be much weaker. Ion temperature pedestal is not as well defined as the density pedestal. Neoclassical electron transport rate, including the collisional heat exchange rate with ions, is too slow to be considered in the time scale of simulation (∼ 10 ms). (author)

  13. Ideal-MHD beta limits: scaling laws and comparison with Doublet III high-beta plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, L.C.; Bhadra, D.K.; Helton, F.J.; Lao, L.L.; Todd, T.N.

    1983-06-01

    Doublet III (DIII) recently has achieved a value for #betta#, the ratio of volume averaged plasma to magnetic pressure, of 4.5%. This #betta# value is in the range required for an economically attractive tokamak reactor, and also close to the relevant limit predicted by ideal-MHD theory. It is therefore of great interest to assess the validity of the theory by comparison with experiment and thus to have a basis for the prediction of future reactor performance. A large variety of plasma shapes have been obtained in DIII. These shapes can be divided into two classes: (1) limiter discharges, and (2) diverted discharges, which are of great interest because of their good confinement in the H-mode operation. We derive simple scaling laws from the variation of optimized ideal-MHD beta limits (#betta#/sub c/) with plasma shape parameters. The current profile is optimized for fixed plasma shapes, separately for the high-n (ballooning) and the low-n (kink) modes. Results are presented in the form of suitability normalized curves of #betta# versus poloidal beta, #betta#/sub p/, for both ballooning and kink modes in order to simultaneously compare all the DIII experimental data

  14. Scaling laws for the rotational velocity of a J x B driven rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yasuhito; Kataoka, Tomohiro; Ikehata, Takashi; Sato, Naoyuki; Tanabe, Toshio; Mase, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    Rapidly rotating plasmas of helium and argon have been extracted from a coaxial plasma gun operated in pulsed glow mode. The rotational velocity and its parametric dependence have been analyzed systematically by means of visible - emission spectroscopy. The plasma is observed to rotate rigidly inside the diameter of the gun anode while outside the velocity decreases rapidly ; furthermore, different ions are found to rotate at different angular frequencies as ω (Ar + ) = 0.5 x 10 6 rad/sec, ω (Ar 2+ ) = 1.1 x 10 6 rad/sec, ω (C 2+ ) = 1.8 x 10 6 rad/sec, ω (N + ) = 1.2 x 10 6 rad/sec. The plasma density and rotational velocity have been measured as a function of the discharge current and magnetic field to derive experimental scaling laws. They are summarized as : 1. Ion density is proportional to the square of discharge current. 2. Rotational and axial velocities are proportional to the driving force per ion. These results are confirmed to agree well with a theoretical prediction. (author)

  15. Scaling law systematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Duechs, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    A number of statistical implications of empirical scaling laws in form of power products obtained by linear regression are analysed. The sensitivity of the error against a change of exponents is described by a sensitivity factor and the uncertainty of predictions by a ''range of predictions factor''. Inner relations in the statistical material is discussed, as well as the consequences of discarding variables.A recipe is given for the computations to be done. The whole is exemplified by considering scaling laws for the electron energy confinement time of ohmically heated tokamak plasmas. (author)

  16. Tokamak confinement scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.

    1998-01-01

    The scaling of energy confinement with engineering parameters, such as plasma current and major radius, is important for establishing the size of an ignited fusion device. Tokamaks exhibit a variety of modes of operation with different confinement properties. At present there is no adequate first principles theory to predict tokamak energy confinement and the empirical scaling method is the preferred approach to designing next step tokamaks. This paper reviews a number of robust theoretical concepts, such as dimensional analysis and stability boundaries, which provide a framework for characterising and understanding tokamak confinement and, therefore, generate more confidence in using empirical laws for extrapolation to future devices. (author)

  17. Scaling law in laboratory astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jiangfan; Zhang Jie

    2001-01-01

    The use of state-of-the-art lasers makes it possible to produce, in the laboratory, the extreme conditions similar to those in astrophysical processes. The introduction of astrophysics-relevant ideas in laser-plasma interaction experiments is propitious to the understanding of astrophysical phenomena. However, the great difference between laser-produced plasma and astrophysical objects makes it awkward to model the latter by laser-plasma experiments. The author presents the physical reasons for modeling astrophysical plasmas by laser plasmas, connecting these two kinds of plasmas by scaling laws. This allows the creation of experimental test beds where observation and models can be quantitatively compared with laboratory data

  18. Scaling Laws of Nitrogen Soft X-Ray Yields from 1 to 200 kJ Plasma Focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akel, M.; Lee, S.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical experiments are carried out systematically to determine the nitrogen soft x-ray yield for optimized nitrogen plasma focus with storage energy E 0 from 1 kJ to 200 kJ. Scaling laws on nitrogen soft x-ray yield, in terms of storage energies E 0 , peak discharge current I p eak and focus pinch current I p inch were found. It was found that the nitrogen x-ray yields scales on average with y s xr, N= 1.93xE o 1 .21 J (E 0 in kJ) with the scaling showing gradual deterioration as E 0 rises over the range. A more robust scaling is y s xr = 8x10 - 8I 0 3.38 p inch . The optimum nitrogen soft x-ray yield emitted from plasma focus is found to be about 1 kJ for storage energy of 200 kJ. This indicates that nitrogen plasma focus is a good water-window soft x-ray source when properly designed. (author)

  19. Knowing the dense plasma focus - The coming of age (of the PF) with broad-ranging scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2017-03-01

    The dense plasma focus is blessed not only with copious multi-radiations ranging from electron and ion beams, x-rays both soft and hard, fusion neutrons D-D and D-T but also with the property of enhanced compression from radiative collapse leading to HED (high energy density) states. The Lee code has been used in extensive systematic numerical experiments tied to reality through fitting with measured current waveforms and verified through comparison of measured and computed yields and measurements of multi-radiation. The studies have led to establishment of scaling laws with respect to storage energy, discharge current and pinch currents for fusion neutrons, characteristic soft x-rays, all-line radiation and ion beams. These are summarized here together with a first-time presentation of a scaling law of radiatively enhanced compression as a function of atomic number of operational gas. This paper emphasizes that such a broad range of scaling laws signals the coming of age of the DPF and presents a reference platform for planning the many potential applications such as in advanced SXR lithography, materials synthesizing and testing, medical isotopes, imaging and energy and high energy density (HED).

  20. Thermal stability of a thermonuclear plasma for different confinement scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johner, J.

    1985-10-01

    The thermal stability of the ignition curve is investigated using a simple OD model for a temperature dependent energy confinement time (tausub(E) is proportional to 1/Tsup(γ)). The stability limit in the (ntausub(E),T) plane is also calculated for a plasma with external heating. The degradation of confinement time with increasing temperature is found to be favourable for divergence temperature and minimum temperature for stable ignition. It also decreases the external power per unit volume necessary to reach divergence. On the contrary, it is extremely unfavourable for the required μsub(E) for divergence and ignition. Detailed results are given for the special case of the Kaye-Goldston scaling (γ=1.38)

  1. Understanding scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysenko, W.P.

    1986-01-01

    Accelerator scaling laws how they can be generated, and how they are used are discussed. A scaling law is a relation between machine parameters and beam parameters. An alternative point of view is that a scaling law is an imposed relation between the equations of motion and the initial conditions. The relation between the parameters is obtained by requiring the beam to be matched. (A beam is said to be matched if the phase-space distribution function is a function of single-particle invariants of the motion.) Because of this restriction, the number of independent parameters describing the system is reduced. Using simple models for bunched- and unbunched-beam situations. Scaling laws are shown to determine the general behavior of beams in accelerators. Such knowledge is useful in design studies for new machines such as high-brightness linacs. The simple model presented shows much of the same behavior as a more detailed RFQ model

  2. Numerical experiments on plasma focus for soft x-ray yield scaling laws derivation using Lee model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akel, M.

    2015-01-01

    The required plasma parameters of krypton and xenon at different temperatures were calculated, the x-ray emission properties of plasmas were studied, and based on the corona model the suitable temperature range for generating H-like and He-like ions (therefore soft x-ray emissions) of different gases plasma were found. The code is applied to characterize the plasma focus in different plasma focus devices, and for optimizing the nitrogen, oxygen, neon, argon, krypton and xenon soft x-ray yields based on bank, tubes and operating parameters. It is found that t he soft x-ray yield increases with changing pressure until it reaches the maximum value for each plasma focus device. Keeping the bank parameters, operational voltage unchanged but systematically changing other parameters, numerical experiments were performed finding the optimum combination of Po, z0 and 'a' for the maximum soft x-ray yield. Thus we expect to increase the soft x-ray yield of plasma focus device several-fold from its present typical operation; without changing the capacitor bank, merely by changing the electrode configuration and the operating pressure. The Lee model code was also used to run numerical experiments on plasma focus devices for optimizing soft x-ray yield with reducing Lo, varying z0 and 'a' to get engineering designs with maximum soft x-ray yield for these devices at different experimental conditions and gases. Numerical experiments showed the influence of the gas used in plasma focus and its propor ties on soft x-ray emission and its propor ties and then on its applications. Scaling laws for soft x-ray of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, argon, krypton and xenon plasma focus in terms of energy, peak discharge current and focus pinch current were found. Radiative cooling effects are studied indicating that radiative collapse may be observed for heavy noble gases (Ar, Kr, Xe) for pinch currents even below 100 k A. The results show that the line radiation emission and

  3. Numerical experiments on plasma focus for soft x-ray yield scaling laws derivation using Lee model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akel, M.

    2012-09-01

    The required plasma parameters of krypton and xenon at different temperatures were calculated, the x-ray emission properties of plasmas were studied, and based on the corona model the suitable temperature range for generating H-like and He-like ions (therefore soft x-ray emissions) of different gases plasma were found. The code is applied to characterize the plasma focus in different plasma focus devices, and for optimizing the nitrogen, oxygen, neon, argon, krypton and xenon soft x-ray yields based on bank, tubes and operating parameters. It is found that the soft x-ray yield increases with changing pressure until it reaches the maximum value for each plasma focus device. Keeping the bank parameters, operational voltage unchanged but systematically changing other parameters, numerical experiments were performed finding the optimum combination of P o , Z o and 'a' for the maximum soft x-ray yield. Thus we expect to increase the soft x-ray yield of plasma focus device several-fold from its present typical operation; without changing the capacitor bank, merely by changing the electrode configuration and the operating pressure. The Lee model code was also used to run numerical experiments on plasma focus devices for optimizing soft x-ray yield with reducing L o , varying L o and 'a' to get engineering designs with maximum soft x-ray yield for these devices at different experimental conditions and gases. Numerical experiments showed the influence of the gas used in plasma focus and its properties on soft x-ray emission and its properties and then on its applications. Scaling laws for soft x-ray of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, argon, krypton and xenon plasma focus, in terms of energy, peak discharge current and focus pinch current were found. Radiative cooling effects are studied indicating that radiative collapse may be observed for heavy noble gases (Ar, Kr, Xe) for pinch currents even below 100 kA. The results show that the line radiation emission and tube voltages have

  4. Temperature dynamics and velocity scaling laws for interchange driven, warm ion plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jeppe Miki Busk; Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2016-01-01

    The influence of electron and ion temperature dynamics on the radial convection of isolated structures in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated by means of numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that the maximum radial velocity of these plasma blobs roughly follows the inertial velocity...

  5. Divertor scaling laws for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catto, P.J.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Connor, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The breakdown of two body scaling laws is illustrated by using the two dimensional plasma code UEDGE coupled to an advanced Navier-Stokes neutrals transport package to model attached and detached regimes in a simplified geometry. Two body similarity scalings are used as benchmarks for runs retaining non-two body modifications due to the effects of (i) multi-step processes altering ionization and radiation via the excited states of atomic hydrogen and (ii) three body recombination. Preliminary investigations indicate that two body scaling interpretations of experimental data fail due to (i) multi-step processes when a significant region of the plasma exceeds a plasma density of 10 19 m -3 , or (ii) three body recombination when there is a significant region in which the temperature is ≤1 eV while the plasma density is ≥10 20 m -3 . These studies demonstrate that two body scaling arguments are often inappropriate in the divertor and the first results for alternate scalings are presented. (orig.)

  6. Morphological study of polymer surfaces exposed to non-thermal plasma based on contact angle and the use of scaling laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, T., E-mail: tsfelix81@gmail.com [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Cassini, F.A.; Benetoli, L.O.B. [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Dotto, M.E.R. [Physics Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Debacher, N.A. [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Polymeric surfaces were etched using non-thermal plasma at different intensities. • Polymers of low mechanical hardness reached the saturation level faster. • A mathematical model based on scaling laws was proposed. - Abstract: The experiments presented in this communication have the purpose to elaborate an explanation for the morphological evolution of the growth of polymeric surfaces provided by the treatment of non-thermal plasma. According to the roughness analysis and the model proposed by scaling laws it is possible relate to a predictable or merely random effect. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly(etherether)ketone (PEEK) samples were exposed to a non-thermal plasma discharge and the resulting surfaces roughness were analyzed based on the measurements from contact angle, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy coupled with scaling laws analysis which can help to describe and understand the dynamic of formation of a wide variety of rough surfaces. The roughness, R{sub RMS} (RMS- Root Mean Square) values for polymer surface range between 19.8 nm and 110.9 nm. The contact angle and the AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) measurements as a function of the plasma exposure time were in agreement with both polar and dispersive components according to the surface roughness and also with the morphology evaluated described by Wolf-Villain model, with proximate values of α between 0.91{sub (PET)} and 0.88{sub (PEEK)}, β = 0.25{sub (PET)} and z = 3,64{sub (PET)}.

  7. Modeling of negative ion extraction from a magnetized plasma source: Derivation of scaling laws and description of the origins of aberrations in the ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fubiani, G.; Garrigues, L.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2018-02-01

    We model the extraction of negative ions from a high brightness high power magnetized negative ion source. The model is a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm with Monte-Carlo Collisions. The negative ions are generated only on the plasma grid surface (which separates the plasma from the electrostatic accelerator downstream). The scope of this work is to derive scaling laws for the negative ion beam properties versus the extraction voltage (potential of the first grid of the accelerator) and plasma density and investigate the origins of aberrations on the ion beam. We show that a given value of the negative ion beam perveance correlates rather well with the beam profile on the extraction grid independent of the simulated plasma density. Furthermore, the extracted beam current may be scaled to any value of the plasma density. The scaling factor must be derived numerically but the overall gain of computational cost compared to performing a PIC simulation at the real plasma density is significant. Aberrations appear for a meniscus curvature radius of the order of the radius of the grid aperture. These aberrations cannot be cancelled out by switching to a chamfered grid aperture (as in the case of positive ions).

  8. Morphological study of polymer surfaces exposed to non-thermal plasma based on contact angle and the use of scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felix, T.; Cassini, F.A.; Benetoli, L.O.B.; Dotto, M.E.R.; Debacher, N.A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Polymeric surfaces were etched using non-thermal plasma at different intensities. • Polymers of low mechanical hardness reached the saturation level faster. • A mathematical model based on scaling laws was proposed. - Abstract: The experiments presented in this communication have the purpose to elaborate an explanation for the morphological evolution of the growth of polymeric surfaces provided by the treatment of non-thermal plasma. According to the roughness analysis and the model proposed by scaling laws it is possible relate to a predictable or merely random effect. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly(etherether)ketone (PEEK) samples were exposed to a non-thermal plasma discharge and the resulting surfaces roughness were analyzed based on the measurements from contact angle, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy coupled with scaling laws analysis which can help to describe and understand the dynamic of formation of a wide variety of rough surfaces. The roughness, R_R_M_S (RMS- Root Mean Square) values for polymer surface range between 19.8 nm and 110.9 nm. The contact angle and the AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) measurements as a function of the plasma exposure time were in agreement with both polar and dispersive components according to the surface roughness and also with the morphology evaluated described by Wolf-Villain model, with proximate values of α between 0.91_(_P_E_T_) and 0.88_(_P_E_E_K_), β = 0.25_(_P_E_T_) and z = 3,64_(_P_E_T_).

  9. Morphological study of polymer surfaces exposed to non-thermal plasma based on contact angle and the use of scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, T.; Cassini, F. A.; Benetoli, L. O. B.; Dotto, M. E. R.; Debacher, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    The experiments presented in this communication have the purpose to elaborate an explanation for the morphological evolution of the growth of polymeric surfaces provided by the treatment of non-thermal plasma. According to the roughness analysis and the model proposed by scaling laws it is possible relate to a predictable or merely random effect. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly(etherether)ketone (PEEK) samples were exposed to a non-thermal plasma discharge and the resulting surfaces roughness were analyzed based on the measurements from contact angle, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy coupled with scaling laws analysis which can help to describe and understand the dynamic of formation of a wide variety of rough surfaces. The roughness, RRMS (RMS- Root Mean Square) values for polymer surface range between 19.8 nm and 110.9 nm. The contact angle and the AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) measurements as a function of the plasma exposure time were in agreement with both polar and dispersive components according to the surface roughness and also with the morphology evaluated described by Wolf-Villain model, with proximate values of α between 0.91(PET) and 0.88(PEEK), β = 0.25(PET) and z = 3,64(PET).

  10. On inertial range scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, J.C.

    1994-12-01

    Inertial-range scaling laws for two- and three-dimensional turbulence are re-examined within a unified framework. A new correction to Kolmogorov's k -5/3 scaling is derived for the energy inertial range. A related modification is found to Kraichnan's logarithmically corrected two-dimensional enstrophy cascade law that removes its unexpected divergence at the injection wavenumber. The significance of these corrections is illustrated with steady-state energy spectra from recent high-resolution closure computations. The results also underscore the asymptotic nature of inertial-range scaling laws. Implications for conventional numerical simulations are discussed

  11. Reduced energy conservation law for magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosenko, P.P.; Decyk, V.K.

    1994-01-01

    A global energy conservation law for a magnetized plasma is studied within the context of a quasiparticle description. A reduced energy conservation law is derived for low-frequency, as compared to the gyromagnetic frequency, plasma motions with regard to both non-uniform mean flows and fluctuations in the plasma. The mean value of plasma energy is calculated and sufficient stability conditions for non-equilibrium plasmas are derived. (orig.)

  12. Minimum scaling laws in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.Z.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1986-10-01

    Scaling laws governing anomalous electron transport in tokamaks with ohmic and/or auxiliary heating are derived using renormalized Vlasov-Ampere equations for low frequency electromagnetic microturbulence. It is also shown that for pure auxiliary heating (or when auxiliary heating power far exceeds the ohmic power), the energy confinement time scales as tau/sub E/ ∼ P/sub inj//sup -1/3/, where P/sub inj/ is the injected power

  13. Scaling laws for spherical pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.P.; Palleschi, V.; Vaselli, M.

    1991-01-01

    In spherical pinch (SP) experiments, the plasma heated at the center of a cell to reach ignition temperature is confined by imploding shock waves for a time long enough to satisfy the Lawson criterion for plasma fusion. In earlier theoretical studies, the expansion of the central plasma either is neglected or is assumed to be radially uniform. The energy is considered to be deposited instantaneously at the center of the cell and the nonlinear heat conduction equation is solved to study the temporal evolution of the central plasma. Incorporating the ignition condition for the average temperature of the expanding fireball, and its confinement by imploding convergent shock waves, which may be fired from the periphery of the cell with some time delay, the scaling laws for satisfying the Lawson criterion are investigated in detail. The relevant calculations indicate that the cumulative effects of the convergent shock waves in the vicinity of the center of the cell play an important role in these scaling laws. (author)

  14. Scaling laws of Rydberg excitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckötter, J.; Freitag, M.; Fröhlich, D.; Aßmann, M.; Bayer, M.; Semina, M. A.; Glazov, M. M.

    2017-09-01

    Rydberg atoms have attracted considerable interest due to their huge interaction among each other and with external fields. They demonstrate characteristic scaling laws in dependence on the principal quantum number n for features such as the magnetic field for level crossing or the electric field of dissociation. Recently, the observation of excitons in highly excited states has allowed studying Rydberg physics in cuprous oxide crystals. Fundamentally different insights may be expected for Rydberg excitons, as the crystal environment and associated symmetry reduction compared to vacuum give not only optical access to many more states within an exciton multiplet but also extend the Hamiltonian for describing the exciton beyond the hydrogen model. Here we study experimentally and theoretically the scaling of several parameters of Rydberg excitons with n , for some of which we indeed find laws different from those of atoms. For others we find identical scaling laws with n , even though their origin may be distinctly different from the atomic case. At zero field the energy splitting of a particular multiplet n scales as n-3 due to crystal-specific terms in the Hamiltonian, e.g., from the valence band structure. From absorption spectra in magnetic field we find for the first crossing of levels with adjacent principal quantum numbers a Br∝n-4 dependence of the resonance field strength, Br, due to the dominant paramagnetic term unlike for atoms for which the diamagnetic contribution is decisive, resulting in a Br∝n-6 dependence. By contrast, the resonance electric field strength shows a scaling as Er∝n-5 as for Rydberg atoms. Also similar to atoms with the exception of hydrogen we observe anticrossings between states belonging to multiplets with different principal quantum numbers at these resonances. The energy splittings at the avoided crossings scale roughly as n-4, again due to crystal specific features in the exciton Hamiltonian. The data also allow us to

  15. Scaling laws for specialized hohlraums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    The author presents scaling laws for the behavior of hohlraums that are somewhat more complex than a simple sphere or cylinder. In particular the author considers hohlraums that are in what has become known as a open-quotes primaryclose quotes open-quotes secondaryclose quotes configuration, namely geometries in which the laser is absorbed in a primary region of a hohlraum, and only radiation energy is transported to a secondary part of the hohlraum that is shielded from seeing the laser light directly. Such hohlraums have been in use of late for doing LTE opacity experiments on a sample in the secondary and in recently proposed open-quotes shimmedclose quotes hohlraums that use gold disks on axis to block a capsule's view of the cold laser entrance hole. The temperature/drive of the secondary, derived herein, scales somewhat differently than the drive in simple hohlraums

  16. Multitude scaling laws in axisymmetric turbulent wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layek, G. C.; Sunita

    2018-03-01

    We establish theoretically multitude scaling laws of a self-similar (statistical) axisymmetric turbulent wake. At infinite Reynolds number limit, the flow evolves as general power law and a new exponential law of streamwise distance, consistent with the criterion of equilibrium similarity hypothesis. We found power law scalings for components of the homogeneous dissipation rate (ɛ) obeying the non-Richardson-Kolmogorov cascade as ɛu˜ku3 /2/(l R elm ) , ɛv˜kv3 /2/l , kv˜ku/R el2 m, 0 stress, l is the local length scale, and Rel is the Reynolds number. The Richardson-Kolmogorov cascade corresponds to m = 0. For m ≈ 1, the power law agrees with non-equilibrium scaling laws observed in recent experiments of the axisymmetric wake. On the contrary, the exponential scaling law follows the above dissipation law with different regions of existence for power index m = 3. At finite Reynolds number with kinematic viscosity ν, scalings obey the dissipation laws ɛu ˜ νku/l2 and ɛv ˜ νkv/l2 with kv˜ku/R eln. The value of n is preferably 0 and 2. Different possibilities of scaling laws and symmetry breaking process are discussed at length.

  17. Scaling laws for coastal overwash morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Eli D.

    2016-12-01

    Overwash is a physical process of coastal sediment transport driven by storm events and is essential to landscape resilience in low-lying barrier environments. This work establishes a comprehensive set of scaling laws for overwash morphology: unifying quantitative descriptions with which to compare overwash features by their morphological attributes across case examples. Such scaling laws also help relate overwash features to other morphodynamic phenomena. Here morphometric data from a physical experiment are compared with data from natural examples of overwash features. The resulting scaling relationships indicate scale invariance spanning several orders of magnitude. Furthermore, these new relationships for overwash morphology align with classic scaling laws for fluvial drainages and alluvial fans.

  18. Power law scaling for rotational energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritchard, D.E.; Smith, N.; Driver, R.D.; Brunner, T.A.

    1979-01-01

    We have applied a new scaling law to several sets of rotational energy transfer cross sections. The new law asserts that the square of the T-matrix depends on the amount of energy transferred as a power law. Two different kinds of angular momentum statistics are assumed, one corresponding to m/sub j/ being conserved and the other corresponding to m/sub j/ being completely randomized. Numerical fits are presented which demonstrate that the data follow the power law better than the widely used exponential gap law

  19. Exact Turbulence Law in Collisionless Plasmas: Hybrid Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinger, P.; Verdini, A.; Landi, S.; Franci, L.; Matteini, L.

    2017-12-01

    An exact vectorial law for turbulence in homogeneous incompressible Hall-MHD is derived and tested in two-dimensional hybrid simulations of plasma turbulence. The simulations confirm the validity of the MHD exact law in the kinetic regime, the simulated turbulence exhibits a clear inertial range on large scales where the MHD cascade flux dominates. The simulation results also indicate that in the sub-ion range the cascade continues via the Hall term and that the total cascade rate tends to decrease at around the ion scales, especially in high-beta plasmas. This decrease is like owing to formation of non-thermal features, such as collisionless ion energization, that can not be retained in the Hall MHD approximation.

  20. Acoustofluidics 10: Scaling laws in acoustophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In Part 10 of the thematic tutorial series “Acoustofluidics – exploiting ultrasonic standing waves forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic systems for cell and particle manipulation”, we present and analyze a number of scaling laws relevant for microsystem acoustophoresis. Such laws...

  1. RFQ scaling-law implications and examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadlinger, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of the RFQ scaling laws that have been previously derived. These laws are relations between accelerator parameters (electric field, fr frequency, etc.) and beam parameters (current, energy, emittance, etc.) that act as guides for designing radio-frequency quadrupoles (RFQs) by showing the various tradeoffs involved in making RFQ designs. These scaling laws give a unique family of curves, at any given synchronous particle phase, that relates the beam current, emittance, particle mass, and space-charge tune depression with the RFQ frequency and maximum vane-tip electric field when assuming equipartitioning and equal longitudinal and transverse tune depressions. These scaling curves are valid at any point in any given RFQ where there is a bunched and equipartitioned beam. We show several examples for designing RFQs, examine the performance characteristics of an existing device, and study various RFQ performance limitations required by the scaling laws

  2. On the universality of power laws for tokamak plasma predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J.; Cambon, D.; Contributors, JET

    2018-02-01

    Significant deviations from well established power laws for the thermal energy confinement time, obtained from extensive databases analysis as the IPB98(y,2), have been recently reported in dedicated power scans. In order to illuminate the adequacy, validity and universality of power laws as tools for predicting plasma performance, a simplified analysis has been carried out in the framework of a minimal modeling for heat transport which is, however, able to account for the interplay between turbulence and collinear effects with the input power known to play a role in experiments with significant deviations from such power laws. Whereas at low powers, the usual scaling laws are recovered with little influence of other plasma parameters, resulting in a robust power low exponent, at high power it is shown how the exponents obtained are extremely sensitive to the heating deposition, the q-profile or even the sampling or the number of points considered due to highly non-linear behavior of the heat transport. In particular circumstances, even a minimum of the thermal energy confinement time with the input power can be obtained, which means that the approach of the energy confinement time as a power law might be intrinsically invalid. Therefore plasma predictions with a power law approximation with a constant exponent obtained from a regression of a broad range of powers and other plasma parameters which can non-linearly affect and suppress heat transport, can lead to misleading results suggesting that this approach should be taken cautiously and its results continuously compared with modeling which can properly capture the underline physics, as gyrokinetic simulations.

  3. Pair plasma relaxation time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, A G; Ruffini, R; Vereshchagin, G V

    2010-04-01

    By numerically solving the relativistic Boltzmann equations, we compute the time scale for relaxation to thermal equilibrium for an optically thick electron-positron plasma with baryon loading. We focus on the time scales of electromagnetic interactions. The collisional integrals are obtained directly from the corresponding QED matrix elements. Thermalization time scales are computed for a wide range of values of both the total-energy density (over 10 orders of magnitude) and of the baryonic loading parameter (over 6 orders of magnitude). This also allows us to study such interesting limiting cases as the almost purely electron-positron plasma or electron-proton plasma as well as intermediate cases. These results appear to be important both for laboratory experiments aimed at generating optically thick pair plasmas as well as for astrophysical models in which electron-positron pair plasmas play a relevant role.

  4. Fluctuation scaling, Taylor's law, and crime.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin S Hanley

    Full Text Available Fluctuation scaling relationships have been observed in a wide range of processes ranging from internet router traffic to measles cases. Taylor's law is one such scaling relationship and has been widely applied in ecology to understand communities including trees, birds, human populations, and insects. We show that monthly crime reports in the UK show complex fluctuation scaling which can be approximated by Taylor's law relationships corresponding to local policing neighborhoods and larger regional and countrywide scales. Regression models applied to local scale data from Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire found that different categories of crime exhibited different scaling exponents with no significant difference between the two regions. On this scale, violence reports were close to a Poisson distribution (α = 1.057 ± 0.026 while burglary exhibited a greater exponent (α = 1.292 ± 0.029 indicative of temporal clustering. These two regions exhibited significantly different pre-exponential factors for the categories of anti-social behavior and burglary indicating that local variations in crime reports can be assessed using fluctuation scaling methods. At regional and countrywide scales, all categories exhibited scaling behavior indicative of temporal clustering evidenced by Taylor's law exponents from 1.43 ± 0.12 (Drugs to 2.094 ± 0081 (Other Crimes. Investigating crime behavior via fluctuation scaling gives insight beyond that of raw numbers and is unique in reporting on all processes contributing to the observed variance and is either robust to or exhibits signs of many types of data manipulation.

  5. Fluctuation scaling, Taylor's law, and crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Quentin S; Khatun, Suniya; Yosef, Amal; Dyer, Rachel-May

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuation scaling relationships have been observed in a wide range of processes ranging from internet router traffic to measles cases. Taylor's law is one such scaling relationship and has been widely applied in ecology to understand communities including trees, birds, human populations, and insects. We show that monthly crime reports in the UK show complex fluctuation scaling which can be approximated by Taylor's law relationships corresponding to local policing neighborhoods and larger regional and countrywide scales. Regression models applied to local scale data from Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire found that different categories of crime exhibited different scaling exponents with no significant difference between the two regions. On this scale, violence reports were close to a Poisson distribution (α = 1.057 ± 0.026) while burglary exhibited a greater exponent (α = 1.292 ± 0.029) indicative of temporal clustering. These two regions exhibited significantly different pre-exponential factors for the categories of anti-social behavior and burglary indicating that local variations in crime reports can be assessed using fluctuation scaling methods. At regional and countrywide scales, all categories exhibited scaling behavior indicative of temporal clustering evidenced by Taylor's law exponents from 1.43 ± 0.12 (Drugs) to 2.094 ± 0081 (Other Crimes). Investigating crime behavior via fluctuation scaling gives insight beyond that of raw numbers and is unique in reporting on all processes contributing to the observed variance and is either robust to or exhibits signs of many types of data manipulation.

  6. Practical scaling law for photoelectron angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Dongsheng; Zhang Jingtao; Xu Zhizhan; Li Xiaofeng; Fu Panming; Freeman, R.R.

    2003-01-01

    A practical scaling law that predicts photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) is derived using angular distribution formulas which explicitly contain spontaneous emission. The scaling law is used to analyze recent PAD measurements in above-threshold ionization, and to predict results of future experiments. Our theoretical and numerical studies show that, in the non-relativistic regime and long-wavelength approximation, the shapes of PADs are determined by only three dimensionless numbers: (1) u p ≡U p /(ℎ/2π)ω, the ponderomotive number (ponderomotive energy in units of laser photon energy); (2) ε b ≡E b /(ℎ/2π)ω, the binding number (atomic binding energy in units of the laser photon energy); (3) j, the absorbed-photon number. The scaling law is shown to be useful in predictions of results from strong-field Kapitza-Dirac effect measurements; specifically, the application of this scaling law to recently reported Kapitza-Dirac diffraction is discussed. Possible experimental tests to verify the scaling law are suggested

  7. Effective Ohm's law for a magnetohydrodynamic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayukawa, Naoyuki; Oikawa, Shunichi; Aoki, Yoshiyuki

    1991-01-01

    Considering that the electrical conductivity of a thermally equilibrium MHD plasma is a strong non-linear function of the gas temperature, the authors first pointed out that the statistically averaged conductivity should be evaluated by the mean temperature as =(1+G)σ( ), where G is given by the third order Taylor expansion with respect to the temperature fluctuation T- and is always positive. Next, in order to obtain a statistically averaged Ohm's law for a turbulent plasma, the correlation (σ'E'> between the conductivity and the electric field fluctuations has been numerically investigated for a plasma with a 1/7th-power average temperature distribution and layered one-dimensional fluctuation between parallel electrodes. It was shown that the correlation is always negative and the averaged current density as well as the plasma resistance is to be corrected appreciably from the values based on the mean temperature. Finally, it was shown that the correction factor / can be evaluated approximately by a 4th-order polynomial of the relative rms temperature fluctuation √ 2 >/ and the relationship is practically insensitive to the variation of the electrode temperature, the boundary-layer thickness and also to the spatial distribution of the fluctuation amplitudes. (author)

  8. Temperature Scaling Law for Quantum Annealing Optimizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albash, Tameem; Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2017-09-15

    Physical implementations of quantum annealing unavoidably operate at finite temperatures. We point to a fundamental limitation of fixed finite temperature quantum annealers that prevents them from functioning as competitive scalable optimizers and show that to serve as optimizers annealer temperatures must be appropriately scaled down with problem size. We derive a temperature scaling law dictating that temperature must drop at the very least in a logarithmic manner but also possibly as a power law with problem size. We corroborate our results by experiment and simulations and discuss the implications of these to practical annealers.

  9. A crude scaling law for lasertrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.

    1987-11-01

    The lasertron is under consideration in several laboratories as a promising new source of high-power microwaves that is competitive with conventional klystrons in its properties - particularly in efficiency. In this note, a crude scaling law for high-power lasertrons is derived based on the observation that the main limiting phenomenon, the phenomenon that curtails the tube's efficiency, is debunching due to longitudinal space-charge forces acting in the electron gun. The scaling law indicates that lasertrons are quite restricted in the power they can generate at high frequencies

  10. Large-scale numerical simulations of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    The recent trend of large scales simulations of fusion plasma and processing plasmas is briefly summarized. Many advanced simulation techniques have been developed for fusion plasmas and some of these techniques are now applied to analyses of processing plasmas. (author)

  11. Scaling laws for radial foil bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavara Prasad, Srikanth

    The effects of fluid pressurization, structural deformation of the compliant members and heat generation in foil bearings make the design and analysis of foil bearings very complicated. The complex fluid-structural-thermal interactions in foil bearings also make modeling efforts challenging because these phenomena are governed by highly non-linear partial differential equations. Consequently, comparison of various bearing designs require detailed calculation of the flow fields (velocities, pressures), bump deflections (structural compliance) and heat transfer phenomena (viscous dissipation in the fluid, frictional heating, temperature profile etc.,) resulting in extensive computational effort (time/hardware). To obviate rigorous computations and aid in feasibility assessments of foil bearings of various sizes, NASA developed the "rule of thumb" design guidelines for estimation of journal bearing load capacity. The guidelines are based on extensive experimental data. The goal of the current work is the development of scaling laws for radial foil bearings to establish an analytical "rule of thumb" for bearing clearance and bump stiffness. The use of scale invariant Reynolds equation and experimentally observed NASA "rule of thumb" yield scale factors which can be deduced from first principles. Power-law relationships between: a. Bearing clearance and bearing radius, and b. bump stiffness and bearing radius, are obtained. The clearance and bump stiffness values obtained from scaling laws are used as inputs for Orbit simulation to study various cases. As the clearance of the bearing reaches the dimensions of the material surface roughness, asperity contact breaks the fluid film which results in wear. Similarly, as the rotor diameter increases (requiring larger bearing diameters), the load capacity of the fluid film should increase to prevent dry rubbing. This imposes limits on the size of the rotor diameter and consequently bearing diameter. Therefore, this thesis aims

  12. On global H-mode scaling laws for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kardaun, O.; Lackner, K.; Thomsen, K.; Christiansen, J.; Cordey, J.; Gottardi, N.; Keilhacker, M.; Smeulders, P.

    1989-01-01

    Investigation of the scaling of the energy confinement time τ E with various plasma parameters has since long been an interesting, albeit not uncontroversial topic in plasma physics. Various global scaling laws have been derived for ohmic as well as (NBI and/or RF heated) L-mode discharges. Due to the scarce availability of computerised, extensive and validated H-mode datasets, systematic statistical analysis of H-mode scaling behaviour has hitherto been limited. A common approach is to fit the available H-mode data by an L-mode scaling law (e.g., Kaye-Goldston, Rebut-Lallia) with one or two adjustable constant terms. In this contribution we will consider the alternative approach of fitting all free parameters of various simple scaling models to two recently compiled datasets consisting of about 140 ELM-free and 40 ELMy H-mode discharges, measured at JET in the period 1986-1988. From this period, approximately all known H-mode shots have been included that satisfy the following criteria: D-injected D + discharges with no RF heating, a sufficiently long (≥300 ms) and regular P NBI flat-top, and validated main diagnostics. (author) 13 refs., 1 tab

  13. Scaling Laws in Chennai Bus Network

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Atanu; Ramadurai, Gitakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the structural properties of the complex bus network of Chennai. We formulate this extensive network structure by identifying each bus stop as a node, and a bus which stops at any two adjacent bus stops as an edge connecting the nodes. Rigorous statistical analysis of this data shows that the Chennai bus network displays small-world properties and a scale-free degree distribution with the power-law exponent, $\\gamma > 3$.

  14. Scaling laws for nonintercommuting cosmic string networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, C.J.A.P.

    2004-01-01

    We study the evolution of noninteracting and entangled cosmic string networks in the context of the velocity-dependent one-scale model. Such networks may be formed in several contexts, including brane inflation. We show that the frozen network solution L∝a, although generic, is only a transient one, and that the asymptotic solution is still L∝t as in the case of ordinary (intercommuting) strings, although in the present context the universe will usually be string dominated. Thus the behavior of two strings when they cross does not seem to affect their scaling laws, but only their densities relative to the background

  15. Turbulence effect on Ohm's law in partially ionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, M.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of nonuniformity on electric current flow in partially ionized plasmas is made. An Ohm's law for a nonuniform plasma was derived, from which Rosa's equation is obtained as a special case. Making use of this new Ohm's law, the effective electrical conductivity and Hall coefficient are determined for isotropically turbulent plasmas. They are found to be in good agreement with the results obtained previously. (author)

  16. Chiral battery, scaling laws and magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, Sampurn; Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Pandey, Arun Kumar, E-mail: sampurn@prl.res.in, E-mail: jeet@prl.res.in, E-mail: arunp@prl.res.in [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, 380009 (India)

    2017-07-01

    We study the generation and evolution of magnetic field in the presence of chiral imbalance and gravitational anomaly which gives an additional contribution to the vortical current. The contribution due to gravitational anomaly is proportional to T {sup 2} which can generate seed magnetic field irrespective of plasma being chirally charged or neutral. We estimate the order of magnitude of the magnetic field to be 10{sup 30} G at T ∼ 10{sup 9} GeV, with a typical length scale of the order of 10{sup −18} cm, which is much smaller than the Hubble radius at that temperature (10{sup −8} cm). Moreover, such a system possess scaling symmetry. We show that the T {sup 2} term in the vorticity current along with scaling symmetry leads to more power transfer from lower to higher length scale as compared to only chiral anomaly without scaling symmetry.

  17. Scaling laws in (e,3e) processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasaneo, G; Rodriguez, K V; Ancarani, L U; Cappello, C Dal; Charpentier, I

    2009-01-01

    We study the double ionization of helium-like ions by impact of electrons with high incident energy. Within the isoelectronic sequence, an approximate scaling law for (e,3e) differential cross sections is proposed and confirmed by calculations. The latter are performed using 14-parameters Hylleraas-like wave functions to represent the bound electrons in the initial channel, plane waves for the fast incoming and scattered electrons, and a continuum distorted wave approach for the two ejected electrons in the final channel.

  18. New Empirical Earthquake Source‐Scaling Laws

    KAUST Repository

    Thingbaijam, Kiran Kumar S.

    2017-12-13

    We develop new empirical scaling laws for rupture width W, rupture length L, rupture area A, and average slip D, based on a large database of rupture models. The database incorporates recent earthquake source models in a wide magnitude range (M 5.4–9.2) and events of various faulting styles. We apply general orthogonal regression, instead of ordinary least-squares regression, to account for measurement errors of all variables and to obtain mutually self-consistent relationships. We observe that L grows more rapidly with M compared to W. The fault-aspect ratio (L/W) tends to increase with fault dip, which generally increases from reverse-faulting, to normal-faulting, to strike-slip events. At the same time, subduction-inter-face earthquakes have significantly higher W (hence a larger rupture area A) compared to other faulting regimes. For strike-slip events, the growth of W with M is strongly inhibited, whereas the scaling of L agrees with the L-model behavior (D correlated with L). However, at a regional scale for which seismogenic depth is essentially fixed, the scaling behavior corresponds to the W model (D not correlated with L). Self-similar scaling behavior with M − log A is observed to be consistent for all the cases, except for normal-faulting events. Interestingly, the ratio D/W (a proxy for average stress drop) tends to increase with M, except for shallow crustal reverse-faulting events, suggesting the possibility of scale-dependent stress drop. The observed variations in source-scaling properties for different faulting regimes can be interpreted in terms of geological and seismological factors. We find substantial differences between our new scaling relationships and those of previous studies. Therefore, our study provides critical updates on source-scaling relations needed in seismic–tsunami-hazard analysis and engineering applications.

  19. Scaling Laws for NanoFET Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qi-Huo; Zhou, Fu-Shan

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we report our numerical studies of the scaling laws for nanoplate field-effect transistor (FET) sensors by simplifying the nanoplates as random resistor networks. Nanowire/tube FETs are included as the limiting cases where the device width goes small. Computer simulations show that the field effect strength exerted by the binding molecules has significant impact on the scaling behaviors. When the field effect strength is small, nanoFETs have little size and shape dependence. In contrast, when the field-effect strength becomes stronger, there exists a lower detection threshold for charge accumulation FETs and an upper detection threshold for charge depletion FET sensors. At these thresholds, the nanoFET devices undergo a transition between low and large sensitivities. These thresholds may set the detection limits of nanoFET sensors. We propose to eliminate these detection thresholds by employing devices with very short source-drain distance and large width.

  20. Consequences of nonlinear heat transport laws on expected plasma profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, K.

    1987-03-01

    The expected variation of plasma pressure profiles against changes in power deposition is investigated by using a simple linear heat transport law as well as a quadratic one. Applying the quadratic transport law it can be shown that the stiffening of the resulting profiles is sufficient to understand the experimentally measured phenomenon of 'profile consistence' without further assumptions of nonlocal effects. (orig.) [de

  1. Multi-scaling of the dense plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus is a copious source of multi-radiations with many potential new applications of special interest such as in advanced SXR lithography, materials synthesizing and testing, medical isotopes and imaging. This paper reviews the series of numerical experiments conducted using the Lee model code to obtain the scaling laws of the multi-radiations.

  2. Scaling Law of Urban Ride Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachet, R.; Sagarra, O.; Santi, P.; Resta, G.; Szell, M.; Strogatz, S. H.; Ratti, C.

    2017-03-01

    Sharing rides could drastically improve the efficiency of car and taxi transportation. Unleashing such potential, however, requires understanding how urban parameters affect the fraction of individual trips that can be shared, a quantity that we call shareability. Using data on millions of taxi trips in New York City, San Francisco, Singapore, and Vienna, we compute the shareability curves for each city, and find that a natural rescaling collapses them onto a single, universal curve. We explain this scaling law theoretically with a simple model that predicts the potential for ride sharing in any city, using a few basic urban quantities and no adjustable parameters. Accurate extrapolations of this type will help planners, transportation companies, and society at large to shape a sustainable path for urban growth.

  3. Two-dimensional divertor modeling and scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catto, P.J.; Connor, J.W.; Knoll, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical models of divertors contain large numbers of dimensionless parameters that must be varied to investigate all operating regimes of interest. To simplify the task and gain insight into divertor operation, we employ similarity techniques to investigate whether model systems of equations plus boundary conditions in the steady state admit scaling transformations that lead to useful divertor similarity scaling laws. A short mean free path neutral-plasma model of the divertor region below the x-point is adopted in which all perpendicular transport is due to the neutrals. We illustrate how the results can be used to benchmark large computer simulations by employing a modified version of UEDGE which contains a neutral fluid model. (orig.)

  4. Dynamical scaling law in the development of drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.; Fujisaka, H.; Iwayama, T.

    1997-01-01

    The Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation, with random forcing at the narrow band wave-number region, which is set to be slightly larger than the characteristic wave number λ, evaluating the inverse ion Larmor radius in plasma, is numerically studied. It is shown that the Fourier spectrum of the potential vorticity fluctuation in the development of turbulence with an initial condition of quiescent state obeys a dynamic scaling law for k 1/2 ε 5/4 t 7/4 F(k/bar k(t))[bar k(t)∼λ 3/4 ε -1/8 t -3/8 ] with a scaling function F(x), which turns out to be in good agreement with numerical experiments. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  5. Empirical Scaling Laws of Neutral Beam Injection Power in HL-2A Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jian-Yong; Wei Hui-Ling; Liu He; Yang Xian-Fu; Zou Gui-Qing; Yu Li-Ming; Li Qing; Luo Cui-Wen; Pan Yu-Dong; Jiang Shao-Feng; Lei Guang-Jiu; Li Bo; Rao Jun; Duan Xu-Ru

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental method to obtain neutral beam injection (NBI) power scaling laws with operating parameters of the NBI system on HL-2A, including the beam divergence angle, the beam power transmission efficiency, the neutralization efficiency and so on. With the empirical scaling laws, the estimating power can be obtained in every shot of experiment on time, therefore the important parameters such as the energy confinement time can be obtained precisely. The simulation results by the tokamak simulation code (TSC) show that the evolution of the plasma parameters is in good agreement with the experimental results by using the NBI power from the empirical scaling law. (paper)

  6. A new large-scale plasma source with plasma cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, K.; Hirokawa, K.; Suzuki, H.; Satake, T.

    1996-01-01

    A new large-scale plasma source (200 mm diameter) with a plasma cathode has been investigated. The plasma has a good spatial uniformity, operates at low electron temperature, and is highly ionized under relatively low gas pressure of about 10 -4 Torr. The plasma source consists of a plasma chamber and a plasma cathode generator. The plasma chamber has an anode which is 200 mm in diameter, 150 mm in length, is made of 304 stainless steel, and acts as a plasma expansion cup. A filament-cathode-like plasma ''plasma cathode'' is placed on the central axis of this source. To improve the plasma spatial uniformity in the plasma chamber, a disk-shaped, floating electrode is placed between the plasma chamber and the plasma cathode. The 200 mm diameter plasma is measure by using Langmuir probes. As a result, the discharge voltage is relatively low (30-120 V), the plasma space potential is almost equal to the discharge voltage and can be easily controlled, the electron temperature is several electron volts, the plasma density is about 10 10 cm -3 , and the plasma density is about 10% variance in over a 100 mm diameter. (Author)

  7. On generalized scaling laws with continuously varying exponents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sittler, Lionel; Hinrichsen, Haye

    2002-01-01

    Many physical systems share the property of scale invariance. Most of them show ordinary power-law scaling, where quantities can be expressed as a leading power law times a scaling function which depends on scaling-invariant ratios of the parameters. However, some systems do not obey power-law scaling, instead there is numerical evidence for a logarithmic scaling form, in which the scaling function depends on ratios of the logarithms of the parameters. Based on previous ideas by Tang we propose that this type of logarithmic scaling can be explained by a concept of local scaling invariance with continuously varying exponents. The functional dependence of the exponents is constrained by a homomorphism which can be expressed as a set of partial differential equations. Solving these equations we obtain logarithmic scaling as a special case. The other solutions lead to scaling forms where logarithmic and power-law scaling are mixed

  8. Scaling laws for nanoFET sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Fushan; Wei Qihuo

    2008-01-01

    The sensitive conductance change of semiconductor nanowires and carbon nanotubes in response to the binding of charged molecules provides a novel sensing modality which is generally denoted as nanoFET sensors. In this paper, we study the scaling laws of nanoplate FET sensors by simplifying nanoplates as random resistor networks with molecular receptors sitting on lattice sites. Nanowire/tube FETs are included as the limiting cases where the device width goes small. Computer simulations show that the field effect strength exerted by the binding molecules has significant impact on the scaling behaviors. When the field effect strength is small, nanoFETs have little size and shape dependence. In contrast, when the field effect strength becomes stronger, there exists a lower detection threshold for charge accumulation FETs and an upper detection threshold for charge depletion FET sensors. At these thresholds, the nanoFET devices undergo a transition between low and large sensitivities. These thresholds may set the detection limits of nanoFET sensors, while they could be eliminated by designing devices with very short source-drain distance and large width

  9. Non-thermal Power-Law Distributions in Solar and Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, M.; Battaglia, M.; Birn, J.; Chaston, C. C.; Effenberger, F.; Eriksson, E.; Fletcher, L.; Hatch, S.; Imada, S.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Kuhar, M.; Livadiotis, G.; Miyoshi, Y.; Retino, A.

    2017-12-01

    Particles are accelerated to very high, non-thermal energies in solar and space plasma environments. While energy spectra of accelerated particles often exhibit a power-law and are characterized by the power-law index δ, it remains unclear how particles are accelerated to high energies and how δ is determined. Here, we review previous observations of the power-law index δ in a variety of different plasma environments with a particular focus on sub-relativistic electrons. It appears that in regions more closely related to magnetic reconnection (such as the "above-the-looptop" solar hard X-ray source and the plasma sheet in Earth's magnetotail), the spectra are typically soft (δ> 4). This is in contrast to the typically hard spectra (δuniform in the plasma sheet, while power-law distributions still exist even in quiet times. The role of magnetotail reconnection in the electron power-law formation could therefore be confounded with these background conditions. Because different regions have been studied with different instrumentations and methodologies, we point out a need for more systematic and coordinated studies of power-law distributions for a better understanding of possible scaling laws in particle acceleration as well as their universality.

  10. A Unified Scaling Law in Spiral Galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda; Sofue; Wada

    2000-03-01

    We investigate the origin of a unified scaling relation in spiral galaxies. Observed spiral galaxies are spread on a plane in the three-dimensional logarithmic space of luminosity L, radius R, and rotation velocity V. The plane is expressed as L~&parl0;VR&parr0;alpha in the I passband, where alpha is a constant. On the plane, observed galaxies are distributed in an elongated region which looks like the shape of a surfboard. The well-known scaling relations L-V (Tully-Fisher [TF] relation), V-R (also the TF relation), and R-L (Freeman's law) can be understood as oblique projections of the surfboard-like plane into two-dimensional spaces. This unified interpretation of the known scaling relations should be a clue to understand the physical origin of all the relations consistently. Furthermore, this interpretation can also explain why previous studies could not find any correlation between TF residuals and radius. In order to clarify the origin of this plane, we simulate formation and evolution of spiral galaxies with the N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics method, including cooling, star formation, and stellar feedback. Initial conditions are set to 14 isolated spheres with two free parameters, such as mass and angular momentum. The cold dark matter (h=0.5, Omega0=1) cosmology is considered as a test case. The simulations provide the following two conclusions: (1) The slope of the plane is well reproduced but the zero point is not. This zero-point discrepancy could be solved in a low-density (Omega00.5) cosmology. (2) The surfboard-shaped plane can be explained by the control of galactic mass and angular momentum.

  11. Plasma Jet Simulations Using a Generalized Ohm's Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersohn, Frans; Shebalin, John V.; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma jets are important physical phenomena in astrophysics and plasma propulsion devices. A currently proposed dual jet plasma propulsion device to be used for ISS experiments strongly resembles a coronal loop and further draws a parallel between these physical systems [1]. To study plasma jets we use numerical methods that solve the compressible MHD equations using the generalized Ohm s law [2]. Here, we will discuss the crucial underlying physics of these systems along with the numerical procedures we utilize to study them. Recent results from our numerical experiments will be presented and discussed.

  12. An alcator-like confinement time scaling law derived from buckingham's PI theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The unsatisfactory state of understanding of particle transport and confinement in tokamaks is well known. The best available theory, neoclassical transport, predicts a confinement time which scales as the square of the magnetic field, and inversely as the number density. Until recently, the best available phenomenological scaling law was the Alcator scaling law. This scaling law has recently been supplanted by the neoAlcator scaling law. Both of these expressions are unsatisfactory, because they not only are unsupported by any physical theory, but also their numerical constants are dimensional, suggesting that additional physical parameters need to be accounted for. A more firmly based scaling law can be derived from Buckingham's pi theorem. We adopt the particle confinement time as the dependent variable (derived dimension), and as independent variables (fundamental dimensions) we use the plasma volume, the average ion charge density, the ion current on the limiter, and the magnetic induction. From Buckingham's pi theorem, we obtain an equation which correctly predicts the absence of magnetic induction dependence, and the direct dependence on the ion density. The dependence on the product of the major radius and the plasma radius is intermediate between the original and neoAlcator scaling laws, and may be consistent with the data if the ion kinetic temperature and limiter area were accounted for

  13. A scaling law beyond Zipf's law and its relation to Heaps' law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font-Clos, Francesc; Corral, Álvaro; Boleda, Gemma

    2013-01-01

    The dependence on text length of the statistical properties of word occurrences has long been considered a severe limitation on the usefulness of quantitative linguistics. We propose a simple scaling form for the distribution of absolute word frequencies that brings to light the robustness of this distribution as text grows. In this way, the shape of the distribution is always the same, and it is only a scale parameter that increases (linearly) with text length. By analyzing very long novels we show that this behavior holds both for raw, unlemmatized texts and for lemmatized texts. In the latter case, the distribution of frequencies is well approximated by a double power law, maintaining the Zipf's exponent value γ ≃ 2 for large frequencies but yielding a smaller exponent in the low-frequency regime. The growth of the distribution with text length allows us to estimate the size of the vocabulary at each step and to propose a generic alternative to Heaps' law, which turns out to be intimately connected to the distribution of frequencies, thanks to its scaling behavior. (paper)

  14. On spectral scaling laws for incompressible anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galtier, Sebastien; Pouquet, Annick; Mangeney, Andre

    2005-01-01

    A heuristic model is given for anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics turbulence in the presence of a uniform external magnetic field B 0 e parallel . The model is valid for both moderate and strong B 0 and is able to describe both the strong and weak wave turbulence regimes as well as the transition between them. The main ingredient of the model is the assumption of constant ratio at all scales between the linear wave period and the nonlinear turnover time scale. Contrary to the model of critical balance introduced by Goldreich and Sridhar [Astrophys. J. 438, 763 (1995)], it is not assumed, in addition, that this ratio be equal to unity at all scales. This allows us to make use of the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan phenomenology; it is then possible to recover the widely observed anisotropic scaling law k parallel ∝k perpendicular 2/3 between parallel and perpendicular wave numbers (with reference to B 0 e parallel and to obtain for the total-energy spectrum E(k perpendicular ,k parallel )∼k perpendicular -α k parallel -β the universal prediction, 3α+2β=7. In particular, with such a prediction, the weak Alfven wave turbulence constant-flux solution is recovered and, for the first time, a possible explanation to its precursor found numerically by Galtier et al. [J. Plasma Phys. 63, 447 (2000)] is given.

  15. Intermittency and scaling laws for wall bounded turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benzi, R.; Amati, G.; Casciola, C.M.; Toschi, F.; Piva, R.

    1999-01-01

    Well defined scaling laws clearly appear in wall bounded turbulence, very close to the wall, where a distinct violation of the refined Kolmogorov similarity hypothesis (RKSH) occurs together with the simultaneous persistence of scaling laws. A new form of RKSH for the wall region is here proposed in

  16. Origin of Noncubic Scaling Law in Disordered Granular Packing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Chengjie; Li, Jindong; Kou, Binquan; Cao, Yixin; Li, Zhifeng; Xiao, Xianghui; Fu, Yanan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Hong, Liang; Zhang, Jie; Kob, Walter; Wang, Yujie

    2017-06-01

    Recent diffraction experiments on metallic glasses have unveiled an unexpected non-cubic scaling law between density and average interatomic distance, which lead to the speculations on the presence of fractal glass order. Using X-ray tomography we identify here a similar non-cubic scaling law in disordered granular packing of spherical particles. We find that the scaling law is directly related to the contact neighbors within first nearest neighbor shell, and therefore is closely connected to the phenomenon of jamming. The seemingly universal scaling exponent around 2.5 arises due to the isostatic condition with contact number around 6, and we argue that the exponent should not be universal.

  17. Plasma parameter estimations for the Large Helical Device based on the gyro-reduced Bohm scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Masao; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Sugama, Hideo.

    1991-10-01

    A model of gyro-reduced Bohm scaling law is incorporated into a one-dimensional transport code to predict plasma parameters for the Large Helical Device (LHD). The transport code calculations reproduce well the LHD empirical scaling law and basic parameters and profiles of the LHD plasma are calculated. The amounts of toroidal currents (bootstrap current and beam-driven current) are also estimated. (author)

  18. Scaling laws for fractional Brownian motion with power-law clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Malley, Daniel; Cushman, John H; Johnson, Graham

    2011-01-01

    We study the mean first passage time (MFPT) for fractional Brownian motion (fBm) in a finite interval with absorbing boundaries at each end. Analytical arguments are used to suggest a simple scaling law for the MFPT and numerical experiments are performed to verify its accuracy. The same approach is used to derive a scaling law for fBm with a power-law clock (fBm-plc). The MFPT scaling laws are employed to develop scaling laws for the finite-size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE) of fBm and fBm-plc. We apply these results to diffusion of a large polymer in a region with absorbing boundaries. (letter)

  19. Scaling laws for modeling nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahavandi, A.N.; Castellana, F.S.; Moradkhanian, E.N.

    1979-01-01

    Scale models are used to predict the behavior of nuclear reactor systems during normal and abnormal operation as well as under accident conditions. Three types of scaling procedures are considered: time-reducing, time-preserving volumetric, and time-preserving idealized model/prototype. The necessary relations between the model and the full-scale unit are developed for each scaling type. Based on these relationships, it is shown that scaling procedures can lead to distortion in certain areas that are discussed. It is advised that, depending on the specific unit to be scaled, a suitable procedure be chosen to minimize model-prototype distortion

  20. Electrostatic direct energy converter performance and cost scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1977-08-01

    This study is concerned with electrostatic type direct energy converters for direct recovery of a large fraction of the plasma ion energy from fusion reactors. Simplified equations are presented for each of the important loss mechanisms in both single-stage direct converters and multistage ''Venetian Blind'' type direct converters. These equations can be used to estimate the efficiency and electric power output of the direct converter subsystem. Scaling relations for the cost of each major component in the direct converter subsystem are also given; these include the vacuum tank, direct converter modules, the DC power conditioning equipment, cryogenic vacuum pumping system and the thermal bottoming plant. The performance and cost scaling laws have been developed primarily for use in overall fusion power plant systems codes. However, to illustrate their utility, cost-effectiveness studies of two specific reference direct converter designs are presented in terms of the specific capital costs (i.e., the capital cost per unit electric power produced) for the Direct Converter Subsystem alone. Some examples of design improvements which can significantly reduce the specific capital costs of the Direct Converter Subsystem are also given

  1. Strain scaling law for flux pinning in practical superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekin, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed experimental data are reported on the critical current and pinning force density of a number of different Nb 3 Sn conductors measured over an extensive range of magnetic fields and strain. Strain scaling in terms of the upper-critical field as scaling parameter is tested and a strain scaling relation formulated. This is compared with the data and its application to practical conductors described. The relation between this strain scaling law and the usual temperature scaling law is discussed and an empirical expression is obtained unifying the two. (U.K.)

  2. SCALING LAW FOR THE IMPACT OF MAGNET FRINGE FIELDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WEI, J.; PAPAPHILIPPOU, Y.; TALMAN, R.

    2000-01-01

    A general scaling law can be derived for the relative momentum deflection produced on a particle beam by fringe fields, to leading order. The formalism is applied to two concrete examples, for magnets having dipole and quadrupole symmetry. During recent years, the impact of magnet fringe fields is becoming increasingly important for rings of relatively small circumference but large acceptance. A few years ago, following some heuristic arguments, a scaling law was proposed [1], for the relative deflection of particles passing through a magnet fringe-field. In fact, after appropriate expansion of the magnetic fields in Cartesian coordinates, which generalizes the expansions of Steffen [2], one can show that this scaling law is true for any multipole magnet, at leading order in the transverse coefficients [3]. This paper intends to provide the scaling law to estimate the impact of fringe fields in the special cases of magnets with dipole and quadrupole symmetry

  3. Intermittency and scaling laws for wall bounded turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Benzi, R.; Amati, G.; Casciola, C. M.; Toschi, F.; Piva, R.

    1998-01-01

    Well defined scaling laws clearly appear in wall bounded turbulence, even very close to the wall, where a distinct violation of the refined Kolmogorov similarity hypothesis (RKSH) occurs together with the simultaneous persistence of scaling laws. A new form of RKSH for the wall region is here proposed in terms of the structure functions of order two which, in physical terms, confirms the prevailing role of the momentum transfer towards the wall in the near wall dynamics.

  4. Aeroelastic scaling laws for gust load alleviation control system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Bo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gust load alleviation (GLA tests are widely conducted to study the effectiveness of the control laws and methods. The physical parameters of models in these tests are aeroelastic scaled, while the scaling of GLA control system is always unreached. This paper concentrates on studying the scaling laws of GLA control system. Through theoretical demonstration, the scaling criterion of a classical PID control system has been come up and a scaling methodology is provided and verified. By adopting the scaling laws in this paper, gust response of the scaled model could be directly related to the full-scale aircraft theoretically under both open-loop and closed-loop conditions. Also, the influences of different scaling choices of an important non-dimensional parameter, the Froude number, have been studied in this paper. Furthermore for practical application, a compensating method is given when the theoretical scaled actuators or sensors cannot be obtained. Also, the scaling laws of some non-linear elements in control system such as the rate and amplitude saturations in actuator have been studied and examined by a numerical simulation.

  5. Scaling laws between population and facility densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Jaegon; Son, Seung-Woo; Lee, Sung-Ik; Jeong, Hawoong; Kim, Beom Jun

    2009-08-25

    When a new facility like a grocery store, a school, or a fire station is planned, its location should ideally be determined by the necessities of people who live nearby. Empirically, it has been found that there exists a positive correlation between facility and population densities. In the present work, we investigate the ideal relation between the population and the facility densities within the framework of an economic mechanism governing microdynamics. In previous studies based on the global optimization of facility positions in minimizing the overall travel distance between people and facilities, it was shown that the density of facility D and that of population rho should follow a simple power law D approximately rho(2/3). In our empirical analysis, on the other hand, the power-law exponent alpha in D approximately rho(alpha) is not a fixed value but spreads in a broad range depending on facility types. To explain this discrepancy in alpha, we propose a model based on economic mechanisms that mimic the competitive balance between the profit of the facilities and the social opportunity cost for populations. Through our simple, microscopically driven model, we show that commercial facilities driven by the profit of the facilities have alpha = 1, whereas public facilities driven by the social opportunity cost have alpha = 2/3. We simulate this model to find the optimal positions of facilities on a real U.S. map and show that the results are consistent with the empirical data.

  6. Scaling laws for a compliant biomimetic swimmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibouin, Florence; Raufaste, Christophe; Bouret, Yann; Argentina, Mederic

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by the seminal work of Lord Lighthill in the sixties, we study the motion of inertial aquatic swimmers that propels with undulatory gaits. In 2014, Gazzola et al. have uncovered the law linking the swimming velocity to the kinematics of the swimmer and the fluid properties. At high Reynolds numbers, the velocity appears to be equal to 0.4 Af /(2 π) , where A and f are respectively the amplitude and the frequency of the oscillating fin. We have constructed a compliant biomimetic swimmer, whose muscles have been modeled through a torque distribution thanks to a servomotor. A soft polymeric material mimics the flesh and provides the flexibility. By immersing our robot into a water tunnel, we find and characterize the operating point for which the propulsive force balances the drag. We bring the first experimental proof of the former law and probe large amplitude undulations which exhibits nonlinear effects. All data collapse perfectly onto a single master curve. We investigate the role of the fin flexibility by varying its length and its thickness and we figured out the existence of an efficient swimming regime. We thank the support of CNRS and Université Côte d'Azur.

  7. Scaling law of runaway electrons in the HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongzhen

    2005-01-01

    Runaway confinement time in ohmic and additionally heated tokamak plasmas presents an anomalous behavior in comparison with theoretical predictions based on neoclassical models. A one-dimensional numerical including generation and loss effects for runaway electrons is used to deduce the dependence of runaway energy ε τ on runaway confinement time. The simulation results are presented in the form of a scaling law for ε τ on plasma parameters. The scaling of ε τ and therefore the runaway confinement time and runaway electron diffusivity has been studied in the HL-1M tokamak, by measuring hard X-ray spectra under different experimental conditions. (authors)

  8. Newton's Third Law on a Scale Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Huntula, Jiradawan

    2009-01-01

    We propose a series of experiments involving balance readings of an object naturally floating or forced to be partially or fully immersed in water contained in a beaker sitting on an electronic scale balance. Students were asked to predict, observe and explain each case. The teacher facilitated the learning by asking probing questions, giving…

  9. Current relaxation time scales in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.

    1987-02-01

    An approximate normal mode analysis of plasma current diffusion in tokamaks is presented. The work is based on numerical solutions of the current diffusion equation in cylindrical geometry. Eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are shown for a broad range of plasma conductivity profile shapes. Three classes of solutions are considered which correspond to three types of tokamak operation. Convenient approximations to the three lowest eigenvalues in each class are presented and simple formulae for the current relaxation time scales are given

  10. Scaling laws for mode lockings in circle maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvitanovic, P.; Shraiman, B.; Soederberg, B.

    1985-06-01

    The self-similar structure of mode lockings for circle maps is studied by means of the associated Farey trees. We investigate numerically several classes of scaling relations implicit in the Farey organization of mode lockings and discuss the extent to which they lead to universal scaling laws. (orig.)

  11. Human learning: Power laws or multiple characteristic time scales?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried Mayer-Kress

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The central proposal of A. Newell and Rosenbloom (1981 was that the power law is the ubiquitous law of learning. This proposition is discussed in the context of the key factors that led to the acceptance of the power law as the function of learning. We then outline the principles of an epigenetic landscape framework for considering the role of the characteristic time scales of learning and an approach to system identification of the processes of performance dynamics. In this view, the change of performance over time is the product of a superposition of characteristic exponential time scales that reflect the influence of different processes. This theoretical approach can reproduce the traditional power law of practice – within the experimental resolution of performance data sets - but we hypothesize that this function may prove to be a special and perhaps idealized case of learning.

  12. Numerical assessment of the ion turbulent thermal transport scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottaviani, M.; Manfredi, G.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulations of ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence were carried out to investigate the parametric dependence of the ion thermal transport on the reduced gyroradius and on the local safety factor. Whereas the simulations show a clear proportionality of the conductivity to the gyroradius, the dependence on the safety factor cannot be represented as a simple power law like the one exhibited by the empirical scaling laws. (author)

  13. Scaling laws for HTGR core block seismic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of scaling laws, physical modeling, and seismic testing of a model designed to represent a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) core consisting of graphite blocks. The establishment of the proper scale relationships for length, time, force, and other parameters is emphasized. Tests to select model materials and the appropriate scales are described. Preliminary results obtained from both model and prototype systems tested under simulated seismic vibration are presented

  14. Scaling laws and properties of compositional data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccianti, Antonella; Albanese, Stefano; Lima, AnnaMaria; Minolfi, Giulia; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2016-04-01

    Many random processes occur in geochemistry. Accurate predictions of the manner in which elements or chemical species interact each other are needed to construct models able to treat presence of random components. Geochemical variables actually observed are the consequence of several events, some of which may be poorly defined or imperfectly understood. Variables tend to change with time/space but, despite their complexity, may share specific common traits and it is possible to model them stochastically. Description of the frequency distribution of the geochemical abundances has been an important target of research, attracting attention for at least 100 years, starting with CLARKE (1889) and continued by GOLDSCHMIDT (1933) and WEDEPOHL (1955). However, it was AHRENS (1954a,b) who focussed on the effect of skewness distributions, for example the log-normal distribution, regarded by him as a fundamental law of geochemistry. Although modeling of frequency distributions with some probabilistic models (for example Gaussian, log-normal, Pareto) has been well discussed in several fields of application, little attention has been devoted to the features of compositional data. When compositional nature of data is taken into account, the most typical distribution models for compositions are the Dirichlet and the additive logistic normal (or normal on the simplex) (AITCHISON et al. 2003; MATEU-FIGUERAS et al. 2005; MATEU-FIGUERAS and PAWLOWSKY-GLAHN 2008; MATEU-FIGUERAS et al. 2013). As an alternative, because compositional data have to be transformed from simplex space to real space, coordinates obtained by the ilr transformation or by application of the concept of balance can be analyzed by classical methods (EGOZCUE et al. 2003). In this contribution an approach coherent with the properties of compositional information is proposed and used to investigate the shape of the frequency distribution of compositional data. The purpose is to understand data-generation processes

  15. Theoretical scaling law of coronal magnetic field and electron power-law index in solar microwave burst sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Song, Q. W.; Tan, B. L.

    2018-04-01

    It is first proposed a theoretical scaling law respectively for the coronal magnetic field strength B and electron power-law index δ versus frequency and coronal height in solar microwave burst sources. Based on the non-thermal gyro-synchrotron radiation model (Ramaty in Astrophys. J. 158:753, 1969), B and δ are uniquely solved by the observable optically-thin spectral index and turnover (peak) frequency, the other parameters (plasma density, temperature, view angle, low and high energy cutoffs, etc.) are relatively insensitive to the calculations, thus taken as some typical values. Both of B and δ increase with increasing of radio frequency but with decreasing of coronal height above photosphere, and well satisfy a square or cubic logarithmic fitting.

  16. Theoretical scaling law for ohmically heated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minardi, E.

    1981-06-01

    The electrostatic drift instability arising from the reduction of shear damping, due to toroidal effects, is assumed to be the basic source of the anomalous electron transport in tokamaks. The Maxwellian population of electrons constitutes a medium whose adiabatic nonlinear reaction to the instability (described in terms of an effective dielectric constant of the medium) determines the stationary electrostatic fluctuation level in marginally unstable situations. The existence of a random electrostatic potenial implies a fluctuating current of the Maxwellian electrons which creates a random magnetic field and a stocasticization of a magnetic configuration. The application of recent results allows the calculation of the realted radial electron transport. It is found that the confinement time under stationary ohmic conditions scales as n Tsub(i)sup( - 1/2) and is proportional roughly to the cube of the geometric dimenisions. Moreover, it is deduced that the loop voltage is approximateley the same for all tokamaks, irrespective of temperature and density and to a large extent, also of geometrical conditions. Thes results are characteristic of the ohmic stationary regime and can hardly be extrapolated to order heating regimes. (orig.)

  17. Scaling laws and fluctuations in the statistics of word frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Martin; Altmann, Eduardo G.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we combine statistical analysis of written texts and simple stochastic models to explain the appearance of scaling laws in the statistics of word frequencies. The average vocabulary of an ensemble of fixed-length texts is known to scale sublinearly with the total number of words (Heaps’ law). Analyzing the fluctuations around this average in three large databases (Google-ngram, English Wikipedia, and a collection of scientific articles), we find that the standard deviation scales linearly with the average (Taylor's law), in contrast to the prediction of decaying fluctuations obtained using simple sampling arguments. We explain both scaling laws (Heaps’ and Taylor) by modeling the usage of words using a Poisson process with a fat-tailed distribution of word frequencies (Zipf's law) and topic-dependent frequencies of individual words (as in topic models). Considering topical variations lead to quenched averages, turn the vocabulary size a non-self-averaging quantity, and explain the empirical observations. For the numerous practical applications relying on estimations of vocabulary size, our results show that uncertainties remain large even for long texts. We show how to account for these uncertainties in measurements of lexical richness of texts with different lengths.

  18. Scaling laws and fluctuations in the statistics of word frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlach, Martin; Altmann, Eduardo G

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we combine statistical analysis of written texts and simple stochastic models to explain the appearance of scaling laws in the statistics of word frequencies. The average vocabulary of an ensemble of fixed-length texts is known to scale sublinearly with the total number of words (Heaps’ law). Analyzing the fluctuations around this average in three large databases (Google-ngram, English Wikipedia, and a collection of scientific articles), we find that the standard deviation scales linearly with the average (Taylor's law), in contrast to the prediction of decaying fluctuations obtained using simple sampling arguments. We explain both scaling laws (Heaps’ and Taylor) by modeling the usage of words using a Poisson process with a fat-tailed distribution of word frequencies (Zipf's law) and topic-dependent frequencies of individual words (as in topic models). Considering topical variations lead to quenched averages, turn the vocabulary size a non-self-averaging quantity, and explain the empirical observations. For the numerous practical applications relying on estimations of vocabulary size, our results show that uncertainties remain large even for long texts. We show how to account for these uncertainties in measurements of lexical richness of texts with different lengths. (paper)

  19. Effective Ohm's law for magnetized plasmas with anisotropic inhomogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamma, S.E.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Louis, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    Reduction formulae for the effective, or macroscopic, Ohm's law parameters are derived for inhomogeneous plasmas with anisotropic conductivity fluctuations having two general types of geometry: (a) elongated or shortened in the direction of the magnetic field and (b) two-dimensional, with the direction of constant properties lying in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. In each case, two approaches are used: (a) a small perturbation method and (b) an approximate method where each region in the plasma is considered separately, and consistency conditions are used to relate the results corresponding to each separate region to the effective properties of the whole plasma. Both methods are found to agree well when the fluctuations are weak, but differences appear at high fluctuation levels and, for nonuniformities very elongated along B, when the Hall parameter β is high. Comparison with available exact solutions valid at high β and strong fluctuation levels indicates that the self-consistency method gives accurate results even in these cases. The results of these analyses are used to evaluate the performance reduction in magnetohydrodynamic channels with plasma nonuniformities of several geometries, including axial streamers, perfectly isotropic fluctuations, and fluctuations elongated along B; the power density is reduced most strongly when β and the rms of the fluctuations are high, and also when the inhomogeneities are stretched along the magnetic field

  20. Triadic closure dynamics drives scaling laws in social multiplex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimek, Peter; Thurner, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Social networks exhibit scaling laws for several structural characteristics, such as degree distribution, scaling of the attachment kernel and clustering coefficients as a function of node degree. A detailed understanding if and how these scaling laws are inter-related is missing so far, let alone whether they can be understood through a common, dynamical principle. We propose a simple model for stationary network formation and show that the three mentioned scaling relations follow as natural consequences of triadic closure. The validity of the model is tested on multiplex data from a well-studied massive multiplayer online game. We find that the three scaling exponents observed in the multiplex data for the friendship, communication and trading networks can simultaneously be explained by the model. These results suggest that triadic closure could be identified as one of the fundamental dynamical principles in social multiplex network formation. (paper)

  1. Scattering Length Scaling Laws for Ultracold Three-Body Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Incao, J.P.; Esry, B.D.

    2005-01-01

    We present a simple and unifying picture that provides the energy and scattering length dependence for all inelastic three-body collision rates in the ultracold regime for three-body systems with short-range two-body interactions. Here, we present the scaling laws for vibrational relaxation, three-body recombination, and collision-induced dissociation for systems that support s-wave two-body collisions. These systems include three identical bosons, two identical bosons, and two identical fermions. Our approach reproduces all previous results, predicts several others, and gives the general form of the scaling laws in all cases

  2. Data adaptive control parameter estimation for scaling laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinklage, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Dose, Volker [Max-Planck- Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Bayesian experimental design quantifies the utility of data expressed by the information gain. Data adaptive exploration determines the expected utility of a single new measurement using existing data and a data descriptive model. In other words, the method can be used for experimental planning. As an example for a multivariate linear case, we apply this method for constituting scaling laws of fusion devices. In detail, the scaling of the stellarator W7-AS is examined for a subset of {iota}=1/3 data. The impact of the existing data on the scaling exponents is presented. Furthermore, in control parameter space regions of high utility are identified which improve the accuracy of the scaling law. This approach is not restricted to the presented example only, but can also be extended to non-linear models.

  3. Verification of frequency scaling laws for capacitive radio-frequency discharges using two-dimensional simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahedi, V.; Birdsall, C.K.; Lieberman, M.A.; DiPeso, G.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1993-01-01

    Weakly ionized processing plasmas are studied in two dimensions using a bounded particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code with a Monte Carlo collision (MCC) package. The MCC package models the collisions between charged and neutral particles, which are needed to obtain a self-sustained plasma and the proper electron and ion energy loss mechanisms. A two-dimensional capacitive radio-frequency (rf) discharge is investigated in detail. Simple frequency scaling laws for predicting the behavior of some plasma parameters are derived and then compared with simulation results, finding good agreements. It is found that as the drive frequency increases, the sheath width decreases, and the bulk plasma becomes more uniform, leading to a reduction of the ion angular spread at the target and an improvement of ion dose uniformity at the driven electrode

  4. Scaling laws in high energy electron-nuclear processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemtob, M.

    1980-11-01

    We survey the parton model description of high momentum transfer electron scattering processes with nuclei. We discuss both nucleon and quark parton models and confront the patterns of scaling laws violations, induced by binding effects, in the former, and perturbative QCD effects, in the latter

  5. Wafer scale oblique angle plasma etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Jarecki, Jr., Robert L.; Finnegan, Patrick Sean

    2017-05-23

    Wafer scale oblique angle etching of a semiconductor substrate is performed in a conventional plasma etch chamber by using a fixture that supports a multiple number of separate Faraday cages. Each cage is formed to include an angled grid surface and is positioned such that it will be positioned over a separate one of the die locations on the wafer surface when the fixture is placed over the wafer. The presence of the Faraday cages influences the local electric field surrounding each wafer die, re-shaping the local field to be disposed in alignment with the angled grid surface. The re-shaped plasma causes the reactive ions to follow a linear trajectory through the plasma sheath and angled grid surface, ultimately impinging the wafer surface at an angle. The selected geometry of the Faraday cage angled grid surface thus determines the angle at with the reactive ions will impinge the wafer.

  6. The Origin of Scales and Scaling Laws in Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guszejnov, David; Hopkins, Philip; Grudich, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Star formation is one of the key processes of cosmic evolution as it influences phenomena from the formation of galaxies to the formation of planets, and the development of life. Unfortunately, there is no comprehensive theory of star formation, despite intense effort on both the theoretical and observational sides, due to the large amount of complicated, non-linear physics involved (e.g. MHD, gravity, radiation). A possible approach is to formulate simple, easily testable models that allow us to draw a clear connection between phenomena and physical processes.In the first part of the talk I will focus on the origin of the IMF peak, the characteristic scale of stars. There is debate in the literature about whether the initial conditions of isothermal turbulence could set the IMF peak. Using detailed numerical simulations, I will demonstrate that not to be the case, the initial conditions are "forgotten" through the fragmentation cascade. Additional physics (e.g. feedback) is required to set the IMF peak.In the second part I will use simulated galaxies from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project to show that most star formation theories are unable to reproduce the near universal IMF peak of the Milky Way.Finally, I will present analytic arguments (supported by simulations) that a large number of observables (e.g. IMF slope) are the consequences of scale-free structure formation and are (to first order) unsuitable for differentiating between star formation theories.

  7. Unified scaling law for earthquakes in Crimea and Northern Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasova, A. K.; Kossobokov, V. G.

    2016-10-01

    This study continues detailed investigations on the construction of regional charts of the parameters of the generalized Guttenberg-Richter Law, which takes into account the properties of the spatiotemporal seismic energy scaling. We analyzed the parameters of the law in the vicinity of the intersections of morphostructural lineaments in Crimea and Greater Caucasus. It was shown that ignoring the fractal character of the spatial distribution of earthquakes in the southern part of the Russian Federation can lead to significant underestimation of the seismic hazard in the largest cities of the region.

  8. Scaling laws for trace impurity confinement: a variational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyagaraja, A.; Haas, F.A.

    1990-01-01

    A variational approach is outlined for the deduction of impurity confinement scaling laws. Given the forms of the diffusive and convective components to the impurity particle flux, we present a variational principle for the impurity confinement time in terms of the diffusion time scale and the convection parameter, which is a non-dimensional measure of the size of the convective flux relative to the diffusive flux. These results are very general and apply irrespective of whether the transport fluxes are of theoretical or empirical origin. The impurity confinement time scales exponentially with the convection parameter in cases of practical interest. (orig.)

  9. Power Laws, Scale-Free Networks and Genome Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Koonin, Eugene V; Karev, Georgy P

    2006-01-01

    Power Laws, Scale-free Networks and Genome Biology deals with crucial aspects of the theoretical foundations of systems biology, namely power law distributions and scale-free networks which have emerged as the hallmarks of biological organization in the post-genomic era. The chapters in the book not only describe the interesting mathematical properties of biological networks but moves beyond phenomenology, toward models of evolution capable of explaining the emergence of these features. The collection of chapters, contributed by both physicists and biologists, strives to address the problems in this field in a rigorous but not excessively mathematical manner and to represent different viewpoints, which is crucial in this emerging discipline. Each chapter includes, in addition to technical descriptions of properties of biological networks and evolutionary models, a more general and accessible introduction to the respective problems. Most chapters emphasize the potential of theoretical systems biology for disco...

  10. Current scaling of plasma focus devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiuma, C.; Herold, H.; Kaeppeler, H.J.; Shakhatre, M.; Auluck, S.K.H.

    1990-03-01

    In continuation of the work by G. Decker et al. on current and neutron yield scaling of plasma focus devices an analytical solution for the circuit equation (with resistance R = 0) in the compression phase was derived. Together with the solution for the rundown phase from G. Decker et al, which was extended for finite resistance (R ≠ 0), there follows an analytical scaling theory for maximum and pinch currents. At the same time there exists the possibility to discuss the influence of finite resistance on current variation and scaling parameters. The model solutions were checked out by numerical integrations of the current equation. While at the beginning of the rundown phase the ohmic resistance cannot be neglected (the magnitude R/L plays an important role), its influence at the end of the rundown phase and in the compression phase is negligible. The theoretically determined values are compared with the results of numerous probe measurements. (orig.)

  11. Scaling Laws for Dynamic Aperture due to Chromatic Sextupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    1997-01-01

    Scaling laws for the dynamic aperture due to chromatic sextupoles are investigated. The problem is addressed in a simplified lattice model containing 4 N identical cells and one linear betatron phase shifter to break the overall cell-lattice symmetry. Two families of chromatic sextupoles are used to compensate the natural chromaticity. Analytical formulae for the dynamic apertur as a function of the number of cells and of the cell length are found and confirmed through computer tracking.

  12. Deviations from uniform power law scaling in nonstationary time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, G. M.; Peng, C. K.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    A classic problem in physics is the analysis of highly nonstationary time series that typically exhibit long-range correlations. Here we test the hypothesis that the scaling properties of the dynamics of healthy physiological systems are more stable than those of pathological systems by studying beat-to-beat fluctuations in the human heart rate. We develop techniques based on the Fano factor and Allan factor functions, as well as on detrended fluctuation analysis, for quantifying deviations from uniform power-law scaling in nonstationary time series. By analyzing extremely long data sets of up to N = 10(5) beats for 11 healthy subjects, we find that the fluctuations in the heart rate scale approximately uniformly over several temporal orders of magnitude. By contrast, we find that in data sets of comparable length for 14 subjects with heart disease, the fluctuations grow erratically, indicating a loss of scaling stability.

  13. A New Scaling Law of Resonance in Total Scattering Cross Section in Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2009-10-01

    Electrical discharges in gases continue to be an active area of research because of industrial applications such as power systems, environmental clean up, laser technology, semiconductor fabrication etc. A fundamental knowledge of electron-gas neutral interaction is indispensable and, the total scattering cross section is one of the quantities that have been measured extensively. The energy dependence of the total cross sections shows peaks or resonance processes that are operative in the collision process. These peaks and the energies at which they occur are shown to satisfy a broad relationship involving the polarizability and the dipole moment of the target particle. Data on 62 target particles belonging to the following species are analyzed. (Eq 1) Rare gas atoms (Eq 2) Di-atomic molecules with combinations of polar, non-polar, attaching, and non-attaching properties Poly-atomic molecules with combinations of polar, non-polar, attaching, and non-attaching properties. Methods of improving the newly identified scaling law and possible application have been identified. 1 INTRODUCTION: Data on electron-neutral interactions are one of the most fundamental in the study of gaseous electronics and an immense literature, both experimental and theoretical, has become available since about the year 1920. [1-5]. In view of the central role which these data play in all facets of gas discharges and plasma science, it is felt that a critical review of available data is timely, mainly for the community of high voltage engineers and industries connected with plasma science in general. The electron-neutral interaction, often referred to as scattering in the scientific literature, is quantified by using the quantity called the total scattering cross section (QT, m^2). In the literature on cross section, total cross section and total scattering cross section are terms used synonymously and we follow the same practice. A definition may be found in reference [1]. This paper concerns

  14. Power-law citation distributions are not scale-free.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golosovsky, Michael

    2017-09-01

    We analyze time evolution of statistical distributions of citations to scientific papers published in the same year. While these distributions seem to follow the power-law dependence we find that they are nonstationary and the exponent of the power-law fit decreases with time and does not come to saturation. We attribute the nonstationarity of citation distributions to different longevity of the low-cited and highly cited papers. By measuring citation trajectories of papers we found that citation careers of the low-cited papers come to saturation after 10-15 years while those of the highly cited papers continue to increase indefinitely: The papers that exceed some citation threshold become runaways. Thus, we show that although citation distribution can look as a power-law dependence, it is not scale free and there is a hidden dynamic scale associated with the onset of runaways. We compare our measurements to our recently developed model of citation dynamics based on copying-redirection-triadic closure and find explanations to our empirical observations.

  15. Scaling and scale invariance of conservation laws in Reynolds transport theorem framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltas, Ismail; Ulusoy, Suleyman

    2015-07-01

    Scale invariance is the case where the solution of a physical process at a specified time-space scale can be linearly related to the solution of the processes at another time-space scale. Recent studies investigated the scale invariance conditions of hydrodynamic processes by applying the one-parameter Lie scaling transformations to the governing equations of the processes. Scale invariance of a physical process is usually achieved under certain conditions on the scaling ratios of the variables and parameters involved in the process. The foundational axioms of hydrodynamics are the conservation laws, namely, conservation of mass, conservation of linear momentum, and conservation of energy from continuum mechanics. They are formulated using the Reynolds transport theorem. Conventionally, Reynolds transport theorem formulates the conservation equations in integral form. Yet, differential form of the conservation equations can also be derived for an infinitesimal control volume. In the formulation of the governing equation of a process, one or more than one of the conservation laws and, some times, a constitutive relation are combined together. Differential forms of the conservation equations are used in the governing partial differential equation of the processes. Therefore, differential conservation equations constitute the fundamentals of the governing equations of the hydrodynamic processes. Applying the one-parameter Lie scaling transformation to the conservation laws in the Reynolds transport theorem framework instead of applying to the governing partial differential equations may lead to more fundamental conclusions on the scaling and scale invariance of the hydrodynamic processes. This study will investigate the scaling behavior and scale invariance conditions of the hydrodynamic processes by applying the one-parameter Lie scaling transformation to the conservation laws in the Reynolds transport theorem framework.

  16. Catastrophic Failure and Critical Scaling Laws of Fiber Bundle Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengwang Hao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a spring-fiber bundle model used to describe the failure process induced by energy release in heterogeneous materials. The conditions that induce catastrophic failure are determined by geometric conditions and energy equilibrium. It is revealed that the relative rates of deformation of, and damage to the fiber bundle with respect to the boundary controlling displacement ε0 exhibit universal power law behavior near the catastrophic point, with a critical exponent of −1/2. The proportion of the rate of response with respect to acceleration exhibits a linear relationship with increasing displacement in the vicinity of the catastrophic point. This allows for the prediction of catastrophic failure immediately prior to failure by extrapolating the trajectory of this relationship as it asymptotes to zero. Monte Carlo simulations are completed and these two critical scaling laws are confirmed.

  17. Empirical scaling law connecting persistence and severity of global terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianbo; Fang, Peng; Liu, Feiyan

    2017-09-01

    Terrorism and counterterrorism have both been evolving rapidly. From time to time, there have been debates on whether the new terrorism is evolutionary or revolutionary. Such debate often becomes more heated after major terrorist activities, such as the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 and the November 13, 2015 coordinated Paris terror attack. Using country-wide terrorism data since 1970, we show that there exist scaling laws governing the continuity and persistence of world-wide terrorism, with the long-term scaling parameter for each country closely related to its yearly global terrorism index. This suggests that the new terrorism is more accurately considered evolutionary. It is further shown that the imbalance in the seesaw of terrorism and counterterrorism is not only responsible for the scaling behavior found here, but also provides new means of quantifying the severity of the global terrorism.

  18. Centrifugal fans: Similarity, scaling laws, and fan performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Asad Mohammad

    Centrifugal fans are rotodynamic machines used for moving air continuously against moderate pressures through ventilation and air conditioning systems. There are five major topics presented in this thesis: (1) analysis of the fan scaling laws and consequences of dynamic similarity on modelling; (2) detailed flow visualization studies (in water) covering the flow path starting at the fan blade exit to the evaporator core of an actual HVAC fan scroll-diffuser module; (3) mean velocity and turbulence intensity measurements (flow field studies) at the inlet and outlet of large scale blower; (4) fan installation effects on overall fan performance and evaluation of fan testing methods; (5) two point coherence and spectral measurements conducted on an actual HVAC fan module for flow structure identification of possible aeroacoustic noise sources. A major objective of the study was to identity flow structures within the HVAC module that are responsible for noise and in particular "rumble noise" generation. Possible mechanisms for the generation of flow induced noise in the automotive HVAC fan module are also investigated. It is demonstrated that different modes of HVAC operation represent very different internal flow characteristics. This has implications on both fan HVAC airflow performance and noise characteristics. It is demonstrated from principles of complete dynamic similarity that fan scaling laws require that Reynolds, number matching is a necessary condition for developing scale model fans or fan test facilities. The physical basis for the fan scaling laws derived was established from both pure dimensional analysis and also from the fundamental equations of fluid motion. Fan performance was measured in a three times scale model (large scale blower) in air of an actual forward curved automotive HVAC blower. Different fan testing methods (based on AMCA fan test codes) were compared on the basis of static pressure measurements. Also, the flow through an actual HVAC

  19. Crater ejecta scaling laws: fundamental forms based on dimensional analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Housen, K.R.; Schmidt, R.M.; Holsapple, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A model of crater ejecta is constructed using dimensional analysis and a recently developed theory of energy and momentum coupling in cratering events. General relations are derived that provide a rationale for scaling laboratory measurements of ejecta to larger events. Specific expressions are presented for ejection velocities and ejecta blanket profiles in two limiting regimes of crater formation: the so-called gravity and strength regimes. In the gravity regime, ejectra velocities at geometrically similar launch points within craters vary as the square root of the product of crater radius and gravity. This relation implies geometric similarity of ejecta blankets. That is, the thickness of an ejecta blanket as a function of distance from the crater center is the same for all sizes of craters if the thickness and range are expressed in terms of crater radii. In the strength regime, ejecta velocities are independent of crater size. Consequently, ejecta blankets are not geometrically similar in this regime. For points away from the crater rim the expressions for ejecta velocities and thickness take the form of power laws. The exponents in these power laws are functions of an exponent, α, that appears in crater radius scaling relations. Thus experimental studies of the dependence of crater radius on impact conditions determine scaling relations for ejecta. Predicted ejection velocities and ejecta-blanket profiles, based on measured values of α, are compared to existing measurements of velocities and debris profiles

  20. Scaling Law for Irreversible Entropy Production in Critical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Danh-Tai; Prasanna Venkatesh, B; Han, Seungju; Jo, Junghyo; Watanabe, Gentaro; Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2016-06-09

    We examine the Jarzynski equality for a quenching process across the critical point of second-order phase transitions, where absolute irreversibility and the effect of finite-sampling of the initial equilibrium distribution arise in a single setup with equal significance. We consider the Ising model as a prototypical example for spontaneous symmetry breaking and take into account the finite sampling issue by introducing a tolerance parameter. The initially ordered spins become disordered by quenching the ferromagnetic coupling constant. For a sudden quench, the deviation from the Jarzynski equality evaluated from the ideal ensemble average could, in principle, depend on the reduced coupling constant ε0 of the initial state and the system size L. We find that, instead of depending on ε0 and L separately, this deviation exhibits a scaling behavior through a universal combination of ε0 and L for a given tolerance parameter, inherited from the critical scaling laws of second-order phase transitions. A similar scaling law can be obtained for the finite-speed quench as well within the Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  1. Gravitational Contraction and Fusion Plasma Burn. Universal Expansion and the Hubble Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic approach is developed for the two principle phases of (i) gravitational condensation, and (ii) burning fusion plasma evolution. Comparison is made with conceptual descriptions of star formation and of subsequent decay towards red giant stars, white dwarfs, and other condensed core objects like neutron stars and black holes. The possibility of treating the expansion of the Universe by means of a similar approach is also discussed. The concept of negative diffusion is introduced for the contraction phase of star formation. The coefficients of defining the nonlinear diffusion are determined uniquely by physical conditions and for the case of the expansion of the universe, by the observation of the Hubble law. The contraction and evolution of large scale 3-D stars and 2-D galactic systems can thus be dynamically surveyed. In particular the time-scales can be determined

  2. Scaling Law between Urban Electrical Consumption and Population in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaowu; Xiong, Aimin; Li, Liangsheng; Liu, Maoxin; Chen, X. S.

    The relation between the household electrical consumption Y and population N for Chinese cities in 2006 has been investigated with the power law scaling form Y = A_0 N^{β}. It is found that the Chinese cities should be divided into three categories characterized by different scaling exponent β. The first category, which includes the biggest and coastal cities of China, has the scaling exponent β> 1. The second category, which includes mostly the cities in central China, has the scaling exponent β ≈ 1. The third category, which consists of the cities in northwestern China, has the scaling exponent β 1, there is also a fixed point population N f . If the initial population N(0) > N f , the population increases very fast with time and diverges within a finite time. If the initial population N(0) < N f , the population decreases with time and collapse finally. The pattern of population evolution in a city is determined by its scaling exponent and initial population.

  3. Dimensionless parameters, scaling laws, and the implications for ETG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castle, G.G.

    1995-04-20

    ETG will be useful in resolving several physical issues relevant to Spherical Tokamak Reactor concepts. First, it will provide a test of whether transport is Bohm or gyro-Bohm in nature. The second point is that ETG will operate in a completely different range of {rho}* space from other high performance machines, opening up a previously inaccessible region of parameter space. ETG is also a (very) high-{beta} machine. It would be the only device that would have all of its parameters except {rho}* similar to those of a Spherical tokamak Reactor. If it turns out that the transport scales definitively as either Bohm or gyro-Bohm, then extrapolation to reactor conditions with significantly lower values of {rho}* would become more credible. It is also shown that in general one cannot obtain a power law relation in the dimensionless variables for the confinement tim from a power law fit to the engineering variables. It is shown, however, that if T{sub i}/T{sub e} and n{sub i}/n{sub e} are constant or if a modified definition of certain dimensionless variables is adopted, then such a power law conversion is possible.

  4. Extreme Scale Computing for First-Principles Plasma Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Choogn-Seock [Princeton University

    2011-10-12

    World superpowers are in the middle of the “Computnik” race. US Department of Energy (and National Nuclear Security Administration) wishes to launch exascale computer systems into the scientific (and national security) world by 2018. The objective is to solve important scientific problems and to predict the outcomes using the most fundamental scientific laws, which would not be possible otherwise. Being chosen into the next “frontier” group can be of great benefit to a scientific discipline. An extreme scale computer system requires different types of algorithms and programming philosophy from those we have been accustomed to. Only a handful of scientific codes are blessed to be capable of scalable usage of today’s largest computers in operation at petascale (using more than 100,000 cores concurrently). Fortunately, a few magnetic fusion codes are competing well in this race using the “first principles” gyrokinetic equations.These codes are beginning to study the fusion plasma dynamics in full-scale realistic diverted device geometry in natural nonlinear multiscale, including the large scale neoclassical and small scale turbulence physics, but excluding some ultra fast dynamics. In this talk, most of the above mentioned topics will be introduced at executive level. Representative properties of the extreme scale computers, modern programming exercises to take advantage of them, and different philosophies in the data flows and analyses will be presented. Examples of the multi-scale multi-physics scientific discoveries made possible by solving the gyrokinetic equations on extreme scale computers will be described. Future directions into “virtual tokamak experiments” will also be discussed.

  5. Entropy of gravitating systems: scaling laws versus radial profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesci, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Through the consideration of spherically symmetric gravitating systems consisting of perfect fluids with linear equation of state constrained to be in a finite volume, an account is given of the properties of entropy at conditions in which it is no longer an extensive quantity (it does not scale with the system's size). To accomplish this, the methods introduced by Oppenheim (2003 Phys. Rev.E 68 016108) to characterize non-extensivity are used, suitably generalized to the case of gravitating systems subject to an external pressure. In particular when, far from the system's Schwarzschild limit, both area scaling for conventional entropy and inverse radius law for the temperature set in (i.e. the same properties of the corresponding black hole thermodynamical quantities), the entropy profile is found to behave like 1/r, with r the area radius inside the system. In such circumstances entropy heavily resides in internal layers, in opposition to what happens when area scaling is gained while approaching the Schwarzschild mass, in which case conventional entropy lies at the surface of the system. The information content of these systems, even if it globally scales like the area, is then stored in the whole volume, instead of packed on the boundary

  6. Transition in multiple-scale-lengths turbulence in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.; Kawasaki, M.; Kitazawa, A. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Itoh, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    The statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is developed for the cases where fluctuations with different scale-lengths coexist. Statistical nonlinear interactions between semi-micro and micro modes are first kept in the analysis as the drag, noise and drive. The nonlinear dynamics determines both the fluctuation levels and the cross field turbulent transport for the fixed global parameters. A quenching or suppressing effect is induced by their nonlinear interplay, even if both modes are unstable when analyzed independently. Influence of the inhomogeneous global radial electric field is discussed. A new insight is given for the physics of internal transport barrier. The thermal fluctuation of the scale length of {lambda}{sub D} is assumed to be statistically independent. The hierarchical structure is constructed according to the scale lengths. Transitions in turbulence are found and phase diagrams with cusp type catastrophe are obtained. Dynamics is followed. Statistical properties of the subcritical excitation are discussed. The probability density function (PDF) and transition probability are obtained. Power-laws are obtained in the PDF as well as in the transition probability. Generalization for the case where turbulence is composed of three-classes of modes is also developed. A new catastrophe of turbulent sates is obtained. (author)

  7. Transition in multiple-scale-lengths turbulence in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.; Kawasaki, M.; Kitazawa, A.

    2002-02-01

    The statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is developed for the cases where fluctuations with different scale-lengths coexist. Statistical nonlinear interactions between semi-micro and micro modes are first kept in the analysis as the drag, noise and drive. The nonlinear dynamics determines both the fluctuation levels and the cross field turbulent transport for the fixed global parameters. A quenching or suppressing effect is induced by their nonlinear interplay, even if both modes are unstable when analyzed independently. Influence of the inhomogeneous global radial electric field is discussed. A new insight is given for the physics of internal transport barrier. The thermal fluctuation of the scale length of λ D is assumed to be statistically independent. The hierarchical structure is constructed according to the scale lengths. Transitions in turbulence are found and phase diagrams with cusp type catastrophe are obtained. Dynamics is followed. Statistical properties of the subcritical excitation are discussed. The probability density function (PDF) and transition probability are obtained. Power-laws are obtained in the PDF as well as in the transition probability. Generalization for the case where turbulence is composed of three-classes of modes is also developed. A new catastrophe of turbulent sates is obtained. (author)

  8. Earthquake scaling laws for rupture geometry and slip heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thingbaijam, Kiran K. S.; Mai, P. Martin; Goda, Katsuichiro

    2016-04-01

    We analyze an extensive compilation of finite-fault rupture models to investigate earthquake scaling of source geometry and slip heterogeneity to derive new relationships for seismic and tsunami hazard assessment. Our dataset comprises 158 earthquakes with a total of 316 rupture models selected from the SRCMOD database (http://equake-rc.info/srcmod). We find that fault-length does not saturate with earthquake magnitude, while fault-width reveals inhibited growth due to the finite seismogenic thickness. For strike-slip earthquakes, fault-length grows more rapidly with increasing magnitude compared to events of other faulting types. Interestingly, our derived relationship falls between the L-model and W-model end-members. In contrast, both reverse and normal dip-slip events are more consistent with self-similar scaling of fault-length. However, fault-width scaling relationships for large strike-slip and normal dip-slip events, occurring on steeply dipping faults (δ~90° for strike-slip faults, and δ~60° for normal faults), deviate from self-similarity. Although reverse dip-slip events in general show self-similar scaling, the restricted growth of down-dip fault extent (with upper limit of ~200 km) can be seen for mega-thrust subduction events (M~9.0). Despite this fact, for a given earthquake magnitude, subduction reverse dip-slip events occupy relatively larger rupture area, compared to shallow crustal events. In addition, we characterize slip heterogeneity in terms of its probability distribution and spatial correlation structure to develop a complete stochastic random-field characterization of earthquake slip. We find that truncated exponential law best describes the probability distribution of slip, with observable scale parameters determined by the average and maximum slip. Applying Box-Cox transformation to slip distributions (to create quasi-normal distributed data) supports cube-root transformation, which also implies distinctive non-Gaussian slip

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Resolving Scaling Laws of Polyethylene Melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuaki Z. Takahashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations were performed to estimate the actual physical nature of a united-atom model of polyethylene (PE. Several scaling laws for representative polymer properties are compared to theoretical predictions. Internal structure results indicate a clear departure from theoretical predictions that assume ideal chain statics. Chain motion deviates from predictions that assume ideal motion of short chains. With regard to linear viscoelasticity, the presence or absence of entanglements strongly affects the duration of the theoretical behavior. Overall, the results indicate that Gaussian statics and dynamics are not necessarily established for real atomistic models of PE. Moreover, the actual physical nature should be carefully considered when using atomistic models for applications that expect typical polymer behaviors.

  10. Scaling law of resistance fluctuations in stationary random resistor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennetta; Trefan; Reggiani

    2000-12-11

    In a random resistor network we consider the simultaneous evolution of two competing random processes consisting in breaking and recovering the elementary resistors with probabilities W(D) and W(R). The condition W(R)>W(D)/(1+W(D)) leads to a stationary state, while in the opposite case, the broken resistor fraction reaches the percolation threshold p(c). We study the resistance noise of this system under stationary conditions by Monte Carlo simulations. The variance of resistance fluctuations is found to follow a scaling law |p-p(c)|(-kappa(0)) with kappa(0) = 5.5. The proposed model relates quantitatively the defectiveness of a disordered media with its electrical and excess-noise characteristics.

  11. The Physical Origin of Galaxy Morphologies and Scaling Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Matthias; Navarro, Julio F.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a numerical study designed to interpret the origin and evolution of galaxy properties revealed by space- and ground-based imaging and spectroscopical surveys. Our aim is to unravel the physical processes responsible for the development of different galaxy morphologies and for the establishment of scaling laws such as the Tully-Fisher relation for spirals and the Fundamental Plane of ellipticals. In particular, we plan to address the following major topics: (1) The morphology and observability of protogalaxies, and in particular the relationship between primordial galaxies and the z approximately 3 'Ly-break' systems identified in the Hubble Deep Field and in ground-based searches; (2) The origin of the disk and spheroidal components in galaxies, the timing and mode of their assembly, the corresponding evolution in galaxy morphologies and its sensitivity to cosmological parameters; (3) The origin and redshift evolution of the scaling laws that link the mass, luminosity size, stellar content, and metal abundances of galaxies of different morphological types. This investigation will use state-of-the-art N-body/gasdynamical codes to provide a spatially resolved description of the galaxy formation process in hierarchically clustering universes. Coupled with population synthesis techniques. our models can be used to provide synthetic 'observations' that can be compared directly with observations of galaxies both nearby and at cosmologically significant distances. This study will thus provide insight into the nature of protogalaxies and into the formation process of galaxies like our own Milky Way. It will also help us to assess the cosmological significance of these observations within the context of hierarchical theories of galaxy formation and will supply a theoretical context within which current and future observations can be interpreted.

  12. Dust-acoustic waves and stability in the permeating dusty plasma. II. Power-law distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Jingyu; Du Jiulin; Liu Zhipeng

    2012-01-01

    The dust-acoustic waves and the stability theory for the permeating dusty plasma with power-law distributions are studied by using nonextensive q-statistics. In two limiting physical cases, when the thermal velocity of the flowing dusty plasma is much larger than, and much smaller than the phase velocity of the waves, we derived the dust-acoustic wave frequency, the instability growth rate, and the instability critical flowing velocity. As compared with the formulae obtained in part I [Gong et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 043704 (2012)], all formulae of the present cases and the resulting plasma characteristics are q-dependent, and the power-law distribution of each plasma component of the permeating dusty plasma has a different q-parameter and thus has a different nonextensive effect. Further, we make numerical analyses of an example that a cometary plasma tail is passing through the interplanetary space dusty plasma and we show that these power-law distributions have significant effects on the plasma characteristics of this kind of plasma environment.

  13. Transport coefficients in Lorentz plasmas with the power-law kappa-distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiulin, Du

    2013-01-01

    Transport coefficients in Lorentz plasma with the power-law κ-distribution are studied by means of using the transport equation and macroscopic laws of Lorentz plasma without magnetic field. Expressions of electric conductivity, thermoelectric coefficient, and thermal conductivity for the power-law κ-distribution are accurately derived. It is shown that these transport coefficients are significantly modified by the κ-parameter, and in the limit of the parameter κ→∞ they are reduced to the standard forms for a Maxwellian distribution

  14. Basic physical phenomena, neutron production and scaling of the dense plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeppeler, H.J.

    This paper presents an attempt at establishing a model theory for the dense plasma focus in order to present a consistent interpretation of the basic physical phenomena leading to neutron production from both acceleration and thermal processes. To achieve this, the temporal history of the focus is divided into the compression of the plasma sheath, a qiescent and very dense phase with ensuing expansion, and an instable phase where the focus plasma is disrupted by instabilities. Finally, the decay of density, velocity and thermal fields is considered. Under the assumption that Io 2 /sigmaoRo 2 = const and to/Tc = const, scaling laws for plasma focus devices are derived. It is shown that while generally the neutron yield scales with the fourth power of maximum current, neutron production from thermal processes becomes increasingly important for large devices, while in the small devices neutron production from acceleration processes is by far predominant. (orig.) [de

  15. SCALING LAW OF RELATIVISTIC SWEET-PARKER-TYPE MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Kudoh, Takahiro; Masada, Youhei; Matsumoto, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Relativistic Sweet-Parker-type magnetic reconnection is investigated by relativistic resistive magnetohydrodynamic (RRMHD) simulations. As an initial setting, we assume anti-parallel magnetic fields and a spatially uniform resistivity. A perturbation imposed on the magnetic fields triggers magnetic reconnection around a current sheet, and the plasma inflows into the reconnection region. The inflows are then heated due to ohmic dissipation in the diffusion region and finally become relativistically hot outflows. The outflows are not accelerated to ultrarelativistic speeds (i.e., Lorentz factor ≅ 1), even when the magnetic energy dominates the thermal and rest mass energies in the inflow region. Most of the magnetic energy in the inflow region is converted into the thermal energy of the outflow during the reconnection process. The energy conversion from magnetic to thermal energy in the diffusion region results in an increase in the plasma inertia. This prevents the outflows from being accelerated to ultrarelativistic speeds. We find that the reconnection rate R obeys the scaling relation R≅S -0.5 , where S is the Lundquist number. This feature is the same as that of non-relativistic reconnection. Our results are consistent with the theoretical predictions of Lyubarsky for Sweet-Parker-type magnetic reconnection.

  16. Cope's Rule and the Universal Scaling Law of Ornament Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raia, Pasquale; Passaro, Federico; Carotenuto, Francesco; Maiorino, Leonardo; Piras, Paolo; Teresi, Luciano; Meiri, Shai; Itescu, Yuval; Novosolov, Maria; Baiano, Mattia Antonio; Martínez, Ricard; Fortelius, Mikael

    2015-08-01

    Luxuriant, bushy antlers, bizarre crests, and huge, twisting horns and tusks are conventionally understood as products of sexual selection. This view stems from both direct observation and from the empirical finding that the size of these structures grows faster than body size (i.e., ornament size shows positive allometry). We contend that the familiar evolutionary increase in the complexity of ornaments over time in many animal clades is decoupled from ornament size evolution. Increased body size comes with extended growth. Since growth scales to the quarter power of body size, we predicted that ornament complexity should scale according to the quarter power law as well, irrespective of the role of sexual selection in the evolution and function of the ornament. To test this hypothesis, we selected three clades (ammonites, deer, and ceratopsian dinosaurs) whose species bore ornaments that differ in terms of the importance of sexual selection to their evolution. We found that the exponent of the regression of ornament complexity to body size is the same for the three groups and is statistically indistinguishable from 0.25. We suggest that the evolution of ornament complexity is a by-product of Cope's rule. We argue that although sexual selection may control size in most ornaments, it does not influence their shape.

  17. Pinch-off Scaling Law of Soap Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, John; Ryu, Sangjin

    2014-11-01

    Three common interfacial phenomena that occur daily are liquid drops in gas, gas bubbles in liquid and thin-film bubbles. One aspect that has been studied for these phenomena is the formation or pinch-off of the drop/bubble from the liquid/gas threads. In contrast to the formation of liquid drops in gas and gas bubbles in liquid, thin-film bubble pinch-off has not been well documented. Having thin-film interfaces may alter the pinch-off process due to the limiting factor of the film thickness. We observed the pinch-off of one common thin-film bubble, soap bubbles, in order to characterize its pinch-off behavior. We achieved this by constructing an experimental model replicating the process of a human producing soap bubbles. Using high-speed videography and image processing, we determined that the minimal neck radius scaled with the time left till pinch-off, and that the scaling law exponent was 2/3, similar to that of liquid drops in gas.

  18. Localized Enzymatic Degradation of Polymers: Physics and Scaling Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalitha Sridhar, Shankar; Vernerey, Franck

    2018-03-01

    Biodegradable polymers are naturally abundant in living matter and have led to great advances in controlling environmental pollution due to synthetic polymer products, harnessing renewable energy from biofuels, and in the field of biomedicine. One of the most prevalent mechanisms of biodegradation involves enzyme-catalyzed depolymerization by biological agents. Despite numerous studies dedicated to understanding polymer biodegradation in different environments, a simple model that predicts the macroscopic behavior (mass and structural loss) in terms of microphysical processes (enzyme transport and reaction) is lacking. An interesting phenomenon occurs when an enzyme source (released by a biological agent) attacks a tight polymer mesh that restricts free diffusion. A fuzzy interface separating the intact and fully degraded polymer propagates away from the source and into the polymer as the enzymes diffuse and react in time. Understanding the characteristics of this interface will provide crucial insight into the biodegradation process and potential ways to precisely control it. In this work, we present a centrosymmetric model of biodegradation by characterizing the moving fuzzy interface in terms of its speed and width. The model predicts that the characteristics of this interface are governed by two time scales, namely the polymer degradation and enzyme transport times, which in turn depend on four main polymer and enzyme properties. A key finding of this work is simple scaling laws that can be used to guide biodegradation of polymers in different applications.

  19. Multi-scale magnetic field intermittence in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vörös

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that intermittent magnetic field fluctuations in the plasma sheet exhibit transitory, localized, and multi-scale features. We propose a multifractal-based algorithm, which quantifies intermittence on the basis of the statistical distribution of the "strength of burstiness", estimated within a sliding window. Interesting multi-scale phenomena observed by the Cluster spacecraft include large-scale motion of the current sheet and bursty bulk flow associated turbulence, interpreted as a cross-scale coupling (CSC process.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetotail; plasma sheet – Space plasma physics (turbulence

  20. Nonstandard scaling law of fluctuations in finite-size systems of globally coupled oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Isao; Tanaka, Gouhei; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2013-08-01

    Universal scaling laws form one of the central issues in physics. A nonstandard scaling law or a breakdown of a standard scaling law, on the other hand, can often lead to the finding of a new universality class in physical systems. Recently, we found that a statistical quantity related to fluctuations follows a nonstandard scaling law with respect to the system size in a synchronized state of globally coupled nonidentical phase oscillators [I. Nishikawa et al., Chaos 22, 013133 (2012)]. However, it is still unclear how widely this nonstandard scaling law is observed. In the present paper, we discuss the conditions required for the unusual scaling law in globally coupled oscillator systems and validate the conditions by numerical simulations of several different models.

  1. Gravity, turbulence and the scaling ``laws'' in molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    The so-called Larson (1981) scaling laws found empirically in molecular clouds have been generally interpreted as evidence that the clouds are turbulent and fractal. In the present contribution we discussed how recent observations and models of cloud formation suggest that: (a) these relations are the result of strong observational biases due to the cloud definition itself: since the filling factor of the dense structures is small, by thresholding the column density the computed mean density between clouds is nearly constant, and nearly the same as the threshold (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2012). (b) When accounting for column density variations, the velocity dispersion-size relation does not appears anymore. Instead, dense cores populate the upper-left corner of the δ v-R diagram (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011a). (c) Instead of a δ v-R relation, a more appropriate relation seems to be δ v 2 / R = 2 GMΣ, which suggest that clouds are in collapse, rather than supported by turbulence (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011a). (d) These results, along with the shapes of the star formation histories (Hartmann, Ballesteros-Paredes & Heitsch 2012), line profiles of collapsing clouds in numerical simulations (Heitsch, Ballesteros-Paredes & Hartmann 2009), core-to-core velocity dispersions (Heitsch, Ballesteros-Paredes & Hartmann 2009), time-evolution of the column density PDFs (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011b), etc., strongly suggest that the actual source of the non-thermal motions is gravitational collapse of the clouds, so that the turbulent, chaotic component of the motions is only a by-product of the collapse, with no significant ``support" role for the clouds. This result calls into question if the scale-free nature of the motions has a turbulent, origin (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011a; Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011b, Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2012).

  2. Scaling laws for e+/e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delahaye, J.P.; Guignard, G.; Raubenheimer, T.; Wilson, I.

    1999-01-01

    Design studies of a future TeV e + e - Linear Collider (TLC) are presently being made by five major laboratories within the framework of a world-wide collaboration. A figure of merit is defined which enables an objective comparison of these different designs. This figure of merit is shown to depend only on a small number of parameters. General scaling laws for the main beam parameters and linac parameters are derived and prove to be very effective when used as guidelines to optimize the linear collider design. By adopting appropriate parameters for beam stability, the figure of merit becomes nearly independent of accelerating gradient and RF frequency of the accelerating structures. In spite of the strong dependence of the wake fields with frequency, the single-bunch emittance blow-up during acceleration along the linac is also shown to be independent of the RF frequency when using equivalent trajectory correction schemes. In this situation, beam acceleration using high-frequency structures becomes very advantageous because it enables high accelerating fields to be obtained, which reduces the overall length and consequently the total cost of the linac. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. Scaling relations for plasma production and acceleration of rotating plasma flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehata, Takashi; Tanabe, Toshio; Mase, Hiroshi; Sekine, Ryusuke; Hasegawa, Kazuyuki.

    1989-01-01

    Scaling relations are investigated theoretically and experimentally of the plasma production and acceleration in the rotating plasma gun which has been developed as a new means of plasma centrifuge. Two operational modes: the gas-discharge mode for gaseous elements and the vacuum-discharge mode for solid elements are studied. Relations of the plasma density and velocities to the discharge current and the magnetic field are derived. The agreement between experiment and theory is quite well. It is found that fully-ionized rotating plasmas produced in the gas-discharge mode is most advantageous to realize efficient plasma centrifuge. (author)

  4. Scaling study of edge plasma parameters using a multi-device database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, H.Y.W.; Miner, W.H.; Wootton, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    A database consisting of edge equilibrium, turbulence and transport related plasma parameters has been compiled. Scaling laws for edge density, electron temperature, and radial particle flux are derived in an initial study using a subset of data obtained from tokamaks Phaedrus-T, Tokamak de Varennes, TEXT and TEXT-U. A comparison of edge particle transport in divertor and limiter plasmas shows that the magnetic topology of a separatrix or a divertor improves particle confinement. The particle diffusion coefficient varies radially in a manner opposite to that of Bohm diffusion. ((orig.))

  5. Wavelength scaling of laser plasma coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruer, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    The use of shorter wavelength laser light both enhances collisional absorption and reduces deleterious collective plasma effects. Coupling processes which can be important in reactor-size targets are briefly reviewed. Simple estimates are presented for the intensity-wavelength regime in which collisional absorption is high and collective effects are minimized

  6. MicroScale - Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran, Mohan [Case Western Reserve University

    2012-01-25

    Low-temperature plasmas play an essential role in the manufacturing of integrated circuits which are ubiquitous in modern society. In recent years, these top-down approaches to materials processing have reached a physical limit. As a result, alternative approaches to materials processing are being developed that will allow the fabrication of nanoscale materials from the bottom up. The aim of our research is to develop a new class of plasmas, termed “microplasmas” for nanomaterials synthesis. Microplasmas are a special class of plasmas formed in geometries where at least one dimension is less than 1 mm. Plasma confinement leads to several unique properties including high-pressure stability and non-equilibrium that make microplasams suitable for nanomaterials synthesis. Vapor-phase precursors can be dissociated to homogeneously nucleate nanometer-sized metal and alloyed nanoparticles. Alternatively, metal salts dispersed in liquids or polymer films can be electrochemically reduced to form metal nanoparticles. In this talk, I will discuss these topics in detail, highlighting the advantages of microplasma-based systems for the synthesis of well-defined nanomaterials.

  7. Scaling laws for soliton pulse compression by cascaded quadratic nonlinearities (vol 24, pg 2752, 2007)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Moses, J.; Wise, F.W.

    2010-01-01

    Erratum for [M. Bache, J. Moses, and F. W. Wise, "Scaling laws for soliton pulse compression by cascaded quadratic nonlinearities," J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 24, 2752-2762 (2007)].......Erratum for [M. Bache, J. Moses, and F. W. Wise, "Scaling laws for soliton pulse compression by cascaded quadratic nonlinearities," J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 24, 2752-2762 (2007)]....

  8. Hydrodynamics of long-scale-length plasmas. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craxton, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    A summary is given relating to the importance of long-scale-length plasmas to laser fusion. Some experiments are listed in which long-scale-length plasmas have been produced and studied. This talk presents SAGE simulations of most of these experiments with the emphasis being placed on understanding the hydrodynamic conditions rather than the parametric/plasma-physics processes themselves which are not modeled by SAGE. However, interpretation of the experiments can often depend on a good understanding of the hydrodynamics, including optical ray tracing

  9. Scaling for scrape-off layer plasma in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, Yasuo; Maeda, Hikosuke; Kimura, Haruyuki; Azumi, Masashi; Odajima, Kazuo

    1977-12-01

    Scaling for a scrape-off layer plasma in a tokamak is obtained by using DIVA (JFT-2a). The scaling gives the average electron temperature, the width and the mean electron density of the scrape-off layer. The temperature at the edge will be high in a future large tokamak with a small energy-loss by charge-exchange and radiation. The scrape-off layer plasma can easily shield the impurity influx from the wall. The fuel, however, can easily penetrate into the main plasma. (auth.)

  10. Generalization and consolidation of scaling laws of potential formation and associated effects in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, T.; Hirata, M.; Hojo, H.; Ichimura, M.; Ishii, K.; Itakura, A.; Katanuma, I.; Kohagura, J.; Nakashima, Y.; Saito, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.; Numakura, T.; Minami, R.; Nagashima, S.; Watanabe, H.; Yoshida, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Tamano, T.; Yatsu, K.; Miyoshi, S.

    2001-01-01

    Generalized scaling laws for the formation of plasma confining potentials and the associated effectiveness of the potentials produced are systematically investigated to find the physics essentials common to the representative tandem mirror operational modes of GAMMA 10, and to explore novel extended operational modes from the scaling bases constructed. (a) The potential formation scalings are generalized using a novel finding of wider validity of Cohen's strong ECH theory covering the representative modes. (b) The potentials produced, in turn, provide a favourable novel scaling of the increase in the central cell electron temperatures T e with increasing thermal barrier potentials φ b , limited by the available ECH power. The scaling of T e with φ b is well interpreted in terms of the generalized Pastukhov theory of plasma potential confinement. A detailed comparison of the results from several related modified theories is also made. (c) Consolidation of the two major scalings of (a) and (b) in a tandem mirror is carried out by the use of an electron energy balance equation for the first time. In addition, (d) an empirical scaling of φ c with ECH power in the plug region and the central cell densities are studied to discover whether there is the possibility of extending these theoretically well interpreted scaling data to parameters in the future scalable regime. There is also a discussion about numerical scalings in the three dimensional parameter spaces. (author)

  11. Multi-scale Dynamical Processes in Space and Astrophysical Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Vörös, Zoltán; IAFA 2011 - International Astrophysics Forum 2011 : Frontiers in Space Environment Research

    2012-01-01

    Magnetized plasmas in the universe exhibit complex dynamical behavior over a huge range of scales. The fundamental mechanisms of energy transport, redistribution and conversion occur at multiple scales. The driving mechanisms often include energy accumulation, free-energy-excited relaxation processes, dissipation and self-organization. The plasma processes associated with energy conversion, transport and self-organization, such as magnetic reconnection, instabilities, linear and nonlinear waves, wave-particle interactions, dynamo processes, turbulence, heating, diffusion and convection represent fundamental physical effects. They demonstrate similar dynamical behavior in near-Earth space, on the Sun, in the heliosphere and in astrophysical environments. 'Multi-scale Dynamical Processes in Space and Astrophysical Plasmas' presents the proceedings of the International Astrophysics Forum Alpbach 2011. The contributions discuss the latest advances in the exploration of dynamical behavior in space plasmas environm...

  12. Extended consolidation of scaling laws of potential formation and effects covering the representative Tandem mirror operations in GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, T.; Higaki, H.; Hirata, M.; Hojo, H.; Ichimura, M.; Ishii, K.; Itakura, A.; Katanuma, I.; Kohagura, J.; Nakashima, Y.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.; Minami, R.; Numakura, T.; Yoshida, M.; Watanabe, H.; Yatsu, K.; Miyoshi, S.; Cho, T.

    2003-01-01

    Scaling laws of potential formation and associated effects along with their physical interpretations are consolidated on the basis of experimental verification using the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. A proposal of extended consolidation and generalization of the two major theories - (i) Cohen's strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH) theory for the formation physics of plasma confining potentials and (ii) the generalized Pastukhov theory for the effectiveness of the produced potentials on plasma confinement is made through the use of the energy balance equation. This proposal is then followed by verification using experimental data from two representative operational modes of GAMMA 10, characterized in terms of (i) a high-potential mode having plasma confining potentials of the order of kilovolts and (ii) a hot ion mode yielding fusion neutrons with bulk ion temperatures of 10-20 keV. The importance of the validity of the proposed physics-based scaling is highlighted by the possibility of extended capability inherent in Pastukhov's prediction of requiring an ion confining potential of ∼30 kV for a fusion Q value of unity on the basis of an application of Cohen's potential formation method. In addition to the above potential physics scaling, an externally controllable parameter scaling of the potential formation increasing with either plug or barrier ECH powers is summarized. The combination of (i) the physics-based scaling of the proposed consolidation of potential formation and effects with (ii) the externally controllable practical ECH power scaling provides a new direction for future tandem mirror studies. (author)

  13. Simple scaling laws for the evaporation of droplets pinned on pillars: Transfer-rate- and diffusion-limited regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Perez, Ruth; García-Cordero, José L; Escobar, Juan V

    2017-12-01

    The evaporation of droplets can give rise to a wide range of interesting phenomena in which the dynamics of the evaporation are crucial. In this work, we find simple scaling laws for the evaporation dynamics of axisymmetric droplets pinned on millimeter-sized pillars. Different laws are found depending on whether evaporation is limited by the diffusion of vapor molecules or by the transfer rate across the liquid-vapor interface. For the diffusion-limited regime, we find that a mass-loss rate equal to 3/7 of that of a free-standing evaporating droplet brings a good balance between simplicity and physical correctness. We also find a scaling law for the evaporation of multicomponent solutions. The scaling laws found are validated against experiments of the evaporation of droplets of (1) water, (2) blood plasma, and (3) a mixture of water and polyethylene glycol, pinned on acrylic pillars of different diameters. These results shed light on the macroscopic dynamics of evaporation on pillars as a first step towards the understanding of other complex phenomena that may be taking place during the evaporation process, such as particle transport and chemical reactions.

  14. Simple scaling laws for the evaporation of droplets pinned on pillars: Transfer-rate- and diffusion-limited regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Perez, Ruth; García-Cordero, José L.; Escobar, Juan V.

    2017-12-01

    The evaporation of droplets can give rise to a wide range of interesting phenomena in which the dynamics of the evaporation are crucial. In this work, we find simple scaling laws for the evaporation dynamics of axisymmetric droplets pinned on millimeter-sized pillars. Different laws are found depending on whether evaporation is limited by the diffusion of vapor molecules or by the transfer rate across the liquid-vapor interface. For the diffusion-limited regime, we find that a mass-loss rate equal to 3/7 of that of a free-standing evaporating droplet brings a good balance between simplicity and physical correctness. We also find a scaling law for the evaporation of multicomponent solutions. The scaling laws found are validated against experiments of the evaporation of droplets of (1) water, (2) blood plasma, and (3) a mixture of water and polyethylene glycol, pinned on acrylic pillars of different diameters. These results shed light on the macroscopic dynamics of evaporation on pillars as a first step towards the understanding of other complex phenomena that may be taking place during the evaporation process, such as particle transport and chemical reactions.

  15. Analysis of plasma channels in mm-scale plasmas formed by high intensity laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, R; Habara, H; Iwawaki, T; Uematsu, Y; Tanaka, K A; Ivancic, S; Anderson, K; Haberberger, D; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W; Sakagami, H

    2016-01-01

    A plasma channel created by a high intensity infrared laser beam was observed in a long scale-length plasma (L ∼ 240 μm) with the angular filter refractometry technique, which indicated a stable channel formation up to the critical density. We analyzed the observed plasma channel using a rigorous ray-tracing technique, which provides a deep understanding of the evolution of the channel formation. (paper)

  16. Experimental evidence of widespread regions of small-scale plasma irregularities in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmgren, G.; Kintner, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    Small-scale (≤ 1 km) plasma irregularities have previously been observed in situ from the E region to an altitude of 8,000 km. In this paper the authors report results from the Viking plasma wave experiments which extends the measurements of high-latitude irregularities in two ways: (1) they have acquired electron density fluctuation measurements up to an altitude of 13,500 km and (2) for the first time a measurement technique was used that made a phase velocity deduction possible from in situ measurements. The spacecraft was equipped with two spatially separated Langmuir probes, each with an ability to measure relative probe current fluctuations with frequencies from dc to about 400 Hz. Under certain assumptions the current fluctuations could be interpreted as relative plasma density fluctuations, δn e /n e . Data from this interferometric instrument has been used to infer the distribution and nature of plasma irregularities along Viking orbits. It is demonstrated that the interferometric technique offers great advantages compared to single point measurements in this kind of study. It is shown that the observed small-scale plasma irregularities are nondispersive and convecting with the background plasma. They exhibit a power law frequency spectrum as observed in the satellite reference frame. The spectral index varies with location. An attempt to map source regions by identifying regions of high power and shallow spectrums is made

  17. Extended consolidation of scaling laws of potentials covering over the representative tandem-mirror operations in GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, T.; Higaki, H.; Hirata, M.

    2003-01-01

    Scaling laws of potential formation and associated effects are constructed in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. A novel proposal of extended consolidation and generalization of the two major theories of (i) Cohen's strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH) theory for the formation physics of plasma confining potentials, and (ii) the generalized Pastukhov theory for the effectiveness of the produced potentials on plasma confinement is made through the use of the energy-balance equation. This proposal is then followed by the verification from experimental data in two representative operational modes, characterized in terms of (i) a high-potential mode having kV-order plasma-confining potentials, and (ii) a hot-ion mode yielding fusion neutrons with 10-20 keV bulk-ion temperatures. The importance of the validity of the proposed consolidated physics-based scaling is highlighted by a possibility of extended capability inherent in Pastukhov's prediction of requiring ion-confining potential (φ c ) of 30 kV for a fusion Q value of unity on the basis of an application of Cohen's potential formation method. In addition to the above potential physics scaling, an externally controllable parameter scaling including both plug and barrier ECH powers for potential formation is investigated. The combination of (i) the physics scaling of the above-proposed consolidation over potential formation and effects with (ii) the externally controllable practical ECH power scaling provides a scalable way for the future tandem-mirror researches. Under the assumption of the validity of the extension of the present theoretically well interpreted scaling, the formation of Pastukhov's predicted φ c for confining Q=1 plasmas is scaled to require total plug with barrier ECH powers of 3 MW. (author)

  18. Large-scale structuring of a rotating plasma due to plasma macroinstabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Toshinori; Ikehata, Takashi; Sato, Naoyuki; Watahiki, Takeshi; Tanabe, Toshio; Mase, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    The formation of coherent structures during plasma macroinstabilities have been of interest in view of the nonlinear plasma physics. In the present paper, we have investigated in detail, the mechanism and specific features of large-scale structuring of a rotating plasma. In the case of weak magnetic field, the plasma ejected from a plasma gun has a high beta value (β > 1) so that it expands rapidly across the magnetic field excluding a magnetic flux from its interior. Then, the boundary between the expanding plasma and the magnetic field becomes unstable against Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability has the higher growth rate at the shorter wavelength and the mode appears as flute. These features of the instability are confirmed by the observation of radial plasma jets with the azimuthal mode number m=20-40 in the early time of the plasma expansion. In the case of strong magnetic field, on the other hand, the plasma little expands and rotates at two times the ion sound speed. Especially, we observe spiral jets of m=2 instead of short-wavelength radial jets. This mode appears only when a glass target is installed or a dense neutral gas is introduced around the plasma to give the plasma a frictional force. From these results and with reference to the theory of plasma instabilities, the centrifugal instability caused by a combination of the velocity shear and centrifugal force is concluded to be responsible for the formation of spiral jets. (author)

  19. A scaling law derived from a broadband impedance applications to SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, L.

    1990-01-01

    The bunch length in high-brightness synchrotron radiation sources is an important performance parameter. It is critically dependent on the μ-wave instability. Usually the SPEAR scaling law is used to compute the expected bunch length. In this paper we show that the SPEAR scaling law is compatible with a broadband impedance. This makes it possible to calculate the appropriate scaling law for a machine like the one proposed in Berkeley assuming that the impedance is known from measurements and/or calculations. (author) 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  20. Asymptotic scaling laws for precision of parameter estimates in dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbelt, W.; Timmer, J.

    2003-01-01

    When parameters are estimated from noisy data, the uncertainty of the estimates in terms of their standard deviation typically scales like the inverse square root of the number of data points. In the case of deterministic dynamical systems with added observation noise, superior scaling laws can be achieved. This is demonstrated numerically for the logistic map, the van der Pol oscillator and the Lorenz system, where exponential scaling laws and power laws have been found, depending on the number of degrees of freedom. For some special cases, analytical expressions are derived

  1. Dynamical scaling laws – A few unanswered questions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a highly nonlinear process far from equilibrium. The second phase grows with ... The scaling hypothesis assumes the existence of a single characteristic length scale L(t) such that the domain sizes and ... the mean density of the medium varies as a function of distance from a given point, should exhibit the scaling form with ...

  2. On micro-scale self-organization in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maluckov, A.; Jovanovic, M.S.; Skoric, M.M.; Sato, T.

    1998-01-01

    We concentrate on a nonlinear saturation of a stimulated Raman backscattering in an open convective weakly confined model in the context of micro-kinetic scale self-organization in plasmas. The results have led to an assertion that a long-time nonlinear saturation in an open SRBS model with phenomenological effects of anomalous dissipation, plasma heating and subsequent entropy expulsion, reveals a generic interrelation of self-organization at wave-fluid (macro) and particle-kinetic (micro) levels. (author)

  3. Robust scaling laws for energy confinement time, including radiated fraction, in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Peluso, E.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, the limitations of scalings in power-law form that are obtained from traditional log regression have become increasingly evident in many fields of research. Given the wide gap in operational space between present-day and next-generation devices, robustness of the obtained models in guaranteeing reasonable extrapolability is a major issue. In this paper, a new technique, called symbolic regression, is reviewed, refined, and applied to the ITPA database for extracting scaling laws of the energy-confinement time at different radiated fraction levels. The main advantage of this new methodology is its ability to determine the most appropriate mathematical form of the scaling laws to model the available databases without the restriction of their having to be power laws. In a completely new development, this technique is combined with the concept of geodesic distance on Gaussian manifolds so as to take into account the error bars in the measurements and provide more reliable models. Robust scaling laws, including radiated fractions as regressor, have been found; they are not in power-law form, and are significantly better than the traditional scalings. These scaling laws, including radiated fractions, extrapolate quite differently to ITER, and therefore they require serious consideration. On the other hand, given the limitations of the existing databases, dedicated experimental investigations will have to be carried out to fully understand the impact of radiated fractions on the confinement in metallic machines and in the next generation of devices.

  4. Scaling of laser-plasma interactions with laser wavelength and plasma size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Max, C.E.; Campbell, E.M.; Mead, W.C.; Kruer, W.L.; Phillion, D.W.; Turner, R.E.; Lasinski, B.F.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma size is an important parameter in wavelength-scaling experiments because it determines both the threshold and potential gain for a variety of laser-plasma instabilities. Most experiments to date have of necessity produced relatively small plasmas, due to laser energy and pulse-length limitations. We have discussed in detail three recent Livermore experiments which had large enough plasmas that some instability thresholds were exceeded or approached. Our evidence for Raman scatter, filamentation, and the two-plasmon decay instability needs to be confirmed in experiments which measure several instability signatures simultaneously, and which produce more quantitative information about the local density and temperature profiles than we have today

  5. Scaling of laser-plasma interactions with laser wavelength and plasma size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, C.E.; Campbell, E.M.; Mead, W.C.; Kruer, W.L.; Phillion, D.W.; Turner, R.E.; Lasinski, B.F.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1983-01-25

    Plasma size is an important parameter in wavelength-scaling experiments because it determines both the threshold and potential gain for a variety of laser-plasma instabilities. Most experiments to date have of necessity produced relatively small plasmas, due to laser energy and pulse-length limitations. We have discussed in detail three recent Livermore experiments which had large enough plasmas that some instability thresholds were exceeded or approached. Our evidence for Raman scatter, filamentation, and the two-plasmon decay instability needs to be confirmed in experiments which measure several instability signatures simultaneously, and which produce more quantitative information about the local density and temperature profiles than we have today.

  6. Observation of scaling laws of ion confining potential versus thermal barrier depth and of axial particle confinement time in the tandem mirror GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, T.; Inutake, M.; Ishii, K.

    1988-01-01

    In the thermal barrier tandem mirror GAMMA 10, the scaling law governing the enhancement of the ion confining potential, φ c , resulting from thermal barrier formation, is obtained experimentally, and is consistently interpreted in terms of the weak and strong ECH theories set up by Cohen and co-workers. The scaling law on the axial particle confinement time, τ pparallel , related to this φ c formation, is also demonstrated in detail; it is in good agreement with the Pastukhov theory as modified by Cohen and co-workers. This scaling is verified at any radial position in the core plasma region and at any time through the various stages of a discharge; this indicates a scaling with drastic improvement of τ pparallel , due to the potential formation in the tandem mirror plasma. (author). 41 refs, 12 figs

  7. Networks, complexity and internet regulation scale-free law

    OpenAIRE

    Guadamuz, Andres

    2013-01-01

    This book, then, starts with a general statement: that regulators should try, wherever possible, to use the physical methodological tools presently available in order to draft better legislation. While such an assertion may be applied to the law in general, this work will concentrate on the much narrower area of Internet regulation and the science of complex networks The Internet is the subject of this book not only because it is my main area of research, but also because –without...

  8. Scaling laws and indications of self-organized criticality in urban systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yanguang; Zhou Yixing

    2008-01-01

    Evolution of urban systems has been considered to exhibit some form of self-organized criticality (SOC) in the literature. This paper provides further mathematical foundations and empirical evidences to support the supposition. The hierarchical structure of systems of cities can be formulated as three exponential functions: the number law, the population size law, and the area law. These laws are identical in form to the Horton-Strahler laws of rivers and Gutenberg-Richter laws of earthquakes. From the exponential functions, three indications of SOC are also derived: the frequency-spectrum relation indicting the 1/f noise, the power laws indicating the fractal structure, and the Zipf's law indicating the rank-size distribution. These mathematical models form a set of scaling laws for urban systems, as demonstrated in the empirical study of the system of cities in China. The fact that the scaling laws of urban systems bear an analogy to those on rivers and earthquakes lends further support to the notion of possible SOC in urban systems

  9. Intrinsic symmetry of the scaling laws and generalized relations for critical indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plechko, V.N.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the scating taws for criticat induces can be expressed as a consequence of a simple symmetry principle. Heuristic relations for critical induces of generalizing scaling laws for the case of arbitrary order parameters are presented, which manifestiy have a symmetric form and include the standard scalling laws as a particular case

  10. submitter Unified Scaling Law for flux pinning in practical superconductors: II. Parameter testing, scaling constants, and the Extrapolative Scaling Expression

    CERN Document Server

    Ekin, Jack W; Goodrich, Loren; Splett, Jolene; Bordini, Bernardo; Richter, David

    2016-01-01

    A scaling study of several thousand Nb$_{3}$Sn critical-current $(I_c)$ measurements is used to derive the Extrapolative Scaling Expression (ESE), a relation that can quickly and accurately extrapolate limited datasets to obtain full three-dimensional dependences of I c on magnetic field (B), temperature (T), and mechanical strain (ε). The relation has the advantage of being easy to implement, and offers significant savings in sample characterization time and a useful tool for magnet design. Thorough data-based analysis of the general parameterization of the Unified Scaling Law (USL) shows the existence of three universal scaling constants for practical Nb$_{3}$Sn conductors. The study also identifies the scaling parameters that are conductor specific and need to be fitted to each conductor. This investigation includes two new, rare, and very large I c(B,T,ε) datasets (each with nearly a thousand I c measurements spanning magnetic fields from 1 to 16 T, temperatures from ~2.26 to 14 K, and intrinsic strain...

  11. Conservation laws for steady flow and solitons in a multifluid plasma revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mace, R. L.; McKenzie, J. F.; Webb, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    The conservation laws used in constructing the governing equations for planar solitons in multifluid plasmas are revisited. In particular, the concept of generalized vorticity facilitates the derivation of some general ''Bernoulli theorems,'' which reduce, in specific instances, to conservation laws previously deduced by other means. These theorems clarify the underlying physical principles that give rise to the conserved quantities. As an example of the usefulness of the techniques, even for relatively simple flows and progressive waves, the equations governing stationary nonlinear whistler waves propagating parallel to an ambient magnetic field are derived using generalized vorticity concepts

  12. Investigation of scaling laws in frequency-dependent minor hysteresis loops for ferromagnetic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Tsukidate, S.; Kamada, Y.; Kikuchi, H.; Ohtani, T.

    2012-01-01

    Scaling laws in dynamical magnetic minor hysteresis loops have been investigated in the magnetizing frequency range of 0.05-300 Hz for various steels including Cr-Mo-V steel subjected to creep, cold rolled steels, and plastically deformed Ni. Although scaling laws in the medium magnetization range found previously fail in the high magnetization frequency regime owing to a significant contribution of eddy currents, a scaling power law of the relation between remanence and remanence work of minor loops, associated with a constant exponent of approximately 1.9, holds true in a very low magnetization regime, irrespective of magnetization frequency and investigated materials. The coefficient of the law is proportionally related to Vickers hardness over the wide frequency range. These observations demonstrate that the scaling analysis of dynamical minor loops enables us to evaluate materials degradation in a short measurement time with low measurement field and high sensitivity to defect density. - Highlights: → We performed hysteresis scaling for dynamical minor loops in ferromagnetic steels. → An universal scaling power law with an exponent of 1.9 was observed. → Coefficient of the scaling law reflects defect density due to creep and deformation. → This method is useful for on-line non-destructive evaluation.

  13. Computational Study of Separation Control Using ZNMF Devices: Flow Physics and Scaling Laws

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mittal, Rajat

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of the proposed research was to gain a fundamental understanding of strategies, mechanisms, and scaling laws for successful control of separation using zern-net mass-flux (ZNMF) actuators...

  14. Multifractal aspects of the scaling laws in fully developed compressible turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivamoggi, B.K.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, multifractal aspects of the scalings laws in fully developed compressible turbulence are considered. Compressibility effects on known results of incompressible turbulence are pointed out. copyright 1995 Academic Press, Inc

  15. The use of scaling laws for the design of high beta tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauel, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Several different empirical scaling laws for the tokamak energy confinement time are used to estimate the auxiliary heating power required for a laboratory experiment capable of testing tokamak confinement at high beta and techniques to access the second stability regime. Since operating experience in the second stability regime does not yet exist, these laws predict a wide range of possible power requirements, especially at large aspect ratios. However, by examining a model DT fusion power reactor with reasonable restrictions on the fusion island weight, neutron loading, and maximum magnetic field of the external coils, only a limited range of operating conditions are found for both first and second regime tokamaks, and only a subset of the scaling laws predict ignition. These particular scaling laws are then used to set confinement goals which if demonstrated by the laboratory experiment would indicate favourable scaling to a reactor. (author)

  16. Scaling of energy confinement with minor radius, current and density in Doublet III Ohmically heated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejima, S.; Petrie, T.W.; Riviere, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    The dependence of plasma energy confinement on minor radius, density and plasma current is described for Ohmically heated near-circular plasmas in Doublet III. A wide range of parameters is used for the study of scaling laws; the plasma minor radius defined by the flux surface in contact with limiter is varied by a factor of 2 (a = 44, 32, and 23 cm), the line average plasma density, nsub(e)-bar, is varied by a factor of 20 from 0.5 to 10 x 10 13 cm -3 (nsub(e)-bar R 0 /Bsub(T) = 0.3 to 6 x 10 14 cm -2 .kG -1 ) and the plasma current, I, is varied by a factor of 6 from 120 to 718 kA. The range of the limiter safety factor, qsub(L), is from 2 to 12. - For plasmas with a = 23 and 32 cm, the scaling law at low nsub(e)-bar for the gross electron energy confinement time can be written as (s, cm) tausub(Ee)sup(G) approx.= 3.6 x 10 -19 nsub(e)-bar a 2 qsub(c)sup(3/4), where qsub(c) = 2πa 2 Bsub(T)/μ 0 IR 0 . For the 44-cm plasmas, tausub(Ee)sup(G) is about 1.8 times less than predicted by this scaling, possibly owing to the change in limiter configuration and small plasma-wall separation and/or the aspect ratio change. At high nsub(e)-bar, tausub(Ee)sup(G) saturates and in many cases decreases with nsub(e)-bar but increases with I in a classical-like manner. The dependence of tausub(Ee)sup(G) on a is considerably weakened. The confinement behaviour can be explained by taking an ion thermal conductivity 2 to 7 times that given by Hinton-Hazeltine's neoclassical theory with a lumped-Zsub(eff) impurity model. Within this range the enhancement factor increases with a or a/R 0 . The electron thermal conductivity evaluated at half-temperature radius where most of the thermal insulation occurs sharply increases with average current density within that radius, but does not depend on a within the uncertainties of the measurements. (author)

  17. Beyond KNO multiplicative cascades and novel multiplicity scaling laws

    CERN Document Server

    Hegyi, S

    1999-01-01

    The collapse of multiplicity distributions P/sub n/ onto a universal scaling curve arises when P/sub n/ is expressed as a function of the standardized multiplicity (n-c)/ lambda with c and lambda being location and scale parameters governed by leading particle effects and the growth of average multiplicity. It is demonstrated that self- similar multiplicative cascade processes such as QCD parton branching naturally lead to a novel type of scaling behavior of P/sub n/ which manifests itself in Mellin space through a location change controlled by the degree of multifractality and a scale change governed by the depth of the cascade. Applying the new scaling rule it is shown how to restore data collapsing behavior of P/sub n/ measured in hh collisions at ISR and SPS energies. (21 refs).

  18. Simple analytical approximation for rotationally inelastic rate constants based on the energy corrected sudden scaling law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, N.; Pritchard, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the energy corrected sudden (ECS) scaling law of De Pristo et al. when conbined with the power law assumption for the basis rates k/sub l/→0proportional[l(l+1)]/sup -g/ can accurately fit a wide body of rotational energy transfer data. We develop a simple and accurate approximation to this fitting law, and in addition mathematically show the connection between it and our earlier proposed energy based law which also has been successful in describing both theoretical and experimental data on rotationally inelastic collisions

  19. Nonlocal Ohms Law, Plasma Resistivity, and Reconnection During Collisions of Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, W.; DeHaas, T.; Pribyl, P.; Vincena, S.; Van Compernolle, B.; Sydora, R.; Tripathi, S. K. P.

    2018-01-01

    The plasma resistivity was evaluated in an experiment on the collision of two magnetic flux ropes. Whenever the ropes collide, some magnetic energy is lost as a result of reconnection. Volumetric data, in which all the relevant time-varying quantities were recorded in detail, are presented. Ohm’s law is shown to be nonlocal and cannot be used to evaluate the plasma resistivity. The resistivity was instead calculated using the AC Kubo resistivity and shown to be anomalously high in certain regions of space.

  20. Scaling symmetries, conservation laws and action principles in one-dimensional gas dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G M; Zank, G P

    2009-01-01

    Scaling symmetries of the planar, one-dimensional gas dynamic equations with adiabatic index γ are used to obtain Lagrangian and Eulerian conservation laws associated with the symmetries. The known Eulerian symmetry operators for the scaling symmetries are converted to the Lagrangian form, in which the Eulerian spatial position of the fluid element is given in terms of the Lagrangian fluid labels. Conditions for a linear combination of the three scaling symmetries to be a divergence or variational symmetry of the action are established. The corresponding Lagrangian and Eulerian form of the conservation laws are determined by application of Noether's theorem. A nonlocal conservation law associated with the scaling symmetries is obtained by applying a nonlocal symmetry operator to the scaling symmetry-conserved vector. An action principle incorporating known conservation laws using Lagrangian constraints is developed. Noether's theorem for the constrained action principle gives the same formulas for the conserved vector as the classical Noether theorem, except that the Lie symmetry vector field now includes the effects of nonlocal potentials. Noether's theorem for the constrained action principle is used to obtain nonlocal conservation laws. The scaling symmetry conservation laws only apply for special forms of the entropy of the gas.

  1. Mobile user forecast and power-law acceleration invariance of scale-free networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jin-Li; Guo Zhao-Hua; Liu Xue-Jiao

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies and predicts the number growth of China's mobile users by using the power-law regression. We find that the number growth of the mobile users follows a power law. Motivated by the data on the evolution of the mobile users, we consider scenarios of self-organization of accelerating growth networks into scale-free structures and propose a directed network model, in which the nodes grow following a power-law acceleration. The expressions for the transient and the stationary average degree distributions are obtained by using the Poisson process. This result shows that the model generates appropriate power-law connectivity distributions. Therefore, we find a power-law acceleration invariance of the scale-free networks. The numerical simulations of the models agree with the analytical results well. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  2. Plasma Science Contribution to the SCaLeS Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.

    2003-01-01

    In June of 2003, about 250 computational scientists and mathematicians being funded by the DOE Office of Science met in Arlington, VA, to attend a 2-day workshop on the Science Case for Large-scale Simulation (SCaLeS). This document was the output of the Plasma Science Section of that workshop. The conclusion is that exciting and important progress can be made in the field of Plasma Science if computer power continues to grow and algorithmic development continues to occur at the rate that it has in the past. Full simulations of burning plasma experiments could be possible in the 5-10 year time frame if an aggressive growth program is launched in this area

  3. Spatial structure of ion-scale plasma turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito eNarita

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial structure of small-scale plasma turbulence is studied under different conditions of plasma parameter beta directly in the three-dimensional wave vector domain. Two independent approaches are taken: observations of turbulent magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind measured by four Cluster spacecraft, and direct numerical simulations of plasma turbulence using the hybrid code AIKEF, both resolving turbulence on the ion kinetic scales. The two methods provide independently evidence of wave vector anisotropy as a function of beta. Wave vector anisotropy is characterized primarily by an extension of the energy spectrum in the direction perpendicular to the large-scale magnetic field. The spectrum is strongly anisotropic at lower values of beta, and is more isotropic at higher values of beta. Cluster magnetic field data analysis also provides evidence of axial asymmetry of the spectrum in the directions around the large-scale field. Anisotropy is interpreted as filament formation as plasma evolves into turbulence. Axial asymmetry is interpreted as the effect of radial expansion of the solar wind from the corona.

  4. Progress in Long Scale Length Laser-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenzer, S H; Arnold, P; Bardsley, G; Berger, R L; Bonanno, G; Borger, T; Bower, D E; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S.; Burkhart, S C; Campbell, K; Chrisp, M P; Cohen, B I; Constantin, G; Cooper, F; Cox, J; Dewald, E; Divol, L; Dixit, S; Duncan, J; Eder, D; Edwards, J; Erbert, G; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Froula, D H; Gardner, S D; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Gregori, G; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Hall, T; Hammel, B A; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermes, G; Hinkel, D; Holder, J; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hsing, W; Huber, S; James, T; Johnson, S; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D; Kamperschroer, J H; Kauffman, R; Kelleher, T; Knight, J; Kirkwood, R K; Kruer, W L; Labiak, W; Landen, O L; Langdon, A B; Langer, S; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lee, F D; Lund, D; MacGowan, B; Marshall, S; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Mackinnon, A J; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K; Marshall, C; Mertens, E; Meezan, N; Miller, G; Montelongo, S; Moody, J D; Moses, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Ng, E; Niemann, C; Nikitin, A; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rekow, V; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Rhodes, M.

    2003-01-01

    The first experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have employed the first four beams to measure propagation and laser backscattering losses in large ignition-size plasmas. Gas-filled targets between 2 mm and 7 mm length have been heated from one side by overlapping the focal spots of the four beams from one quad operated at 351 nm (3ω) with a total intensity of 2 x 10 15 W cm -2 . The targets were filled with 1 atm of CO 2 producing of up to 7 mm long homogeneously heated plasmas with densities of n e = 6 x 10 20 cm -3 and temperatures of T e = 2 keV. The high energy in a NIF quad of beams of 16kJ, illuminating the target from one direction, creates unique conditions for the study of laser plasma interactions at scale lengths not previously accessible. The propagation through the large-scale plasma was measured with a gated x-ray imager that was filtered for 3.5 keV x rays. These data indicate that the beams interact with the full length of this ignition-scale plasma during the last ∼1 ns of the experiment. During that time, the full aperture measurements of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering show scattering into the four focusing lenses of 6% for the smallest length (∼2 mm). increasing to 12% for ∼7 mm. These results demonstrate the NIF experimental capabilities and further provide a benchmark for three-dimensional modeling of the laser-plasma interactions at ignition-size scale lengths

  5. Mean-field Ohm's law and coaxial helicity injection in force-free plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weening, R. H.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of steady-state coaxial helicity injection (CHI) in force-free plasmas is presented using a parallel mean-field Ohm's law that includes resistivity η and hyper-resistivity Λ terms. Using Boozer coordinates, a partial differential equation is derived for the time evolution of the mean-field poloidal magnetic flux, or magnetic Hamiltonian function, from the parallel mean-field Ohm's law. A general expression is obtained from the mean-field theory for the efficiency of CHI current drive in force-free plasmas. Inductances of internal energy, magnetic helicity, and poloidal magnetic flux are used to characterize axisymmetric plasma equilibria that have a model current profile. Using the model current profile, a method is suggested to determine the level of magnetohydrodynamic activity at the magnetic axis and the consequent deviation from the completely relaxed Taylor state. The mean-field Ohm's law model suggests that steady-state CHI can be viewed most simply as a boundary layer problem.

  6. Law machines: scale models, forensic materiality and the making of modern patent law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottage, Alain

    2011-10-01

    Early US patent law was machine made. Before the Patent Office took on the function of examining patent applications in 1836, questions of novelty and priority were determined in court, within the forum of the infringement action. And at all levels of litigation, from the circuit courts up to the Supreme Court, working models were the media through which doctrine, evidence and argument were made legible, communicated and interpreted. A model could be set on a table, pointed at, picked up, rotated or upended so as to display a point of interest to a particular audience within the courtroom, and, crucially, set in motion to reveal the 'mode of operation' of a machine. The immediate object of demonstration was to distinguish the intangible invention from its tangible embodiment, but models also'machined' patent law itself. Demonstrations of patent claims with models articulated and resolved a set of conceptual tensions that still make the definition and apprehension of the invention difficult, even today, but they resolved these tensions in the register of materiality, performativity and visibility, rather than the register of conceptuality. The story of models tells us something about how inventions emerge and subsist within the context of patent litigation and patent doctrine, and it offers a starting point for renewed reflection on the question of how technology becomes property.

  7. Nonlinear Analysis and Scaling Laws for Noncircular Composite Structures Subjected to Combined Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Results from an analytical study of the response of a built-up, multi-cell noncircular composite structure subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads are presented. Nondimensional parameters and scaling laws based on a first-order shear-deformation plate theory are derived for this noncircular composite structure. The scaling laws are used to design sub-scale structural models for predicting the structural response of a full-scale structure representative of a portion of a blended-wing-body transport aircraft. Because of the complexity of the full-scale structure, some of the similitude conditions are relaxed for the sub-scale structural models. Results from a systematic parametric study are used to determine the effects of relaxing selected similitude conditions on the sensitivity of the effectiveness of using the sub-scale structural model response characteristics for predicting the full-scale structure response characteristics.

  8. A scaling law for random walks on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Theodore J.; Foxall, Eric; Glass, Leon; Edwards, Roderick

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of many natural and artificial systems are well described as random walks on a network: the stochastic behaviour of molecules, traffic patterns on the internet, fluctuations in stock prices and so on. The vast literature on random walks provides many tools for computing properties such as steady-state probabilities or expected hitting times. Previously, however, there has been no general theory describing the distribution of possible paths followed by a random walk. Here, we show that for any random walk on a finite network, there are precisely three mutually exclusive possibilities for the form of the path distribution: finite, stretched exponential and power law. The form of the distribution depends only on the structure of the network, while the stepping probabilities control the parameters of the distribution. We use our theory to explain path distributions in domains such as sports, music, nonlinear dynamics and stochastic chemical kinetics.

  9. Application of Scaling-Law and CFD Modeling to Hydrodynamics of Circulating Biomass Fluidized Bed Gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazda Biglari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two modeling approaches, the scaling-law and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics approaches, are presented in this paper. To save on experimental cost of the pilot plant, the scaling-law approach as a low-computational-cost method was adopted and a small scale column operating under ambient temperature and pressure was built. A series of laboratory tests and computer simulations were carried out to evaluate the hydrodynamic characteristics of a pilot fluidized-bed biomass gasifier. In the small scale column solids were fluidized. The pressure and other hydrodynamic properties were monitored for the validation of the scaling-law application. In addition to the scaling-law modeling method, the CFD approach was presented to simulate the gas-particle system in the small column. 2D CFD models were developed to simulate the hydrodynamic regime. The simulation results were validated with the experimental data from the small column. It was proved that the CFD model was able to accurately predict the hydrodynamics of the small column. The outcomes of this research present both the scaling law with the lower computational cost and the CFD modeling as a more robust method to suit various needs for the design of fluidized-bed gasifiers.

  10. Dynamo Scaling Laws for Uranus and Neptune: The Role of Convective Shell Thickness on Dipolarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Sabine; Yunsheng Tian, Bob

    2017-10-01

    Previous dynamo scaling law studies (Christensen and Aubert, 2006) have demonstrated that the morphology of a planet’s magnetic field is determined by the local Rossby number (Ro_l): a non-dimensional diagnostic variable that quantifies the ratio of inertial forces to Coriolis forces on the average length scale of the flow. Dynamos with Ro_l ~ 0.1 produce multipolar magnetic fields. Scaling studies have also determined the dependence of the local Rossby number on non-dimensional parameters governing the system - specifically the Ekman, Prandtl, magnetic Prandtl and flux-based Rayleigh numbers (Olson and Christensen, 2006). When these scaling laws are applied to the planets, it appears that Uranus and Neptune should have dipole-dominated fields, contrary to observations. However, those scaling laws were derived using the specific convective shell thickness of the Earth’s core. Here we investigate the role of convective shell thickness on dynamo scaling laws. We find that the local Rossby number depends exponentially on the convective shell thickness. Including this new dependence on convective shell thickness, we find that the dynamo scaling laws now predict that Uranus and Neptune reside deeply in the multipolar regime, thereby resolving the previous contradiction with observations.

  11. Coulomb and Nuclear Breakup at Low Energies: Scaling Laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on a recent work on the low-energy behavior of the breakup cross section in so far as it has important role in the fusion of weakly bound and halo nuclei at near-barrier energies. We assess the way the nuclear component of this cross section scales with the target mass. In complete accord with previous finding at higher energies we verify that the low energy behavior of the breakup cross section for a given projectile and relative center of mass energy with respect to the Coulomb barrier height scales as the cubic root of the mass number of the target. Surprisingly we find that the Coulomb component of the breakup cross section at these low energies also obeys scaling, but with a linear dependence on the target charge. Our findings are important when planning for experiments involving these exotic nuclei.

  12. Collisional effects on diffusion scaling laws in electrostatic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.; Misguich, J.H.; Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.; Balescu, R.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of particle collisions on the effective transport in an electrostatic plasma turbulence is analytically studied in the framework of test particle approach. We show that an amplification of the diffusion coefficient can be produced by the combined effect of collisions and trajectory trapping in the structure of the stochastic potential. The paper is organized as follows. The model and the system of equations are formulated in Sec. 2. A short description of the process of trajectory trapping around the extrema of the stochastic potential and of the de-correlation trajectory method is presented in Sec.3. The effect of particle collisions is treated in Sec. 4 where the running diffusion coefficient is determined. Sec. 5 contains the analyses of the results, and Sec. 6 a detailed study of the possible diffusion regimes. The conclusions are summarized in Sec. 7. (authors)

  13. Scaling laws for photoelectron holography in the midinfrared wavelength regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huismans, Y.; Gijsbertsen, A.; Smolkowska, A S; Jungmann, J H; Rouz??e, A.; Logman, P. S W M; L??pine, F.; Cauchy, C.; Zamith, S; Marchenko, T; Bakker, Joost M.; Berden, G.; Redlich, B; Van Der Meer, A. F G; Ivanov, M Yu; Yan, T. M.; Bauer, D.; Smirnova, O; Vrakking, M. J J

    2012-01-01

    Midinfrared strong-field laser ionization offers the promise of measuring holograms of atoms and molecules, which contain both spatial and temporal information of the ion and the photoelectron with subfemtosecond temporal and angstrom spatial resolution. We report on the scaling of photoelectron

  14. Scaling Laws for Photoelectron Holography in the Midinfrared Wavelength Regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huismans, Y.; Gijsbertsen, A.; Smolkowska, A. S.; Jungmann, J. H.; Rouzee, A.; Logman, Pswm; Lepine, F.; Cauchy, C.; Zamith, S.; Marchenko, T.; Bakker, J. M.; G. Berden,; Redlich, B.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Ivanov, M. Y.; Yan, T. M.; Bauer, D.; Smirnova, O.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2012-01-01

    Midinfrared strong-field laser ionization offers the promise of measuring holograms of atoms and molecules, which contain both spatial and temporal information of the ion and the photoelectron with subfemtosecond temporal and angstrom spatial resolution. We report on the scaling of photoelectron

  15. Ohm close-quote s law for plasmas in reversed field pinch configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martines, E.; Vallone, F.

    1997-01-01

    An analytical relationship between current density and applied electric field in reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas has been derived in the framework of the kinetic dynamo theory, that is assuming a radial field-aligned momentum transport caused by the magnetic field stochasticity. This Ohm close-quote s law yields current density profiles with a poloidal current density at the edge which can sustain the magnetic field configuration against resistive diffusion. The dependence of the loop voltage on plasma current and other plasma parameters for RFP experiments has been obtained. The results of the theoretical work have been compared with experimental data from the RFX experiment, and a good agreement has been found. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  16. Power law relation between particle concentrations and their sizes in the blood plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirichenko, M N; Chaikov, L L; Zaritskii, A R

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of sizes and concentrations of particles in blood plasma by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Blood plasma contains many different proteins and their aggregates, microparticles and vesicles. Their sizes, concentrations and shapes can give information about donor's health. Our DLS study of blood plasma reveals unexpected dependence: with increasing of the particle sizes r (from 1 nm up to 1 μm), their concentrations decrease as r -4 (almost by 12 orders). We found also that such dependence was repeated for model solution of fibrinogen and thrombin with power coefficient is -3,6. We believe that this relation is a fundamental law of nature that shows interaction of proteins (and other substances) in biological liquids. (paper)

  17. EXTENDED SCALING LAWS IN NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, Joanne; Cattaneo, Fausto; Perez, Jean Carlos; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Magnetized turbulence is ubiquitous in astrophysical systems, where it notoriously spans a broad range of spatial scales. Phenomenological theories of MHD turbulence describe the self-similar dynamics of turbulent fluctuations in the inertial range of scales. Numerical simulations serve to guide and test these theories. However, the computational power that is currently available restricts the simulations to Reynolds numbers that are significantly smaller than those in astrophysical settings. In order to increase computational efficiency and, therefore, probe a larger range of scales, one often takes into account the fundamental anisotropy of field-guided MHD turbulence, with gradients being much slower in the field-parallel direction. The simulations are then optimized by employing the reduced MHD equations and relaxing the field-parallel numerical resolution. In this work we explore a different possibility. We propose that there exist certain quantities that are remarkably stable with respect to the Reynolds number. As an illustration, we study the alignment angle between the magnetic and velocity fluctuations in MHD turbulence, measured as the ratio of two specially constructed structure functions. We find that the scaling of this ratio can be extended surprisingly well into the regime of relatively low Reynolds number. However, the extended scaling easily becomes spoiled when the dissipation range in the simulations is underresolved. Thus, taking the numerical optimization methods too far can lead to spurious numerical effects and erroneous representation of the physics of MHD turbulence, which in turn can affect our ability to identify correctly the physical mechanisms that are operating in astrophysical systems.

  18. A generalized power-law scaling law for a two-phase imbibition in a porous medium

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2013-11-01

    Dimensionless time is a universal parameter that may be used to predict real field behavior from scaled laboratory experiments in relation to imbibition processes in porous media. Researchers work to nondimensionalize the time has been through the use of parameters that are inherited to the properties of the moving fluids and the porous matrix, which may be applicable to spontaneous imbibition. However, in forced imbibition, the dynamics of the process depends, in addition, on injection velocity. Therefore, we propose the use of scaling velocity in the form of a combination of two velocities, the first of which (the characteristic velocity) is defined by the fluid and the porous medium parameters and the second is the injection velocity, which is a characteristic of the process. A power-law formula is suggested for the scaling velocity such that it may be used as a parameter to nondimensionalize time. This may reduce the complexities in characterizing two-phase imbibition through porous media and works well in both the cases of spontaneous and forced imbibition. The proposed scaling-law is tested against some oil recovery experimental data from the literature. In addition, the governing partial differential equations are nondimensionalized so that the governing dimensionless groups are manifested. An example of a one-dimensional countercurrent imbibition is considered numerically. The calculations are carried out for a wide range of Ca and Da to illustrate their influences on water saturation as well as relative water/oil permeabilities. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  19. A generalized power-law scaling law for a two-phase imbibition in a porous medium

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu

    2013-01-01

    Dimensionless time is a universal parameter that may be used to predict real field behavior from scaled laboratory experiments in relation to imbibition processes in porous media. Researchers work to nondimensionalize the time has been through the use of parameters that are inherited to the properties of the moving fluids and the porous matrix, which may be applicable to spontaneous imbibition. However, in forced imbibition, the dynamics of the process depends, in addition, on injection velocity. Therefore, we propose the use of scaling velocity in the form of a combination of two velocities, the first of which (the characteristic velocity) is defined by the fluid and the porous medium parameters and the second is the injection velocity, which is a characteristic of the process. A power-law formula is suggested for the scaling velocity such that it may be used as a parameter to nondimensionalize time. This may reduce the complexities in characterizing two-phase imbibition through porous media and works well in both the cases of spontaneous and forced imbibition. The proposed scaling-law is tested against some oil recovery experimental data from the literature. In addition, the governing partial differential equations are nondimensionalized so that the governing dimensionless groups are manifested. An example of a one-dimensional countercurrent imbibition is considered numerically. The calculations are carried out for a wide range of Ca and Da to illustrate their influences on water saturation as well as relative water/oil permeabilities. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Evidence for large-scale uniformity of physical laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubbs, A.D.; Wolfe, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    The coincidence of redshifts deduced from 21 cm and resonance transitions in absorbing gas detected in front of four quasi-stellar objects results in stringent limits on the variation of the product of three physical constants both in space and in time. We find that α 2 g/sub p/(m/M) is spatially uniform, to a few parts in 10 4 , throughout the observable universe. This uniformity holds subsequent to an epoch corresponding to less than 5% of the current age of the universe t 0 . Moreover, time variations in α 2 g/sub p/m/M are excluded to the same accuracy subsequent to an epoch corresponding to > or approx. =0.20 t 0 . These limits are largely model independent, relying only upon the cosmoligical interpretation of redshifts, and the isotropy of the 3 K background radiation. That a quantity as complex as g/sub p/, which depends on all the details of strong interaction physics, is uniform throughout most of spacetime, even in causally disjoint regions, suggests that all physical laws are globally invariant

  1. On a Possible Unified Scaling Law for Volcanic Eruption Durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavò, Flavio; Nunnari, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    Volcanoes constitute dissipative systems with many degrees of freedom. Their eruptions are the result of complex processes that involve interacting chemical-physical systems. At present, due to the complexity of involved phenomena and to the lack of precise measurements, both analytical and numerical models are unable to simultaneously include the main processes involved in eruptions thus making forecasts of volcanic dynamics rather unreliable. On the other hand, accurate forecasts of some eruption parameters, such as the duration, could be a key factor in natural hazard estimation and mitigation. Analyzing a large database with most of all the known volcanic eruptions, we have determined that the duration of eruptions seems to be described by a universal distribution which characterizes eruption duration dynamics. In particular, this paper presents a plausible global power-law distribution of durations of volcanic eruptions that holds worldwide for different volcanic environments. We also introduce a new, simple and realistic pipe model that can follow the same found empirical distribution. Since the proposed model belongs to the family of the self-organized systems it may support the hypothesis that simple mechanisms can lead naturally to the emergent complexity in volcanic behaviour.

  2. Isotopic scaling of transport in deuterium-tritium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, S.D.; Adler, H.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Budny, R.V.; Bush, C.E.; Chang, Z.; Duong, H.

    1995-01-01

    Both global and thermal energy confinement improve in high-temperature supershot plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) when deuterium beam heating is partially or wholly replaced by tritium beam heating. For the same heating power, the tritium-rich plasmas obtain up to 22% higher total energy, 30% higher thermal ion energy, and 20-25% higher central ion temperature. Kinetic analysis of the temperature and density profiles indicates a favorable isotopic scaling of ion heat transport and electron particle transport, with τ Ei (a/2) ∝ (A) 0.7-0.8 and τ pe (a) ∝ (A) 0.8

  3. A study of flame spread in engineered cardboard fuelbeds: Part II: Scaling law approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittany A. Adam; Nelson K. Akafuah; Mark Finney; Jason Forthofer; Kozo Saito

    2013-01-01

    In this second part of a two part exploration of dynamic behavior observed in wildland fires, time scales differentiating convective and radiative heat transfer is further explored. Scaling laws for the two different types of heat transfer considered: Radiation-driven fire spread, and convection-driven fire spread, which can both occur during wildland fires. A new...

  4. Symbolic regression via genetic programming for data driven derivation of confinement scaling laws without any assumption on their mathematical form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murari, A; Peluso, E; Gelfusa, M; Lupelli, I; Lungaroni, M; Gaudio, P

    2015-01-01

    Many measurements are required to control thermonuclear plasmas and to fully exploit them scientifically. In the last years JET has shown the potential to generate about 50 GB of data per shot. These amounts of data require more sophisticated data analysis methodologies to perform correct inference and various techniques have been recently developed in this respect. The present paper covers a new methodology to extract mathematical models directly from the data without any a priori assumption about their expression. The approach, based on symbolic regression via genetic programming, is exemplified using the data of the International Tokamak Physics Activity database for the energy confinement time. The best obtained scaling laws are not in power law form and suggest a revisiting of the extrapolation to ITER. Indeed the best non-power law scalings predict confinement times in ITER approximately between 2 and 3 s. On the other hand, more comprehensive and better databases are required to fully profit from the power of these new methods and to discriminate between the hundreds of thousands of models that they can generate. (paper)

  5. Nano-scaling law: geometric foundation of thiolated gold nanomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Amala

    2012-04-07

    Thiolated gold nanomolecules show a power correlation between the number of gold atoms and the thiolate ligands with a 2/3 scaling similar to Platonic and Archimedean solids. Nanomolecule stability is influenced by a universal geometric factor that is foundational to its stability through the Euclidean surface rule, in addition to the electronic shell closing factor and staple motif requirements. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  6. Geometric scalings for the electrostatically driven helical plasma state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçay, Cihan; Finn, John M.; Nebel, Richard A.; Barnes, Daniel C.

    2017-12-01

    A new plasma state has been investigated [Akcay et al., Phys. Plasmas 24, 052503 (2017)], with a uniform applied axial magnetic field in a periodic cylinder of length L = 2 π R , driven by helical electrodes. The drive is single helicity, depending on m θ + k z = m θ - n ζ , where ζ = z / R and k = - n / R . For strong ( m , n ) = ( 1 , 1 ) drive, the state was found to have a strong axial mean current density, with a mean-field safety factor q 0 ( r ) just above the pitch of the electrodes m / n = 1 in the interior. This state has possible applications to DC electrical transformers and tailoring of the current profile in tokamaks. We study two geometric issues of interest for these applications: (i) scaling of properties with the plasma length or aspect ratio and (ii) behavior for different helicities, specifically ( m , n ) = ( 1 , n ) for n > 1 and ( m , n ) = ( 2 , 1 ) .

  7. Temperature profiles of time dependent tokamak plasmas from the parallel Ohm's law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micozzi, P.; Roccella, M.

    1993-01-01

    Profile consistency based on the parallel component of Ohm's law has been used to obtain electron temperature profiles. A resistive neoclassical term and a term that accounts for the bootstrap current contributions have been considered in Ohm's law. A numerical code has been developed to find solutions according to the MHD equilibrium equations. For stationary plasmas, the temperature profiles, obtained by a procedure in which a pseudo-parabolic shape of (J φ /R) is assumed and the peak temperature known from experiments is used, are close to the experimental data for several very different machines (JET, TFTR, ASDEX, ALCATOR-C and FT). The main feature of the model is its capability to provide an easy parametrization of Ohm's law also in non-stationary cases, without going through the complication of a detailed solution of the magnetic field diffusion equation. A rule for estimating a maximum value of the current diffusion time inside the plasma volume in such situations is given. This rule accounts for both the temperature profiles and the stabilization times in some non-stationary pulses observed in JET. (author). 28 refs, 12 figs

  8. Likert scales, levels of measurement and the "laws" of statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Geoff

    2010-12-01

    Reviewers of research reports frequently criticize the choice of statistical methods. While some of these criticisms are well-founded, frequently the use of various parametric methods such as analysis of variance, regression, correlation are faulted because: (a) the sample size is too small, (b) the data may not be normally distributed, or (c) The data are from Likert scales, which are ordinal, so parametric statistics cannot be used. In this paper, I dissect these arguments, and show that many studies, dating back to the 1930s consistently show that parametric statistics are robust with respect to violations of these assumptions. Hence, challenges like those above are unfounded, and parametric methods can be utilized without concern for "getting the wrong answer".

  9. A Scaling Law for the Snapback in Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L; Bauer, P; Haverkamp, M; Pieloni, T; Sanfilippo, S; Velev, G

    2005-01-01

    The decay of the sextupole component in the bending dipoles during injection and the subsequent snapback at the start of beam acceleration are issues of common concern for all superconducting colliders built or in construction. Recent studies performed on LHC and Tevatron dipole magnets revealed many similarities in the snapback characteristics. Some are expected, e.g. the effect of operational history. One particular similarity, however, is striking and is the subject of this paper. It appears that there is a simple linear relation between the amount of sextupole drift during the decay and the magnet current (or field) change during the ramp required to resolve the snapback. It is surprising that the linear correlation between snapback amplitude and snapback field holds very well for all magnets of the same family (e.g. Tevatron or LHC dipoles). In this paper we present the data collected to date and discuss a simple theory that explains the scaling found.

  10. Power law scaling in synchronization of brain signals depends on cognitive load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis ePerez Velazquez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As it has several features that optimize information processing, it has been proposed that criticality governs the dynamics of nervous system activity. Indications of such dynamics have been reported for a variety of in vitro and in vivo recordings, ranging from in vitro slice electrophysiology to human functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, there still remains considerable debate as to whether the brain actually operates close to criticality or in another governing state such as stochastic or oscillatory dynamics. A tool used to investigate the criticality of nervous system data is the inspection of power-law distributions. Although the findings are controversial, such power-law scaling has been found in different types of recordings. Here, we studied whether there is a power law scaling in the distribution of the phase synchronization derived from magnetoencephalographic recordings during executive function tasks performed by children with and without autism. Characterizing the brain dynamics that is different between autistic and non-autistic individuals is important in order to find differences that could either aid diagnosis or provide insights as to possible therapeutic interventions in autism. We report in this study that power law scaling in the distributions of a phase synchrony index is not very common and its frequency of occurrence is similar in the control and the autism group. In addition, power law scaling tends to diminish with increased cognitive load (difficulty or engagement in the task. There were indications of changes in the probability distribution functions for the phase synchrony that were associated with a transition from power law scaling to lack of power law (or vice versa, which suggests the presence of phenomenological bifurcations in brain dynamics associated with cognitive load. Hence, brain dynamics may fluctuate between criticality and other regimes depending upon context and behaviours.

  11. Tornado outbreak variability follows Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling and increases dramatically with severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippett, Michael K; Cohen, Joel E

    2016-02-29

    Tornadoes cause loss of life and damage to property each year in the United States and around the world. The largest impacts come from 'outbreaks' consisting of multiple tornadoes closely spaced in time. Here we find an upward trend in the annual mean number of tornadoes per US tornado outbreak for the period 1954-2014. Moreover, the variance of this quantity is increasing more than four times as fast as the mean. The mean and variance of the number of tornadoes per outbreak vary according to Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling (TL), with parameters that are consistent with multiplicative growth. Tornado-related atmospheric proxies show similar power-law scaling and multiplicative growth. Path-length-integrated tornado outbreak intensity also follows TL, but with parameters consistent with sampling variability. The observed TL power-law scaling of outbreak severity means that extreme outbreaks are more frequent than would be expected if mean and variance were independent or linearly related.

  12. Scaling law for noise variance and spatial resolution in differential phase contrast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guanghong; Zambelli, Joseph; Li Ke; Bevins, Nicholas; Qi Zhihua

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The noise variance versus spatial resolution relationship in differential phase contrast (DPC) projection imaging and computed tomography (CT) are derived and compared to conventional absorption-based x-ray projection imaging and CT. Methods: The scaling law for DPC-CT is theoretically derived and subsequently validated with phantom results from an experimental Talbot-Lau interferometer system. Results: For the DPC imaging method, the noise variance in the differential projection images follows the same inverse-square law with spatial resolution as in conventional absorption-based x-ray imaging projections. However, both in theory and experimental results, in DPC-CT the noise variance scales with spatial resolution following an inverse linear relationship with fixed slice thickness. Conclusions: The scaling law in DPC-CT implies a lesser noise, and therefore dose, penalty for moving to higher spatial resolutions when compared to conventional absorption-based CT in order to maintain the same contrast-to-noise ratio.

  13. Recurrence spectroscopy of atoms in electric fields: Failure of classical scaling laws near bifurcations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, J.A.; Robicheaux, F.

    1998-01-01

    The photoabsorption spectra of atoms in a static external electric field shows modulations from recurrences: electron waves that go out from and return to the vicinity of the atomic core. Closed-orbit theory predicts the amplitudes and phases of these modulations in terms of closed classical orbits. A classical scaling law relates the properties of a closed orbit at one energy and field strength to its properties at another energy and field strength at fixed scaled energy ε=EF -1/2 . The scaling law states that the recurrence strength of orbits along the electric field axis scale as F 1/4 . We show how this law fails near bifurcations when the effective Planck constant ℎ≡ℎF 1/4 increases with increasing field at fixed ε. The recurrences of orbits away from the axis scale as F 1/8 in accordance with the classical prediction. These deviations from the classical scaling law are important in interpreting the recurrence spectra of atoms in current experiments. This leads to an extension of the uniform approximation developed by Gao and Delos [Phys. Rev. A 56, 356 (1997)] to complex momenta. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  14. Mathematical analysis of the dimensional scaling technique for the Schroedinger equation with power-law potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zhonghai; Chen, Goong; Lin, Chang-Shou

    2010-01-01

    The dimensional scaling (D-scaling) technique is an innovative asymptotic expansion approach to study the multiparticle systems in molecular quantum mechanics. It enables the calculation of ground and excited state energies of quantum systems without having to solve the Schroedinger equation. In this paper, we present a mathematical analysis of the D-scaling technique for the Schroedinger equation with power-law potentials. By casting the D-scaling technique in an appropriate variational setting and studying the corresponding minimization problem, the D-scaling technique is justified rigorously. A new asymptotic dimensional expansion scheme is introduced to compute asymptotic expansions for ground state energies.

  15. A psychometric appraisal of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy using law students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams B

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Brett Williams,1 Adiva Sifris,2 Marty Lynch1 1Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, 2Faculty of Law, Monash University, Frankston, VIC, Australia Background: A growing body of literature indicates that empathic behaviors are positively linked, in several ways, with the professional performance and mental well-being of lawyers and law students. It is therefore important to assess empathy levels among law students using psychometrically sound tools that are suitable for this cohort.Participants and methods: The 20-item Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Health Profession Students Version was adapted for a law context (eg, the word “health care” became “legal”, and the new Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Law Students (JSE-L-S version was completed by 275 students at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Data were subjected to principal component analysis.Results: Four factors emerged from the principal component analysis (“understanding the client’s perspective”, “responding to clients’ experiences and emotions”, “responding to clients’ cues and behaviors”, and “standing in clients’ shoes”, which accounted for 46.7% of the total variance. The reliability of the factors varied, but the overall 18-item JSE-L-S yielded a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.80. Several patterns among the item loadings were similar to those reported in studies using other versions of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy.Conclusion: The JSE-L-S appears to be a reliable measure of empathy among undergraduate law students, which could help provide insights into law student welfare and future performance as legal practitioners. Additional evaluation of the JSE-L-S is required to disambiguate some of the minor findings explored. Adjustments may improve the psychometric properties. Keywords: empathy, law, student, Jefferson, sympathy

  16. Scaling Law for Photon Transmission through Optically Turbid Slabs Based on Random Walk Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Past work has demonstrated the value of a random walk theory (RWT to solve multiple-scattering problems arising in numerous contexts. This paper’s goal is to investigate the application range of the RWT using Monte Carlo simulations and extending it to anisotropic media using scaling laws. Meanwhile, this paper also reiterates rules for converting RWT formulas to real physical dimensions, and corrects some errors which appear in an earlier publication. The RWT theory, validated by the Monte Carlo simulations and combined with the scaling law, is expected to be useful to study multiple scattering and to greatly reduce the computation cost.

  17. The Development and Psychometric Properties of the Immigration Law Concerns Scale (ILCS) for HIV Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Julia; Galletly, Carol L; Broaddus, Michelle R; Dickson-Gomez, Julia B; Glasman, Laura R; McAuliffe, Timothy L; Vega, Miriam Y; LeGrand, Sarah; Mena, Carla A; Barlow, Morgan L; Valera, Erik; Montenegro, Judith I

    2017-11-08

    To develop, pilot test, and conduct psychometric analyses of an innovative scale measuring the influence of perceived immigration laws on Latino migrants' HIV-testing behavior. The Immigration Law Concerns Scale (ILCS) was developed in three phases: Phase 1 involved a review of law and literature, generation of scale items, consultation with project advisors, and subsequent revision of the scale. Phase 2 involved systematic translation- back translation and consensus-based editorial processes conducted by members of a bilingual and multi-national study team. In Phase 3, 339 sexually active, HIV-negative Spanish-speaking, non-citizen Latino migrant adults (both documented and undocumented) completed the scale via audio computer-assisted self-interview. The psychometric properties of the scale were tested with exploratory factor analysis and estimates of reliability coefficients were generated. Bivariate correlations were conducted to test the discriminant and predictive validity of identified factors. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a three-factor, 17-item scale. subscale reliability ranged from 0.72 to 0.79. There were significant associations between the ILCS and the HIV-testing behaviors of participants. Results of the pilot test and psychometric analysis of the ILCS are promising. The scale is reliable and significantly associated with the HIV-testing behaviors of participants. Subscales related to unwanted government attention and concerns about meeting moral character requirements should be refined.

  18. DOES A SCALING LAW EXIST BETWEEN SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS AND SOLAR FLARES?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahler, S. W.

    2013-01-01

    Among many other natural processes, the size distributions of solar X-ray flares and solar energetic particle (SEP) events are scale-invariant power laws. The measured distributions of SEP events prove to be distinctly flatter, i.e., have smaller power-law slopes, than those of the flares. This has led to speculation that the two distributions are related through a scaling law, first suggested by Hudson, which implies a direct nonlinear physical connection between the processes producing the flares and those producing the SEP events. We present four arguments against this interpretation. First, a true scaling must relate SEP events to all flare X-ray events, and not to a small subset of the X-ray event population. We also show that the assumed scaling law is not mathematically valid and that although the flare X-ray and SEP event data are correlated, they are highly scattered and not necessarily related through an assumed scaling of the two phenomena. An interpretation of SEP events within the context of a recent model of fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality by Aschwanden provides a physical basis for why the SEP distributions should be flatter than those of solar flares. These arguments provide evidence against a close physical connection of flares with SEP production.

  19. Neoclassical tearing modes on ASDEX Upgrade: Improved scaling laws, high confinement at high βN and new stabilization experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenter, S.; Gude, A.; Igochine, V.; Maraschek, M.; Sips, A.C.C.; Zohm, H.; Gantenbein, G.; Sauter, O.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper recent results on the physics of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) achieved on ASDEX Upgrade are reported. A scaling law for NTM decay has been found, showing that the minimum local bootstrap current density required for mode growth is proportional to the ion gyro radius. As this scaling law does not depend on the seed island size, and thus on the background MHD activity, it is more reliable than previously derived scaling laws for the NTM onset. Furthermore, the recently reported Frequently Interrupted Regime (FIR) is discussed. In this new regime (m,n) NTMs are characterized by frequent amplitude drops caused by interaction with (m+1,n+1) background MHD activity. Due to the resulting reduced time averaged island size this leads to lower confinement degradation compared to that caused by the usual NTMs. As shown here, the transition into this regime can actively be triggered by lowering the magnetic shear at the q=(m+1)/=(n+1) rational surface. Further investigations regard mechanisms to increase the β N value for NTM onset such as plasma shaping, seed island size and density profile control. Using these studies, a scenario with high β N (β N = 3:5) at high density (n/n GW = 0.83) and confinement (H 98(y,2) = 1.2) has been developed. Moreover, this scenario is characterized by type II ELM activity and thus by moderate heat load to the target plates. Finally, new NTM stabilization experiments are reported, demonstrating an increase in β N after NTM stabilization. (author)

  20. Scaling laws in high-energy inverse compton scattering. II. Effect of bulk motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, Satoshi; Kohyama, Yasuharu; Itoh, Naoki

    2010-01-01

    We study the inverse Compton scattering of the CMB photons off high-energy nonthermal electrons. We extend the formalism obtained by the previous paper to the case where the electrons have nonzero bulk motions with respect to the CMB frame. Assuming the power-law electron distribution, we find the same scaling law for the probability distribution function P 1,K (s) as P 1 (s) which corresponds to the zero bulk motions, where the peak height and peak position depend only on the power-index parameter. We solved the rate equation analytically. It is found that the spectral intensity function also has the same scaling law. The effect of the bulk motions to the spectral intensity function is found to be small. The present study will be applicable to the analysis of the x-ray and gamma-ray emission models from various astrophysical objects with nonzero bulk motions such as radio galaxies and astrophysical jets.

  1. Two-phase flow in porous media: power-law scaling of effective permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeva, Morten; Hansen, Alex, E-mail: Morten.Grova@ntnu.no, E-mail: Alex.Hansen@ntnu.no [Department of Physics, NTNU, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2011-09-15

    A recent experiment has reported power-law scaling of effective permeability of two-phase flow with respect to capillary number for a two-dimensional model porous medium. In this paper, we consider the simultaneous flow of two phases through a porous medium under steady-state conditions, fixed total flow-rate and saturation, using a two-dimensional network simulator. We obtain power-law exponents for the scaling of effective permeability with respect to capillary number. The simulations are performed both for viscosity matched fluids and for a high viscosity ratio resembling that of air and water. Good power-law behaviour is found for both cases. Different exponents are found, depending on saturation.

  2. Towards large-scale plasma-assisted synthesis of nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvelbar, U.

    2011-05-01

    Large quantities of nanomaterials, e.g. nanowires (NWs), are needed to overcome the high market price of nanomaterials and make nanotechnology widely available for general public use and applications to numerous devices. Therefore, there is an enormous need for new methods or routes for synthesis of those nanostructures. Here plasma technologies for synthesis of NWs, nanotubes, nanoparticles or other nanostructures might play a key role in the near future. This paper presents a three-dimensional problem of large-scale synthesis connected with the time, quantity and quality of nanostructures. Herein, four different plasma methods for NW synthesis are presented in contrast to other methods, e.g. thermal processes, chemical vapour deposition or wet chemical processes. The pros and cons are discussed in detail for the case of two metal oxides: iron oxide and zinc oxide NWs, which are important for many applications.

  3. Isotopic scaling of transport in deuterium-tritium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, S.D.; Murakami, M.; Adler, H.; Chang, Z.; Duong, H.; Grisham, L.R.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Grek, B.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Loughlin, M.J.; Mansfield, D.K.; McGuire, K.M.; Meade, D.M.; Mikkelsen, D.M.; Murphy, J.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schivell, J.; Skinner, C.H.; Strachan, J.D.; Synakowski, E.J.; Taylor, G.; Thompson, M.E.; Wieland, R.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    Both global and thermal energy confinement improve in high-temperature supershot plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) when deuterium beam heating is partially or wholly replaced by tritium beam heating. For the same heating power, the tritium-rich plasmas obtain up to 22% higher total energy, 30% higher thermal ion energy, and 20-25% higher central ion temperature. Kinetic analysis of the temperature and density profiles indicates a favorable isotopic scaling of ion heat transport and electron particle transport, with τ Ei (a/2) ∝ left angle A right angle 0.7-0.8 and τ pe (a) ∝ left angle A right angle 0.8 . (orig.)

  4. Scaling laws for file dissemination in P2P networks with random contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunez-Queija, R.; Prabhu, B.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we obtain the scaling law for the mean broadcast time of a file in a P2P network with an initial population of N nodes. In the model, at Poisson rate λ a node initiates a contact with another node chosen uniformly at random. This contact is said to be successful if the contacted node

  5. Scaling laws for file dissemination in P2P networks with random contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Núñez-Queija, R.; Prabhu, B.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we obtain the scaling law for the mean broadcast time of a file in a P2P network with an initial population of N nodes. In the model, at Poisson rate lambda a node initiates a contact with another node chosen uniformly at random. This contact is said to be successful if the contacted

  6. The physics of megajoule, large-scale, and ultrafast short-scale laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in laser science and technology have opened new possibilities for the study of high energy density plasma physics. The advances include techniques to control the laser spatial and temporal coherence, and the development of laser architectures and optical materials that have led to the demonstration of compact, short pulse (τ≤10 -12 sec) high brightness lasers, capable of irradiating plasmas with intensities ≥10 18 W/cm 2 . Experiments with reduced laser coherence have shown a substantial decrease in laser-driven parametric instabilities and have extended the parameter range where inverse bremsstrahlung absorption is the dominant coupling process. Beam smoothing with short wavelength lasers should result in inverse bremsstrahlung dominated coupling in the irradiance parameter regimes of the millimeter scale-length plasmas envisioned for the megajoule class lasers for ignition and gain in inertial fusion. In addition new regimes of laser--plasma coupling will become experimentally accessible when plasmas are irradiated with I≥10 18 W/cm 2 . Relativistic effects, extreme profile modification, and electrons heated to energies exceeding 1 MeV are several of the phenomena that are expected. Numerous applications in basic and applied plasma physics will result from these new capabilities

  7. Multiple time-scale methods in particle simulations of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.I.

    1985-01-01

    This paper surveys recent advances in the application of multiple time-scale methods to particle simulation of collective phenomena in plasmas. These methods dramatically improve the efficiency of simulating low-frequency kinetic behavior by allowing the use of a large timestep, while retaining accuracy. The numerical schemes surveyed provide selective damping of unwanted high-frequency waves and preserve numerical stability in a variety of physics models: electrostatic, magneto-inductive, Darwin and fully electromagnetic. The paper reviews hybrid simulation models, the implicitmoment-equation method, the direct implicit method, orbit averaging, and subcycling

  8. On the scaling of magnetic plasma confinement under classical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1979-04-01

    Present magnetic confinement schemes based on tokamaks and similar devices are characterized by relatively large losses and low beta values. As a consequence, thermonuclear conditions can only be reached in such devices at large linear dimensions or by means of very strong magnetic fields, in combination with large heating powers. This does not rule out the possibility of realizing the same conditions on a smaller scale, i.e. by finding alternative schemes which provide classical and stable confinement of a pure plasma in a closed magnetic bottle. (author)

  9. Testing of Large-Scale ICV Glasses with Hanford LAW Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Matyas, Josef; Smith, Donald E.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Yeager, John D.

    2005-03-01

    Preliminary glass compositions for immobilizing Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) by the in-container vitrification (ICV) process were initially fabricated at crucible- and engineering-scale, including simulants and actual (radioactive) LAW. Glasses were characterized for vapor hydration test (VHT) and product consistency test (PCT) responses and crystallinity (both quenched and slow-cooled samples). Selected glasses were tested for toxicity characteristic leach procedure (TCLP) responses, viscosity, and electrical conductivity. This testing showed that glasses with LAW loading of 20 mass% can be made readily and meet all product constraints by a far margin. Glasses with over 22 mass% Na2O can be made to meet all other product quality and process constraints. Large-scale testing was performed at the AMEC, Geomelt Division facility in Richland. Three tests were conducted using simulated LAW with increasing loadings of 12, 17, and 20 mass% Na2O. Glass samples were taken from the test products in a manner to represent the full expected range of product performance. These samples were characterized for composition, density, crystalline and non-crystalline phase assemblage, and durability using the VHT, PCT, and TCLP tests. The results, presented in this report, show that the AMEC ICV product with meets all waste form requirements with a large margin. These results provide strong evidence that the Hanford LAW can be successfully vitrified by the ICV technology and can meet all the constraints related to product quality. The economic feasibility of the ICV technology can be further enhanced by subsequent optimization.

  10. Titius--Bode law and the possibility of recent large-scale evolution in the solar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neito, M.M.

    1974-01-01

    Although it is by no means clear that the Titius--Bode law of planetary distances is indeed a ''law'' (even though there are enticing indications), it is proposed that if one assumes that the law is a ''law'' and that the planets obey it, then this argues against recent large-scale evolution in the solar system. Put another way: one can believe in the Titius--Bode law or in recent large-scale evolution or in neither of them. But it appears difficult to believe in both of them

  11. Extended power-law scaling of air permeabilities measured on a block of tuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Siena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We use three methods to identify power-law scaling of multi-scale log air permeability data collected by Tidwell and Wilson on the faces of a laboratory-scale block of Topopah Spring tuff: method of moments (M, Extended Self-Similarity (ESS and a generalized version thereof (G-ESS. All three methods focus on q-th-order sample structure functions of absolute increments. Most such functions exhibit power-law scaling at best over a limited midrange of experimental separation scales, or lags, which are sometimes difficult to identify unambiguously by means of M. ESS and G-ESS extend this range in a way that renders power-law scaling easier to characterize. Our analysis confirms the superiority of ESS and G-ESS over M in identifying the scaling exponents, ξ(q, of corresponding structure functions of orders q, suggesting further that ESS is more reliable than G-ESS. The exponents vary in a nonlinear fashion with q as is typical of real or apparent multifractals. Our estimates of the Hurst scaling coefficient increase with support scale, implying a reduction in roughness (anti-persistence of the log permeability field with measurement volume. The finding by Tidwell and Wilson that log permeabilities associated with all tip sizes can be characterized by stationary variogram models, coupled with our findings that log permeability increments associated with the smallest tip size are approximately Gaussian and those associated with all tip sizes scale show nonlinear variations in ξ(q with q, are consistent with a view of these data as a sample from a truncated version (tfBm of self-affine fractional Brownian motion (fBm. Since in theory the scaling exponents, ξ(q, of tfBm vary linearly with q we conclude that nonlinear scaling in our case is not an indication of multifractality but an artifact of sampling from tfBm. This allows us to explain theoretically how power-law scaling of our data, as well

  12. From coastal barriers to mountain belts - commonalities in fundamental geomorphic scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, E.

    2016-12-01

    Overwash is a sediment-transport process essential to the form and resilience of coastal barrier landscapes. Driven by storm events, overwash leaves behind distinctive sedimentary features that, although intensively studied, have lacked unifying quantitative descriptions with which to compare their morphological attributes across documented examples or relate them to other morphodynamic phenomena. Geomorphic scaling laws quantify how measures of shape and size change with respect to another - information that helps to constrain predictions of future change and reconstructions of past environmental conditions. Here, a physical model of erosional and depositional overwash morphology yields intrinsic, allometric scaling laws involving length, width, area, volume, and alongshore spacing. Corroborative comparisons with natural washover morphology indicate scale invariance spanning several orders of magnitude. Several observers of the physical model remarked that the overwashed barrier resembled a dissected linear mountain front with an alluvial apron - an intriguing reimagining of the intended analog. Indeed, that resemblance is reflected quantitatively in these new scaling relationships, which align with canonical scaling laws for terrestrial and marine drainage basins and alluvial fans on Earth and Mars. This finding suggests disparate geomorphic systems that share common allometric properties may be related dynamically, perhaps by an influence more fundamental than characteristic erosion and deposition processes. Such an influence could come from emergent behavior at the intersection of advection and diffusion. Geomorphic behaviors at advection-diffusion transitions (and vice versa), specifically, could be the key to disentangling mechanistic causality from acausality in physical landscape patterns.

  13. Identifying all moiety conservation laws in genome-scale metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Andrea; De Martino, Daniele; Mulet, Roberto; Pagnani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The stoichiometry of a metabolic network gives rise to a set of conservation laws for the aggregate level of specific pools of metabolites, which, on one hand, pose dynamical constraints that cross-link the variations of metabolite concentrations and, on the other, provide key insight into a cell's metabolic production capabilities. When the conserved quantity identifies with a chemical moiety, extracting all such conservation laws from the stoichiometry amounts to finding all non-negative integer solutions of a linear system, a programming problem known to be NP-hard. We present an efficient strategy to compute the complete set of integer conservation laws of a genome-scale stoichiometric matrix, also providing a certificate for correctness and maximality of the solution. Our method is deployed for the analysis of moiety conservation relationships in two large-scale reconstructions of the metabolism of the bacterium E. coli, in six tissue-specific human metabolic networks, and, finally, in the human reactome as a whole, revealing that bacterial metabolism could be evolutionarily designed to cover broader production spectra than human metabolism. Convergence to the full set of moiety conservation laws in each case is achieved in extremely reduced computing times. In addition, we uncover a scaling relation that links the size of the independent pool basis to the number of metabolites, for which we present an analytical explanation.

  14. Identifying all moiety conservation laws in genome-scale metabolic networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea De Martino

    Full Text Available The stoichiometry of a metabolic network gives rise to a set of conservation laws for the aggregate level of specific pools of metabolites, which, on one hand, pose dynamical constraints that cross-link the variations of metabolite concentrations and, on the other, provide key insight into a cell's metabolic production capabilities. When the conserved quantity identifies with a chemical moiety, extracting all such conservation laws from the stoichiometry amounts to finding all non-negative integer solutions of a linear system, a programming problem known to be NP-hard. We present an efficient strategy to compute the complete set of integer conservation laws of a genome-scale stoichiometric matrix, also providing a certificate for correctness and maximality of the solution. Our method is deployed for the analysis of moiety conservation relationships in two large-scale reconstructions of the metabolism of the bacterium E. coli, in six tissue-specific human metabolic networks, and, finally, in the human reactome as a whole, revealing that bacterial metabolism could be evolutionarily designed to cover broader production spectra than human metabolism. Convergence to the full set of moiety conservation laws in each case is achieved in extremely reduced computing times. In addition, we uncover a scaling relation that links the size of the independent pool basis to the number of metabolites, for which we present an analytical explanation.

  15. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  16. Scaling laws and vortex profiles in two-dimensional decaying turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, J P; Chavanis, P H; Dubrulle, B; Sire, C

    2001-06-01

    We use high resolution numerical simulations over several hundred of turnover times to study the influence of small scale dissipation onto vortex statistics in 2D decaying turbulence. A scaling regime is detected when the scaling laws are expressed in units of mean vorticity and integral scale, like predicted in Carnevale et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2735 (1991), and it is observed that viscous effects spoil this scaling regime. The exponent controlling the decay of the number of vortices shows some trends toward xi=1, in agreement with a recent theory based on the Kirchhoff model [C. Sire and P. H. Chavanis, Phys. Rev. E 61, 6644 (2000)]. In terms of scaled variables, the vortices have a similar profile with a functional form related to the Fermi-Dirac distribution.

  17. Wide range scaling laws for radiation driven shock speed, wall albedo and ablation parameters for high-Z materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Gaurav; Ghosh, Karabi; Ray, Aditi; Gupta, N. K.

    2018-06-01

    Radiation hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations for four different potential high-Z hohlraum materials, namely Tungsten (W), Gold (Au), Lead (Pb), and Uranium (U) are performed in order to investigate their performance with respect to x-ray absorption, re-emission and ablation properties, when irradiated by constant temperature drives. A universal functional form is derived for estimating time dependent wall albedo for high-Z materials. Among the high-Z materials studied, it is observed that for a fixed simulation time the albedo is maximum for Au below 250 eV, whereas it is maximum for U above 250 eV. New scaling laws for shock speed vs drive temperature, applicable over a wide temperature range of 100 eV to 500 eV, are proposed based on the physics of x-ray driven stationary ablation. The resulting scaling relation for a reference material Aluminium (Al), shows good agreement with that of Kauffman's power law for temperatures ranging from 100 eV to 275 eV. New scaling relations are also obtained for temperature dependent mass ablation rate and ablation pressure, through RHD simulation. Finally, our study reveals that for temperatures above 250 eV, U serves as a better hohlraum material since it offers maximum re-emission for x-rays along with comparable mass ablation rate. Nevertheless, traditional choice, Au works well for temperatures below 250 eV. Besides inertial confinement fusion (ICF), the new scaling relations may find its application in view-factor codes, which generally ignore atomic physics calculations of opacities and emissivities, details of laser-plasma interaction and hydrodynamic motions.

  18. On correction factor in scaling law for low pressure DC gas breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleb Wataghin, UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil))" data-affiliation=" (Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil))" >Ronchi, G; Gleb Wataghin, UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil))" data-affiliation=" (Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil))" >Machida, M

    2014-01-01

    The low pressure gas breakdown described by Paschen's law in Townsend theory, i.e. the breakdown voltage as a function of gas pressure p and the electrode distance d, provides an accurate description of breakdown in DC discharges when the ratio between inter-electrode gap distance d and electrode radii R tends to zero. On increasing of the ratio d/R, the Paschen's curves are shifted to the region of higher breakdown voltage and higher pd values. A modified Paschen's law recently proposed is well satisfied in our measurements. However, the value of constant b changes not only due to gas type but also according to electrode gap distance; furthermore, gas breakdown voltages are considerably modified by plasma-wall interactions due to glass tube proximity in the discharge.

  19. Fractionaly Integrated Flux model and Scaling Laws in Weather and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertzer, Daniel; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2013-04-01

    The Fractionaly Integrated Flux model (FIF) has been extensively used to model intermittent observables, like the velocity field, by defining them with the help of a fractional integration of a conservative (i.e. strictly scale invariant) flux, such as the turbulent energy flux. It indeed corresponds to a well-defined modelling that yields the observed scaling laws. Generalised Scale Invariance (GSI) enables FIF to deal with anisotropic fractional integrations and has been rather successful to define and model a unique regime of scaling anisotropic turbulence up to planetary scales. This turbulence has an effective dimension of 23/9=2.55... instead of the classical hypothesised 2D and 3D turbulent regimes, respectively for large and small spatial scales. It therefore theoretically eliminates a non plausible "dimension transition" between these two regimes and the resulting requirement of a turbulent energy "mesoscale gap", whose empirical evidence has been brought more and more into question. More recently, GSI-FIF was used to analyse climate, therefore at much larger time scales. Indeed, the 23/9-dimensional regime necessarily breaks up at the outer spatial scales. The corresponding transition range, which can be called "macroweather", seems to have many interesting properties, e.g. it rather corresponds to a fractional differentiation in time with a roughly flat frequency spectrum. Furthermore, this transition yields the possibility to have at much larger time scales scaling space-time climate fluctuations with a much stronger scaling anisotropy between time and space. Lovejoy, S. and D. Schertzer (2013). The Weather and Climate: Emergent Laws and Multifractal Cascades. Cambridge Press (in press). Schertzer, D. et al. (1997). Fractals 5(3): 427-471. Schertzer, D. and S. Lovejoy (2011). International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos 21(12): 3417-3456.

  20. The cooling law and the search for a good temperature scale, from Newton to Dalton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besson, Ugo, E-mail: ugo.besson@unipv.it [Department of Physics ' A Volta' , University of Pavia, Via A Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    The research on the cooling law began with an article by Newton published in 1701. Later, many studies were performed by other scientists confirming or confuting Newton's law. This paper presents a description and an interpretation of Newton's article, provides a short overview of the research conducted on the topic during the 18th century, and discusses the relationships between the research on cooling laws and the definition of a temperature scale, as it was treated in Newton's article and in the work of Dalton, including Dalton's search for the absolute zero of temperature. It is shown that these scientists considered the exponential cooling law as a fundamental principle rather than a conjecture to be tested by means of experiments. The faith in the simplicity of natural laws and the spontaneous idea of proportionality between cause and effect seem to have strongly influenced Newton and Dalton. The topic is developed in a way that can be suitable for both undergraduate students and general physicists.

  1. The cooling law and the search for a good temperature scale, from Newton to Dalton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, Ugo

    2011-01-01

    The research on the cooling law began with an article by Newton published in 1701. Later, many studies were performed by other scientists confirming or confuting Newton's law. This paper presents a description and an interpretation of Newton's article, provides a short overview of the research conducted on the topic during the 18th century, and discusses the relationships between the research on cooling laws and the definition of a temperature scale, as it was treated in Newton's article and in the work of Dalton, including Dalton's search for the absolute zero of temperature. It is shown that these scientists considered the exponential cooling law as a fundamental principle rather than a conjecture to be tested by means of experiments. The faith in the simplicity of natural laws and the spontaneous idea of proportionality between cause and effect seem to have strongly influenced Newton and Dalton. The topic is developed in a way that can be suitable for both undergraduate students and general physicists.

  2. Scaling laws for free piston Stirling engine design: Benefits and challenges of miniaturization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formosa, Fabien; Fréchette, Luc G.

    2013-01-01

    This work explores the scaling effects for FPSE (free piston Stirling engines), which are known for their simple architecture and potentially high thermodynamic performances. Scaling laws are given and their potential for miniaturization is highlighted. A simple model which allows the design of the geometrical parameters of the heat exchangers, the regenerator and the masses of the pistons is proposed. It is based on the definition of six characteristic dimensionless groups. They are derived from the physics underlying the behavior of the free piston Stirling machine and their relevancy is backed up by comparisons between documented Stirling engines from the literature. Keeping constant values for each group throughout the scaling range theoretically ensures constant performance. The main losses of Stirling engine (heat conduction loss, reheat loss in the regenerator, pressure drop and gas-spring hysteresis) can be expressed as a function of the geometrical and operating parameters. Additionally, the consequences of leakage due to the manufacturing precision of pistons architectures are underlined. From the proposed scaling laws, potential power and efficiency of Stirling cycle engines at a millimeter scale can be anticipated. It appears that the power density increases with miniaturization. It is also shown that the dynamic masses related to the engine size are increased when scaling down and that the gap leakage presents the highest detrimental effects on the efficiency. These results call for dedicated architectures for micro-engines. - Highlights: • Similitude strategy is applied to Stirling engines and allows preliminary design. • New scaling laws are derived. • The power density can be increased with miniaturization. • The gap between the piston and casing is highly detrimental to the performances. • High engine operating pressure is required when miniaturizing

  3. Scale-free crystallization of two-dimensional complex plasmas: Domain analysis using Minkowski tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böbel, A.; Knapek, C. A.; Räth, C.

    2018-05-01

    Experiments of the recrystallization processes in two-dimensional complex plasmas are analyzed to rigorously test a recently developed scale-free phase transition theory. The "fractal-domain-structure" (FDS) theory is based on the kinetic theory of Frenkel. It assumes the formation of homogeneous domains, separated by defect lines, during crystallization and a fractal relationship between domain area and boundary length. For the defect number fraction and system energy a scale-free power-law relation is predicted. The long-range scaling behavior of the bond-order correlation function shows clearly that the complex plasma phase transitions are not of the Kosterlitz, Thouless, Halperin, Nelson, and Young type. Previous preliminary results obtained by counting the number of dislocations and applying a bond-order metric for structural analysis are reproduced. These findings are supplemented by extending the use of the bond-order metric to measure the defect number fraction and furthermore applying state-of-the-art analysis methods, allowing a systematic testing of the FDS theory with unprecedented scrutiny: A morphological analysis of lattice structure is performed via Minkowski tensor methods. Minkowski tensors form a complete family of additive, motion covariant and continuous morphological measures that are sensitive to nonlinear properties. The FDS theory is rigorously confirmed and predictions of the theory are reproduced extremely well. The predicted scale-free power-law relation between defect fraction number and system energy is verified for one more order of magnitude at high energies compared to the inherently discontinuous bond-order metric. It is found that the fractal relation between crystalline domain area and circumference is independent of the experiment, the particular Minkowski tensor method, and the particular choice of parameters. Thus, the fractal relationship seems to be inherent to two-dimensional phase transitions in complex plasmas. Minkowski

  4. Buoyancy limits on magnetic viscosity stress-law scalings in quasi stellar object accretion disk models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakimoto, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSOs) are apparently the excessively bright nuclei of distant galaxies. They are thought to be powered by accretion disks surrounding supermassive black holes: however, proof of this presumption is hampered by major uncertainties in the viscous stress necessary for accretion to occur. Models generally assume an and hoc stress law which scales the stress with the total pressure. Near the black hole, radiation pressure dominates gas pressure; scaling the stress with the radiation pressure results in disk models that are thermally unstable and optically thin. This dissertation shows that a radiation pressure scaling for the stress is not possible if the viscosity is due to turbulent magnetic Maxwell stresses. The argument is one of internal self-consistency. First, four model accretion disks that bound the reasonably expected ranges of viscous stress scalings and vertical structures are constructed. Magnetic flux tubes of various initial field strengths are then placed within these models, nd their buoyancy is modeled numerically. In disks using the radiation pressure stress law scaling, low opacities allow rapid heat flow into the flux tubes: the tubes are extremely buoyant, and magnetic fields strong enough to provide the required stress cannot be retained. If an alternative gas pressure scaling for the stress is assumed, then the disks are optically thick; flux tubes have corresponding lower buoyancy, and magnetic fields strong enough to provide the stress can be retained for dynamically significant time periods

  5. Volume-law scaling for the entanglement entropy in spin-1/2 chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitagliano, G; Riera, A; Latorre, J I

    2010-01-01

    Entanglement entropy obeys area law scaling for typical physical quantum systems. This may naively be argued to follow from the locality of interactions. We show that this is not the case by constructing an explicit simple spin chain Hamiltonian with nearest-neighbor interactions that presents an entanglement volume scaling law. This non-translational model is contrived to have couplings that force the accumulation of singlet bonds across the half-chain. This configuration of the couplings is suggested by real-space renormalization group arguments. Computation of the entanglement entropy is performed by mapping the system to free fermions and diagonalizing numerically its correlation matrix. An analytical relationship between the entanglement entropy and the Frobenius norm of the correlation matrix is also established. Our result is complementary to the known relationship between non-translational invariant, nearest-neighbor interacting Hamiltonians and quantum Merlin-Arthur (QMA)-complete problems.

  6. Mechanism and scaling for convection of isolated structures in nonuniformly magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.; Naulin, V.

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale radial advection of isolated structures in nonuniformly magnetized plasmas is investigated. The underlying mechanism considered is due to the nonlinear evolution of interchange motions, without any presumption of plasma sheaths. Theoretical arguments supported by numerical simulations...

  7. The l-mixing cross section of Rydberg states of atomic Rb and the scaling LAW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hong; Chen Aiqiu; Li Baiwen

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of impulse approximate method, a kind of analytical wavefunctions based on a potential model was used to calculate the l mixing cross section of thermal collision of Rydberg states of atomic Rb with rare gas (He, Ne). The results were compared with the experimental results and other theoretical values. These results show that there exists a kind of scaling law for the l mixing cross section of Rydberg alkali atoms

  8. SCALING LAWS AND TEMPERATURE PROFILES FOR SOLAR AND STELLAR CORONAL LOOPS WITH NON-UNIFORM HEATING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, P. C. H.

    2010-01-01

    The bulk of solar coronal radiative loss consists of soft X-ray emission from quasi-static loops at the cores of active regions. In order to develop diagnostics for determining the heating mechanism of these loops from observations by coronal imaging instruments, I have developed analytical solutions for the temperature structure and scaling laws of loop strands for a set of temperature- and pressure-dependent heating functions that encompass heating concentrated at the footpoints, uniform heating, and heating concentrated at the loop apex. Key results are that the temperature profile depends only weakly on the heating distribution-not sufficiently to be of significant diagnostic value-and that the scaling laws survive for this wide range of heating distributions, but with the constant of proportionality in the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana scaling law (P 0 L ∼ T 3 max ) depending on the specific heating function. Furthermore, quasi-static solutions do not exist for an excessive concentration of heating near the loop footpoints, a result in agreement with recent numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that a generalization of the results to a set of solutions for strands with a functionally prescribed variable diameter leads to only relatively small correction factors in the scaling laws and temperature profiles for constant diameter loop strands. A quintet of leading theoretical coronal heating mechanisms is shown to be captured by the formalism of this paper, and the differences in thermal structure between them may be verified through observations. Preliminary results from full numerical simulations demonstrate that, despite the simplifying assumptions, the analytical solutions from this paper are accurate and stable.

  9. Tornado outbreak variability follows Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling and increases dramatically with severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippett, Michael K.; Cohen, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    Tornadoes cause loss of life and damage to property each year in the United States and around the world. The largest impacts come from ‘outbreaks' consisting of multiple tornadoes closely spaced in time. Here we find an upward trend in the annual mean number of tornadoes per US tornado outbreak for the period 1954–2014. Moreover, the variance of this quantity is increasing more than four times as fast as the mean. The mean and variance of the number of tornadoes per outbreak vary according to Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling (TL), with parameters that are consistent with multiplicative growth. Tornado-related atmospheric proxies show similar power-law scaling and multiplicative growth. Path-length-integrated tornado outbreak intensity also follows TL, but with parameters consistent with sampling variability. The observed TL power-law scaling of outbreak severity means that extreme outbreaks are more frequent than would be expected if mean and variance were independent or linearly related. PMID:26923210

  10. A simple model for determining photoelectron-generated radiation scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dipp, T.M.

    1993-12-01

    The generation of radiation via photoelectrons induced off of a conducting surface was explored using a simple model to determine fundamental scaling laws. The model is one-dimensional (small-spot) and uses monoenergetic, nonrelativistic photoelectrons emitted normal to the illuminated conducting surface. Simple steady-state radiation, frequency, and maximum orbital distance equations were derived using small-spot radiation equations, a sin 2 type modulation function, and simple photoelectron dynamics. The result is a system of equations for various scaling laws, which, along with model and user constraints, are simultaneously solved using techniques similar to linear programming. Typical conductors illuminated by low-power sources producing photons with energies less than 5.0 eV are readily modeled by this small-spot, steady-state analysis, which shows they generally produce low efficiency (η rsL -10.5 ) pure photoelectron-induced radiation. However, the small-spot theory predicts that the total conversion efficiency for incident photon power to photoelectron-induced radiated power can go higher than 10 -5.5 for typical real conductors if photons having energies of 15 eV and higher are used, and should go even higher still if the small-spot limit of this theory is exceeded as well. Overall, the simple theory equations, model constraint equations, and solution techniques presented provide a foundation for understanding, predicting, and optimizing the generated radiation, and the simple theory equations provide scaling laws to compare with computational and laboratory experimental data

  11. Probabilistic finite-size transport models for fusion: Anomalous transport and scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligen, B.Ph. van; Sanchez, R.; Carreras, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Transport in fusion plasmas in the low confinement mode is characterized by several remarkable properties: the anomalous scaling of transport with system size, stiff (or 'canonical') profiles, power degradation, and rapid transport phenomena. The present article explores the possibilities of constructing a unified transport model, based on the continuous-time random walk, in which all these phenomena are handled adequately. The resulting formalism appears to be sufficiently general to provide a sound starting point for the development of a full-blown plasma transport code, capable of incorporating the relevant microscopic transport mechanisms, and allowing predictions of confinement properties

  12. Network-state modulation of power-law frequency-scaling in visual cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Boustani, Sami; Marre, Olivier; Béhuret, Sébastien; Baudot, Pierre; Yger, Pierre; Bal, Thierry; Destexhe, Alain; Frégnac, Yves

    2009-09-01

    Various types of neural-based signals, such as EEG, local field potentials and intracellular synaptic potentials, integrate multiple sources of activity distributed across large assemblies. They have in common a power-law frequency-scaling structure at high frequencies, but it is still unclear whether this scaling property is dominated by intrinsic neuronal properties or by network activity. The latter case is particularly interesting because if frequency-scaling reflects the network state it could be used to characterize the functional impact of the connectivity. In intracellularly recorded neurons of cat primary visual cortex in vivo, the power spectral density of V(m) activity displays a power-law structure at high frequencies with a fractional scaling exponent. We show that this exponent is not constant, but depends on the visual statistics used to drive the network. To investigate the determinants of this frequency-scaling, we considered a generic recurrent model of cortex receiving a retinotopically organized external input. Similarly to the in vivo case, our in computo simulations show that the scaling exponent reflects the correlation level imposed in the input. This systematic dependence was also replicated at the single cell level, by controlling independently, in a parametric way, the strength and the temporal decay of the pairwise correlation between presynaptic inputs. This last model was implemented in vitro by imposing the correlation control in artificial presynaptic spike trains through dynamic-clamp techniques. These in vitro manipulations induced a modulation of the scaling exponent, similar to that observed in vivo and predicted in computo. We conclude that the frequency-scaling exponent of the V(m) reflects stimulus-driven correlations in the cortical network activity. Therefore, we propose that the scaling exponent could be used to read-out the "effective" connectivity responsible for the dynamical signature of the population signals measured

  13. Network-state modulation of power-law frequency-scaling in visual cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami El Boustani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Various types of neural-based signals, such as EEG, local field potentials and intracellular synaptic potentials, integrate multiple sources of activity distributed across large assemblies. They have in common a power-law frequency-scaling structure at high frequencies, but it is still unclear whether this scaling property is dominated by intrinsic neuronal properties or by network activity. The latter case is particularly interesting because if frequency-scaling reflects the network state it could be used to characterize the functional impact of the connectivity. In intracellularly recorded neurons of cat primary visual cortex in vivo, the power spectral density of V(m activity displays a power-law structure at high frequencies with a fractional scaling exponent. We show that this exponent is not constant, but depends on the visual statistics used to drive the network. To investigate the determinants of this frequency-scaling, we considered a generic recurrent model of cortex receiving a retinotopically organized external input. Similarly to the in vivo case, our in computo simulations show that the scaling exponent reflects the correlation level imposed in the input. This systematic dependence was also replicated at the single cell level, by controlling independently, in a parametric way, the strength and the temporal decay of the pairwise correlation between presynaptic inputs. This last model was implemented in vitro by imposing the correlation control in artificial presynaptic spike trains through dynamic-clamp techniques. These in vitro manipulations induced a modulation of the scaling exponent, similar to that observed in vivo and predicted in computo. We conclude that the frequency-scaling exponent of the V(m reflects stimulus-driven correlations in the cortical network activity. Therefore, we propose that the scaling exponent could be used to read-out the "effective" connectivity responsible for the dynamical signature of the population

  14. Model of the Dynamic Construction Process of Texts and Scaling Laws of Words Organization in Language Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Lin, Ruokuang; Bian, Chunhua; Ma, Qianli D Y; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2016-01-01

    Scaling laws characterize diverse complex systems in a broad range of fields, including physics, biology, finance, and social science. The human language is another example of a complex system of words organization. Studies on written texts have shown that scaling laws characterize the occurrence frequency of words, words rank, and the growth of distinct words with increasing text length. However, these studies have mainly concentrated on the western linguistic systems, and the laws that govern the lexical organization, structure and dynamics of the Chinese language remain not well understood. Here we study a database of Chinese and English language books. We report that three distinct scaling laws characterize words organization in the Chinese language. We find that these scaling laws have different exponents and crossover behaviors compared to English texts, indicating different words organization and dynamics of words in the process of text growth. We propose a stochastic feedback model of words organization and text growth, which successfully accounts for the empirically observed scaling laws with their corresponding scaling exponents and characteristic crossover regimes. Further, by varying key model parameters, we reproduce differences in the organization and scaling laws of words between the Chinese and English language. We also identify functional relationships between model parameters and the empirically observed scaling exponents, thus providing new insights into the words organization and growth dynamics in the Chinese and English language.

  15. Model of the Dynamic Construction Process of Texts and Scaling Laws of Words Organization in Language Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Li

    Full Text Available Scaling laws characterize diverse complex systems in a broad range of fields, including physics, biology, finance, and social science. The human language is another example of a complex system of words organization. Studies on written texts have shown that scaling laws characterize the occurrence frequency of words, words rank, and the growth of distinct words with increasing text length. However, these studies have mainly concentrated on the western linguistic systems, and the laws that govern the lexical organization, structure and dynamics of the Chinese language remain not well understood. Here we study a database of Chinese and English language books. We report that three distinct scaling laws characterize words organization in the Chinese language. We find that these scaling laws have different exponents and crossover behaviors compared to English texts, indicating different words organization and dynamics of words in the process of text growth. We propose a stochastic feedback model of words organization and text growth, which successfully accounts for the empirically observed scaling laws with their corresponding scaling exponents and characteristic crossover regimes. Further, by varying key model parameters, we reproduce differences in the organization and scaling laws of words between the Chinese and English language. We also identify functional relationships between model parameters and the empirically observed scaling exponents, thus providing new insights into the words organization and growth dynamics in the Chinese and English language.

  16. On the Scaling Law for Broadband Shock Noise Intensity in Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanudula, Max

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model for the scaling of broadband shock noise intensity in supersonic jets was formulated on the basis of linear shock-shear wave interaction. An hypothesis has been postulated that the peak angle of incidence (closer to the critical angle) for the shear wave primarily governs the generation of sound in the interaction process rather than the noise generation contribution from off-peak incident angles. The proposed theory satisfactorily explains the well-known scaling law for the broadband shock -associated noise in supersonic jets.

  17. Truncation of power law behavior in 'scale-free' network models due to information filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossa, Stefano; Barthelemy, Marc; Eugene Stanley, H.; Nunes Amaral, Luis A.

    2002-01-01

    We formulate a general model for the growth of scale-free networks under filtering information conditions--that is, when the nodes can process information about only a subset of the existing nodes in the network. We find that the distribution of the number of incoming links to a node follows a universal scaling form, i.e., that it decays as a power law with an exponential truncation controlled not only by the system size but also by a feature not previously considered, the subset of the network 'accessible' to the node. We test our model with empirical data for the World Wide Web and find agreement

  18. Theory and evidence for using the economy-of-scale law in power plant economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phung, D.L.

    1987-05-01

    This report compiles theory and evidence for the use of the economy-of-scale law in energy economics, particularly in the estimation of capital costs for coal-fired and nuclear power plants. The economy-of-scale law is widely used in its simplest form: cost is directly proportional to capacity raised to an exponent. An additive constant is an important component that is not generally taken into account. Also, the economy of scale is perforce valid only over a limited size range. The majority of engineering studies have estimated an economy of scale exponent of 0.7 to 0.9 for coal-fired plants and an exponent of 0.4 to 0.6 for nuclear plants in the capacity ranges of 400 to 1000 MWe. However, the majority of econometric analyses found little or no economy of scale for coal-fired plants and only a slight economy of scale for nuclear plants. This disparity is explained by the fact that economists have included regulatory and time-related costs in addition to the direct and indirect costs used by the engineers. Regulatory and time-related costs have become an increasingly larger portion of total costs during the last decade. In addition, these costs appeared to have either a very small economy of scale or to be increasing as the size of the power plant increased. We conclude that gains in economy of scale can only be made by reducing regulatory and time-related costs through design standardization and regulatory stability, in combination with more favorable economic conditions. 59 refs

  19. The star-formation law at GMC scales in M33, the Triangulum Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas G.; Gear, Walter K.; Smith, Matthew W. L.

    2018-06-01

    We present a high spatial resolution study, on scales of ˜100pc, of the relationship between star-formation rate (SFR) and gas content within Local Group galaxy M33. Combining deep SCUBA-2 observations with archival GALEX, SDSS, WISE, Spitzer and submillimetre Herschel data, we are able to model the entire SED from UV to sub-mm wavelengths. We calculate the SFR on a pixel-by-pixel basis using the total infrared luminosity, and find a total SFR of 0.17 ± 0.06 {M}_⊙/yr, somewhat lower than our other two measures of SFR - combined FUV and 24μ SFR (0.25^{+0.10}_{-0.07} {M}_⊙/yr) and SED-fitting tool MAGPHYS (0.33^{+0.05}_{-0.06} {M}_⊙/yr). We trace the total gas using a combination of the 21cm HI line for atomic hydrogen, and CO(J=2-1) data for molecular hydrogen. We have also traced the total gas using dust masses. We study the star-formation law in terms of molecular gas, total gas, and gas from dust. We perform an analysis of the star-formation law on a variety of pixel scales, from 25" to 500" (100pc to 2kpc). At kpc scales, we find that a linear Schmidt-type power law index is suitable for molecular gas, but the index appears to be much higher with total gas, and gas from dust. Whilst we find a strong scale dependence on the Schmidt index, the gas depletion timescale is invariant with pixel scale.

  20. Scaling law of diffusivity generated by a noisy telegraph signal with fractal intermittency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradisi, Paolo; Allegrini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In many complex systems the non-linear cooperative dynamics determine the emergence of self-organized, metastable, structures that are associated with a birth–death process of cooperation. This is found to be described by a renewal point process, i.e., a sequence of crucial birth–death events corresponding to transitions among states that are faster than the typical long-life time of the metastable states. Metastable states are highly correlated, but the occurrence of crucial events is typically associated with a fast memory drop, which is the reason for the renewal condition. Consequently, these complex systems display a power-law decay and, thus, a long-range or scale-free behavior, in both time correlations and distribution of inter-event times, i.e., fractal intermittency. The emergence of fractal intermittency is then a signature of complexity. However, the scaling features of complex systems are, in general, affected by the presence of added white or short-term noise. This has been found also for fractal intermittency. In this work, after a brief review on metastability and noise in complex systems, we discuss the emerging paradigm of Temporal Complexity. Then, we propose a model of noisy fractal intermittency, where noise is interpreted as a renewal Poisson process with event rate r_p. We show that the presence of Poisson noise causes the emergence of a normal diffusion scaling in the long-time range of diffusion generated by a telegraph signal driven by noisy fractal intermittency. We analytically derive the scaling law of the long-time normal diffusivity coefficient. We find the surprising result that this long-time normal diffusivity depends not only on the Poisson event rate, but also on the parameters of the complex component of the signal: the power exponent μ of the inter-event time distribution, denoted as complexity index, and the time scale T needed to reach the asymptotic power-law behavior marking the emergence of complexity. In particular

  1. Fully determined scaling laws for volumetrically heated convective systems, a tool for assessing habitability of exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilella, Kenny; Kaminski, Edouard

    2017-05-01

    The long-term habitability of a planet rises from its ability to generate and maintain an atmosphere through partial melting and volcanism. This question has been mainly addressed in the framework of plate tectonics, which may be too specific to apply to the wide range of internal dynamics expected for exoplanets, and even to the thermal evolution of the early Earth. Here we propose a more general theoretical approach of convection to build a regime diagram giving the conditions for partial melting to occur, in planetary bodies, as a function of key parameters that can be estimated for exoplanets, their size and internal heating rate. To that aim, we introduce a refined view of the Thermal Boundary Layer (TBL) in a convective system heated from within, that focuses on the temperature and thickness of the TBL at the top of the hottest temperature profiles, along which partial melting shall first occur. This ;Hottest Thermal Boundary Layer; (HotTBL) is first characterized using fully theoretical scaling laws based on the dynamics of thermal boundary layers. These laws are the first ones proposed in the literature that do not rely on empirical determinations of dimensionless constants and that apply to both low Rayleigh and high Rayleigh convective regimes. We show that the scaling laws can be successfully applied to planetary bodies by comparing their predictions to full numerical simulations of the Moon. We then use the scaling laws to build a regime diagram for exoplanets. Combined with estimates of internal heating in exoplanets, the regime diagram predicts that in the habitable zone partial melting occurs in planets younger than the Earth.

  2. Contact area of rough spheres: Large scale simulations and simple scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastewka, Lars; Robbins, Mark O.

    2016-05-01

    We use molecular simulations to study the nonadhesive and adhesive atomic-scale contact of rough spheres with radii ranging from nanometers to micrometers over more than ten orders of magnitude in applied normal load. At the lowest loads, the interfacial mechanics is governed by the contact mechanics of the first asperity that touches. The dependence of contact area on normal force becomes linear at intermediate loads and crosses over to Hertzian at the largest loads. By combining theories for the limiting cases of nominally flat rough surfaces and smooth spheres, we provide parameter-free analytical expressions for contact area over the whole range of loads. Our results establish a range of validity for common approximations that neglect curvature or roughness in modeling objects on scales from atomic force microscope tips to ball bearings.

  3. Contact area of rough spheres: Large scale simulations and simple scaling laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastewka, Lars, E-mail: lars.pastewka@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials & MicroTribology Center muTC, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Engelbert-Arnold-Straße 4, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Robbins, Mark O., E-mail: mr@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2016-05-30

    We use molecular simulations to study the nonadhesive and adhesive atomic-scale contact of rough spheres with radii ranging from nanometers to micrometers over more than ten orders of magnitude in applied normal load. At the lowest loads, the interfacial mechanics is governed by the contact mechanics of the first asperity that touches. The dependence of contact area on normal force becomes linear at intermediate loads and crosses over to Hertzian at the largest loads. By combining theories for the limiting cases of nominally flat rough surfaces and smooth spheres, we provide parameter-free analytical expressions for contact area over the whole range of loads. Our results establish a range of validity for common approximations that neglect curvature or roughness in modeling objects on scales from atomic force microscope tips to ball bearings.

  4. EMAPS: An Efficient Multiscale Approach to Plasma Systems with Non-MHD Scale Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omelchenko, Yuri A. [Trinum Research, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-08-08

    we have developed a novel Event-driven Multiscale Asynchronous Parallel Simulation (EMAPS) technology that replaces time stepping with self-adaptive update events. Local calculations are carried out only on an “as needed basis”. EMAPS (i) guarantees accurate and stable processing of physical variables in time accurate simulations, and (ii) eliminates unnecessary computation. Applying EMAPS to the hybrid model has resulted in the development of a unique parallel code, dimension-independent (compile-time-configurable) HYPERS (Hybrid Parallel Event-Resolved Simulator) that scales to hundreds of thousands of parallel processors. HYPERS advances electromagnetic fields and particles asynchronously on time scales determined by local physical laws and mesh properties. To achieve high computational accuracy in complex device geometries, HYPERS employs high-fidelity Cartesian grids with masked conductive cells. The HYPERS model includes multiple ion species, energy and momentum conserving ion-ion collisions, and provides a number of approximations for plasma resistivity and vacuum regions. Both local and periodic boundary conditions are allowed. The HYPERS solver preserves zero divergence of magnetic field. The project has demonstrated HYPERS capabilities on a number of applications of interest to fusion and astrophysical plasma physics applications listed below. 1. Theta-pinch formation of FRCs The formation, spontaneous spin-up, and stability of theta-pinch formed field-reversed configurations have been studied self-consistently in 3D. The end-to-end hybrid simulations reveal poloidal profiles of implosion-driven fast toroidal plasma rotation and demonstrate three discharge regimes as a function of experimental parameters: the decaying stable configuration, the tilt unstable configuration, and the nonlinear evolution of a fast growing tearing mode. 2. FRC collisions with magnetic mirrors Interactions of fast plasma streams and objects with magnetic obstacles (dipoles

  5. Dissipation of Alfven Waves at Fluid Scale through Parametric Decay Instabilities in Low-beta Turbulent Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Li, H.; Guo, F.; Li, X.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2017-12-01

    The solar wind is a turbulent magnetized plasma extending from the upper atmosphere of the sun to the edge of the heliosphere. It carries charged particles and magnetic fields originated from the Sun, which have great impact on the geomagnetic environment and human activities in space. In such a magnetized plasma, Alfven waves play a crucial role in carrying energy from the surface of the Sun, injecting into the solar wind and establishing power-law spectra through turbulent energy cascades. On the other hand, in compressible plasmas large amplitude Alfven waves are subject to a parametric decay instability (PDI) which converts an Alfven wave to another counter-propagating Alfven wave and an ion acoustic wave (slow mode). The counter-propagating Alfven wave provides an important ingredient for turbulent cascade, and the slow-mode wave provides a channel for solar wind heating in a spatial scale much larger than ion kinetic scales. Growth and saturation of PDI in quiet plasma have been intensively studied using linear theory and nonlinear simulations in the past. Here using 3D hybrid simulations, we show that PDI is still effective in turbulent low-beta plasmas, generating slow modes and causing ion heating. Selected events in WIND data are analyzed to identify slow modes in the solar wind and the role of PDI, and compared with our simulation results. We also investigate the validity of linear Vlasov theory regarding PDI growth and slow mode damping in turbulent plasmas. Since PDI favors low plasma beta, we expect to see more evidence of PDI in the solar wind close to the Sun, especially from the upcoming NASA's Parker Solar Probe mission which will provide unprecedented wave and plasma data as close as 8.5 solar radii from the Sun.

  6. BPS ZN string tensions, sine law and Casimir scaling, and integrable field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneipp, Marco A. C.

    2007-01-01

    We consider a Yang-Mills-Higgs theory with spontaneous symmetry breaking of the gauge group G→U(1) r →C G , with C G being the center of G. We study two vacua solutions of the theory which produce this symmetry breaking. We show that for one of these vacua, the theory in the Coulomb phase has the mass spectrum of particles and monopoles which is exactly the same as the mass spectrum of particles and solitons of two-dimensional affine Toda field theory, for suitable coupling constants. That result holds also for N=4 super Yang-Mills theories. On the other hand, in the Higgs phase, we show that for each of the two vacua the ratio of the tensions of the BPS Z N strings satisfy either the Casimir scaling or the sine law scaling for G=SU(N). These results are extended to other gauge groups: for the Casimir scaling, the ratios of the tensions are equal to the ratios of the quadratic Casimir constant of specific representations; for the sine law scaling, the tensions are proportional to the components of the left Perron-Frobenius eigenvector of Cartan matrix K ij and the ratios of tensions are equal to the ratios of the soliton masses of affine Toda field theories

  7. Does environmental policy affect scaling laws between population and pollution? Evidence from American metropolitan areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Nicholas Z; Jha, Akshaya

    2017-01-01

    Modern cities are engines of production, innovation, and growth. However, urbanization also increases both local and global pollution from household consumption and firms' production. Do emissions change proportionately to city size or does pollution tend to outpace or lag urbanization? Do emissions scale differently with population versus economic growth or are emissions, population, and economic growth inextricably linked? How are the scaling relationships between emissions, population, and economic growth affected by environmental regulation? This paper examines the link between urbanization, economic growth and pollution using data from Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) in the United States between 1999 and 2011. We find that the emissions of local air pollution in these MSAs scale according to a ¾ power law with both population size and gross domestic product (GDP). However, the monetary damages from these local emissions scale linearly with both population and GDP. Counties that have previously been out of attainment with the local air quality standards set by the Clean Air Act show an entirely different relationship: local emissions scale according to the square root of population, while the monetary damages from local air pollution follow a 2/3rds power law with population. Counties out of attainment are subject to more stringent emission controls; we argue based on this that enforcement of the Clean Air Act induces sublinear scaling between emissions, damages, and city size. In contrast, we find that metropolitan GDP scales super-linearly with population in all MSAs regardless of attainment status. Summarizing, our findings suggest that environmental policy limits the adverse effects of urbanization without interfering with the productivity benefits that manifest in cities.

  8. Estimation of neutral-beam-induced field reversal in MFTF by an approximate scaling law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Scaling rules are derived for field-reversed plasmas whose dimensions are common multiples of the ion gyroradius in the vacuum field. These rules are then applied to the tandem MFTF configuration, and it is shown that field reversal appears to be possible for neutral beam currents of the order of 150 amperes, provided that the electron temperature is at least 500 eV

  9. Passive Plasma Contact Mechanisms for Small-Scale Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTernan, Jesse K.

    Small-scale spacecraft represent a paradigm shift in how entities such as academia, industry, engineering firms, and the scientific community operate in space. However, although the paradigm shift produces unique opportunities to build satellites in unique ways for novel missions, there are also significant challenges that must be addressed. This research addresses two of the challenges associated with small-scale spacecraft: 1) the miniaturization of spacecraft and associated instrumentation and 2) the need to transport charge across the spacecraft-environment boundary. As spacecraft decrease in size, constraints on the size, weight, and power of on-board instrumentation increase--potentially limiting the instrument's functionality or ability to integrate with the spacecraft. These constraints drive research into mechanisms or techniques that use little or no power and efficiently utilize existing resources. One limited resource on small-scale spacecraft is outer surface area, which is often covered with solar panels to meet tight power budgets. This same surface area could also be needed for passive neutralization of spacecraft charging. This research explores the use of a transparent, conductive layer on the solar cell coverglass that is electrically connected to spacecraft ground potential. This dual-purpose material facilitates the use of outer surfaces for both energy harvesting of solar photons as well as passive ion collection. Mission capabilities such as in-situ plasma measurements that were previously infeasible on small-scale platforms become feasible with the use of indium tin oxide-coated solar panel coverglass. We developed test facilities that simulate the space environment in low Earth orbit to test the dual-purpose material and the various application of this approach. Particularly, this research is in support of two upcoming missions: OSIRIS-3U, by Penn State's Student Space Programs Lab, and MiTEE, by the University of Michigan. The purpose of

  10. Scaling laws for perturbations in the ocean-atmosphere system following large CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towles, N.; Olson, P.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2015-07-01

    Scaling relationships are found for perturbations to atmosphere and ocean variables from large transient CO2 emissions. Using the Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir (LOSCAR) model (Zeebe et al., 2009; Zeebe, 2012b), we calculate perturbations to atmosphere temperature, total carbon, ocean temperature, total ocean carbon, pH, alkalinity, marine-sediment carbon, and carbon-13 isotope anomalies in the ocean and atmosphere resulting from idealized CO2 emission events. The peak perturbations in the atmosphere and ocean variables are then fit to power law functions of the form of γ DαEβ, where D is the event duration, E is its total carbon emission, and γ is a coefficient. Good power law fits are obtained for most system variables for E up to 50 000 PgC and D up to 100 kyr. Although all of the peak perturbations increase with emission rate E/D, we find no evidence of emission-rate-only scaling, α + β = 0. Instead, our scaling yields α + β ≃ 1 for total ocean and atmosphere carbon and 0 < α + β < 1 for most of the other system variables.

  11. Scaling laws for perturbations in the ocean–atmosphere system following large CO2 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Towles

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scaling relationships are found for perturbations to atmosphere and ocean variables from large transient CO2 emissions. Using the Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir (LOSCAR model (Zeebe et al., 2009; Zeebe, 2012b, we calculate perturbations to atmosphere temperature, total carbon, ocean temperature, total ocean carbon, pH, alkalinity, marine-sediment carbon, and carbon-13 isotope anomalies in the ocean and atmosphere resulting from idealized CO2 emission events. The peak perturbations in the atmosphere and ocean variables are then fit to power law functions of the form of γ DαEβ, where D is the event duration, E is its total carbon emission, and γ is a coefficient. Good power law fits are obtained for most system variables for E up to 50 000 PgC and D up to 100 kyr. Although all of the peak perturbations increase with emission rate E/D, we find no evidence of emission-rate-only scaling, α + β = 0. Instead, our scaling yields α + β ≃ 1 for total ocean and atmosphere carbon and 0 < α + β < 1 for most of the other system variables.

  12. Air-chemistry "turbulence": power-law scaling and statistical regularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-m. Hsu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available With the intent to gain further knowledge on the spectral structures and statistical regularities of surface atmospheric chemistry, the chemical gases (NO, NO2, NOx, CO, SO2, and O3 and aerosol (PM10 measured at 74 air quality monitoring stations over the island of Taiwan are analyzed for the year of 2004 at hourly resolution. They represent a range of surface air quality with a mixed combination of geographic settings, and include urban/rural, coastal/inland, plain/hill, and industrial/agricultural locations. In addition to the well-known semi-diurnal and diurnal oscillations, weekly, and intermediate (20 ~ 30 days peaks are also identified with the continuous wavelet transform (CWT. The spectra indicate power-law scaling regions for the frequencies higher than the diurnal and those lower than the diurnal with the average exponents of −5/3 and −1, respectively. These dual-exponents are corroborated with those with the detrended fluctuation analysis in the corresponding time-lag regions. These exponents are mostly independent of the averages and standard deviations of time series measured at various geographic settings, i.e., the spatial inhomogeneities. In other words, they possess dominant universal structures. After spectral coefficients from the CWT decomposition are grouped according to the spectral bands, and inverted separately, the PDFs of the reconstructed time series for the high-frequency band demonstrate the interesting statistical regularity, −3 power-law scaling for the heavy tails, consistently. Such spectral peaks, dual-exponent structures, and power-law scaling in heavy tails are important structural information, but their relations to turbulence and mesoscale variability require further investigations. This could lead to a better understanding of the processes controlling air quality.

  13. Temperature and heat flux scaling laws for isoviscous, infinite Prandtl number mixed heating convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilella, Kenny; Deschamps, Frederic

    2018-04-01

    Thermal evolution of terrestrial planets is controlled by heat transfer through their silicate mantles. A suitable framework for modelling this heat transport is a system including bottom heating (from the core) and internal heating, e.g., generated by secular cooling or by the decay of radioactive isotopes. The mechanism of heat transfer depends on the physical properties of the system. In systems where convection is able to operate, two different regimes are possible depending on the relative amount of bottom and internal heating. For moderate internal heating rates, the system is composed of active hot upwellings and cold downwellings. For large internal heating rates, the bottom heat flux becomes negative and the system is only composed of active cold downwellings. Here, we build theoretical scaling laws for both convective regimes following the approach of Vilella & Kaminski (2017), which links the surface heat flux and the temperature jump across both the top and bottom thermal boundary layer (TBL) to the Rayleigh number and the dimensionless internal heating rate. Theoretical predictions are then verified against numerical simulations performed in 2D and 3D-Cartesian geometry, and covering a large range of the parameter space. Our theoretical scaling laws are more successful in predicting the thermal structure of systems with large internal heating rates than that of systems with no or moderate internal heating. The differences between moderate and large internal heating rates are interpreted as differences in the mechanisms generating thermal instabilities. We identified three mechanisms: conductive growth of the TBL, instability impacting, and TBL erosion, the last two being present only for moderate internal heating rates, in which hot plumes are generated at the bottom of the system and are able to reach the surface. Finally, we apply our scaling laws to the evolution of the early Earth, proposing a new model for the cooling of the primordial magma ocean

  14. Parametric scaling studies of energy-confinement time for neutral-beam-heated Heliotron-E plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, F.; Takeiri, Y.; Hanatani, K.

    1989-02-01

    Kinetic analysis of the global energy confinement time for neutral-beam-heated Heliotron-E plasmas has been performed with the 1-D, time-independent transport analysis code, PROCTR-Mod. Beam-power scans were performed by firing various number of hydrogen neutral beams, while density scans were performed by puffing gas and/or pellet fueling under the metallic or carbonized wall conditions. The wall carbonization facilitated the density increase due to the enhanced particle recycling on the walls, and also enabled long-pulse, quasi-stationary, currentless ECH + NBI operation with reduced heavy-impurity contamination. The data analysis shows that the favorable density dependence partially offsets the unfavorable power dependence, and that the anomalous electron transport loss becomes dominant in the over-all energy balance as the beam power and plasma density are increased. An alternative scaling law is also presented which is to fit τ E G [ms] by an 'offset-linear' law. The latter scaling is found to provide a better fit to the presented data sets in spite of its simple form. The parametric scaling of the local electron thermal diffusivity, χ e , is also discussed on the basis of the kinetic analysis. (J.P.N.)

  15. Scaling laws and higher-order effects in Coulomb excitation of neutron halo nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typel, S.; Baur, G.

    2008-01-01

    Essential properties of halo nuclei can be described in terms of a few low-energy constants. For neutron halo nuclei, analytical results can be found for wave functions and electromagnetic transition matrix elements in simple but well-adapted models. These wave functions can be used to study nuclear reactions; an especially simple and instructive example is Coulomb excitation. A systematic expansion in terms of small parameters can be given. We present scaling laws for excitation amplitudes and cross-sections. The results can be used to analyze experiments like 11 Be Coulomb excitation. They also serve as benchmark tests for more involved reaction theories. (orig.)

  16. Scaling Laws for Unstable Interfaces Driven by Strong Shocks in Cylindrical Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Q.; Graham, M.J.; Graham, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability is an interfacial interface between two fluids of different densities driven by shock waves and plays an important role in the studies of inertial confinement fusion and of supernovas. So far, most of the studies are for RM unstable interfaces driven by weak or intermediate shocks in planar geometry. For experiments conducted at the Nova laser, the unstable material interface is accelerated by very strong shocks. In this Letter, we present scaling laws for the RM unstable interface driven by strong imploding and exploding shocks. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  17. The O(epsilon2) scaling law for dsigma/dt in the Reggeon field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash, J.W.; Grandou, Thierry.

    1979-04-01

    The two loop contributions were calculated within the epsilon-expansion to the Reggeon Field Theory scaling law for dsigma/dt, derived using the renormalization group and a general renormalization point for the Pomeron propagator. This generalizes the O(epsilon) work of Abarbanel, Bartels, Bronzan, and Sidhu. The invariance of the results under certain coupling constant rescalings is demonstrated. Some qualitative comments were made regarding phenomenological applications. Our amplitude in a certain limit approximates the form of the low energy diffractive amplitude advocated by Kane

  18. Conservation laws and radiation in the scale covariant theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beesham, A.

    1988-01-01

    The conservation laws for mass, energy, and momentum are derived in the scale covariant theory of gravitation. The entropy problem which exists in the standard Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker models can be solved in the present context. Since the weak and strong energy conditions may be violated, a big bang singularity may be avoided, in contrast to general relativity. Since beta is shown to be constant during the radiation-dominated era, the difficulties in the theory associated with nucleosynthesis are avoided. 10 references

  19. Scaling laws for dislocation microstructures in monotonic and cyclic deformation of fcc metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubin, L.P.; Sauzay, M.

    2011-01-01

    This work reviews and critically discusses the current understanding of two scaling laws, which are ubiquitous in the modeling of monotonic plastic deformation in face-centered cubic metals. A compilation of the available data allows extending the domain of application of these scaling laws to cyclic deformation. The strengthening relation tells that the flow stress is proportional to the square root of the average dislocation density, whereas the similitude relation assumes that the flow stress is inversely proportional to the characteristic wavelength of dislocation patterns. The strengthening relation arises from short-range reactions of non-coplanar segments and applies all through the first three stages of the monotonic stress vs. strain curves. The value of the proportionality coefficient is calculated and simulated in good agreement with the bulk of experimental measurements published since the beginning of the 1960's. The physical origin of what is called similitude is not understood and the related coefficient is not predictable. Its value is determined from a review of the experimental literature. The generalization of these scaling laws to cyclic deformation is carried out on the base of a large collection of experimental results on single and polycrystals of various materials and on different microstructures. Surprisingly, for persistent slip bands (PSBs), both the strengthening and similitude coefficients appear to be more than two times smaller than the corresponding monotonic values, whereas their ratio is the same as in monotonic deformation. The similitude relation is also checked in cell structures and in labyrinth structures. Under low cyclic stresses, the strengthening coefficient is found even lower than in PSBs. A tentative explanation is proposed for the differences observed between cyclic and monotonic deformation. Finally, the influence of cross-slip on the temperature dependence of the saturation stress of PSBs is discussed in some detail

  20. Results of bench-scale plasma system testing in support of the Plasma Hearth Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leatherman, G.L.; Cornelison, C.; Frank, S.

    1996-01-01

    The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) is a high-temperature process that destroys hazardous organic components and stabilizes the radioactive components and hazardous metals in a leach-resistant vitreous slag waste form. The PHP technology development program is targeted at mixed waste that cannot be easily treated by conventional means. For example, heterogeneous debris, which may contain hazardous organics, toxic metals, and radionuclides, is difficult to characterize and cannot be treated with conventional thermal, chemical, or physical treatment methods. A major advantage of the PHP over other plasma processes is its ability to separate nonradioactive, non-hazardous metals from the non-metallic and radioactive components which are contained in the vitreous slag. The overall PHP program involves the design, fabrication, and operation of test hardware to demonstrate and certify that the PHP concept is viable for DOE waste treatment. The program involves bench-scale testing of PHP equipment in radioactive service, as well as pilot-scale demonstration of the PHP concept using nonradioactive, surrogate test materials. The fate of secondary waste streams is an important consideration for any technology considered for processing mixed waste. The main secondary waste stream generated by the PHP is flyash captured by the fabric- filter baghouse. The PHP concept is that flyash generated by the process can, to a large extent, be treated by processing this secondary waste stream in the PHP. Prior to the work presented in the paper, however, the PHP project has not quantitatively demonstrated the ability to treat PHP generated flyash. A major consideration is the quantity of radionuclides and RCRA-regulated metals in the flyash that can be retained the resultant waste form

  1. Engagement in the electoral processes: scaling laws and the role of political positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, M C; Ribeiro, H V; Lenzi, E K; Picoli, S; Mendes, R S

    2013-08-01

    We report on a statistical analysis of the engagement in the electoral processes of all Brazilian cities by considering the number of party memberships and the number of candidates for mayor and councillor. By investigating the relationships between the number of party members and the population of voters, we have found that the functional forms of these relationships are well described by sublinear power laws (allometric scaling) surrounded by a multiplicative log-normal noise. We have observed that this pattern is quite similar to those we previously reported for the relationships between the number of candidates (mayor and councillor) and population of voters [Europhys. Lett. 96, 48001 (2011)], suggesting that similar universal laws may be ruling the engagement in the electoral processes. We also note that the power-law exponents display a clear hierarchy, where the more influential is the political position the smaller is the value of the exponent. We have also investigated the probability distributions of the number of candidates (mayor and councillor), party memberships, and voters. The results indicate that the most influential positions are characterized by distributions with very short tails, while less influential positions display an intermediate power-law decay before showing an exponential-like cutoff. We discuss the possibility that, in addition to the political power of the position, limitations in the number of available seats can also be connected with this changing of behavior. We further believe that our empirical findings point out to an under-representation effect, where the larger the city is, the larger are the obstacles for more individuals to become directly engaged in the electoral process.

  2. A novel nonlinear nano-scale wear law for metallic brake pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sandeep P; Chilakamarri, Sri Harsha; Markert, Bernd

    2018-05-03

    In the present work, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate the temperature distribution as well as the fundamental friction characteristics such as the coefficient of friction and wear in a disc-pad braking system. A wide range of constant velocity loadings was applied on metallic brake pads made of aluminium, copper and iron with different rotating speeds of a diamond-like carbon brake disc. The average temperature of Newtonian atoms and the coefficient of friction of the brake pad were investigated. The resulting relationship of the average temperature with the speed of the disc as well as the applied loading velocity can be described by power laws. The quantitative description of the volume lost from the brake pads was investigated, and it was found that the volume lost increases linearly with the sliding distance. Our results show that Archard's linear wear law is not applicable to a wide range of normal loads, e.g., in cases of low normal load where the wear rate was increased considerably and in cases of high load where there was a possibility of severe wear. In this work, a new formula for the brake pad wear in a disc brake assembly is proposed, which displays a power law relationship between the lost volume of the metallic brake pads per unit sliding distance and the applied normal load with an exponent of 0.62 ± 0.02. This work provides new insights into the fundamental understanding of the wear mechanism at the nano-scale leading to a new bottom-up wear law for metallic brake pads.

  3. The analog of Blanc's law for drift velocities of electrons in gas mixtures in weakly ionized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiflikian, R.V.

    1995-01-01

    The analog of Blanc's law for drift velocities of electrons in multicomponent gas mixtures in weakly ionized spatially homogeneous low-temperature plasma is derived. The obtained approximate-analytical expressions are valid for average electron energy in the 1--5 eV range typical for plasma conditions of low-pressure direct current (DC) discharges. The accuracy of these formulas is ±5%. The analytical criterion of the negative differential conductivity (NDC) of electrons in binary mixtures of gases is obtained. NDC of electrons is predicted in He:Kr and He:Xe rare gas mixtures. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  4. Scaling laws for the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka violating decays and productions and the interpretation of UPSILON and UPSILON'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, S.

    1977-08-01

    We propose simple scaling laws for the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka violating decays and the inclusive productions of hidden flavour vector mesons. These laws are in good agreement with the available data on phi, PSI and PSI'. Assuming that the recently observed bumps at approximately 9.44 (UPSILON) and at approximately 10.17 (UPSILON') GeV to be due to some new hidden flavour vector mesons, (such as t anti t and/or b anti b), these scaling laws are used to estimate the direct hadronic decay widths and the inclusive yields of UPSILON and UPSILON'. (orig.) [de

  5. Conceptual design based on scale laws and algorithms for sub-critical transmutation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Gu; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    In order to conduct the effective integration of computer-aided conceptual design for integrated nuclear power reactor, not only is a smooth information flow required, but also decision making for both conceptual design and construction process design must be synthesized. In addition to the aboves, the relations between the one step and another step and the methodologies to optimize the decision variables are verified, in this paper especially, that is, scaling laws and scaling criteria. In the respect with the running of the system, the integrated optimization process is proposed in which decisions concerning both conceptual design are simultaneously made. According to the proposed reactor types and power levels, an integrated optimization problems are formulated. This optimization is expressed as a multi-objective optimization problem. The algorithm for solving the problem is also presented. The proposed method is applied to designing a integrated sub-critical reactors. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  6. Analysis of Scaling Law and Figure of Merit of Fiber-Based Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Teng Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a normalized transmitted signal (NTS of a fiber-based sensor using gold nanorods as the plasmon excitation medium of the evanescent wave. The NTS and the refractive index (RI sensitivity is calculated as a function of the gold aspect ratio (R, the RI of the sensing medium, and a scaling parameter given by the ratio of the fiber length and its diameter. Finally, the optimal value of gold aspect ratio is calculated to be R = (3.0–4.0 for maximum figure of merits (FOMs defined by the ratio of the refractive index sensitivity and the full width at half maximum. The scaling laws and the FOM presented in this paper may serve as the guidelines for optimal designs in fiber-based nanosensors.

  7. Conceptual design based on scale laws and algorithms for sub-critical transmutation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Gu; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    In order to conduct the effective integration of computer-aided conceptual design for integrated nuclear power reactor, not only is a smooth information flow required, but also decision making for both conceptual design and construction process design must be synthesized. In addition to the aboves, the relations between the one step and another step and the methodologies to optimize the decision variables are verified, in this paper especially, that is, scaling laws and scaling criteria. In the respect with the running of the system, the integrated optimization process is proposed in which decisions concerning both conceptual design are simultaneously made. According to the proposed reactor types and power levels, an integrated optimization problems are formulated. This optimization is expressed as a multi-objective optimization problem. The algorithm for solving the problem is also presented. The proposed method is applied to designing a integrated sub-critical reactors. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  8. A general scaling law reveals why the largest animals are not the fastest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Myriam R; Jetz, Walter; Rall, Björn C; Brose, Ulrich

    2017-08-01

    Speed is the fundamental constraint on animal movement, yet there is no general consensus on the determinants of maximum speed itself. Here, we provide a general scaling model of maximum speed with body mass, which holds across locomotion modes, ecosystem types and taxonomic groups. In contrast to traditional power-law scaling, we predict a hump-shaped relationship resulting from a finite acceleration time for animals, which explains why the largest animals are not the fastest. This model is strongly supported by extensive empirical data (474 species, with body masses ranging from 30 μg to 100 tonnes) from terrestrial as well as aquatic ecosystems. Our approach unravels a fundamental constraint on the upper limit of animal movement, thus enabling a better understanding of realized movement patterns in nature and their multifold ecological consequences.

  9. Cardiovascular performance of adult breeding sows fails to obey allometric scaling laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Essen, G J; Vernooij, J C M; Heesterbeek, J A P; Anjema, D; Merkus, D; Duncker, D J

    2011-02-01

    In view of the remarkable decrease of the relative heart weight (HW) and the relative blood volume in growing pigs, we investigated whether HW, cardiac output (CO), and stroke volume (SV) of modern growing pigs are proportional to BW, as predicted by allometric scaling laws: HW (or CO or SV) = a·BW(b), in which a and b are constants, and constant b is a multiple of 0.25 (quarter-power scaling law). Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that both HW and CO scale with BW to the power of 0.75 (HW or CO = a·BW(0.75)) and SV scales with BW to the power of 1.00 (SV = a·BW(1.0)). For this purpose, 2 groups of pigs (group 1, consisting of 157 pigs of 50 ± 1 kg; group 2, consisting of 45 pigs of 268 ± 18 kg) were surgically instrumented with a flow probe or a thermodilution dilution catheter, under open-chest anesthetized conditions to measure CO and SV, after which HW was determined. The 95% confidence intervals of power-coefficient b for HW were 0.74 to 0.80, encompassing the predicted value of 0.75, suggesting that HW increased proportionally with BW, as predicted by the allometric scaling laws. In contrast, the 95% confidence intervals of power-coefficient b for CO and SV as measured with flow probes were 0.40 to 0.56 and 0.39 to 0.61, respectively, and values obtained with the thermodilution technique were 0.34 to 0.53 and 0.40 to 0.62, respectively. Thus, the 95% confidence limits failed to encompass the predicted values of b for CO and SV of 0.75 and 1.0, respectively. In conclusion, although adult breeding sows display normal heart growth, cardiac performance appears to be disproportionately low for BW. This raises concern regarding the health status of adult breeding sows.

  10. Pore scale simulations for the extension of the Darcy-Forchheimer law to shear thinning fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Tiziana; Marchisio, Daniele; Lince, Federica; Boccardo, Gianluca; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-05-01

    Flow of non-Newtonian fluids through porous media at high Reynolds numbers is often encountered in chemical, pharmaceutical and food as well as petroleum and groundwater engineering and in many other industrial applications (1 - 2). In particular, the use of shear thinning polymeric solutions has been recently proposed to improve colloidal stability of micro- and nanoscale zerovalent iron particles (MZVI and NZVI) for groundwater remediation. In all abovementioned applications, it is of paramount importance to correctly predict the pressure drop resulting from non-Newtonian fluid flow through the porous medium. For small Reynolds numbers, usually up to 1, typical of laboratory column tests, the extended Darcy law is known to be applicable also to non Newtonian fluids, provided that all non-Newtonian effects are lumped together into a proper viscosity parameter (1,3). For higher Reynolds numbers (eg. close to the injection wells) non linearities between pressure drop and flow rate arise, and the Darcy-Forchheimer law holds for Newtonian fluids, while for non-Newtonian fluids, it has been demonstrated that, at least for simple rheological models (eg. power law fluids) a generalized Forchheimer law can be applied, even if the determination of the flow parameters (permeability K, inertial coefficient β, and equivalent viscosity) is not straightforward. This work (co-funded by European Union project AQUAREHAB FP7 - Grant Agreement Nr. 226565) aims at proposing an extended formulation of the Darcy-Forchheimer law also for shear-thinning fluids, and validating it against results of pore-scale simulations via computational fluid dynamics (4). Flow simulations were performed using Fluent 12.0 on four different 2D porous domains for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids (Cross, Ellis and Carreau models). The micro-scale flow simulation results are analyzed in terms of 'macroscale' pressure drop between inlet and outlet of the model domain as a function of flow rate. The

  11. Scaling laws of resistive magnetohydrodynamic reconnection in the high-Lundquist-number, plasmoid-unstable regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yimin; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Sweet-Parker layer in a system that exceeds a critical value of the Lundquist number (S) is unstable to the plasmoid instability. In this paper, a numerical scaling study has been done with an island coalescing system driven by a low level of random noise. In the early stage, a primary Sweet-Parker layer forms between the two coalescing islands. The primary Sweet-Parker layer breaks into multiple plasmoids and even thinner current sheets through multiple levels of cascading if the Lundquist number is greater than a critical value S c ≅4x10 4 . As a result of the plasmoid instability, the system realizes a fast nonlinear reconnection rate that is nearly independent of S, and is only weakly dependent on the level of noise. The number of plasmoids in the linear regime is found to scales as S 3/8 , as predicted by an earlier asymptotic analysis [N. F. Loureiro et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 100703 (2007)]. In the nonlinear regime, the number of plasmoids follows a steeper scaling, and is proportional to S. The thickness and length of current sheets are found to scale as S -1 , and the local current densities of current sheets scale as S -1 . Heuristic arguments are given in support of theses scaling relations.

  12. A generalized scaling law for the ignition energy of inertial confinement fusion capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    The minimum energy needed to ignite an inertial confinement fusion capsule is of considerable interest in the optimization of an inertial fusion driver. Recent computational work investigating this minimum energy has found that it depends on the capsule implosion history, in particular, on the capsule drive pressure. This dependence is examined using a series of LASNEX simulations to find ignited capsules which have different values of the implosion velocity, fuel adiabat and drive pressure. It is found that the main effect of varying the drive pressure is to alter the stagnation of the capsule, changing its stagnation adiabat, which, in turn, affects the energy required for ignition. To account for this effect a generalized scaling law has been devised for the ignition energy, E ign ∝α if 1.88±0.05 υ -5.89±0.12 P -0.77±0.03 . This generalized scaling law agrees with the results of previous work in the appropriate limits. (author)

  13. Fractal and multifractal approaches for the analysis of crack-size dependent scaling laws in fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggi, Marco [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Structural Engineering and Geotechnics, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)], E-mail: marco.paggi@polito.it; Carpinteri, Alberto [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Structural Engineering and Geotechnics, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    The enhanced ability to detect and measure very short cracks, along with a great interest in applying fracture mechanics formulae to smaller and smaller crack sizes, has pointed out the so-called anomalous behavior of short cracks with respect to their longer counterparts. The crack-size dependencies of both the fatigue threshold and the Paris' constant C are only two notable examples of these anomalous scaling laws. In this framework, a unified theoretical model seems to be missing and the behavior of short cracks can still be considered as an open problem. In this paper, we propose a critical reexamination of the fractal models for the analysis of crack-size effects in fatigue. The limitations of each model are put into evidence and removed. At the end, a new generalized theory based on fractal geometry is proposed, which permits to consistently interpret the short crack-related anomalous scaling laws within a unified theoretical formulation. Finally, this approach is herein used to interpret relevant experimental data related to the crack-size dependence of the fatigue threshold in metals.

  14. Fractal and multifractal approaches for the analysis of crack-size dependent scaling laws in fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paggi, Marco; Carpinteri, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced ability to detect and measure very short cracks, along with a great interest in applying fracture mechanics formulae to smaller and smaller crack sizes, has pointed out the so-called anomalous behavior of short cracks with respect to their longer counterparts. The crack-size dependencies of both the fatigue threshold and the Paris' constant C are only two notable examples of these anomalous scaling laws. In this framework, a unified theoretical model seems to be missing and the behavior of short cracks can still be considered as an open problem. In this paper, we propose a critical reexamination of the fractal models for the analysis of crack-size effects in fatigue. The limitations of each model are put into evidence and removed. At the end, a new generalized theory based on fractal geometry is proposed, which permits to consistently interpret the short crack-related anomalous scaling laws within a unified theoretical formulation. Finally, this approach is herein used to interpret relevant experimental data related to the crack-size dependence of the fatigue threshold in metals.

  15. Scaling-Laws of Flow Entropy with Topological Metrics of Water Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Francesco Santonastaso

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Robustness of water distribution networks is related to their connectivity and topological structure, which also affect their reliability. Flow entropy, based on Shannon’s informational entropy, has been proposed as a measure of network redundancy and adopted as a proxy of reliability in optimal network design procedures. In this paper, the scaling properties of flow entropy of water distribution networks with their size and other topological metrics are studied. To such aim, flow entropy, maximum flow entropy, link density and average path length have been evaluated for a set of 22 networks, both real and synthetic, with different size and topology. The obtained results led to identify suitable scaling laws of flow entropy and maximum flow entropy with water distribution network size, in the form of power–laws. The obtained relationships allow comparing the flow entropy of water distribution networks with different size, and provide an easy tool to define the maximum achievable entropy of a specific water distribution network. An example of application of the obtained relationships to the design of a water distribution network is provided, showing how, with a constrained multi-objective optimization procedure, a tradeoff between network cost and robustness is easily identified.

  16. Scaling Law for Cross-stream Diffusion in Microchannels under Combined Electroosmotic and Pressure Driven Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the cross-stream diffusion of an analyte in a rectangular microchannel under combined electroosmotic flow (EOF) and pressure driven flow to investigate the heterogeneous transport behavior and spatially-dependent diffusion scaling law. An analytical model capable of accurately describing 3D steady-state convection-diffusion in microchannels with arbitrary aspect ratios is developed based on the assumption of the thin Electric Double Layer (EDL). The model is verified against high-fidelity numerical simulation in terms of flow velocity and analyte concentration profiles with excellent agreement (parametric analysis is then undertaken to interrogate the effect of the combined flow velocity field on the transport behavior in both the positive pressure gradient (PPG) and negative pressure gradient (NPG) cases. For the first time, the evolution from the spindle-shaped concentration profile in the PPG case, via the stripe-shaped profile (pure EOF), and finally to the butterfly-shaped profile in the PPG case is obtained using the analytical model along with a quantitative depiction of the spatially-dependent diffusion layer thickness and scaling law across a wide range of the parameter space.

  17. Chromospheric scaling laws, width-luminosity correlations, and the Wilson-Bappu effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, T.R.

    1979-01-01

    Simple scaling laws are developed to explain the thickness and mean electron density of late-type stellar chromospheres in an effort to understand why the emission cores of effectively thick resonance lines such as Ca II H and K broaden with increasing stellar luminosity (the Wilson-Bappu effect). It is shown that stellar chromospheres become thicker in mass column density as stellar gravity g decreases and that the mean chromospheric electric density n/sub e/ decreases if the chromospheric heating dF/dm is constant with height and if the total heating F/sup tot/ is independent of g. It is also shown that chromospheres becomes thicker and the mean electron density becomes larger than the total chromospheric heating increases. The predicted behavior of the K 1 minimum separation and full width at half-maximum of the Ca II emission core (W 0 ) based on the derived scaling laws agree quantitatively with the observed correlations of these widths with fundamental stellar parameters, particularly surface gravity. In addition, the predicted behavior of the K 2 peak separation and base emission width with increasing chromospheric heating is consistent with the behavior of the Ca II emission core shapes in solar plages. The analytical arguments suggest that the Wilson-Bappu effect is largely a consequence of hydrostatic equilibrium rather than chromospheric dynamics

  18. An exponential universal scaling law for the volume pinning force of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampshire, D.P.

    1993-01-01

    The exponential magnetic field dependence of the critical current density (J c (B,T)) found in many high temperature superconductors, given by: J c (B,T) α(T)exp(-B/β(T)) where α(T) and β(T) are functions of temperature alone, necessarily implies a Universal Scaling Law for the volume pinning force (F p ) of the form: F p /F PMAX exp(+1).(B/β(T)).exp(-B/β(T)). If the Upper Critical Field is not explicitly measured but is artificially determined by smooth extrapolation of J c (B,T) to zero on a linear J c (B,T) vs B plot, this exponential scaling law can be closely approximated by the Kramer dependence given by: F p /F PMAX C.b p .(1-b) q where p = 0.5, q = 2, C ∼ 3.5 and b = B/B C2 (T). The implications for flux pinning studies are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Pattern recognition in probability spaces for visualization and identification of plasma confinement regimes and confinement time scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdoolaege, G; Karagounis, G; Oost, G Van; Tendler, M

    2012-01-01

    Pattern recognition is becoming an increasingly important tool for making inferences from the massive amounts of data produced in fusion experiments. The purpose is to contribute to physics studies and plasma control. In this work, we address the visualization of plasma confinement data, the (real-time) identification of confinement regimes and the establishment of a scaling law for the energy confinement time. We take an intrinsically probabilistic approach, modeling data from the International Global H-mode Confinement Database with Gaussian distributions. We show that pattern recognition operations working in the associated probability space are considerably more powerful than their counterparts in a Euclidean data space. This opens up new possibilities for analyzing confinement data and for fusion data processing in general. We hence advocate the essential role played by measurement uncertainty for data interpretation in fusion experiments. (paper)

  20. Astrophysical gyrokinetics: turbulence in pressure-anisotropic plasmas at ion scales and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, M. W.; Abel, I. G.; Klein, K. G.

    2018-04-01

    We present a theoretical framework for describing electromagnetic kinetic turbulence in a multi-species, magnetized, pressure-anisotropic plasma. The turbulent fluctuations are assumed to be small compared to the mean field, to be spatially anisotropic with respect to it and to have frequencies small compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. At scales above the ion-Larmor radius, the theory reduces to the pressure-anisotropic generalization of kinetic reduced magnetohydrodynamics (KRMHD) formulated by Kunz et al. (J. Plasma Phys., vol. 81, 2015, 325810501). At scales at and below the ion-Larmor radius, three main objectives are achieved. First, we analyse the linear response of the pressure-anisotropic gyrokinetic system, and show it to be a generalization of previously explored limits. The effects of pressure anisotropy on the stability and collisionless damping of Alfvénic and compressive fluctuations are highlighted, with attention paid to the spectral location and width of the frequency jump that occurs as Alfvén waves transition into kinetic Alfvén waves. Secondly, we derive and discuss a very general gyrokinetic free-energy conservation law, which captures both the KRMHD free-energy conservation at long wavelengths and dual cascades of kinetic Alfvén waves and ion entropy at sub-ion-Larmor scales. We show that non-Maxwellian features in the distribution function change the amount of phase mixing and the efficiency of magnetic stresses, and thus influence the partitioning of free energy amongst the cascade channels. Thirdly, a simple model is used to show that pressure anisotropy, even within the bounds imposed on it by firehose and mirror instabilities, can cause order-of-magnitude variations in the ion-to-electron heating ratio due to the dissipation of Alfvénic turbulence. Our theory provides a foundation for determining how pressure anisotropy affects turbulent fluctuation spectra, the differential heating of particle species and the ratio of parallel

  1. The plasma transport equations derived by multiple time-scale expansions and turbulent transport. I. General theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edenstrasser, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    A multiple time-scale derivative expansion scheme is applied to the dimensionless Fokker--Planck equation and to Maxwell's equations, where the parameter range of a typical fusion plasma was assumed. Within kinetic theory, the four time scales considered are those of Larmor gyration, particle transit, collisions, and classical transport. The corresponding magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) time scales are those of ion Larmor gyration, Alfven, MHD collision, and resistive diffusion. The solution of the zeroth-order equations results in the force-free equilibria and ideal Ohm's law. The solution of the first-order equations leads under the assumption of a weak collisional plasma to the ideal MHD equations. On the MHD-collision time scale, not only the full set of the MHD transport equations is obtained, but also turbulent terms, where the related transport quantities are one order in the expansion parameter larger than those of classical transport. Finally, at the resistive diffusion time scale the known transport equations are arrived at including, however, also turbulent contributions. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  2. Revisiting the generalized scaling law for adhesion: role of compliance and extension to progressive failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojdehi, Ahmad R; Holmes, Douglas P; Dillard, David A

    2017-10-25

    A generalized scaling law, based on the classical fracture mechanics approach, is developed to predict the bond strength of adhesive systems. The proposed scaling relationship depends on the rate of change of debond area with compliance, rather than the ratio of area to compliance. This distinction can have a profound impact on the expected bond strength of systems, particularly when the failure mechanism changes or the compliance of the load train increases. Based on the classical fracture mechanics approach for rate-independent materials, the load train compliance should not affect the force capacity of the adhesive system, whereas when the area to compliance ratio is used as the scaling parameter, it directly influences the bond strength, making it necessary to distinguish compliance contributions. To verify the scaling relationship, single lap shear tests were performed for a given pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) tape specimens with different bond areas, number of backing layers, and load train compliance. The shear lag model was used to derive closed-form relationships for the system compliance and its derivative with respect to the debond area. Digital image correlation (DIC) is implemented to verify the non-uniform shear stress distribution obtained from the shear lag model in a lap shear geometry. The results obtained from this approach could lead to a better understanding of the relationship between bond strength and the geometry and mechanical properties of adhesive systems.

  3. The Evolution of the Social Criminal Law on an International Wide Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Razvan Popescu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Brought to maturity, the labor criminal law represents a real branch of the criminal law, as well as the business criminal law, fiscal criminal law or the environment criminal law. Notwithstanding labor criminal law cannot be considered merely as an accessory part of the corporate criminal law, but having an essential part such as an exhibit test, in order to determine new legal mechanisms, such as the ones regarding criminal liability of the legal persons. In the Romanian legislation, the labor criminal law, as an interference zone between the criminal law and labor law, has to be regarded from the internal social realities governing the labor aspects, as well from the comparative law's point of view.

  4. Scaling laws governing the multiple scattering of diatomic molecules under Coulomb explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigmund, P.

    1992-01-01

    The trajectories of fast molecules during and after penetration through foils are governed by Coulomb explosion and distorted by multiple scattering and other penetration phenomena. A scattering event may cause the energy available for Coulomb explosion to increase or decrease, and angular momentum may be transferred to the molecule. Because of continuing Coulomb explosion inside and outside the target foil, the transmission pattern recorded at a detector far away from the target is not just a linear superposition of Coulomb explosion and multiple scattering. The velocity distribution of an initially monochromatic and well-collimated, but randomly oriented, beam of molecular ions is governed by a generalization of the standard Bothe-Landau integral that governs the multiple scattering of atomic ions. Emphasis has been laid on the distribution in relative velocity and, in particular, relative energy. The statistical distributions governing the longitudinal motion (i.e., the relative motion along the molecular axis) and the rotational motion can be scaled into standard multiple-scattering distributions of atomic ions. The two scaling laws are very different. For thin target foils, the significance of rotational energy transfer is enhanced by an order of magnitude compared to switched-off Coulomb explosion. A distribution for the total relative energy (i.e., longitudinal plus rotational motion) has also been found, but its scaling behavior is more complex. Explicit examples given for all three distributions refer to power-law scattering. As a first approximation, scattering events undergone by the two atoms in the molecule were assumed uncorrelated. A separate section has been devoted to an estimate of the effect of impact-parameter correlation on the multiple scattering of penetrating molecules

  5. Scaling laws for gas–liquid flow in swirl vane separators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Li; Bai, Bofeng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Model for swirl vane separator performance is established with similarity criteria. • Scaling laws are developed to correlate downscale test with prototype separator. • Effects of key similarity criteria on separation performance are studied. • The vital role of droplet size distribution on separation performance is discussed. - Abstract: Laboratory tests on gas–liquid flow in swirl vane separators are usually carried out to help establish an experimental database for separator design and performance improvement. Such model tests are generally performed in the reduced scale and not on the actual working conditions. Though great efficiency is often obtainable in the reduced model, the performance of the full-sized prototype usually cannot be well predicted. To design downscale model tests and apply the experimental results to predict the prototype, a general relationship to correlate them is required. In this paper, the relation of the similitude-criterion concerning the pressure loss is presented by using the dimensionless analysis, and mathematical models for critical droplet diameter, grade efficiency and overall separation efficiency are established by analyzing the features of the droplet trajectory in gas swirling flow field. The essential similarity criteria accounting for pressure loss and separation efficiency are obtained, respectively. On this basis, the scaling laws which enable a comparison between the reduced model and the full-sized prototype under similar conditions are also developed. It is found that the overall separation efficiency is significantly affected by the size distribution of the small droplets, especially when the mean diameter is smaller than the critical droplet diameter.

  6. Extreme robustness of scaling in sample space reducing processes explains Zipf’s law in diffusion on directed networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown recently that a specific class of path-dependent stochastic processes, which reduce their sample space as they unfold, lead to exact scaling laws in frequency and rank distributions. Such sample space reducing processes offer an alternative new mechanism to understand the emergence of scaling in countless processes. The corresponding power law exponents were shown to be related to noise levels in the process. Here we show that the emergence of scaling is not limited to the simplest SSRPs, but holds for a huge domain of stochastic processes that are characterised by non-uniform prior distributions. We demonstrate mathematically that in the absence of noise the scaling exponents converge to −1 (Zipf’s law) for almost all prior distributions. As a consequence it becomes possible to fully understand targeted diffusion on weighted directed networks and its associated scaling laws in node visit distributions. The presence of cycles can be properly interpreted as playing the same role as noise in SSRPs and, accordingly, determine the scaling exponents. The result that Zipf’s law emerges as a generic feature of diffusion on networks, regardless of its details, and that the exponent of visiting times is related to the amount of cycles in a network could be relevant for a series of applications in traffic-, transport- and supply chain management. (paper)

  7. Modulational instability: Conservation laws and bright soliton solution of ion-acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion-dust plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Kalaawy, O. H.

    2018-02-01

    We consider the nonlinear propagation of non-planar (cylindrical and spherical) ion-acoustic (IA) envelope solitary waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of electron-positron-ion-dust plasma with two-electron temperature distributions in the context of the non-extensive statistics. The basic set of fluid equations is reduced to the modified nonlinear Schrödinger (MNLS) equation in cylindrical and spherical geometry by using the reductive perturbation method (RPM). It is found that the nature of the modulational instabilities would be significantly modified due to the effects of the non-extensive and other plasma parameters as well as cylindrical and spherical geometry. Conservation laws of the MNLS equation are obtained by Lie symmetry and multiplier method. A new exact solution (envelope bright soliton) is obtained by the extended homogeneous balance method. Finally, we study the results of this article.

  8. Magnetized and collimated millimeter scale plasma jets with astrophysical relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Parrish C.; Quevedo, Hernan J.; Valanju, Prashant M.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Magnetized collimated plasma jets are created in the laboratory to extend our understanding of plasma jet acceleration and collimation mechanisms with particular connection to astrophysical jets. In this study, plasma collimated jets are formed from supersonic unmagnetized flows, mimicking a stellar wind, subject to currents and magnetohydrodynamic forces. It is found that an external poloidal magnetic field, like the ones found anchored to accretion disks, is essential to stabilize the jets against current-driven instabilities. The maximum jet length before instabilities develop is proportional to the field strength and the length threshold agrees well with Kruskal-Shafranov theory. The plasma evolution is modeled qualitatively using MHD theory of current-carrying flux tubes showing that jet acceleration and collimation arise as a result of electromagnetic forces.

  9. Scaling of plasma turbulence resulting from parametric instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, E.

    1976-01-01

    Dimensional analysis is used to obtain results on the turbulent state resulting from parametric instabilities of an initially cold plasma. The results include the possibility of an applied magnetic field, multiple ion species, and arbitrary dimensionality

  10. The US business cycle: power law scaling for interacting units with complex internal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormerod, Paul

    2002-11-01

    In the social sciences, there is increasing evidence of the existence of power law distributions. The distribution of recessions in capitalist economies has recently been shown to follow such a distribution. The preferred explanation for this is self-organised criticality. Gene Stanley and colleagues propose an alternative, namely that power law scaling can arise from the interplay between random multiplicative growth and the complex structure of the units composing the system. This paper offers a parsimonious model of the US business cycle based on similar principles. The business cycle, along with long-term growth, is one of the two features which distinguishes capitalism from all previously existing societies. Yet, economics lacks a satisfactory theory of the cycle. The source of cycles is posited in economic theory to be a series of random shocks which are external to the system. In this model, the cycle is an internal feature of the system, arising from the level of industrial concentration of the agents and the interactions between them. The model-in contrast to existing economic theories of the cycle-accounts for the key features of output growth in the US business cycle in the 20th century.

  11. Scaling laws and universality for the strength of genetic interactions in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velenich, Andrea; Dai, Mingjie; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    Genetic interactions provide a window to the organization of the thousands of biochemical reactions in living cells. If two mutations affect unrelated cellular functions, the fitness effects of their combination can be easily predicted from the two separate fitness effects. However, because of interactions, for some pairs of mutations their combined fitness effect deviates from the naive prediction. We study genetic interactions in yeast cells by analyzing a publicly available database containing experimental growth rates of 5 million double mutants. We show that the characteristic strength of genetic interactions has a simple power law dependence on the fitness effects of the two interacting mutations and that the probability distribution of genetic interactions is a universal function. We further argue that the strength of genetic interactions depends only on the fitness effects of the interacting mutations and not on their biological origin in terms of single point mutations, entire gene knockouts or even more complicated physiological perturbations. Finally, we discuss the implications of the power law scaling of genetic interactions on the ruggedness of fitness landscapes and the consequent evolutionary dynamics.

  12. Temporal scaling law and intrinsic characteristic of laser induced damage on the dielectric coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Jiang, Youen; Wang, Chao; Wei, Hui; Zhang, Peng; Fan, Wei; Li, Xuechun

    2018-01-01

    High power laser is essential for optical manipulation and fabrication. When the laser travels through optics and to the target finally, irreversible damage on the dielectric coating is always accompanied without knowing the law and principle of laser induced damage. Here, an experimental study of laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) Fth of the dielectric coating under different pulse duration t is implemented. We observe that the temporal scaling law of square pulse for high-reflectivity (HR) coating and anti-reflectivity (AR) coating are Fth = 9.53t0.47 and Fth = 6.43t0.28 at 1064 nm, respectively. Moreover, the intrinsic LIDT of HR coating is 62.7 J/cm2 where the coating is just 100% damaged by gradually increasing the fluence densities of a 5ns-duration pulse, which is much higher than the actual LIDT of 18.6 J/cm2. Thus, a more robust and reliable high power laser system will be a reality, even working at very high fluence, if measures are taken to improve the actual LIDT to a considerable level near the intrinsic value.

  13. Scaling law for (e, 2e) cross sections for isoelectronic hydrogen- and alkali-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancarani, L U; Hervieux, P-A

    2003-01-01

    Triple differential cross sections (TDCSs) for (e, 2e) processes on the valence electrons of H-, Li-, Na- and K-like positive ions are calculated for asymmetric coplanar geometries and intermediate incident energies. Although the proper boundary conditions are not respected, both the long-range Coulomb interaction in the initial and final channels, and the short-range effects, are taken into account in the Coulomb Born approximation through the use of two effective charges. The latter are obtained within the framework of the frozen-core Hartree-Fock approximation which is also used for describing the bound state wavefunctions. An approximate scaling law for the TDCSs is predicted for the ionization of sequences of isoelectronic ions, provided the incident and ejected energies are properly scaled. The calculations illustrate that the scaling is generally well verified, in particular for increasing ionicity within a sequence. Moreover, as one moves from the H- to K-like sequences, more TDCS structure is observed. Two main peaks are always situated close to the direction of the momentum transfer and opposite direction, although with strong shifts. Contrary to what is observed for the ionization of outer-shells electrons in neutral atoms, the dominant peak of all cross sections is in the opposite direction to the momentum transfer, a signature of strong elastic scattering from the nucleus

  14. Prediction of scaling physics laws for proton acceleration with extended parameter space of the NIF ARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutwala, Krish; Beg, Farhat; Mariscal, Derek; Wilks, Scott; Ma, Tammy

    2017-10-01

    The Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the world's most energetic short-pulse laser. It comprises four beamlets, each of substantial energy ( 1.5 kJ), extended short-pulse duration (10-30 ps), and large focal spot (>=50% of energy in 150 µm spot). This allows ARC to achieve proton and light ion acceleration via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanism, but it is yet unknown how proton beam characteristics scale with ARC-regime laser parameters. As theory has also not yet been validated for laser-generated protons at ARC-regime laser parameters, we attempt to formulate the scaling physics of proton beam characteristics as a function of laser energy, intensity, focal spot size, pulse length, target geometry, etc. through a review of relevant proton acceleration experiments from laser facilities across the world. These predicted scaling laws should then guide target design and future diagnostics for desired proton beam experiments on the NIF ARC. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the LLNL LDRD program under tracking code 17-ERD-039.

  15. Peak Fields of Nb$_{3}$Sn Superconducting Undulators and a Scaling Law

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S H

    2005-01-01

    The peak fields on the beam axis and the maximum fields in the conductor of Nb$_{3}$Sn superconducting undulators (SCUs) were calculated for an undulator period length of 16 mm. Using a simple scaling law for SCUs [1], the peak fields, as well as the conductor maximum fields and the current densities, were calculated for a period range of 8 to 32 mm. The critical current densities of commercially available Nb$_{3}$Sn superconducting strands were used for the calculations. The achievable peak fields are limited mainly by the flux-jump instabilities at low fields. The possible or feasible peak field will also be compared with that achieved in prototype development of SCUs.

  16. Validation of a power-law noise model for simulating small-scale breast tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, I; Edwards, A; Nishikawa, R M

    2013-01-01

    We have validated a small-scale breast tissue model based on power-law noise. A set of 110 patient images served as truth. The statistical model parameters were determined by matching the radially averaged power-spectrum of the projected simulated tissue with that of the central tomosynthesis patient breast projections. Observer performance in a signal-known exactly detection task in simulated and actual breast backgrounds was compared. Observers included human readers, a pre-whitening observer model and a channelized Hotelling observer model. For all observers, good agreement between performance in the simulated and actual backgrounds was found, both in the tomosynthesis central projections and the reconstructed images. This tissue model can be used for breast x-ray imaging system optimization. The complete statistical description of the model is provided. (paper)

  17. Scaling law in free walking of mice in circular open fields of various diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Hiroto

    2016-03-01

    Open-field tests are routinely used to study locomotor activity in rodents. I studied the effects of apparatus size on rodent locomotor activity, specifically with respect to how resting and walking periods are interwoven. I explored the open-field behavior of mice utilizing circular open fields of various diameters. When the diameter of the test apparatus was greater than 75 cm, the durations of the resting and moving periods of free walking behavior obeyed bounded power-law distribution functions. I found that the properties of the scaling exponents and model selection became similar for test apparatus diameters greater than 75 cm. These results can provide a guide for the selection of the size of the test apparatus for use in the study of the open-field behavior of rodents.

  18. In-medium scaling law and electron scattering from high-spin states in 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias de Saavedra, F.; Lallena, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of the environment modifications in the structure of the low-lying high-spin states of 208 Pb are studied by analyzing how the in-medium scaling law works on the excitation energies, wave functions, and electron scattering form factors corresponding to these states. It is shown that the consideration of f π * in addition to the effective ρ-meson mass does not affect too much most of the states analyzed. However, some of them appear to be extremely sensitive to its inclusion in the residual nucleon-nucleon interaction. As a result, a value of m ρ * /m ρ ∼f π * /f π ∼0.91 gives a good description of the (e,e') form factors of these particular states without any quenching factor. This value is in agreement with the one found for 48 Ca in a similar analysis performed in a previous work

  19. Scaling laws of free dendritic growth in a forced Oseen flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurnatowski, M von; Kassner, K

    2014-01-01

    We use the method presented in M von Kurnatowski et al (2013 Phys. Rev. E 87 042405) to solve the nonlinear problem of free dendritic growth in an Oseen flow. The growth process is assumed to be limited by thermal transport via diffusion and convection. A singular perturbation expansion is treated to lowest nontrivial order in the framework of asymptotic decomposition. The resulting complex integro-differential equation is solved using an elaborate numerical method. The approximate scaling laws V∝U 2/3 and ρ∝U −1/3 for the growth velocity and the tip radius of curvature of the dendrite, respectively, are found as a function of the forced flow velocity. The results are compared to those by Pelcé and Bouissou, constituting the only other attempt so far to treat the problem analytically. (paper)

  20. Solving large scale unit dilemma in electricity system by applying commutative law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legino, Supriadi; Arianto, Rakhmat

    2018-03-01

    The conventional system, pooling resources with large centralized power plant interconnected as a network. provides a lot of advantages compare to the isolated one include optimizing efficiency and reliability. However, such a large plant need a huge capital. In addition, more problems emerged to hinder the construction of big power plant as well as its associated transmission lines. By applying commutative law of math, ab = ba, for all a,b €-R, the problem associated with conventional system as depicted above, can be reduced. The idea of having small unit but many power plants, namely “Listrik Kerakyatan,” abbreviated as LK provides both social and environmental benefit that could be capitalized by using proper assumption. This study compares the cost and benefit of LK to those of conventional system, using simulation method to prove that LK offers alternative solution to answer many problems associated with the large system. Commutative Law of Algebra can be used as a simple mathematical model to analyze whether the LK system as an eco-friendly distributed generation can be applied to solve various problems associated with a large scale conventional system. The result of simulation shows that LK provides more value if its plants operate in less than 11 hours as peaker power plant or load follower power plant to improve load curve balance of the power system. The result of simulation indicates that the investment cost of LK plant should be optimized in order to minimize the plant investment cost. This study indicates that the benefit of economies of scale principle does not always apply to every condition, particularly if the portion of intangible cost and benefit is relatively high.

  1. Energy loss of a high charge bunched electron beam in plasma: Simulations, scaling, and accelerating wakefields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Rosenzweig

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The energy loss and gain of a beam in the nonlinear, “blowout” regime of the plasma wakefield accelerator, which features ultrahigh accelerating fields, linear transverse focusing forces, and nonlinear plasma motion, has been asserted, through previous observations in simulations, to scale linearly with beam charge. Additionally, from a recent analysis by Barov et al., it has been concluded that for an infinitesimally short beam, the energy loss is indeed predicted to scale linearly with beam charge for arbitrarily large beam charge. This scaling is predicted to hold despite the onset of a relativistic, nonlinear response by the plasma, when the number of beam particles occupying a cubic plasma skin depth exceeds that of plasma electrons within the same volume. This paper is intended to explore the deviations from linear energy loss using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that arise in the case of experimentally relevant finite length beams. The peak accelerating field in the plasma wave excited behind the finite-length beam is also examined, with the artifact of wave spiking adding to the apparent persistence of linear scaling of the peak field amplitude into the nonlinear regime. At large enough normalized charge, the linear scaling of both decelerating and accelerating fields collapses, with serious consequences for plasma wave excitation efficiency. Using the results of parametric particle-in-cell studies, the implications of these results for observing severe deviations from linear scaling in present and planned experiments are discussed.

  2. The HyperV Full-Scale Contoured-Gap Coaxial Plasma Railgun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockington, Samuel; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Elton, Raymond; Wu, Linchun; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2009-11-01

    HyperV has been developing pulsed plasma injected coaxial railguns with a contoured gap profile designed to mitigate the blowby instability. Previous work using half-scale guns has been successful in launching 150 μg plasmas at 90 km/s [1]. In order to meet the original goal of 200 μg at 200 km/s the full-scale coaxial plasma gun has been constructed, and initial testing is beginning. This new plasma gun consists of two machined aluminum electrodes and a UHMW polyethylene breech insulator. The gun is breech fed by 64 ablative polyethylene capillary discharge units identical to the half-scale gun units. Maximum accelerator energy storage has also been increased 50%. Refractory coatings may be necessary to allow full current (˜800 kA) operation. The outer electrode includes 24 small diagnostic ports for optical and magnetic probe access to the plasma inside the gun to allow direct measurement of the plasma armature dynamics. Initial test data from the full-scale coax gun will be presented along with plans for future testing. Work supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences.[4pt] [1] F. D. Witherspoon, A. Case, S. Messer, R. Bomgardner, M. Phillips, S. Brockington, R. Elton, ``Contoured Gap Coaxial Plasma Gun with Injected Plasma Armature'' Rev. Sci. Instr. submitted (2009)

  3. Evaluation of a pilot scale high pressure plasma ozonizer for use in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The plasma technique which is used for wastewater treatment is one of the most effective processes for ozone production. In this study, a laboratory scale plasma technique ozonizer designed for treating wastewater was tested under various operation conditions which included voltage (E), current frequency (f), electrical ...

  4. Theoretical and Numerical Properties of a Gyrokinetic Plasma: Issues Related to Transport Time Scale Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.

    2003-01-01

    Particle simulation has played an important role for the recent investigations on turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas. In this paper, theoretical and numerical properties of a gyrokinetic plasma as well as its relationship with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are discussed with the ultimate aim of simulating microturbulence in transport time scale using massively parallel computers

  5. Radiative corrections to the Coulomb law and model of dense quantum plasmas: Dispersion of longitudinal waves in magnetized quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2018-04-01

    Two kinds of quantum electrodynamic radiative corrections to electromagnetic interactions and their influence on the properties of highly dense quantum plasmas are considered. Linear radiative correction to the Coulomb interaction is considered. Its contribution in the spectrum of the Langmuir waves is presented. The second kind of radiative corrections are related to the nonlinearity of the Maxwell equations for the strong electromagnetic field. Their contribution in the spectrum of transverse waves of magnetized plasmas is briefly discussed. At the consideration of the Langmuir wave spectrum, we included the effect of different distributions of the spin-up and spin-down electrons revealing in the Fermi pressure shift.

  6. Scaling Laws in the Transient Dynamics of Firefly-like Oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubido, N; Cabeza, C; Marti, A; Ramirez Avila, G M

    2011-01-01

    Fireflies constitute a paradigm of pulse-coupled oscillators. In order to tackle the problems related to synchronisation transients of pulse-coupled oscillators, a Light-Controlled Oscillator (LCO) model is presented. A single LCO constitutes a one-dimensional relaxation oscillator described by two distinct time-scales meant to mimic fireflies in the sense that: it is capable of emitting light in a pulse-like fashion and detect the emitted by others in order to adjust its oscillation. We present dynamical results for two interacting LCOs in the torus for all possible coupling configurations. Transient times to the synchronous limit cycle are obtained experimentally and numerically as a function of initial conditions and coupling strengths. Scaling laws are found based on dimensional analysis and critical exponents calculated, thus, global dynamic is restricted. Furthermore, an analytical orthogonal transformation that allows to calculate Floquet multipliers directly from the time series is presented. As a consequence, local dynamics is also fully characterized. This transformation can be easily extended to a system with an arbitrary number of interacting LCOs.

  7. Determination of fractional flow reserve (FFR) based on scaling laws: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Jerry T; Molloi, Sabee

    2008-01-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) provides an objective physiological evaluation of stenosis severity. A technique that can measure FFR using only angiographic images would be a valuable tool in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. To perform this, the diseased blood flow can be measured with a first pass distribution analysis and the theoretical normal blood flow can be estimated from the total coronary arterial volume based on scaling laws. A computer simulation of the coronary arterial network was used to gain a better understanding of how hemodynamic conditions and coronary artery disease can affect blood flow, arterial volume and FFR estimation. Changes in coronary arterial flow and volume due to coronary stenosis, aortic pressure and venous pressure were examined to evaluate the potential use of flow and volume for FFR determination. This study showed that FFR can be estimated using arterial volume and a scaling coefficient corrected for aortic pressure. However, variations in venous pressure were found to introduce some error in FFR estimation. A relative form of FFR was introduced and was found to cancel out the influence of pressure on coronary flow, arterial volume and FFR estimation. The use of coronary flow and arterial volume for FFR determination appears promising

  8. Additive scaling law for structural organization of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iashina, E. G.; Velichko, E. V.; Filatov, M. V.; Bouwman, W. G.; Duif, C. P.; Brulet, A.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2017-07-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) on nuclei of chicken erythrocytes demonstrates the cubic dependence of the scattering intensity Q-3 in the range of momentum transfer Q ∈10-3-10-2nm-1 . Independent spin-echo SANS measurements give the spin-echo function, which is well described by the exponential law in a range of sizes (3 ×102) -(3 ×104) nm. Both experimental dependences reflect the nature of the structural organization of chromatin in the nucleus of a living cell, which corresponds to the correlation function γ (r )=ln(ξ /r ) for r <ξ , where ξ =(3.69 ±0.07 ) ×103 nm, the size of the nucleus. It has the specific scaling property of the logarithmic fractal γ (r /a )=γ (r )+ln(a ), i.e., the scaling down by a gives an additive constant to the correlation function, which distinguishes it from the mass fractal, which is characterized by multiplicative constant.

  9. Scaling law and enhancement of lift generation of an insect-size hovering flexible wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chang-kwon; Shyy, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We report a comprehensive scaling law and novel lift generation mechanisms relevant to the aerodynamic functions of structural flexibility in insect flight. Using a Navier–Stokes equation solver, fully coupled to a structural dynamics solver, we consider the hovering motion of a wing of insect size, in which the dynamics of fluid–structure interaction leads to passive wing rotation. Lift generated on the flexible wing scales with the relative shape deformation parameter, whereas the optimal lift is obtained when the wing deformation synchronizes with the imposed translation, consistent with previously reported observations for fruit flies and honeybees. Systematic comparisons with rigid wings illustrate that the nonlinear response in wing motion results in a greater peak angle compared with a simple harmonic motion, yielding higher lift. Moreover, the compliant wing streamlines its shape via camber deformation to mitigate the nonlinear lift-degrading wing–wake interaction to further enhance lift. These bioinspired aeroelastic mechanisms can be used in the development of flapping wing micro-robots. PMID:23760300

  10. An exponential scaling law for the strain dependence of the Nb3Sn critical current density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordini, B; Alknes, P; Bottura, L; Rossi, L; Valentinis, D

    2013-01-01

    The critical current density of the Nb 3 Sn superconductor is strongly dependent on the strain applied to the material. In order to investigate this dependence, it is a common practice to measure the critical current of Nb 3 Sn strands for different values of applied axial strain. In the literature, several models have been proposed to describe these experimental data in the reversible strain region. All these models are capable of fitting the measurement results in the strain region where data are collected, but tend to predict unphysical trends outside the range of data, and especially for large strain values. In this paper we present a model of a new strain function, together with the results obtained by applying the new scaling law on relevant datasets. The data analyzed consisted of the critical current measurements at 4.2 K that were carried out under applied axial strain at Durham University and the University of Geneva on different strand types. With respect to the previous models proposed, the new scaling function does not present problems at large strain values, has a lower number of fitting parameters (only two instead of three or four), and is very stable, so that, starting from few experimental points, it can estimate quite accurately the strand behavior in a strain region where there are no data. A relationship is shown between the proposed strain function and the elastic strain energy, and an analogy is drawn with the exponential form of the McMillan equation for the critical temperature. (paper)

  11. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and “wind pressure” resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional “drive parameter,” is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance

  12. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auluck, S. K. H., E-mail: skhauluck@gmail.com, E-mail: skauluck@barc.gov.in [Physics Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai (India)

    2014-09-15

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and “wind pressure” resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional “drive parameter,” is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance.

  13. Preionization Techniques in a kJ-Scale Dense Plasma Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povilus, Alexander; Shaw, Brian; Chapman, Steve; Podpaly, Yuri; Cooper, Christopher; Falabella, Steve; Prasad, Rahul; Schmidt, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) is a type of z-pinch device that uses a high current, coaxial plasma gun with an implosion phase to generate dense plasmas. These devices can accelerate a beam of ions to MeV-scale energies through strong electric fields generated by instabilities during the implosion of the plasma sheath. The formation of these instabilities, however, relies strongly on the history of the plasma sheath in the device, including the evolution of the gas breakdown in the device. In an effort to reduce variability in the performance of the device, we attempt to control the initial gas breakdown in the device by seeding the system with free charges before the main power pulse arrives. We report on the effectiveness of two techniques developed for a kJ-scale DPF at LLNL, a miniature primer spark gap and pulsed, 255nm LED illumination. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Characterization of long-scale-length plasmas produced from plastic foam targets for laser plasma instability (LPI) research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2017-10-01

    We report on an experimental effort to produce plasmas with long scale lengths for the study of parametric instabilities, such as two plasmon decay (TPD) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), under conditions relevant to fusion plasma. In the current experiment, plasmas are formed from low density (10-100 mg/cc) CH foam targets irradiated by Nike krypton fluoride laser pulses (λ = 248 nm, 1 nsec FWHM) with energies up to 1 kJ. This experiment is conducted with two primary diagnostics: the grid image refractometer (Nike-GIR) to measure electron density and temperature profiles of the coronas, and time-resolved spectrometers with absolute intensity calibration to examine scattered light features of TPD or SRS. Nike-GIR was recently upgraded with a 5th harmonic probe laser (λ = 213 nm) to access plasma regions near quarter critical density of 248 nm light (4.5 ×1021 cm-3). The results will be discussed with data obtained from 120 μm scale-length plasmas created on solid CH targets in previous LPI experiments at Nike. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  15. Plasma interaction with emmissive surface with Debye-scale grooves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweigert, Irina; Burton, Thomas S.; Thompson, Gregory B.; Langendorf, Samuel; Walker, Mitchell L. R.; Keidar, Michael

    2018-04-01

    The sheath development over emissive grooved surface in dc discharge plasma controlled by an electron beam is studied in the experiment and in 2D kinetic simulations. Grooved hexagonal boron nitride surfaces with different aspect ratios, designed to mimic the erosion channels, were exposed to an argon plasma. The characteristic size of the grooves (1 mm and 5 mm) is about of the Debye length. The secondary electrons emission from the grooved surfaces is provided by the bombardment with energetic electrons originated from the heated powered cathode. The transition between a developed and a collapsed sheaths near emissive surface takes place with an increase of the beam electron energy. For grooved emissive surfaces, the sheath transition happens at essentially higher voltage compared to the planar one. This phenomenon is analyzed in the terms of the electron energy distribution function.

  16. Investigation of small-scale tokamak plasma turbulence by correlative UHR backscattering diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusakov, E Z; Gurchenko, A D; Altukhov, A B; Bulanin, V V; Esipov, L A; Kantor, M Yu; Kouprienko, D V; Lashkul, S I; Petrov, A V; Stepanov, A Yu

    2006-01-01

    Fine scale turbulence is considered nowadays as a possible candidate for the explanation of anomalous ion and electron energy transport in magnetized fusion plasmas. The unique correlative upper hybrid resonance backscattering (UHR BS) technique is applied at the FT-2 tokamak for investigation of density fluctuations excited in this turbulence. The measurements are carried out in Ohmic discharge at several values of plasma current and density and during current ramp up experiment. The moveable focusing antennas set have been used in experiments allowing probing out of equatorial plane. The radial wave number spectra of the small-scale component of tokamak turbulence are determined from the correlation data with high spatial resolution. Two small-scale modes possessing substantially different phase velocities are observed in plasma under conditions when the threshold for the electron temperature gradient mode excitation is overcome. The possibility of plasma poloidal velocity profile determination using the UHR BS signal is demonstrated

  17. A micro-scale plasma spectrometer for space and plasma edge applications (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scime, E. E., E-mail: escime@wvu.edu; Keesee, A. M.; Elliott, D. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Dugas, M.; Ellison, S.; Tersteeg, J.; Wagner, G. [Advanced Research Corporation, White Bear Lake, Minnesota 55110 (United States); Barrie, A.; Rager, A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A plasma spectrometer design based on advances in lithography and microchip stacking technologies is described. A series of curved plate energy analyzers, with an integrated collimator, is etched into a silicon wafer. Tests of spectrometer elements, the energy analyzer and collimator, were performed with a 5 keV electron beam. The measured collimator transmission and energy selectivity were in good agreement with design targets. A single wafer element could be used as a plasma processing or fusion first wall diagnostic.

  18. Resistive Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation of Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, X.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Jardin, S.C.; Lowe, L.L.; Park, W.; Strauss, H.R.

    2001-01-01

    Although high-temperature plasmas in laboratory magnetic fusion confinements are sufficiently collisionless that formal fluid closures are difficult to attain, the resistive MHD model has proven, by comparison with experimental data, to be useful for describing the large scale dynamics of magnetized plasmas. Resistive MHD model consists of Faraday's law for the evolution of the magnetic field and Navier-Stokes equation for the plasma flow. These equations are closed by the Ohm's law and an equation of state for the plasma

  19. Constraining self-interacting dark matter with scaling laws of observed halo surface densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, Kyrylo; Boyarsky, Alexey; Bringmann, Torsten; Sokolenko, Anastasia

    2018-04-01

    The observed surface densities of dark matter halos are known to follow a simple scaling law, ranging from dwarf galaxies to galaxy clusters, with a weak dependence on their virial mass. Here we point out that this can not only be used to provide a method to determine the standard relation between halo mass and concentration, but also to use large samples of objects in order to place constraints on dark matter self-interactions that can be more robust than constraints derived from individual objects. We demonstrate our method by considering a sample of about 50 objects distributed across the whole halo mass range, and by modelling the effect of self-interactions in a way similar to what has been previously done in the literature. Using additional input from simulations then results in a constraint on the self-interaction cross section per unit dark matter mass of about σ/mχlesssim 0.3 cm2/g. We expect that these constraints can be significantly improved in the future, and made more robust, by i) an improved modelling of the effect of self-interactions, both theoretical and by comparison with simulations, ii) taking into account a larger sample of objects and iii) by reducing the currently still relatively large uncertainties that we conservatively assign to the surface densities of individual objects. The latter can be achieved in particular by using kinematic observations to directly constrain the average halo mass inside a given radius, rather than fitting the data to a pre-selected profile and then reconstruct the mass. For a velocity-independent cross-section, our current result is formally already somewhat smaller than the range 0.5‑5 cm2/g that has been invoked to explain potential inconsistencies between small-scale observations and expectations in the standard collisionless cold dark matter paradigm.

  20. Energy harvesting with stacked dielectric elastomer transducers: Nonlinear theory, optimization, and linearized scaling law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutcuoglu, A.; Majidi, C.

    2014-12-01

    Using principles of damped harmonic oscillation with continuous media, we examine electrostatic energy harvesting with a "soft-matter" array of dielectric elastomer (DE) transducers. The array is composed of infinitely thin and deformable electrodes separated by layers of insulating elastomer. During vibration, it deforms longitudinally, resulting in a change in the capacitance and electrical enthalpy of the charged electrodes. Depending on the phase of electrostatic loading, the DE array can function as either an actuator that amplifies small vibrations or a generator that converts these external excitations into electrical power. Both cases are addressed with a comprehensive theory that accounts for the influence of viscoelasticity, dielectric breakdown, and electromechanical coupling induced by Maxwell stress. In the case of a linearized Kelvin-Voigt model of the dielectric, we obtain a closed-form estimate for the electrical power output and a scaling law for DE generator design. For the complete nonlinear model, we obtain the optimal electrostatic voltage input for maximum electrical power output.

  1. Ohm's law in turbulent plasmas and beta limitations by anomalous diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrass, K.

    1978-01-01

    For axisymmetric diffusive equilibria a condition is derived by means of a generalized Ohm's law. It relates some effective outward particle flux to the toroidal current density. An approximate version of it requires that the corresponding effective diffusion velocity Vsub(D)sup(*) must not exceed the poloidal magnetic diffusion velocity Vsub(m). The simple version of Ohm's law as used in transport calculations only applies if Vsub(D)sup(*)<< Vsub(m). A preliminary discussion is performed for the case of anomalous diffusion due to trapped particle instabilities. (author)

  2. Systematic study of intermediate-scale structures of equatorial plasma irregularities in the ionosphere based on CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann eLühr

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Equatorial spread-F ionospheric plasma irregularities on the night-side, commonly called equatorial plasma bubbles (EPB, include electron density variations over a wide range of spatial scales. Here we focus on intermediate-scale structures ranging from 100 m to 10 km, which play an important role in the evolution of EPBs. High-resolution CHAMP magnetic field measurements sampled along north-south track at 50 Hz are interpreted in terms of diamagnetic effect for illustrating the details of electron density variations. We provide the first comprehensive study on intermediate-scale density structures associated with EPBs, covering a whole solar cycle from 2000 to 2010. The large number of detected events, almost 9000, allows us to draw a detailed picture of the plasma fine structure. The occurrence of intermediate-scale events is strongly favoured by high solar flux. During times of F10.7 < 100 sfu practically no events were observed. The longitudinal distribution of our events with respect to season or local time agrees well with that of the EPBs, qualifying the fine structure as a common feature, but the occurrence rates are smaller by a factor of 4 during the period 2000-2005. Largest amplitude electron density variations appear at the poleward boundaries of plasma bubbles. Above the dip-equator recorded amplitudes are small and fall commonly below our resolution. Events can generally be found at local times between 19 and 24 LT, with a peak lasting from 20 to 22 LT. The signal spectrum can be approximated by a power law. Over the frequency range 1 – 25 Hz we observe spectral indices between -1.4 and -2.6 with peak occurrence rates around -1.9. There is a weak dependence observed of the spectral index on local time. Towards later hours the spectrum becomes shallower. Similarly for the latitude dependence, there is a preference of shallower spectra for latitudes poleward of the ionisation anomaly crest. Our data suggest that the generation of

  3. Evaluation of Large-scale Data to Detect Irregularity in Payment for Medical Services. An Extended Use of Benford's Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junghyun A; Kim, Minki; Yoon, Seokjoon

    2016-05-17

    Sophisticated anti-fraud systems for the healthcare sector have been built based on several statistical methods. Although existing methods have been developed to detect fraud in the healthcare sector, these algorithms consume considerable time and cost, and lack a theoretical basis to handle large-scale data. Based on mathematical theory, this study proposes a new approach to using Benford's Law in that we closely examined the individual-level data to identify specific fees for in-depth analysis. We extended the mathematical theory to demonstrate the manner in which large-scale data conform to Benford's Law. Then, we empirically tested its applicability using actual large-scale healthcare data from Korea's Health Insurance Review and Assessment (HIRA) National Patient Sample (NPS). For Benford's Law, we considered the mean absolute deviation (MAD) formula to test the large-scale data. We conducted our study on 32 diseases, comprising 25 representative diseases and 7 DRG-regulated diseases. We performed an empirical test on 25 diseases, showing the applicability of Benford's Law to large-scale data in the healthcare industry. For the seven DRG-regulated diseases, we examined the individual-level data to identify specific fees to carry out an in-depth analysis. Among the eight categories of medical costs, we considered the strength of certain irregularities based on the details of each DRG-regulated disease. Using the degree of abnormality, we propose priority action to be taken by government health departments and private insurance institutions to bring unnecessary medical expenses under control. However, when we detect deviations from Benford's Law, relatively high contamination ratios are required at conventional significance levels.

  4. On the critical or geometrical nature of the observed scaling laws associated with the fracture and faulting processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potirakis, Stelios M.; Kopanas, John; Antonopoulos, George; Nomicos, Constantinos; Eftaxias, Konstantinos

    2015-04-01

    One of the largest controversial issues of the materials science community is the interpretation of scaling laws associated with the fracture and faulting processes. Especially, an important open question is whether the spatial and temporal complexity of earthquakes and fault structures, above all the interpretation of the observed scaling laws, emerge from geometrical and material built-in heterogeneities or from the critical behavior inherent to the nonlinear equations governing the earthquake dynamics. Crack propagation is the basic mechanism of material's failure. A number of laboratory studies carried out on a wide range of materials have revealed the existence of EMEs during fracture experiments, while these emissions are ranging in a wide frequency spectrum, i.e., from the kHz to the MHz bands. A crucial feature observed on the laboratory scale is that the MHz EME systematically precedes the corresponding kHz one. The aforementioned crucial feature is observed in geophysical scale, as well. The remarkable asynchronous appearance of these two EMEs both on the laboratory and the geophysical scale implies that they refer to different final stages of faulting process. Accumulated laboratory, theoretical and numerical evidence supports the hypothesis that the MHz EME is emitted during the fracture of process of heterogeneous medium surrounding the family of strong entities (asperities) distributed along the fault sustaining the system. The kHz EME is attributed to the family of asperities themselves. We argue in terms of the fracture induced pre-seismic MHz-kHz EMEs that the scaling laws associated with the fracture of heterogeneous materials emerge from the critical behavior inherent to the nonlinear equations governing their dynamics (second-order phase transition), while the scaling laws associated with the fracture of family of asperities have geometric nature, namely, are rooted in the fractal nature of the population of asperities.

  5. Scaling-law for the energy dependence of anatomic power spectrum in dedicated breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Glick, Stephen J.; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the x-ray photon energy dependence of the anatomic power spectrum of the breast when imaged with dedicated breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: A theoretical framework for scaling the empirically determined anatomic power spectrum at one x-ray photon energy to that at any given x-ray photon energy when imaged with dedicated breast CT was developed. Theory predicted that when the anatomic power spectrum is fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, where k and {beta} are fit coefficients and f is spatial frequency, the exponent {beta} would be independent of x-ray photon energy (E), and the amplitude k scales with the square of the difference in energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues. Twenty mastectomy specimens based numerical phantoms that were previously imaged with a benchtop flat-panel cone-beam CT system were converted to 3D distribution of glandular weight fraction (f{sub g}) and were used to verify the theoretical findings. The 3D power spectrum was computed in terms of f{sub g} and after converting to linear attenuation coefficients at monoenergetic x-ray photon energies of 20-80 keV in 5 keV intervals. The 1D power spectra along the axes were extracted and fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}. The energy dependence of k and {beta} were analyzed. Results: For the 20 mastectomy specimen based numerical phantoms used in the study, the exponent {beta} was found to be in the range of 2.34-2.42, depending on the axis of measurement. Numerical simulations agreed with the theoretical predictions that for a power-law anatomic spectrum of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, {beta} was independent of E and k(E) =k{sub 1}[{mu}{sub g}(E) -{mu}{sub a}(E)]{sup 2}, where k{sub 1} is a constant, and {mu}{sub g}(E) and {mu}{sub a}(E) represent the energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues, respectively. Conclusions: Numerical

  6. Questioning the Status Quo: Can Stakeholder Participation Improve Implementation of Small-Scale Mining Laws in Ghana?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Osei-Kojo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ghana’s small-scale mining sector faces complex challenges, including environmental degradation and pollution, loss of life and increased health risks, despite several years of implementation of small-scale mining laws. These challenges, generally, are known to have escalated because of illegal small-scale mining, locally known as “galamsey”. Despite the illegal status of this category of miners, this paper examines the extent to which stakeholder participation can improve implementation of mining regulations and also address the marginalization of these miners. This paper about stakeholder participation is timely because news reports in mid-2016 mentioned that the Government of Ghana, despite many years of disengagement, is now planning to engage with galamsey operators, in terms of registration, as part of measures to effectively regulate the activities of small-scale miners. Findings from fieldwork indicate that (1 chiefs are seldom consulted in the granting of mining licenses; (2 illegal miners do not participate in the implementation of small-scale mining laws; and (3 stakeholders, such as officers in district mining offices, feel distant from the implementation process. Against the backdrop of these findings, it remains useful to explore the extent to which effective stakeholder participation could help overcome the status quo—particularly its ramifications for both the implementation of ASM laws and the eradication of other underlying challenges the sector faces.

  7. Laser-energy scaling law for neutrons generated from nano particles Coulomb-exploded by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakabe, Shuji; Hashida, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the feasibility of compact neutron sources the yield of laser produced neutrons is scaled by the laser energy. High-energy ions are generated by Coulomb explosion of clusters through intense femtosecond laser-cluster interactions. The laser energy scaling law of the neutron yield is estimated using the laser intensity scaling law for the energy of ions emitted from clusters Coulomb-exploded by an intense laser pulse. The neutron yield for D (D, n) He shows the potential of compact neutron sources with modern laser technology, and the yield for p (Li, n) Be shows much higher than that for Li (p, n) Be with the assumption of 500 nm-class cluster Coulomb explosion. (author)

  8. The Cooling Law and the Search for a Good Temperature Scale, from Newton to Dalton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo

    2011-01-01

    The research on the cooling law began with an article by Newton published in 1701. Later, many studies were performed by other scientists confirming or confuting Newton's law. This paper presents a description and an interpretation of Newton's article, provides a short overview of the research conducted on the topic during the 18th century, and…

  9. Spectral classification of medium-scale high-latitude F region plasma density irregularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.; Rodriguez, P.; Szuszczewicz, E.P.; Sachs Freeman Associates, Bowie, MD)

    1985-01-01

    The high-latitude ionosphere represents a highly structured plasma. Rodriguez and Szuszczewicz (1984) reported a wide range of plasma density irregularities (150 km to 75 m) at high latitudes near 200 km. They have shown that the small-scale irregularities (7.5 km to 75 m) populated the dayside oval more often than the other phenomenological regions. It was suggested that in the lower F region the chemical recombination is fast enough to remove small-scale irregularities before convection can transport them large distances, leaving structured particle precipitation as the dominant source term for irregularities. The present paper provides the results of spectral analyses of pulsed plasma probe data collected in situ aboard the STP/S3-4 satellite during the period March-September 1978. A quantitative description of irregularity spectra in the high-latitude lower F region plasma density is given. 22 references

  10. ROLE OF LAW IN CONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF SMALL SCALE INDUSTRIES THROUGH NORMATIVE PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Sutrisno

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of law has become an absolute prerequisite that must exist in the dynamics of civil society. It is to achieve justice, certainty, and expediency, so the works of it will not be separated from such a noble mission. On the other side, the law is likely inseparable from the fields of meta-juridical, including economics. The expectations of the interference of law into economy, makes the existence of justice for the business players can be realized through the enacted product legislation. Regulations concerning investments and partnerships have the intent to build self-reliance and empowerment for small industry players so as to compete in the era of economic globalization. Laws employed as the instrument of social change to strengthen the capitalization of small industry and business empowerment through the training and development of small industries, as normatively mandated by law.

  11. Size and shape characteristics of drumlins, derived from a large sample, and associated scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Chris D.; Hughes, Anna L. C.; Greenwood, Sarah L.; Spagnolo, Matteo; Ng, Felix S. L.

    2009-04-01

    - L space, and records a scale-dependent maximum elongation limit (approximated by Emax = L1/3, when L measured in metres). For a given length, for some reason as yet unknown, drumlins do not exceed the elongation ratio defined by this scaling law. We also report and compare our statistics to an amalgamated sample (25,907 drumlins) of measures derived from around 50 published investigations. Any theory must be able to explain the drumlin statistics and fundamental scaling properties reported herein and they thus provide powerful tests for drumlin modelling.

  12. Nonlinear MHD dynamics of tokamak plasmas on multiple time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, S.E.; Schnack, D.D.; Brennan, D.P.; Gianakon, T.A.; Sovinec, C.R.

    2003-01-01

    Two types of numerical, nonlinear simulations using the NIMROD code are presented. In the first simulation, we model the disruption occurring in DIII-D discharge 87009 as an ideal MHD instability driven unstable by neutral-beam heating. The mode grows faster than exponential, but on a time scale that is a hybrid of the heating rate and the ideal MHD growth rate as predicted by analytic theory. The second type of simulations, which occur on a much longer time scale, focus on the seeding of tearing modes by sawteeth. Pressure effects play a role both in the exterior region solutions and in the neoclassical drive terms. The results of both simulations are reviewed and their implications for experimental analysis is discussed. (author)

  13. Forsterite Shock Temperatures and Entropy: New Scaling Laws for Impact Melting and Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, E.; Root, S.; Kraus, R. G.; Townsend, J. P.; Spaulding, D.; Stewart, S. T.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Fratanduono, D.; Millot, M. A.; Mattsson, T. R.; Hanshaw, H. L.

    2017-12-01

    The observed masses, radii and temperatures of thousands of extra-solar planets have challenged our theoretical understanding of planet formation and planetary structures. Planetary materials are subject to extreme pressures and temperatures during formation and within the present-day interiors of large bodies. Here, we focus on improving understanding of the physical properties of rocky planets for calculations of internal structure and the outcomes of giant impacts. We performed flyer plate impact experiments on forsterite [Mg2SiO4] on the Z-Machine at Sandia National Laboratory and decaying shock temperature measurements at the Omega EP laser at U. Rochester. At Z, planar, supported shock waves are generated in single crystal samples, permitting observation of both compressed and released states. Using available static and dynamic thermodynamic data, we calculate absolute entropy and heat capacity along the forsterite shock Hugoniot. Entropy and heat capacity on the Hugoniot are larger than previous estimates. Our data constrain the thermodynamic properties of forsterite liquid at high pressures and temperatures and the amount of melt and vapor produced during impact events. For an ambient pressure of 1 bar, shock-vaporization begins upon reaching the liquid region on the forsterite Hugoniot (about 200 GPa). Using hydrocode simulations of giant impacts between rocky planets with forsterite mantles and iron cores and the new experimentally-constrained forsterite shock entropy, we present a new scaling law for the fraction of mantle that is melted or vaporized by the initial shock wave. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Prepared by the Center

  14. Dynamic evaluation of seismic hazard and risks based on the Unified Scaling Law for Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossobokov, V. G.; Nekrasova, A.

    2016-12-01

    We continue applying the general concept of seismic risk analysis in a number of seismic regions worldwide by constructing seismic hazard maps based on the Unified Scaling Law for Earthquakes (USLE), i.e. log N(M,L) = A + B•(6 - M) + C•log L, where N(M,L) is the expected annual number of earthquakes of a certain magnitude M within an seismically prone area of linear dimension L, A characterizes the average annual rate of strong (M = 6) earthquakes, B determines the balance between magnitude ranges, and C estimates the fractal dimension of seismic locus in projection to the Earth surface. The parameters A, B, and C of USLE are used to assess, first, the expected maximum magnitude in a time interval at a seismically prone cell of a uniform grid that cover the region of interest, and then the corresponding expected ground shaking parameters. After a rigorous testing against the available seismic evidences in the past (e.g., the historically reported macro-seismic intensity or paleo data), such a seismic hazard map is used to generate maps of specific earthquake risks for population, cities, and infrastructures. The hazard maps for a given territory change dramatically, when the methodology is applied to a certain size moving time window, e.g. about a decade long for an intermediate-term regional assessment or exponentially increasing intervals for a daily local strong aftershock forecasting. The of dynamical seismic hazard and risks assessment is illustrated by applications to the territory of Greater Caucasus and Crimea and the two-year series of aftershocks of the 11 October 2008 Kurchaloy, Chechnya earthquake which case-history appears to be encouraging for further systematic testing as potential short-term forecasting tool.

  15. Seismic hazard assessment based on the Unified Scaling Law for Earthquakes: the Greater Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasova, A.; Kossobokov, V. G.

    2015-12-01

    Losses from natural disasters continue to increase mainly due to poor understanding by majority of scientific community, decision makers and public, the three components of Risk, i.e., Hazard, Exposure, and Vulnerability. Contemporary Science is responsible for not coping with challenging changes of Exposures and their Vulnerability inflicted by growing population, its concentration, etc., which result in a steady increase of Losses from Natural Hazards. Scientists owe to Society for lack of knowledge, education, and communication. In fact, Contemporary Science can do a better job in disclosing Natural Hazards, assessing Risks, and delivering such knowledge in advance catastrophic events. We continue applying the general concept of seismic risk analysis in a number of seismic regions worldwide by constructing regional seismic hazard maps based on the Unified Scaling Law for Earthquakes (USLE), i.e. log N(M,L) = A - B•(M-6) + C•log L, where N(M,L) is the expected annual number of earthquakes of a certain magnitude M within an seismically prone area of linear dimension L. The parameters A, B, and C of USLE are used to estimate, first, the expected maximum magnitude in a time interval at a seismically prone cell of a uniform grid that cover the region of interest, and then the corresponding expected ground shaking parameters including macro-seismic intensity. After a rigorous testing against the available seismic evidences in the past (e.g., the historically reported macro-seismic intensity), such a seismic hazard map is used to generate maps of specific earthquake risks (e.g., those based on the density of exposed population). The methodology of seismic hazard and risks assessment based on USLE is illustrated by application to the seismic region of Greater Caucasus.

  16. Emergence of good conduct, scaling and zipf laws in human behavioral sequences in an online world.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Thurner

    Full Text Available We study behavioral action sequences of players in a massive multiplayer online game. In their virtual life players use eight basic actions which allow them to interact with each other. These actions are communication, trade, establishing or breaking friendships and enmities, attack, and punishment. We measure the probabilities for these actions conditional on previous taken and received actions and find a dramatic increase of negative behavior immediately after receiving negative actions. Similarly, positive behavior is intensified by receiving positive actions. We observe a tendency towards antipersistence in communication sequences. Classifying actions as positive (good and negative (bad allows us to define binary 'world lines' of lives of individuals. Positive and negative actions are persistent and occur in clusters, indicated by large scaling exponents α ~ 0.87 of the mean square displacement of the world lines. For all eight action types we find strong signs for high levels of repetitiveness, especially for negative actions. We partition behavioral sequences into segments of length n (behavioral 'words' and 'motifs' and study their statistical properties. We find two approximate power laws in the word ranking distribution, one with an exponent of κ ~ -1 for the ranks up to 100, and another with a lower exponent for higher ranks. The Shannon n-tuple redundancy yields large values and increases in terms of word length, further underscoring the non-trivial statistical properties of behavioral sequences. On the collective, societal level the timeseries of particular actions per day can be understood by a simple mean-reverting log-normal model.

  17. Micro- and macro-scale self-organization in a dissipative plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoric, M.M.; Sato, T.; Maluckov, A.; Jovanovic, M.S.

    1998-10-01

    We study a nonlinear three-wave interaction in an open dissipative model of stimulated Raman backscattering in a plasma. A hybrid kinetic-fluid scheme is proposed to include anomalous kinetic dissipation due to electron trapping and plasma wave breaking. We simulate a finite plasma with open boundaries and vary a transport parameter to examine a route to spatio-temporal complexity. An interplay between self-organization at micro (kinetic) and macro (wave/fluid) scales is revealed through quasi-periodic and intermittent evolution of dynamical variables, dissipative structures and related entropy rates. An evidence that entropy rate extrema correspond to structural transitions is found. (author)

  18. Laser scattering in large-scale-length plasmas relevant to National Ignition Facility hohlraums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGowan, B.J.; Berger, R.L.; Afeyan, B.B.

    1996-10-01

    We have used homogeneous plasmas of high density (up to 1.3 X 10 21 electrons per cm 3 ) and temperature (∼ 3 keV) with large density scale lengths (∼2 mm) to approximate conditions within National Ignition Facility (NIF) hohlraums. Within these plasmas we have studied the dependence of stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin (SBS) scattering on beam smoothing and plasma conditions at the relevant laser intensity (3ω, 2 X 10 15 Wcm 2 ). Both SBS and SRS are reduced by the use of smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD)

  19. Validación estructural del Wong-Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS: estudio preliminar en adultos / Structural validation of the Wong-Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS: preliminary study in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Merino Soto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: La medición de la inteligencia emocional ha tenido muchas propuestas en formato de autorreporte. Una de estas es el Wong-Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS, creada para el contexto laboral y que evalúa valoración y expresión de las emociones propias, valoración y reconocimiento de las emociones en otros, regulación de las propias emociones y uso de la emoción para facilitar el desempeño. Hay poca evidencia psicométrica sobre el Wong-Law Emotional Intelligence Scale en habla hispana, lo que posiblemente conduce a que sea también poco utilizado en la investigación y práctica profesional. El objetivo del presente estudio es presentar los primeros resultados de la validez de la estructura interna del WLEIS en adultos peruanos. Fueron 120 participantes (72 mujeres entre 17 y 59 años, quienes respondieron al cuestionario mediados por internet. Se analizó la estructura interna mediante metodología de ecuaciones estructurales. Se halló una satisfactoria estructura de 4 factores y elevadas cargas factoriales de los ítems; las correlaciones interfactores fueron altas o moderadamente altas; y la consistencia interna fue buena. Se concluye que los primeros resultados son aceptables para asumir que el modelo de Wong-Law también es aparentemente generalizable. ABSTRACT: The measurement of emotional intelligence has had many proposals in the form of self-report. One of these is the Wong-Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS, created for the job context and which evaluates valuation and the expression of self-emotions; valuation and recognition of emotions in others; regulation of one’s own emotions and the use of emotion to facilitate performance. There is little psychometric evidence regarding the Wong-Law Emotional Intelligence Scale in the Spanish speaking world, which could lead to it also being little used in research and professional practice. The objective of this study is to present the first results of the internal

  20. Multi-scale semi-ideal magnetohydrodynamics of a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazdenkov, S.; Sato, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Kunihiko.

    1995-09-01

    An analytical model of fast spatial flattening of the toroidal current density and q-profile at the nonlinear stage of (m = 1/n = 1) kink instability of a tokamak plasma is presented. The flattening is shown to be an essentially multi-scale phenomenon which is characterized by, at least, two magnetic Reynolds numbers. The ordinary one, R m , is related with a characteristic radial scale-length, while the other, R m * , corresponds to a characteristic scale-length of plasma inhomogeneity along the magnetic field line. In a highly conducting plasma inside the q = 1 magnetic surface, where q value does not much differ from unity, plasma evolution is governed by a multi-scale non-ideal dynamics characterized by two well-separated magnetic Reynolds numbers, R m and R m * ≡ (1 - q) R m , where R m * - O(1) and R m >> 1. This dynamics consistently explains two seemingly contradictory features recently observed in a numerical simulation [Watanabe et al., 1995]: i) the current profile (q-profile) is flattened in the magnetohydrodynamic time scale within the q = 1 rational surface; ii) the magnetic surface keeps its initial circular shape during this evolution. (author)

  1. Multi-scale semi-ideal magnetohydrodynamics of a tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazdenkov, S.; Sato, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Kunihiko

    1995-09-01

    An analytical model of fast spatial flattening of the toroidal current density and q-profile at the nonlinear stage of (m = 1/n = 1) kink instability of a tokamak plasma is presented. The flattening is shown to be an essentially multi-scale phenomenon which is characterized by, at least, two magnetic Reynolds numbers. The ordinary one, R{sub m}, is related with a characteristic radial scale-length, while the other, R{sub m}{sup *}, corresponds to a characteristic scale-length of plasma inhomogeneity along the magnetic field line. In a highly conducting plasma inside the q = 1 magnetic surface, where q value does not much differ from unity, plasma evolution is governed by a multi-scale non-ideal dynamics characterized by two well-separated magnetic Reynolds numbers, R{sub m} and R{sub m}{sup *} {identical_to} (1 - q) R{sub m}, where R{sub m}{sup *} - O(1) and R{sub m} >> 1. This dynamics consistently explains two seemingly contradictory features recently observed in a numerical simulation [Watanabe et al., 1995]: (i) the current profile (q-profile) is flattened in the magnetohydrodynamic time scale within the q = 1 rational surface; (ii) the magnetic surface keeps its initial circular shape during this evolution. (author).

  2. A scaling law for the local CHF on the external bottom side of a fully submerged reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.; Liu, Y.C.

    1997-01-01

    A scaling law for estimating the local critical heat flux on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel that is fully submerged in water has been developed from the results of an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model for pool boiling on a downward facing curved heating surface. The scaling law accounts for the effects of the size of the vessel, the level of liquid subcooling, the intrinsic properties of the fluid, and the spatial variation of the local critical heat flux along the heating surface. It is found that for vessels with diameters considerably larger than the characteristic size of the vapor masses, the size effect on the local critical heat flux is limited almost entirely to the effect of subcooling associated with the local liquid head. When the subcooling effect is accounted for separately, the local CHF limit is nearly independent of the vessel size. Based upon the scaling law developed in this work, it is possible to merge, within the experimental uncertainties, all the available local CHF data obtained for various vessel sizes under both saturated and subcooled boiling conditions into a single curve. Applications of the scaling law to commercial-size vessels have been made for various system pressures and water levels above the heated vessel. Over the range of conditions explored in this study, the local CHF limit is found to increase by a factor of two or more from the bottom center to the upper edge of the vessel. Meanwhile, the critical heat flux at a given angular position of the heated vessel is also found to increase appreciably with the system pressure and the water level

  3. A probabilistic model for the identification of confinement regimes and edge localized mode behavior, with implications to scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdoolaege, Geert; Van Oost, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Pattern recognition is becoming an important tool in fusion data analysis. However, fusion diagnostic measurements are often affected by considerable statistical uncertainties, rendering the extraction of useful patterns a significant challenge. Therefore, we assume a probabilistic model for the data and perform pattern recognition in the space of probability distributions. We show the considerable advantage of our method for identifying confinement regimes and edge localized mode behavior, and we discuss the potential for scaling laws.

  4. Re-examining the effect of low and intermediate mode number perturbations on Ignition Metrics Scaling Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malka, Elad; Shvarts, Dov

    2017-10-01

    We re-examine the way 2/3D effects on scaling laws for ignition metrics, such as the generalized Lawson Criterion (GLC) and the Ignition Threshold Factor (ITF). These scaling laws were derived for 1D symmetrical case and 2/3D perturbations [Hann et al. PoP 2010; Lindl et al., PoP 2014; Betti et al., PoP 2010]. The main cause for the difference between the 1D and the 2/3D scaling laws in those works, is heat conduction losses from the hot-spot bubbles to the cold shell [Kishony and Shvarts, PoP 2001]. This ``dry out'' of the bubbles is the dominant mechanism for intermediate mode number perturbations (6hot spot. These two effects do not have an effective 1D analogue and therefore needs a more complicated model. A consistent extension of the ignition metrics for l <=6, accounting for both energy loss mechanisms, will be presented and compared with previous models and results. This work was supported by the LLNL under subcontract B614207.

  5. Model of detached plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.; Chance, M.

    1986-07-01

    Recently a tokamak plasma was observed in TFTR that was not limited by a limiter or a divertor. A model is proposed to explain this equilibrium, which is called a detached plasma. The model consists of (1) the core plasma where ohmic heating power is lost by anomalous heat conduction and (2) the shell plasma where the heat from the core plasma is radiated away by the atomic processes of impurity ions. A simple scaling law is proposed to test the validity of this model

  6. Dynamical nature of inviscid power law for two dimensional turbulences and self-consistent spectrum and transport of plasma filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhnag, Y.Z.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    On basis of equal-time correlation theory (a non-perturbative approach) inviscid power laws of 2D isotropic plasma turbulences with one Lagrangian inviscid constant of motion are unambiguously solved by determining the dynamical characteristics. Two distinct types of induced transport according to the divergence of the inverse correlation length in the inviscid limit are revealed. This analysis also suggests a physically reasonable closure. The self-consistent system (a set of integral equations) for plasma filaments is investigated in detail, and is found to be a nonlinear differential eigenvalue problem for diffusion coefficient D, whereon the Dyson-like (integral) equation plays a role of boundary condition. This new type of transport is non-Bohm-like, and is very much like the quasilinear formula even in the strong turbulence regime. Physically, it arises from synchronization of shrinking squared correlation length with decorrelation time, for which the ''mixing-length'' breaks down. The shrinkage of correlation length is a characteristic pertaining to the new type of turbulence; its relationship with the turbulence observed in supershot regime on TFTR is commented on. (author). 12 refs, 2 figs

  7. A Scale-Invariant Model of Statistical Mechanics and Modified Forms of the First and the Second Laws of Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrab, Siavash H.; Pitch, Nancy (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A scale-invariant statistical theory of fields is presented that leads to invariant definition of density, velocity, temperature, and pressure, The definition of Boltzmann constant is introduced as k(sub k) = m(sub k)v(sub k)c = 1.381 x 10(exp -23) J x K(exp -1), suggesting that the Kelvin absolute temperature scale is equivalent to a length scale. Two new state variables called the reversible heat Q(sub rev) = TS and the reversible work W(sub rev) = PV are introduced. The modified forms of the first and second law of thermodynamics are presented. The microscopic definition of heat (work) is presented as the kinetic energy due to the random (peculiar) translational, rotational, and pulsational motions. The Gibbs free energy of an element at scale Beta is identified as the total system energy at scale (Beta-1), thus leading to an invariant form of the first law of thermodynamics U(sub Beta) = Q(sub Beta) - W(sub Beta) +N(e3)U(sub Beta-1).

  8. Magnetic reconnection in plasma under inertial confinement fusion conditions driven by heat flux effects in Ohm's law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, A S; Thomas, A G R; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A

    2014-03-14

    In the interaction of high-power laser beams with solid density plasma there are a number of mechanisms that generate strong magnetic fields. Such fields subsequently inhibit or redirect electron flows, but can themselves be advected by heat fluxes, resulting in complex interplay between thermal transport and magnetic fields. We show that for heating by multiple laser spots reconnection of magnetic field lines can occur, mediated by these heat fluxes, using a fully implicit 2D Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code. Under such conditions, the reconnection rate is dictated by heat flows rather than Alfvènic flows. We find that this mechanism is only relevant in a high β plasma. However, the Hall parameter ωcτei can be large so that thermal transport is strongly modified by these magnetic fields, which can impact longer time scale temperature homogeneity and ion dynamics in the system.

  9. Efficient coupling of 527 nm laser beam power to a long scale-length plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, J.D.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S.H.; MacKinnon, A.J.; Froula, D.H.; Gregori, G.; Kruer, W.L.; Meezan, N.B.; Suter, L.J.; Williams, E.A.; Bahr, R.; Seka, W.

    2006-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that application of laser smoothing schemes including smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS) increases the intensity range for efficient coupling of frequency doubled (527 nm) laser light to a long scale-length plasma with n e /n cr equals 0.14 and T e equals 2 keV. (authors)

  10. Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in Earth's plasma sheet. From more than 80 Cluster plasma sheet crossings (660 h data at the altitude of about 15–20 RE in the summer and fall of 2001, we have identified 116 Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and 35 Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have estimated typical values of the scale size and life time of the CLRs and the CGRs. We find that a majority of the observed ECRs are rather stationary in space, but varying in time. Assuming that the ECRs are cylindrically shaped and equal in size, we conclude that the typical scale size of the ECRs is 2 RE≲ΔSECR≲5 RE. The ECRs hence occupy a significant portion of the mid altitude plasma sheet. Moreover, the CLRs appear to be somewhat larger than the CGRs. The life time of the ECRs are of the order of 1–10 min, consistent with the large scale magnetotail MHD simulations of Birn and Hesse (2005. The life time of the CGRs is somewhat shorter than for the CLRs. On time scales of 1–10 min, we believe that ECRs rise and vanish in significant regions of the plasma sheet, possibly oscillating between load and generator character. It is probable that at least some of the observed ECRs oscillate energy back and forth in the plasma sheet instead of channeling it to the ionosphere.

  11. Animal Construction as a Free Boundary Problem: Evidence of Fractal Scaling Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolis, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    We suggest that the main features of animal construction can be understood as the sum of locally independent actions of non-interacting individuals subjected to the global constraints imposed by the nascent structure. We first formulate an analytically tractable oscopic description of construction which predicts a 1/3 power law for how the length of the structure grows with time. We further show how the power law is modified when biases in random walk performed by the constructors as well as halting times between consecutive construction steps are included.

  12. Challenges in Upscaling Geomorphic Transport Laws: Scale-dependence of Local vs. Non-local Formalisms and Derivation of Closures (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Ganti, V. K.; Passalacqua, P.

    2010-12-01

    Nonlinear geomorphic transport laws are often derived from mechanistic considerations at a point, and yet they are implemented on 90m or 30 m DEMs, presenting a mismatch in the scales of derivation and application of the flux laws. Since estimates of local slopes and curvatures are known to depend on the scale of the DEM used in their computation, two questions arise: (1) how to meaningfully compensate for the scale dependence, if any, of local transport laws? and (2) how to formally derive, via upscaling, constitutive laws that are applicable at larger scales? Recently, non-local geomorphic transport laws for sediment transport on hillslopes have been introduced using the concept of an integral flux that depends on topographic attributes in the vicinity of a point of interest. In this paper, we demonstrate the scale dependence of local nonlinear hillslope sediment transport laws and derive a closure term via upscaling (Reynolds averaging). We also show that the non-local hillslope transport laws are inherently scale independent owing to their non-local, scale-free nature. These concepts are demonstrated via an application to a small subbasin of the Oregon Coast Range using 2m LiDAR topographic data.

  13. The application of J integral to measure cohesive laws under large-scale yielding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutianos, Stergios; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2016-01-01

    A method is developed to obtain the mode I cohesive law of elastic-plastic materials using a Double Cantilever Beam sandwich specimen loaded with pure bending moments. The approach is based on the validity of the J integral for materials having a non-linear stress-strain relationship without...

  14. Studies of thermal energy confinement scaling in PDX plasmas: D0 → H+ limiter discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, S.M.; Goldston, R.J.; Bell, M.

    1984-06-01

    Experiments were performed on the PDX tokamak to study plasma heating and β scaling with higher power, near-perpendicular neutral beam injection. The data taken during these experiments were analyzed using a time-dependent data interpretation code (TRANSP) to study the transport and thermal confinement scaling over a wide range of plasma parameters. This study focuses on results from experiments with D 0 injection into H + plasmas using graphite rail limiters, a = 40 to 44 cm, R = 143 cm, I/sub p/ = 200 to 480 kA, B/sub T/ = 0.7 to 2.2 T, and typically anti n/sub e/ = 2.5 to 4.2 x 10 13 cm -3 . The results of this study indicate that for both ohmic and neutral beam heated discharges the energy flow out of the plasma is dominated by anomalous electron losses, attributed to electron thermal conduction. The ion conduction losses are well described to electron thermal conduction. The ion conduction losses are well described by neoclassical theory; however, the total ion loss influences the power balance significantly only at high toroidal fields and high plasma currents

  15. The scaling of edge parameters in jet with plasma input power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erents, S.K.; McCracken, G.M.; Harbour, P.J.; Clement, S.; Summers, D.D.R.; Tagle, J.A.; Kock, L. de

    1989-01-01

    The scaling of edge parameters of density and temperature with central density and ohmic power in JET has been presented previously for the discrete limiter geometry and more recently for the new belt limiter configuration. However, the scaling with plasma current (I p ) is difficult to interpret because varying I p does not only change the input power but also the safety factor qs and consequently the SOL thickness. The use of additional heating at constant current allows more direct observation of the effects of changing heating power. In this paper we present data in which the plasma input power is increased by ICRH, (Pt<20MW), using a 3MA target plasma, and compare data for different plasma currents using discrete and belt limiter geometries. Edge data is presented from Langmuir probes in tiles at the top of the torus, when the tokamak is operated in single null magnetic separatrix (divertor) mode, as well as for probes in the main plasma boundary to contrast these data with limiter data. (author) 3 refs., 4 figs

  16. MMS Observations of Ion-Scale Magnetic Island in the Magnetosheath Turbulent Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. Y.; Sahraoui, F.; Retino, A.; Contel, O. Le; Yuan, Z. G.; Chasapis, A.; Aunai, N.; Breuillard, H.; Deng, X. H.; Zhou, M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, first observations of ion-scale magnetic island from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission in the magnetosheath turbulent plasma are presented. The magnetic island is characterized by bipolar variation of magnetic fields with magnetic field compression, strong core field, density depletion, and strong currents dominated by the parallel component to the local magnetic field. The estimated size of magnetic island is about 8 di, where di is the ion inertial length. Distinct particle behaviors and wave activities inside and at the edges of the magnetic island are observed: parallel electron beam accompanied with electrostatic solitary waves and strong electromagnetic lower hybrid drift waves inside the magnetic island and bidirectional electron beams, whistler waves, weak electromagnetic lower hybrid drift waves, and strong broadband electrostatic noise at the edges of the magnetic island. Our observations demonstrate that highly dynamical, strong wave activities and electron-scale physics occur within ion-scale magnetic islands in the magnetosheath turbulent plasma..

  17. Geometry and scaling laws of excursion and iso-sets of enstrophy and dissipation in isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsas, José Hugo; Szalay, Alexander S.; Meneveau, Charles

    2018-04-01

    Motivated by interest in the geometry of high intensity events of turbulent flows, we examine the spatial correlation functions of sets where turbulent events are particularly intense. These sets are defined using indicator functions on excursion and iso-value sets. Their geometric scaling properties are analysed by examining possible power-law decay of their radial correlation function. We apply the analysis to enstrophy, dissipation and velocity gradient invariants Q and R and their joint spatial distributions, using data from a direct numerical simulation of isotropic turbulence at Reλ ≈ 430. While no fractal scaling is found in the inertial range using box-counting in the finite Reynolds number flow considered here, power-law scaling in the inertial range is found in the radial correlation functions. Thus, a geometric characterisation in terms of these sets' correlation dimension is possible. Strong dependence on the enstrophy and dissipation threshold is found, consistent with multifractal behaviour. Nevertheless, the lack of scaling of the box-counting analysis precludes direct quantitative comparisons with earlier work based on multifractal formalism. Surprising trends, such as a lower correlation dimension for strong dissipation events compared to strong enstrophy events, are observed and interpreted in terms of spatial coherence of vortices in the flow.

  18. Multi-machine scaling of the main SOL parallel heat flux width in tokamak limiter plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Jan; Pitts, R.A.; Adámek, Jiří; Arnoux, G.; Bak, J.-G.; Brezinsek, S.; Dimitrova, Miglena; Goldston, R.J.; Gunn, J. P.; Havlíček, Josef; Hong, S.-H.; Janky, Filip; LaBombard, B.; Marsen, S.; Maddaluno, G.; Nie, L.; Pericoli, V.; Popov, Tsv.; Pánek, Radomír; Rudakov, D.; Seidl, Jakub; Seo, D.S.; Shimada, M.; Silva, C.; Stangeby, P.C.; Viola, B.; Vondráček, Petr; Wang, H.; Xu, G.S.; Xu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 7 (2016), č. článku 074005. ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/12/2327; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-10723S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * ITER * SOL decay length * SOL width * scaling Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.392, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0741-3335/58/7/074005

  19. Plasma turbulence driven by transversely large-scale standing shear Alfvén waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Rao, Sathyanarayan

    2012-01-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study generation of turbulence consisting of transversely small-scale dispersive Alfvén and electrostatic waves when plasma is driven by a large-scale standing shear Alfvén wave (LS-SAW). The standing wave is set up by reflecting a propagating LS-SAW. The ponderomotive force of the standing wave generates transversely large-scale density modifications consisting of density cavities and enhancements. The drifts of the charged particles driven by the ponderomotive force and those directly caused by the fields of the standing LS-SAW generate non-thermal features in the plasma. Parametric instabilities driven by the inherent plasma nonlinearities associated with the LS-SAW in combination with the non-thermal features generate small-scale electromagnetic and electrostatic waves, yielding a broad frequency spectrum ranging from below the source frequency of the LS-SAW to ion cyclotron and lower hybrid frequencies and beyond. The power spectrum of the turbulence has peaks at distinct perpendicular wave numbers (k ⊥ ) lying in the range d e −1 -6d e −1 , d e being the electron inertial length, suggesting non-local parametric decay from small to large k ⊥ . The turbulence spectrum encompassing both electromagnetic and electrostatic fluctuations is also broadband in parallel wave number (k || ). In a standing-wave supported density cavity, the ratio of the perpendicular electric to magnetic field amplitude is R(k ⊥ ) = |E ⊥ (k ⊥ )/|B ⊥ (k ⊥ )| ≪ V A for k ⊥ d e A is the Alfvén velocity. The characteristic features of the broadband plasma turbulence are compared with those available from satellite observations in space plasmas.

  20. Measuring Black men's police-based discrimination experiences: Development and validation of the Police and Law Enforcement (PLE) Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Devin; Bowleg, Lisa; Del Río-González, Ana Maria; Tschann, Jeanne M; Agans, Robert P; Malebranche, David J

    2017-04-01

    Although social science research has examined police and law enforcement-perpetrated discrimination against Black men using policing statistics and implicit bias studies, there is little quantitative evidence detailing this phenomenon from the perspective of Black men. Consequently, there is a dearth of research detailing how Black men's perspectives on police and law enforcement-related stress predict negative physiological and psychological health outcomes. This study addresses these gaps with the qualitative development and quantitative test of the Police and Law Enforcement (PLE) Scale. In Study 1, we used thematic analysis on transcripts of individual qualitative interviews with 90 Black men to assess key themes and concepts and develop quantitative items. In Study 2, we used 2 focus groups comprised of 5 Black men each (n = 10), intensive cognitive interviewing with a separate sample of Black men (n = 15), and piloting with another sample of Black men (n = 13) to assess the ecological validity of the quantitative items. For Study 3, we analyzed data from a sample of 633 Black men between the ages of 18 and 65 to test the factor structure of the PLE, as we all as its concurrent validity and convergent/discriminant validity. Qualitative analyses and confirmatory factor analyses suggested that a 5-item, 1-factor measure appropriately represented respondents' experiences of police/law enforcement discrimination. As hypothesized, the PLE was positively associated with measures of racial discrimination and depressive symptoms. Preliminary evidence suggests that the PLE is a reliable and valid measure of Black men's experiences of discrimination with police/law enforcement. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G., E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Martin, E., E-mail: martin@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Boscary, J., E-mail: jean.boscary@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Camus, G., E-mail: camus@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Herb, V., E-mail: herb@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Schlosser, J., E-mail: jacques.schlosser@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F., E-mail: frederic.escourbiac@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Missirlian, M., E-mail: marc.missirlian@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2011-10-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  2. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevet, G.; Martin, E.; Boscary, J.; Camus, G.; Herb, V.; Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Missirlian, M.

    2011-01-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  3. The application of J integral to measure cohesive laws in materials undergoing large scale yielding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Goutianos, Stergios

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility of determining cohesive laws by the J-integral approach for materials having non-linear stress-strain behaviour (e.g. polymers and composites) by the use of a DCB sandwich specimen, consisting of stiff elastic beams bonded to the non-linear test material, loaded with pure...... bending moments. For a wide range of parameters of the non-linear material, the plastic unloading during crack extension is small, resulting in J integral values (fracture resistance) that deviate maximum 15% from the work of the cohesive traction. Thus the method can be used to extract the cohesive laws...... directly from experiments without any presumption about their shape. Finally, the DCB sandwich specimen was also analysed using the I integral to quantify the overestimation of the steady-state fracture resistance obtained using the J integral based method....

  4. Safety and risk, a comparison on an international scale with regard to society, law and economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compes, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    More than 130 experts of different nations and different fields of science met to discuss the following subjects: Traffic and transport, labour and employment, products and commodities, energy and environment (safety concepts for fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants, international harmonisation of nuclear technical standards, harmonisation of environmental law in a European context). All contributions are presented in their original language, with abstracts in German, English, and French. (HP) [de

  5. Scaling of mean inertia and theoretical basis for a log law in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Jimmy; Morrill-Winter, Caleb; Klewicki, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    Log law in the mean streamwise velocity (U) for pipes/channels is well accepted based on the derivation from the mean momentum balance (MMB) equation and support from experimental data. For flat plate turbulent boundary layers (TBLs), however, there is only empirical evidence and a theoretical underpinning of the kind available for pipes/channels in lacking. The main difficultly is the mean inertia (MI) term in the MMB equation, which, unlike in pipes/channels, is not a constant in TBLs. We present results from our paper (JFM `` 2017, Vol 813, pp 594-617), where the MI term for TBL is transformed so as to render it invariant in the outer region, corroborated with high Re (δ+) data from Melbourne Wind Tunnel and New Hampshire Flow Physics Facility. The transformation is possible because the MI term in the TBL has a `shape' which becomes invariant with increasing δ+ and a `magnitude' which is proportional to 1 /δ+ . The transformed equation is then employed to derive a log law for U with κ an order one (von-Karman) constant. We also show that the log law begins at y+ =C1√{δ+} , and the peak location of the Reynolds shear stress, ym+ =C2√{δ+} , where, C1 3.6 and C2 2.17 are from high Re data. Australian Research Council and the US National Science Foundation.

  6. Long time scale plasma dynamics driven by the double tearing mode in reversed shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Y.; Azumi, M.; Kishimoto, Y.; Leboeuf, J.N.

    2003-01-01

    The new nonlinear destabilization process is found in the nonlinear phase of the double tearing mode (DTM) by using the reduced MHD equations in a helical symmetry. The nonlinear destabilization causes the abrupt growth of DTM and subsequent collapse after long time scale evolution in the Rutherford-type regime. The nonlinear growth of the DTM is suddenly triggered, when the triangular deformation of magnetic islands with sharp current point at the x-point around the outer rational surface exceeds a certain value. Such structure deformation is accelerated during the nonlinear growth phase. Decreasing the resistivity increases the sharpness of the triangularity and the spontaneous growth rate in the abrupt growth phase is almost independent on the resistivity. Current point formation is also confirmed in the multi-helicity simulation, where the magnetic fields become stochastic between two rational surfaces. (author)

  7. Long time scale plasma dynamics driven by the double tearing mode in reversed shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yasutomo; Azumi, M.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The new nonlinear destabilization process is found in the nonlinear phase of the double tearing mode(DTM) by using the reduced MHD equations in a helical symmetry. The nonlinear destabilization causes the abrupt growth of DTM and subsequent collapse after long time scale evolution in the Rutherford-type regime. The nonlinear growth of the DTM is suddenly triggered, when the triangular deformation of magnetic islands with sharp current point at the x-point around the outer rational surface exceeds a certain value. Such structure deformation is accelerated during the nonlinear growth phase. Decreasing the resistivity increases the sharpness of the triangularity and the spontaneous growth rate in the abrupt growth phase is almost independent on the resistivity. Current point formation is also confirmed in the multi-helicity simulation, where the magnetic fields become stochastic between two rational surfaces. (author)

  8. Scaling laws and technology development strategies for biorefineries and bioenergy plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Michael W

    2009-12-01

    The economies of scale of larger biorefineries or bioenergy plants compete with the diseconomies of scale of transporting geographically distributed biomass to a central location. This results in an optimum plant size that depends on the scaling parameters of the two contributions. This is a fundamental aspect of biorefineries and bioenergy plants and has important consequences for technology development as "bigger is better" is not necessarily true. In this paper we explore the consequences of these scaling effects via a simplified model of biomass transportation and plant costs. Analysis of this model suggests that there is a need for much more sophisticated technology development strategies to exploit the consequences of these scaling effects. We suggest three potential strategies in terms of the scaling parameters of the system.

  9. Heating of field-reversed plasma rings estimated with two scaling models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, J.W.

    1978-05-18

    Scaling calculations are presented of the one temperature heating of a field-reversed plasma ring. Two sharp-boundary models of the ring are considered: the long thin approximation and a pinch model. Isobaric, adiabatic, and isovolumetric cases are considered, corresponding to various ways of heating the plasma in a real experiment by using neutral beams, or by raising the magnetic field. It is found that the shape of the plasma changes markedly with heating. The least sensitive shape change (as a function of temperature) is found for the isovolumetric heating case, which can be achieved by combining neutral beam heating with compression. The complications introduced by this heating problem suggest that it is desirable, if possible, to create a field reversed ring which is already quite hot, rather than cold.

  10. Effect of air gap on uniformity of large-scale surface-wave plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan Chaohui; Hu Xiwei; Jiang Zhonghe; Liu Minghai

    2009-01-01

    The effect of air gap on the uniformity of large-scale surface-wave plasma (SWP) in a rectangular chamber device is studied by using three-dimensional numerical analyses based on the finite difference time-domain (FDTD) approximation to Maxwell's equations and plasma fluid model. The spatial distributions of surface wave excited by slot-antenna array and the plasma parameters such as electron density and temperature are presented. For different air gap thicknesses, the results show that the existence of air gap would severely weaken the excitations of the surface wave and thereby the SWP. Thus the air gap should be eliminated completely in the design of the SWP source, which is opposite to the former research results. (authors)

  11. The Role of Kinetic Alfven Waves in Plasma Transport in an Ion-scale Flux Rope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, B.; Li, W.; Wang, C.; Dai, L.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic flux ropes, if generated by multiply X-line reconnections, would be born as a crater type one, meaning the plasma density within is relatively high. They will then evolve into typical flux ropes as plasma are transported away along the magnetic field lines [Zhang et al., 2010]. In this study, we report an ion-scale flux rope observed by MMS on November 28, 2016, which is accompanied by strong kinetic Alfven waves (KAW). The related wave parallel electric field can effectively accelerate electrons inside the flux rope by Landau resonance, resulting into a significant decrease of the electron at 90° pitch angle. The change of electron pitch angle distribution would cause the rapid plasma transport along the magnetic field lines, and help the flux rope evolve into a strong magnetic core in a short time. This wave-particle interaction would be a candidate mechanism to explain the rareness of crater flux ropes in reality.

  12. Scale-lengths and instabilities in magnetized classical and relativistic plasma fluid models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diver, D A; Laing, E W

    2015-01-01

    The validity of the traditional plasma continuum is predicated on a hierarchy of scale-lengths, with the Debye length being considered to be effectively unresolvable in the continuum limit. In this article, we revisit the strong magnetic field case in which the Larmor radius is comparable or smaller than the Debye length in the classical plasma, and also for a relativistic plasma. Fresh insight into the validity of the continuum assumption in each case is offered, including a fluid limit on the Alfvén speed that may impose restrictions on the validity of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in some solar and fusion contexts. Additional implications concerning the role of the firehose instability are also explored. (paper)

  13. Aspect Ratio Scaling of Ideal No-wall Stability Limits in High Bootstrap Fraction Tokamak Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, J.E.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Gates, D.A.; Kaye, S.M.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Maingi, R.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stutman, D.

    2003-01-01

    Recent experiments in the low aspect ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] have achieved normalized beta values twice the conventional tokamak limit at low internal inductance and with significant bootstrap current. These experimental results have motivated a computational re-examination of the plasma aspect ratio dependence of ideal no-wall magnetohydrodynamic stability limits. These calculations find that the profile-optimized no-wall stability limit in high bootstrap fraction regimes is well described by a nearly aspect ratio invariant normalized beta parameter utilizing the total magnetic field energy density inside the plasma. However, the scaling of normalized beta with internal inductance is found to be strongly aspect ratio dependent at sufficiently low aspect ratio. These calculations and detailed stability analyses of experimental equilibria indicate that the nonrotating plasma no-wall stability limit has been exceeded by as much as 30% in NSTX in a high bootstrap fraction regime

  14. A new scaling law for temperature variance profile in the mixing zone of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin; Xu, Wei; He, Xiao-Zhou; Yik, Hiu-Fai; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Schumacher, Jorg; Tong, Penger

    2017-11-01

    We report a combined experimental and numerical study of the scaling properties of the temperature variance profile η(z) along the central z axis of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a thin disk cell and an upright cylinder of aspect ratio unity. In the mixing zone outside the thermal boundary layer region, the measured η(z) is found to scale with the cell height H in both cells and obey a power law, η(z) (z/H)ɛ, with the obtained values of ɛ being very close to -1. Based on the experimental and numerical findings, we derive a new equation for η(z) in the mixing zone, which has a power-law solution in good agreement with the experimental and numerical results. Our work thus provides a common framework for understanding the effect of boundary layer fluctuations on the scaling properties of the temperature variance profile in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. This work was supported in part by Hong Kong Research Grants Council.

  15. Conceptual design for accelerator-driven sodium-cooled sub-critical transmutation reactors using scale laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Gu; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The feasibility study on conceptual design methodology for accelerator-driven sodium-cooled sub-critical transmutation reactors has been conducted to optimize the design parameters from the scale laws and validates the reactor performance with the integrated code system. A 1000 MWth sodium-cooled sub-critical transmutation reactor has been scaled and verified through the methodology in this paper, which is referred to Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). A Pb-Bi target material and a partitioned fuel are the liquid phases, and they are cooled by the circulation of secondary Pb-Bi coolant and by primary sodium coolant, respectively. Overall key design parameters are generated from the scale laws and they are improved and validated by the integrated code system. Integrated Code System (ICS) consists of LAHET, HMCNP, ORIGEN2, and COMMIX codes and some files. Through ICS the target region, the core region, and thermal-hydraulic related regions are analyzed once-through Results of conceptual design are attached in this paper. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  16. Experimental verification of the scaling laws for CFB boilers of different designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirek Paweł

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper flow dynamic similarity criteria have been presented to reflect the macroscopic flow pattern in the combustion chamber of large-scale circulating fluidised bed boilers. The proposed scaling rules have been verified on two cold models of CFB boilers operating in Tauron Wytwarzanie S.A. - El. Lagisza division (scale factor 1/20 and Fortum Power and Heat Poland Sp. z o. o. Czestochowa division (scale factor 1/10 – working with the power of 966 MWth and 120 MWth, respectively. As follows from the results of measurements, regardless of CFB boiler’s geometry the use of a defined set of criterial numbers allows to obtain satisfactory agreement between the suspension density distributions registered in the CFB boilers and scaling models.

  17. Scaling-laws of human broadcast communication enable distinction between human, corporate and robot Twitter users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Gabriela; Faisal, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Human behaviour is highly individual by nature, yet statistical structures are emerging which seem to govern the actions of human beings collectively. Here we search for universal statistical laws dictating the timing of human actions in communication decisions. We focus on the distribution of the time interval between messages in human broadcast communication, as documented in Twitter, and study a collection of over 160,000 tweets for three user categories: personal (controlled by one person), managed (typically PR agency controlled) and bot-controlled (automated system). To test our hypothesis, we investigate whether it is possible to differentiate between user types based on tweet timing behaviour, independently of the content in messages. For this purpose, we developed a system to process a large amount of tweets for reality mining and implemented two simple probabilistic inference algorithms: 1. a naive Bayes classifier, which distinguishes between two and three account categories with classification performance of 84.6% and 75.8%, respectively and 2. a prediction algorithm to estimate the time of a user's next tweet with an R(2) ≈ 0.7. Our results show that we can reliably distinguish between the three user categories as well as predict the distribution of a user's inter-message time with reasonable accuracy. More importantly, we identify a characteristic power-law decrease in the tail of inter-message time distribution by human users which is different from that obtained for managed and automated accounts. This result is evidence of a universal law that permeates the timing of human decisions in broadcast communication and extends the findings of several previous studies of peer-to-peer communication.

  18. Scaling-laws of human broadcast communication enable distinction between human, corporate and robot Twitter users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Tavares

    Full Text Available Human behaviour is highly individual by nature, yet statistical structures are emerging which seem to govern the actions of human beings collectively. Here we search for universal statistical laws dictating the timing of human actions in communication decisions. We focus on the distribution of the time interval between messages in human broadcast communication, as documented in Twitter, and study a collection of over 160,000 tweets for three user categories: personal (controlled by one person, managed (typically PR agency controlled and bot-controlled (automated system. To test our hypothesis, we investigate whether it is possible to differentiate between user types based on tweet timing behaviour, independently of the content in messages. For this purpose, we developed a system to process a large amount of tweets for reality mining and implemented two simple probabilistic inference algorithms: 1. a naive Bayes classifier, which distinguishes between two and three account categories with classification performance of 84.6% and 75.8%, respectively and 2. a prediction algorithm to estimate the time of a user's next tweet with an R(2 ≈ 0.7. Our results show that we can reliably distinguish between the three user categories as well as predict the distribution of a user's inter-message time with reasonable accuracy. More importantly, we identify a characteristic power-law decrease in the tail of inter-message time distribution by human users which is different from that obtained for managed and automated accounts. This result is evidence of a universal law that permeates the timing of human decisions in broadcast communication and extends the findings of several previous studies of peer-to-peer communication.

  19. EMAPS: An Efficient Multiscale Approach to Plasma Systems with Non-MHD Scale Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omelchenko, Yuri A. [SciberQuest, Inc., Del Mar, CA (United States); Karimabadi, Homa [SciberQuest, Inc., Del Mar, CA (United States)

    2014-10-14

    Using Discrete-Event Simulation (DES) as a novel paradigm for time integration of large-scale physics-driven systems, we have achieved significant breakthroughs in simulations of multi-dimensional magnetized plasmas where ion kinetic and finite Larmor radius (FLR) and Hall effects play a crucial role. For these purposes we apply a unique asynchronous simulation tool: a parallel, electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code, HYPERS (Hybrid Particle Event-Resolved Simulator), which treats plasma electrons as a charge neutralizing fluid and solves a self-consistent set of non-radiative Maxwell, electron fluid equations and ion particle equations on a structured computational grid. HYPERS enables adaptive local time steps for particles, fluid elements and electromagnetic fields. This ensures robustness (stability) and efficiency (speed) of highly dynamic and nonlinear simulations of compact plasma systems such spheromaks, FRCs, ion beams and edge plasmas. HYPERS is a unique asynchronous code that has been designed to serve as a test bed for developing multi-physics applications not only for laboratory plasma devices but generally across a number of plasma physics fields, including astrophysics, space physics and electronic devices. We have made significant improvements to the HYPERS core: (1) implemented a new asynchronous magnetic field integration scheme that preserves local divB=0 to within round-off errors; (2) Improved staggered-grid discretizations of electric and magnetic fields. These modifications have significantly enhanced the accuracy and robustness of 3D simulations. We have conducted first-ever end-to-end 3D simulations of merging spheromak plasmas. The preliminary results show: (1) tilt-driven relaxation of a freely expanding spheromak to an m=1 Taylor helix configuration and (2) possibility of formation of a tilt-stable field-reversed configuration via merging and magnetic reconnection of two double-sided spheromaks with opposite helicities.

  20. On relative spatial diffusion in plasma and fluid turbulences: clumps, Richardson's law and intrinsic stochasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misguich, J.H.; Balescu, R.

    1981-02-01

    Three different time regimes are presented for relative spatial diffusion of charged particles in fluctuating electric fields, which behave like tau 3 , exp (tau) and tau 3 , respectively. The first regime, corresponding to a quasi-linear description of the trajectories, is analogous to the one observed in fluid turbulence and is valid in the limit of a small amplitude turbulent spectrum, or for not too small initial separation of the particles. The third regime, appearing for long times, describes the diffusion of independent particles at very large separations. Its existence is ensured by the nonlinear renormalization of the propagators. The second, intermediate, regime appears in a stochastic treatment of the renormalization effect for particles with a very small spatial and velocity difference, and describes Dupree's clumps diffusion. The appearance of the corresponding regime is similar to that of the Suzuki scaling regime of non-linear Langevin equations. It is also shown that the clumps have a behaviour similar to an intrinsic stochasticity, but which is of extrinsic nature. Similar failure of the quasi-linear approximation for spacific velocity domains has been previously studied and solved for classical Landau collisions, as well as for pitch angle diffusion where renormalization effects have been proved also to be important

  1. Increased plasma levels of IL-6 in bacteremic periodontis patients after scaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forner, Lone; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Bacteremia frequently occurs after dental treatment. Periodontal inflammation may influence the incidence, magnitude and duration of bacteremia. The presence of circulating oral bacteria or bacterial components may induce cytokine synthesis in blood cells, which may contribute to the development...... or exacerbation of atherosclerosis. The present study tested the hypothesis that bacteremia occurring after scaling in periodontitis patients results in altered plasma levels of cytokines. Twenty periodontitis patients were subjected to scaling. Blood samples at baseline and at 0.5, 10 and 30 minutes postscaling...

  2. Theory-based scaling of the SOL width in circular limited tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, F.D.; Ricci, P.; Labit, B.; Furno, I.; Jolliet, S.; Loizu, J.; Mosetto, A.; Arnoux, G.; Silva, C.; Gunn, J.P.; Horacek, J.; Kočan, M.; LaBombard, B.

    2013-01-01

    A theory-based scaling for the characteristic length of a circular, limited tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) is obtained by considering the balance between parallel losses and non-linearly saturated resistive ballooning mode turbulence driving anomalous perpendicular transport. The SOL size increases with plasma size, resistivity, and safety factor q. The scaling is verified against flux-driven non-linear turbulence simulations, which reveal good agreement within a wide range of dimensionless parameters, including parameters closely matching the TCV tokamak. An initial comparison of the theory against experimental data from several tokamaks also yields good agreement. (letter)

  3. Design and fabrication of a glovebox for the Plasma Hearth Process radioactive bench-scale system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlquist, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents some of the design considerations and fabrication techniques for building a glovebox for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) radioactive bench-scale system. The PHP radioactive bench-scale system uses a plasma torch to process a variety of radioactive materials into a final vitrified waste form. The processed waste will contain plutonium and trace amounts of other radioactive materials. The glovebox used in this system is located directly below the plasma chamber and is called the Hearth Handling Enclosure (HHE). The HHE is designed to maintain a confinement boundary between the processed waste and the operator. Operations that take place inside the HHE include raising and lowering the hearth using a hydraulic lift table, transporting the hearth within the HHE using an overhead monorail and hoist system, sampling and disassembly of the processed waste and hearth, weighing the hearth, rebuilding a hearth, and sampling HEPA filters. The PHP radioactive bench-scale system is located at the TREAT facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho

  4. Scaling characteristics of one-dimensional fractional diffusion processes in the presence of power-law distributed random noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhadhaghighi, Mohsen Ghasemi

    2017-08-01

    Here, we present results of numerical simulations and the scaling characteristics of one-dimensional random fluctuations with heavy-tailed probability distribution functions. Assuming that the distribution function of the random fluctuations obeys Lévy statistics with a power-law scaling exponent, we investigate the fractional diffusion equation in the presence of μ-stable Lévy noise. We study the scaling properties of the global width and two-point correlation functions and then compare the analytical and numerical results for the growth exponent β and the roughness exponent α. We also investigate the fractional Fokker-Planck equation for heavy-tailed random fluctuations. We show that the fractional diffusion processes in the presence of μ-stable Lévy noise display special scaling properties in the probability distribution function (PDF). Finally, we numerically study the scaling properties of the heavy-tailed random fluctuations by using the diffusion entropy analysis. This method is based on the evaluation of the Shannon entropy of the PDF generated by the random fluctuations, rather than on the measurement of the global width of the process. We apply the diffusion entropy analysis to extract the growth exponent β and to confirm the validity of our numerical analysis.

  5. Scaling characteristics of one-dimensional fractional diffusion processes in the presence of power-law distributed random noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhadhaghighi, Mohsen Ghasemi

    2017-08-01

    Here, we present results of numerical simulations and the scaling characteristics of one-dimensional random fluctuations with heavy-tailed probability distribution functions. Assuming that the distribution function of the random fluctuations obeys Lévy statistics with a power-law scaling exponent, we investigate the fractional diffusion equation in the presence of μ -stable Lévy noise. We study the scaling properties of the global width and two-point correlation functions and then compare the analytical and numerical results for the growth exponent β and the roughness exponent α . We also investigate the fractional Fokker-Planck equation for heavy-tailed random fluctuations. We show that the fractional diffusion processes in the presence of μ -stable Lévy noise display special scaling properties in the probability distribution function (PDF). Finally, we numerically study the scaling properties of the heavy-tailed random fluctuations by using the diffusion entropy analysis. This method is based on the evaluation of the Shannon entropy of the PDF generated by the random fluctuations, rather than on the measurement of the global width of the process. We apply the diffusion entropy analysis to extract the growth exponent β and to confirm the validity of our numerical analysis.

  6. Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in Earth's plasma sheet. From more than 80 Cluster plasma sheet crossings (660 h data at the altitude of about 15–20 RE in the summer and fall of 2001, we have identified 116 Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and 35 Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have estimated typical values of the scale size and life time of the CLRs and the CGRs. We find that a majority of the observed ECRs are rather stationary in space, but varying in time. Assuming that the ECRs are cylindrically shaped and equal in size, we conclude that the typical scale size of the ECRs is 2 RE≲ΔSECR≲5 RE. The ECRs hence occupy a significant portion of the mid altitude plasma sheet. Moreover, the CLRs appear to be somewhat larger than the CGRs. The life time of the ECRs are of the order of 1–10 min, consistent with the large scale magnetotail MHD simulations of Birn and Hesse (2005. The life time of the CGRs is somewhat shorter than for the CLRs. On time scales of 1–10 min, we believe that ECRs rise and vanish in significant regions of the plasma sheet, possibly oscillating between load and generator character. It is probable that at least some of the observed ECRs oscillate energy back and forth in the plasma sheet instead of channeling it to the ionosphere.

  7. Visually and memory-guided grasping: aperture shaping exhibits a time-dependent scaling to Weber's law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Scott A; Mulla, Ali; Binsted, Gordon; Heath, Matthew

    2011-09-01

    The 'just noticeable difference' (JND) represents the minimum amount by which a stimulus must change to produce a noticeable variation in one's perceptual experience and is related to initial stimulus magnitude (i.e., Weber's law). The goal of the present study was to determine whether aperture shaping for visually derived and memory-guided grasping elicit a temporally dependent or temporally independent adherence to Weber's law. Participants were instructed to grasp differently sized objects (20, 30, 40, 50 and 60mm) in conditions wherein vision of the grasping environment was available throughout the response (i.e., closed-loop), when occluded at movement onset (i.e., open-loop), and when occluded for a brief (i.e., 0ms) or longer (i.e., 2000ms) delay in advance of movement onset. Within-participant standard deviations of grip aperture (i.e., the JNDs) computed at decile increments of normalized grasping time were used to determine participant's sensitivity to detecting changes in object size. Results showed that JNDs increased linearly with increasing object size from 10% to 40% of grasping time; that is, the trial-to-trial stability (i.e., visuomotor certainty) of grip aperture (i.e., the comparator) decreased with increasing object size (i.e., the initial stimulus). However, a null JND/object size scaling was observed during the middle and late stages of the response (i.e., >50% of grasping time). Most notably, the temporal relationship between JNDs and object size scaling was similar across the different visual conditions used here. Thus, our results provide evidence that aperture shaping elicits a time-dependent early, but not late, adherence to the psychophysical principles of Weber's law. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Variability of three-dimensional sea breeze structure in southern France: observations and evaluation of empirical scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobinski, P.; Bastin, S.; Dabas, A.; Delville, P.; Reitebuch, O.

    2006-08-01

    Sea-breeze dynamics in southern France is investigated using an airborne Doppler lidar, a meteorological surface station network and radiosoundings, in the framework of the ESCOMPTE experiment conducted during summer 2001 in order to evaluate the role of thermal circulations on pollutant transport and ventilation. The airborne Doppler lidar WIND contributed to three-dimensional (3-D) mapping of the sea breeze circulation in an unprecedented way. The data allow access to the onshore and offshore sea breeze extents (xsb), and to the sea breeze depth (zsb) and intensity (usb). They also show that the return flow of the sea breeze circulation is very seldom seen in this area due to (i) the presence of a systematic non zero background wind, and (ii) the 3-D structure of the sea breeze caused by the complex coastline shape and topography. A thorough analysis is conducted on the impact of the two main valleys (Rhône and Durance valleys) affecting the sea breeze circulation in the area. Finally, this dataset also allows an evaluation of the existing scaling laws used to derive the sea breeze intensity, depth and horizontal extent. The main results of this study are that (i) latitude, cumulative heating and surface friction are key parameters of the sea breeze dynamics; (ii) in presence of strong synoptic flow, all scaling laws fail in predicting the sea breeze characteristics (the sea breeze depth, however being the most accurately predicted); and (iii) the ratio zsb/usb is approximately constant in the sea breeze flow.

  9. Optimal Focusing and Scaling Law for Uniform Photo-Polymerization in a Thick Medium Using a Focused UV Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Teng Lin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a modeling study of photoinitiated polymerization in a thick polymer-absorbing medium using a focused UV laser. Transient profiles of the initiator concentration at various focusing conditions are analyzed to define the polymerization boundary. Furthermore, we demonstrate the optimal focusing conditions that yield more uniform polymerization over a larger volume than the collimated or non-optimal cases. Too much focusing with the focal length f < f* (an optimal focal length yields a fast process; however, it provides a smaller polymerization volume at a given time than in the optimal focusing case. Finally, a scaling law is derived and shows that f* is inverse proportional to the product of the extinction coefficient and the initiator initial concentration. The scaling law provides useful guidance for the prediction of optimal conditions for photoinitiated polymerization under a focused UV laser irradiation. The focusing technique also provides a novel and unique means for obtaining uniform photo-polymerization within a limited irradiation time.

  10. Numerical analysis of scaling laws for capillary rise in soils; Lois d'echelle pour l'ascension capillaire dans les sols: analyse numerique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezzoug, A.; Konig, D.; Triantafyllidis, Th. [Ruhr Bochum Univ. (Germany); Coumoulos, H.; Soga, K. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    The capillary movement of water through soils is of interest in many practical environmental engineering problems, especially problems concerning pollutant transport in soils. The potential use of the geotechnical centrifuge to study the capillary phenomena in soils has been proposed and some results have been reported. The main issue in relation is the verification of the scaling laws for the capillary phenomena in soils. However, the theoretical aspect of the capillary rise in relation to the accelerated gravity effect is still poorly understood; further investigation is required on the gravity effect on the capillary pressure, the meniscus form, the scaling of the capillary height and the scaling of the time. A theoretical analysis of the movement in capillary tube, representing soil, is presented. Scaling laws for the capillary height and the time are proposed. The effect of the contact angle changes on the scaling laws is also considered. (authors)

  11. Wall thickness dependence of the scaling law for ferroic stripe domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalan, G; Scott, J F; Schilling, A; Gregg, J M

    2007-01-01

    The periodicity of 180 0 stripe domains as a function of crystal thickness scales with the width of the domain walls, both for ferroelectric and for ferromagnetic materials. Here we derive an analytical expression for the generalized ferroic scaling factor and use this to calculate the domain wall thickness and gradient coefficients (exchange constants) in some ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials. We then use these to discuss some of the wider implications for the physics of ferroelectric nanodevices and periodically poled photonic crystals. (fast track communication)

  12. Energy loss as the origin of a universal scaling law of the elliptic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, Carlota; Pajares, Carlos [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias IGFAE, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Braun, Mikhail [Saint Petersburg State University, Department of High-Energy Physics, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    It is shown that the excellent scaling of the elliptic flow found for all centralities, species and energies from RHIC to the LHC for p{sub T} less than the saturation momentum is a consequence of the energy lost by a parton interacting with the color field produced in a nucleus-nucleus collision. In particular, the deduced shape of the scaling curve describes correctly all the data. We discuss the possible extensions to higher p{sub T}, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions as well as higher harmonics. (orig.)

  13. An allometric scaling law between gray matter and white matter of cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jihuan

    2006-01-01

    An allometric scaling relationship between cortical white and gray volumes is derived from a general model that describes brain's remarkable efficiency and prodigious communications between brain areas. The model assumes that (1) a cell's metabolic rate depends upon cell's surface; (2) the overall basal metabolic rates of brain areas depend upon their fractal structures; (3) differential brain areas have same basal metabolic rate at slow wave sleep. The obtained allometric exponent scaling white matter to gray matter is 1.2, which is very much close to Zhang and Sejnowski's observation data

  14. From HERA to the Tevatron: A scaling law in hard diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulianos, K.

    1997-01-01

    Results on hard diffraction from CDF are reviewed and compared with predictions based on the diffractive structure function of the proton measured in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The predictions are generally larger than the measured rates by a factor of ∼ 6, suggesting a breakdown of conventional factorization. Correct predictions are obtained by scaling the rapidity gap probability distribution of the diffractive structure function to the total integrated gap probability. The scaling of the gap probability is traced back to the pomeron flux renormalization hypothesis, which was introduced to unitarize the soft diffraction amplitude

  15. Empirical scaling for present ohmic heated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daughney, C.

    1975-06-01

    Empirical scaling laws are given for the average electron temperature and electron energy confinement time as functions of plasma current, average electron density, effective ion charge, toroidal magnetic field, and major and minor plasma radius. The ohmic heating is classical, and the electron energy transport is anomalous. The present scaling indicates that ohmic-heating becomes ineffective with larger experiments. (U.S.)

  16. A simple model of the plasma deflagration gun including self-consistent electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enloe, C.L.; Reinovsky, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    At the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, interest has continued for some time in energetic plasma injectors. A possible scheme for such a device is the plasma deflagration gun. When the question arose whether it would be possible to scale a deflagration gun to the multi-megajoule energy level, it became clear that a scaling law which described the fun as a circuit element and allowed one to confidently scale gun parameters would be required. The authors sought to develop a scaling law which self-consistently described the current, magnetic field, and velocity profiles in the gun. They based this scaling law on plasma parameters exclusively, abandoning the fluid approach

  17. The Mathematics of Networks Science: Scale-Free, Power-Law Graphs and Continuum Theoretical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Janice

    2012-01-01

    When hoping to initiate or sustain students' interest in mathematics teachers should always consider relevance, relevance to students' lives and in the middle and later years of instruction in high school and university, accessibility. A topic such as the mathematics behind networks science, more specifically scale-free graphs, is up-to-date,…

  18. An enquiry into the method of paired comparison: reliability, scaling, and Thurstone's Law of Comparative Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas C. Brown; George L. Peterson

    2009-01-01

    The method of paired comparisons is used to measure individuals' preference orderings of items presented to them as discrete binary choices. This paper reviews the theory and application of the paired comparison method, describes a new computer program available for eliciting the choices, and presents an analysis of methods for scaling paired choice data to...

  19. an evaluation of the indonesian law and policy on small-scale fisheries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAYAN_

    Fisheries play an important role in food security, especially in Indonesia. ... context of fulfilling animal protein needs or providing a basis for the local, ... and 42 per cent of them are women.4 Small-scale fisheries make a .... Provision of school facilities and health centres; h. ... Indonesia, the first problem lies in inequality.

  20. HRP facility for fabrication of ITER vertical target divertor full scale plasma facing units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visca, Eliseo; Roccella, S.; Candura, D.; Palermo, M.; Rossi, P.; Pizzuto, A.; Sanguinetti, G.P.; Mancini, A.; Verdini, L.; Cacciotti, E.; Cerri, V.; Mugnaini, G.; Reale, A.; Giacomi, G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • R&D activities for the manufacturing of ITER divertor high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC). • ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components. • ENEA and ANSALDO NUCLEARE jointly participate to the European program for the qualification of the manufacturing technology for the ITER divertor IVT. • Successful manufacturing by HRP (Hot Radial Pressing) of first full-scale full-W armored IVT qualification prototype. - Abstract: ENEA and Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A. (ANN) have being deeply involved in the European development activities for the manufacturing of the ITER Divertor Inner Vertical Target (IVT) plasma-facing components. During normal operation the heat flux deposited on the bottom segment of divertor is 5–10 MW/m 2 but the capability to remove up to 20 MW/m 2 during transient events of 10 s must also be demonstrated. In order to fulfill ITER requirements, ENEA has set up and widely tested a manufacturing process, named Hot Radial Pressing (HRP). The last challenge is now to fabricate full-scale prototypes of the IVT, aimed to be qualified for the next step, i.e. the series production. On the basis of the experience of manufacturing hundreds of small mock-ups, ENEA designed and installed a new suitable HRP facility. The objective of getting a final shaped plasma facing unit (PFU) that satisfies these requirements is an ambitious target because tolerances set by ITER/F4E are very tight. The setting-up of the equipment started with the fabrication of full scale and representative ‘dummies’ in which stainless steel instead of CFC or W was used for monoblocks. The results confirmed that dimensions were compliant with the required tolerances. The paper reports a brief description of the innovative HRP equipment and the dimensional check results after HRP of the first full-scale full-W PFU.

  1. HRP facility for fabrication of ITER vertical target divertor full scale plasma facing units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visca, Eliseo, E-mail: eliseo.visca@enea.it [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Roccella, S. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Candura, D.; Palermo, M. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16152 Genova (Italy); Rossi, P.; Pizzuto, A. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Sanguinetti, G.P. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16152 Genova (Italy); Mancini, A.; Verdini, L.; Cacciotti, E.; Cerri, V.; Mugnaini, G.; Reale, A.; Giacomi, G. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • R&D activities for the manufacturing of ITER divertor high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC). • ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components. • ENEA and ANSALDO NUCLEARE jointly participate to the European program for the qualification of the manufacturing technology for the ITER divertor IVT. • Successful manufacturing by HRP (Hot Radial Pressing) of first full-scale full-W armored IVT qualification prototype. - Abstract: ENEA and Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A. (ANN) have being deeply involved in the European development activities for the manufacturing of the ITER Divertor Inner Vertical Target (IVT) plasma-facing components. During normal operation the heat flux deposited on the bottom segment of divertor is 5–10 MW/m{sup 2} but the capability to remove up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} during transient events of 10 s must also be demonstrated. In order to fulfill ITER requirements, ENEA has set up and widely tested a manufacturing process, named Hot Radial Pressing (HRP). The last challenge is now to fabricate full-scale prototypes of the IVT, aimed to be qualified for the next step, i.e. the series production. On the basis of the experience of manufacturing hundreds of small mock-ups, ENEA designed and installed a new suitable HRP facility. The objective of getting a final shaped plasma facing unit (PFU) that satisfies these requirements is an ambitious target because tolerances set by ITER/F4E are very tight. The setting-up of the equipment started with the fabrication of full scale and representative ‘dummies’ in which stainless steel instead of CFC or W was used for monoblocks. The results confirmed that dimensions were compliant with the required tolerances. The paper reports a brief description of the innovative HRP equipment and the dimensional check results after HRP of the first full-scale full-W PFU.

  2. Pebble-isolation mass: Scaling law and implications for the formation of super-Earths and gas giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsch, Bertram; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Johansen, Anders; Lega, Elena; Lambrechts, Michiel; Crida, Aurélien

    2018-04-01

    The growth of a planetary core by pebble accretion stops at the so-called pebble isolation mass, when the core generates a pressure bump that traps drifting pebbles outside its orbit. The value of the pebble isolation mass is crucial in determining the final planet mass. If the isolation mass is very low, gas accretion is protracted and the planet remains at a few Earth masses with a mainly solid composition. For higher values of the pebble isolation mass, the planet might be able to accrete gas from the protoplanetary disc and grow into a gas giant. Previous works have determined a scaling of the pebble isolation mass with cube of the disc aspect ratio. Here, we expand on previous measurements and explore the dependency of the pebble isolation mass on all relevant parameters of the protoplanetary disc. We use 3D hydrodynamical simulations to measure the pebble isolation mass and derive a simple scaling law that captures the dependence on the local disc structure and the turbulent viscosity parameter α. We find that small pebbles, coupled to the gas, with Stokes number τf gap at pebble isolation mass. However, as the planetary mass increases, particles must be decreasingly smaller to penetrate the pressure bump. Turbulent diffusion of particles, however, can lead to an increase of the pebble isolation mass by a factor of two, depending on the strength of the background viscosity and on the pebble size. We finally explore the implications of the new scaling law of the pebble isolation mass on the formation of planetary systems by numerically integrating the growth and migration pathways of planets in evolving protoplanetary discs. Compared to models neglecting the dependence of the pebble isolation mass on the α-viscosity, our models including this effect result in higher core masses for giant planets. These higher core masses are more similar to the core masses of the giant planets in the solar system.

  3. Frozen Fractals all Around: Solar flares, Ampere’s Law, and the Search for Units in Scale-Free Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAteer, R. T. James

    2015-08-01

    My soul is spiraling in frozen fractals all around, And one thought crystallizes like an icy blast, I'm never going back, the past is in the past.Elsa, from Disney’s Frozen, characterizes two fundamental aspects of scale-free processes in Nature: fractals are everywhere in space; fractals can be used to probe changes in time. Self-Organized Criticality provides a powerful set of tools to study scale-free processes. It connects spatial fractals (more generically, multifractals) to temporal evolution. The drawback is that this usually results in scale-free, unit-less, indices, which can be difficult to connect to everyday physics. Here, I show a novel method that connects one of the most powerful SOC tools - the wavelet transform modulus maxima approach to calculating multifractality - to one of the most powerful equations in all of physics - Ampere’s law. In doing so I show how the multifractal spectra can be expressed in terms of current density, and how current density can then be used for the prediction of future energy release from such a system.Our physical understanding of the solar magnetic field structure, and hence our ability to predict solar activity, is limited by the type of data currently available. I show that the multifractal spectrum provides a powerful physical connection between the details of photospheric magnetic gradients of current data and the coronal magnetic structure. By decomposing Ampere’s law and comparing it to the wavelet transform modulus maximum method, I show how the scale-free Holder exponent provides a direct measure of current density across all relevant sizes. The prevalence of this current density across various scales is connected to its stability in time, and hence to the ability of the magnetic structure to store and then release energy. Hence (spatial) multifractals inform us of (future) solar activity.Finally I discuss how such an approach can be used in any study of scale-free processes, and highlight the necessary

  4. Observations of temporal and spatial behaviour of plasmas in relation to the interchange stability boundary scaling in GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, R.; Cho, T.; Kohagura, J.

    2002-01-01

    Observations of internal core plasma structural behaviour during the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) destabilization of the central cell plasmas are carried out by the use of our developed semiconductor x-ray detector arrays installed in both central cell and anchor regions of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. In the present paper, it is found from the developed x-ray diagnostics that the bulk plasmas rotate without a change in its shape and structure with an ExB velocity during the destabilization. The onset of the off-axis rotation is identified to be closely related to a scaling of the MHD stability boundary (i.e. the anchor beta requirements for stabilizing central cell hot ion plasmas). These data confirm pressure driven interchange instability in tandem mirror plasmas, and reveal the rigid rotational bulk plasma structure as the first demonstrated interior plasma property during the destabilization. (author)

  5. Transition from Connected to Fragmented Vegetation across an Environmental Gradient: Scaling Laws in Ecotone Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastner, Michael T; Oborny, Beata; Zimmermann, D K; Pruessner, Gunnar

    2009-07-01

    A change in the environmental conditions across space-for example, altitude or latitude-can cause significant changes in the density of a vegetation type and, consequently, in spatial connectivity. We use spatially explicit simulations to study the transition from connected to fragmented vegetation. A static (gradient percolation) model is compared to dynamic (gradient contact process) models. Connectivity is characterized from the perspective of various species that use this vegetation type for habitat and differ in dispersal or migration range, that is, "step length" across the landscape. The boundary of connected vegetation delineated by a particular step length is termed the " hull edge." We found that for every step length and for every gradient, the hull edge is a fractal with dimension 7/4. The result is the same for different spatial models, suggesting that there are universal laws in ecotone geometry. To demonstrate that the model is applicable to real data, a hull edge of fractal dimension 7/4 is shown on a satellite image of a piñon-juniper woodland on a hillside. We propose to use the hull edge to define the boundary of a vegetation type unambiguously. This offers a new tool for detecting a shift of the boundary due to a climate change.

  6. Investigation of a staged plasma-focus apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; McFarland, D.R.; Harries, W.L.

    1978-01-01

    A new staged plasma-focus geometry combining two Mather-type plasma-focus guns has been constructed, and the current-sheet dynamics investigated. The production of simultaneous pairs of plasma foci has been achieved. The intensities of X-ray and fusion-neutron emission were measured and found to agree with the scaling law for a plasma focus. Advantages of this new geometry include the possibility of using plasma-focus type pinches in multiple arrays at power levels beyond the validity regime of the current scaling law for a single gun. (author)

  7. Studies of small-scale plasma inhomogeneities in the cusp ionosphere using sounding rocket data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshov, Alexander A.; Spicher, Andres; Ilyasov, Askar A.; Miloch, Wojciech J.; Clausen, Lasse B. N.; Saito, Yoshifumi; Jin, Yaqi; Moen, Jøran I.

    2018-04-01

    Microprocesses associated with plasma inhomogeneities are studied on the basis of data from the Investigation of Cusp Irregularities (ICI-3) sounding rocket. The ICI-3 rocket is devoted to investigating a reverse flow event in the cusp F region ionosphere. By numerical stability analysis, it is demonstrated that inhomogeneous-energy-density-driven (IEDD) instability can be a mechanism for the excitation of small-scale plasma inhomogeneities. The Local Intermittency Measure (LIM) method also applied the rocket data to analyze irregular structures of the electric field during rocket flight in the cusp. A qualitative agreement between high values of the growth rates of the IEDD instability and the regions with enhanced LIM is observed. This suggests that IEDD instability is connected to turbulent non-Gaussian processes.

  8. Scaling experiments on plasma opening switches for inductive energy storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boller, J.R.; Commisso, R.J.; Cooperstein, G.

    1983-01-01

    A new type of fast opening switch for use with pulsed power accelerators is examined. This Plasma Opening Switch (POS) utilizes an injected carbon plasma to conduct large currents (circa 1 MA) for up to 100 ns while a vacuum inductor (circa 100 nH) is charged. The switch is then capable of opening on a short (circa 10 ns) timescale and depositing the stored energy into a load impedance. Output pulse widths and power levels are determined by the storage inductance and the load impedance. The switch operation is studied in detail both analytically and experimentally. Experiments are performed at the 5 kJ stored energy level on the Gamble I generator and at the 50 kJ level on the Gamble II generator. Results of both experiments are reported and the scaling of switch operation is discussed

  9. Existence of k⁻¹ power-law scaling in the equilibrium regions of wall-bounded turbulence explained by Heisenberg's eddy viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katul, Gabriel G; Porporato, Amilcare; Nikora, Vladimir

    2012-12-01

    The existence of a "-1" power-law scaling at low wavenumbers in the longitudinal velocity spectrum of wall-bounded turbulence was explained by multiple mechanisms; however, experimental support has not been uniform across laboratory studies. This letter shows that Heisenberg's eddy viscosity approach can provide a theoretical framework that bridges these multiple mechanisms and explains the elusiveness of the "-1" power law in some experiments. Novel theoretical outcomes are conjectured about the role of intermittency and very-large scale motions in modifying the k⁻¹ scaling.

  10. Scaling laws for perturbations in the ocean–atmosphere system following large CO2 emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Towles, N.; Olson, P.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Scaling relationships are derived for the perturbations to atmosphere and ocean variables from large transient CO2 emissions. Using the carbon cycle model LOSCAR (Zeebe et al., 2009; Zeebe, 2012b) we calculate perturbations to atmosphere temperature and total carbon, ocean temperature, total ocean carbon, pH, and alkalinity, marine sediment carbon, plus carbon-13 isotope anomalies in the ocean and atmosphere resulting from idealized CO2 emission events. The...

  11. Scaling-Laws of Flow Entropy with Topological Metrics of Water Distribution Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Francesco Santonastaso; Armando Di Nardo; Michele Di Natale; Carlo Giudicianni; Roberto Greco

    2018-01-01

    Robustness of water distribution networks is related to their connectivity and topological structure, which also affect their reliability. Flow entropy, based on Shannon’s informational entropy, has been proposed as a measure of network redundancy and adopted as a proxy of reliability in optimal network design procedures. In this paper, the scaling properties of flow entropy of water distribution networks with their size and other topological metrics are studied. To such aim, flow entropy, ma...

  12. Seismic equivalents of volcanic jet scaling laws and multipoles in acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Matthew M.; Matoza, Robin S.; Fee, David; Aldridge, David F.

    2018-04-01

    We establish analogies between equivalent source theory in seismology (moment-tensor and single-force sources) and acoustics (monopoles, dipoles and quadrupoles) in the context of volcanic eruption signals. Although infrasound (acoustic waves volcanic eruptions may be more complex than a simple monopole, dipole or quadrupole assumption, these elementary acoustic sources are a logical place to begin exploring relations with seismic sources. By considering the radiated power of a harmonic force source at the surface of an elastic half-space, we show that a volcanic jet or plume modelled as a seismic force has similar scaling with respect to eruption parameters (e.g. exit velocity and vent area) as an acoustic dipole. We support this by demonstrating, from first principles, a fundamental relationship that ties together explosion, torque and force sources in seismology and highlights the underlying dipole nature of seismic forces. This forges a connection between the multipole expansion of equivalent sources in acoustics and the use of forces and moments as equivalent sources in seismology. We further show that volcanic infrasound monopole and quadrupole sources exhibit scalings similar to seismicity radiated by volume injection and moment sources, respectively. We describe a scaling theory for seismic tremor during volcanic eruptions that agrees with observations showing a linear relation between radiated power of tremor and eruption rate. Volcanic tremor over the first 17 hr of the 2016 eruption at Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, obeyed the linear relation. Subsequent tremor during the main phase of the eruption did not obey the linear relation and demonstrates that volcanic eruption tremor can exhibit other scalings even during the same eruption.

  13. Potential medical applications of the plasma focus in the radioisotope production for PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshan, M.V.; Razaghi, S.; Asghari, F.; Rawat, R.S.; Springham, S.V.; Lee, P.; Lee, S.; Tan, T.L.

    2014-01-01

    Devices other than the accelerators are desired to be investigated for generating high energy particles to induce nuclear reaction and positron emission tomography (PET) producing radioisotopes. The experimental data of plasma focus devices (PF) are studied and the activity scaling law for External Solid Target (EST) activation is established. Based on the scaling law and the techniques to enhance the radioisotopes production, the feasibility of generating the required activity for PET imaging is studied. - Highlights: • Short lived radioisotopes for PET imaging are produced in plasma focus device. • The scaling law of the activity induced with plasma focus energy is established. • The potential medical applications of plasma focus are studied

  14. Scattering effects of small-scale density fluctuations on reflectometric measurements in a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.P.; Manso, M.E.; Serra, F.M.; Mendonca, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    When a wave propagates in a non homogeneous fluctuating plasma part of the incident energy is scattered out to the nonlinear interaction between the wave and the oscillating modes perturbing the plasma. The possibility of enhanced scattering at the cutoff layer, where reflection of the incident wave occurs, has been recently suggested as the basis of a reflectometric experiment to determine the spatial location of small scale fluctuations in a fusion plasma. Here we report on the development of a theoretical model to evaluate the flux of energy scattered by fluctuations, in order to give insight about the interpretation of measurements using a microwave reflectometry diagnostic in a tokamak. The scattered field is obtained through the resolution of a (non-homogeneous) wave propagation equation where the source term is related with the nonlinear current due to the interaction between the incident wave and local fluctuations. We use a slab model for the plasma, and an ordinary (0) wave propagation along the density gradient is considered. The amplitude of the scattered wave at the border of the plasma is estimated. In order to know the contributions to the energy scattered both from the propagation region and the reflecting layer, an approach was used where perturbations are modelled by spatial step functions at several layers. The main contribution to the scattered power comes from the cutoff region, where the electric field amplitude swells as compared with the incident value. Considering the reflectometric system recently installed on the ASDEX tokamak, and using typical density profiles, expected values of the 'swelling factor' have been numerically evaluated. The role of incoherent scattering due to drift wave activity is discussed as well as the coherent scattering due to fluctuations induced by lower hybrid (LH) waves. (author) 2 refs., 4 figs

  15. MHD model including small-scale perturbations in a plasma with temperature variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvshinov, B.N.; Mikhailovskii, A.B.

    1996-01-01

    The possibility is studied of using a hydrodynamic model to describe a magnetized plasma with density and temperature variations on scales that are arbitrary with respect to the ion Larmor radius. It is shown that the inertial component of the transverse ion thermal flux should be taken into account. This component is found from the collisionless kinetic equation. It can also be obtained from the equations of the Grad type. A set of two-dimensional hydrodynamic equations for ions is obtained with this component taken into account. These equations are used to derive model hydrodynamic expressions for the density and temperature variations. It is shown that, for large-scale perturbations (when the wavelengths are longer than the ion Larmor radius), the expressions derived coincide with the corresponding kinetic expressions and, for perturbations on sub-Larmor scales (when the wavelengths are shorter than the Larmor radius), they agree qualitatively. Hydrodynamic dispersion relations are derived for several types of drift waves with arbitrary wavenumbers. The range of applicability of the MHD model is determined from a comparison of these dispersion relations with the kinetic ones. It is noted that, on the basis of results obtained, drift effects can be included in numerical MHD codes for studying plasma instabilities in high-temperature regimes in tokamaks

  16. Measurement of ozone production scaling in a helium plasma jet with oxygen admixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Brian; Ganguly, Biswa

    2012-10-01

    Capillary dielectric barrier plasma jet devices that generate confined streamer-like discharges along a rare gas flow can produce significant quantities of reactive oxygen species with average input powers ranging from 100 mW to >1 W. We have measured spatially-resolved ozone production in a He plasma jet with O2 admixture concentrations up to 5% using absorption spectroscopy of the O3 Hartley band system. A 20-ns risetime, 10-13 kV positive unipolar voltage pulse train was used to power the discharge, with pulse repetition rates varied from 1-20 kHz. The discharge was operated in a transient glow mode to scale the input power by adjusting the gap width between the anode and downstream cathodic plane. Peak ozone number densities in the range of 10^16 - 10^17 cm-3 were measured. At a given voltage, the density of ozone increased monotonically up to 3% O2 admixture (6 mm gap) as the peak discharge current decreased by an order of magnitude. Ozone production increased with distance from the capillary, consistent with observations by other groups. Atomic oxygen production inferred from O-atom 777 nm emission intensity did not scale with ozone as the input power was increased. The spatial distribution of ozone and scaling with input power will be presented.

  17. LPI Thresholds in Longer Scale Length Plasmas Driven by the Nike Laser*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J.; Oh, J.; Phillips, L.; Afeyan, B.; Seely, J.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Feldman, U.; Holland, G.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E.; Manka, C.

    2010-11-01

    The Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) laser is an attractive driver for inertial confinement fusion due to its short wavelength (248nm), large bandwidth (1-3 THz), and beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence. Experiments with the Nike KrF laser have demonstrated intensity thresholds for laser plasma instabilities (LPI) higher than reported for other high power lasers operating at longer wavelengths (>=351 nm). The previous Nike experiments used short pulses (350 ps FWHM) and small spots (<260 μm FWHM) that created short density scale length plasmas (Ln˜50-70 μm) from planar CH targets and demonstrated the onset of two-plasmon decay (2φp) at laser intensities ˜2x10^15 W/cm^2. This talk will present an overview of the current campaign that uses longer pulses (0.5-4.0 ns) to achieve greater density scale lengths (Ln˜100-200 μm). X-rays, emission near ^1/2φo and ^3/2φo harmonics, and reflected laser light have been monitored for onset of 2φp. The longer density scale lengths will allow better comparison to results from other laser facilities. *Work supported by DoE/NNSA and ONR.

  18. Extended consolidation of scaling laws of potentials covering over the representative tandem-mirror operations in GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, T.

    2002-01-01

    (i) A verification of our novel proposal of extended consolidation of the two major theories of Cohen's potential formation and Pastukhov's potential effectiveness is carried out by the use of a novel experimental mode with central ECH. The validity of the proposal provides a roadmap of bridging and combining two present representative modes in GAMMA 10 for upgrading to hot-ion plasmas with high potentials. (ii) A novel efficient scaling of ion-confining potential formation due to plug ECH with barrier ECH is constructed as the extension over the IAEA 2000 scaling with plug ECH alone. The combination of the physics scaling of (i) with the externally controllable power scaling of (ii) provides a scalable way for future tandem-mirror researches. The importance of the validity of the present consolidation is highlighted by a possibility of the extended capability inherent in Pastukhov's prediction of requiring 30 kV potentials for a fusion Q of unity with an application of Cohen's potential formation method. (author)

  19. Large-scale production and properties of human plasma-derived activated Factor VII concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomokiyo, K; Yano, H; Imamura, M; Nakano, Y; Nakagaki, T; Ogata, Y; Terano, T; Miyamoto, S; Funatsu, A

    2003-01-01

    An activated Factor VII (FVIIa) concentrate, prepared from human plasma on a large scale, has to date not been available for clinical use for haemophiliacs with antibodies against FVIII and FIX. In the present study, we attempted to establish a large-scale manufacturing process to obtain plasma-derived FVIIa concentrate with high recovery and safety, and to characterize its biochemical and biological properties. FVII was purified from human cryoprecipitate-poor plasma, by a combination of anion exchange and immunoaffinity chromatography, using Ca2+-dependent anti-FVII monoclonal antibody. To activate FVII, a FVII preparation that was nanofiltered using a Bemberg Microporous Membrane-15 nm was partially converted to FVIIa by autoactivation on an anion-exchange resin. The residual FVII in the FVII and FVIIa mixture was completely activated by further incubating the mixture in the presence of Ca2+ for 18 h at 10 degrees C, without any additional activators. For preparation of the FVIIa concentrate, after dialysis of FVIIa against 20 mm citrate, pH 6.9, containing 13 mm glycine and 240 mm NaCl, the FVIIa preparation was supplemented with 2.5% human albumin (which was first pasteurized at 60 degrees C for 10 h) and lyophilized in vials. To inactivate viruses contaminating the FVIIa concentrate, the lyophilized product was further heated at 65 degrees C for 96 h in a water bath. Total recovery of FVII from 15 000 l of plasma was approximately 40%, and the FVII preparation was fully converted to FVIIa with trace amounts of degraded products (FVIIabeta and FVIIagamma). The specific activity of the FVIIa was approximately 40 U/ micro g. Furthermore, virus-spiking tests demonstrated that immunoaffinity chromatography, nanofiltration and dry-heating effectively removed and inactivated the spiked viruses in the FVIIa. These results indicated that the FVIIa concentrate had both high specific activity and safety. We established a large-scale manufacturing process of human plasma

  20. Startup of reversed-field mirror reactors using coaxial plasma guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.C. Jr.; Hartman, C.W.; Carlson, G.A.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Eddleman, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary calculations are given that indicate that a coaxial plasma gun might scale reasonably to reactor-grade operating conditions. Ongoing experiments and numerical simulations should shed some light on the validity of the described scaling laws

  1. Study on scaling law of PWR natural circulation with motion condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Donghua; Xiao Zejun; Chen Bingde

    2009-01-01

    For some nuclear reactors installed on automobiles, boats or deep sea vehicles, it is an important way to investigate their system safety by performing natural circulation experiments under motion condition. This paper studied the natural circulation on moving plants based on work of static natural circulation scaling method. With rigid motion theory, acceleration at each point was obtained on primary system and introduced to momentum equation. Thus a set of motion similar criteria were obtained. Furthermore, equal and unequal height simulation were analyzed. As to the unequal one, non isochronous simulation was needed for displacement and angular acceleration. (authors)

  2. Power-law scaling of extreme dynamics near higher-order exceptional points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Q.; Christodoulides, D. N.; Khajavikhan, M.; Makris, K. G.; El-Ganainy, R.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the extreme dynamics of non-Hermitian systems near higher-order exceptional points in photonic networks constructed using the bosonic algebra method. We show that strong power oscillations for certain initial conditions can occur as a result of the peculiar eigenspace geometry and its dimensionality collapse near these singularities. By using complementary numerical and analytical approaches, we show that, in the parity-time (PT ) phase near exceptional points, the logarithm of the maximum optical power amplification scales linearly with the order of the exceptional point. We focus in our discussion on photonic systems, but we note that our results apply to other physical systems as well.

  3. Experimental scaling law for the subcritical transition to turbulence in plane Poiseuille flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoult, Grégoire; Aider, Jean-Luc; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2012-02-01

    We present an experimental study of the transition to turbulence in a plane Poiseuille flow. Using a well-controlled perturbation, we analyze the flow by using extensive particle image velocimetry and flow visualization (using laser-induced fluorescence) measurements, and use the deformation of the mean velocity profile as a criterion to characterize the state of the flow. From a large parametric study, four different states are defined, depending on the values of the Reynolds number and the amplitude of the perturbation. We discuss the role of coherent structures, such as hairpin vortices, in the transition. We find that the minimal amplitude of the perturbation triggering transition scales asymptotically as Re(-1).

  4. Scaling laws and sum rules for the B-mode polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The formation of the microwave background polarization anisotropies is investigated when the stochastic Faraday rate is stationary, random and Markovian. The scaling properties of the polarization power spectra and of their nonlinear combinations are scrutinized as a function of the comoving frequency. It is argued that each frequency channel of a given experiment measuring simultaneously the E-mode and the B-mode spectra can be analyzed in this framework with the aim of testing the physical origin of the polarization in a model-independent perspective.

  5. Reproducible Analysis and Blindness in a Null Test of Newton's Gravitational Inverse Square Law At Sub-millimeter Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Charles; Venkateswara, Krishna; Gundlach, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Proper execution of an experiment is independent of its result. Physicists who test fundamental physical law face the reality that signals for new physics receive more attention and scrutiny than null results. Yet, null results may have greater impact upon the direction of both experiment and theory. Blind experiments and result-blind review are bulwarks against systematic human bias for both experimenters and referees. I'll describe the method that made possible an irreversible public unblinding of our torsion-balance parallel-plate test of gravity at submillimeter scales in 2015. One publicly-available computer procedure generated from blind raw data the analysis, the final result, and the complete documenting thesis. The experiment included an optical ``foil monitor'' to constrain a systematic effect intrinsic to all short-range parallel-plate gravity experiments. I'll describe the experiment, successes, lessons learned, and result. Supported by NSF (PHY-1305726) and DOE support for CENPA.

  6. Variability of three-dimensional sea breeze structure in southern France: observations and evaluation of empirical scaling laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Drobinski

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Sea-breeze dynamics in southern France is investigated using an airborne Doppler lidar, a meteorological surface station network and radiosoundings, in the framework of the ESCOMPTE experiment conducted during summer 2001 in order to evaluate the role of thermal circulations on pollutant transport and ventilation. The airborne Doppler lidar WIND contributed to three-dimensional (3-D mapping of the sea breeze circulation in an unprecedented way. The data allow access to the onshore and offshore sea breeze extents (xsb, and to the sea breeze depth (zsb and intensity (usb. They also show that the return flow of the sea breeze circulation is very seldom seen in this area due to (i the presence of a systematic non zero background wind, and (ii the 3-D structure of the sea breeze caused by the complex coastline shape and topography. A thorough analysis is conducted on the impact of the two main valleys (Rhône and Durance valleys affecting the sea breeze circulation in the area.

    Finally, this dataset also allows an evaluation of the existing scaling laws used to derive the sea breeze intensity, depth and horizontal extent. The main results of this study are that (i latitude, cumulative heating and surface friction are key parameters of the sea breeze dynamics; (ii in presence of strong synoptic flow, all scaling laws fail in predicting the sea breeze characteristics (the sea breeze depth, however being the most accurately predicted; and (iii the ratio zsb/usb is approximately constant in the sea breeze flow.

  7. Variability of three-dimensional sea breeze structure in southern France: observations and evaluation of empirical scaling laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Drobinski

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Sea-breeze dynamics in southern France is investigated using an airborne Doppler lidar, a meteorological surface station network and radiosoundings, in the framework of the ESCOMPTE experiment conducted during summer 2001 in order to evaluate the role of thermal circulations on pollutant transport and ventilation. The airborne Doppler lidar WIND contributed to three-dimensional (3-D mapping of the sea breeze circulation in an unprecedented way. The data allow access to the onshore and offshore sea breeze extents (xsb, and to the sea breeze depth (zsb and intensity (usb. They also show that the return flow of the sea breeze circulation is very seldom seen in this area due to (i the presence of a systematic non zero background wind, and (ii the 3-D structure of the sea breeze caused by the complex coastline shape and topography. A thorough analysis is conducted on the impact of the two main valleys (Rhône and Durance valleys affecting the sea breeze circulation in the area. Finally, this dataset also allows an evaluation of the existing scaling laws used to derive the sea breeze intensity, depth and horizontal extent. The main results of this study are that (i latitude, cumulative heating and surface friction are key parameters of the sea breeze dynamics; (ii in presence of strong synoptic flow, all scaling laws fail in predicting the sea breeze characteristics (the sea breeze depth, however being the most accurately predicted; and (iii the ratio zsb/usb is approximately constant in the sea breeze flow.

  8. Collisionless coupling of a high- β expansion to an ambient, magnetized plasma. I. Rayleigh model and scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Jeffrey

    2018-04-01

    The dynamics of a magnetized, expanding plasma with a high ratio of kinetic energy density to ambient magnetic field energy density, or β, are examined by adapting a model of gaseous bubbles expanding in liquids as developed by Lord Rayleigh. New features include scale magnitudes and evolution of the electric fields in the system. The collisionless coupling between the expanding and ambient plasma due to these fields is described as well as the relevant scaling relations. Several different responses of the ambient plasma to the expansion are identified in this model, and for most laboratory experiments, ambient ions should be pulled inward, against the expansion due to the dominance of the electrostatic field.

  9. Coulomb-Gas scaling law for a superconducting Bi(2+y)Sr(2-x-y)La(x)CuO(6+delta) thin films in magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang; Deltour; Zhao

    2000-10-16

    The electrical transport properties of epitaxial superconducting Bi(2+y)Sr(2-x-y)La(x)CuO(6+delta) thin films have been studied in magnetic fields. Using a modified Coulomb-gas scaling law, we can fit all the magnetic field dependent low resistance data with a universal scaling curve, which allows us to determine a relation between the activation energy of the thermally activated flux flow resistance and the characteristic temperature scaling parameters.

  10. Investigation of scaling laws by critical neutron scattering from beta-brass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1969-01-01

    Using a Cu65-Zn β-brass crystal, the critical scattering of neutrons has been studied, both above and below T c. The staggered susceptibilities χ vary as C+(T/Tc-1)-γ and C-(1-T/Tc)-γ ', respectively. It is found that γ=γ' within an accuracy of 3%, in agreement with the scaling hypothesis of static...... critical phenomena; and that C+/C-=5.46±0.05, in excellent agreement with the recent parametric representation theory of Schofield and in fair agreement with the results of series expansions by Essam and Hunter. For fixed q, a flat maximum is observed in the wave-vector-dependent susceptibility χ(q, T...

  11. Regimes of Axisymmetric Flow and Scaling Laws in a Rotating Annulus with Local Convective Forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Wright

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical study of axisymmetric flow in a rotating annulus in which local thermal forcing, via a heated annular ring on the outside of the base and a cooled circular disk in the centre of the top surface, drives convection. This new configuration is a variant of the classical thermally-driven annulus, where uniform heating and cooling are applied through the outer and inner sidewalls respectively. The annulus provides an analogue to a planetary circulation and the new configuration, with its more relaxed vertical thermal boundary conditions, is expected to better emulate vigorous convection in the tropics and polar regions as well as baroclinic instability in the mid-latitude baroclinic zone. Using the Met Office/Oxford Rotating Annulus Laboratory (MORALS code, we have investigated a series of equilibrated, two dimensional axisymmetric flows across a large region of parameter space. These are characterized in terms of their velocity and temperature fields. When rotation is applied several distinct flow regimes may be identified for different rotation rates and strengths of differential heating. These regimes are defined as a function of the ratio of the horizontal Ekman layer thickness to the non-rotating thermal boundary layer thickness and are found to be similar to those identified in previous annulus experiments. Convection without rotation is also considered and the scaling of the heat transport with Rayleigh number is calculated. This is then compared with existing work on the classical annulus as well as horizontal and Rayleigh-Bénard convection. As with previous studies on both rotating and non-rotating convection the system’s behaviour is found to be aspect ratio dependent. This dependence is seen in the scaling of the non-rotating Nusselt number and in transitions between regimes in the rotating case although further investigation is required to fully explain these observations.

  12. Atomic oxygen production scaling in a nanosecond-pulsed externally grounded dielectric barrier plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Brian; Schmidt, Jacob; Ganguly, Biswa; Scofield, James

    2014-10-01

    Atomic oxygen production is studied in a capillary dielectric barrier plasma jet that is externally grounded and driven with a 20-ns risetime positive unipolar pulsed voltage at pulse repetition rates up to 25 kHz. The power coupled to the discharge can be easily increased by increasing the pulse repetition rate. At a critical turnover frequency, determined by the net energy density coupled to the discharge, the plasma chemistry abruptly changes. This is indicated by increased plasma conductance and a transition in reactive oxygen species production from an ozone-dominated production regime below the turnover frequency to atomic-oxygen-dominated production at higher pulse rates. Here, we characterize atomic oxygen production scaling using spatially- and temporally-resolved two-photon absorption laser-induced-fluorescence (TALIF). Quantitative results are obtained via calibration with xenon using a similar laser excitation and collection system. These results are compared with quantitative ozone and discharge power measurements using a helium gas flow with oxygen admixtures up to 3%.

  13. A simple scaling law for the equation of state and the radial distribution functions calculated by density-functional theory molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danel, J.-F.; Kazandjian, L.

    2018-06-01

    It is shown that the equation of state (EOS) and the radial distribution functions obtained by density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) obey a simple scaling law. At given temperature, the thermodynamic properties and the radial distribution functions given by a DFT-MD simulation remain unchanged if the mole fractions of nuclei of given charge and the average volume per atom remain unchanged. A practical interest of this scaling law is to obtain an EOS table for a fluid from that already obtained for another fluid if it has the right characteristics. Another practical interest of this result is that an asymmetric mixture made up of light and heavy atoms requiring very different time steps can be replaced by a mixture of atoms of equal mass, which facilitates the exploration of the configuration space in a DFT-MD simulation. The scaling law is illustrated by numerical results.

  14. Optimal Multiuser Diversity in Multi-Cell MIMO Uplink Networks: User Scaling Law and Beamforming Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Chul Jung

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a distributed protocol to achieve multiuser diversity in a multicell multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO uplink network, referred to as a MIMO interfering multiple-access channel (IMAC. Assuming both no information exchange among base stations (BS and local channel state information at the transmitters for the MIMO IMAC, we propose a joint beamforming and user scheduling protocol, and then show that the proposed protocol can achieve the optimal multiuser diversity gain, i.e., KMlog(SNRlog N, as long as the number of mobile stations (MSs in a cell, N, scales faster than SNR K M − L 1 − ϵ for a small constant ϵ > 0, where M, L, K, and SNR denote the number of receive antennas at each BS, the number of transmit antennas at each MS, the number of cells, and the signal-to-noise ratio, respectively. Our result indicates that multiuser diversity can be achieved in the presence of intra-cell and inter-cell interference even in a distributed fashion. As a result, vital information on how to design distributed algorithms in interference-limited cellular environments is provided.

  15. The long-range correlation and evolution law of centennial-scale temperatures in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaohui; Lian, Yi; Wang, Qiguang

    2018-01-01

    This paper applies the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) method to investigate the long-range correlation of monthly mean temperatures from three typical measurement stations at Harbin, Changchun, and Shenyang in Northeast China from 1909 to 2014. The results reveal the memory characteristics of the climate system in this region. By comparing the temperatures from different time periods and investigating the variations of its scaling exponents at the three stations during these different time periods, we found that the monthly mean temperature has long-range correlation, which indicates that the temperature in Northeast China has long-term memory and good predictability. The monthly time series of temperatures over the past 106 years also shows good long-range correlation characteristics. These characteristics are also obviously observed in the annual mean temperature time series. Finally, we separated the centennial-length temperature time series into two time periods. These results reveal that the long-range correlations at the Harbin station over these two time periods have large variations, whereas no obvious variations are observed at the other two stations. This indicates that warming affects the regional climate system's predictability differently at different time periods. The research results can provide a quantitative reference point for regional climate predictability assessment and future climate model evaluation.

  16. Unified Scaling Law for flux pinning in practical superconductors: III. Minimum datasets, core parameters, and application of the Extrapolative Scaling Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekin, Jack W.; Cheggour, Najib; Goodrich, Loren; Splett, Jolene

    2017-03-01

    In Part 2 of these articles, an extensive analysis of pinning-force curves and raw scaling data was used to derive the Extrapolative Scaling Expression (ESE). This is a parameterization of the Unified Scaling Law (USL) that has the extrapolation capability of fundamental unified scaling, coupled with the application ease of a simple fitting equation. Here in Part 3, the accuracy of the ESE relation to interpolate and extrapolate limited critical-current data to obtain complete I c(B,T,ɛ) datasets is evaluated and compared with present fitting equations. Accuracy is analyzed in terms of root mean square (RMS) error and fractional deviation statistics. Highlights from 92 test cases are condensed and summarized, covering most fitting protocols and proposed parameterizations of the USL. The results show that ESE reliably extrapolates critical currents at fields B, temperatures T, and strains ɛ that are remarkably different from the fitted minimum dataset. Depending on whether the conductor is moderate-J c or high-J c, effective RMS extrapolation errors for ESE are in the range 2-5 A at 12 T, which approaches the I c measurement error (1-2%). The minimum dataset for extrapolating full I c(B,T,ɛ) characteristics is also determined from raw scaling data. It consists of one set of I c(B,ɛ) data at a fixed temperature (e.g., liquid helium temperature), and one set of I c(B,T) data at a fixed strain (e.g., zero applied strain). Error analysis of extrapolations from the minimum dataset with different fitting equations shows that ESE reduces the percentage extrapolation errors at individual data points at high fields, temperatures, and compressive strains down to 1/10th to 1/40th the size of those for extrapolations with present fitting equations. Depending on the conductor, percentage fitting errors for interpolations are also reduced to as little as 1/15th the size. The extrapolation accuracy of the ESE relation offers the prospect of straightforward implementation of

  17. Being affected by large-scale projects - considerations on the protection of rights in Atomic Energy Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, W.

    1982-01-01

    This is the final part of an article published in Bay. (VBL 1982, 257). The author comes to the following conclusions: Proposals for reducing the protection of rights frames against a certain background of interests and partly taken over in practice by administrative courts meet with a variety of dogmatic and political considerations relating to these rights. This does not only hold for the attempt to restrict the rights of all those under public and substantive law who are affected by construction and operation, but also for making it harder for the complainants to pursue their rights, and especially for efforts intended to further limit the fact-finding of courts in case of large-scale projects. The judicature is called to review the individual licences issued for large-scale projects, especially because of the inherent symptomatic collisions of basic rights. The judge has a confidence-building advantage; i.e. his independence, which is gaining in importance in the struggle between hardened fronts and economic interests. (orig./HSCH) [de

  18. Scaling laws, renormalization group flow and the continuum limit in non-compact lattice QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeckeler, M.; Horsley, R.; Rakow, P.; Schierholz, G.; Sommer, R.

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the ultra-violet behavior of non-compact lattice QED with light staggered fermions. The main question is whether QED is a non-trivial theory in the continuum limit, and if not, what is its range of validity as a low-energy theory. Perhaps the limited range of validity could offer an explanation of why the fine-structure constant is so small. Non-compact QED undergoes a second-order chiral phase transition at strong coupling, at which the continuum limit can be taken. We examine the phase diagram and the critical behavior of the theory in detail. Moreover, we address the question as to whether QED confines in the chirally broken phase. This is done by investigating the potential between static external charges. We then compute the renormalized charge and derive the Callan-Symanzik β-function in the critical region. No ultra-violet stable zero is found. Instead, we find that the evolution of charge is well described by renormalized perturbation theory, and that the renormalized charge vanishes at the critical point. The consequence is that QED can only be regarded as a cut-off theory. We evaluate the maximum value of the cut-off as a function of the renormalized charge. Next, we compute the masses of fermion-antifermion composite states. The scaling behavior of these masses is well described by an effective action with mean-field critical exponents plus logarithmic corrections. This indicates that also the matter sector of the theory is non-interacting. Finally, we investigate and compare the renormalization group flow of different quantities. Altogether, we find that QED is a valid theory only for samll renormalized charges. (orig.)

  19. Universal artifacts affect the branching of phylogenetic trees, not universal scaling laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaba, Cristian R

    2009-01-01

    for tree shape convergence of large trees. There is no evidence for any universal scaling in the tree of life. Instead, there is a need for improved methods of tree analysis that can be used to discriminate the noise due to outgroups from the phylogenetic signal within the taxon of interest, and to evaluate realistic models of evolution, correcting the retrospective perspective and explicitly recognizing extinction as a driving force. Artifacts are pervasive, and can only be overcome through understanding the structure and biological meaning of phylogenetic trees. Catalan Abstract in Translation S1.

  20. Scaling Laws in Arctic Permafrost River Basins: Statistical Signature in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, J. C.; Gangodagamage, C.; Wilson, C. J.; Prancevic, J. P.; Brumby, S. P.; Marsh, P.; Crosby, B. T.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic landscape has been shown to be fundamentally different from the temperate landscape in many ways. Long winters and cold temperatures have led to the development of permafrost, perennially frozen ground, that controls geomorphic processes and the structure of the Arctic landscape. Climate warming is causing changes in permafrost and the active layer (the seasonally thawed surface layer) that is driving an increase in thermal erosion including thermokarst (collapsed soil), retrogressive thaw slumps, and gullies. These geomorphic anomalies in the arctic landscapes have not been well quantified, even though some of the landscape geomorphic and hydrologic characteristics and changes are detectable by our existing sensor networks. We currently lack understanding of the fundamental fluvio-thermal-erosional processes that underpin Arctic landscape structure and form, which limits our ability to develop models to predict the landscape response to current and future climate change. In this work, we seek a unified framework that can explain why permafrost landscapes are different from temperate landscapes. We use high resolution LIDAR data to analyze arctic geomorphic processes at a scale of less than a 1 m and demonstrate our ability to quantify the fundamental difference in the arctic landscape. We first simulate the arctic hillslopes from a stochastic space-filling network and demonstrate that the flow-path convergent properties of arctic landscape can be effectively captured from this simple model, where the simple model represents a landscape flowpath arrangement on a relatively impervious frozen soil layer. Further, we use a novel data processing algorithm to analyze landscape attributes such as slope, curvature, flow-accumulation, elevation-drops and other geomorphic properties, and show that the pattern of diffusion and advection dominated soil transport processes (diffusion/advection regime transition) in the arctic landscape is substantially different

  1. Scaling laws for oxygen transport across the space-filling system of respiratory membranes in the human lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chen

    Space-filling fractal surfaces play a fundamental role in how organisms function at various levels and in how structure determines function at different levels. In this thesis, we develop a quantitative theory of oxygen transport to and across the surface of the highly branched, space-filling system of alveoli, the fundamental gas exchange unit (acinar airways), in the human lung. Oxygen transport in the acinar airways is by diffusion, and we treat the two steps---diffusion through the branched airways, and transfer across the alveolar membranes---as a stationary diffusion-reaction problem, taking into account that there may be steep concentration gradients between the entrance and remote alveoli (screening). We develop a renormalization treatment of this screening effect and derive an analytic formula for the oxygen current across the cumulative alveolar membrane surface, modeled as a fractal, space-filling surface. The formula predicts the current from a minimum of morphological data of the acinus and appropriate values of the transport parameters, through a number of power laws (scaling laws). We find that the lung at rest operates near the borderline between partial screening and no screening; that it switches to no screening under exercise; and that the computed currents agree with measured values within experimental uncertainties. From an analysis of the computed current as a function of membrane permeability, we find that the space-filling structure of the gas exchanger is simultaneously optimal with respect to five criteria. The exchanger (i) generates a maximum oxygen current at minimum permeability; (ii) 'wastes' a minimum of surface area; (iii) maintains a minimum residence time of oxygen in the acinar airways; (iv) has a maximum fault tolerance to loss of permeability; and (v) generates a maximum current increase when switching from rest to exercise.

  2. A statistical methodology to derive the scaling law for the H-mode power threshold using a large multi-machine database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murari, A.; Lupelli, I.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Vega, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a refined set of statistical techniques is developed and then applied to the problem of deriving the scaling law for the threshold power to access the H-mode of confinement in tokamaks. This statistical methodology is applied to the 2010 version of the ITPA International Global Threshold Data Base v6b(IGDBTHv6b). To increase the engineering and operative relevance of the results, only macroscopic physical quantities, measured in the vast majority of experiments, have been considered as candidate variables in the models. Different principled methods, such as agglomerative hierarchical variables clustering, without assumption about the functional form of the scaling, and nonlinear regression, are implemented to select the best subset of candidate independent variables and to improve the regression model accuracy. Two independent model selection criteria, based on the classical (Akaike information criterion) and Bayesian formalism (Bayesian information criterion), are then used to identify the most efficient scaling law from candidate models. The results derived from the full multi-machine database confirm the results of previous analysis but emphasize the importance of shaping quantities, elongation and triangularity. On the other hand, the scaling laws for the different machines and at different currents are different from each other at the level of confidence well above 95%, suggesting caution in the use of the global scaling laws for both interpretation and extrapolation purposes. (paper)

  3. Numerical Simulation of the Time Evolution of Small-Scale Irregularities in the F-Layer Ionospheric Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Mingalev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of magnetic field-aligned small-scale irregularities in the electron concentration, existing in the F-layer ionospheric plasma, is investigated with the help of a mathematical model. The plasma is assumed to be a rarefied compound consisting of electrons and positive ions and being in a strong, external magnetic field. In the applied model, kinetic processes in the plasma are simulated by using the Vlasov-Poisson system of equations. The system of equations is numerically solved applying a macroparticle method. The time evolution of a plasma irregularity, having initial cross-section dimension commensurable with a Debye length, is simulated during the period sufficient for the irregularity to decay completely. The results of simulation indicate that the small-scale irregularity, created initially in the F-region ionosphere, decays accomplishing periodic damped vibrations, with the process being collisionless.

  4. Toward multi-scale simulation of reconnection phenomena in space plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den, M.; Horiuchi, R.; Usami, S.; Tanaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ohtani, H.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is considered to play an important role in space phenomena such as substorm in the Earth's magnetosphere. It is well known that magnetic reconnection is controlled by microscopic kinetic mechanism. Frozen-in condition is broken due to particle kinetic effects and collisionless reconnection is triggered when current sheet is compressed as thin as ion kinetic scales under the influence of external driving flow. On the other hand configuration of the magnetic field leading to formation of diffusion region is determined in macroscopic scale and topological change after reconnection is also expressed in macroscopic scale. Thus magnetic reconnection is typical multi-scale phenomenon and microscopic and macroscopic physics are strongly coupled. Recently Horiuchi et al. developed an effective resistivity model based on particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results obtained in study of collisionless driven reconnection and applied to a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of substorm in the Earth's magnetosphere. They showed reproduction of global behavior in substrom such as dipolarization and flux rope formation by global three dimensional MHD simulation. Usami et al. developed multi-hierarchy simulation model, in which macroscopic and microscopic physics are solved self-consistently and simultaneously. Based on the domain decomposition method, this model consists of three parts: a MHD algorithm for macroscopic global dynamics, a PIC algorithm for microscopic kinetic physics, and an interface algorithm to interlock macro and micro hierarchies. They verified the interface algorithm by simulation of plasma injection flow. In their latest work, this model was applied to collisionless reconnection in an open system and magnetic reconnection was successfully found. In this paper, we describe our approach to clarify multi-scale phenomena and report the current status. Our recent study about extension of the MHD domain to global system is presented. We

  5. Collisionless magnetic reconnection in large-scale electron-positron plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daughton, William; Karimabadi, Homa

    2007-01-01

    One of the most fundamental questions in reconnection physics is how the dynamical evolution will scale to macroscopic systems of physical relevance. This issue is examined for electron-positron plasmas using two-dimensional fully kinetic simulations with both open and periodic boundary conditions. The resulting evolution is complex and highly dynamic throughout the entire duration. The initial phase is distinguished by the coalescence of tearing islands to larger scale while the later phase is marked by the expansion of diffusion regions into elongated current layers that are intrinsically unstable to plasmoid generation. It appears that the repeated formation and ejection of plasmoids plays a key role in controlling the average structure of a diffusion region and preventing the further elongation of the layer. The reconnection rate is modulated in time as the current layers expand and new plasmoids are formed. Although the specific details of this evolution are affected by the boundary and initial conditions, the time averaged reconnection rate remains fast and is remarkably insensitive to the system size for sufficiently large systems. This dynamic scenario offers an alternative explanation for fast reconnection in large-scale systems

  6. The Effects of Land Surface Heating And Roughness Elements on the Structure and Scaling Laws of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannam, Khaled

    The atmospheric boundary-layer is the lowest 500-2000 m of the Earth's atmosphere where much of human life and ecosystem services reside. This layer responds to land surface (e.g. buoyancy and roughness elements) and slowly evolving free tropospheric (e.g. temperature and humidity lapse rates) conditions that arguably mediate and modulate biosphere-atmosphere interactions. Such response often results in spatially- and temporally-rich turbulence scales that continue to be the subject of inquiry given their significance to a plethora of applications in environmental sciences and engineering. The work here addresses key aspects of boundary layer turbulence with a focus on the role of roughness elements (vegetation canopies) and buoyancy (surface heating) in modifying the well-studied picture of shear-dominated wall-bounded turbulence. A combination of laboratory channel experiments, field experiments, and numerical simulations are used to explore three distinct aspects of boundary layer turbulence. These are: • The concept of ergodicity in turbulence statistics within canopies: It has been long-recognized that homogeneous and stationary turbulence is ergodic, but less is known about the effects of inhomogeneity introduced by the presence of canopies on the turbulence statistics. A high resolution (temporal and spatial) flume experiment is used here to test the convergence of the time statistics of turbulent scalar concentrations to their ensemble (spatio-temporal) counterpart. The findings indicate that within-canopy scalar statistics have a tendency to be ergodic, mostly in shallow layers (close to canopy top) where the sweeping flow events appear to randomize the statistics. Deeper layers within the canopy are dominated by low-dimensional (quasi-deterministic) von Karman vortices that tend to break ergodicity. • Scaling laws of turbulent velocity spectra and structure functions in near-surface atmospheric turbulence: the existence of a logarithmic scaling in the

  7. The nonlinear coupling between gyroradius scale turbulence and mesoscale magnetic islands in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornsby, W. A.; Peeters, A. G.; Snodin, A. P.; Casson, F. J.; Camenen, Y.; Szepesi, G.; Siccinio, M.; Poli, E.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between small scale turbulence (of the order of the ion Larmor radius) and mesoscale magnetic islands is investigated within the gyrokinetic framework. Turbulence, driven by background temperature and density gradients, over nonlinear mode coupling, pumps energy into long wavelength modes, and can result in an electrostatic vortex mode that coincides with the magnetic island. The strength of the vortex is strongly enhanced by the modified plasma flow response connected with the change in topology, and the transport it generates can compete with the parallel motion along the perturbed magnetic field. Despite the stabilizing effect of sheared plasma flows in and around the island, the net effect of the island is a degradation of the confinement. When density and temperature gradients inside the island are below the threshold for turbulence generation, turbulent fluctuations still persist through turbulence convection and spreading. The latter mechanisms then generate a finite transport flux and, consequently, a finite pressure gradient in the island. A finite radial temperature gradient inside the island is also shown to persist due to the trapped particles, which do not move along the field around the island. In the low collisionality regime, the finite gradient in the trapped population leads to the generation of a bootstrap current, which reduces the neoclassical drive.

  8. Debye-scale solitary structures measured in a beam-plasma laboratory experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lefebvre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solitary electrostatic pulses have been observed in numerous places of the magnetosphere such as the vicinity of reconnection current sheets, shocks or auroral current systems, and are often thought to be generated by energetic electron beams. We present results of a series of experiments conducted at the UCLA large plasma device (LAPD where a suprathermal electron beam was injected parallel to a static magnetic field. Micro-probes with tips smaller than a Debye length enabled the detection of solitary pulses with positive electric potential and half-widths 4–25 Debye lengths (λDe, over a set of experiments with various beam energies, plasma densities and magnetic field strengths. The shape, scales and amplitudes of the structures are similar to those observed in space, and consistent with electron holes. The dependance of these properties on the experimental parameters is shown. The velocities of the solitary structures (1–3 background electron thermal velocities are found to be much lower than the beam velocities, suggesting an excitation mechanism driven by parallel currents associated to the electron beam.

  9. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joulaei, A. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); University of Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moody, J. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Berti, N.; Kasparian, J. [University of Geneva (Switzerland); Mirzanejhad, S. [University of Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Muggli, P. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment. - Highlights: • Discussion the AWAKE plasma source based on photoionization of rubidium vapor with a TW/cm^2 Intensity laser with a spectrum across valence ground state transition resonances. • Examines the propagation of the AWAKE ionization laser through rubidium vapor at design density on a small scale and reduced intensity with a linear numerical model compared to experimental results. • Discusses physics of pulse propagation through the vapor at high intensity regime where strong ionization occurs within the laser pulse.

  10. Power-Law Scaling of the Impact Crater Size-Frequency Distribution on Pluto: A Preliminary Analysis Based on First Images from New Horizons' Flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholkmann F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent (14 th July 2015 flyby of NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft of the dwarf planet Pluto resulted in the first high-resolution images of the geological surface- features of Pluto. Since previous studies showed that the impact crater size-frequency distribution (SFD of different celestial objects of our solar system follows power-laws, the aim of the present analysis was to determine, for the first time, the power-law scaling behavior for Pluto’s crater SFD based on the first images available in mid-September 2015. The analysis was based on a high-resolution image covering parts of Pluto’s re- gions Sputnik Planum , Al-Idrisi Montes and Voyager Terra . 83 impact craters could be identified in these regions and their diameter ( D was determined. The analysis re- vealed that the crater diameter SFD shows a statistically significant power-law scaling ( α = 2.4926±0.3309 in the interval of D values ranging from 3.75±1.14 km to the largest determined D value in this data set of 37.77 km. The value obtained for the scaling coefficient α is similar to the coefficient determined for the power-law scaling of the crater SFDs from the other celestial objects in our solar system. Further analysis of Pluto’s crater SFD is warranted as soon as new images are received from the spacecraft.

  11. Absolute fragmentation cross sections in atom-molecule collisions : Scaling laws for non-statistical fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.; Alexander, J. D.; Zhang, Y.; Rousseau, P.; Domaracka, A.; Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Adoui, L.; Huber, B. A.; Schlathölter, T.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H.

    2014-01-01

    We present scaling laws for absolute cross sections for non-statistical fragmentation in collisions between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH/PAH+) and hydrogen or helium atoms with kinetic energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 keV. Further, we calculate the total fragmentation cross sections

  12. Evidence of small-scale magnetic concentrations dragged by vortex motion of solar photospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmaceda, L.; Vargas Domínguez, S.; Palacios, J.; Cabello, I.; Domingo, V.

    2010-04-01

    Vortex-type motions have been measured by tracking bright points in high-resolution observations of the solar photosphere. These small-scale motions are thought to be determinant in the evolution of magnetic footpoints and their interaction with plasma and therefore likely to play a role in heating the upper solar atmosphere by twisting magnetic flux tubes. We report the observation of magnetic concentrations being dragged towards the center of a convective vortex motion in the solar photosphere from high-resolution ground-based and space-borne data. We describe this event by analyzing a series of images at different solar atmospheric layers. By computing horizontal proper motions, we detect a vortex whose center appears to be the draining point for the magnetic concentrations detected in magnetograms and well-correlated with the locations of bright points seen in G-band and CN images.

  13. Plasma-Induced Wafer-Scale Self-Assembly of Silver Nanoparticles and Application to Biochemical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunbo Shi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the wafer-scale silver nanoparticles fabricated by a self-assembly method was demonstrated based on a magnetron sputtering and plasma treatment process. Silver nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes were prepared, and the effects of the plasma treatment time, plasma gas composition, and power were systematically investigated to develop a method for low-cost and large-scale fabrication of silver nanoparticles. Furthermore, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering experiments: crystal violet, as the probe, was absorbed on the silver nanoparticles film of different size and density, and get the phenomena of surface-enhanced Raman scattering and surface-enhanced fluorescence. The results show that the proposed technique provides a rapid method for the fabrication of silver nanomaterial; the method is adaptable to large-scale production and is compatible with the fabrication of other materials and biosensors.

  14. Failure of the n3 scaling law in the Temkin-Poet model of e-H scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakletron, T.; Stelbovics, A.T.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We have carried out a study of the Temkin-Poet model of e-H scattering. This model has been of considerable interest to scattering theorists because it is a subset of the full e-H problem and has been used many times to test methods of solution of the full problem. Recently it was shown by Ihra and Macek that the ionisation cross section should be suppressed near threshold. The reason for this is that, classically, ionisation is forbidden in a small region above threshold and hence quantum mechanically we expect a manifestation of quantum mechanical tunnelling. Because the total ionisation cross section can be found using the optical theorem for total cross section and then subtracting off the discrete inelastic scattering cross sections, one might expect interesting behaviour of the inelastic cross sections. Indeed this is confirmed by our extensive numerical simulations using a solution method based on Poet's Fredholm equation of the first kind for the scattering matrix. We conclude that the cross sections fall off at a rate faster than the n 3 scaling law in a region of about 2eV below and above the ionisation threshold. The rate varies with nearness to the threshold

  15. Out of equilibrium transport through an Anderson impurity: probing scaling laws within the equation of motion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balseiro, C A; Usaj, G; Sánchez, M J

    2010-10-27

    We study non-equilibrium electron transport through a quantum impurity coupled to metallic leads using the equation of motion technique at finite temperature T. Assuming that the interactions are taking place solely in the impurity and focusing on the infinite Hubbard limit, we compute the out of equilibrium density of states and the differential conductance G(2)(T, V) in order to test several scaling laws. We find that G(2)(T, V)/G(2)(T, 0) is a universal function of both eV/T(K) and T/T(K), T(K) being the Kondo temperature. The effect of an in-plane magnetic field on the splitting of the zero bias anomaly in the differential conductance is also analyzed. For a Zeeman splitting Δ, the computed differential conductance peak splitting depends only on Δ/T(K), and for large fields approaches the value of 2Δ. Besides studying the traditional two leads setup, we also consider other configurations that mimic recent experiments, namely, an impurity embedded in a mesoscopic wire and the presence of a third weakly coupled lead. In these cases, a double peak structure of the Kondo resonance is clearly obtained in the differential conductance while the amplitude of the highest peak is shown to decrease as ln(eV/T(K)). Several features of these results are in qualitative agreement with recent experimental observations reported on quantum dots.

  16. Mathematical formulation to predict the harmonics of the superconducting Large Hadron Collider magnets. II. Dynamic field changes and scaling laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Sammut

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A superconducting particle accelerator like the LHC (Large Hadron Collider at CERN, can only be controlled well if the effects of the magnetic field multipoles on the beam are compensated. The demands on a control system solely based on beam feedback may be too high for the requirements to be reached at the specified bandwidth and accuracy. Therefore, we designed a suitable field description for the LHC (FIDEL as part of the machine control baseline to act as a feed-forward magnetic field prediction system. FIDEL consists of a physical and empirical parametric field model based on magnetic measurements at warm and in cryogenic conditions. The performance of FIDEL is particularly critical at injection when the field decays, and in the initial part of the acceleration when the field snaps back. These dynamic components are both current and time dependent and are not reproducible from cycle to cycle since they also depend on the magnet powering history. In this paper a qualitative and quantitative description of the dynamic field behavior substantiated by a set of scaling laws is presented.

  17. A New Approach to Adaptive Control of Multiple Scales in Plasma Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelchenko, Yuri

    2007-04-01

    A new approach to temporal refinement of kinetic (Particle-in-Cell, Vlasov) and fluid (MHD, two-fluid) simulations of plasmas is presented: Discrete-Event Simulation (DES). DES adaptively distributes CPU resources in accordance with local time scales and enables asynchronous integration of inhomogeneous nonlinear systems with multiple time scales on meshes of arbitrary topologies. This removes computational penalties usually incurred in explicit codes due to the global Courant-Friedrich-Levy (CFL) restriction on a time-step size. DES stands apart from multiple time-stepping algorithms in that it requires neither selecting a global synchronization time step nor pre-determining a sequence of time-integration operations for individual parts of the system (local time increments need not bear any integer multiple relations). Instead, elements of a mesh-distributed solution self-adaptively predict and synchronize their temporal trajectories by directly enforcing local causality (accuracy) constraints, which are formulated in terms of incremental changes to the evolving solution. Together with flux-conservative propagation of information, this new paradigm ensures stable and fast asynchronous runs, where idle computation is automatically eliminated. DES is parallelized via a novel Preemptive Event Processing (PEP) technique, which automatically synchronizes elements with similar update rates. In this mode, events with close execution times are projected onto time levels, which are adaptively determined by the program. PEP allows reuse of standard message-passing algorithms on distributed architectures. For optimum accuracy, DES can be combined with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) techniques for structured and unstructured meshes. Current examples of event-driven models range from electrostatic, hybrid particle-in-cell plasma systems to reactive fluid dynamics simulations. They demonstrate the superior performance of DES in terms of accuracy, speed and robustness.

  18. Multi-scale description of the laser-plasma interaction: application to the physics of shock ignition in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colaitis, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript presents a novel formulation of the Laser-Plasma Interaction (LPI) at hydrodynamical scales, that couples the plasma dynamics with linear and nonlinear LPI processes. The standard Ray Tracing model, based on Geometrical Optics, is not well suited for that purpose because it does not readily describe the laser intensity distribution in plasma. We propose an alternative model formulated for a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code. It is based on the ray-based Paraxial Complex Geometrical Optics (PCGO) that describes Gaussian optical beamlets. A method for modeling non-Gaussian laser beams smoothed by Phase Plates is presented, that allows to create intensity variations that reproduce the beam envelope, contrast and high-intensity statistics predicted by paraxial laser propagation codes. We propose in line reduced models for the non-linear laser-plasma interaction, in the case of the Cross-Beam Energy Transfer (CBET) and the generation of Hot Electrons (HE). The in line CBET model is validated against a time-dependent conventional paraxial electromagnetic wave propagation code, in a well-defined plasma configuration with density and velocity profiles corresponding to an inhomogeneous plasma. Good agreement is found past a transient period on the picosecond time scale, notably for the spatial distribution of density perturbations and laser intensities in the interaction region. Application of the model to a direct-drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) configuration shows that CBET significantly degrades the irradiation symmetry by amplifying low frequency modes and reducing the laser-capsule coupling efficiency, ultimately leading to large modulations of the shell areal density and lower convergence ratios. The LPI/HE model predicts the HE fluxes, temperatures, angular dispersion and direction from the laser intensity of PCGO beamlets from simplified expressions based on theoretical models and scaling laws obtained in kinetic simulations. The HE beams

  19. RADAR upper hybrid resonance scattering diagnostics of small-scale fluctuations and waves in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulyiginskiy, D.G.; Gurchenko, A.D.; Gusakov, E.Z.; Korkin, V.V.; Larionov, M.M.; Novik, K.M.; Petrov, Yu.V.; Popov, A.Yu.; Saveliev, A.N.; Selenin, V.L.; Stepanov, A.Yu.

    2001-01-01

    The upper hybrid resonance (UHR) scattering technique possessing such merits as one-dimensional probing geometry, enhancement of cross section, and fine localization of scattering region is modified in the new diagnostics under development to achieve wave number resolution. The fluctuation wave number is estimated in the new technique from the scattering signal time delay measurements. The feasibility of the scheme is checked in the proof of principal experiment in a tokamak. The time delay of the UHR scattering signal exceeding 10 ns is observed. The small scale low frequency density fluctuations are investigated in the UHR RADAR backscattering experiment. The UHR cross-polarization scattering signal related to small scale magnetic fluctuations is observed. The lower hybrid (LH) wave propagation and both linear and nonlinear wave conversion are investigated. The small wavelength (λ≤0.02 cm) high number ion Bernstein harmonics, resulting from the linear wave conversion of the LH wave are observed in a tokamak plasma for the first time

  20. Self-Adaptive Event-Driven Simulation of Multi-Scale Plasma Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelchenko, Yuri; Karimabadi, Homayoun

    2005-10-01

    Multi-scale plasmas pose a formidable computational challenge. The explicit time-stepping models suffer from the global CFL restriction. Efficient application of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to systems with irregular dynamics (e.g. turbulence, diffusion-convection-reaction, particle acceleration etc.) may be problematic. To address these issues, we developed an alternative approach to time stepping: self-adaptive discrete-event simulation (DES). DES has origin in operations research, war games and telecommunications. We combine finite-difference and particle-in-cell techniques with this methodology by assuming two caveats: (1) a local time increment, dt for a discrete quantity f can be expressed in terms of a physically meaningful quantum value, df; (2) f is considered to be modified only when its change exceeds df. Event-driven time integration is self-adaptive as it makes use of causality rules rather than parametric time dependencies. This technique enables asynchronous flux-conservative update of solution in accordance with local temporal scales, removes the curse of the global CFL condition, eliminates unnecessary computation in inactive spatial regions and results in robust and fast parallelizable codes. It can be naturally combined with various mesh refinement techniques. We discuss applications of this novel technology to diffusion-convection-reaction systems and hybrid simulations of magnetosonic shocks.

  1. Industrial scale production of stable isotopes employing the technique of plasma separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, N.R.; Bigelow, T.S.; Tarallo, F.J.

    2003-01-01

    Calutrons, centrifuges, diffusion and distillation processes are some of the devices and techniques that have been employed to produce substantial quantities of enriched stable isotopes. Nevertheless, the availability of enriched isotopes in sufficient quantities for industrial applications remains very restricted. Industries such as those involved with medicine, semiconductors, nuclear fuel, propulsion, and national defense have identified the potential need for various enriched isotopes in large quantities. Economically producing most enriched (non-gaseous) isotopes in sufficient quantities has so far eluded commercial producers. The plasma separation process is a commercial technique now available for producing large quantities of a wide range of enriched isotopes. Until recently, this technique has mainly been explored with small-scale ('proof-of-principle') devices that have been built and operated at research institutes. The new Theragenics TM facility at Oak Ridge, TN houses the only existing commercial scale PSP system. This device, which successfully operated in the 1980's, has recently been re-commissioned and is planned to be used to produce a variety of isotopes. Progress and the capabilities of this device and it's potential for impacting the world's supply of stable isotopes in the future is summarized. This technique now holds promise of being able to open the door to allowing new and exciting applications of these isotopes in the future. (author)

  2. Use of a hybrid code for global-scale plasma simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a demonstration of the use of a hybrid code to model the Earth's magnetosphere on a global scale. The typical hybrid code calculates the interaction of fully kinetic ions and a massless electron fluid with the magnetic field. This code also includes a fluid ion component to approximate the cold ionospheric plasma that spatially overlaps with the discrete particle component. Other innovative features of the code include a numerically generated curvilinear coordinate system and subcycling of the magnetic field update to the particle push. These innovations allow the code to accommodate disparate time and distance scales. The demonstration is a simulation of the noon meridian plane of the magnetosphere. The code exhibits the formation of fast and slow-mode shocks and tearing reconnection at the magnetopause. New results include particle acceleration in the cusp and nearly field aligned currents linking the cusp and polar ionosphere. The paper also describes a density depletion instability and measures to avoid it. 27 refs., 4 figs

  3. Allometric scaling of population variance with mean body size is predicted from Taylor's law and density-mass allometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joel E; Xu, Meng; Schuster, William S F

    2012-09-25

    Two widely tested empirical patterns in ecology are combined here to predict how the variation of population density relates to the average body size of organisms. Taylor's law (TL) asserts that the variance of the population density of a set of populations is a power-law function of the mean population density. Density-mass allometry (DMA) asserts that the mean population density of a set of populations is a power-law function of the mean individual body mass. Combined, DMA and TL predict that the variance of the population density is a power-law function of mean individual body mass. We call this relationship "variance-mass allometry" (VMA). We confirmed the theoretically predicted power-law form and the theoretically predicted parameters of VMA, using detailed data on individual oak trees (Quercus spp.) of Black Rock Forest, Cornwall, New York. These results connect the variability of population density to the mean body mass of individuals.

  4. Seismic hazard and seismic risk assessment based on the unified scaling law for earthquakes: Himalayas and adjacent regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasova, A. K.; Kossobokov, V. G.; Parvez, I. A.

    2015-03-01

    For the Himalayas and neighboring regions, the maps of seismic hazard and seismic risk are constructed with the use of the estimates for the parameters of the unified scaling law for earthquakes (USLE), in which the Gutenberg-Richter law for magnitude distribution of seismic events within a given area is applied in the modified version with allowance for linear dimensions of the area, namely, log N( M, L) = A + B (5 - M) + C log L, where N( M, L) is the expected annual number of the earthquakes with magnitude M in the area with linear dimension L. The spatial variations in the parameters A, B, and C for the Himalayas and adjacent regions are studied on two time intervals from 1965 to 2011 and from 1980 to 2011. The difference in A, B, and C between these two time intervals indicates that seismic activity experiences significant variations on a scale of a few decades. With a global consideration of the seismic belts of the Earth overall, the estimates of coefficient A, which determines the logarithm of the annual average frequency of the earthquakes with a magnitude of 5.0 and higher in the zone with a linear dimension of 1 degree of the Earth's meridian, differ by a factor of 30 and more and mainly fall in the interval from -1.1 to 0.5. The values of coefficient B, which describes the balance between the number of earthquakes with different magnitudes, gravitate to 0.9 and range from less than 0.6 to 1.1 and higher. The values of coefficient C, which estimates the fractal dimension of the local distribution of epicenters, vary from 0.5 to 1.4 and higher. In the Himalayas and neighboring regions, the USLE coefficients mainly fall in the intervals of -1.1 to 0.3 for A, 0.8 to 1.3 for B, and 1.0 to 1.4 for C. The calculations of the local value of the expected peak ground acceleration (PGA) from the maximal expected magnitude provided the necessary basis for mapping the seismic hazards in the studied region. When doing this, we used the local estimates of the

  5. Adiabatic shear banding and scaling laws in chip formation with application to cutting of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, A.; Soldani, X.; Miguélez, M. H.

    2013-11-01

    The phenomenon of adiabatic shear banding is analyzed theoretically in the context of metal cutting. The mechanisms of material weakening that are accounted for are (i) thermal softening and (ii) material failure related to a critical value of the accumulated plastic strain. Orthogonal cutting is viewed as a unique configuration where adiabatic shear bands can be experimentally produced under well controlled loading conditions by individually tuning the cutting speed, the feed (uncut chip thickness) and the tool geometry. The role of cutting conditions on adiabatic shear banding and chip serration is investigated by combining finite element calculations and analytical modeling. This leads to the characterization and classification of different regimes of shear banding and the determination of scaling laws which involve dimensionless parameters representative of thermal and inertia effects. The analysis gives new insights into the physical aspects of plastic flow instability in chip formation. The originality with respect to classical works on adiabatic shear banding stems from the various facets of cutting conditions that influence shear banding and from the specific role exercised by convective flow on the evolution of shear bands. Shear bands are generated at the tool tip and propagate towards the chip free surface. They grow within the chip formation region while being convected away by chip flow. It is shown that important changes in the mechanism of shear banding take place when the characteristic time of shear band propagation becomes equal to a characteristic convection time. Application to Ti-6Al-4V titanium are considered and theoretical predictions are compared to available experimental data in a wide range of cutting speeds and feeds. The fundamental knowledge developed in this work is thought to be useful not only for the understanding of metal cutting processes but also, by analogy, to similar problems where convective flow is also interfering with

  6. A novel scaling law relating the geometrical dimensions of a photocathode radio frequency gun to its radio frequency properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K. K.; Krishnagopal, S.

    2011-12-01

    Developing a photocathode RF gun with the desired RF properties of the π-mode, such as field balance (eb) ˜1, resonant frequency fπ = 2856 MHz, and waveguide-to-cavity coupling coefficient βπ ˜1, requires precise tuning of the resonant frequencies of the independent full- and half-cells (ff and fh), and of the waveguide-to-full-cell coupling coefficient (βf). While contemporary electromagnetic codes and precision machining capability have made it possible to design and tune independent cells of a photocathode RF gun for desired RF properties, thereby eliminating the need for tuning, access to such computational resources and quality of machining is not very widespread. Therefore, many such structures require tuning after machining by employing conventional tuning techniques that are iterative in nature. Any procedure that improves understanding of the tuning process and consequently reduces the number of iterations and the associated risks in tuning a photocathode gun would, therefore, be useful. In this paper, we discuss a method devised by us to tune a photocathode RF gun for desired RF properties under operating conditions. We develop and employ a simple scaling law that accounts for inter-dependence between frequency of independent cells and waveguide-to-cavity coupling coefficient, and the effect of brazing clearance for joining of the two cells. The method has been employed to successfully develop multiple 1.6 cell BNL/SLAC/UCLA type S-band photocathode RF guns with the desired RF properties, without the need to tune them by a tiresome cut-and-measure process. Our analysis also provides a physical insight into how the geometrical dimensions affect the RF properties of the photo-cathode RF gun.

  7. Characterization of alumina scales formed during isothermal and cyclic oxidation of plasma-sprayed TBC systems at 1150 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.; Rigney, E.D.

    1999-01-01

    The isothermal- and cyclic-oxidation behavior of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems consisting of vacuum plasma-sprayed (VPS) Ni-22Cr-10Al/Y (wt%) bond coatings and air plasma-sprayed (APS) Y 2 O 3 -stabilized ZrO 2 (YSZ) top coatings (on single-crystal superalloys) was investigated. The microstructures, flaw contents, and fracture behavior of the Al 2 O 3 scales formed during oxidation testing at 1150 C were characterized (by analysis of coating and scale fracture surfaces and metallographic cross sections). Significant localized fracture and buckling of the Al 2 O 3 scales that formed along the bond-coat--top-coat interfaces were observed after cyclic oxidation of TBCs. However, substantial amounts of localized scale damage did not induce rapid TBC failure. Decohesion of the columnar alumina scales on the rough bond-coat surfaces occurred by both internal Al 2 O 3 fracture (parallel to the metal surface) and oxide-metal delamination. There were microstructural indications of Al 2 O 3 scale crack healing by sintering into planar arrays of voids. Alumina scales that formed on convex NiCrAlY surfaces (with radii of 50 microm or less) after cyclic oxidation, whereas scales formed by isothermal oxidation contained few visible voids. Accelerated void growth in Al 2 O 3 scales on the irregular NiCrAlY surfaces appeared to be creep-related and was attributed to the synergistic effects of geometric and thermal stresses

  8. Consequences of atomic layer etching on wafer scale uniformity in inductively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huard, Chad M.; Lanham, Steven J.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2018-04-01

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) typically divides the etching process into two self-limited reactions. One reaction passivates a single layer of material while the second preferentially removes the passivated layer. As such, under ideal conditions the wafer scale uniformity of ALE should be independent of the uniformity of the reactant fluxes onto the wafers, provided all surface reactions are saturated. The passivation and etch steps should individually asymptotically saturate after a characteristic fluence of reactants has been delivered to each site. In this paper, results from a computational investigation are discussed regarding the uniformity of ALE of Si in Cl2 containing inductively coupled plasmas when the reactant fluxes are both non-uniform and non-ideal. In the parameter space investigated for inductively coupled plasmas, the local etch rate for continuous processing was proportional to the ion flux. When operated with saturated conditions (that is, both ALE steps are allowed to self-terminate), the ALE process is less sensitive to non-uniformities in the incoming ion flux than continuous etching. Operating ALE in a sub-saturation regime resulted in less uniform etching. It was also found that ALE processing with saturated steps requires a larger total ion fluence than continuous etching to achieve the same etch depth. This condition may result in increased resist erosion and/or damage to stopping layers using ALE. While these results demonstrate that ALE provides increased etch depth uniformity, they do not show an improved critical dimension uniformity in all cases. These possible limitations to ALE processing, as well as increased processing time, will be part of the process optimization that includes the benefits of atomic resolution and improved uniformity.

  9. Statistical theory and transition in multiple-scale-lengths turbulence in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Sanae-I. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    The statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is developed for the cases where fluctuations with different scale-lengths coexist. Nonlinear interactions in the same kind of fluctuations as well as nonlinear interplay between different classes of fluctuations are kept in the analysis. Nonlinear interactions are modelled as turbulent drag, nonlinear noise and nonlinear drive, and a set of Langevin equations is formulated. With the help of an Ansatz of a large number of degrees of freedom with positive Lyapunov number, Langevin equations are solved and the fluctuation dissipation theorem in the presence of strong plasma turbulence has been derived. A case where two driving mechanisms (one for micro mode and the other for semi-micro mode) coexist is investigated. It is found that there are several states of fluctuations: in one state, the micro mode is excited and the semi-micro mode is quenched; in the other state, the semi-micro mode is excited, and the micro mode remains at finite but suppressed level. New type of turbulence transition is obtained, and a cusp type catastrophe is revealed. A phase diagram is drawn for turbulence which is composed of multiple classes of fluctuations. Influence of the inhomogeneous global radial electric field is discussed. A new insight is given for the physics of internal transport barrier. Finally, the nonlocal heat transport due to the long-wave-length fluctuations, which are noise-pumped by shorter-wave-length ones, is analyzed and the impact on transient transport problems is discussed. (author)

  10. Small scale structure of magnetospheric electron density through on-line tracking of plasma resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higel, B.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma resonance phenomena observed at fsub(pe), nfsub(ce), and fsub(qn) by the GEOS-1 S-301 relaxation sounder are identified through a pattern recognition software process implemented in a mini-computer which receives on-line the compressed data. First, this processing system distributes in real time fsub(pe) and fsub(ce) measurements to the ground media. Second, it drives and controls automatically the S-301 on-board experiment by sending appropriate telecommands: the tracking of resonances is performed by shortening the frequency sweeps to a narrow range centered on the resonance location. Examples of such tracking sequences are presented, exhibiting sampling rates of the electron density measurements from once every 22s (slowest rate) to once every 86 ms (highest rate available). The results give evidence of the existence of very small scale structures in the magnetospheric density, having characteristic sizes of the order of a few 10 2 m or/and a few 10 -1 s. The relative amplitude of these density fluctuations is typically 1%. Because of satellite spinning, fixed frequency sounding sequences allow to measure in a few seconds the directivity features of the plasma resonance signals. Examples of directional patterns in the plane perpendicular to the geomagnetic field are presented: the electrostatic nature of the waves received at fsub(pe), nfsub(ce), and fsub(qn) being consistent with these patterns, the corresponding k vector orientations become available. The Bernstein modes properties are used to interpret the nfsub(ce) and fsub(qn) results. (Auth.)

  11. Predictive of the quantum capacitance effect on the excitation of plasma waves in graphene transistors with scaling limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Hu, Yibin; Wang, Shao-Wei; Lu, Wei

    2015-04-28

    Plasma waves in graphene field-effect transistors (FETs) and nano-patterned graphene sheets have emerged as very promising candidates for potential terahertz and infrared applications in myriad areas including remote sensing, biomedical science, military, and many other fields with their electrical tunability and strong interaction with light. In this work, we study the excitations and propagation properties of plasma waves in nanometric graphene FETs down to the scaling limit. Due to the quantum-capacitance effect, the plasma wave exhibits strong correlation with the distribution of density of states (DOS). It is indicated that the electrically tunable plasma resonance has a power-dependent V0.8 TG relation on the gate voltage, which originates from the linear dependence of density of states (DOS) on the energy in pristine graphene, in striking difference to those dominated by classical capacitance with only V0.5 TG dependence. The results of different transistor sizes indicate the potential application of nanometric graphene FETs in highly-efficient electro-optic modulation or detection of terahertz or infrared radiation. In addition, we highlight the perspectives of plasma resonance excitation in probing the many-body interaction and quantum matter state in strong correlation electron systems. This study reveals the key feature of plasma waves in decorated/nanometric graphene FETs, and paves the way to tailor plasma band-engineering and expand its application in both terahertz and mid-infrared regions.

  12. Continuous production of fullerenes and other carbon nanomaterials on a semi-industrial scale using plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenberger, T.M.; Gonzalez-Aguilar, J.; Fulcheri, L.; Fabry, F.; Grivei, E.; Probst, N.; Flamant, G.; Charlier, J.-C.

    2002-01-01

    A new production method is presented allowing the production of bulk quantities of fullerenes and other carbon nanomaterials using a 3-phase thermal plasma (260 kW). The main characteristics of this method lie in the independent control of the carbon throughput by injection of a solid carbon feedstock, and the immediate extraction of the synthesised product from the reactor, allowing production on a continuous basis. The currently investigated plasma facility is of an intermediate scale between lab-size and an industrial pilot plant, ready for further up scaling to an industrial size. The influence of a large number of different carbon precursors, plasma gases and operating conditions on the fullerene yield has been studied. At this state, quantities of up to 1 kg of carbon can be processed per hour with further scope for increase, leading to production rates for this type of materials not achievable with any other technology at present

  13. SAFETY FACTOR SCALING OF ENERGY TRANSPORT IN L-MODE PLASMAS ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PETTY, C.C.; KINSEY, J.E.; LUCE, T.C.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 The scaling of energy transport with safety factor (q) at fixed magnetic shear has been measured on the DIII-D tokamak [Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] for low confinement (L) mode discharges. At constant density, temperature, and toroidal magnetic field strength, such that the toroidal dimensionless parameters other than q are held fixed, the one-fluid thermal diffusivity is found to scale like χ ∝ q 0.84±0.15 , with the ion channel having a stronger q dependence than the electron channel in the outer half of the plasma. The measured q scaling is in good agreement with the predicted scaling by the GLF23 transport model for the ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes, but it is significantly weaker than the inferred scaling from empirically-derived confinement scaling relations

  14. BURNING PLASMA PROJECTIONS USING DRIFT WAVE TRANSPORT MODELS AND SCALINGS FOR THE H-MODE PEDESTAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KINSEY, J.E.; ONJUN, T.; BATEMAN, G.; KRITZ, A.; PANKIN, A.; STAEBLER, G.M.; WALTZ, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    OAK-B135 The GLF23 and Multi-Mode (MM95) transport models are used along with a model for the H-mode pedestal to predict the fusion performance for the ITER, FIRE, and IGNITOR tokamak designs. The drift-wave predictive transport models reproduce the core profiles in a wide variety of tokamak discharges, yet they differ significantly in their response to temperature gradient (stiffness). Recent gyro-kinetic simulations of ITG/TEM and ETG modes motivate the renormalization of the GLF23 model. The normalizing coefficients for the ITG/TEM modes are reduced by a factor of 3.7 while the ETG mode coefficient is increased by a factor of 4.8 in comparison with the original model. A pedestal temperature model is developed for type I ELMy H-mode plasmas based on ballooning mode stability and a theory-motivated scaling for the pedestal width. In this pedestal model, the pedestal density is proportional to the line-averaged density and the pedestal temperature is inversely related to the pedestal density

  15. Observation of ion confining potential enhancement due to thermal barrier potential formation and its scaling law in the tandem mirror GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Teruji; Nakashima, Yousuke; Foote, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    In the tandem mirror GAMMA 10, (i) the enhancement of the ion confining potential, φ c , only during the period of the thermal barrier potential φ b -formation, has been observed first by using not only end-loss-analysers (ELA's) of GAMMA 10 but an end-loss-ion-spectrometer (ELIS) installed from TMX-U. This results in strong end-loss-ion plugging with increased central cell density. (ii) The first experimental observation of the φ c vs φ b -scaling law is obtained, where φ c increases with φ b . This scaling law is consistently interpreted by Cohen's theories of the weak-ECH and the strong-ECH in the plug region. (iii) Good agreement of the plug potential measured with the ELA's and the ELIS is achieved. (author)

  16. Environmental law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, B.; Sparwasser, R.

    1988-01-01

    Environmental law is discussed exhaustively in this book. Legal and scientific fundamentals are taken into account, a systematic orientation is given, and hints for further information are presented. The book covers general environmental law, plan approval procedures, protection against nuisances, atomic law and radiation protection law, water protection law, waste management law, laws on chemical substances, conservation law. (HSCH) [de

  17. Scaling laws in centrifuge modelling for capillary rise in soils; Lois de similitude de l'ascension capillaire dans les sols en centrifugeuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezzoug, A.; Konig, D.; Triantafyllidis, Th. [Ruhr Bochum Univ. (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    It appears to be possible to extend the application of geotechnical centrifuge modelling to environmental problems. In this paper, one aspect of similitude laws concerning the flow of water through soils is investigated. Within the Network of European Centrifuges of Environmental Geotechnic Research (NECER), several tests have been carried out to study similitude laws describing the capillary ascension in porous media under different levels of acceleration. The aim of this paper is to present the results obtained at Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum. A fine sand is used in the experiment. For the visualisation of capillary height in the soil sample, image processing is used. Different boundary conditions (constant water level or variable) have been investigated and discussed. A simple similitude law for capillary rise has been investigated and the kinetic phenomena has been measured at different g-levels. These experiments confirm, that capillary rise appears to be scaled by the factor N and time seems to be scaled by N{sup 2}. These results validate thus the possibility of using accelerated small-scale models of capillary phenomena in a centrifuge, and open the way to more complex investigations on flow and pollutant transports in unsaturated centrifuged soils. (authors)

  18. Development of Diagnostics for Large-Scale Experiments with Dense Magnetized Plasmas - MJ Plasma-focus diagnostics systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, M.; Karpinski, L.; Paduch, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Zielinska, E.; Chodukowski, T. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion IPPLM, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Sadowski, M.J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion IPPLM, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)] [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies IPJ, 05-400 Otwock-Swiert (Poland); Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Czaus, K.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Malinowski, K. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies IPJ, 05-400 Otwock-Swiert (Poland); Krauz, S. [RNC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mitrovanov, K. [FGUP GNC RF Triniti, Troick (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    This document presents the diagnostics arrangements and interesting results of research on fusion pulsed plasma, which was generated within the large PF-1000 facility operated in the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (Warsaw, Poland). Experimental studies were carried out with the following diagnostic techniques: 1) Rogovski coil for current measurements; 2) Four dI/dt probes in different places around the collector of PF-1000; 3) Voltage divider; 4) Mach-Zender interferometer (16 frames); 5) Fast scintillation probes for X-ray and neutron detection; 6) Silver activation counters; 7) Specially prepared current probes; 8) Thomson spectrometer for mass- and energy-analysis of deuterium beams; 9) Ion-pinhole cameras equipped with nuclear-track detectors, etc. The studies have been carried out with the pure deuterium filling, and particular attention was paid to correlations between the fast-neutron emission and an evolution of plasma parameters. The total fusion-neutron yield, as measured with four silver-activation counters, was found to be up to 7*10{sup 11} per shot, depending on the experimental conditions. Correlations of the neutron pulses with interferometric frame-pictures of the PF pinch column were studied. From time-of-flight (ToF) measurements of the fusion neutrons it was possible to estimate a CM velocity of deuterons involved in the D-D reactions. The fast fusion-produced protons have also been recorded and analyzed by means pinhole cameras and shielded track detectors. The document is composed of an abstract followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  19. Coaxial plasma guns as injectors of high beta linear theta pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, J.

    1975-01-01

    A brief review of research on coaxial plasma guns and their use is given. Some problems and possibilities of using this gun for beam injection experiments are pointed out. Some scaling laws for gun energy are described

  20. Optimization of the plasma parameters for the high current and uniform large-scale pulse arc ion source of the VEST-NBI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Bongki; Park, Min; Heo, Sung Ryul; Kim, Tae-Seong; Jeong, Seung Ho; Chang, Doo-Hee; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang-Ryul

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • High power magnetic bucket-type arc plasma source for the VEST NBI system is developed with modifications based on the prototype plasma source for KSTAR. • Plasma parameters in pulse duration are measured to characterize the plasma source. • High plasma density and good uniformity is achieved at the low operating pressure below 1 Pa. • Required ion beam current density is confirmed by analysis of plasma parameters and results of a particle balance model. - Abstract: A large-scale hydrogen arc plasma source was developed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute for a high power pulsed NBI system of VEST which is a compact spherical tokamak at Seoul national university. One of the research target of VEST is to study innovative tokamak operating scenarios. For this purpose, high current density and uniform large-scale pulse plasma source is required to satisfy the target ion beam power efficiently. Therefore, optimizing the plasma parameters of the ion source such as the electron density, temperature, and plasma uniformity is conducted by changing the operating conditions of the plasma source. Furthermore, ion species of the hydrogen plasma source are analyzed using a particle balance model to increase the monatomic fraction which is another essential parameter for increasing the ion beam current density. Conclusively, efficient operating conditions are presented from the results of the optimized plasma parameters and the extractable ion beam current is calculated.